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Sample records for glioblastoma multiforme treated

  1. Glioblastoma Multiforme: Novel Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fialho, Arsenio M.; Salunkhe, Prabhakar; Manna, Sunil; Mahali, Sidharth; Chakrabarty, Ananda M.

    2012-01-01

    The current therapy for glioblastoma multiforme involves total surgical resection followed by combination of radiation therapy and temozolomide. Unfortunately, the efficacy for such current therapy is limited, and newer approaches are sorely needed to treat this deadly disease. We have recently described the isolation of bacterial proteins and peptides with anticancer activity. In phase I human clinical trials, one such peptide, p28, derived from a bacterial protein azurin, showed partial and complete regression of tumors in several patients among 15 advanced-stage cancer patients with refractory metastatic tumors where the tumors were no longer responsive to current conventional drugs. An azurin-like protein called Laz derived from Neisseria meningitides demonstrates efficient entry and high cytotoxicity towards glioblastoma cells. Laz differs from azurin in having an additional 39-amino-acid peptide called an H.8 epitope, which allows entry and high cytotoxicity towards glioblastoma cells. Since p28 has been shown to have very little toxicity and high anti-tumor activity in advanced-stage cancer patients, it will be worthwhile to explore the use of H.8-p28, H.8-azurin, and Laz in toxicity studies and glioblastoma therapy in preclinical and human clinical trials. PMID:22462021

  2. Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Glioblastoma Multiforme Treated With Radiotherapy With or Without Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, Ashley H. Chang, Susan M.; Larson, David; Butowski, Nicholas; Cha, Soonmee

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To compare temporal patterns of recurrent contrast enhancement in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) vs. EBRT alone. Methods and Materials: We evaluated serial MRI scans for 15 patients who received brachytherapy followed by EBRT (6000 cGy) and 20 patients who received standard EBRT alone (5940-6000 cGy). Brachytherapy consisted of permanent, low-activity {sup 125}I seeds placed around the resection cavity at the time of initial gross total resection. Contrast enhancement (linear, nodular, feathery, or solid), serial progression, and location of contrast enhancement were described. Results: In the EBRT group, 14 patients demonstrated focal nodular contrast enhancement along the resection cavity within 4 months. The 6 remaining EBRT patients developed either transient linear enhancement or no abnormal enhancement. In the brachytherapy plus EBRT group, 7 patients initially developed linear rim enhancement within 4 months that progressed to feathery contrast enhancement over the course of 1 to 2 years. Histopathology confirmed radiation necrosis in all 7 patients. The remaining 8 brachytherapy patients eventually developed focal nodular contrast enhancement along the resection cavity and tumor recurrence. Conclusions: Our data suggest that longitudinal MRI features differ between GBM patients treated with EBRT vs. brachytherapy plus EBRT. In both groups, nodular enhancement adjacent to or remote from the resection cavity strongly suggested tumor recurrence. Feathery enhancement, which progressed from linear rim enhancement immediately adjacent to the cavity, seen only in brachytherapy patients, strongly indicated radiation necrosis.

  3. Advanced case of glioblastoma multiforme and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rasheedy, Intisar M.; Al-Hameed, Fahad M.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of the glial tumors. Advanced and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy for many reasons. Glioblastoma multiforme presenting during pregnancy carries unique challenges to the patient, baby, family, and health care providers. We describe an unusual case of advanced GBM that was treated with maximum doses of chemotherapy and radiations, and she became pregnant and presented at eighteenth weeks of gestation. Her medical management was associated with a significant ethical dilemma. We managed to deliver the baby safely through cesarean section at week 28 despite the critical condition of the mother. Unfortunately, the mother died 2 weeks post delivery. We concluded that although recurrent and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy and carries dismal prognosis, but if it occurs, it can still be carried, and a multidisciplinary team work is the key for successful outcome. PMID:26492122

  4. Glioblastoma multiforme outcomes of 107 patients treated in two Singapore institutions

    PubMed Central

    Cheo, Song Tao Timothy; Lim, Gek Hsiang; Lim, Keith Hsiu Chin

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour in adults. Although the survival rate for GBM has improved with recent advancements in treatment, the prognosis remains generally poor. METHODS We conducted a retrospective review of GBM patients seen in National University Hospital, Singapore, and Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, from January 2002 to December 2011. Data on disease and treatment factors was collected and correlated with survival. RESULTS Data on a total of 107 GBM patients was analysed. Their median survival time was 15.1 months and the two-year survival rate was 23.5%, which is comparable with data published in other series. The factors associated with improved median survival time were radiotherapy dose > 50 Gy (16.1 months vs. 8.7 months, p = 0.01) and adjuvant concurrent chemotherapy (16.4 months vs. 9.2 months, p = 0.003). CONCLUSION GBM confers a poor prognosis. Adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy are associated with improved survival. Ethnicity may be a contributing factor to differences in GBM incidence and prognosis. PMID:26915391

  5. Secondary gliosarcoma after the treatment of primary glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Andaloussi-Saghir, Khalid; Oukabli, Mohamed; El Marjany, Mohammed; Sifat, Hassan; Hadadi, Khalid; Mansouri, Hamid

    2011-11-01

    Gliosarcoma is a rare variant of glioblastoma multiforme containing distinct gliomatous and sarcomatous components. Gliosarcoma comprise 1.8-8% of glioblastoma multiforme and are clinically similar to them, affecting adults in the fourth and sixth decades of life, with a higher proportion found in males. The survival for patients with Gliosarcoma is equally poor as for those with glioblastoma multiforme, and there is a greater propensity for extracranial metastasis in Gliosarcoma. Clinical treatment-related experience reported in the literature is limited, and Gliosarcoma are currently treated in a similar fashion to glioblastoma multiforme, with modalities including tumor resection, postoperative radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Gliosarcoma can arise secondarily, after conventional adjuvant treatment of high-grade glioma. The current literature on the occurrence of secondary gliosarcoma after glioblastoma multiforme is limited, with only 54 reported cases. The authors present a 48-year-old Caucasian male who had previously received postoperative combined radiation and temozolomide chemotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. After a free disease period of 9 months the disease recurs as Gliosarcoma. The patient underwent a Total surgical excision and received chemotherapy with a basis of bevacizumab and irinotecan. The patient died from tumor progression 5 months after gliosarcoma diagnosis. The poor survival of patients with secondary gliosarcoma who had previously received combined radiation and temozolomide chemotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme may reflect a unique molecular profile of glioblastoma multiforme that eventually recurs as secondary gliosarcoma. We have to keep in mind the possibility of gliosarcomatous change in the recurrence of malignant glioma. Awareness of this pathological entity will allow more rapid diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Current data and strategy in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Dinca, EB

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) or astrocytoma grade Ⅳ on WHO classification is the most aggressive and the most frequent of all primary brain tumors. Glioblastoma is multiforme , resistant to therapeutic interventions illustrating the heterogeneity exhibited by this tumor in its every aspect, including clinical presentation, pathology, genetic signature. Current data and treatment strategy in GBM are presented focusing on basic science data and key clinical aspects like surgery, including personal experience; adjuvant modalities: radiotherapy, chemotherapy, but also for experimental approaches. Therapeutic attitude in recurrent GBM is also widely discussed. PMID:20108752

  7. Targeted Nanotechnology in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Talita; Han, Inbo; Wu, Liquan; Zeng, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas, and in particular glioblastoma multiforme, are aggressive brain tumors characterized by a poor prognosis and high rates of recurrence. Current treatment strategies are based on open surgery, chemotherapy (temozolomide) and radiotherapy. However, none of these treatments, alone or in combination, are considered effective in managing this devastating disease, resulting in a median survival time of less than 15 months. The efficiency of chemotherapy is mainly compromised by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that selectively inhibits drugs from infiltrating into the tumor mass. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), with their unique biology and their resistance to both radio- and chemotherapy, compound tumor aggressiveness and increase the chances of treatment failure. Therefore, more effective targeted therapeutic regimens are urgently required. In this article, some well-recognized biological features and biomarkers of this specific subgroup of tumor cells are profiled and new strategies and technologies in nanomedicine that explicitly target CSCs, after circumventing the BBB, are detailed. Major achievements in the development of nanotherapies, such as organic poly(propylene glycol) and poly(ethylene glycol) or inorganic (iron and gold) nanoparticles that can be conjugated to metal ions, liposomes, dendrimers and polymeric micelles, form the main scope of this summary. Moreover, novel biological strategies focused on manipulating gene expression (small interfering RNA and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats [CRISPR]/CRISPR associated protein 9 [Cas 9] technologies) for cancer therapy are also analyzed. The aim of this review is to analyze the gap between CSC biology and the development of targeted therapies. A better understanding of CSC properties could result in the development of precise nanotherapies to fulfill unmet clinical needs.

  8. Targeted Nanotechnology in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Talita; Han, Inbo; Wu, Liquan; Zeng, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas, and in particular glioblastoma multiforme, are aggressive brain tumors characterized by a poor prognosis and high rates of recurrence. Current treatment strategies are based on open surgery, chemotherapy (temozolomide) and radiotherapy. However, none of these treatments, alone or in combination, are considered effective in managing this devastating disease, resulting in a median survival time of less than 15 months. The efficiency of chemotherapy is mainly compromised by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that selectively inhibits drugs from infiltrating into the tumor mass. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), with their unique biology and their resistance to both radio- and chemotherapy, compound tumor aggressiveness and increase the chances of treatment failure. Therefore, more effective targeted therapeutic regimens are urgently required. In this article, some well-recognized biological features and biomarkers of this specific subgroup of tumor cells are profiled and new strategies and technologies in nanomedicine that explicitly target CSCs, after circumventing the BBB, are detailed. Major achievements in the development of nanotherapies, such as organic poly(propylene glycol) and poly(ethylene glycol) or inorganic (iron and gold) nanoparticles that can be conjugated to metal ions, liposomes, dendrimers and polymeric micelles, form the main scope of this summary. Moreover, novel biological strategies focused on manipulating gene expression (small interfering RNA and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats [CRISPR]/CRISPR associated protein 9 [Cas 9] technologies) for cancer therapy are also analyzed. The aim of this review is to analyze the gap between CSC biology and the development of targeted therapies. A better understanding of CSC properties could result in the development of precise nanotherapies to fulfill unmet clinical needs. PMID:28408882

  9. [Results of postoperative radiochemotherapy of glioblastoma multiforme].

    PubMed

    Lövey, József; Fedorcsák, Imre; Bajcsay, András; Sipos, László; Mangel, László; Kásler, Miklós; Bagó, Attila

    2013-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme has one of the worst prognoses of all cancers. A substantial progression in its treatment has been achieved only eight years ago when a new adjuvant radiochemotherapy regimen containing temozolomid has been introduced to the clinical practice. In this paper we evaluate the treatment results in adjuvant radiochemotherapy of glioblastoma carried out by two neurosurgery and oncology centers in Budapest, Hungary and we compared our results to the data of the reference phase III registration trial of the EORTC/NCIC. We analyzed the data of 210 patients treated for glioblastoma between 2005 and 2013. The primary endpoints of our study were overall survival and side effects. We studied and statistically analyzed the influence of multiple factors on survival. We compared our results with the data of the reference study and other results published in the literature. The median follow-up for the surviving patients in our study was 52 months. The median age of our patients was 58 (18-79) years. Seventy-two women and 138 men have been treated. The median overall survival was 17 (3-96) months, the progression-free survival 11 (3-96) months. The radiochemotherapy phase was completed in 95.2% and the monotherapy phase in 68% of all cases.Univariate analysis showed that age, ECOG status and RPA class had significant influence on survival. In multivariate analysis only RPA class remained statistically significant (RR 1.86, 95% CI 1.14-3.05). The proportion of grade III and worse side effects during the chemoradiation phase was 3.8% and in the monotherapy phase 1.9%. These were hematological side effects only. Serious hematological sequelae occurred nearly exclusively in women. Comparing to the reference study the demographic distribution of the patients was similar in our study but among our patients there were less patients with unfavorable prognosis (ECOG 2 or RPA V), and it resulted in a longer median survival than in the original trial (17 vs. 14

  10. Peritumoral apparent diffusion coefficient as a metric of response in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Andre, J B; Lu, S; Spearman, K; Raval, S N

    2008-06-03

    Bevacizumab and irinotecan have shown promising results in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), which traditionally carries a poor prognosis after first-line therapies have been exhausted. Retrospectively documenting the short-term effects of this chemotherapeutic regimen on recurrent GBM, as evidenced by comparative magnetic resonance images obtained two weeks prior to, and one-month following initiation of treatment, we hypothesize that peritumoral apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values will decrease on post-treatment scans. Brain MR data were collected from August 2005 to December 2006, in which post-contrast T1-weighted images demonstrated measurable enhancement or GBM tumor mass. Pre- and post-treatment MR images for ten consecutive patients were collected, each having failed temozolomide and radiation therapy. Pre- and post-treatment recurrent GBM bulk tumor and peritumoral T2 signal abnormality were measured in three dimensions. Diffusion of peritumoral T2 signal abnormality was evaluated on pre- and post-treatment ADC. All patients witnessed a significant decrease in tumor bulk ranging from 15.3% to 96.7% with a mean reduction of 48.2%, having received an average of two cycles of chemotherapy. FLAIR images demonstrated a mean volumetric reduction in peritumoral T2 signal abnormality of 44.3%. ADC measurements demonstrated an average reduction in peritumoral ADC of 20.6%, which was statistically significant (p-value < .005). Recurrent GBM tumor bulk demonstrated a 48.2% mean reduction, with corresponding decrease in peritumoral ADC values of 20.6%, suggesting that ADC may represent a valuable metric in the evaluation of the chemotherapeutic response of recurrent GBM, when treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan.

  11. Promising survival for patients with glioblastoma multiforme treated with individualised chemotherapy based on in vitro drug sensitivity testing.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Y; Fujimoto, S; Namba, H; Yamaura, A

    2003-11-17

    We retrospectively investigated the efficacy and feasibility of individualised chemotherapy based on in vitro drug sensitivity testing (DST) for patients with glioblastoma multiforme. A total of 40 consecutive patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GM) were enrolled into this study between January 1995 and December 2000. The flow cytometric (FCM) detection of apoptosis was used to determine the in vitro sensitivity of tumour cells obtained at surgery to 30 different kinds of anticancer agents. From the results of FCM assay, an in vitro best regimen was prospectively selected. All the patients concurrently received the individualised chemotherapy with the in vitro best regimen and 60 Gy of conventional radiation therapy. Of the 31 assessable patients, eight patients (26%) achieved partial response, and 20 patients (65%) had stable disease. The median survival time was 20.5 months. The individualised chemotherapy based on in vitro DST was associated with favourable survival time for the patients with GM compared with the reported results of conventional therapy regimens. The present result suggests that the currently available anticancer agents could be effective against GM when used in individualised chemotherapy.

  12. Development of an integrated Monte Carlo model for glioblastoma multiforme treated with boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Moghaddasi, Leyla; Bezak, Eva

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are notorious for their high fatality rate. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) being a biochemically targeted type of radiotherapy is a potent modality for GBM. In the current work, a BNCT treatment modelling framework for GBM was developed. Optimal Clinical Target Volume (CTV) margins for GBM-BNCT and the BNCT efficacy have been investigated. The model integrated a cell-based dosimetry model, an in-house-developed epithermal neutron beam model and previously-developed Microscopic Extension Probability (MEP) model. The system was defined as a cubic ICRP-brain phantom divided into 20 μm side voxels. The corresponding (10)B concentrations in GBM and normal brain cells were applied. The in-silico model was irradiated with the epithermal neutron beam using 2 and 2.5 cm CTV margins. Results from the cell-based dosimetry and the MEP models were combined to calculate GBM cell survival fractions (SF) post BNCT and compared to x-ray radiotherapy (XRT) SFs. Compared to XRT, the SF within the beam decreased by five orders of magnitudes and the total SF was reduced three times following BNCT. CTV extension by 0.5 cm reduced the SF by additional (53.8 ± 0.3)%. In conclusion, BNCT results in a more efficient cell kill. The extension of the CTV margin, however, may not increase the treatment outcome significantly.

  13. Advanced case of glioblastoma multiforme and pregnancy. An ethical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Al-Rasheedy, Intisar M; Al-Hameed, Fahad M

    2015-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of the glial tumors. Advanced and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy for many reasons. Glioblastoma multiforme presenting during pregnancy carries unique challenges to the patient, baby, family, and health care providers. We describe an unusual case of advanced GBM that was treated with maximum doses of chemotherapy and radiations, and she became pregnant and presented at eighteenth weeks of gestation. Her medical management was associated with a significant ethical dilemma. We managed to deliver the baby safely through cesarean section at week 28 despite the critical condition of the mother. Unfortunately, the mother died 2 weeks post delivery. We concluded that although recurrent and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy and carries dismal prognosis, but if it occurs, it can still be carried, and a multidisciplinary team work is the key for successful outcome.

  14. Glioblastoma multiforme after radiotherapy for acromegaly

    SciTech Connect

    Piatt, J.H. Jr.; Blue, J.M.; Schold, S.C. Jr.; Burger, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    A case of glioblastoma multiforme that occurred 14 years after radiotherapy for acromegaly is presented. The striking correspondence between the anatomy of the tumor and the geometry of the radiation ports is suggestive of a causal relationship. Previously reported cases of radiation-associated glioma are reviewed, and a brief appraisal of the evidence for induction of these lesions by radiation is presented. The differentiation of radiation-associated neoplasms from radionecrosis is also discussed.

  15. Advances in Immunotherapy for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Boyuan; Zhang, Hongbo; Ye, Bainxin

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults. Patients with GBM have poor outcomes, even with the current gold-standard first-line treatment: maximal safe resection combined with radiotherapy and temozolomide chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that advances in antigen-specific cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint blockade in other advanced tumors may provide an appealing promise for immunotherapy in glioma. The future of therapy for GBM will likely incorporate a combinatorial, personalized approach, including current conventional treatments, active immunotherapeutics, plus agents targeting immunosuppressive checkpoints. PMID:28299344

  16. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM’s cancer biology. PMID:27148537

  17. Glioblastoma Multiforme: The Genetic Perspective of the Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Rasime

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is divided into two distinct disease entities called primary and secondary GBM. The genetic and the epigenetic background of these tumors are highly variable. These tumors are not successfully treated because of their cellular heterogeneity and intrinsic ability of the tumor cells to invade healthy tissues. The fatal outcomes of these tumors promote researchers to find new markers associated with prognosis and treatment planning. A better understanding of stem-like cells and the genetic and the epigenetic background of GBM are necessary for designing new effective treatments and developing novel molecular strategies to target tumor cells and glioblastoma stem cells. In this review, we discuss the new therapeutic targets. Focusing on inhibiting the signaling pathways, which are associated with hypoxia-mediated maintenance of glioblastoma stem cells or the knockdown of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1α), may help to the develop new target-specific treatments.

  18. Computational Trials: Unraveling Motility Phenotypes, Progression Patterns, and Treatment Options for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Fabio; Scribner, Elizabeth; Saut, Olivier; Wenger, Cornelia; Colin, Thierry; Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a malignant brain tumor with poor prognosis and high morbidity due to its invasiveness. Hypoxia-driven motility and concentration-driven motility are two mechanisms of glioblastoma multiforme invasion in the brain. The use of anti-angiogenic drugs has uncovered new progression patterns of glioblastoma multiforme associated with significant differences in overall survival. Here, we apply a mathematical model of glioblastoma multiforme growth and invasion in humans and design computational trials using agents that target angiogenesis, tumor replication rates, or motility. The findings link highly-dispersive, moderately-dispersive, and hypoxia-driven tumors to the patterns observed in glioblastoma multiforme treated by anti-angiogenesis, consisting of progression by Expanding FLAIR, Expanding FLAIR + Necrosis, and Expanding Necrosis, respectively. Furthermore, replication rate-reducing strategies (e.g. Tumor Treating Fields) appear to be effective in highly-dispersive and moderately-dispersive tumors but not in hypoxia-driven tumors. The latter may respond to motility-reducing agents. In a population computational trial, with all three phenotypes, a correlation was observed between the efficacy of the rate-reducing agent and the prolongation of overall survival times. This research highlights the potential applications of computational trials and supports new hypotheses on glioblastoma multiforme phenotypes and treatment options. PMID:26756205

  19. Glioblastoma multiforme associated with klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasayama, Takashi; Mizukawa, Katsu; Sakagami, Yoshio; Mizowaki, Takashi; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Mori, Kiyoshi; Kitazawa, Sohei; Kohmura, Eiji

    2009-11-01

    A 54-year-old man with Klinefelter syndrome presented with glioblastoma multiforme manifesting as a 2-week history of motor weakness of the bilateral extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple heterogeneously enhanced tumors in the bilateral frontal lobes. Angiography showed no tumor stain or arteriovenous shunt. The tumor was partially removed through a right craniotomy. The histological diagnosis was glioblastoma. Immunohistochemical examination showed no O(6)-methylguanine-deoxyribonucleic acid methyltransferase protein expression. Postoperative local radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions) combined with temozolomide (75 mg/m(2) x 42 days) and interferon-beta (3,000,000 U, 3 times/week) was performed. The patient's clinical status rapidly deteriorated during chemoradiotherapy, and he died of tumor progression 3.5 months after the surgery. Postmortem examination revealed widespread glioblastoma infiltrating the basal ganglia and thalamus. Klinefelter syndrome is associated with increased cancer predisposition, especially for male breast cancer and germ cell tumors, but glioma is extremely rare. The abnormal genetic constitution of this patient may have been directly responsible for the poor outcome.

  20. TCGA Workshop: Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) held a workshop entitled, “Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM),” to review the initial GBM data from the TCGA pilot project.

  1. Targeting metabolic remodeling in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Amparo; Agnihotri, Sameer; Guha, Abhijit

    2010-11-01

    A key aberrant biological difference between tumor cells and normal differentiated cells is altered metabolism, whereby cancer cells acquire a number of stable genetic and epigenetic alterations to retain proliferation, survive under unfavorable microenvironments and invade into surrounding tissues. A classic biochemical adaptation is the metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis rather than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, regardless of oxygen availability, a phenomenon termed the "Warburg Effect". Aerobic glycolysis, characterized by high glucose uptake, low oxygen consumption and elevated production of lactate, is associated with a survival advantage as well as the generation of substrates such as fatty acids, amino acids and nucleotides necessary in rapidly proliferating cells. This review discusses the role of key metabolic enzymes and their association with aerobic glycolysis in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), an aggressive, highly glycolytic and deadly brain tumor. Targeting key metabolic enzymes involved in modulating the "Warburg Effect" may provide a novel therapeutic approach either singularly or in combination with existing therapies in GBMs.

  2. Glioblastoma Multiforme in a Patient with Isolated Hemimegalencephaly

    PubMed Central

    Chrastina, Jan; Novak, Zdenek; Brazdil, Milan; Hermanova, Marketa

    2015-01-01

    We present an exceptional case of a patient with hemimegalencephaly and secondary intractable epilepsy treated with vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and subsequent glioblastoma development in the hemimegalencephalic hemisphere 6 years after surgery. VNS (at age 18 years) led to a 60% reduction of intractable seizures. However, symptoms of intracranial hypertension suddenly occurred 6 years after surgery. A computed tomography scan revealed a brain tumor in the hemimegalencephalic hemisphere. Pathologic examination confirmed glioblastoma multiforme. The genetic background of hemimegalencephaly is discussed here, with attention paid to the available data about the malignant transformation of malformations of cortical development (MCDs). The case points to the need for adequate clinical and radiologic follow-up care for patients with MCDs including hemimegalencephaly. PMID:26251796

  3. Glioblastoma Multiforme in a Patient with Isolated Hemimegalencephaly.

    PubMed

    Chrastina, Jan; Novak, Zdenek; Brazdil, Milan; Hermanova, Marketa

    2015-07-01

    We present an exceptional case of a patient with hemimegalencephaly and secondary intractable epilepsy treated with vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and subsequent glioblastoma development in the hemimegalencephalic hemisphere 6 years after surgery. VNS (at age 18 years) led to a 60% reduction of intractable seizures. However, symptoms of intracranial hypertension suddenly occurred 6 years after surgery. A computed tomography scan revealed a brain tumor in the hemimegalencephalic hemisphere. Pathologic examination confirmed glioblastoma multiforme. The genetic background of hemimegalencephaly is discussed here, with attention paid to the available data about the malignant transformation of malformations of cortical development (MCDs). The case points to the need for adequate clinical and radiologic follow-up care for patients with MCDs including hemimegalencephaly.

  4. Glioblastoma multiforme in a child with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Vignoli, Aglaia; Lesma, Elena; Alfano, Rosa Maria; Peron, Angela; Scornavacca, Giulia Federica; Massimino, Maura; Schiavello, Elisabetta; Ancona, Silvia; Cerati, Michele; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Gorio, Alfredo; Canevini, Maria Paola

    2015-10-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is characterized by the presence of benign tumors in the brain, kidneys, heart, eyes, lungs, and skin. The typical brain lesions are cortical tubers, subependimal nodules and subependymal giant-cell astrocytomas. The occurrence of malignant astrocytomas such as glioblastoma is rare. We report on a child with a clinical diagnosis of TSC and a rapidly evolving glioblastoma multiforme. Genetic analysis identified a de novo mutation in TSC2. Molecular characterization of the tumor was performed and discussed, as well as a review of the literature where cases of TSC and glioblastoma multiforme are described. Although the co-occurrence of TSC and glioblastoma multiforme seems to be rare, this possible association should be kept in mind, and proper clinical and radiological follow up should be recommended in these patients.

  5. Glioblastoma multiforme: treatment by large dose fraction irradiation and metronidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Kapp, D.S.; Wagner, F.C.; Lawrence, R.

    1982-03-01

    In an attempt to overcome the possible radioresistance of glioblastoma multiforme related to the large shoulder on the in vitro survival curves and to sensitize hypoxic tumor cells, a treatment protocol was instituted at Yale University Medical Center and affiliated hospitals, using large dose fraction irradiation therapy in conjunction with the hypoxic cell sensitizer metronidazole. Nineteen patients with biopsy-confirmed, previously untreated, cerebral grade IV glioblastoma multiforme were, following surgery, irradiated once a week at 600 rad per fraction, 3.5 to 4 hours after ingestion of metronidazole, 6 gm/m/sup 2/. A total of 7 treatments were employed, with all patients maintained on antiseizure medications and corticosteroids. Metronidazole levels were determined prior to each treatment and patients were followed closely clinically and with serial computerized tomography (CT) scans. The treatment was well tolerated, in general, with no untoward side effects related to the high dose fraction irradiation. The majority of the patients experienced varying degrees of gastrointestinal upset lasting up to several hours following metronidazole administration. Three patients died of pulmonary emboli. One patient experienced moderately severe ototoxicity. A median survival of 9.4 months was obtained for all 19 patients, suggestive of a prolongation of survival compared to historical controls treated with conventionally fractionated radiation or with unconventional radiation fractionation schemes and metronidazole or misonidazole.

  6. Molecular and Genomic Alterations in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Ines; Vital, Ana Louisa; Gonzalez-Tablas, María; Patino, María del Carmen; Otero, Alvaro; Lopes, María Celeste; de Oliveira, Catarina; Domingues, Patricia; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, Maria Dolores

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, important advances have been achieved in the understanding of the molecular biology of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM); thus, complex genetic alterations and genomic profiles, which recurrently involve multiple signaling pathways, have been defined, leading to the first molecular/genetic classification of the disease. In this regard, different genetic alterations and genetic pathways appear to distinguish primary (eg, EGFR amplification) versus secondary (eg, IDH1/2 or TP53 mutation) GBM. Such genetic alterations target distinct combinations of the growth factor receptor-ras signaling pathways, as well as the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/phosphatase and tensin homolog/AKT, retinoblastoma/cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) N2A-p16(INK4A), and TP53/mouse double minute (MDM) 2/MDM4/CDKN2A-p14(ARF) pathways, in cells that present features associated with key stages of normal neurogenesis and (normal) central nervous system cell types. This translates into well-defined genomic profiles that have been recently classified by The Cancer Genome Atlas Consortium into four subtypes: classic, mesenchymal, proneural, and neural GBM. Herein, we review the most relevant genetic alterations of primary versus secondary GBM, the specific signaling pathways involved, and the overall genomic profile of this genetically heterogeneous group of malignant tumors. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multifocal Glioblastoma Multiforme: Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Progression

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Andrel, Jocelyn; Andrews, David W.; Curran, Walter J.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Werner-Wasik, Maria

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the progression patterns in patients with multifocal glioblastoma multiforme who had undergone whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), the historical standard, versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and to identify predictive treatment and pretreatment factors. Methods and Materials: The records of 50 patients with multifocal glioblastoma multiforme treated with RT were reviewed. Univariate analyses were performed using survival methods and the Cox proportional hazards regression method. Multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazards regression method. Results: The mean age was 61 years, and 71% had a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score of {>=}70. Of the 50 patients, 32% underwent WBRT and 68%, three-dimensional conformal RT. Progression was local in all evaluable patients, as determined by imaging in 38 patients and early neurologic progression in 12. The median time to progression (TTP) was 3.1 months, and the median survival time (MST) was 8.1 months. The significant independent predictors of TTP on multivariate analysis were a KPS score <70 (p = 0.001), the extent of surgery (p = 0.040), a radiation dose <60 Gy (p = 0.027), and the lack of chemotherapy (p = 0.001). The significant independent predictors of a reduced MST were a KPS score <70 (p = 0.022) and the absence of salvage surgery (p = 0.011) and salvage chemotherapy (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Local progression was observed in all patients. On multivariate analysis, no significant difference was found in the TTP or MST between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and WBRT. The KPS was a consistent independent predictor of both TTP and MST. On the basis of the progression pattern, we do not recommend WBRT as a mandatory component of the treatment of multifocal glioblastoma multi0011for.

  8. Integrated Cox's model for predicting survival time of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Ai, Zhibing; Li, Longti; Fu, Rui; Lu, Jing-Min; He, Jing-Dong; Li, Sen

    2017-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary brain tumor and is highly lethal. This study aims to figure out signatures for predicting the survival time of patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Clinical information, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and single-nucleotide polymorphism array data of patients with glioblastoma multiforme were retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Patients were separated into two groups by using 1 year as a cutoff, and a logistic regression model was used to figure out any variables that can predict whether the patient was able to live longer than 1 year. Furthermore, Cox's model was used to find out features that were correlated with the survival time. Finally, a Cox model integrated the significant clinical variables, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and single-nucleotide polymorphism was built. Although the classification method failed, signatures of clinical features, messenger RNA expression levels, and microRNA expression levels were figured out by using Cox's model. However, no single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to prognosis were found. The selected clinical features were age at initial diagnosis, Karnofsky score, and race, all of which had been suggested to correlate with survival time. Both of the two significant microRNAs, microRNA-221 and microRNA-222, were targeted to p27(Kip1) protein, which implied the important role of p27(Kip1) on the prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme patients. Our results suggested that survival modeling was more suitable than classification to figure out prognostic biomarkers for patients with glioblastoma multiforme. An integrated model containing clinical features, messenger RNA levels, and microRNA expression levels was built, which has the potential to be used in clinics and thus to improve the survival status of glioblastoma multiforme patients.

  9. Morphometic analysis of TCGA glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Our goals are to develop a computational histopathology pipeline for characterizing tumor types that are being generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) for genomic association. TCGA is a national collaborative program where different tumor types are being collected, and each tumor is being characterized using a variety of genome-wide platforms. Here, we have developed a tumor-centric analytical pipeline to process tissue sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) for visualization and cell-by-cell quantitative analysis. Thus far, analysis is limited to Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) and kidney renal clear cell carcinoma tissue sections. The final results are being distributed for subtyping and linking the histology sections to the genomic data. Results A computational pipeline has been designed to continuously update a local image database, with limited clinical information, from an NIH repository. Each image is partitioned into blocks, where each cell in the block is characterized through a multidimensional representation (e.g., nuclear size, cellularity). A subset of morphometric indices, representing potential underlying biological processes, can then be selected for subtyping and genomic association. Simultaneously, these subtypes can also be predictive of the outcome as a result of clinical treatments. Using the cellularity index and nuclear size, the computational pipeline has revealed five subtypes, and one subtype, corresponding to the extreme high cellularity, has shown to be a predictor of survival as a result of a more aggressive therapeutic regime. Further association of this subtype with the corresponding gene expression data has identified enrichment of (i) the immune response and AP-1 signaling pathways, and (ii) IFNG, TGFB1, PKC, Cytokine, and MAPK14 hubs. Conclusion While subtyping is often performed with genome-wide molecular data, we have shown that it can also be applied to categorizing histology sections. Accordingly, we

  10. PARP-1 protein expression in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Galia, A.; Calogero, A.E.; Condorelli, R.A.; Fraggetta, F.; La Corte, C.; Ridolfo, F.; Bosco, P.; Castiglione, R.; Salemi, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common type of primary brain tumors in adults is the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) (World Health Organization grade IV astrocytoma). It is the most common malignant and aggressive form of glioma and it is among the most lethal ones. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) gene, located to 1q42, plays an important role for the efficient maintenance of genome integrity. PARP-1 protein is required for the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) translocation from the mitochondria to the nucleus. PARP-1 is proteolytically cleaved at the onset of apoptosis by caspase-3. Microarray analysis of PARP-1 gene expression in more than 8000 samples revealed that PARP-1 is more highly expressed in several types of cancer compared with the equivalent normal tissues. Overall, the most differences in PARP-1 gene expression have been observed in breast, ovarian, endometrial, lung, and skin cancers, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We evaluated the expression of PARP-1 protein in normal brain tissues and primary GBM by immunohistochemistry. Positive nuclear PARP-1 staining was found in all samples with GBM, but not in normal neurons from controls (n=4) and GBM patients (n=27). No cytoplasmic staining was observed in any sample. In conclusion, PARP-1 gene is expressed in GBM. This finding may be envisioned as an attempt to trigger apoptosis in this tumor, as well as in many other malignancies. The presence of the protein exclusively at the nucleus further support the function played by this gene in genome integrity maintenance and apoptosis. Finally, PARP-1 staining may be used as GBM cell marker. PMID:22472897

  11. Prevalence of glioblastoma multiforme in subjects with prior therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, L.C.; Smith, J.L.; Garrett, A.; Tate, S. )

    1992-04-01

    This retrospective study profiled subjects with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who had previously received therapeutic radiation. A chart review was conducted of 100 adult patients diagnosed with GBM and referred to a major medical center in the southwestern United States. Seventeen patients received previous radiation therapy with an average dose of 48.5 Grey (Gy) and an average latency period of 15 years between initial therapy and GBM diagnosis. Of these 17, four white females fit all four attribution criteria for radiation-induced GBM. Two had been treated with radiation for prolactinomas, one for pinealoma and one for squamous cell cancer of the ethmoid sinus. The addition of these four case studies to the previously published descriptions of 80 cases of gliomas, 36 of which were GBM, subsequent to radiation therapy provides additional support for considering therapeutic radiation as a risk factor for GBM development.

  12. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    PubMed Central

    Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Orlowski, Piotr; Hotowy, Anna; Niemiec, Tomasz; Szmidt, Maciej; Mitura, Katarzyna; Chwalibog, André

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubation, were treated with carbon nanoparticles administered in ovo to the tumor. Both types of nanoparticles significantly decreased tumor mass and volume, and vessel area. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed downregulated fibroblast growth factor-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor expression at the messenger ribonucleic acid level. The present results demonstrate antiangiogenic activity of carbon nanoparticles, making them potential factors for anticancer therapy. PMID:22162660

  13. Syndecan-4 as a biomarker to predict clinical outcome for glioblastoma multiforme treated with WT1 peptide vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Satoshi; Oka, Yoshihiro; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Nakajima, Hiroko; Nakae, Yoshiki; Nakata, Jun; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Hosen, Naoki; Tatsumi, Naoya; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Naoya; Oji, Yusuke; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: In cancer immunotherapy, biomarkers are important for identification of responsive patients. This study was aimed to find biomarkers that predict clinical outcome of WT1 peptide vaccination. Materials & methods: Candidate genes that were expressed differentially between long- and short-term survivors were identified by cDNA microarray analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were extracted from 30 glioblastoma patients (discovery set) prior to vaccination and validated by quantitative RT-PCR using discovery set and different 23 patients (validation set). Results: SDC-4 mRNA expression levels distinguished between the long- and short-term survivors: 1-year survival rates were 64.0 and 18.5% in SDC4-low and -high patients, respectively. Conclusion: SDC-4 is a novel predictive biomarker for the efficacy of WT1 peptide vaccine. PMID:28116121

  14. Restricted calorie ketogenic diet for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Maroon, Joseph; Bost, Jeffrey; Amos, Austin; Zuccoli, Giulio

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults and generally considered to be universally fatal. Glioblastoma multiforme accounts for 12% to 15% of all intracranial neoplasms and affects 2 to 3 adults per every 100,000 in the United States annually. In children glioblastoma multiforme accounts for only approximately 7% to 9% of central nervous system tumors. The mean survival rate in adults after diagnosis ranges from 12 to 18 months with standard therapy and 3 to 6 months without therapy. The prognosis in children is better compared to adult tumor onset with a mean survival of approximately 4 years following gross total surgical resection and chemotherapy. There have been few advances in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme in the past 40 years beyond surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and corticosteroids. For this reason a restrictive calorie ketogenic diet, similar to that used in children to control drug resistant seizure activity, has been advanced as an alternative adjunctive treatment to help prolonged survival. This article reviews the science of tumor metabolism and discusses the mechanism of calorie restriction, cellular energy metabolism, and how dietary induced ketosis can inhibit cancer cell's energy supply to slow tumor growth.

  15. Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Candace Elise

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most fatal malignant brain tumor, is highly infiltrative and incurable. Although improved prognosis has been demonstrated by surgically resecting the bulk tumor, a lack of clear borders at the tumor margins complicates the selection decision during surgery. This dissertation investigates the potential of Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing between normal and malignant brain tissue and sets the groundwork for a surgical diagnostic guide for resection of gross malignant gliomas. These studies revealed that Raman spectroscopy was capable of discriminating between normal scid mouse brain tissue and human xenograft tumors induced in those mice. The spectra of normal and malignant tissue were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1440 cm -1. Spectral differences include the shape of the broad peaks near 1440 cm-1 and 1660 cm-1 and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1264 cm-1, 1287 cm-1, 1297 cm-1, 1556 cm -1, 1586 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, and 1683 cm-1. From these studies emerged questions regarding how to objectively normalize and compare spectra for future automation. Some differences in the Raman spectra were shown to be inherent in the disease states of the cells themselves via differences in the Raman spectra of normal human astrocytes in culture and cultured cells derived from GBM tumors. The spectra of astrocytes and glioma cells were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1450 cm-1. The differences between the Raman spectra of normal and transformed cells include the ratio of the 1450 cm-1/1650 cm-1 peaks and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1181 cm-1, 1191 cm-1, 1225 cm-1, 1263 cm -1, 1300 cm-1, 1336 cm-1, 1477 cm-1, 1494 cm-1, and 1695 cm -1. Previous Raman spectroscopic studies of biological cells have shown that the magnitude of the Raman signal decreases over time, indicating sample damage. Cells exposed to laser excitation at similar power

  16. c-MYC inhibition impairs hypoxia response in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Falchetti, Maria Laura; Illi, Barbara; Bozzo, Francesca; Valle, Cristiana; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Nasi, Sergio; Levi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The c-MYC oncoprotein is a DNA binding transcription factor that enhances the expression of many active genes. c-MYC transcriptional signatures vary according to the transcriptional program defined in each cell type during differentiation. Little is known on the involvement of c-MYC in regulation of gene expression programs that are induced by extracellular cues such as a changing microenvironment. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of c-MYC in glioblastoma multiforme cells blunts hypoxia-dependent glycolytic reprogramming and mitochondria fragmentation in hypoxia. This happens because c-MYC inhibition alters the cell transcriptional response to hypoxia and finely tunes the expression of a subset of Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1-regulated genes. We also show that genes whose expression in hypoxia is affected by c-MYC inhibition are able to distinguish the Proneural subtype of glioblastoma multiforme, thus potentially providing a molecular signature for this class of tumors that are the least tractable among glioblastomas. PMID:27119353

  17. [Spinal cord metastatic glioblastoma multiforme of childhood: case report].

    PubMed

    Rondinelli, Patricia Imperatriz Porto; Martinez, Carlos Alberto Osório

    2002-09-01

    We report the case of an eleven years-old girl with a right temporo-parietal glioblastoma multiforme. The tumor was totally resected on neurosurgery, and cranial radiotherapy was applied at next. The tumor recurred three months later, far from primary site, in the caudal portion of the spinal canal. Death occurred in less than one month later. Taking into account the data of this case, we discuss our experience in the management of such tumors and the literature on the subject.

  18. Zinc enhances temozolomide cytotoxicity in glioblastoma multiforme model systems

    PubMed Central

    Toren, Amos; Pismenyuk, Tatyana; Yalon, Michal; Freedman, Shani; Simon, Amos J.; Fisher, Tamar; Moshe, Itai; Reichardt, Juergen K.V.; Constantini, Shlomi; Mardor, Yael; Last, David; Guez, David; Daniels, Dianne; Assoulin, Moria; Mehrian-Shai, Ruty

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is an alkylating agent that has become the mainstay treatment of the most malignant brain cancer, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Unfortunately only a limited number of patients positively respond to it. It has been shown that zinc metal reestablishes chemosensitivity but this effect has not been tested with TMZ. Using both in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches, we investigated whether addition of zinc to TMZ enhances its cytotoxicity against GBM. In vitro cell viability analysis showed that the cytotoxic activity of TMZ was substantially increased with addition of zinc and this response was accompanied by an elevation of p21, PUMA, BAX and Caspase-3 expression and a decrease in growth fraction as manifested by low ki67 and lower colony formation. Analysis of GBM as intracranial xenografts in athymic mice and administration of concurrent TMZ and zinc yielded results consistent with those of the in vitro analyses. The co-treatment resulted in significant reduction in tumor volume in TMZ/zinc treated mice relative to treatment with TMZ alone. Our results suggest that zinc may serve as a potentiator of TMZ therapy in GBM patients. PMID:27556862

  19. In Vitro Selection of DNA Aptamers to Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aptamer probes for specific recognition of glioblastoma multiforme were generated using a repetitive and broad cell-SELEX-based procedure without negative selection. The 454 sequencing technology was used to monitor SELEX, and bioinformatics tools were used to identify aptamers from high throughput data. A group of aptamers were generated that can bind to target cells specifically with dissociation constants (Kd) in the nanomolar range. Selected aptamers showed high affinity to different types of glioblastoma cell lines while showing little or no affinity to other cancer cell lines. The aptamers generated in this study have potential use in different applications, such as probes for diagnosis and devices for targeted drug delivery, as well as tools for molecular marker discovery for glioblastomas. PMID:21892384

  20. MicroRNAs/TP53 feedback circuitry in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Sung-Suk; Yoo, Ji Young; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Jeon, Young-Jun; Kim, Seokho; Lee, Tae Jin; Kim, Taewan; Bakàcs, Arianna; Alder, Hansjuerg; Kaur, Balveen; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Pichiorri, Flavia; Croce, Carlo M.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are increasingly implicated in regulating cancer initiation and progression. In this study, two miRNAs, miR-25 and -32, are identified as p53-repressed miRNAs by p53-dependent negative regulation of their transcriptional regulators, E2F1 and MYC. However, miR-25 and -32 result in p53 accumulation by directly targeting Mdm2 and TSC1, which are negative regulators of p53 and the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway, respectively, leading to inhibition of cellular proliferation through cell cycle arrest. Thus, there is a recurrent autoregulatory circuit involving expression of p53, E2F1, and MYC to regulate the expression of miR-25 and -32, which are miRNAs that, in turn, control p53 accumulation. Significantly, overexpression of transfected miR-25 and -32 in glioblastoma multiforme cells inhibited growth of the glioblastoma multiforme cells in mouse brain in vivo. The results define miR-25 and -32 as positive regulators of p53, underscoring their role in tumorigenesis in glioblastoma. PMID:22431589

  1. MicroRNAs/TP53 feedback circuitry in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Suk; Yoo, Ji Young; Nuovo, Gerard J; Jeon, Young-Jun; Kim, Seokho; Lee, Tae Jin; Kim, Taewan; Bakàcs, Arianna; Alder, Hansjuerg; Kaur, Balveen; Aqeilan, Rami I; Pichiorri, Flavia; Croce, Carlo M

    2012-04-03

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are increasingly implicated in regulating cancer initiation and progression. In this study, two miRNAs, miR-25 and -32, are identified as p53-repressed miRNAs by p53-dependent negative regulation of their transcriptional regulators, E2F1 and MYC. However, miR-25 and -32 result in p53 accumulation by directly targeting Mdm2 and TSC1, which are negative regulators of p53 and the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway, respectively, leading to inhibition of cellular proliferation through cell cycle arrest. Thus, there is a recurrent autoregulatory circuit involving expression of p53, E2F1, and MYC to regulate the expression of miR-25 and -32, which are miRNAs that, in turn, control p53 accumulation. Significantly, overexpression of transfected miR-25 and -32 in glioblastoma multiforme cells inhibited growth of the glioblastoma multiforme cells in mouse brain in vivo. The results define miR-25 and -32 as positive regulators of p53, underscoring their role in tumorigenesis in glioblastoma.

  2. Infratentorial congenital glioblastoma multiforme. A rare tumour with a still unknown biology.

    PubMed

    Salas, S; Agut, T; Rovira, C; Canizo, D; Lavarino, C; Garcia-Alix, A

    2016-11-01

    Introduccion. El glioblastoma multiforme congenito representa solo el 3% de los tumores congenitos del sistema nervioso central, y su ubicacion infrantentorial es excepcional. Caso clinico. Recien nacido con un glioblastoma multiforme congenito sin mutacion en el gen TP53 ni inmunorreactividad nuclear p53, que infiltraba practicamente todo el tronco cerebral e invadia tambien estructuras supratentoriales. Conclusiones. Hasta donde sabemos, solo se han referido previamente cuatro casos de localizacion infratentorial, tres en el cerebelo y uno en el tronco del encefalo. La biologia del glioblastoma multiforme congenito no se conoce bien y, a diferencia del glioblastoma multiforme en la edad adulta, las mutaciones en el gen TP53 son poco frecuentes, sin que eso parezca implicar un mejor pronostico. Estas observaciones sugieren que el glioblastoma multiforme con origen en la vida fetal tiene una biologia diferente del que se presenta en otras etapas de la vida.

  3. CBX Chromodomain Inhibition Enhances Chemotherapy Response in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Katelyn E.; Martin, Emily C.; Dykhuizen, Emily C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) lacks effective therapeutic options leaving patients with a survival time of approximately one year. Recently, the alteration of chromatin modulators has been implicated in the pathogenesis and chemoresistance of numerous cancers; in particular, the Polycomb Group Proteins have been shown to play a role in glioblastoma progression and maintenance [1-5]. In this study, we aimed to identify drug combinations that decrease GBM cell viability by combining small molecule inhibitors against the Polycomb family with two standard chemotherapies. We identified dual inhibition of the CBX chromodomain with doxorubicin as a novel therapeutic strategy. While treatment with chromodomain inhibitor is non-toxic to cells alone, it dramatically increased the toxicity of standard chemotherapy drugs. We further validated an increase in DNA damage resulting in a G2/M block and subsequent apoptosis using the dual inhibitor treatment. PMID:28018136

  4. Rapid progression of glioblastoma multiforme: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan Yan; Ruan, Ling Xiang; Zhang, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors are intracranial lesions with varying shapes that grow rapidly. GBM tumors most commonly present as solitary lesions and multiple lesions are rare. The aim of the present case report was to investigate the imaging features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In this study, the case of a 60-year-old patient who was hospitalized due to seizures is presented. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple lesions, heterogeneous in size, with peritumoral edema and ring-shaped enhancement. The lesions grew rapidly within 10 days of hospitalization and were initially misdiagnosed as either infections or intracranial metastatic tumors as a result of imaging examinations. The patient was subsequently administered mannitol, diazepam, Tegretol and ceftriaxone. After treatment, the patient recovered and regained full consciousness. However, MRI examination 23 days after hospitalization revealed that the multiple lesions in the left temporal and left occipital lobes had increased in size. Therefore, resection of the tumor in the left temporal occipital lobe was performed. Histopathological examination identified GBM (grade IV) in the left temporal and parietal lobes. The patient succumbed to the disease 7 months after surgery due to GBM recurrence. The findings of the present case indicate that GBM may progress rapidly with a doubling time of 10 days and multiple cystic alterations. Furthermore, if diagnosis of GBM is unclear, early biopsy is recommended. PMID:28105188

  5. Cyclophilin B supports Myc and mutant p53-dependent survival of glioblastoma multiforme cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Won; Schroeder, Mark A; Sarkaria, Jann N; Bram, Richard J

    2014-01-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive, treatment-refractory type of brain tumor for which effective therapeutic targets remain important to identify. Here, we report that cyclophilin B (CypB), a prolyl isomerase residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), provides an essential survival signal in glioblastoma multiforme cells. Analysis of gene expression databases revealed that CypB is upregulated in many cases of malignant glioma. We found that suppression of CypB reduced cell proliferation and survival in human glioblastoma multiforme cells in vitro and in vivo. We also found that treatment with small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilins, including the approved drug cyclosporine, greatly reduced the viability of glioblastoma multiforme cells. Mechanistically, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of CypB caused hyperactivation of the oncogenic RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, induction of cellular senescence signals, and death resulting from loss of MYC, mutant p53, Chk1, and Janus-activated kinase/STAT3 signaling. Elevated reactive oxygen species, ER expansion, and abnormal unfolded protein responses in CypB-depleted glioblastoma multiforme cells indicated that CypB alleviates oxidative and ER stresses and coordinates stress adaptation responses. Enhanced cell survival and sustained expression of multiple oncogenic proteins downstream of CypB may thus contribute to the poor outcome of glioblastoma multiforme tumors. Our findings link chaperone-mediated protein folding in the ER to mechanisms underlying oncogenic transformation, and they make CypB an attractive and immediately targetable molecule for glioblastoma multiforme therapy.

  6. The autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid-lysophosphatidic acid receptor cascade: proposal of a novel potential therapeutic target for treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Sadaharu

    2015-06-18

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant tumor of the central nervous system (CNS). Its prognosis is one of the worst among all cancer types, and it is considered a fatal malignancy, incurable with conventional therapeutic strategies. As the bioactive multifunctional lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is well recognized to be involved in the tumorigenesis of cancers by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors, LPA receptor (LPAR) antagonists and LPA synthesis inhibitors have been proposed as promising drugs for cancer treatment. Six LPARs, named LPA1-6, are currently recognized. Among them, LPA1 is the dominant LPAR in the CNS and is highly expressed in GBM in combination with the overexpression of autotaxin (ATX), the enzyme (a phosphodiesterase, which is a potent cell motility-stimulating factor) that produces LPA.Invasion is a defining hallmark of GBM. LPA is significantly related to cell adhesion, cell motility, and invasion through the Rho family GTPases Rho and Rac. LPA1 is responsible for LPA-driven cell motility, which is attenuated by LPA4. GBM is among the most vascular human tumors. Although anti-angiogenic therapy (through the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)) was established, sufficient results have not been obtained because of the increased invasiveness triggered by anti-angiogenesis. As both ATX and LPA play a significant role in angiogenesis, similar to VEGF, inhibition of the ATX/LPA axis may be beneficial as a two-pronged therapy that includes anti-angiogenic and anti-invasion therapy. Conventional approaches to GBM are predominantly directed at cell proliferation. Recurrent tumors regrow from cells that have invaded brain tissues and are less proliferative, and are thus quite resistant to conventional drugs and radiation, which preferentially kill rapidly proliferating cells. A novel approach that targets this invasive subpopulation of GBM cells may improve the prognosis of GBM. Patients with GBM that

  7. Glioblastoma multiforme following cranial irradiation and chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukaemia. Report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Menon, R; Muzumdar, D; Shah, A; Goel, A

    2007-01-01

    The most common secondary neoplasms which occur following cranial radiation therapy are sarcoma and meningioma. The occurrence of glioblastoma multiforme following radiation and chemotherapy in acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) is rare. We report 3 cases of glioblastoma multiforme in children developing 11-72 months following completion of chemotherapy/radiotherapy for ALL. The exact cause for the development of glioblastoma multiforme following therapy for ALL is not clear. A genetic predisposition may be essential for the occurrence of such a highly malignant primary brain tumour in leukaemia patients, irrespective of radiation and/or chemotherapy. The pathogenesis and surgical management are discussed, and the literature on the subject is reviewed.

  8. Prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme using textural properties on MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, Maysam

    This thesis addresses the challenge of prognosis, in terms of survival prediction, for patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme brain tumors. Glioblastoma is the most malignant brain tumor, which has a median survival time of no more than a year. Accurate assessment of prognostic factors is critical in deciding amongst different treatment options and in designing stratified clinical trials. This thesis is motivated by two observations. Firstly, clinicians often refer to properties of glioblastoma tumors based on magnetic resonance images when assessing prognosis. However, clinical data, along with histological and most recently, molecular and gene expression data, have been more widely and systematically studied and used in prognosis assessment than image based information. Secondly, patient survival times are often used along with clinical data to conduct population studies on brain tumor patients. Recursive Partitioning Analysis is typically used in these population studies. However, researchers validate and assess the predictive power of these models by measuring the statistical association between survival groups and survival times. In this thesis, we propose a learning approach that uses historical training data to produce a system that predicts patient survival. We introduce a classification model for predicting patient survival class, which uses texture based features extracted from magnetic resonance images as well as other patient properties. Our prognosis approach is novel as it is the first to use image-extracted textural characteristics of glioblastoma scans, in a classification model whose accuracy can be reliably validated by cross validation. We show that our approach is a promising new direction for prognosis in brain tumor patients

  9. Molecular analysis of WWOX expression correlation with proliferation and apoptosis in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Pluciennik, Elzbieta; Kurzyk, Agata; Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Kordek, Radzislaw; Potemski, Piotr; Bednarek, Andrzej K.

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common type of primary brain tumor in adults. WWOX is a tumor suppressor gene involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression in many different neoplasms. Reduced WWOX expression is associated with more aggressive phenotype and poor patient outcome in several cancers. We investigated alternations of WWOX expression and its correlation with proliferation, apoptosis and signal trafficking in 67 glioblastoma multiforme specimens. Moreover, we examined the level of WWOX LOH and methylation status in WWOX promoter region. Our results suggest that loss of heterozygosity (relatively frequent in glioblastoma multiforme) along with promoter methylation may decrease the expression of this tumor suppressor gene. Our experiment revealed positive correlations between WWOX and Bcl2 and between WWOX and Ki67. We also confirmed that WWOX is positively correlated with ErbB4 signaling pathway in glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:20535528

  10. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, N. Andres; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Ishkanian, Fazilat; Huang, Kris; Walker, Gail R.; Padgett, Kyle; Roy, Bhaswati; Panoff, Joseph; Markoe, Arnold; Stoyanova, Radka

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}, respectively). MTV{sub Cho} and MTV{sub NAA} were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTV{sub NAA} were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTV{sub Cho} was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTV{sub Cho} for these patients were outside of CTV{sub 60}. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on

  11. Data analysis and tissue type assignment for glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqian; Pi, Yiming; Liu, Xin; Liu, Yuhan; Van Cauter, Sofie

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is characterized by high infiltration. The interpretation of MRSI data, especially for GBMs, is still challenging. Unsupervised methods based on NMF by Li et al. (2013, NMR in Biomedicine) and Li et al. (2013, IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering) have been proposed for glioma recognition, but the tissue types is still not well interpreted. As an extension of the previous work, a tissue type assignment method is proposed for GBMs based on the analysis of MRSI data and tissue distribution information. The tissue type assignment method uses the values from the distribution maps of all three tissue types to interpret all the information in one new map and color encodes each voxel to indicate the tissue type. Experiments carried out on in vivo MRSI data show the feasibility of the proposed method. This method provides an efficient way for GBM tissue type assignment and helps to display information of MRSI data in a way that is easy to interpret.

  12. Glioblastoma multiforme: State of the art and future therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Taylor A; Karajannis, Matthias A; Harter, David H

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary malignancy of the central nervous system (CNS). Despite the proven benefit of surgical resection and aggressive treatment with chemo- and radiotherapy, the prognosis remains very poor. Recent advances of our understanding of the biology and pathophysiology of GBM have allowed the development of a wide array of novel therapeutic approaches, which have been developed. These novel approaches include molecularly targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and gene therapy. We offer a brief review of the current standard of care, and a survey of novel therapeutic approaches for treatment of GBM. Despite promising results in preclinical trials, many of these therapies have demonstrated limited therapeutic efficacy in human clinical trials. Thus, although survival of patients with GBM continues to slowly improve, treatment of GBM remains extremely challenging. Continued research and development of targeted therapies, based on a detailed understanding of molecular pathogenesis can reasonably be expected to yield improved outcomes for patients with GBM.

  13. Hypothermia secondary to glioblastoma multiforme? Autopsy findings in two cases.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Matthew; Schwartz, Liliana; Duflou, Johan

    2015-03-01

    Death due to accidental primary hypothermia in cold climates is relatively common, with previous case series reflecting this. In contrast, hypothermia-related death as a result of an underlying medical cause, such as a brain tumor, is rare. The literature clearly illustrates a theoretical causal relationship between brain neoplasms and hypothermia through the infiltration of the hypothalamus; however, the number of reported cases is minimal. Two cases are presented where autopsy confirmed hypothermia as the cause of death with both cases revealing widespread glioblastoma multiforme in the brain. Both decedents were elderly with a number of comorbidities identified during autopsy that could explain death; however, hypothermia was deemed the most likely cause. It is proposed that both decedents died of hypothermia as a result of the tumor's effect on thermoregulation. These cases underline the importance of forensic pathologists to be aware of the relationship between brain tumors and hypothermia and to not dismiss death as being due to other disease processes.

  14. Protocols for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme at Brookhaven: Practical considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    In this report we discuss some issues considered in selecting initial protocols for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of human glioblastoma multiforme. First the tolerance of normal tissues, especially the brain, to the radiation field. Radiation doses limits were based on results with human and animal exposures. Estimates of tumor control doses were based on the results of single-fraction photon therapy and single fraction BNCT both in humans and experimental animals. Of the two boron compounds (BSH and BPA), BPA was chosen since a FDA-sanctioned protocol for distribution in humans was in effect at the time the first BNCT protocols were written and therapy studies in experimental animals had shown it to be more effective than BSH.

  15. Nanotechnology to augment immunotherapy for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Ung, Nolan; Yang, Isaac

    2015-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is characterized as one of the most common and most deadly malignant primary brain tumors. Current treatment modalities include the use of surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy, though survival is still limited. Because of this, new treatment strategies are needed to improve overall survival. Immunotherapy has emerged as a potential treatment, but still possesses certain limitations to have a substantial clinical effect. In addition, nanotechnology has emerged as potent treatment effectors that have been shown to augment the effects of therapies including chemotherapy, gene therapy, and more. Nanoparticles possess a novel approach due to the myriad of functional groups that can create targeted treatments, though further optimization is still required. In this review, the authors will present the current uses and abilities of nanotechnology and its implication for use with immunotherapy in the treatment of GBM.

  16. Translational research in glioblastoma multiforme: molecular criteria for patient selection.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Rafael; de Las Peñas, Ramon; Balaña, Carme; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Salazar, Fernanda; de Aguirre, Itziar; Reguart, Noemi; Villa, Salvador; Wei, Jia; Ramirez, Jose Luis; Molina, Miguel Angel; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; Jablons, David; Taron, Miquel

    2008-04-01

    In spite of the dismal outcome of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we are in a position to provide a ray of hope to patients and families. Methylation of MGMT in tumor occurs in approximately a third of patients and predicts meaningful response and survival to adjuvant radiotherapy plus temozolomide. Limited access to tumor tissue in some patients could be circumvented by examining MGMT methylation in circulating serum DNA, although this approach needs to be validated. Molecular signatures are also promising prognostic and predictive markers, and clinical trials should be carried out to validate their use in the selection of patients for specific targeted therapies. Gene expression by quantitative PCR of key components of these molecular signatures could pave the way for easy identification of different subgroups of patients. Translational clinical trials are warranted in order to detect the subgroups of patients resistant to radiotherapy who may derive benefit from novel therapies, including antiangiogenic drugs.

  17. The role of Octamer binding transcription factors in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Rooj, AK.; Bronisz, A.

    2016-01-01

    A group of transcription factors (TF) that are master developmental regulators of the establishment and maintenance of pluripotency during embryogenesis play additional roles to control tissue homeostasis and regeneration in adults. Among these TFs, members of the Octamer-binding transcription factor (OCT) gene family are well documented as major regulators controlling the self-renewal and pluripotency of stem cells isolated from different adult organs including the brain. In the last few years a large number of studies show the aberrant expression and dysfunction of OCT in different types of cancers including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM is the most common malignant primary brain tumor, and contains a subpopulation of undifferentiated stem cells (GSCs), with self-renewal and tumorigenic potential that contribute to tumor initiation, invasion, recurrence, and therapeutic resistance. In this review, we have summarized the current knowledge about OCT family in GBM and their crucial role in the initiation, maintenance and drug resistance properties of GSCs. PMID:26968235

  18. Comprehensive portrait of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme in molecular and clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Chen, Xincheng; You, Yongping; Wang, Xiefeng; Liu, Yanwei; Hu, Qi; Yan, Wei

    2015-10-13

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults. In addition to poor response to treatment, a high recurrence rate contributes to the poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetical and clinical characteristics of recurrent glioblastoma. We used whole transcriptome sequencing data to examine the distribution of molecular subtypes and gene signatures in 22 recurrent glioblastoma taken from the Chinese population, and further analyzed biological progression of the tumors, when compared with primary glioblastoma. The proportion of the classical subtype in recurrent ones (22%) was lower than that in primary glioblastoma (36%). The frequency of IDH1 mutations in recurrent glioblastomas was nearly twice that in primary glioblastomas. TP53 mutations were fewer in proneural recurrent glioblastomas (20%) but frequent in classical recurrent glioblastomas (80%). The most common sites of recurrent glioblastomas were the temporal lobe (41%). In patients diagnosed with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme, 64% were younger than 50 years. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that chromatin fracture, repair, and remodeling genes were enriched in recurrent glioblastoma. Our results highlight the differences in clinical features, molecular subtypes and gene alterations between primary and recurrent glioblastoma and may be helpful for targeted therapy for recurrent glioblastoma.

  19. The evolution of the EGFRvIII (rindopepimut) immunotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme patients

    PubMed Central

    Paff, Michelle; Alexandru-Abrams, Daniela; Hsu, Frank P K; Bota, Daniela A

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common type of brain tumor and it is uniformly fatal. The community standard of treatment for this disease is gross or subtotal resection of the tumor, followed by radiation and temozolomide. At recurrence bevacizumab can be added for increased progression free survival. Many challenges are encountered while trying to devise new drugs to treat GBM, such as the presence of the blood brain barrier which is impermeable to most drugs. Therefore in the past few years attention was turned to immunological means for the treatment of this devastating disease. EGFRvIII targeting has proven a good way to attack glioblastoma cells by using the immune system. Although in still in development, this approach holds the promise as a great first step toward immune-tailored drugs for the treatment of brain cancers. PMID:25625931

  20. Drug delivery approaches for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Fakhoury, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is by far the most common and aggressive form of glial tumor. It is characterized by a highly proliferative population of cells that invade surrounding tissue and that frequently recur after surgical resection and chemotherapy. Over the last decades, a number of promising novel pharmacological approaches have been investigated, but most of them have failed clinical trials due to some side-effects such as toxicity and poor drug delivery to the brain. The major obstacle in the treatment of GBM is the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Due to their relatively high molecular weight, most therapeutic drugs fail to cross the BBB from the blood circulation. This paper sheds light on the characteristics of GBM and the challenges of current pharmacological treatments. A closer look is given to the role of nanotechnology in the field of drug delivery, and its application in the treatment of brain tumors such as GBM. For this purpose, effort was made to select the most recent studies using predefined search criteria that included at least one of the following keywords in the PubMed and Medline databases: glioblastoma, drug delivery, blood-brain barrier, nanotechnology, and nanoparticle. Breakthrough in nanotechnology offers promising applications in cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery. However, more efforts need to be devoted to the development of novel therapeutic strategies that enable the delivery of drugs to desired areas of the brain with limited side-effects and higher therapeutic efficiency.

  1. Survival comparison between glioblastoma multiforme and other incurable cancers.

    PubMed

    Tran, B; Rosenthal, M A

    2010-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an incurable disease that has a reputation as having one of the worst prognoses of all cancers. Recent advances in treatment have led to significant improvements in both progression-free and overall survival. Despite this, the wider medical community continues to perceive GBM as having an incomparably poor prognosis. This perception may stem from a lack of awareness regarding the significant survival advantage through the addition of concurrent and post-radiotherapy temozolomide, as well as unfair comparisons to cancers with curable early stages. In this analysis, we compared the efficacy data reported in pivotal studies for the incurable stage of common cancers to modern efficacy data for GBM. In particular, we compared median overall survival, median progression-free survival and 12-month and 5-year survival rates. Our results demonstrate that with modern treatment, GBM survival is now comparable to, if not better than, many other incurable cancers. (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Glioblastoma multiforme: State of the art and future therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Taylor A.; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Harter, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary malignancy of the central nervous system (CNS). Despite the proven benefit of surgical resection and aggressive treatment with chemo- and radiotherapy, the prognosis remains very poor. Recent advances of our understanding of the biology and pathophysiology of GBM have allowed the development of a wide array of novel therapeutic approaches, which have been developed. These novel approaches include molecularly targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and gene therapy. Methods: We offer a brief review of the current standard of care, and a survey of novel therapeutic approaches for treatment of GBM. Results: Despite promising results in preclinical trials, many of these therapies have demonstrated limited therapeutic efficacy in human clinical trials. Thus, although survival of patients with GBM continues to slowly improve, treatment of GBM remains extremely challenging. Conclusion: Continued research and development of targeted therapies, based on a detailed understanding of molecular pathogenesis can reasonably be expected to yield improved outcomes for patients with GBM. PMID:24991467

  3. Revisiting CDK Inhibitors for Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Lubanska, Dorota; Porter, Lisa

    2017-03-21

    Despite extensive efforts and continual progress in research and medicine, outcomes for patients with high-grade glioma remain exceptionally poor. Over the past decade, research has revealed a great deal about the complex biology behind glioma development, and has brought to light some of the major barriers preventing successful treatment. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) (stage 4 astrocytoma) is a highly dynamic tumour and one of the most extreme examples of intratumoural heterogeneity, making targeting with specific therapeutics an inefficient and highly unpredictable goal. The cancer stem cell hypothesis offers a new view on the possible mechanisms dictating the heterogeneous nature of this disease and contributes to our understanding of glioma resistance and recurrence. Revealing cell division characteristics of initiating cell populations within GBM may represent novel treatment targets and/or the effective repurposing of existing therapies. In this review, we discuss the potential role of targeting the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) driving this specific population. We also describe developments using multi-omic approaches that may aid in stratifying patient populations for CDK inhibitor therapy.

  4. Third Ventricular Glioblastoma Multiforme: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Omid R; Quadri, Syed A; Farr, Saman; Gupta, Ravi; Bieber, Andrew J; Dyurgerova, Anya; Corsino, Casey; Miulli, Dan; Siddiqi, Javed

    2015-11-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) typically presents in the supratentorial white matter, commonly within the centrum semiovale as a ring-enhancing lesion with areas of necrosis. An atypical presentation of this lesion, both anatomically as well as radiographically, is significant and must be part of the differential for a neoplasm in this anatomical location. Case Description We present a case of a 62-year-old woman with headaches, increasing somnolence, and cognitive decline for several weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated mild left ventricular dilatation with a well-marginated, homogeneous, and nonhemorrhagic lesion located at the ceiling of the third ventricle within the junction of the septum pellucidum and fornix, without exhibiting the typical radiographic features of hemorrhage or necrosis. Final pathology reports confirmed the diagnosis of GBM. Conclusion This case report describes an unusual location for the most common primary brain neoplasm. Moreover, this case identifies the origin of a GBM related to the paracentral ventricular structures infiltrating the body of the fornix and leaves of the septum pellucidum. To our knowledge this report is the first reported case of a GBM found in this anatomical location with an entirely atypical radiographic presentation.

  5. Third Ventricular Glioblastoma Multiforme: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Omid R.; Quadri, Syed A.; Farr, Saman; Gupta, Ravi; Bieber, Andrew J.; Dyurgerova, Anya; Corsino, Casey; Miulli, Dan; Siddiqi, Javed

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) typically presents in the supratentorial white matter, commonly within the centrum semiovale as a ring-enhancing lesion with areas of necrosis. An atypical presentation of this lesion, both anatomically as well as radiographically, is significant and must be part of the differential for a neoplasm in this anatomical location. Case Description We present a case of a 62-year-old woman with headaches, increasing somnolence, and cognitive decline for several weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated mild left ventricular dilatation with a well-marginated, homogeneous, and nonhemorrhagic lesion located at the ceiling of the third ventricle within the junction of the septum pellucidum and fornix, without exhibiting the typical radiographic features of hemorrhage or necrosis. Final pathology reports confirmed the diagnosis of GBM. Conclusion This case report describes an unusual location for the most common primary brain neoplasm. Moreover, this case identifies the origin of a GBM related to the paracentral ventricular structures infiltrating the body of the fornix and leaves of the septum pellucidum. To our knowledge this report is the first reported case of a GBM found in this anatomical location with an entirely atypical radiographic presentation. PMID:26623232

  6. Honokiol-induced apoptosis and autophagy in glioblastoma multiforme cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ken-Hu; Yan, Ming-DE; Yao, Chih-Jung; Lin, Pei-Chun; Lai, Gi-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Honokiol, a hydroxylated biphenyl compound isolated from the Chinese herb Magnolia officinalis, has been reported to have anticancer activities in a variety of cancer cell lines. The present study aimed to evaluate the anticancer effect and possible molecular mechanisms of honokiol in a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell line. The anticancer activities of honokiol were investigated in the DBTRG-05MG GBM cell line. The effect of honokiol on cell growth was determined using a sulforhodamine B assay. Flow cytometry and immunoblotting were used to measure honokiol-induced apoptosis (programmed cell death type I) and autophagy (programmed cell death type II). Honokiol was observed to reduce DBTRG-05MG cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. At a dose of 50 μM, honokiol markedly decreased the expression of Rb protein and led to the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and Bcl-xL to promote apoptosis in the cancer cells. In addition, markers of autophagy, including Beclin-1 and LC3-II, were also significantly increased. In addition to apoptosis, honokiol was also able to induce autophagy in the DBTRG-05MG cells. The mechanisms that are responsible for the correlation between honokiol-induced apoptosis and autophagy require further investigation. Such efforts may provide a potential strategy for improving the clinical outcome of GBM treatment.

