Science.gov

Sample records for glioma bearer mouse

  1. Noninvasive Monitoring of Glioma Growth in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrini, Francesco; Ceresa, Davide; Appolloni, Irene; Marubbi, Daniela; Malatesta, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and deadly primary malignant brain tumors. In vivo orthotopic models could doubtless represent an appropriate tool to test novel treatment for gliomas. However, methods commonly used to monitor the growth of glioma inside the mouse brain are time consuming and invasive. We tested the reliability of a minimally invasive procedure, based on a secreted luciferase (Gaussia luciferase), to frequently monitor the changes of glioma size. Gluc activity was evaluated from blood samples collected from the tail tip of mice twice a week, allowing to make a growth curve for the tumors. We validated the correlation between Gluc activity and tumor size by analysing the tumor after brain dissection. We found that this method is reliable for monitoring human glioma transplanted in immunodeficient mice, but it has strong limitation in immunocompetent models, where an immune response against the luciferase is developed during the first weeks after transplant. PMID:27698917

  2. Noninvasive Monitoring of Glioma Growth in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Alessandrini, Francesco; Ceresa, Davide; Appolloni, Irene; Marubbi, Daniela; Malatesta, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and deadly primary malignant brain tumors. In vivo orthotopic models could doubtless represent an appropriate tool to test novel treatment for gliomas. However, methods commonly used to monitor the growth of glioma inside the mouse brain are time consuming and invasive. We tested the reliability of a minimally invasive procedure, based on a secreted luciferase (Gaussia luciferase), to frequently monitor the changes of glioma size. Gluc activity was evaluated from blood samples collected from the tail tip of mice twice a week, allowing to make a growth curve for the tumors. We validated the correlation between Gluc activity and tumor size by analysing the tumor after brain dissection. We found that this method is reliable for monitoring human glioma transplanted in immunodeficient mice, but it has strong limitation in immunocompetent models, where an immune response against the luciferase is developed during the first weeks after transplant.

  3. Investigation of immunosuppressive mechanisms in a mouse glioma model.

    PubMed

    Ksendzovsky, Alexander; Feinstein, Douglas; Zengou, Ryan; Sharp, Anthony; Polak, Paul; Lichtor, Terry; Glick, Roberta P

    2009-05-01

    The development of an immune competent mouse model for the study of immunosuppressive mechanisms is important for improving the efficacy of brain tumor immunotherapy. In the present study we investigated regulatory T cells (Tregs), TGF-beta1 and other putative immunosuppressive cytokines using GL261 mouse glioma in C57BL mice. We explored whether tumor growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is expressed and secreted by glioma cells constitutively or in response to a T-cell mediated immunity (simulated by conditioned media from T cells (TCM) activated by anti-CD3 antibody). We also investigated TGF-beta1's role in Treg mediated immunosuppression by quantifying TGF-beta1secretion from T regulatory cells (Tregs) co-incubated with GL261 cells as compared to Tregs alone. Finally, we studied other newly identified cytokines that were secreted preferentially by glioma cells in response to CD3 activated TCM versus cytokines secreted by glioma cells in absence of T-cell activation (naïve TCM). TGF-beta1expression was studied using RT-PCR and secretion was quantified using ELISA. A 308 protein cytokine array was used to identify and quantify cytokine expression. TGF-beta1expression and secretion from glioma cells was found to be up-regulated by conditioned media from CD3-activated T cells, suggesting that this immunosuppressive cytokine is not secreted constitutively but in response to immunity. TGF-beta1 was not found to be differentially secreted by Tregs co-incubated with glioma cells as compared to Tregs alone. This data suggest that TGF-beta1immunosupppression may not be a Treg dependent mechanism in this glioma model. Finally, the cytokine array elucidated several other cytokines which were up-regulated or down-regulated by CD3-activated TCM. These results have several implications for enhancing immunotherapy treatment, including the potential benefit of TGF-beta1inhibition in conjunction with immunotherapy, as well as the illumination of several other potential cytokine

  4. Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... come from ependymal cells. Tumors that display a mixture of these different cells are called mixed gliomas. ... oligodendrocytes, and ependymal cells. Tumors that display a mixture of these cells are called mixed gliomas. Astrocytoma: ...

  5. Dynamics of circulating gamma delta T cell activity in an immunocompetent mouse model of high-grade glioma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human gamma delta T cells are potent effectors against glioma cell lines in vitro and in human/mouse xenograft models of glioblastoma, however, this effect has not been investigated in an immunocompetent mouse model. In this report, we established GL261 intracranial gliomas in syngeneic WT C57BL/6 m...

  6. Malignant glioma: lessons from genomics, mouse models, and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; McKay, Renée M; Parada, Luis F

    2012-03-30

    Eighty percent of malignant tumors that develop in the central nervous system are malignant gliomas, which are essentially incurable. Here, we discuss how recent sequencing studies are identifying unexpected drivers of gliomagenesis, including mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and the NF-κB pathway, and how genome-wide analyses are reshaping the classification schemes for tumors and enhancing prognostic value of molecular markers. We discuss the controversies surrounding glioma stem cells and explore how the integration of new molecular data allows for the generation of more informative animal models to advance our knowledge of glioma's origin, progression, and treatment.

  7. Assessment of Tumor Cells in a Mouse Model of Diffuse Infiltrative Glioma by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanahashi, Kuniaki; Natsume, Atsushi; Motomura, Kazuya; Watabe, Naoki; Muraishi, Shuichi; Nakahara, Hitoshi; Saito, Yahachi; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Glioma of infiltrative nature is challenging for surgeons to achieve tumor-specific and maximal resection. Raman spectroscopy provides structural information on the targeted materials as vibrational shifts. We utilized Raman spectroscopy to distinguish invasive tumors from normal tissues. Spectra obtained from replication-competent avian sarcoma-(RCAS-) based infiltrative glioma cells and glioma tissues (resembling low-grade human glioma) were compared with those obtained from normal mouse astrocytes and normal tissues. In cell analysis, the spectra at 950–1000, 1030, 1050–1100, 1120–1130, 1120–1200, 1200–1300, 1300–1350, and 1450 cm−1 were significantly higher in infiltrative glioma cells than in normal astrocytes. In brain tissue analysis, the spectra at 1030, 1050–1100, and 1200–1300 cm−1 were significantly higher in infiltrative glioma tissues than in normal brain tissues. These spectra reflect the structures of proteins, lipids, and DNA content. The sensitivity and specificity to predict glioma cells by distinguishing normal cells were 98.3% and 75.0%, respectively. Principal component analysis elucidated the significance of spectral difference between tumor tissues and normal tissues. It is possible to distinguish invasive tumors from normal tissues by using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:25247190

  8. 31 CFR 358.8 - Are there fees for the conversion of bearer corpora or detached bearer coupons?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... bearer corpora or detached bearer coupons? 358.8 Section 358.8 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY CONVERSION OF BEARER CORPORA AND DETACHED BEARER COUPONS § 358.8 Are there fees for the conversion of bearer corpora or detached bearer coupons? We do not charge...

  9. High-grade glioma formation results from postnatal pten loss or mutant epidermal growth factor receptor expression in a transgenic mouse glioma model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingxia; Clarke, Laura; Scheidenhelm, Danielle K; Qian, Baoping; Tong, Amanda; Sabha, Nesrin; Karim, Zia; Bock, Nicholas A; Reti, Robert; Swoboda, Rolf; Purev, Enkhtsetseg; Lavoie, Jean-Francois; Bajenaru, M Livia; Shannon, Patrick; Herlyn, Dorothee; Kaplan, David; Henkelman, R Mark; Gutmann, David H; Guha, Abhijit

    2006-08-01

    High-grade gliomas are devastating brain tumors associated with a mean survival of <50 weeks. Two of the most common genetic changes observed in these tumors are overexpression/mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) vIII and loss of PTEN/MMAC1 expression. To determine whether somatically acquired EGFRvIII expression or Pten loss accelerates high-grade glioma development, we used a previously characterized RasB8 glioma-prone mouse strain, in which these specific genetic changes were focally introduced at 4 weeks of age. We show that both postnatal EGFRvIII expression and Pten inactivation in RasB8 mice potentiate high-grade glioma development. Moreover, we observe a concordant loss of Pten and EGFR overexpression in nearly all high-grade gliomas induced by either EGFRvIII introduction or Pten inactivation. This novel preclinical model of high-grade glioma will be useful in evaluating brain tumor therapies targeted to the pathways specifically dysregulated by EGFR expression or Pten loss.

  10. 31 CFR 358.3 - Are there any bearer corpora or detached bearer coupons that are not eligible for conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are there any bearer corpora or... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY CONVERSION OF BEARER CORPORA AND DETACHED BEARER COUPONS § 358.3 Are there any bearer corpora or detached bearer coupons that are not eligible...

  11. Enhanced immunity in a mouse model of malignant glioma is mediated by a therapeutic ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Lussier, Danielle M; Woolf, Eric C; Johnson, John L; Brooks, Kenneth S; Blattman, Joseph N; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2016-05-13

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a highly aggressive brain tumor with a poor prognosis, and advances in treatment have led to only marginal increases in overall survival. We and others have shown previously that the therapeutic ketogenic diet (KD) prolongs survival in mouse models of glioma, explained by both direct tumor growth inhibition and suppression of pro-inflammatory microenvironment conditions. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of the KD on the glioma reactive immune response. The GL261-Luc2 intracranial mouse model of glioma was used to investigate the effects of the KD on the tumor-specific immune response. Tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells, CD4+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of immune inhibitory receptors cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) on CD8+ T cells were also analyzed by flow cytometry. Analysis of intracellular cytokine production was used to determine production of IFN, IL-2 and IFN- in tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T and natural killer (NK) cells and IL-10 production by T regulatory cells. We demonstrate that mice fed the KD had increased tumor-reactive innate and adaptive immune responses, including increased cytokine production and cytolysis via tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells. Additionally, we saw that mice maintained on the KD had increased CD4 infiltration, while T regulatory cell numbers stayed consistent. Lastly, mice fed the KD had a significant reduction in immune inhibitory receptor expression as well as decreased inhibitory ligand expression on glioma cells. The KD may work in part as an immune adjuvant, boosting tumor-reactive immune responses in the microenvironment by alleviating immune suppression. This evidence suggests that the KD increases tumor-reactive immune responses, and may have implications in combinational treatment approaches.

  12. ELTD1, an effective anti-angiogenic target for gliomas: preclinical assessment in mouse GL261 and human G55 xenograft glioma models.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jadith; Pody, Richard; Coutinho de Souza, Patricia; Evans, Blake; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Mallory, Samantha; Njoku, Charity; Dong, Yunzhou; Chen, Hong; Dong, Jiali; Lerner, Megan; Mian, Osamah; Tummala, Sai; Battiste, James; Fung, Kar-Ming; Wren, Jonathan D; Towner, Rheal A

    2017-02-01

    Despite current therapies, glioblastoma is a devastating cancer, and validation of effective biomarkers for it will enable better diagnosis and therapeutic intervention for this disease. We recently discovered a new biomarker for high-grade gliomas, ELTD1 (epidermal growth factor, latrophilin, and 7 transmembrane domain-containing protein 1 on chromosome 1) via bioinformatics, and validated that ELTD1 protein levels are significantly higher in human and rodent gliomas. The focus of this study was to assess the effect on tumor growth of an antibody against ELTD1 in orthotopic, GL261, and G55 xenograft glioma models. The effect of anti-ELTD1 antibody therapy was assessed by animal survival, MRI measured tumor volumes, MR angiography, MR perfusion imaging, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) characterization of microvessel density in mouse glioma models. Comparative treatments included anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and anti-c-Met antibody therapies, compared with untreated controls. Tumor volume and survival data in this study show that antibodies against ELTD1 inhibit glioma growth just as effectively or even more so compared with other therapeutic targets studied, including anti-VEGF antibody therapy. Untreated GL261 or G55 tumors were found to have significantly higher ELTD1 levels (IHC) compared with contralateral normal brain. The anti-angiogenic effect of ELTD1 antibody therapy was observed in assessment of microvessel density, as well as from MR angiography and perfusion measurements, which indicated that anti-ELTD1 antibody therapy significantly decreased vascularization compared with untreated controls. Either as a single therapy or in conjunction with other therapeutic approaches, anti-ELTD1 antibodies could be a valuable new clinical anti-angiogenic therapeutic for high-grade gliomas.

  13. Impaired orthotopic glioma growth and vascularization in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Daniel; Ganey, Nowel; Banasiak, Magdalena; Laporte, Vincent; Patel, Nikunj; Mullan, Myles; Murphy, Susan F.; Yee, Gi-Taek; Bachmeier, Corbin; Ganey, Christopher; Beaulieu-Abdelahad, David; Mathura, Venkatarajan S; Brem, Steven; Mullan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the aging population and is characterized pathologically by the progressive intracerebral accumulation of Aβ peptides and neurofibrillary tangles. The level of proangiogenic growth factors and inflammatory mediators with proangiogenic activity is known to be elevated in AD brains which has led to the supposition that the cerebrovasculature of AD patients is in a proangiogenic state. However, angiogenesis depends on the balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors and the brains of AD patients also show an accumulation of endostatin and Aβ peptides which have been shown to be antiangiogenic. In order to determine whether angiogenesis is compromised in the brains of two transgenic mouse models of AD overproducing Aβ peptides (Tg APPsw and Tg PS1/APPsw mice), we assessed the growth and vascularization of orthotopically implanted murine gliomas since they require a high degree of angiogenesis to sustain their growth. Our data reveal that intracranial tumor growth and angiogenesis is significantly reduced in Tg APPsw and Tg PS1/APPsw mice compared to their wild-type littermates. In addition, we show that Aβ inhibits the angiogenesis stimulated by glioma cells when co-cultured with human brain microvascular cells on a matrigel layer. Altogether our data suggest that the brain of transgenic mouse models of AD does not constitute a favorable environment to support neoangiogenesis and may explain why vascular insults synergistically precipitate the cognitive presentation of AD. PMID:20739545

  14. Study of the biodistribution of fluorescein in glioma-infiltrated mouse brain and histopathological correlation of intraoperative findings in high-grade gliomas resected under fluorescein fluorescence guidance.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Roberto Jose; Dios, Roberto Rey; Hattab, Eyas M; Burrell, Kelly; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Sabha, Nesrin; Hawkins, Cynthia; Zadeh, Gelareh; Rutka, James T; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2015-06-01

    Intravenous fluorescein sodium has been used during resection of high-grade gliomas to help the surgeon visualize tumor margins. Several studies have reported improved rates of gross-total resection (GTR) using high doses of fluorescein sodium under white light. The recent introduction of a fluorescein-specific camera that allows for high-quality intraoperative imaging and use of very low dose fluorescein has drawn new attention to this fluorophore. However, the ability of fluorescein to specifically stain glioma cells is not yet well understood. The authors designed an in vitro model to assess fluorescein uptake in normal human astrocytes and U251 malignant glioma cells. An in vivo experiment was also subsequently designed to study fluorescein uptake by intracranial U87 malignant glioma xenografts in male nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. A genetically induced mouse glioma model was used to adjust for the possible confounding effect of an inflammatory response in the xenograft model. To assess the intraoperative application of this technology, the authors prospectively enrolled 12 patients who underwent fluorescein-guided resection of their high-grade gliomas using low-dose intravenous fluorescein and a microscope-integrated fluorescence module. Intraoperative fluorescent and nonfluorescent specimens at the tumor margins were randomly analyzed for histopathological correlation. The in vitro and in vivo models suggest that fluorescein demarcation of glioma-invaded brain is the result of distribution of fluorescein into the extracellular space, most likely as a result of an abnormal blood-brain barrier. Glioblastoma tumor cell-specific uptake of fluorescein was not observed, and tumor cells appeared to mostly exclude fluorescein. For the 12 patients who underwent resection of their high-grade gliomas, the histopathological analysis of the resected specimens at the tumor margin confirmed the intraoperative fluorescent findings. Fluorescein

  15. Synergistic Antivascular and Antitumor Efficacy with Combined Cediranib and SC6889 in Intracranial Mouse Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Merryl R.; Kukino, Ayaka; Tran, Huong; Schabel, Matthias C.; Springer, Charles S.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Woltjer, Randall L.; Pike, Martin M.

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis remains extremely poor for malignant glioma. Targeted therapeutic approaches, including single agent anti-angiogenic and proteasome inhibition strategies, have not resulted in sustained anti-glioma clinical efficacy. We tested the anti-glioma efficacy of the anti-angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor cediranib and the novel proteasome inhibitor SC68896, in combination and as single agents. To assess anti-angiogenic effects and evaluate efficacy we employed 4C8 intracranial mouse glioma and a dual-bolus perfusion MRI approach to measure Ktrans, relative cerebral blood flow and volume (rCBF, rCBV), and relative mean transit time (rMTT) in combination with anatomical MRI measurements of tumor growth. While single agent cediranib or SC68896 treatment did not alter tumor growth or survival, combined cediranib/SC68896 significantly delayed tumor growth and increased median survival by 2-fold, compared to untreated. This was accompanied by substantially increased tumor necrosis in the cediranib/SC68896 group (p<0.01), not observed with single agent treatments. Mean vessel density was significantly lower, and mean vessel lumen area was significantly higher, for the combined cediranib/SC68896 group versus untreated. Consistent with our previous findings, cediranib alone did not significantly alter mean tumor rCBF, rCBV, rMTT, or Ktrans. In contrast, SC68896 reduced rCBF in comparison to untreated, but without concomitant reductions in rCBV, rMTT, or Ktrans. Importantly, combined cediranib/SC68896 substantially reduced rCBF, rCBV. rMTT, and Ktrans. A novel analysis of Ktrans/rCBV suggests that changes in Ktrans with time and/or treatment are related to altered total vascular surface area. The data suggest that combined cediranib/SC68896 induced potent anti-angiogenic effects, resulting in increased vascular efficiency and reduced extravasation, consistent with a process of vascular normalization. The study represents the first demonstration that the

  16. 31 CFR 358.5 - Which bearer corpora or detached bearer coupons are eligible for conversion to non-transferable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Which bearer corpora or detached... CORPORA AND DETACHED BEARER COUPONS § 358.5 Which bearer corpora or detached bearer coupons are eligible... associated with the corpus are not submitted with the corpus, the corpus will be converted to a...

  17. 31 CFR 358.4 - Which bearer corpora or detached bearer coupons are eligible for conversion to transferable BECCS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Which bearer corpora or detached... CORPORA AND DETACHED BEARER COUPONS § 358.4 Which bearer corpora or detached bearer coupons are eligible for conversion to transferable BECCS or CUBES securities? (a) For a callable corpus to be eligible...

  18. Toward Distinguishing Recurrent Tumor From Radiation Necrosis: DWI and MTC in a Gamma Knife–Irradiated Mouse Glioma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Torres, Carlos J.; Engelbach, John A.; Cates, Jeremy; Thotala, Dinesh; Yuan, Liya; Schmidt, Robert E.; Rich, Keith M.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Accurate noninvasive diagnosis is vital for effective treatment planning. Presently, standard anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is incapable of differentiating recurring tumor from delayed radiation injury, as both lesions are hyperintense in both postcontrast T1- and T2-weighted images. Further studies are therefore necessary to identify an MRI paradigm that can differentially diagnose these pathologies. Mouse glioma and radiation injury models provide a powerful platform for this purpose. Methods and Materials: Two MRI contrasts that are widely used in the clinic were chosen for application to a glioma/radiation-injury model: diffusion weighted imaging, from which the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is obtained, and magnetization transfer contrast, from which the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) is obtained. These metrics were evaluated longitudinally, first in each lesion type alone–glioma versus irradiation – and then in a combined irradiated glioma model. Results: MTR was found to be consistently decreased in all lesions compared to nonlesion brain tissue (contralateral hemisphere), with limited specificity between lesion types. In contrast, ADC, though less sensitive to the presence of pathology, was increased in radiation injury and decreased in tumors. In the irradiated glioma model, ADC also increased immediately after irradiation, but decreased as the tumor regrew. Conclusions: ADC is a better metric than MTR for differentiating glioma from radiation injury. However, MTR was more sensitive to both tumor and radiation injury than ADC, suggesting a possible role in detecting lesions that do not enhance strongly on T1-weighted images.

  19. [Establishment and characterization of dual-color fluorescence nude mouse models of glioma].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinshi; Lu, Zhaohui; Fei, Xifeng; Dai, Xingliang; Wu, Jinding; Wan, Yi; Wang, Zhimin; Wang, Aidong; Dong, Jun; Lan, Qing; Huang, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    To establish red-green dual-color fluorescence glioma model in nude mice and to explore its practical values. CM-DiI-stained rat glioma C6 cells (C6-CM- DiI cells) expressing red fluorescence were inoculated into the brain of athymic nude mice expressing green fluorescence protein (NC-C57BL/6J-EGFP). Then the whole-body dual-color fluorescence imaging was detected dynamically. Finally whole brains of the tumor-bearing mice were removed and 5 µm thick serial frozen slices were made. Light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were performed to observe the transplanted tumor tissue structure and fluorescent cells. Tumor mass with red fluorescence increased gradually under continuous in-vivo fluorescence imaging monitoring. Under the fluorescence microscope, cells with red, green and yellow fluorescence were observed in the frozen sections of transplanted tumor tissue and the mutual structural relationship among them could be defined. The tumor cells migration, implantation and cell fusion between transplanted tumor cells and host cells could be observed. It could be distinguished according to the fluorescence, that blood vessels of tumor-origin displayed red fluorescence, blood vessels of host-origin displayed green fluorescence and mosaic blood vessels appeared yellow fluorescence. It was depicted that host innate astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in the microenvironment at the tumor periphery could be activated and dedifferentiated into nestin-positive cells. In contrast to traditional animal model, the dual-color fluorescence imaging of nude mouse models of glioma possesses enormous advantages in investigating tumor mass in-vivo fluorescence imaging, tumor cells migration and metastasis, tumor angiogenesis and reactive activation of host innate cells in the microenvironment at tumor periphery, thus, has highly practical application value.

  20. MNK Inhibition Disrupts Mesenchymal Glioma Stem Cells and Prolongs Survival in a Mouse Model of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jonathan B; Eckerdt, Frank D; Alley, Kristen; Magnusson, Lisa P; Hussain, Hridi; Bi, Yingtao; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Clymer, Jessica; Alvarez, Angel A; Goldman, Stewart; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Nakano, Ichiro; Horbinski, Craig; Davuluri, Ramana V; James, C David; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme remains the deadliest malignant brain tumor, with glioma stem cells (GSC) contributing to treatment resistance and tumor recurrence. We have identified MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK) as potential targets for the GSC population in glioblastoma multiforme. Isoform-level subtyping using The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed that both MNK genes (MKNK1 and MKNK2) are upregulated in mesenchymal glioblastoma multiforme as compared with other subtypes. Expression of MKNK1 is associated with increased glioma grade and correlated with the mesenchymal GSC marker, CD44, and coexpression of MKNK1 and CD44 predicts poor survival in glioblastoma multiforme. In established and patient-derived cell lines, pharmacologic MNK inhibition using LY2801653 (merestinib) inhibited phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E, a crucial effector for MNK-induced mRNA translation in cancer cells and a marker of transformation. Importantly, merestinib inhibited growth of GSCs grown as neurospheres as determined by extreme limiting dilution analysis. When the effects of merestinib were assessed in vivo using an intracranial xenograft mouse model, improved overall survival was observed in merestinib-treated mice. Taken together, these data provide strong preclinical evidence that pharmacologic MNK inhibition targets mesenchymal glioblastoma multiforme and its GSC population. These findings raise the possibility of MNK inhibition as a viable therapeutic approach to target the mesenchymal subtype of glioblastoma multiforme. Mol Cancer Res; 14(10); 984-93. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. 31 CFR 358.6 - What is the procedure for converting bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to book-entry?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to book-entry? 358.6 Section 358.6 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY CONVERSION OF BEARER CORPORA AND DETACHED BEARER COUPONS § 358.6 What is the procedure for converting bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to...

  2. 31 CFR 358.6 - What is the procedure for converting bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to book-entry?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to book-entry? 358.6 Section 358.6 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY CONVERSION OF BEARER CORPORA AND DETACHED BEARER COUPONS § 358.6 What is the procedure for converting bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to book-entry...

  3. Early detection of human glioma sphere xenografts in mouse brain using diffusion MRI at 14.1 T.

    PubMed

    Porcari, P; Hegi, M E; Lei, H; Hamou, M-F; Vassallo, I; Capuani, S; Gruetter, R; Mlynarik, V

    2016-11-01

    Glioma models have provided important insights into human brain cancers. Among the investigative tools, MRI has allowed their characterization and diagnosis. In this study, we investigated whether diffusion MRI might be a useful technique for early detection and characterization of slow-growing and diffuse infiltrative gliomas, such as the proposed new models, LN-2669GS and LN-2540GS glioma sphere xenografts. Tumours grown in these models are not visible in conventional T2 -weighted or contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted MRI at 14.1 T. Diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging protocols were optimized for contrast by exploring long diffusion times sensitive for probing the microstructural alterations induced in the normal brain by the slow infiltration of glioma sphere cells. Compared with T2 -weighted images, tumours were properly identified in their early stage of growth using diffusion MRI, and confirmed by localized proton MR spectroscopy as well as immunohistochemistry. The first evidence of tumour presence was revealed for both glioma sphere xenograft models three months after tumour implantation, while no necrosis, oedema or haemorrhage were detected either by MRI or by histology. Moreover, different values of diffusion indices, such as mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy, were obtained in tumours grown from LN-2669GS and LN-2540GS glioma sphere lines. These observations highlighted diverse tumour microstructures for both xenograft models, which were reflected in histology. This study demonstrates the ability of diffusion MRI techniques to identify and investigate early stages of slow-growing, invasive tumours in the mouse brain, thus providing a potential imaging biomarker for early detection of tumours in humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. 31 CFR 358.7 - Where do I send my bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to be converted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... detached bearer coupons to be converted to: Bureau of the Fiscal Service, Division of Customer Service, P... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY CONVERSION OF BEARER CORPORA AND DETACHED BEARER COUPONS §...

  5. Characterisation of a new mouse monoclonal antibody (ONS-M21) reactive with both medulloblastomas and gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Moriuchi, S.; Shimizu, K.; Miyao, Y.; Hayakawa, T.

    1993-01-01

    We developed an IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody (ONS-M21) directed against a cell surface antigen of medulloblastomas and gliomas in immunisation of mice with the ONS-76 medulloblastoma cell line. The antibody specifically reacted with medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours (SPNETs) and gliomas, but not with other neuroectodermally derived tumours (neuroblastoma and melanoma) or with other kinds of tumours (meningioma, neurinoma, leukaemia, and small cell lung cancer). No reactivity was identified with normal body tissues, including peripheral blood cells. Characterisation of the ONS-M21 antigen showed that it was a trypsin-sensitive glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 80 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The pattern of reactivity and the biochemical properties of this antigen were different from those of other markers of medulloblastoma. These results indicate that ONS-M21 detects a new tumour-associated cell surface antigen specifically expressed by medulloblastomas, SPNETs, and gliomas. This is the first report that medulloblastomas may share common cell surface antigens with gliomas, although most studies have concluded that medulloblastoma has a predominantly neuronal phenotype. The lack of reactivity with normal tissue implies that ONS-M21 has potential applications as both a diagnostic tool and a therapeutic agent. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8217597

  6. 3-D imaging mass spectrometry of protein distributions in mouse Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1)-associated optic glioma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David M G; Van de Plas, Raf; Rose, Kristie L; Hill, Salisha; Schey, Kevin L; Solga, Anne C; Gutmann, David H; Caprioli, Richard M

    2016-10-21

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common neurogenetic disorder, in which affected individuals develop tumors of the nervous system. Children with NF1 are particularly prone to brain tumors (gliomas) involving the optic pathway that can result in impaired vision. Since tumor formation and expansion requires a cooperative tumor microenvironment, it is important to identify the cellular and acellular components associated with glioma development and growth. In this study, we used 3-D matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) to measure the distributions of multiple molecular species throughout optic nerve tissue in mice with and without glioma, and to explore their spatial relationships within the 3-D volume of the optic nerve and chiasm. 3-D IMS studies often involve extensive workflows due to the high volume of sections required to generate high quality 3-D images. Herein, we present a workflow for 3-D data acquisition and volume reconstruction using mouse optic nerve tissue. The resulting 3-D IMS data yield both molecular similarities and differences between glioma-bearing and wild-type (WT) tissues, including protein distributions localizing to different anatomical subregions.

  7. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  8. Potent tumor tropism of induced pluripotent stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells in the mouse intracerebral glioma model.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Tomohiro; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Amano, Shinji; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Although neural and mesenchymal stem cells have been well-known to have a strong glioma tropism, this activity in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has not yet been fully studied. In the present study, we tested tumor tropic activity of mouse iPSCs and neural stem cells derived from the iPSC (iPS-NSCs) using in vitro Matrigel invasion chamber assay and in vivo mouse intracranial tumor model. Both iPSC and iPS-NSC had a similar potent in vitro tropism for glioma conditioned media. The migrated iPSCs to the gliomas kept expressing Nanog-GFP gene, suggesting no neuronal or glial differentiation. iPSCs or iPS-NSCs labeled with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine were intracranially implanted in the contralateral hemisphere to the GL261 glioma cell implantation in the allogeneic C57BL/6 mouse. Active migration of both stem cells was observed 7 days after implantation. Again, the iPSCs located in the tumor area expressed Nanog-GFP gene, suggesting that the migrated cells were still iPSCs. These findings demonstrated that both iPSCs and iPS-NSCs had potent glioma tropism and could be candidates as vehicles in stem cell-based glioma therapy.

  9. Dynamics of Circulating γδ T Cell Activity in an Immunocompetent Mouse Model of High-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Rebecca; Jadus, Martin R.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Cloud, Gretchen A.; Hoa, Neil T.; Langford, Catherine P.; Lopez, Richard D.; Harkins, Lualhati E.; Lamb Jr., Lawrence S.

    2015-01-01

    Human γδ T cells are potent effectors against glioma cell lines in vitro and in human/mouse xenograft models of glioblastoma, however, this effect has not been investigated in an immunocompetent mouse model. In this report, we established GL261 intracranial gliomas in syngeneic WT C57BL/6 mice and measured circulating γδ T cell count, phenotype, Vγ/Vδ repertoire, tumor histopathology, NKG2D ligands expression, and T cell invasion at day 10–12 post-injection and at end stage. Circulating γδ T cells transiently increased and upregulated Annexin V expression at post-tumor day 10–12 followed by a dramatic decline in γδ T cell count at end stage. T cell receptor repertoire showed no changes in Vγ1, Vγ4, Vγ7 or Vδ1 subsets from controls at post-tumor day 10–12 or at end stage except for an end-stage increase in the Vδ4 population. Approximately 12% of γδ T cells produced IFN-γ. IL-17 and IL-4 producing γδ T cells were not detected. Tumor progression was the same in TCRδ-/- C57BL/6 mice as that observed in WT mice, suggesting that γδ T cells exerted neither a regulatory nor a sustainable cytotoxic effect on the tumor. WT mice that received an intracranial injection of γδ T cells 15m following tumor placement showed evidence of local tumor growth inhibition but this was insufficient to confer a survival advantage over untreated controls. Taken together, our findings suggest that an early nonspecific proliferation of γδ T cells followed by their depletion occurs in mice implanted with syngeneic GL261 gliomas. The mechanism by which γδ T cell expansion occurs remains a subject for further investigation of the mechanisms responsible for this immune response in the setting of high-grade glioma. PMID:25955158

  10. Monitoring of tumor growth and post-irradiation recurrence in a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Caretti, Viola; Zondervan, Ilse; Meijer, Dimphna H; Idema, Sander; Vos, Wim; Hamans, Bob; Bugiani, Marianna; Hulleman, Esther; Wesseling, Pieter; Vandertop, W Peter; Noske, David P; Kaspers, Gertjan; Molthoff, Carla F M; Wurdinger, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a fatal malignancy because of its diffuse infiltrative growth pattern. Translational research suffers from the lack of a representative DIPG animal model. Hence, human E98 glioma cells were stereotactically injected into the pons of nude mice. The E98 DIPG tumors presented a strikingly similar histhopathology to autopsy material of a DIPG patient, including diffuse and perivascular growth, brainstem- and supratentorial invasiveness and leptomeningeal growth. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was effectively employed to image the E98 DIPG tumor. [(18) F] 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18) F]fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was applied to assess the subcutaneous (s.c.) E98 tumor proliferation status but no orthotopic DIPG activity could be visualized. Next, E98 cells were cultured in vitro and engineered to express firefly luciferase and mCherry (E98-Fluc-mCherry). These cultured E98-Fluc-mCherry cells developed focal pontine glioma when injected into the pons directly. However, the diffuse E98 DIPG infiltrative phenotype was restored when cells were injected into the pons immediately after an intermediate s.c. passage. The diffuse E98-Fluc-mCherry model was subsequently used to test escalating doses of irradiation, applying the bioluminescent Fluc signal to monitor tumor recurrence over time. Altogether, we here describe an accurate DIPG mouse model that can be of clinical relevance for testing experimental therapeutics in vivo.

  11. Molecular susceptibility weighted imaging of the glioma rim in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Blasiak, Barbara; Landry, James; Tyson, Randy; Sharp, Jonathan; Iqbal, Umar; Abulrob, Abedelnasser; Rushforth, David; Matyas, John; Ponjevic, Dragana; Sutherland, Garnette R; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2014-04-15

    Glioma is the most common and most difficult to treat brain cancer. Despite many efforts treatment, efficacy remains low. As neurosurgical removal is the standard procedure for glioma, a method, allowing for both early detection and exact determination of the location, size and extent of the tumor, could improve a patient's positive response to therapy. We propose application of susceptibility weighted molecular magnetic resonance imaging using, targeted contrast agents, based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, for imaging of the, glioma rim, namely brain-tumor interface. Iron oxide attached to the targeted cells increases, susceptibility differences at the boundary between tumor and normal tissue, providing the opportunity, to utilize susceptibility weighted imaging for improved tumor delineation. We investigated potential, enhancement of the tumor-brain contrast, including tumor core and rim when using susceptibility, weighted MRI for molecular imaging of glioma. There were significant differences in contrast-to-noise ratio before, 12 and 120min after contrast, agent injection between standard gradient echo pulse sequence and susceptibility weighted molecular, magnetic resonance imaging for the core-brain, tumor rim-core and tumor rim-brain areas. Currently, the most common MRI contrast agent used for glioma diagnosis is a non-specific, gadolinium-based agent providing T1-weighted enhancement. Susceptibility-weighted magnetic, resonance imaging is much less efficient when no targeted superparamagnetic contrast agents are, used. The improved determination of glioma extent provided by SWI offers an important new tool for, diagnosis and surgical planning. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DICER governs characteristics of glioma stem cells and the resulting tumors in xenograft mouse models of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Alamsahebpour, Amir; Burrell, Kelly; Li, Mira; Karabork, Merve; Ekinci, Can; Koch, Elizabeth; Solaroglu, Ihsan; Chang, Jeffery T.; Wouters, Bradly; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-01-01

    The RNAse III endonuclease DICER is a key regulator of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and is frequently decreased in a variety of malignancies. We characterized the role of DICER in glioblastoma (GB), specifically demonstrating its effects on the ability of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) to form tumors in a mouse model of GB. DICER silencing in GSCs reduced their stem cell characteristics, while tumors arising from these cells were more aggressive, larger in volume, and displayed a higher proliferation index and lineage differentiation. The resulting tumors, however, were more sensitive to radiation treatment. Our results demonstrate that DICER silencing enhances the tumorigenic potential of GSCs, providing a platform for analysis of specific relevant miRNAs and development of potentially novel therapies against GB. PMID:27421140

  13. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Eric C.; Curley, Kara L.; Liu, Qingwei; Turner, Gregory H.; Charlton, Julie A.; Preul, Mark C.; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD) may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma. Results Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4. Conclusions The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:26083629

  14. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Eric C; Curley, Kara L; Liu, Qingwei; Turner, Gregory H; Charlton, Julie A; Preul, Mark C; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2015-01-01

    The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD) may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood. To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma. Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4. The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas.

  15. 31 CFR 358.7 - Where do I send my bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to be converted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... detached bearer coupons to be converted to: Bureau of the Public Debt, Division of Customer Service, P. O... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC...

  16. 31 CFR 358.7 - Where do I send my bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to be converted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... detached bearer coupons to be converted to: Bureau of the Public Debt, Division of Customer Service, P. O... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC...

  17. 31 CFR 358.7 - Where do I send my bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to be converted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... detached bearer coupons to be converted to: Bureau of the Public Debt, Division of Customer Service, P. O... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE...

  18. 31 CFR 358.7 - Where do I send my bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to be converted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... detached bearer coupons to be converted to: Bureau of the Public Debt, Division of Customer Service, P. O... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE...

  19. Low-fluence rate, long duration photodynamic therapy in glioma mouse model using organic light emitting diode (OLED).

    PubMed

    Guo, Han-Wen; Lin, Liang-Ting; Chen, Po-Hsiung; Ho, Meng-Huan; Huang, Wan-Ting; Lee, Yi-Jang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Hsieh, Yei-San; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Wang, Hsing-Wen

    2015-09-01

    The treatment of gliomas poses significant clinical challenges due to resistance to chemo and radiation therapy, and treatment side effects. Metronomic photodynamic therapy (mPDT), which involves long treatment time with low fluence rate and multiple or continuous photosensitizer administrations, has potential in treating gliomas without threatening the quality of life and has been demonstrated in rats and rabbits. mPDT in small animals such as mouse is not yet shown due to lack of lightweight illumination device for long periods of time. We presented low fluence rate (3mW/cm(2)) and long duration (3.7h) PDT treatment in a nude mouse model of human glioblastoma by using organic light emitting diode (OLED) with single dose of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration as photosensitizer. Tumor volume was measured using bioluminescent imaging and the animal survival time was recorded. Additionally, we have performed limited PDT dosimetric measurements of PpIX fluorescence, tumor oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration in 3 PDT mice. For animals with similar pre- and immediate post-light tumor volume, the averaged total survival time of PDT mice is 40.5±9.2 days that are significantly longer than the control mice (26.0±2.0 days). The post-light survival time of PDT mice is 14.3±5.9 days that are marginally longer than the control group (8.0±0.0 days). In the dosimetric measurement, good maintenance of PpIX fluorescence in one PDT mouse has relatively improved survival time, compared with the other two PDT mice (i.e., 24 days versus 16 and 17 days). This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of low-fluence rate and long treatment time of ALA-PDT using OLED without anesthetization of animals. The response of PDT treated animals with similar pre- and post-light tumor volume is encouraging to show a longer survival time than the controls. The dosimetric indices such as photosensitizer fluorescence and tissue oxygenation would help understand the possible treatment

  20. Induction of the fibrinolytic system by cartilage extract mediates its antiangiogenic effect in mouse glioma.

    PubMed

    Simard, Bryan; Bouamrani, Ali; Jourdes, Peggy; Pernod, Gilles; Dimitriadou, Violetta; Berger, François

    2011-07-01

    Both the antiangiogenic and antitumoral activity of shark cartilage extracts (SCE) have been demonstrated in animal models and clinical trials. Studies reported that SCE induces the expression of tissue plasminogen activator gene (PLAT) in endothelial cells and increases the activity of the protein (t-PA) in vitro. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the crucial role of t-PA induction in the antiangiogenic and antitumor activity of SCE in experimental glioma. This study showed antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects of SCE in three mice glioma models (C6, HGD and GL26). Histological examination suggested perivascular proteolysis and edema as well as important intratumoral necrosis, which artefactually increased the tumor volume at high doses. Thus, the antiangiogenic effect of SCE correlated with the presence of t-PA and angiostatin in degenerating vessels. Functional in vivo experiments were conducted to modulate the plasminogen pathway. No antiangiogenic effect was observed on tumors overexpressing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Moreover, therapeutical effects were neutralized in mice that were cotreated with ε-aminocaproic acid (EACA, 120 mg/kg p.o.), an inhibitor that blocks the high-affinity lysine binding sites of both plasminogen and plasmin. In contrast, cotreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 7,5mg/kg i.p.), a sulfhydril donor that reduces plasmin into angiostatin or other antiangiogenic fragments, increased the benefit of SCE on mice survival. In subcutaneous models, NAC prevented the increase in tumor volume caused by high doses of cartilage extract. In conclusion, this study indicates that induction of t-PA by shark cartilage extract plays an essential role in its antiangiogenic activity, but that control of excessive proteolysis by a plasmin reductor could prevent edema and uncover the full benefit of shark cartilage extract in the treatment of intracranial tumors.