  7. Oncolytic Virus Therapy of Glioblastoma Multiforme – Concepts and Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Wollmann, Guido; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years of oncolytic virus (OV) development have created a field that is driven by the potential promise of lasting impact on our cancer treatment repertoire. With the field constantly expanding – over 20 viruses have been recognized as potential OVs – new virus candidates continue to emerge even as established viruses reach clinical trials. They all share the defining commonalities of selective replication in tumors, subsequent tumor cell lysis, and dispersion within the tumor. Members from diverse virus classes with distinctly different biologies and host species have been identified. Of these viruses, 15 have been tested on human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). So far, 20 clinical trials have been conducted or initiated using attenuated strains of 7 different oncolytic viruses against GBM. In this review, we present an overview of viruses that have been developed or considered for GBM treatment. We outline the principles of tumor targeting and selective viral replication, which include mechanisms of tumor-selective binding, and molecular elements usurping cellular biosynthetic machinery in transformed cells. Results from clinical trials have clearly established the proof of concept and have confirmed the general safety of OV application in the brain. The moderate clinical efficacy has not yet matched the promising preclinical lab results; next-generation OVs that are either “armed” with therapeutic genes or that are embedded in a multimodality treatment regimen should enhance the clinical results. PMID:22290260

  8. The role of octamer binding transcription factors in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Rooj, A K; Bronisz, A; Godlewski, J

    2016-06-01

    A group of transcription factors (TF) that are master developmental regulators of the establishment and maintenance of pluripotency during embryogenesis play additional roles to control tissue homeostasis and regeneration in adults. Among these TFs, members of the octamer-binding transcription factor (OCT) gene family are well documented as major regulators controlling the self-renewal and pluripotency of stem cells isolated from different adult organs including the brain. In the last few years a large number of studies show the aberrant expression and dysfunction of OCT in different types of cancers including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM is the most common malignant primary brain tumor, and contains a subpopulation of undifferentiated stem cells (GSCs), with self-renewal and tumorigenic potential that contribute to tumor initiation, invasion, recurrence, and therapeutic resistance. In this review, we have summarized the current knowledge about OCT family in GBM and their crucial role in the initiation, maintenance and drug resistance properties of GSCs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Core Canonical Pathways Involved in Developing Human Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somiranjan; Dutta, Sisir; Thorne, Gabriel; Boston, Ava; Barfield, Alexis; Banerjee, Narendra; Walker, Rayshawn; Banerjee, Hirendra Nath

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive type of the primary brain tumors with pathologic hallmarks of necrosis and vascular proliferation. The diagnosis of GBM is currently mostly based on histological examination of brain tumor tissues, after radiological characterization and surgical biopsy. The ability to characterize tumors comprehensively at the molecular level raises the possibility that diagnosis can be made based on molecular profiling with or without histological examination, rather than solely on histological phenotype. The development of novel genomic and proteomic techniques will foster in the identification of such diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers. We analyzed the global differential gene expression of a GBM cell line HTB15 in comparison to normal human Astrocytes, and established a few canonical pathways that are important in determining the molecular mechanisms of cancer using global gene expression microarray, coupled with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA®). Overall, we revealed a discrete gene expression profile in the experimental model that resembled progression of GBM cancer. The canonical pathway analysis showed the involvement of genes that differentially expressed in such a disease condition that included Inositol pathway, Polo like kinases, nNOS signaling, and Tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. Our findings established that the gene expression pattern of this dreaded brain cancer will probably help the cancer research community by finding out newer therapeutic strategies to combat this dreaded cancer type that leads to the identification of high-risk population in this category, with almost hundred percent mortality rate.

  10. Long-term survival of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

    PubMed

    Smoll, Nicolas R; Schaller, Karl; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2013-05-01

    Long-term survival is an often used, yet poorly defined, concept in the study of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This study suggests a method to define a time-point for long-term survival in patients with GBM. Data for this study were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results database, which was limited to the most recent data using the period approach. Relative survival measures were used and modelled using piecewise constant hazards to describe the survival profile of long-term survivors of GBM. For patients with GBM, the first quarter of the second year (5th quarter) post-diagnosis is considered to be the peak incidence of mortality with an excess hazard ratio of 7.58 (95% confidence interval=6.54, 8.78) and the risk of death due to GBM decreases to half of its rate at 2.5 years post-diagnosis. The 2.5-year cumulative relative survival (CRS) for all patients is approximately 8%, with a CRS of approximately 2% at 10 years. Using the definition of long-term survival suggested here, the results indicate that long-term survivors are patients who survive at least 2.5 years post-diagnosis. The most likely time period for patients with GBM to die is the 5th quarter post-diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A comprehensive characterization of mitochondrial DNA mutations in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Vidone, Michele; Clima, Rosanna; Santorsola, Mariangela; Calabrese, Claudia; Girolimetti, Giulia; Kurelac, Ivana; Amato, Laura Benedetta; Iommarini, Luisa; Trevisan, Elisa; Leone, Marco; Soffietti, Riccardo; Morra, Isabella; Faccani, Giuliano; Attimonelli, Marcella; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain cancer in adults, with a poor prognosis, whose molecular stratification still represents a challenge in pathology and clinics. On the other hand, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors as modifiers of the bioenergetics state, albeit in GBM a characterization of the mtDNA status is lacking to date. Here, a characterization of the burden of mtDNA mutations in GBM samples was performed. First, investigation of tumor-specific vs. non tumor-specific mutations was carried out with the MToolBox bioinformatics pipeline by analyzing 45 matched tumor/blood samples, from whole genome or whole exome sequencing datasets obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. Additionally, the entire mtDNA sequence was obtained in a dataset of 104 fresh-frozen GBM samples. Mitochondrial mutations with potential pathogenic interest were prioritized based on heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. A preliminary biochemical analysis of the activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes was also performed on fresh-frozen GBM samples. Although a high number of mutations was detected, we report that the large majority of them does not pass the prioritization filters. Therefore, a relatively limited burden of pathogenic mutations is indeed carried by GBM, which did not appear to determine a general impairment of the respiratory chain. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. p53 regulates the mevalonate pathway in human glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Laezza, C; D'Alessandro, A; Di Croce, L; Picardi, P; Ciaglia, E; Pisanti, S; Malfitano, A M; Comegna, M; Faraonio, R; Gazzerro, P; Bifulco, M

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is an important metabolic pathway implicated in multiple aspects of tumorigenesis. In this study, we provided evidence that p53 induces the expression of a group of enzymes of the MVA pathway including 3′-hydroxy-3′-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, MVA kinase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase and farnesyl diphosphate farnesyl transferase 1, in the human glioblastoma multiforme cell line, U343 cells, and in normal human astrocytes, NHAs. Genetic and pharmacologic perturbation of p53 directly influences the expression of these genes. Furthermore, p53 is recruited to the gene promoters in designated p53-responsive elements, thereby increasing their transcription. Such effect was abolished by site-directed mutagenesis in the p53-responsive element of promoter of the genes. These findings highlight another aspect of p53 functions unrelated to tumor suppression and suggest p53 as a novel regulator of the MVA pathway providing insight into the role of this pathway in cancer progression. PMID:26469958

  13. Optimizing radiotherapy schedules for elderly glioblastoma multiforme patients.

    PubMed

    Clarke, James W; Chang, Eric L; Levin, Victor A; Mayr, Nina A; Hong, Eugene; Cavaliere, Robert; Lo, Simon S

    2008-05-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor. Despite recent advances, the overall prognosis remains poor with median survivals of approximately 1 year and 5-year survivals of less than 5%. Efforts at risk stratification have identified age and performance status as the most important prognostic features. It is well established that patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy have improved survival and functional capacity compared with unirradiated patients. Recent evidence suggests that the benefit of postoperative radiation persists even within the cohort aged 70 years or over. Some investigators have questioned whether the standard treatment schedule of 60 Gy delivered over a 6-week period is necessary for older patients with limited functional status. Alternative treatment schedules have been devised to reduce the inconvenience and morbidity of standard therapy. This review aims to evaluate the current state of knowledge on alternative radiotherapy schedules for elderly and poor-prognosis patients with glioblastoma.

  14. ApoE enhances nanodisk-mediated curcumin delivery to glioblastoma multiforme cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mistuni; Ryan, Robert O

    2013-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effect of incorporating the polyphenol, curcumin, into nanodisk (ND) particles on its biological activity. Materials & methods Curcumin-NDs formulated with different scaffold proteins were incubated with cultured glioblastoma multiforme cells. Results When ApoE was employed as the ND scaffold protein, enhanced curcumin uptake was observed. Furthermore, ApoE curcumin-NDs induced greater cell death than either free curcumin or ApoAI curcumin-NDs. A total of 1 h after exposure of glioblastoma multiforme cells to ApoE curcumin-NDs, significant curcumin uptake was detected while ApoE was localized at the cell surface. After 2 h, a portion of the curcumin had migrated to the nucleus, giving rise to enhanced fluorescence intensity in discrete intranuclear sites. Conclusion ApoE-mediated interaction of curcumin-NDs with glioblastoma multiforme cells leads to enhanced curcumin uptake and increased biological activity. PMID:23879635

  15. Androgen receptor signaling regulates growth of glioblastoma multiforme in men.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Yuhua; Wei, Wei; Cong, Ping; Ding, Yinlu; Xiang, Lei; Wu, Kang

    2015-02-01

    Although glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant primary human brain cancer with surprisingly high incidence rate in adult men than in women, the exact mechanism underlying this pronounced epidemiology is unclear. Here, we showed significant upregulated androgen receptor (AR) expression in the GBM tissue compared to the periphery normal brain tissue in patients. An expression of AR was further detected in all eight examined human GBM cell lines. To figure out whether AR signaling may play a role in GBM, we used high AR-expressing U87-MG GBM line for further study. We found that activation of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) receptor signaling by TGFβ1 in GBM significantly inhibited cell growth and increased apoptosis. Moreover, application of active AR ligand 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) significantly decreased the effect of TGFβ1 on GBM growth and apoptosis, suggesting that AR signaling pathway may contradict the effect of TGFβ receptor signaling in GBM. However, neither total protein nor the phosphorylated protein of SMAD3, a major TGFβ receptor signaling downstream effector in GBM, was affected by DHT, suggesting that AR activation may not affect the SMAD3 protein production or phosphorylation of TGFβ receptor and SMAD3. Finally, immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot confirmed binding of pAR to pSMAD3, which may prevent the DNA binding of pSMAD3 and subsequently prevent its effect on cell growth in GBM. Taken together, our study suggests that AR signaling may promote tumorigenesis of GBM in adult men by inhibiting TGFβ receptor signaling.

  16. The identification of mitochondrial DNA variants in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes key proteins of the electron transfer chain (ETC), which produces ATP through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and is essential for cells to perform specialised functions. Tumor-initiating cells use aerobic glycolysis, a combination of glycolysis and low levels of OXPHOS, to promote rapid cell proliferation and tumor growth. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressively malignant brain tumor and mitochondria have been proposed to play a vital role in GBM tumorigenesis. Results Using next generation sequencing and high resolution melt analysis, we identified a large number of mtDNA variants within coding and non-coding regions of GBM cell lines and predicted their disease-causing potential through in silico modeling. The frequency of variants was greatest in the D-loop and origin of light strand replication in non-coding regions. ND6 was the most susceptible coding gene to mutation whilst ND4 had the highest frequency of mutation. Both genes encode subunits of complex I of the ETC. These variants were not detected in unaffected brain samples and many have not been previously reported. Depletion of HSR-GBM1 cells to varying degrees of their mtDNA followed by transplantation into immunedeficient mice resulted in the repopulation of the same variants during tumorigenesis. Likewise, de novo variants identified in other GBM cell lines were also incorporated. Nevertheless, ND4 and ND6 were still the most affected genes. We confirmed the presence of these variants in high grade gliomas. Conclusions These novel variants contribute to GBM by rendering the ETC. partially dysfunctional. This restricts metabolism to anaerobic glycolysis and promotes cell proliferation. PMID:24383468

  17. Understanding cytoskeleton regulators in glioblastoma multiforme for therapy design

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Samaneh; Harisankar, Aditya; Gracias, Aileen; Bachinger, Fabian; Fufa, Temesgen; Chandrasekar, Gayathri; Gaunitz, Frank; Walfridsson, Julian; Kitambi, Satish S

    2016-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton forms the primary basis through which a cell governs the changes in size, shape, migration, proliferation, and forms the primary means through which the cells respond to their environment. Indeed, cell and tissue morphologies are used routinely not only to grade tumors but also in various high-content screening methods with an aim to identify new small molecules with therapeutic potential. This study examines the expression of various cytoskeleton regulators in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM is a very aggressive disease with a low life expectancy even after chemo- and radiotherapy. Cancer cells of GBM are notorious for their invasiveness, ability to develop resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, and to form secondary site tumors. This study aims to gain insight into cytoskeleton regulators in GBM cells and to understand the effect of various oncology drugs, including temozolomide, on cytoskeleton regulators. We compare the expression of various cytoskeleton regulators in GBM-derived tumor and normal tissue, CD133-postive and -negative cells from GBM and neural cells, and GBM stem-like and differentiated cells. In addition, the correlation between the expression of cytoskeleton regulators with the clinical outcome was examined to identify genes associated with longer patient survival. This was followed by a small molecule screening with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved oncology drugs, and its effect on cellular cytoskeleton was compared to treatment with temozolomide. This study identifies various groups of cytoskeletal regulators that have an important effect on patient survival and tumor development. Importantly, this work highlights the advantage of using cytoskeleton regulators as biomarkers for assessing prognosis and treatment design for GBM. PMID:27672311

  18. Genome-Wide Methylation Analyses in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Rose K.; Chen, Yanwen; Guan, Xiaowei; Nousome, Darryl; Sharma, Charu; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey; Sloan, Andrew E.; Cortes, Etty; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Su, Tao; Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Gurvich, Irina; Santella, Regina M.; Ostrom, Quinn; Lee, Annette; Gregersen, Peter; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Few studies had investigated genome-wide methylation in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Our goals were to study differential methylation across the genome in gene promoters using an array-based method, as well as repetitive elements using surrogate global methylation markers. The discovery sample set for this study consisted of 54 GBM from Columbia University and Case Western Reserve University, and 24 brain controls from the New York Brain Bank. We assembled a validation dataset using methylation data of 162 TCGA GBM and 140 brain controls from dbGAP. HumanMethylation27 Analysis Bead-Chips (Illumina) were used to interrogate 26,486 informative CpG sites in both the discovery and validation datasets. Global methylation levels were assessed by analysis of L1 retrotransposon (LINE1), 5 methyl-deoxycytidine (5m-dC) and 5 hydroxylmethyl-deoxycytidine (5hm-dC) in the discovery dataset. We validated a total of 1548 CpG sites (1307 genes) that were differentially methylated in GBM compared to controls. There were more than twice as many hypomethylated genes as hypermethylated ones. Both the discovery and validation datasets found 5 tumor methylation classes. Pathway analyses showed that the top ten pathways in hypomethylated genes were all related to functions of innate and acquired immunities. Among hypermethylated pathways, transcriptional regulatory network in embryonic stem cells was the most significant. In the study of global methylation markers, 5m-dC level was the best discriminant among methylation classes, whereas in survival analyses, high level of LINE1 methylation was an independent, favorable prognostic factor in the discovery dataset. Based on a pathway approach, hypermethylation in genes that control stem cell differentiation were significant, poor prognostic factors of overall survival in both the discovery and validation datasets. Approaches that targeted these methylated genes may be a future therapeutic goal. PMID:24586730

  19. Genome-wide methylation analyses in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Lai, Rose K; Chen, Yanwen; Guan, Xiaowei; Nousome, Darryl; Sharma, Charu; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey; Sloan, Andrew E; Cortes, Etty; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Su, Tao; Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Gurvich, Irina; Santella, Regina M; Ostrom, Quinn; Lee, Annette; Gregersen, Peter; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Few studies had investigated genome-wide methylation in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Our goals were to study differential methylation across the genome in gene promoters using an array-based method, as well as repetitive elements using surrogate global methylation markers. The discovery sample set for this study consisted of 54 GBM from Columbia University and Case Western Reserve University, and 24 brain controls from the New York Brain Bank. We assembled a validation dataset using methylation data of 162 TCGA GBM and 140 brain controls from dbGAP. HumanMethylation27 Analysis Bead-Chips (Illumina) were used to interrogate 26,486 informative CpG sites in both the discovery and validation datasets. Global methylation levels were assessed by analysis of L1 retrotransposon (LINE1), 5 methyl-deoxycytidine (5m-dC) and 5 hydroxylmethyl-deoxycytidine (5hm-dC) in the discovery dataset. We validated a total of 1548 CpG sites (1307 genes) that were differentially methylated in GBM compared to controls. There were more than twice as many hypomethylated genes as hypermethylated ones. Both the discovery and validation datasets found 5 tumor methylation classes. Pathway analyses showed that the top ten pathways in hypomethylated genes were all related to functions of innate and acquired immunities. Among hypermethylated pathways, transcriptional regulatory network in embryonic stem cells was the most significant. In the study of global methylation markers, 5m-dC level was the best discriminant among methylation classes, whereas in survival analyses, high level of LINE1 methylation was an independent, favorable prognostic factor in the discovery dataset. Based on a pathway approach, hypermethylation in genes that control stem cell differentiation were significant, poor prognostic factors of overall survival in both the discovery and validation datasets. Approaches that targeted these methylated genes may be a future therapeutic goal.

  20. Glioblastoma multiforme in children: experience at Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Herrera, Federico; Castro-Sierra, Eduardo; Gordillo-Domínguez, Luis Felipe; Vaca-Ruiz, Miguel Angel; Santana-Montero, Blanca; Perezpeña-Diazconti, Mario; González-Carranza, Vicente; Torres-García, Samuel; Chico-Ponce de León, Fernando

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate clinical evolution of pediatric patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Cases of patients treated from January to May, 2007, were included in this study. Variables analyzed were: age, diagnosis, size of tumor, histopathological description, degree of resection, time of stay in hospital, complications and outcome using Pearson's chi-squared test and logistic regression. Sixteen patients were identified. Mean age of presentation was 8.8. An increased frequency of complications was observed in younger patients and longer survival rates in patients with greater resections; main mode of presentation was directly related to intracranial hypertension; size of tumor was not related to evolution or outcome. Modern histological classifications especially designed for children are deemed necessary to accurately diagnose GBM.

  1. Current status and future therapeutic perspectives of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) therapy: A review.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Komal; Shagufta, Bibi Ibtesam; Abbas, Syed Qamar; Patel, Seema; Khan, Ishrat; Shah, Sayed Asmat Ali; Akhter, Najeeb; Hassan, Syed Shams Ul

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the deadliest form of heterogeneous brain cancer. It affects an enormous number of patients every year and the survival is approximately 8 to 15 months. GBM has driven by complex signaling pathways and considered as a most challenging to treat. Standard treatment of GBM includes surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and also the combined treatment. This review article described inter and intra- tumor heterogeneity of GMB. In addition, recent chemotherapeutic agents, with their mechanism of action have been defined. FDA-approved drugs also been focused over here and most importantly highlighting some natural and synthetic and novel anti- glioma agents, that are the main focus of researchers nowadays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance of nicotinamide combined with radiation therapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Cartei, F; Danesi, R; Ducci, F; Fatigante, L; Caciagli, P G; Tacca, M; Laddaga, M

    1994-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of nicotinamide and its tolerance were studied in seven patients affected by glioblastoma multiforme and treated with two fractions per day of radiation therapy. Nicotinamide was given orally at two daily doses of 4 g and then 2 g separated by a 6-h-interval. The treatment was well tolerated in almost all patients and had no effect on blood pressure, cardiac rhythm or body temperature. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed peak plasma levels (Cmax) above 100 mg/l 45 minutes after the administration of both doses. This was followed by a biexponential decay of plasma concentrations with a thermal half life of 9.4h. Tumours were irradiated 1 hour after each drug dose to match with drug Cmax in plasma, and although it is too early to evaluate the tumour response, the drug levels achieved should be sufficient to improve radiation therapy.

  3. Metabolic management of glioblastoma multiforme using standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zuccoli, Giulio; Marcello, Norina; Pisanello, Anna; Servadei, Franco; Vaccaro, Salvatore; Mukherjee, Purna; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2010-04-22

    Management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been difficult using standard therapy (radiation with temozolomide chemotherapy). The ketogenic diet is used commonly to treat refractory epilepsy in children and, when administered in restricted amounts, can also target energy metabolism in brain tumors. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with progressive memory loss, chronic headaches, nausea, and a right hemisphere multi-centric tumor seen with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Following incomplete surgical resection, the patient was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme expressing hypermethylation of the MGMT gene promoter. Prior to initiation of the standard therapy, the patient conducted water-only therapeutic fasting and a restricted 4:1 (fat: carbohydrate + protein) ketogenic diet that delivered about 600 kcal/day. The patient also received the restricted ketogenic diet concomitantly during the standard treatment period. The diet was supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Steroid medication (dexamethasone) was removed during the course of the treatment. The patient was followed using MRI and positron emission tomography with fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG-PET). After two months treatment, the patient's body weight was reduced by about 20% and no discernable brain tumor tissue was detected using either FDG-PET or MRI imaging. Biomarker changes showed reduced levels of blood glucose and elevated levels of urinary ketones. MRI evidence of tumor recurrence was found 10 weeks after suspension of strict diet therapy. This is the first report of confirmed GBM treated with standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet. As rapid regression of GBM is rare in older patients following incomplete surgical resection and standard therapy alone, the response observed in this case could result in part from the action of the calorie restricted ketogenic diet. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of restricted ketogenic diets

  4. A Common Sense Approach to Radiotherapy Planning of Glioblastoma Multiforme Situated in The Temporal Lobe

    SciTech Connect

    Bokstein, Felix Kovner, Felix; Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Ram, Zvi; Templehoff, Haim; Kanner, Andrew A.; Corn, Benjamin W.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Irradiation remains the cornerstone of management for glioblastoma multiforme. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer advocate encompassing the primary tumor plus a 2-cm margin in the high-dose volume. One shortcoming of this approach is the exposure of critical structures to radiation doses that could exceed organ tolerance. We investigated whether the temporal bone (rather than the aforementioned 2-cm radius) would serve as a barrier to tumor spread when regarded as the anterior margin for temporal lobe lesions. We hypothesized that by using the temporal bone as the radiation field margin, toxicity could be reduced without compromising tumor control. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2007, 342 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme were treated with surgery and primary irradiation at our institution. Of these 342 patients, 50 had lesions confined to the temporal lobe. The clinical target volume included the primary lesion, the area of edema when present, and a 2-cm margin, except in the direction of the temporal bone. Results: Of the 50 patients, 40 were available for evaluation. At a median follow-up of 12.95 months, 8 patients had not yet shown signs of tumor progression, 24 had local failure, 7 had distant or mixed (local plus distant) failure, and only 1 patient had failure in the infratemporal fossa. Conclusions: The results of the study have demonstrated an acceptable level of recurrence when the temporal bone, rather than a 2-cm margin, is used as the anterior border of the clinical target volume. The strategy we have proposed achieves tumor control and respects optic tolerance without resorting to complex, expensive approaches such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

  5. Uptake of the BPA into glioblastoma multiforme correlates with tumor cellularity

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Fourteen patients scheduled to undergo craniotomy for glioblastoma multiforme were infused with p-boronophenylalanine fructose intravenously for 2 hours prior to surgery. Tissues removed during the procedure and blood obtained at its conclusion were analyzed for boron by direct current plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The results are presented herein.

  6. MRP3: a molecular target for human glioblastoma multiforme immunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is refractory to conventional therapies. To overcome the problem of heterogeneity, more brain tumor markers are required for prognosis and targeted therapy. We have identified and validated a promising molecular therapeutic target that is expressed by GBM: human multidrug-resistance protein 3 (MRP3). Methods We investigated MRP3 by genetic and immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of human gliomas to determine the incidence, distribution, and localization of MRP3 antigens in GBM and their potential correlation with survival. To determine MRP3 mRNA transcript and protein expression levels, we performed quantitative RT-PCR, raising MRP3-specific antibodies, and IHC analysis with biopsies of newly diagnosed GBM patients. We used univariate and multivariate analyses to assess the correlation of RNA expression and IHC of MRP3 with patient survival, with and without adjustment for age, extent of resection, and KPS. Results Real-time PCR results from 67 GBM biopsies indicated that 59/67 (88%) samples highly expressed MRP3 mRNA transcripts, in contrast with minimal expression in normal brain samples. Rabbit polyvalent and murine monoclonal antibodies generated against an extracellular span of MRP3 protein demonstrated reactivity with defined MRP3-expressing cell lines and GBM patient biopsies by Western blotting and FACS analyses, the latter establishing cell surface MRP3 protein expression. IHC evaluation of 46 GBM biopsy samples with anti-MRP3 IgG revealed MRP3 in a primarily membranous and cytoplasmic pattern in 42 (91%) of the 46 samples. Relative RNA expression was a strong predictor of survival for newly diagnosed GBM patients. Hazard of death for GBM patients with high levels of MRP3 RNA expression was 2.71 (95% CI: 1.54-4.80) times that of patients with low/moderate levels (p = 0.002). Conclusions Human GBMs overexpress MRP3 at both mRNA and protein levels, and elevated MRP3 mRNA levels in GBM biopsy samples correlated with a

  7. A Phase 1 trial of intravenous boronophenylalanine-fructose complex in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.

    1996-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of glioblastoma multiforme was initially performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the early 1950`s While this treatment for malignant brain tumors has continued in Japan, new worldwide interest has been stimulated by the development of new and more selective boron compounds. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a blood-brain barrier penetrating compound that has been used in BNCT of malignant melanomas. SPA has been employed experimentally in BNCT of rat gliosarcoma and has potential use in the treatment of human glioblastoma. As a preface to clinical BNCT trials, we studied the biodistribution of SPA in patients with glioblastoma.

  8. Gliosarcoma: A rare variant of glioblastoma multiforme in paediatric patient: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Ugan Singh; Sharma, Sumit; Chopra, Sanjeev; Jain, Shashi Kant

    2016-01-01

    Gliosarcoma is rare central nervous system tumour and a variant of glioblastoma multiforme with bimorphic histological pattern of glial and sarcomatous differentiation. It occurs in elderly between 5th and 6th decades of life and extremely rare in children. It is highly aggressive tumour and managed like glioblastoma multiforme. A 12-year-old female child presented with complaints of headache and vomiting from 15 d and blurring of vision from 3 d. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain shows heterogeneous mass in right parieto-occipital cortex. A right parieto-occipito-temporal craniotomy with complete excision of mass revealed a primary glioblastoma on histopathological investigation. Treatment consists of maximum surgical excision followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. The etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities and prognosis is discussed. The available literature is also reviewed. PMID:27672648

  9. Glioblastoma multiforme in conus medullaris with intracranial metastasis after postoperative adjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chengrui; Kong, Xiangyi; Yin, Hua; Wang, Yu; He, Huayu; Zhang, Hui; Gao, Jun; Li, Yongning; Ma, Wenbin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Spinal glioblastoma multiforme is not common among spinal cord tumors. According to our literature review, only 27 cases originating from the conus medullaris were reported. We herein reported a case of a 10-year-old child diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy and standard temozolomide chemotherapy after total excision. Intracranial lesions were found 1 month after postoperative adjuvant therapy. We described the clinical characteristics and postoperative therapy of the patient, and reviewed all of the published cases of conus medullaris glioblastoma. Location, age, leptomeningeal spread, and secondary hydrocephalus may be predictive factors. Immunohistochemical factors such as p53 and Ki-67 are also important. Combined treatment of surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy is commonly used, but is controversial. PMID:28353599

  10. Hypervascular glioblastoma multiforme or arteriovenous malformation associated Glioma? A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lohkamp, Laura-Nanna; Strong, Christian; Rojas, Rafael; Anderson, Matthew; Laviv, Yosef; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Simultaneous presentation of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is rarely reported in the literature and needs to be differentiated from “angioglioma”, a highly vascular glioma and other differential diagnosis such as hypervascular glioblastoma. Incorporating critical features of both, malignant glioma and AVM, such lesions lack a standard algorithm for diagnosis and therapy due to their rare incidence as well as their complex radiological and highly individualized clinical presentation. Case Description: We present a case of a 71-year-old female with newly developing motor deficits and radiographic findings of a heterogeneously contrast enhancing right-sided thalamic lesion with highly prominent vasculature. While computed tomography angiogram and cerebral digital subtraction angiography supported the diagnosis of AVM, contrast-enhancing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR-spectroscopy was suggestive of malignant glioma. A stereotactic biopsy revealed the diagnosis of a GBM (WHO IV) and the patient was treated accordingly. Conclusion: The coincidental presentation of vascular lesions such as AVM and malignant glioma is rare and presents a major challenge when establishing a diagnosis. The respective treatment decision is complicated by the fact that available treatment modalities (e.g. radiosurgery and/or open resection) carry disease specific complications for each entity. Finding a suitable solution for such cases requires standardization of early diagnostic and therapeutic management. PMID:27999714

  11. Gene expressions of TRP channels in glioblastoma multiforme and relation with survival.

    PubMed

    Alptekin, M; Eroglu, S; Tutar, E; Sencan, S; Geyik, M A; Ulasli, M; Demiryurek, A T; Camci, C

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most lethal forms of cancer in humans, with a median survival of 10 to 12 months. Glioblastoma is highly malignant since the cells are supported by a great number of blood vessels. Although new treatments have been developed by increasing knowledge of molecular nature of the disease, surgical operation remains the standard of care. The TRP (transient receptor potential) superfamily consists of cation-selective channels that have roles in sensory physiology such as thermo- and osmosensation and in several complex diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, and neuronal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression levels of TRP channel genes in patients with glioblastoma multiforme and to evaluate the relationship between TRP gene expressions and survival of the patients. Thirty-three patients diagnosed with glioblastoma were enrolled to the study. The expression levels of 21 TRP genes were quantified by using qRT-PCR with dynamic array 48 × 48 chip (BioMark HD System, Fluidigm, South San Francisco, CA, USA). TRPC1, TRPC6, TRPM2, TRPM3, TRPM7, TRPM8, TRPV1, and TRPV2 were found significantly higher in glioblastoma patients. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between the overexpression of TRP genes and the survival of the patients. These results demonstrate for the first time that TRP channels contribute to the progression and survival of the glioblastoma patients.

  12. GliaSite Brachytherapy Boost as Part of Initial Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Retrospective Multi-Institutional Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Sanan, Abhay; Gabayan, Arash J.; Green, Sylvan B.; Lustig, Robert; Burri, Stuart; Kwong, Edmund; Stea, Baldassarre . E-mail: bstea@email.ariozna.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To report on a retrospective analysis of the cumulative experience from eight institutions using the GliaSite Radiotherapy System as a brachytherapy boost in the initial management of glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eight institutions provided data on 20 patients with histologically proven glioblastoma multiforme with a median age of 59 years (range, 39-76) and median Karnofsky performance scale of 80 (range, 50-100). After maximal surgical debulking, patients were treated with GliaSite brachytherapy to a median dose of 50 Gy, followed by external beam radiotherapy to a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 46-60 Gy), for a cumulative dose escalation of 110 Gy (range, 84-130 Gy). Results: The average survival for this study population was 11.4 months (range, 4-29). When the patients' survival was compared with that of historical controls according to their Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis class, the average survival was increased by 3 months (95% confidence interval, 0.23-4.9) corresponding to a 43% increase (p = 0.033). Three patients (14%) experienced Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 central nervous system toxicity. Of the treatment failures, 50% were >2 cm from the edge of the balloon. Conclusion: The results of this analysis have demonstrated that dose escalation (>100 Gy) with GliaSite is well tolerated and associated with minimal toxicity. Local control improved with the use of GliaSite brachytherapy. The putative survival advantage seen in this study needs to be interpreted with caution; nevertheless, the data provide sufficient justification to investigate the potential role of radiation dose escalation in conjunction with GliaSite in the initial treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

  13. Historical controls for phase II surgically based trials requiring gross total resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Berger, Mitchel S; Prados, Michael D; Chang, Susan M

    2007-10-01

    New treatments for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are frequently tested in phase II surgically based clinical trials that require gross total resection (GTR). In order to determine efficacy in such single-arm phase II clinical trials, the results are often compared to those from a historical control group that is not limited to patients with GTR. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) can define risk groups within historical control groups; however, RPA analyses to date included patients irrespective of whether a patient had a GTR or not. To provide a more appropriate historical control group for surgically based trials requiring a GTR, we sought to determine survival for a group of patients with newly diagnosed GBM, all of who underwent GTR and were treated on prospective clinical trials. GTR was defined as removal of >90% of the enhancing mass, determined by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Of 893 patients with GBM treated during these trials, 153 underwent GTR. The median survival for the GTR group was 71 weeks (95% CI 65-76) which was better than those who did not have a GTR. Within the GTR group, the median age was 54 years (range 25-77 years), and median Karnofsky Performance Score was 90 (range 60-100). Considering only patients with GTR, age at diagnosis continued to be a statistically significant prognostic factor. Patients treated during surgically based phase II studies should be matched with a historical control group restricted to patients with similar pretreatment variables, including GTR.

  14. Improved outcomes with intensity modulated radiation therapy combined with temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Horsley, Patrick J; Silva, Thomaz; Wilcox, Shea; Amalaseelan, Julan; Dwyer, Patrick; Tahir, Abdul M R; Hill, Jacques; Last, Andrew; Hansen, Carmen; McLachlan, Craig S; Lee, Yvonne L; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy) and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months). We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  15. Established and emerging variants of glioblastoma multiforme: review of morphological and molecular features.

    PubMed

    Karsy, Michael; Gelbman, Marshall; Shah, Paarth; Balumbu, Odessa; Moy, Fred; Arslan, Erol

    2012-01-01

    Since the recent publication of the World Health Organization brain tumour classification guidelines in 2007, a significant expansion in the molecular understanding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and its pathological as well as genomic variants has been evident. The purpose of this review article is to evaluate the histopathological, molecular and clinical features surrounding emerging and currently established GBM variants. The tumours discussed include classic glioblastoma multiforme and its four genomic variants, proneural, neural, mesenchymal, classical, as well as gliosarcoma (GS), and giant cell GBM (gcGBM). Furthermore, the emerging variants include fibrillary/epithelial GBM, small cell astrocytoma (SCA), GBM with oligodendroglial component (GBMO), GBM with primitive neuroectodermal features (GBM-PNET), gemistocytic astrocytoma (GA), granular cell astrocytoma (GCA), and paediatric high-grade glioma (HGG) as well as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). Better understanding of the heterogeneous nature of GBM may provide improved treatment paradigms, prognostic classification, and approaches towards molecularly targeted treatments.

  16. Chemoirradiation for glioblastoma multiforme: the national cancer institute experience.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer; Ondos, John; Ning, Holly; Smith, Sharon; Kreisl, Teri; Iwamoto, Fabio; Sul, Joohee; Kim, Lyndon; McNeil, Kate; Krauze, Andra; Shankavaram, Uma; Fine, Howard A; Camphausen, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Standard treatment for glioblastoma (GBM) is surgery followed by radiation (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ). While there is variability in survival based on several established prognostic factors, the prognostic utility of other factors such as tumor size and location are not well established. The charts of ninety two patients with GBM treated with RT at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) between 1998 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Most patients received RT with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Topographic locations were classified using preoperative imaging. Gross tumor volumes were contoured using treatment planning systems utilizing both pre-operative and post-operative MR imaging. At a median follow-up of 18.7 months, the median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for all patients was 17.9 and 7.6 months. Patients with the smallest tumors had a median OS of 52.3 months compared to 16.3 months among patients with the largest tumors, P = 0.006. The patients who received bevacizumab after recurrence had a median OS of 23.3 months, compared to 16.3 months in patients who did not receive it, P = 0.0284. The median PFS and OS in patients with periventricular tumors was 5.7 and 17.5 months, versus 8.9 and 23.3 months in patients with non-periventricular tumors, P = 0.005. Survival in our cohort was comparable to the outcome of the defining EORTC-NCIC trial establishing the use of RT+TMZ. This study also identifies several potential prognostic factors that may be useful in stratifying patients.

  17. Chemoirradiation for Glioblastoma Multiforme: The National Cancer Institute Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jennifer; Ondos, John; Ning, Holly; Smith, Sharon; Kreisl, Teri; Iwamoto, Fabio; Sul, Joohee; Kim, Lyndon; McNeil, Kate; Krauze, Andra; Shankavaram, Uma; Fine, Howard A.; Camphausen, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Standard treatment for glioblastoma (GBM) is surgery followed by radiation (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ). While there is variability in survival based on several established prognostic factors, the prognostic utility of other factors such as tumor size and location are not well established. Experimental Design The charts of ninety two patients with GBM treated with RT at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) between 1998 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Most patients received RT with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Topographic locations were classified using preoperative imaging. Gross tumor volumes were contoured using treatment planning systems utilizing both pre-operative and post-operative MR imaging. Results At a median follow-up of 18.7 months, the median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for all patients was 17.9 and 7.6 months. Patients with the smallest tumors had a median OS of 52.3 months compared to 16.3 months among patients with the largest tumors, P = 0.006. The patients who received bevacizumab after recurrence had a median OS of 23.3 months, compared to 16.3 months in patients who did not receive it, P = 0.0284. The median PFS and OS in patients with periventricular tumors was 5.7 and 17.5 months, versus 8.9 and 23.3 months in patients with non-periventricular tumors, P = 0.005. Conclusions Survival in our cohort was comparable to the outcome of the defining EORTC-NCIC trial establishing the use of RT+TMZ. This study also identifies several potential prognostic factors that may be useful in stratifying patients. PMID:23940635

  18. Glioblastoma multiforme: relationship to subventricular zone and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Margareth; Lee, Yeuh; Miller, Ryan; Castillo, Mauricio

    2013-10-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain is active in two areas: the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone. Cancer stem cells have been isolated from malignant brain tumors and it is widely believed they arise from transformed endogenous stem cells. We sought to determine if the initial location of glioblastoma (GB) as seen on conventional MRI and its relationship to the subventricular zone (SVZ) predicts the pattern of recurrence. We analyzed the initial (prior to any treatment) and last follow-up MR studies in 49 patients with GB. On post contrast images all non-treated GB were divided into three groups according to the relationship of their enhancing margins to the SVZ: Group I (directly in contact with the SVZ), Group II (in the subcortical [SC] region) and Group III (in both the SVZ and SC regions). Recurrences or continuous growth seen as enhancing areas on follow-up studies were characterized as local, spread, or distant according to their contact with the surgical bed and correlated with the locations of the initial tumors. Local and spread patterns of recurrence occurred with nearly equal frequency (45 and 43% each, respectively) and distant in 12%. In Group I, 80% showed a spread pattern, 20% a local pattern, and none a distant pattern. In Group II, 45% showed a spread pattern, 35% a local pattern, and a 20% distant one. In Group III, 58% showed a local pattern, 33% a spread pattern, and 8% distant one. Unlike other reports, the location of GB in relation to the SVZ in our patients did not predict the pattern of tumor recurrence and/or extension in our patients.

  19. Overcoming Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma Multiforme with MGMT-Targeting Spherical Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sita, Timothy L.

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most prevalent primary central nervous system malignancy. Due to the aggressive nature of these tumors and our inability to adequately treat them, only 3-5% of patients survive longer than 3 years post-diagnosis. The standard of care for newly diagnosed GBM is surgical resection followed by concomitant and adjuvant radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. TMZ cytotoxicity is mediated primarily through methylation of the O 6 -position of guanine. In the majority of patients, this methyl group is rapidly removed by the enzyme O6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), conferring resistance to the chemotherapy. However, in a small subset of GBM patients, the promoter region for MGMT is methylated over the course of tumor development. This epigenetic silencing of MGMT activity allows TMZ to induce apoptosis in glioblastoma cells and drastically increases survival in GBM patients. The following work seeks to recapitulate this improved survival phenotype by combining TMZ with a novel nanoconstruct capable of silencing MGMT expression. The nanoconstruct consists of gold nanoparticles densely conjugated with either an MGMT-targeting ribozyme (ribozyme-Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs)), or small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes designed against MGMT (siMGMT-SNAs), and has been found to have unique characteristics, including (1) the rapid internalization by all glioma cell types studied including glioma initiating cells (GICs), (2) the capacity to potently silence MGMT expression, (3) increased apoptotic response in GBM cells, (4) the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), blood-tumor barrier (BTB), and accumulate in GBM xenografts, and (5) no observable acute toxicity at high doses in animal models. In summary, preliminary data suggest ribozyme-SNA and siMGMT-SNAs sensitize GBM cells in vitro and in vivo, enhancing the therapeutic response to TMZ.

  20. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Jung; Park, Tae Sung; Lee, Seung Tae; Song, Jaewoo; Suh, Borum; Kim, Se Hoon; Jang, Seon Jung; Lee, Chang Hoon; Choi, Jong Rak

    2009-01-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia after treatment with temozolomide have rarely been described in the literature. Only 10 cases in association with temozolomide have been documented. The cases included anaplastic astrocytoma (4 cases), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (2 cases), low grade astrocytoma (2 cases), low grade oligodendroglioma (1 case), and one case of secondary Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Here we report a novel case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia associated with der(1;7)(q10;p10) in a glioblastoma multiforme patient treated with temozolomide. Results of bone marrow morphology, chromosome, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, as well as the clinical history, strongly suggest a treatment-related etiology in our case. In past reports, karyotypes in cases of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia mostly demonstrated abnormalities in chromosomes 5 and 7. However, we report a case of temozolomide-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with der(1;7)(q10;p10), possibly the first reported case, to the authors' knowledge.

  1. An investigation of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Pellettieri, L; H-Stenstam, B; Rezaei, A; Giusti, V; Sköld, K

    2008-03-01

    Objectives - To explore the use of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), recurring after surgery and conventional radiotherapy (photon radiotherapy). Materials and Methods - Boron uptake in recurrent GBM was measured for four patients. Twelve patients were subsequently treated by BNCT with boronophenylalanine-fructose (900 mg/kg body weight), administered by intravenous infusion for 6 h. Results - Median survival time from initial diagnosis was 22.2 months. Comparison with other BNCT studies indicates a clinical advantage of the prolonged infusion. BNCT was well tolerated and quality of life remained stable until tumor progression for all 12 patients. No correlation was found between survival times and minimum tumor dose and number of radiation fields. Conclusions - Boron neutron capture therapy, with the prolonged procedure for infusion, is at least as effective as other radiation therapies for recurrent GBM and is delivered in one treatment session, with low radiation dose to the healthy brain. Survival from diagnosis compares favorably with that obtained with conventional radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) and survival from recurrence compares favorably with that obtained with TMZ at first relapse. The results of the present investigation are encouraging and should be confirmed in a randomized trial.

  2. Positron emission tomography-guided conformal fast neutron therapy for glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Keith J; Douglas, James G; Mankoff, David A; Silbergeld, Daniel L; Krohn, Kenneth A; Laramore, George E; Spence, Alexander M

    2008-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) continues to be a difficult therapeutic challenge. Our study was conducted to determine whether improved survival and tumor control could be achieved with modern delivery of fast neutron radiation using three-dimensional treatment planning. Ten patients were enrolled. Eligibility criteria included pathologic diagnosis of GBM, age >or=18 years, and KPS >or=60. Patients underwent MRI and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG PET) as part of initial three-dimensional treatment planning. Sequential targets were treated with noncoplanar fields to a total dose of 18 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks. Median and 1-year overall survival were 55 weeks and 60%, respectively. One patient remains alive at last follow-up 255 weeks after diagnosis. Median progression-free survival was 16 weeks, and all patients had tumor progression by 39 weeks. Treatment was clinically well tolerated, but evidence of mild to moderate gliosis and microvascular sclerosis consistent with radiation injury was observed at autopsy in specimens taken from regions of contralateral brain that received approximately 6-10 Gy. Fast neutron radiation using modern imaging, treatment planning, and beam delivery was feasible to a total dose of 18 Gy, but tumor control probability was poor in comparison to that predicted from a dose-response model based on older studies. Steep dose-response curves for both tumor control and neurotoxicity continue to present a challenge to establishing a therapeutic window for fast neutron radiation in GBM, even with modern techniques.

  3. A fatal outcome in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme after receiving high-dose methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Price, Samantha; Harless, William; Rikhye, Somi; Altaha, Ramin

    2008-03-01

    The most common adult primary brain tumor is glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Current treatment is surgical resection, adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy, which can extend the median survival 20-36 weeks (Mansky et al. Central nervous system tumors. In Abraham J, Allegra CJ, Gulley J, eds. Bethesda Handbook of clinical oncology, 2nd edn. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2000: 440-2; Knox S. Intracranial tumors. In Pillot G, Chantler M, Magiera H, Peles S, et al., eds. The Washington Manual Hematology and Oncology Subspecialty Consult. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2004: 204-6.). But treatment efficacy is limited, mandating the exploration of more effective treatments. We report on a patient with GBM treated as per a clinical protocol with high-dose methotrexate (12 g/m(2)), who expired within hours after the initiation of treatment secondary to transtentorial herniation. Although it is not completely clear what caused the patient's herniation, we think that high-dose methotrexate therapy may have played a crucial role. We suggest that high-dose methotrexate should be used cautiously in patients with GBM.

  4. Targeting metabolism with a ketogenic diet during the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Champ, Colin E; Palmer, Joshua D; Volek, Jeff S; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Andrews, David W; Evans, James J; Glass, Jon; Kim, Lyndon; Shi, Wenyin

    2014-03-01

    Retrospective data suggests that low serum glucose levels during the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) may improve clinical outcomes. As such, many patients are implementing a ketogenic diet (KD) in order to decrease serum glucose flux while simultaneously elevating circulating ketones during radiation therapy and chemotherapy for the treatment of GBM. With IRB approval, a retrospective review of patients with high-grade glioma treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy was carried out from August 2010 to April 2013. Serum glucose and ketone levels, dexamethasone dose, and toxicity of patients undergoing a KD during treatment were also assessed. Blood glucose levels were compared between patients on an unspecified/standard diet and a KD. Toxicity was assessed by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. In total, 53 patients were analyzed. Six underwent a KD during treatment. The diet was well tolerated with no grade III toxicity and one episode of grade II fatigue. No episodes of symptomatic hypoglycemia were experienced. Four patients are alive at a median follow-up of 14 months. The mean blood glucose of patients on a standard diet was 122 versus 84 mg/dl for those on a KD. Based on this retrospective study, a KD appears safe and well tolerated during the standard treatment of GBM. Dietary restriction of carbohydrates through a KD reduces serum glucose levels significantly, even in conjunction with high dose steroids, which may affect the response to standard treatment and prognosis. Larger prospective trials to confirm this relationship are warranted.

  5. Rad51 Protein Expression and Survival in Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James W. Ellsworth, Ron K.; Kumar, Rachit; Fjerstad, Kyle; Martinez, Jesse; Nagel, Raymond B.; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Stea, Baldassarre

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) continues to pose a significant therapeutic challenge, with most tumors recurring within the previously irradiated tumor bed. To improve outcomes, we must be able to identify and treat resistant cell populations. Rad51, an enzyme involved in homologous recombinational repair, leads to increased resistance of tumor cells to cytotoxic treatments such as radiotherapy. We hypothesized that Rad51 might contribute to GBM's apparent radioresistance and consequently influence survival. Methods and Materials: A total of 68 patients with an initial diagnosis of GBM were retrospectively evaluated; for 10 of these patients, recurrent tumor specimens were used to construct a tissue microarray. Rad51 protein expression was then correlated with the actual and predicted survival using recursive partitioning analysis. Results: Rad51 protein was elevated in 53% of the GBM specimens at surgery. The Rad51 levels correlated directly with survival, with a median survival of 15 months for patients with elevated Rad51 compared with 9 months for patients with low or absent levels of Rad51 (p = .05). At disease recurrence, 70% of patients had additional increases in Rad51 protein. Increased Rad51 levels at disease recurrence similarly predicted for improved overall survival, with a mean survival of 16 months from the second craniotomy compared with only 4 months for patients with low Rad51 levels (p = .13). Conclusion: Elevated levels of the double-stranded DNA repair protein Rad51 predicted for an increase survival duration in patients with GBM, at both initial tumor presentation and disease recurrence.

  6. A Pilot Safety Study of Lenalidomide and Radiotherapy for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Drappatz, Jan Wong, Eric T.; Schiff, David; Kesari, Santosh; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Doherty, Lisa; LaFrankie, Debra Conrad

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of lenalidomide, an analogue of thalidomide with enhanced immunomodulatory and antiangiogenic properties and a more favorable toxicity profile, in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) when given concurrently with radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Patients with newly diagnosed GBM received radiotherapy concurrently with lenalidomide given for 3 weeks followed by a 1-week rest period and continued lenalidomide until tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity. Dose escalation occurred in groups of 6. Determination of the MTD was based on toxicities during the first 12 weeks of therapy. The primary endpoint was toxicity. Results: Twenty-three patients were enrolled, of whom 20 were treated and evaluable for both toxicity and tumor response and 2 were evaluable for toxicity only. Common toxicities included venous thromboembolic disease, fatigue, and nausea. Dose-limiting toxicities were eosinophilic pneumonitis and transaminase elevations. The MTD for lenalidomide was determined to be 15 mg/m{sup 2}/d. Conclusion: The recommended dose for lenalidomide with radiotherapy is 15 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 3 weeks followed by a 1-week rest period. Venous thromboembolic complications occurred in 4 patients, and prophylactic anticoagulation should be considered.

  7. MicroRNA-34a targets notch1 and inhibits cell proliferation in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Bo; Ma, Min-Wang; Dong, Li-Jie; Wang, Fei; Chen, Lu-Xia; Li, Xiao-Rong

    2011-09-15

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we found that microRNA-34a (miR-34a) is significantly downregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) specimens compared with normal brain tissues. Growth curve and colony formation assays revealed that miR-34a suppresses proliferation of U373MG and SHG44 glioblastoma cells. Overexpression of miR-34a could induce apoptosis of glioblastoma cells. Also, we identified notch1 as a direct target gene of miR-34a. Knockdown of notch1 showed similar cellular functions as overexpression of miR-34a both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our findings show that miR-34a is downregulated in GBM cells and inhibits GBM growth by targeting notch1.

  8. Aberrant ganglioside composition in glioblastoma multiforme and peritumoral tissue: A mass spectrometry characterization.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Dragana; Rožman, Marko; Sajko, Tomislav; Vukelić, Željka

    2017-06-01

    Tumor cells are characterized by aberrant glycosylation of the cell surface glycoconjugates. Gangliosides are sialylated glycosphingolipids highly abundant in neural tissue and considered as tumor markers and therapeutic targets. In this study, a detailed characterization of native ganglioside mixtures from glioblastoma multiforme, corresponding peritumoral tissue and healthy human brain was performed using mass spectrometry and high performance thin layer chromatography in order to elucidate their roles as tumor-associated antigens. Distinctive changes in ganglioside expression were determined in glioblastoma compared to healthy brain tissue showing 5 times lower total ganglioside content and higher abundance of simple gangliosides. Glioblastoma gangliosides were characterized by highly diverse ceramide composition with fatty acyl chains varying from 16 to 24 carbon atoms, while in normal and peritumoral tissue mostly C18 chains were found. The most abundant ganglioside in glioblastoma was GD3 (d18:1/18:0), followed by GD3 (d18:1/24:0) that was exclusively detected in glioblastoma tissue. Peritumoral tissue expressed higher abundance of GD3- and nLM1/GM1-species while lower GT1-species vs. normal brain. O-Ac-GD1, known as neurostatin, was detected in normal and peritumoral tissue, but not in glioblastoma. O-Ac-GD3 species were found exclusively in glioblastoma; MS structural characterization of the isomeric form possessing the O-acetylation at the inner sialic acid residue confirmed our previous finding that this isomer is glioma-associated. This, to our knowledge, the most detailed characterization of ganglioside composition in glioblastoma and peritumoral tissue, especially addressing the ceramide variability and O-acetylation of tumor-associated gangliosides, could contribute to recognition of new molecular targets for glioblastoma treatment and sub-classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Mol

  9. Impact of Human Immunodeficiency Virus in the Pathogenesis and Outcome of Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Winward; Lagman, Carlito; Lee, Seung J.; Bui, Timothy T.; Safaee, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Improvement in antiviral therapies have been accompanied by an increased frequency of non-Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) defining malignancies, such as glioblastoma multiforme. Here, we investigated all reported cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with glioblastoma and evaluated their clinical outcomes. A comprehensive review of the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms underlying glioblastoma development in the setting of HIV/AIDS is provided. Methods We performed a PubMed search using keywords “HIV glioma” AND “glioblastoma,” and “AIDS glioma” AND “glioblastoma.” Case reports and series describing HIV-positive patients with glioblastoma (histologically-proven World Health Organization grade IV astrocytoma) and reporting on HAART treatment status, clinical follow-up, and overall survival (OS), were included for the purposes of quantitative synthesis. Patients without clinical follow-up data or OS were excluded. Remaining articles were assessed for data extraction eligibility. Results A total of 17 patients met our inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 14 (82.4%) were male and 3 (17.6%) were female, with a mean age of 39.5±9.2 years (range 19–60 years). Average CD4 count at diagnosis of glioblastoma was 358.9±193.4 cells/mm3. Tumor progression rather than AIDS-associated complications dictated patient survival. There was a trend towards increased median survival with HAART treatment (12.0 vs 7.5 months, p=0.10) Conclusion Our data suggests that HAART is associated with improved survival in patients with HIV-associated glioblastoma, although the precise mechanisms underlying this improvement remain unclear. PMID:27867916

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging for target volume definition in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Berberat, Jatta; McNamara, Jane; Remonda, Luca; Bodis, Stephan; Rogers, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an MR-based technique that may better detect the peritumoural region than MRI. Our aim was to explore the feasibility of using DTI for target volume delineation in glioblastoma patients. MR tensor tracts and maps of the isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components of water diffusion were coregistered with CT in 13 glioblastoma patients. An in-house image processing program was used to analyse water diffusion in each voxel of interest in the region of the tumour. Tumour infiltration was mapped according to validated criteria and contralateral normal brain was used as an internal control. A clinical target volume (CTV) was generated based on the T1-weighted image obtained using contrast agent (T1Gd), tractography and the infiltration map. This was compared to a conventional T2-weighted CTV (T2-w CTV). Definition of a diffusion-based CTV that included the adjacent white matter tracts proved highly feasible. A statistically significant difference was detected between the DTI-CTV and T2-w CTV volumes (p < 0.005, t = 3.480). As the DTI-CTVs were smaller than the T2-w CTVs (tumour plus peritumoural oedema), the pq maps were not simply detecting oedema. Compared to the clinical planning target volume (PTV), the DTI-PTV showed a trend towards volume reduction. These diffusion-based volumes were smaller than conventional volumes, yet still included sites of tumour recurrence. Extending the CTV along the abnormal tensor tracts in order to preserve coverage of the likely routes of dissemination, whilst sparing uninvolved brain, is a rational approach to individualising radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma patients.

  11. Immune Checkpoint Inhibition for Hypermutant Glioblastoma Multiforme Resulting From Germline Biallelic Mismatch Repair Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bouffet, Eric; Larouche, Valérie; Campbell, Brittany B; Merico, Daniele; de Borja, Richard; Aronson, Melyssa; Durno, Carol; Krueger, Joerg; Cabric, Vanja; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Zhukova, Nataliya; Mason, Gary; Farah, Roula; Afzal, Samina; Yalon, Michal; Rechavi, Gideon; Magimairajan, Vanan; Walsh, Michael F; Constantini, Shlomi; Dvir, Rina; Elhasid, Ronit; Reddy, Alyssa; Osborn, Michael; Sullivan, Michael; Hansford, Jordan; Dodgshun, Andrew; Klauber-Demore, Nancy; Peterson, Lindsay; Patel, Sunil; Lindhorst, Scott; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Cohen, Zane; Laframboise, Rachel; Dirks, Peter; Taylor, Michael; Malkin, David; Albrecht, Steffen; Dudley, Roy W R; Jabado, Nada; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Shlien, Adam; Tabori, Uri

    2016-07-01

    Recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is incurable with current therapies. Biallelic mismatch repair deficiency (bMMRD) is a highly penetrant childhood cancer syndrome often resulting in GBM characterized by a high mutational burden. Evidence suggests that high mutation and neoantigen loads are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibition. We performed exome sequencing and neoantigen prediction on 37 bMMRD cancers and compared them with childhood and adult brain neoplasms. Neoantigen prediction bMMRD GBM was compared with responsive adult cancers from multiple tissues. Two siblings with recurrent multifocal bMMRD GBM were treated with the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab. All malignant tumors (n = 32) were hypermutant. Although bMMRD brain tumors had the highest mutational load because of secondary polymerase mutations (mean, 17,740 ± standard deviation, 7,703), all other high-grade tumors were hypermutant (mean, 1,589 ± standard deviation, 1,043), similar to other cancers that responded favorably to immune checkpoint inhibitors. bMMRD GBM had a significantly higher mutational load than sporadic pediatric and adult gliomas and all other brain tumors (P < .001). bMMRD GBM harbored mean neoantigen loads seven to 16 times higher than those in immunoresponsive melanomas, lung cancers, or microsatellite-unstable GI cancers (P < .001). On the basis of these preclinical data, we treated two bMMRD siblings with recurrent multifocal GBM with the anti-programmed death-1 inhibitor nivolumab, which resulted in clinically significant responses and a profound radiologic response. This report of initial and durable responses of recurrent GBM to immune checkpoint inhibition may have implications for GBM in general and other hypermutant cancers arising from primary (genetic predisposition) or secondary MMRD. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Postoperative Treatment of Primary Glioblastoma Multiforme With Radiation and Concomitant Temozolomide in Elderly Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E. Wagner, Johanna; Bischof, Marc; Welzel, Thomas; Wagner, Florian; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy and toxicity in elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ). Patients and Methods: Forty-three patients aged 65 years or older were treated with postoperative with radiochemotherapy using TMZ for primary GBM. Median age at primary diagnosis was 67 years; 14 patients were female, 29 were male. A complete surgical resection was performed in 12 patients, subtotal resection in 17 patients, and biopsy only in 14 patients. Radiotherapy was applied with a median dose of 60 Gy, in a median fractionation of 5 x 2 Gy/wk. Thirty-five patients received concomitant TMZ at 50 mg/m{sup 2}, and in 8 patients 75 mg/m{sup 2} of TMZ was applied. Adjuvant cycles of TMZ were prescribed in 5 patients only. Results: Median overall survival was 11 months in all patients; the actuarial overall survival rate was 48% at 1 year and 8% at 2 years. Median overall survival was 18 months after complete resection, 16 months after subtotal resection, and 6 months after biopsy only. Median progression-free survival was 4 months; the actuarial progression-free survival rate was 41% at 6 months and 18% at 12 months. Radiochemotherapy was well tolerated in most patients and could be completed without interruption in 38 of 43 patients. Four patients developed hematologic side effects greater than Common Terminology Criteria Grade 2, which led to early discontinuation of TMZ in 1 patient. Conclusions: Radiochemotherapy is safe and effective in a subgroup of elderly patients with GBM and should be considered in patients without major comorbidities.

  13. Rapid Neurological Recovery Following Partial Surgical Resection of Spinal Glioblastoma Multiforme in a Pediatric Patient Presenting With Complete Paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Gabriel N; Grannan, Benjamin L; Yanamadala, Vijay; Shankar, Ganesh M; Dewitt, John C; Puthenpura, Vidya; Koffie, Robert M; Macdonald, Shannon M; Ebb, David H; Frosch, Matthew P; Duhaime, Ann-Christine

    2016-11-01

    Pediatric spinal cord glioblastoma multiforme is a rare entity with a poor prognosis often presenting with lower extremity weakness or paralysis. Previous literature suggests that aggressive surgical resection may provide overall survival benefit; however, there is limited concurrent analysis demonstrating neurological recovery following surgical resection. We report the case of a 9-year-old boy who presented with complete paraplegia and regained the ability to ambulate independently following subtotal surgical resection, radiation, and chemotherapy. The case demonstrates the balance between meaningful neurological recovery and overall survival when deciding on the extent of resection in cases of pediatric spinal glioblastoma multiforme.

  14. Analysis of Electronic Densities and Integrated Doses in Multiform Glioblastomas Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baron-Aznar, C.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.

    2008-08-11

    Integrated dose is the total energy delivered in a radiotherapy target. This physical parameter could be a predictor for complications such as brain edema and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy treatments for brain tumors. Integrated Dose depends on the tissue density and volume. Using CT patients images from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery and BrainScan(c) software, this work presents the mean density of 21 multiform glioblastomas, comparative results for normal tissue and estimated integrated dose for each case. The relationship between integrated dose and the probability of complications is discussed.

  15. Glioblastoma Multiforme with Hypodipsic Hypernatremia in a Seven-Month-Old Golden Retriever.

    PubMed

    Engel, Stephanie; Hilling, Karen Marie; Meuten, Travis Kuder; Frank, Chad Brendan; Marolf, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    Primary hypodipsic hypernatremia is a rarely reported disease in dogs. Reported underlying causes associated with this disease in dogs include congenital malformations, encephalitis, intracranial neoplasia, and pressure atrophy of the hypothalamus secondary to hydrocephalus. The dog in this report had an infiltrative neoplastic disorder, likely causing damage to the hypothalamic osmoreceptors responsible for the thirst generation. The neoplastic process was identified histopathologically as glioblastoma multiforme, an unusual tumor to occur in a dog this young. A tumor of the central nervous system causing physical destruction of the osmoreceptors has rarely been reported in dogs and none of the previously reported cases involved a glial cell tumor.

  16. Regression of a glioblastoma multiforme: spontaneous versus a potential antineoplastic effect of dexamethasone and levetiracetam

    PubMed Central

    Peddi, Prakash; Ajit, Nisha Elizabeth; Burton, Gary Von; El-Osta, Hazem

    2016-01-01

    Patients with grade IV astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) have a median survival of <12 months, increased to 14.6 months by maximal safe resection with radiation and temozolamide. In the absence of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, spontaneous regression of GBM or regression while only being on dexamethasone (DEX) and levetiracetam (LEV) have seldom been reported. Here, we present a case of a patient who had significant regression of the GBM with DEX and LEV alone. In this study, we hypothesise a plausible antineoplastic role of DEX and or LEV in GBM and highlight molecular, preclinical and clinical studies supporting this role. PMID:28011886

  17. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (175). Corpus callosum glioblastoma multiforme (GBM): butterfly glioma.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vijay; Lim, Tze Chwan; Ho, Francis Cho Hao; Peh, Wilfred Cg

    2017-03-01

    A 54-year-old man presented with change in behaviour, nocturnal enuresis, abnormal limb movement and headache of one week's duration. The diagnosis of butterfly glioma (glioblastoma multiforme) was made based on imaging characteristics and was further confirmed by biopsy findings. As the corpus callosum is usually resistant to infiltration by tumours, a mass that involves and crosses the corpus callosum is suggestive of an aggressive neoplasm. Other neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions that may involve the corpus callosum and mimic a butterfly glioma, as well as associated imaging features, are discussed.

  18. Analysis of Electronic Densities and Integrated Doses in Multiform Glioblastomas Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barón-Aznar, C.; Moreno-Jiménez, S.; Celis, M. A.; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, J. M.; Ballesteros-Zebadúa, P.

    2008-08-01

    Integrated dose is the total energy delivered in a radiotherapy target. This physical parameter could be a predictor for complications such as brain edema and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy treatments for brain tumors. Integrated Dose depends on the tissue density and volume. Using CT patients images from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery and BrainScansoftware, this work presents the mean density of 21 multiform glioblastomas, comparative results for normal tissue and estimated integrated dose for each case. The relationship between integrated dose and the probability of complications is discussed.

  19. Apoptosis-inducing effects of Melissa officinalis L. essential oil in glioblastoma multiforme cells.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Rafaela Muniz de; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Guimarães, Lívia Paes Tavares Pacheco; Rocha, Gleice da Graça; Alviano, Daniela Sales; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Gattass, Cerli Rocha

    2014-07-01

    Current therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are not effective. This study investigated the activity of the M. officinalis essential oil (EO) and its major component (citral) in GBM cell lines. Both EO and citral decreased the viability and induced apoptosis of GBM cells as demonstrated by DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activation. Antioxidant prevented citral-induced death, indicating its dependence on the production of reactive oxygen species. Citral downmodulated the activity and inhibited the expression of multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1). These results show that EO, through its major component, citral, may be of potential interest for the treatment of GBM.

  20. Glioblastoma multiforme of the brain stem in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R; Zimmermann, M; Marquardt, Gerhard; Lanfermann, H; Nafe, R; Seifert, V

    2002-09-01

    Glioblastoma of the brain stem is rare and there is no description of such a lesion in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The majority of intracerebral mass lesions are due either to toxoplasmosis or primary central nervous system lymphomas so that it is usually not included in the differential diagnosis of enhancing lesions of the central nervous system in these patients. A 31-year-old human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected man presented with a four months history of slowly progressive deterioration of brainstem associated symptoms despite antitoxoplasmic therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large ring enhancing lesion in the brainstem. Clinical and neuroradiological data could not establish a proper diagnosis and a stereotactic serial biopsy was undertaken. Histological examination of the specimen showed a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) as the first reported case of GBM located in the brainstem in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. Patient management and effectiveness of stereotactic serial biopsy are discussed.

  1. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy for Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Norred, Sarah E.; Johnson, Jacqueline Anne

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermotherapy (MRgLITT) has become an increasingly relevant therapy for tumor ablation due to its minimally invasive approach and broad applicability across many tissue types. The current state of the art applies laser irradiation via cooled optical fiber applicators in order to generate ablative heat and necrosis in tumor tissue. Magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) is used concurrently with this therapy to plan treatments and visualize tumor necrosis. Though application in neurosurgery remains in its infancy, MRgLITT has been found to be a promising therapy for many types of brain tumors. This review examines the current use of MRgLITT with regard to the special clinical challenge of glioblastoma multiforme and examines the potential applications of next-generation nanotherapy specific to the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:24527455

  2. Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor with Glioblastoma Multiforme Components in an Adult: A Collision Tumor.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Victoria; Vredenburgh, James

    2016-01-11

    We report a rare case of a central nervous system collision tumor in a 40-year-old woman. Histopathological examination of her large temporal tumor revealed two different components making up the tumor tissue. The predominant component of the tumor was found to be a primitive neuroectodermal tumor. The other component was glioblastoma multiforme. Both of these tumors carry a poor prognosis, and primitive neuroectodermal tumors are extremely uncommon in adults. Central nervous system neoplasms with the combined features of both primitive neuroectodermal tumor and malignant glioma are very rare and represent a diagnostic and treatment predicament. The patient underwent surgical resection, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy targeting both the primitive neuroectodermal tumor and glioblastoma. Our patient has been fortunate in not showing any sign of recurrence and will celebrate the third anniversary since her diagnosis this January.

  3. VB-111: a novel anti-vascular therapeutic for glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Gruslova, Aleksandra; Cavazos, David A; Miller, Jessica R; Breitbart, Eyal; Cohen, Yael C; Bangio, Livnat; Yakov, Niva; Soundararajan, Anu; Floyd, John R; Brenner, Andrew J

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is among the most highly vascularized of solid tumors, contributing to the infiltrative nature of the disease, and conferring poor outcome. Due to the critical dependency of GBM on growth of new endothelial vasculature, we evaluated the preclinical activity of a novel adenoviral gene therapy that targets the endothelium within newly formed blood vessels for apoptosis. VB-111, currently in phase II clinical trials, consists of a non-replicating Adenovirus 5 (El deleted) carrying a proapoptotic human Fas-chimera (transgene) under the control of a modified murine promoter (PPE-1-3×) which specifically targets endothelial cells within the tumor vasculature. Here we report that a single intravenous dose of 2.5 × 10(11) or 1 × 10(11) VPs was sufficient to extend survival in nude rats bearing U87MG-luc2 or nude mice bearing U251-luc, respectively. Bioluminescence imaging of nude rats showed that VB-111 effectively inhibited tumor growth within four weeks of treatment. This was confirmed in a select group of animals by MRI. In our mouse model we observed that 3 of 10 nude mice treated with VB-111 completely lost U251 luciferase signal and were considered long term survivors. To assess the antiangiogenic effects of VB-111, we evaluated the tumor-associated microvaculature by CD31, a common marker of neovascularization, and found a significant decrease in the microvessel density by IHC. We further assessed the neovasculature by confocal microscopy and found that VB-111 inhibits vascular density in two separate mouse models bearing U251-RFP xenografts. Collectively, this study supports the clinical development of VB-111 as a treatment for GBM.

  4. VB-111: A novel anti-vascular therapeutic for glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Gruslova, Aleksandra; Cavazos, David A; Miller, Jessica R.; Breitbart, Eyal; Cohen, Yael C; Bangio, Livnat; Yakov, Niva; Soundararajan, Anu; Floyd, John R.; Brenner, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is among the most highly vascularized of solid tumors, contributing to the infiltrative nature of the disease, and conferring poor outcome. Due to the critical dependency of GBM on growth of new endothelial vasculature, we evaluated the preclinical activity of a novel adenoviral gene therapy that targets the endothelium within newly formed blood vessels for apoptosis. VB-111, currently in phase II clinical trials, consists of a non-replicating Adenovirus 5 (El deleted) carrying a proapoptotic human Fas-chimera (transgene) under the control of a modified murine promoter (PPE-1-3x) which specifically targets endothelial cells within the tumor vasculature. Here we report that a single intravenous dose of 2.5×1011 or 1×1011 VPs was sufficient to extend survival in nude rats bearing U87MG-luc2 or nude mice bearing U251-luc, respectively. Bioluminescence imaging of nude rats showed that VB-111 effectively inhibited tumor growth within four weeks of treatment. This was confirmed in a select group of animals by MRI. In our mouse model we observed that 3 of 10 nude mice treated with VB-111 completely lost U251 luciferase signal and were considered long term survivors. To assess the antiangiogenic effects of VB-111, we evaluated the tumor-associated microvaculature by CD31, a common marker of neovascularization, and found a significant decrease in the microvessel density by IHC. We further assessed the neovasculature by confocal microscopy and found that VB-111 inhibits vascular density in two separate mouse models bearing U251-RFP xenografts. Collectively, this study supports the clinical development of VB-111 as a treatment for GBM. PMID:26108658

  5. Differential expression of microRNAs in postoperative radiotherapy sensitive and resistant patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Wu, He-Ming; Wang, Han-Dong; Tang, Yong; Fan, You-Wu; Hu, Yue-Bing; Tohti, Mamatemin; Hao, Xiao-Ke; Wei, Wu-Ting; Wu, Yong

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant primary brain tumor and more resistant to radiotherapy. However, hetero-radiosensitivity occurs in different patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the initiation and progression of a multitude of tumors. The study aims to examine the different microRNAs expression profiles of postoperative radiotherapy sensitive and resistant patients with GBM, to make an inquiry about their potential role and discover a certain set of radio-sensitivity markers. Three paired samples from six GBM patients who had only been treated with postoperative radiotherapy were selected, and then, they were divided into radiotherapy sensitive group and resistant group according to their overall survivals, local recurrence rates, and Karnofsky Performance Scale scores. Expression profiles of miRNAs in these two groups were determined by the method of microarray assay. Comparing with resistant patients, 13 miRNAs were significantly upregulated and 10 miRNAs were greatly downregulated in sensitive group. Among them, four miRNAs were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. The differentially expressed miRNAs and their putative target genes were revealed by bioformatic analysis to play a role in cell signaling, proliferation, aging, and death. High-enrichment pathway analysis identified that some classical pathways participated in numerous metabolic processes, especially in cell cycle regulation, such as mTOR, MAPK, TGF-beta, and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways. Our research will contribute to identifying clinical diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets in the treatment of GBM by postoperative radiotherapy.

  6. Genetic profiling of a distant second glioblastoma multiforme after radiotherapy: Recurrence or second primary tumor?

    PubMed

    van Nifterik, Krista A; Elkhuizen, Paula H M; van Andel, Rob J; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Leenstra, Sieger; Lafleur, M Vincent M; Vandertop, W Peter; Slotman, Ben J; Hulsebos, Theo J M; Sminia, Peter

    2006-11-01

    In nearly all patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) a local recurrence develops within a short period of time. In this paper the authors describe two patients in whom a second GBM developed after a relatively long time interval at a site remote from the primary tumor. The genetic profiles of the tumors were compared to discriminate between distant recurrence and a second primary tumor. Both patients harboring a supratentorial GBM were treated with surgery and local high-dose radiotherapy. Local control of the disease at the primary tumor site was achieved. Within 2 years, a second GBM developed in both patients, not only outside the previously irradiated target areas but infratentorially in one patient and in the opposite hemisphere in the other. The tumors were examined for the presence of several genetic alterations that are frequently found in GBMs--a loss of heterozygosity at chromosome regions 1p36, 10pl5, 19q13, and 22q13, and at the CDKN2A, PTEN, DMBT1, and TP53 gene regions; a TP53 mutation; and EGFR amplification. In the first patient, genetic profiling revealed that the primary tumor had an allelic imbalance for markers in several chromosome regions for which the second tumor displayed a complete loss. In the second patient, genetic profiling demonstrated the presence of genetic changes in the second tumor that were identical with and additional to those found in the primary tumor. Based on the similarities between the genetic profiles of the primary and the second tumors in these patients, the authors decided that in each case the second distant GBM was a distant recurrence rather than a second independent primary tumor.

  7. Photothermal therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using multiwalled carbon nanotubes optimized for diffusion in extracellular space.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Brittany N; Bernish, Brian W; Fahrenholtz, Cale D; Singh, Ravi

    2016-06-13

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most lethal primary brain tumor with a 5 year overall survival rate of approximately 5%. Currently, no therapy is curative and all have significant side effects. Focal thermal ablative therapies are being investigated as a new therapeutic approach. Such therapies can be enhanced using nanotechnology. Carbon nanotube mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) uses lasers that emit near infrared radiation to excite carbon nanotubes (CNTs) localized to the tumor to generate heat needed for thermal ablation. Clinical translation of CNMTT for GBM will require development of effective strategies to deliver CNTs to tumors, clear structure-activity and structure-toxicity evaluation, and an understanding of the effects of inherent and acquired thermotolerance on the efficacy of treatment. In our studies, we show that a dense coating of phospholipid-poly(ethylene glycol) on multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTS) allows for better diffusion through brain phantoms, while maintaining the ability to achieve ablative temperatures after laser exposure. Phospholipid-poly(ethylene glycol) coated MWCNTs do not induce a heat shock response (HSR) in GBM cell lines. Activation of the HSR in GBM cells via exposure to sub-ablative temperatures or short term treatment with an inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG)), induces a protective heat shock response that results in thermotolerance and protects against CNMTT. Finally, we evaluate the potential for CNMTT to treat GBM multicellular spheroids. These data provide pre-clinical insight into key parameters needed for translation of CNMTT including nanoparticle delivery, cytotoxicity, and efficacy for treatment of thermotolerant GBM.

  8. Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme in the Era of Temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Badiyan, Shahed N.; Markovina, Stephanie; Simpson, Joseph R.; Robinson, Clifford G.; DeWees, Todd; Tran, David D.; Linette, Gerry; Jalalizadeh, Rohan; Dacey, Ralph; Rich, Keith M.; Chicoine, Michael R.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Kim, Albert H.; Huang, Jiayi

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To review clinical outcomes of moderate dose escalation using high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) in the setting of concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), compared with standard-dose radiation therapy (SDRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients aged <70 years with biopsy-proven GBM were treated with SDRT (60 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction) or with HDRT (>60 Gy) and TMZ from 2000 to 2012. Biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions was calculated for the HDRT assuming an α/β ratio of 5.6 for GBM. Results: Eighty-one patients received SDRT, and 128 patients received HDRT with a median (range) biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions of 64 Gy (61-76 Gy). Overall median follow-up time was 1.10 years, and for living patients it was 2.97 years. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for patients that received HDRT versus SDRT were 12.4% versus 13.2% (P=.71), and 5.6% versus 4.1% (P=.54), respectively. Age (P=.001) and gross total/near-total resection (GTR/NTR) (P=.001) were significantly associated with PFS on multivariate analysis. Younger age (P<.0001), GTR/NTR (P<.0001), and Karnofsky performance status ≥80 (P=.001) were associated with improved OS. On subset analyses, HDRT failed to improve PFS or OS for those aged <50 years or those who had GTR/NTR. Conclusion: Moderate radiation therapy dose escalation above 60 Gy with concurrent TMZ does not seem to improve clinical outcomes for patients with GBM.

  9. Phase I/II Trial of Hyperfractionated Concomitant Boost Proton Radiotherapy for Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Mizumoto, Masashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Igaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Takano, Shingo; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yasutaka; Hashii, Haruko; Kanemoto, Ayae; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Matsumura, Akira; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of postoperative hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy with nimustine hydrochloride for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with histologically confirmed supratentorial GBM met the following criteria: (1) a Karnofsky performance status of >=60; (2) the diameter of the enhanced area before radiotherapy was <=40 cm; and (3) the enhanced area did not extend to the brain stem, hypothalamus, or thalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T{sub 2}-weighted high area (clinical tumor volume 3 [CTV3]) was treated by x-ray radiotherapy in the morning (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). More than 6 hours later, 250 MeV proton beams were delivered to the enhanced area plus a 10-mm margin (CTV2) in the first half of the protocol (23.1 GyE in 14 fractions) and to the enhanced volume (CTV1) in the latter half (23.1 GyE in 14 fraction). The total dose to the CTV1 was 96.6 GyE. Nimustine hydrochloride (80 mg/m2) was administered during the first and fourth weeks. Results: Acute toxicity was mainly hematologic and was controllable. Late radiation necrosis and leukoencephalopathy were each seen in one patient. The overall survival rates after 1 and 2 years were 71.1% and 45.3%, respectively. The median survival period was 21.6 months. The 1- and 2-year progression-free survival rates were 45.0% and 15.5%, respectively. The median MRI change-free survival was 11.2 months. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy (96.6 GyE in 56 fractions) for GBM was tolerable and beneficial if the target size was well considered. Further studies are warranted to pursue the possibility of controlling border region recurrences.

  10. Effects of Flavonoids from Food and Dietary Supplements on Glial and Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells.

    PubMed

    Vidak, Marko; Rozman, Damjana; Komel, Radovan

    2015-10-23

    Quercetin, catechins and proanthocyanidins are flavonoids that are prominently featured in foodstuffs and dietary supplements, and may possess anti-carcinogenic activity. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most dangerous form of glioma, a malignancy of the brain connective tissue. This review assesses molecular structures of these flavonoids, their importance as components of diet and dietary supplements, their bioavailability and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, their reported beneficial health effects, and their effects on non-malignant glial as well as glioblastoma tumor cells. The reviewed flavonoids appear to protect glial cells via reduction of oxidative stress, while some also attenuate glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and reduce neuroinflammation. Most of the reviewed flavonoids inhibit proliferation of glioblastoma cells and induce their death. Moreover, some of them inhibit pro-oncogene signaling pathways and intensify the effect of conventional anti-cancer therapies. However, most of these anti-glioblastoma effects have only been observed in vitro or in animal models. Due to limited ability of the reviewed flavonoids to access the brain, their normal dietary intake is likely insufficient to produce significant anti-cancer effects in this organ, and supplementation is needed.

  11. Hematopoietic stem cells as a tool for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bryukhovetskiy, Igor S.; Dyuizen, Inessa V.; Shevchenko, Valeriy E.; Bryukhovetskiy, Andrey S.; Mischenko, Polina V.; Milkina, Elena V.; Khotimchenko, Yuri S.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive malignant brain tumor with terminal consequences. A primary reason for its resistance to treatment is associated with cancer stem cells (CSCs), of which there are currently no effective ways to destroy. It remains unclear what cancer cells become a target of stem cell migration, what the role of this process is in oncogenesis and what stem cell lines should be used in developing antitumor technologies. Using modern post-genome technologies, the present study investigated the migration of human stem cells to cancer cells in vitro, the comparative study of cell proteomes of certain stem cells (including CSCs) was conducted and stem cell migration in vivo was examined. Of all glioblastoma cells, CSCs have the stability to attract normal stem cells. Critical differences in cell proteomes allow the consideration of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as an instrument for interaction with glioblastoma CSCs. Following injection into the bloodstream of animals with glioblastoma, the majority of HSCs migrated to the tumor-containing brain hemisphere and penetrated the tumor tissue. HSCs therefore are of potential use in the development of methods to target CSCs. PMID:27748891

  12. Augmented expression of RUNX1 deregulates the global gene expression of U87 glioblastoma multiforme cells and inhibits tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Bogoch, Yoel; Friedlander-Malik, Gilgi; Lupu, Lior; Bondar, Ekaterina; Zohar, Nitzan; Langier, Sheila; Ram, Zvi; Nachmany, Ido; Klausner, Joseph M; Pencovich, Niv

    2017-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. A mesenchymal phenotype was associated with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis in glioblastoma multiforme patients. Recently, the transcription factor RUNX1 was suggested as a driver of the glioblastoma multiforme mesenchymal gene expression signature; however, its independent role in this process is yet to be described. Here, we assessed the role of RUNX1 in U87 glioblastoma multiforme cells in correspondence to its mediated transcriptome and genome-wide occupancy pattern. Overexpression of RUNX1 led to diminished tumor growth in nude and severe combined immunodeficiency mouse xenograft tumor model. At the molecular level, RUNX1 occupied thousands of genomic regions and regulated the expression of hundreds of target genes, both directly and indirectly. RUNX1 occupied genomic regions that corresponded to genes that were shown to play a role in brain tumor progression and angiogenesis and upon overexpression led to a substantial down-regulation of their expression level. When overexpressed in U87 glioblastoma multiforme cells, RUNX1 down-regulated key pathways in glioblastoma multiforme progression including epithelial to mesenchymal transition, MTORC1 signaling, hypoxia-induced signaling, and TNFa signaling via NFkB. Moreover, master regulators of the glioblastoma multiforme mesenchymal phenotype including CEBPb, ZNF238, and FOSL2 were directly regulated by RUNX1. The data suggest a central role for RUNX1 as master regulator of gene expression in the U87 glioblastoma multiforme cell line and mark RUNX1 as a potential target for novel future therapies for glioblastoma multiforme.

  13. Liposomal n-butylidenephthalide protects the drug from oxidation and enhances its antitumor effects in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Ling; Chang, Kai-Fu; Huang, Xiao-Fan; Hung, Che-Lun; Chen, Shyh-Chang; Chao, Wan-Ru; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Tsai, Nu-Man

    2015-01-01

    Background The natural compound n-butylidenephthalide (BP) can pass through the blood–brain barrier to inhibit the growth of glioblastoma multiforme tumors. However, BP has an unstable structure that reduces its antitumor activity and half-life in vivo. Objective The aim of this study is to design a drug delivery system to encapsulate BP to enhance its efficacy by improving its protection and delivery. Methods To protect its structural stability against protein-rich and peroxide solutions, BP was encapsulated into a lipo-PEG-PEI complex (LPPC). Then, the cytotoxicity of BP/LPPC following preincubation in protein-rich, acid/alkaline, and peroxide solutions was analyzed by MTT. Cell uptake of BP/LPPC was also measured by confocal microscopy. The therapeutic effects of BP/LPPC were analyzed in xenograft mice following intratumoral and intravenous injections. Results When BP was encapsulated in LPPC, its cytotoxicity was maintained following preincubation in protein-rich, acid/alkaline, and peroxide solutions. The cytotoxic activity of encapsulated BP was higher than that of free BP (~4.5- to 8.5-fold). This increased cytotoxic activity of BP/LPPC is attributable to its rapid transport across the cell membrane. In an animal study, a subcutaneously xenografted glioblastoma multiforme mouse that was treated with BP by intratumoral and intravenous administration showed inhibited tumor growth. The same dose of BP/LPPC was significantly more effective in terms of tumor inhibition. Conclusion LPPC encapsulation technology is able to protect BP’s structural stability and enhance its antitumor effects, thus providing a better tool for use in cancer therapy. PMID:26451107

  14. GlioLab-a space system for Glioblastoma multiforme cells on orbit behavior study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelletti, Chantal; Twiggs, Robert J.

    Microgravity conditions and ionizing radiation pose significant health risks for human life in space. This is a concern for future missions and also for future space tourism flights. Nev-ertheless, at the same time it is very interesting to study the effects of these conditions in unhealthy organism like biological samples affected by cancer. It is possible that space envi-ronment increases, decreases or doesn't have any effect on cancer cells. In any case the test results give important informations about cancer treatment or space tourism flight for people affected by cancer. GlioLab is a joint project between GAUSS-Group of Astrodynamics at the "Sapienza" University of Roma and the Morehead State University (MSU) Space Science Center in Kentucky. The main goal of this project is the design and manufacturing of an autonomous space system to investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on a human glioblastoma multiforme cell line derived from a 65-year-old male and on Normal Human Astrocytes (NHA). In particular the samples are Glioblastoma multiforme cancer cells because the radiotherapy using ionizing radiation is the only treatment after surgery that can give on ground an improvement on the survival rate for this very malignant cancer. During a mission on the ISS, GlioLab mission has to test the in orbit behavior of glioblastoma cancer cells and healthy neuronal cells, which are extremely fragile and require complex experimentation and testing. In this paper engineering solutions to design and manufacturing of an autonomous space system that can allow to keep alive these kind of cells are described. This autonomous system is characterized also by an optical device dedicated to cells behavior analysis and by microdosimeters for monitoring space radiation environment.

  15. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated IMRT With Temozolomide for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Krishna; Damek, Denise; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Ney, Douglas; Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin; Stuhr, Kelly; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Chen Changhu

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To report toxicity and overall survival (OS) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed GBM after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status and organ or bone marrow function were eligible for this study. Patients received postoperative hypo-IMRT to the surgical cavity and residual tumor seen on T1-weighted brain MRI with a 5-mm margin to a total dose of 60 Gy in 10 fractions (6 Gy/fraction) and to the T2 abnormality on T2-weighted MRI with 5-mm margin to 30 Gy in 10 fractions (3 Gy/fraction). Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150 to 200 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days every 28 days. Toxicities were defined using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Twenty-four patients were treated, consisting of 14 men, 10 women; a median age of 60.5 years old (range, 27-77 years); and a median Karnofsky performance score of 80 (range, 60-90). All patients received hypo-IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to protocol, except for 2 patients who received only 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 6.5 (range, 0-14).With a median follow-up of 14.8 months (range, 2.7-34.2 months) for all patients and a minimum follow-up of 20.6 months for living patients, no instances of grade 3 or higher nonhematologic toxicity were observed. The median OS was 16.6 months (range, 4.1-35.9 months). Six patients underwent repeated surgery for suspected tumor recurrence; necrosis was found in 50% to 100% of the resected specimens. Conclusion: In selected GBM patients, 60 Gy hypo-IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions over 2 weeks with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ is safe. OS in this small cohort of patients was comparable to that treated with current standard of care

  16. Specific patterns of DNA copy number gains and losses in eight new glioblastoma multiforme cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Thoma, Karen; Taja-Chayeb, Lucia; Efferth, Thomas; Herrera, Luis A; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Gebhart, Erich

    2003-08-01

    Eight cell lines newly established from glioblastoma multiforme were examined by comparative genomic hybridization for their patterns of genomic imbalance. The total number of DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) found in the eight cell lines varied between 15 and 24. This characterized the examined cell lines (or the tumors they were derived from) as distinctly progressed in karyotypic evolution. The most frequent CNAs were gains of the entire chromosome 6 or, at least, parts of it, and of 7p22, which were found in all eight cell lines. Other changes present in seven of the eight cell lines were gains of 3q26qter and the entire chromosome 7 and losses of segments on chromosome 4q (e.g., 4q34q35) and of the short arm of chromosome 10. Enh(3q21q25), dim(4q22q33) and dim(4qter), dim(13q22), enh(15q14), and enh(18q22q23) were found in six of the eight cell lines. Several other CNAs [e.g., dim(9p21)] were found in common in five or less of the eight lines. Using a hierarchical cluster analysis, the specific patterns of genomic imbalance allowed various groupings of the examined cell lines. Although a close relation could be confirmed among all examined lines on the basis of shared CNAs, two main groups could be roughly differentiated. Among those there were also more or less closely related subgroups. However, also alterations which were restricted to one single cell line each were found, e.g., dim(1q41qter), dim(2q22qter), enh(4p), dim(5p), dim(4p13pter), dim(8q21qter), enh(9p), dim(9q), dim(11p14pter), enh(12q15q23), enh(13q21), dim(14q21qter), dim(15q21qter), dim(19q), and enh(22q). The comparison of the obtained data on gains and losses of DNA copy numbers in specific chromosomal segments with the data on localization of genes possibly associated with the biology of glioblastoma multiforme additionally shows high conformity but also disparity of the examined cell lines among each other, as well as compared to primary glioblastoma multiforme. Eventually, each of the

  17. Comparative Study of Adjuvant Temozolomide Six Cycles Versus Extended 12 Cycles in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Menal; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Devnani, Bharti; Kumar, Pavnesh; Sharma, Daya Nand; Julka, Pramod Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Studies have shown promising survival with the use of Extended Temozolomide (E-TMZ) as compared to Conventional six cycles of Temozolomide (C-TMZ) in malignant gliomas; however, the reports are mostly limited to retrospective studies with significant bias. This study assesses the impact of six versus 12 cycles of adjuvant Temozolomide (TMZ) on Overall Survival (OS) in newly diagnosed postoperative patients of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). Between January 2012 and July 2013, 40 postoperative patients of GBM between age 18-65 years and Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) ≥70 were included. Patients were randomized to receive radiation (60 Gray in 30 fractions over six weeks) with concomitant TMZ (75 mg/m(2)/day) and adjuvant therapy with either six (C-TMZ arm) or 12 cycles (E-TMZ arm) of TMZ (150-200 mg/m(2) for five days, repeated four weekly). Twenty patients were treated in each arm. Toxicity was assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0. OS and Progression Free Survival (PFS) were calculated from the time of diagnosis. Kaplan Meier method was used for survival analysis. A p-value of <0.05 was taken as significant and SPSS version 12.0 was used for all statistical analysis. Median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was six and 12 in C-TMZ and E-TMZ arm respectively. Overall, 5% and 15% patients respectively in C-TMZ and E-TMZ arm had haematological toxicity ≥ 3 in grade. Median follow up in C-TMZ and E-TMZ arm were 14.65 months and 19.85 months. Median PFS was 12.8 months and 16.8 months in C-TMZ and E-TMZ arm respectively (p=0.069). Median OS was 15.4 months vs. 23.8 months in C-TMZ and E-TMZ arm respectively (p=0.044). Our study showed that E-TMZ is well tolerated and leads to a significant increase in PFS as well as OS in newly diagnosed patients of GBM. Further prospective randomized studies are needed to validate the findings of our study.

  18. Clinical outcome of gliosarcoma compared with glioblastoma multiforme: a clinical study in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guobin; Huang, Shengyue; Zhang, Junting; Wu, Zhen; Lin, Song; Wang, Yonggang

    2016-04-01

    Gliosarcoma (GSM) is a rare biphasic neoplasms of the central nervous system composed of a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) admixed with a sarcomatous component. In clinical practice GSM is generally managed similarly to GBM. However, there are conflicting reports regarding their clinical aggressiveness, cell line of origin and possible prognosis compared with those of GBM. The objective of this study was to compare clinic-pathological features in GSM patients with the GBM patients during the same study period. 518 patients with GBM were treated at our hospital between 2008 and 2013, among them 51 were GSM. In this series the GSMs represented 9.8% of all GBMs and included 58.8% male with a median age of 44.7 years. The locations, all supratentorial, included temporal in 41.2%, frontal in 25.5%, parietal in 19.6%, and occipital in 13.7%. All patients underwent tumor resection followed by post-operative radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. The O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation studies were significantly more frequent in the GBMs than GSMs (80.1% vs. 44.7%, P < 0.001). The median progression free survival and overall survival for the patients with GSM were 8.0 and 13.0 months, respectively, as compared with 9.0 and 14.0 months in the GBM group (log rank test P = 0.001 and 0.004, respectively). The Cox proportional hazards regression model indicated that the extent of tumor resection (HR = 1.518, P = 0.009) and pathological types (HR = 0.608, P = 0.002) were the significant prognostic factors in our own series. With regard to clinical features and outcomes, GSM and GBM cannot be distinguished clinically. GSM in China may be managed similarly to GBM, with maximal safe surgical resection followed by chemo-radiotherapy. Our study adds further evidence to support GSM as a unique clinical entity with a likely worse prognosis than GBM.

  19. MERTK Inhibition Induces Polyploidy and Promotes Cell Death and Cellular Senescence in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Sufit, Alexandra; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B.; DeRyckere, Deborah; Rupji, Manali; Dwivedi, Bhakti; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Pierce, Angela M.; Kowalski, Jeanne; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen V.; Earp, H. Shelton

    2016-01-01

    Background MER receptor tyrosine kinase (MERTK) is expressed in a variety of malignancies, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Our previous work demonstrated that inhibition of MERTK using RNA interference induced cell death and chemosensitivity in GBM cells, implicating MERTK as a potential therapeutic target. Here we investigate whether a novel MERTK-selective small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, UNC2025, has similar anti-tumor effects in GBM cell lines. Methods Correlations between expression of GAS6, a MERTK ligand, and prognosis were determined using data from the TCGA database. GBM cell lines (A172, SF188, U251) were treated in vitro with increasing doses of UNC2025 (50-400nM). Cell count and viability were determined by trypan blue exclusion. Cell cycle profiles and induction of apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometric analysis after BrdU or Po-Pro-1/propidium iodide staining, respectively. Polyploidy was detected by propidium iodide staining and metaphase spread. Cellular senescence was determined by β-galactosidase staining and senescence-associated secretory cytokine analysis. Results Decreased overall survival significantly correlated with high levels of GAS6 expression in GBM, highlighting the importance of TAM kinase signaling in GBM tumorigenesis and/or therapy resistance and providing strong rationale for targeting these pathways in the clinic. All three GBM cell lines exhibited dose dependent reductions in cell number and colony formation (>90% at 200nM) after treatment with UNC2025. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase and development of polyploidy. After extended exposure, 60–80% of cells underwent apoptosis. The majority of surviving cells (65–95%) were senescent and did not recover after drug removal. Thus, UNC2025 mediates anti-tumor activity in GBM by multiple mechanisms. Conclusions The findings described here provide further evidence of oncogenic roles for MERTK in GBM, demonstrate the

  20. Classifying Glioblastoma Multiforme Follow-Up Progressive vs. Responsive Forms Using Multi-Parametric MRI Features

    PubMed Central

    Ion-Mărgineanu, Adrian; Van Cauter, Sofie; Sima, Diana M.; Maes, Frederik; Sunaert, Stefan; Himmelreich, Uwe; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is discriminating between tumor progression and response to treatment based on follow-up multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data retrieved from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Materials and Methods: Multi-parametric MRI data consisting of conventional MRI (cMRI) and advanced MRI [i.e., perfusion weighted MRI (PWI) and diffusion kurtosis MRI (DKI)] were acquired from 29 GBM patients treated with adjuvant therapy after surgery. We propose an automatic pipeline for processing advanced MRI data and extracting intensity-based histogram features and 3-D texture features using manually and semi-manually delineated regions of interest (ROIs). Classifiers are trained using a leave-one-patient-out cross validation scheme on complete MRI data. Balanced accuracy rate (BAR)–values are computed and compared between different ROIs, MR modalities, and classifiers, using non-parametric multiple comparison tests. Results: Maximum BAR–values using manual delineations are 0.956, 0.85, 0.879, and 0.932, for cMRI, PWI, DKI, and all three MRI modalities combined, respectively. Maximum BAR–values using semi-manual delineations are 0.932, 0.894, 0.885, and 0.947, for cMRI, PWI, DKI, and all three MR modalities combined, respectively. After statistical testing using Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc Dunn-Šidák analysis we conclude that training a RUSBoost classifier on features extracted using semi-manual delineations on cMRI or on all MRI modalities combined performs best. Conclusions: We present two main conclusions: (1) using T1 post-contrast (T1pc) features extracted from manual total delineations, AdaBoost achieves the highest BAR–value, 0.956; (2) using T1pc-average, T1pc-90th percentile, and Cerebral Blood Volume (CBV) 90th percentile extracted from semi-manually delineated contrast enhancing ROIs, SVM-rbf, and RUSBoost achieve BAR–values of 0.947 and 0.932, respectively. Our findings show that AdaBoost, SVM-rbf, and

  1. Metallofullerene-Nanoplatform-Delivered Interstitial Brachytherapy Improved Survival in a Murine Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John D.; Broaddus, William C.; Dorn, Harry C.; Fatouros, Panos P.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Shultz, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Fullerenes are used across scientific disciplines because of their diverse properties gained by altering encapsulated or surface bound components. In this study, the recently developed theranostic agent based on a radiolabeled functionalized metallofullerene (177Lu-DOTA-f-Gd3N@C80) was synthesized with high radiochemical yield and purity. The efficacy of this agent was demonstrated in two orthotopic xenograft brain tumor models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A dose-dependent improvement in survival was also shown. The in vivo stability of the agent was verified through dual label measurements of biological elimination from the tumor. Overall, these results provide evidence that nanomaterial platforms can be used to deliver effective interstitial brachytherapy. PMID:22881865

  2. Modeling the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme and Cancer Stem Cells with Ordinary Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    Abernathy, Kristen; Burke, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in cancer therapy and treatments, tumor recurrence is a common event in cancer patients. One explanation of recurrence is that cancer therapy focuses on treatment of tumor cells and does not eradicate cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are postulated to behave similar to normal stem cells in that their role is to maintain homeostasis. That is, when the population of tumor cells is reduced or depleted by treatment, CSCs will repopulate the tumor, causing recurrence. In this paper, we study the application of the CSC Hypothesis to the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme by immunotherapy. We extend the work of Kogan et al. (2008) to incorporate the dynamics of CSCs, prove the existence of a recurrence state, and provide an analysis of possible cancerous states and their dependence on treatment levels. PMID:27022405

  3. Motivating the Additional Use of External Validity: Examining Transportability in a Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Kyle W.; Speier, William; Bui, Alex AT; Hsu, William

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing ubiquity of data in the medical domain, it remains difficult to apply results from experimental and observational studies to additional populations suffering from the same disease. Many methods are employed for testing internal validity; yet limited effort is made in testing generalizability, or external validity. The development of disease models often suffers from this lack of validity testing and trained models frequently have worse performance on different populations, rendering them ineffective. In this work, we discuss the use of transportability theory, a causal graphical model examination, as a mechanism for determining what elements of a data resource can be shared or moved between a source and target population. A simplified Bayesian model of glioblastoma multiforme serves as the example for discussion and preliminary analysis. Examination over data collection hospitals from the TCGA dataset demonstrated improvement of prediction in a transported model over a baseline model. PMID:25954466

  4. Significant anti-tumor effect of bevacizumab in treatment of pineal gland glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Joshua; Fields, Braxton; Macomson, Samuel; Rixe, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive subtype of malignant gliomas. Current standard treatment for GBM involves a combination of cytoreduction through surgical resection, followed by radiation with concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy (temozolomide). The role of bevacizumab in the treatment of GBM continues to be a topic of ongoing research and debate. Despite aggressive treatment, these tumors remain undoubtedly fatal, especially in the elderly. Furthermore, tumors present in the pineal gland are extremely rare, accounting for only 0.1-0.4 % of all adult brain tumors, with this location adding to the complexity of treatment. We present a case of GBM, at the rare location of pineal gland, in an elderly patient who was refractory to initial standard of care treatment with radiation and concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide, but who developed a significant response to anti-angiogenic therapy using bevacizumab.

  5. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Dose Calculation using Geometrical Factors Spherical Interface for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Zasneda, Sabriani; Widita, Rena

    2010-06-22

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a cancer therapy by utilizing thermal neutron to produce alpha particles and lithium nuclei. The superiority of BNCT is that the radiation effects could be limited only for the tumor cells. BNCT radiation dose depends on the distribution of boron in the tumor. Absorbed dose to the cells from the reaction 10B (n, {alpha}) 7Li was calculated near interface medium containing boron and boron-free region. The method considers the contribution of the alpha particle and recoiled lithium particle to the absorbed dose and the variation of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles energy. Geometrical factor data of boron distribution for the spherical surface is used to calculate the energy absorbed in the tumor cells, brain and scalp for case Glioblastoma Multiforme. The result shows that the optimal dose in tumor is obtained for boron concentrations of 22.1 mg {sup 10}B/g blood.

  6. 5-aminolevulinic acid guidance during awake craniotomy to maximise extent of safe resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Corns, Robert; Mukherjee, Soumya; Johansen, Anja; Sivakumar, Gnanamurthy

    2015-07-15

    Overall survival for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been consistently shown to improve when the surgeon achieves a gross total resection of the tumour. It has also been demonstrated that surgical adjuncts such as 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence--which delineates malignant tumour tissue--normal brain tissue margin seen using violet-blue excitation under an operating microscope--helps achieve this. We describe the case of a patient with recurrent left frontal GBM encroaching on Broca's area (eloquent brain). Gross total resection of the tumour was achieved by combining two techniques, awake resection to prevent damage to eloquent brain and 5-ALA fluorescence guidance to maximise the extent of tumour resection.This technique led to gross total resection of all T1-enhancing tumour with the avoidance of neurological deficit. The authors recommend this technique in patients when awake surgery can be tolerated and gross total resection is the aim of surgery.

  7. [Factors related with post-surgical complications in elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme].

    PubMed

    Martin-Risco, M; Rodrigo-Paradells, V; Olivera-Gonzalez, S; Del Rio-Perez, C M; Bances-Florez, L; Calatayud-Perez, J B; Villagrasa-Compaired, F J

    2017-02-16

    Introduccion. El glioblastoma multiforme es el tumor maligno mas frecuente del sistema nervioso central, y su incidencia es del 80% en los mayores de 50 años. En los ultimos tiempos se ha producido un aumento en la esperanza de vida de la poblacion, y el analisis de las complicaciones posquirurgicas en pacientes de edad avanzada resulta de gran relevancia para una correcta indicacion quirurgica. Objetivo. Analizar factores relacionados con las complicaciones posquirurgicas en pacientes de edad avanzada. Pacientes y metodos. Se analizan retrospectivamente 88 pacientes diagnosticados de glioblastoma multiforme entre 31 y 78 años. Las variables estudiadas son: antecedentes personales, edad, estado funcional, estado preanestesico, caracteristicas tumorales, tipo de cirugia y complicaciones posquirurgicas. Resultados. Se observa una influencia de la edad en las complicaciones quirurgicas locales (p = 0,006) y sistemicas (p = 0,034) y en la escala de Clavien-Dindo (p = 0,001). Las personas con peor estado funcional y riesgo cardiovascular presentaron mas complicaciones sistemicas (p = 0,006 y 0,044) y peor graduacion en dicha escala (p = 0,024 y 0,025). Asimismo, hallamos mas complicaciones locales en las cirugias de exeresis que en las biopsias (p = 0,027). El estado preanestesico y los tratamientos antihemostaticos no se relacionaron con dichos eventos. Conclusiones. Los pacientes mayores de 65 años presentan una mayor incidencia de antecedentes patologicos y peor estado funcional prequirurgico. La edad, el riesgo cardiovascular, el estado funcional y el tipo de cirugia han aumentado de manera significativa las complicaciones posquirurgicas.

  8. Cancer stem cells from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis posits that deregulated neural stem cells (NSCs) form the basis of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM, however, usually forms in the cerebral white matter while normal NSCs reside in subventricular and hippocampal regions. We attempted to characterize CSCs from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall. Methods We described isolating CSCs from a GBM involving the lateral ventricles and characterized these cells with in vitro molecular biomarker profiling, cellular behavior, ex vivo and in vivo techniques. Results The patient’s MRI revealed a heterogeneous mass with associated edema, involving the left subventricular zone. Histological examination of the tumor established it as being a high-grade glial neoplasm, characterized by polygonal and fusiform cells with marked nuclear atypia, amphophilic cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, frequent mitotic figures, irregular zones of necrosis and vascular hyperplasia. Recurrence of the tumor occurred shortly after the surgical resection. CD133-positive cells, isolated from the tumor, expressed stem cell markers including nestin, CD133, Ki67, Sox2, EFNB1, EFNB2, EFNB3, Cav-1, Musashi, Nucleostemin, Notch 2, Notch 4, and Pax6. Biomarkers expressed in differentiated cells included Cathepsin L, Cathepsin B, Mucin18, Mucin24, c-Myc, NSE, and TIMP1. Expression of unique cancer-related transcripts in these CD133-positive cells, such as caveolin-1 and −2, do not appear to have been previously reported in the literature. Ex vivo organotypic brain slice co-culture showed that the CD133+ cells behaved like tumor cells. The CD133-positive cells also induced tumor formation when they were stereotactically transplanted into the brains of the immune-deficient NOD/SCID mice. Conclusions This brain tumor involving the neurogenic lateral ventricular wall was comprised of tumor-forming, CD133-positive cancer stem cells, which are likely

  9. Immunophenotypic signature of primary glioblastoma multiforme: A case of extended progression free survival.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Puneet; Khare, Richa; Garg, Nitin; Sorte, Sandeep

    2017-06-16

    Glioblastoma-multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive glial tumor, has a worldwide age-adjusted incidence ranging from 0.59-3.69/100000 persons. Despite current multimodal-treatment approach, median-survival time and progression-free survival (PFS) remains short. Glioblastomas display a variety of molecular alterations, which necessitates determining which of these have a prognostic significance. This is a case of a 45-year-old patient who presented with progressive slurring of speech and features of raised intracranial pressure. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a large heterogeneously enhancing lesion in the left front-temporal-perisylvian region with solid, cystic areas, suggestive of malignant glioma. Partial tumor-excision was followed by concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Histopathologically, the tumor was astrocytoma grade-IV. Patient had an extended PFS of 12 mo, with an overall survival of 26 mo. Primary-GBM was confirmed using molecular markers and the immunophenotypic signature was defined by evaluating systemic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, interleukin-6, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1, human chitinase-3-like-protein-1 (YKL-40) and high mobility group-A1. Current findings suggest that this signature can identify worst outcomes, independent of clinical criteria.

  10. Tapered microtract array platform for antimigratory drug screening of human glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Cha, Junghwa; Koh, Ilkyoo; Choi, Yemuk; Lee, Jungwhoi; Choi, Chulhee; Kim, Pilnam

    2015-02-18

    Understanding the effects of topographic characteristics on tumor cell migration is important for the development of new anti-migratory therapies. However, simplified in vitro culture systems often lead to inaccurate results regarding the efficacy of drugs. Histopathologically, glioblastoma multiform (GBM) cells migrate along the orientation of thin, elongated anatomical structures, such as white-matter tracts. Here, a tapered microtract array platform which mimics the anatomical features of brain tissue is introduced. This platform enables optimization of design for platform fabrication depending on topographic effects. By monitoring the migration of GBM cells on a simple tapered microtract, a saltatory migration resembling the migratory phenotype of human GBM cells in vivo is observed. The platform effectively induces the native characteristics and behavior of cells by topographic cues, allowing to observe the critical point for crawling to saltatory transition. Furthermore, this platform can be applied to efficiently screen anti-cancer drug by inhibiting associated signaling pathways on GBM cells. In conclusion, the microtract array platform reported here may provide a better understanding of the effects of topographic characteristics on cell migration, and may also be useful to determine the efficacy of antimigratory drugs for glioblastoma cells with cellular and molecular research and high-throughput screening. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Phase I Trial of Tipifarnib (R115777) Concurrent With Radiotherapy in Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, Elizabeth . E-mail: moyal.elizabeth@claudiusregaud.fr; Laprie, Anne; Delannes, Martine; Poublanc, Muriel; Catalaa, Isabelle; Dalenc, Florence; Berchery, Delphine; Sabatier, Jean; Bousquet, Philippe; De Porre, Peter; Alaux, Beatrice; Toulas, Christine

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To conduct a Phase I trial to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of tipifarnib in combination with conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (RT) for patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: After resection or biopsy, tipifarnib was given 1 week before and then continuously during RT (60 Gy), followed by adjuvant administration until progression. The tipifarnib dose during RT was escalated in cohorts of 3 starting at 200 mg/day. Results: Thirteen patients were enrolled, and 12 were evaluable for MTD. Of these patients, 7 had undergone biopsy, 4 had partial resection, and 1 had gross total resection. No dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed during the concomitant treatment at 200 mg. All 3 patients at 300 mg experienced DLT during the concomitant treatment: 1 with sudden death and 2 with acute pneumonitis. The MTD was reached at 300 mg. The adjuvant treatment was suppressed from the protocol after a case of pneumonitis during this treatment. Six additional patients were included at 200 mg/day of the new protocol, confirming the safety of this treatment. Of the 9 evaluable patients, 1 had partial response, 4 had stable disease, and 3 had rapid progression; the patient with gross total resection was relapse-free after 21 months. Median survival of the evaluable patients was 12 months (range, 5.2-21 months). Conclusion: Tipifarnib (200 mg/day) concurrent with standard radiotherapy is well tolerated in patients with glioblastoma. Preliminary efficacy results are encouraging.

  12. The effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on proliferation and apoptosis of in ovo cultured glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells.

    PubMed

    Urbańska, Kaja; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz; Sokołowska, Justyna; Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Szmidt, Maciej; Sysa, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) provide a unique approach to the treatment of tumors, especially those of neuroepithelial origin. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of AgNPs on proliferation and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells cultured in an in ovo model. Human GBM cells, line U-87, were placed on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane. After 8 days, the tumors were divided into three groups: control (non-treated), treated with colloidal AgNPs (40 μg/ml), and placebo (tumors supplemented with vehicle only). At the end of the experiment, all tumors were isolated. Assessment of cell proliferation and cell apoptosis was estimated by histological, immunohistochemical, and Western blot analyses. The results show that AgNPs can influence GBM growth. AgNPs inhibit proliferation of GBM cells and seem to have proapoptotic properties. Although there were statistically significant differences between control and AgNP groups in the AI and the levels of active caspase 9 and active caspase 3, the level of these proteins in GBM cells treated with AgNPs seems to be on the border between the spontaneous apoptosis and the induced. Our results indicate that the antiproliferative properties of silver nanoparticles overwhelm proapoptotic ones. Further research focused on the cytotoxic effect of AgNPs on tumor and normal cells should be conducted.

  13. The effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on proliferation and apoptosis of in ovo cultured glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbańska, Kaja; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz; Sokołowska, Justyna; Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Szmidt, Maciej; Sysa, Paweł

    2015-03-01

    Recently, it has been shown that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) provide a unique approach to the treatment of tumors, especially those of neuroepithelial origin. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of AgNPs on proliferation and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells cultured in an in ovo model. Human GBM cells, line U-87, were placed on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane. After 8 days, the tumors were divided into three groups: control (non-treated), treated with colloidal AgNPs (40 μg/ml), and placebo (tumors supplemented with vehicle only). At the end of the experiment, all tumors were isolated. Assessment of cell proliferation and cell apoptosis was estimated by histological, immunohistochemical, and Western blot analyses. The results show that AgNPs can influence GBM growth. AgNPs inhibit proliferation of GBM cells and seem to have proapoptotic properties. Although there were statistically significant differences between control and AgNP groups in the AI and the levels of active caspase 9 and active caspase 3, the level of these proteins in GBM cells treated with AgNPs seems to be on the border between the spontaneous apoptosis and the induced. Our results indicate that the antiproliferative properties of silver nanoparticles overwhelm proapoptotic ones. Further research focused on the cytotoxic effect of AgNPs on tumor and normal cells should be conducted.

  14. Nanocarriers for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme: Current state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Karim, Reatul; Palazzo, Claudio; Evrard, Brigitte; Piel, Geraldine

    2016-04-10

    Glioblastoma multiforme, a grade IV glioma, is the most frequently occurring and invasive primary tumor of the central nervous system, which causes about 4% of cancer-associated-deaths, making it one of the most fatal cancers. With present treatments, using state-of-the-art technologies, the median survival is about 14 months and 2 year survival rate is merely 3-5%. Hence, novel therapeutic approaches are urgently necessary. However, most drug molecules are not able to cross the blood-brain barrier, which is one of the major difficulties in glioblastoma treatment. This review describes the features of blood-brain barrier, and its anatomical changes with different stages of tumor growth. Moreover, various strategies to improve brain drug delivery i.e. tight junction opening, chemical modification of the drug, efflux transporter inhibition, convection-enhanced delivery, craniotomy-based drug delivery and drug delivery nanosystems are discussed. Nanocarriers are one of the highly potential drug transport systems that have gained huge research focus over the last few decades for site specific drug delivery, including drug delivery to the brain. Properly designed nanocolloids are capable to cross the blood-brain barrier and specifically deliver the drug in the brain tumor tissue. They can carry both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, protect them from degradation, release the drug for sustained period, significantly improve the plasma circulation half-life and reduce toxic effects. Among various nanocarriers, liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and lipid nanocapsules are the most widely studied, and are discussed in this review. For each type of nanocarrier, a general discussion describing their composition, characteristics, types and various uses is followed by their specific application to glioblastoma treatment. Moreover, some of the main challenges regarding toxicity and standardized evaluation techniques are narrated in brief. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  15. Epigenetic modulation of the drug resistance genes MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance of the highly aggressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) to drug therapy is a major clinical problem resulting in a poor patient’s prognosis. Beside promoter methylation of the O 6 -methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene the efflux transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 have been suggested as pivotal factors contributing to drug resistance, but the methylation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 has not been assessed before in GBM. Methods Therefore, we evaluated the proportion and prognostic significance of promoter methylation of MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in 64 GBM patient samples using pyrosequencing technology. Further, the single nucleotide polymorphisms MGMT C-56 T (rs16906252), ABCB1 C3435T (rs1045642) and ABCG2 C421A (rs2231142) were determined using the restriction fragment length polymorphism method (RFLP). To study a correlation between promoter methylation and gene expression, we analyzed MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 expression in 20 glioblastoma and 7 non-neoplastic brain samples. Results Despite a significantly increased MGMT and ABCB1 promoter methylation in GBM tissue, multivariate regression analysis revealed no significant association between overall survival of glioblastoma patients and MGMT or ABCB1 promoter methylation. However, a significant negative correlation between promoter methylation and expression could be identified for MGMT but not for ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, MGMT promoter methylation was significantly associated with the genotypes of the MGMT C-56 T polymorphism showing a higher methylation level in the T allele bearing GBM. Conclusions In summary, the data of this study confirm the previous published relation of MGMT promoter methylation and gene expression, but argue for no pivotal role of MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 promoter methylation in GBM patients’ survival. PMID:24380367

  16. Use of ERC-1671 Vaccine in a Patient with Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme after Progression during Bevacizumab Therapy: First Published Report.

    PubMed

    Bota, Daniela A; Alexandru-Abrams, Daniela; Pretto, Chrystel; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C; Fu, Beverly; Carrillo, Jose A; Schijns, Virgil Ejc; Stathopoulos, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a highy aggressive tumor that recurs despite resection, focal beam radiation, and temozolamide chemotherapy. ERC-1671 is an experimental treatment strategy that uses the patient's own immune system to attack the tumor cells. The authors report preliminary data on the first human administration of ERC-1671 vaccination under a single-patient, compassionate-use protocol. The patient survived for ten months after the vaccine administration without any other adjuvant therapy and died of complications related to his previous chemotherapies.

  17. Investigating the impact of headaches on the quality of life of patients with glioblastoma multiforme: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Samuel Robert; Cruickshank, Garth; Lindenmeyer, Antje; Morris, Simon Rhys

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Headaches and facial pain have been identified as the most prevalent form of pain among patients with glioblastoma multiforme, the most common malignant primary brain tumour. Despite this, minimal research has been undertaken investigating the direct and indirect impact these headaches have on their quality of life. Therefore, in this study, we aimed at gaining a personal insight into the importance and impact that these headaches have on the quality of life of patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Design Exploratory study using face-to-face semistructured interviews. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and then qualitatively analysed using thematic analysis. Setting Participants recruited from a tertiary referral hospital in Birmingham, UK. Participants Purposive sampling of 14 registered outpatients recently diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme. Results 3 themes were identified: (1) an underlying attitude of determination and positivity; (2) impact of headache unpredictability on social interaction; (3) headaches found to act as a springboard onto thoughts regarding their disease and future. Conclusions While the quality of life of patients with glioblastoma multiforme is clearly multifactorial, headaches do indeed play a part for some. However, it is not the direct pain of the headache as one might expect that impacts on the quality of life of these patients, but the indirect effect of headaches through limiting patients' social lives and by serving as a painful psychological reminder of having a life-threatening illness. In clinical practice, using headache diaries for these patients may help provide a more comprehensive assessment and further aid management plans. Alongside acting as an important reminder of the potential secondary implications of this disease, suggestions for future research include quantitatively investigating whether headaches can act as a prognostic indicator for quality of life within this patient

  18. Glioblastoma multiforme following prophylactic cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate in a child with acute lymphocytic leukemia. [. gamma. rays; infants

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.K.; Stryker, J.A.; Cruse, R.; Vannuci, R.; Towfighi, J.

    1981-06-01

    Cases of radiation-induced glioma in humans are extremely rare. A 2-year-old boy with acute lymphocytic leukemia had received prophylactic cranial irradiation (2400 rad/2 1/2 weeks) and intrathecal methotrexate. Five years later he developed a glioblastoma multiforme on the left cerebral hemisphere while the leukemia was in remission. This is the first reported association of these disorders. It is possible that the glioma may have been induced by radiation and/or chemotherapy.

  19. Establishment and genetic characterization of ANGM-CSS, a novel, immortal cell line derived from a human glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Notarangelo, Angelantonio; Trombetta, Domenico; D'Angelo, Vincenzo; Parrella, Paola; Palumbo, Orazio; Storlazzi, Clelia Tiziana; Impera, Luciana; Muscarella, Lucia Anna; La Torre, Antonella; Affuso, Andrea; Fazio, Vito Michele; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo

    2014-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (World Health Organization, grade IV astrocytoma) is the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor. We report a novel cell line, designated as ANGM-CSS, which was established from a 56-year-old male patient with a surgically removed glioblastoma multiforme. The ANGM-CSS cell line was established in vitro and characterized using histological and immunohistochemical staining, classical and molecular cytogenetic analyses, molecular studies and functional assays using a xenograft model in immunodeficient animals. ANGM-CSS was positive for CD133, nestin and vimentin proteins, whereas GFAP showed staining only in a fraction of the cells. Cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analysis revealed a near-tetraploid karyotype, with a modal chromosome number from 88 to 91, and additional cytogenetic abnormalities, such as the t(6;14)(p12;q11.2), t(8;10)(q24.2;q21.1) and t(5;9)(q34;p21) unbalanced translocations. Moreover, ANGM-CSS showed amplification of the MET and EGFR genes whose overexpression was observed at the mRNA level. Interestingly, ANGM-CSS is tumorigenic when implanted in immunodeficient mice, and the cells obtained from the xenografts showed the same morphology and karyotype in vitro as the original cell line. ANGM-CSS represents a biologically relevant cell line to be used to investigate the molecular pathology of glioblastoma multiforme, also to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutic drugs in vitro.

  20. Diagnostic value of peritumoral minimum apparent diffusion coefficient for differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme from solitary metastatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Ja; terBrugge, Karel; Mikulis, David; Choi, Dae Seob; Bae, Jong Myon; Lee, Seon Kyu; Moon, Soon Young

    2011-01-01

    In glioblastoma multiforme, the peritumoral region may be infiltrated with malignant cells in addition to vasogenic edema, whereas in a metastatic deposit, the peritumoral areas comprise predominantly vasogenic edema. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can be used to differentiate glioblastoma from solitary metastasis on the basis of cellularity levels in the enhancing tumor and in the peritumoral region. Seventy-three patients underwent conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) before undergoing treatment. The minimum ADC was measured in the enhancing tumor, peritumoral region, and contralateral normal white matter. To determine whether there was a statistical difference between metastasis and glioblastoma, we analyzed patient age and sex, minimum ADC value, and ADC ratio of the two groups. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the cutoff value of the minimum ADC that had the best combination of sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing between glioblastoma and metastasis. The mean minimum ADC values and mean ADC ratios in the peritumoral regions of glioblastomas were significantly higher than those in metastases. However, the mean minimum ADC values and mean ADC ratios in enhancing tumors showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups. According to ROC curve analysis, a cutoff value of 1.302 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s for the minimum peritumoral ADC value generated the best combination of sensitivity (82.9%) and specificity (78.9%) for distinguishing between glioblastoma and metastasis. Although the characteristics of solitary metastasis and glioblastoma multiforme may be similar on conventional MRI, DWI can offer diagnostic information to distinguish between the tumors.

  1. Phase I Trial of Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Temozolomide Chemotherapy for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Changhu; Damek, Denise; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B.K.; Robischon, Monica; Stuhr, Kelly; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the maximal tolerated biologic dose intensification of radiotherapy using fractional dose escalation with temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status, bone marrow, and organ function were eligible. The patients underwent postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. All patients received a total dose of 60 Gy to the surgical cavity and residual tumor, with a 5-mm margin. IMRT biologic dose intensification was achieved by escalating from 3 Gy/fraction (Level 1) to 6 Gy/fraction (Level 4) in 1-Gy increments. Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 5 days every 28 days. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity, excluding Grade 3 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. A standard 3+3 Phase I design was used. Results: A total of 16 patients were accrued (12 men and 4 women, median age, 69 years; range, 34-84. The median Karnofsky performance status was 80 (range, 60-90). Of the 16 patients, 3 each were treated at Levels 1 and 2, 4 at Level 3, and 6 at Level 4. All patients received IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to the protocol, except for 1 patient, who received 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 7.5 (range, 0-12). The median survival was 16.2 months (range, 3-33). One patient experienced vision loss in the left eye 7 months after IMRT. Four patients underwent repeat surgery for suspected tumor recurrence 6-12 months after IMRT; 3 had radionecrosis. Conclusions: The maximal tolerated IMRT fraction size was not reached in our study. Our results have shown that 60 Gy IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions within 2 weeks with

  2. Phase I Trial of Gross Total Resection, Permanent Iodine-125 Brachytherapy, and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Chang, Susan; Pouliot, Jean; Sneed, Penny K.; Prados, Michael D.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Malec, Mary K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Berger, Mitchell S.; Larson, David A.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: From April 1999 to May 2002, 21 patients with glioblastoma multiforme were enrolled on a Phase I protocol investigating planned gross total resection and immediate placement of permanent I-125 seeds, followed by postoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy at 100 cGy b.i.d., 5 days per week. Median age and Karnofsky performance status were 50 years (range, 32-65 years) and 90 (range, 70-100), respectively. Toxicity was assessed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Eighteen patients completed treatment according to protocol. The median preoperative tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging was 18.6 cm{sup 3} (range, 4.4-41.2 cm{sup 3}). The median brachytherapy dose measured 5 mm radially outward from the resection cavity was 400 Gy (range, 200-600 Gy). Ten patients underwent 12 reoperations, with 11 of 12 reoperations demonstrating necrosis without evidence of tumor. Because of high toxicity, the study was terminated early. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 57 and 114 weeks, respectively, but not significantly improved compared with historical patients treated at University of California, San Francisco, with gross total resection and radiotherapy without brachytherapy. Conclusions: Treatment with gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy as performed in this study results in high toxicity and reoperation rates, without demonstrated improvement in survival.

  3. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis brain abscess mimicking meningitis after surgery for glioblastoma multiforme: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Léa; Dubourg, Grégory; Graillon, Thomas; Honnorat, Estelle; Lepidi, Hubert; Drancourt, Michel; Seng, Piseth; Stein, Andreas

    2016-07-07

    Salmonella brain abscess associated with brain tumor is rare. Only 11 cases have been reported to date. Here we report a case of brain abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mimicking post-surgical meningitis in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. A 60-year-old Algerian woman was admitted through an emergency department for a 4-day history of headache, nausea and vomiting, and behavioral disorders. Surgery for cerebral tumor excision was performed and histopathological analysis revealed glioblastoma multiforme. On the seventh day post-surgery, she presented a sudden neurological deterioration with a meningeal syndrome, confusion, and fever of 39.8°C. Her cerebrospinal fluid sample and blood cultures were positive for S. enterica Enteritidis. She was treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. On the 17th day post-surgery, she presented a new neurological disorder and purulent discharge from the surgical wound. Brain computed tomography revealed a large cerebral abscess located at the operative site. Surgical drainage of the abscess was performed and microbial cultures of surgical deep samples were positive for the same S. enterica Enteritidis isolate. She recovered and was discharged 6 weeks after admission. In this case report, a brain abscess was initially diagnosed as Salmonella post-surgical meningitis before the imaging diagnosis of the brain abscess. The diagnosis of brain abscess should be considered in all cases of non-typhoidal Salmonella meningitis after surgery for brain tumor. Surgical brain abscess drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic treatment remains a major therapeutic option.

  4. [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for targeting radiation dose escalation for patients with glioblastoma multiforme: Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, James G. . E-mail: drjay@u.washington.edu; Stelzer, Keith J.; Mankoff, David A.; Tralins, Kevin S.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Muzi, Mark; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Scharnhorst, Jeffrey B.S.; Spence, Alexander M.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging for brain tumors has been shown to identify areas of active disease. Radiation dose escalation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme may lead to improved disease control. Based on these premises, we initiated a prospective study of FDG-PET for the treatment planning of radiation dose escalation for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Forty patients were enrolled. Patients were treated with standard conformal fractionated radiotherapy with volumes defined by MRI imaging. When patients reached a dose of 45-50.4 Gy, they underwent FDG-PET imaging for boost target delineation, for an additional 20 Gy (2 Gy per fraction) to a total dose of 79.4 Gy (n = 30). Results: The estimated 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) for the entire group was 70% and 17%, respectively, with a median overall survival of 70 weeks. The estimated 1-year and 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 18% and 3%, respectively, with a median of 24 weeks. No significant improvements in OS or PFS were observed for the study group in comparison to institutional historical controls. Conclusions: Radiation dose escalation to 79.4 Gy based on FDG-PET imaging demonstrated no improvement in OS or PFS. This study establishes the feasibility of integrating PET metabolic imaging into radiotherapy treatment planning.

  5. Graphene Functionalized with Arginine Decreases the Development of Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor in a Gene-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Vadalasetty, Krishna Prasad; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Hotowy, Anna; Lipińska, Ludwika; Jagiełło, Joanna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-10-23

    Our previous studies revealed that graphene had anticancer properties in experiments in vitro with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells and in tumors cultured in vivo. We hypothesized that the addition of arginine or proline to graphene solutions might counteract graphene agglomeration and increase the activity of graphene. Experiments were performed in vitro with GBM U87 cells and in vivo with GBM tumors cultured on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes. The measurements included cell morphology, mortality, viability, tumor morphology, histology, and gene expression. The cells and tumors were treated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and rGO functionalized with arginine (rGO + Arg) or proline (rGO + Pro). The results confirmed the anticancer effect of graphene on GBM cells and tumor tissue. After functionalization with amino acids, nanoparticles were distributed more specifically, and the flakes of graphene were less agglomerated. The molecule of rGO + Arg did not increase the expression of TP53 in comparison to rGO, but did not increase the expression of MDM2 or the MDM2/TP53 ratio in the tumor, suggesting that arginine may block MDM2 expression. The expression of NQO1, known to be a strong protector of p53 protein in tumor tissue, was greatly increased. The results indicate that the complex of rGO + Arg has potential in GBM therapy.

  6. Comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Maria F.; Schupak, Karen; Burman, Chandra; Chui, C.-S.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2003-12-31

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility and potential benefit of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for patients newly diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Five consecutive patients with confirmed histopathologically GBM were entered into the study. These patients were planned and treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) using our standard plan of 3 noncoplanar wedged fields. They were then replanned with the IMRT method that included a simultaneous boost to the gross tumor volume (GTV). The dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DHVs) for the planning treatment volume (PTV), GTV, and the relevant critical structures, as obtained with 3DCRT and IMRT, respectively, were compared. In both the 3DCRT and IMRT plans, 59.4 Gy was delivered to the GTV plus a margin of 2.5 cm, with doses to critical structures below the tolerance threshold. However, with the simultaneous boost in IMRT, a higher tumor dose of {approx}70 Gy could be delivered to the GTV, while still maintaining the uninvolved brain at dose levels of the 3DCRT technique. In addition, our experience indicated that IMRT planning is less labor intensive and time consuming than 3DCRT planning. Our study shows that IMRT planning is feasible and efficient for radiotherapy of GBM. In particular, IMRT can deliver a simultaneous boost to the GTV while better sparing the normal brain and other critical structures.

  7. Graphene Functionalized with Arginine Decreases the Development of Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor in a Gene-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Vadalasetty, Krishna Prasad; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Hotowy, Anna; Lipińska, Ludwika; Jagiełło, Joanna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that graphene had anticancer properties in experiments in vitro with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells and in tumors cultured in vivo. We hypothesized that the addition of arginine or proline to graphene solutions might counteract graphene agglomeration and increase the activity of graphene. Experiments were performed in vitro with GBM U87 cells and in vivo with GBM tumors cultured on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes. The measurements included cell morphology, mortality, viability, tumor morphology, histology, and gene expression. The cells and tumors were treated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and rGO functionalized with arginine (rGO + Arg) or proline (rGO + Pro). The results confirmed the anticancer effect of graphene on GBM cells and tumor tissue. After functionalization with amino acids, nanoparticles were distributed more specifically, and the flakes of graphene were less agglomerated. The molecule of rGO + Arg did not increase the expression of TP53 in comparison to rGO, but did not increase the expression of MDM2 or the MDM2/TP53 ratio in the tumor, suggesting that arginine may block MDM2 expression. The expression of NQO1, known to be a strong protector of p53 protein in tumor tissue, was greatly increased. The results indicate that the complex of rGO + Arg has potential in GBM therapy. PMID:26512645

  8. Biodistribution of boronophenylalanine in patients with glioblastoma multiforme: boron concentration correlates with tumor cellularity.

    PubMed

    Coderre, J A; Chanana, A D; Joel, D D; Elowitz, E H; Micca, P L; Nawrocky, M M; Chadha, M; Gebbers, J O; Shady, M; Peress, N S; Slatkin, D N

    1998-02-01

    Boron-10 (10B) concentrations were measured in 107 surgical samples from 15 patients with glioblastoma multiforme who were infused with 95 atom% 10B-enriched p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) intravenously for 2 h just prior to surgery at doses ranging from 98 to 290 mg BPA/kg body weight. The blood 10B concentration reached a maximum at the end of the infusion (ranging from 9.3 to 26.0 microg 10B/g) and was proportional to the amount of BPA infused. The boron concentrations in excised tumor samples ranged from 2.7 to 41.3 microg 10B/g over the range of administered BPA doses and varied considerably among multiple samples from individual patients and among patients at the same BPA dose. A morphometric index of the density of viable-appearing tumor cells in histological sections obtained from samples adjacent to, and macroscopically similar to, the tumor samples used for boron analysis correlated linearly with the boron concentrations. From that correlation it is estimated that 10B concentrations in glioblastoma tumor cells were over four times greater than concurrent blood 10B concentrations. Thus, in the dose range of 98 to 290 mg BPA/kg, the accumulation of boron in tumor cells is a linear function of BPA dose and the variations observed in boron concentrations of tumor specimens obtained surgically are largely due to differences in the proportion of nontumor tissue (i.e. necrotic tissue, normal brain) present in the samples submitted for boron analysis. The tumor:blood 10B concentration ratio derived from this analysis provides a rationale for estimating the fraction of the radiation dose to viable tumor cells resulting from the boron neutron capture reaction based on measured boron concentrations in the blood at the time of BNCT without the need for analysis of tumor samples from individual patients.

  9. Evidence of association of human papillomavirus with prognosis worsening in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Vidone, Michele; Alessandrini, Federica; Marucci, Gianluca; Farnedi, Anna; de Biase, Dario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Calabrese, Claudia; Kurelac, Ivana; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Cricca, Monica; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain tumor in adults, but its etiology still remains unknown. Recently, a role of viruses such as cytomegalovirus and JC virus in gliomagenesis has been suggested. Since human papillomavirus (HPV) is considered the most common oncogenic virus in humans, we evaluated its occurrence in GBM samples. Material and Methods Fifty-two formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary glioblastoma specimens were retrospectively analyzed. The presence of HPV genome on tumor DNA was assessed by MY/GP nested PCR. Confirmation of HPV detection was obtained by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with an antibody directed against the L1 capsidic protein. Finally, univariate and multivariate proportional-hazards models were used to compare the risk of death among HPV-positive and HPV-negative patients. Results Strikingly, viral DNA was detected after PCR in 12 cases (23%). HPV16 genome was present in 25% infected samples, whereas the remaining samples tested positive for HPV6. CISH confirmed positivity in all infected samples for which enough material was available. Moreover, IHC positivity suggested that production of viral proteins from HPV genome is an ongoing process in GBM cancer cells. Finally an association between HPV infection and a worse prognosis was found in patients upon age stratification with a univariate analysis (HR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.00–4.44; log-rank P = .045). Conclusions HPV infection status may be considered an independent prognostic factor in GBM patients and suggests that prevention may be considered, should HPV be recognized as a causative agent in gliomagenesis. PMID:24285549

  10. Neuronatin in a Subset of Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor Progenitor Cells Is Associated with Increased Cell Proliferation and Shorter Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Bründl, Elisabeth; Brawanski, Alexander; Fang, Xueping; Lee, Cheng S.; Weil, Robert J.; Zhuang, Zhengping; Lonser, Russell R.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and malignant primary brain tumor. Recent evidence indicates that a subset of glioblastoma tumor cells have a stem cell like phenotype that underlies chemotherapy resistance and tumor recurrence. We utilized a new “multidimensional” capillary isoelectric focusing nano-reversed-phase liquid chromatography platform with tandem mass spectrometry to compare the proteomes of isolated glioblastoma tumor stem cell and differentiated tumor cell populations. This proteomic analysis yielded new candidate proteins that were differentially expressed. Specifically, two isoforms of the membrane proteolipid neuronatin (NNAT) were expressed exclusively within the tumor stem cells. We surveyed the expression of NNAT across 10 WHO grade II and III gliomas and 23 glioblastoma (grade IV) human tumor samples and found NNAT was expressed in a subset of primary glioblastoma tumors. Through additional in vitro studies utilizing the U87 glioma cell line, we found that expression of NNAT is associated with significant increases in cellular proliferation. Paralleling the in vitro results, when NNAT levels were evaluated in tumor specimens from a consecutive cohort of 59 glioblastoma patients, the presence of increased levels of NNAT were found to be a an independent risk factor (P = 0.006) for decreased patient survival through Kaplan-Meier and multivariate analysis. These findings indicate that NNAT may have utility as a prognostic biomarker, as well as a cell-surface target for chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22624064

  11. Glioblastoma multiforme with epithelial differentiation: a potential diagnostic pitfall in cerebrospinal fluid cytology.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simpal K; Padmanabhan, Vijayalakshmi; Hickey, William F; Marotti, Jonathan D

    2015-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology provides valuable diagnostic and prognostic information for diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) and remains the gold standard for the detection of neoplastic meningitis. Metastatic involvement of the CSF by non-CNS neoplasms far surpasses that of primary brain tumors, although conventional glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can occasionally be identified in the CSF. GBM with epithelial differentiation is an uncommon variant that may contain features such as adenoid structures, signet ring cells, or squamous metaplasia. Herein, we present a case of GBM with epithelial differentiation to highlight a potential diagnostic pitfall in CSF cytology. A 55-year-old man presented with neurological symptoms and a 6.4 cm left temporal lobe cystic mass. Primary resection revealed GBM with focal epithelial differentiation confirmed by cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunohistochemical studies. Four months following primary resection, the patient developed severe headache for which a lumbar puncture with CSF cytologic evaluation was performed. The cytospin preparation showed numerous malignant epithelioid cells with high nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio and prominent cytoplasmic vacuoles resembling metastatic carcinoma. However, the lesional cells were cytomorphologically identical to the epithelial component present in the patient's recently diagnosed GBM. This case illustrates the potential for GBM with epithelial differentiation to closely mimic metastatic carcinoma from a non-CNS site in CSF cytology, which expands the differential diagnosis and emphasizes the necessity of clinical correlation.

  12. VEGFR-2 Expression in Glioblastoma Multiforme Depends on Inflammatory Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Jaal, Jana; Kase, Marju; Minajeva, Ave; Saretok, Mikk; Adamson, Aidi; Junninen, Jelizaveta; Metsaots, Tõnis; Jõgi, Tõnu; Joonsalu, Madis; Vardja, Markus; Asser, Toomas

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most angiogenic tumors. However, antiangiogenic therapy has not shown significant clinical efficacy. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of inflammatory tumor microenvironment on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2). Surgically excised primary GBM tissues were histologically examined for overall extent of inflammation (score 1-3). After immunohistochemistry, the tissue expression of ICAM-1 (optical density), the number of VEGFR-2 positive (VEGFR-2+) blood vessels (per microscopic field), and the endothelial staining intensity of VEGFR-2 (score 0-3) were determined. In GBM, the extent of inflammation was 1.9 ± 0.7 (group mean ± SD). Mean optical density of inflammatory mediator ICAM-1 was 57.0 ± 27.1 (pixel values). The number of VEGFR-2+ blood vessels and endothelial VEGFR-2 staining intensity were 6.2 ± 2.4 and 1.2 ± 0.8, respectively. A positive association was found between endothelial VEGFR-2 staining intensity and the extent of inflammation (p = 0.005). Moreover, VEGFR-2 staining intensity correlated with the expression level of ICAM-1 (p = 0.026). The expression of VEGFR-2, one of the main targets of antiangiogenic therapy, depends on GBM microenvironment. Higher endothelial VEGFR-2 levels were seen in the presence of more pronounced inflammation. Target dependence on inflammatory tumor microenvironment has to be taken into consideration when treatment approaches that block VEGFR-2 signaling are designed.

  13. Glioblastoma Multiforme and Adult Neurogenesis in the Ventricular-Subventricular Zone: A Review.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Claudia; Rodríguez Vázquez, Lucía; Martí, Joaquín

    2017-07-01

    Brain cancers account for <1,5% of all new cancer cases reported in the United States each year. Due to their invasive and heterogeneous nature, in addition to their resistance to multimodal treatments, these tumors are usually fatal. Gliomas, and in particular high-grade astrocytomas such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), are the most common and lethal primary tumors of the central nervous system. The median survival of most patients is less than 1 year after application of multimodal therapies. The question is why are these cancers so injurious? And above all, how is it possible for a so carefully orchestrated area like the brain to develop such tumors? This brings us to the study of glioma stem cells, their specialized niches (perivascular and hypoxic), and the neurogenic phenomena that takes place within the adult ventricular-subventricular zone: a structure that lies at the intersection between brain development and gliomagenesis. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1596-1601, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Detection of complex genetic alterations in human glioblastoma multiforme using comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, J.; Stumm, G.; Scherthan, H.; Arens, N.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to detect complex genetic alterations in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) by comparative genomic in situ hybridization (CGH). Of the 24 GBM that were examined, increased fluorescence intensities indicating chromosomal polysomy of chromosome 7 and gene amplification at chromosome 7p were found in 42% of the tumors. In addition, signal enhancement of chromosome 19 was present in 29% and at 12q13-15 in 21% of the tumors. We also detected reduction of fluorescence intensities indicating gross deletions on chromosomes 10 (58%), 9p (46%), and 13 (29%). There was a close correlation of CGH results when compared with Southern analysis of the EGFR gene localized on chromosome 7 and loss of heterozygosity detection of chromosome 9 and 10 by microsatellite PCR. A close correlation was also observed between copy number changes of chromosome 7 and deletions of chromosome 10. Amplification of chromosome 12q and deletions of chromosomes 9p and 13 seemed to be complementary in the tumors investigated in the present study. 44 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Stimulation of prolactin receptor induces STAT-5 phosphorylation and cellular invasion in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Alkharusi, Amira; Yu, Shengze; Landázuri, Natalia; Zadjali, Fahad; Davodi, Belghis; Nyström, Thomas; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Rahbar, Afsar; Norstedt, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in humans and is characterized with poor outcome. In this study, we investigated components of prolactin (Prl) system in cell models of GBM and in histological tissue sections obtained from GBM patients. Expression of Prolactin receptor (PrlR) was detected at high levels in U251-MG, at low levels in U87-MG and barely detectable in U373 cell lines and in 66% of brain tumor tissues from 32 GBM patients by immunohistochemical technique. In addition, stimulation of U251-MG and U87-MG cells but not U373 with Prl resulted in increased STAT5 phosphorylation and only in U251-MG cells with increased cellular invasion. Furthermore, STAT5 phosphorylation and cellular invasion induced in Prl stimulated cells were significantly reduced by using a Prl receptor antagonist that consists of Prl with four amino acid replacements. We conclude that Prl receptor is expressed at different levels in the majority of GBM tumors and that blocking of PrlR in U251-MG cells significantly reduce cellular invasion. PMID:27788487

  16. Aligned Nanotopography Promotes a Migratory State in Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beliveau, Alexander; Thomas, Gawain; Gong, Jiaxin; Wen, Qi; Jain, Anjana

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive, Grade IV astrocytoma with a poor survival rate, primarily due to the GBM tumor cells migrating away from the primary tumor site along the nanotopography of white matter tracts and blood vessels. It is unclear whether this nanotopography influences the biomechanical properties (i.e. cytoskeletal stiffness) of GBM tumor cells. Although GBM tumor cells have an innate propensity to migrate, we believe this capability is enhanced due to the influence of nanotopography on the tumor cells’ biomechanical properties. In this study, we used an aligned nanofiber film that mimics the nanotopography in the tumor microenvironment to investigate the mechanical properties of GBM tumor cells in vitro. The data demonstrate that the cytoskeletal stiffness, cell traction stress, and focal adhesion area were significantly lower in the GBM tumor cells compared to healthy astrocytes. Moreover, the cytoskeletal stiffness was significantly reduced when cultured on aligned nanofiber films compared to smooth and randomly aligned nanofiber films. Gene expression analysis showed that tumor cells cultured on the aligned nanotopography upregulated key migratory genes and downregulated key proliferative genes. Therefore, our data suggest that the migratory potential is elevated when GBM tumor cells are migrating along aligned nanotopographical substrates. PMID:27189099

  17. Integrative Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and Radiogenomic Network Analysis of Glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Heiland, Dieter Henrik; Simon-Gabriel, Carl Philipp; Demerath, Theo; Haaker, Gerrit; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Kellner, Elias; Kiselev, Valerij G.; Staszewski, Ori; Urbach, Horst; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Mader, Irina

    2017-01-01

    In the past, changes of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient in glioblastoma multiforme have been shown to be related to specific genes and described as being associated with survival. The purpose of this study was to investigate diffusion imaging parameters in combination with genome-wide expression data in order to obtain a comprehensive characterisation of the transcriptomic changes indicated by diffusion imaging parameters. Diffusion-weighted imaging, molecular and clinical data were collected prospectively in 21 patients. Before surgery, MRI diffusion metrics such as axial (AD), radial (RD), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were assessed from the contrast enhancing tumour regions. Intraoperatively, tissue was sampled from the same areas using neuronavigation. Transcriptional data of the tissue samples was analysed by Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) thus classifying genes into modules based on their network-based affiliations. Subsequent Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) identified biological functions or pathways of the expression modules. Network analysis showed a strong association between FA and epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) pathway activation. Also, patients with high FA had a worse clinical outcome. MD correlated with neural function related genes and patients with high MD values had longer overall survival. In conclusion, FA and MD are associated with distinct molecular patterns and opposed clinical outcomes. PMID:28266556

  18. Cyclophilin B Supports Myc and Mutant p53 Dependent Survival of Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Won; Schroeder, Mark A.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Bram, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive, treatment-refractory type of brain tumor for which effective therapeutic targets remain important to identify. Here we report that cyclophilin B (CypB), a prolyl isomerase residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), provides an essential survival signal in GBM cells. Analysis of gene expression databases revealed that CypB is upregulated in many cases of malignant glioma. We found that suppression of CypB reduced cell proliferation and survival in human GBM cells in vitro and in vivo. We also found that treatment with small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilins, including the approved drug cyclosporine, greatly reduced the viability of GBM cells. Mechanistically, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of CypB caused hyperactivation of the oncogenic RAS-MAPK pathway, induction of cellular senescence signals, and death resulting from loss of MYC, mutant p53, Chk1 and JAK/STAT3 signaling. Elevated reactive oxygen species, ER expansion and abnormal unfolded protein responses in CypB-depleted GBM cells indicated that CypB alleviates oxidative and ER stresses and coordinates stress adaptation responses. Enhanced cell survival and sustained expression of multiple oncogenic proteins downstream of CypB may thus contribute to the poor outcome of GBM tumors. Our findings link chaperone-mediated protein folding in the ER to mechanisms underlying oncogenic transformation, and they make CypB an attractive and immediately targetable molecule for GBM therapy. PMID:24272483

  19. Targeted Toxins for Glioblastoma Multiforme: pre-clinical studies and clinical implementation

    PubMed Central

    Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Xiong, Weidong; Liu, Chunyan; Puntel, Mariana; Yagiz, Kader; Ghulam Muhammad, AKM; Mineharu, Yohei; Foulad, David; Wibowo, Mia; Assi, Hikmat; Baker, Gregory J.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is most common primary brain tumor in adults. GBM is very aggressive due to its poor cellular differentiation and invasiveness, which makes complete surgical resection virtually impossible. Therefore, GBM’s invasive nature as well as its intrinsic resistance to current treatment modalities makes it a unique therapeutic challenge. Extensive examination of human GBM specimens has uncovered that these tumors overexpress a variety of receptors that are virtually absent in the surrounding non-neoplastic brain. Human GBMs overexpress receptors for cytokines, growth factors, ephrins, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), and transferrin, which can be targeted with high specificity by linking their ligands with highly cytotoxic molecules, such as Diptheria toxin and Pseudomonas exotoxin A. We review the preclinical development and clinical translation of targeted toxins for GBM. In view of the clinical experience, we conclude that although these are very promising therapeutic modalities for GBM patients, efforts should be focused on improving the delivery systems utilized in order to achieve better distribution of the immuno-toxins in the tumor/resection cavity. Delivery of targeted toxins using viral vectors would also benefit enormously from improved strategies for local delivery. PMID:21707497

  20. PHENOTYPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF BREAST INVASIVE CARCINOMA VIA TRANSFERABLE TISSUE MORPHOMETRIC PATTERNS LEARNED FROM GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ju; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Wang, Yunfu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Chang, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of whole slide images (WSIs) in a large cohort may provide predictive models of clinical outcome. However, the performance of the existing techniques is hindered as a result of large technical variations (e.g., fixation, staining) and biological heterogeneities (e.g., cell type, cell state) that are always present in a large cohort. Although unsupervised feature learning provides a promising way in learning pertinent features without human intervention, its capability can be greatly limited due to the lack of well-curated examples. In this paper, we explored the transferability of knowledge acquired from a well-curated Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) dataset through its application to the representation and characterization of tissue histology from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Breast Invasive Carcinoma (BRCA) cohort. Our experimental results reveals two major phenotypic subtypes with statistically significantly different survival curves. Further differential expression analysis of these two subtypes indicates enrichment of genes regulated by NF-kB in response to TNF and genes up-regulated in response to IFNG. PMID:27390615

  1. Annexin A5 promotes invasion and chemoresistance to temozolomide in glioblastoma multiforme cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Yang, Liang; Xiong, Yu; Guo, Hua; Shen, Xiaoli; Cheng, Zujue; Zhang, Yan; Gao, Ziyun; Zhu, Xingen

    2014-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the prevalent and most fatal brain tumor in adults. Invasion and a high rate of recurrence largely contribute to the poor prognosis of GBM. The current standard therapy for GBM includes surgery with maximum feasible resection, radiotherapy, and treatment with chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide. Annexin A5 reportedly promotes progression and chemoresistance in a variety of cancers. In the present study, we explored the effects of annexin A5 on GBM cell invasion and chemoresistance to temozolomide. Stable overexpression and knockdown of annexin A5 were performed in both U-87 MG and U-118 MG human GBM cell lines. Overexpression of annexin A5 in both cell lines significantly increased cell invasion, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression/activity, Akt phosphorylation at serine 473, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of temozolomide and markedly decreased temozolomide-induced apoptosis, all of which were abolished by selective PI3K inhibitor BKM120. On the other hand, knockdown of annexin A5 markedly decreased cell invasion, MMP-2 expression/activity, Akt phosphorylation at serine 473, and the IC50 values of temozolomide and significantly increased temozolomide-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study provides the first evidence that annexin A5 promotes GBM cell invasion, MMP-2 expression/activity, and chemoresistance to temozolomide through a PI3K-dependent mechanism. It adds new insights not only into the biological function of annexin A5 but also into the molecular mechanisms underlying GBM progression and chemoresistance.