  1. Magnetic Targeting of Novel Heparinized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Evaluated in a 9L-glioma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Shin, Meong Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A novel PEGylated and heparinized magnetic iron oxide nano-platform (DNPH) was synthesized for simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and tumor targeting. Methods Starch-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (“D”) were crosslinked, aminated (DN) and then simultaneously PEGylated and heparinized with different feed ratios of PEG and heparin (DNPH1-4). DNPH products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The magentic targeting of DNPH3, with appropriate amounts of conjugated PEG and heparin, in a mouse 9L-glioma subcutaneous tumor model was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/electron spin resonance (ESR). Results DNPH3 showed long circulating properties in vivo (half-life > 8 h, more than 60-fold longer than that of parent D) and low reticuloendothelial system (RES) recognition in liver and spleen. Protamine, a model cationic protein, was efficiently loaded onto DNPH3 with a maxium loading content of 26.4 μg/mg Fe. Magnetic capture of DNPH3 in tumor site with optimized conditions (I.D. of 12 mg/kg, targeting time of 45 min) was up to 29.42 μg Fe/g tissue (12.26% I.D./g tissue). Conclusion DNPH3 showed the potential to be used as a platform for cationic proteins for simultaneous tumor targeting and imaging. PMID:24065589

  2. Metallothinein 1E Enhances Glioma Invasion through Modulation Matrix Metalloproteinases-2 and 9 in U87MG Mouse Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hyuk; Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Li, Chun-Hao; Kim, In Young; Jang, Woo-Youl

    2016-01-01

    Malignant glioma cells invading surrounding normal brain are inoperable and resistant to radio- and chemotherapy, and eventually lead to tumor regrowth. Identification of genes related to motility is important for understanding the molecular biological behavior of invasive gliomas. According to our previous studies, Metallothionein 1E (MT1E) was identified to enhance migration of human malignant glioma cells. The purpose of this study was to confirm that MT1E could modulate glioma invasion in vivo. Firstly we established 2 cell lines; MTS23, overexpressed by MT1E complementary DNA construct and pV12 as control. The expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, -9 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 were increased in MTS23 compared with pV12. Furthermore it was confirmed that MT1E could modulate MMPs secretion and translocation of NFkB p50 and B-cell lymphoma-3 through small interfering ribonucleic acid knocked U87MG cells. Then MTS23 and pV12 were injected into intracranial region of 5 week old male nude mouse. After 4 weeks, for brain tissues of these two groups, histological analysis, and immunohistochemical stain of MMP-2, 9 and Nestin were performed. As results, the group injected with MTS23 showed irregular margin and tumor cells infiltrating the surrounding normal brain, while that of pV12 (control) had round and clear margin. And regrowth of tumor cells in MTS23 group was observed in another site apart from tumor cell inoculation. MT1E could enhance tumor proliferation and invasion of malignant glioma through regulation of activation and expression of MMPs. PMID:27847566

  3. Resistance to oncolytic myxoma virus therapy in nf1(-/-)/trp53(-/-) syngeneic mouse glioma models is independent of anti-viral type-I interferon.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Maxwell, Lori; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical studies, oncolytic viral therapy for malignant gliomas has resulted in variable, but underwhelming results in clinical evaluations. Of concern are the low levels of tumour infection and viral replication within the tumour. This discrepancy between the laboratory and the clinic could result from the disparity of xenograft versus syngeneic models in determining in vivo viral infection, replication and treatment efficacy. Here we describe a panel of primary mouse glioma lines derived from Nf1 (+/-) Trp53 (+/-) mice in the C57Bl/6J background for use in the preclinical testing of the oncolytic virus Myxoma (MYXV). These lines show a range of susceptibility to MYXV replication in vitro, but all succumb to viral-mediated cell death. Two of these lines orthotopically grafted produced aggressive gliomas. Intracranial injection of MYXV failed to result in sustained viral replication or treatment efficacy, with minimal tumour infection that was completely resolved by 7 days post-infection. We hypothesized that the stromal production of Type-I interferons (IFNα/β) could explain the resistance seen in these models; however, we found that neither the cell lines in vitro nor the tumours in vivo produce any IFNα/β in response to MYXV infection. To confirm IFNα/β did not play a role in this resistance, we ablated the ability of tumours to respond to IFNα/β via IRF9 knockdown, and generated identical results. Our studies demonstrate that these syngeneic cell lines are relevant preclinical models for testing experimental glioma treatments, and show that IFNα/β is not responsible for the MYXV treatment resistance seen in syngeneic glioma models.

  4. The PD-1/B7-H1 Pathway Modulates the Natural Killer Cells versus Mouse Glioma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Wen Jing; Yu, Chun Jiang; Li, Jun Fa; Qu, Yan Ming; Han, Song

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant primary type of brain tumor in adults. There has been increased focus on the immunotherapies to treat GBM patients, the therapeutic value of natural killer (NK) cells is still unknown. Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a major immunological checkpoint that can negatively regulate the T-cell-mediated immune response. We tested the combination of the inhibiting the PD-1/B7H1 pathway with a NK-cell mediated immune response in an orthotopic mouse model of GBM. Methods and Materials Mouse glioma stem cells (GL261GSCs) and mouse NK cells were isolated and identified. A lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay was perfomed to detect the cytotoxicity of NK cells against GL261GSCs. GL261GSCs were intracranially implanted into mice, and the mice were stratified into 3 treatment groups: 1) control, 2) NK cells treatment, and 3) PD-1 inhibited NK cells treatment group. Overall survival was quantified, and animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to determine tumor growth. The brains were harvested after the mice were euthanized, and immunohistochemistry against CD45 and PCNA was performed. Results The mouse NK cells were identified as 90% CD3- NK1.1+CD335+ by flow cytometric analysis. In the LDH assay, the ratios of the damaged GL261GSCs, with the E:T ratios of 2.5:1, 5:1, and 10:1, were as follows: 1) non-inhibited group: 7.42%, 11.31%, and 15.1%, 2) B7H1 inhibited group: 14.75%, 18.25% and 29.1%, 3) PD-1 inhibited group: 15.53%, 19.21% and 29.93%, 4) double inhibited group: 33.24%, 42.86% and 54.91%. In the in vivo experiments, the mice in the PD-1 inhibited NK cells treatment group and IL-2-stimulated-NK cells treatment group displayed a slowest tumor growth (F = 308.5, P<0.01) and a slower tumor growth compared with control group (F = 118.9, P<0.01), respectively. The median survival of the mice in the three groups were as follows: 1) conrol group: 29 days, 2) NK cells treatment group: 35 days (P = 0.0012), 3) PD

  5. Combined molecular MRI and immuno-spin-trapping for in vivo detection of free radicals in orthotopic mouse GL261 gliomas.

    PubMed

    Towner, Rheal A; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; De Souza, Patricia Coutinho; Henry, Leah; Lupu, Florea; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Mason, Ronald P; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E; Ramirez, Dario C

    2013-12-01

    Free radicals play a major role in gliomas. By combining immuno-spin-trapping (IST) and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI), in vivo levels of free radicals were detected within mice bearing orthotopic GL261 gliomas. The nitrone spin trap DMPO (5,5-dimethyl pyrroline N-oxide) was administered prior to injection of an anti-DMPO probe (anti-DMPO antibody covalently bound to a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-Gd (gadolinium)-DTPA (diethylene triamine penta acetic acid)-biotin MRI contrast agent) to trap tumor-associated free radicals. mMRI detected the presence of anti-DMPO adducts by either a significant sustained increase (p<0.001) in MR signal intensity or a significant decrease (p<0.001) in T1 relaxation, measured as %T1 change. In vitro assessment of the anti-DMPO probe indicated a significant decrease (p<0.0001) in T1 relaxation in GL261 cells that were oxidatively stressed with hydrogen peroxide, compared to controls. The biotin moiety of the anti-DMPO probe was targeted with fluorescently-labeled streptavidin to locate the anti-DMPO probe in excised brain tissues. As a negative control a non-specific IgG antibody covalently bound to the albumin-Gd-DTPA-biotin construct was used. DMPO adducts were also confirmed in tumor tissue from animals administered DMPO, compared to non-tumor brain tissue. GL261 gliomas were found to have significantly increased malondialdehyde (MDA) protein adducts (p<0.001) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) (p<0.05) compared to normal mouse brain tissue, indicating increased oxidized lipids and proteins, respectively. Co-localization of the anti-DMPO probe with either 3-NT or 4-hydroxynonenal was also observed. This is the first report regarding the detection of in vivo levels of free radicals from a glioma model.

  6. Digital technologies as truth-bearers in health care.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Ruth; Balmer, Andrew; Brannelly, Petula

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the idea of digital technologies as truth-bearers in health care and argue that devices like SenseCam, which facilitate reflection and memory recall, have a potentially vital role in healthcare situations when questions of veracity are at stake (e.g., when best interest decisions are being made). We discuss the role of digital technologies as truth-bearers in the context of nursing people with dementia, as this is one area of health care in which the topic of truth-telling has been hotly debated. People with dementia have been excluded from research studies and decisions that affect their lives because they are not regarded as truth-bearers-that is, as being capable of giving truthful accounts of their experiences. Also, considerable research has focused on the ethics of lying to and deceiving people with dementia. Given their increasing prominence in healthcare settings, there has been surprisingly little discussion of what role digital technologies might play in relation to these questions of truth and deception. Drawing on theories from science and technology studies (STS), we explore their possible future role in some of the truth-making processes of health care. In particular, we discuss the potential value of constraints on use of SenseCam to support the accounts of people with dementia as part of their care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. CD8+ T cell independent tumor regression induced by Fc-OX40L and therapeutic vaccination in a mouse model of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Katherine A.; Erickson, Jami R.; Johnson, Charles S.; Seiler, Charles E.; Bedi, Jessica; Hu, Peisheng; Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Epstein, Alan L.; Ohlfest, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing number of pre-clinical and clinical trials focused on immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas, the prognosis for this disease remains grim. Although some promising advances have been made, the immune response stimulated as a result of immunotherapeutic protocols has been inefficient at complete tumor elimination, primarily due to our lack of understanding of the necessary effector functions of the immune system. We previously demonstrated that a tumor lysate vaccine/Fc-OX40L therapy is capable of inducing enhanced survival and tumor elimination in the GL261 mouse glioma model. The following experiments were performed to determine the mechanism(s) of action of this therapy that elicits a potent anti-tumor immune response. The evidence subsequently outlined indicates a CD8+ T cell independent and CD4+ T cell, NK cell, and B cell dependent means of prolonged survival. CD8+ T cell independent tumor clearance is surprising considering the current focus of many cancer immunotherapy protocols. These results provide evidence for CD8+ T cell independent means of anti-tumor response and should lead to additional examination of the potential manipulation of this mechanism for future treatment strategies. PMID:24293627

  8. MicroRNA-Attenuated Clone of Virulent Semliki Forest Virus Overcomes Antiviral Type I Interferon in Resistant Mouse CT-2A Glioma.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Miika; Niittykoski, Minna; von und zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Immonen, Arto; Koponen, Susanna; van Geenen, Maartje; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Ylösmäki, Erkko; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Saksela, Kalle; Hinkkanen, Ari

    2015-10-01

    Glioblastoma is a terminal disease with no effective treatment currently available. Among the new therapy candidates are oncolytic viruses capable of selectively replicating in cancer cells, causing tumor lysis and inducing adaptive immune responses against the tumor. However, tumor antiviral responses, primarily mediated by type I interferon (IFN-I), remain a key problem that severely restricts viral replication and oncolysis. We show here that the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) strain SFV4, which causes lethal encephalitis in mice, is able to infect and replicate independent of the IFN-I defense in mouse glioblastoma cells and cell lines originating from primary human glioblastoma patient samples. The ability to tolerate IFN-I was retained in SFV4-miRT124 cells, a derivative cell line of strain SFV4 with a restricted capacity to replicate in neurons due to insertion of target sites for neuronal microRNA 124. The IFN-I tolerance was associated with the viral nsp3-nsp4 gene region and distinct from the genetic loci responsible for SFV neurovirulence. In contrast to the naturally attenuated strain SFV A7(74) and its derivatives, SFV4-miRT124 displayed increased oncolytic potency in CT-2A murine astrocytoma cells and in the human glioblastoma cell lines pretreated with IFN-I. Following a single intraperitoneal injection of SFV4-miRT124 into C57BL/6 mice bearing CT-2A orthotopic gliomas, the virus homed to the brain and was amplified in the tumor, resulting in significant tumor growth inhibition and improved survival. Although progress has been made in development of replicative oncolytic viruses, information regarding their overall therapeutic potency in a clinical setting is still lacking. This could be at least partially dependent on the IFN-I sensitivity of the viruses used. Here, we show that the conditionally replicating SFV4-miRT124 virus shares the IFN-I tolerance of the pathogenic wild-type SFV, thereby allowing efficient targeting of a glioma that is refractory

  9. Pharmacological doses of daily ascorbate protect tumors from radiation damage after a single dose of radiation in an intracranial mouse glioma model.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah V; Castro, M Leticia; Field, Cameron S; Schleich, Nanette; McConnell, Melanie J; Herst, Patries M

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumor environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionizing radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitizing GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here, we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy) of radiation combined with a 1 h exposure to ascorbate (5 mM) sensitized murine glioma GL261 cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy) of whole brain radiation combined with daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg) in an intracranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain 8 days after tumor implantation, a second group received daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8-45) after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumor progression, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumor progression. Tumor progression was faster in tumor-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than in those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumors treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumor microenvironment, which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant, or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant.

  10. Benefit of contralateral hearing aid in adult cochlear implant bearers.

    PubMed

    Bouccara, D; Blanchet, E; Waterlot, P E; Smadja, M; Frachet, B; Meyer, B; Sterkers, O

    2016-06-01

    The present study assessed the interest of a contralateral hearing aid (HA) in adult cochlear implant (CI) bearers. The study recruited 10 French-speaking adult HA bearers with postlingual bilateral hearing loss, fitted for at least 2 years with a unilateral CI after loss of benefit from HA in one ear but continuing to use their contralateral HA: 4 male, 6 female; mean age, 58 years. All had regularly used bilateral HAs prior to CI. Audiometric assessment comprised: (1) individual ear hearing assessment on pure-tone audiometry and speech discrimination; and (2) free-field testing without aid, with CI only, with HA only and with CI plus HA, on pure-tone audiometry and speech discrimination with quiet background and on speech discrimination in noise. Speech discrimination was significantly improved in the bimodal condition (CI plus HA) as compared to CI alone, on all tests. In quiet, discrimination for disyllabic words was>50% in 7 cases with HA alone, in 2 cases with CI alone and in 1 case in with HA+CI. Under 0dB signal-to-noise ratio, discrimination was>50% in 1 case with HA alone, in 3 cases with CI alone and in 6 cases with HA+CI. The present results showed benefit in auditory perception in quiet and in noise with bimodal stimulation. When there is residual hearing in the non-implanted ear, a HA should be fitted; and in progressive bilateral hearing loss, CI should be suggested when HA benefit decreases in one ear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Silver nanoparticles outperform gold nanoparticles in radiosensitizing U251 cells in vitro and in an intracranial mouse model of glioma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peidang; Jin, Haizhen; Guo, Zhirui; Ma, Jun; Zhao, Jing; Li, Dongdong; Wu, Hao; Gu, Ning

    Radiotherapy performs an important function in the treatment of cancer, but resistance of tumor cells to radiation still remains a serious concern. More research on more effective radiosensitizers is urgently needed to overcome such resistance and thereby improve the treatment outcome. The goal of this study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing efficacies of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on glioma at clinically relevant megavoltage energies. Both AuNPs and AgNPs potentiated the in vitro and in vivo antiglioma effects of radiation. AgNPs showed more powerful radiosensitizing ability than AuNPs at the same mass and molar concentrations, leading to a higher rate of apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, the combination of AgNPs with radiation significantly increased the levels of autophagy as compared with AuNPs plus radiation. These findings suggest the potential application of AgNPs as a highly effective nano-radiosensitizer for the treatment of glioma.

  12. Silver nanoparticles outperform gold nanoparticles in radiosensitizing U251 cells in vitro and in an intracranial mouse model of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peidang; Jin, Haizhen; Guo, Zhirui; Ma, Jun; Zhao, Jing; Li, Dongdong; Wu, Hao; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy performs an important function in the treatment of cancer, but resistance of tumor cells to radiation still remains a serious concern. More research on more effective radiosensitizers is urgently needed to overcome such resistance and thereby improve the treatment outcome. The goal of this study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing efficacies of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on glioma at clinically relevant megavoltage energies. Both AuNPs and AgNPs potentiated the in vitro and in vivo antiglioma effects of radiation. AgNPs showed more powerful radiosensitizing ability than AuNPs at the same mass and molar concentrations, leading to a higher rate of apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, the combination of AgNPs with radiation significantly increased the levels of autophagy as compared with AuNPs plus radiation. These findings suggest the potential application of AgNPs as a highly effective nano-radiosensitizer for the treatment of glioma. PMID:27757033

  13. Intravenous administration of retroviral replicating vector, Toca 511, demonstrates therapeutic efficacy in orthotopic immune-competent mouse glioma model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tiffany T; Parab, Shraddha; Burnett, Ryan; Diago, Oscar; Ostertag, Derek; Hofman, Florence M; Espinoza, Fernando Lopez; Martin, Bryan; Ibañez, Carlos E; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Gruber, Harry E; Pertschuk, Daniel; Jolly, Douglas J; Robbins, Joan M

    2015-02-01

    Toca 511 (vocimagene amiretrorepvec), a nonlytic, amphotropic retroviral replicating vector (RRV), encodes and delivers a functionally optimized yeast cytosine deaminase (CD) gene to tumors. In orthotopic glioma models treated with Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) the CD enzyme within infected cells converts 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), resulting in tumor killing. Toca 511, delivered locally either by intratumoral injection or by injection into the resection bed, in combination with subsequent oral extended-release 5-FC (Toca FC), is under clinical investigation in patients with recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG). If feasible, intravenous administration of vectors is less invasive, can easily be repeated if desired, and may be applicable to other tumor types. Here, we present preclinical data that support the development of an intravenous administration protocol. First we show that intravenous administration of Toca 511 in a preclinical model did not lead to widespread or uncontrolled replication of the RVV. No, or low, viral DNA was found in the blood and most of the tissues examined 180 days after Toca 511 administration. We also show that RRV administered intravenously leads to efficient infection and spread of the vector carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-encoding gene (Toca GFP) through tumors in both immune-competent and immune-compromised animal models. However, initial vector localization within the tumor appeared to depend on the mode of administration. Long-term survival was observed in immune-competent mice when Toca 511 was administered intravenously or intracranially in combination with 5-FC treatment, and this combination was well tolerated in the preclinical models. Enhanced survival could also be achieved in animals with preexisting immune response to vector, supporting the potential for repeated administration. On the basis of these and other supporting data, a clinical trial investigating intravenous administration of Toca 511 in

  14. RNA interference targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1α via a novel multifunctional surfactant attenuates glioma growth in an intracranial mouse model.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, David L; Aguirre, Maria T; Ravichandran, Sandhya; Leishman, Lisa L; Berrondo, Claudia; Gamboa, Joseph T; Wang, Libo; King, Rose; Wang, Xuli; Tan, Mingqian; Malamas, Anthony; Lu, Zheng-Rong; Jensen, Randy L

    2015-02-01

    High-grade gliomas are the most common form of adult brain cancer, and patients have a dismal survival rate despite aggressive therapeutic measures. Intratumoral hypoxia is thought to be a main contributor to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis of these tumors. Because hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is the major mediator of hypoxia-regulated cellular control, inhibition of this transcription factor may reduce glioblastoma growth. Using an orthotopic mouse model with U87-LucNeo cells, the authors used RNA interference to knock down HIF-1α in vivo. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) was packaged using a novel multifunctional surfactant, 1-(aminoethyl) iminobis[N-(oleicylcysteinylhistinyl-1-aminoethyl)propionamide] (EHCO), a nucleic acid carrier that facilitates cellular uptake and intracellular release of siRNA. Stereotactic injection was used to deliver siRNA locally through a guide-screw system, and delivery/uptake was verified by imaging of fluorescently labeled siRNA. Osmotic pumps were used for extended siRNA delivery to model a commonly used human intracranial drug-delivery technique, convection-enhanced delivery. Mice receiving daily siRNA injections targeting HIF-1α had a 79% lower tumor volume after 50 days of treatment than the controls. Levels of the HIF-1 transcriptional targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1), c-MET, and carbonic anhydrase-IX (CA-IX) and markers for cell growth (MIB-1 and microvascular density) were also significantly lower. Altering the carrier EHCO by adding polyethylene glycol significantly increased the efficacy of drug delivery and subsequent survival. Treating glioblastoma with siRNA targeting HIF-1α in vivo can significantly reduce tumor growth and increase survival in an intracranial mouse model, a finding that has direct clinical implications.

  15. Resistance to Oncolytic Myxoma Virus Therapy in Nf1−/−/Trp53−/− Syngeneic Mouse Glioma Models Is Independent of Anti-Viral Type-I Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Lun, Xueqing; Maxwell, Lori; Reilly, Karlyne M.; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V. Wee; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical studies, oncolytic viral therapy for malignant gliomas has resulted in variable, but underwhelming results in clinical evaluations. Of concern are the low levels of tumour infection and viral replication within the tumour. This discrepancy between the laboratory and the clinic could result from the disparity of xenograft versus syngeneic models in determining in vivo viral infection, replication and treatment efficacy. Here we describe a panel of primary mouse glioma lines derived from Nf1+/−Trp53+/− mice in the C57Bl/6J background for use in the preclinical testing of the oncolytic virus Myxoma (MYXV). These lines show a range of susceptibility to MYXV replication in vitro, but all succumb to viral-mediated cell death. Two of these lines orthotopically grafted produced aggressive gliomas. Intracranial injection of MYXV failed to result in sustained viral replication or treatment efficacy, with minimal tumour infection that was completely resolved by 7 days post-infection. We hypothesized that the stromal production of Type-I interferons (IFNα/β) could explain the resistance seen in these models; however, we found that neither the cell lines in vitro nor the tumours in vivo produce any IFNα/β in response to MYXV infection. To confirm IFNα/β did not play a role in this resistance, we ablated the ability of tumours to respond to IFNα/β via IRF9 knockdown, and generated identical results. Our studies demonstrate that these syngeneic cell lines are relevant preclinical models for testing experimental glioma treatments, and show that IFNα/β is not responsible for the MYXV treatment resistance seen in syngeneic glioma models. PMID:23762429

  16. ET-39REPEATED PHARMACOLOGICAL DOSES OF ASCORBATE PROTECTS TUMOURS FROM RADIATION DAMAGE IN AN INTRACRANIAL MOUSE GLIOMA MODEL

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Melanie; Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah; Castro, Leticia; Schleich, Nanette; Herst, Patries

    2014-01-01

    High dose ascorbate is used as an anti-cancer treatment by complementary and alternative medicine. In the acidic, metal-rich tumour environment ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, generating free radicals and DNA damage, similar to ionising radiation. We showed that addition of high-dose ascorbate to radiation blocked repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in primary GBM cell lines, effectively radio-sensitising. We examined the effect of ascorbate and radiation on the murine glioma GL261 in vitro, and combined with intra-peritoneal ascorbate in an intra-cranial GL261 model. As previously seen, high dose ascorbate radio-sensitized GL261 cells in a clonogenicity assay. Tumour-bearing mice were treated with: 4.5Gy to the brain 8 days post-implantation; repeated high-dose ascorbate from day 8-45; both treatments; or no treatment. While radiation increased survival, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect. In contrast with in vitro data, tumour-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate had poorer survival than those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis of the tumours showed less necrosis and bleeding within tumours treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. While the mechanism of protection is not yet defined, this finding might have important clinical implications for combining high-dose ascorbate with radiation therapy.

  17. Pharmacological Doses of Daily Ascorbate Protect Tumors from Radiation Damage after a Single Dose of Radiation in an Intracranial Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah V.; Castro, M. Leticia; Field, Cameron S.; Schleich, Nanette; McConnell, Melanie J.; Herst, Patries M.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumor environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionizing radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitizing GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here, we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy) of radiation combined with a 1 h exposure to ascorbate (5 mM) sensitized murine glioma GL261 cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy) of whole brain radiation combined with daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg) in an intracranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain 8 days after tumor implantation, a second group received daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8–45) after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumor progression, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumor progression. Tumor progression was faster in tumor-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than in those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumors treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumor microenvironment, which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant, or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant. PMID:25566497

  18. 18F-AFETP, 18F-FET, and 18F-FDG Imaging of Mouse DBT Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Sai, Kiran Kumar Solingapuram; Huang, Chaofeng; Yuan, Liya; Zhou, Dong; Piwnica-Worms, David; Garbow, Joel R.; Engelbach, John A.; Mach, Robert H.; Rich, Keith M.; McConathy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the 18F-labeled nonnatural amino acid (S)-2-amino-3-[1-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-1H-[1,2,3]triazol-4-yl]propanoic acid (18F-AFETP) as a PET imaging agent for brain tumors and to compare its effectiveness with the more-established tracers O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (18F-FET) and 18F-FDG in a murine model of glioblastoma. The tracer 18F-AFETP is a structural analog of histidine and is a lead compound for imaging cationic amino acid transport, a relatively unexplored target for oncologic imaging. Methods 18F-AFETP was prepared using the click reaction. BALB/c mice with intracranially implanted delayed brain tumor (DBT) gliomas (n = 4) underwent biodistribution and dynamic small-animal PET imaging for 60 min after intravenous injection of 18F-AFETP. Tumor and brain uptake of 18F-AFETP were compared with those of 18F-FDG and 18F-FET through small-animal PET analyses. Results 18F-AFETP demonstrated focally increased uptake in tumors with good visualization. Peak tumor uptake occurred within 10 min of injection, with stable or gradual decrease over time. All 3 tracers demonstrated relatively high uptake in the DBTs throughout the study. At late time points (47.5–57.5 min after injection), the average standardized uptake value with 18F-FDG (1.9 ± 0.1) was significantly greater than with 18F-FET (1.1 ± 0.1) and 18F-AFETP (0.7 ± 0.2). The uptake also differed substantially in normal brain, with significant differences in the standardized uptake values at late times among 18F-FDG (1.5 ± 0.2), 18F-FET (0.5 ± 0.05), and 18F-AFETP (0.1 ± 0.04). The resulting average tumor-to-brain ratio at the late time points was significantly higher for 18F-AFETP (7.5 ± 0.1) than for 18F-FDG (1.3 ± 0.1) and 18F-FET (2.0 ± 0.3). Conclusion 18F-AFETP is a promising brain tumor imaging agent, providing rapid and persistent tumor visualization, with good tumor–to–normal-brain ratios in the DBT glioma model. High tumor-to-brain, tumor

  19. Isolation of glioma cancer stem cells in relation to histological grades in glioma specimens.

    PubMed

    Kong, Byung Ho; Park, Na-Ri; Shim, Jin-Kyoung; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Shin, Hye-Jin; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Huh, Yong-Min; Lee, Su-Jae; Kim, Se-Hoon; Kim, Eui-Hyun; Park, Eun-Kyung; Chang, Jong Hee; Kim, Dong-Seok; Kim, Sun Ho; Hong, Yong-Kil; Kang, Seok-Gu; Lang, Frederick F

    2013-02-01

    The existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in glioblastoma has been proposed. However, the unknown knowledge that is yet to be revealed is the presence of glioma CSCs (gCSCs) in correlation to each WHO grades of glioma. We approached this study with a hypothesis that specimens from high-grade gliomas would have higher isolation rate of gCSCs in comparison to those of lower-grade gliomas. The glioma specimens were obtained from patients and underwent gliomasphere assay. The gliomaspheres were chosen to be analyzed with immunocytochemisty for surface markers. Then the selected gliomaspheres were exposed to neural differentiation conditions. Lastly, we made mouse orthotopic glioma models to examine the capacity of gliomagenesis. The gliomaspheres were formed in WHO grade IV (13 of 21) and III (two of nine) gliomas. Among them, WHO grade IV (11 of 13) and III (two of two) gliomaspheres showed similar surface markers to gCSCs and were capable of neural differentiation. Lastly, among the chosen cells, 10 of 11 WHO grade IV and two of two WHO grade III gliomaspheres were capable of gliomagenesis. Thus, overall, the rates of existence of gCSCs were more prominent in high-grade gliomas: 47.6% (10 of 21) in WHO grade IV gliomas and 22.2% (two of nine) in WHO grade III gliomas, whereas WHO grade II and I gliomas showed virtually no gCSCs. This trend of stage-by-stage increase of gCSCs in gliomas showed statistical significance by chi-square test linear-by-linear association. We prove that the rates of existence of gCSCs increase proportionally as the WHO grades of gliomas rise.

  20. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol mimic bradykinin effects on mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D A; Higashida, H

    1988-01-01

    1. The role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) as possible mediators of the membrane current responses of NG108-15 neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cells to bradykinin (BK, Brown & Higashida, 1988b) has been tested using intracellular ionophoresis of InsP3 and external application of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) and 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (OAG). 2. Intracellular ionophoresis of InsP3 into cells clamped at -30 to -50 mV produced (i) a transient outward current, (ii) a transient outward current followed by an inward current, or (iii) an inward current. All currents were accompanied by an increased input conductance. 3. The transient outward current reversed at between -80 and -90 mV. The reversal potential was shifted to more positive potentials on raising extracellular [K+], suggesting that it resulted from an increased K+ conductance. 4. The outward current was inhibited by apamin (0.4 microM) or d-tubocurarine (0.2-0.5 mM); these drugs also inhibit the outward current produced by BK or by intracellular Ca2+ injections (Brown & Higashida, 1988 a, b). The outward current was also slowly reduced in 0 mM [Ca2+] or 0.5 mM [Cd2+] plus 2 mM [Co2+] solution. 5. Ionophoretic injection of inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate and inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate, guanosine trisphosphate or inorganic phosphate did not evoke an outward current but produced only an inward current with an increased conductance, reversing at between -10 and -20 mV. 6. Bath application of PDBu (10 nM-1 microM) or OAG (1-10 microM) produced an inward current with a fall in input conductance. The inward current was voltage dependent and was accompanied by an inhibition of the time-dependent current relaxations associated with activation or deactivation of the voltage-dependent K+ current, IM. 7. PDBu did not clearly reduce the Ca2+ current or the Ca2+-dependent K+ current recorded in these cells. During superfusion with PDBu, the outward current produced by intracellular

  1. Neurofibromatosis-1 Heterozygosity Increases Microglia in a Spatially- and Temporally-Restricted Pattern Relevant to Mouse Optic Glioma Formation and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Grant W.; Pong, Winnie W.; Emnett, Ryan J.; White, Crystal R.; Gianino, Scott M.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Gutmann, David H.

    2011-01-01

    While carcinogenesis requires the acquisition of driver mutations in progenitor cells, tumor growth and progression is heavily influenced by the local microenvironment. Previous studies from our laboratory have employed Neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1) genetically engineered mice to characterize the role of stromal cells and signals to optic glioma formation and growth. Previously, we have shown that Nf1+/- microglia in the tumor microenvironment are critical cellular determinants of optic glioma proliferation. To define the role of microglia in tumor formation and maintenance further, we employed CD11b-TK mice, in which resident brain microglia (CD11b+, CD68+, Iba1+, CD45low cells) can be ablated at specific times following ganciclovir (GCV) administration. GCV-mediated microglia reduction reduced Nf1 optic glioma proliferation during both tumor maintenance and tumor development. We identified the developmental window during which microglia are increased in the Nf1+/- optic nerve and demonstrated that this accumulation reflected delayed microglia dispersion. The increase in microglia in the Nf1+/- optic nerve was associated with reduced expression of the chemokine receptor, CX3CR1, such that reduced Cx3cr1 expression in Cx3cr1-GFP heterozygous knockout mice led to a similar increase in optic nerve microglia. These results establish a critical role for microglia in the development and maintenance of Nf1 optic glioma. PMID:21157378

  2. MEF promotes stemness in the pathogenesis of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bazzoli, Elena; Pulvirenti, Teodoro; Oberstadt, Moritz C; Perna, Fabiana; Wee, Boyoung; Schultz, Nikolaus; Huse, Jason T; Fomchenko, Elena I; Voza, Francesca; Tabar, Viviane; Brennan, Cameron W; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Nimer, Stephen D; Holland, Eric C; Squatrito, Massimo

    2012-12-07

    High-grade gliomas are aggressive and uniformly fatal tumors, composed of a heterogeneous population of cells that include many with stem-cell-like properties. The acquisition of stem-like traits might contribute to glioma initiation, growth, and recurrence. Here we investigated the role of the transcription factor myeloid Elf-1 like factor (MEF, also known as ELF4) in gliomas. We found that MEF is highly expressed in both human and mouse glioblastomas and its absence impairs gliomagenesis in a PDGF-driven glioma mouse model. We show that modulation of MEF levels in both mouse neural stem cells and human glioblastoma cells has a significant impact on neurosphere formation. Moreover, we identify Sox2 as a direct downstream target of MEF. Taken together, our studies implicate MEF as a previously unrecognized gatekeeper gene in gliomagenesis that promotes stem cell characteristics through Sox2 activation.

  3. MEF promotes stemness in the pathogenesis of gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Bazzoli, Elena; Pulvirenti, Teodoro; Oberstadt, Moritz C.; Perna, Fabiana; Wee, Boyoung; Schultz, Nikolaus; Huse, Jason T.; Fomchenko, Elena I.; Voza, Francesca; Tabar, Viviane; Brennan, Cameron W.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Nimer, Stephen D.; Holland, Eric C.; Squatrito, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary High-grade gliomas are aggressive and uniformly fatal tumors, composed of a heterogeneous population of cells that include many with stem cell-like properties. The acquisition of stem-like traits might contribute to glioma initiation, growth and recurrence. Here we investigated the role of the transcription factor myeloid Elf-1 like factor (MEF, also known as ELF4) in glioma. We found that MEF is highly expressed in both human and mouse GBMs and its absence impairs gliomagenesis in a PDGF-driven glioma mouse model. We show that modulation of MEF levels in both mouse neural stem cells and human glioblastoma cells, has a significant impact on neurosphere formation. Moreover, we identify Sox2 as a direct downstream target of MEF. Taken together, our studies implicate MEF as a previously unrecognized gatekeeper gene in gliomagenesis by promoting stem cell characteristics through Sox2 activation. PMID:23217424

  4. Genetics of adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Goodenberger, McKinsey L; Jenkins, Robert B

    2012-12-01

    Gliomas make up approximately 30% of all brain and central nervous system tumors and 80% of all malignant brain tumors. Despite the frequency of gliomas, the etiology of these tumors remains largely unknown. Diffuse gliomas, including astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, belong to a single pathologic class but have very different histologies and molecular etiologies. Recent genomic studies have identified separate molecular subtypes within the glioma classification that appear to correlate with biological etiology, prognosis, and response to therapy. The discovery of these subtypes suggests that molecular genetic tests are and will be useful, beyond classical histology, for the clinical classification of gliomas. While a familial susceptibility to glioma has been identified, only a small percentage of gliomas are thought to be due to single-gene hereditary cancer syndromes. Through the use of linkage studies and genome-wide association studies, multiple germline variants have been identified that are beginning to define the genetic susceptibility to glioma.

  5. Endogenous GABAA receptor activity suppresses glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Blanchart, A; Fernando, R; Häring, M; Assaife-Lopes, N; Romanov, R A; Andäng, M; Harkany, T; Ernfors, P

    2017-02-09

    Although genome alterations driving glioma by fueling cell malignancy have largely been resolved, less is known of the impact of tumor environment on disease progression. Here, we demonstrate functional GABAA receptor-activated currents in human glioblastoma cells and show the existence of a continuous GABA signaling within the tumor cell mass that significantly affects tumor growth and survival expectancy in mouse models. Endogenous GABA released by tumor cells, attenuates proliferation of the glioma cells with enriched expression of stem/progenitor markers and with competence to seed growth of new tumors. Our results suggest that GABA levels rapidly increase in tumors impeding further growth. Thus, shunting chloride ions by a maintained local GABAA receptor activity within glioma cells has a significant impact on tumor development by attenuating proliferation, reducing tumor growth and prolonging survival, a mechanism that may have important impact on therapy resistance and recurrence following tumor resection.

  6. Epidemiology of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Quinn T; Gittleman, Haley; Stetson, Lindsay; Virk, Selene M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary intracranial tumors. Some glioma subtypes cause significant mortality and morbidity that are disproportionate to their relatively rare incidence. A very small proportion of glioma cases can be attributed to inherited genetic disorders. Many potential risk factors for glioma have been studied to date, but few provide explanation for the number of brain tumors identified. The most significant of these factors includes increased risk due to exposure to ionizing radiation, and decreased risk with history of allergy or atopic disease. The potential effect of exposure to cellular phones has been studied extensively, but the results remain inconclusive. Recent genomic analyses, using the genome-wide association study (GWAS) design, have identified several inherited risk variants that are associated with increased glioma risk. The following chapter provides an overview of the current state of research in the epidemiology of intracranial glioma.