  2. Vitamin D receptor expression is associated with improved overall survival in human glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Salomón, Débora G; Fermento, María E; Gandini, Norberto A; Ferronato, María J; Arévalo, Julián; Blasco, Jorge; Andrés, Nancy C; Zenklusen, Jean C; Curino, Alejandro C; Facchinetti, María M

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin D and its analogs have been shown to display anti-proliferative effects in a wide variety of cancer types including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). These anticancer effects are mediated by its active metabolite, 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) acting mainly through vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling. In addition to its involvement in calcitriol action, VDR has also been demonstrated to be useful as a prognostic factor for some types of cancer. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies evaluating the expression of VDR protein and its association with outcome in gliomas. Therefore, we investigated VDR expression by using immunohistochemical analysis in human glioma tissue microarrays, and analyzed the association between VDR expression and clinico-pathological parameters. We further investigated the effects of genetic and pharmacologic modulation of VDR on survival and migration of glioma cell lines. Our data demonstrate that VDR is increased in tumor tissues when compared with VDR in non-malignant brains, and that VDR expression is associated with an improved outcome in patients with GBM. We also show that both genetic and pharmacologic modulation of VDR modulates GBM cellular migration and survival and that VDR is necessary for calcitriol-mediated effects on migration. Altogether these results provide some limited evidence supporting a role for VDR in glioma progression.

  3. Copper induces cellular senescence in human glioblastoma multiforme cells through downregulation of Bmi-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Hu, Jifan; Guan, Fangxia; Song, Laijun; Fan, Ruitai; Zhu, Huaijie; Hu, Xiang; Shen, Eileen; Yang, Bo

    2013-05-01

    Most human tumor cells, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells, have aberrant control of cell aging and apoptosis. Subcytotoxic concentrations of oxidative or stress‑causing agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, may induce human cell senescence. Thus, induction of tumor cells into premature senescence may provide a useful in vitro model for developing novel therapeutic strategy to combat tumors. In the present study, we assessed the molecular mechanism(s) underlying senescence in GBM cells induced by copper sulfate. Following pretreatment with subcytotoxic concentrations of copper sulfate, U87-MG tumor cells showed typical aging characteristics, including reduced cell proliferation, cell enlargement, increased level of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) activity, and overexpression of several senescence-associated genes, p16, p21, transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1), insulin growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) and apolipoprotein J (ApoJ). We further demonstrated that the Bmi-1 pathway was downregulated in GBM cells in parallel with the induced senescence. The present study for the first time demonstrates the ability of copper to induce GBM cell senescence by downregulating Bmi-1.

  4. Preparation of Temozolomide-Loaded Nanoparticles for Glioblastoma Multiforme Targeting—Ideal Versus Reality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chooi Yeng; Ooi, Ing Hong

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for glioblastoma multiforme, but the required high administration dose is accompanied by side effects. To overcome this problem and to further improve TMZ’s efficacy, targeted delivery of TMZ by using polymeric nanoparticles has been explored. We synthesised the PLGA-PEG-FOL copolymer and attempted encapsulation of TMZ into PLGA-PEG-FOL nanoparticles using the emulsion solvent evaporation method and the nanoprecipitation method. Conjugation of PEG and FOL to PLGA has been reported to be able to increase the delivery of TMZ to the brain as well as targeting the glioma cells. However, despite making numerous modifications to these methods, the loading of TMZ in the nanoparticles only ranged between 0.2% and 2%, and the nanoparticles were between 400 nm and 600 nm in size after freeze-drying. We proceed with determining the release profile of TMZ in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Our initial data indicated that TMZ was slowly released from the nanoparticles. The metabolite of TMZ rather than the parent compound was detected in PBS. Our study suggests that while PLGA-PEG-FOL can be used as a polymeric or encapsulation material for central delivery of TMZ, a practical and cost effective formulation method is still far from reach. PMID:27618068

  5. Radiologically Defined Ecological Dynamics and Clinical Outcomes in Glioblastoma Multiforme: Preliminary Results1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mu; Hall, Lawrence; Goldgof, Dmitry; Russo, Robin; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Gillies, Robert; Gatenby, Robert

    2014-01-01

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations from 32 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) enrolled in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Spatial variations in T1 post-gadolinium and either T2-weighted or fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences from each tumor MRI study were used to characterize each small region of the tumor by its local contrast enhancement and edema/cellularity (“habitat”). The patient cohort was divided into group 1 (survival < 400 days, n = 16) and group 2 (survival > 400 days, n = 16). RESULTS: Histograms of relative values in each sequence demonstrated that the tumor regions were consistently divided into high and low blood contrast enhancement, each of which could be subdivided into regions of high, low, and intermediate cell density/interstitial edema. Group 1 tumors contained greater volumes of habitats with low contrast enhancement but intermediate and high cell density (not fully necrotic) than group 2. Both leave-one-out and 10-fold cross-validation schemes demonstrated that individual patients could be correctly assigned to the short or long survival group with 81.25% accuracy. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that novel image analytic techniques can characterize regional habitat variations in GBMs using combinations of MRI sequences. A preliminary study of 32 patients from the TCGA database found that the distribution of MRI-defined habitats varied significantly among the different survival groups. Radiologically defined ecological tumor analysis may provide valuable prognostic and predictive biomarkers in GBM and other tumors. PMID:24772202

  6. Toward 3D Biomimetic Models to Understand the Behavior of Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shreyas S.; Lannutti, John J.; Viapiano, Mariano S.; Sarkar, Atom

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors are one of the most deadly forms of human cancer and despite improved treatments, median survival time for the majority of patients is a dismal 12–15 months. A hallmark of these aggressive tumors is their unique ability to diffusively infiltrate normal brain tissue. To understand this behavior and successfully target the mechanisms underlying tumor progression, it is crucial to develop robust experimental ex vivo disease models. This review discusses current two-dimensional (2D) experimental models, as well as animal-based models used to examine GBM cell migration, including their advantages and disadvantages. Recent attempts to develop three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering-inspired models and their utility in unraveling the role of microenvironment on tumor cell behaviors are also highlighted. Further, the use of 3D models to bridge the gap between 2D and animal models is explored. Finally, the broad utility of such models in the context of brain cancer research is examined. PMID:24044776

  7. A Deep Learning-Based Radiomics Model for Prediction of Survival in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Lao, Jiangwei; Chen, Yinsheng; Li, Zhi-Cheng; Li, Qihua; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Jing; Zhai, Guangtao

    2017-09-04

    Traditional radiomics models mainly rely on explicitly-designed handcrafted features from medical images. This paper aimed to investigate if deep features extracted via transfer learning can generate radiomics signatures for prediction of overall survival (OS) in patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). This study comprised a discovery data set of 75 patients and an independent validation data set of 37 patients. A total of 1403 handcrafted features and 98304 deep features were extracted from preoperative multi-modality MR images. After feature selection, a six-deep-feature signature was constructed by using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) Cox regression model. A radiomics nomogram was further presented by combining the signature and clinical risk factors such as age and Karnofsky Performance Score. Compared with traditional risk factors, the proposed signature achieved better performance for prediction of OS (C-index = 0.710, 95% CI: 0.588, 0.932) and significant stratification of patients into prognostically distinct groups (P < 0.001, HR = 5.128, 95% CI: 2.029, 12.960). The combined model achieved improved predictive performance (C-index = 0.739). Our study demonstrates that transfer learning-based deep features are able to generate prognostic imaging signature for OS prediction and patient stratification for GBM, indicating the potential of deep imaging feature-based biomarker in preoperative care of GBM patients.

  8. Alternative Polyadenylation in Glioblastoma Multiforme and Changes in Predicted RNA Binding Protein Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jiaofang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zengming; Jiang, Huawei; Lou, Xiaoyan; Foltz, Gregory; Lan, Qing; Huang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is widely present in the human genome and plays a key role in carcinogenesis. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the APA products in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, one of the most lethal brain tumors) and normal brain tissues and further developed a computational pipeline, RNAelements (http://sysbio.zju.edu.cn/RNAelements/), using covariance model from known RNA binding protein (RBP) targets acquired by RNA Immunoprecipitation (RIP) analysis. We identified 4530 APA isoforms for 2733 genes in GBM, and found that 182 APA isoforms from 148 genes showed significant differential expression between normal and GBM brain tissues. We then focused on three genes with long and short APA isoforms that show inconsistent expression changes between normal and GBM brain tissues. These were myocyte enhancer factor 2D, heat shock factor binding protein 1, and polyhomeotic homolog 1 (Drosophila). Using the RNAelements program, we found that RBP binding sites were enriched in the alternative regions between the first and the last polyadenylation sites, which would result in the short APA forms escaping regulation from those RNA binding proteins. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first comprehensive APA isoform dataset for GBM and normal brain tissues. Additionally, we demonstrated a putative novel APA-mediated mechanism for controlling RNA stability and translation for APA isoforms. These observations collectively lay a foundation for novel diagnostics and molecular mechanisms that can inform future therapeutic interventions for GBM. PMID:23421905

  9. The PEP-3-KLH (CDX-110) vaccine in glioblastoma multiforme patients

    PubMed Central

    Heimberger, Amy B.; Sampson, John H

    2009-01-01

    Conventional therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) fail to target tumor cells exclusively resulting in non-specific toxicity. Immune targeting of tumor-specific mutations may allow for more precise eradication of neoplastic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is a tumor-specific mutation that is widely expressed on GBM and other neoplasms and its expression enhances tumorigenicity. This in-frame deletion mutation splits a codon resulting in a novel glycine at the fusion junction producing a tumor-specific epitope target for cellular or humoral immunotherapy. We have previously shown that vaccination with a peptide that spans the EGFRvIII fusion junction (PEPvIII-KLH/CDX-110) is an efficacious immunotherapy in syngeneic murine models. In this review, we summarize our results in GBM patients targeting this mutation in multiple, multi-institutional Phase II immunotherapy trials. These trials demonstrated that a selected population of GBM patients who received the vaccines targeting EGFRvIII had an unexpectedly long survival time. Further therapeutic strategies and potential pitfalls using this approach are discussed. PMID:19591631

  10. Role of the GNAS1 T393C polymorphism in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    El Hindy, N; Lambertz, N; Bachmann, H S; Frey, U H; Adamzik, M; Zhu, Y; Sure, U; Siffert, W; Sandalcioglu, I E

    2011-11-01

    The T393C polymorphism of the GNAS1 locus, which encodes the Gαs protein, has recently been found to be associated with patient outcome in various malignancies. We investigated the association between GNAS1 genotype and survival among patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). One hundred and sixty-two patients with GBM were retrospectively investigated. Inclusion criteria were availability of DNA and, for surviving patients, a follow-up of at least 24 months. The results were analysed based on clinical data, type of surgical intervention, adjuvant therapy, and 2-year survival. At the 2-year follow up, 79.6% of patients had died. Two-year survival rates were as follows: CC-homozygous patients, 15.8%; CT-heterozygous patients, 23.1%; and TT-homozygous patients, 18.2% (p = 0.461). Subgroup analysis revealed different 2-year survival rates in the group that underwent stereotactic biopsy, with 0% for CC-homozygous, 2.8% for CT-heterozygous, and 15.4% survival for TT-homozygous patients, but the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.229). Our results indicate that there is no association between the GNAS1 T393C polymorphism and 2-year survival among patients with GBM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intratumoral therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using genetically engineered transferrin for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dennis J; Kwan, Byron H; Chao, Felix C; Nicolaides, Theodore P; Phillips, Joanna J; Lam, Gretchen Y; Mason, Anne B; Weiss, William A; Kamei, Daniel T

    2010-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor with median survival of only 12 to 15 months under the current standard of care. To both increase tumor specificity and decrease nonspecific side effects, recent experimental strategies in the treatment of GBM have focused on targeting cell surface receptors, including the transferrin (Tf) receptor, that are overexpressed in many cancers. A major limitation of Tf-based therapeutics is the short association of Tf within the cell to deliver its payload. We previously developed two mutant Tf molecules, K206E/R632A Tf and K206E/K534A Tf, in which iron is locked into each of the two homologous lobes. Relative to wild-type Tf, we showed enhanced delivery of diphtheria toxin (DT) from these mutants to a monolayer culture of HeLa cells. Here, we extend the application of our Tf mutants to the treatment of GBM. In vitro treatment of Tf mutants to a monolayer culture of glioma cells showed enhanced cellular association as well as enhanced delivery of conjugated DT. Treatment of GBM xenografts with mutant Tf-conjugated DT resulted in pronounced regression in vivo, indicating their potential use as drug carriers.

  12. Fast Neutron Induced Autophagy Leads To Necrosis In Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Linda; Gladden, Samantha; Andorf, Christine; Kroc, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Fast neutrons are highly effective at killing glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), U87 and U251 cells. The mode of cell death was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to identify the fraction of irradiated U87 or U251 cells having morphological features of autophagy and/or necrosis. U87 or U251 cells were irradiated with 2 Gy fast neturons or 10 Gy {gamma} rays. A majority of U87 and U251 cells exhibit features of cell death with autophagy after irradiation with either 10 Gy {gamma} rays or 2 Gy fast neutrons. Very few {gamma} irradiated cells had features of necrosis (U87 or U251 cell samples processed for TEM 1 day after 10 Gy {gamma} irradiation). In contrast, a significant increase was observed in necrotic U87 and U251 cells irradiated with fast neutrons. These results show a greater percentage of cells exhibit morphological evidence of necrosis induced by a lower dose of fast neutron irradiation compared to {gamma} irradiation. Also, the evidence of necrosis in fast neutron irradiated U87 and U251 cells occurs in a background of autophagy. Since autophagy is observed before necrosis, autophagy may play a role in signaling programmed necrosis in fast neutron irradiated U87 and U251 cells.

  13. Survival time prediction of patients with glioblastoma multiforme tumors using spatial distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mu; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Gillies, Robert J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2013-02-01

    Regional variations in tumor blood flow and necrosis are commonly observed in cross sectional imaging of clinical cancers. We hypothesize that radiologically-defined regional variations in tumor characteristics can be used to define distinct "habitats" that reflect the underlying evolutionary dynamics. Here we present an experimental framework to extract spatially-explicit variations in tumor features (habitats) from multiple MRI sequences performed on patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). The MRI sequences consist of post gadolinium T1-weighted, FLAIR, and T2-weighted images from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Our strategy is to identify spatially distinct, radiologically-defined intratumoral habitats by characterizing each small tumor regions based on their combined properties in 3 different MRI sequences. Initial tumor identification was performed by manually drawing a mask on a T1-weighted post contrast image slice. The extracted tumor was segmented into an enhancing and non-enhancing region by the Otsu segmentation algorithm, followed by a mask mapping procedure onto the corresponding FLAIR and T2-weighted images. Then Otsu was applied on the FLAIR and T2 images separately. We find that tumor heterogeneity measured through Distance Features (DF) can be used as a strong predictor of survival time. In an initial cohort of 16 cases slow progressing tumors have lower DF values (are less heterogeneous) compared to those with fast progression and short survival times.

  14. Vaccination elicits correlated immune and clinical responses in glioblastoma multiforme patients.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Christopher J; Black, Keith L; Liu, Gentao; Mazer, Mia; Zhang, Xiao-xue; Pepkowitz, Samuel; Goldfinger, Dennis; Ng, Hiushan; Irvin, Dwain; Yu, John S

    2008-07-15

    Cancer vaccine trials have failed to yield robust immune-correlated clinical improvements as observed in animal models, fueling controversy over the utility of human cancer vaccines. Therapeutic vaccination represents an intriguing additional therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM; grade 4 glioma), which has a dismal prognosis and treatment response, but only early phase I vaccine trial results have been reported. Immune and clinical responses from a phase II GBM vaccine trial are reported here. IFN-gamma responsiveness was quantified in peripheral blood of 32 GBM patients given therapeutic dendritic cell vaccines. Posttreatment times to tumor progression (TTP) and survival (TTS) were compared in vaccine responders and nonresponders and were correlated with immune response magnitudes. GBM patients (53%) exhibited >or=1.5-fold vaccine-enhanced cytokine responses. Endogenous antitumor responses of similar magnitude occurred in 22% of GBM patients before vaccination. Vaccine responders exhibited significantly longer TTS and TTP relative to nonresponders. Immune enhancement in vaccine responders correlated logarithmically with TTS and TTP spanning postvaccine chemotherapy, but not with initial TTP spanning vaccination alone. This is the first report of a progressive correlation between cancer clinical outcome and T-cell responsiveness after therapeutic vaccination in humans and the first tracing of such correlation to therapeutically exploitable tumor alteration. As such, our findings offer unique opportunities to identify cellular and molecular components of clinically meaningful antitumor immunity in humans.

  15. Ultrastructural characterization of primary cilia in pathologically characterized human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors.

    PubMed

    Moser, Joanna J; Fritzler, Marvin J; Rattner, Jerome B

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are non-motile sensory cytoplasmic organelles that are involved in cell cycle progression. Ultrastructurally, the primary cilium region is complex, with normal ciliogenesis progressing through five distinct morphological stages in human astrocytes. Defects in early stages of ciliogenesis are key features of astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines and provided the impetus for the current study which describes the morphology of primary cilia in molecularly characterized human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. Seven surgically resected human GBM tissue samples were molecularly characterized according to IDH1/2 mutation status, EGFR amplification status and MGMT promoter methylation status and were examined for primary cilia expression and structure using indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. We report for the first time that primary cilia are disrupted in the early stages of ciliogenesis in human GBM tumors. We confirm that immature primary cilia and basal bodies/centrioles have aberrant ciliogenesis characteristics including absent paired vesicles, misshaped/swollen vesicular hats, abnormal configuration of distal appendages, and discontinuity of centriole microtubular blades. Additionally, the transition zone plate is able to form in the absence of paired vesicles on the distal end of the basal body and when a cilium progresses beyond the early stages of ciliogenesis, it has electron dense material clumped along the transition zone and a darkening of the microtubules at the proximal end of the cilium. Primary cilia play a role in a variety of human cancers. Previously primary cilia structure was perturbed in cultured cell lines derived from astrocytomas/glioblastomas; however there was always some question as to whether these findings were a cell culture phenomena. In this study we confirm that disruptions in ciliogenesis at early stages do occur in GBM tumors and that these ultrastructural findings bear resemblance to those previously

  16. Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid-Modified Lipid-Polymer Hybrid Nanoparticles for Docetaxel Delivery in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kairong; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Liu, Yayuan; Zong, Taili; He, Qin

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid nanoparticles consisting of lipids and the biodegradable polymer, poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), were developed for the targeted delivery of the anticancer drug, docetaxel. Transmission electron microscopic observations confirmed the presence of a lipid coating over the polymeric core. Using coumarin-6 as a fluorescent probe, the uptake efficacy of RGD conjugated lipid coated nanoparticles (RGD-L-P) by C6 cells was increased significantly, compared with that of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (L-P; 2.5-fold higher) or PLGA-nanoparticles (PLGA-P; 1.76-fold higher). The superior tumor spheroid penetration of RGD-L-P indicated that RGD-L-P could target effectively and specifically to C6 cells overexpressing integrin α(v)β3. The anti-proliferative activity of docetaxel-loaded RGD-L-P against C6 cells was increased 2.69- and 4.13-fold compared with L-P and PLGA-P, respectively. Regarding biodistribution, the strongest brain-localized fluorescence signals were detected in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-bearing rats treated with 1,10-Dioctadecyl-3,3,30,30-tetramethylindotricarb-ocyanine iodide (DiR)-loaded RGD-L-P, compared to rats treated with DiR-loaded L-P or PLGA-P. The median survival time of GBM-bearing rats treated with docetaxel-loaded RGD-L-P was 57 days, a fold increase of 1.43, 1.78, 3.35, and 3.56 compared with animals given L-P (P < 0.05), PLGA-P (P < 0.05), Taxotere (P < 0.01) and saline (P < 0.01), respectively. Collectively, these results support RGD-L-P as a promising drug delivery system for the specific targeting and the treatment of GBM.

  17. Connection between Cell Phone use, p53 Gene Expression in Different Zones of Glioblastoma Multiforme and Survival Prognoses

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan-Sigari, Reza; Baf, Morteza Mazloum Farsi; Ariabod, Vahid; Rohde, Veit; Rahighi, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate p53 gene expression in the central and peripheral zones of glioblastoma multiforme using a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique in patients who use cell phones ≥3 hours a day and determine its relationship to clinicopathological findings and overall survival. Sixty-three patients (38 males and 25 females), diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), underwent tumor resection between 2008 and 2011. Patient ages ranged from 25 to 88 years, with a mean age of 55. The levels of expression of p53 in the central and peripheral zone of the GBM were quantified by RT-PCR. Data on p53 gene expression from the central and peripheral zone, the related malignancy and the clinicopatholagical findings (age, gender, tumor location and size), as well as overall survival, were analyzed. Forty-one out of 63 patients (65%) with the highest level of cell phone use (≥3 hours/day) had higher mutant type p53 expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma; the difference was statistically significant (P=0.034). Results from the present study on the use of mobile phones for ≥3 hours a day show a consistent pattern of increased risk for the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma, and that this increase was significantly correlated with shorter overall survival time. The risk was not higher for ipsilateral exposure. We found that the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma was increased in 65% of patients using cell phones ≥3 hours a day. PMID:25276320

  18. Correlation of microvascular fractal dimension with positron emission tomography [(11)C]-methionine uptake in glioblastoma multiforme: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Grizzi, Fabio; Tschabitscher, Manfred; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Casali, Massimiliano; Simonelli, Matteo; Widhalm, Georg; Muzzio, Pier Carlo; Matula, Christian; Chiti, Arturo; Rodriguez y Baena, Riccardo

    2010-09-01

    Neuroradiological and metabolic imaging is a fundamental diagnostic procedure in the assessment of patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. The correlation between objective parameters capable of quantifying the neoplastic angioarchitecture and imaging data may improve our understanding of the underlying physiopathology and make it possible to evaluate treatment efficacy in brain tumors. Only a few studies have so far correlated the quantitative parameters measuring the neovascularity of brain tumors with the metabolic profiles measured by means of amino acid uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Fractal geometry offers new mathematical tools for the description and quantification of complex anatomical systems, including microvascularity. In this study, we evaluated the microvascular network complexity of six cases of human glioblastoma multiforme quantifying the surface fractal dimension on CD34 immunostained specimens. The microvascular fractal dimension was estimated by applying the box-counting algorithm. As the fractal dimension depends on the density, size and shape of the vessels, and their distribution pattern, we defined it as an index of the whole complexity of microvascular architecture and compared it with the uptake of (11)C-methionine (MET) assessed by PET. The different fractal dimension values observed showed that the same histological category of brain tumor had different microvascular network architectures. Fractal dimension ranged between 1.19 and 1.77 (mean: 1.415+/-0.225), and the uptake of (11)C-methionine ranged between 1.30 and 5.30. A statistically significant direct correlation between the microvascular fractal dimension and the uptake of (11)C-methionine (p=0.02) was found. Our preliminary findings indicate that that vascularity (estimated on the histologic specimens by means of the fractal dimension) and (11)C-methionine uptake (assessed by PET) closely correlate in glioblastoma multiforme and that microvascular

  19. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Judith M. Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide.

  20. A systematic review of overall survival in pediatric primary glioblastoma multiforme of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Konar, Subhas K; Bir, Shyamal C; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Nanda, Anil

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The incidence of primary spinal cord glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in the pediatric age group is very rare. Only a few case series and case reports have been published in the literature; therefore, overall survival (OS) outcome and the as-yet poorly defined management options are not discussed in detail. The authors performed a cumulative survival analysis of all reported cases of pediatric spinal cord GBM to identify the predictive factors related to final survival outcome. METHODS A comprehensive search for relevant articles was performed on PubMed's electronic database MEDLINE for the period from 1950 to 2015 using the search words "malignant spinal cord tumor" and "spinal glioblastoma multiforme." This study was limited to patients younger than 18 years of age. Survival rates for children with various tumor locations and treatments were collected from the published articles and analyzed. RESULTS After an extensive literature search, 29 articles met the study inclusion criteria. From the detailed information in these articles, the authors found 53 children eligible for the survival analysis. The majority (45%) of the children were more than 12 years old. Thirty-four percent of the cases were between 7 and 12 years of age, and 21% were younger than 7 years. In the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, children younger than 7 years of age had better survival (13 months) than the children older than 7 years (7-12 years: 10 months, > 12 years: 9 months; p = 0.01, log-rank test). Fifty-five percent of the children were female and 45% were male. A cervical tumor location (32%) was the most common, followed by thoracic (28.3%). Cervicothoracic (18.9%) and conus (18.8%) tumor locations shared the same percentage of cases. Cervical tumors had a worse outcome than tumors in other locations (p = 0.003, log-rank test). The most common presenting symptom was limb weakness (53%), followed by sensory disturbances (25%). Median OS was 10 months. The addition of adjuvant

  1. Myelin structure is a key difference in the x-ray scattering signature between meningioma, schwannoma and glioblastoma multiforme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzon, G.; Pearson, S.; Murison, R.; Hall, C.; Siu, K.; Round, A.; Schültke, E.; Kaye, A. H.; Lewis, R.

    2007-11-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns of benign and malignant brain tumour tissue were examined. Independent component analysis was used to find a feature set representing the images collected. A set of coefficients was then used to describe each image, which allowed the use of the statistical technique of flexible discriminant analysis to discover a hidden order in the data set. The key difference was found to be in the intensity and spectral content of the second and fourth order myelin scattering peaks. This has clearly demonstrated that significant differences in the structure of myelin exist in the highly malignant glioblastoma multiforme as opposed to the benign: meningioma and schwannoma.

  2. A Time-Based and Intratumoral Proteomic Assessment of a Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, Priscila F.; Carvalho, Paulo Costa; Nogueira, Fábio C. S.; da Fonseca, Clovis Orlando; de Souza Silva, Júlio Cesar Thomé; Carvalho, Maria da Gloria da Costa; Domont, Gilberto B.; Zanchin, Nilson I. T.; Fischer, Juliana de Saldanha da Gama

    2016-01-01

    Tumors consist of cells in different stages of transformation with molecular and cellular heterogeneity. By far, heterogeneity is the hallmark of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most malignant and aggressive type of glioma. Most proteomic studies aim in comparing tumors from different patients, but here we dive into exploring the intratumoral proteome diversity of a single GBM. For this, we profiled tumor fragments from the profound region of the same patient’s GBM but obtained from two surgeries a year’s time apart. Our analysis also included GBM‘s fragments from different anatomical regions. Our quantitative proteomic strategy employed 4-plex iTRAQ peptide labeling followed by a four-step strong cation chromatographic separation; each fraction was then analyzed by reversed-phase nano-chromatography coupled on-line with an Orbitrap-Velos mass spectrometer. Unsupervised clustering grouped the proteomic profiles into four major distinct groups and showed that most changes were related to the tumor’s anatomical region. Nevertheless, we report differentially abundant proteins from GBM’s fragments of the same region but obtained 1 year apart. We discuss several key proteins (e.g., S100A9) and enriched pathways linked with GBM such as the Ras pathway, RHO GTPases activate PKNs, and those related to apoptosis, to name a few. As far as we know, this is the only report that compares GBM fragments proteomic profiles from the same patient. Ultimately, our results fuel the forefront of scientific discussion on the importance in exploring the richness of subproteomes within a single tissue sample for a better understanding of the disease, as each tumor is unique. PMID:27597932

  3. Boron neutron capture therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme: an assessment of clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Sköld, K; Gorlia, T; Pellettieri, L; Giusti, V; H-Stenstam, B; Hopewell, J W

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), with a 6-h infusion of the boron carrier l-boronophenylalanine as a fructose preparation (BPA-f), as first-line radiotherapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Patient survival data from a Phase II study using BNCT were compared with retrospective data from the two arms of a Phase III study using conventional radiotherapy (RT) in the reference arm and using RT plus concomitant and adjuvant medication with temozolomide (TMZ) in the experimental arm, and were also compared with small subgroups of these patients for whom the methylation status of the MGMT (O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) DNA repair gene was known. Differences in the baseline characteristics, salvage therapy after recurrence and levels of severe adverse events were also considered. The results indicate that BNCT offers a treatment that is at least as effective as conventional RT alone. For patients with an unmethylated MGMT DNA repair gene, a possible clinical advantage of BNCT over RT/TMZ was suggested. BNCT is a single-day treatment, which is of convenience to patients, with mild side effects, which would offer an initial 6 weeks of good-quality life during the time when patients would otherwise be undergoing daily treatments with RT and TMZ. It is suggested that the use of BNCT with a 6-h infusion of BPA-f should be explored in a stratified randomised Phase II trial in which patients with the unmethylated MGMT DNA repair gene are offered BNCT in the experimental arm and RT plus TMZ in the reference arm.

  4. [11C] methionine and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose PET in the follow-up of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Pötzi, Christian; Becherer, Alexander; Marosi, Christine; Karanikas, Georgios; Szabo, Monika; Dudczak, Robert; Kletter, Kurt; Asenbaum, Susanne

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of [11C] methionine (MET) and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET in the follow-up of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). After surgical and/or conservative treatment, 28 patients (pts) with GBM underwent FDG and MET PET on average 12.7 months after the diagnosis had been established. Scans were evaluated visually and by calculating the maximal tumor SUV as well as the ratio of tumor vs. contralateral region (RTu). The degree of tracer uptake was compared with survival time, disease duration and MRI findings. The mean overall duration of survival was 12.7 months. The patients were divided into two groups: those that survived less than 12 months and those that survived longer than 12 months. Focally increased uptake was revealed by MET PET in 24 patients and by FDG PET in 2 patients. On MRI scans, viable tumor tissue was suspected in 18 patients. No correlations were registered between FDG/MET uptake and survival time or disease duration respectively; Kaplan-Meier calculations were negative in this regard. Similarly, negative results were obtained in subgroups of patients who had undergone microsurgical resection and whose disease was at least of 6 months' duration, and additionally in a subgroup who had undergone their last treatment longer than 6 months ago. With respect to survival groups, a positive MET PET was associated with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 8%. SUV and RTu values did not differ between patients with positive or negative MRI results. In this study FDG PET seems to be of limited value in the work-up of recurrent GBM because of its lower sensitivity than MET PET and the fact that it allows no prediction of the outcome. MET PET visualizes viable tumor tissue without adding any prognostic information and appears to be in no way superior to conventional imaging.

  5. Serial analysis of imaging parameters in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Lupo, Janine M.; Polley, Mei-Yin; Crane, Jason C.; Bian, Wei; Cha, Soonmee; Chang, Susan; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the predictive value of serial MRI data in relation to clinical outcome for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Sixty-four patients with newly diagnosed GBM underwent conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted imaging postsurgery and prior to radiation/chemotherapy (pre-RT), immediately after RT (post-RT), and every 1–2 months thereafter until tumor progression, up to a maximum of 1 year. Tumor volumes and perfusion and diffusion parameters were calculated and subject to time-independent and time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models that were adjusted for age and MR scanner field strength. Larger volumes of the T2 hyperintensity lesion (T2ALL) and nonenhancing lesion (NEL) at pre-RT, as well as increased anatomic volumes at post-RT, were associated with worse overall survival (OS). Higher normalized cerebral blood volumes (nCBVs), normalized peak height (nPH) and normalized recirculation factors (nRF) at pre-RT, and nCBV at post-RT, in the T2ALL and NEL, were associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS). From pre- to post-RT, there was a reduction in nCBV and nPH and an increase in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Patients with lower nRF values at pre-RT, or a larger increase in nRF from pre-RT to post-RT, had significantly longer PFS. Time-dependent analysis showed that patterns of changes in ADC and anatomic volumes were associated with OS, while changes in nCBV, nPH, and the contrast-enhancing volume were associated with PFS. Our studies suggest that quantitative MRI variables derived from anatomic and physiological MRI provide useful information for predicting outcome in patients with GBM. PMID:21297128

  6. VEGFR-2 Expression in Glioblastoma Multiforme Depends on Inflammatory Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jaal, Jana; Kase, Marju; Minajeva, Ave; Saretok, Mikk; Adamson, Aidi; Junninen, Jelizaveta; Metsaots, Tõnis; Jõgi, Tõnu; Joonsalu, Madis; Vardja, Markus; Asser, Toomas

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most angiogenic tumors. However, antiangiogenic therapy has not shown significant clinical efficacy. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of inflammatory tumor microenvironment on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2). Surgically excised primary GBM tissues were histologically examined for overall extent of inflammation (score 1–3). After immunohistochemistry, the tissue expression of ICAM-1 (optical density), the number of VEGFR-2 positive (VEGFR-2+) blood vessels (per microscopic field), and the endothelial staining intensity of VEGFR-2 (score 0–3) were determined. In GBM, the extent of inflammation was 1.9 ± 0.7 (group mean ± SD). Mean optical density of inflammatory mediator ICAM-1 was 57.0 ± 27.1 (pixel values). The number of VEGFR-2+ blood vessels and endothelial VEGFR-2 staining intensity were 6.2 ± 2.4 and 1.2 ± 0.8, respectively. A positive association was found between endothelial VEGFR-2 staining intensity and the extent of inflammation (p = 0.005). Moreover, VEGFR-2 staining intensity correlated with the expression level of ICAM-1 (p = 0.026). The expression of VEGFR-2, one of the main targets of antiangiogenic therapy, depends on GBM microenvironment. Higher endothelial VEGFR-2 levels were seen in the presence of more pronounced inflammation. Target dependence on inflammatory tumor microenvironment has to be taken into consideration when treatment approaches that block VEGFR-2 signaling are designed. PMID:26798546

  7. Impact of tumor infiltrating CD63 positive cells on survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Kase, Marju; Adamson, Aidi; Saretok, Mikk; Minajeva, Ave; Vardja, Markus; Jõgi, Tõnu; Asser, Toomas; Jaal, Jana

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive type of brain cancer in adults. It is suggested that tumour microenvironment might influence treatment outcome. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of tumor infiltrating CD63 positive (CD63+) inflammatory and immune cells on treatment response and survival of GBM patients. Forty patients were operated and received postoperative radiotherapy (±chemotherapy for recurrent disease). In surgically excised GBM tissues, the number of CD63+ cells per microscopic field was determined and correlated with patient's survival. Immunohistochemical parameters were examined by two independent researchers whose results were in good accordance (R=0.8, P<0.001). Median survival time of the study group was 10.0 months (95% CI 9.0-11.0). However, the survival time clearly depended on the number of CD63+ cells in GBM tissue (log rank test, P=0.003). Median survival times for patients with low (

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme: an assessment of clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Sköld, K; Gorlia, T; Pellettieri, L; Giusti, V; H-Stenstam, B; Hopewell, J W

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), with a 6-h infusion of the boron carrier l-boronophenylalanine as a fructose preparation (BPA-f), as first-line radiotherapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Patient survival data from a Phase II study using BNCT were compared with retrospective data from the two arms of a Phase III study using conventional radiotherapy (RT) in the reference arm and using RT plus concomitant and adjuvant medication with temozolomide (TMZ) in the experimental arm, and were also compared with small subgroups of these patients for whom the methylation status of the MGMT (O6-methylguanine–DNA methyltransferase) DNA repair gene was known. Differences in the baseline characteristics, salvage therapy after recurrence and levels of severe adverse events were also considered. The results indicate that BNCT offers a treatment that is at least as effective as conventional RT alone. For patients with an unmethylated MGMT DNA repair gene, a possible clinical advantage of BNCT over RT/TMZ was suggested. BNCT is a single-day treatment, which is of convenience to patients, with mild side effects, which would offer an initial 6 weeks of good-quality life during the time when patients would otherwise be undergoing daily treatments with RT and TMZ. It is suggested that the use of BNCT with a 6-h infusion of BPA-f should be explored in a stratified randomised Phase II trial in which patients with the unmethylated MGMT DNA repair gene are offered BNCT in the experimental arm and RT plus TMZ in the reference arm. PMID:20603410

  9. New insights into the genetics of glioblastoma multiforme by familial exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Christina; Harz, Christian; Fischer, Ulrike; Schmitt, Jana; Ludwig, Nicole; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Mueller, Sabine C.; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Wolf, Nadine M.; Katus, Hugo A.; Meder, Benjamin; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Franke, Andre; Bohle, Rainer; Henn, Wolfram; Graf, Norbert; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and malignant subtype of human brain tumors. While a family clustering of GBM has long been acknowledged, relevant hereditary factors still remained elusive. Exome sequencing of families offers the option to discover respective genetic factors. We sequenced blood samples of one of the rare affected families: while both parents were healthy, both children were diagnosed with GBM. We report 85 homozygous non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in both siblings that were heterozygous in the parents. Beyond known key players for GBM such as ERBB2, PMS2, or CHI3L1, we identified over 50 genes that have not been associated to GBM so far. We also discovered three accumulative effects potentially adding to the tumorigenesis in the siblings: a clustering of multiple variants in single genes (e.g. PTPRB, CROCC), the aggregation of affected genes on specific molecular pathways (e.g. Focal adhesion or ECM receptor interaction) and genomic proximity (e.g. chr22.q12.2, chr1.p36.33). We found a striking accumulation of SNVs in specific genes for the daughter, who developed not only a GBM at the age of 12 years but was subsequently diagnosed with a pilocytic astrocytoma, a common acute lymphatic leukemia and a diffuse pontine glioma. The reported variants underline the relevance of genetic predisposition and cancer development in this family and demonstrate that GBM has a complex and heterogeneous genetic background. Sequencing of other affected families will help to further narrow down the driving genetic causes for this disease. PMID:25537509

  10. Invariant Delineation of Nuclear Architecture in Glioblastoma Multiforme for Clinical and Molecular Association

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ju; Borowsky, Alexander; Loss, Leandro; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    Automated analysis of whole mount tissue sections can provide insights into tumor subtypes and the underlying molecular basis of neoplasm. However, since tumor sections are collected from different laboratories, inherent technical and biological variations impede analysis for very large datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Our objective is to characterize tumor histopathology, through the delineation of the nuclear regions, from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections. Such a representation can then be mined for intrinsic subtypes across a large dataset for prediction and molecular association. Furthermore, nuclear segmentation is formulated within a multi-reference graph framework with geodesic constraints, which enables computation of multidimensional representations, on a cell-by-cell basis, for functional enrichment and bioinformatics analysis. Here, we present a novel method, Multi-Reference Graph Cut (MRGC), for nuclear segmentation that overcomes technical variations associated with sample preparation by incorporating prior knowledge from manually annotated reference images and local image features. The proposed approach has been validated on manually annotated samples and then applied to a dataset of 377 Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) whole slide images from 146 patients. For the GBM cohort, multidimensional representation of the nuclear features and their organization have identified (i) statistically significant subtypes based on several morphometric indices, (ii) whether each subtype can be predictive or not, and (iii) that the molecular correlates of predictive subtypes are consistent with the literature. Data and intermediaries for a number of tumor types (GBM, low grade glial, and kidney renal clear carcinoma) are available at: http://tcga.lbl.gov for correlation with TCGA molecular data. The website also provides an interface for panning and zooming of whole mount tissue sections with/without overlaid segmentation results for

  11. Cycloheximide promotes paraptosis induced by inhibition of cyclophilins in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Gundelach, Justin H; Bram, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Current treatment strategies based on multi-agent chemotherapy and/or radiation regimens have improved overall survival in some cases. However, resistance to apoptosis often develops in cancer cells, and its occurrence is thought to contribute to treatment failure. Non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms have become of great interest, therefore, in hopes that they would bypass tumor cell resistance. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a grade IV astrocytic tumor is the most frequent brain tumor in adults, and has a high rate of mortality. We report that NIM811, a small molecule cyclophilin-binding inhibitor, induces catastrophic vacuolization and cell death in GBM cells. These unique features are distinct from many known cell death pathways, and are associated with an incompletely defined cell death mechanism known as paraptosis. We found that NIM811-induced paraptosis is due to unresolved ER stress. The abnormal upregulation of protein translation was responsible for the build-up of misfolded or unfolded proteins in ER, whereas pro-survival autophagy and UPR signals were shutdown during prolonged treatment with NIM811. Although cycloheximide has been claimed to suppress paraptosis, instead we find that it only temporarily delayed vacuole formation, but actually enhanced paraptotic cell death in the long term. On the other hand, mTOR inhibitors rescued cells from NIM811-induced paraptosis by sustaining autophagy and the UPR, while specifically restraining cap-dependent translation. These findings not only provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying paraptosis, but also shed light on a potential approach to enhance GBM treatment. PMID:28518150

  12. Cycloheximide promotes paraptosis induced by inhibition of cyclophilins in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Gundelach, Justin H; Bram, Richard J

    2017-05-18

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Current treatment strategies based on multi-agent chemotherapy and/or radiation regimens have improved overall survival in some cases. However, resistance to apoptosis often develops in cancer cells, and its occurrence is thought to contribute to treatment failure. Non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms have become of great interest, therefore, in hopes that they would bypass tumor cell resistance. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a grade IV astrocytic tumor is the most frequent brain tumor in adults, and has a high rate of mortality. We report that NIM811, a small molecule cyclophilin-binding inhibitor, induces catastrophic vacuolization and cell death in GBM cells. These unique features are distinct from many known cell death pathways, and are associated with an incompletely defined cell death mechanism known as paraptosis. We found that NIM811-induced paraptosis is due to unresolved ER stress. The abnormal upregulation of protein translation was responsible for the build-up of misfolded or unfolded proteins in ER, whereas pro-survival autophagy and UPR signals were shutdown during prolonged treatment with NIM811. Although cycloheximide has been claimed to suppress paraptosis, instead we find that it only temporarily delayed vacuole formation, but actually enhanced paraptotic cell death in the long term. On the other hand, mTOR inhibitors rescued cells from NIM811-induced paraptosis by sustaining autophagy and the UPR, while specifically restraining cap-dependent translation. These findings not only provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying paraptosis, but also shed light on a potential approach to enhance GBM treatment.

  13. Glioblastoma Multiforme Regional Genetic and Cellular Expression Patterns: Influence on Anatomic and Physiologic MR Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Hodgson, J. Graeme; Chang, Jamie S.; Vandenberg, Scott R.; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Parsa, Andrew T.; McDermott, Michael W.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Dillon, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is influenced by genetic and cellular features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) aggressiveness. Materials and Methods: In this HIPAA-compliant institutional review board–approved study, multiple enhancing and peritumoral nonenhancing stereotactic neurosurgical biopsy samples from treatment-naïve GBMs were collected prospectively, with guidance from cerebral blood volume (CBV) MR imaging measurements. By using monoclonal antibodies, tissue specimens were examined for microvascular expression, hypoxia, tumor and overall cellular density, and histopathologic features of GBM aggressiveness. Genetic expression patterns were investigated with RNA microarrays. Imaging and histopathologic variables were compared with the Welch t test and Pearson correlations. Microarray analysis was performed by using false discovery rate (FDR) statistics. Results: Tumor biopsy of 13 adult patients yielded 16 enhancing and 14 peritumoral nonenhancing specimens. Enhancing regions had elevated relative CBV and reduced relative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements compared with peritumoral nonenhancing biopsy regions (P < .01). A positive correlation was found between relative CBV and all histopathologic features of aggressiveness (P < .04). An inverse correlation was found between relative ADC and all histopathologic features of aggressiveness (P < .05). RNA expression patterns between tumor regions were found to be significantly different (FDR < 0.05), with hierarchical clustering by biopsy region only. Conclusion: These findings suggest MR imaging is significantly influenced by GBM genetic and cellular biologic features of aggressiveness and imply physiologic MR imaging may be useful in pinpointing regions of highest malignancy within heterogeneous tissues, thus facilitating histologic grading of primary glial brain tumors. © RSNA, 2010 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10

  14. Mechanisms of a Glial Modulating Agent, Propentofylline: Potential New Treatment for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Valerie

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor with a very poor prognosis despite multi-modalities of treatment. As a result, there is a critical need to develop alternative therapies. Propentofylline (PPF) is a methyl xanthine with glial modulating properties. Based on known mechanisms of PPF and the important role of glial cells in glioma growth, we hypothesized that PPF can target glial cells in the tumor microenvironment, decreasing tumor growth. More specifically, PPF can target microglia and astrocytes. In Chapter 3 we demonstrate that PPF decreases microglia migration towards CNS-1 cells, decreases CNS-1 cells invasion when cultured with microglia and decreases MMP-9 expression in microglia. In Chapter 4 we showed that PPF decreases TROY expression in microglia. In Chapter 5 we showed PPF causes astrocytes to increase glutamate uptake through the GLT-1 transporter, leading to less glutamate available for CNS-1 cells, ultimately resulting in increased CNS-1 cell apoptosis. Finally, in Chapter 6 we present supportive data that PPF uniquely targets resident microglia in the CNS due to pharmacological differences between species and cell types. This thesis describes the following major contributions to the field of glioma research: 1) identification of propentofylline as a possible new drug for GBM treatment that targets microglia and astrocytes, decreasing brain tumor growth in vivo, and further supporting a different functional role of microglia and infiltrating macrophages in the tumor microenvironment, 2) identification of TROY as a novel signaling molecule expressed in microglia in response to CNS-1 cells and involved in microglia migration, and 3) identification of differential responses between species and cell types with propentofylline treatment.

  15. Patient-Specific Resection Strategy of Glioblastoma Multiforme: Choice Based on a Preoperative Scoring Scale.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihui; Cui, Yong; Liu, Xiang; Ren, Xiaohui; Lin, Song

    2017-07-01

    The real association between extent of resection and outcome in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains unclear. The goal of this study was to disclose the effect of gross total resection on survival and establish a scale used for surgical decision making. A retrospective review was undertaken of 416 patients who received operation for GBM from 2008 to 2015 in Beijing Tiantan Hospital. To reduce bias in patient selection, propensity score analysis was conducted and 99 pairs of matched GBMs were generated. Survival between different groups was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method, and independent predictors of survival were identified using the Cox proportional hazards model. Overall, the survival of patients undergoing GTR was significantly longer than those not undergoing GTR (12.0 vs. 9.0 months [p < 0.001] for progression-free survival [PFS], and 20.5 versus 16.0 months [p < 0.001] for overall survival [OS]). In the propensity model, the survival benefit of GTR remained significant, which has been further validated in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.613, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.454-0.827 [p = 0.001] for PFS, and HR 0.475, 95% CI 0.343-0.659 [p < 0.001] for OS). Using a scoring scale based on age, epilepsy, location, tumor size, and Karnofsky performance score, patients were stratified into low-, moderate-, and high-risk cohorts. The survival benefit of GTR could be observed in the low- and moderate-risk cohorts but not the high-risk cohort. GTR was an independent predictor of increased survival for patients with GBM. The risk scoring scale quantified the clinical significance of operation and helped us to project more personalized surgical strategies for individual patients.

  16. Molecular Predictors of Long-Term Survival in Glioblastoma Multiforme Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cowperthwaite, Matthew C.; Burnett, Mark G.; Shpak, Max

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive adult primary brain cancer, with <10% of patients surviving for more than 3 years. Demographic and clinical factors (e.g. age) and individual molecular biomarkers have been associated with prolonged survival in GBM patients. However, comprehensive systems-level analyses of molecular profiles associated with long-term survival (LTS) in GBM patients are still lacking. We present an integrative study of molecular data and clinical variables in these long-term survivors (LTSs, patients surviving >3 years) to identify biomarkers associated with prolonged survival, and to assess the possible similarity of molecular characteristics between LGG and LTS GBM. We analyzed the relationship between multivariable molecular data and LTS in GBM patients from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), including germline and somatic point mutation, gene expression, DNA methylation, copy number variation (CNV) and microRNA (miRNA) expression using logistic regression models. The molecular relationship between GBM LTS and LGG tumors was examined through cluster analysis. We identified 13, 94, 43, 29, and 1 significant predictors of LTS using Lasso logistic regression from the somatic point mutation, gene expression, DNA methylation, CNV, and miRNA expression data sets, respectively. Individually, DNA methylation provided the best prediction performance (AUC = 0.84). Combining multiple classes of molecular data into joint regression models did not improve prediction accuracy, but did identify additional genes that were not significantly predictive in individual models. PCA and clustering analyses showed that GBM LTS typically had gene expression profiles similar to non-LTS GBM. Furthermore, cluster analysis did not identify a close affinity between LTS GBM and LGG, nor did we find a significant association between LTS and secondary GBM. The absence of unique LTS profiles and the lack of similarity between LTS GBM and LGG, indicates

  17. Screening of genomic imbalances in glioblastoma multiforme using high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Vranová, Vladimíra; Necesalová, Eva; Kuglík, Petr; Cejpek, Pavel; Pesáková, Martina; Budínská, Eva; Relichová, Jirina; Veselská, Renata

    2007-02-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a molecular cytogenetic technique that allows the genome-wide analysis of DNA sequence copy number differences. We applied conventional CGH and the recently developed high-resolution CGH (HR-CGH) to tumour samples from 18 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in order to compare the sensitivity of CGH and HR-CGH in the screening of chromosomal abnormalities. The abnormalities were studied in topologically different central and peripheral tumour parts. A total of 78 different changes were observed using CGH (0-16 per tumour, median 3.5) and 154 using HR-CGH (0-21 per tumour, median 6). Using HR-CGH, losses were more frequent than gains. The representation of the most prominent changes revealed by both methods was similar and was comprised of the amplification of 7q12 and 12q13-q15, the gain of 7, 3q and 19, and the loss of 10, 9p, and 13q. However, HR-CGH detected certain other abnormalities (the loss of 6, 14q, 15q and 18q, and the gain of 19), which were rarely revealed by CGH. Using HR-CGH, the numbers and types of chromosomal changes detected in the central and peripheral parts of GBM were almost the same. The loss of chromosomes 10 and 9p and the gain of chromosomes 7 and 19 were the most frequent chromosomal alterations in both tumour parts. Our results from the GBM analysis show that HR-CGH technology can reveal new, recurrent genetic alterations involving the genes known to participate in tumorigenesis and in the progression of several human malignancies, thus allowing for a more accurate genetic characterization of these tumours.

  18. Glioblastoma multiforme in Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Tevfik; Cikla, Ulas; Kirst, Alice; Baskaya, Mustafa K

    2015-04-17

    Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome (KTWS) is a rare syndrome in which patients usually present with cutaneous hemangiomas, venous varicosities, and bone and soft tissue hypertrophy of the affected limb. Intracranial lesions in patients with KTWS are extremely rare, and are generally reported as single cases in the literature. We describe a rare case, where a patient with KTWS was found with a hemorrhagic grade IV astrocytoma. Although central nervous system abnormalities such as intracranial aneurysms and cerebral and spinal cord cavernomas have been described in patients with KTWS, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between glioblastoma multiforme (grade IV astrocytoma) and KTWS in the English-language medical literature. A 61-year-old white Caucasian man with a history of KTWS presented with seizures. Left upper and lower extremity hypertrophy, left foot, leg and ear gigantism and left-sided abdominal capillary hemangiomas were noted in the physical examination. Cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained, showing a heterogeneous lesion in the cingulate gyrus, with peripheral and central areas of T1 hyperintensity and layering T2 hypointensity consistent with a hemorrhage. A right parasagittal frontal craniotomy was performed with an interhemispheric approach. We had difficulty controlling the bleeding with bipolar electrocautery during surgery and finally were able to stop the bleeding using surgicel and gelfoam. Postoperative cranial CT and MRI scans showed intraparenchymal hemorrhage centered within the medial right frontal lobe. There was no increase in hematoma size in consecutive CT scans. Co-occurrence of vascular abnormalities with KWTS should be taken into consideration to avoid perilous preoperative and postoperative complications.

  19. FDA drug approval summary: bevacizumab (Avastin) as treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Martin H; Shen, Yuan Li; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2009-11-01

    On May 5, 2009, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to bevacizumab injection (Avastin; Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA) as a single agent for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with progressive disease following prior therapy. The approval was based on durable objective responses (independent radiologic review with stable or decreasing corticosteroid use). Two trials evaluating bevacizumab, 10 mg/kg by i.v. infusion every 2 weeks, were submitted. One trial also randomized patients to bevacizumab plus irinotecan treatment. All patients had received prior surgery, radiotherapy, and temozolomide. Patients with active brain hemorrhage were excluded. One trial enrolled 78 independently confirmed GBM patients. Partial responses were observed in 25.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.0%-36.1%) of the patients. The median response duration was 4.2 months (95% CI, 3.0-5.7 months). The second trial enrolled 56 GBM patients. Partial responses were observed in 19.6% (95% CI, 10.9%-31.3%) of the patients. The median response duration was 3.9 months (95% CI, 2.4-17.4 months). Safety data were provided for the first study. The most frequently reported bevacizumab adverse events of any grade were infection, fatigue, headache, hypertension, epistaxis, and diarrhea. Grade 3-5 bevacizumab-related adverse events included bleeding/hemorrhage, central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhage, hypertension, venous and arterial thromboembolic events, wound-healing complications, proteinuria, gastrointestinal perforation, and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy. The attribution of certain adverse events (e.g., CNS hemorrhage, wound-healing complications, and thromboembolic events) to either bevacizumab, underlying disease, or both could not be determined because of the single-arm, noncomparative study design.

  20. An Integrated mRNA and microRNA Expression Signature for Glioblastoma Multiforme Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Bing, Zhitong; Su, Yanlin; Deng, Defeng; Peng, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Although patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) have grave prognosis, significant variability in patient outcome is observed. The objective of this study is to identify a molecular signature for GBM prognosis. We subjected 355 mRNA and microRNA expression profiles to elastic net-regulated Cox regression for identification of an integrated RNA signature for GBM prognosis. A prognostic index (PI) was generated for patient stratification. Survival comparison was conducted by Kaplan-Meier method and a general multivariate Cox regression procedure was applied to evaluate the independence of the PI. The abilities and efficiencies of signatures to predict GBM patient outcome was assessed and compared by the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC). An integrated RNA prognostic signature consisted by 4 protective mRNAs, 12 risky mRNAs, and 1 risky microRNA was identified. Decreased survival was associated with being in the high-risk group (hazard ratio = 2.864, P<0.0001). The prognostic value of the integrated signature was validated in five independent GBM expression datasets (n = 201, hazard ratio = 2.453, P<0.0001). The PI outperformed the known clinical factors, mRNA-only, and miRNA-only prognostic signatures for GBM prognosis (area under the ROC curve for the integrated RNA, mRNA-only, and miRNA-only signatures were 0.828, 0.742, and 0.757 at 3 years of overall survival, respectively, P<0.0001 by permutation test). We describe the first, to our knowledge, robust transcriptome-based integrated RNA signature that improves the current GBM prognosis based on clinical variables, mRNA-only, and miRNA-only signatures. PMID:24871302

  1. Human Glioblastoma Multiforme: p53 Reactivation by a Novel MDM2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Barbara; Bendinelli, Sara; Gabelloni, Pamela; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Daniele, Simona; Scatena, Fabrizio; Vanacore, Renato; Campiglia, Pietro; Bertamino, Alessia; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel; Sorriento, Daniela; Del Giudice, Carmine; Iaccarino, Guido; Novellino, Ettore; Martini, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Cancer development and chemo-resistance are often due to impaired functioning of the p53 tumor suppressor through genetic mutation or sequestration by other proteins. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), p53 availability is frequently reduced because it binds to the Murine Double Minute-2 (MDM2) oncoprotein, which accumulates at high concentrations in tumor cells. The use of MDM2 inhibitors that interfere with the binding of p53 and MDM2 has become a valid approach to inhibit cell growth in a number of cancers; however little is known about the efficacy of these inhibitors in GBM. We report that a new small-molecule inhibitor of MDM2 with a spirooxoindolepyrrolidine core structure, named ISA27, effectively reactivated p53 function and inhibited human GBM cell growth in vitro by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In immunoincompetent BALB/c nude mice bearing a human GBM xenograft, the administration of ISA27 in vivo activated p53, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in tumor tissue. Significantly, ISA27 was non-toxic in an in vitro normal human cell model and an in vivo mouse model. ISA27 administration in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) produced a synergistic inhibitory effect on GBM cell viability in vitro, suggesting the possibility of lowering the dose of TMZ used in the treatment of GBM. In conclusion, our data show that ISA27 releases the powerful antitumor capacities of p53 in GBM cells. The use of this MDM2 inhibitor could become a novel therapy for the treatment of GBM patients. PMID:23977270

  2. Glioblastoma multiforme of the optic chiasm: A rare case of common pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lyapichev, Kirill A.; Bregy, Amade; Cassel, Adrienne; Handfield, Chelsea; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Kay, Matthew D.; Basil, Gregory; Komotar, Ricardo J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malignant optic and chiasmatic gliomas are extremely rare, and are classified pathologically as anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Approximately 40 cases of optic GBM in adults have been reported in the literature, and only five of them were described to originate from the optic chiasm. Case Description: An 82-year-old male patient with a past medical history of diabetes mellitus type 2, melanoma, and bladder cancer presented with gradual vision loss of the left eye in a period of 1 month. After neuro-ophthalmological examination, the decision of thither magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies was made. It showed a contrast enhancing mass in the region of the optic chiasm. In this case, imaging study was not enough to establish an accurate diagnosis and a left pterional craniotomy for biopsy and resection of the optic chiasmal mass was performed. After histological evaluation of the mass tissue, the diagnosis of GBM was made. Taking into account the patient's poor condition and unfavorable prognosis he was moved to inpatient hospice. The patient deceased within 2 months after surgery. Conclusion: Chiasmal GBM is an extremely rare condition where a biopsy is necessary for accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment. Differential diagnosis for such lesions can be very difficult and include demyelinating optic neuritis and non-demyelinating inflammatory optic neuropathy (e.g., sarcoid), vascular lesions (e.g., cavernoma), compressive lesions of the optic apparatus, metastatic malignancy, and primary tumors of the anterior optic pathway. The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy including novel stereotaxic radiosurgery methods is still unclear and will need to be evaluated. PMID:27512611

  3. Glioblastoma multiforme of the optic chiasm: A rare case of common pathology.

    PubMed

    Lyapichev, Kirill A; Bregy, Amade; Cassel, Adrienne; Handfield, Chelsea; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Kay, Matthew D; Basil, Gregory; Komotar, Ricardo J

    2016-01-01

    Malignant optic and chiasmatic gliomas are extremely rare, and are classified pathologically as anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Approximately 40 cases of optic GBM in adults have been reported in the literature, and only five of them were described to originate from the optic chiasm. An 82-year-old male patient with a past medical history of diabetes mellitus type 2, melanoma, and bladder cancer presented with gradual vision loss of the left eye in a period of 1 month. After neuro-ophthalmological examination, the decision of thither magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies was made. It showed a contrast enhancing mass in the region of the optic chiasm. In this case, imaging study was not enough to establish an accurate diagnosis and a left pterional craniotomy for biopsy and resection of the optic chiasmal mass was performed. After histological evaluation of the mass tissue, the diagnosis of GBM was made. Taking into account the patient's poor condition and unfavorable prognosis he was moved to inpatient hospice. The patient deceased within 2 months after surgery. Chiasmal GBM is an extremely rare condition where a biopsy is necessary for accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment. Differential diagnosis for such lesions can be very difficult and include demyelinating optic neuritis and non-demyelinating inflammatory optic neuropathy (e.g., sarcoid), vascular lesions (e.g., cavernoma), compressive lesions of the optic apparatus, metastatic malignancy, and primary tumors of the anterior optic pathway. The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy including novel stereotaxic radiosurgery methods is still unclear and will need to be evaluated.

  4. Differential Radiosensitizing Potential of Temozolomide in MGMT Promoter Methylated Glioblastoma Multiforme Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nifterik, Krista A. van; Berg, Jaap van den; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Lafleur, M. Vincent M.; Leenstra, Sieger; Slotman, Ben J.; Hulsebos, Theo J.M.; Sminia, Peter

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the radiosensitizing potential of temozolomide (TMZ) for human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines using single-dose and fractionated {gamma}-irradiation. Methods and Materials: Three genetically characterized human GBM cell lines (AMC-3046, VU-109, and VU-122) were exposed to various single (0-6 Gy) and daily fractionated doses (2 Gy per fraction) of {gamma}-irradiation. Repeated TMZ doses were given before and concurrent with irradiation treatment. Immediately plated clonogenic cell-survival curves were determined for both the single-dose and the fractionated irradiation experiments. To establish the net effect of clonogenic cell survival and cell proliferation, growth curves were determined, expressed as the number of surviving cells. Results: All three cell lines showed MGMT promoter methylation, lacked MGMT protein expression, and were sensitive to TMZ. The isotoxic TMZ concentrations used were in a clinically feasible range of 10 {mu}mol/L (AMC-3046), 3 {mu}mol/L (VU-109), and 2.5 {mu}mol/L (VU-122). Temozolomide was able to radiosensitize two cell lines (AMC 3046 and VU-122) using single-dose irradiation. A reduction in the number of surviving cells after treatment with the combination of TMZ and fractionated irradiation was seen in all three cell lines, but only AMC 3046 showed a radiosensitizing effect. Conclusions: This study on TMZ-sensitive GBM cell lines shows that TMZ can act as a radiosensitizer and is at least additive to {gamma}-irradiation. Enhancement of the radiation response by TMZ seems to be independent of the epigenetically silenced MGMT gen000.

  5. Integrative analysis of micro-RNA, gene expression, and survival of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Hsu, Thomas; Kelsey, Karl T; Lin, Chien-Ling

    2015-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common type of malignant brain tumor, is highly fatal. Limited understanding of its rapid progression necessitates additional approaches that integrate what is known about the genomics of this cancer. Using a discovery set (n = 348) and a validation set (n = 174) of GBM patients, we performed genome-wide analyses that integrated mRNA and micro-RNA expression data from GBM as well as associated survival information, assessing coordinated variability in each as this reflects their known mechanistic functions. Cox proportional hazards models were used for the survival analyses, and nonparametric permutation tests were performed for the micro-RNAs to investigate the association between the number of associated genes and its prognostication. We also utilized mediation analyses for micro-RNA-gene pairs to identify their mediation effects. Genome-wide analyses revealed a novel pattern: micro-RNAs related to more gene expressions are more likely to be associated with GBM survival (P = 4.8 × 10(-5)). Genome-wide mediation analyses for the 32,660 micro-RNA-gene pairs with strong association (false discovery rate [FDR] < 0.01%) identified 51 validated pairs with significant mediation effect. Of the 51 pairs, miR-223 had 16 mediation genes. These 16 mediation genes of miR-223 were also highly associated with various other micro-RNAs and mediated their prognostic effects as well. We further constructed a gene signature using the 16 genes, which was highly associated with GBM survival in both the discovery and validation sets (P = 9.8 × 10(-6)). This comprehensive study discovered mediation effects of micro-RNA to gene expression and GBM survival and provided a new analytic framework for integrative genomics.

  6. Initial care and outcome of glioblastoma multiforme patients in 2 diverse health care scenarios in Brazil: does public versus private health care matter?

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Luiz Victor Maia; Pontes, Lucíola de Barros; Callegaro-Filho, Donato; Koch, Ludmila de Oliveira; Weltman, Eduardo; Victor, Elivane da Silva; Santos, Adrialdo José; Borges, Lia Raquel Rodrigues; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Malheiros, Suzana Maria Fleury

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological and survival features of patients with glioblastoma multiforme treated in 2 health care scenarios—public and private—in Brazil. Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical, treatment, and outcome characteristics of glioblastoma multiforme patients from 2003 to 2011 at 2 institutions. Results The median age of the 171 patients (117 public and 54 private) was 59.3 years (range, 18–84). The median survival for patients treated in private institutions was 17.4 months (95% confidence interval, 11.1–23.7) compared with 7.1 months (95% confidence interval, 3.8–10.4) for patients treated in public institutions (P < .001). The time from the first symptom to surgery was longer in the public setting (median of 64 days for the public hospital and 31 days for the private institution; P = .003). The patients at the private hospital received radiotherapy concurrent with chemotherapy in 59.3% of cases; at the public hospital, only 21.4% (P < .001). Despite these differences, the institution of treatment was not found to be an independent predictor of outcome (hazard ratio, 1.675; 95% confidence interval, 0.951–2.949; P = .074). The Karnofsky performance status and any additional treatment after surgery were predictors of survival. A hazard ratio of 0.010 (95% confidence interval, 0.003–0.033; P < .001) was observed for gross total tumor resection followed by radiotherapy concurrent with chemotherapy. Conclusions Despite obvious disparities between the hospitals, the medical assistance scenario was not an independent predictor of survival. However, survival was directly influenced by additional treatment after surgery. Therefore, increasing access to resources in developing countries like Brazil is critical. PMID:24463356

  7. Fatal Liver and Bone Marrow Toxicity by Combination Treatment of Dichloroacetate and Artesunate in a Glioblastoma Multiforme Patient: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Martin; Schwab, Stefan; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old male patient was treated with standard radiochemotherapy with temozolomide for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). After worsening of his clinical condition, further tumor-specific treatment was unlikely to be successful, and the patient seeked help from an alternative practitioner, who administered a combination of dichloroacetate (DCA) and artesunate (ART). A few days later, the patient showed clinical and laboratory signs of liver damage and bone marrow toxicity (leukopenia, thrombocytopenia). Despite successful restoration of laboratory parameters upon symptomatic treatment, the patient died 10 days after the infusion. DCA bears a well-documented hepatotoxic risk, while ART can be considered as safe concerning hepatotoxicity. Bone marrow toxicity can appear upon ART application as reduced reticulocyte counts and disturbed erythropoiesis. It can be assumed that the simultaneous use of both drugs caused liver injury and bone marrow toxicity. The compassionate use of DCA/ART combination therapy outside of clinical trials cannot be recommended for GBM treatment. PMID:27774434

  8. Asiatic acid induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptotic death in glioblastoma multiforme cells both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Chandagirikoppal V.; Jain, Anil K.; Agarwal, Chapla; Pierce, Angela; Keating, Amy; Huber, Kendra M.; Serkova, Natalie J.; Wempe, Michael F.; Agarwal, Rajesh; Deep, Gagan

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an untreatable malignancy. Existing therapeutic options are insufficient, and adversely affect functional and non-cancerous cells in the brain impairing different functions of the body. Therefore, there is an urgent need for additional preventive and therapeutic non-toxic drugs against GBM. Asiatic acid (AsA; 2,3,23-trihydroxy-12-ursen-28-oic acid, C30H48O5) is a natural small molecule widely used to treat various neurological disorders, and the present research investigates AsA’s efficacy against GBM both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that AsA treatment (10–100 μM) decreased the human GBM cell (LN18, U87MG, and U118MG) viability, with better efficacy than temozolomide at equimolar doses. Orally administered AsA (30 mg/kg/day) strongly decreased tumor volume in mice when administered immediately after ectopic U87MG xenograft implantation (54% decrease, p≤0.05) or in mice with established xenografts (48% decrease, p≤0.05) without any apparent toxicity. Importantly, AsA feeding (30 mg/kg/twice a day) also decreased the orthotopic U87MG xenografts growth in nude mice as measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Using LC/MS-MS methods, AsA was detected in mice plasma and brain tissue, confirming that AsA crosses blood-brain barrier. Mechanistic studies showed that AsA induces apoptotic death by modulating the protein expression of several apoptosis regulators (caspases, Bcl2 family members, and survivin) in GBM cells. Furthermore, AsA induced ER stress (increased GRP78 and Calpain, and decreased Calnexin and IRE1α expression), enhanced free intra-cellular calcium, and damaged cellular organization in GBM cells. These experimental results demonstrate that AsA is effective against GBM, and advocate further pre-clinical and clinical evaluations of AsA against GBM. PMID:25252179

  9. Interobserver variability in the radiological assessment of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including perfusion MRI in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Kerkhof, M; Hagenbeek, R E; van der Kallen, B F W; Lycklama À Nijeholt, G J; Dirven, L; Taphoorn, M J B; Vos, M J

    2016-10-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has limited value for differentiation of true tumor progression and pseudoprogression in treated glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) may be helpful in the differentiation of these two phenomena. Here interobserver variability in routine radiological evaluation of GBM patients is assessed using MRI, including PWI. Three experienced neuroradiologists evaluated MR scans of 28 GBM patients during temozolomide chemoradiotherapy at three time points: preoperative (MR1) and postoperative (MR2) MR scan and the follow-up MR scan after three cycles of adjuvant temozolomide (MR3). Tumor size was measured both on T1 post-contrast and T2 weighted images according to the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria. PW images of MR3 were evaluated by visual inspection of relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) color maps and by quantitative rCBV measurements of enhancing areas with highest rCBV. Image interpretability of PW images was also scored. Finally, the neuroradiologists gave a conclusion on tumor status, based on the interpretation of both T1 and T2 weighted images (MR1, MR2 and MR3) in combination with PWI (MR3). Interobserver agreement on visual interpretation of rCBV maps was good (κ = 0.63) but poor on quantitative rCBV measurements and on interpretability of perfusion images (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.37 and κ = 0.23, respectively). Interobserver agreement on the overall conclusion of tumor status was moderate (κ = 0.48). Interobserver agreement on the visual interpretation of PWI color maps was good. However, overall interpretation of MR scans (using both conventional and PW images) showed considerable interobserver variability. Therefore, caution should be applied when interpreting MRI results during chemoradiation therapy. © 2016 EAN.

  10. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Monjazeb, Arta M.; Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney; Case, L. Douglas; Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Lesser, Glen J.; Shaw, Edward G.

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4-5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  11. A Metabolic Inhibitory Cocktail for Grave Cancers: Metformin, Pioglitazone and Lithium Combination in Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer and Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Elmaci, İlhan; Altinoz, Meric A

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are among the human cancers with worst prognosis which require an urgent need for efficient therapies. Here, we propose to apply to treat both malignancies with a triple combination of drugs, which are already in use for different indications. Recent studies demonstrated a considerable link between risk of PC and diabetes. In experimental models, anti-diabetogenic agents suppress growth of PC, including metformin (M), pioglitazone (P) and lithium (L). L is used in psychiatric practice, yet also bears anti-diabetic potential and selectively inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β). M, a biguanide class anti-diabetic agent shows anticancer activity via activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Glitazones bind to PPAR-γ and inhibit NF-κB, triggering cell proliferation, apoptosis resistance and synthesis of inflammatory cytokines in cancer cells. Inhibition of inflammatory cytokines could simultaneously decrease tumor growth and alleviate cancer cachexia, having a major role in PC mortality. Furthermore, mutual synergistic interactions exist between PPAR-γ and GSK-3β, between AMPK and GSK-3β and between AMPK and PPAR-γ. In GBM, M blocks angiogenesis and migration in experimental models. Very noteworthy, among GBM patients with type 2 diabetes, usage of M significantly correlates with better survival while reverse is true for sulfonylureas. In experimental models, P synergies with ligands of RAR, RXR and statins in reducing growth of GBM. Further, usage of P was found to be lesser in anaplastic astrocytoma and GBM patients, indicating a protective effect of P against high-grade gliomas. L is accumulated in GBM cells faster and higher than in neuroblastoma cells, and its levels further increase with chronic exposure. Recent studies revealed anti-invasive potential of L in GBM cell lines. Here, we propose that a triple-agent regime including drugs already in clinical usage may provide a

  12. Addition of Bevacizumab to Standard Radiation Therapy and Daily Temozolomide Is Associated With Minimal Toxicity in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Vredenburgh, James J.; Desjardins, Annick; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Reardon, David A.; Peters, Katherine B.; Herndon, James E.; Marcello, Jennifer; Bailey, Leighann; Threatt, Stevie; Sampson, John; Friedman, Allan; Friedman, Henry S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety of the addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 125 patients with newly diagnosed GBM were enrolled in the study, and received standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide. All patients underwent a craniotomy and were at least 2 weeks postoperative. Radiation therapy was administered in 1.8-Gy fractions, with the clinical target volume for the primary course treated to a dose of 45 to 50.4 Gy, followed by a boost of 9 to 14.4 Gy, to a total dose of 59.4 Gy. Patients received temozolomide at 75 mg/m{sup 2} daily throughout the course of radiation therapy. Bevacizumab was given at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 14 days, beginning a minimum of 4 weeks postoperatively. Results: Of the 125 patients, 120 (96%) completed the protocol-specified radiation therapy. Five patients had to stop the protocol therapy, 2 patients with pulmonary emboli, and 1 patient each with a Grade 2 central nervous system hemorrhage, Grade 4 pancytopenia, and wound dehiscence requiring surgical intervention. All 5 patients ultimately finished the radiation therapy. After radiation therapy, 3 patients had progressive disease, 2 had severe fatigue and decreased performance status, 1 patient had a colonic perforation, and 1 had a rectal fissure; these 7 patients therefore did not proceed with the protocol-specified adjuvant temozolomide, bevacizumab, and irinotecan. However, 113 patients (90%) were able to continue on study. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide was found to be associated with minimal toxicity in patients newly diagnosed with GBM.

  13. Correlation between EGFR Amplification and the Expression of MicroRNA-200c in Primary Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Serna, Eva; Lopez-Gines, Concha; Monleon, Daniel; Muñoz-Hidalgo, Lisandra; Callaghan, Robert C.; Gil-Benso, Rosario; Martinetto, Horacio; Gregori-Romero, Aurelia; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Extensive infiltration of the surrounding healthy brain tissue is a critical feature in glioblastoma. Several miRNAs have been related to gliomagenesis, some of them related with the EGFR pathway. We have evaluated whole-genome miRNA expression profiling associated with different EGFR amplification patterns, studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization in tissue microarrays, of 30 cases of primary glioblastoma multiforme, whose clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features have also been analyzed. MicroRNA-200c showed a very significant difference between tumors having or not EGFR amplification. This microRNA plays an important role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, but its implication in the behavior of glioblastoma is largely unknown. With respect to EGFR status our cases were categorized into three groups: high level EGFR amplification, low level EGFR amplification, and no EGFR amplification. Our results showed that microRNA-200c and E-cadherin expression are down-regulated, while ZEB1 is up-regulated, when tumors showed a high level of EGFR amplification. Conversely, ZEB1 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower in the group of tumors without EGFR amplification. Tumors with a low level of EGFR amplification showed ZEB1 expression levels comparable to those detected in the group with a high level of amplification. In this study we provide what is to our knowledge the first report of association between microRNA-200c and EGFR amplification in glioblastomas. PMID:25058589

  14. Correlation between EGFR amplification and the expression of microRNA-200c in primary glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Serna, Eva; Lopez-Gines, Concha; Monleon, Daniel; Muñoz-Hidalgo, Lisandra; Callaghan, Robert C; Gil-Benso, Rosario; Martinetto, Horacio; Gregori-Romero, Aurelia; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Extensive infiltration of the surrounding healthy brain tissue is a critical feature in glioblastoma. Several miRNAs have been related to gliomagenesis, some of them related with the EGFR pathway. We have evaluated whole-genome miRNA expression profiling associated with different EGFR amplification patterns, studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization in tissue microarrays, of 30 cases of primary glioblastoma multiforme, whose clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features have also been analyzed. MicroRNA-200c showed a very significant difference between tumors having or not EGFR amplification. This microRNA plays an important role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, but its implication in the behavior of glioblastoma is largely unknown. With respect to EGFR status our cases were categorized into three groups: high level EGFR amplification, low level EGFR amplification, and no EGFR amplification. Our results showed that microRNA-200c and E-cadherin expression are down-regulated, while ZEB1 is up-regulated, when tumors showed a high level of EGFR amplification. Conversely, ZEB1 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower in the group of tumors without EGFR amplification. Tumors with a low level of EGFR amplification showed ZEB1 expression levels comparable to those detected in the group with a high level of amplification. In this study we provide what is to our knowledge the first report of association between microRNA-200c and EGFR amplification in glioblastomas.

  15. Phase II study of XR5000 (DACA) administered as a 120-h infusion in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Twelves, C; Campone, M; Coudert, B; Van den Bent, M; de Jonge, M; Dittrich, C; Rampling, R; Sorio, R; Lacombe, D; de Balincourt, C; Fumoleau, P

    2002-05-01

    XR5000 is a tricyclic carboxamide that intercalates DNA and inhibits both topoisomerase I and II. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of XR5000 in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme previously untreated with chemotherapy at relapse. Patients received XR5000 at a dose of 3010 mg/m2 as a 120-h central venous infusion every 3 weeks. An independent panel assessed response every two cycles using McDonald's criteria (tumour size, steroid intake and neurological status); toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0. Sixteen patients were enrolled (one ineligible patient was excluded from efficacy evaluation). Performance status was zero (five patients), one (nine patients) or two (one patient). They received 30 cycles of XR5000 (median 2, range 1-5). Haematological toxicity was mild, with only one patient experiencing grade 3 neutropenia. Other related grade 3/4 adverse events included chest pain (one patient), axillary vein thrombosis (one patient) and rigors/fever in the absence of neutropenia (one patient). There were no objective responses, 14 patients progressing on XR5000 and one having stable disease. Although XR5000 was generally well tolerated, these results do not support further evaluation in patients with glioblastoma multiforme using this dose and schedule.

  16. Application of fuzzy c-means segmentation technique for tissue differentiation in MR images of a hemorrhagic glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W E; Velthuizen, R P; Phuphanich, S; Hall, L O; Clarke, L P; Silbiger, M L

    1995-01-01

    The application of a raw data-based, operator-independent MR segmentation technique to differentiate boundaries of tumor from edema or hemorrhage is demonstrated. A case of a glioblastoma multiforme with gross and histopathologic correlation is presented. The MR image data set was segmented into tissue classes based on three different MR weighted image parameters (T1-, proton density-, and T2-weighted) using unsupervised fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithm technique for pattern recognition. A radiological examination of the MR images and correlation with fuzzy clustering segmentations was performed. Results were confirmed by gross and histopathology which, to the best of our knowledge, reports the first application of this demanding approach. Based on the results of neuropathologic correlation, the application of FCM MR image segmentation to several MR images of a glioblastoma multiforme represents a viable technique for displaying diagnostically relevant tissue contrast information used in 3D volume reconstruction. With this technique, it is possible to generate segmentation images that display clinically important neuroanatomic and neuropathologic tissue contrast information from raw MR image data.

  17. Hepatotoxicity by combination treatment of temozolomide, artesunate and Chinese herbs in a glioblastoma multiforme patient: case report review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Efferth, Thomas; Schöttler, Ursula; Krishna, Sanjeev; Schmiedek, Peter; Wenz, Frederik; Giordano, Frank A

    2017-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents an aggressive tumor type with poor prognosis. The majority of GBM patients cannot be cured. There is high willingness among patients for the compassionate use of non-approved medications, which might occasionally lead to profound toxicity. A 65-year-old patient with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been treated with radiochemotherapy including temozolomide (TMZ) after surgery. The treatment outcome was evaluated as stable disease with a tendency to slow tumor progression. In addition to standard medication (ondansetron, valproic acid, levetiracetam, lorazepam, clobazam), the patient took the antimalarial drug artesunate (ART) and a decoction of Chinese herbs (Coptis chinensis, Siegesbeckia orientalis, Artemisia scoparia, Dictamnus dasycarpus). In consequence, the clinical status deteriorated. Elevated liver enzymes were noted with peak values of 238 U/L (GPT/ALAT), 226 U/L (GOT/ASAT), and 347 U/L (γ-GT), respectively. After cessation of ART and Chinese herbs, the values returned back to normal and the patient felt well again. In the literature, hepatotoxicity is well documented for TMZ, but is very rare for ART. Among the Chinese herbs used, Dictamnus dasycarpus has been reported to induce liver injury. Additional medication included valproic acid and levetiracetam, which are also reported to exert hepatotoxicity. While all drugs alone may bear a minor risk for hepatotoxicity, the combination treatment might have caused increased liver enzyme activities. It can be speculated that the combination of these drugs caused liver injury. We conclude that the compassionate use of ART and Chinese herbs is not recommended during standard radiochemotherapy with TMZ for GBM.

  18. Accelerated Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolomide for Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Safety and Efficacy Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Panet-Raymond, Valerie; Souhami, Luis; Roberge, David; Kavan, Petr; Shakibnia, Lily; Muanza, Thierry; Lambert, Christine; Leblanc, Richard; Del Maestro, Rolando; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Shenouda, George

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Despite multimodality treatments, the outcome of patients with glioblastoma multiforme remains poor. In an attempt to improve results, we have begun a program of accelerated hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and June 2006, 35 unselected patients with glioblastoma multiforme were treated with hypo-IMRT. During a 4-week period, using a concomitant boost technique, a dose of 60 Gy and 40 Gy were delivered in 20 fractions prescribed to the periphery of the gross tumor volume and planning target volume, respectively. TMZ was administered according to the regimen of Stupp et al. Results: The median follow-up was 12.6 months. Of the 35 patients, 29 (82.8%) completed the combined modality treatment, and 25 (71.4%) received a median of four cycles of adjuvant TMZ. The median overall survival was 14.4 months, and the median disease-free survival was 7.7 months. The median survival time differed significantly between patients who underwent biopsy and those who underwent partial or total resection (7.1 vs. 16.1 months, p = 0.035). The median survival was also significantly different between patients with methylated vs. unmethylated 0-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoters (14.4 vs. 8.7 months, p = 0.049). The pattern of failure was predominantly central, within 2 cm of the initial gross tumor volume. Grade 3-4 toxicity was limited to 1 patient with nausea and emesis during adjuvant TMZ administration. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that hypo-IMRT with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is well tolerated with a useful 2-week shortening of radiotherapy. Despite a high number of patients with poor prognostic features (74.3% recursive partitioning analysis class V or VI), the median survival was comparable to that after standard radiotherapy fractionation schedules plus TMZ.

  19. Columbia University: Computational Human High-grade Glioblastoma Multiforme Interactome - miRNA (Post-transcriptional) Layer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Human High-Grade Glioma Interactome (HGi) contains a genome-wide complement of molecular interactions that are Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)-specific. HGi v3 contains the post-transcriptional layer of the HGi, which includes the miRNA-target (RNA-RNA) layer of the interactome. Read the Abstract

  20. High-resolution genomic copy number profiling of glioblastoma multiforme by single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dong; Ogawa, Seishi; Kawamata, Norihiko; Tunici, Patrizia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Eoli, Marica; Ruckert, Christian; Huynh, Thien; Liu, Gentao; Kato, Motohiro; Sanada, Masashi; Jauch, Anna; Dugas, Martin; Black, Keith L; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2009-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an extremely malignant brain tumor. To identify new genomic alterations in GBM, genomic DNA of tumor tissue/explants from 55 individuals and 6 GBM cell lines were examined using single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray (SNP-Chip). Further gene expression analysis relied on an additional 56 GBM samples. SNP-Chip results were validated using several techniques, including quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), nucleotide sequencing, and a combination of Q-PCR and detection of microsatellite markers for loss of heterozygosity with normal copy number [acquired uniparental disomy (AUPD)]. Whole genomic DNA copy number in each GBM sample was profiled by SNP-Chip. Several signaling pathways were frequently abnormal. Either the p16(INK4A)/p15(INK4B)-CDK4/6-pRb or p14(ARF)-MDM2/4-p53 pathways were abnormal in 89% (49 of 55) of cases. Simultaneous abnormalities of both pathways occurred in 84% (46 of 55) samples. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway was altered in 71% (39 of 55) GBMs either by deletion of PTEN or amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor and/or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha. Deletion of chromosome 6q26-27 often occurred (16 of 55 samples). The minimum common deleted region included PARK2, PACRG, QKI, and PDE10A genes. Further reverse transcription Q-PCR studies showed that PARK2 expression was decreased in another collection of GBMs at a frequency of 61% (34 of 56) of samples. The 1p36.23 region was deleted in 35% (19 of 55) of samples. Notably, three samples had homozygous deletion encompassing this site. Also, a novel internal deletion of a putative tumor suppressor gene, LRP1B, was discovered causing an aberrant protein. AUPDs occurred in 58% (32 of 55) of the GBM samples and five of six GBM cell lines. A common AUPD was found at chromosome 17p13.3-12 (included p53 gene) in 13 of 61 samples and cell lines. Single-strand conformational polymorphism and nucleotide

  1. Glioblastoma multiforme in patients with history of extracranial cancer: Case series.

    PubMed

    Kalita, O; Trojanec, R; Megova, M; Hajduch, M; Vaverka, M; Hrabalek, L; Zlevorova, M; Drabek, J; Tuckova, L; Vrbkova, J

    2016-05-01

    Significant progress in treatment strategies improves the expectations of patients with extracranial cancers. Metastases are the primary consideration in patients with cancer history. In the case of neurologic disorders, the patient should undergo brain MRI. A rationale is presented for surgery, whole-brain or stereotactic radiotherapy, or chemotherapy. Recently, we have encountered misdiagnosed primary malignant brain tumours in patients with oncologic history who had been admitted for surgery for brain metastases. The aim of our study is to evaluate the incidence of concurrent cancers, to assess the relationship between previous cancer staging and primary brain tumour evaluation as well as to determine treatment efficiency. From January 2007 to December 2011, we prospectively followed up patients with concurrent history of both extracranial cancer and subsequent glioblastoma multiforme. Information was collected on the clinical condition, imaging, history of extracranial cancer, previous and present surgical and oncologic procedures, and GBM histologic, cytogenetic, and molecular genetic investigations. Five patients were recruited: three females and two males. The average patient age at the time of GBM diagnosis was 65.6 years. Three patients had a history of breast carcinoma, one of renal carcinoma and one of colorectal carcinoma. Following the diagnosis of carcinoma, three patients received chemotherapy and radiotherapy, one patient had radiotherapy alone, and one had no adjuvant therapy. In all the cases, surgery revealed primary GBM, with a standard occurrence of genetic abnormalities (Table 1). The average time from the diagnosis of extracranial cancer to that of GBM was 4 years. Four patients underwent chemoradiotherapy and one had palliative radiotherapy. Two patients completed oncotherapy and their OS was 27 months and 19 months, respectively. One patient had post-surgical progression of hemiparesis. One patient had pulmonary embolism during oncotherapy

  2. Hypofractionated intensity modulated radiotherapy with temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Ammirati, Mario; Chotai, Silky; Newton, Herbert; Lamki, Tariq; Wei, Lai; Grecula, John

    2014-04-01

    We conducted a phase I study to determine (a) the maximum tolerated dose of peri-radiation therapy temozolomide (TMZ) and (b) the safety of a selected hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (HIMRT) regimen in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Patients with histological diagnosis of GBM, Karnofsky performance status (KPS)≥ 60 and adequate bone marrow function were eligible for the study. All patients received peri-radiation TMZ; 1 week before the beginning of radiation therapy (RT), 1 week after RT and for 3 weeks during RT. Standard 75 mg/m(2)/day dose was administered to all patients 1 week post-RT. Dose escalation was commenced at level I: 50mg/m(2)/day, level II: 65 mg/m(2)/day and level III: 75 mg/m(2)/day for 4 weeks. HIMRT was delivered at 52.5 Gy in 15 fractions to the contrast enhancing lesion (or surgical cavity) plus the surrounding edema plus a 2 cm margin. Six men and three women with a median age of 67 years (range, 44-81) and a median KPS of 80 (range, 80-90) were enrolled. Three patients were accrued at each TMZ dose level. Median follow-up was 10 months (range, 1-15). Median progression free survival was 3.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9-7.4; range, 0.9-9.9 months) and the overall survival 12.7 months (95% CI: 2.5-17.6; range, 2.5-20.7 months). Time spent in a KPS ≥ 70 was 8.1 months (95% CI: 2.4-15.6; range, 2.4-16 months). No instance of irreversible grade 3 or higher acute toxicity was noted. HIMRT at 52.5 Gy in 15 fractions with peri-RT TMZ at a maximum tolerated dose of 75 mg/m(2)/day for 5 weeks is well tolerated and is able to abate treatment time for these patients.

  3. Podocalyxin promotes glioblastoma multiforme cell invasion and proliferation by inhibiting angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Yugang

    2015-05-01

    Podocalyxin (PODX) reportedly enhances invasion in many human cancers including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Recent studies have shown that the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in tumor environment contributes significantly to tumor progression. As a counter-regulatory axis in RAS, angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas signaling has been shown to inhibit the growth and invasiveness of several human cancers including GBM. In the present study, we examined the crosstalk between PODX and Ang-(1-7)/Mas signaling in GBM cells, and assessed its impact on GBM cell invasion and proliferation. A strong negative correlation between the expression of PODX and Mas in GBM tumor tissues from 10 consecutive patients (r=-0.768, p<0.01) was observed. The stable overexpression of PODX in LN-229 and U-118 MG human GBM cells decreased the expression of Mas at the mRNA and protein levels, which led to decreased density of Ang-(1-7)-binding Mas on the cell membrane. This effect was completely abolished by selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor BKM120. By contrast, the stable knockdown of PODX in LN-229 and U-118 MG cells increased the expression of Mas and the density of Ang-(1-7)-binding Mas on the cell membrane. Overexpression and knockdown of PODX respectively reversed and enhanced the inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on the expression/activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cell invasion and proliferation in GBM cells. Although the overexpression of Mas showed no significant effect on the promoting effect of PODX on GBM cell invasion and proliferation in the absence of Ang-(1-7), it completely eliminated the effect of PODX in the presence of Ang-(1-7). In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provided the first evidence that PODX inhibits Ang-(1-7)/Mas signaling by downregulating the expression of Mas through a PI3K-dependent mechanism in GBM cells. This effect led to enhanced GBM cell invasion and proliferation. The results of this study add

  4. Reassessing the Role of Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery for Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jason A.; Banu, Matei; Hossain, Shaolie S.; Singh-Moon, Rajinder; Lavine, Sean D.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Joshi, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment for glioblastoma (GBM) will likely require targeted delivery of several specific pharmacological agents simultaneously. Intra-arterial (IA) delivery is one technique for targeting the tumor site with multiple agents. Although IA chemotherapy for glioblastoma (GBM) has been attempted since the 1950s, the predicted benefits remain unproven in clinical practice. This review focuses on innovative approaches to IA drug delivery in treating GBM. Guided by novel in vitro and in vivo optical measurements, newer pharmacokinetic models promise to better define the complex relationship between background cerebral blood flow and drug injection parameters. Advanced optical technologies and tracers, unique nanoparticles designs, new cellular targets, and rational drug formulations are continuously modifying the therapeutic landscape for GBM. Personalized treatment approaches are emerging; however, such tailored approaches will largely depend on effective drug delivery techniques and on the ability to simultaneously deliver multidrug regimens. These new paradigms for tumor-selective drug delivery herald dramatic improvements in the effectiveness of IA chemotherapy for GBM. Therefore, within this context of so-called “precision medicine,” the role of IA delivery for GBM is thoroughly reassessed. PMID:26819758

  5. Boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme: clinical studies in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Capala, Jacek; Stenstam, Britta H; Sköld, Kurt; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Giusti, Valerio; Persson, Charlotta; Wallin, Eva; Brun, Arne; Franzen, Lars; Carlsson, Jörgen; Salford, Leif; Ceberg, Crister; Persson, Bertil; Pellettieri, Luigi; Henriksson, Roger

    2003-01-01

    A boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility has been constructed at Studsvik, Sweden. It includes two filter/moderator configurations. One of the resulting neutron beams has been optimized for clinical irradiations with a filter/moderator system that allows easy variation of the neutron spectrum from the thermal to the epithermal energy range. The other beam has been designed to produce a large uniform field of thermal neutrons for radiobiological research. Scientific operations of the Studsvik BNCT project are overseen by the Scientific Advisory Board comprised of representatives of major universities in Sweden. Furthermore, special task groups for clinical and preclinical studies have been formed to facilitate collaboration with academia. The clinical Phase II trials for glioblastoma are sponsored by the Swedish National Neuro-Oncology Group and, presently, involve a protocol for BNCT treatment of glioblastoma patients who have not received any therapy other than surgery. In this protocol, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), administered as a 6-h intravenous infusion, is used as the boron delivery agent. As of January 2002, 17 patients were treated. The 6-h infusion of 900 mg BPA/kg body weight was shown to be safe and resulted in the average blood-boron concentration of 24 microg/g (range: 15-32 microg/g) at the time of irradiation (approximately 2-3 h post-infusion). Peak and average weighted radiation doses to the brain were in the ranges of 8.0-15.5 Gy(W) and 3.3-6.1 Gy(W), respectively. So far, no severe BNCT-related acute toxicities have been observed. Due to the short follow-up time, it is too early to evaluate the efficacy of these studies.

  6. Survival analysis of HDR brachytherapy versus reoperation versus temozolomide alone: a retrospective cohort analysis of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Archavlis, Eleftherios; Tselis, Nikolaos; Birn, Gerhard; Ulrich, Peter; Baltas, Dimos; Zamboglou, Nikolaos

    2013-03-15

    Tumour recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after initial treatment with surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy is an inevitable phenomenon. This retrospective cohort study compared the efficacy of interstitial high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT), re-resection and sole dose dense temozolomide chemotherapy (ddTMZ) in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma after initial surgery and radiochemotherapy. Retropective cohort study. Primary level of care with two participating centres. The geographical location was central Germany. From January 2005 to December 2010, a total of 111 patients developed recurrent GBM after initial surgery and radiotherapy with concomitant temozolomide. The inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) histology-proven diagnosis of primary GBM (WHO grade 4), (2) primary treatment with resection and radiochemotherapy, and (3) tumour recurrence/progression. This study compared retrospectively the efficacy of interstitial HDR-BRT, re-resection and ddTMZ alone in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. Median survival, progression free survival and complication rate. Median survival after salvage therapy of the recurrence was 37, 30 and 26 weeks, respectively. The HDR-BRT group did significantly better than both the reoperation (p<0.05) and the ddTMZ groups (p<0.05). Moderate to severe complications in the HDR-BRT, reoperation and sole chemotherapy groups occurred in 5/50 (10%), 4/36 (11%) and 9/25 (36%) cases, respectively. CT-guided interstitial HDR-BRT attained higher survival benefits in the management of recurrent glioblastoma after initial surgery and radiotherapy with concurrent temozolomide in comparison with the other treatment modalities. The low risk of complications of the HDR-BRT and the fact that it can be delivered percutaneously in local anaesthesia render it a promissing treatment option for selected patients which should be further evaluated.

  7. Survival analysis of HDR brachytherapy versus reoperation versus temozolomide alone: a retrospective cohort analysis of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Archavlis, Eleftherios; Tselis, Nikolaos; Birn, Gerhard; Ulrich, Peter; Baltas, Dimos; Zamboglou, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Tumour recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after initial treatment with surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy is an inevitable phenomenon. This retrospective cohort study compared the efficacy of interstitial high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT), re-resection and sole dose dense temozolomide chemotherapy (ddTMZ) in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma after initial surgery and radiochemotherapy. Design Retropective cohort study. Setting Primary level of care with two participating centres. The geographical location was central Germany. Participants From January 2005 to December 2010, a total of 111 patients developed recurrent GBM after initial surgery and radiotherapy with concomitant temozolomide. The inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) histology-proven diagnosis of primary GBM (WHO grade 4), (2) primary treatment with resection and radiochemotherapy, and (3) tumour recurrence/progression. Interventions This study compared retrospectively the efficacy of interstitial HDR-BRT, re-resection and ddTMZ alone in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. Primary and secondary outcome measures Median survival, progression free survival and complication rate. Results Median survival after salvage therapy of the recurrence was 37, 30 and 26 weeks, respectively. The HDR-BRT group did significantly better than both the reoperation (p<0.05) and the ddTMZ groups (p<0.05). Moderate to severe complications in the HDR-BRT, reoperation and sole chemotherapy groups occurred in 5/50 (10%), 4/36 (11%) and 9/25 (36%) cases, respectively. Conclusions CT-guided interstitial HDR-BRT attained higher survival benefits in the management of recurrent glioblastoma after initial surgery and radiotherapy with concurrent temozolomide in comparison with the other treatment modalities. The low risk of complications of the HDR-BRT and the fact that it can be delivered percutaneously in local anaesthesia render it a promissing treatment option for selected

  8. Phase I study of hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (Hypo-IMRT) using helical tomotherapy (HT) with concurrent low dose temozolomide (TMZ) followed by adjuvant TMZ in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and materials Adult patients with GBM and KPS > 70 were prospectively enrolled between 2005 and 2007 in this phase I study. The Fibonacci dose escalation protocol was implemented to establish a safe radiation fractionation regimen. The protocol defined radiation therapy (RT) dose level I as 54.4 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks and dose level II as 60 Gy in 22 fractions over 4.5 weeks. Concurrent TMZ followed by adjuvant TMZ was given according to the Stupp regimen. The primary endpoints were feasibility and safety of Hypo-IMRT with concurrent TMZ. Secondary endpoints included progression free survival (PFS), pattern of failure, overall survival (OS) and incidence of pseudoprogression. The latter was defined as clinical or radiological suggestion of tumour progression within three months of radiation completion followed by spontaneous recovery of the patient. Results A total of 25 patients were prospectively enrolled with a median follow-up of 12.4 months. The median age at diagnosis was 53 years. Based on recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) criteria, 16%, 52% and 32% of the patients were RPA class III, class IV and class V, respectively. All patients completed concurrent RT and TMZ, and 19 patients (76.0%) received adjuvant TMZ. The median OS was 15.67 months (95% CI 11.56 - 20.04) and the median PFS was 6.7 months (95% CI 4.0 – 14.0). The median time between surgery and start of RT was 44 days (range of 28 to 77 days). Delaying radiation therapy by more than 6 weeks after surgery was an independent prognostic factor associated with a worse OS (4.0 vs. 16.1 months, P = 0.027). All recurrences occurred within 2 cm of the original gross tumour volume (GTV). No cases of pseudoprogression were

  9. Bilateral posterior RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme: a case report.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Stefanie; Prox-Vagedes, Vanessa; Elolf, Erck; Brueggemann, Ines; Gademann, Guenther; Galazky, Imke; Bartels, Claudius

    2010-10-01

    Radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) is a rare but severe consequence of radiation therapy that is associated with adjuvant chemotherapy, specifically therapy with vincristine or nitrosoureas. However, there is very little evidence regarding the occurrence of RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide. The case of a 63 year old woman with glioblastoma multiforme and concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide is described. Due to a slight depressive episode the patient also took hypericum perforatum. Five months after cessation of fractionated radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (cumulative dose of 11040 mg) the patient developed bilateral amaurosis due to RION. Tumor regrowth was excluded by magnetic resonance imaging. After the application of gadolinium a pathognomonic contrast enhancement of both prechiasmatic optic nerves could be observed. In this patient, the occurrence of RION may have been the result of radiosensitization by temozolomide, which could have been strengthened by hypericin. Consequently, physicians should avoid a concomitant application of hypericum perforatum and radiochemotherapy.

  10. Resistance of human glioblastoma multiforme cells to growth factor inhibitors is overcome by blockade of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, David S.; Wright, Renee D.; Kesari, Santosh; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Tran, Mary A.; Jain, Monish; Zawel, Leigh; Kung, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), including PDGFR, have been validated as therapeutic targets in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), yet inhibitors of RTKs have had limited clinical success. As various antiapoptotic mechanisms render GBM cells resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, we hypothesized that these antiapoptotic mechanisms also confer resistance to RTK inhibition. We found that in vitro inhibition of PDGFR in human GBM cells initiated the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, as evidenced by mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, but downstream caspase activation was blocked by inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). Consistent with this, inhibition of PDGFR combined with small molecule inactivation of IAPs induced apoptosis in human GBM cells in vitro and had synergistic antitumor effects in orthotopic mouse models of GBM and in primary human GBM neurospheres. These results demonstrate that concomitant inhibition of IAPs can overcome resistance to RTK inhibitors in human malignant GBM cells, and suggest that blockade of IAPs has the potential to improve treatment outcomes in patients with GBM. PMID:18677408

  11. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.; Liu, H.B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Wielopolski, L.; Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.

    1994-12-31

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report.

  12. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors. PMID:20596476

  13. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ciofani, Gianni; Raffa, Vittoria; Menciassi, Arianna; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2008-11-25

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of (10)B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors.

  14. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Raffa, Vittoria; Menciassi, Arianna; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2009-02-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of 10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly- l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors.

  15. Tumor cycling hypoxia induces chemoresistance in glioblastoma multiforme by upregulating the expression and function of ABCB1

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chii-Wen; Wang, Chi-Chung; Wu, Chung-Pu; Lin, Yu-Jung; Lee, Yu-Chun; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Hsieh, Chia-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cycling hypoxia is now a well-recognized phenomenon in animal and human solid tumors. However, how tumor cycling hypoxia impacts chemotherapy is unclear. In the present study, we explored the impact and the mechanism of cycling hypoxia on tumor microenvironment-mediated chemoresistance. Hoechst 33342 staining and hypoxia-inducible factor–1 (HIF-1) activation labeling together with immunofluorescence imaging and fluorescence-activated cell sorting were used to isolate hypoxic tumor subpopulations from human glioblastoma xenografts. ABCB1 expression, P-glycoprotein function, and chemosensitivity in tumor cells derived from human glioblastoma xenografts or in vitro cycling hypoxic stress-treated glioblastoma cells were determined using Western blot analysis, drug accumulation and efflux assays, and MTT assay, respectively. ABCB1 expression and P-glycoprotein function were upregulated under cycling hypoxia in glioblastoma cells concomitant with decreased responses to doxorubicin and BCNU. However, ABCB1 knockdown inhibited these effects. Moreover, immunofluorescence imaging and flow cytometric analysis for ABCB1, HIF-1 activation, and Hoechst 3342 in glioblastoma revealed highly localized ABCB1 expression predominantly in potentially cycling hypoxic areas with HIF-1 activation and blood perfusion in the solid tumor microenvironment. The cycling hypoxic tumor cells derived from glioblastoma xenografts exhibited higher ABCB1 expression, P-glycoprotein function, and chemoresistance, compared with chronic hypoxic and normoxic cells. Tumor-bearing mice that received YC-1, an HIF-1α inhibitor, exhibited suppressed tumor microenvironment-induced ABCB1 induction and enhanced survival rate in BCNU chemotherapy. Cycling hypoxia plays a vital role in tumor microenvironment-mediated chemoresistance through the HIF-1–dependent induction of ABCB1. HIF-1 blockade before and concurrent with chemotherapy could suppress cycling hypoxia-induced chemoresistance. PMID:22946104

  16. Radioactive (125)I seeds inhibit cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human glioblastoma multiforme via a ROS-mediated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yunhong; Xie, Qiang; He, Jie; Luo, Xiaojun; Zhou, Tao; Liu, Ying; Huang, Zuoping; Tian, Yunming; Sun, Dan; Yao, Kaitai

    2015-02-19

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary central nervous system neoplasm in adults. Radioactive (125)I seed implantation has been widely applied in the treatment of cancers. Moreover, previous clinical trials have confirmed that (125)I seeds treatment was an effective therapy in GBM. We sought to investigate the effect of (125)I seed on GBM cell growth and Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cells were exposed to irradiation at different doses. Colony-formation assay, EdU assay, cell cycle analysis, and TUNEL assay were preformed to investigate the radiation sensitivity. The effects of (125)I seeds irradiation on EMT were measured by transwell, Boyden and wound-healing assays. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by DCF-DA assay. Moreover, the radiation sensitivity and EMT were investigated with or without pretreatment with glutathione. Additionally, nude mice with tumors were measured after treated with radiation. Radioactive (125)I seeds are more effective than X-ray irradiation in inhibiting GBM cell growth. Moreover, EMT was effectively inhibited by (125)I seed irradiation. A mechanism study indicated that GBM cell growth and EMT inhibition were induced by (125)I seeds with the involvement of a ROS-mediated signaling pathway. Radioactive (125)I seeds exhibit novel anticancer activity via a ROS-mediated signaling pathway. These findings have clinical implications for the treatment of patients with GBM by (125)I seeds.

  17. Benefit of temozolomide compared to procarbazine in treatment of glioblastoma multiforme at first relapse: effect on neurological functioning, performance status, and health related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, David R; Kiebert, Gwendoline; Prados, Michael; Yung, Alfred; Olson, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Since high-grade malignant gliomas can seldom be treated curatively, the main aim of first line therapy is to improve progression free survival (PFS), to reduce morbidity, and to preserve, if not restore neurological functions and the capacity to perform daily activities. Focusing on a single clinical efficacy parameter in clinical trials may provide a potentially biased result, as for patients the overall result of treatment entails a more complex picture of weighing and balancing gains and losses on different outcome measures. In this paper we address different clinical outcomes measures separately and we illustrate the value of multiple outcome measures using the results of a recent clinical trial comparing temozolomide with procarbazine in the treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme. Compared with procarbazine, temozolomide not only prolonged PFS, but also maintained neurological functioning and performance status for a longer period of time, and also improved health-related quality of life (HRQL). All these statistically significant outcomes demonstrate a remarkable consistency. In addition, temozolomide showed a trend of extending overall survival over procarbazine.

  18. Notch- and vitamin D signaling in 1,25(OH)2D3-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines.

    PubMed

    Reichrath, Sandra; Müller, Cornelia S L; Gleissner, Beate; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Vogt, Thomas; Reichrath, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    Recently, an important role of Notch activation for Ras-induced transformation of glial cells and for glioma growth and survival has been demonstrated. It was concluded that activation of Notch-signaling may represent a new target for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) therapy. We now analyzed five GBM cell lines (Tx3095, Tx3868, U87, U118, U373) for key components of Notch-signaling pathways (Notch-1, Notch-2, Notch-3, Notch-4, Delta-like 1, Delta-like 3, Delta-like 4, Jagged-1, Jagged-2) using conventional RT-PCR. We found that some components (Notch-1, Notch-2, Notch-4, Jagged-1) were consistently expressed in all cell lines analyzed while, in contrast, other key components of Notch-signaling were differentially expressed. Notch-3 was expressed in three out of five cell lines (in U87, U118 and U373), but was missing in Tx3095 and Tx3868 cells. Jagged-2 was expressed in U87, U373 and Tx3868, but not in U118 or Tx3095 cells. Delta-like 1 and Delta-like 3 were not detected in Tx3905 cells, but in all other cell lines. RNA for Delta-like 4 was only found in U373 and Tx3868 GBM cell lines. Treating GBM cell lines with 1,25(OH)2D3 (10(-6), 10(-8), and 10(-10) M), the biologically active form of vitamin D, did not result in significant dose- or time-dependent antiproliferative effects, indicating that GBM cell lines are resistant against the antiproliferative activity of 1,25(OH)2D3. In vitro treatment of GBM cells with 1,25(OH)2D3 did not result in a modulation of the expression of key components of the Notch-signaling pathway. Treatment with HDAC-inhibitor TSA or DNA-methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza exerted dose- and time-dependent antiproliferative effects on GBM cell lines. We asked the question whether the resistance against 1,25(OH)2D3 could be restored by co-treatment with TSA or 5-aza. However, combination therapy with 1,25(OH)2D3 and TSA or 5-aza did not result in enhanced antiproliferative effects as compared to treatment with TSA or 5-aza alone. In contrast

  19. Targeting glioblastoma multiforme with an IL-13/diphtheria toxin fusion protein in vitro and in vivo in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunbin; Hall, Walter A; Jin, Ni; Todhunter, Deborah A; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Vallera, Daniel A

    2002-05-01

    Fusion proteins composed of tumor binding agents and potent catalytic toxins show promise for intracranial therapy of brain cancer and an advantage over systemic therapy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of brain cancer and overexpresses IL-13R. Thus, we developed an interleukin-13 receptor targeting fusion protein, DT(390)IL13, composed of human interleukin-13 and the first 389 amino acids of diphtheria toxin. To measure its ability to inhibit GBM, DT(390)IL13 was tested in vitro and found to inhibit selectively the U373 MG GBM cell line with an IC(50) around 12 pmol/l. Cytotoxicity was neutralized by anti-human-interleukin-13 antibody, but not by control antibodies. In vivo, small U373 MG glioblastoma xenografts in nude mice completely regressed in most animals after five intratumoral injections of 1 microg of DT(390)IL13 q.o.d., but not by the control fusion protein DT(390)IL-2. DT(390)IL13 was also tested against primary explant GBM cells of a patient's excised tumor and the IC(50) was similar to that measured for U373 MG. Further studies showed a therapeutic window for DT(390)IL13 of 1-30 microg/injection and histology studies and enzyme measurements showed that the maximum tolerated dose of DT(390)IL13 had little effect on kidney, liver, spleen, lung and heart in non-tumor-bearing immunocompetent mice. Together, these data suggest that DT(390)IL13 may provide an important, alternative therapy for brain cancer.

  20. Spatial Habitat Features Derived from Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Are Associated with Molecular Subtype and 12-Month Survival Status in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joonsang; Narang, Shivali; Martinez, Juan; Rao, Ganesh; Rao, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common and aggressive malignant brain tumors is Glioblastoma multiforme. Despite the multimodality treatment such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy (temozolomide: TMZ), the median survival rate of glioblastoma patient is less than 15 months. In this study, we investigated the association between measures of spatial diversity derived from spatial point pattern analysis of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data with molecular status as well as 12-month survival in glioblastoma. We obtained 27 measures of spatial proximity (diversity) via spatial point pattern analysis of multiparametric T1 post-contrast and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI data. These measures were used to predict 12-month survival status (≤12 or >12 months) in 74 glioblastoma patients. Kaplan-Meier with receiver operating characteristic analyses was used to assess the relationship between derived spatial features and 12-month survival status as well as molecular subtype status in patients with glioblastoma. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that 14 spatial features were capable of stratifying overall survival in a statistically significant manner. For prediction of 12-month survival status based on these diversity indices, sensitivity and specificity were 0.86 and 0.64, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and the accuracy were 0.76 and 0.75, respectively. For prediction of molecular subtype status, proneural subtype shows highest accuracy of 0.93 among all molecular subtypes based on receiver operating characteristic analysis. We find that measures of spatial diversity from point pattern analysis of intensity habitats from T1 post-contrast and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images are associated with both tumor subtype status and 12-month survival status and may therefore be useful indicators of patient prognosis, in addition to providing potential guidance for molecularly-targeted therapies in

  1. Establishment and Biological Characterization of a Panel of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) and GBM Variant Oncosphere Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Zev A.; Wilson, Kelli M.; Salmasi, Vafi; Orr, Brent A.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Siu, I-Mei; Lim, Michael; Weingart, Jon D.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bettegowda, Chetan; Kassam, Amin B.; Olivi, Alessandro; Brem, Henry; Riggins, Gregory J.; Gallia, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human tumor cell lines form the basis of the majority of present day laboratory cancer research. These models are vital to studying the molecular biology of tumors and preclinical testing of new therapies. When compared to traditional adherent cell lines, suspension cell lines recapitulate the genetic profiles and histologic features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with higher fidelity. Using a modified neural stem cell culture technique, here we report the characterization of GBM cell lines including GBM variants. Methods Tumor tissue samples were obtained intra-operatively and cultured in neural stem cell conditions containing growth factors. Tumor lines were characterized in vitro using differentiation assays followed by immunostaining for lineage-specific markers. In vivo tumor formation was assayed by orthotopic injection in nude mice. Genetic uniqueness was confirmed via short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiling. Results Thirteen oncosphere lines derived from GBM and GBM variants, including a GBM with PNET features and a GBM with oligodendroglioma component, were established. All unique lines showed distinct genetic profiles by STR profiling. The lines assayed demonstrated a range of in vitro growth rates. Multipotency was confirmed using in vitro differentiation. Tumor formation demonstrated histologic features consistent with high grade gliomas, including invasion, necrosis, abnormal vascularization, and high mitotic rate. Xenografts derived from the GBM variants maintained histopathological features of the primary tumors. Conclusions We have generated and characterized GBM suspension lines derived from patients with GBMs and GBM variants. These oncosphere cell lines will expand the resources available for preclinical study. PMID:27028405

  2. Nitric oxide released from JS-K induces cell death by mitotic catastrophe as part of necrosis in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Günzle, Jessica; Osterberg, Nadja; Saavedra, Joseph E; Weyerbrock, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) donor JS-K is specifically activated by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in GST-overexpressing cells. We have shown the induction of cell death in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells at high JS-K doses but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether NO-induced cell death is triggered by induction of apoptotic or necrotic pathways. For the first time, we demonstrate that NO induces cell death via mitotic catastrophe (MC) with non-apoptotic mechanisms in GBM cells. Moreover, the level of morphological changes indicating MC correlates with increased necrosis. Therefore, we conclude that MC is the main mechanism by which GBM cells undergo cell death after treatment with JS-K associated with necrosis rather than apoptosis. In addition, we show that PARP1 is not an exclusive marker for late apoptosis but is also involved in MC. Activating an alternative way of cell death can be useful for the multimodal cancer therapy of GBM known for its strong anti-apoptotic mechanisms and drug resistance.

  3. MicroRNA-10b pleiotropically regulates invasion, angiogenicity and apoptosis of tumor cells resembling mesenchymal subtype of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Teo, S; Lam, D H; Jeyaseelan, K; Wang, S

    2012-10-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a heterogeneous disease despite its seemingly uniform pathology. Deconvolution of The Cancer Genome Atlas's GBM gene expression data has unveiled the existence of distinct gene expression signature underlying discrete GBM subtypes. Recent conflicting findings proposed that microRNA (miRNA)-10b exclusively regulates glioma growth or invasion but not both. We showed that silencing of miRNA-10b by baculoviral decoy vectors in a glioma cell line resembling the mesenchymal subtype of GBM reduces its growth, invasion and angiogenesis while promoting apoptosis in vitro. In an orthotopic human glioma mouse model, inhibition of miRNA-10b diminishes the invasiveness, angiogenicity and growth of the mesenchymal subtype-like glioma cells in the brain and significantly prolonged survival of glioma-bearing mice. We demonstrated that the pleiotropic nature of miRNA-10b was due to its suppression of multiple tumor suppressors, including TP53, FOXO3, CYLD, PAX6, PTCH1, HOXD10 and NOTCH1. In particular, siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments identified TP53, PAX6, NOTCH1 and HOXD10 as invasion regulatory genes in our mesenchymal subtype-like glioma cells. By interrogating the REMBRANDT, we noted that dysregulation of many direct targets of miRNA-10b was associated with significantly poorer patient survival. Thus, our study uncovers a novel role for miRNA-10b in regulating angiogenesis and suggests that miRNA-10b may be a pleiotropic regulator of gliomagenesis.

  4. C-Myc negatively controls the tumor suppressor PTEN by upregulating miR-26a in glioblastoma multiforme cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Pin; Nie, Quanmin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming; Mao, Qing

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •The c-Myc oncogene directly upregulates miR-26a expression in GBM cells. •ChIP assays demonstrate that c-Myc interacts with the miR-26a promoter. •Luciferase reporter assays show that PTEN is a specific target of miR-26a. •C-Myc–miR-26a suppression of PTEN may regulate the PTEN/AKT pathway. •Overexpression of c-Myc enhances the proliferative capacity of GBM cells. -- Abstract: The c-Myc oncogene is amplified in many tumor types. It is an important regulator of cell proliferation and has been linked to altered miRNA expression, suggesting that c-Myc-regulated miRNAs might contribute to tumor progression. Although miR-26a has been reported to be upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the mechanism has not been established. We have shown that ectopic expression of miR-26a influenced cell proliferation by targeting PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene that is inactivated in many common malignancies, including GBM. Our findings suggest that c-Myc modulates genes associated with oncogenesis in GBM through deregulation of miRNAs via the c-Myc–miR-26a–PTEN signaling pathway. This may be of clinical relevance.

  5. Hot melt extruded and injection moulded disulfiram-loaded PLGA millirods for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme via stereotactic injection.

    PubMed

    McConville, Christopher; Tawari, Patricia; Wang, Weiguang

    2015-10-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has a poor prognosis and is one of the most common primary malignant brain tumours in adults. Stereotactic injections have been used to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs directly into brain tumours. This paper describes the development of disulfiram (DSF)-loaded biodegradable millirods manufactured using hot melt extrusion (HME) and injection moulding (IM). The paper demonstrates that the stability of the DSF within the millirods is dependent on the manufacturing technique used as well as the drug loading. The physical state of the DSF within the millirods was dependent on the fabrication process, with the DSF in the HME millirods being either completely amorphous within the PLGA, while the DSF within the IM millirods retained between 54 and 66% of its crystallinity. Release of DSF from the millirods was dependent on the degradation rate of the PLGA, the manufacturing technique used as well as the DSF loading. DSF in the 10% (w/w) DSF loaded HME millirods and the 20% (w/w) DSF-loaded HME and IM millirods had a similar cytotoxicity against a GBM cell line compared to the unprocessed DSF control. However, the 10% (w/w) DSF-loaded IM millirods had a significantly lower cytotoxicity when compared to the unprocessed control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reversing glioma malignancy: a new look at the role of antidepressant drugs as adjuvant therapy for glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Bielecka-Wajdman, Anna M; Lesiak, Marta; Ludyga, Tomasz; Sieroń, Aleksander; Obuchowicz, Ewa

    2017-06-01

    The role of glioma stem cells (GSCs) in cancer progression is currently debated; however, it is hypothesised that this subpopulation is partially responsible for therapeutic resistance observed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Recent studies have shown that the current treatments not only fail to eliminate the GSC population but even promote GSCs through reprogramming of glioma non-stem cells to stem cells. Since the standard GBM treatment often requires supplementation with adjuvant drugs such as antidepressants, their role in the regulation of the heterogeneous nature of GSCs needs evaluation. We examined the effects of imipramine, amitriptyline, fluoxetine, mirtazapine, agomelatine, escitalopram, and temozolomide on the phenotypic signature (CD44, Ki67, Nestin, Sox1, and Sox2 expression) of GSCs isolated from a human T98G cell line. These drugs were examined in several models of hypoxia (1% oxygen, 2.5% oxygen, and a hypoxia-reoxygenation model) as compared to the standard laboratory conditions (20% oxygen). We report that antidepressant drugs, particularly imipramine and amitriptyline, modulate plasticity, silence the GSC profile, and partially reverse the malignant phenotype of GBM. Moreover, we observed that, in contrast to temozolomide, these tricyclic antidepressants stimulated viability and mitochondrial activity in normal human astrocytes. The ability of phenotype switching from GSC to non-GSC as stimulated by antidepressants (primarily imipramine and amitriptyline) sheds new light on the heterogeneous nature of GSC, as well as the role of antidepressants in adjuvant GBM therapy.

  7. IQGAP1 in Podosomes/Invadosomes Is Involved in the Progression of Glioblastoma Multiforme Depending on the Tumor Status

    PubMed Central

    Rotoli, Deborah; Pérez-Rodríguez, Natalia Dolores; Morales, Manuel; Maeso, María del Carmen; Ávila, Julio; Mobasheri, Ali; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and aggressive primary brain tumor. GBM is formed by a very heterogeneous astrocyte population, neurons, neovascularization and infiltrating myeloid cells (microglia and monocyte derived macrophages). The IQGAP1 scaffold protein interacts with components of the cytoskeleton, cell adhesion molecules, and several signaling molecules to regulate cell morphology and motility, cell cycle and other cellular functions. IQGAP1 overexpression and delocalization has been observed in several tumors, suggesting a role for this protein in cell proliferation, transformation and invasion. IQGAP1 has been identified as a marker of amplifying cancer cells in GBMs. To determine the involvement of IQGAP1 in the onco-biology of GBM, we performed immunohistochemical confocal microscopic analysis of the IQGAP1 protein in human GBM tissue samples using cell type-specific markers. IQGAP1 immunostaining and subcellular localization was heterogeneous; the protein was located in the plasma membrane and, at variable levels, in nucleus and/or cytosol. Moreover, IQGAP1 positive staining was found in podosome/invadopodia-like structures. IQGAP1+ staining was observed in neurons (Map2+ cells), in cancer stem cells (CSC; nestin+) and in several macrophages (CD31+ or Iba1+). Our results indicate that the IQGAP1 protein is involved in normal cell physiology as well as oncologic processes. PMID:28098764

  8. Establishment and partial characterization of a human tumor cell line, GBM-HSF, from a glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jiagui; Rizak, Joshua D; Fan, Yaodong; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Li, Jiejing; Huma, Tanzeel; Ma, Yuanye

    2014-07-01

    This paper outlines the establishment of a new and stable cell line, designated GBM-HSF, from a malignant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) removed from a 65-year-old Chinese woman. This cell line has been grown for 1 year without disruption and has been passaged over 50 times. The cells were adherently cultured in RPMI-1640 media with 10% fetal bovine serum supplementation. Cells displayed spindle and polygonal morphology, and displayed multi-layered growth without evidence of contact inhibition. The cell line had a high growth rate with a doubling time of 51 h. The cells were able to grow without adhering to the culture plates, and 4.5% of the total cells formed colonies in soft agar. The cell line has also been found to form tumors in nude mice and to be of a highly invasive nature. The cells were also partially characterized with RT-PCR. The RT-PCR revealed that Nestin, β-tubulin III, Map2, Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and CD26 were positively transcribed, whereas GFAP, Rex1, and CD133 were negatively transcribed in this cell line. These results suggest that the GBM-HSF cell line will provide a good model to study the properties of cancer stem cells and metastasis. It will also facilitate more detailed molecular and cellular studies of GBM cell division and pathology.

  9. Methylglyoxal (MGO) inhibits proliferation and induces cell death of human glioblastoma multiforme T98G and U87MG cells.

    PubMed

    Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Łasut, Barbara; Pudełko, Adam; Fila-Daniłow, Anna; Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Suchanek-Raif, Renata; Zieliński, Michał; Borkowska, Paulina; Kowalski, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant and invasive human brain tumor and it is characterized by a poor prognosis and short survival time. Current treatment strategies for GBM using surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are ineffective. Thus new therapeutic strategies to target GBM are urgently needed. The effect of methylglyoxal (MGO) on the cell cycle, cell death and proliferation of human GBM cells was investigated. The T98G and U87MG cell lines were cultured in modified EMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and maintained at 37°C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air. Cells were exposed to methylglyoxal (0.025mM) per 72h. The influence of MGO on T98G and U87MG cell cycle, proliferation and apoptosis was evaluated as well. Cell cycle phase distribution, proliferation, apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. MGO causes changes in cell cycle and induces accumulation of G1/G0-phase cells and reduced fraction of cells in S and G2/M phases. We have also observed inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We have also revealed that MGO induces senescence of U87MG but not T98G cells, but further studies are necessary in order to clarify and check mechanism of action of methylglyoxal and it Is a positive phenomenon for the treatment of GBM.

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification and protein expression in glioblastoma multiforme: prognostic significance and relationship to other prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Layfield, Lester J; Willmore, Carlynn; Tripp, Sheryl; Jones, Claudia; Jensen, Randy L

    2006-03-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression occurs in a significant percentage of cases of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and amplification has been found in approximately 40% of these neoplasms. Controversy exists as to the prognostic significance of EGFR gene amplification: some reports have indicated that amplification is associated with a poor prognosis, while other authors have reported no relationship between gene amplification and prognosis. Some reports have found a poor prognosis to be associated with amplification of the EGFR gene in patients of all ages with GBM, while other authors have found EGFR amplification to be an independent predictor of prolonged survival in patients with GBM who are older than 60 years of age. The authors studied a series of 34 specimens (32 patients) with histologically proven GBM by immunohistochemistry for the presence of EGFR overexpression and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for gene amplification of the EGFR gene. Results of these studies and data on patient age, sex, functional status, therapy, and survival were correlated to determine which variables were predictive of survival. p53 expression was also determined by immunohistochemistry and correlated with the other variables and survival.

  11. IQGAP1 in Podosomes/Invadosomes Is Involved in the Progression of Glioblastoma Multiforme Depending on the Tumor Status.

    PubMed

    Rotoli, Deborah; Pérez-Rodríguez, Natalia Dolores; Morales, Manuel; Maeso, María Del Carmen; Ávila, Julio; Mobasheri, Ali; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2017-01-13

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and aggressive primary brain tumor. GBM is formed by a very heterogeneous astrocyte population, neurons, neovascularization and infiltrating myeloid cells (microglia and monocyte derived macrophages). The IQGAP1 scaffold protein interacts with components of the cytoskeleton, cell adhesion molecules, and several signaling molecules to regulate cell morphology and motility, cell cycle and other cellular functions. IQGAP1 overexpression and delocalization has been observed in several tumors, suggesting a role for this protein in cell proliferation, transformation and invasion. IQGAP1 has been identified as a marker of amplifying cancer cells in GBMs. To determine the involvement of IQGAP1 in the onco-biology of GBM, we performed immunohistochemical confocal microscopic analysis of the IQGAP1 protein in human GBM tissue samples using cell type-specific markers. IQGAP1 immunostaining and subcellular localization was heterogeneous; the protein was located in the plasma membrane and, at variable levels, in nucleus and/or cytosol. Moreover, IQGAP1 positive staining was found in podosome/invadopodia-like structures. IQGAP1⁺ staining was observed in neurons (Map2⁺ cells), in cancer stem cells (CSC; nestin⁺) and in several macrophages (CD31⁺ or Iba1⁺). Our results indicate that the IQGAP1 protein is involved in normal cell physiology as well as oncologic processes.

  12. Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme cells with temozolomide-BioShuttle ligated by the inverse Diels-Alder ligation chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Ehemann, Volker; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Spring, Herbert; Debus, Juergen; Didinger, Bernd; Koch, Mario; Muller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), insensitive against most therapeutic interventions, has low response and survival rates. Temozolomide (TMZ) was approved for second-line therapy of recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma. However, TMZ therapy in GBM patients reveals properties such as reduced tolerability and inauspicious hemogram. The solution addressed here concerning GBM therapy consolidates and uses the potential of organic and peptide chemistry with molecular medicine. We enhanced the pharmacologic potency with simultaneous reduction of unwanted adverse reactions of the highly efficient chemotherapeutic TMZ. The TMZ connection to transporter molecules (TMZ-BioShuttle) was investigated, resulting in a much higher pharmacological effect in glioma cell lines and also with reduced dose rate. From this result we can conclude that a suitable chemistry could realize the ligation of pharmacologically active, but sensitive and highly unstable pharmaceutical ingredients without functional deprivation. The TMZ-BioShuttle dramatically enhanced the potential of TMZ for the treatment of brain tumors and is an attractive drug for combination chemotherapy. PMID:19920915

  13. MiR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme cells through targeting of ataxia–telangiectasia mutated

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Pin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei; Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Liemei; Qiu, Yongming; Mao, Qing

    2014-01-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is notoriously resistant to radiation, and consequently, new radiosensitizers are urgently needed. MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous gene modulators with emerging roles in DNA repair. We found that overexpression of miR-26a can enhance radiosensitivity and reduce the DNA repair ability of U87 cells. However, knockdown miR-26a in U87 cells could act the converse manner. Mechanistically, this effect is mediated by direct targeting of miR-26a to the 3′UTR of ATM, which leads to reduced ATM levels and consequent inhibition of the homologous recombination repair pathway. These results suggest that miR-26a may act as a new radiosensitizer of GBM. - Highlights: ●miR-26a directly target ATM in GBM cells. ●miR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of GBM cells. ●miR-26a could reduce the DNA repair capacity of GBM cells.

  14. 18F-fluorothymidine-pet imaging of glioblastoma multiforme: effects of radiation therapy on radiotracer uptake and molecular biomarker patterns.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Hollander, Andrew; Xu, Xiangsheng; Benci, Joseph L; Davis, James J; Dorsey, Jay F; Kao, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. PET imaging is a useful clinical tool for studying tumor progression and treatment effects. Conventional (18)F-FDG-PET imaging is of limited usefulness for imaging Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) due to high levels of glucose uptake by normal brain and the resultant signal-to-noise intensity. (18)F-Fluorothymidine (FLT) in contrast has shown promise for imaging GBM, as thymidine is taken up preferentially by proliferating cells. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of (18)F-FLT-PET in a GBM mouse model, especially after radiation therapy (RT), and its correlation with useful biomarkers, including proliferation and DNA damage. Methods. Nude/athymic mice with human GBM orthografts were assessed by microPET imaging with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT. Patterns of tumor PET imaging were then compared to immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence for markers of proliferation (Ki-67), DNA damage and repair (γH2AX), hypoxia (HIF-1α), and angiogenesis (VEGF). Results. We confirmed that (18)F-FLT-PET uptake is limited in healthy mice but enhanced in the intracranial tumors. Our data further demonstrate that (18)F-FLT-PET imaging usefully reflects the inhibition of tumor by RT and correlates with changes in biomarker expression. Conclusions. (18)F-FLT-PET imaging is a promising tumor imaging modality for GBM, including assessing RT effects and biologically relevant biomarkers.

  15. Discovery of potent and selective cytotoxic activity of new quinazoline-ureas against TMZ-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

    PubMed

    Elkamhawy, Ahmed; Viswanath, Ambily Nath Indu; Pae, Ae Nim; Kim, Hyeon Young; Heo, Jin-Chul; Park, Woo-Kyu; Lee, Chong-Ock; Yang, Heekyoung; Kim, Kang Ho; Nam, Do-Hyun; Seol, Ho Jun; Cho, Heeyeong; Roh, Eun Joo

    2015-10-20

    Herein, we report new quinazoline-urea based compounds with potent cytotoxic activities against TMZ-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells. Low micromolar IC₅₀ values were exhibited over a panel of three primary GBM patient-derived cell cultures belonging to proneural (GBM-1), mesenchymal (GBM-2), and classical (GBM-3) subtypes. Eight compounds showed excellent selectivity indices for GBM cells comparing to a normal astrocyte cell line. In JC-1 assay, analogues 11, 12, 20, 22, and 24 exerted promising rates of mPTP opening induction towards proneural GBM subtype. Compounds 11, 20, and 24 bound to the translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) in submicromolar range using [(3)H] PK-11195 binding affinity assay. A homology model was built and docked models of 11, 12, 20, 22 and 24 were generated for describing their plausible binding modes in TSPO. In 3D clonogenic assay, compound 20 manifested potent tumoricidal effects on TMZ-resistant GBM cells even at submicromolar concentrations. In addition, CYP450 and hERG assays presented a safe toxicity profile of 20. Taken as a whole, this report presents compound 20 as a potent, selective and safe GBM cytotoxic agent which constitutes a promising direction against TMZ-resistant GBM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Establishment and Biological Characterization of a Panel of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) and GBM Variant Oncosphere Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Binder, Zev A; Wilson, Kelli M; Salmasi, Vafi; Orr, Brent A; Eberhart, Charles G; Siu, I-Mei; Lim, Michael; Weingart, Jon D; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bettegowda, Chetan; Kassam, Amin B; Olivi, Alessandro; Brem, Henry; Riggins, Gregory J; Gallia, Gary L

    2016-01-01

    Human tumor cell lines form the basis of the majority of present day laboratory cancer research. These models are vital to studying the molecular biology of tumors and preclinical testing of new therapies. When compared to traditional adherent cell lines, suspension cell lines recapitulate the genetic profiles and histologic features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with higher fidelity. Using a modified neural stem cell culture technique, here we report the characterization of GBM cell lines including GBM variants. Tumor tissue samples were obtained intra-operatively and cultured in neural stem cell conditions containing growth factors. Tumor lines were characterized in vitro using differentiation assays followed by immunostaining for lineage-specific markers. In vivo tumor formation was assayed by orthotopic injection in nude mice. Genetic uniqueness was confirmed via short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiling. Thirteen oncosphere lines derived from GBM and GBM variants, including a GBM with PNET features and a GBM with oligodendroglioma component, were established. All unique lines showed distinct genetic profiles by STR profiling. The lines assayed demonstrated a range of in vitro growth rates. Multipotency was confirmed using in vitro differentiation. Tumor formation demonstrated histologic features consistent with high grade gliomas, including invasion, necrosis, abnormal vascularization, and high mitotic rate. Xenografts derived from the GBM variants maintained histopathological features of the primary tumors. We have generated and characterized GBM suspension lines derived from patients with GBMs and GBM variants. These oncosphere cell lines will expand the resources available for preclinical study.

  17. Brain Stem and Entire Spinal Leptomeningeal Dissemination of Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme in a Patient during Postoperative Radiochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyi; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shuai; Chen, Keyin; Zhou, Qiangyi; Yan, Chengrui; He, Huayu; Gao, Jun; Guan, Jian; Yang, Yi; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Wang, Renzhi; Ma, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignancy of the central nervous system in adults. Macroscopically evident and symptomatic spinal metastases occur rarely. Autopsy series suggest that approximately 25% of patients with intracranial GBM have evidence of spinal subarachnoid seeding, although the exact incidence is not known as postmortem examination of the spine is not routinely performed.1–3 Herein, we present a rare case of symptomatic brain stem and entire spinal dissemination of GBM in a 36-year-old patient during postoperative adjuvant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide and cisplatin. Visual deterioration, intractable stomachache, and limb paralysis were the main clinical features. The results of cytological and immunohistochemical tests on the cerebrospinal fluid cells were highly suggestive of spinal leptomeningeal dissemination. After 1 month, the patient's overall condition deteriorated and succumbed to his disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of GBM dissemination presenting in this manner. Because GBM extracranial dissemination is rare, we also reviewed pertinent literature regarding this uncommon entity. Although metastases to spinal cord from GBM are uncommon, it is always important to have in mind when patients with a history of GBM present with symptoms that do not correlate with the primary disease pattern. PMID:26091464

  18. Label-free detection of fibrillar collagen deposition associated with vascular elements in glioblastoma multiforme by using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L W; Wang, X F; Wu, Z Y; Lin, P H; DU, H P; Wang, S; Li, L H; Fang, N; Zhuo, S M; Kang, D Z; Chen, J X

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM-WHO grade IV) is the most common and the most aggressive form of brain tumors in adults with the median survival of 10-12 months. The diagnostic detection of extracellular matrix (ECM) component in the tumour microenvironment is of prognostic value. In this paper, the fibrillar collagen deposition associated with vascular elements in GBM were investigated in the fresh specimens and unstained histological slices by using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our study revealed the existence of fibrillar collagen deposition in the adventitia of remodelled large blood vessels and in glomeruloid vascular structures in GBM. The degree of fibrillar collagen deposition can be quantitatively evaluated by measuring the adventitial thickness of blood vessels or calculating the ratio of SHG pixel to the whole pixel of glomeruloid vascular structure in MPM images. These results indicated that MPM can not only be employed to perform a retrospective study in unstained histological slices but also has the potential to apply for in vivo brain imaging to understand correlations between malignancy of gliomas and fibrillar collagen deposition.

  19. Dual-modality optical biopsy of glioblastomas multiforme with diffuse reflectance and fluorescence: ex vivo retrieval of optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Provias, John; Murty, Naresh; Patterson, Michael S.; Nie, Zhaojun; Hayward, Joseph E.; Farrell, Thomas J.; McMillan, William; Zhang, Wenbin; Fang, Qiyin

    2017-02-01

    Glioma itself accounts for 80% of all malignant primary brain tumors, and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for 55% of such tumors. Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy have the potential to discriminate healthy tissues from abnormal tissues and therefore are promising noninvasive methods for improving the accuracy of brain tissue resection. Optical properties were retrieved using an experimentally evaluated inverse solution. On average, the scattering coefficient is 2.4 times higher in GBM than in low grade glioma (LGG), and the absorption coefficient is 48% higher. In addition, the ratio of fluorescence to diffuse reflectance at the emission peak of 460 nm is 2.6 times higher for LGG while reflectance at 650 nm is 2.7 times higher for GBM. The results reported also show that the combination of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy could achieve sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90% in discriminating GBM from LGG during ex vivo measurements of 22 sites from seven glioma specimens. Therefore, the current technique might be a promising tool for aiding neurosurgeons in determining the extent of surgical resection of glioma and, thus, improving intraoperative tumor identification for guiding surgical intervention.

  20. Postoperative treatment of glioblastoma multiforme with radiation therapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide : A mono-institutional experience of 215 patients.

    PubMed

    Julka, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Daya Nand; Mallick, Supriya; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Joshi, Nikhil; Rath, Goura Kisor

    2013-01-01

    To study the clinical results and prognostic factors of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated by postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) and concomitant temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. From 2005 to 2008, 215 patients (median age 48 years) with GBM were treated with PORT plus temozolomide chemotherapy. Radiation therapy (RT) was employed with a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks by conventional fractionation with concomitant temozolomide (75 mg/m(2)/day). Adjuvant therapy consisted of 6 cycles of temozolomide (150 mg/m(2) for 5 days, 28 days cycle). The primary end point of the study was overall survival (OS), and the secondary end points were progression free survival (PFS) and toxicity. OS was determined with respect to different variables to study the prognostic significance. Median follow up was 11 months (range 2-50 months). Median OS and PFS were 13 months and 11 months respectively. The 1-year and 2-year OS was 44% and 18% respectively. There was no statistical significant impact of age, sex, KP score, anatomical location and extent of surgery. Presentation without seizures (on univariate analysis) and 6 cycles of adjuvant temozolomide therapy (on univariate as well as multivariate analysis) were found significant prognostic factors. Sixteen patients developed grade III-IV neutropenia/thrombocytopenia during the course of RT. Our results authenticate the role of concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in combination with PORT for the management of GBM patients. We strongly recommend complete 6 cycle of adjuvant temozolomide since it significantly improved the survival in our study.

  1. MicroPET/CT Imaging of an Orthotopic Model of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme and Evaluation of Pulsed Low-Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Chunta, John L.; Robertson, John M.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Oliver Wong, Ching-Yee; Amin, Mitual; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive tumor that typically causes death due to local progression. To assess a novel low-dose radiotherapy regimen for treating GBM, we developed an orthotopic murine model of human GBM and evaluated in vivo treatment efficacy using micro-positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) tumor imaging. Methods: Orthotopic GBM xenografts were established in nude mice and treated with standard 2-Gy fractionation or 10 0.2-Gy pulses with 3-min interpulse intervals, for 7 consecutive days, for a total dose of 14 Gy. Tumor growth was quantified weekly using the Flex Triumph (GE Healthcare/Gamma Medica-Ideas, Waukesha, WI) combined PET-single-photon emission CT (SPECT)-CT imaging system and necropsy histopathology. Normal tissue damage was assessed by counting dead neural cells in tissue sections from irradiated fields. Results: Tumor engraftment efficiency for U87MG cells was 86%. Implanting 0.5 x 10{sup 6} cells produced a 50- to 70-mm{sup 3} tumor in 10 to 14 days. A significant correlation was seen between CT-derived tumor volume and histopathology-measured volume (p = 0.018). The low-dose 0.2-Gy pulsed regimen produced a significantly longer tumor growth delay than standard 2-Gy fractionation (p = 0.045). Less normal neuronal cell death was observed after the pulsed delivery method (p = 0.004). Conclusion: This study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo brain tumor imaging and longitudinal assessment of tumor growth and treatment response with microPET/CT. Pulsed radiation treatment was more efficacious than the standard fractionated treatment and was associated with less normal tissue damage.

  2. Surprisal analysis of Glioblastoma Multiform (GBM) microRNA dynamics unveils tumor specific phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zadran, Sohila; Remacle, Francoise; Levine, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Gliomablastoma multiform (GBM) is the most fatal form of all brain cancers in humans. Currently there are limited diagnostic tools for GBM detection. Here, we applied surprisal analysis, a theory grounded in thermodynamics, to unveil how biomolecule energetics, specifically a redistribution of free energy amongst microRNAs (miRNAs), results in a system deviating from a non-cancer state to the GBM cancer -specific phenotypic state. Utilizing global miRNA microarray expression data of normal and GBM patients tumors, surprisal analysis characterizes a miRNA system response capable of distinguishing GBM samples from normal tissue biopsy samples. We indicate that the miRNAs contributing to this system behavior is a disease phenotypic state specific to GBM and is therefore a unique GBM-specific thermodynamic signature. MiRNAs implicated in the regulation of stochastic signaling processes crucial in the hallmarks of human cancer, dominate this GBM-cancer phenotypic state. With this theory, we were able to distinguish with high fidelity GBM patients solely by monitoring the dynamics of miRNAs present in patients' biopsy samples. We anticipate that the GBM-specific thermodynamic signature will provide a critical translational tool in better characterizing cancer types and in the development of future therapeutics for GBM.