  7. Evaluation of (76)Br-FBAU as a PET reporter probe for HSV1-tk gene expression imaging using mouse models of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Steve Y; Ravasi, Laura; Szajek, Lawrence P; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V; Fine, Howard A; Eckelman, William C

    2005-11-01

    The utility of 5-(76)Br-bromo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine ((76)Br-FBAU), a uracil analog, as a PET reporter probe for use with the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene system for gene expression imaging was evaluated in vivo and in vitro using human and rat glioma cells. Human glioma cell lines U87 and U251 were transduced with replication-defective adenovirus constitutively expressing HSV1-tk (Ad.TK) or a control expressing green fluorescent protein (Ad.GFP). These cells were incubated with (76)Br-FBAU for 20-120 min to determine the percentage of total dose uptake. In vitro uptake of equimolar concentrations (1.8 x 10(-8) mol/L) of (76)Br-FBAU and 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodouracil-beta-d-arabinofuranoside ((14)C-FIAU) was also determined in RG2-TK rat glioma cells stably expressing HSV1-tk and in control RG2 cells at 30-120 min. In vivo uptake of (76)Br-FBAU was determined in subcutaneous U87 tumor intratumorally transduced with Ad.TK by ex vivo biodistribution. Uptake in intracranial U87 tumors transduced with Ad.TK expressing HSV1-tk was measured by brain autoradiography. In vivo PET was performed on subcutaneous and intracranial U87 tumors transduced with Ad.TK and on subcutaneous and intracranial stably expressing RG2-TK tumors. U87 and U251 cells transduced with Ad.TK had significantly increased uptake of (76)Br-FBAU compared with cells transduced with Ad.GFP over 20-120 min. In stably expressing cells at 120 min, (14)C-FIAU uptake in RG2-TK tumor cells was 11.3 %ID (percentage injected dose) and in RG2 control cells was 1.7 %ID, and (76)Br-FBAU uptake in RG2-TK tumor cells was 14.2 %ID and in RG2 control cells was 1.5 %ID. Ex vivo biodistribution of subcutaneous U87 tumors transduced with Ad.TK accumulated (76)Br-FBAU significantly more than in the control Ad.GFP transduced tumor and normal tissue, with the lowest uptake in brain. Autoradiography showed localized uptake in intracranial U87 and U251 cells transduced with Ad

  8. Antitumor activity of (R,R')-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol in a rat C6 glioma xenograft model in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Dossou, Katina S S; Wnorowski, Artur; Ramamoorthy, Anuradha; Paris, Arnaud; Moaddel, Ruin; Cloix, Jean-François; Wainer, Irving W

    2013-12-01

    (R,R')-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol (MNF) inhibits cancer cell proliferation in vitro through cell-type specific modulation of β2-adrenergic receptor and/or cannabinoid receptor function. Here, we report an investigation into antitumor activity of MNF in rat C6 glioma cells. The potent antiproliferative action of MNF in these cells (IC50 of ∼1 nmol/L) was refractory to pharmacological inhibition of β2-adrenergic receptor while a synthetic inverse agonist of cannabinoid receptor 1 significantly blocked MNF activity. The antitumor activity of MNF was then assessed in a C6 glioblastoma xenograft model in mice. Three days after subcutaneous implantation of C6 cells into the lower flank of nude mice, these animals were subjected to i.p. injections of saline or MNF (2 mg/kg) for 19 days and tumor volumes were measured over the course of the experiment. Gene expression analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot assays were performed on the tumors after treatment. Significant reduction in mean tumor volumes was observed in mice receiving MNF when compared with the saline-treated group. We identified clusters in expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation, as well as molecular markers for glioblastoma that were significantly downregulated in tumors of MNF-treated mice as compared to saline-injected controls. The efficacy of MNF against C6 glioma cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by marked reduction in the expression of cell cycle regulator proteins. This study is the first demonstration of MNF-dependent chemoprevention of a glioblastoma xenograft model and may offer a potential mechanism for its anticancer action in vivo.

  9. Antitumor activity of (R,R’)-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol in a rat C6 glioma xenograft model in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Dossou, Katina S S; Wnorowski, Artur; Ramamoorthy, Anuradha; Paris, Arnaud; Moaddel, Ruin; Cloix, Jean-François; Wainer, Irving W

    2013-01-01

    (R,R’)-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol (MNF) inhibits cancer cell proliferation in vitro through cell-type specific modulation of β2-adrenergic receptor and/or cannabinoid receptor function. Here, we report an investigation into antitumor activity of MNF in rat C6 glioma cells. The potent antiproliferative action of MNF in these cells (IC50 of ∼1 nmol/L) was refractory to pharmacological inhibition of β2-adrenergic receptor while a synthetic inverse agonist of cannabinoid receptor 1 significantly blocked MNF activity. The antitumor activity of MNF was then assessed in a C6 glioblastoma xenograft model in mice. Three days after subcutaneous implantation of C6 cells into the lower flank of nude mice, these animals were subjected to i.p. injections of saline or MNF (2 mg/kg) for 19 days and tumor volumes were measured over the course of the experiment. Gene expression analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot assays were performed on the tumors after treatment. Significant reduction in mean tumor volumes was observed in mice receiving MNF when compared with the saline-treated group. We identified clusters in expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation, as well as molecular markers for glioblastoma that were significantly downregulated in tumors of MNF-treated mice as compared to saline-injected controls. The efficacy of MNF against C6 glioma cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by marked reduction in the expression of cell cycle regulator proteins. This study is the first demonstration of MNF-dependent chemoprevention of a glioblastoma xenograft model and may offer a potential mechanism for its anticancer action in vivo. PMID:25505565

  10. Focal brainstem gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Abdulrahman J.; Alaqeel, Ahmed M.

    2015-01-01

    Improved neuronavigation guidance as well as intraoperative imaging and neurophysiologic monitoring technologies have enhanced the ability of neurosurgeons to resect focal brainstem gliomas. In contrast, diffuse brainstem gliomas are considered to be inoperable lesions. This article is a continuation of an article that discussed brainstem glioma diagnostics, imaging, and classification. Here, we address open surgical treatment of and approaches to focal, dorsally exophytic, and cervicomedullary brainstem gliomas. Intraoperative neuronavigation, intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring, as well as intraoperative imaging are discussed as adjunctive measures to help render these procedures safer, more acute, and closer to achieving surgical goals. PMID:25864061

  11. A glioma classification scheme based on coexpression modules of EGFR and PDGFRA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingyu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dongfeng; Lv, Yuhong; Zheng, Junxiong; Lilljebjörn, Henrik; Ran, Liang; Bao, Zhaoshi; Soneson, Charlotte; Sjögren, Hans Olov; Salford, Leif G; Ji, Jianguang; French, Pim J; Fioretos, Thoas; Jiang, Tao; Fan, Xiaolong

    2014-03-04

    We hypothesized that key signaling pathways of glioma genesis might enable the molecular classification of gliomas. Gene coexpression modules around epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (EM, 29 genes) or platelet derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) (PM, 40 genes) in gliomas were identified. Based on EM and PM expression signatures, nonnegative matrix factorization reproducibly clustered 1,369 adult diffuse gliomas WHO grades II-IV from four independent databases generated in three continents, into the subtypes (EM, PM and EM(low)PM(low) gliomas) in a morphology-independent manner. Besides their distinct patterns of genomic alterations, EM gliomas were associated with higher age at diagnosis, poorer prognosis, and stronger expression of neural stem cell and astrogenesis genes. Both PM and EM(low)PM(low) gliomas were associated with younger age at diagnosis and better prognosis. PM gliomas were enriched in the expression of oligodendrogenesis genes, whereas EM(low)PM(low) gliomas were enriched in the signatures of mature neurons and oligodendrocytes. The EM/PM-based molecular classification scheme is applicable to adult low-grade and high-grade diffuse gliomas, and outperforms existing classification schemes in assigning diffuse gliomas to subtypes with distinct transcriptomic and genomic profiles. The majority of the EM/PM classifiers, including regulators of glial fate decisions, have not been extensively studied in glioma biology. Subsets of these classifiers were coexpressed in mouse glial precursor cells, and frequently amplified or lost in an EM/PM glioma subtype-specific manner, resulting in somatic copy number alteration-dependent gene expression that contributes to EM/PM signatures in glioma samples. EM/PM-based molecular classification provides a molecular diagnostic framework to expedite the search for new glioma therapeutic targets.

  12. Glioma associated microglial MMP9 expression is up regulated by TLR2 signalling and sensitive to minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Feng; Ku, Min-Chi; Markovic, Darko; Dzaye, Omar Dildar a; Lehnardt, Seija; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A.; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    The invasiveness of malignant gliomas is one of the major obstacles in glioma therapy and the reason for the poor survival of patients. Glioma cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma and thereby escape surgical resection. Glioma associated microglia/macrophages support glioma infiltration into the brain parenchyma by increased expression and activation of extracellular matrix degrading proteases such as matrix-metalloprotease 2, matrix-metalloprotease 9 and membrane-type 1 matrix metalloprotease. In this work we demonstrate that, matrix-metalloprotease 9 is predominantly expressed by glioma associated microglia/macrophages in mouse and human glioma tissue but not by the glioma cells. Supernatant from glioma cells induced the expression of matrix-metalloprotease 9 in cultured microglial cells. Using mice deficient for different Toll-like receptors we identified Toll-like receptor 2/6 as the signalling pathway for the glioma induced upregulation of microglial matrix-metalloprotease 9. Also in an experimental mouse glioma model, Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency attenuated the upregulation of microglial matrix-metalloprotease 9. Moreover, glioma supernatant triggered an upregulation of Toll-like receptor 2 expression in microglia. Both, the upregulation of matrix-metalloprotease 9 and Toll-like receptor 2 were attenuated by the antibiotic minocycline and a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase antagonist in vitro. Minocycline also extended the survival rate of glioma bearing mice when given to the drinking water. Thus glioma cells change the phenotype of glioma associated microglia/macrophages in a complex fashion using Toll-like receptor 2 as an important signalling pathway and minocycline further proved to be a potential candidate for adjuvant glioma therapy. PMID:24752463

  13. Molecular neuropathology of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Markus J; Reifenberger, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies.

  14. 31 CFR 358.19 - Who is responsible for any loss resulting from the conversion of a bearer corpus missing callable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... resulting from the conversion of a bearer corpus missing callable coupons? 358.19 Section 358.19 Money and... TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY CONVERSION OF BEARER CORPORA AND... corpus missing callable coupons? The submitting depository institution shall indemnify the United...

  15. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation.

  16. 48 CFR 252.247-7003 - Pass-Through of Motor Carrier Fuel Surcharge Adjustment To The Cost Bearer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pass-Through of Motor... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.247-7003 Pass-Through of Motor...: PASS-THROUGH OF MOTOR CARRIER FUEL SURCHARGE ADJUSTMENT TO THE COST BEARER (SEP 2010) (a) This...

  17. 48 CFR 252.247-7003 - Pass-Through of Motor Carrier Fuel Surcharge Adjustment To The Cost Bearer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pass-Through of Motor... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.247-7003 Pass-Through of Motor...: Pass-Through of Motor Carrier Fuel Surcharge Adjustment to the Cost Bearer (SEP 2010) (a) This clause...

  18. 48 CFR 252.247-7003 - Pass-Through of Motor Carrier Fuel Surcharge Adjustment To The Cost Bearer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pass-Through of Motor... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.247-7003 Pass-Through of Motor...: Pass-Through of Motor Carrier Fuel Surcharge Adjustment to the Cost Bearer (JUN 2013) (a) This clause...

  19. 48 CFR 252.247-7003 - Pass-Through of Motor Carrier Fuel Surcharge Adjustment To The Cost Bearer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pass-Through of Motor... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.247-7003 Pass-Through of Motor...: Pass-Through of Motor Carrier Fuel Surcharge Adjustment to the Cost Bearer (JUN 2013) (a) This clause...

  20. 48 CFR 252.247-7003 - Pass-Through of Motor Carrier Fuel Surcharge Adjustment To The Cost Bearer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pass-Through of Motor... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.247-7003 Pass-Through of Motor...: PASS-THROUGH OF MOTOR CARRIER FUEL SURCHARGE ADJUSTMENT TO THE COST BEARER (SEP 2010) (a) This clause...

  1. 31 CFR 306.27 - Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. 306.27 Section 306.27 Money and... § 306.27 Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. All interest coupons due and payable on or before the date of maturity or date fixed in the call...

  2. 31 CFR 306.27 - Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. 306.27 Section 306.27 Money and... § 306.27 Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. All interest coupons due and payable on or before the date of maturity or date fixed in the call...

  3. 31 CFR 306.27 - Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. 306.27 Section 306.27 Money and... § 306.27 Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. All interest coupons due and payable on or before the date of maturity or date fixed in the call...

  4. 31 CFR 306.27 - Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. 306.27 Section 306.27 Money and... § 306.27 Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. All interest coupons due and payable on or before the date of maturity or date fixed in the call...

  5. 31 CFR 306.27 - Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. 306.27 Section 306.27 Money and... § 306.27 Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. All interest coupons due and payable on or before the date of maturity or date fixed in the...

  6. Fatty acid oxidation is required for the respiration and proliferation of malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hua; Patel, Shaan; Affleck, Valerie S.; Wilson, Ian; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Joshi, Abhijit R.; Maxwell, Ross

    2017-01-01

    Background. Glioma is the most common form of primary malignant brain tumor in adults, with approximately 4 cases per 100 000 people each year. Gliomas, like many tumors, are thought to primarily metabolize glucose for energy production; however, the reliance upon glycolysis has recently been called into question. In this study, we aimed to identify the metabolic fuel requirements of human glioma cells. Methods. We used database searches and tissue culture resources to evaluate genotype and protein expression, tracked oxygen consumption rates to study metabolic responses to various substrates, performed histochemical techniques and fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based mitotic profiling to study cellular proliferation rates, and employed an animal model of malignant glioma to evaluate a new therapeutic intervention. Results. We observed the presence of enzymes required for fatty acid oxidation within human glioma tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that this metabolic pathway is a major contributor to aerobic respiration in primary-cultured cells isolated from human glioma and grown under serum-free conditions. Moreover, inhibiting fatty acid oxidation reduces proliferative activity in these primary-cultured cells and prolongs survival in a syngeneic mouse model of malignant glioma. Conclusions. Fatty acid oxidation enzymes are present and active within glioma tissues. Targeting this metabolic pathway reduces energy production and cellular proliferation in glioma cells. The drug etomoxir may provide therapeutic benefit to patients with malignant glioma. In addition, the expression of fatty acid oxidation enzymes may provide prognostic indicators for clinical practice. PMID:27365097

  7. Pathophysiology of glioma cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Adn, Mahmoudreza; Saikali, Stephan; Guegan, Yvon; Hamlat, Abderrahmane

    2006-01-01

    Fluid filled cystic cavities are accompaniments of some cerebral gliomas. These tumoural cysts together with peritumoural vasogenic brain oedema add to the morbid effects of the gliomas in terms of mass effect and increased intracranial pressure. Although different mechanisms have been suggested as to the pathogenesis of glioma-associated cysts, it is still unclear why these cysts appear in only a limited number of cerebral gliomas while brain oedema, a probable precursor of glioma cysts, is a usual accompaniment of most gliomas. Here, the authors present a two-hit hypothesis of brain glioma cyst formation. We suggest that after the formation of vasogenic tumoural brain oedema, microvascular phenomena may lead to the formation of microcysts, which might later become confluent and grow to form macroscopic cysts. Progress in the understanding of pathogenesis of cerebral glioma cysts might set targets for treatment of brain edema and glioma cysts.

  8. Glioma Stem Cells but Not Bulk Glioma Cells Upregulate IL-6 Secretion in Microglia/Brain Macrophages via Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling.

    PubMed

    a Dzaye, Omar Dildar; Hu, Feng; Derkow, Katja; Haage, Verena; Euskirchen, Philipp; Harms, Christoph; Lehnardt, Seija; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral macrophages and resident microglia constitute the dominant glioma-infiltrating cells. The tumor induces an immunosuppressive and tumor-supportive phenotype in these glioma-associated microglia/brain macrophages (GAMs). A subpopulation of glioma cells acts as glioma stem cells (GSCs). We explored the interaction between GSCs and GAMs. Using CD133 as a marker of stemness, we enriched for or deprived the mouse glioma cell line GL261 of GSCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Over the same period of time, 100 CD133(+ )GSCs had the capacity to form a tumor of comparable size to the ones formed by 10,000 CD133(-) GL261 cells. In IL-6(-/-) mice, only tumors formed by CD133(+ )cells were smaller compared with wild type. After stimulation of primary cultured microglia with medium from CD133-enriched GL261 glioma cells, we observed an selective upregulation in microglial IL-6 secretion dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Our results show that GSCs, but not the bulk glioma cells, initiate microglial IL-6 secretion via TLR4 signaling and that IL-6 regulates glioma growth by supporting GSCs. Using human glioma tissue, we could confirm the finding that GAMs are the major source of IL-6 in the tumor context.

  9. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  10. Galectins and Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Le Mercier, Marie; Fortin, Shannon; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert; Lefranc, Florence

    2010-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, especially glioblastomas, are associated with a dismal prognosis. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, glioblastoma patients still have a median survival expectancy of only 14 months. This poor prognosis can be at least partly explained by the fact that glioma cells diffusely infiltrate the brain parenchyma and exhibit decreased levels of apoptosis, and thus resistance to cytotoxic drugs. Galectins are a family of mammalian beta-galactoside-binding proteins characterized by a shared characteristic amino acid sequence. They are expressed differentially in normal vs. neoplastic tissues and are known to play important roles in several biological processes such as cell proliferation, death and migration. This review focuses on the role played by galectins, especially galectin-1 and galectin-3, in glioma biology. The involvement of these galectins in different steps of glioma malignant progression such as migration, angiogenesis or chemoresistance makes them potentially good targets for the development of new drugs to combat these malignant tumors. PMID:19371355

  11. Immunotherapeutic Approaches for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hideho; Kohanbash, Gary; Zhu, Xinmei; Kastenhuber, Edward R.; Hoji, Aki; Ueda, Ryo; Fujita, Mitsugu

    2009-01-01

    The development of effective immunotherapy strategies for glioma requires adequate understanding of the unique immunological microenvironment in the central nervous system (CNS) and CNS tumors. Although the CNS is often considered to be an immunologically privileged site and poses unique challenges for the delivery of effector cells and molecules, recent advances in technology and discoveries in CNS immunology suggest novel mechanisms that may significantly improve the efficacy of immunotherapy against gliomas. In this review, we first summarize recent advances in the CNS and CNS tumor immunology. We address factors that may promote immune escape of gliomas. We also review advances in passive and active immunotherapy strategies for glioma, with an emphasis on lessons learned from recent early-phase clinical trials. We also discuss novel immunotherapy strategies that have been recently tested in non-CNS tumors and show great potential for application to gliomas. Finally, we discuss how each of these promising strategies can be combined to achieve clinical benefit for patients with gliomas. PMID:19348609

  12. The glioma cell edge--winning by engulfing the enemy?

    PubMed

    Persson, Annette; Englund, Elisabet

    2009-09-01

    Malignant glioma and glioblastoma multiforme form the largest group of highly malignant brain tumours, for which there is yet no definitive cure. Different approaches to treatment have been tried, in vain or with minimal benefit for the patient. In addition to surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, immunotherapy aiming at evoking an inflammatory reaction against the tumour itself has been tried. Immunotherapy has shown good results in an experimental mouse model, but no convincing efficacy/success in patients. Why are the gliomas always winning, how do they take the lead? The following phenomena lead us to propose an hypothesis about the reason for the glioma lead: the reported findings of phagocytic activity in reactive and neoplastic astrocytes in animal models and humans; the frequently observed ingested "non-self material"/debris in glioma cells; the markedly high contents of tumour cells with phagocytic phenotype in gliomas and the signs of only limited and temporary inflammatory reactions in different immunotherapy attempts. Whether it being a true phagocytosis, an engulfing or comparable activity by the glioma cells, contributing to the tumour's self defense against e.g. antitumoural therapies, it should be beneficial to attempt hampering these self defense properties e.g. by blocking their engulfing capacity.

  13. Expression of TIP-1 Confers Radioresistance of Malignant Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant gliomas represent one group of tumors that poorly respond to ionizing radiation (IR) alone or combined with chemotherapeutic agents because of the intrinsic or acquired resistance. In this study, TIP-1 was identified as one novel protein that confers resistance of glioma cells to IR. Methodology/Principal Findings Meta-analysis indicated that high TIP-1 expression levels correlate with the poor prognosis of human malignant gliomas after radiotherapy. Studies with established human glioma cell lines demonstrated that TIP-1 depletion with specific shRNAs sensitized the cells to IR, whereas an ectopic expression of TIP-1 protected the glioma cells from the IR-induced DNA damage and cell death. Biochemical studies indicated that TIP-1 protein promoted p53 ubiquitination and resulted in a reduced p53 protein level. Furthermore, p53 and its ubiquitination are required for the TIP-1 regulated cellular response to IR. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified that TIP-1, through its single PDZ domain, binds to the carboxyl terminus of LZAP that has been studied as one tumor suppressor functioning through ARF binding and p53 activation. It was revealed that the presence of TIP-1 enhances the protein association between LZAP and ARF and modulates the functionality of ARF/HDM2 toward multi-ubiquitination of p53, while depleting TIP-1 rescued p53 from polyubiquitination and degradation in the irradiated glioma cells. Studies with a mouse xenograft model indicated that depleting TIP-1 within D54 cells improved the tumor growth control with IR. Conclusions/Significance This study provided the first evidence showing that TIP-1 modulates p53 protein stability and is involved in the radioresistance of malignant gliomas, suggesting that antagonizing TIP-1 might be one novel approach to sensitize malignant gliomas to radiotherapy. PMID:23028987

  14. Smoking and Glioma Risk

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chuan; Zhao, Wei; Qi, Zhenyu; He, Jiaquan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To systematically assess the relationship between smoking and glioma risk. A dose–response meta-analysis of case–control and cohort studies was performed. Pertinent studies were identified by searching database and reference lists. Random-effects model was employed to pool the estimates of the relative risks (RRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 19 case–control and 6 cohort studies were included. Overall, compared with those who never smoked, the pooled RR and 95% CI was 0.98 (0.92–1.05) for ever smoker. The subgroups were not significantly different regarding risk of glioma except the group of age at start smoking (RR = 1.17, 95% CI: 0.93–1.48 for age < 20; RR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02–1.52 for age ≥ 20). Dose–response analysis also suggested no significant association between smoking and the risk of glioma, although some evidence for a linear relationship between smoking and glioma risk was observed. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides little support for a causal relationship between smoking and risk of glioma. PMID:26765433

  15. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients.

  16. A Mismatch between the Perceived Fighting Signal and Fighting Ability Reveals Survival and Physiological Costs for Bearers

    PubMed Central

    González-Santoyo, Isaac; González-Tokman, Daniel M.; Munguía-Steyer, Roberto E.; Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Signals of fighting indicate an animal's intention to attack and so they serve to prevent costly aggressive encounters. However, according to theory, a signal that is different in design (i.e. a novel signal) but that fails to inform fighting intentions will result in negative fitness consequences for the bearer. In the present study we used males of the territorial damselfly Hetaerina americana, which have a red wing spot during territory defense that has evolved as a signal of fighting ability. By producing a novel signal (covering the red spot with blue ink) in territory owners, we investigated: a) the behavioral responses by conspecific males; b) survival cost and c) three physiological mediators of impaired survival: muscular fat reserves, muscle mass and immune ability. We predicted that males with the novel signal would be attacked more often by conspecifics as the former would fail to convey fighting ability and intentions adequately. This will result in lower survival and physiological condition for the novel signal bearers. We found that, compared to control males (males whose red spot was not changed), experimental males had reduced survival, were less able to hold a territory, and had a reduced muscle mass. It seems that spot modified males were not able to effectively communicate their territory tenancy, which may explain why they lost their defended sites. Our results provide support for theoretical models that a novel signal that fails to informing fighting ability may lead to a fitness cost for bearers. PMID:24409304

  17. Optic nerve glioma: an update.

    PubMed

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Pathak, Rima S; Iyer, Veena R; Gandhi, Rashmin A

    2014-08-01

    Optic nerve glioma is the most common optic nerve tumour. However, it has an unpredictable natural history. The treatment of optic nerve gliomas has changed considerably over the past few years. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy can now stabilize and in some cases improve the vision of patients with optic nerve gliomas. The treatment of optic nerve glioma requires a multi-disciplinary approach where all treatment options may have to be implemented in a highly individualized manner. The aim of this review article is to present current diagnostic and treatment protocols for optic nerve glioma.

  18. A role for intracellular zinc in glioma alteration of neuronal chloride equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Di Angelantonio, S; Murana, E; Cocco, S; Scala, F; Bertollini, C; Molinari, M G; Lauro, C; Bregestovski, P; Limatola, C; Ragozzino, D

    2014-01-01

    Glioma patients commonly suffer from epileptic seizures. However, the mechanisms of glioma-associated epilepsy are far to be completely understood. Using glioma-neurons co-cultures, we found that tumor cells are able to deeply influence neuronal chloride homeostasis, by depolarizing the reversal potential of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-evoked currents (EGABA). EGABA depolarizing shift is due to zinc-dependent reduction of neuronal KCC2 activity and requires glutamate release from glioma cells. Consistently, intracellular zinc loading rapidly depolarizes EGABA in mouse hippocampal neurons, through the Src/Trk pathway and this effect is promptly reverted upon zinc chelation. This study provides a possible molecular mechanism linking glioma invasion to excitation/inhibition imbalance and epileptic seizures, through the zinc–mediated disruption of neuronal chloride homeostasis. PMID:25356870

  19. KITENIN promotes glioma invasiveness and progression, associated with the induction of EMT and stemness markers

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Jeong; Kim, Ok; Joo, Young-Eun; Bae, Jeong-A; Yoon, Somy; Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Jung, Shin; Kim, Kyung-Keun; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Moon, Kyung-Sub

    2015-01-01

    KITENIN (KAI1 COOH-terminal interacting tetraspanin) promotes tumor invasion and metastasis in various cancers. This study assessed the association between KITENIN expression and advanced glioma grade in patients. In vitro assays revealed that KITENIN knockdown inhibited the invasion and migration of glioma cells, whereas KITENIN overexpression promoted their invasion and migration. In orthotopic mouse tumor models, mice transplanted with KITENIN-transfected glioma cells had significantly shorter survival than mice transplanted with mock-transfected cells. Patients with low KITENIN expression showed a significantly longer progression-free survival than patients with high KITENIN expression. KITENIN induced the expression of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers (N-cadherin, ZEB1, ZEB2, SNAIL and SLUG) as well as the glioma stemness markers (CD133, ALDH1 and EPH-B1). Taken together, these findings showed that high levels of KITENIN increased glioma invasiveness and progression, associated with the up-regulation of EMT and stemness markers. PMID:25605251

  20. A role for intracellular zinc in glioma alteration of neuronal chloride equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Di Angelantonio, S; Murana, E; Cocco, S; Scala, F; Bertollini, C; Molinari, M G; Lauro, C; Bregestovski, P; Limatola, C; Ragozzino, D

    2014-10-30

    Glioma patients commonly suffer from epileptic seizures. However, the mechanisms of glioma-associated epilepsy are far to be completely understood. Using glioma-neurons co-cultures, we found that tumor cells are able to deeply influence neuronal chloride homeostasis, by depolarizing the reversal potential of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-evoked currents (EGABA). EGABA depolarizing shift is due to zinc-dependent reduction of neuronal KCC2 activity and requires glutamate release from glioma cells. Consistently, intracellular zinc loading rapidly depolarizes EGABA in mouse hippocampal neurons, through the Src/Trk pathway and this effect is promptly reverted upon zinc chelation. This study provides a possible molecular mechanism linking glioma invasion to excitation/inhibition imbalance and epileptic seizures, through the zinc-mediated disruption of neuronal chloride homeostasis.

  1. A Phase I Study of Mebendazole for the Treatment of Pediatric Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Glioma, Astrocytic; Optic Nerve Glioma; Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Gliosarcoma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; DIPG; Low-grade Glioma; Brainstem Glioma

  2. Pten signaling in gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Knobbe, Christiane B.; Merlo, Adrian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the PTEN gene (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) was identified as a tumor suppressor gene on the long arm of chromosome 10. Since then, important progress has been made with respect to the understanding of the role of the Pten protein in the normal development of the brain as well as in the molecular pathogenesis of human gliomas. This review summarizes the current state of the art concerning the involvement of aberrant Pten function in the development of different biologic features of malignant gliomas, such as loss of cell-cycle control and uncontrolled cell proliferation, escape from apoptosis, brain invasion, and aberrant neoangiogenesis. Most of the tumor-suppressive properties of Pten are dependent on its lipid phosphatase activity, which inhibits the phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway through dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)-triphosphate. The additional function of Pten as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase may also play a role in glioma pathogenesis. Besides the wealth of data elucidating the functional roles of Pten, recent studies suggest a diagnostic significance of PTEN gene alterations as a molecular marker for poor prognosis in anaplastic astrocytomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Furthermore, the possibility of selective targeting of PTEN mutant tumor cells by specific pharmacologic inhibitors of members of the Pten/PI3K/Akt pathway opens up new perspectives for a targeted molecular therapy of malignant gliomas. PMID:12084351

  3. [Management of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Lévy, S; Chapet, S; Mazeron, J-J

    2014-10-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumors. Their care is difficult because of the proximity of organs at risk. The treatment of glioblastoma includes surgery followed by chemoradiation with the protocol of Stupp et al. The addition of bevacizumab allows an increase in progression-free survival by 4 months but it does not improve overall survival. This treatment is reserved for clinical trials. Intensity modulation radiotherapy may be useful to reduce the neurocognitive late effects in different types of gliomas. In elderly patients an accelerated radiotherapy 40 Gy in 15 fractions allows a similar survival to standard radiotherapy. O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) status may help to choose between chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There is no standard for the treatment of recurrent gliomas. Re-irradiation in stereotactic conditions allows a median survival of 8 to 12.4 months. Anaplastic gliomas with 1p19q mutation have a greater sensibility to chemotherapy by procarbazine, lomustine and vincristine. Chemoradiotherapy in these patients has become the standard treatment. Many studies are underway testing targeted therapies, their place in the therapeutic management and new radiotherapy techniques. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Glioma sensitive or chemoresistant to temozolomide differentially modulate macrophage protumor activities.

    PubMed

    Azambuja, Juliana H; da Silveira, Elita F; de Carvalho, Taíse R; Oliveira, Pathise S; Pacheco, Simone; do Couto, Carlus T; Beira, Fátima T; Stefanello, Francieli M; Spanevello, Rosélia M; Braganhol, Elizandra

    2017-11-01

    Glioblastomas are the most devastating brain tumor characterized by chemoresistance development and poor prognosis. Macrophages are a component of tumor microenvironment related to glioma malignancy. The relation among inflammation, innate immunity and cancer is accepted; however, molecular and cellular mechanisms mediating this relation and chemoresistance remain unresolved. Here we evaluated whether glioma sensitive or resistant to temozolomide (TMZ) modulate macrophage polarization and inflammatory pathways associated. The impact of glioma-macrophage crosstalk on glioma proliferation was also investigated. GL261 glioma chemoresistance was developed by exposing cells to increasing TMZ concentrations over a period of 6months. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were exposed to glioma-conditioned medium or co-cultured directly with glioma sensitive (GL) or chemoresistant (GLTMZ). Macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo glioma proliferation, redox parameters, ectonucleotidase activity and ATP cytotoxicity were performed. GLTMZ cells were more effective than GL in induce M2-like macrophage polarization and in promote a strong immunosuppressive environment characterized by high IL-10 release and increased antioxidant potential, which may contribute to glioma chemoresistance and proliferation. Interestingly, macrophage-GLTMZ crosstalk enhanced in vitro and in vivo proliferation of chemoresistant cells, decreased ectonucleotidase activities, which was followed by increased macrophage sensitivity to ATP induced death. Results suggest a differential macrophage modulation by GLTMZ cells, which may favor the maintenance of immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and glioma proliferation. The induction of immunosuppressive environment and macrophage education by chemoresistant gliomas may be important for tumor recovery after chemotherapy and could be considered to overcome chemoresistance development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) contributes to human glioma oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Zhou, Quan; Zhou, Jingxu; Huang, Yan; Yan, Yong; Li, Weiqing; Wang, Chunlin; Hu, Guohan; Lu, Yicheng; Chen, Juxiang

    2011-05-01

    Malignant glioma is the most common adult primary brain tumor, and the mechanism of its oncogenesis is poorly understood. Growing evidence has shown that E3 ubiquitin ligases can promote tumorgenesis of glioma. CHIP is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that can induce ubiquitylation and degradation of many tumor-related proteins, and it has been reported to act as an upstream regulator in breast cancer; however, its role in human gliomas has not been evaluated yet. In this study, the expression of CHIP in glioma tissues was studied using immunohistochemistry. CHIP expression in glioma cells was studied by real-time RT-PCR, western blot and double immunofluorescence staining. The role of CHIP in glioma oncogenesis was investigated by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) and overexpression in vitro and in vivo. We showed CHIP expression in glioma samples was related to tumor grades, with stronger staining in high-grade gliomas than in low-grade gliomas. Knocking down of CHIP suppressed proliferation, colony formation of U251 and U87 glioma cells, while overexpression of CHIP resulted in enhanced proliferation and colony formation in vitro. In a nude mouse xenograft model, intratumoral injection of CHIP RNAi lentivirus significantly delayed tumor growth. In contrast, overexpression of CHIP resulted in enhanced tumor growth in vivo. After CHIP RNAi, both survivin mRNA and protein were decreased, while CHIP overexpression induced increased mRNA and protein levels of survivin. This is the first study demonstrating CHIP contributes to oncogenesis of glioma. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  6. Anti-tumor activity of phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride on malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian-Bin; Jiang, Lei; Ding, Mao-Hua; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Bao, Yi; Chen, Yi; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Chen-Ran; Hu, Hong-Kang; Cai, Zhen; Lu, Cheng-Yin; Zhou, Jue-Yu; Qian, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Jin, Wei-Lin; Hu, Guo-Han

    2016-03-01

    Phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride (PHEN) is a selective antagonist of both α-adrenoceptor and calmodulin that exhibits anticancer properties. The aim of this study was to explore the anti-tumor function of PHEN in glioma. Cell proliferation assay was used to assess glioma cell growth. Migration and invasion capacity of glioma cells was monitored by wound-healing and transwell assay, respectively. Neurosphere formation test was adopted for the tumorigenesis of glioma cells, which was also confirmed by soft agar cloning formation test in vitro and a nude mouse model in vivo. Finally, we explored the potential pathway utilized by PHEN using Western blot and immunofluoresce staining. PHEN exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on the proliferation of both U251 and U87MG glioma cell lines in a positive dose-dependent manner. PHEN apparently attenuated the malignancy of glioma in terms of migration and invasion and also suppressed the tumorigenic capacity both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanism study showed that PHEN promoted tumor suppression by inhibiting the TrkB-Akt pathway. The results of the present study demonstrated that PHEN suppressed the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis of glioma cells, induced LINGO-1 expression, and inhibited the TrkB-Akt pathway, which may prove to be the mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor effect of PHEN on glioma cells.

  7. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy12

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Gregory J.; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Motsch, Sebastien; Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Mineharu, Yohei; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra Ines; Orringer, Daniel; Bannykh, Serguei; Nichols, Wesley S.; deCarvalho, Ana C.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM), and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients. PMID:25117977

  8. Mechanisms of glioma formation: iterative perivascular glioma growth and invasion leads to tumor progression, VEGF-independent vascularization, and resistance to antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Baker, Gregory J; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Motsch, Sebastien; Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Mineharu, Yohei; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra Ines; Orringer, Daniel; Bannykh, Serguei; Nichols, Wesley S; deCarvalho, Ana C; Mikkelsen, Tom; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2014-07-01

    As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM), and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Circulating glioma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kros, Johan M.; Mustafa, Dana M.; Dekker, Lennard J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.; Luider, Theo M.; Zheng, Ping-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Validated biomarkers for patients suffering from gliomas are urgently needed for standardizing measurements of the effects of treatment in daily clinical practice and trials. Circulating body fluids offer easily accessible sources for such markers. This review highlights various categories of tumor-associated circulating biomarkers identified in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioma patients, including circulating tumor cells, exosomes, nucleic acids, proteins, and oncometabolites. The validation and potential clinical utility of these biomarkers is briefly discussed. Although many candidate circulating protein biomarkers were reported, none of these have reached the required validation to be introduced for clinical practice. Recent developments in tracing circulating tumor cells and their derivatives as exosomes and circulating nuclear acids may become more successful in providing useful biomarkers. It is to be expected that current technical developments will contribute to the finding and validation of circulating biomarkers. PMID:25253418

  10. Akt- or MEK-mediated mTOR inhibition suppresses Nf1 optic glioma growth

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Aparna; Toonen, Joseph A.; Cimino, Patrick J.; Gianino, Scott M.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop optic pathway gliomas, which result from impaired NF1 protein regulation of Ras activity. One obstacle to the implementation of biologically targeted therapies is an incomplete understanding of the individual contributions of the downstream Ras effectors (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase [MEK], Akt) to optic glioma maintenance. This study was designed to address the importance of MEK and Akt signaling to Nf1 optic glioma growth. Methods Primary neonatal mouse astrocyte cultures were employed to determine the consequence of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MEK inhibition on Nf1-deficient astrocyte growth. Nf1 optic glioma–bearing mice were used to assess the effect of Akt and MEK inhibition on tumor volume, proliferation, and retinal ganglion cell dysfunction. Results Both MEK and Akt were hyperactivated in Nf1-deficient astrocytes in vitro and in Nf1 murine optic gliomas in vivo. Pharmacologic PI3K or Akt inhibition reduced Nf1-deficient astrocyte proliferation to wild-type levels, while PI3K inhibition decreased Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Akt inhibition of Nf1-deficient astrocyte and optic glioma growth reflected Akt-dependent activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Sustained MEK pharmacologic blockade also attenuated Nf1-deficient astrocytes as well as Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Importantly, these MEK inhibitory effects resulted from p90RSK-mediated, Akt-independent mTOR activation. Finally, both PI3K and MEK inhibition reduced optic glioma–associated retinal ganglion cell loss and nerve fiber layer thinning. Conclusion These findings establish that the convergence of 2 distinct Ras effector pathways on mTOR signaling maintains Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth, supporting the evaluation of pharmacologic inhibitors that target mTOR function in future human NF1–optic pathway glioma clinical trials. PMID:25534823

  11. Canine spinal cord glioma.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Barber, Renee; Burnum, Annabelle; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord glioma is uncommonly reported in dogs. We describe the clinicopathologic and diagnostic features of 7 cases of canine spinal cord glioma and briefly review the veterinary literature on this topic. The median age at presentation was 7.2 y. Six females and 1 male were affected and 4 dogs were brachycephalic. The clinical course lasted from 3 d to 12 wk, and clinical signs were progressive and associated with multiple suspected neuroanatomic locations in the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging of 6 cases revealed T2-weighted hyperintense lesions with variable contrast enhancement in the spinal cord. All dogs had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of intraparenchymal neoplasia or myelitis based on history, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Euthanasia was elected in all cases because of poor outcome despite anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive treatment or because of poor prognosis at the time of diagnosis. Tumor location during autopsy ranged from C1 to L6, with no clear predilection for a specific spinal cord segment. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the immunohistochemistry expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, and Ki-67. Diagnoses consisted of 4 cases of oligodendroglioma, 2 cases of gliomatosis cerebri, and 1 astrocytoma. This case series further defines the clinicopathologic features of canine spinal glioma and highlights the need for comprehensive immunohistochemistry in addition to routine histopathology to confirm the diagnosis of these tumors.

  12. Inherited predisposition to glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kyritsis, Athanassios P.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rao, Jasti S.; Sioka, Chrissa

    2010-01-01

    In gliomas, germline gene alterations play a significant role during malignant transformation of progenitor glial cells, at least for families with occurrence of multiple cancers or with specific hereditary cancer syndromes. Scientific evidence during the last few years has revealed several constitutive genetic abnormalities that may influence glioma formation. These germline abnormalities are manifested as either gene polymorphisms or hemizygous mutations of key regulatory genes that are involved either in DNA repair or in apoptosis. Such changes, among others, include hemizygous alterations of the neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and p53 genes that are involved in apoptotic pathways, and alterations in multiple DNA repair genes such as mismatch repair (MMR) genes, x-ray cross-complementary genes (XRCC), and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) genes. Subsequent cellular changes include somatic mutations in cell cycle regulatory genes and genes involved in angiogenesis and invasion, leading eventually to tumor formation in various stages. Future molecular diagnosis may identify new genomic regions that could harbor genes important for glioma predisposition and aid in the early diagnosis of these patients and genetic counseling of their families. PMID:20150373

  13. Dianhydrogalactitol and radiation therapy. Treatment of supratentorial glioma.

    PubMed

    Eagan, R T; Childs, D S; Layton, D D; Laws, E R; Bisel, H F; Holbrook, M A; Fleming, T R

    1979-05-11

    Dianhydrogalactitol was the most active of 177 agents tested against a mouse ependymoblastoma tumor. We conducted a prospectively randomized trial comparing whole-brain irradiation alone vs identical irradiation plus dianhydrogalactitol in 42 patients with grade 3 and 4 supratentorial astrocytomas. Patients receiving dianhydrogalactitol in addition to irradiation had a significantly longer median survival time (67 vs 35 weeks) than did patients receiving only irradiation. The major toxic effect of dianhydrogalactitol is hematologic suppression of a cumulative nature. Dianhydrogalactitol may play an important role (in conjunction with radiation therapy) in the initial treatment of patients with supratentorial glioma. Our data may indicate that the mouse ependymoblastoma system is a useful screen for agents to be used in the treatment of human glioma.

  14. Microscopic DTI accurately identifies early glioma cell migration: correlation with multimodal imaging in a new glioma stem cell model.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Ulysse; Perles-Barbacaru, Adriana-T; Millet, Arnaud; Appaix, Florence; El-Atifi, Michele; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2016-11-01

    Monitoring glioma cell infiltration in the brain is critical for diagnosis and therapy. Using a new glioma Glio6 mouse model derived from human stem cells we show how diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may predict glioma cell migration/invasion. In vivo multiparametric MRI was performed at one, two and three months of Glio6 glioma growth (Glio6 (n = 6), sham (n = 3)). This longitudinal study reveals the existence of a time window to study glioma cell/migration/invasion selectively. Indeed, at two months only Glio6 cell invasion was detected, while tumor mass formation, edema, blood-brain barrier leakage and tumor angiogenesis were detected later, at three months. To robustly confirm the potential of DTI for detecting glioma cell migration/invasion, a microscopic 3D-DTI (80 μm isotropic spatial resolution) technique was developed and applied to fixed mouse brains (Glio6 (n = 6), sham (n = 3)). DTI changes were predominant in the corpus callosum (CC), a known path of cell migration. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and perpendicular diffusivity (D⊥ ) changes derived from ex vivo microscopic 3D-DTI were significant at two months of tumor growth. In the caudate putamen an FA increase of +38% (p < 0.001) was observed, while in the CC a - 28% decrease in FA (p < 0.005) and a + 95% increase in D⊥ (p < 0.005) were observed. In the CC, DTI changes and fluorescent Glio6 cell density obtained by two-photon microscopy in the same brains were correlated (p < 0.001, r = 0.69), validating FA and D⊥ as early quantitative biomarkers to detect glioma cell migration/invasion. The origin of DTI changes was assessed by electron microscopy of the same tract, showing axon bundle disorganization. During the first two months, Glio6 cells display a migratory phenotype without being associated with the constitution of a brain tumor mass. This offers a unique opportunity to apply microscopic 3D-DTI and to validate DTI parameters FA and D⊥ as biomarkers for glioma cell

  15. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth.

    PubMed

    Solga, Anne C; Pong, Winnie W; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J; Toonen, Joseph A; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H; Mardis, Elaine R; Gutmann, David H

    2015-10-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies.

  16. Effects of Long-term Physical Training on the Bearers of a Float during the Nagasaki Kunchi Festival

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Shigemori; Kawano, Hiroaki; Maemura, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Nagasaki Kunchi Festival is one of the most famous festivals in Nagasaki. The bearers the floats that are used in this festival undergo long-term training for the performance. However, there have not been any studies on the effects of this training on the health of the float bearers. Methods Thirty-four men ranging in age from 20 to 49 years (mean age: 35.7±7.6 years) were included in the study. We examined the following parameters before and after the training: body weight (BW), body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage, muscle volume, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse rate (PR), pulse pressure (PP), bearing power, arterial pressure volume index (API), and arterial velocity pulse index (AVI). Results For all participants, the BW, BMI, body fat percentage, and PR were significantly decreased, and the muscle volume and bearing power were significantly increased after the training; however, there were no significant changes in the SBP, DBP, PP, API, or AVI. In the participants with hypertension, in addition to decreases in BW, BMI, body fat percentage, PR, and PP, the SBP, DBP, and API were significantly decreased after the training. Conclusion Training for bearing a float during Nagasaki Kunchi effectively improved the body structure of all participants and reduced the BP and API in participants with hypertension. PMID:28049988

  17. Two Unique Glioma Subtypes Revealed.

    PubMed

    Poh, Alissa

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 1,122 diffuse glioma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas has revealed two new subtypes of this common brain cancer, with molecular and clinical features that diverge from the norm. The study findings also support the use of DNA methylation profiles to improve glioma classification and treatment.

  18. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2014-12-15

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the immune response of the patient to the virus infection limits the utility of the therapy, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using nonspecific pharmacologic inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumors, and robust monocyte, T-, and NK cell infiltration 3 days after MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumor-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumor-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of cyclophosphamide-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multifaceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with cyclophosphamide-mediated lymphoablation.

  19. Podoplanin: a marker for reactive gliosis in gliomas and brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Kushal; Freitas-Andrade, Moises; Bechberger, John F; Krishnan, Harini; Goldberg, Gary S; Naus, Christian C; Sin, Wun Chey

    2015-01-01

    Reactive astrogliosis is associated with many pathologic processes in the central nervous system, including gliomas. The glycoprotein podoplanin (PDPN) is upregulated in malignant gliomas. Using a syngeneic intracranial glioma mouse model, we show that PDPN is highly expressed in a subset of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes within and adjacent to gliomas. The expression of PDPN in tumor-associated reactive astrocytes was confirmed by its colocalization with the astrocytic marker S100β and with connexin43, a major astrocytic gap junction protein. To determine whether the increase in PDPN is a general feature of gliosis, we used 2 mouse models in which astrogliosis was induced either by a needle injury or ischemia and observed similar upregulation of PDPN in reactive astrocytes in both models. Astrocytic PDPN was also found to be coexpressed with nestin, an intermediate filament marker for neural stem/progenitor cells. Our findings confirm that expression of PDPN is part of the normal host response to brain injury and gliomas, and suggest that it may be a novel cell surface marker for a specific population of reactive astrocytes in the vicinity of gliomas and nonneoplastic brain lesions. The findings also highlight the heterogeneity of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes in reactive gliosis.

  20. Differential utilization of ketone bodies by neurons and glioma cell lines: a rationale for ketogenic diet as experimental glioma therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Even in the presence of oxygen, malignant cells often highly depend on glycolysis for energy generation, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. One strategy targeting this metabolic phenotype is glucose restriction by administration of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet. Under these conditions, ketone bodies are generated serving as an important energy source at least for non-transformed cells. Methods To investigate whether a ketogenic diet might selectively impair energy metabolism in tumor cells, we characterized in vitro effects of the principle ketone body 3-hydroxybutyrate in rat hippocampal neurons and five glioma cell lines. In vivo, a non-calorie-restricted ketogenic diet was examined in an orthotopic xenograft glioma mouse model. Results The ketone body metabolizing enzymes 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (BDH1 and 2), 3-oxoacid-CoA transferase 1 (OXCT1) and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) were expressed at the mRNA and protein level in all glioma cell lines. However, no activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway was observed in glioma cells, consistent with the absence of substantial 3-hydroxybutyrate metabolism and subsequent accumulation of succinate. Further, 3-hydroxybutyrate rescued hippocampal neurons from glucose withdrawal-induced cell death but did not protect glioma cell lines. In hypoxia, mRNA expression of OXCT1, ACAT1, BDH1 and 2 was downregulated. In vivo, the ketogenic diet led to a robust increase of blood 3-hydroxybutyrate, but did not alter blood glucose levels or improve survival. Conclusion In summary, glioma cells are incapable of compensating for glucose restriction by metabolizing ketone bodies in vitro, suggesting a potential disadvantage of tumor cells compared to normal cells under a carbohydrate-restricted ketogenic diet. Further investigations are necessary to identify co-treatment modalities, e.g. glycolysis inhibitors or antiangiogenic agents that efficiently

  1. Ets Factors Regulate Neural Stem Cell Depletion and Gliogenesis in Ras Pathway Glioma.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Joshua J; Levy, Rachelle; Antonuk, C Danielle; Molina, Jessica; Dutra-Clarke, Marina; Park, Hannah; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Kim, Gi Bum; Hu, Xin; Bannykh, Serguei I; Verhaak, Roel G W; Danielpour, Moise

    2015-07-14

    As the list of putative driver mutations in glioma grows, we are just beginning to elucidate the effects of dysregulated developmental signaling pathways on the transformation of neural cells. We have employed a postnatal, mosaic, autochthonous glioma model that captures the first hours and days of gliomagenesis in more resolution than conventional genetically engineered mouse models of cancer. We provide evidence that disruption of the Nf1-Ras pathway in the ventricular zone at multiple signaling nodes uniformly results in rapid neural stem cell depletion, progenitor hyperproliferation, and gliogenic lineage restriction. Abolishing Ets subfamily activity, which is upregulated downstream of Ras, rescues these phenotypes and blocks glioma initiation. Thus, the Nf1-Ras-Ets axis might be one of the select molecular pathways that are perturbed for initiation and maintenance in glioma. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intracellular glycine receptor function facilitates glioma formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Förstera, Benjamin; a Dzaye, Omar Dildar; Winkelmann, Aline; Semtner, Marcus; Benedetti, Bruno; Markovic, Darko S; Synowitz, Michael; Wend, Peter; Fähling, Michael; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Glass, Rainer; Kettenmann, Helmut; Meier, Jochen C

    2014-09-01

    The neuronal function of Cys-loop neurotransmitter receptors is established; however, their role in non-neuronal cells is poorly defined. As brain tumors are enriched in the neurotransmitter glycine, we studied the expression and function of glycine receptors (GlyRs) in glioma cells. Human brain tumor biopsies selectively expressed the GlyR α1 and α3 subunits, which have nuclear localization signals (NLSs). The mouse glioma cell line GL261 expressed GlyR α1, and knockdown of GlyR α1 protein expression impaired the self-renewal capacity and tumorigenicity of GL261 glioma cells, as shown by a neurosphere assay and GL261 cell inoculation in vivo, respectively. We furthermore showed that the pronounced tumorigenic effect of GlyR α1 relies on a new intracellular signaling function that depends on the NLS region in the large cytosolic loop and impacts on GL261 glioma cell gene regulation. Stable expression of GlyR α1 and α3 loops rescued the self-renewal capacity of GlyR α1 knockdown cells, which demonstrates their functional equivalence. The new intracellular signaling function identified here goes beyond the well-established role of GlyRs as neuronal ligand-gated ion channels and defines NLS-containing GlyRs as new potential targets for brain tumor therapies. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Chlorotoxin Labeled Magnetic Nanovectors for Targeted Gene Delivery to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors, and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site, but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers. PMID:20731441

  4. A dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, PI-103, cooperates with stem cell-delivered TRAIL in experimental glioma models.

    PubMed

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Anderegg, Maarten; Cameron, Cody; Shah, Khalid

    2011-01-01

    The resistance of glioma cells to a number of antitumor agents and the highly invasive nature of glioma cells that escape the primary tumor mass are key impediments to the eradication of tumors in glioma patients. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of a novel PI3-kinase/mTOR inhibitor, PI-103, in established glioma lines and primary CD133(+) glioma-initiating cells and explored the potential of combining PI-103 with stem cell-delivered secretable tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (S-TRAIL) both in vitro and in orthotopic mouse models of gliomas. We show that PI-103 inhibits proliferation and invasion, causes G(0)-G(1) arrest in cell cycle, and results in significant attenuation of orthotopic tumor growth in vivo. Establishing cocultures of neural stem cells (NSC) and glioma cells, we show that PI-103 augments the response of glioma cells to stem cell-delivered S-TRAIL. Using bimodal optical imaging, we show that when different regimens of systemic PI-103 delivery are combined with NSC-derived S-TRAIL, a significant reduction in tumor volumes is observed compared with PI-103 treatment alone. To our knowledge, this is the first study that reveals the antitumor effect of PI-103 in intracranial gliomas. Our findings offer a preclinical rationale for application of mechanism-based systemically delivered antiproliferative agents and novel stem cell-based proapoptotic therapies to improve treatment of malignant gliomas.

  5. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A Sorana; Taylor, Michael D; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Collier, Lara S

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  6. Myxoma Virus Infection Promotes NK Lysis of Malignant Gliomas In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ogbomo, Henry; Zemp, Franz J.; Lun, Xueqing; Zhang, Jiqing; Stack, Danuta; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mcfadden, Grant; Mody, Christopher H.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a well-established oncolytic agent against different types of tumors. MYXV is also known for its immunomodulatory properties in down-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I surface expression (via the M153R gene product, a viral E3-ubiquitin ligase) and suppressing T cell killing of infected target cells. MHC I down-regulation, however, favors NK cell activation. Brain tumors including gliomas are characterized by high MHC I expression with impaired NK activity. We thus hypothesized that MYXV infection of glioma cells will promote NK cell-mediated recognition and killing of gliomas. We infected human gliomas with MYXV and evaluated their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. MYXV enhanced NK cell-mediated killing of glioma cells (U87 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 51.73% vs. 28.63%, P = .0001, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 40.4% vs. 20.03%, P .0007, t test). Using MYXV M153R targeted knockout (designated vMyx-M153KO) to infect gliomas, we demonstrate that M153R was responsible for reduced expression of MHC I on gliomas and enhanced NK cell-mediated antiglioma activity (U87 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 51.73% vs. 25.17%, P = .0002, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 40.4% vs. 19.27, P = .0013, t test). Consequently, NK cell-mediated lysis of established human glioma tumors in CB-17 SCID mice was accelerated with improved mouse survival (log-rank P = .0072). These results demonstrate the potential for combining MYXV with NK cells to effectively kill malignant gliomas. PMID:23762498

  7. Myxoma virus infection promotes NK lysis of malignant gliomas in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ogbomo, Henry; Zemp, Franz J; Lun, Xueqing; Zhang, Jiqing; Stack, Danuta; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Mody, Christopher H; Forsyth, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a well-established oncolytic agent against different types of tumors. MYXV is also known for its immunomodulatory properties in down-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I surface expression (via the M153R gene product, a viral E3-ubiquitin ligase) and suppressing T cell killing of infected target cells. MHC I down-regulation, however, favors NK cell activation. Brain tumors including gliomas are characterized by high MHC I expression with impaired NK activity. We thus hypothesized that MYXV infection of glioma cells will promote NK cell-mediated recognition and killing of gliomas. We infected human gliomas with MYXV and evaluated their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. MYXV enhanced NK cell-mediated killing of glioma cells (U87 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 51.73% vs. 28.63%, P = .0001, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 40.4% vs. 20.03%, P .0007, t test). Using MYXV M153R targeted knockout (designated vMyx-M153KO) to infect gliomas, we demonstrate that M153R was responsible for reduced expression of MHC I on gliomas and enhanced NK cell-mediated antiglioma activity (U87 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 51.73% vs. 25.17%, P = .0002, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 40.4% vs. 19.27, P = .0013, t test). Consequently, NK cell-mediated lysis of established human glioma tumors in CB-17 SCID mice was accelerated with improved mouse survival (log-rank P = .0072). These results demonstrate the potential for combining MYXV with NK cells to effectively kill malignant gliomas.

  8. KCa3.1 channel inhibition sensitizes malignant gliomas to temozolomide treatment

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Grimaldi, Alfonso; Chece, Giuseppina; Porzia, Alessandra; Esposito, Vincenzo; Santoro, Antonio; Salvati, Maurizio; Mainiero, Fabrizio; Ragozzino, Davide; Angelantonio, Silvia Di; Wulff, Heike; Catalano, Myriam; Limatola, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are among the most frequent and aggressive cerebral tumors, characterized by high proliferative and invasive indexes. Standard therapy for patients, after surgery and radiotherapy, consists of temozolomide (TMZ), a methylating agent that blocks tumor cell proliferation. Currently, there are no therapies aimed at reducing tumor cell invasion. Ion channels are candidate molecular targets involved in glioma cell migration and infiltration into the brain parenchyma. In this paper we demonstrate that: i) blockade of the calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 with TRAM-34 has co-adjuvant effects with TMZ, reducing GL261 glioma cell migration, invasion and colony forming activity, increasing apoptosis, and forcing cells to pass the G2/M cell cycle phase, likely through cdc2 de-phosphorylation; ii) KCa3.1 silencing potentiates the inhibitory effect of TMZ on glioma cell viability; iii) the combination of TMZ/TRAM-34 attenuates the toxic effects of glioma conditioned medium on neuronal cultures, through a microglia dependent mechanism since the effect is abolished by clodronate-induced microglia killing; iv) TMZ/TRAM-34 co-treatment increases the number of apoptotic tumor cells, and the mean survival time in a syngeneic mouse glioma model (C57BL6 mice implanted with GL261 cells); v) TMZ/TRAM-34 co-treatment reduces cell viability of GBM cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) freshly isolated from patients. Taken together, these data suggest a new therapeutic approach for malignant glioma, targeting both glioma cell proliferating and migration, and demonstrate that TMZ/TRAM-34 co-treatment affects both glioma cells and infiltrating microglia, resulting in an overall reduction of tumor cell progression. PMID:27096953

  9. Glutamine Metabolism in Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Szeliga, Monika; Albrecht, Jan

    2016-01-01

    By histological, morphological criteria, and malignancy, brain tumors are classified by WHO into grades I (most benign) to IV (highly malignant), and gliomas are the most frequently occurring class throughout the grades. Similar to peripheral tumors, the growth of glia-derived tumor cells largely depends on glutamine (Gln), which is vividly taken up by the cells, using mostly ASCT2 and SN1 as Gln carriers. Tumor growth-promoting effects of Gln are associated with its phosphate-activated glutaminase (GA) (specifically KGA)-mediated degradation to glutamate (Glu) and/or with its entry to the energy- and intermediate metabolite-generating pathways related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. However, a subclass of liver-type GA are absent in glioma cells, a circumstance which allows phenotype manipulations upon their transfection to the cells. Gln-derived Glu plays a major role in promoting tumor proliferation and invasion. Glu is relatively inefficiently recycled to Gln and readily leaves the cells by exchange with the extracellular pool of the glutathione (GSH) precursor Cys mediated by xc- transporter. This results in (a) cell invasion-fostering interaction of Glu with ionotropic Glu receptors in the surrounding tissue, (b) intracellular accumulation of GSH which increases tumor resistance to radio- and chemotherapy.

  10. Occupation and adult gliomas.

    PubMed

    Carozza, S E; Wrensch, M; Miike, R; Newman, B; Olshan, A F; Savitz, D A; Yost, M; Lee, M

    2000-11-01

    Lifetime job histories from a population-based, case-control study of gliomas diagnosed among adults in the San Francisco Bay area between August 1991 and April 1994 were evaluated to assess occupational risk factors. Occupational data for 476 cases and 462 controls were analyzed, with adjustment for age, gender, education, and race. Imprecise increased risks were observed for physicians and surgeons (odds ratio (OR) = 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7, 17.6), artists (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 0.5, 6.5), foundry and smelter workers (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 13.1), petroleum and gas workers (OR = 4.9, 95% CI: 0.6, 42.2), and painters (OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 4.9). Legal and social service workers, shippers, janitors, motor vehicle operators, and aircraft operators had increased odds ratios only with longer duration of employment. Physicians and surgeons, foundry and smelter workers, petroleum and gas workers, and painters showed increased risk for both astrocytic and nonastrocytic tumors. Artists and firemen had increased risk for astrocytic tumors only, while messengers, textile workers, aircraft operators, and vehicle manufacturing workers showed increased risk only for nonastrocytic tumors. Despite study limitations, including small numbers for many of the occupational groups, a high percentage of proxy respondents among cases, and lack of specific exposure information, associations were observed for several occupations previously reported to be at higher risk for brain tumors generally and gliomas specifically.

  11. Long non-coding RNA ATB promotes glioma malignancy by negatively regulating miR-200a.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun-Chun; Xiong, Zhang; Zhu, Guan-Nan; Wang, Chao; Zong, Gang; Wang, Hong-Liang; Bian, Er-Bao; Zhao, Bing

    2016-06-06

    Glioma is one of the most common and aggressive primary malignant tumor in the brain. Accumulating evidences indicated that aberrantly expressed non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), contribute to tumorigenesis. However, potential mechanisms between lncRNAs and miRNAs in glioma remain largely unknown. Long non-coding RNA activated by TGF-β (LncRNA-ATB) expression in glioma tissues and cells was quantified by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Glioma cell lines U251 and A172 were transfected with sh-ATB, miR-200a mimics, miR-200a inhibitors, after we assayed the cell phenotype and expression of the relevant molecules. Dual-luciferase reporter assay, RIP and a xenograft mouse model were used to examine the expression of sh-ATB and its target gene miR-200a. ATB is abnormally up-regulated both in glioma tissues and cell lines compared with normal brain tissues, and glioma patients with high ATB expression had shorter overall survival time. Knockdown of ATB significantly inhibits glioma malignancy, including cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion in vitro, and the xenograft tumor formation in vivo. In addition, ATB was confirmed to target miR-200a, and miR-200a inhibition reversed the malignant characteristics of ATB knockdown on glioma cells. In particular, ATB may act as a ceRNA, effectively becoming a sink for miR-200a, thereby modulating the derepression of TGF-β2. Our findings suggest that ATB plays an oncogenic role of glioma cells by inhibiting miR-200a and facilitating TGF-β2 in glioma, thereby may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of human glioma.

  12. Myc inhibition is effective against glioma and reveals a role for Myc in proficient mitosis.

    PubMed

    Annibali, Daniela; Whitfield, Jonathan R; Favuzzi, Emilia; Jauset, Toni; Serrano, Erika; Cuartas, Isabel; Redondo-Campos, Sara; Folch, Gerard; Gonzàlez-Juncà, Alba; Sodir, Nicole M; Massó-Vallés, Daniel; Beaulieu, Marie-Eve; Swigart, Lamorna B; Mc Gee, Margaret M; Somma, Maria Patrizia; Nasi, Sergio; Seoane, Joan; Evan, Gerard I; Soucek, Laura

    2014-08-18

    Gliomas are the most common primary tumours affecting the adult central nervous system and respond poorly to standard therapy. Myc is causally implicated in most human tumours and the majority of glioblastomas have elevated Myc levels. Using the Myc dominant negative Omomyc, we previously showed that Myc inhibition is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Here, we preclinically validate Myc inhibition as a therapeutic strategy in mouse and human glioma, using a mouse model of spontaneous multifocal invasive astrocytoma and its derived neuroprogenitors, human glioblastoma cell lines, and patient-derived tumours both in vitro and in orthotopic xenografts. Across all these experimental models we find that Myc inhibition reduces proliferation, increases apoptosis and remarkably, elicits the formation of multinucleated cells that then arrest or die by mitotic catastrophe, revealing a new role for Myc in the proficient division of glioma cells.

  13. Myc inhibition is effective against glioma and reveals a role for Myc in proficient mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Annibali, Daniela; Whitfield, Jonathan R.; Favuzzi, Emilia; Jauset, Toni; Serrano, Erika; Cuartas, Isabel; Redondo-Campos, Sara; Folch, Gerard; Gonzàlez-Juncà, Alba; Sodir, Nicole M.; Massó-Vallés, Daniel; Beaulieu, Marie-Eve; Swigart, Lamorna B.; Mc Gee, Margaret M.; Somma, Maria Patrizia; Nasi, Sergio; Seoane, Joan; Evan, Gerard I.; Soucek, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary tumours affecting the adult central nervous system and respond poorly to standard therapy. Myc is causally implicated in most human tumours and the majority of glioblastomas have elevated Myc levels. Using the Myc dominant negative Omomyc, we previously showed that Myc inhibition is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Here, we preclinically validate Myc inhibition as a therapeutic strategy in mouse and human glioma, using a mouse model of spontaneous multifocal invasive astrocytoma and its derived neuroprogenitors, human glioblastoma cell lines, and patient-derived tumours both in vitro and in orthotopic xenografts. Across all these experimental models we find that Myc inhibition reduces proliferation, increases apoptosis and remarkably, elicits the formation of multinucleated cells that then arrest or die by mitotic catastrophe, revealing a new role for Myc in the proficient division of glioma cells. PMID:25130259

  14. Imaging of adult brainstem gliomas.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Bela; Kamli, Ali A; Kollias, Spyros S

    2015-04-01

    Brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are uncommon in adults accounting for about 2% of all intracranial neoplasms. They are often phenotypically low-grade as compared to their more common paediatric counterparts. Since brainstem biopsies are rarely performed, these tumours are commonly classified according to their MR imaging characteristics into 4 subgroups: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas, (b) enhancing malignant gliomas, (c) focal tectal gliomas and (d) exophytic gliomas/other subtypes. The prognosis and treatment is variable for the different types and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. Radiotherapy (RT) with adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment of diffuse low-grade and malignant BSGs, whereas, surgical resection is limited to the exophytic subtypes. Review of previous literature shows that the detailed imaging of adult BSGs has not received significant attention. This review illustrates in detail the imaging features of adult BSGs using conventional and advanced MR techniques like diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), as well as 18F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine positron emission tomography (18F-FET/PET). We have discussed the pertinent differences between childhood and adult BSGs, imaging mimics, prognostic factors and briefly reviewed the treatment options of these tumours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Controversy on treatments for gliomas].

    PubMed

    Nomura, K

    1998-09-01

    Gliomas are representative primary malignant brain tumors, and with such tumors it is difficult to define the advanced stage. If the advanced stage indicates no curability by surgery alone, most gliomas would belong to this criterion because of their poor prognosis without any completely effective treatment. In this sense, no one could show a standard therapy to treat these unfortunate patients, for example, patients with glioblastoma, they could permit only 1 year survived even they had any applicable treatments to the lesions, these days. Treatment for low-grade gliomas has been most controversial for a long time, and no standard treatments have been determined so far. In this paper, as the treatment of low-grade gliomas it was intended to report what must be done for this patient and the present results of opinion survey for the treatment of gliomas which was done to professors of 80 institutes, from schools of medicine at all universities and medical colleges in Japan. For high-grade gliomas, some effectiveness of radiation therapy was disclosed as well as chemotherapy from recent papers. Gene therapy was also discussed briefly, its present status and future.

  16. Targeting of human glioma xenografts in vivo utilizing radiolabeled antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.A.; Wessels, B.W.; Wharam, M.D.; Order, S.E.; Wanek, P.M.; Poggenburg, J.K.; Klein, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies provide a potential basis for selective radiotherapy of human gliomas. We have measured tumor targeting by radiolabeled monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against neuroectodermal and tumor-associated antigens in nude mice bearing human glioma xenografts. Monoclonal P96.5, a mouse IgG2a immunoglobulin, defines an epitope of a human melanoma cell surface protein, and specifically binds the U-251 human glioma as measured by immunoperoxidase histochemistry. 111In-radiolabeled P96.5 specifically targets the U-251 human glioma xenograft and yields 87.0 microCuries (microCi) of tumor activity per gram per 100 microCi injected activity compared to 4.5 microCi following administration of radiolabeled irrelevant monoclonal antibody. Calculations of targeting ratios demonstrate deposited dose to be 11.6 times greater with radiolabeled P96.5 administration compared to irrelevant monoclonal antibody. The proportion of tumor dose found in normal organs is less than 10%, further supporting specific targeting of the human glioma xenograft by this antibody. Monoclonal antibody ZME018, which defines a second melanoma-associated antigen, and polyclonal rabbit antiferritin, which defines a tumor-associated antigen, demonstrate positive immunoperoxidase staining of the tumor, but comparatively decreased targeting. When compared to the 111In-radiolabeled antibody, 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5 demonstrates comparable tumor targeting and percentages of tumor dose found in normal organs. To test the therapeutic potential of 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, tumors and normal sites were implanted with miniature thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Seven days following administration of 100 microCi 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, average absorbed doses of 3770, 980, 353, and 274 cGy were observed in tumor, liver, contralateral control site, and total body, respectively.

  17. CK2 inhibition induced PDK4-AMPK axis regulates metabolic adaptation and survival responses in glioma.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Deobrat; Ahmad, Fahim; Ghildiyal, Ruchi; Joshi, Shanker Datt; Sen, Ellora

    2016-05-15

    Understanding mechanisms that link aberrant metabolic adaptation and pro-survival responses in glioma cells is crucial towards the development of new anti-glioma therapies. As we have previously reported that CK2 is associated with glioma cell survival, we evaluated its involvement in the regulation of glucose metabolism. Inhibition of CK2 increased the expression of metabolic regulators, PDK4 and AMPK along with the key cellular energy sensor CREB. This increase was concomitant with altered metabolic profile as characterized by decreased glucose uptake in a PDK4 and AMPK dependent manner. Increased PDK4 expression was CREB dependent, as exogenous inhibition of CREB functions abrogated CK2 inhibitor mediated increase in PDK4 expression. Interestingly, PDK4 regulated AMPK phosphorylation which in turn affected cell viability in CK2 inhibitor treated glioma cells. CK2 inhibitor 4,5,6,7-Tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBB) significantly retarded the growth of glioma xenografts in athymic nude mouse model. Coherent with the in vitro findings, elevated senescence, pAMPK and PDK4 levels were also observed in TBB-treated xenograft tissue. Taken together, CK2 inhibition in glioma cells drives the PDK4-AMPK axis to affect metabolic profile that has a strong bearing on their survival.

  18. The impact of coexisting genetic mutations on murine optic glioma biology

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Aparna; Toonen, Joseph A.; Gianino, Scott M.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor predisposition syndrome are prone to the development of optic pathway gliomas resulting from biallelic inactivation of the NF1 gene. Recent studies have revealed the presence of other molecular alterations in a small portion of these NF1-associated brain tumors. The purpose of this study was to leverage Nf1 genetically engineered mouse strains to define the functional significance of these changes to optic glioma biology. Methods Nf1+/− mice were intercrossed with Nf1flox/flox mice, which were then crossed with Nf1flox/flox; GFAP-Cre mice, to generate Nf1flox/mut; GFAP-Cre (FMC) mice. These mice were additionally mated with conditional KIAA1549:BRAF knock-in or Ptenflox/wt mice to generate Nf1flox/mut; f-BRAF; GFAP-Cre (FMBC) mice or Nf1flox/mut; Ptenflox/wt; GFAP-Cre (FMPC) mice, respectively. The resulting optic gliomas were analyzed for changes in tumor volume, proliferation, and retinal ganglion cell loss. Results While KIAA1549:BRAF conferred no additional biological properties on Nf1 optic glioma, FMPC mice had larger optic gliomas with greater proliferative indices and microglial infiltration. In addition, all 3 Nf1 murine optic glioma strains exhibited reduced retinal ganglion cell survival and numbers; however, FMPC mice had greater retinal nerve fiber layer thinning near the optic head relative to FMC and FMBC mice. Conclusions Collectively, these experiments demonstrate genetic cooperativity between Nf1 loss and Pten heterozygosity relevant to optic glioma biology and further underscore the value of employing genetically engineered mouse strains to define the contribution of discovered molecular alterations to brain tumor pathogenesis. PMID:25246427

  19. Isolation and Flow Cytometric Analysis of Glioma-infiltrating Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Gregory J.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory has recently demonstrated that natural killer (NK) cells are capable of eradicating orthotopically implanted mouse GL26 and rat CNS-1 malignant gliomas soon after intracranial engraftment if the cancer cells are rendered deficient in their expression of the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-1 (gal-1). More recent work now shows that a population of Gr-1+/CD11b+ myeloid cells is critical to this effect. To better understand the mechanisms by which NK and myeloid cells cooperate to confer gal-1-deficient tumor rejection we have developed a comprehensive protocol for the isolation and analysis of glioma-infiltrating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The method is demonstrated here by comparing PBMC infiltration into the tumor microenvironment of gal-1-expressing GL26 gliomas with those rendered gal-1-deficient via shRNA knockdown. The protocol begins with a description of how to culture and prepare GL26 cells for inoculation into the syngeneic C57BL/6J mouse brain. It then explains the steps involved in the isolation and flow cytometric analysis of glioma-infiltrating PBMCs from the early brain tumor microenvironment. The method is adaptable to a number of in vivo experimental designs in which temporal data on immune infiltration into the brain is required. The method is sensitive and highly reproducible, as glioma-infiltrating PBMCs can be isolated from intracranial tumors as soon as 24 hr post-tumor engraftment with similar cell counts observed from time point matched tumors throughout independent experiments. A single experimentalist can perform the method from brain harvesting to flow cytometric analysis of glioma-infiltrating PBMCs in roughly 4–6 hr depending on the number of samples to be analyzed. Alternative glioma models and/or cell-specific detection antibodies may also be used at the experimentalists’ discretion to assess the infiltration of several other immune cell types of interest without the need for alterations to the

  20. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Anne C.; Pong, Winnie W.; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J.; Toonen, Joseph A.; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L.; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies. PMID:26585233

  1. Rehabilitation of patients with glioma.

    PubMed

    Vargo, Mary; Henriksson, Roger; Salander, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Disabling sequelae occur in a majority of patients diagnosed with brain tumor, including glioma, such as cognitive deficits, weakness, and visual perceptual changes. Often, multiple impairments are present concurrently. Healthcare staff must be aware of the "biographic disruption" the patient with glioma has experienced. While prognostic considerations factor into rehabilitation goals and expectations, regardless of prognosis the treatment team must offer cohesive support, facilitating hope, function, and quality of life. Awareness of family and caregiver concerns plays an important role in the overall care. Inpatient rehabilitation, especially after surgical resection, has been shown to result in functional improvement and homegoing rates on a par with individuals with other neurologic conditions, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury. Community integration comprises a significant element of life satisfaction, as has been shown in childhood glioma survivors. Employment is often affected by the glioma diagnosis, but may be ameliorated, when appropriate, by addressing modifiable factors such as depression, fatigue, or sleep disturbance, or by workplace accommodations. Further research is needed into many facets of rehabilitation in the setting of glioma, including establishing better care models for consistently identifying and addressing functional limitations in this population, measuring outcomes of various levels of rehabilitation care, identifying optimal physical activity strategies, delineating the long-term effects of rehabilitation interventions, and exploring impact of rehabilitation interventions on caregiver burden. The effective elements of cognitive rehabilitation, including transition of cognitive strategies to everyday living, need to be better defined.

  2. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  3. EGFR immunolabeling pattern may discriminate low-grade gliomas from gliosis.

    PubMed

    Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Benchetrit, Maxime; Miquel, Catherine; Fontaine, Denys; Auvergne, Romane; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Cardot-Leccia, Nathalie; Michiels, Jean-François; Paquis-Flucklinger, Veronique; Virolle, Thierry

    2011-04-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is common in gliomas. Gliomas are infiltrating tumors in which neoplastic glial cells can be intermingled with reactive glial cells, particularly in diffuse low-grade gliomas. As overexpression of EGFR has also been described in gliosis, it can be difficult to evaluate EGFR immunolabeling in diffuse low-grade gliomas because of this cell mix. We compared EGFR immunolabeling between gliosis and low-grade gliomas in order to identify distinctive criteria. We studied EGFR expression in 28 cases of gliosis and 39 diffuse low-grade gliomas (23 astrocytomas and 16 oligodendrogliomas). EGFR immunohistochemistry staining was performed on paraffin-embedded sections with a mouse monoclonal antibody (clone 2-18C9; Dako). Co-expression of EGFR with Olig2, Mib-1, and p53 was assessed in seven cases of low-grade gliomas using double immunolabeling. Then, EGFR immunostaining was blindly tested on 22 small specimens of indeterminate glial lesions provided by a reference neuropathological center. Two pathologists of our local center were asked to classify the lesions into diffuse low-grade glioma or gliosis according to the pattern of EGFR expression. Weak expression of EGFR was commonly detected in gliosis (23/28 cases). Strongly-stained cells were absent. Positive cells had reactive glial cell morphology. EGFR expression in gliomas was characterized by constant strongly-stained cells (39/39 cases). All strongly-stained cells had a high nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio, with minimal to moderate nuclear atypia. Most of the strongly EGFR-positive cells were Olig2-positive. All the cases displayed cells co-expressing EGFR and Mib-1. In three p53-positive tumors, many p53-positive cells were strongly EGFR-positive. On the basis of EGFR expression, 14 out of the 22 indeterminate cases were classified as gliomas and eight as gliosis by both pathologists. Concordance with the initial diagnosis established by the reference center and

  4. [Genetics and brain gliomas].

    PubMed

    Alentorn, Agusti; Labussière, Marianne; Sanson, Marc; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Chromosome arms 1p and 19q codeletion, corresponding to an unbalanced reciprocal translocation t(1;19)(q10;p10), is seen in oligodendroglial tumours and is associated with better prognosis and better chemosensitivity. BRAF abnormalities are observed in pilocytic astrocytomas (tandem duplication-rearrangement) and in pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas (BRAF V600E mutation). The vast majority of primary or de novo glioblastomas exhibit genetic abnormalities disrupting the intracellular signaling pathways of: transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors to growth factors and their downstream signaling pathways (i.e. NF1-RAS-RAF-MAPK and PTEN-PI3K-AKT-TSC-mTOR); RB and; TP53. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are frequent in diffuse grade II and grade III gliomas and in secondary glioblastomas. They are diagnostic and favorable independent prognostic biomarkers. In contrast, they are rare in primary or de novo glioblastomas and not reported in pilocytic astrocytomas. Germlin mutations in MSH2/MLH1/PMS2/MSH6, CDKN2A, TSC1/TSC2, PTEN, TP53 and NF1/NF2 predispose to glial tumors in the setting of hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in TERT,CCDC26, CDKN2A/CDKN2B, RTEL, EGFR and PHLDB1 confer an inherited susceptibility to glial tumors.

  5. Glutamine Addiction In Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Javier; Alonso, Francisco J; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Campos-Sandoval, José A

    2017-03-09

    Cancer cells develop and succeed by shifting to different metabolic programs compared with their normal cell counterparts. One of the classical hallmarks of cancer cells is their higher glycolysis rate and lactate production even in the presence of abundant O2 (Warburg effect). Another common metabolic feature of cancer cells is a high rate of glutamine (Gln) consumption normally exceeding their biosynthetic and energetic needs. The term Gln addiction is now widely used to reflect the strong dependence shown by most cancer cells for this essential nitrogen substrate after metabolic reprogramming. A Gln/glutamate (Glu) cycle occurs between host tissues and the tumor in order to maximize its growth and proliferation rates. The mechanistic basis for this deregulated tumor metabolism and how these changes are connected to oncogenic and tumor suppressor pathways are becoming increasingly understood. Based on these advances, new avenues of research have been initiated to find novel therapeutic targets and to explore strategies that interfere with glutamine metabolism as anticancer therapies. In this review, we provided an updated overview of glutamine addiction in glioma, the most prevalent type of brain tumor.

  6. Culture and characteristics of hormone-responsive neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamprecht, B.; Glaser, T.; Reiser, G.; Bayer, E.; Propst, F.

    1985-01-01

    Neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cells were generated by cell fusion of the 6-thioguanine-resistant clonal mouse neuroblastoma cells and the bromodeoxyuridine-resistant rat glioma cells, selection, and cloning. Every characteristics generally ascribed to neurons has been observed with the hybrid cells. The paper explores the morphological differentiation of hybrid cells, procedures for testing the hormonal regulation of intracellular levels of cyclic, (/sup 3/H)AMP in hybrid cells, hormonal regulation of adenylate cyclase in homogenates of hyrbid cells, intracellular levels of cyclic GMP, and uptake of guanidinium ions in hybrid cells.