  3. Expression of lncRNAs in Low-Grade Gliomas and Glioblastoma Multiforme: An In Silico Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reon, Brian J; Anaya, Jordan; Zhang, Ying; Mandell, James; Purow, Benjamin; Abounader, Roger; Dutta, Anindya

    2016-12-01

    Each year, over 16,000 patients die from malignant brain cancer in the US. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently been shown to play critical roles in regulating neurogenesis and brain tumor progression. To better understand the role of lncRNAs in brain cancer, we performed a global analysis to identify and characterize all annotated and novel lncRNAs in both grade II and III gliomas as well as grade IV glioblastomas (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM]). We determined the expression of all lncRNAs in over 650 brain cancer and 70 normal brain tissue RNA sequencing datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other publicly available datasets. We identified 611 induced and 677 repressed lncRNAs in glial tumors relative to normal brains. Hundreds of lncRNAs were specifically expressed in each of the three lower grade glioma (LGG) subtypes (IDH1/2 wt, IDH1/2 mut, and IDH1/2 mut 1p19q codeletion) and the four subtypes of GBMs (classical, mesenchymal, neural, and proneural). Overlap between the subtype-specific lncRNAs in GBMs and LGGs demonstrated similarities between mesenchymal GBMs and IDH1/2 wt LGGs, with 2-fold higher overlap than would be expected by random chance. Using a multivariate Cox regression survival model, we identified 584 and 282 lncRNAs that were associated with a poor and good prognosis, respectively, in GBM patients. We developed a survival algorithm for LGGs based on the expression of 64 lncRNAs that was associated with patient prognosis in a test set (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.168, 95% CI = 1.765-2.807, p < 0.001) and validation set (HR = 1.921, 95% CI = 1.333-2.767, p < 0.001) of patients from TCGA. The main limitations of this study are that further work is needed to investigate the clinical relevance of our findings, and that validation in an independent dataset is needed to determine the robustness of our survival algorithm. This work identifies a panel of lncRNAs that appear to be prognostic in gliomas and provides a critical resource for

  4. Expression of lncRNAs in Low-Grade Gliomas and Glioblastoma Multiforme: An In Silico Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reon, Brian J.; Anaya, Jordan; Zhang, Ying; Abounader, Roger; Dutta, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Background Each year, over 16,000 patients die from malignant brain cancer in the US. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently been shown to play critical roles in regulating neurogenesis and brain tumor progression. To better understand the role of lncRNAs in brain cancer, we performed a global analysis to identify and characterize all annotated and novel lncRNAs in both grade II and III gliomas as well as grade IV glioblastomas (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM]). Methods and Findings We determined the expression of all lncRNAs in over 650 brain cancer and 70 normal brain tissue RNA sequencing datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other publicly available datasets. We identified 611 induced and 677 repressed lncRNAs in glial tumors relative to normal brains. Hundreds of lncRNAs were specifically expressed in each of the three lower grade glioma (LGG) subtypes (IDH1/2 wt, IDH1/2 mut, and IDH1/2 mut 1p19q codeletion) and the four subtypes of GBMs (classical, mesenchymal, neural, and proneural). Overlap between the subtype-specific lncRNAs in GBMs and LGGs demonstrated similarities between mesenchymal GBMs and IDH1/2 wt LGGs, with 2-fold higher overlap than would be expected by random chance. Using a multivariate Cox regression survival model, we identified 584 and 282 lncRNAs that were associated with a poor and good prognosis, respectively, in GBM patients. We developed a survival algorithm for LGGs based on the expression of 64 lncRNAs that was associated with patient prognosis in a test set (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.168, 95% CI = 1.765–2.807, p < 0.001) and validation set (HR = 1.921, 95% CI = 1.333–2.767, p < 0.001) of patients from TCGA. The main limitations of this study are that further work is needed to investigate the clinical relevance of our findings, and that validation in an independent dataset is needed to determine the robustness of our survival algorithm. Conclusions This work identifies a panel of lncRNAs that appear to be prognostic in

  5. Establishment, Maintenance and in vitro and in vivo Applications of Primary Human Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) Xenograft Models for Translational Biology Studies and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Brett L.; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2011-01-01

    Development of clinically relevant tumor model systems for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is important for advancement of basic and translational biology. One model that has gained wide acceptance in the neuro-oncology community is the primary xenograft model. This model entails the engraftment of patient tumor specimens into the flank of nude mice and subsequent serial passage of these tumors in the flank of mice. These tumors then can be used to establish short-term explant cultures or intracranial xenografts. The focus of this manuscript is to review the procedures associated with the establishment, maintenance and utilization of a primary GBM xenograft panel. PMID:21743824

  6. Elimination of cancer stem-like cells and potentiation of temozolomide sensitivity by Honokiol in glioblastoma multiforme cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, I-Chun; Shih, Ping-Hsiao; Yao, Chih-Jung; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Wang-Peng, Jacqueline; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Chuang, Suang-En; Hu, Tsai-Shu; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Lai, Gi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common adult malignant glioma with poor prognosis due to the resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which might be critically involved in the repopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) after treatment. We had investigated the characteristics of cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells sorted from GBM cells, and studied the effect of Honokiol targeting on CSCs. GBM8401 SP cells possessed the stem cell markers, such as nestin, CD133 and Oct4, and the expressions of self-renewal related stemness genes, such as SMO, Notch3 and IHH (Indian Hedgehog). Honokiol inhibited the proliferation of both GBM8401 parental cells and SP cells in a dose-dependent manner, the IC50 were 5.3±0.72 and 11±1.1 μM, respectively. The proportions of SP in GBM8401 cells were diminished by Honokiol from 1.5±0.22% down to 0.3±0.02% and 0.2±0.01% at doses of 2.5 μM and 5 μM, respectively. The SP cells appeared to have higher expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and be more resistant to Temozolomide (TMZ). The resistance to TMZ could be only slightly reversed by MGMT inhibitor O6-benzylguanine (O6-BG), but markedly further enhanced by Honokiol addition. Such significant enhancement was accompanied with the higher induction of apoptosis, greater down-regulation of Notch3 as well as its downstream Hes1 expressions in SP cells. Our data indicate that Honokiol might have clinical benefits for the GBM patients who are refractory to TMZ treatment.

  7. Glutamine synthetase expression as a valuable marker of epilepsy and longer survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Anna; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Todeschini, Alice; Cominelli, Manuela; Medicina, Daniela; Cenzato, Marco; Simoncini, Edda Lucia; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Buglione, Michela; Grisanti, Salvatore; Padovani, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Background Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an astrocytic enzyme catalyzing the conversion of glutamate and ammonia to glutamine. Its up-regulation has been related to higher tumor proliferation and poor prognosis in extra-cerebral tumors. We have previously reported a GS deficiency in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who also developed epilepsy, which is a favorable prognostic factor in glioma. Here, we investigated the prognostic value of GS expression in patients with GBM with or without epilepsy and its correlation with survival. Methods We conducted a clinical and histopathological study on 83 (52 males) consecutive patients with newly diagnosed GBM. Immunohistochemical expression of GS was scored semi-quantitatively on the basis of cell number, staining intensity, and distribution of immunoreactive cells. Several clinical and neuropathological variables were analyzed in relation to survival and GS expression. Results Median age at diagnosis was 62 years. At the last evaluation, with a median follow-up of 11.5 months (range, 1.5–58 months), 5 patients (6%) were still alive and 78 (94%) were dead. GS expression patterns in neoplastic cells were inversely correlated to the presence of epilepsy (P < .0001 for intensity and P < .009 for homogeneity of GS distribution, respectively). Univariate analysis showed that RPA score, epilepsy, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGM)T status, application of Stupp protocol, and GS intensity pattern had a significant impact on survival. Absent/low intensity of GS expression was significantly associated with a longer survival in both uni- (19 vs 8 months; P < .0005) and multivariate (P = .003) analyses. Conclusions Absent/low-intensity GS expression pattern represents a valuable biomarker of both epilepsy and overall survival in GBM. PMID:23410662

  8. Extracted magnetic resonance texture features discriminate between phenotypes and are associated with overall survival in glioblastoma multiforme patients.

    PubMed

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Tanougast, Camel

    2016-11-01

    GBM is a markedly heterogeneous brain tumor consisting of three main volumetric phenotypes identifiable on magnetic resonance imaging: necrosis (vN), active tumor (vAT), and edema/invasion (vE). The goal of this study is to identify the three glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) phenotypes using a texture-based gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) approach and determine whether the texture features of phenotypes are related to patient survival. MR imaging data in 40 GBM patients were analyzed. Phenotypes vN, vAT, and vE were segmented in a preprocessing step using 3D Slicer for rigid registration by T1-weighted imaging and corresponding fluid attenuation inversion recovery images. The GBM phenotypes were segmented using 3D Slicer tools. Texture features were extracted from GLCM of GBM phenotypes. Thereafter, Kruskal-Wallis test was employed to select the significant features. Robust predictive GBM features were identified and underwent numerous classifier analyses to distinguish phenotypes. Kaplan-Meier analysis was also performed to determine the relationship, if any, between phenotype texture features and survival rate. The simulation results showed that the 22 texture features were significant with p value <0.05. GBM phenotype discrimination based on texture features showed the best accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 79.31, 91.67, and 98.75 %, respectively. Three texture features derived from active tumor parts: difference entropy, information measure of correlation, and inverse difference were statistically significant in the prediction of survival, with log-rank p values of 0.001, 0.001, and 0.008, respectively. Among 22 features examined, three texture features have the ability to predict overall survival for GBM patients demonstrating the utility of GLCM analyses in both the diagnosis and prognosis of this patient population.

  9. Elimination of Cancer Stem-Like Cells and Potentiation of Temozolomide Sensitivity by Honokiol in Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, I-Chun; Shih, Ping-Hsiao; Yao, Chih-Jung; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Wang-Peng, Jacqueline; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Chuang, Suang-En; Hu, Tsai-Shu; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Lai, Gi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common adult malignant glioma with poor prognosis due to the resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which might be critically involved in the repopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) after treatment. We had investigated the characteristics of cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells sorted from GBM cells, and studied the effect of Honokiol targeting on CSCs. GBM8401 SP cells possessed the stem cell markers, such as nestin, CD133 and Oct4, and the expressions of self-renewal related stemness genes, such as SMO, Notch3 and IHH (Indian Hedgehog). Honokiol inhibited the proliferation of both GBM8401 parental cells and SP cells in a dose-dependent manner, the IC50 were 5.3±0.72 and 11±1.1 μM, respectively. The proportions of SP in GBM8401 cells were diminished by Honokiol from 1.5±0.22% down to 0.3±0.02% and 0.2±0.01% at doses of 2.5 μM and 5 μM, respectively. The SP cells appeared to have higher expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and be more resistant to Temozolomide (TMZ). The resistance to TMZ could be only slightly reversed by MGMT inhibitor O6-benzylguanine (O6-BG), but markedly further enhanced by Honokiol addition. Such significant enhancement was accompanied with the higher induction of apoptosis, greater down-regulation of Notch3 as well as its downstream Hes1 expressions in SP cells. Our data indicate that Honokiol might have clinical benefits for the GBM patients who are refractory to TMZ treatment. PMID:25763821

  10. Increased expression of EphA7 correlates with adverse outcome in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin-Fang; Fokas, Emmanouil; Juricko, Janko; You, An; Rose, Frank; Pagenstecher, Axel; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; An, Han-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Background Malignant gliomas are lethal cancers, highly dependent on angiogenesis and treatment options and prognosis still remain poor for patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Ephs and ephrins have many well-defined functions during embryonic development of central nervous system such as axon mapping, neural crest cell migration, hindbrain segmentation and synapse formation as well as physiological and abnormal angiogenesis. Accumulating evidence indicates that Eph and ephrins are frequently overexpressed in different tumor types including GBM. However, their role in tumorigenesis remains controversial, as both tumor growth promoter and suppressor potential have been ascribed to Eph and ephrins while the function of EphA7 in GBM pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Methods In this study, we investigated the immunohistochemical expression of EphA7 in a series of 32 primary and recurrent GBM and correlated it with clinical pathological parameters and patient outcome. In addition, intratumor microvascular density (MVD) was quantified by immunostaining for endothelial cell marker von Willebrand factor (vWF). Results Overexpression of EphA7 protein was predictive of the adverse outcome in GBM patients, independent of MVD expression (p = 0.02). Moreover, high density of MVD as well as higher EphA7 expression predicted the disease outcome more accurately than EphA7 variable alone (p = 0.01). There was no correlation between MVD and overall survival or recurrence-free survival (p > 0.05). However, a statistically significant correlation between lower MVD and tumor recurrence was observed (p = 0.003). Conclusion The immunohistochemical assessment of tissue EphA7 provides important prognostic information in GBM and would justify its use as surrogate marker to screen patients for tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. PMID:18366728

  11. Treatment of primary glioblastoma multiforme with cetuximab, radiotherapy and temozolomide (GERT) – phase I/II trial: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Stephanie E; Heeger, Steffen; Haselmann, Renate; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Jürgen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Background The implementation of combined radiochemotherapy (RCHT) with temozolomide (TMZ) has lead to a significant increase in overall survival times in patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), however, outcome still remains unsatisfactory. The majority of GBMs show an overexpression and/or amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Therefore, addition of EGFR-inhibition with cetuximab to the current standard treatment approach with radiotherapy and TMZ seems promising. Methods/design GERT is a one-armed single-center phase I/II trial. In a first step, dose-escalation of TMZ from 50 mg/m2 to 75 mg/m2 together with radiotherapy and cetuximab will be performed. Should safety be proven, the phase II trial will be initiated with the standard dose of 75 mg/m2 of TMZ. Cetuximab will be applied in the standard application dose of 400 mg/m2 in week 1, thereafter at a dose of 250 mg/m2 weekly. A total of 46 patients will be included into this phase I/II trial. Primary endpoints are feasibility and toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall and progression-free survival. An interim analysis will be performed after inclusion of 15 patients into the main study. Patients' enrolment will be performed over a period of 2 years. The observation time will end 2 years after inclusion of the last patient. Discussion The goal of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combined RCHT-immunotherapy with TMZ and cetuximab as first-line treatment for patients with primary GBM. PMID:16709245

  12. Differentiation between Glioblastoma Multiforme and Primary Cerebral Lymphoma: Additional Benefits of Quantitative Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chien Feng; Chen, Tai Yuan; Shu, Ginger; Kuo, Yu Ting; Lee, Yu Chang

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation between glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and primary cerebral lymphoma (PCL) is important because the treatments are substantially different. The purpose of this article is to describe the MR imaging characteristics of GBM and PCL with emphasis on the quantitative ADC analysis in the tumor necrosis, the most strongly-enhanced tumor area, and the peritumoral edema. This retrospective cohort study collected 104 GBM (WHO grade IV) patients and 22 immune-competent PCL (diffuse large B cell lymphoma) patients. All these patients had pretreatment brain MR DWI and ADC imaging. Analysis of conventional MR imaging and quantitative ADC measurement including the tumor necrosis (ADCn), the most strongly-enhanced tumor area (ADCt), and the peritumoral edema (ADCe) were done. ROC analysis with optimal cut-off values and area-under-the ROC curve (AUC) was performed. For conventional MR imaging, there are statistical differences in tumor size, tumor location, tumor margin, and the presence of tumor necrosis between GBM and PCL. Quantitative ADC analysis shows that GBM tended to have significantly (P<0.05) higher ADC in the most strongly-enhanced area (ADCt) and lower ADC in the peritumoral edema (ADCe) as compared with PCL. Excellent AUC (0.94) with optimal sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 86% for differentiating between GBM and PCL was obtained by combination of ADC in the tumor necrosis (ADCn), the most strongly-enhanced tumor area (ADCt), and the peritumoral edema (ADCe). Besides, there are positive ADC gradients in the peritumoral edema in a subset of GBMs but not in the PCLs. Quantitative ADC analysis in these three areas can thus be implemented to improve diagnostic accuracy for these two brain tumor types. The histological correlation of the ADC difference deserves further investigation. PMID:27631626

  13. Pulsed Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy in Combination With Temozolomide in a Murine Orthotopic Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, David Y.; Chunta, John L.; Park, Sean S.; Huang, Jiayi; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Grills, Inga S.; Krueger, Sarah A.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of pulsed low-dose radiation therapy (PLRT) combined with temozolomide (TMZ) as a novel treatment approach for radioresistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a murine model. Methods and Materials: Orthotopic U87MG hGBM tumors were established in Nu-Foxn1{sup nu} mice and imaged weekly using a small-animal micropositron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) system. Tumor volume was determined from contrast-enhanced microCT images and tumor metabolic activity (SUVmax) from the F18-FDG microPET scan. Tumors were irradiated 7 to 10 days after implantation with a total dose of 14 Gy in 7 consecutive days. The daily treatment was given as a single continuous 2-Gy dose (RT) or 10 pulses of 0.2 Gy using an interpulse interval of 3 minutes (PLRT). TMZ (10 mg/kg) was given daily by oral gavage 1 hour before RT. Tumor vascularity and normal brain damage were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Radiation therapy with TMZ resulted in a significant 3- to 4-week tumor growth delay compared with controls, with PLRT+TMZ the most effective. PLRT+TMZ resulted in a larger decline in SUVmax than RT+TMZ. Significant differences in survival were evident. Treatment after PLRT+TMZ was associated with increased vascularization compared with RT+TMZ. Significantly fewer degenerating neurons were seen in normal brain after PLRT+TMZ compared with RT+TMZ. Conclusions: PLRT+TMZ produced superior tumor growth delay and less normal brain damage when compared with RT+TMZ. The differential effect of PLRT on vascularization may confirm new treatment avenues for GBM.

  14. Prognosis classification in glioblastoma multiforme using multimodal MRI derived heterogeneity textural features: impact of pre-processing choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhaya, Taman; Morvan, Yannick; Stindel, Eric; Le Reste, Pierre-Jean; Hatt, Mathieu

    2016-03-01

    Heterogeneity image-derived features of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors from multimodal MRI sequences may provide higher prognostic value than standard parameters used in routine clinical practice. We previously developed a framework for automatic extraction and combination of image-derived features (also called "Radiomics") through support vector machines (SVM) for predictive model building. The results we obtained in a cohort of 40 GBM suggested these features could be used to identify patients with poorer outcome. However, extraction of these features is a delicate multi-step process and their values may therefore depend on the pre-processing of images. The original developed workflow included skull removal, bias homogeneity correction, and multimodal tumor segmentation, followed by textural features computation, and lastly ranking, selection and combination through a SVM-based classifier. The goal of the present work was to specifically investigate the potential benefit and respective impact of the addition of several MRI pre-processing steps (spatial resampling for isotropic voxels, intensities quantization and normalization) before textural features computation, on the resulting accuracy of the classifier. Eighteen patients datasets were also added for the present work (58 patients in total). A classification accuracy of 83% (sensitivity 79%, specificity 85%) was obtained using the original framework. The addition of the new pre-processing steps increased it to 93% (sensitivity 93%, specificity 93%) in identifying patients with poorer survival (below the median of 12 months). Among the three considered pre-processing steps, spatial resampling was found to have the most important impact. This shows the crucial importance of investigating appropriate image pre-processing steps to be used for methodologies based on textural features extraction in medical imaging.

  15. A phase II trial of accelerated radiotherapy using weekly stereotactic conformal boost for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme: RTOG 0023

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, Robert; Choucair, Ali; Gillin, Michael; Chakravarti, Arnab; Schultz, Christopher; Souhami, Luis; Chen, Allan; Pham, Huong; Mehta, Minesh

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: This phase II trial was performed to assess the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of dose-intense accelerated radiation therapy using weekly fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) boost for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed GBM with postoperative enhancing tumor plus tumor cavity diameter <60 mm were enrolled. A 50-Gy dose of standard radiation therapy (RT) was given in daily 2-Gy fractions. In addition, patients received four FSRT treatments, once weekly, during Weeks 3 to 6. FSRT dosing of either 5 Gy or 7 Gy per fraction was given for a cumulative dose of 70 or 78 Gy in 29 (25 standard RT + 4 FSRT) treatments over 6 weeks. After the RT course, carmustine (BCNU) at 80 mg/m{sup 2} was given for 3 days, every 8 weeks, for 6 cycles. Results: A total of 76 patients were analyzed. Toxicity included: 3 Grade 4 chemotherapy, 3 acute Grade 4 radiotherapy, and 1 Grade 3 late. The median survival time was 12.5 months. No survival difference is seen when compared with the RTOG historical database. Patients with gross total resection (41%) had a median survival time of 16.6 months vs. 12.0 months for historic controls with gross total resection (p = 0.14). Conclusion: This first, multi-institutional FSRT boost trial for GBM was feasible and well tolerated. There is no significant survival benefit using this dose-intense RT regimen. Subset analysis revealed a trend toward improved outcome for GTR patients suggesting that patients with minimal disease burden may benefit from this form of accelerated RT.

  16. The interaction of bee products with temozolomide in human diffuse astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme and astroglia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Borawska, Maria H; Markiewicz-Żukowska, Renata; Naliwajko, Sylwia K; Moskwa, Justyna; Bartosiuk, Emilia; Socha, Katarzyna; Surażyński, Arkadiusz; Kochanowicz, Jan; Mariak, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the influence of extracts from Salix spp. honey (ESH), beebread (EBB), and royal jelly (ERJ) with and without temozolomide (TMZ) on cell lines derived from a patient with diffuse astrocytoma (DASC), human glioblastoma multiforme (U87MG), and normal human astroglia (SVGp12). DASC was identified by immunocytochemistry. TMZ (20 μM) in combination with ESH (30 μg/mL), EBB (50 μg/mL), and ERJ (30 μg/mL) has stronger cytotoxic activity on U87MG cells after 72 h (20.0, 26.5, and 29.3% of control, respectively) than TMZ alone (about 6% of control). An increase of the cytotoxic effect and inhibition of DNA synthesis in SVGp12 were detected after administering TMZ with the studied extracts. NF-κB p50 subunit was reduced in U87MG cells after treatment with ESH (70.9%) and ESH + TMZ (74.7%). A significant decline of MMP-9 and MMP-2 secretion in cultured U87MG was detected after incubation with EBB (42.9% and 73.0%, respectively) and EBB + TMZ (38.4% and 68.5%, respectively). In conclusion, the use of bee products may increase the cytotoxic effect of TMZ in U87MG but also in SVGp12 cell line. It is important to note that the U87MG cells were sensitive to natural bee products, although there was no influence of natural bee products on the DASC cells.

  17. Stratification of pseudoprogression and true progression of glioblastoma multiform based on longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging without segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaohua; Tan, Hua; Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Weilin; Chan, Michael D.; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Pseudoprogression (PsP) can mimic true tumor progression (TTP) on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with glioblastoma multiform (GBM). The phenotypical similarity between PsP and TTP makes it a challenging task for physicians to distinguish these entities. So far, no approved biomarkers or computer-aided diagnosis systems have been used clinically for this purpose. Methods: To address this challenge, the authors developed an objective classification system for PsP and TTP based on longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging. A novel spatio-temporal discriminative dictionary learning scheme was proposed to differentiate PsP and TTP, thereby avoiding segmentation of the region of interest. The authors constructed a novel discriminative sparse matrix with the classification-oriented dictionary learning approach by excluding the shared features of two categories, so that the pooled features captured the subtle difference between PsP and TTP. The most discriminating features were then identified from the pooled features by their feature scoring system. Finally, the authors stratified patients with GBM into PsP and TTP by a support vector machine approach. Tenfold cross-validation (CV) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) were used to assess the robustness of the developed system. Results: The average accuracy and AUC values after ten rounds of tenfold CV were 0.867 and 0.92, respectively. The authors also assessed the effects of different methods and factors (such as data types, pooling techniques, and dimensionality reduction approaches) on the performance of their classification system which obtained the best performance. Conclusions: The proposed objective classification system without segmentation achieved a desirable and reliable performance in differentiating PsP from TTP. Thus, the developed approach is expected to advance the clinical research and diagnosis of PsP and TTP. PMID:27806598

  18. Graphene nanoribbons as a drug delivery agent for lucanthone mediated therapy of glioblastoma multiforme

    DOE PAGES

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Surhland, Cassandra; Sanchez, Zina; ...

    2014-08-13

    We report use of PEG-DSPE coated oxidized graphene nanoribbons (O-GNR-PEG-DSPE) as agent for delivery of anti-tumor drug Lucanthone (Luc) into Glioblastoma Multiformae (GBM) cells targeting base excision repair enzyme APE-1 (Apurinic endonuclease-1). Lucanthone, an endonuclease inhibitor of APE-1, was loaded onto O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs using a simple non-covalent method. We found its uptake by GBM cell line U251 exceeding 67% and 60% in APE-1-overexpressing U251, post 24 hours (h). However, their uptake was ~38% and 29% by MCF-7 and rat glial progenitor cells (CG-4), respectively. TEM analysis of U251 showed large aggregates of O-GNR-PEG-DSPE in vesicles. Luc-O-GNR-PEG-DSPE was significantly toxic to U251more » but showed little / no toxicity when exposed to MCF-7/CG-4 cells. This differential uptake effect can be exploited to use O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs as a vehicle for Luc delivery to GBM, while reducing nonspecific cytotoxicity to the surrounding healthy tissue. In conclusion, cell death in U251 was necrotic, probably due to oxidative degradation of APE-1.« less

  19. Graphene nanoribbons as a drug delivery agent for lucanthone mediated therapy of glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Surhland, Cassandra; Sanchez, Zina; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Suresh Kumar, M. A.; Lee, Stephen; Peña, Louis A.; Waring, Michael; Sitharaman, Balaji; Naidu, Mamta

    2014-08-13

    We report use of PEG-DSPE coated oxidized graphene nanoribbons (O-GNR-PEG-DSPE) as agent for delivery of anti-tumor drug Lucanthone (Luc) into Glioblastoma Multiformae (GBM) cells targeting base excision repair enzyme APE-1 (Apurinic endonuclease-1). Lucanthone, an endonuclease inhibitor of APE-1, was loaded onto O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs using a simple non-covalent method. We found its uptake by GBM cell line U251 exceeding 67% and 60% in APE-1-overexpressing U251, post 24 hours (h). However, their uptake was ~38% and 29% by MCF-7 and rat glial progenitor cells (CG-4), respectively. TEM analysis of U251 showed large aggregates of O-GNR-PEG-DSPE in vesicles. Luc-O-GNR-PEG-DSPE was significantly toxic to U251 but showed little / no toxicity when exposed to MCF-7/CG-4 cells. This differential uptake effect can be exploited to use O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs as a vehicle for Luc delivery to GBM, while reducing nonspecific cytotoxicity to the surrounding healthy tissue. In conclusion, cell death in U251 was necrotic, probably due to oxidative degradation of APE-1.

  20. Diagnosis of pseudoprogression using MRI perfusion in patients with glioblastoma multiforme may predict improved survival

    PubMed Central

    Gahramanov, Seymur; Varallyay, Csanad; Tyson, Rose Marie; Lacy, Cynthia; Fu, Rongwei; Netto, Joao Prola; Nasseri, Morad; White, Tricia; Woltjer, Randy L; Gultekin, Sakir Humayun; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Aims This retrospective study determined the survival of glioblastoma patients with or without pseudoprogression. Methods A total of 68 patients were included. Overall survival was compared between patients showing pseudoprogression (in most cases diagnosed using perfusion MRI with ferumoxytol) and in patients without pseudoprogession. MGMT methylation status was also analyzed in the pseudoprogression cases. Results Median survival in 24 (35.3%) patients with pseudoprogression was 34.7 months (95% CI: 20.3–54.1), and 13.4 months (95% CI: 11.1–19.5) in 44 (64.7%) patients without pseudoprogression (p < 0.0001). The longest survival was a median of 54.1 months in patients with combination of pseudoprogression and (MGMT) promoter methylation. Conclusion Pseudoprogression is associated with better outcome, especially if concurring with MGMT promoter methylation. Patients never diagnosed with pseudoprogression had poor survival. This study emphasizes the importance of differentiating tumor progression and pseudoprogression using perfusion MRI. PMID:25438810

  1. Graphene Nanoribbons as a Drug Delivery Agent for Lucanthone Mediated Therapy of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Surhland, Cassandra; Sanchez, Zina; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Kumar, M.A. Suresh; Lee, Stephen; Peña, Louis A.; Waring, Michael; Sitharaman, Balaji; Naidu, Mamta

    2014-01-01

    We report use of PEG-DSPE coated oxidized graphene nanoribbons (O-GNR-PEG-DSPE) as agent for delivery of anti-tumor drug Lucanthone (Luc) into Glioblastoma Multiformae (GBM) cells targeting base excision repair enzyme APE-1 (Apurinic endonuclease-1). Lucanthone, an endonuclease inhibitor of APE-1, was loaded onto O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs using a simple non-covalent method. We found its uptake by GBM cell line U251 exceeding 67% and 60% in APE-1-overexpressing U251, post 24 hours (h). However, their uptake was ~38% and 29% by MCF-7 and rat glial progenitor cells (CG-4), respectively. TEM analysis of U251 showed large aggregates of O-GNR-PEG-DSPE in vesicles. Luc-O-GNR-PEG-DSPE was significantly toxic to U251 but showed little / no toxicity when exposed to MCF-7/CG-4 cells. This differential uptake effect can be exploited to use O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs as a vehicle for Luc delivery to GBM, while reducing nonspecific cytotoxicity to the surrounding healthy tissue. Cell death in U251 was necrotic, probably due to oxidative degradation of APE-1. PMID:25131339

  2. Anti-proliferative and anti-migration effects of Polish propolis combined with Hypericum perforatum L. on glioblastoma multiforme cell line U87MG.

    PubMed

    Borawska, Maria H; Naliwajko, Sylwia K; Moskwa, Justyna; Markiewicz-Żukowska, Renata; Puścion-Jakubik, Anna; Soroczyńska, Jolanta

    2016-09-20

    Propolis and Hypericum perforatum L. are natural products which contain many active compounds and have numerous beneficial effects, including an antitumor effect. Gliobmastoma multiforme (GBM) is a common primary brain tumor with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. In this study, the effect of propolis (EEP) combined with H. perforatum L. (HPE) on glioblastoma cell line U87MG was investigated for the first time. Anti-proliferative activity of EEP, HPE and their combination (EEP + HPE) was determined by a cytotoxicity test, DNA binding by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and cell migration assay. Anti-metastatic properties in U87MG treated with EEP, HPE and EEP + HPE were estimated on cells migration test (scratch assay) and metalloproteinases (MMP2 and MMP9) secretion (gelatin zymography). Combination of HPE and EEP extracts was found to have a time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the viability of U87MG cells. This effect was significantly higher (p < 0.05) when compared to these two extracts applied separately, which was confirmed by the significant reduction of DNA synthesis and significantly higher mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. A significant decreasing in migration cells and in pro-MMP9 and pro-MMP2 secretion in U87MG cells were demonstrated after exposure to combination of EEP (30 μg/ml) with HPE (6.25 μg/ml). In this study, the combination of ethanolic extract from propolis and ethanolic extract of fresh-cut H. perforatum L. was proved the ability to reduce invasiveness of glioma cells through the inhibition of MMP2 and MMP9 secretion and suppression of cell migration. It has a more potent anti-proliferative effect on U87MG glioma cell line compared to using propolis and H. perforatum L. separately. Further studies are required to verify whether the examined extracts can activate apoptotic pathways.

  3. Knockdown of AKT3 (PKB γ) and PI3KCA Suppresses Cell Viability and Proliferation and Induces the Apoptosis of Glioblastoma Multiforme T98G Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Suchanek, Renata; Borkowska, Paulina; Pudełko, Adam; Owczarek, Aleksander; Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Machnik, Grzegorz; Fila-Daniłow, Anna; Kowalski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant and invasive human brain tumor that is difficult to treat and has a very poor prognosis. Thus, new therapeutic strategies that target GBM are urgently needed. The PI3K/AKT/PTEN signaling pathway is frequently deregulated in a wide range of cancers. The present study was designed to examine the inhibitory effect of AKT3 or PI3KCA siRNAs on GBM cell growth, viability, and proliferation.T98G cells were transfected with AKT3 and/or PI3KCA siRNAs. AKT3 and PI3KCA protein-positive cells were identified using FC and Western blotting. The influence of specific siRNAs on T98G cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis was evaluated as well using FC. Alterations in the mRNA expression of AKT3, PI3KCA, and apoptosis-related genes were analyzed using QRT-PCR. Knockdown of AKT3 and/or PI3KCA genes in T98G cells led to a significant reduction in cell viability, the accumulation of subG1-phase cells and, a reduced fraction of cells in the S and G2/M phases. Additionally, statistically significant differences in the BAX/BCL-2 ratio and an increased percentage of apoptotic cells were found. The siRNA-induced AKT3 and PI3KCA mRNA knockdown may offer a novel therapeutic strategy to control the growth of human GBM cells. PMID:24967401

  4. Immunohistochemically determined total epidermal growth factor receptor levels not of prognostic value in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme: report from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Arnab; Seiferheld, Wendy; Tu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Huijun; Zhang, Hua Zhong; Ang, K Kian; Hammond, Elizabeth; Curran, Walter; Mehta, Minesh

    2005-06-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) performed an analysis of patterns of immunohistochemically detected total epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein expression levels and their prognostic significance on archival tissue in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients from prior prospective RTOG clinical trials. Patients in this study had been treated on previous RTOG GBM trials (RTOG 7401, 7918, 8302, 8409, 9006, 9305, 9602, and 9806). Tissue microarrays were prepared from 155 patients enrolled in these trials. These specimens were stained using a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for the extracellular binding domain of EGFR to detect total EGFR (including both wild-type phosphorylated and wild-type unphosphorylated isoforms with some cross-reactivity with EGFRvIII). The intensity of total EGFR protein expression was measured by computerized quantitative image analysis using the SAMBA 4000 Cell Image Analysis System. The parameters measured were the mean optical densities over the labeled areas and the staining index, which represents the proportion of stained area relative to the mean stain concentration. Both parameters were correlated with the clinical outcome. No differences in either overall or progression-free survival could be demonstrated by the mean optical density class or mean optical density quartile or the staining index of total EGFR immunostaining among the representative RTOG GBM cases. Total EGFR protein expression levels, as measured immunohistochemically, do not appear to be of prognostic value in newly diagnosed GBM patients. Given the accumulating clinical evidence of the activity of anti-EGFR agents in GBM and the preclinical data suggesting the important role of downstream mediators as effectors of EGFR signaling, the RTOG is conducting additional investigations into the prognostic value of activation patterns of EGFR signaling, both at the level of the receptor (e.g., EGFRvIII, phospho-EGFR) and at the level of

  5. Phase I trial of erlotinib with radiation therapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme: Results of North Central Cancer Treatment Group protocol N0177

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil . E-mail: skrishnan@mdanderson.org; Brown, Paul D.; Ballman, Karla V.; Fiveash, John B.; Uhm, Joon H.; Giannini, Caterina; Jaeckle, Kurt A.; Geoffroy, Francois J.; Nabors, L. Burt; Buckner, Jan C.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of erlotinib plus radiation therapy (RT) in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a multicenter phase I trial. Methods and Materials: Patients were stratified on the basis of the use of enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants (EIACs). After resection or biopsy, patients were treated with erlotinib for 1 week before concurrent erlotinib and 6 weeks (60 Gy) of RT and maintained on erlotinib until progression. The erlotinib dose was escalated in cohorts of 3 starting at 100 mg/day. Results: Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 were evaluable for the MTD and efficacy endpoints. Of these patients, 14 were males and 5 were females, with a median age of 54 years. Seven had undergone biopsy only, 5 had subtotal resections, and 7 had gross total resections. The highest dose level was 150 mg/day erlotinib for patients not on EIACs (Group 1) and 200 mg/day for patients on EIACs (Group 2). MTD was not reached in either group. In Group 1 at 100 mg (n = 6) and at 150 mg (n = 4), only 1 dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) occurred (stomatitis at 100 mg). No DLTs have occurred in Group 2 at 100 mg (n = 3), 150 mg (n = 3), and 200 mg (n = 3). With a median follow-up of 52 weeks, progression was documented in 16 patients and 13 deaths occurred. Median time to progression was 26 weeks, and median survival was 55 weeks. Conclusion: Toxicity is acceptable at the current doses of erlotinib plus RT. The study was modified to include concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide, and accrual is in progress.

  6. Phase II and pharmacogenomics study of enzastaurin plus temozolomide during and following radiation therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme and gliosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan M; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Polley, Mei-Yin; Pieper, Russell; Costello, Joseph F; Vandenberg, Scott; Parvataneni, Rupa; Nicole, Angelina; Sneed, Patricia K; Clarke, Jennifer; Hsieh, Emily; Costa, Bruno M; Reis, Rui M; Hristova-Kazmierski, Maria; Nicol, Steven J; Thornton, Donald E; Prados, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    This open-label, single-arm, phase II study combined enzastaurin with temozolomide plus radiation therapy (RT) to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and gliosarcoma. Adults with newly diagnosed disease and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 60 were enrolled. Treatment was started within 5 weeks after surgical diagnosis. RT consisted of 60 Gy over 6 weeks. Temozolomide was given at 75 mg/m(2) daily during RT and then adjuvantly at 200 mg/m(2) daily for 5 days, followed by a 23-day break. Enzastaurin was given once daily during RT and in the adjuvant period at 250 mg/day. Cycles were 28 days. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Progression-free survival (PFS), toxicity, and correlations between efficacy and molecular markers analyzed from tumor tissue samples were also evaluated. A prospectively planned analysis compared OS and PFS of the current trial with outcomes from 3 historical phase II trials that combined novel agents with temozolomide plus RT in patients with GBM or gliosarcoma. Sixty-six patients were enrolled. The treatment regimen was well tolerated. OS (median, 74 weeks) and PFS (median, 36 weeks) results from the current trial were comparable to those from a prior phase II study using erlotinib and were significantly better than those from 2 other previous studies that used thalidomide or cis-retinoic acid, all in combination with temozolomide plus RT. A positive correlation between O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation and OS was observed. Adjusting for age and KPS, no other biomarker was associated with survival outcome. Correlation of relevant biomarkers with OS may be useful in future trials.

  7. Association of {sup 11}C-Methionine PET Uptake With Site of Failure After Concurrent Temozolomide and Radiation for Primary Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Irwin H.; Piert, Morand; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Junck, Larry; Rogers, Lisa; Hayman, James; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao Yue; Tsien, Christina

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether increased uptake on 11C-methionine-PET (MET-PET) imaging obtained before radiation therapy and temozolomide is associated with the site of subsequent failure in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods: Patients with primary GBM were treated on a prospective trial with dose- escalated radiation and concurrent temozolomide. As part of the study, MET-PET was obtained before treatment but was not used for target volume definition. Using automated image registration, we assessed whether the area of increased MET-PET activity (PET gross target volume [GTV]) was fully encompassed within the high-dose region and compared the patterns of failure for those with and without adequate high-dose coverage of the PET-GTV. Results: Twenty-six patients were evaluated with a median follow-up of 15 months. Nineteen of 26 had appreciable (>1 cm{sup 3}) volumes of increased MET-PET activity before treatment. Five of 19 patients had PET-GTV that was not fully encompassed within the high-dose region, and all five patients had noncentral failures. Among the 14 patients with adequately covered PET-GTV, only two had noncentral treatment failures. Three of 14 patients had no evidence of recurrence more than 1 year after radiation therapy. Inadequate PET-GTV coverage was associated with increased risk of noncentral failures. (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Pretreatment MET-PET appears to identify areas at highest risk for recurrence for patients with GBM. It would be reasonable to test a strategy of incorporating MET-PET into radiation treatment planning, particularly for identifying areas for conformal boost.

  8. Radiosensitizing Effects of Temozolomide Observed in vivo only in a Subset of O6-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase Methylated Glioblastoma Multiforme Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Brett L.; Grogan, Patrick T.; Mladek, Ann C.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Kitange, Gaspar J.; Decker, Paul A.; Giannini, Caterina; Wu Wenting; Ballman, Karla A.; James, C. David; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT) followed by adjuvant TMZ is standard treatment for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), although the relative contribution of concurrent versus adjuvant TMZ is unknown. In this study, the efficacy of TMZ/RT was tested with a panel of 20 primary GBM xenografts. Methods and Materials: Mice with intracranial xenografts were treated with TMZ, RT, TMZ/RT, or placebo. Survival ratio for a given treatment/line was defined as the ratio of median survival for treatment vs. placebo. Results: The median survival ratio was significantly higher for O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylated tumors versus unmethylated tumors following treatment with TMZ (median survival ratio, 3.6 vs. 1.5, respectively; p = 0.008) or TMZ/RT (5.7 vs. 2.3, respectively; p = 0.001) but not RT alone (1.7 vs. 1.6; p = 0.47). In an analysis of variance, MGMT methylation status and p53 mutation status were significantly associated with treatment response. When we analyzed the additional survival benefit conferred specifically by combined therapy, only a subset (5 of 11) of MGMT methylated tumors derived substantial additional benefit from combined therapy, while none of the MGMT unmethylated tumors did. Consistent with a true radiosensitizing effect of TMZ, sequential treatment in which RT (week 1) was followed by TMZ (week 2) proved significantly less effective than TMZ followed by RT or concurrent TMZ/RT (survival ratios of 4.0, 9.6 and 12.9, respectively; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Concurrent treatment with TMZ and RT provides significant survival benefit only in a subset of MGMT methylated tumors and provides superior antitumor activity relative to sequential administration of RT and TMZ.

  9. R132H Mutation in IDH1 Gene is Associated with Increased Tumor HIF1-Alpha and Serum VEGF Levels in Primary Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Yalaza, Cem; Ak, Handan; Cagli, Mehmet Sedat; Ozgiray, Erkin; Atay, Sevcan; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan

    2017-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of primary brain tumors. Although mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) have been identified in a number of cancers, their role in tumor development has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between IDH1 mutations, tumor tissue HIF-1 alpha, and serum VEGF levels in patients with primary GBM for the first time. 32 patients (mean age, years: 58±14.0) diagnosed with primary glioblastoma multiforme were screened for IDH1 mutations (R132H, R132S, R132C and R132L) by direct sequencing. Serum VEGF and tumor tissue HIF1-alpha levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Associations between categoric variables were determined using chi-square tests. Differences between two groups were compared with t test for continuous variables. Six percent of patients were found to be heterozygous for R132H mutation. Tumor HIF1-alpha and serum VEGF levels were found to be significantly increased in IDH1-mutated tumor tissues (p<0.0001 and p=0.0454, respectively). Our results suggest that mutated IDH1 may contribute to carcinogenesis via induction of HIF-1 alpha pathway in primary GBM. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  10. The contrasting epigenetic role of RUNX3 when compared with that of MGMT and TIMP3 in glioblastoma multiforme clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Saraiva-Esperón, Uxia; Ruibal, Alvaro; Herranz, Michel

    2014-12-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and malignant astrocytic glioma in the adult, with a survival rate at 5 years less than 5%. In the GBM pathogenesis, the importance of genes methylation involved in cell cycle, tumor suppression, DNA repair and genome integrity, as well as tumor invasion and apoptosis has been described. We analyzed epigenetic regulation involvement of two genes related with apoptosis: TIMP3 and RUNX3 in order to define a clinical profile and compare with the most studied gene in GBM: MGMT. Eighty samples from GBM patients were evaluated by methylation specific PCR (MSP). Data from each patient were collected from medical histories to relate survival rates with gene methylation patterns. Methylation percentages obtained were: MGMT 45%, RUNX3 30% and TIMP3 28%. The study of MGMT methylation had prognostic value in patients with glioblastoma multiforme because at 8 months, 28% of patients survived with the gene methylated, while none of them lived with the gene unmethylated (P=0.016). RUNX3 behavior was opposite to TIMP3 and MGMT. TIMP3action, in terms of patient's survival, was similar to that observed with MGMT, percentage of patients surviving at 8 months with the gene methylated was 27%, compared with 7% of those with the unmethylated gene; there being a tendency to statistical significance (p=0.09).

  11. P17.51FUNCTIONAL PREDICTION OF MITOCHONDRIAL DNA MUTATIONS IN GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, R.E.; Keatley, K.; Littlewood, D.J.; Holt, W.V.; Higgins, S.C.; An, Q.; Fillmore, H.L.; Pilkington, G.J.; McGeehan, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Gliobastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common adult primary brain tumour. It is highly malignant with fewer than half of patients surviving for over one year following diagnosis. One reason for this is its highly heterogeneous nature, which renders the current standard-of-care treatment of surgical resection, radiotherapy, and temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy inadequate. Altered metabolism is a hallmark of cancer compared to non-cancer cells and central to this are mitochondria, which contain their own multi-copy circular DNA (mtDNA). At the heart of every mitochondrion is a collection of five large protein machines known as the respiratory chain (RC). The RC consists of approximately 70 subunits. MtDNA-encodes thirteen of the core catalytic subunits that form the RC. Variations in mtDNA can therefore directly affect metabolism and contribute to the pathology of numerous human diseases, including cancer. The acquisition of TMZ-resistance and decreased overall survival in GBM patients has been linked to altered RC activity but the contribution of mtDNA variations to this remains unexplored. To address this we have employed a novel dual approach for (1) discovering and (2) predicting the function of mtDNA variations in GBM patients using a combination of long PCR and next generation sequencing and 3D structural analysis, respectively. We have generated a set of 10 high quality mtDNAs each from GBM-biopsy derived cells with a mean depth of coverage per nucleotide of over 22,000. This enabled a total of 193 mtDNA variations to be detected, including those present at less than 1% heteroplasmy. Twenty five of these variations caused non-synonymous amino acid substitutions (AAS) in mtDNA-encoded Complex III and IV proteins. Using 3D structural analysis, we predict that 8 of these are highly likely to be functional, occurring in RC active sites, substrate/drug binding pockets and protein-protein interaction regions. The latter class will affect the assembly and stability

  12. Procarbazine, carmustine, and vincristine (PBV) for chemotherapy pre-treated patients with recurrent glioblastoma: a single-institution analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuhnhenn, Jan; Kowalski, Thomas; Steenken, Sabine; Ostermann, Kathrin; Schlegel, Uwe

    2012-09-01

    In newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme, surgery, combined radio and chemotherapy, and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide is the standard of care. Therapy for recurrent glioblastoma is less well established and comprises re-operation, re-irradiation, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, inhibition of neoangiogenesis, and others. In this observational study we recorded the efficacy and toxicity of a combination of procarbazine, carmustine, and vincristine (PBV) for 69 patients with recurrent and/or progressive glioblastoma after surgery, concomitant radio and/or chemotherapy, and adjuvant first-line temozolomide therapy. Of 41 patients evaluable for response by MRI, partial response was observed for one, minor response for three, stable disease for at least 6 weeks for ten, and immediate progression for 27. Median PFS was 15 weeks, and PFS-6 was 21 % for 57 patients who could be followed; 12 other patients were lost to follow-up after application of the first PBV cycle. Grade III or IV leucopenia and/or grade III or IV thrombocytopenia were seen in 26 % and 26 % of cycles, respectively. Haematological complications led to interruption of treatment for four (7 %) patients. Non-haematological toxicity was moderate. Salvage PBV therapy in recurrent and/or progressive glioblastoma, pre-treated with temozolomide-based chemotherapy as first-line treatment, is of limited efficacy with a small number of long-term survivors, but is hampered by relevant myelotoxicity.

  13. Prognostic Value of Early [{sup 18}F]Fluoroethyltyrosine Positron Emission Tomography After Radiochemotherapy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Piroth, Marc D.; Pinkawa, Michael; Holy, Richard; Klotz, Jens; Nussen, Sandra; Stoffels, Gabriele; Coenen, Heinz H.; Kaiser, Hans J.; Langen, Karl J.; Eble, Michael J.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Early detection of treatment response in glioma patients after radiochemotherapy (RCX) is uncertain because treatment-related contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging can mimic tumor progression. Positron emission tomography (PET) using the amino acid tracer [{sup 18}F]fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) seems to be a promising tool for treatment monitoring. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the prognostic value of early changes of FET uptake after postoperative RCX in glioblastomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with glioblastoma were treated by surgery and subsequent RCX (whole dose 60-72 Gy). The FET-PET studies were performed before RCX, 7-10 days and 6-8 weeks after completion of RCX. Early treatment response in PET was defined as a decrease of the maximal tumor-to-brain ratio (TBR{sub max}) of FET uptake after RCX of more than 10%. The prognostic value of early changes of FET uptake after RCX was evaluated using Kaplan-Maier estimates for median disease-free survival and overall survival. Results: The median overall and disease-free survival of the patients was 14.8 and 7.8 months. There were 16 early responders in FET-PET (72.7%) and 6 nonresponders (27.3%). Early PET responders had a significantly longer median disease-free survival (10.3 vs. 5.8 months; p < 0.01) and overall survival ('not reached' vs. 9.3 months; p < 0.001). No statistically significant differences between the patient subgroups were found concerning the defined prognostic parameters. Conclusions: FET-PET is a sensitive tool to predict treatment response in patients with glioblastomas at an early stage after RCX.

  14. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  15. SU-F-R-17: Advancing Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) Recurrence Detection with MRI Image Texture Feature Extraction and Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, V; Ruan, D; Nguyen, D; Kaprealian, T; Chin, R; Sheng, K

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test the potential of early Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) recurrence detection utilizing image texture pattern analysis in serial MR images post primary treatment intervention. Methods: MR image-sets of six time points prior to the confirmed recurrence diagnosis of a GBM patient were included in this study, with each time point containing T1 pre-contrast, T1 post-contrast, T2-Flair, and T2-TSE images. Eight Gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture features including Contrast, Correlation, Dissimilarity, Energy, Entropy, Homogeneity, Sum-Average, and Variance were calculated from all images, resulting in a total of 32 features at each time point. A confirmed recurrent volume was contoured, along with an adjacent non-recurrent region-of-interest (ROI) and both volumes were propagated to all prior time points via deformable image registration. A support vector machine (SVM) with radial-basis-function kernels was trained on the latest time point prior to the confirmed recurrence to construct a model for recurrence classification. The SVM model was then applied to all prior time points and the volumes classified as recurrence were obtained. Results: An increase in classified volume was observed over time as expected. The size of classified recurrence maintained at a stable level of approximately 0.1 cm{sup 3} up to 272 days prior to confirmation. Noticeable volume increase to 0.44 cm{sup 3} was demonstrated at 96 days prior, followed by significant increase to 1.57 cm{sup 3} at 42 days prior. Visualization of the classified volume shows the merging of recurrence-susceptible region as the volume change became noticeable. Conclusion: Image texture pattern analysis in serial MR images appears to be sensitive to detecting the recurrent GBM a long time before the recurrence is confirmed by a radiologist. The early detection may improve the efficacy of targeted intervention including radiosurgery. More patient cases will be included to create a generalizable

  16. Low levels of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection in Glioblastoma multiforme associates with patient survival; -a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represent the most aggressive brain tumor with a median overall survival of about 12-15 months. Over 90% of GBM tumors have recently been shown to be infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In this case-control study, we evaluated whether there was an association between the grade of HCMV infection and long-term survival (> 18 months) in GBM patients. Material and methods Brain tumor tissue sections from consecutive GBMs patients who survived more than 18 months (n = 40), and an equal number of GBM patients, matched to date of diagnosis and surgery, operated at Karolinska University Hospital in 2000-2005 were selected. HCMV infection grade was determined by estimation of the number of HCMV positive cells (scored negative or grade 1-4) in tumor tissue specimens. Using Chi-Square test and logistic regression analysis, we analyzed whether there was an association between long-term survival and HCMV low-grade infection or other clinical parameters known to be associated with prolonged survival of GBM patients; age under 50 years, radical surgery or low recursive partition analysis (RPA) subclass. Results HCMV infection was detected in tumor samples from 79 of 80 patients (99%). Among patients surviving > 18 months, HCMV infection grade 1 in the GBM tumor was predominant. A low grade HCMV infection was found in 19 patients, of these 16 survived > 18 months. Thus, 16 of 40 (40%) GBM patients who lived > 18 months had low-grade HCMV infection while only 3 of 40 (8%) GBM patients who lived < 18 months did (p .0006, Chi-Square test). Multiple logistic regression analyses yielded an odds ratio estimate of 6.604 with 95% confidence interval (1.36-32.1) (p .019) for low grade HCMV after adjustment for RPA class III and IV, radical surgery, age and gamma knife treatment. Conclusion In conclusion, we found that low-grade HCMV infection was strongly associated with long-term survival in GBM patients. PMID:22424569

  17. Phase II study of thalidomide and radiation in children with newly diagnosed brain stem gliomas and glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Turner, Christopher D; Chi, Susan; Marcus, Karen J; MacDonald, Tobey; Packer, Roger J; Poussaint, Tina Young; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Ullrich, Nicole; Goumnerova, Liliana C; Scott, R Michael; Briody, Caitlin; Chordas, Christine; Zimmerman, Mary Ann; Kieran, Mark W

    2007-03-01

    A phase II study was conducted to assess the efficacy of administering daily thalidomide concomitantly with radiation and continuing for up to 1 year following radiation in children with brain stem gliomas (BSG) or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Secondary objectives were to obtain preliminary evidence of biologic activity of thalidomide and to evaluate toxicities from chronic administration of thalidomide in this population. Thirteen patients (2-14 years old) with newly diagnosed BSG (12 patients) or GBM (one patient) were enrolled between July 1999 and June 2000. All patients received focal radiotherapy to a total dose of 5,580 cGy. Thalidomide was administered once daily beginning on the first day of radiation and continued for 12 months or until the patient came off study. The starting dose was 12 mg/kg (rounded down to the nearest 50 mg) and was increased by 20% weekly, if tolerated, to 24 mg/kg or 1,000 mg (whichever was lower). Advanced imaging techniques and urine and serum analysis for anti-angiogenic markers were performed in some patients in an attempt to correlate changes with clinical effect of therapy. No patients completed the planned 12 months of thalidomide therapy and all have since died of disease progression. The median duration of therapy was 5 months (range 2-11 months). Nine patients came off study for progressive disease (PD), three patients due to toxicity and one patient withdrew consent. Several patients on this study required more extended courses of high dose steroids than would have been otherwise expected for this population due to significant peritumoral edema and necrosis. No consistent pattern emerged from the biologic correlative studies from 11 patients. However, advanced imaging with techniques such as MR spectroscopy, MR perfusion and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) were helpful in distinguishing growing tumor from treatment effect and necrosis in some patients. The median time to progression (TTP

  18. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W S; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2016-03-15

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient´s survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient´s survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells.In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation.

  19. SU-F-R-42: Association of Radiomic and Metabolic Tumor Volumes in Radiation Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, C; Nagornaya, N; Parra, N; Kwon, D; Ishkanian, F; Markoe, A; Maudsley, A; Stoyanova, R

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High-throughput extraction of imaging and metabolomic quantitative features from MRI and MR Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) results in tens of variables per patient. In radiotherapy (RT) of GBM, the relevant metabolic tumor volumes (MTVs) are related to aberrant levels of N-acetyl Aspartate (NAA) and Choline (Cho). Corresponding Clinical Target Volumes (CTVs) for RT planning are based on Contrast Enhancing T1-weighted MRI (CE-T1w) and T2-weighted/Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) MRI. The objective is to build a framework for investigation of associations between imaging, CTV, and MTV features better understanding of the underlying information in the CTVs and dependencies between these volumes. Methods: Necrotic portions, enhancing lesion and edema were manually contoured on T1w/T2w images for 17 GBM patients. CTVs and MTVs for NAA (MTV{sub NAA}) and Cho (MTV{sub Cho}) were constructed. Tumors were scored categorically for ten semantic imaging traits by neuroradiologist. All features were investigated for redundancy. Two-way correlations between imaging and RT/MTV features were visualized as heat maps. Associations between MTV{sub NAA}, MTV{sub Cho} and imaging features were studied using Spearman correlation. Results: 39 imaging features were computed per patient. Half of the imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. 21 features were extracted from MTVs/CTVs. There were a high number (43) of significant correlations of imaging with CTVs/MTV{sub NAA} while very few (10) significant correlations were with CTVs/MTV{sub Cho}. MTV{sub NAA} was found to be closely associated with MRI volumes, MTV{sub Cho} remains elusive for characterization with imaging. Conclusion: A framework for investigation of co-dependency between MRI and RT/metabolic features is established. A series of semantic imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. The approach will

  20. Impact of [{sup 11}C]Methionine Positron Emission Tomography for Target Definition of Glioblastoma Multiforme in Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Masayuki; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Osamu; Shinoda, Jun; Nishibori, Hironori; Tsuge, Yusuke; Yano, Hirohito; Iwama, Toru; Hayashi, Shinya; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Aoyama, Hidefumi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to define the optimal margins for gadolinium-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-MRI) and T{sub 2}-weighted MRI (T{sub 2}-MRI) for delineating target volumes in planning radiation therapy for postoperative patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) by comparison to carbon-11-labeled methionine positron emission tomography ([{sup 11}C]MET-PET) findings. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT), MRI, and [{sup 11}C]MET-PET were separately performed for radiation therapy planning for 32 patients newly diagnosed with GBM within 2 weeks after undergoing surgery. The extent of Gd-MRI (Gd-enhanced clinical target volume [CTV-Gd]) uptake and that of T{sub 2}-MRI of the CTV (CTV-T{sub 2}) were compared with the extent of [{sup 11}C]MET-PET (CTV--[{sup 11}C]MET-PET) uptake by using CT--MRI or CT--[{sup 11}C]MET-PET fusion imaging. We defined CTV-Gd (x mm) and CTV-T{sub 2} (x mm) as the x-mm margins (where x = 0, 2, 5, 10, and 20 mm) outside the CTV-Gd and the CTV-T{sub 2}, respectively. We evaluated the relationship between CTV-Gd (x mm) and CTV-- [{sup 11}C]MET-PET and the relationship between CTV-T{sub 2} (x mm) and CTV-- [{sup 11}C]MET-PET. Results: The sensitivity of CTV-Gd (20 mm) (86.4%) was significantly higher than that of the other CTV-Gd. The sensitivity of CTV-T{sub 2} (20 mm) (96.4%) was significantly higher than that of the other CTV-T{sub 2} (x = 0, 2, 5, 10 mm). The highest sensitivity and lowest specificity was found with CTV-T{sub 2} (x = 20 mm). Conclusions: It is necessary to use a margin of at least 2 cm for CTV-T{sub 2} for the initial target planning of radiation therapy. However, there is a limit to this setting in defining the optimal margin for Gd-MRI and T{sub 2}-MRI for the precise delineation of target volumes in radiation therapy planning for postoperative patients with GBM.

  1. Age, Neurological Status MRC Scale, and Postoperative Morbidity are Prognostic Factors in Patients with Glioblastoma Treated by Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Verlut, Clotilde; Mouillet, Guillaume; Magnin, Eloi; Buffet-Miny, Joëlle; Viennet, Gabriel; Cattin, Françoise; Billon-Grand, Nora Clelia; Bonnet, Emilie; Servagi-Vernat, Stéphanie; Godard, Joël; Billon-Grand, Romain; Petit, Antoine; Moulin, Thierry; Cals, Laurent; Pivot, Xavier; Curtit, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Temozolomide and concomitant radiotherapy followed by temozolomide has been used as a standard therapy for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiform since 2005. A search for prognostic factors was conducted in patients with glioblastoma routinely treated by this strategy in our institution. METHODS This retrospective study included all patients with histologically proven glioblastoma diagnosed between June 1, 2005, and January 1, 2012, in the Franche-Comté region and treated by radiotherapy (daily fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 60 Gy) combined with temozolomide at a dose of 75 mg/m2 per day, followed by six cycles of maintenance temozolomide (150–200 mg/m2, five consecutive days per month). The primary aim was to identify prognostic factors associated with overall survival (OS) in this cohort of patients. RESULTS One hundred three patients were included in this study. The median age was 64 years. The median OS was 13.7 months (95% confidence interval, 12.5–15.9 months). In multivariate analysis, age over 65 years (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.88; P = 0.01), Medical Research Council (MRC) scale 3–4 (HR = 1.62; P = 0.038), and occurrence of postoperative complications (HR = 2.15; P = 0.028) were associated with unfavorable OS. CONCLUSIONS This study identified three prognostic factors in patients with glioblastoma eligible to the standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment. Age over 65 years, MRC scale 3–4, and occurrence of postoperative complications were associated with unfavorable OS. A simple clinical evaluation including these three factors enables to estimate the patient prognosis. MRC neurological scale could be a useful, quick, and simple measure to assess neurological status in glioblastoma patients. PMID:27559302

  2. SU-C-BRE-03: Dual Compartment Mathematical Modeling of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Kupelian, P; Kaprealian, T; Selch, M; Low, D; Pajonk, F; Sheng, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the aggressive recurrence and radioresistence of GBM with a dual compartment tumor survival mathematical model based on intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The repopulation and differentiation responses to radiotherapy of a solid tumor were simulated using an Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE). To obtain the tumor radiobiological parameters, we assumed that a tumor consists of two subpopulations, each with its distinctive linear quadratic parameters. The dual compartment cell survival model was constructed as SF(D)=F × exp(-α{sub 1} D-β{sub 1}D{sup 2}) + (1-F) × exp(-α{sub 2}D-β{sub 2}D{sup 2}) for a single fraction of treatment, with F as the fraction of CSC, and α and β describing the radiological properties of each population. Robust least square fitting was performed on clonogenic survival data from one GBM (U373MG) and one NSCLC (H460) cell line. The fit parameters were then used in the ODE model to predict treatment outcome of various treatment schemes. Results: The fit parameters from GBM cell survival data were (F, α{sub 1}, β{sub 1}, α{sub 2}, β{sub 2})=(0.0396, 0.0801, 0.0006, 0.1363, 0.0279), exhibiting two populations with distinctive radiological properties, CSC more radioresistant than DCC. The GBM cell line exhibited significantly poorer tumor control than its single compartment model prediction and NSCLC, which responded well to hypofrationation. The increased radioresistance was due to rapid regrowth of the DCC compartment triggered by its depletion while maintaining a viable CSC population. The rapid regrowth can be reduced by treating dose fractions ≤ 2 Gy with a prolonged treatment period. Conclusion: The interaction between a radioresistant CSC compartment and DCC compartment can explain the poor clinical outcome of GBM after radiotherapy despite dose escalation and hypofractionation attempts. Lower dose fractions result in better treatment

  3. [Treatment of recurrent glioblastoma with single-agent bevacizumab].

    PubMed

    Sinkó, Dániel; Nemeskéri, Csaba

    2016-03-27

    The prognosis of patients with recurrent glioblastoma is poor, as the median survival does not exceed 6 months. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of bevacizumab monotherapy in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. From April, 2012 to June, 2015, 40 patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme were treated with bevacizumab in a dose of 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks. The average progression-free survival was 6.4 months (2-22 months), and the 6-month progression-free survival was 42.5%. The six-month overall survival was 82.5%, which corresponds to those published in the literature. Bevacizumab monotherapy improves progression-free survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

  4. Association of WT1 IgG antibody against WT1 peptide with prolonged survival in glioblastoma multiforme patients vaccinated with WT1 peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Naoya; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Murakami, Yui; Iwai, Miki; Kagawa, Naoki; Chiba, Yasuyoshi; Izumoto, Shuichi; Elisseeva, Olga; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Sakamoto, Junichi; Morita, Satoshi; Nakajima, Hiroko; Takashima, Satoshi; Nakae, Yoshiki; Nakata, Jun; Kawakami, Manabu; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Hosen, Naoki; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Adachi, Mayuko; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    We previously evaluated Wilms’ tumor gene 1 (WT1) peptide vaccination in a large number of patients with leukemia or solid tumors and have reported that HLA‐A*24:02 restricted, 9‐mer WT1‐235 peptide (CYTWNQMNL) vaccine induces cellular immune responses and elicits WT1‐235‐specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, whether this vaccine induces humoral immune responses to produce WT1 antibody remains unknown. Thus, we measured IgG antibody levels against the WT1‐235 peptide (WT1‐235 IgG antibody) in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) receiving the WT1 peptide vaccine. The WT1‐235 IgG antibody, which was undetectable before vaccination, became detectable in 30 (50.8%) of a total of 59 patients during 3 months of WT1 peptide vaccination. The dominant WT1‐235 IgG antibody subclass was Th1‐type, IgG1 and IgG3. WT1‐235 IgG antibody production was significantly and positively correlated with both progression‐free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Importantly, the combination of WT1‐235 IgG antibody production and positive delayed type‐hypersensitivity (DTH) to the WT1‐235 peptide was a better prognostic marker for long‐term OS than either parameter alone. These results suggested that WT1‐235 peptide vaccination induces not only WT1‐235‐specific CTLs as previously described but also WT1‐235‐specific humoral immune responses associated with antitumor cellular immune response. Our results indicate that the WT1 IgG antibody against the WT1 peptide may be a useful predictive marker, with better predictive performance in combination with DTH to WT1 peptide, and provide a new insight into the antitumor immune response induction in WT1 peptide vaccine‐treated patients. PMID:27170523

  5. IDH mutation and MGMT promoter methylation are associated with the pseudoprogression and improved prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme patients who have undergone concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Li, Jiye; Cheng, Gang; Zhang, Jianning; Li, Xuezhen

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential association between IDH mutation and O(6)-methyl-guanine methyl transferase (MGMT) gene promoter methylation and pseudoprogression disease (psPD) in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients after concurrent temozolomide (TMZ)-based chemoradiotherapy. A total of 157 GBM patients who received concurrent TMZ-based chemoradiotherapy were included in this retrospective study. The association between psPD and a number of demographic and genetic factors, including IDH mutation and MGMT promoter methylation, were analyzed based on logistic regression, Cox regression, and multivariate analysis. Of the 157 GBM patients, 145 (92.36%) patients, including 38 patients with psPD, 38 patients with early progression (ePD), and 69 patients with non-progression (non-PD), were followed up for six to 56 months. We identified a higher rate of MGMT promoter methylation and IDH1 mutation in psPD patients compared with ePD patients (P=0.002). In addition, MGMT promoter methylation and IDH1 mutation predicted a high probability of psPD development in GBM patients (P=0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). MGMT promoter methylation, IDH1 mutation, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) ≥70, and psPD were associated with a significantly longer overall survival of GBM patients (P=0.001, 0.001, 0.002, and P<0.001, respectively). Both of MGMT promoter methylation and IDH mutation had a cumulative effect on the OS of GBM patients. GBM patients with psPD (39.2±2.1months, P<0.001) had a longer median survival (MS) than GBM patients with ePD (11.9±1.1months) or with non-PD (24.4±2.4months). MGMT promoter methylation and IDH1 mutation were associated with PsPD and predicted a longer median survival in GBM patients after TMZ-based chemoradiotherapy. Genetic analyses of the MGMT promoter and IDH1 may allow us to effectively treat GBM patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Knockdown of the AKT3 (PKBγ), PI3KCA, and VEGFR2 genes by RNA interference suppresses glioblastoma multiforme T98G cells invasiveness in vitro.

    PubMed

    Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Pudełko, Adam; Suchanek-Raif, Renata; Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Fila-Daniłow, Anna; Borkowska, Paulina; Kowalski, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain malignancy, having a very poor prognosis and is characterized by extensive brain invasion as well as resistance to the therapy. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/PTEN signaling pathway is deregulated in GBM. Besides, florid vascularization and aberrantly elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) occur very often. The present study was designed to examine the inhibitory effect of AKT3, PI3KCA, and VEGFR2 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) on GBM cell invasiveness. T98G cells were transfected with AKT3, PI3KCA, and/or VEGFR2 siRNAs. VEGFR2 protein-positive cells were identified by flow cytometry using specific monoclonal anti-VEGFR2 antibodies. Alterations in messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of VEGF, VEGFR2, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) (MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-13, MMP-14), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) (TIMP-1, TIMP-3), c-Fos, c-Jun, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), ObRa, and cathepsin D genes were analyzed by qRT-PCR. Cells treated with specific siRNA were also analyzed for invasion using the Matrigel invasion assay. We have found significantly lower mRNA levels of MMPs, cathepsin D, VEGF, VEGFR2, HIF-1α, and c-Fos/c-Jun ratio, as well as significantly higher mRNA level of TIMPs in AKT3 and PI3KCA siRNA transfected cells compared to untransfected cells, while significantly lower mRNA levels of MMPs (MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-14) and TIMP-1, as well as significantly higher mRNA level of TIMP-3, were shown only in cells transfected with VEGFR2 siRNA. The positive correlation between MMP-13 and ObRa mRNA copy number has been found. Summarizing, transfection of T98G cells with AKT3, PI3KCA, or VEGFR2 siRNAs leads to a significant reduction in cell invasiveness. The siRNA-induced AKT3, PI3KCA, and VEGFR2 mRNA knockdown may offer a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce the invasiveness of GBM cells.

  7. Predictive value of tumor recurrence using urinary vascular endothelial factor levels in patients receiving radiation therapy for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM).

    PubMed

    Krauze, Andra V; Won, Minhee; Graves, Christian; Corn, Ben W; Muanza, Thierry M; Howard, Steven P; Mahadevan, Arul; Schultz, Christopher J; Haas, Michael L; Mehta, Minesh P; Camphausen, Kevin A

    2013-10-31

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the central nervous system. Standard of care includes maximal resection followed by chemoradiotherapy. Tumors need adequate perfusion and neovascularization to maintain oxygenation and for removal of wastes. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a well characterized pro-angiogenic factor. We hypothesized that the increases in urinary VEGF levels would occur early in the course of tumor recurrence or progression. We examine the feasibility of collecting and analyzing urinary VEGF levels in a prospective, multi-institutional trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTOG, 0611) as well as the role of VEGF as a marker of tumor recurrence. We evaluated VEGF levels in urine specimens collected post-operatively, at the conclusion of radiation therapy (RT) and one month following RT. Urinary VEGF levels were correlated with tumor progression at one year. VEGF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay in urine specimens and normalized to urinary creatinine levels. Sample size was determined based on a 50% 1-year recurrence rate. With a sensitivity and specificity of 80%, the expected 95% confidence interval was (0.69, 0.91) with 100 patients. A failure was defined as documented disease progression, recurrence or death before one year. 202 patients were enrolled between February-2006 and October-2007. Four patients were ineligible as they did not receive RT. Of the remaining 198 patients, 128 had all three samples collected. In this group, 35 patients (27.3%) did not progress, 89 (69.5%) had progression and 4 (3.1%) died without evidence of progression. Median VEGF levels at baseline were 52.9 pg/mg Cr (range 0.2- 15,034.4); on the last day of RT, 56.6 (range 0-2,377.1); and at one month follow-up, 70.0 (range 0.1-1813.2). In patients without progression at 1-year, both baseline VEGF level and end of RT VEGF level were lower than those of patients who progressed: 40.3 (range 0

  8. Predictive value of tumor recurrence using urinary vascular endothelial factor levels in patients receiving radiation therapy for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the central nervous system. Standard of care includes maximal resection followed by chemoradiotherapy. Tumors need adequate perfusion and neovascularization to maintain oxygenation and for removal of wastes. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a well characterized pro-angiogenic factor. We hypothesized that the increases in urinary VEGF levels would occur early in the course of tumor recurrence or progression. We examine the feasibility of collecting and analyzing urinary VEGF levels in a prospective, multi-institutional trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTOG, 0611) as well as the role of VEGF as a marker of tumor recurrence. Method We evaluated VEGF levels in urine specimens collected post-operatively, at the conclusion of radiation therapy (RT) and one month following RT. Urinary VEGF levels were correlated with tumor progression at one year. VEGF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay in urine specimens and normalized to urinary creatinine levels. Sample size was determined based on a 50% 1-year recurrence rate. With a sensitivity and specificity of 80%, the expected 95% confidence interval was (0.69, 0.91) with 100 patients. A failure was defined as documented disease progression, recurrence or death before one year. Results 202 patients were enrolled between February-2006 and October-2007. Four patients were ineligible as they did not receive RT. Of the remaining 198 patients, 128 had all three samples collected. In this group, 35 patients (27.3%) did not progress, 89 (69.5%) had progression and 4 (3.1%) died without evidence of progression. Median VEGF levels at baseline were 52.9 pg/mg Cr (range 0.2- 15,034.4); on the last day of RT, 56.6 (range 0–2,377.1); and at one month follow-up, 70.0 (range 0.1-1813.2). In patients without progression at 1-year, both baseline VEGF level and end of RT VEGF level were lower than those of patients

  9. A New Approach in Gene Therapy of Glioblastoma Multiforme: Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells as a Novel Carrier for Suicide Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mansoureh; Fallah, Ali; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Arjmand, Babak; Yazdani, Nasrin; Verdi, Javad; Ghodsi, Seyed Mohammad; Miri, Seyed Mojtaba; Hadjighassem, Mahmoudreza

    2016-10-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) of human olfactory mucosa are a type of glial-like cells that possess good migratory and tropism properties. We believe that neuronal-derived vehicle may have better capability to receive to the site of injury. In addition to, obtaining of such vehicle from the patient reduces risk of unwanted complications. So, in this study, we investigate whether human olfactory ensheathing cells can be used as a cell source for the first time in gene delivery to assay the tumoricidal effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSV-tk) on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We obtained OECs from superior turbinate of human nasal cavity mucosa, and cell phenotype was confirmed by the expression of cell-specific antigens including low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (p75 neurotrophin receptor), microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP2), and S100 calcium binding protein B (S100-beta) using immunocytochemistry. Then, these cells were transduced by lentiviral vector for transient and stable expression of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (OEC-tk). The migratory capacity of OEC-tk, their potency to convert prodrug ganciclovir to toxic form, and cytotoxic effect on astrocyte cells were assayed in vitro. The OECs showed fibroblast-like morphology and expressed specific antigens such as p75 neurotrophin receptor, S100-beta, and MAP2. Our results indicated that OECs-tk were able to migrate toward primary cultured human glioblastoma multiforme and affected survival rate of tumor cells according to exposure time and concentration of ganciclovir. Also, OECs-HSV-tk was capable of inducing apoptosis in tumor cells. Our findings suggest that human OECs could employ as a possible tool to transfer anticancer agent in gene therapy of brain tumor.

  10. Up-regulation of miR-370-3p restores glioblastoma multiforme sensitivity to temozolomide by influencing MGMT expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yong-tao; Chen, Xiao-bing; Liu, Hong-lin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are believed to play an important role in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)chemotherapy. Our study aims to investigate potential miRNA biomarkers in GBM. Sixty GBM patients, which were given temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy and recurrent radiotherapy, were recruited. miRNA array was performed in cancerous and in paired normal tissues. Microarray results were further validated by a quantitative real-time PCR in selected tissues and GBM cell lines. TMZ resistance cells were developed and cell proliferation along with colony formation assays was determined. Our study employed H2AX formation and flow cytometry to analyse the role of miRNA in DNA damage and apoptosis. Our study illustrated 16 miRNA in which 9 were up-regulated and 7 down-regulated. and their differential expression were demonstrated in a recurrent GBM tissue. Among them, miRNA-370-3p demonstrated the highest level of down- regulation in tissues and in TMZ resistance cells. miRNA-370-3p mimic increased its expression and sensitivity of GBM cells to TMZ by suppressing the self-reparative ability of tumour cell DNA. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was identified as the direct target gene of miR-370-3p, and it was found to be inversely correlated with miR-370-3p expression in tissue samples obtained. Thus, our study demonstrated a critical clinical role of an up-regulated miR-370-3p expression in glioblastoma multiforme chemotherapy sensitivity. PMID:27595933

  11. MicroRNA-139-5p acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting ELTD1 and regulating cell cycle in glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Shouping; Wang, Xianjun; Li, Xiao; Cao, Yuandong

    2015-11-13

    MicroRNA-139-5p was identified to be significantly down-regulated in glioblastoma multiform (GBM) by miRNA array. In this report we aimed to clarify its biological function, molecular mechanisms and direct target gene in GBM. Twelve patients with GBM were analyzed for the expression of miR-139-5p by quantitative RT-PCR. miR-139-5p overexpression was established by transfecting miR-139-5p-mimic into U87MG and T98G cells, and its effects on cell proliferation were studied using MTT assay and colony formation assays. We concluded that ectopic expression of miR-139-5p in GBM cell lines significantly suppressed cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Bioinformatics coupled with luciferase and western blot assays also revealed that miR-139-5p suppresses glioma cell proliferation by targeting ELTD1 and regulating cell cycle. - Highlights: • miR-139-5p is downregulated in GBM. • miR-139-5p regulates cell proliferation through inducing apoptosis. • miR-139-5p regulates glioblastoma tumorigenesis by targeting 3′UTR of ELTD1. • miR-139-5p is involved in cell cycle regulation.

  12. First clinical results of a personalized immunotherapeutic vaccine against recurrent, incompletely resected, treatment-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors, based on combined allo- and auto-immune tumor reactivity.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil E J C; Pretto, Chrystel; Devillers, Laurent; Pierre, Denis; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C; Mespouille, Pascal; Hantos, Peter; Glorieux, Philippe; Bota, Daniela A; Stathopoulos, Apostolos

    2015-05-28

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients have a poor prognosis. After tumor recurrence statistics suggest an imminent death within 1-4.5 months. Supportive preclinical data, from a rat model, provided the rational for a prototype clinical vaccine preparation, named Gliovac (or ERC 1671) composed of autologous antigens, derived from the patient's surgically removed tumor tissue, which is administered together with allogeneic antigens from glioma tissue resected from other GBM patients. We now report the first results of the Gliovac treatment for treatment-resistant GBM patients. Nine (9) recurrent GBM patients, after standard of care treatment, including surgery radio- and chemotherapy temozolomide, and for US patients, also bevacizumab (Avastin™), were treated under a compassionate use/hospital exemption protocol. Gliovac was given intradermally, together with human GM-CSF (Leukine(®)), and preceded by a regimen of regulatory T cell-depleting, low-dose cyclophosphamide. Gliovac administration in patients that have failed standard of care therapies showed minimal toxicity and enhanced overall survival (OS). Six-month (26 weeks) survival for the nine Gliovac patients was 100% versus 33% in control group. At week 40, the published overall survival was 10% if recurrent, reoperated patients were not treated. In the Gliovac treated group, the survival at 40 weeks was 77%. Our data suggest that Gliovac has low toxicity and a promising efficacy. A phase II trial has recently been initiated in recurrent, bevacizumab naïve GBM patients (NCT01903330). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. MNK Inhibition Disrupts Mesenchymal Glioma Stem Cells and Prolongs Survival in a Mouse Model of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jonathan B; Eckerdt, Frank D; Alley, Kristen; Magnusson, Lisa P; Hussain, Hridi; Bi, Yingtao; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Clymer, Jessica; Alvarez, Angel A; Goldman, Stewart; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Nakano, Ichiro; Horbinski, Craig; Davuluri, Ramana V; James, C David; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme remains the deadliest malignant brain tumor, with glioma stem cells (GSC) contributing to treatment resistance and tumor recurrence. We have identified MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK) as potential targets for the GSC population in glioblastoma multiforme. Isoform-level subtyping using The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed that both MNK genes (MKNK1 and MKNK2) are upregulated in mesenchymal glioblastoma multiforme as compared with other subtypes. Expression of MKNK1 is associated with increased glioma grade and correlated with the mesenchymal GSC marker, CD44, and coexpression of MKNK1 and CD44 predicts poor survival in glioblastoma multiforme. In established and patient-derived cell lines, pharmacologic MNK inhibition using LY2801653 (merestinib) inhibited phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E, a crucial effector for MNK-induced mRNA translation in cancer cells and a marker of transformation. Importantly, merestinib inhibited growth of GSCs grown as neurospheres as determined by extreme limiting dilution analysis. When the effects of merestinib were assessed in vivo using an intracranial xenograft mouse model, improved overall survival was observed in merestinib-treated mice. Taken together, these data provide strong preclinical evidence that pharmacologic MNK inhibition targets mesenchymal glioblastoma multiforme and its GSC population. These findings raise the possibility of MNK inhibition as a viable therapeutic approach to target the mesenchymal subtype of glioblastoma multiforme. Mol Cancer Res; 14(10); 984-93. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Neurocognitive function in patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Wefel, Jeffrey S.; Cloughesy, Timothy; Zazzali, James L.; Zheng, Maoxia; Prados, Michael; Wen, Patrick Y.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Schiff, David; Abrey, Lauren E.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Paleologos, Nina; Nicholas, Martin K.; Jensen, Randy; Vredenburgh, James; Das, Asha; Friedman, Henry S.

    2011-01-01

    Neurocognitive decline is a frequent adverse effect of glioblastoma. Antitumor therapies that are efficacious, as measured by traditional endpoints such as objective response (OR) and progression-free survival (PFS), and have beneficial effects on neurocognitive function (NCF) are of clinical benefit to these patients. We evaluated neurocognitive changes across time in 167 patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab-based therapy in BRAIN, a phase II, randomized, multicenter trial. All patients underwent MRI and neurocognitive testing at baseline and every 6 weeks thereafter. Memory, visuomotor scanning speed, and executive function were evaluated using the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test–Revised, the Trail Making Test, and the Controlled Oral Word Association test, respectively. NCF relative to baseline for patients with an OR, PFS >6 months, or disease progression was evaluated at time of OR, 24 weeks, and time of progression, respectively. For patients with an OR or PFS >6 months, median standardized test scores were examined from baseline to week 24. Most patients with an OR or PFS >6 months had poorer NCF performance compared to the general population at baseline and had improved or stable NCF at the time of response or at the 24-week assessment, respectively; most patients with progressive disease had neurocognitive decline at the time of progression. For patients with an OR or PFS >6 months, median standardized test scores were largely stable across the first 24 weeks on study. Neurocognitive testing was an objective, valid, and feasible method of monitoring NCF in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. PMID:21558074

  15. Outcome and prognostic factors in cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme in adults: A retrospective study from the Rare Cancer Network

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Damien C. . E-mail: damien.weber@hcuge.ch; Miller, Robert C.; Villa, Salvador; Hanssens, Patrick; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Castadot, Pierre; Varlet, Pascale; Abacioglu, Ufuk; Igdem, Sefik; Szutowicz, Ewa; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Hofer, Silvia; Rutz, Hans Peter; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Taghian, Alphonse; Mirimanoff, Rene O.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the outcome in patients with cerebellar glioblastoma (GBM) treated in 15 institutions of the Rare Cancer Network. Methods and Materials: Data from a series of 45 adult patients with cerebellar GBM were collected in a retrospective multicenter study. Median age was 50.3 years. Brainstem invasion was observed in 9 (20%) patients. Radiotherapy (RT) was administered to 36 patients (with concomitant chemotherapy, 7 patients). Adjuvant chemotherapy after RT was administered in 8 patients. Median RT dose was 59.4 Gy. Median follow-up was 7.2 months (range, 3.4-39.0). Results: The 1-year and 2-year actuarial overall survival rate was 37.8% and 14.7%, respectively, and was significantly influenced by salvage treatment (p = 0.048), tumor volume (p = 0.044), extent of neurosurgical resection (p = 0.019), brainstem invasion (p = 0.0013), additional treatment after surgery (p < 0.001), and completion of the initial treatment (p < 0.001) on univariate analysis. All patients experienced local progression: 8 and 22 had progression with and without a distant failure, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial progression free survival was 25% and 10.7%, respectively, and was significantly influenced by brainstem invasion (p = 0.002), additional treatment after surgery (p = 0.0016), and completion of the initial treatment (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, survival was negatively influenced by the extent of surgery (p = 0.03) and brainstem invasion (p = 0.02). Conclusions: In this multicenter retrospective study, the observed pattern of failure was local in all cases, but approximately 1 patient of 4 presented with an extracerebellar component. Brainstem invasion was observed in a substantial number of patients and was an adverse prognostic factor.

  16. Erythema multiforme

    MedlinePlus

    ... multiforme von Hebra; Acute bullous disorder - erythema multiforme; Herpes simplex - erythema multiforme ... may lead to EM include: Viruses, such as herpes simplex that cause cold sores and genital herpes (most ...

  17. A Monte Carlo based formalism to identify potential locations at high risk of tumor recurrence with a numerical model for glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Trepanier, Pier-Yves; Fortin, Israel; Lambert, Carole; Lacroix, Frederic

    2012-11-01

    The strategy currently used to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients, which mostly relies on population-based failure patterns, does not consider the important variability in such patterns reported in the literature. As part of the multidisciplinary efforts being made to develop personalized therapeutic approaches, numerical models of tumor growth and treatment are increasingly being used by different groups around the world. In this study, a new formalism relying on the proliferation-invasion model is developed to identify potential locations of GBM recurrences. The authors assess the sensitivity of the location of potential tumor recurrences to the input parameter values predicted for a given patient by varying those values using a Monte-Carlo based approach. Our approach is designed to be prospective in the sense that it relies on patient-specific imaging data that can be gathered in one single preradiotherapy imaging session. The authors modeled the infiltration paths of glial cells using patient-specific diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. Nine GBM patients with preradiotherapy DTI data are considered in this study. The possible locations of tumor recurrences are determined by randomly selecting many ensembles of values for each of the growth and radiobiological parameters in the GBM growth model. A novel concept, the occurrence probability (OP), is introduced to assess the sensitivity of potential tumor recurrence locations to the input parameter values. For a given patient, the OP map is derived from a superposition of all potential tumor recurrence locations obtained with all sets of parameter values. For eight out of nine of patients, the authors have identified a statistically significant region where the OP is above 50%. For two patients, these high risk regions are found to be located at a distance greater than 3.9 cm from the border of the gross tumor volume highlighting the inaccuracy of current margins for some patients. The exact location

  18. Phase 2 trial of radiation plus high-dose tamoxifen for glioblastoma multiforme: RTOG protocol BR-00211

    PubMed Central

    Robins, H. Ian; Won, M.; Seiferheld, Wendy F.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Choucair, Ali K.; Brachman, David G.; Demas, William F.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2006-01-01

    Preclinical studies support the concept that inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) by tamoxifen (TAM) should provide both antineoplastic effects and radiosensitization. High-dose TAM (80 mg/m2 p.o. daily in divided doses) was given with and after conventional radiotherapy (XRT) to inhibit PKC-mediated signaling, which is known to be enhanced in glioblastoma (GBM). Seventy-seven patients were accrued between December 2000 and December 2001; two were ineligible and not included in the efficacy results. Pretreatment characteristics of the patients included the following: 52% were less than 60 years of age, 39% had a Zubrod score of 0, 70% had minor or no neurological symptoms, and 65% were Radiation Therapy Oncology Group–recursive partition analysis (RPA) class III and IV. Eighty-six percent of patients achieved acceptable dosing of TAM. Notable toxicity included late radiation grade 3 in two patients and thromboembolic events in 16 patients (two grade 2, 10 grade 3, three grade 4, and one grade 5), for an incidence of 20.8% (which is lower than expected, based on the literature for deep vein thrombophlebitis in GBM patients not receiving TAM). Median survival time (MST) was 9.7 months as compared (by three different statistical methodologies) to the historical GBM control database of 1457 RPA class III, IV, and V drug/ XRT-treated patients. After controlling for RPA class IV, the MST was 11.3 months, which compares to the historical RPA control of 11.3 months (P = 0.37). The results obtained do not exhibit a substantial advance over those of previous studies with various XRT/drug doublets, including BCNU. However, as TAM does not have significant overlapping toxicities with most other drugs, its testing in a combined modality approach with other medications may be justified in future clinical trials. Historically, the incidence of thromboembolic events in GBM patients is approximately 30%. The lower-than-expected incidence seen here has also been observed in other

  19. Glioblastoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common form of glioblastoma; it is very aggressive. Secondary: These tumors have a longer, somewhat slower growth history, but still are very aggressive. They may begin as lower-grade tumors which ...

  20. Long-Term Survival after Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in a Case of Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thumma, Sudheer R.; Elaimy, Ameer L.; Daines, Nathan; Mackay, Alexander R.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S.; Lee, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    The management of recurrent glioblastoma is highly challenging, and treatment outcomes remain uniformly poor. Glioblastoma is a highly infiltrative tumor, and complete surgical resection of all microscopic extensions cannot be achieved at the time of initial diagnosis, and hence local recurrence is observed in most patients. Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used to treat these tumor recurrences for select cases and has been successful in prolonging the median survival by 8–12 months on average for select cases. We present the unique case of a 63-year-old male with multiple sequential recurrences of glioblastoma after initial standard treatment with surgery followed by concomitant external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy (temozolomide). The patient was followed clinically as well as with surveillance MRI scans at every 2-3-month intervals. The patient underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery three times for 3 separate tumor recurrences, and the patient survived for seven years following the initial diagnosis with this aggressive treatment. The median survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma is usually 8–12 months after recurrence, and this unique case illustrates that aggressive local therapy can lead to long-term survivors in select situations. We advocate that each patient treatment at the time of recurrence should be tailored to each clinical situation and desire for quality of life and improved longevity. PMID:22548078

  1. Decreased survival of glioma patients with astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme) associated with long-term use of mobile and cordless phones.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, Michael; Hardell, Lennart

    2014-10-16

    On 31 May 2011 the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorised radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields, as a Group 2B, i.e., a "possible", human carcinogen. A causal association would be strengthened if it could be shown that the use of wireless phones has an impact on the survival of glioma patients. We analysed survival of 1678 glioma patients in our 1997-2003 and 2007-2009 case-control studies. Use of wireless phones in the >20 years latency group (time since first use) yielded an increased hazard ratio (HR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.3 for glioma. For astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme; n = 926) mobile phone use yielded HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4-2.9 and cordless phone use HR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.04-11 in the same latency category. The hazard ratio for astrocytoma grade IV increased statistically significant per year of latency for wireless phones, HR = 1.020, 95% CI = 1.007-1.033, but not per 100 h cumulative use, HR = 1.002, 95% CI = 0.999-1.005. HR was not statistically significant increased for other types of glioma. Due to the relationship with survival the classification of IARC is strengthened and RF-EMF should be regarded as human carcinogen requiring urgent revision of current exposure guidelines.

  2. Pilot Study to Explore the Accuracy of Current Prediction Equations in Assessing Energy Needs of Patients with Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Little, Rebecca B; Oster, Robert A; Darnell, Betty E; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Nabors, L Burt

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is rare, yet it is the most common brain malignancy and has a poor prognosis. In regard to GBM, there is a dearth of research on resting energy expenditure (REE) and the accuracy of extant prediction equations. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare measured REE (mREE) to commonly used prediction equations in newly diagnosed GBM patients. REE was collected by indirect calorimetry in 20 GBM patients. Calculated REE was derived from Harris-Benedict (again with weight adjusted for obesity), Mifflin-St Jeor, and the 20 kcal/kg body weight ratio method. Paired t-tests and Bland-Altman analyses were used to compare group means, evaluate the bias, and find the limits of agreement. Clinical accuracy was assessed by determining the percentage of patients with predicted REE within ±10% of mREE. Subjects were evenly distributed with regard to gender, primarily Caucasian, and largely overweight or obese and had a mean age of 57 years. All equations overestimated mREE. Mifflin-St Jeor and adjusted Harris-Benedict had the narrowest limits of agreement and accurately predicted 60% and 65% of subjects, respectively. Clinicians should be aware of the discrepancy between commonly used prediction equations and REE. More research is needed to verify these findings and decipher the cause and significance in the GBM population.

  3. Radiosensitisation by pharmacological ascorbate in glioblastoma multiforme cells, human glial cells, and HUVECs depends on their antioxidant and DNA repair capabilities and is not cancer specific.

    PubMed

    Castro, M Leticia; McConnell, Melanie J; Herst, Patries M

    2014-09-01

    We previously showed that 5 mM ascorbate radiosensitized early passage radioresistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells derived from one patient tumor. Here we investigate the sensitivity of a panel of cell lines to 5 mM ascorbate and 6 Gy ionizing radiation, made up of three primary human GBM cells, three GBM cell lines, a human glial cell line, and primary human vascular endothelial cells. The response of different cells lines to ascorbate and/or radiation was determined by measuring viability, colony-forming ability, generation and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs), cell cycle progression, antioxidant capacity and generation of reactive oxygen species. Individually, radiation and ascorbate both decreased viability and clonogenicity by inducing DNA damage, but had differential effects on cell cycle progression. Radiation led to G2/M arrest in most cells whereas ascorbate caused accumulation in S phase, which was moderately associated with poor DSB repair. While high dose ascorbate radiosensitized all cell lines in clonogenic assays, the sensitivity to radiation, high dose ascorbate, and combined treatment varied between cell lines. Normal glial cells were similar to GBM cells with respect to free radical scavenging potential and effect of treatment on DNA damage and repair, viability, and clonogenicity. Both GBM cells and normal cells coped equally poorly with oxidative stress caused by radiation and/or high dose ascorbate, dependent primarily on their antioxidant and DSB repair capacity.

  4. Combined inhibition of AKT/mTOR and MDM2 enhances Glioblastoma Multiforme cell apoptosis and differentiation of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Simona; Costa, Barbara; Zappelli, Elisa; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Sestito, Simona; Nesi, Giulia; Campiglia, Pietro; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Rapposelli, Simona; Martini, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The poor prognosis of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is due to a high resistance to conventional treatments and to the presence of a subpopulation of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Combination therapies targeting survival/self-renewal signals of GBM and GSCs are emerging as useful tools to improve GBM treatment. In this context, the hyperactivated AKT/mammalian target of the rapamycin (AKT/mTOR) and the inhibited wild-type p53 appear to be good candidates. Herein, the interaction between these pathways was investigated, using the novel AKT/mTOR inhibitor FC85 and ISA27, which re-activates p53 functionality by blocking its endogenous inhibitor murine double minute 2 homologue (MDM2). In GBM cells, FC85 efficiently inhibited AKT/mTOR signalling and reactivated p53 functionality, triggering cellular apoptosis. The combined therapy with ISA27 produced a synergic effect on the inhibition of cell viability and on the reactivation of p53 pathway. Most importantly, FC85 and ISA27 blocked proliferation and promoted the differentiation of GSCs. The simultaneous use of these compounds significantly enhanced GSC differentiation/apoptosis. These findings suggest that FC85 actively enhances the downstream p53 signalling and that a combination strategy aimed at inhibiting the AKT/mTOR pathway and re-activating p53 signalling is potentially effective in GBM and in GSCs. PMID:25898313

  5. Pre-clinical analysis of changes in intra-cellular biochemistry of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells due to c-Myc silencing.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Vishal; Vaidyanathan, Muthukumar; Janardhanam, Vanisree Arambakkam; Bradner, James E

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of brain Tumor that has few cures. In this study, we analyze the anti-proliferative effects of a new molecule JQ1 against GBMs induced in Wistar Rats. JQ1 is essentially a Myc inhibitor. c-Myc is also known for altering the biochemistry of a tumor cell. Therefore, the study is intended to analyze certain other oncogenes associated with c-Myc and also the change in cellular biochemistry upon c-Myc inhibition. The quantitative analysis of gene expression gave a co-expressive pattern for all the three genes involved namely; c-Myc, Bcl-2, and Akt. The cellular biochemistry analysis by transmission electron microscopy revealed high glycogen and lipid aggregation in Myc inhibited cells and excessive autophagy. The study demonstrates the role of c-Myc as a central metabolic regulator and Bcl-2 and Akt assisting in extending c-Myc half-life as well as in regulation of autophagy, so as to regulate cell survival on the whole. The study also demonstrates that transient treatment by JQ1 leads to aggressive development of tumor and therefore, accelerating death, emphasizing the importance of dosage fixation, and duration for clinical use in future.

  6. Differentiation of Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme from Radiation Necrosis after External Beam Radiation Therapy with Dynamic Susceptibility-weighted Contrast-enhanced Perfusion MR Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Chang, Jamie S.; Segal, Mark R.; Parsa, Andrew T.; McDermott, Michael W.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Cha, Soonmee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether cerebral blood volume (CBV), peak height (PH), and percentage of signal intensity recovery (PSR) measurements derived from the results of T2*-weighted dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast material–enhanced (DSC) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) can be used to distinguish recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) from radiation necrosis. Materials and Methods: Fifty-seven patients were enrolled in this HIPAA-compliant institutional review board–approved retrospective study after they received a diagnosis of GBM, underwent EBRT, and were examined with DSC MR imaging, which revealed progressive contrast enhancement within the radiation field. A definitive diagnosis was established at subsequent surgical resection or clinicoradiologic follow-up. Regions of interest were retrospectively drawn around the entire contrast-enhanced region. This created T2*-weighted signal intensity–time curves that produced three cerebral hemodynamic MR imaging measurements: CBV, PH, and PSR. Welch t tests were used to compare measurements between groups. Results: Mean, maximum, and minimum relative PH and relative CBV were significantly higher (P < .01) in patients with recurrent GBM than in patients with radiation necrosis. Mean, maximum, and minimum relative PSR values were significantly lower (P < .05) in patients with recurrent GBM than in patients with radiation necrosis. Conclusion: These findings suggest that DSC perfusion MR imaging may be used to differentiate recurrent GBM from EBRT-induced radiation necrosis. © RSNA, 2009 PMID:19789240

  7. Protein Co-Expression Analysis as a Strategy to Complement a Standard Quantitative Proteomics Approach: Case of a Glioblastoma Multiforme Study

    PubMed Central

    Deighton, Ruth F.

    2016-01-01

    Although correlation network studies from co-expression analysis are increasingly popular, they are rarely applied to proteomics datasets. Protein co-expression analysis provides a complementary view of underlying trends, which can be overlooked by conventional data analysis. The core of the present study is based on Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis applied to a glioblastoma multiforme proteomic dataset. Using this method, we have identified three main modules which are associated with three different membrane associated groups; mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum, and a vesicle fraction. The three networks based on protein co-expression were assessed against a publicly available database (STRING) and show a statistically significant overlap. Each of the three main modules were de-clustered into smaller networks using different strategies based on the identification of highly connected networks, hierarchical clustering and enrichment of Gene Ontology functional terms. Most of the highly connected proteins found in the endoplasmic reticulum module were associated with redox activity while a core of the unfolded protein response was identified in addition to proteins involved in oxidative stress pathways. The proteins composing the electron transfer chain were found differently affected with proteins from mitochondrial Complex I being more down-regulated than proteins from Complex III. Finally, the two pyruvate kinases isoforms show major differences in their co-expressed protein networks suggesting roles in different cellular locations. PMID:27571357

  8. Development of disulfiram-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) wafers for the localised treatment of glioblastoma multiforme: a comparison of manufacturing techniques.

    PubMed

    Zembko, Iwona; Ahmed, Iram; Farooq, Aneesa; Dail, Jagdeep; Tawari, Patrica; Wang, Weiguang; Mcconville, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumour in adults with a very poor prognosis. This paper describes the development of disulfiram (DSF)-loaded biodegradable wafers manufactured using three standard techniques: compression, solvent casting and heat compression moulding. The paper demonstrates that neither technique has an adverse effect on the stability of the DSF within the wafers. However, the solvent casting technique results in an interaction between the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and the DSF. The physical state of the DSF within the wafers was dependent on the manufacturing technique, with the DSF in the wafers manufactured by compression or solvent casting retaining between 40% and 98% crystallinity, whereas the DSF in the wafers manufactured using heat compression moulding was completely amorphous. Release of DSF from the wafers is dependent on the degradation of the PLGA, the manufacturing technique used, and the DSF loading. DSF in the compressed and heat compression moulded wafers had a similar cytotoxicity against a GBM cell line compared with the unprocessed DSF control. However, the cytotoxicity of the DSF in the solvent-casted wafers was significantly lower than the unprocessed DSF. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. CXCR4 expression varies significantly among different subtypes of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and its low expression or hypermethylation might predict favorable overall survival.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinlong; Shang, Feng; Zhu, Weidong; Lin, Qingtang

    2017-09-01

    CXCR4 is an oncogene in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) but the mechanism of its dysregulation and its prognostic value in GBM have not been fully understood. Bioinformatic analysis was performed by using R2 and the UCSC Xena browser based on data from GSE16011 in GEO datasets and in GBM cohort in TCGA database (TCGA-GBM). Kaplan Meier curves of overall survival (OS) were generated to assess the association between CXCR4 expression/methylation and OS in patients with GBM. GBM patients with high CXCR4 expression had significantly worse 5 and 10 yrs OS (p < 0.05). Across different GBM subtypes, there was an inverse relationship between overall DNA methylation and CXCR4 expression. CXCR4 expression was significantly lower in CpG island methylation phenotype (CIMP) group than in non CIMP group. Log rank test results showed that patients with high CXCR4 methylation (first tertile) had significantly better 5 yrs OS (p = 0.038). CXCR4 expression is regulated by DNA methylation in GBM and its low expression or hypermethylation might indicate favorable OS in GBM patients.

  10. LncRNA and mRNA expression profiles of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) reveal the potential roles of lncRNAs in GBM pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Jia, Hongmei; Li, Haowen; Dong, Chengya; Wang, Yajie; Zou, Zhongmei

    2016-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common brain malignancy. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are aberrantly expressed in many cancers and are involved in their cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and invasion. The functional roles of lncRNAs in GBM are less known. We analyzed a cohort of exon microarray datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The differently expressed lncRNAs and mRNA were subjected to construct lncRNA-mRNA co-expression network. Probable functions for lncRNAs were predicted according to lncRNA-mRNA network and genomic adjacency by GO and pathway analysis. The expression of lncRNAs and mRNAs in GBM tissues versus normal brain tissues was examined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The 398 lncRNAs and 1995 mRNAs were identified as distinctively expressed in GBM. Probable functional roles for 98 lncRNAs were involved in 30 pathways and 32 gene functions related to tumorigenesis, development, and metastasis. The identified sets of key lncRNAs specific to GBM were subsequently verified by experiment in GBM tissues. Our reports predict the biological functions of a multitude of lncRNAs in GBM that could be potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers as well as therapeutic targets. Moreover, our research provides a road map for the identification and analysis of lncRNAs in tumors.

  11. Dysregulated miR-671-5p / CDR1-AS / CDR1 / VSNL1 axis is involved in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Davide; Condorelli, Angelo; Ragusa, Marco; Salito, Loredana; Sammito, Mariangela; Banelli, Barbara; Caltabiano, Rosario; Barbagallo, Giuseppe; Zappalà, Agata; Battaglia, Rosalia; Cirnigliaro, Matilde; Lanzafame, Salvatore; Vasquez, Enrico; Parenti, Rosalba; Cicirata, Federico; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Romani, Massimo; Purrello, Michele

    2016-01-26

    MiR-671-5p is encoded by a gene localized at 7q36.1, a region amplified in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most malignant brain cancer. To investigate whether expression of miR-671-5p were altered in GBM, we analyzed biopsies from a cohort of forty-five GBM patients and from five GBM cell lines. Our data show significant overexpression of miR-671-5p in both biopsies and cell lines. By exploiting specific miRNA mimics and inhibitors, we demonstrated that miR-671-5p overexpression significantly increases migration and to a less extent proliferation rates of GBM cells. Through a combined in silico and in vitro approach, we identified CDR1-AS, CDR1, VSNL1 as downstream miR-671-5p targets in GBM. Expression of these genes significantly decreased both in GBM biopsies and cell lines and negatively correlated with that of miR-671-5p. Based on our data, we propose that the axis miR-671-5p / CDR1-AS / CDR1 / VSNL1 is functionally altered in GBM cells and is involved in the modification of their biopathological profile.

  12. Dysregulated miR-671-5p / CDR1-AS / CDR1 / VSNL1 axis is involved in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Salito, Loredana; Sammito, Mariangela; Banelli, Barbara; Caltabiano, Rosario; Barbagallo, Giuseppe; Zappalà, Agata; Battaglia, Rosalia; Cirnigliaro, Matilde; Lanzafame, Salvatore; Vasquez, Enrico; Parenti, Rosalba; Cicirata, Federico; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Romani, Massimo; Purrello, Michele

    2016-01-01

    MiR-671-5p is encoded by a gene localized at 7q36.1, a region amplified in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most malignant brain cancer. To investigate whether expression of miR-671-5p were altered in GBM, we analyzed biopsies from a cohort of forty-five GBM patients and from five GBM cell lines. Our data show significant overexpression of miR-671-5p in both biopsies and cell lines. By exploiting specific miRNA mimics and inhibitors, we demonstrated that miR-671-5p overexpression significantly increases migration and to a less extent proliferation rates of GBM cells. Through a combined in silico and in vitro approach, we identified CDR1-AS, CDR1, VSNL1 as downstream miR-671-5p targets in GBM. Expression of these genes significantly decreased both in GBM biopsies and cell lines and negatively correlated with that of miR-671-5p. Based on our data, we propose that the axis miR-671-5p / CDR1-AS / CDR1 / VSNL1 is functionally altered in GBM cells and is involved in the modification of their biopathological profile. PMID:26683098

  13. The relative value of postoperative versus preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale scores as a predictor of survival after surgical resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Chambless, Lola B; Kistka, Heather M; Parker, Scott L; Hassam-Malani, Laila; McGirt, Matthew J; Thompson, Reid C

    2015-01-01

    The Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score is a widespread metric to stratify patient prognosis and determine appropriate management in glioblastoma multiforme(GBM). Low preoperative KPS values have been associated with shorter overall survival (OS). However, surgical resection can have a dramatic effect on a patient's functional status which subsequently alters their KPS score. To determine the predictive value of preoperative verses postoperative KPS scores in terms of OS in patients with GBM. We conducted a retrospective review of 163 patients who underwent initial surgical intervention for pathologically proven GBM at our institution between 2003 and 2013. Pre and postoperative performance status, demographic, operative, and treatment variables were recorded for each patient. Multivariate regression analysis identified predictors of prolonged OS. The adequacy index was calculated to compare the predictive value of preoperative and postoperative KPS score. Median preoperative and postoperative KPS scores were 70 and 80, respectively. Overall, 92 (57 %) patients experienced an improvement in their KPS score, 40 (25 %) remained stable, and 29 (18 %) declined. Higher postoperative KPS (P = 0.0001), radiation therapy (P < 0.0001), younger age (P = 0.0443) and the absence of diabetes (P = 0.0006) were each independently associated with increased OS in a multivariate regression model. Postoperative KPS score has superior predictive value compared to pre-operative KPS score (A = 0.758 vs. 1.002). Postoperative KPS scores have superior predictive capabilities in terms of OS in GBM and should replace preoperative KPS scores when estimating prognosis in this population.

  14. Intracerebral abscess with dissecting pneumocephalus caused by a gas-producing gram-positive rod following craniotomy for glioblastoma multiforme resection.

    PubMed

    Sarkiss, Christopher A; Soleymani, Teo; Caplan, Justin M; Dorsi, Michael J; Huang, Judy

    2013-11-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), an indolent and slow-growing anaerobic gram-positive bacterium, has largely been known as a commensal organism of the normal skin flora. However, P. acnes is increasingly being recognized as the causative infectious organism complicating craniotomies and shunt insertions. To our knowledge, we present the first reported patient with an intracerebral abscess with dissecting pneumocephalus caused by P. acnes. A 58-year-old woman who was immunocompetent presented 3 weeks after a craniotomy for resection of a glioblastoma multiforme with worsening mental status, lethargy and left hemiparesis. Head CT scans and MRI demonstrated significant vasogenic edema and dissecting pneumocephalus in the resection cavity. A craniotomy was performed and purulent material was found in the subdural space and resection cavity. Cultures were positive for P. acnes. She completed a full course of intravenous antibiotics appropriate for the organism. The infection was eradicated and the patient survived albeit with persistent deficits. This case illustrates the importance of considering an underlying intracerebral abscess in patients with worsening neurological function and pneumocephalus on imaging several weeks after surgery. Our review of the literature underscores the great importance in early recognition and treatment with both surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy in achieving optimal patient recovery.

  15. Multi-parametric (ADC/PWI/T2-w) image fusion approach for accurate semi-automatic segmentation of tumorous regions in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Fathi Kazerooni, Anahita; Mohseni, Meysam; Rezaei, Sahar; Bakhshandehpour, Gholamreza; Saligheh Rad, Hamidreza

    2015-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumor is heterogeneous in nature, so its quantification depends on how to accurately segment different parts of the tumor, i.e. viable tumor, edema and necrosis. This procedure becomes more effective when metabolic and functional information, provided by physiological magnetic resonance (MR) imaging modalities, like diffusion-weighted-imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted-imaging (PWI), is incorporated with the anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this preliminary tumor quantification work, the idea is to characterize different regions of GBM tumors in an MRI-based semi-automatic multi-parametric approach to achieve more accurate characterization of pathogenic regions. For this purpose, three MR sequences, namely T2-weighted imaging (anatomical MR imaging), PWI and DWI of thirteen GBM patients, were acquired. To enhance the delineation of the boundaries of each pathogenic region (peri-tumoral edema, viable tumor and necrosis), the spatial fuzzy C-means algorithm is combined with the region growing method. The results show that exploiting the multi-parametric approach along with the proposed semi-automatic segmentation method can differentiate various tumorous regions with over 80 % sensitivity, specificity and dice score. The proposed MRI-based multi-parametric segmentation approach has the potential to accurately segment tumorous regions, leading to an efficient design of the pre-surgical treatment planning.

  16. Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wirsching, Hans-Georg; Galanis, Evanthia; Weller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Defining histopathologic features are necrosis and endothelial proliferation, resulting in the assignment of grade IV, the highest grade in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of brain tumors. The classic clinical term "secondary glioblastoma" refers to a minority of glioblastomas that evolve from previously diagnosed WHO grade II or grade III gliomas. Specific point mutations of the genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 or 2 appear to define molecularly these tumors that are associated with younger age and more favorable outcome; the vast majority of glioblastomas are IDH wild-type. Typical molecular changes in glioblastoma include mutations in genes regulating receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/rat sarcoma (RAS)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), p53, and retinoblastoma protein (RB) signaling. Standard treatment of glioblastoma includes surgery, radiotherapy, and alkylating chemotherapy. Promoter methylation of the gene encoding the DNA repair protein, O(6)-methylguanyl DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), predicts benefit from alkylating chemotherapy with temozolomide and guides choice of first-line treatment in elderly patients. Current developments focus on targeting the molecular characteristics that drive the malignant phenotype, including altered signal transduction and angiogenesis, and more recently, various approaches of immunotherapy.

  17. Effects of Concurrent Topotecan and Radiation on 6-Month Progression-Free Survival in the Primary Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. Gerber, Klaus-Dieter; Ganslandt, Oliver; Richter, Andrea M.S.; Klautke, Gunther; Birkmann, Josef; Meyer, Martin

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To report a prospective, randomized, Phase II trial of radiotherapy with and without topotecan for the treatment of glioblastoma. Patients and Methods: Inclusion criteria were histology of glioblastoma, age <60 years, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status 0-2. Patients were stratified according to recursive partitioning analysis class, center, and enzyme-inducing antiepileptic medication. Magnetic resonance imaging scans, neurologic examinations, and quality of life assessments were done every 3 months. The primary endpoint was the progression-free survival rate at 6 months (6-m-PFS). This trial was designed as an exploratory, randomized, Phase II trial with an accrual of 140 patients to detect a difference of 15-20% in 6-m-PFS. An interim analysis was scheduled after 60 patients. Median follow-up was 14 months (range, 1-50 months). Results: The 6-m-PFS was 56% and 40% for patients with and without topotecan, respectively. This benefit disappeared within 2 months. Mean (range) progression-free survival time was 8 (5-10.9) months and 6.7 (4-9.5) months for patients with and without topotecan, respectively. The corresponding 2-year-overall survival rates were 28% vs. 22% (nonsignificant difference), and mean (range) survival time was 20.7 (13.9-27.5) months vs. 18.9 (13.5-24.4) months (nonsignificant difference). Conclusions: A slight but measurable increase of 16% was detected in 6-m-PFS for patients receiving topotecan with radiation as compared with patients having radiotherapy alone. These data might support further investigations into topotecan for the treatment of glioblastoma.

  18. DTI and PWI analysis of peri-enhancing tumoral brain tissue in patients treated for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Stecco, Alessandro; Pisani, Carla; Quarta, Raffaella; Brambilla, Marco; Masini, Laura; Beldì, Debora; Zizzari, Sara; Fossaceca, Rita; Krengli, Marco; Carriero, Alessandro

    2011-04-01

    To analyse the role of MR diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) in characterising tumour boundaries in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Seventeen patients with surgically treated WHO IV grade gliomas who were candidates for adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy were enrolled. Before (T0) and after radiation treatment (T1), they underwent DTI and PWI, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in the enhancing tumour, the hyperintense tissue adjacent to the enhancing tumour, and the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) adjacent to the hyperintense areas were analysed. The enhancing tissue at T1 was retrospectively divided on the basis of whether or not it was also enhancing at T0. The controls were the corresponding contralateral areas, on which we normalized the rCBV values, calculating the rCBV ratio. In NAWM, we did not find any significant differences in FA, ADC or rCBV. In the hyperintense perilesional regions, FA was significantly lower and ADC significantly higher than in the unaffected contralateral tissue; there were no significant differences in the rCBV maps. The values of FA, ADC and rCBV in enhancing neoplastic tissue were all significantly different from those observed in the contralateral tissue. There was no significant difference in rCBV values between the areas enhancing at T0 and those not enhancing at T0 but enhancing at T1, which may indicate the neoplastic transformation of apparently normal brain tissue. DTI metrics identify ultrastructural changes in hyperintense perilesional areas, but these are not specific for neoplastic tissue. rCBV seemed to reflect an ultrastructural alteration that was not visible at T0, but became visible (as neoplastic progression) on conventional MR images at T1. These findings could help identify tissue at risk of tumour infiltration.

  19. Inhibition of Notch signaling alters the phenotype of orthotopic tumors formed from glioblastoma multiforme neurosphere cells but does not hamper intracranial tumor growth regardless of endogene Notch pathway signature.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Karina; Nedergaard, Mette Kjølhede; Villingshøj, Mette; Borup, Rehannah; Broholm, Helle; Kjær, Andreas; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése

    2014-07-01

    Brain cancer stem-like cells (bCSC) are cancer cells with neural stem cell (NSC)-like properties found in the devastating brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). bCSC are proposed a central role in tumor initiation, progression, treatment resistance and relapse and as such present a promising target in GBM research. The Notch signaling pathway is often deregulated in GBM and we have previously characterized GBM-derived bCSC cultures based on their expression of the Notch-1 receptor and found that it could be used as predictive marker for the effect of Notch inhibition. The aim of the present project was therefore to further elucidate the significance of Notch pathway activity for the tumorigenic properties of GBM-derived bCSC. Human-derived GBM xenograft cells previously established as NSC-like neurosphere cultures were used. Notch inhibition was accomplished by exposing the cells to the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT prior to gene expression analysis and intracranial injection into immunocompromised mice. By analyzing the expression of several Notch pathway components, we found that the cultures indeed displayed different Notch pathway signatures. However, when DAPT-treated neurosphere cells were injected into the brain of immunocompromised mice, no increase in survival was obtained regardless of Notch pathway signature and Notch inhibition. We did however observe a decrease in the expression of the stem cell marker Nestin, an increase in the proliferative marker Ki-67 and an increased number of abnormal vessels in tumors formed from DAPT-treated, high Notch-1 expressing cultures, when compared with the control. Based on the presented results we propose that Notch inhibition partly induces differentiation of bCSC, and selects for a cell type that more strongly induces angiogenesis if the treatment is not sustained. However, this more differentiated cell type might prove to be more sensitive to conventional therapies.

  20. Conspirators in a capital crime: co-deletion of p18INK4c and p16INK4a/p14ARF/p15INK4b in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Solomon, David A; Kim, Jung-Sik; Jean, Walter; Waldman, Todd

    2008-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most dreaded cancer diagnoses due to its poor prognosis and the limited treatment options. Homozygous deletion of the p16(INK4a)/p14(ARF)/p15(INK4b) locus is among the most common genetic alterations in GBM. Two recent studies have shown that deletion and mutation of another INK4 family member, p18(INK4c), also drives the pathogenesis of GBM. This minireview will discuss the known roles for p18(INK4c) in the initiation and progression of cancer and suggest opportunities for future studies.

  1. USP8 links the PTEN-Akt-AIP4 pathway to the control of FLIPS stability and TRAIL sensitivity in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Panner, Amith; Crane, Courtney A.; Weng, Changjiang; Feletti, Alberto; Fang, Shanna; Parsa, Andrew T.; Pieper, Russell O.

    2010-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein FLIPS is a key suppressor of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) -induced apoptosis in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells. We previously reported that a novel phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-Akt-atrophin interacting protein 4 (AIP4) pathway regulates FLIPS ubiquitination and stability, although the means by which PTEN and Akt were linked to AIP4 activity were unclear. We here report that a second regulator of ubiquitin metabolism, the ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) 8, is a downstream target of Akt, and that USP8 links Akt to AIP4 and the regulation of FLIPS stability and TRAIL resistance. In human GBM xenografts, levels of USP8 correlated inversely with pAkt levels, and genetic or pharmacologic manipulation of Akt regulated USP8 levels in an inverse manner. Over-expression of WT USP8, but not catalytically inactive USP8, increased FLIPS ubiquitination, decreased FLIPS half-life, decreased FLIPS steady-state levels, and decreased TRAIL resistance, while siRNA-mediated suppression of USP8 levels had the opposite effects. Because high levels of the USP8 deubiquitinase correlated with high levels of FLIPS ubiquitination, USP8 appeared to control FLIPS ubiquitination through an intermediate target. Consistent with this idea, over-expression of WT USP8 decreased ubiquitination of the FLIPS E3 ubiquitin ligase AIP4, an event previously shown to increase AIP4-FLIPS interaction, while siRNA-mediated suppression of USP8 increased AIP4 ubiquitination. Furthermore, the suppression of FLIPS levels by USP8 over-expression was reversed by introduction of siRNA targeting AIP4. These results show that USP8, a downstream target of Akt, regulates the ability of AIP4 to control FLIPS stability and TRAIL sensitivity. PMID:20484045

  2. Combination treatment of glioblastoma multiforme cell lines with the anti-malarial artesunate and the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor OSI-774.

    PubMed

    Efferth, Thomas; Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Gebhart, Erich; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2004-05-01

    New drugs and combination modalities for otherwise non-responsive brain tumors are urgently required. The anti-malarial artesunate (ART) and the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor OSI-774 reveal profound cytotoxic activity. The effectiveness of a combination treatment and the underlying molecular determinants of cellular response are unknown. In the present investigation, we studied ART and OSI-774 in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines. Supra-additive inhibition of cell growth was observed in U-87MG.DeltaEGFR cells transduced with a deletion-mutant constitutively active EGFR gene, while additive effects were present in cells transduced with wild-type EGFR (U-87MG.WT-2N), kinase-deficient EGFR (U-87MG.DK-2N), mock vector controls (U-87MG.LUX), or non-transduced parental U-87MG cells. Among nine other non-transduced GBM cell lines, supra-additive effects were found in two cell lines (G-210GM, G-599GM), while ART and OSI-774 acted in an additive manner in the other seven cell lines (G-211GM, G-750GM, G-1163GM, G-1187GM, G-1265GM, G-1301GM, and G-1408GM). Sub-additive or antagonistic effects were not observed. Genomic gains and losses of genetic material in the non-transduced cell lines as assessed by comparative genomic hybridization were correlated with the IC(50) values for ART and OSI-774 and subsequently subjected to hierarchical cluster analysis and cluster image mapping. A genomic profile of imbalances was detected that predicted cellular response to ART and OSI-774. The genes located at the genomic imbalances of interest may serve as candidate resistance genes of GBM cells towards ART and OSI-774. In conclusion, the combination treatment of ART and OSI-774 resulted in an increased growth inhibition of GBM cell lines as compared to each drug alone.

  3. miR128-1 inhibits the growth of glioblastoma multiforme and glioma stem-like cells via targeting BMI1 and E2F3

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Zheng-nan; Tian, Rui; Zhang, Min; Gui, Zhao-hua; Wu, Jing; Ding, Min; Zhou, Xin-Fu; He, Jie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA128-1 (miR128-1), as a brain-specific miRNA, is downregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and closely associated with the progression of GBM. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of the downregulation and its role in the regulation of tumorigenesis and anticancer drug resistance in GBM remains largely unknown. In the current study,we found that miR128-1 was downregulated in GBM and glioma stem-like cells (GSCs). Intriguingly, treatment with the DNA methylation inhibitors 5-Aza-CdR (Aza) and 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) resulted in miR128-1 upregulation in both GBM cells and GSCs. Either forced expression of miR128-1 or Aza/PBA treatment inhibited tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. Moreover, overexpression of miR128-1 inhibited the growth of transplant tumor in vivo. BMI1 and E2F3 were found to be direct targets of miR128-1 and downregulated by miR128-1 in vitro and in vivo. Our results revealed a mechanism of methylation that controls miR128-1 expression in GBM cells and GSCs and indicate miR128-1 could function as a tumor suppressor in GBM by negatively regulating tumor cell proliferation, invasion and self-renewal through direct targeting BMI1 and E2F3. Our findings suggest that DNA methylation inhibitors are potential agents for GBM treatment by upregulating miR-128-1. PMID:27705931

  4. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibition kills glioblastoma multiforme brain tumor cells in part through loss of SOX2 and delays tumor progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cathy; Fotovati, Abbas; Triscott, Joanna; Chen, James; Venugopal, Chitra; Singhal, Ash; Dunham, Christopher; Kerr, John M; Verreault, Maite; Yip, Stephen; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Jones, Chris; Jayanthan, Aarthi; Narendran, Aru; Singh, Sheila K; Dunn, Sandra E

    2012-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) ranks among the deadliest types of cancer and given these new therapies are urgently needed. To identify molecular targets, we queried a microarray profiling 467 human GBMs and discovered that polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was highly expressed in these tumors and that it clustered with the proliferative subtype. Patients with PLK1-high tumors were more likely to die from their disease suggesting that current therapies are inactive against such tumors. This prompted us to examine its expression in brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) given their association with treatment failure. BTICs isolated from patients expressed 110-470 times more PLK1 than normal human astrocytes. Moreover, BTICs rely on PLK1 for survival because the PLK1 inhibitor BI2536 inhibited their growth in tumorsphere cultures. PLK1 inhibition suppressed growth, caused G(2) /M arrest, induced apoptosis, and reduced the expression of SOX2, a marker of neural stem cells, in SF188 cells. Consistent with SOX2 inhibition, the loss of PLK1 activity caused the cells to differentiate based on elevated levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein and changes in cellular morphology. We then knocked glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) down SOX2 with siRNA and showed that it too inhibited cell growth and induced cell death. Likewise, in U251 cells, PLK1 inhibition suppressed cell growth, downregulated SOX2, and induced cell death. Furthermore, BI2536 delayed tumor growth of U251 cells in an orthotopic brain tumor model, demonstrating that the drug is active against GBM. In conclusion, PLK1 level is elevated in GBM and its inhibition restricts the growth of brain cancer cells.

  5. First-line chemotherapy with cisplatin plus fractionated temozolomide in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: a phase II study of the Gruppo Italiano Cooperativo di Neuro-Oncologia.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Alba A; Basso, Umberto; Reni, Michele; Vastola, Francesca; Tosoni, Alicia; Cavallo, Giovanna; Scopece, Luciano; Ferreri, Andres J; Panucci, Maria G; Monfardini, Silvio; Ermani, Mario

    2004-05-01

    Cisplatin and temozolomide (TMZ) are active in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), with different profiles of toxicity. A bid regimen of TMZ achieves a strong inhibition of O(6)-alkylguanine DNA-alkyl transferase (AGAT), and cisplatin reduces AGAT activity in vitro, suggesting a possible synergic interaction. The primary end point of the present multicenter phase II study was progression-free survival (PFS) at 6 months (PFS-6); secondary end points included response, toxicity, and overall survival. Chemotherapy-naive patients with GBM who experienced disease recurrence or progression after surgery and standard radiotherapy were eligible. Chemotherapy cycles consisted of cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) on day 1, TMZ 130 mg/m(2) bolus followed by nine doses of 70 mg/m(2) every 12 hours (total of 5 days) from day 2 every 4 weeks. In the absence of hematologic toxicity, TMZ was escalated to 1,000 mg/m(2) in 5 days. A total of 50 patients (median age, 53.4 years; range, 27 to 70 years; median Karnofsky performance status, 80; range, 60 to 100) were accrued in the study. PFS-6 was 34% (95% CI, 23% to 50%), and PFS-12 was 4% (95% CI, 0.3% to 16%). Median PFS was 18.4 weeks (95% CI, 13 to 25.9 weeks). Among 49 assessable patients, one complete response and nine partial responses were obtained, with an overall response rate of 20.4% (95% CI, 7.7% to 33%). Among 203 treatment cycles delivered, the most common grade 3 or grade 4 events included granulocytopenia in 7.9% of cycles, thrombocytopenia in 4%, and neurologic toxicity in three patients (6%). The new cisplatin plus bid TMZ regimen appears active in chemotherapy-naive patients with recurrent GBM and incurs an acceptable toxicity.

  6. The SGK1 Kinase Inhibitor SI113 Sensitizes Theranostic Effects of the 64CuCl2 in Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells.

    PubMed

    Catalogna, Giada; Talarico, Cristina; Dattilo, Vincenzo; Gangemi, Vincenzo; Calabria, Ferdinando; D'Antona, Lucia; Schenone, Silvia; Musumeci, Francesca; Bianco, Cataldo; Perrotti, Nicola; Amato, Rosario; Cascini, Giuseppe L

    2017-08-25

    The importance of copper in the metabolism of cancer cells has been widely studied in the last 20 years and a clear-cut association between copper levels and cancer deregulation has been established. Copper-64, emitting positrons and β-radiations, is indicated for the labeling of a large number of molecules suitable for radionuclide imaging as well as radionuclide therapy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the CNS tumor with the worse prognosis, characterized by high number of recurrences and strong resistance to chemo-radio therapy, strongly affecting patients survival. We have recently discovered and studied the small molecule SI113, as inhibitor of SGK1, a serine/threonine protein kinase, that affects several neoplastic phenotypes and signaling cascades. The SI113-dependent SGK1 inhibition induces cell death, blocks proliferation, perturbs cell cycle progression and restores chemo-radio sensibility by modulating SGK1-related substrates. In the present paper we aim to characterize the combined effects of 64CuCl2 and SI113 on human GBM cell lines with variable p53 expression. Cell viability, cell death and stress/authopagic related pathways were then analyzed by FACS and WB-based assays, after exposure to SI113 and/or 64CuCl2. We demonstrate here, that i) 64CuCl2 is able to induce a time and dose dependent modulation of cell viability (with different IC50 values) in highly malignant gliomas and that the co-treatment with SI113 leads to ii) additive/synergistic effects in terms of cell death; iii) enhancement of the effects of ionizing radiations, probably by a TRC1 modulation; iv) modulation of the autophagic response. Evidence reported here underlines the therapeutic potential of the combined treatment with SI113 and 64CuCl2 in GBM cells. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Inhibit, But Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote, Glioblastoma Multiforme Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Keiko; Kimura, Kenichi; Nagano, Masumi; Takano, Shingo; To'a Salazar, Georgina; Yamashita, Toshiharu

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess self-renewal and multipotential differentiation abilities, and they are thought to be one of the most reliable stem cell sources for a variety of cell therapies. Recently, cell therapy using MSCs has been studied as a novel therapeutic approach for cancers that show refractory progress and poor prognosis. MSCs from different tissues have different properties. However, the effect of different MSC properties on their application in anticancer therapies has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, to characterize the anticancer therapeutic application of MSCs from different sources, we established two different kinds of human MSCs: umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (UCB-MSCs) and adipose-tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs). We used these MSCs in a coculture assay with primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells to analyze how MSCs from different sources can inhibit GBM growth. We found that UCB-MSCs inhibited GBM growth and caused apoptosis, but AT-MSCs promoted GBM growth. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated UTP nick-end labeling assay clearly demonstrated that UCB-MSCs promoted apoptosis of GBM via tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). TRAIL was expressed more highly by UCB-MSCs than by AT-MSCs. Higher mRNA expression levels of angiogenic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietin 1, platelet-derived growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor) and stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) were observed in AT-MSCs, and highly vascularized tumors were developed when AT-MSCs and GBM were cotransplanted. Importantly, CXCL12 inhibited TRAIL activation of the apoptotic pathway in GBM, suggesting that AT-MSCs may support GBM development in vivo by at least two distinct mechanisms—promoting angiogenesis and inhibiting apoptosis. The opposite effects of AT-MSCs and UCB-MSCs on GBM clearly demonstrate that differences must be considered when choosing a stem cell source

  8. Systemic approaches identify a garlic-derived chemical, Z-ajoene, as a glioblastoma multiforme cancer stem cell-specific targeting agent.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yuchae; Park, Heejoo; Zhao, Hui-Yuan; Jeon, Raok; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kim, Woo-Young

    2014-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most common brain malignancies and has a very poor prognosis. Recent evidence suggests that the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC) in GBM and the rare CSC subpopulation that is resistant to chemotherapy may be responsible for the treatment failure and unfavorable prognosis of GBM. A garlic-derived compound, Z-ajoene, has shown a range of biological activities, including anti-proliferative effects on several cancers. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that Z-ajoene specifically inhibits the growth of the GBM CSC population. CSC sphere-forming inhibition was achieved at a concentration that did not exhibit a cytotoxic effect in regular cell culture conditions. The specificity of this inhibitory effect on the CSC population was confirmed by detecting CSC cell surface marker CD133 expression and biochemical marker ALDH activity. In addition, stem cell-related mRNA profiling and real-time PCR revealed the differential expression of CSC-specific genes, including Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog, upon treatment with Z-ajoene. A proteomic approach, i.e., reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) and Western blot analysis, showed decreased SMAD4, p-AKT, 14.3.3 and FOXO3A expression. The protein interaction map (http://string-db.org/) of the identified molecules suggested that the AKT, ERK/p38 and TGFβ signaling pathways are key mediators of Z-ajoene's action, which affects the transcriptional network that includes FOXO3A. These biological and bioinformatic analyses collectively demonstrate that Z-ajoene is a potential candidate for the treatment of GBM by specifically targeting GBM CSCs. We also show how this systemic approach strengthens the identification of new therapeutic agents that target CSCs.

  9. Systemic Approaches Identify a Garlic-Derived Chemical, Z-ajoene, as a Glioblastoma Multiforme Cancer Stem Cell-Specific Targeting Agent

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yuchae; Park, Heejoo; Zhao, Hui-Yuan; Jeon, Raok; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kim, Woo-Young

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most common brain malignancies and has a very poor prognosis. Recent evidence suggests that the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC) in GBM and the rare CSC subpopulation that is resistant to chemotherapy may be responsible for the treatment failure and unfavorable prognosis of GBM. A garlic-derived compound, Z-ajoene, has shown a range of biological activities, including anti-proliferative effects on several cancers. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that Z-ajoene specifically inhibits the growth of the GBM CSC population. CSC sphere-forming inhibition was achieved at a concentration that did not exhibit a cytotoxic effect in regular cell culture conditions. The specificity of this inhibitory effect on the CSC population was confirmed by detecting CSC cell surface marker CD133 expression and biochemical marker ALDH activity. In addition, stem cell-related mRNA profiling and real-time PCR revealed the differential expression of CSC-specific genes, including Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog, upon treatment with Z-ajoene. A proteomic approach, i.e., reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) and Western blot analysis, showed decreased SMAD4, p-AKT, 14.3.3 and FOXO3A expression. The protein interaction map (http://string-db.org/) of the identified molecules suggested that the AKT, ERK/p38 and TGFβ signaling pathways are key mediators of Z–ajoene’s action, which affects the transcriptional network that includes FOXO3A. These biological and bioinformatic analyses collectively demonstrate that Z-ajoene is a potential candidate for the treatment of GBM by specifically targeting GBM CSCs. We also show how this systemic approach strengthens the identification of new therapeutic agents that target CSCs. PMID:25078449

  10. Correlation of the extent of tumor volume resection and patient survival in surgery of glioblastoma multiforme with high-field intraoperative MRI guidance.

    PubMed

    Kuhnt, Daniela; Becker, Andreas; Ganslandt, Oliver; Bauer, Miriam; Buchfelder, Michael; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-12-01

    Extent of resection (EOR) still remains controversial in therapy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, an increasing number of studies favor maximum EOR as being associated with longer patient survival. One hundred thirty-five GBM patients underwent tumor resection aided by 1.5T intraoperative MRI (iMRI) and integrated multimodal navigation. Tumor volume was quantified by manual segmentation. The influences of EOR, patient age, recurrent tumor, tumor localization, and gender on survival time were examined. Intraoperative MRI detected residual tumor volume in 88 patients. In 19 patients surgery was continued; further resection resulted in final gross total resection (GTR) for 9 patients (GTR increased from 47 [34.80%] to 56 [41.49%] patients). Tumor volumes were significantly reduced from 34.25 ± 23.68% (first iMRI) to 1.22 ± 16.24% (final iMRI). According to Kaplan-Meier estimates, median survival was 14 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.7-16.2) for EOR ≥ 98% and 9 months (95% CI: 7.4-10.5) for EOR <98% (P< .0001); it was 9 months (95% CI: 7.3-10.7) for patients ≥ 65 years and 12 months (95% CI: 8.4-15.6) for patients <65 years (P < .05). Multivariate analysis showed a hazard ratio of 0.39 (95% CI: 0.24-0.63; P = .001) for EOR ≥ 98% and 0.61 (95% CI: 0.38-0.97; P < .05) for patient age <65 years. To our knowledge, this is the largest study including correlation of iMRI, tumor volumetry, and survival time. We demonstrate that navigation guidance and iMRI significantly contribute to optimal EOR with low postoperative morbidity, where EOR ≥ 98% and patient age <65 years are associated with significant survival advantages. Thus, maximum EOR should be the surgical goal in GBM surgery while preserving neurological function.

  11. Pentavalent technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid [Tc-99m (V) DMSA] brain SPECT: does it have a place in predicting survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme?

    PubMed

    Amin, Amr; Mustafa, M; Abd El-Hadi, E; Monier, A; Badwey, A; Saad, E

    2015-01-01

    Pentavalent technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (Tc-99m (V) DMSA) is reported as a useful tool for detection of residual or recurrent gliomas. We aimed to investigate the prognostic value of Tc-99m (V) DMSA brain SPECT in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). 40 patients [21 males and 19 females; mean age 48.6 ± 12.2 years] with GBM were included. Tc-99m (V) DMSA brain SPECT was done after surgery and before onset of radiation therapy or chemotherapy (Baseline study), at 4-6 weeks and at 6 months as a follow-up after therapy. The end point of the study was clinical follow-up for 2 years and/or death. 4-6 weeks after therapy, 40 and 60 % had negative and positive Tc-99m (V) DMSA for viable tumor tissues respectively (P = 0.09). At 6 months follow-up, 62.5 % of (V) DMSA negative patients and 12.5 % of the positive subjects were responders (P = 0.001). The median over-all survival (OS) of all patients was 12.3 month [range 5-24 month]. Patients with positive (V) DMSA had worse survival (8.87 month) compared to the negative ones (16.67 month) (P = 0.0001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that Tc-99m (V) DMSA brain SPECT studies at 4-6 weeks and 6-months follow-up were independent prognostic factors for survival [OR 1.069; 95 % CI 1.417-2.174; P = 0.03 and OR 1.055; 95 % CI 0.821-1.186; P = 0.01 respectively]. Stratification of tumors into risk groups based on prognostic parameters may improve outcome by altering or intensifying treatment methods. Technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid brain SPECT may have an additional prognostic role in patients with GBM which needs further evaluation in larger future series.

  12. Combined imaging biomarkers for therapy evaluation in glioblastoma multiforme: correlating sodium MRI and F-18 FLT PET on a voxel-wise basis.

    PubMed

    Laymon, Charles M; Oborski, Matthew J; Lee, Vincent K; Davis, Denise K; Wiener, Erik C; Lieberman, Frank S; Boada, Fernando E; Mountz, James M

    2012-11-01

    We evaluate novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) quantitative imaging biomarkers and associated multimodality, serial-time-point analysis methodologies, with the ultimate aim of providing clinically feasible, predictive measures for early assessment of response to cancer therapy. A focus of this work is method development and an investigation of the relationship between the information content of the two modalities. Imaging studies were conducted on subjects who were enrolled in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) therapeutic clinical trials. Data were acquired, analyzed and displayed using methods that could be adapted for clinical use. Subjects underwent dynamic [(18)F]fluorothymidine (F-18 FLT) PET, sodium ((23)Na) MRI and 3-T structural MRI scans at baseline (before initiation of therapy), at an early time point after beginning therapy and at a late follow-up time point after therapy. Sodium MRI and F-18 FLT PET images were registered to the structural MRI. F-18 FLT PET tracer distribution volumes and sodium MRI concentrations were calculated on a voxel-wise basis to address the heterogeneity of tumor physiology. Changes in, and differences between, these quantities as a function of scan timing were tracked. While both modalities independently show a change in tissue status as a function of scan time point, results illustrate that the two modalities may provide complementary information regarding tumor progression and response. Additionally, tumor status changes were found to vary in different regions of tumor. The degree to which these methods are useful for GBM therapy response assessment and particularly for differentiating true progression from pseudoprogression requires additional patient data and correlation of these imaging biomarker changes with clinical outcome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patterns of Recurrence Analysis in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy With Respect to Pre-Radiation Therapy Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ilwoo; Chuang, Cynthia F.; Chang, Susan M.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) before radiation therapy (RT) is valuable for RT target definition, and to evaluate the feasibility of replacing the current definition of uniform margins by custom-shaped margins based on the information from MRI and MRSI. Methods and Materials: A total of 23 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients underwent MRI and MRSI within 4 weeks after surgery but before the initiation of RT and at 2-month follow-up intervals thereafter. The MRSI data were quantified on the basis of a Choline-to-NAA Index (CNI) as a measure of spectroscopic abnormality. A combined anatomic and metabolic region of interest (MRI/S) consisting of T2-weighted hyperintensity, contrast enhancement (CE), resection cavity, and CNI2 (CNI {>=} 2) based on the pre-RT imaging was compared to the extent of CNI2 and the RT dose distribution. The spatial relationship of the pre-RT MRI/S and the RT dose volume was compared with the extent of CE at each follow-up. Results: Nine patients showed new or increased CE during follow-up, and 14 patients were either stable or had decreased CE. New or increased areas of CE occurred within CNI2 that was covered by 60 Gy in 6 patients and within the CNI2 that was not entirely covered by 60 Gy in 3 patients. New or increased CE resided within the pre-RT MRI/S lesion in 89% (8/9) of the patients with new or increased CE. Conclusion: These data indicate that the definition of RT target volumes according to the combined morphologic and metabolic abnormality may be sufficient for RT targeting.

  14. Decreased Survival of Glioma Patients with Astrocytoma Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme) Associated with Long-Term Use of Mobile and Cordless Phones

    PubMed Central

    Carlberg, Michael; Hardell, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    On 31 May 2011 the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorised radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields, as a Group 2B, i.e., a “possible”, human carcinogen. A causal association would be strengthened if it could be shown that the use of wireless phones has an impact on the survival of glioma patients. We analysed survival of 1678 glioma patients in our 1997–2003 and 2007–2009 case-control studies. Use of wireless phones in the >20 years latency group (time since first use) yielded an increased hazard ratio (HR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2–2.3 for glioma. For astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme; n = 926) mobile phone use yielded HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4–2.9 and cordless phone use HR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.04–11 in the same latency category. The hazard ratio for astrocytoma grade IV increased statistically significant per year of latency for wireless phones, HR = 1.020, 95% CI = 1.007–1.033, but not per 100 h cumulative use, HR = 1.002, 95% CI = 0.999–1.005. HR was not statistically significant increased for other types of glioma. Due to the relationship with survival the classification of IARC is strengthened and RF-EMF should be regarded as human carcinogen requiring urgent revision of current exposure guidelines. PMID:25325361

  15. An Epigenetic Biomarker Panel for Glioblastoma Multiforme Personalized Medicine through DNA Methylation Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-like Signature

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wan-Shu; Hood, Leroy; Tian, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Alterations of DNA methylation occur during the course of both stem cell development and tumorigenesis. We present a novel strategy that can be used to stratify glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients through the epigenetic states of genes associated with human embryonic stem cell (hESC) identity in order to 1) assess linkages between the methylation signatures of these stem cell genes and survival of GBM patients, and 2) delineate putative mechanisms leading to poor prognosis in some patient subgroups. A DNA methylation signature was established for stratifying GBM patients into several hESC methylator subgroups. The hESC methylator-negative phenotype has demonstrated poor survival and upregulation of glioma stem cell (GSC) markers, and is enriched in one of the previously defined transcriptomic phenotypes—the mesenchymal phenotype. We further identified a refined signature of 36 genes as the gene panel, including SOX2, POU3F2, FGFR2, GAP43, NTRK2, NTRK3, and NKX2-2, which are highly enriched in the nervous system. Both signatures outperformed the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation test in predicting patient's outcome. These findings were also validated through an independent dataset of patients. Furthermore, through statistical analyses, both signatures were examined significantly. Hypomethylation of hESC-associated genes predicted poorer clinical outcome in GBM, supporting the idea that epigenetic activation of stem cell genes contributes to GBM aggression. The gene panel presented herein may be developed into clinical assays for patient stratification and future personalized medicine interventions. PMID:24601786

  16. Improved treatment planning for boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme using fluorine-18 labeled boronophenylalanine and positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Trent L; Kabalka, George W; Miller, Laurence F; Khan, Mohammad K; Smith, Gary T

    2002-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer brachytherapy based upon the thermal neutron reaction: 10B(n,alpha)7Li. The efficacy of the treatment depends primarily upon two conditions being met: (a) the preferential concentration of a boronated compound in the neoplasm and (b) an adequate fluence of thermal neutrons delivered to the neoplasm. The boronated amino acid, para-boronophenylalanine (BPA), is the agent widely used in clinical trials to deliver 10B to the malignancy. Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to generate in vivo boron distribution maps by labeling BPA with the positron emitting nuclide fluorine-18. The incorporation of the PET-derived boron distribution maps into current treatment planning protocols is shown to provide improved treatment plans. Using previously established protocols, six patients with glioblastoma had 18BPA PET scans. The PET distribution maps obtained were used in the conventional BNCT treatment codes. The isodose curves derived from the PET data are shown to differ both qualitatively and quantitatively from the conventional isodose curves that were derived from calculations based upon the assumption of uniform uptake of the pharmaceutical in tumor and normal brain regions. The clinical course of each of the patients who eventually received BNCT (five of the six patients) was compared using both sets of isodose calculations. The isodose contours based upon PET derived distribution data appear to be more consistent with the patients' clinical course.

  17. An overview of the infection of CMV, HSV 1/2 and EBV in Mexican patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Vega, Sergio; Castro-Escarpulli, Graciela; Hernández-Santos, Hector; Salinas-Lara, Citlatepetl; Palma, Icela; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Gelista-Herrera, Noemí; Rembao-Bojorquez, Daniel; Ochoa, Sara A; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Uribe-Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Arellano-Galindo, José

    2017-03-01

    Several risk factors are involved in glioblastoma, including cytomegalovirus (CMV). This research was carried out to determine the rate of CMV infection, as well as HSV 1/2 and EBV in brain tissue, in patients with glioblastomamultiforme (GBM). The tissues were tested using immunohistochemistry, PCR, in situ hybridization and real-time PCR. At least, one HHV was detected in 21/29 (72%) patients as follows: single infections with HSV-1/2 in 4/21 (19%), EBV in 6/21 (28.6%) and CMV in 1/21 (4.8%). Mixed viral infection, HSV-1/2 and EBV were detected in 4/21 patients (19%), CMV and EBV in 5/21 (23.8%), and HSV-1/2, EBV, and CMV in 1/21. The CMV viral load ranged from 3×10(2) to 4.33×10(5) genome/100ng of tissue. Genotype based on CMV gB was 3/7 where 2/3 was gB1 and 1/3 gB4. HSV, EBV and CMV were frequently found in brain tissues, more in mix in a population reported as highly seropositive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhancing tumor apparent diffusion coefficient histogram skewness stratifies the postoperative survival in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patients undergoing salvage surgery.

    PubMed

    Zolal, Amir; Juratli, Tareq A; Linn, Jennifer; Podlesek, Dino; Sitoci Ficici, Kerim Hakan; Kitzler, Hagen H; Schackert, Gabriele; Sobottka, Stephan B; Rieger, Bernhard; Krex, Dietmar

    2016-05-01

    Objective To determine the value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram parameters for the prediction of individual survival in patients undergoing surgery for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) in a retrospective cohort study. Methods Thirty-one patients who underwent surgery for first recurrence of a known GBM between 2008 and 2012 were included. The following parameters were collected: age, sex, enhancing tumor size, mean ADC, median ADC, ADC skewness, ADC kurtosis and fifth percentile of the ADC histogram, initial progression free survival (PFS), extent of second resection and further adjuvant treatment. The association of these parameters with survival and PFS after second surgery was analyzed using log-rank test and Cox regression. Results Using log-rank test, ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing tumor was significantly associated with both survival (p = 0.001) and PFS after second surgery (p = 0.005). Further parameters associated with prolonged survival after second surgery were: gross total resection at second surgery (p = 0.026), tumor size (0.040) and third surgery (p = 0.003). In the multivariate Cox analysis, ADC histogram skewness was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for survival after second surgery. Conclusion ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing lesion, enhancing lesion size, third surgery, as well as gross total resection have been shown to be associated with survival following the second surgery. ADC histogram skewness was an independent prognostic factor for survival in the multivariate analysis.