  7. Notch Promotes Radioresistance of Glioma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jialiang; Wakeman, Timothy P.; Latha, Justin D.; Hjelmeland, Anita B.; Wang, Xiao-Fan; White, Rebekah R.; Rich, Jeremy N.; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy represents the most effective nonsurgical treatments for gliomas. Yet, gliomas are highly radioresistant and recurrence is nearly universal. Results from our laboratory and other groups suggest that cancer stem cells contribute to radioresistance in gliomas and breast cancers. The Notch pathway is critically implicated in stem cell fate determination and cancer. In this study, we showed that inhibition of Notch pathway with gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) rendered the glioma stem cells more sensitive to radiation at clinically relevant doses. GSIs enhanced radiation-induced cell death and impaired clonogenic survival of glioma stem cells, but not non-stem glioma cells. Similarly, knockdown of Notch1 or Notch2 increased radiosensitivity of glioma stem cells. The specificity of the radiosensitizing effects of GSIs was confirmed by expression of the constitutively active intracellular domains of Notch1 or Notch2 that protected glioma stem cells against radiation. Notch inhibition with GSIs did not alter the DNA damage response of glioma stem cells following radiation, but rather impaired radiation-induced Akt activation and upregulated levels of the truncated apoptotic isoform of Mcl-1 (Mcl-1s). Taken together, our results suggest a critical role of Notch to promote radioresistance of glioma stem cells. Inhibition of Notch signaling holds promise to improve the efficiency of current radiotherapy in glioma treatment. PMID:19921751

  8. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Yu; Liu, Pin; Zhao, Weiguo

    2016-08-05

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients’ poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. - Highlights: • Nek1 is upregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and cell lines. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with glioma grades and patients’ KPS score. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with patients’ poor overall survival. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 inhibits glioma cell growth. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide.

  9. Free-space optics technology employed in an UMTS release 4 bearer independent core network access part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibac, Ionut

    2005-08-01

    The UMTS Bearer Independent Core Network program introduced the 3rd Generation Partnership Program Release 4 BICN architecture into the legacy UMTS TDM-switched network. BICN is the application of calI server archltecture for voice and circuit switched data, enabling the provisioning of traditional circuit-switched services using a packet-switched transport network. Today"s business climate has made it essential for service providers to develop a comprehensive networking strategy that means introduction of RCBICN networks. The R4-BICN solution to the evolution of the Core Network in UMTS will enable operators to significantly reduce the capital and operational costs of delivering both traditional voice sewices and new multimedia services. To build the optical backbone, which can support the third generation (3G) packetized infrastructure, the operators could choose a fibre connection, or they could retain the benefits of a wireless connectivity by using a FSO - Free Space Optical lmk, the only wireless technology available that is capable of achieving data rates up to 2.4 Gbit/s. FSO offers viable alternatives for both core transmission networks and for replacing microwaves links in NodeB - RNC access networks. The paper and presentation aim to demonstrate the manner in which FSO products and networks are employed into R4-BICN design solutions.

  10. [Expression and significance of ABCG2 in human malignant glioma].

    PubMed

    Chu, Liang; Huang, Qiang; Zhai, De-Zhong; Zhu, Qing; Huo, Hong-Mei; Dong, Jun; Qian, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Ai-Dong; Lan, Qing; Gao, Yi-Lu

    2007-10-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter protein ABCG2 is a marker derived from hematopoietic stem cells. However, its role in tumorigenesis and malignant progression of glioma is unclear. This study was to investigate the expression and significance of ABCG2 in gliomas of different malignant grades. A microarray chip containing glioma tissues of different malignant grades, implanted glioma xenografts in nude mice, spheroids of glioma cell lines and glioma stem cells was prepared and examined for the expression of ABCG2 with immunohistochemical staining. The positive rate of ABCG2 was 26.8% in the 71 specimens of human glioma tissues, with 11.1% in grade I gliomas, 8% in grade II gliomas, 43.5% in grade III gliomas, and 42.9% in grade IV gliomas; it was significantly higher in grade III-IV gliomas than in grade I-II gliomas (chi2=10.710, P=0.001). The positive rate of ABCG2 was 100% in implanted glioma xenografts in nude mice, gliomas stem cells, and neural stem cells. It was also expressed in some normal tissues. The positive cells surrounded and invaded into vessels in glioma tissues. ABCG2 is overexpressed in glioma stem cells, glioma tissues of higher grades, and implanted glioma xenografts. The positive cells distribute around vessels in glioma tissues.

  11. Molecular signalling pathways in canine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, C E; York, D; Higgins, R J; LeCouteur, R A; Dickinson, P J

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we determined the expression of key signalling pathway proteins TP53, MDM2, P21, AKT, PTEN, RB1, P16, MTOR and MAPK in canine gliomas using western blotting. Protein expression was defined in three canine astrocytic glioma cell lines treated with CCNU, temozolamide or CPT-11 and was further evaluated in 22 spontaneous gliomas including high and low grade astrocytomas, high grade oligodendrogliomas and mixed oligoastrocytomas. Response to chemotherapeutic agents and cell survival were similar to that reported in human glioma cell lines. Alterations in expression of key human gliomagenesis pathway proteins were common in canine glioma tumour samples and segregated between oligodendroglial and astrocytic tumour types for some pathways. Both similarities and differences in protein expression were defined for canine gliomas compared to those reported in human tumour counterparts. The findings may inform more defined assessment of specific signalling pathways for targeted therapy of canine gliomas.

  12. Emerging targeted therapies for glioma.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie J; Wen, Patrick Y

    2016-12-01

    Gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Despite aggressive treatment with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, these tumors are incurable and invariably recur. Molecular characterization of these tumors in recent years has advanced our understanding of gliomagenesis and offered an array of pathways that can be specifically targeted. Areas covered: The most commonly dysregulated signaling pathways found in gliomas will be discussed, as well as the biologic importance of these disrupted pathways and how each may contribute to tumor development. Our knowledge regarding these pathways are most relevant to Grade IV glioma/glioblastoma, but we will also discuss genomic categorization of low grade glioma. Further, drugs targeting single pathways, which have undergone early phase clinical trials will be reviewed, followed by an in depth discussion of emerging treatments on the horizon, which will include inhibitors of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and receptor tyrosine kinases, Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase (PI3K), angiogenesis, cell cycle and mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations. Expert opinion: Results from single agent targeted therapy trials have been modest. Lack of efficacy may stem from a combination of poor blood brain barrier penetration, the genetically heterogeneous make-up of the tumors and the emergence of resistance mechanisms. These factors can be overcome by rational drug design that capitalizes on ways to target critical pathways and limits upregulation of redundant pathways.

  13. Nimotuzumab treatment of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bode, Udo; Massimino, Maura; Bach, Ferdinand; Zimmermann, Martina; Khuhlaeva, Elena; Westphal, Manfred; Fleischhack, Gudrun

    2012-12-01

    In spite of new alkylating medication and recently accumulated knowledge about genomics, the prognosis of malignant gliomas remains poor. The introduction of single substances interfering with tumour proliferation dynamics has been disappointing and the lessons learned indicate that a complicated network of proliferation needs time consuming, in-depth analysis in order to more specifically treat now distinguishable subgroups of a disease, which too long was thought of as a uniform entity. The clinical trials using the EGFR antibody nimotuzumab in the treatment of malignant gliomas are reviewed. Pending conformation in future studies the antibody might be part of the treatment of MGMT-negative, EGFR-amplified, not completely resected gliomas of adulthood and juvenile DIPG (pontine gliomas). Upcoming genomic results of the different tumour entities may suggest certain combination partners of the antibody. Recent studies of nimotuzumab indicate the reason for the lack of toxicity, which is the most attractive argument for its clinical use besides modest efficacy. We await the final results on the use of the antibody together with vinorelbine and radiation therapy for the therapy of DIPG. Adult patients with MGMT-negative, EGFR amplified, not totally resected GBM may also profit from this combination therapy. TK-inhibitors combined with the antibody and irradiation may be an option for a therapeutic trial in paediatric patients.

  14. Postirradiation cerebellar glioma. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Raffel, C.; Edwards, M.S.; Davis, R.L.; Ablin, A.R.

    1985-02-01

    A 13-year-old girl developed an anaplastic astrocytoma of the cerebellum 7 years after irradiation of the central nervous system and prophylactic chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The fact that the astrocytoma was anaplastic and infiltrative was unusual for astroglial tumors at this site. It is proposed that this is a radiation-induced glioma.

  15. 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone, a chalcone derivative, inhibits glioma growth and invasion through regulation of the tropomyosin 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Bo Mi; Ryu, Hyung Won; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Ryu, Jinhyun; Jeong, Joo Yeon; Choi, Jungil; Cho, Hee Jun; Park, Ki Hun; Kang, Sang Soo

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) has anti-cancer property for glioma. {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) increased tropomyosin expreesion through activattion of PKA signaling. {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion. {yields} In vivo administration of 4'-acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) reduced tumor growth. -- Abstract: Chalcones are precursors of flavonoids and have been shown to have anti-cancer activity. Here, we identify the synthetic chalcone derivative 4'-acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma. Treatment with AHC reduced glioma cell invasion, migration, and colony formation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, AHC inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor-induced migration, invasion, and tube formation in HUVECs. To determine the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of AHC on glioma cell invasion and migration, we investigated the effect of AHC on the gene expression change and found that AHC affects actin dynamics in U87MG glioma cells. In actin cytoskeleton regulating system, AHC increased tropomyosin expression and stress fiber formation, probably through activation of PKA. Suppression of tropomyosin expression by siRNA or treatment with the PKA inhibitor H89 reduced the inhibitory effects of AHC on glioma cell invasion and migration. In vivo experiments also showed that AHC inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft mouse tumor model. Together, these data suggest that the synthetic chalcone derivative AHC has potent anti-cancer activity through inhibition of glioma proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis and is therefore a potential chemotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of glioma.

  16. Erythropoietin Augments Survival of Glioma Cells After Radiation and Temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Hassouna, Imam; Sperling, Swetlana; Kim, Ella; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jelkmann, Wolfgang; Giese, Alf; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Despite beneficial effects of irradiation/chemotherapy on survival of glioblastoma (GBM) patients, collateral damage to intact neural tissue leads to 'radiochemobrain' and reduced quality of life in survivors. For prophylactic neuroprotection, erythropoietin (EPO) is a promising candidate, provided that concerns regarding potential tumor promoting effects are alleviated. Methods and Materials: Human GBM-derived cell lines U87, G44, G112, and the gliosarcoma-derived line G28 were treated with EPO, with and without combinations of irradiation or temozolomide (TMZ). Responsiveness of glioma cells to EPO was measured by cell migration from spheroids, cell proliferation, and clonogenic survival. Implantation of U87 cells into brains of nude mice, followed 5 days later by EPO treatment (5,000 U/kg intraperitoneal every other day for 2 weeks) should reveal effects of EPO on tumor growth in vivo. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed for EPOR, HIF-1{alpha}, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)vIII in cell lines and 22 human GBM specimens. Results: EPO did not modulate basal glioma cell migration and stimulated proliferation in only one of four cell lines. Importantly, EPO did not enhance tumor growth in mouse brains. Preincubation of glioma cells with EPO for 3 h, followed by irradiation and TMZ for another 24 h, resulted in protection against chemoradiation-induced cytotoxicity in three cell lines. Conversely, EPO induced a dose-dependent decrease in survival of G28 gliosarcoma cells. In GBM specimens, expression of HIF-1{alpha} correlated positively with expression of EPOR and EGFRvIII. EPOR and EGFRvIII expression did not correlate. Conclusions: EPO is unlikely to appreciably influence basal glioma growth. However, concomitant use of EPO with irradiation/chemotherapy in GBM patients is not advisable.

  17. Mutant IDH1 and thrombosis in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Dusten; Schwarze, Steven R; Khoury, Laith; Thomas, Cheddhi; Wu, Meijing; Chen, Li; Chen, Rui; Liu, Yinxing; Schwartz, Margaret A; Amidei, Christina; Kumthekar, Priya; Benjamin, Carolina G; Song, Kristine; Dawson, Caleb; Rispoli, Joanne M; Fatterpekar, Girish; Golfinos, John G; Kondziolka, Douglas; Karajannis, Matthias; Pacione, Donato; Zagzag, David; McIntyre, Thomas; Snuderl, Matija; Horbinski, Craig

    2016-12-01

    Mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is common in gliomas, and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG). The full effects of IDH1 mutations on glioma biology and tumor microenvironment are unknown. We analyzed a discovery cohort of 169 World Health Organization (WHO) grade II-IV gliomas, followed by a validation cohort of 148 cases, for IDH1 mutations, intratumoral microthrombi, and venous thromboemboli (VTE). 430 gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas were analyzed for mRNAs associated with coagulation, and 95 gliomas in a tissue microarray were assessed for tissue factor (TF) protein. In vitro and in vivo assays evaluated platelet aggregation and clotting time in the presence of mutant IDH1 or D-2-HG. VTE occurred in 26-30 % of patients with wild-type IDH1 gliomas, but not in patients with mutant IDH1 gliomas (0 %). IDH1 mutation status was the most powerful predictive marker for VTE, independent of variables such as GBM diagnosis and prolonged hospital stay. Microthrombi were far less common within mutant IDH1 gliomas regardless of WHO grade (85-90 % in wild-type versus 2-6 % in mutant), and were an independent predictor of IDH1 wild-type status. Among all 35 coagulation-associated genes, F3 mRNA, encoding TF, showed the strongest inverse relationship with IDH1 mutations. Mutant IDH1 gliomas had F3 gene promoter hypermethylation, with lower TF protein expression. D-2-HG rapidly inhibited platelet aggregation and blood clotting via a novel calcium-dependent, methylation-independent mechanism. Mutant IDH1 glioma engraftment in mice significantly prolonged bleeding time. Our data suggest that mutant IDH1 has potent antithrombotic activity within gliomas and throughout the peripheral circulation. These findings have implications for the pathologic evaluation of gliomas, the effect of altered isocitrate metabolism on tumor microenvironment, and risk assessment of glioma patients for VTE.

  18. Pembrolizumab in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory High-Grade Gliomas, Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas, or Hypermutated Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome; Lynch Syndrome; Malignant Glioma; Recurrent Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; Refractory Brain Neoplasm; Refractory Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

  19. Quercetin derivatives as potent inducers of selective cytotoxicity in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Dell'Albani, Paola; Di Marco, Barbara; Grasso, Sonia; Rocco, Concetta; Foti, Mario C

    2017-04-01

    Quercetin (Q) is a flavonoid widely distributed in the plant kingdom and well-known for its ability to exert antioxidant, prooxidant and anticarcinogenic activities in several tumor cells. Furthermore, quercetin plays an important role both in the regulation of key elements in cellular signal transduction pathways related to apoptotic cell death, and in cell cycle progression. Several studies have reported of toxic effects of Q against glioma cell lines. In this study, the effects of Q and of some Q-derivatives (acyl esters and bromo-derivatives) on U373-MG and 9L glioma cell lines survival are analyzed. The 24-hour treatment of glioma cells with several concentrations of Q (25, 50 and 100μM) did not cause any cytotoxic effects, while the administration of Q-derivatives, such as acylated and brominated quercetin, caused a sharp increase in cell death. Among all tested derivatives, 3-O-decanoylquercetin 10 manifested the strongest cytotoxic effect at a concentration as low as 25μM both in U373-MG (ca. 40% viability after 24h) and in 9L cells (ca. 20% viability after 24h). The cytotoxic effects of the Q-derivatives 3 and 10-13 were proven to be satisfactorily selective for glioma cells. When Q-derivatives were in fact administered to mouse primary astroglial or human fibroblast cell cultures, a higher cell survival rate (~90-70% and 55-45%, respectively) was observed relative to that detected in glioma cells. These results prove that selective esterification and bromination of Q increase to a great extent the toxicity of this polyphenol against glioma cells, thereby providing a possible new tool for cyto-specific glioma therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic Myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M.; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V. Wee; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the patient's immune response to the virus infection limits the therapy's utility, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using non-specific pharmacological inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumours, and robust monocyte, T and NK cell infiltration 3 days following MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumour-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumour-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of CPA-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multi-faceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with CPA-mediated lymphoablation. PMID:25336188

  1. A novel bispecific immunotoxin delivered by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to target blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Sun, Xinlin; Huang, Min; Ke, Yiquan; Wang, Jihui; Liu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    In previous years, immunotoxins have been shown to be a greatly promising therapeutic tool for brain malignancies, such as gliomas. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) exhibit tropism to tumor tissue. However, the effect of bispecific immunotoxins in malignant gliomas is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of bispecific immunotoxins in human malignant gliomas. In the present study, the bispecific immunotoxin VEGF165-ephrin A1-PE38KDEL was established using deoxyribonucleic acid shuffling and cloning techniques. The VEGF165-ephrin A1-PE38KDEL was delivered by hMSCs to mouse malignant gliomas. The effects of the bispecific immunotoxins on glioma-derived blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumorigenic effects of immunotoxins were examined in vivo. In vitro, transfected hMSCs significantly inhibited the cell viability of gliomas cell lines U87 and U251 in a dose-dependent manner compared with untransfected hMSCs (P<0.01). In vivo, the intratumoral injection of engineered hMSCs was effective at inhibiting tumor growth in a malignant glioma tumor model. The bispecific immunotoxin secreted from hMSCs acts as a novel strategy for improving treatment options for malignant gliomas in the clinic.

  2. CSF-1R inhibition alters macrophage polarization and blocks glioma progression

    PubMed Central

    Pyonteck, Stephanie M.; Akkari, Leila; Schuhmacher, Alberto J.; Bowman, Robert L.; Sevenich, Lisa; Quail, Daniela F.; Olson, Oakley C.; Quick, Marsha L.; Huse, Jason T.; Teijeiro, Virginia; Setty, Manu; Leslie, Christina S.; Oei, Yoko; Pedraza, Alicia; Zhang, Jianan; Brennan, Cameron W.; Sutton, James C.; Holland, Eric C.; Daniel, Dylan; Joyce, Johanna A.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) comprises several molecular subtypes including proneural GBM. Most therapeutic approaches targeting glioma cells have failed. An alternative strategy is to target cells in the glioma microenvironment, such as tumor-associated macrophages and microglia (TAMs). Macrophages depend upon colony stimulating factor (CSF)-1 for differentiation and survival. A CSF-1R inhibitor was used to target TAMs in a mouse proneural GBM model, which dramatically increased survival, and regressed established tumors. CSF-1R blockade additionally slowed intracranial growth of patient-derived glioma xenografts. Surprisingly, TAMs were not depleted in treated mice. Instead, glioma-secreted factors including GM-CSF and IFN-γ facilitated TAM survival in the context of CSF-1R inhibition. Alternatively activated/ M2 macrophage markers decreased in surviving TAMs, consistent with impaired tumor-promoting functions. These gene signatures were associated with enhanced survival in proneural GBM patients. Our results identify TAMs as a promising therapeutic target for proneural gliomas, and establish the translational potential of CSF-1R inhibition for GBM. PMID:24056773

  3. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha in glioma: a bad seed.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Wei; Hu, Bo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    Recent collaborative, large-scale genomic profiling of the most common and aggressive brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme(GBM) has significantly advanced our understanding of this disease. The gene encoding platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha(PDGFRα) was identified as the third of the top 11 amplified genes in clinical GBM specimens. The important roles of PDGFRα signaling during normal brain development also implicate the possible pathologic consequences of PDGFRα over-activation in glioma. Although the initial clinical trials using PDGFR kinase inhibitors have been predominantly disappointing, diagnostic and treatment modalities involving genomic profiling and personalized medicine are expected to improve the therapy targeting PDGFRα signaling. In this review, we discuss the roles of PDGFRαsignaling during development of the normal central nervous system(CNS) and in pathologic conditions such as malignant glioma. We further compare various animal models of PDGF-induced gliomagenesis and their potential as a novel platform of pre-clinical drug testing. We then summarize our recent publication and how these findings will likely impact treatments for gliomas driven by PDGFRα overexpression. A better understanding of PDGFRα signaling in glioma and their microenvironment, through the use of human or mouse models, is necessary to design a more effective therapeutic strategy against gliomas harboring the aberrant PDGFRα signaling.

  4. MicroRNA in Human Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengfeng; Li, Jun; Liu, Lei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Glioma represents a serious health problem worldwide. Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeting therapy, the disease remains one of the most lethal malignancies in humans, and new approaches to improvement of the efficacy of anti-glioma treatments are urgently needed. Thus, new therapeutic targets and tools should be developed based on a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glioma. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, play a pivotal role in the development of the malignant phenotype of glioma cells, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, tumor angiogenesis, and stem cell generation. This review will discuss the biological functions of miRNAs in human glioma and their implications in improving clinical diagnosis, prediction of prognosis, and anti-glioma therapy. PMID:24202447

  5. CXCR4 increases in-vivo glioma perivascular invasion, and reduces radiation induced apoptosis: A genetic knockdown study

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Viveka Nand; Zamler, Daniel; Baker, Gregory J.; Kadiyala, Padma; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; DeCarvalho, Ana C.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly invasive brain tumor. Perivascular invasion, autovascularization and vascular co-option occur throughout the disease and lead to tumor invasion and progression. The molecular basis for perivascular invasion, i.e., the interaction of glioma tumor cells with endothelial cells is not well characterized. Recent studies indicate that glioma cells have increased expression of CXCR4. We investigated the in-vivo role of CXCR4 in perivascular invasion of glioma cells using shRNA-mediated knock down of CXCR4. We show that primary cultures of human glioma stem cells HF2303 and mouse glioma GL26-Cit cells exhibit significant migration towards human (HBMVE) and mouse (MBVE) brain microvascular endothelial cells. Blocking CXCR4 on tumor cells with AMD3100 in-vitro, inhibits migration of GL26-Cit and HF2303 toward MBVE and HBMVE cells. Additionally, genetic down regulation of CXCR4 in mouse glioma GL26-Cit cells inhibits their in-vitro migration towards MBVE cells; in an in-vivo intracranial mouse model, these cells display reduced tumor growth and perivascular invasion, leading to increased survival. Quantitative analysis of brain sections showed that CXCR4 knockdown tumors are less invasive. Lastly, we tested the effects of radiation on CXCR4 knock down GL26-Cit cells in an orthotopic brain tumor model. Radiation treatment increased apoptosis of CXCR4 downregulated tumor cells and prolonged median survival. In summary, our data suggest that CXCR4 signaling is critical for perivascular invasion of GBM cells and targeting this receptor makes tumors less invasive and more sensitive to radiation therapy. Combination of CXCR4 knock down and radiation treatment might improve the efficacy of GBM therapy. PMID:27863376

  6. CXCR4 increases in-vivo glioma perivascular invasion, and reduces radiation induced apoptosis: A genetic knockdown study.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Viveka Nand; Zamler, Daniel; Baker, Gregory J; Kadiyala, Padma; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; DeCarvalho, Ana C; Mikkelsen, Tom; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2016-12-13

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly invasive brain tumor. Perivascular invasion, autovascularization and vascular co-option occur throughout the disease and lead to tumor invasion and progression. The molecular basis for perivascular invasion, i.e., the interaction of glioma tumor cells with endothelial cells is not well characterized. Recent studies indicate that glioma cells have increased expression of CXCR4. We investigated the in-vivo role of CXCR4 in perivascular invasion of glioma cells using shRNA-mediated knock down of CXCR4. We show that primary cultures of human glioma stem cells HF2303 and mouse glioma GL26-Cit cells exhibit significant migration towards human (HBMVE) and mouse (MBVE) brain microvascular endothelial cells. Blocking CXCR4 on tumor cells with AMD3100 in-vitro, inhibits migration of GL26-Cit and HF2303 toward MBVE and HBMVE cells. Additionally, genetic down regulation of CXCR4 in mouse glioma GL26-Cit cells inhibits their in-vitro migration towards MBVE cells; in an in-vivo intracranial mouse model, these cells display reduced tumor growth and perivascular invasion, leading to increased survival. Quantitative analysis of brain sections showed that CXCR4 knockdown tumors are less invasive. Lastly, we tested the effects of radiation on CXCR4 knock down GL26-Cit cells in an orthotopic brain tumor model. Radiation treatment increased apoptosis of CXCR4 downregulated tumor cells and prolonged median survival. In summary, our data suggest that CXCR4 signaling is critical for perivascular invasion of GBM cells and targeting this receptor makes tumors less invasive and more sensitive to radiation therapy. Combination of CXCR4 knock down and radiation treatment might improve the efficacy of GBM therapy.

  7. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of early myeloid progenitors and precursors at different stages of differentiation into granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Blockade of their differentiation into mature myeloid cells in cancer results in an expansion of this population. High-grade gliomas are the most common malignant tumours of the central nervous system (CNS), with a poor prognosis despite intensive radiation and chemotherapy. Histopathological and flow cytometry analyses of human and rodent experimental gliomas revealed the extensive heterogeneity of immune cells infiltrating gliomas and their microenvironment. Immune cell infiltrates consist of: resident (microglia) and peripheral macrophages, granulocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and T lymphocytes. Intratumoural density of glioma-associated MDSCs correlates positively with the histological grade of gliomas and patient’s survival. MDSCs have the ability to attract T regulatory lymphocytes to the tumour, but block the activation of tumour-reactive CD4+ T helper cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Immunomodulatory mechanisms employed by malignant gliomas pose an appalling challenge to brain tumour immunotherapy. In this mini-review we describe phenotypic and functional characteristics of MDSCs in humans and rodents, and their occurrence and potential roles in glioma progression. While understanding the complexity of immune cell interactions in the glioma microenvironment is far from being accomplished, there is significant progress that may lead to the development of immunotherapy for gliomas. PMID:28373814

  8. Practical molecular pathologic diagnosis of infiltrating gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pekmezci, Melike; Perry, Arie

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have led to better understanding of glioma tumorigenesis and biology. Numerous glioma biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive value have been identified. Although some of these markers are already part of the routine clinical management of glioma patients, data regarding others are limited and difficult to apply routinely. In addition, multiple methods for molecular subclassification have been proposed either together with or as an alternative to the current morphologic classification and grading scheme. This article reviews the literature regarding glioma biomarkers and offers a few practical suggestions.

  9. [Therapeutic strategies and prospects of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Taillibert, Sophie; Pedretti, Marta; Sanson, Marc

    2004-10-23

    The prognosis and the treatment of gliomas depend on age, performance status and histological grade. Symptomatic treatment relies on steroids against cerebral edema, anti-epileptic drugs for seizures and perioperatively, prevention of thrombo-embolism and digestive complications, physiotherapy. Specific therapies include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Surgery is necessary for histological diagnosis. In low grade gliomas, it has a significant impact in terms of survival. In malignant gliomas, surgery provides symptomic relief without clearly improving survival. Radiation therapy has been shown to improve survival in malignant glioma, but not in asymptomatic low grade tumors. Chemotherapy has a modest efficacy in glioblastomas, whereas oligodendrogliomas with 1p 19q deletion are chemosensitive tumors.

  10. Up-regulation of USP2a and FASN in gliomas correlates strongly with glioma grade.

    PubMed

    Tao, Bang-Bao; He, Hua; Shi, Xiu-hua; Wang, Chun-lin; Li, Wei-qing; Li, Bing; Dong, Yan; Hu, Guo-Han; Hou, Li-Jun; Luo, Chun; Chen, Ju-xiang; Chen, Huai-rui; Yu, Yu-hong; Sun, Qing-fang; Lu, Yi-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Gliomas are the most common neoplasms in the central nervous system. The lack of efficacy of glioma therapies necessitates in-depth studies of glioma pathology, especially of the underlying molecular mechanisms that transform normal glial cells into tumor cells. Here we report that a deubiquitinating enzyme, ubiquitin-specific protease 2a (USP2a), and its substrate, fatty acid synthase (FASN), are over-expressed in glioma tissue. Using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression and cellular distribution of USP2a and FASN in human glioma tissues. The expression patterns of USP2a and FASN correlated with the pathologic and clinical characteristics of the patients. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of USP2a and its substrate FASN were higher in high-grade (World Health Organization [WHO] grades III and IV) glioma tissues than in low-grade (WHO grades I and II) glioma tissues. Western blot analysis indicated that the average optical densitometry ratio of USP2a and its substrate FASN in high-grade gliomas was higher than in low-grade gliomas. Moreover, statistical analysis of grade-classified glioma samples showed that the level of USP2a and FASN expression increased with the elevation of the WHO grade of glioma. USP2a protein expression was detected in the nucleus of glioma tissues and an increase in expression was significantly associated with the elevation of the WHO grade of glioma by immunohistochemistry. These findings expand our understanding of the molecular profiling of glioma and could shed light on new diagnostic criteria for gliomas.

  11. The pathobiology of glioma tumors.

    PubMed

    Gladson, Candece L; Prayson, Richard A; Liu, Wei Michael

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing characterization of the genetic and epigenetic alterations in the gliomas has already improved the classification of these heterogeneous tumors and enabled the development of rodent models for analysis of the molecular pathways underlying their proliferative and invasive behavior. Effective application of the targeted therapies that are now in development will depend on pathologists' ability to provide accurate information regarding the genetic alterations and the expression of key receptors and ligands in the tumors. Here we review the mechanisms that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the gliomas and provide examples of the cooperative nature of the pathways involved, which may influence the initial therapeutic response and the potential for development of resistance.

  12. Potential regulation of glioma through the induction of apoptosis signaling via Egl-9 family hypoxia-inducible factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Ke; You, Chao; Lei, Ding; Zhang, Heng

    2017-01-01

    Glioma is an aggressive form of brain cancer that occurs following the abnormal proliferation of glial cells. Although glioma cannot spread to other organs, the morbidity and mortality rates of the disease are high, even following surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The function of Egl-9 family hypoxia-inducible factor 3 (Egln3) in cancer is controversial, and it is debated as to whether Egln3 positively or negatively regulates tumors. In the present study, a mouse model of low-grade glioma was successfully established. Through the use of immunohistochemical and western blot analyses, it was demonstrated that Egln3 expression in glioma tissue performed an important role in regulation by amplifying the signals for apoptosis, as determined by an increase in DNA fragments. Furthermore, Egln3 expression was inhibited by the administration of dimethyloxalylglycine, and the downregulated expression of Egln3 had marked effects on the regulation of glioma through apoptosis. The present study therefore provides evidence of an association between Egln3 expression and apoptosis in low-grade glioma. PMID:28356975

  13. Progression of motor deficits in glioma-bearing mice: impact of CNF1 therapy at symptomatic stages.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Eleonora; Maltese, Federica; Olimpico, Francesco; Fabbri, Alessia; Costa, Mario; Caleo, Matteo; Baroncelli, Laura

    2017-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive type of brain tumor. In this context, animal models represent excellent tools for the early detection and longitudinal mapping of neuronal dysfunction, that are critical in the preclinical validation of new therapeutic strategies. In a mouse glioma model, we developed sensitive behavioral readouts that allow early recognizing and following neurological symptoms. We injected GL261 cells into the primary motor cortex of syngenic mice and we used a battery of behavioral tests to longitudinally monitor the dysfunction induced by tumor growth. Grip strength test revealed an early onset of functional deficit associated to the glioma growth, with a significant forelimb weakness appearing 9 days after tumor inoculation. A later deficit was observed in the rotarod and in the grid walk tasks. Using this model, we found reduced tumor growth and maintenance of behavioral functions following treatment with Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1) at a symptomatic stage. Our data provide a detailed and precise examination of how tumor growth reverberates on the behavioral functions of glioma-bearing mice, providing normative data for the study of therapeutic strategies for glioma treatment. The reduced tumor volume and robust functional sparing observed in CNF1-treated, glioma-bearing mice strengthen the notion that CNF1 delivery is a promising strategy for glioma therapy.

  14. Neurofibromatosis-1 (Nf1) heterozygous brain microglia elaborate paracrine factors that promote Nf1-deficient astrocyte and glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Daginakatte, Girish C; Gutmann, David H

    2007-05-01

    The tumor microenvironment is considered to play an important role in tumor formation and progression by providing both negative and positive signals that influence tumor cell growth. We and others have previously shown that brain tumor (glioma) formation in Nf1 genetically engineered mice requires a microenvironment composed of cells heterozygous for a targeted Nf1 mutation. Using NF1 as a model system to understand the contribution of the tumor microenvironment to glioma formation, we show that Nf1+/- brain microglia produce specific factors that promote Nf1-/- astrocyte growth in vitro and in vivo and identify hyaluronidase as one of these factors in both genetically engineered Nf1 mouse and human NF1-associated optic glioma. We further demonstrate that blocking hyaluronidase ameliorates the ability of Nf1+/- microglia to increase Nf1-/- astrocyte proliferation and that hyaluronidase increases Nf1-/- astrocyte proliferation in an MAPK-dependent fashion. Lastly, inhibiting microglia activation in genetically engineered Nf1 mice significantly reduces mouse optic glioma proliferation in vivo. Collectively, these studies identify Nf1+/- microglia as an important stromal cell type that promotes Nf1-/- astrocyte and optic glioma growth relevant to the pathogenesis of NF1-associated brain tumors and suggest that future brain therapies might be directed against paracrine factors produced by cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  15. Intraarterial Infusion Of Erbitux and Bevacizumab For Relapsed/Refractory Intracranial Glioma In Patients Under 22

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Glioblastoma Multiforme; Fibrillary Astrocytoma of Brain; Glioma of Brainstem; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Mixed Oligodendroglioma-Astrocytoma; Brain Stem Glioma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

  16. Telomere Length and Risk of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Walcott, Farzana; Rajaraman, Preetha; Gadalla, Shahinaz M.; Inskip, Peter D.; Purdue, Mark P.; Albanes, Demetrius; Orr, Esther; De Vivo, Immaculata; Savage, Sharon A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Telomere length in blood or buccal cell DNA has been associated with risk of various cancers. Glioma can be a highly malignant brain tumor and has few known risk factors. Genetic variants in or near RTEL1 and TERT, key components of telomere biology, are associated with glioma risk. Therefore, we evaluated the association between relative telomere length (RTL) and glioma in a prospective study. Materials and Methods We performed a nested case-control study within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. RTL was determined by quantitative PCR on blood or buccal cell DNA obtained at least two years prior to diagnosis from 101 individuals with glioma cases. Healthy controls (n=198) were matched to cases (2:1) on age, gender, smoking status, calendar year, and DNA source. Conditional logistic regression was used to investigate the association between RTL and glioma. Results As expected, RTL declined with increasing age in both cases and controls. There was no statistically significant association between RTL and glioma overall. An analysis stratified by gender suggested that short RTL (1st tertile) in males was associated with glioma (odds ratio, [OR] = 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-5.11); this association was not observed for females (OR=0.41, 95% CI 0.14-1.17). Conclusions This prospective study did not identify significant associations between RTL and glioma risk, but there may be gender-specific differences. Larger, prospective studies are needed to evaluate these findings. PMID:24231251

  17. T Cells Enhance Stem-Like Properties and Conditional Malignancy in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Dwain K.; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Duvall, Gretchen; Zhang, Xiao-xue; Zhai, Yuying; Sarayba, Danielle; Seksenyan, Akop; Panwar, Akanksha; Black, Keith L.; Wheeler, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Small populations of highly tumorigenic stem-like cells (cancer stem cells; CSCs) can exist within, and uniquely regenerate cancers including malignant brain tumors (gliomas). Many aspects of glioma CSCs (GSCs), however, have been characterized in non-physiological settings. Methods We found gene expression similarity superiorly defined glioma “stemness”, and revealed that GSC similarity increased with lower tumor grade. Using this method, we examined stemness in human grade IV gliomas (GBM) before and after dendritic cell (DC) vaccine therapy. This was followed by gene expression, phenotypic and functional analysis of murine GL26 tumors recovered from nude, wild-type, or DC-vaccinated host brains. Results GSC similarity was specifically increased in post-vaccine GBMs, and correlated best to vaccine-altered gene expression and endogenous anti-tumor T cell activity. GL26 analysis confirmed immune alterations, specific acquisition of stem cell markers, specifically enhanced sensitivity to anti-stem drug (cyclopamine), and enhanced tumorigenicity in wild-type hosts, in tumors in proportion to anti-tumor T cell activity. Nevertheless, vaccine-exposed GL26 cells were no more tumorigenic than parental GL26 in T cell-deficient hosts, though they otherwise appeared similar to GSCs enriched by chemotherapy. Finally, vaccine-exposed GBM and GL26 exhibited relatively homogeneous expression of genes expressed in progenitor cells and/or differentiation. Conclusions T cell activity represents an inducible physiological process capable of proportionally enriching GSCs in human and mouse gliomas. Stem-like gliomas enriched by strong T cell activity, however, may differ from other GSCs in that their stem-like properties may be disassociated from increased tumor malignancy and heterogeneity under specific host immune conditions. PMID:20539758

  18. Data analyses of honokiol-induced autophagy of human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gong-Jhe; Lin, Chien-Ju; Lin, Yung-Wei; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2016-12-01

    This article contains raw and processed data related to a research, "Honokiol induces autophagic cell death in malignant glioma through reactive oxygen species-mediated regulation of the p53/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway" (C.J. Lin, T.L. Chen, Y.Y. Tseng, G.J. Wu, M.H. Hsieh, Y.W. Lin, R.M. Chen, 2016) [1]. Data were obtained by immunoblotting analyses of light chain 3 (LC3)-II, beclin-1, Akt, and mTOR in human glioma U87 MG cells and mouse glioma tissues treated with honokiol, an active constituent extracted from the bark of Magnolia officinalis, "Honokiol induces autophagy of neuroblastoma cells through activating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and endoplasmic reticular stress/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and suppressing cell migration" (P.S. Yeh, W. Wang, Y.A. Chang, C.J. Lin, J.J. Wang, R.M. Chen, 2016) [2]. The processed data show the effects of honokiol on induction of autophagy in human glioma U87 MG cells by analyzing levels of LC3-II, p62, and bectin-1, "Honokiol-induced apoptosis and autophagy in glioblastoma multiforme cells" (K.H. Chang, M.D Yan, C.J. Yao, P.C. Lin, G.M. Lai, 2013) [3]. In addition, chloroquine, a lysosomal inhibitor, was administered to the cells to further confirm honokiol-induced cell autophagy. Sequentially, mice with gliomas were created and treated with honokiol. Amounts of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated Akt and mTOR in glioma tissues were analyzed to determine the possible mechanisms of honokiol-induced autophagy.

  19. Associations of High-Grade Glioma With Glioma Risk Alleles and Histories of Allergy and Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Daniel H.; Yang, Ping; Johnson, Derek R.; Decker, Paul A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Rice, Terri; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Ali-Osman, Francis; Wang, Frances; Stoddard, Shawn M.; Sprau, Debra J.; Kosel, Matthew L.; Wiencke, John K.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Patoka, Joseph S.; Davis, Faith; McCarthy, Bridget; Rynearson, Amanda L.; Worra, Joel B.; Fridley, Brooke L.; O’Neill, Brian Patrick; Buckner, Jan C.; Il’yasova, Dora; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2011-01-01

    Glioma risk has consistently been inversely associated with allergy history but not with smoking history despite putative biologic plausibility. Data from 855 high-grade glioma cases and 1,160 controls from 4 geographic regions of the United States during 1997–2008 were analyzed for interactions between allergy and smoking histories and inherited variants in 5 established glioma risk regions: 5p15.3 (TERT), 8q24.21 (CCDC26/MLZE), 9p21.3 (CDKN2B), 11q23.3 (PHLDB1/DDX6), and 20q13.3 (RTEL1). The inverse relation between allergy and glioma was stronger among those who did not (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.40, 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.58) versus those who did (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.97; Pinteraction = 0.02) carry the 9p21.3 risk allele. However, the inverse association with allergy was stronger among those who carried (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.44, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 0.68) versus those who did not carry (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.54, 0.86) the 20q13.3 glioma risk allele, but this interaction was not statistically significant (P = 0.14). No relation was observed between glioma risk and smoking (odds ratio = 0.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.77, 1.10; P = 0.37), and there were no interactions for glioma risk of smoking history with any of the risk alleles. The authors’ observations are consistent with a recent report that the inherited glioma risk variants in chromosome regions 9p21.3 and 20q13.3 may modify the inverse association of allergy and glioma. PMID:21742680

  20. Expressions of glia maturation factor-β by tumor cells and endothelia correlate with neovascularization and poor prognosis in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cong; Su, Xiao-rui; Shi, Yu; Wu, Jin-rong; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Xin-li; Cui, You-hong; Ping, Yi-fang; Bian, Xiu-wu

    2016-01-01

    Glia maturation factor-β (GMF-β) has been reported to promote glial differentiation, and act as a negative prognostic indicator in certain cancers. However, its roles in glioma progression remain unclear. Since neurogenesis and vasculogenesis were proved to share some common regulators during gliomagenesis, we aim to explore the potential impact of GMF-β on tumor neovascularization and patient survival in glioma. In this study, we first detected GMF-β expression not only in tumor cells but also in microvascular endothelia by double immunohistochemical staining. Both tumoral and endothelial GMF-β expression levels were positively correlated with tumor grade and microvessel density (MVD), while negatively associated with poor prognoses of the patients. Interestingly, multivariate analysis demonstrated that endothelial GMF-β expression level was the only independent predictor of progression-free and overall survival of glioma patients. The results of in vitro angiogenesis assay showed that GMF-β knockdown significantly inhibited tubulogenesis of human U87 glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, GMF-β knockdown suppressed tumor growth and the formation of human-CD31 positive (glioma cell-derived) microvessels in a mouse orthotopic U87 glioma model. Our results demonstrated that GMF-β is an important player in glioma progression via promoting neovascularization. GMF-β may therefore be a novel prognostic marker as well as a potential therapeutic target for glioma. PMID:26515590

  1. Tubulin nitration in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Gabriella; Di Cristo, Carlo; Monti, Gianluca; Amoresano, Angela; Columbano, Laura; Pucci, Pietro; Cioffi, Fernando A; Di Cosmo, Anna; Palumbo, Anna; d'Ischia, Marco

    2006-02-06

    Immunohistochemical and biochemical investigations showed that significant protein nitration occurs in human gliomas, especially in grade IV glioblastomas at the level of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and neurones. Enhanced alpha-tubulin immunoreactivity was co-present in the same elements in the glioblastomas. Proteomic methodologies were employed to identify a nitrated protein band at 55 kDa as alpha-tubulin. Peptide mass fingerprinting procedures demonstrated that tubulin is nitrated at Tyr224 in grade IV tumour samples but is unmodified in grade I samples and in non-cancerous brain tissue. These results provide the first characterisation of endogenously nitrated tubulin from human tumour samples.

  2. Incidence of gliomas by anatomic location

    PubMed Central

    Larjavaara, Suvi; Mäntylä, Riitta; Salminen, Tiina; Haapasalo, Hannu; Raitanen, Jani; Jääskeläinen, Juha; Auvinen, Anssi

    2007-01-01

    The anatomic location of a glioma influences prognosis and treatment options. The aim of our study was to describe the distribution of gliomas in different anatomic areas of the brain. A representative population-based sample of 331 adults with glioma was used for preliminary analyses. The anatomic locations for 89 patients from a single center were analyzed in more detail from radiologic imaging and recorded on a three-dimensional 1 × 1 × 1– cm grid. The age-standardized incidence rate of gliomas was 4.7 per 100,000 person-years. The most frequent subtypes were glioblastoma (47%) and grade II–III astrocytoma (23%), followed by oligodendroglioma and mixed glioma. The gliomas were located in the frontal lobe in 40% of the cases, temporal in 29%, parietal in 14%, and occipital lobe in 3%, with 14% in the deeper structures. The difference in distribution between lobes remained after adjustment for their tissue volume: the tumor:volume ratio was 4.5 for frontal, 4.8 for temporal, and 2.3 for parietal relative to the occipital lobe. The area with the densest occurrence was the anterior subcortical brain. Statistically significant spatial clustering was found in the three-dimensional analysis. No differences in location were found among glioblastoma, diffuse astrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma. Our results demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in the anatomic distribution of gliomas within the brain. PMID:17522333

  3. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 R132H mutation is not detected in angiocentric glioma.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Aditya; Olar, Adriana; Vogel, Hannes; Parker, John R; Coventry, Susan C; Debski, Robert; Albarracin, Constance T; Aldape, Kenneth D; Cahill, Daniel P; Powell, Suzanne Z; Fuller, Gregory N

    2012-08-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 gene (IDH1), most commonly resulting in replacement of arginine at position 132 by histidine (R132H), have been described in World Health Organization grade II and III diffuse gliomas and secondary glioblastoma. Immunohistochemistry using a mouse monoclonal antibody has a high specificity and sensitivity for detecting IDH1 R132H mutant protein in sections from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Angiocentric glioma (AG), a unique neoplasm with mixed phenotypic features of diffuse glioma and ependymoma, has recently been codified as a grade I neoplasm in the 2007 World Health Organization classification of central nervous system tumors. The present study was designed to evaluate IDH1 R132H protein in AG. Three cases of AG were collected, and the diagnoses were confirmed. Expression of mutant IDH1 R132H protein was determined by immunohistochemistry on representative formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections using the antihuman mouse monoclonal antibody IDH1 R132H (Dianova, Hamburg, Germany). Known IDH1 mutation-positive and IDH1 wild-type cases of grade II to IV glioma served as positive and negative controls. All 3 patients were male, aged 3, 5, and 15 years, with intra-axial tumors in the right posterior parietal-occipital lobe, right frontal lobe, and left frontal lobe, respectively. All 3 cases showed characteristic morphologic features of AG, including a monomorphous population of slender bipolar cells that diffusely infiltrated cortical parenchyma and ensheathed cortical blood vessels radially and longitudinally. All 3 cases were negative for the presence of IDH1 R132H mutant protein (0/3). All control cases showed appropriate reactivity. IDH1 R132H mutation has been described as a common molecular signature of grade II and III diffuse gliomas and secondary glioblastoma; however, AG, which exhibits some features of diffuse glioma, has not been evaluated. The absence of mutant IDH1 R132H protein expression in AG

  4. Disruption of astrocyte-vascular coupling and the blood-brain barrier by invading glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Stacey; Robel, Stefanie; Kimbrough, Ian F.; Robert, Stephanie M.; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Sontheimer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic endfeet cover the entire cerebral vasculature and serve as exchange sites for ions, metabolites, and energy substrates from the blood to the brain. They maintain endothelial tight junctions that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and release vasoactive molecules that regulate vascular tone. Malignant gliomas are highly invasive tumors that use the perivascular space for invasion and co-opt existing vessels as satellite tumors form. Here we use a clinically relevant mouse model of glioma and find that glioma cells, as they populate the perivascular space of pre-existing vessels, displace astrocytic endfeet from endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells. This causes a focal breach in the BBB. Furthermore, astrocyte-mediated gliovascular coupling is lost, and glioma cells seize control over regulation of vascular tone through Ca2+-dependent release of K+. These findings have important clinical implications regarding blood flow in the tumor-associated brain and the ability to locally deliver chemotherapeutic drugs in disease. PMID:24943270

  5. Bystander effect in glioma suicide gene therapy using bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoyi; Gu, Chunyu; Gao, Yun; Amano, Shinji; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2012-11-01

    An established rat intracranial glioma was successfully treated through the tumoricidal bystander effect generated by intratumoral injection of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transduced with the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase gene (BMSCtk cells) followed by systemic ganciclovir administration. In the present study, we tested the bystander effect of this treatment strategy when using human BMSCs as the vector cells. Human BMSCtk cells were mixed with various kinds of brain tumor cell lines (human and rat glioma cells) and examined in vitro and in vivo tumoricidal bystander effects, by co-culture study and co-implantation study in the nude mouse, respectively. A significant in vitro bystander effect was observed between human BMSCtk cells and any of the tumor cells examined in the ganciclovir-containing medium. A potent in vivo bystander effect against human and rat glioma cells was also demonstrated when ganciclovir was administered. Migratory activity of the human BMSCs toward the tumor cells was enhanced by the conditioned media obtained from both human and rat glioma cells compared to the fresh media. The results of this study have demonstrated that the bystander effect generated by BMSCtk cells and ganciclovir is not cell type-specific, suggesting that the strategy would be quite feasible for clinical use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetic paclitaxel nanoparticles inhibit glioma growth and improve the survival of rats bearing glioma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Liang, Chao; Li, Anmin; Chang, Jin; Wang, Hanjie; Yan, Runmin; Zhang, Jiajing; Tai, Junli

    2010-06-01

    Paclitaxel has fared poorly in clinical trials against brain glioma. We hypothesized that superparamagnetic nanocarriers may enhance its bioactivities by delivering it into the brain. The magnetic paclitaxel nanoparticles (MPNPs) were fabricated and their cytotoxicity against glioma was tested both in vitro and in glioma-bearing rats. MPNPs exhibited superparamagnetism and produced an extended release of paclitaxel over 15 days in vitro. They were easily internalized into glioma cells and exerted remarkable toxicity, as free paclitaxel did. Furthermore, after intravenous injection of MPNPs to glioma-bearing rats and magnetic targeting with a 0.5 T magnet, drug content increased for 6- to 14-fold in implanted glioma and 4.6- to 12.1-fold in the normal brain compared to free paclitaxel. The survival of glioma-bearing rats was significantly prolonged after magnetic targeting therapy with MPNPs. MPNPs efficiently delivered paclitaxel into brain glioma by magnetic targeting and enhance its antitumor activity. They are promising for local chemotherapy for malignant glioma.

  7. A neurocentric perspective on glioma invasion

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Vishnu Anand; Robel, Stefanie; Watkins, Stacey; Sontheimer, Harald

    2017-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are devastating tumours that frequently kill patients within 1 year of diagnosis. The major obstacle to a cure is diffuse invasion, which enables tumours to escape complete surgical resection and chemo- and radiation therapy. Gliomas use the same tortuous extracellular routes of migration that are travelled by immature neurons and stem cells, frequently using blood vessels as guides. They repurpose ion channels to dynamically adjust their cell volume to accommodate to narrow spaces and breach the blood-brain barrier through disruption of astrocytic endfeet, which envelop blood vessels. The unique biology of glioma invasion provides hitherto unexplored brain-specific therapeutic targets for this devastating disease. PMID:24946761

  8. Surgical management of low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Carter S; Straus, David; Byrne, Richard W

    2014-08-01

    Low-grade gliomas represent a wide spectrum of intra-axial brain tumors with diverse presentations, radiographic and surgical appearances, and prognoses. While there remains a role for biopsy, a growing body of evidence shows that aggressive surgical resection of low-grade gliomas may improve symptoms, extend progression-free survival (PFS), and even cure a select few patients. With the application of preoperative functional imaging, intraoperative navigation, and cortical stimulation, neurosurgeons are able to perform more complete resections while limiting the risk to patients. In this article, we describe the surgical management and current operative techniques used in the treatment of low-grade gliomas.

  9. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F. )

    1991-01-15

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references.

  10. Involvement of FOS-mediated miR-181b/miR-21 signalling in the progression of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tao; Wang, Yingyi; Luo, Hui; Yao, Lei; Wang, Lin; Wang, Jiajia; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Junxia; Wang, Huibo; Shi, Yan; Yin, Yu; Jiang, Tao; Kang, Chunsheng; Liu, Ning; You, Yongping

    2013-09-01

    Recently, a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) were shown to be dysregulated in gliomas, and involved in glioma development. However, the effect of miRNA-miRNA functional networks on gliomas is poorly understood. In this study, we identified that FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS)-mediated miR-181b/miR-21 signalling was critical for glioma progression. Using microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), we found increased FOS in high grade gliomas. FOS depletion (via FOS-shRNA), inhibited invasion and promoted apoptosis in glioma cells. Using microarrays, combined with Pearson correlation analysis, we found FOS positively correlated with miR-21 expression. Reduction of FOS inhibited miR-21 expression by binding to the miR-21 promoter using luciferase reporter assays. Introduction of miR-21 abrogated FOS knockdown-induced cell invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assays showed that miR-181b modulated FOS expression by directly targeting the binding site within the 3'UTR. Expression of FOS with a FOS cDNA lacking 3'UTR overrided miR-181b-induced miR-21 expression and cell function. Finally, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridisation (ISH) analysis revealed a significant correlation in miR-181b, FOS and miR-21 expression in nude mouse tumour xenograft and human glioma tissues. To our knowledge, it is the first time to demonstrate that miR-181b/FOS/miR-21 signalling plays a critical role in the progression of gliomas, providing important clues for understanding the key roles of transcription factor mediated miRNA-miRNA functional network in the regulation of gliomas.

  11. ABCG2 and ABCB1 Limit the Efficacy of Dasatinib in a PDGF-B-Driven Brainstem Glioma Model.

    PubMed

    Mittapalli, Rajendar K; Chung, Alexander H; Parrish, Karen E; Crabtree, Donna; Halvorson, Kyle G; Hu, Guo; Elmquist, William F; Becher, Oren J

    2016-05-01

    Dasatinib is a multikinase inhibitor in clinical trials for glioma, and thus far has failed to demonstrate significant efficacy. We investigated whether the ABC efflux transporters ABCG2 and ABCB1 expressed in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), are limiting the efficacy of dasatinib in the treatment of glioma using genetic and pharmacologic approaches. We utilized a genetic brainstem glioma mouse model driven by platelet-derived growth factor-B and p53 loss using abcg2/abcb1 wild-type (ABC WT) or abcg2/abcb1 knockout mice (ABC KO). First, we observed that brainstem glioma tumor latency is significantly prolonged in ABC KO versus ABC WT mice (median survival of 47 vs. 34 days). Dasatinib treatment nearly doubles the survival of brainstem glioma-bearing ABC KO mice (44 vs. 80 days). Elacridar, an ABCG2 and ABCB1 inhibitor, significantly increases the efficacy of dasatinib in brainstem glioma-bearing ABC WT mice (42 vs. 59 days). Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrates that dasatinib delivery into the normal brain, but not into the tumor core, is significantly increased in ABC KO mice compared with ABC WT mice. Surprisingly, elacridar did not significantly increase dasatinib delivery into the normal brain or the tumor core of ABC WT mice. Next, we demonstrate that the tight junctions of the BBB of this model are compromised as assessed by tissue permeability to Texas Red dextran. Finally, elacridar increases the cytotoxicity of dasatinib independent of ABCG2 and ABCB1 expression in vitro In conclusion, elacridar improves the efficacy of dasatinib in a brainstem glioma model without significantly increasing its delivery to the tumor core. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 819-29. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Electrophysiology of glioma: a Rho GTPase-activating protein reduces tumor growth and spares neuron structure and function.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Eleonora; Olimpico, Francesco; Middei, Silvia; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; de Graaf, Erik L; McDonnell, Liam; Schmidt, Gudula; Fabbri, Alessia; Fiorentini, Carla; Baroncelli, Laura; Costa, Mario; Caleo, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastomas are the most aggressive type of brain tumor. A successful treatment should aim at halting tumor growth and protecting neuronal cells to prevent functional deficits and cognitive deterioration. Here, we exploited a Rho GTPase-activating bacterial protein toxin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1), to interfere with glioma cell growth in vitro and vivo. We also investigated whether this toxin spares neuron structure and function in peritumoral areas. We performed a microarray transcriptomic and in-depth proteomic analysis to characterize the molecular changes triggered by CNF1 in glioma cells. We also examined tumor cell senescence and growth in vehicle- and CNF1-treated glioma-bearing mice. Electrophysiological and morphological techniques were used to investigate neuronal alterations in peritumoral cortical areas. Administration of CNF1 triggered molecular and morphological hallmarks of senescence in mouse and human glioma cells in vitro. CNF1 treatment in vivo induced glioma cell senescence and potently reduced tumor volumes. In peritumoral areas of glioma-bearing mice, neurons showed a shrunken dendritic arbor and severe functional alterations such as increased spontaneous activity and reduced visual responsiveness. CNF1 treatment enhanced dendritic length and improved several physiological properties of pyramidal neurons, demonstrating functional preservation of the cortical network. Our findings demonstrate that CNF1 reduces glioma volume while at the same time maintaining the physiological and structural properties of peritumoral neurons. These data indicate a promising strategy for the development of more effective antiglioma therapies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Culture conditions tailored to the cell of origin are critical for maintaining native properties and tumorigenicity of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Ledur, Pítia F; Liu, Chong; He, Hua; Harris, Alexandra R; Minussi, Darlan C; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Shaffrey, Mark E; Asthagiri, Ashok; Lopes, Maria Beatriz S; Schiff, David; Lu, Yi-Cheng; Mandell, James W; Lenz, Guido; Zong, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Cell culture plays a pivotal role in cancer research. However, culture-induced changes in biological properties of tumor cells profoundly affect research reproducibility and translational potential. Establishing culture conditions tailored to the cancer cell of origin could resolve this problem. For glioma research, it has been previously shown that replacing serum with defined growth factors for neural stem cells (NSCs) greatly improved the retention of gene expression profile and tumorigenicity. However, among all molecular subtypes of glioma, our laboratory and others have previously shown that the oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) rather than the NSC serves as the cell of origin for the proneural subtype, raising questions regarding the suitability of NSC-tailored media for culturing proneural glioma cells. OPC-originated mouse glioma cells were cultured in conditions for normal OPCs or NSCs, respectively, for multiple passages. Gene expression profiles, morphologies, tumorigenicity, and drug responsiveness of cultured cells were examined in comparison with freshly isolated tumor cells. OPC media-cultured glioma cells maintained tumorigenicity, gene expression profiles, and morphologies similar to freshly isolated tumor cells. In contrast, NSC-media cultured glioma cells gradually lost their OPC features and most tumor-initiating ability and acquired heightened sensitivity to temozolomide. To improve experimental reproducibility and translational potential of glioma research, it is important to identify the cell of origin, and subsequently apply this knowledge to establish culture conditions that allow the retention of native properties of tumor cells. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Natural killer cells require monocytic Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells to eradicate orthotopically engrafted glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Baker, Gregory J; Chockley, Peter; Zamler, Daniel; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2016-06-01

    Malignant gliomas are resistant to natural killer (NK) cell immune surveillance. However, the mechanisms used by these cancers to suppress antitumor NK cell activity remain poorly understood. We have recently reported on a novel mechanism of innate immune evasion characterized by the overexpression of the carbohydrate-binding protein galectin-1 by both mouse and rat malignant glioma. Here, we investigate the cytokine profile of galectin-1-deficient GL26 cells and describe the process by which these tumors are targeted by the early innate immune system in RAG1(-/-) and C57BL/6J mice. Our data reveal that galectin-1 knockdown in GL26 cells heightens their inflammatory status leading to the rapid recruitment of Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells and NK1.1(+) NK cells into the brain tumor microenvironment, culminating in tumor clearance. We show that immunodepletion of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells in RAG1(-/-) mice permits the growth of galectin-1-deficient glioma despite the presence of NK cells, thus demonstrating an essential role for myeloid cells in the clearance of galectin-1-deficient glioma. Further characterization of tumor-infiltrating Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) cells reveals that these cells also express CCR2 and Ly-6C, markers consistent with inflammatory monocytes. Our results demonstrate that Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells, often referred to as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), are required for antitumor NK cell activity against galectin-1-deficient GL26 glioma. We conclude that glioma-derived galectin-1 represents an important factor in dictating the phenotypic behavior of monocytic Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells. Galectin-1 suppression may be a valuable treatment approach for clinical glioma by promoting their innate immune-mediated recognition and clearance through the concerted effort of innate myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages.

  15. Synergistic antitumor effect with indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase inhibition and temozolomide in a murine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Hanihara, Mitsuto; Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Oh-Oka, Kyoko; Mitsuka, Kentaro; Nakao, Atsuhito; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a key enzyme of tryptophan (Trp) metabolism, is involved in tumor-derived immune suppression through depletion of Trp and accumulation of the metabolite kynurenine, resulting in inactivation of natural killer cells and generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). It has been reported that high expression of IDO in cancer cells is associated with suppression of the antitumor immune response and is consistent with a poor prognosis. Thus, IDO may be a therapeutic target for malignant cancer. The authors have recently shown that IDO expression is markedly increased in human glioblastoma and secondary glioblastoma with malignant change, suggesting that IDO targeting may also have therapeutic potential for patients with glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of IDO inhibition and to examine the synergistic function of IDO inhibitor and temozolomide (TMZ) in a murine glioma model. METHODS Murine glioma GL261 cells and human glioma U87 cells were included in this study. The authors used 3 mouse models to study glioma cell growth: 1) a subcutaneous ectopic model, 2) a syngeneic intracranial orthotopic model, and 3) an allogenic intracranial orthotopic model. IDO inhibition was achieved via knockdown of IDO in GL261 cells using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and through oral administration of the IDO inhibitor, 1-methyl-l-tryptophan (1-MT). Tumor volume in the subcutaneous model and survival time in the intracranial model were evaluated. RESULTS In the subcutaneous model, oral administration of 1-MT significantly suppressed tumor growth, and synergistic antitumor effects of 1-MT and TMZ were observed (p < 0.01). Mice containing intracranially inoculated IDO knockdown cells had a significantly longer survival period as compared with control mice (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that IDO expression is implicated in immunosuppression and tumor progression in glioma cells. Therefore, combining IDO

  16. ABCG2 and ABCB1 limit the efficacy of dasatinib in a PDGF-B driven brainstem glioma model

    PubMed Central

    Mittapalli, Rajendar K; Chung, Alexander H; Parrish, Karen E; Crabtree, Donna; Halvorson, Kyle G.; Hu, Guo; Elmquist, William F; Becher, Oren J

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib is a multi-kinase inhibitor in clinical trials for glioma, and thus far failed to demonstrate significant efficacy. We investigated whether the ABC efflux transporters, ABCG2 and ABCB1, expressed in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), are limiting the efficacy of dasatinib in the treatment of glioma using genetic and pharmacological approaches. We utilized a genetic brainstem glioma mouse model driven by platelet-derived growth factor-B and p53 loss using abcg2/abcb1 wild type (ABC WT) or abcg2/abcb1 knockout mice (ABC KO). First, we observed that brainstem glioma tumor latency is significantly prolonged in ABC KO versus ABC WT mice (median survival of 47 vs. 34 days). Dasatinib treatment nearly doubles the survival of brainstem glioma-bearing ABC KO mice (44 vs. 80 days). Elacridar, an ABCG2 and ABCB1 inhibitor, significantly increases the efficacy of dasatinib in brainstem glioma-bearing ABC WT mice (42 vs. 59 days). Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrates that dasatinib delivery into the normal brain, but not into the tumor core, is significantly increased in ABC KO mice compared to ABC WT mice. Surprisingly, elacridar did not significantly increase dasatinib delivery into the normal brain or the tumor core of ABC WT mice. Next, we demonstrate that the tight junctions of the BBB of this model are compromised as assessed by tissue permeability to Texas Red dextran. Lastly, elacridar increases the cytotoxicity of dasatinib independent of ABCG2 and ABCB1 expression in vitro. In conclusion, elacridar improves the efficacy of dasatinib in a brainstem glioma model without significantly increasing its delivery to the tumor core. PMID:26883271

  17. Toll-like receptor 2 mediates microglia/brain macrophage MT1-MMP expression and glioma expansion

    PubMed Central

    Vinnakota, Katyayni; Hu, Feng; Ku, Min-Chi; Georgieva, Petya B.; Szulzewsky, Frank; Pohlmann, Andreas; Waiczies, Sonia; Waiczies, Helmar; Niendorf, Thoralf; Lehnardt, Seija; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Synowitz, Michael; Markovic, Darko; Wolf, Susanne A.; Glass, Rainer; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas are the most aggressive primary brain tumors in humans. Microglia/brain macrophage accumulation in and around the tumor correlates with malignancy and poor clinical prognosis of these tumors. We have previously shown that microglia promote glioma expansion through upregulation of membrane type 1 matrix metalloprotease (MT1-MMP). This upregulation depends on signaling via the Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor molecule myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88). Methods Using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo techniques, we identified TLR2 as the main TLR controlling microglial MT1-MMP expression and promoting microglia-assisted glioma expansion. Results The implantation of mouse GL261 glioma cells into TLR2 knockout mice resulted in significantly smaller tumors, reduced MT1-MMP expression, and enhanced survival rates compared with wild-type control mice. Tumor expansion studied in organotypic brain slices depended on both parenchymal TLR2 expression and the presence of microglia. Glioma-derived soluble factors and synthetic TLR2 specific ligands induced MT1-MMP expression in microglia from wild-type mice, but no such change in MT1-MMP gene expression was observed in microglia from TLR2 knockout mice. We also found evidence that TLR1 and TLR6 cofunction with TLR2 as heterodimers in regulating MT1-MMP expression in vitro. Conclusions Our results thus show that activation of TLR2 along with TLRs 1 and/or 6 converts microglia into a glioma supportive phenotype. PMID:24014382

  18. Osteopontin-CD44 signaling in the glioma perivascular niche enhances cancer stem cell phenotypes and promotes aggressive tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Pietras, Alexander; Katz, Amanda M.; Ekström, Elin J.; Wee, Boyoung; Halliday, John J.; Pitter, Kenneth L.; Werbeck, Jillian L.; Amankulor, Nduka M.; Huse, Jason T.; Holland, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Stem-like glioma cells reside within a perivascular niche and display hallmark radiation resistance. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying these properties will be vital for the development of effective therapies. Here we show that the stem cell marker CD44 promotes cancer stem cell phenotypes and radiation resistance. In a mouse model of glioma, Cd44−/− and Cd44+/− animals showed improved survival compared to controls. The CD44 ligand Osteopontin shared a perivascular expression pattern with CD44 and promoted glioma stem cell-like phenotypes. These effects were mediated via the γ-secretase regulated intracellular domain of CD44, which promoted aggressive glioma growth in vivo and stem cell-like phenotypes via CBP/p300-dependent enhancement of HIF-2α activity. In human glioblastoma multiforme, expression of CD44 correlated with hypoxia-induced gene signatures and poor survival. Together, these data suggest that in the glioma perivascular niche, Osteopontin promotes stem cell-like properties and radiation resistance in adjacent tumor cells via activation of CD44 signaling. PMID:24607407

  19. CacyBP/SIP inhibits Doxourbicin-induced apoptosis of glioma cells due to activation of ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuan; Zhan, Wenjian; Cao, Tong; Tang, Tianjin; Gao, Yong; Qiu, Zhichao; Fu, Chunling; Qian, Fengyuan; Yu, Rutong; Shi, Hengliang

    2016-03-01

    Calcyclin-binding protein or Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP) was previously reported to promote the proliferation of glioma cells. However, the effect of CacyBP/SIP on apoptosis of glioma is poorly understood. Here, our study shows that CacyBP/SIP plays a role in inhibiting doxorubicin (DOX) induced apoptosis of glioma cells U251 and U87. Overexpression of CacyBP/SIP obviously suppressed the DOX-induced cell apoptosis. On the contrary, silencing of CacyBP/SIP significantly promoted it. Further investigation indicated that inhibition of apoptosis by CacyBP/SIP was relevant to its nuclear translocation in response to the DOX treatment. Importantly, we found that the level of p-ERK1/2 in nuclei was related to the nuclear accumulation of CacyBP/SIP. Finally, the role of CacyBP/SIP was confirmed in vivo in a mouse model with the cell line stably silencing CacyBP/SIP. Taken together, our results suggest that CacyBP/SIP plays an important role in inhibiting apoptosis of glioma cells which might be mediated by ERK1/2 signaling pathway, which will provide some guidance for the treatment of glioma.

  20. Improving vaccine efficacy against malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ladomersky, Erik; Genet, Matthew; Zhai, Lijie; Gritsina, Galina; Lauing, Kristen L.; Lulla, Rishi R.; Fangusaro, Jason; Lenzen, Alicia; Kumthekar, Priya; Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Binder, David C.; James, C. David; Wainwright, Derek A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effective treatment of adult and pediatric malignant glioma is a significant clinical challenge. In adults, glioblastoma (GBM) accounts for the majority of malignant glioma diagnoses with a median survival of 14.6 mo. In children, malignant glioma accounts for 20% of primary CNS tumors with a median survival of less than 1 y. Here, we discuss vaccine treatment for children diagnosed with malignant glioma, through targeting EphA2, IL-13Rα2 and/or histone H3 K27M, while in adults, treatments with RINTEGA, Prophage Series G-100 and dendritic cells are explored. We conclude by proposing new strategies that are built on current vaccine technologies and improved upon with novel combinatorial approaches. PMID:27622066

  1. Targeting immune checkpoints in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tete; Liu, Yong-Jun; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jingtao

    2017-01-01

    Malignant glioma is the most common and a highly aggressive cancer in the central nervous system (CNS). Cancer immunotherapy, strategies to boost the bodys anti-cancer immune responses instead of directly targeting tumor cells, recently achieved great success in treating several human solid tumors. Although once considered immune privileged and devoid of normal immunological functions, CNS is now considered a promising target for cancer immunotherapy, featuring the recent progresses in neurobiology and neuroimmunology and a highly immunosuppressive state in malignant glioma. In this review, we focus on immune checkpoint inhibitors, specifically, antagonizing monoclonal antibodies for programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). We discuss advances in the working mechanisms of these immune checkpoint molecules, their status in malignant glioma, and current preclinical and clinical trials targeting these molecules in malignant glioma. PMID:27756892

  2. [Classification and documentation of diffuse gliomas].

    PubMed

    Romeike, B F M

    2007-06-01

    Most current grading systems of diffuse gliomas are based solely on the microscopic evaluation of surgical specimens and the TNM classification does not have a value for brain tumors. Here additional parameters are presented, which are suitable for a classification and documentation of diffuse gliomas. As additional parameters to the WHO typing and grading we discuss age groups, different tumor devolutions, circumstances such as a second malignant neoplasm or hereditary tumors, tumor expansion based on anatomically defined brain regions, Karnofsky Scale, eloquence of the brain regions, diag-nostic certainty and informativity of tissue samples. This work shows that clinical data and imaging studies can contribute substantially to the classification of diffuse gliomas. The additional parameters presented here constitute a significant improvement of glioma documentation. Especially complex courses of long duration and repeated therapeutic interventions can be better surveyed and digitally processed.

  3. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zoe Z.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Sun, David A.; Zhang, Yi Ping; Hunt, Matthew A.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    A major dilemma in brain-tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture, which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of (1) image-based navigation, (2) intraoperative sampling, (3) electrophysiological monitoring, and (4) enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease. PMID:26284196

  4. Photochemical internalization of bleomycin for glioma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Marlon S.; Blickenstaff, Joseph W.; Shih, En-Chung; Zamora, Genesis; Vo, Van; Sun, Chung-Ho; Hirschberg, Henry; Madsen, Steen J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We study the use of photochemical internalization (PCI) for enhancing chemotherapeutic response to malignant glioma cells in vitro. Two models are studied: monolayers consisting of F98 rat glioma cells and human glioma spheroids established from biopsy-derived glioma cells. In both cases, the cytotoxicity of aluminum phthalocyanine disulfonate (AlPcS2a)-based PCI of bleomycin was compared to AlPcS2a-photodynamic therapy (PDT) and chemotherapy alone. Monolayers and spheroids were incubated with AlPcS2a (PDT effect), bleomycin (chemotherapy effect), or AlPcS2a+bleomycin (PCI effect) and were illuminated (670 nm). Toxicity was evaluated using colony formation assays or spheroid growth kinetics. F98 cells in monolayer/spheroids were not particularly sensitive to the effects of low radiant exposure (1.5  J/cm2 @ 5  mW/cm2) AlPcS2a-PDT. Bleomycin was moderately toxic to F98 cells in monolayer at relatively low concentrations—incubation of F98 cells in 0.1  μg/ml for 4 h resulted in 80% survival, but less toxic in human glioma spheroids respectively. In both in vitro systems investigated, a significant PCI effect is seen. PCI using 1.5  J/cm2 together with 0.25  μg/ml bleomycin resulted in approximately 20% and 18% survival of F98 rat glioma cells and human glioma spheroids, respectively. These results show that AlPcS2a-mediated PCI can be used to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents such as bleomycin in malignant gliomas. PMID:22612148

  5. Neurofibromatosis type 1 and sporadic optic gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, S; Birch, J; Kerr, B; Lashford, L; Evans, D

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To compare the natural history of sporadic optic glioma with those associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Methods: Optic glioma cases were identified using both the Manchester Children's Tumour Registry (CTR) and the North West Regional NF1 Database (NF1DB), with detailed information on natural history available from the former (in 34 of 36 cases identified). Results: A total of 52 cases over a period of 41 years were identified. From the 34 whose natural history was known, almost all (n = 31) were symptomatic, with mean ages of presentation of 4.5 and 5.1 years for NF1 and sporadic cases respectively. The majority (n = 22) presented with visual impairment, seven of whom were blind in at least one eye. Sporadic cases were over twice as likely as NF1 to have visual impairment. Recurrence occurred in 12 patients. Fewer NF1 patients died as a direct result of their optic glioma, but overall mortality and 5 and 10 year survival rates between the two groups were similar. All five primary (non-metastatic) second central nervous system (CNS) tumours occurred in NF1 cases, two of these following radiotherapy. Conclusions: Symptomatic sporadic optic gliomas presented with impaired vision more frequently and were more aggressive than NF1 optic gliomas. Only optic glioma cases with NF1 were at risk of developing a second CNS tumour. Aggressive treatment of sporadic optic gliomas and early surveillance of NF1 optic gliomas may be required. The use of radiotherapy in these children requires further clarification. PMID:12089128

  6. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08 mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical

  7. Imaging mass spectrometry identifies prognostic ganglioside species in rodent intracranial transplants of glioma and medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ermini, Leonardo; Morganti, Elena; Post, Alexander; Yeganeh, Behzad; Caniggia, Isabella; Leadley, Michael; Faria, Claudia C; Rutka, James T; Post, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-MSI) allows us to investigate the distribution of lipid molecules within tissues. We used MALDI-MSI to identify prognostic gangliosides in tissue sections of rat intracranial allografts of rat glioma and mouse intracranial xenografts of human medulloblastoma. In the healthy adult rodent brain, GM1 and GD1 were the main types of glycolipids. Both gangliosides were absent in both intracranial transplants. The ganglioside GM3 was not present in the healthy adult brain but was highly expressed in rat glioma allografts. In combination with tandem mass spectrometry GM3 (d18:1/C24:0) was identified as the most abundant ganglioside species in the glioma allotransplant. By contrast, mouse xenografts of human medulloblastoma were characterized by prominent expression of the ganglioside GM2 (d18:0/C18:0). Together, these data demonstrate that tissue-based MALDI-MSI of gangliosides is able to discriminate between different brain tumors and may be a useful clinical tool for their classification and grading.

  8. The interface between glial progenitors and gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Canoll, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian brain and spinal cord contain heterogeneous populations of cycling, immature cells. These include cells with stem cell-like properties as well as progenitors in various stages of early glial differentiation. This latter population is distributed widely throughout gray and white matter and numerically represents an extremely large cell pool. In this review, we discuss the possibility that the glial progenitors that populate the adult CNS are one source of gliomas. Indeed, the marker phenotypes, morphologies, and migratory properties of cells in gliomas strongly resemble glial progenitors in many ways. We review briefly some salient features of normal glial development and then examine the similarities and differences between normal progenitors and cells in gliomas, focusing on the phenotypic plasticity of glial progenitors and the responses to growth factors in promoting proliferation and migration of normal and glioma cells, and discussing known mutational changes in gliomas in the context of how these might affect the proliferative and migratory behaviors of progenitors. Finally, we will discuss the “cancer stem cell” hypothesis in light of the possibility that glial progenitors can generate gliomas. PMID:18784926

  9. Multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes for treating brain glioma along with eliminating glioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-tao; Tang, Wei; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-min; Wang, Yan-hong; Cheng, Lan; Meng, Xian-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain glioma is the most lethal and aggressive type of cancer. Surgery and radiotherapy cannot eliminate all glioma stem cells (GSCs) and blood–brain barrier (BBB) restricts the movement of antitumor drugs from blood to brain, thus leading to the poor prognosis with high recurrence rate. In the present study, the targeting conjugates of cholesterol polyethylene glycol polyethylenimine (CHOL-PEG2000-PEI) and D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate vapreotide (TPGS1000-VAP) were newly synthesized for transporting drugs across the BBB and targeting glioma cells and GSCs. The multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes were constructed by modifying the targeting conjugates. The studies were undertaken on BBB model, glioma cells, GSCs, and glioma-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes with suitable physicochemical property could enhance the transport drugs across the BBB, increase the intracellular uptake, inhibit glioma cells and GSCs, penetrate and destruct the GSCs spheroids, and induce apoptosis via activating related apoptotic proteins. In vivo results demonstrated that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes could significantly accumulate into brain tumor location, show the specificity to tumor sites, and result in a robust overall antitumor efficacy in glioma-bearing mice. These data suggested that the multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes could offer a promising strategy for treating brain glioma. PMID:27029055

  10. GliomaPredict: a clinically useful tool for assigning glioma patients to specific molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Aiguo; Bozdag, Serdar; Kotliarov, Yuri; Fine, Howard A

    2010-07-15

    Advances in generating genome-wide gene expression data have accelerated the development of molecular-based tumor classification systems. Tools that allow the translation of such molecular classification schemas from research into clinical applications are still missing in the emerging era of personalized medicine. We developed GliomaPredict as a computational tool that allows the fast and reliable classification of glioma patients into one of six previously published stratified subtypes based on sets of extensively validated classifiers derived from hundreds of glioma transcriptomic profiles. Our tool utilizes a principle component analysis (PCA)-based approach to generate a visual representation of the analyses, quantifies the confidence of the underlying subtype assessment and presents results as a printable PDF file. GliomaPredict tool is implemented as a plugin application for the widely-used GenePattern framework. GliomaPredict provides a user-friendly, clinically applicable novel platform for instantly assigning gene expression-based subtype in patients with gliomas thereby aiding in clinical trial design and therapeutic decision-making. Implemented as a user-friendly diagnostic tool, we expect that in time GliomaPredict, and tools like it, will become routinely used in translational/clinical research and in the clinical care of patients with gliomas.

  11. Microglia-glioma cross-talk: a two way approach to new strategies against glioma.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, Cataldo; Fioretti, Bernard; Bianchi, Roberta; Mecca, Carmen; Tubaro, Claudia; Beccari, Tommaso; Franciolini, Fabio; Giambanco, Ileana; Donato, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant and aggressive among primary brain tumors, characterized by very low life expectancy. In vivo, glioma and glioblastoma in particular contain large numbers of immune cells (myeloid cells) such as microglia and tumour-infiltrating macrophages (or glioma associated macrophages). These glioma-infiltrating myeloid cells comprise up to 30% of total tumor mass and have been suggested to play several roles in glioma progression including proliferation, survival, motility and immunosuppression. Although tumor microglia and macrophages can acquire proinflammatory (M1) phenotype being capable of releasing proinflammatory cytokines, phagocytosing and presenting antigens, their effector immune function in gliomas appears to be suppressed by the acquisition of an anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. In the present work we review the microglia-glioma interactions to highlight the close relationship between the two cell types and the factors that can influence their properties (chemokines, cytokines, S100B protein). A future therapeutic possibility might be to simultaneously targeting, for example with nanomedicine, glioma cells and microglia to push the microglia towards an antitumor phenotype (M1) and/or prevent glioma cells from "conditioning" by microglia.

  12. An optical assessment of the effects of glioma growth on resting state networks in mice (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orukari, Inema E.; Bauer, Adam Q.; Baxter, Grant A.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Culver, Joseph P.