  19. Redox-Active Mn Porphyrin-based Potent SOD Mimic, MnTnBuOE-2-PyP5+, Enhances Carbenoxolone-Mediated TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Yulyana, Yulyana; Tovmasyan, Artak; Ho, Ivy AW; Sia, Kian Chuan; Newman, Jennifer P; Ng, Wai Hoe; Guo, Chang Ming; Hui, Kam Man; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Lam, Paula YP

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant tumor of the brain and is challenging to treat due to its highly invasive nature and heterogeneity. Malignant brain tumor displays high metabolic activity which perturbs its redox environment and in turn translates to high oxidative stress. Thus, pushing the oxidative stress level to achieve the maximum tolerable threshold that induces cell death is a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Previously, we have shown that gap junction inhibitor, carbenoxolone (CBX), is capable of enhancing tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis in glioma cells. Since CBX is known to induce oxidative stress, we hypothesized that the addition of another potent mediator of oxidative stress, powerful SOD mimic MnTnBuOE-2-PyP5+ (MnBuOE), could further enhance TRAIL-driven therapeutic efficacy in glioma cells. Our results showed that combining TRAIL + CBX with MnBuOE significantly enhances cell death of glioma cell lines and this enhancement could be further potentiated by CBX pretreatment. MnBuOE-driven cytotoxicity is due to its ability to take advantage of oxidative stress imposed by CBX + TRAIL system, and enhance it in the presence of endogenous reductants, ascorbate and thiol, thereby producing cytotoxic H2O2, and in turn inducing death of glioma cells but not normal astrocytes. Most importantly, combination treatment significantly reduces viability of TRAIL-resistant Asian patient-derived glioma cells, thus demonstrating the potential clinical use of our therapeutic system. It was reported that H2O2 is involved in membrane depolarization-based sensitization of cancer cells toward TRAIL. MnBuOE is entering Clinical Trials as a normal brain radioprotector in glioma patients at Duke University increasing Clinical relevance of our studies. PMID:26454429

  20. Preclinical effects of honokiol on treating glioblastoma multiforme via G1 phase arrest and cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Ju; Chang, Ya-An; Lin, Yi-Ling; Liu, Shing Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Kuei; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2016-05-15

    Our previous study showed that honokiol, a bioactive polyphenol, can traverse the blood-brain barrier and kills neuroblastoma cells. In this study, we further evaluated the preclinical effects of honokiol on development of malignant glioma and the possible mechanisms. Effects of honokiol on viability, caspase activities, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human glioma U87 MG or U373MG cells were assayed. As to the mechanisms, levels of inactive or phosphorylated (p) p53, p21, CDK6, CDK4, cyclin D1, and E2F1 were immunodetected. Pifithrin-α (PFN-α), a p53 inhibitor, was pretreated into the cells. Finally, our in vitro findings were confirmed using intracranial nude mice implanted with U87 MG cells. Exposure of human U87 MG glioma cells to honokiol decreased the cell viability. In parallel, honokiol induced activations of caspase-8, -9, and -3, apoptosis, and G1 cell cycle arrest. Treatment of U87 MG cells with honokiol increased p53 phosphorylation and p21 levels. Honokiol provoked signal-transducing downregulation of CDK6, CDK4, cyclin D1, phosphorylated (p)RB, and E2F1. Pretreatment of U87 MG cells with PFN-α significantly reversed honokiol-induced p53 phosphorylation and p21 augmentation. Honokiol-induced alterations in levels of CDK6, CDK4, cyclin D1, p-RB, and E2F1 were attenuated by PFN-α. Furthermore, honokiol could induce apoptotic insults to human U373MG glioma cells. In our in vivo model, administration of honokiol prolonged the survival rate of nude mice implanted with U87 MG cells and induced caspase-3 activation and chronological changes in p53, p21, CDK6, CDK4, cyclin D1, p-RB, and E2F1. Honokiol can repress human glioma growth by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in tumor cells though activating a p53/cyclin D1/CDK6/CDK4/E2F1-dependent pathway. Our results suggest the potential of honokiol in therapies for human malignant gliomas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Tumor treating fields inhibit glioblastoma cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Hyo Sook; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with alternating electric fields at an intermediate frequency (100–300 kHz), referred to as tumor treating fields (TTF) therapy, inhibits cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we demonstrated that TTF application suppressed the metastatic potential of U87 and U373 glioblastoma cell lines via the NF-kB, MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Wound-healing and transwell assays showed that TTF suppressed cell migration and invasion compared with controls. Soft agar and three-dimensional culture assays showed that TTF inhibited both anchorage-dependent (cell proliferation) and anchorage-independent (colony formation) GBM cell growth. TTF dysregulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related genes, such as vimentin and E-cadherin, which partially accounted for TTF inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We further demonstrated that TTF application suppressed angiogenesis by downregulating VEGF, HIF1α and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. TTF also inhibited NF-kB transcriptional activity. Collectively, our findings show that TTF represents a promising novel anti-invasion and anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategy for use in GBM patients. PMID:27556184

  2. Vacquinol-1 inducible cell death in glioblastoma multiforme is counter regulated by TRPM7 activity induced by exogenous ATP.

    PubMed

    Sander, Philip; Mostafa, Haouraa; Soboh, Ayman; Schneider, Julian M; Pala, Andrej; Baron, Ann-Kathrin; Moepps, Barbara; Wirtz, C Rainer; Georgieff, Michael; Schneider, Marion

    2017-05-23

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most malignant brain tumors in humans and have a very poor prognosis. New therapeutic options are urgently needed. A novel drug, Vacquinol-1 (Vac), a quinolone derivative, displays promising properties by inducing rapid cell death in GBM but not in non-transformed tissues. Features of this type of cell death are compatible with a process termed methuosis. Here we tested Vac on a highly malignant glioma cell line observed by long-term video microscopy. Human dental-pulp stem cells (DPSCs) served as controls. A major finding was that an exogenous ATP concentration of as little as 1 μM counter regulated the Vac-induced cell death. Studies using carvacrol, an inhibitor of transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7), demonstrated that the ATP-inducible inhibitory effect is likely to be via TRPM7. Exogenous ATP is of relevance in GBM with large necrotic areas. Our results support the use of GBM cultures with different grades of malignancy to address their sensitivity to methuosis. The video-microscopy approach presented here allows decoding of signaling pathways as well as mechanisms of chemotherapeutic resistance by long-term observation. Before implementing Vac as a novel therapeutic drug in GBM, cells from each individual patient need to be assessed for their ATP sensitivity. In summary, the current investigation supports the concept of methuosis, described as non-apoptotic cell death and a promising approach for GBM treatment. Tissue-resident ATP/necrosis may interfere with this cell-death pathway but can be overcome by a natural compound, carvacrol that even penetrates the blood-brain barrier.

  3. Vacquinol-1 inducible cell death in glioblastoma multiforme is counter regulated by TRPM7 activity induced by exogenous ATP

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Philip; Mostafa, Haouraa; Soboh, Ayman; Schneider, Julian M.; Pala, Andrej; Baron, Ann-Kathrin; Moepps, Barbara; Wirtz, C. Rainer; Georgieff, Michael; Schneider, Marion

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most malignant brain tumors in humans and have a very poor prognosis. New therapeutic options are urgently needed. A novel drug, Vacquinol-1 (Vac), a quinolone derivative, displays promising properties by inducing rapid cell death in GBM but not in non-transformed tissues. Features of this type of cell death are compatible with a process termed methuosis. Here we tested Vac on a highly malignant glioma cell line observed by long-term video microscopy. Human dental-pulp stem cells (DPSCs) served as controls. A major finding was that an exogenous ATP concentration of as little as 1 μM counter regulated the Vac-induced cell death. Studies using carvacrol, an inhibitor of transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7), demonstrated that the ATP-inducible inhibitory effect is likely to be via TRPM7. Exogenous ATP is of relevance in GBM with large necrotic areas. Our results support the use of GBM cultures with different grades of malignancy to address their sensitivity to methuosis. The video-microscopy approach presented here allows decoding of signaling pathways as well as mechanisms of chemotherapeutic resistance by long-term observation. Before implementing Vac as a novel therapeutic drug in GBM, cells from each individual patient need to be assessed for their ATP sensitivity. In summary, the current investigation supports the concept of methuosis, described as non-apoptotic cell death and a promising approach for GBM treatment. Tissue-resident ATP/necrosis may interfere with this cell-death pathway but can be overcome by a natural compound, carvacrol that even penetrates the blood-brain barrier. PMID:28410232

  4. Differential expression in glioblastoma multiforme and cerebral hemangioblastoma of cytoplasmic proteins that bind two different domains within the 3'-untranslated region of the human glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, H; Boado, R J; Pardridge, W M

    1996-01-01

    The glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) protein is underexpressed in human glioblastoma multiforme and is overexpressed in human cerebral hemangioblastoma. To gain in-sight into possible posttranscriptional mechanisms regulating the expression of the GLUT1 protein in human brain tumors, cytosolic proteins were prepared from these two tumors and used in RNase T1 protection assays that employed [32P]human GLUT1 synthetic RNA prepared from transcription plasmids. Gel shift mobility assays and ultra-violet light cross-linking studies demonstrated the formation of specific RNA/protein complexes that migrated with a mol mass of 120, 44, and 41 kD. RNase T1 mapping and oligodeoxynucleotide competition studies showed that the 120 kD complex was comprised of an RNA fragment that localized to nucleotides 2186-2203 of the GLUT1 mRNA. The 44 kD complex contained an adenosine-uridine-rich RNA fragment that localized to nucleotides 1885-1906 of the human GLUT1 mRNA, and the formation of this complex was inhibited by synthetic RNA enriched in adenosine-uridine sequences. The 44 kD complex was selectively downregulated in hemangioblastoma as compared to glioblastoma multiforme. These studies demonstrate that human brain tumors have differential regulation of cytosolic proteins that specifically interact with two different domains in the 3'-untranslated region of the GLUT1 mRNA, which may serve to mediate the posttranscriptional regulation of GLUT1 gene expression in these tumors. PMID:8675694

  5. Pathway inhibition: emerging molecular targets for treating glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Wolfgang; Weller, Michael; Weiler, Markus; Batchelor, Tracy; Yung, Alfred W.K.; Platten, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Insights into the molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma have not yet resulted in relevant clinical improvement. With standard therapy, which consists of surgical resection with concomitant temozolomide in addition to radiotherapy followed by adjuvant temozolomide, the median duration of survival is 12–14 months. Therefore, the identification of novel molecular targets and inhibitory agents has become a focus of research for glioblastoma treatment. Recent results of bevacizumab may represent a proof of principle that treatment with targeted agents can result in clinical benefits for patients with glioblastoma. This review discusses limitations in the existing therapy for glioblastoma and provides an overview of current efforts to identify molecular targets using large-scale screening of glioblastoma cell lines and tumor samples. We discuss preclinical and clinical data for several novel molecular targets, including growth factor receptors, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, SRC-family kinases, integrins, and CD95 ligand and agents that inhibit these targets, including erlotinib, enzastaurin, dasatinib, sorafenib, cilengitide, AMG102, and APG101. By combining advances in tumor screening with novel targeted therapies, it is hoped that new treatment options will emerge for this challenging tumor type. PMID:21636705

  6. Phase 1/2 Trials of Temozolomide, Motexafin Gadolinium, and 60-Gy Fractionated Radiation for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme: Final Results of RTOG 0513

    SciTech Connect

    Brachman, David G.; Pugh, Stephanie L.; Ashby, Lynn S.; Thomas, Theresa A.; Dunbar, Erin M.; Narayan, Samir; Robins, H. Ian; Bovi, Joseph A.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Won, Minhee; Curran, Walter P.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of phase 1 was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) given concurrently with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Phase 2 determined whether this combination improved overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in GBM recursive partitioning analysis class III to V patients compared to therapies for recently published historical controls. Methods and Materials: Dose escalation in phase 1 progressed through 3 cohorts until 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity or a dose of 5 mg/kg was reached. Once MTD was established, a 1-sided 1-sample log-rank test at significance level of .1 had 85% power to detect a median survival difference (13.69 vs 18.48 months) with 60 deaths over a 12-month accrual period and an additional 18 months of follow-up. OS and PFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In phase 1, 24 patients were enrolled. The MTD established was 5 mg/kg, given intravenously 5 days a week for the first 10 RT fractions, then 3 times a week for the duration of RT. The 7 patients enrolled in the third dose level and the 94 enrolled in phase 2 received this dose. Of these 101 patients, 87 were eligible and evaluable. Median survival time was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.9-17.6 months), not significantly different from that of the historical control (P=.36). Median PFS was 7.6 months (95% CI: 5.7-9.6 months). One patient (1%) experienced a grade 5 adverse event possibly related to therapy during the concurrent phase, and none experience toxicity during adjuvant TMZ therapy. Conclusions: Treatment was well tolerated, but median OS did not reach improvement specified by protocol compared to historical control, indicating that the combination of standard RT with TMZ and MGd did not achieve a significant survival advantage.

  7. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) induces apoptosis of GBM 8401 human brain glioblastoma multiforms cells via activation of caspase-8/Bid and the reactive oxygen species-dependent mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hung-Sheng; Shih, Yung-Luen; Lu, Tai-Jung; Lee, Ching-Hsiao; Hsueh, Shu-Ching; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Liao, Nien-Chieh; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-12-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is one of member of the isothiocyanate family which has been shown to induce cancer cell apoptosis in many human cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BITC on the growth of GBM 8401 human brain glioblastoma multiforms cells. Results indicated that BITC-induced cell morphological changes decreased in the percentage of viable GBM8401 cells and these effects are dose-dependent manners. Results from flow cytometric assay indicated that BITC induced sub-G1 phase and induction of apoptosis of GBM 8401 cells. Furthermore, results also showed that BITC promoted the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) release, but decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ) and promoted caspase-8, -9, and -3 activates. After cells were pretreated with Z-IETD-FMK, Z-LEHD-FMK, and Z-DEVD-FMK (caspase-8, -9, and -3 inhibitors, respectively) led to decrease in the activities of caspase-8, -9, and -3 and increased the percentage of viable GBM 8401 cells that indicated which BITC induced cell apoptosis through caspase-dependent pathways. Western blotting indicated that BITC induced Fas, Fas-L, FADD, caspase-8, caspase -3, and pro-apoptotic protein (Bax, Bid, and Bak), but inhibited the ant-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and Bcl-x) in GBM 8401 cells. Furthermore, BITC increased the release of cytochrome c, AIF, and Endo G from mitochondria that led to cell apoptosis. Results also showed that BITC increased GADD153, GRP 78, XBP-1, and ATF-6β, IRE-1α, IRE-1β, Calpain 1 and 2 in GBM 8401 cells, which is associated with ER stress. Based on these observations, we may suggest that BITC-induced apoptosis might be through Fas receptor, ROS induced ER stress, caspase-3, and mitochondrial signaling pathways. Taken together, these molecular alterations and signaling pathways offer an insight into BITC-caused growth inhibition and induced apoptotic cell death of GBM 8401 cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ

  8. P13.10SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME: OUTCOME AND ANALYSIS OF PROGNOSTIC FACTORS ESPECIALLY ORIENTED TO THE EXTENT OF SURGICAL RESECTION

    PubMed Central

    Di Somma, L.; Iacoangeli, M.; Alvaro, L.; Di Rienzo, A.; Liverotti, V.; Della Costanza, M.; Brunozzi, D.; Polonara, G.; Scarpelli, M.; Scerrati, M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The prognosis of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) remains poor despite recent therapeutic advances. The surgical treatment of GBM (supported by functional imaging, neuronavigation and electrophysiological monitoring) remains a fundamental step. The methylation of the enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransefrase (MGMT) seems to improve the effectiveness of alkylating agents on this tumour, but other factors can influence the survival. An evaluation of all prognostic factors is essential to individuate subgroups of patients for a better selection of different treatment modalities. Our study confirms the prognostic values of both new recognized factors (MGMT presence, IDH1, news schedule of TM2 etc.) and the well-recognized prognostic factors particularly to the extent of surgical removal with the help of new technologies and in the era where people is asking more and more a better quality of life. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed 172 operated patients (115 males and 57 females), 55 of which located in eloquent areas, between March 2008 and December 2012. For each patient age, sex, preoperative clinical evaluation (Karnofsky score, KPS), tumour location, extent of surgical removal, genetic and epigenetic profile (MGMT, IDH1,etc) and postoperative treatments were recorded. We used Kaplan Meier method for the univariate analysis and the Cox regression for the multivariate one. Surgical strategy was always planned for a total tumour resection, when allowed by the intrinsic characteristics of the tumour using the so called “extracapsular “ technique. RESULTS: Overall median survival time after surgery was 10 months. At univariate analysis the gross total removal (p<0,0001), a postoperative KPS>70 (p<0,0001) and radiotherapy (p<0,0001) improve survivals. Deep structures involved or multifocal lesions (p<0,0001) resulted as negative factors in term of the quod vitam prognosis, whereas lesions arising in insula, deep structures or in primary motor cortex

  9. Preclinical evaluation of ex vivo expanded/activated γδ T cells for immunotherapy of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Nichole L; Gillespie, G Yancey; Lopez, Richard D; Markert, James M; Cloud, Gretchen A; Langford, Catherine P; Arnouk, Hilal; Su, Yun; Haines, Hilary L; Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina; Lamb, Lawrence S

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that expanded/activated γδ T cells from healthy donors are cytotoxic to GBM cell lines and primary GBM explants. In this report, we examined the therapeutic effect of intracranial infusion of expanded/activated γδ T cells on human minimal and established U251 tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the presence of NKG2D ligands on cell lines and tumors, and blocking studies were used to determine the effect of these ligands on γδ T cell recognition. Expanded/activated γδ T cells were prepared by 18-day culture in RPMI, human serum (HS), anti-CD2, IL-12, IFN-γ, and OKT-3. Anti-GBM activity of the cell product was assessed using in vitro cytotoxicity assays against the GBM cell line U251MG in suspension and in adherent culture. Ex vivo expanded/activated γδ T cells were of the effector/memory phenotype, expressed Th1 cytokines, and effectively killed U251 cells in vitro. Xenografts were prepared using a U251 cell line following transfection with a firefly luciferase gene to monitor tumor progression. Mice treated with γδ T cells showed slower progression of both new and established GBM xenografts versus mice that received vehicle only as determined by photon emission over time. Median survival was improved in all γδ T cell treated groups between 32 and 50 days by Kaplan-Meier analysis. U251 cells expressed ULBP-2 and ULBP-3, although blocking of these reduced in vitro cytotoxicity of γδ T cells to U251MG by only 33 and 25%, respectively. These studies show that expanded/activated γδ T cells can mediate killing of new or established GBM xenografts, reduce tumor progression, and constitute a potentially effective novel immunotherapeutic strategy against GBM.

  10. Upfront boost Gamma Knife "leading-edge" radiosurgery to FLAIR MRI-defined tumor migration pathways in 174 patients with glioblastoma multiforme: a 15-year assessment of a novel therapy.

    PubMed

    Duma, Christopher M; Kim, Brian S; Chen, Peter V; Plunkett, Marianne E; Mackintosh, Ralph; Mathews, Marlon S; Casserly, Ryan M; Mendez, Gustavo A; Furman, Daniel J; Smith, Garrett; Oh, Nathan; Caraway, Chad A; Sanathara, Ami R; Dillman, Robert O; Riley, Azzurra-Sky; Weiland, David; Stemler, Lian; Cannell, Ruslana; Abrams, Daniela Alexandru; Smith, Alexa; Owen, Christopher M; Eisenberg, Burton; Brant-Zawadzki, Michael

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is composed of cells that migrate through the brain along predictable white matter pathways. Targeting white matter pathways adjacent to, and leading away from, the original contrast-enhancing tumor site (termed leading-edge radiosurgery [LERS]) with single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery as a boost to standard therapy could limit the spread of glioma cells and improve clinical outcomes. METHODS Between December 2000 and May 2016, after an initial diagnosis of GBM and prior to or during standard radiation therapy and carmustine or temozolomide chemotherapy, 174 patients treated with radiosurgery to the leading edge (LE) of tumor cell migration were reviewed. The LE was defined as a region outside the contrast-enhancing tumor nidus, defined by FLAIR MRI. The median age of patients was 59 years (range 22-87 years). Patients underwent LERS a median of 18 days from original diagnosis. The median target volume of 48.5 cm(3) (range 2.5-220.0 cm(3)) of LE tissue was targeted using a median dose of 8 Gy (range 6-14 Gy) at the 50% isodose line. RESULTS The median overall survival was 23 months (mean 43 months) from diagnosis. The 2-, 3-, 5-, 7-, and 10-year actual overall survival rates after LERS were 39%, 26%, 16%, 10%, and 4%, respectively. Nine percent of patients developed treatment-related imaging-documented changes due to LERS. Nineteen percent of patients were hospitalized for management of edema, 22% for resection of a tumor cyst or new tumor bulk, and 2% for shunting to treat hydrocephalus throughout the course of their disease. Of the patients still alive, Karnofsky Performance Scale scores remained stable in 90% of patients and decreased by 1-3 grades in 10% due to symptomatic treatment-related imaging changes. CONCLUSIONS LERS is a safe and effective upfront adjunctive therapy for patients with newly diagnosed GBM. Limitations of this study include a single-center experience and single-institution determination of the

  11. Tumor treating fields therapy device for glioblastoma: physics and clinical practice considerations.

    PubMed

    Lok, Edwin; Swanson, Kenneth D; Wong, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    Alternating electric fields therapy, as delivered by the tumor treating fields device, is a new modality of cancer treatment that has been approved by the US FDA for recurrent glioblastoma. At a frequency of 200 kHz, these fields emanate from transducer arrays on the surface of the patient's scalp into the brain and perturb processes necessary for cytokinesis during tumor cell mitosis. In the registration Phase III trial for recurrent glioblastoma patients, the efficacy of the tumor treating fields as monotherapy was equivalent to chemotherapy, while scalp irritation was its major adverse event compared with systemic toxicities that were associated with cytotoxic chemotherapies. Alternating electric fields therapy is, therefore, an essential option for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the physics, cell biology and clinical data supporting the use of the tumor treating fields therapy.

  12. Ultrastructural evidence for differentiation in a human glioblastoma cell line treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.E.; Anderson, K.M. ); Seed, T.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Human glioblastoma cells incubated in the presence of inhibitors of eicosanoid biosynthesis show decreased cellular proliferation without cytotoxicity. The authors studied the ultrastructural morphology of a human glioblastoma cell line cultured with nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a lipoxygenase inhibitor, or 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, a cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitor. When glioblastoma cells were treated for 3 days with antiproliferative concentrations of either agent, they shared many morphological characteristics, including evidence for increased astrocytic differentiation with only limited signs of toxicity. The inhibited glioma cells demonstrated an increase in the number and length of astrocytic processes containing greater numbers of glial filaments, and the NDGA-treated cells also demonstrated extensive lateral pseudopod formation along the processes. The glioblastoma cell shape also become more elongated, losing the usual nuclear lobularity and nuclear inclusions, especially in NDGA-treated cells. Many cytoplasmic organelles packed the cytosol of the inhibited glioma cells, including prominent Golgi apparatus, dilated smooth endoplasmic reticulum evolving into dilated vesicles, cytoplasmic vacuoles, and numerous concentric laminations. There was limited evidence for toxicity, however, as the mitochondria were more pleomorphic with some mitochondrial distension and disruption of the cristae along with an increase in cytoplasmic vacuolization. The authors conclude that the inhibitors of eicosanoid biosynthesis. NDGA and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, not only suppress glioblastoma cell proliferation, but also include increased astrocytic differentiation.

  13. SU-E-T-183: Feasibility of Extreme Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme Using 4π Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D; Rwigema, J; Yu, V; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Selch, M; Low, D; Sheng, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: GBM recurrence primarily occurs inside or near the high-dose radiation field of original tumor site requiring greater than 100 Gy to significantly improve local control. We utilize 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy to test the feasibility of planning target volume (PTV) margin expansions or extreme dose escalations without incurring additional radiation toxicities. Methods: 11 GBM patients treated with VMAT to a prescription dose of 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were replanned with 4π. Original VMAT plans were created with 2 to 4 coplanar or non-coplanar arcs using 3 mm hi-res MLC. The 4π optimization, using 5 mm MLC, selected and inverse optimized 30 beams from a candidate pool of 1162 beams evenly distributed through 4π steradians. 4π plans were first compared to clinical plans using the same prescription dose. Two more studies were then performed to respectively escalate the GTV and PTV doses to 100 Gy, followed by a fourth plan expanding the PTV by 5 mm and maintaining the prescription dose. Results: The standard 4π plan significantly reduced (p<0.01) max and mean doses to critical structures by a range of 47.0–98.4% and 61.0–99.2%, respectively. The high dose PTV/high dose GTV/expanded PTV studies showed a reduction (p<0.05) or unchanged* (p>0.05) maximum dose of 72.1%/86.7%/77.1% (chiasm), 7.2%*/27.7%*/30.7% (brainstem), 39.8%*/84.2%/51.9%* (spinal cord), 69.0%/87.0%/66.9% (L eye), 76.2%/88.1%/84.1% (R eye), 95.0%/98.6%/97.5% (L lens), 93.9%/98.8%/97.6% (R lens), 74.3%/88.5%/72.4% (L optical nerve), 80.4%/91.3%/75.7% (R optical nerve), 64.8%/84.2%/44.9%* (L cochlea), and 85.2%/93.0%/78.0% (R cochlea), respectively. V30 and V36 for both brain and (brain - PTV) were reduced for all cases except the high dose PTV plan. PTV dose coverage increased for all 4π plans. Conclusion: Extreme dose escalation or further margin expansion is achievable using 4π, maintaining or reducing OAR doses. This study indicates that clinical trials employing 4π delivery using

  14. Case of glioblastoma patient treated with tumor treating fields therapy at recurrence degenerating to sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Majd, Pejman; O'Connell, Daniel E; Kim, Ronald C; Bota, Daniela A; Carrillo, Jose A

    2017-04-01

    Optune(®) treatment is a US FDA-approved treatment for glioblastoma (GBM) that employs alternating electric fields. Tumor treating field (TTF) therapy can exert its effects on GBM via cell cycle mitosis disruption and cytokinesis. We describe a patient with recurrent GBM who had disease progression following standard surgical treatment and concomitant chemoradiotherapy, and was found to have sarcomatous transformation after initiation of TTF therapy with bevacizumab. Upon tumor progression, repeat surgical resection revealed transformation into a GFAP-negative, reticulin-positive sarcoma with rhabdomyoid features. The possibility of a causal connection between TTF therapy and sarcomatous transformation needs to be further evaluated. No such case of apparent sarcoma formation in the CNS following chemoradiotherapy and/or TTF treatment for GBM has been reported.

  15. Genomic understanding of glioblastoma expanded

    Cancer.gov

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was the first cancer type to be systematically studied by TCGA in 2008. In a new, complementary report, TCGA experts examined more than 590 GBM samples--the largest to date utilizing genomic characterization techniques and ne

  16. Graded functional diffusion map-defined characteristics of apparent diffusion coefficients predict overall survival in recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Benjamin M; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Lai, Albert; Mischel, Paul S; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Lalezari, Shadi; Schmainda, Kathleen M; Pope, Whitney B

    2011-10-01

    Diffusion imaging has shown promise as a predictive and prognostic biomarker in glioma. We assessed the ability of graded functional diffusion maps (fDMs) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) characteristics to predict overall survival (OS) in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with bevacizumab. Seventy-seven patients with recurrent GBMs were retrospectively examined. MRI scans were obtained before and approximately 6 weeks after treatment with bevacizumab. Graded fDMs were created by registering datasets to each patient's pretreatment scan and then performing voxel-wise subtraction between post- and pretreatment ADC maps. Voxels were categorized according to the degree of change in ADC within pretreatment fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and contrast-enhancing regions of interest (ROIs). We found that the volume of tissue showing decreased ADC within both FLAIR and contrast-enhancing regions stratified OS (log-rank, P < .05). fDMs applied to contrast-enhancing ROIs more accurately predicted OS compared with fDMs applied to FLAIR ROIs. Graded fDMs (showing voxels with decreased ADC between 0.25 and 0.4 µm(2)/ms) were more predictive of OS than traditional (single threshold) fDMs, and the predictive ability of graded fDMs could be enhanced even further by adding the ADC characteristics from the fDM-classified voxels to the analysis (log-rank, P < .001). These results demonstrate that spatially resolved diffusion-based tumor metrics are a powerful imaging biomarker of survival in patients with recurrent GBM treated with bevacizumab.

  17. Graded functional diffusion map–defined characteristics of apparent diffusion coefficients predict overall survival in recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Lai, Albert; Mischel, Paul S.; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L.; Lalezari, Shadi; Schmainda, Kathleen M.; Pope, Whitney B.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion imaging has shown promise as a predictive and prognostic biomarker in glioma. We assessed the ability of graded functional diffusion maps (fDMs) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) characteristics to predict overall survival (OS) in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with bevacizumab. Seventy-seven patients with recurrent GBMs were retrospectively examined. MRI scans were obtained before and approximately 6 weeks after treatment with bevacizumab. Graded fDMs were created by registering datasets to each patient's pretreatment scan and then performing voxel-wise subtraction between post- and pretreatment ADC maps. Voxels were categorized according to the degree of change in ADC within pretreatment fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and contrast-enhancing regions of interest (ROIs). We found that the volume of tissue showing decreased ADC within both FLAIR and contrast-enhancing regions stratified OS (log-rank, P < .05). fDMs applied to contrast-enhancing ROIs more accurately predicted OS compared with fDMs applied to FLAIR ROIs. Graded fDMs (showing voxels with decreased ADC between 0.25 and 0.4 µm2/ms) were more predictive of OS than traditional (single threshold) fDMs, and the predictive ability of graded fDMs could be enhanced even further by adding the ADC characteristics from the fDM-classified voxels to the analysis (log-rank, P < .001). These results demonstrate that spatially resolved diffusion-based tumor metrics are a powerful imaging biomarker of survival in patients with recurrent GBM treated with bevacizumab. PMID:21856685

  18. Urticaria Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Sebastian G.; Kovalerchik, Olga; Ahmad, Moneeb

    2013-01-01

    Urticaria multiforme is a benign cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction seen in pediatric patients that is characterized by the acute and transient onset of blanchable, annular, polycyclic, erythematous wheals with dusky, ecchymotic centers in association with acral edema. It is most commonly misdiagnosed as erythema multiforme, a serum-sickness-like reaction, or urticarial vasculitis. Since these three diagnoses represent distinct clinical entities with unique prognoses and management strategies, it is important that physicians distinguish urticaria multiforme from its clinical mimics in order to optimize patient care. By performing a thorough history and physical examination, the astute clinician can make the correct diagnosis and develop an appropriate, effective treatment plan while avoiding unnecessary biopsies and laboratory evaluations. The authors report a case of urticaria multiforme in a four-year-old girl in order to emphasize the distinctive morphological manifestations of this rare, albeit unique, disease seen in the pediatric population. PMID:23556035

  19. A phase I/II trial of hydroxychloroquine in conjunction with radiation therapy and concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Ye, Xiaobu; Supko, Jeffrey G; Desideri, Serena; Grossman, Stuart A; Brem, Steven; Mikkelson, Tom; Wang, Daniel; Chang, Yunyoung C; Hu, Janice; McAfee, Quentin; Fisher, Joy; Troxel, Andrea B; Piao, Shengfu; Heitjan, Daniel F; Tan, Kay-See; Pontiggia, Laura; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Davis, Lisa E; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate autophagy inhibition with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) can augment the efficacy of DNA-damaging therapy. The primary objective of this trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of HCQ in combination with radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GB). A 3 + 3 phase I trial design followed by a noncomparative phase II study was conducted in GB patients after initial resection. Patients received HCQ (200 to 800 mg oral daily) with RT and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Quantitative electron microscopy and immunoblotting were used to assess changes in autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling enabled PK-pharmacodynamic correlations. Sixteen phase I subjects were evaluable for dose-limiting toxicities. At 800 mg HCQ/d, 3/3 subjects experienced Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, 1 with sepsis. HCQ 600 mg/d was found to be the MTD in this combination. The phase II cohort (n = 76) had a median survival of 15.6 mos with survival rates at 12, 18, and 24 mo of 70%, 36%, and 25%. PK analysis indicated dose-proportional exposure for HCQ. Significant therapy-associated increases in AV and LC3-II were observed in PBMC and correlated with higher HCQ exposure. These data establish that autophagy inhibition is achievable with HCQ, but dose-limiting toxicity prevented escalation to higher doses of HCQ. At HCQ 600 mg/d, autophagy inhibition was not consistently achieved in patients treated with this regimen, and no significant improvement in overall survival was observed. Therefore, a definitive test of the role of autophagy inhibition in the adjuvant setting for glioma patients awaits the development of lower-toxicity compounds that can achieve more consistent inhibition of autophagy than HCQ.

  20. Neural Stem Cells and Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, Rossella; Conti, Carlo; Celli, Paolo; Caroli, Emanuela; Carletti, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glioblastoma multiforme represents one of the most common brain cancers with a rather heterogeneous cellular composition, as indicated by the term “multiforme". Recent reports have described the isolation and identification of cancer neural stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme, which possess the capacity to establish, sustain, and expand these tumours, even under the challenging settings posed by serial transplantation experiments. Our study focused on the distribution of neural cancer stem cells inside the tumour. The study is divided into three phases: removal of tumoral specimens in different areas of the tumour (centre, periphery, marginal zone) in an operative room equipped with a 1.5 T scanner; isolation and characterization of neural cancer stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme; identification of neural cancer stem cell distribution inside the tumour. PMID:24750704

  1. Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Einstein, Douglas B.; Wessels, Barry; Bangert, Barbara; Fu, Pingfu; Nelson, A. Dennis; Cohen, Mark; Sagar, Stephen; Lewin, Jonathan; Sloan, Andrew; Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert; Maciunas, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS

  2. Investigation of serum levels and tissue expression of two genes IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 act as potential biomarker for predicting the progression and survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Abdolhoseinpour, Hesam; Mehrabi, Farzad; Shahraki, Kourosh; Khoshnood, Reza Jalili; Masoumi, Babak; Yahaghi, Emad; Goudarzi, Peyman Karimi

    2016-07-15

    Identification of genetic copy number changes in glial tumors is of importance in the context of improved/refined diagnostic, prognostic procedures and therapeutic decision-making. Blood-derived biomarkers, therefore, would be useful as minimally invasive markers that could support diagnosis and enable monitoring of tumour growth and response to treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of IGFBP-2/3 in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and their value as predictors of survival. We examined the plasma levels of IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 using ELISA in patient suffering from GBM and controls groups. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry method was used to evaluate the expression levels of these markers. Preoperative plasma levels of IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 were markedly higher in glioblastoma patients (mean±SD: 521.5±164.2ng/ml; 402.4±126ng/ml) when compared with healthy controls (301.28±73.12; 244±89.5ng/ml; p<0.001). Immunohistochemical results indicated that the median H score for glioblastoma tissues was higher when compared with normal tissues. The mean scores for IGFBP-2 expression in glioblastoma was higher than normal tissues (p<0.001). Our result showed that the median H score for glioblastoma tissues was higher when compared with normal tissue for IGFBP-3 expression. The mean scores for glioblastoma tissues was higher than normal tissues (p<0.001). We also evaluated whether plasma IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 levels were related to clinical features. The plasma IGFBP-2 level was strongly linked to the patient's age (R=0.769, P=0.001) that were strongly increased in patients with older age (>65), (mean±SD: 594.36±33.3ng/ml). On the other hand, plasma IGFBP-3 level was not correlated with age (P=0.462), sex (P=0.532), and tumor size (P=0.245). Our findings indicated that the tissue IGFBP-2 level was also markedly correlated with the patient's age (R=0.612, P=0.015). On the other hand, tissue IGFBP-3 expression level was not correlated with age (P

  3. Dioscin, a natural steroid saponin, induces apoptosis and DNA damage through reactive oxygen species: a potential new drug for treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Lv, Linlin; Zheng, Lingli; Dong, Deshi; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Youwei; Qi, Yan; Han, Xu; Peng, Jinyong

    2013-09-01

    Dioscin, a natural product obtained from medicinal plants shows lipid-lowering, anti-cancer and hepatoprotective effects. However, the effect of it on glioblastoma is unclear. In this study, dioscin significantly inhibited proliferation of C6 glioma cells and caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Ca²⁺ release. ROS accumulation affected levels of malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, glutathione disulfide and glutathione, and caused cell apoptosis. In addition, ROS generation caused mitochondrial damage including structural changes, increased mitochondrial permeability transition and decreased mitochondria membrane potential, which led to the release of cytochrome C, nuclear translation of programmed cell death-5 and increased activities of caspase-3,9. Simultaneously, dioscin down-regulated protein expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, up-regulated expression of Bak, Bax, Bid and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Also, oxygen stress induced S-phase arrest of cancer cells by way of regulating expression of DNA Topo I, p53, CDK2 and Cyclin A and caused DNA damage. In a rat allograft model, dioscin significantly inhibited tumor size and extended the life cycle of the rats. In conclusion, dioscin shows noteworthy anti-cancer activity on glioblastoma cells by promoting ROS accumulation, inducing DNA damage and activating mitochondrial signal pathways. Ultimately, we believe dioscin has promise as a new therapy for the treatment of glioblastoma.

  4. Response as a predictor of survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Michael; Cloughesy, Timothy; Samant, Meghna; Fang, Liang; Wen, Patrick Y.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Schiff, David; Abrey, Lauren E.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Paleologos, Nina; Nicholas, Martin K.; Jensen, Randy; Vredenburgh, James; Das, Asha; Friedman, Henry S.

    2011-01-01

    Development of effective therapies for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and reliable, timely evaluation of their benefit are needed. Understanding the relationship between objective response (OR) and survival is important for determining whether OR can provide an early signal of treatment activity in clinical trials. We performed a landmark analysis to evaluate the association between OR and survival at 9, 18, and 26 weeks for 167 patients with recurrent GBM who participated in BRAIN, a phase II trial that evaluated efficacy of bevacizumab alone or in combination with irinotecan, using the Cox regression models adjusted for age, baseline Karnofsky performance score, first vs second relapse, and treatment arm. Hazard ratios (HRs) and P-values for survival between responders and nonresponders were calculated. Additional analyses were performed to test robustness, validity, fit, and accuracy of the models. The relationships between progression-free survival (PFS) and survival and between OR and PFS were also explored. There were 55 responders and 112 nonresponders across the 2 treatment arms in BRAIN. OR status at 9, 18, and 26 weeks was a statistically significant predictor of survival (HR ≤ 0.52, P < .01). PFS was also a statistically significant predictor of survival at each landmark (HR ≤ 0.25, P < .0001). The association between OR and PFS was not statistically significant, likely due to inadequate statistical power for the analysis. Clarifying the relationship of OR and survival is important for determining whether OR can be a reliable predictor of the benefit of a therapeutic agent in patients with recurrent GBM. PMID:21084434

  5. Differential distribution of erbB receptors in human glioblastoma multiforme: expression of erbB3 in CD133-positive putative cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Duhem-Tonnelle, Véronique; Bièche, Ivan; Vacher, Sophie; Loyens, Anne; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Collier, Francis; Baroncini, Marc; Blond, Serge; Prevot, Vincent; Sharif, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastomas are the most common CNS tumors in adults, and they remain resistant to current treatments. ErbB1 signaling is frequently altered in these tumors, which indicates that the erbB receptor family is a promising target for molecular therapy. However, data on erbB signaling in glioblastomas are still sparse. Therefore, we undertook a comprehensive analysis of erbB receptor and ligand expression profiles in a panel of nine glioblastomas that were compared to non-neoplastic cerebral tissue containing neocortex and corresponding portions of subcortical convolutional white matter and we determined the distribution patterns of erbB receptors among the main neural cell types that are present in these tumors, particularly the putative tumoral stem cell population. Using quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis, we showed that erbB1 signaling and erbB2 receptors exhibited highly variable deregulation profiles among tumors, ranging from under- to overexpression, while erbB3 and erbB4 were down-regulated. Immunohistochemistry revealed an important inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in all four erbB expression profiles. However, each receptor exhibited a distinct repartition pattern among the GFAP-, Olig2-, NeuN- and CD133-positive populations. Interestingly, while erbB1 immunoreactivity was only detected in small subsets of CD133-positive putative tumoral stem cells, erbB3 immunoreactivity was prominent in this cell population thus suggesting that erbB3 may represent a new potential target for molecular therapy. PMID:20467331

  6. AT-33A PHASE II STUDY OF CONCURRENT RADIATION THERAPY, TEMOZOLOMIDE AND THE HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITOR VALPROIC ACID FOR PATIENTS WITH GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

    PubMed Central

    Krauze, Andra V.; Myrehaug, Sten D.; Chang, Michael G.; Holdford, Diane J.; Smith, Sharon; Shih, Joanna; Tofilon, Peter; Fine, Howard; Camphausen, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma (GBM) remains an aggressive brain tumor with poor prognosis. Valproic acid (VPA) is an antiepileptic agent that has been shown to have HDACi activity and to radiosensitize GBM cells in preclinical models. This phase II study aimed to determine if the addition of VPA to standard radiation therapy and temozolomide would improve OS and PFS. METHODS: We prospectively assessed survival, radiological and clinical progression in 37 newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients with the administration of VPA at 25 mg/kg orally BID concurrent with radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ). The first dose of VPA was given 1 week before the first day of RT at 10 to 15 mg/kg/day and subsequently tapered up to 25 mg/kg/day over the week prior to radiation. RESULTS: 81% of patients took VPA according to protocol. Median OS was 29.6 months (21- 63.8), median PFS was 10.5 (6.8 - 51.2). OS at 6, 12, 24 months was 97%, 86%, 56% respectively. PFS at 6, 12, 24 months was 70%, 43%, 38% respectively. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities of VPA in conjunction with TMZ were blood/ bone marrow toxicity (32%), neurological (11%), metabolic/laboratory (8%). At the end of the study 26 (70%) patients were dead, 7 were live without disease, 4 alive with disease. Younger age (<= 50 years) compared to older age and class V RPA were significant for both OS and PFS. Using a landmark analysis, an early progression was related to a shorter interval between progression and death, whereas, a later progression was related to a longer interval between progression and death (p = 0.0002) HR 4.7. CONCLUSION: The addition of VPA to concurrent RT and TMZ in the treatment of newly diagnosed GBM may result in superior outcomes as compared to contemporary and historical data and merits further study.

  7. Alternating electric tumor treating fields for treatment of glioblastoma: rationale, preclinical, and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sandeep; Klinger, Neil V; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Barger, Geoffrey R; Pannullo, Susan C; Juhász, Csaba

    2017-02-24

    OBJECTIVE Treatment for glioblastoma (GBM) remains largely unsuccessful, even with aggressive combined treatment via surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Tumor treating fields (TTFs) are low-intensity, intermediate-frequency, alternating electric fields that have antiproliferative properties in vitro and in vivo. The authors provide an up-to-date review of the mechanism of action as well as preclinical and clinical data on TTFs. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was performed using the terms "tumor treating fields," "alternating electric fields," "glioblastoma," "Optune," "NovoTTF-100A," and "Novocure." RESULTS Preclinical and clinical data have demonstrated the potential efficacy of TTFs for treatment of GBM, leading to several pilot studies, clinical trials, and, in 2011, FDA approval for its use as salvage therapy for recurrent GBM and, in 2015, approval for newly diagnosed GBM. CONCLUSIONS Current evidence supports the use of TTFs as an efficacious, antimitotic treatment with minimal toxicity in patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM. Additional studies are needed to further optimize patient selection, determine cost-effectiveness, and assess the full impact on quality of life.

  8. Genome-wide methylation profiling identifies an essential role of reactive oxygen species in pediatric glioblastoma multiforme and validates a methylome specific for H3 histone family 3A with absence of G-CIMP/isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Prerana; Pia Patric, Irene Rosita; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Pathak, Pankaj; Pal, Jagriti; Sharma, Vikas; Thinagararanjan, Sivaarumugam; Santosh, Vani; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Suri, Ashish; Gupta, Deepak; Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Sarkar, Chitra

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is rare, and there is a single study, a seminal discovery showing association of histone H3.3 and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 mutation with a DNA methylation signature. The present study aims to validate these findings in an independent cohort of pediatric GBM, compare it with adult GBM, and evaluate the involvement of important functionally altered pathways. Methods Genome-wide methylation profiling of 21 pediatric GBM cases was done and compared with adult GBM data (GSE22867). We performed gene mutation analysis of IDH1 and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A), status evaluation of glioma cytosine–phosphate–guanine island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), and Gene Ontology analysis. Experimental evaluation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) association was also done. Results Distinct differences were noted between methylomes of pediatric and adult GBM. Pediatric GBM was characterized by 94 hypermethylated and 1206 hypomethylated cytosine–phosphate–guanine (CpG) islands, with 3 distinct clusters, having a trend to prognostic correlation. Interestingly, none of the pediatric GBM cases showed G-CIMP/IDH1 mutation. Gene Ontology analysis identified ROS association in pediatric GBM, which was experimentally validated. H3F3A mutants (36.4%; all K27M) harbored distinct methylomes and showed enrichment of processes related to neuronal development, differentiation, and cell-fate commitment. Conclusions Our study confirms that pediatric GBM has a distinct methylome compared with that of adults. Presence of distinct clusters and an H3F3A mutation–specific methylome indicate existence of epigenetic subgroups within pediatric GBM. Absence of IDH1/G-CIMP status further indicates that findings in adult GBM cannot be simply extrapolated to pediatric GBM and that there is a strong need for identification of separate prognostic markers. A possible role of ROS in pediatric GBM pathogenesis is demonstrated for the first time and

  9. Computerized assessment of vessel morphological changes during treatment of glioblastoma multiforme: Report of a case imaged serially by MRA over four years

    PubMed Central

    Bullitt, Elizabeth; Ewend, Matthew; Vredenburgh, James; Friedman, Allan; Lin, Weili; Wilber, Kathy; Zeng, Donglin; Aylward, Stephen R.; Reardon, David

    2009-01-01

    A patient with glioblastoma mutliforme underwent serial computerized analysis of tumor-associated vasculature defined from magnetic resonance angiographic (MRA) scans obtained over almost a four year period. The clinical course included tumor resection with subsequent radiation therapy, a long symptom-free interval, emergence of a new malignant focus, resection of that focus, a stroke, and treatment with chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic therapy. Image analysis methods included segmentation of vessels from each MRA and statistical comparison of vessel morphology over 4 regions of interest (the initial tumor site, the second tumor site, a distant control region, and the entire brain) to the same 4 regions of interest in 50 healthy volunteers (26 females and 24 males; mean age 39 years). Results suggested that following completion of focal radiation therapy (RT) vessel shape abnormalities, if elevated at the time of RT completion, may progressively normalize for months in focal regions, that progressively severe vessel shape abnormalities can precede the emergence of a gadolinium enhancing lesion by months, that lesion resection can produce a dramatic but highly transient drop in abnormal vessel tortuosity both focally and globally, and that treatment with anti-angiogenic agents does not necessarily normalize vessel shape. Quantitative measurements of vessel morphology as defined from MRA may provide useful insights into tumor development and response to therapy. PMID:19103295

  10. Tumor-Treating Fields: Nursing Implications for an Emerging Technology
.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alice

    2017-06-01

    Tumor-treating fields (TTFields) are a new technology used for cancer treatment consisting of battery-powered, insulated electromagnetic transducers that are placed on the scalp. This wearable, adhesive device is a certified physician-prescribed therapy for patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a type of primary brain cancer. TTFields are being used concomitantly with temozolomide (Temodar®) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and as a monotherapy in patients with recurrent glioblastoma after radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Nursing professionals caring for patients using this emerging technology should be able to educate patients regarding proper use of TTFields and monitor for side effects.
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  11. Evo-Devo and the evolution of cancer: a hypothesis for metamorphic therapies for the cancers of prolactin-influenced tumourigenesis: with special reference to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

    PubMed

    Pearson, Roy Douglas

    2009-06-01

    Recalling the remarkable developmental similarities between cancer cells and embryonic tissues, this paper argues that, by the process of retrodifferentiation and heterochronization, stem cells that have become neoplastic could be said to have undergone "cellular heterochrony." It theorizes, therefore, that hormones are the major factor in the non-random regulation of cellular heterochrony in tumourigenesis. Two recent articles confirm that there is low thyroxine and high prolactin in glioblastomas. Thyroxine metamorphoses vertebrates' tissues so as to mature the tissues, e.g., in amphibian metamorphosis. In 1896, thyroxine (horse thyroid extract) was the first successful hormonal product to be used against a fulminating breast cancer. Recent work confirms the important role of prolactin in the induction and progression of mammary, prostate and colorectal tumours. Although the pituitary is the main source of prolactin in vertebrates, there is also placental production of prolactin, and paracrine production of prolactin by tumours themselves. Since tumours produce their own prolactin, shutting down the pituitary source has not proven wholly successful. Research to find prolactin receptor antagonists is ongoing. Therefore, prolactin inhibitors (dopamine agonists), prolactin receptor antagonists, plus thyroxine comprise a plausible metamorphic therapy for shrinking solid tumour mass. By contrast with "differentiation" therapies currently sought by stem cell oncologists, this paper advocates "metamorphic" therapies, to introduce hormonal oncological knowledge of how to modulate signalling pathways that are aberrant in the stem cells that give rise to tumours. Despite subtle differences in these signalling translation pathways and cascades, strategies exist that will allow these evolved populations, going back to their stem precursors, to "metamorphose" or perhaps apoptotically cease proliferation.

  12. Nimotuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody specific for the EGFR, in combination with temozolomide and radiation therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme: First results in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Pan, Li; Sheng, Xiao-fang; Chen, Shu; Dai, Jia-zhong

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) in Chinese patients. Twenty-six patients with newly diagnosed GBM were enrolled. All patients received standard external beam RT after surgery, with a total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. During RT, concurrent TMZ was given daily at 75 mg/m(2) for 40-42 days, combined with six weekly infusions of nimotuzumab at a 200 mg dose. After a 4-week interval upon completion of RT, six cycles of adjuvant TMZ (150 to 200 mg/m(2) for 5 days in each 28-day cycle) were given. The primary end point was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate. EGFR expression in tumor tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Treatment was well tolerated and no grade III or higher grade toxicity was observed. Median PFS and overall survival (OS) were 10.0 and 15.9 months, respectively, while the 6-month PFS and OS rates were 69.2% and 88.5%, respectively. No correlation between efficacy and EGFR expression was found. Combination of Nimotuzumab with RT plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ showed favorable safety and tolerability profiles in newly diagnosed GBM in Chinese patients. The survival times were similar to those seen in historical data of standard therapy. © 2014 The Authors. Asia-Pacific Journal of Clincal Oncology; published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Drug Resistance in Glioblastoma: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Haar, Catherine P.; Hebbar, Preetha; Wallace, Gerald C.; Das, Arabinda; Vandergrift, William A.; Smith, Joshua A.; Giglio, Pierre; Patel, Sunil J.; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is recognized as the most common and lethal form of central nervous system cancer. Currently used surgical techniques, chemotherapeutic agents, and radiotherapy strategies have done very little in extending the life expectancies of patients diagnosed with GBM. The difficulty in treating this malignant disease lies both in its inherent complexity and numerous mechanisms of drug resistance. In this review, we summarize several of the primary mechanisms of drug resistance. We reviewed available published literature in the English language regarding drug resistance in glioblastoma. The reasons for drug resistance in glioblastoma include drug efflux, hypoxic areas of tumor cells, cancer stem cells, DNA damage repair, and miRNAs. Many potential therapies target these mechanisms, including a series of investigated alternative and plant-derived agents. Future research and clinical trials in glioblastoma patients should pursue combination of therapies to help combat drug resistance. The emerging new data on the potential of plant-derived therapeutics should also be closely considered and further investigated. PMID:22228201

  14. Drug resistance in glioblastoma: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Haar, Catherine P; Hebbar, Preetha; Wallace, Gerald C; Das, Arabinda; Vandergrift, William A; Smith, Joshua A; Giglio, Pierre; Patel, Sunil J; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2012-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is recognized as the most common and lethal form of central nervous system cancer. Currently used surgical techniques, chemotherapeutic agents, and radiotherapy strategies have done very little in extending the life expectancies of patients diagnosed with GBM. The difficulty in treating this malignant disease lies both in its inherent complexity and numerous mechanisms of drug resistance. In this review, we summarize several of the primary mechanisms of drug resistance. We reviewed available published literature in the English language regarding drug resistance in glioblastoma. The reasons for drug resistance in glioblastoma include drug efflux, hypoxic areas of tumor cells, cancer stem cells, DNA damage repair, and miRNAs. Many potential therapies target these mechanisms, including a series of investigated alternative and plant-derived agents. Future research and clinical trials in glioblastoma patients should pursue combination of therapies to help combat drug resistance. The emerging new data on the potential of plant-derived therapeutics should also be closely considered and further investigated.

  15. Strategies to improve delivery of anticancer drugs across the blood–brain barrier to treat glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Rajneet K.; Parrish, Karen E.; Sio, Terence T.; Mittapalli, Rajendar K.; Elmquist, William F.; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal and aggressive brain tumor that is resistant to conventional radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapies. Molecularly targeted agents hold great promise in treating these genetically heterogeneous tumors, yet have produced disappointing results. One reason for the clinical failure of these novel therapies can be the inability of the drugs to achieve effective concentrations in the invasive regions beyond the bulk tumor. In this review, we describe the influence of the blood–brain barrier on the distribution of anticancer drugs to both the tumor core and infiltrative regions of GBM. We further describe potential strategies to overcome these drug delivery limitations. Understanding the key factors that limit drug delivery into brain tumors will guide future development of approaches for enhanced delivery of effective drugs to GBM. PMID:26359209

  16. Tumor treating field therapy in combination with bevacizumab for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Omar, Ayman I

    2014-10-27

    A novel device that employs TTF therapy has recently been developed and is currently in use for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM). It was FDA approved in April 2011 for the treatment of patients 22 years or older with rGBM. The device delivers alternating electric fields and is programmed to ensure maximal tumor cell kill. Glioblastoma is the most common type of glioma and has an estimated incidence of approximately 10,000 new cases per year in the United States alone. This tumor is particularly resistant to treatment and is uniformly fatal especially in the recurrent setting. Prior to the approval of the TTF System, the only FDA approved treatment for rGBM was bevacizumab. Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeted against the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein that drives tumor angiogenesis. By blocking the VEGF pathway, bevacizumab can result in a significant radiographic response (pseudoresponse), improve progression free survival and reduce corticosteroid requirements in rGBM patients. Bevacizumab however failed to prolong overall survival in a recent phase III trial. A pivotal phase III trial (EF-11) demonstrated comparable overall survival between physicians' choice chemotherapy and TTF Therapy but better quality of life were observed in the TTF arm. There is currently an unmet need to develop novel approaches designed to prolong overall survival and/or improve quality of life in this unfortunate patient population. One appealing approach would be to combine the two currently approved treatment modalities namely bevacizumab and TTF Therapy. These two treatments are currently approved as monotherapy, but their combination has never been evaluated in a clinical trial. We have developed an approach for combining those two treatment modalities and treated 2 rGBM patients. Here we describe a detailed methodology outlining this novel treatment protocol and present representative data from one of the treated patients.

  17. Photodistributed erythema multiforme.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pazos, L; Gómez-Bernal, S; Rodríguez-Granados, M T; Toribio, J

    2013-10-01

    Although the existence of photodistributed erythema multiforme has been recognized for years, few cases have been described to date. It is an uncommon, and probably underdiagnosed, skin disorder that can affect individuals of both sexes and all ages. It has been associated with drugs, reactivation of herpes simplex virus infection, and polymorphous light eruption. A diagnosis is made on the basis of history, physical examination, histology, and phototesting. The condition runs a benign, self-limiting course but patients may experience outbreaks for several years if the causative agent is not eliminated. It is treated symptomatically and patients are advised to avoid triggers and excessive sun exposure.

  18. Phase I/II Trial of Temozolomide (TMZ), Motexafin Gadolinium (MGd), and 60 Gy Fractionated Radiation (RT) for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM): Final Results of RTOG 0513

    PubMed Central

    Brachman, David G.; Pugh, Stephanie L; Ashby, Lynn S.; Thomas, Theresa A.; Dunbar, Erin M.; Narayan, Samir; Robins, H. Ian; Bovi, Joseph A.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Won, Minhee; Curran, Walter P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Phase I: to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) given concurrently with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiotherapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Phase II: to determine whether this combination improved overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in GBM recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class III–V patients as compared to recently published historical controls. Methods and Materials Dose escalation in phase I progressed through three cohorts until 2 of 6 patients experienced a dose limiting toxicity (DLT) or a dose of 5mg/kg was reached. Once a MTD was established, a one-sided one-sample log-rank test at significance level of 0.1 had 85% power to detect a median survival difference (13.69 vs. 18.48 months) with 60 deaths over a 12 month accrual period and an additional 18 months of follow-up. OS and PFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results In phase I, 24 patients were enrolled. The MTD established was 5 mg/kg given intravenously 5 days a week for the first 10 RT fractions then 3 times a week for the duration of RT (1). The 7 patients enrolled to the third dose level and the 94 enrolled to phase II received this dose. Of these 101 patients, 87 were eligible and evaluable. Median survival time (MST) is 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.9–17.6), not significantly different from the historical control (p=0.36). Median PFS is 7.6 months (95% CI: 5.7–9.6). One patient (1%) experienced a grade 5 possibly related adverse event during the concurrent phase and none during the adjuvant TMZ. Conclusions Treatment was well tolerated but median OS did not reach the protocol specified improvement over the historical control, indicating that the combination of standard RT with TMZ and MGd did not achieve a significant survival advantage. PMID:25832688

  19. A functional polymorphism in the pre‑miR‑146a gene influences the prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme by interfering with the balance between Notch1 and Notch2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongyao; Li, Weihua; Wu, Chunming

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between a polymorphism (rs2910164) in the microRNA (miR)‑146a precursor and the prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), as well as to examine the possible underlying mechanism in a Chinese population. A total of 380 patients with histologically confirmed GBM were recruited between 2008 and 2012, and were genotyped for the rs2910164 polymorphism using Sanger sequencing. The Kaplan‑Meier method was used to estimate overall survival (OS), and univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to evaluate the effect of miR‑146a polymorphisms on OS. It was identified that the rs2910164 CC genotype was significantly associated with a decreased OS among the patients with GBM (P=0.002). It was confirmed that Notch1 and Notch2 were targets of miR‑146a and it was demonstrated that the introduction of miR‑146a mimic suppressed the levels of Notch1 and Notch2 to different extents, resulting in a reduced Notch1/Notch2 ratio with an increase in miR‑146a mimic concentration in U251 cells. Additionally, resected tumor specimens were collected from 138 GBM patients and the expression levels of miR‑146a, Notch1 and Notch2 were examined using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Consistent with the in vitro study, lower levels of miR‑146a, higher levels of Notch1 and Notch2, and a higher Notch1/Notch2 ratio were identified in the CC genotype group compared with those of the GG/GC group. In the present study, the rs2910164 C allele was found to be associated with a reduced survival rate in patients with GBM, and the observed association between the CC genotype and poorer prognosis of GBM was at least partially mediated by the decreased expression of miR‑146a, which interfered with the balance of Notch1 and Notch2.

  20. Synthetic 2-aryl-3-((piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)thiazolidin-4-ones exhibit selective in vitro antitumoral activity and inhibit cancer cell growth in a preclinical model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Elita F; Azambuja, Juliana H; de Carvalho, Taíse Rosa; Kunzler, Alice; da Silva, Daniel S; Teixeira, Fernanda C; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Beira, Fátima T; de Cássia Sant Anna Alves, Rita; Spanevello, Roselia M; Cunico, Wilson; Stefanello, Francieli M; Horn, Ana P; Braganhol, Elizandra

    2017-03-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the worst form of primary brain tumor, which has a high rate of infiltration and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy, resulting in poor prognosis for patients. Recent studies show that thiazolidinones have a wide range of pharmacological properties including antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-tumor. Here, we investigate the effect antiglioma in vitro of a panel of sixteen synthetic 2-aryl-3-((piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)thiazolidin-4-ones where 13 of these decreased the viability of glioma cells 30-65% (100 μM) compared with controls. The most promising compounds such as 4d, 4l, 4m and 4p promoted glioma reduction of viability greater than 50%, were further tested at lower concentrations (12.5, 25, 50 and 100 μM). Also, the data showed that the compounds 4d, 4l, 4m and 4p induced cell death primarily through necrosis and late apoptosis mechanisms. Interestingly, none of these 2-aryl-3-((piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)thiazolidin-4-ones were cytotoxic for primary astrocytes, which were used as a non-transformed cell model, indicating selectivity. Our results also show that the treatment with sub-therapeutic doses of 2-aryl-3-((piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)thiazolidin-4-ones (4d, 4l and 4p) reduced in vivo glioma growth as well as malignant characteristics of implanted tumors such as intratumoral hemorrhage and peripheral pseudopalisading. Importantly, 2-aryl-3-((piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)thiazolidin-4-ones treatment did not induce mortality or peripheral damage to animals. Finally, 2-aryl-3-((piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)thiazolidin-4-ones also changed the nitric oxide metabolism which may be associated with reduced growth and malignity characteristics of gliomas. These data indicates for the first time the therapeutic potential of synthetic 2-aryl-3-((piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)thiazolidin-4-ones to GBM treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of physical characteristics of Tumor Treating Fields for human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lok, Edwin; San, Pyay; Hua, Van; Phung, Melissa; Wong, Eric T

    2017-06-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) therapy is an approved treatment that has known clinical efficacy against recurrent and newly diagnosed glioblastoma. However, the distribution of the electric fields and the corresponding pattern of energy deposition in the brain are poorly understood. To evaluate the physical parameters that may influence TTFields, postacquisition MP-RAGE, T1 and T2 MRI sequences from a responder with a right parietal glioblastoma were anatomically segmented and then solved using finite-element method to determine the distribution of the electric fields and rate of energy deposition at the gross tumor volume (GTV) and other intracranial structures. Electric field-volume histograms (EVH) and specific absorption rate-volume histograms (SARVH) were constructed to numerically evaluate the relative and/or absolute magnitude volumetric differences between models. The electric field parameters EAUC , VE150 , E95% , E50% , and E20% , as well as the SAR parameters SARAUC , VSAR7.5 , SAR95% , SAR50% , and SAR20% , facilitated comparisons between models derived from various conditions. Specifically, TTFields at the GTV were influenced by the dielectric characteristics of the adjacent tissues as well as the GTV itself, particularly the presence or absence of a necrotic core. The thickness of the cerebrospinal fluid on the convexity of the brain and the geometry of the tumor were also relevant factors. Finally, the position of the arrays also influenced the electric field distribution and rate of energy deposition in the GTV. Using EVH and SARVH, a personalized approach for TTFields treatment can be developed when various patient-related and tumor-related factors are incorporated into the planning procedure. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Novel Peripherally Derived Neural-Like Stem Cells as Therapeutic Carriers for Treating Glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Sattiraju, Anirudh; Zhu, Dongqin; Zulato, Gilberto; Batista, Izadora; Nguyen, Van T; Messi, Maria Laura; Solingapuram Sai, Kiran Kumar; Marini, Frank C; Delbono, Osvaldo; Mintz, Akiva

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), an aggressive grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common primary malignant adult brain tumor characterized by extensive invasiveness, heterogeneity, and angiogenesis. Standard treatment options such as radiation and chemotherapy have proven to be only marginally effective in treating GBM because of its invasive nature. Therefore, extensive efforts have been put forth to develop tumor-tropic stem cells as viable therapeutic vehicles with potential to treat even the most invasive tumor cells that are harbored within areas of normal brain. To this end, we discovered a newly described NG2-expressing cell that we isolated from a distinct pericyte subtype found abundantly in cultures derived from peripheral muscle. In this work, we show the translational significance of these peripherally derived neural-like stem cells (NLSC) and their potential to migrate toward tumors and act as therapeutic carriers. We demonstrate that these NLSCs exhibit in vitro and in vivo GBM tropism. Furthermore, NLSCs did not promote angiogenesis or transform into tumor-associated stromal cells, which are concerns raised when using other common stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells and induced neural stem cells, as therapeutic carriers. We also demonstrate the potential of NLSCs to express a prototype therapeutic, tumor necrosis factor α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and kill GBM cells in vitro. These data demonstrate the therapeutic potential of our newly characterized NLSC against GBM. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:471-481.

  3. Novel Peripherally Derived Neural-Like Stem Cells as Therapeutic Carriers for Treating Glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Sattiraju, Anirudh; Zhu, Dongqin; Zulato, Gilberto; Batista, Izadora; Nguyen, Van T; Messi, Maria Laura; Solingapuram Sai, Kiran Kumar; Marini, Frank C; Delbono, Osvaldo; Mintz, Akiva

    2016-09-14

    : Glioblastoma (GBM), an aggressive grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common primary malignant adult brain tumor characterized by extensive invasiveness, heterogeneity, and angiogenesis. Standard treatment options such as radiation and chemotherapy have proven to be only marginally effective in treating GBM because of its invasive nature. Therefore, extensive efforts have been put forth to develop tumor-tropic stem cells as viable therapeutic vehicles with potential to treat even the most invasive tumor cells that are harbored within areas of normal brain. To this end, we discovered a newly described NG2-expressing cell that we isolated from a distinct pericyte subtype found abundantly in cultures derived from peripheral muscle. In this work, we show the translational significance of these peripherally derived neural-like stem cells (NLSC) and their potential to migrate toward tumors and act as therapeutic carriers. We demonstrate that these NLSCs exhibit in vitro and in vivo GBM tropism. Furthermore, NLSCs did not promote angiogenesis or transform into tumor-associated stromal cells, which are concerns raised when using other common stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells and induced neural stem cells, as therapeutic carriers. We also demonstrate the potential of NLSCs to express a prototype therapeutic, tumor necrosis factor α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and kill GBM cells in vitro. These data demonstrate the therapeutic potential of our newly characterized NLSC against GBM.

  4. Harnessing nanomedicine for therapeutic intervention in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gutkin, Anna; Cohen, Zvi R; Peer, Dan

    2016-11-01

    Glioblastoma is a type of brain cancer arises from glial cells. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a subtype of glioblastoma, is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumor. Currently, GBM therapy includes surgery and post-operative high-doses of radiation and chemotherapy. This therapeutic strategy has a limited contribution in extending the survival rate of GBM patients. Areas covered: Herein, we focus on harnessing nanoscale drug delivery strategies to treat brain malignancies. Specifically, we briefly discuss the challenges facing GBM therapy such as restricted passage across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and low enhanced permeability and retention effect. Next, we describe different pathways to address these challenges. Finally, we discuss the field of nanomedicine, which emerged as a promising platform for drug delivery to brain malignancies. Expert opinion: Countless strategies have been applied in preclinical and clinical settings to treat GBM. Among them is the use of different types of nanoparticles (NPs) and viruses with different approaches to cross or bypass the BBB. We suggest here a paradigm shift in thinking about crossing the BBB and tumor penetration as fundamental issues that need to be address in order to improve the therapeutic outcome in GBM.

  5. ED-33ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH GLIOBLASTOMA: SHOULD BE TREATED IN A DIFFERENT WAY?

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Maria Angeles Vaz; del Toro, Jacobo Muñoz; Cerco, José Antonio Gutierrez; Urzaiz, Luis Ley; Mena, Alfredo Carrato; Pian, Hector; Olmos, Vanessa Pachón; Rueda, Ana Gomez; de Pedro, Marta Del Alamo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The management of glioblastoma (GB) in elderly patients is not well established, since until recently they have been excluded from randomized trials and there are concerns about the toxicity. METHODS: The authors retrospectively reviewed 53 patients at a single institution from 2005 to 2013. Patients were 70 years of age and older with histologically confirmed GB. RESULTS: Median age was 75 years (70-88y). Fifty-six percent men, 43% women. Majority had some kind of minor morbidity (89%), mainly arterial hypertension (55%). Complete resection was performed in 52%. Biopsy in 8%. 90% had presurgical KPS >70. Seven (14%) had worse KPS after surgery. 71% received radiotherapy, in 45% 60 Gy and in 26% 30 Gy. Nearly 40% were treated with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. The median number of cycles was 4,43 (1-14). 6% had grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or trombocitopenia. 24% had grade 1 asthenia or nausea and vomits. Median overall survival (OS) for the whole cohort was 7,36 m (95% CI 4,8-9,8). Median progression free survival was 5.9 m (3-8.7m). Treatment with temozolomide concomitant and adjuvant (Stupp regimen) was associated with longer OS (11,16 vs 4,1m p = 0.008 ). The median OS was 8,3 m. for those who received radiotherapy and 1,5m for those who did not (p = 0,046). No statistical differences were found between those treated with 60 or 30 Gy (p = 0.143). Nearly 10% was older than 80. Median OS in these patients was 4,2m even though 71% had a complete resection. CONCLUSION: In our experience, in selected patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma over the age of 70, more intensive treatment was associated with prolonged OS, and results are close to those obtained in younger patients. Nevertheless these are retrospective data, selection bias should be considerer. Further randomized trial should be conducted to investigate this topic.

  6. Valproic acid related idiosyncratic drug induced hepatotoxicity in a glioblastoma patient treated with temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Neyns, Bart; Hoorens, Anne; Stupp, Roger

    2008-12-01

    Glioblastoma patients undergoing treatment with surgery followed by radiation and temozolomide chemotherapy often develop a state of immunosuppression and are at risk for opportunistic infections and reactivation of hepatitis and herpes viruses. We report the case of a 48-year-old glioblastoma patient who developed acute cholestatic hepatitis with hepatic failure during adjuvant treatment with temozolomide and the integrin inhibitor cilengitide. A viral hepatitis was excluded and valproic acid treatment was stopped. Upon normalisation of the liver tests, temozolomide treatment was resumed without perturbation of the liver tests. Valproic acid related idiosyncratic drug induced hepatotoxicity should be considered as a differential diagnosis in glioblastoma patients undergoing adjuvant therapy.

  7. Enhanced delivery of paclitaxel liposomes using focused ultrasound with microbubbles for treating nude mice bearing intracranial glioblastoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuanyuan; Pi, Zhaoke; Yan, Fei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Zeng, Xiaojun; Diao, Xianfen; Hu, Yaxin; Chen, Siping; Chen, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel liposomes (PTX-LIPO) are a clinically promising antineoplastic drug formulation for the treatment of various extracranial cancers, excluding glioblastoma. A main reason for this is the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or blood-tumor barrier (BTB), preventing liposomal drugs from crossing at a therapeutically meaningful level. Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles (MBs) has been suggested in many studies to be an effective approach to increase the BBB or BTB permeability. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of enhancing the delivery of PTX-LIPO in intracranial glioblastoma-bearing nude mice using pulsed low-intensity FUS exposure in the presence of MBs. Our results showed that the delivery efficiency of PTX-LIPO could be effectively improved in terms of the penetration of both the BBB in vitro and BTB in vivo by pulsed FUS sonication with a 10 ms pulse length and 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency at 0.64 MPa peak-rarefactional pressure in the presence of MBs. Quantitative analysis showed that a 2-fold higher drug concentration had accumulated in the glioblastoma 3 h after FUS treatment, with 7.20±1.18 µg PTX per g glioma tissue. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging analysis illustrated that the intracranial glioblastoma progression in nude mice treated with PTX-LIPO delivered via FUS with MBs was suppressed consistently for 4 weeks compared to the untreated group. The medium survival time of these tumor-bearing nude mice was significantly prolonged by 20.8%, compared to the untreated nude mice. Immunohistochemical analysis further confirmed the antiproliferation effect and cell apoptosis induction. Our study demonstrated that noninvasive low-intensity FUS with MBs can be used as an effective approach to deliver PTX-LIPO in order to improve their chemotherapy efficacy toward glioblastoma.

  8. Outcomes of pediatric glioblastoma treated with adjuvant chemoradiation with temozolomide and correlation with prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Supriya; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Joshi, Nikhil P; Kumar, Anupam; Puri, Tarun; Sharma, Daya Nand; Haresh, Kunhi Parambath; Gupta, Subhash; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Rath, Goura Kisor; Sarkar, Chitra

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric glioblastoma (pGBM) patients are underrepresented in major trials for this disease. We aimed to explore the outcome of pGBM patients treated with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). 23 patients of pGBM treated from 2004 to 2010 were included in this retrospective analysis. Adjuvant therapy included conformal radiation 60 gray at 2 gray/fraction daily over 6 weeks with concurrent TMZ 75 mg/m(2) followed by six cycles of adjuvant TMZ 150-200 mg/m(2) (day 1-5) every 4 weeks. Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival (OS) were determined. Univariate analysis with log-rank test was used to determine the impact of prognostic variables on survival. Median age at presentation was 11.5 years (range: 7-19 years) and M:F ratio was 15:8. All patients underwent maximal safe surgical resection; 13 gross total resection and 10 sub-total resection. At a median follow-up of 18 months (range: 2.1-126 months), the estimated median OS was 41.9 months. The estimated median OS for patients receiving only concurrent TMZ was 8 months while that for patients receiving concurrent and adjuvant TMZ was 41.9 months (P = 0.081). Estimated median OS for patients who did not complete six cycles of adjuvant TMZ was 9.5 months versus not reached for those who completed at least six cycles (P = 0.0005). Other prognostic factors did not correlate with survival. Our study shows the benefit of TMZ for pGBM patients. Both concurrent and adjuvant TMZ seem to be important for superior OS in this group of patients.

  9. PI3K p110β isoform synergizes with JNK in the regulation of glioblastoma cell proliferation and migration through Akt and FAK inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua-Fu; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Hao-Ran; Chen, Zhong-Ping; To, Shing-Shun Tony

    2016-05-12

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor, characterized by rapid growth and extensive infiltration to neighboring normal brain parenchyma. Both PI3K/Akt and JNK pathways are essential to glioblastoma cell survival, migration and invasion. Due to their hyperactivation in glioblastoma cells, PI3K and JNK are promising targets for glioblastoma treatment. To investigate the combination effects of class IA PI3K catalytic isoforms (p110α, p110β and p110δ) and JNK inhibition on tumor cell growth and motility, glioblastoma cells and xenografts in nude mice were treated with isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors in combination with JNK inhibitor. We showed that combined inhibition of these PI3K isoforms and JNK exerted divergent effects on the proliferation, migration and