    2017-02-01

    Gliomas are known to cause significant changes in normal brain function that lead to cognitive deficits. Disruptions in resting state networks (RSNs) are thought to underlie these changes. However, investigating the effects of glioma growth on RSNs in humans is complicated by the heterogeneity in lesion size, type, and location across subjects. In this study, we evaluated the effects of tumor growth on RSNs over time in a controlled mouse model of glioma growth. Methods: Glioma cells (5x104-105 U87s) were stereotactically injected into the forepaw somatosensory cortex of adult nude mice (n=5). Disruptions in RSNs were evaluated weekly with functional connectivity optical intrinsic signal imaging (fcOIS). Tumor growth was monitored with MRI and weekly bioluminescence imaging (BLI). In order to characterize how tumor growth affected different RSNs over time, we calculated a number of functional connectivity (fc) metrics, including homotopic (bilateral) connectivity, spatial similarity, and node degree. Results: Deficits in fc initiate near the lesion, and over a period of several weeks, extend more globally. The reductions in spatial similarity were found to strongly correlate with the BLI signal indicating that increased tumor size is associated with increased RSN disruption. Conclusions: We have shown that fcOIS is capable of detecting alterations in mouse RSNs due to brain tumor growth. A better understanding of how RSN disruption contributes to the development of cognitive deficits in brain tumor patients may lead to better patient risk stratification and consequently improved cognitive outcomes.

  13. Human Glioma Growth is Controlled by MicroRNA-10b

    PubMed Central

    Gabriely, Galina; Yi, Ming; Narayan, Ravi S.; Niers, Johanna M.; Wurdinger, Thomas; Imitola, Jaime; Ligon, Keith L.; Kesari, Santosh; Esau, Christine; Stephens, Robert M.; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Krichevsky, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiling studies revealed a number of miRNAs dysregulated in the malignant brain tumor, glioblastoma. Molecular functions of these miRNAs in gliomagenesis are mainly unknown. We show that inhibition of miR-10b, a miRNA not expressed in human brain and strongly up-regulated in both low-grade and high-grade gliomas, reduces glioma cell growth by cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These cellular responses are mediated by augmented expression of the direct targets of miR-10b, including BCL2L11/Bim, TFAP2C/AP-2γ, CDKN1A/p21, and CDKN2A/p16, which normally protect cells from uncontrolled growth. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) expression dataset reveals a strong positive correlation between numerous genes sustaining cellular growth and miR-10b levels in human glioblastomas, while pro-apoptotic genes anti-correlate with the expression of miR-10b. Furthermore, survival of glioblastoma patients expressing high levels of miR-10 family members is significantly reduced in comparison to patients with low miR-10 levels, indicating that miR-10 may contribute to glioma growth in vivo. Finally, inhibition of miR-10b in a mouse model of human glioma results in significant reduction of tumor growth. Altogether, our experiments validate an important role of miR-10b in gliomagenesis, reveal a novel mechanism of miR-10b-mediated regulation, and suggest the possibility of its future use as a therapeutic target in gliomas. PMID:21471404

  14. Human glioma growth is controlled by microRNA-10b.

    PubMed

    Gabriely, Galina; Yi, Ming; Narayan, Ravi S; Niers, Johanna M; Wurdinger, Thomas; Imitola, Jaime; Ligon, Keith L; Kesari, Santosh; Esau, Christine; Stephens, Robert M; Tannous, Bakhos A; Krichevsky, Anna M

    2011-05-15

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiling studies revealed a number of miRNAs dysregulated in the malignant brain tumor glioblastoma. Molecular functions of these miRNAs in gliomagenesis are mainly unknown. We show that inhibition of miR-10b, a miRNA not expressed in human brain and strongly upregulated in both low-grade and high-grade gliomas, reduces glioma cell growth by cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. These cellular responses are mediated by augmented expression of the direct targets of miR-10b, including BCL2L11/Bim, TFAP2C/AP-2γ, CDKN1A/p21, and CDKN2A/p16, which normally protect cells from uncontrolled growth. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas expression data set reveals a strong positive correlation between numerous genes sustaining cellular growth and miR-10b levels in human glioblastomas, while proapoptotic genes anticorrelate with the expression of miR-10b. Furthermore, survival of glioblastoma patients expressing high levels of miR-10 family members is significantly reduced in comparison to patients with low miR-10 levels, indicating that miR-10 may contribute to glioma growth in vivo. Finally, inhibition of miR-10b in a mouse model of human glioma results in significant reduction of tumor growth. Altogether, our experiments validate an important role of miR-10b in gliomagenesis, reveal a novel mechanism of miR-10b-mediated regulation, and suggest the possibility of its future use as a therapeutic target in gliomas. ©2011 AACR

  15. Targeting and therapy of human glioma xenografts in vivo utilizing radiolabeled antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.A.; Wessels, B.W.; Edwards, J.A.; Kopher, K.A.; Wanek, P.M.; Wharam, M.D.; Order, S.E.; Klein, J.L. )

    1990-02-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies provide a potential basis for selective radiotherapy of human gliomas. We have measured tumor targeting by radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies directed against neuroectodermal and tumor-associated antigens in nude mice bearing human glioma xenografts. Monoclonal P96.5, a mouse IgG2a immunoglobulin, defines an epitope of a human melanoma cell surface protein and specifically binds the U-251 human glioma as measured by immunoperoxidase histochemistry. IIIIn-radiolabeled P96.5 specifically targets the U-251 human glioma xenograft and yields 87.0 microCi of tumor activity/g/100 microCi injected activity compared to 4.5 microCi following administration of 100 microCi radiolabeled irrelevant monoclonal antibody. Calculations of targeting ratios demonstrate the deposited dose to be 11.6 times greater with radiolabeled P96.5 administration compared to irrelevant monoclonal antibody. The dose found in normal organs is less than 20% of that in the tumor, further supporting specific targeting of the human glioma xenograft by this antibody. Monoclonal antibody ZME018, which defines a second melanoma-associated antigen, demonstrates positive immunoperoxidase staining of the tumor, but comparatively decreased targeting. To test the therapeutic potential of 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5 and ZME018, tumors and normal sites were implanted with miniature thermoluminescent dosimeters. Average absorbed doses of 3770 +/- 445 (SEM) and 645 +/- 48 cGy in tumor, 353 +/- 41 and 222 +/- 13 cGy in a contralateral control i.m. site, 980 +/- 127 and 651 +/- 63 cGy in liver, and 275 +/- 14 and 256 +/- 18 cGy in total body were observed 7 days following administration of 100 microCi 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5 and ZME018, respectively. Calculations of absorbed dose by the medical internal radiation dose method confirmed thermoluminescent dosimeter absorbed dose measurements.

  16. Biphasic Dependence of Glioma Survival and Cell Migration on CD44 Expression Level.

    PubMed

    Klank, Rebecca L; Decker Grunke, Stacy A; Bangasser, Benjamin L; Forster, Colleen L; Price, Matthew A; Odde, Thomas J; SantaCruz, Karen S; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Canoll, Peter; Turley, Eva A; McCarthy, James B; Ohlfest, John R; Odde, David J

    2017-01-03

    While several studies link the cell-surface marker CD44 to cancer progression, conflicting results show both positive and negative correlations with increased CD44 levels. Here, we demonstrate that the survival outcomes of genetically induced glioma-bearing mice and of high-grade human glioma patients are biphasically correlated with CD44 level, with the poorest outcomes occurring at intermediate levels. Furthermore, the high-CD44-expressing mesenchymal subtype exhibited a positive trend of survival with increased CD44 level. Mouse cell migration rates in ex vivo brain slice cultures were also biphasically associated with CD44 level, with maximal migration corresponding to minimal survival. Cell simulations suggest that cell-substrate adhesiveness is sufficient to explain this biphasic migration. More generally, these results highlight the potential importance of non-monotonic relationships between survival and biomarkers associated with cancer progression.

  17. Molecular Diagnostics of Gliomas Using Next Generation Sequencing of a Glioma-Tailored Gene Panel.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Angela; Kaulich, Kerstin; Stepanow, Stefanie; Wolter, Marietta; Köhrer, Karl; Felsberg, Jörg; Malzkorn, Bastian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Current classification of gliomas is based on histological criteria according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. Over the past years, characteristic genetic profiles have been identified in various glioma types. These can refine tumor diagnostics and provide important prognostic and predictive information. We report on the establishment and validation of gene panel next generation sequencing (NGS) for the molecular diagnostics of gliomas. We designed a glioma-tailored gene panel covering 660 amplicons derived from 20 genes frequently aberrant in different glioma types. Sensitivity and specificity of glioma gene panel NGS for detection of DNA sequence variants and copy number changes were validated by single gene analyses. NGS-based mutation detection was optimized for application on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens including small stereotactic biopsy samples. NGS data obtained in a retrospective analysis of 121 gliomas allowed for their molecular classification into distinct biological groups, including (i) isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH) 1 or 2 mutant astrocytic gliomas with frequent α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) gene mutations, (ii) IDH mutant oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q codeletion, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation and frequent Drosophila homolog of capicua (CIC) gene mutation, as well as (iii) IDH wildtype glioblastomas with frequent TERT promoter mutation, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification. Oligoastrocytic gliomas were genetically assigned to either of these groups. Our findings implicate gene panel NGS as a promising diagnostic technique that may facilitate integrated histological and molecular glioma classification.

  18. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-09-14

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  19. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-09-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  20. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:27625116

  1. LuIII parvovirus selectively and efficiently targets, replicates in, and kills human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Paglino, Justin C; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2012-07-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons.

  2. LuIII Parvovirus Selectively and Efficiently Targets, Replicates in, and Kills Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paglino, Justin C.; Ozduman, Koray

    2012-01-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons. PMID:22553327

  3. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    ICHIKAWA, Tomotsugu; OTANI, Yoshihiro; KUROZUMI, Kazuhiko; DATE, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:27169497

  4. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Otani, Yoshihiro; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Date, Isao

    2016-07-15

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies.

  5. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  6. Olaparib in Treating Patients With Advanced Glioma, Cholangiocarcinoma, or Solid Tumors With IDH1 or IDH2 Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Glioblastoma; Grade II Glioma; IDH1 Gene Mutation; IDH2 Gene Mutation; Recurrent Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Glioma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; WHO Grade III Glioma

  7. Distinct molecular profile of diffuse cerebellar gliomas.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Masashi; Mukasa, Akitake; Nagae, Genta; Yamamoto, Shogo; Tatsuno, Kenji; Ueda, Hiroki; Fukuda, Shiro; Umeda, Takayoshi; Suzuki, Tomonari; Otani, Ryohei; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Maruyama, Takashi; Tanaka, Shota; Takayanagi, Shunsaku; Nejo, Takahide; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ichimura, Koichi; Nakamura, Taishi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yoshitaka; Nagane, Motoo; Ueki, Keisuke; Nishikawa, Ryo; Shibahara, Junji; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Saito, Nobuhito

    2017-08-29

    Recent studies have demonstrated that tumor-driving alterations are often different among gliomas that originated from different brain regions and have underscored the importance of analyzing molecular characteristics of gliomas stratified by brain region. Therefore, to elucidate molecular characteristics of diffuse cerebellar gliomas (DCGs), 27 adult, mostly glioblastoma cases were analyzed. Comprehensive analysis using whole-exome sequencing, RNA sequencing, and Infinium methylation array (n = 17) demonstrated their distinct molecular profile compared to gliomas in other brain regions. Frequent mutations in chromatin-modifier genes were identified including, noticeably, a truncating mutation in SETD2 (n = 4), which resulted in loss of H3K36 trimethylation and was mutually exclusive with H3F3A K27M mutation (n = 3), suggesting that epigenetic dysregulation may lead to DCG tumorigenesis. Alterations that cause loss of p53 function including TP53 mutation (n = 9), PPM1D mutation (n = 2), and a novel type of PPM1D fusion (n = 1), were also frequent. On the other hand, mutations and copy number changes commonly observed in cerebral gliomas were infrequent. DNA methylation profile analysis demonstrated that all DCGs except for those with H3F3A mutations were categorized in the "RTK I (PDGFRA)" group, and those DCGs had a gene expression signature that was highly associated with PDGFRA. Furthermore, compared with the data of 315 gliomas derived from different brain regions, promoter methylation of transcription factors genes associated with glial development showed a characteristic pattern presumably reflecting their tumor origin. Notably, SOX10, a key transcription factor associated with oligodendroglial differentiation and PDGFRA regulation, was up-regulated in both DCG and H3 K27M-mutant diffuse midline glioma, suggesting their developmental and biological commonality. In contrast, SOX10 was silenced by promoter methylation in most cerebral gliomas. These

  8. EFEMP2 is upregulated in gliomas and promotes glioma cell proliferation and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Long; Chen, Qianxue; Chen, Zhibiao; Tian, Daofeng; Xu, Haitao; Cai, Qiang; Liu, Baohui; Deng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor. Although EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 2 (EFEMP2), an extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein, is regarded as a candidate oncogene, little is known about the association of EFEMP2 and gliomas. Here, the expression of EFEMP2 was significantly increased in glioma tissues (n=60) compared to non-tumorous brain tissues (n=25). Silencing of EFEMP2 expression through RNA interference in two glioma cell lines (U87 and U373) remarkably inhibited cell proliferation and G1/S transition. More importantly, EFEMP2 silencing significantly induced cell apoptosis via increasing the ratio of Bax and Bcl-2. Additionally, knockdown of EFEMP2 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of both glioma cells, which was associated with the downregulated expression of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. In conclusion, expression of EFEMP2 was associated with the oncogenic potential of gliomas and silencing of its expression can suppress cancer cell growth and metastasis. Inhibition of EFEMP2 may be a therapeutic strategy for gliomas. PMID:26617746

  9. Glioma-Associated Oncogene Homolog1 (Gli1)-Aquaporin1 pathway promotes glioma cell metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zheng-qiang; Ye, Ming; Yu, Pei-gen; Xiao, Chun; Lin, Feng-yun

    2016-01-01

    Glioma-Associated Oncogene Homolog1 (Gli1) is known to be activated in malignant glioma; however, its downstream pathway has not been fully explained. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Gli1-Aquaporin1 (AQP1) signal pathway in glioma cell survival. Our data suggests that both Gli1 and AQP1 are upregulated in glioma tissues, as in comparison to in normal tissues. These up-regulation phenomena were also observed in glioma U251 and U87 cells. It was demonstrated that Gli1 positively regulated the AQP1 expression. By luciferase reporter gene and ChIP assay, we observed that this modulation process was realized by combination of Gli1 with AQP1 promotor. In addition, knock down of Gli1 by siRNA interference reduced the viability of glioma cells as well as suppressed cell metastasis. Also, the inhibitory effects of cell survival by silenced Gli1 were abrogated by AQP1 overexpression. In summary, glioma cell survival is a regulatory process and can be mediated by Gli1-AQP1 pathway. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 394-399] PMID:27157540

  10. Cell biology-metabolic crosstalk in glioma.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, Alison

    2017-08-01

    The renewed interest in cancer metabolism in recent years has been fuelled by the identification of the involvement of key oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes in the control of metabolic pathways. Many of these alterations lead to dramatic changes in bioenergetics, biosynthesis and redox balance within tumour cells. The complex relationship between tumour cell metabolism and the tumour microenvironment has turned this field of biochemistry and cell biology into a challenging and exciting area for study. In the case of gliomas the involvement of altered metabolic pathways including glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation and glutaminolysis are pointing the way to new possibilities for treatment. The tumour-promoting effects of inflammation are an emerging hallmark of cancer and the role of the eicosanoids in gliomas is an area of active research to elucidate the importance of individual eicosanoids in glioma cell proliferation, migration and immune escape. In this review, the different aspects of metabolic reprogramming which occur in gliomas are highlighted and their relationship to glioma cell biology and the wider tumour microenvironment is described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional MRI for Surgery of Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Antonella; Cirillo, Sara; Bello, Lorenzo; Riva, Marco; Falini, Andrea

    2017-08-23

    Advanced neuroimaging techniques such as functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion MR tractography have been increasingly used at every stage of the surgical management of brain gliomas, as a means to improve tumor resection while preserving brain functions. This review provides an overview of the last advancements in the field of functional MRI techniques, with a particular focus on their current clinical use and reliability in the preoperative and intraoperative setting, as well as their future perspectives for personalized multimodal management of patients with gliomas. fMRI and diffusion MR tractography give relevant insights on the anatomo-functional organization of eloquent cortical areas and subcortical connections near or inside a tumor. Task-based fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography have proven to be valid and highly sensitive tools for localizing the distinct eloquent cortical and subcortical areas before surgery in glioma patients; they also show good accuracy when compared with intraoperative stimulation mapping data. Resting-state fMRI functional connectivity as well as new advanced HARDI (high angular resolution diffusion imaging) tractography methods are improving and reshaping the role of functional MRI for surgery of gliomas, with potential benefit for personalized treatment strategies. Noninvasive functional MRI techniques may offer the opportunity to perform a multimodal assessment in brain tumors, to be integrated with intraoperative mapping and clinical data for improving surgical management and oncological and functional outcome in patients affected by gliomas.

  12. Tissue Proteome Analysis of Different Grades of Human Gliomas Provides Major Cues for Glioma Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gollapalli, Kishore; Ghantasala, Saicharan; Atak, Apurva; Rapole, Srikanth; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Epari, Sridhar; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2017-05-01

    Gliomas are heterogeneous and most commonly occurring brain tumors. Blood-brain barrier restricts the entry of brain tumor proteins into blood stream thus limiting the usage of serum or plasma for proteomic analysis. Our study aimed at understanding the molecular basis of aggressiveness of various grades of brain tumors using isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) based mass spectrometry. Tissue proteomic analysis of various grades of gliomas was performed using four-plex iTRAQ. We labeled five sets (each set consists of control, grade-II, III, and IV tumor samples) of individual glioma patients using iTRAQ reagents. Significantly altered proteins were subjected to bioinformatics analysis using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). Various metabolic pathways like glycolysis, TCA-cycle, electron transport chain, lactate metabolism, and blood coagulation pathways were majorly observed to be perturbed in gliomas. Most of the identified proteins involved in redox reactions, protein folding, pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) processing, antiapoptosis, and blood coagulation were found to be upregulated in gliomas. Transcriptomics data of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), low-grade gliomas (LGGs), and controls were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data portal and further analyzed using BRB-Array tools. Expression levels of a few significantly altered proteins like lactate dehydrogenase, alpha-1 antitrypsin, fibrinogen alpha chain, nucleophosmin, annexin A5, thioredoxin, ferritin light chain, thymosin beta-4-like protein 3, superoxide dismutase-2, and peroxiredoxin-1 and 6 showed a positive correlation with increasing grade of gliomas thereby offering an insight into molecular basis behind their aggressive nature. Several proteins identified in different grades of gliomas are potential grade-specific markers, and perturbed pathways provide comprehensive overview of molecular cues involved in glioma

  13. Differential Glioma-Associated Tumor Antigen Expression Profiles of Human Glioma Cells Grown in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N.; Hoa, Neil T.; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R.

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O2) or normoxic (21% O2) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens. PMID:22957023

  14. Differential glioma-associated tumor antigen expression profiles of human glioma cells grown in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N; Hoa, Neil T; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O(2)) or normoxic (21% O(2)) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens.

  15. A stabilized peptide ligand for multifunctional glioma targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ying, Man; Shen, Qing; Zhan, Changyou; Wei, Xiaoli; Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Yao, Bingxin; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-12-10

    Peptide ligands consisting of l-amino acids are subject to proteolysis in vivo. When modified on the surface of nanocarriers, those peptide ligands would readily degrade and the targeting efficacy is significantly attenuated. It has received increasing scrutiny to design stable peptide ligands for targeted drug delivery. Here, we present the design of a stable peptide ligand by the formation of a head-to-tail amide bond as an example. Even though the linear l-peptide A7R (termed (L)A7R) can bind specifically to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) that are overexpressed on glioma cells, neovasculature and glioma vasculogenic mimicry (VM), the tumor-homing capacity of (L)A7R is greatly impaired in vivo due to proteolysis (e.g. in the serum). A cyclic A7R (cA7R) peptide was identified by computer-aided peptide design and synthesized with high yield by combining solid phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. The binding of cA7R to both receptors was theoretically and experimentally assessed. In our simulated model hydrophobic and ionic interactions dominated the binding of (L)A7R to receptors. It is very interesting that cA7R adopting a different structure from (L)A7R retained high binding affinities to receptors without affecting the hydrophobic and ionic interactions. After head-to-tail cyclization by the formation of an amide bond, cA7R exhibited exceptional stability in mouse serum. Either cA7R or (L)A7R was conjugated on the surface of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded liposomes (cA7R-LS/DOX or (L)A7R-LS/DOX). The results of in vitro cellular assays indicated that cA7R-LS/DOX not only displayed stronger anti-proliferative effect against glioma cells, but also demonstrated to be more efficient in destruction of VM and HUVEC tubes in comparison to (L)A7R-LS/DOX and plain liposomes (LS/DOX, without peptide conjugation). cA7R conjugation could achieve significantly higher accumulation of liposomes in glioma than did (L

  16. Dendritic Cell Based Vaccines that Utilize Myeloid Rather than Plasmacytoid Cells Offer a Superior Survival Advantage in Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L.; Miska, Jason; Wainwright, Derek A.; Ahmed, Atique U.; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Pytel, Peter; Han, Yu; Tobias, Alex; Zhang, Lingjiao; Qiao, Jian; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells (APC) that are traditionally divided into two distinct subsets: myeloid DC (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DC (pDCs). pDCs are known for their ability to secrete large amount of IFN-α. Apart from IFN-α production, pDCs can also process antigen and induce T-cell immunity or tolerance. In several solid tumors, pDCs have been shown to play a critical role in promoting tumor immunosuppression. We investigated the role of pDCs in the process of glioma progression in the syngeneic murine model of glioma. We show that glioma-infiltrating pDCs are the major APC in glioma and are deficient in IFN-α secretion (p < 0.05). pDC depletion leads to increased survival of the mice bearing intracranial tumor by decreasing the number of regulatory T-cells (Treg) and by decreasing the suppressive capabilities of Tregs. We subsequently compared the ability of mDCs and pDCs to generate effective anti-glioma immunity in a GL261-OVA mouse model of glioma. Our data suggest that mature pDCs and mDCs isolated from naïve mice can be effectively activated and loaded with SIINFEKL antigen in vitro. Upon intra-dermal injection in the hind leg, a fraction of both types of DCs migrate to the brain and lymph nodes.. Compared to mice vaccinated with pDC or control mice, mice vaccinated with mDCs generated a robust Th1 type immune response, characterized by high frequency of CD4+Tbet+ T-cells and CD8+Siinfekel+ T-cells. This robust anti-tumor T-cell response resulted in tumor eradication and long-term survival in 60% of the animals (p<0.001). PMID:26026061

  17. Preclinical investigation of ibrutinib, a Bruton's kinase tyrosine (Btk) inhibitor, in suppressing glioma tumorigenesis and stem cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li; Su, Yu-Kai; Lin, Chien-Min; Chao, Tsu-Yi; Huang, Shang-Pen; Huynh, Thanh-Tuan; Jan, Hsun-Jin; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Wu, Alexander T H; Hsiao, Michael

    2016-10-25

    Standard interventions for glioma include surgery, radiation and chemotherapies but the prognosis for malignant cases such as glioblastoma multiforme remain grim. Even with targeted therapeutic agent, bevacitumab, malignant glioma often develops resistance and recurrence. Thus, developing alternative interventions (therapeutic targets, biomarkers) is urgently required. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been long implicated in B cell malignancies but surprisingly it has recently been shown to also play a tumorigenic role in solid tumors such as ovarian and prostate cancer. Bioinformatics data indicates that Btk is significantly higher in clinical glioma samples as compared to normal brain cells and Btk expression level is associated with stage progression. This prompts us to investigate the potential role of Btk as a therapeutic target for glioma. Here, we demonstrate Btk expression is associated with GBM tumorigenesis. Down-regulation of Btk in GBM cell lines showed a significantly reduced abilities in colony formation, migration and GBM sphere-forming potential. Mechanistically, Btk-silenced cells showed a concomitant reduction in the expression of CD133 and Akt/mTOR signaling. In parallel, Ibrutinib (a Btk inhibitor) treatment led to a similar anti-tumorigenic response. Using xenograft mouse model, tumorigenesis was significantly reduced in Btk-silenced or ibrutinib-treated mice as compared to control counterparts. Finally, our glioma tissue microarray analysis indicated a higher Btk staining in the malignant tumors than less malignant and normal brain tissues. Collectively, Btk may represent a novel therapeutic target for glioma and ibrunitib may be used as an adjuvant treatment for malignant GBM.

  18. Pax3 expression enhances PDGF-B-induced brainstem gliomagenesis and characterizes a subset of brainstem glioma.

    PubMed

    Misuraca, Katherine L; Barton, Kelly L; Chung, Alexander; Diaz, Alexander K; Conway, Simon J; Corcoran, David L; Baker, Suzanne J; Becher, Oren J

    2014-10-21

    High-grade Brainstem Glioma (BSG), also known as Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG), is an incurable pediatric brain cancer. Increasing evidence supports the existence of regional differences in gliomagenesis such that BSG is considered a distinct disease from glioma of the cerebral cortex (CG). In an effort to elucidate unique characteristics of BSG, we conducted expression analysis of mouse PDGF-B-driven BSG and CG initiated in Nestin progenitor cells and identified a short list of expression changes specific to the brainstem gliomagenesis process, including abnormal upregulation of paired box 3 (Pax3). In the neonatal mouse brain, Pax3 expression marks a subset of brainstem progenitor cells, while it is absent from the cerebral cortex, mirroring its regional expression in glioma. Ectopic expression of Pax3 in normal brainstem progenitors in vitro shows that Pax3 inhibits apoptosis. Pax3-induced inhibition of apoptosis is p53-dependent, however, and in the absence of p53, Pax3 promotes proliferation of brainstem progenitors. In vivo, Pax3 enhances PDGF-B-driven gliomagenesis by shortening tumor latency and increasing tumor penetrance and grade, in a region-specific manner, while loss of Pax3 function extends survival of PDGF-B-driven;p53-deficient BSG-bearing mice by 33%. Importantly, Pax3 is regionally expressed in human glioma as well, with high PAX3 mRNA characterizing 40% of human BSG, revealing a subset of tumors that significantly associates with PDGFRA alterations, amplifications of cell cycle regulatory genes, and is exclusive of ACVR1 mutations. Collectively, these data suggest that regional Pax3 expression not only marks a novel subset of BSG but also contributes to PDGF-B-induced brainstem gliomagenesis.

  19. Bionanotechnology and the Future of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chiarelli, Peter A.; Kievit, Forrest M.; Zhang, Miqin; Ellenbogen, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Designer nanoscaled materials have the potential to revolutionize diagnosis and treatment for glioma. This review summarizes current progress in nanoparticle-based therapies for glioma treatment including targeting, drug delivery, gene delivery, and direct tumor ablation. Preclinical and current human clinical trials are discussed. Although progress in the field has been significant over the past decade, many successful strategies demonstrated in the laboratory have yet to be implemented in human clinical trials. Looking forward, we provide examples of combined treatment strategies, which harness the potential for nanoparticles to interact with their biochemical environment, and simultaneously with externally applied photons or magnetic fields. We present our notion of the “ideal” nanoparticle for glioma, a concept that may soon be realized. PMID:25722933

  20. Treatment of malignant glioma using hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiahang; Guo, Mian; Pang, Hengyuan; Qi, Jingtao; Zhang, Jinwei; Ge, Yunlong

    2013-10-15

    Thirty pathologically diagnosed patients with grade III-IV primary or recurrent malignant glioma (tumor diameter 3-7 cm) were randomly divided into two groups. The control group underwent conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In the hyperthermia group, primary cases received hyperthermia treatment, and patients with recurrent tumors were treated with hyperthermia in com-bination with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Hyperthermia treatment was administered using a 13.56-MHz radio frequency hyperthermia device. Electrodes were inserted into the tumor with the aid of a CT-guided stereotactic apparatus and heat was applied for 1 hour. During 3 months after hyperthermia, patients were evaluated with head CT or MRI every month. Gliomas in the hyper-thermia group exhibited growth retardation or growth termination. Necrosis was evident in 80% of the heated tumor tissue and there was a decrease in tumor diameter. Our findings indicate that ra-dio frequency hyperthermia has a beneficial effect in the treatment of malignant glioma.

  1. Multigene sets for clinical application in glioma.

    PubMed

    de Groot, John F; Sulman, Erik P; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2011-04-01

    Diffuse gliomas are a heterogeneous group of malignancies with highly variable outcomes, and diagnosis is largely based on histologic appearance. Tumor classification according to cell type and grade provides some prognostic information. However, significant clinical and biologic heterogeneity exists in glioma, even after accounting for known clinicopathologic variables. Significant advances in knowledge of the molecular genetics of brain tumors have occurred in the past decade, largely because of the availability of high-throughput profiling techniques, including new sequencing methodologies and multidimensional profiling by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. The large amount of data generated from these efforts has enabled the identification of prognostic and predictive factors and helped to identify pathways driving tumor growth. Implementing these signatures into the clinic to personalize therapy presents a new challenge. Identification of relevant biomarkers, especially when coupled with clinical trials of newer targeted therapies, will enable better patient stratification and individualization of treatment for patients with glioma.

  2. L-Carnitine-conjugated nanoparticles to promote permeation across blood-brain barrier and to target glioma cells for drug delivery via the novel organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2.

    PubMed

    Kou, Longfa; Hou, Yanxian; Yao, Qing; Guo, Weiling; Wang, Gang; Wang, Menglin; Fu, Qiang; He, Zhonggui; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Sun, Jin

    2017-10-03

    Overcoming blood-brain barrier (BBB) and targeting tumor cells are two key steps for glioma chemotherapy. By taking advantage of the specific expression of Na(+)-coupled carnitine transporter 2 (OCTN2) on both brain capillary endothelial cells and glioma cells, l-carnitine conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (LC-PLGA NPs) were prepared to enable enhanced BBB permeation and glioma-cell targeting. Conjugation of l-carnitine significantly enhanced the uptake of PLGA nanoparticles in the BBB endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and the glioma cell line T98G. The uptake was dependent on Na(+) and inhibited by the excessive free l-carnitine, suggesting involvement of OCTN2 in the process. In vivo mouse studies showed that LC-PLGA NPs resulted in high accumulation in the brain as indicated by the biodistribution and imaging assays. Furthermore, compared to Taxol and paclitaxel-loaded unmodified PLGA NPs, the drug-loaded LC-PLGA NPs showed improved anti-glioma efficacy in both 2D-cell and 3D-spheroid models. The PEG spacer length of the ligand attached to the nanoparticles was optimized, and the formulation with PEG1000 (LC-1000-PLGA NPs) showed the maximum targeting efficiency. We conclude that l-carnitine-mediated cellular recognition and internalization via OCTN2 significantly facilitate the transcytosis of nanoparticles across BBB and the uptake of nanoparticles in glioma cells, resulting in improved anti-glioma efficacy.

  3. Molecular alterations of KIT oncogene in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana L; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Lopes, José M; Martinho, Olga; Lambros, Maryou B K; Martins, Albino; Schmitt, Fernando; Pardal, Fernando; Reis, Rui M

    2007-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and devastating primary brain tumours. Despite therapeutic advances, the majority of gliomas do not respond either to chemo or radiotherapy. KIT, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is frequently involved in tumourigenic processes. Currently, KIT constitutes an attractive therapeutic target. In the present study we assessed the frequency of KIT overexpression in gliomas and investigated the genetic mechanisms underlying KIT overexpression. KIT (CD117) immunohistochemistry was performed in a series of 179 gliomas of various grades. KIT activating gene mutations (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17) and gene amplification analysis, as defined by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were performed in CD117 positive cases. Tumour cell immunopositivity was detected in 15.6% (28/179) of cases, namely in 25% (1/4) of pilocytic astrocytomas, 25% (5/20) of diffuse astrocytomas, 20% (1/5) of anaplastic astrocytomas, 19.5% (15/77) of glioblastomas and one third (3/9) of anaplastic oligoastrocytomas. Only 5.7% (2/35) of anaplastic oligodendrogliomas showed CD117 immunoreactivity. No association was found between tumour CD117 overexpression and patient survival. In addition, we also observed CD117 overexpression in endothelial cells, which varied from 0-22.2% of cases, being more frequent in high-grade lesions. No KIT activating mutations were identified. Interestingly, CISH and/or qRT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of KIT gene amplification in 6 glioblastomas and 2 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, corresponding to 33% (8/24) of CD117 positive cases. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that KIT gene amplification rather than gene mutation is a common genetic mechanism underlying KIT expression in subset of malignant gliomas. Further studies are warranted to determine whether glioma patients exhibiting KIT overexpression and KIT gene amplification may benefit from therapy with anti-KIT RTK inhibitors.

  4. Isocitrate dehydrogenase status and molecular subclasses of glioma and glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Aldape, Kenneth D; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs) that develop from low-grade gliomas are a common and incurable class of brain tumor. Mutations in the metabolic enzyme glioblastomas (IDH1) represent a distinguishing feature of low-grade gliomas and secondary GBMs. IDH1 mutations are one of the most common and earliest detectable genetic alterations in low-grade diffuse gliomas, and evidence supports this mutation as a driver of gliomagenesis. Here, the authors highlight the biological consequences of IDH1 mutations in gliomas, the clinical and therapeutic/diagnostic implications, and the molecular subtypes of these tumors. They also explore, in brief, the non-IDH1-mutated gliomas, including primary GBMs, and the molecular subtypes and drivers of these tumors. A fundamental understanding of the diversity of GBMs and lower-grade gliomas will ultimately allow for more effective treatments and predictors of survival.

  5. Glial Progenitors as Targets for Transformation in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ilkanizadeh, Shirin; Lau, Jasmine; Huang, Miller; Foster, Daniel J.; Wong, Robyn; Frantz, Aaron; Wang, Susan; Weiss, William A.; Persson, Anders I.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor and arises throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent focus on stem-like glioma cells has implicated neural stem cells (NSCs), a minor precursor population restricted to germinal zones, as a potential source of gliomas. In this review, we will focus on the relationship between oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), the largest population of cycling glial progenitors in the postnatal brain, and gliomas. Recent studies suggest that OPCs can give rise to gliomas. Furthermore, signaling pathways often associated with NSCs also play key roles during OPC lineage development. Recent advances suggesting that gliomas can undergo a switch from progenitor- to stem-like phenotype after therapy, implicating that an OPC-origin is more likely than previously recognized. Future in-depth studies of OPC biology may shed light on the etiology of OPC-derived gliomas and reveal new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24889528

  6. Novel Oncogenic PDGFRA Mutations in Pediatric High-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Paugh, Barbara S.; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Qu, Chunxu; Endersby, Raelene; Diaz, Alexander K.; Zhang, Junyuan; Bax, Dorine A.; Carvalho, Diana; Reis, Rui M.; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Broniscer, Alberto; Wetmore, Cynthia; Zhang, Jinghui; Jones, Chris; Ellison, David W.; Baker, Suzanne J.

    2013-01-01

    The outcome for children with high-grade gliomas (HGG) remains dismal, with a two-year survival rate of only 10–30%. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) comprise a subset of HGG that arise in brainstem almost exclusively in children. Genome-wide analyses of copy number imbalances previously showed that platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) is the most frequent target of focal amplification in pediatric HGGs, including DIPGs. To determine whether PDGFRA is also targeted by more subtle mutations missed by copy number analysis, we sequenced all PDGFRA coding exons from a cohort of pediatric HGGs. Somatic activating mutations were identified in 14.4% (13/90) of non-brainstem pediatric HGGs and 4.7% (2/43) of DIPGs, including missense mutations and in-frame deletions and insertions not previously described. 40% of tumors with mutation showed concurrent amplification, while 60% carried heterozygous mutations. Six different mutations impacting different domains all resulted in ligand-independent receptor activation that was blocked by small molecule inhibitors of PDGFR. Expression of mutants in p53-null primary mouse astrocytes conferred a proliferative advantage in vitro, and generated HGGs in vivo with complete penetrance when implanted into brain. The gene expression signatures of these murine HGGs reflected the spectrum of human diffuse HGGs. PDGFRA intragenic deletion of exons 8 and 9 were previously shown in adult HGG, but were not detected in 83 non-brainstem pediatric HGG and 57 DIPGs. Thus, a distinct spectrum of mutations confers constitutive receptor activation and oncogenic activity to PDGFRα in childhood HGG. PMID:23970477

  7. [Guidelines for the radiotherapy of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Feuvret, L; Antoni, D; Biau, J; Truc, G; Noël, G; Mazeron, J-J

    2016-09-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumours. Treating these tumours is difficult because of the proximity of organs at risk, infiltrating nature, and radioresistance. Clinical prognostic factors such as age, Karnofsky performance status, tumour location, and treatments such as surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have long been recognized in the management of patients with gliomas. Molecular biomarkers are increasingly evolving as additional factors that facilitate diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making. These practice guidelines aim at helping in choosing the best treatment, in particular radiation therapy. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Changing incidence and improved survival of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ho, Vincent K Y; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Enting, Roelien H; Bienfait, Henri P; Robe, Pierre; Baumert, Brigitta G; Visser, Otto

    2014-09-01

    Tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) represent a relatively rare but serious health burden. This study provides insight into the incidence and survival patterns of gliomas in the Netherlands diagnosed in adult patients during the time period 1989-2010, with a focus on glioblastoma and low-grade gliomas. Data on 21,085 gliomas (excluding grade I tumours) were obtained from the Netherlands Cancer Registry, including tumours of the CNS without pathological confirmation. We calculated the age-standardised incidence rates and the estimated annual percentage change (EAPC) for all glioma subtypes. Crude and relative survival rates were estimated using information on the vital status obtained from the Dutch Municipal Personal Records Database. Incidence of gliomas in adults increased over time, from 4.9 per 100,000 in 1989 to 5.9 in 2010 (EAPC 0.7%, p<0.001). Two thirds were astrocytoma, 10% oligodendroglioma/oligoastrocytoma, 3% ependymoma and 21% were unspecified. Within the group of astrocytic tumours, the proportion of glioblastoma rose, while the proportion of anaplastic and unspecified astrocytoma decreased. Unspecified neoplasms also decreased, but this was significant only after 2005. Over the course of the study period, glioblastoma patients more often received multimodality treatment with chemotherapy concomitant and adjuvant to radiotherapy. The crude two-year survival rate of glioblastoma patients improved significantly, from 5% in the time period 1989-1994 to 15% in 2006-2010, with median survival increasing from 5.5 to 9 months. The incidence of low-grade gliomas did not change over time. Survival rates for low-grade oligodendroglial and mixed tumours show a modest improvement. The incidence rate for the total group of gliomas slightly increased, with a decrease of anaplastic and unspecified tumours and an increase of glioblastoma. Following the introduction of combined chemoradiation, two-year survival rates for glioblastoma significantly improved

  9. 'Low grade glioma': an update for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jennifer; Wharton, Steve B; McKevitt, Fiona; Romanowski, Charles; Bridgewater, Caroline; Zaki, Hesham; Hoggard, Nigel

    2017-02-01

    With the recent publication of a new World Health Organization brain tumour classification that reflects increased understanding of glioma tumour genetics, there is a need for radiologists to understand the changes and their implications for patient management. There has also been an increasing trend for adopting earlier, more aggressive surgical approaches to low-grade glioma (LGG) treatment. We will summarize these changes, give some context to the increased role of tumour genetics and discuss the associated implications of their adoption for radiologists. We will discuss the earlier and more radical surgical resection of LGG and what it means for patients undergoing imaging.

  10. Molecular targeting for malignant gliomas (Review).

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasuko; Hollingsworth, Emporia F; Kondo, Seiji

    2004-05-01

    With tendency to invade rapidly in the brain, malignant gliomas are very resistant to conventional therapies including radiation and chemotherapy. Recent advances in genetic and molecular techniques have made it possible to define characteristic molecular profiles of malignant gliomas. Based on the list of the molecules closely related to glioblastoma tissues, we reviewed strategies targeting them. Target molecules extensively studied include EGFR, PTEN, telomerase and signal pathway modulators for Ras/Raf/MAPK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways. Therapies targeting specific molecules may result in killing tumor cells effectively while keeping normal cells intact.

  11. Brain stem glioma: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Ruth K

    2005-01-01

    The paths taken by each family in coming to terms with the dismal prognosis associated with brain stem glioma can be quite different. The case studies of 2 school-age girls diagnosed with a brain stem glioma within weeks of each other are presented. The multi-disciplinary team response to each family was individualized at each stage of diagnosis, treatment, and end-of-life care, as expected. The ultimate chronologic union of these 2 families as each child neared death was somewhat uncanny. The experience of each family, and their relationship with the team through this process, was an intense challenge and learning experience.

  12. [Classification of nucleotide sequences over their frequency dictionaries reveals a relation between the structure of sequences and taxonomy of their bearers].

    PubMed

    Gorban', A N; Popova, T G; Sadovskiĭ, M G

    2003-01-01

    Classification of 16S RNA sequences over their frequency dictionaries, both real ones, and transformed ones was studied. Two entities were considered to be close each other from the point of view of their structure, if their frequency dictionaries were close, in Eucledian metric. A transformation procedure of a frequency dictionary has been implemented that reveals the peculiarities of information structure of a nucleotide sequence. A comparative study of two classification developed over the real frequency dictionary vs. that one developed over the transformed frequency dictionary was carried out. The strong correlation is revealed between the classification and the taxonomy of 16S RNA bearer. For the classes isolated, the information valuable words were identified. These words are the main factors of a difference between the classes. The frequency dictionaries containing the words of the length 3 exhibit the best correlation between a class and a genus. A genus, as a rule, is included into the same class, and the exclusion are sporadic. A development of hierarchy classification over the transformed frequency dictionaries separated one or two taxonomy groups, as each stage of classification. The unexpectedly frequent, or contrary, unexpectedly rare occurred of words (of the length 3) in entities under consideration make the structure difference between the classes of the nucleotide sequences.

  13. Mutual antagonism between Sox10 and NFIA regulates diversification of glial lineages and glioma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Stacey M; Zhu, Wenyi; Stolt, C Claus; Huang, Teng-Wei; Chen, Fuyi; LoTurco, Joseph J; Neul, Jeffrey L; Wegner, Michael; Mohila, Carrie; Deneen, Benjamin

    2014-10-01

    Lineage progression and diversification is regulated by the coordinated action of unique sets of transcription factors. Oligodendrocytes (OL) and astrocytes (AS) comprise the glial sub-lineages in the CNS, and the manner in which their associated regulatory factors orchestrate lineage diversification during development and disease remains an open question. Sox10 and NFIA are key transcriptional regulators of gliogenesis associated with OL and AS. We found that NFIA inhibited Sox10 induction of OL differentiation through direct association and antagonism of its function. Conversely, we found that Sox10 antagonized NFIA function and suppressed AS differentiation in mouse and chick systems. Using this developmental paradigm as a model for glioma, we found that this relationship similarly regulated the generation of glioma subtypes. Our results describe the antagonistic relationship between Sox10 and NFIA that regulates the balance of OL and AS fate during development and demonstrate for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that the transcriptional processes governing glial sub-lineage diversification oversee the generation of glioma subtypes.

  14. The ketogenic diet is an effective adjuvant to radiation therapy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Mohammed G; Fenton, Kathryn E; Preul, Mark C; Rho, Jong M; Lynch, Andrew; Stafford, Phillip; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2012-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that alters metabolism by increasing the level of ketone bodies in the blood. KetoCal® (KC) is a nutritionally complete, commercially available 4:1 (fat:carbohydrate+protein) ketogenic formula that is an effective non-pharmacologic treatment for the management of refractory pediatric epilepsy. Diet-induced ketosis causes changes to brain homeostasis that have potential for the treatment of other neurological diseases such as malignant gliomas. We used an intracranial bioluminescent mouse model of malignant glioma. Following implantation animals were maintained on standard diet (SD) or KC. The mice received 2×4 Gy of whole brain radiation and tumor growth was followed by in vivo imaging. Animals fed KC had elevated levels of β-hydroxybutyrate (p = 0.0173) and an increased median survival of approximately 5 days relative to animals maintained on SD. KC plus radiation treatment were more than additive, and in 9 of 11 irradiated animals maintained on KC the bioluminescent signal from the tumor cells diminished below the level of detection (p<0.0001). Animals were switched to SD 101 days after implantation and no signs of tumor recurrence were seen for over 200 days. KC significantly enhances the anti-tumor effect of radiation. This suggests that cellular metabolic alterations induced through KC may be useful as an adjuvant to the current standard of care for the treatment of human malignant gliomas.

  15. Lymphoid Cell-Glioma Cell Interaction Enhances Cell Coat Production by Human Gliomas: Novel Suppressor Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.; Macchi, Beatrice; Papazoglou, Savvas; Oldfield, Edward H.; Kornblith, Paul L.; Smith, Barry H.; Gately, Maurice K.

    1983-05-01

    Certain human glioma lines produce mucopolysaccharide coats that impair the generation of cytolytic lymphocytes in response to these lines in vitro. Coat production is substantially enhanced by the interaction of glioma cells with a macromolecular factor released by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. This interaction thus constitutes an unusual mechanism by which inflammatory cells may nonspecifically suppress the cellular immune response to at least one class of solid tumors in humans.

  16. Revealing the potential pathogenesis of glioma by utilizing a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiran; Li, Gang; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the potential mechanism of glioma through bioinformatic approaches. The gene expression profile (GSE4290) of glioma tumor and non-tumor samples was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 180 samples were available, including 23 non-tumor and 157 tumor samples. Then the raw data were preprocessed using robust multiarray analysis, and 8,890 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by using t-test (false discovery rate < 0.0005). Furthermore, 16 known glioma related genes were abstracted from Genetic Association Database. After mapping 8,890 DEGs and 16 known glioma related genes to Human Protein Reference Database, a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network (GAPN) was constructed. In addition, 51 sub-networks in GAPN were screened out through Molecular Complex Detection (score ≥ 1), and sub-network 1 was found to have the closest interaction (score = 3). What' more, for the top 10 sub-networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis (p value < 0.05) was performed, and DEGs involved in sub-network 1 and 2, such as BRMS1L and CCNA1, were predicted to regulate cell growth, cell cycle, and DNA replication via interacting with known glioma related genes. Finally, the overlaps of DEGs and human essential, housekeeping, tissue-specific genes were calculated (p value = 1.0, 1.0, and 0.00014, respectively) and visualized by Venn Diagram package in R. About 61% of human tissue-specific genes were DEGs as well. This research shed new light on the pathogenesis of glioma based on DEGs and GAPN, and our findings might provide potential targets for clinical glioma treatment.

  17. [Intramedullary glioma. Postoperative MRI aspects].

    PubMed

    Borocco, A; Idir, A; Joubert, E; Lacroix, C; Hurth, M; Doyon, D

    1995-06-01

    MRI is the standard exploration of intramedullary tumours. Following up the patients is of prime importance to detect and treat possible recurrences at an early stage. The purpose of this paper is to specify the postoperative MRI semiology of intraspinal gliomas. During the 1986-1992 period, 47 patients operated upon in the Bicêtre hospital for primary intraspinal tumours were followed up with high-field MR (1.5 Tesla, Signa, G.E.). The retrospective visual study was carried out by two neuro-radiologists. The patients' group consisted of 24 women and 23 men aged from 15 to 67 years (mean 38 years). The tumours treated were 29 ependymomas and 18 astrocytomas. Eighty-five MRI examinations were analysed. Most of them comprised at least two planes in T1 and T2-weighted spin echo sequences with gadolinium injection, then only T1-weighted spin echo sequences after gadolinium injection (0.1 mmol/kg). The mean postoperative follow up period in the 47 patients was 32 months (range 7 to 84 months). Contrast enhancement of the spinal cord was observed in 20 cases. In the 6 patients with recurrence (5 astrocytomas, 1 malignant ependymoma) there was a segmental increase of spinal cord volume with contrast enhancement after gadolinium injection. In 3 out of these 6 patients clinical deterioration appeared later than MRI semiology. In clinically stable patients neither enhancement nor increase in spinal cord size was found in 27 cases, and enhancement alone was noted in 12 cases. There was no reliable criterion in the analysis of post gadolinium signal enhancement that could be used to differentiate recurrence from cicatricial contrast enhancement.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Gene therapy for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hidehiro; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and devastating primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current treatment modalities, such as surgical resection followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy, only modest improvements in median survival have been achieved. Frequent recurrence and invasiveness of GBM are likely due to the resistance of glioma stem cells to conventional treatments; therefore, novel alternative treatment strategies are desperately needed. Recent advancements in molecular biology and gene technology have provided attractive novel treatment possibilities for patients with GBM. Gene therapy is defined as a technology that aims to modify the genetic complement of cells to obtain therapeutic benefit. To date, gene therapy for the treatment of GBM has demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in pre-clinical studies and promising safety profiles in clinical studies. However, while this approach is obviously promising, concerns still exist regarding issues associated with transduction efficiency, viral delivery, the pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Tumor development and progression involve alterations in a wide spectrum of genes, therefore a variety of gene therapy approaches for GBM have been proposed. Improved viral vectors are being evaluated, and the potential use of gene therapy alone or in synergy with other treatments against GBM are being studied. In this review, we will discuss the most commonly studied gene therapy approaches for the treatment of GBM in preclinical and clinical studies including: prodrug/suicide gene therapy; oncolytic gene therapy; cytokine mediated gene therapy; and tumor suppressor gene therapy. In addition, we review the principles and mechanisms of current gene therapy strategies as well as advantages and disadvantages of each.

  19. Photodynamic therapy of supratentorial gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.

    1997-05-01

    We are reporting the results form intraoperative intracavitary PDT treatment in 56 patients with recurrent supratentorial gliomas who had failed previous surgery and radiotherapy. These patients received 2mg/kg Photofin iv. 12-36 hours prior to surgical resection of their tumor or tumor cyst drainage. The median survival times in weeks for glioblastoma (GBM), malignant astrocytoma (MA), malignant mixed astrocytoma-oligodendroglioma and ependymoma were 30, 40, >56 and >174 weeks, respectively. Eight patients with recurrent GBM who received >60 J/cm2 had a median survival of 58 weeks and 24 patients who received <60 J/cm2 survived 29 weeks. The survival of patients with recurrent glioblastoma who undergo surgical treatment alone is only 20 weeks. We are also reporting the results of PDT treatment in 20 patients with newly diagnosed MA or GBM treated with intracavitary Photofin-PDT at the time of their initial craniotomy. The median survival of the whole cohort was 44 weeks with a 1 and 2 year survival of 40 percent and 15 percent, respectively. The median survival of patients with GBM was 37 weeks with a 1 and 2 year actuarial survival of 35 percent and 0 percent, respectively. The median survival of patients with MA as 48 weeks with a 1 and 2 year actuarial survival of 44 percent and 33 percent, respectively. Six patients with a Karnofsky score of >70 who received a light dose of >1260J had a median survival of 92 weeks with a 1 and 2 year survival of 83 percent and 33 percent, respectively. The mortality rate in our total series of 93 PDT treatments or brain tumor is 3 percent. The combined serious mortality-morbidity rate is 8 percent.

  20. Veliparib, Radiation Therapy, and Temozolomide in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Pontine Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Brain Stem Glioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma

  1. Gliomas and exposure to wood preservatives.

    PubMed

    Cordier, S; Poisson, M; Gerin, M; Varin, J; Conso, F; Hemon, D

    1988-10-01

    A case-referent study was undertaken to look for occupational risk factors among patients with glioma treated in a neurological hospital in Paris between 1975 and 1984. In the study group were 125 men with gliomas (aged less than or equal to 65) and 238 patients (also less than or equal to 65) admitted for non-neoplastic, non-malformative vascular diseases in the same department during the same period constituting the reference group. All diagnoses were confirmed by tomodensitometry. Information on occupational history was obtained from a postal questionnaire and from medical records. Comparison of cases and referents showed a significant excess risk among teachers (OR = 4.1) and a raised risk among wood workers (OR = 1.6). Four of nine cases of glioma who had been employed as wood workers reported that a colleague had suffered from glioma (those reports were confirmed by hospital records). None were reported among 11 referent wood workers. Using a complementary questionnaire on wood work, exposure assessment to wood preservatives and solvents showed that frequent exposure to organochlorine wood preservatives and to organic solvents occurred more often among cases than referent wood workers (p less than 0.10).

  2. White Matter Change Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Il; Kim, Chi Heon; Park, Chul-Kee; Koo, Bang-Bon; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor-related white matter change is detected at late stages with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when mass effect or prominent edema is present. We analyzed if diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) white matter change earlier than conventional MRI. Methods Twenty-six patients with gliomas (World Health Organization grade II, 5; grade III, 12; and grade IV, 9) within 2 cm from the posterior limb of the internal capsule (IC) were studied. Fifteen normal adults were enrolled as controls. Fluid attenuation inversion recovery MRI showed a high signal change at the posterior limb of the IC (HSIC) in 9 patients with grade III or IV gliomas. We classified the gliomas as WHO grade II (gliomas II), grade III or IV without HSIC [gliomas III/IV(-)] and grade III or IV with HSIC [gliomas III/IV(+)], as an indicator of the increase in the severity of the white matter changes. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were calculated for the pyramidal tract. Tumor progression along pyramidal tract was evaluated by follow-up MRI in 16 patients at 40±18 months. Results FA showed no significant difference between gliomas II and control (p=0.694), but was lower in gliomas III/IV(-) and gliomas III/IV(+) (p<0.001). ADCs were higher in gliomas II, gliomas III/IV(-) and gliomas III/IV(+) than control (p<0.001). Tumor progression was detected in 2/16 patients. Conclusion DTI detected white matter changes that appeared to be normal in MRI. ADC changed even in low grade glioma, indicating ADC may be a better parameter for the early detection of white matter change. PMID:27867919

  3. [Histological and molecular classification of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, D; Colin, C; Coulibaly, B; Quilichini, B; Maues De Paula, A; Fernandez, C; Bouvier, C

    2008-01-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent tumors of the central nervous system. The WHO classification, based on the presumed cell origin, distinguishes astrocytic, oligodendrocytic and mixed gliomas. A grading system is based on the presence of the following criteria: increased cellular density, nuclear atypias, mitosis, vascular proliferation and necrosis. The main histological subtype of grade I gliomas are pilocytic astrocytomas, which are benign. Diffuse astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas are low-grade (II) or high-grade (III and IV) tumors. Glioblastomas correspond to grade IV astrocytomas. C. Daumas-Duport et al. have proposed another classification based on histology and imaging data, which distinguishes oligodendrogliomas and mixed gliomas of grade A (without endothelial proliferation and/or contrast enhancement), oligodendrogliomas and mixed gliomas of grade B (with endothelial proliferation or contrast enhancement), glioblastomas and glioneuronal malignant tumors. Both classifications lack reproducibility. Many studies have searched for a molecular classification. Recurrent abnormalities in gliomas have been found. They encompassed recurrent chromosomal alterations, such as lost of chromosome 10, gain of chromosome 7, deletion of chromosome 1p and 19q, but also activation of the Akt pathway (amplification of EGFR), dysregulation of the cell cycle (deletion of p16, p53). These studies have enabled the description of two molecular subtypes for glioblastomas. De novo glioblastomas, which occur in young patients without of a prior history of brain tumor and harbor frequent amplification of EGFR, deletion of p16 and mutation of PTEN while mutation of p53 is infrequent. Secondary glioblastomas occur in the context of a preexisting low-grade glioma and are characterized by more frequent mutation of p53. On the other side, combined complete deletion of 1p and 19q as the result of the translocation t(1;19)(q10;p10) is highly specific of oligodendrogliomas

  4. Computer Simulation of Glioma Growth and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Frieboes, Hermann B.; Lowengrub, John S.; Wise, S.; Zheng, X.; Macklin, Paul; Bearer, Elaine; Cristini, Vittorio

    2007-01-01

    Despite major advances in the study of glioma, the quantitative links between intra-tumor molecular/cellular properties, clinically observable properties such as morphology, and critical tumor behaviors such as growth and invasiveness remain unclear, hampering more effective coupling of tumor physical characteristics with implications for prognosis and therapy. Although molecular biology, histopathology, and radiological imaging are employed in this endeavor, studies are severely challenged by the multitude of different physical scales involved in tumor growth, i.e., from molecular nanoscale to cell microscale and finally to tissue centimeter scale. Consequently, it is often difficult to determine the underlying dynamics across dimensions. New techniques are needed to tackle these issues. Here, we address this multi-scalar problem by employing a novel predictive three-dimensional mathematical and computational model based on first-principle equations (conservation laws of physics) that describe mathematically the diffusion of cell substrates and other processes determining tumor mass growth and invasion. The model uses conserved variables to represent known determinants of glioma behavior, e.g., cell density and oxygen concentration, as well as biological functional relationships and parameters linking phenomena at different scales whose specific forms and values are hypothesized and calculated based on in-vitro and in-vivo experiments and from histopathology of tissue specimens from human gliomas. This model enables correlation of glioma morphology to tumor growth by quantifying interdependence of tumor mass on the microenvironment (e.g., hypoxia, tissue disruption) and on the cellular phenotypes (e.g., mitosis and apoptosis rates, cell adhesion strength). Once functional relationships between variables and associated parameter values have been informed, e.g. from histopathology or intra-operative analysis, this model can be used for disease diagnosis

  5. [Classification of gliomas. Current progress and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Capper, D; Reifenberger, G

    2015-06-01

    The diagnostic subdivision of gliomas is traditionally based on histological features as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. In recent years molecular studies have identified a number of genetic and epigenetic markers that could contribute to an improved tumor classification and better prediction of response to therapy and prognosis in the individual patient. The most important molecular tests with differential diagnostic relevance in patients with astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors include the detection of genetic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), IDH2, alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX), histone H3.3 (H3F3A) and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) genes as well as the demonstration of codeletions of chromosomal arms 1p and 19q. Important predictive markers that have been linked to the response to alkylating chemotherapy are O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation in glioblastoma patients and 1p/19q codel status in anaplastic glioma patients. Oncogenic c11orf95/RELA fusion gene formation is characteristic for a subgroup of patients with supratentorial ependymoma. In addition to diagnostic testing of individual genes, novel microarray and next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques show promising perspectives in glioma diagnostics. The assessment of DNA methylation profiles using DNA methylation arrays representing 450,000 CpG dinucleotides distributed throughout the human genome (450 k array test) now allows the robust molecular classification of gliomas into clinically relevant entities and variants. Moreover, glioma-associated gene panel NGS promises the timely parallel sequencing of relevant diagnostic and predictive marker genes in a single test. It will now be a major task to integrate these novel results and techniques into the conventional histological procedures in the up-coming revision of the

  6. Economics of Malignant Gliomas: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Fitzner, Karen A.; Jacobs, Daniel I.; Bennett, Charles L.; Liebling, Dustin B.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Trifilio, Steven M.; Grimm, Sean A.; Fisher, Matthew J.; Haleem, Meraaj S.; Ray, Paul S.; McKoy, Judith M.; DeBoer, Rebecca; Tulas, Katrina-Marie E.; Deeb, Mohammed; McKoy, June M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 18,500 persons are diagnosed with malignant glioma in the United States annually. Few studies have investigated the comprehensive economic costs. We reviewed the literature to examine costs to patients with malignant glioma and their families, payers, and society. Methods: A total of 18 fully extracted studies were included. Data were collected on direct and indirect costs, and cost estimates were converted to US dollars using the conversion rate calculated from the study's publication date, and updated to 2011 values after adjustment for inflation. A standardized data abstraction form was used. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by another. Results: Before approval of effective chemotherapeutic agents for malignant gliomas, estimated total direct medical costs in the United States for surgery and radiation therapy per patient ranged from $50,600 to $92,700. The addition of temozolomide (TMZ) and bevacizumab to glioblastoma treatment regimens has resulted in increased overall costs for glioma care. Although health care costs are now less front-loaded, they have increased over the course of illness. Analysis using a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life-year suggests that the benefits of TMZ fall on the edge of acceptable therapies. Furthermore, indirect medical costs, such as productivity losses, are not trivial. Conclusion: With increased chemotherapy use for malignant glioma, the paradigm for treatment and associated out-of-pocket and total medical costs continue to evolve. Larger out-of-pocket costs may influence the choice of chemotherapeutic agents, the economic implications of which should be evaluated prospectively. PMID:25466707

  7. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Bin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Fast-Migrating Human Glioma Cells in the Progression of Malignant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Adamski, Vivian; Schmitt, Anne Dorothée; Flüh, Charlotte; Synowitz, Michael; Hattermann, Kirsten; Held-Feindt, Janka

    2017-03-13

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. The most malignant form, the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM; WHO IV), is characterized by an invasive phenotype, which enables the tumor cells to infiltrate into adjacent brain tissue. When investigating GBM migration and invasion properties in vitro, in most cases GBM cell lines were analyzed. Comprehensive investigations focusing on progression-dependent characteristics of migration processes using fresh human glioma samples of different malignancy grades do not exist. Thus, we isolated fast-migrating tumor cells from fresh human glioma samples of different malignancy grades (astrocytomas WHO grade II, grade III, GBM, and GBM recurrences) and characterized them with regard to the transcription of genes involved in the migration and invasion, tumor progression, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and stemness. In addition, we transferred our results to GBM cell lines and glioma stem-like cells and examined the influence of temozolomide on the expression of the above-mentioned genes in relation to migratory potential. Our results indicate that "evolutionary-like" expression alterations occur during glioma progression when comparing slow- and fast-migrating cells of fresh human gliomas. Furthermore, a close relation between migratory and stemness properties seems to be most likely. Variations in gene expression were also identified in GBM cell lines, not only when comparing fast- and slow-migrating cells but also regarding temozolomide-treated and untreated cells. Moreover, these differences coincided with the expression of stem cell markers and their migratory potential. Expression of migration-related genes in fast-migrating glioma cells is not only regulated in a progression-dependent manner, but these cells are also characterized by specific stem cell-like features.

  9. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes. PMID:27782153

  10. Oncolytic adenoviruses: A thorny path to glioma cure

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, I.V.; Borovjagin, A.V.; Schroeder, B.A.; Baryshnikov, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a rapidly progressing brain tumor. Despite the relatively low percentage of cancer patients with glioma diagnoses, recent statistics indicate that the number of glioma patients may have increased over the past decade. Current therapeutic options for glioma patients include tumor resection, chemotherapy, and concomitant radiation therapy with an average survival of approximately 16 months. The rapid progression of gliomas has spurred the development of novel treatment options, such as cancer gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. Preclinical testing of oncolytic adenoviruses using glioma models revealed both positive and negative sides of the virotherapy approach. Here we present a detailed overview of the glioma virotherapy field and discuss auxiliary therapeutic strategies with the potential for augmenting clinical efficacy of GBM virotherapy treatment. PMID:25685829

  11. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-10-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes.

  12. Progress on molecular biomarkers and classification of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanbao; Bao, Zhaoshi; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    2013-06-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Anaplastic gliomas (WHO grade III) and glioblastomas (WHO grade IV) represent the major groups of malignant gliomas in the brain. Several diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic biomarkers for malignant gliomas have been reported over the last few decades, and these markers have made great contributions to the accuracy of diagnosis, therapeutic decision making, and prognosis of patients. However, heterogeneity in patient outcomes may still be observed, which highlights the insufficiency of a classification system based purely on histopathology. Great efforts have been made to incorporate new information about the molecular landscape of gliomas into novel classifications that may potentially guide treatment. In this review, we summarize three distinctive biomarkers, three most commonly altered pathways, and three classifications based on microarray data in malignant gliomas.

  13. BMPs as Therapeutic Targets and Biomarkers in Astrocytic Glioma

    PubMed Central

    González-Gómez, Pilar; Anselmo, Nilson Praia; Mira, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic glioma is the most common brain tumor. The glioma initiating cell (GIC) fraction of the tumor is considered as highly chemoresistant, suggesting that GICs are responsible for glioma relapse. A potential treatment for glioma is to induce differentiation of GICs to a more benign and/or druggable cell type. Given BMPs are among the most potent inducers of GIC differentiation, they have been considered as noncytotoxic therapeutic compounds that may be of use to prevent growth and recurrence of glioma. We herein summarize advances made in the understanding of the role of BMP signaling in astrocytic glioma, with a particular emphasis on the effects exerted on GICs. We discuss the prognostic value of BMP signaling components and the implications of BMPs in the differentiation of GICs and in their sensitization to alkylating drugs and oncolytic therapy/chemotherapy. This mechanistic insight may provide new opportunities for therapeutic intervention of brain cancer. PMID:24877113

  14. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Ying; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS). The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  15. A mathematical model of pre-diagnostic glioma growth

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Marc; Hao, Wenrui; Schwartzbaum, Judith; Rempala, Grzegorz A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their location, the malignant gliomas of the brain in humans are very difficult to treat in advanced stages. Blood-based biomarkers for glioma are needed for more accurate evaluation of treatment response as well as early diagnosis. However, biomarker research in primary brain tumors is challenging given their relative rarity and genetic diversity. It is further complicated by variations in the permeability of the blood brain barrier that affects the amount of marker released into the bloodstream. Inspired by recent temporal data indicating a possible decrease in serum glucose levels in patients with gliomas yet to be diagnosed, we present an ordinary differential equation model to capture early stage glioma growth. The model contains glioma-glucose-immune interactions and poses a potential mechanism by which this glucose drop can be explained. We present numerical simulations, parameter sensitivity analysis, linear stability analysis and a numerical experiment whereby we show how a dormant glioma can become malignant. PMID:26073722

  16. The H3.3 K27M mutation results in a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas than thalamic gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Hao, Shuyu; Pan, Changcun; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting; Yan, Hai; Zhang, Liwei; Wan, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Brainstem and thalamic gliomas are rare, and they are poorly understood in adults. Genetic aberrations that occur in these tumors are still unknown. In this study, we investigated whether thalamic gliomas have different genetic aberrations and clinical outcomes compared with brainstem gliomas in adults. Forty-three glioma samples were selected, including 28 brainstem and 15 thalamic gliomas. The frequency of the K27M mutation in adult midline gliomas was 58.1%. High-grade gliomas in the thalamus were statistically significantly more numerous than brainstem gliomas. Patients with K27M mutant brainstem gliomas had a significantly shorter overall survival than patients with wild-type tumors (P = .020) by Cox regression after adjustment for other independent risk factors. However, there was no statistical tendency toward a poorer overall survival in thalamic gliomas containing the K27M mutation compared with wild-type tumors. The presence of the K27M mutation significantly corresponded with mutations in TP53 in thalamic gliomas. Interestingly, the K27M mutation was mutually exclusive with mutations in IDH1, which was detected only in brainstem gliomas. The microarray data identified 86 differentially expressed genes between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with the K27M mutation. The cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) gene, which plays an important role in cancer pathways, was found to be differentially expressed between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with K27M mutations. Although the K27M mutation was frequently observed in adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, this mutation tended to be associated with a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas but not in thalamic gliomas. Brainstem gliomas may present different genetic aberrations from thalamic gliomas. These differences may provide guidance for therapeutic decisions for the treatment of adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, which may have different molecular targets.

  17. Establishment of a green fluorescent protein tracing murine model focused on the functions of host components in necrosis repair and the niche of subcutaneously implanted glioma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhao-Hui; Lv, Ke; Zhang, Jin-Shi; Dai, Chun-Gang; Liu, Bin; Ma, Xiao-Yu; He, Lin-Ming; Jia, Jing-Yun; Chen, Yan-Ming; Dai, Xing-Liang; Wang, Ai-Dong; Dong, Jun; Zhang, Quan-Bin; Lan, Qing; Huang, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    Due to progress in the research of glioma stem cells and the glioma niche, development of an animal model that facilitates the elucidation of the roles of the host tissue and cells is necessary. The aim of the present study was to develop a subcutaneous xenograft green fluorescent protein nude mouse model and use this model to analyze the roles of host cells in tumor necrosis repair. Tumors derived from the human glioma stem/progenitor cell line SU3 were subcutaneously implanted in green fluorescent protein nude mice. The implanted tumors were then passed from animal to animal for 10 generations. Finally, subcutaneous xenografts were assayed with traditional pathology, immunopathological techniques and fluorescence photography. For each generation, the tumorigenicity rate was 100%. Subcutaneous xenografts were rich in blood vessels, and necrotic and hemorrhagic foci, which highly expressed hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, tumor necrosis factor, Ki-67, CD68 and CD11b. In the interstitial tissue, particularly in old hemorrhagic foci, there were numerous cells expressing green fluorescent protein, CD68 and CD11b. Green fluorescent protein nude mouse subcutaneous xenografts not only consistently maintained the high invasiveness and tumorigenicity of glioma stem/progenitor cells, but also consisted of a high concentration of tumor blood vessels and necrotic and hemorrhagic foci. Subcutaneous xenografts also expressed high levels of tumor microenvironment-related proteins and host-derived tumor interstitial molecules. The model has significant potential for further research on tumor tissue remodeling and the tumor microenvironment.

  18. Malignant gliomas: old and new systemic treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mesti, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant (high-grade) gliomas are rapidly progressive brain tumours with very high morbidity and mortality. Until recently, treatment options for patients with malignant gliomas were limited and mainly the same for all subtypes of malignant gliomas. The treatment included surgery and radiotherapy. Chemotherapy used as an adjuvant treatment or at recurrence had a marginal role. Conclusions Nowadays, the treatment of malignant gliomas requires a multidisciplinary approach. The treatment includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The chosen approach is more complex and individually adjusted. By that, the effect on the survival and quality of life is notable higher. PMID:27247544

  19. Characteristics of gliomas in patients with somatic IDH mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Charlotte; Thomas, Laure; Psimaras, Dimitri; Bielle, Franck; Vauléon, Elodie; Loiseau, Hugues; Cartalat-Carel, Stéphanie; Meyronet, David; Dehais, Caroline; Honnorat, Jérôme; Sanson, Marc; Ducray, François

    2016-03-31

    IDH mutations are found in the majority of adult, diffuse, low-grade and anaplastic gliomas and are also frequently found in cartilaginous tumors. Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are two enchondromatosis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple benign cartilaginous tumors due to post-zygotic acquisition of IDH mutations. In addition to skeletal tumors, enchondromatosis patients sometimes develop gliomas. The aim of the present study was to determine whether gliomas in enchondromatosis patients might also result from somatic IDH mosaicism and whether their characteristics are similar to those of sporadic IDH-mutated gliomas. For this purpose, we analyzed the characteristics of 6 newly diagnosed and 32 previously reported cases of enchondromatosis patients who developed gliomas and compared them to those of a consecutive series of 159 patients with sporadic IDH-mutated gliomas. As was the case with sporadic IDH mutated gliomas, enchondromatosis gliomas were frequently located in the frontal lobe (54 %) and consisted of diffuse low-grade (73 %) or anaplastic gliomas (21 %). However, they were diagnosed at an earlier age (25.6 years versus 44 years, p < 0.001) and were more frequently multicentric (32 % versus 1 %, p < 0.001) and more frequently located within the brainstem than sporadic IDH mutated gliomas (21 % versus 1 %, p < 0.001). Their molecular profile was characterized by IDH mutations and loss of ATRX expression. In two patients, the same IDH mutation was demonstrated in the glioma and in a cartilaginous tumor. In contrast to sporadic IDH mutated gliomas, no enchondromatosis glioma harbored a 1p/19q co-deletion (0/6 versus 59/123, p = 0.03). The characteristics of gliomas in patients with enchondromatosis suggest that these tumors, as cartilaginous tumors, result from somatic IDH mosaicism and that the timing of IDH mutation acquisition might affect the location and molecular characteristics of gliomas. Early

  20. IGFBP2 expression predicts IDH-mutant glioma patient survival.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin Eric; Cohen, Adam L; Colman, Howard; Jensen, Randy L; Fults, Daniel W; Couldwell, William T

    2017-01-03

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2 genes occur in ~80% of lower-grade (WHO grade II and grade III) gliomas. Mutant IDH produces (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate, which induces DNA hypermethylation and presumably drives tumorigenesis. Interestingly, IDH mutations are associated with improved survival in glioma patients, but the underlying mechanism for the difference in survival remains unclear. Through comparative analyses of 286 cases of IDH-wildtype and IDH-mutant lower-grade glioma from a TCGA data set, we report that IDH-mutant gliomas have increased expression of tumor-suppressor genes (NF1, PTEN, and PIK3R1) and decreased expression of oncogenes(AKT2, ARAF, ERBB2, FGFR3, and PDGFRB) and glioma progression genes (FOXM1, IGFBP2, and WWTR1) compared with IDH-wildtype gliomas. Furthermore, each of these genes is prognostic in overall gliomas; however, within the IDH-mutant group, none remains prognostic except IGFBP2 (encodinginsulin-like growth factor binding protein 2). Through validation in an independent cohort, we show that patients with low IGFBP2 expressiondisplay a clear advantage in overall and disease-free survival, whereas those with high IGFBP2 expressionhave worse median survival than IDH-wildtype patients. These observations hold true across different histological and molecular subtypes of lower-grade glioma. We propose therefore that an unexpected biological consequence of IDH mutations in glioma is to ameliorate patient survival by promoting tumor-suppressor signaling while inhibiting that of oncogenes, particularly IGFBP2.

  1. In Vivo Measurement of Glioma-Induced Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jisook; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    The normal blood–brain barrier (BBB) consists of tight interendothelial cell junctions and adjacent astrocyte end feet separated by a basal lamina surrounding the endothelium. The interactions between the different cell types of BBB are disrupted in distinct patterns in the microenvironment of glioma. Malignant gliomas infiltrate the surrounding normal brain parenchyma; a process associated with vascular permeability (VP) and breakdown of the BBB. Herein, we describe methods to quantitatively measure glioma-induced vascular permeability, utilizing an orthotopic xenograft model of glioma. PMID:21874468

  2. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma

  3. Glioma gene therapy using induced pluripotent stem cell derived neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther Xingwei; Lam, Dang Hoang; Wu, Chunxiao; Yang, Jing; Tham, Chee Kian; Ng, Wai Hoe; Wang, Shu

    2011-10-03

    Using neural stem cells (NSCs) with tumor tropic migratory capacity to deliver therapeutic genes is an attractive strategy in eliminating metastatic or disseminated tumors. While different methods have been developed to isolate or generate NSCs, it has not been assessed whether induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, a type of pluripotent stem cells that hold great potential for regenerative medicine, can be used as a source for derivation of NSCs with tumor tropism. In this study, we used a conventional lentivirus transduction method to derive iPS cells from primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts and then generated NSCs from the iPS cells. To investigate whether the iPS cell derived NSCs can be used in the treatment of disseminated brain tumors, the cells were transduced with a baculoviral vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene and injected into the cerebral hemisphere contralateral to a tumor inoculation site in a mouse intracranial human glioma xenograft model. We observed that NSCs expressing the suicide gene were, in the presence of ganciclovir, effective in inhibiting the growth of the glioma xenografts and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our findings provide evidence for the feasibility of using iPS cell derived NSCs as cellular vehicles for targeted anticancer gene therapy.

  4. Transcriptional repression of FOXO1 by KLF4 contributes to glioma progression

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Guodong; Liu, Dingyang; Xiao, Gelei; Liu, Qing; Yuan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, our findings indicated that FOXO1 expression frequently decreased in glioma tissues and cells. FOXO1 expression decrease correlated with glioma progression and predicted a worse overall survival of glioma patients. Restored FOXO1 expression inhibited glioma cells invasion and suppressed glioma cells proliferation in vitro and growth in vivo. Additionally, we found that KLF4 expression frequently increased in glioma tissues and negatively correlated with FOXO1 expression. Bioinformatics analysis and experimental results indicated that KLF4 transcriptionally repressed FOXO1 expression in glioma cells. Moreover, KLF4 expression increase correlated with glioma progression and predicted a poorer overall survival of glioma patients. KLF4 knockdown attenuated glioma cells invasion and growth. These data provide a rationale for targeted intervention on KLF4-FOXO1 signaling pathway to suppress glioma progression. PMID:27835585

  5. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages in an experimental glioma model with a recombinant immunotoxin to folate receptor beta.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku; Tanaka, Masashi; Tsuneyoshi, Yasuhiro; Xu, Baohui; Michie, Sara A; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Hirano, Hirofumi; Arita, Kazunori; Matsuyama, Takami

    2009-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in glioblastomas and a high degree of macrophage infiltration is associated with a poor prognosis for glioblastoma patients. However, it is unclear whether TAMs in glioblastomas promote tumor growth. In this study, we found that folate receptor beta (FR beta) was expressed on macrophages in human glioblastomas and a rat C6 glioma implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. To target FR beta-expressing TAMs, we produced a recombinant immunotoxin consisting of immunoglobulin heavy and light chain Fv portions of an anti-mouse FR beta monoclonal antibody and Pseudomonas exotoxin A. Injection of the immunotoxin into C6 glioma xenografts in nude mice significantly depleted TAMs and reduced tumor growth. The immunotoxin targeting FR beta-expressing macrophages will provide a therapeutic tool for human glioblastomas.

  6. Bevacizumab and Irinotecan in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Ependymoma, or Low Grade Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-28

    Childhood Cerebral Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma

  7. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  8. Activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Wielgat, P; Walczuk, U; Szajda, S; Bień, M; Zimnoch, L; Mariak, Z; Zwierz, K

    2006-12-01

    There is a lot of data suggesting that modifications of cell glycoconjugates may be important in progression of cancer. In the present work we studied activities of lysosomal exoglycosidases: beta-hexosaminidase and its isoenzymes A and B, beta-galactosidase and alpha-mannosidase, in human gliomas. Enzyme activity was determined spectrophotometrically based on the release of p-nitrophenol from p-nitrophenyl-derivative of appropriate sugars. The activities of the exoglycosidases tested were significantly higher in malignant glial tumors than in control tissue (normal brain tissue) and non-glial tumors. The highest activities of exoglycosidases were observed in high-grade gliomas, and a positive correlation of enzyme activities and degree of malignancy was noted. Our results suggest that lysosomal exoglycosidases may participate in the progression and dynamical development of glial tumors.

  9. Anaplastic glioma: current treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic glioma (AG) is divided into three morphology-based groups (anaplastic astrocytoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma) as well as three molecular groups (glioma-CpG island methylation phenotype [G-CIMP] negative, G-CIMP positive non-1p19q codeleted tumors and G-CIMP positive codeleted tumors). The RTOG 9402 and EORTC 26951 trials established radiotherapy plus (procarbazine, lomustine, vincristine) chemotherapy as the standard of care in 1p/19q codeleted AG. Uni- or non-codeleted AG are currently best treated with radiotherapy only or alkylator-based chemotherapy only as determined by the NOA-04 trial. Maturation of NOA-04 and results of the currently accruing studies, CODEL (for codeleted AG) and CATNON (for uni or non-codeleted AG), will likely refine current up-front treatment recommendations for AG.

  10. Nanotechnology Applications for Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    PubMed

    Bredlau, Amy Lee; Dixit, Suraj; Chen, Chao; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are invariably fatal tumors found in the pons of elementary school aged children. These tumors are grade II-IV gliomas, with a median survival of less than 1 year from diagnosis when treated with standard of care (SOC) therapy. Nanotechnology may offer therapeutic options for the treatment of DIPGs. Multiple nanoparticle formulations are currently being investigated for the treatment of DIPGs. Nanoparticles based upon stable elements, polymer nanoparticles, and organic nanoparticles are under development for the treatment of brain tumors, including DIPGs. Targeting of nanoparticles is now possible as delivery techniques that address the difficulty in crossing the blood brain barrier (BBB) are developed. Theranostic nanoparticles, a combination of therapeutics and diagnostic nanoparticles, improve imaging of the cancerous tissue while delivering therapy to the local region. However, additional time and attention should be directed to developing a nanoparticle delivery system for treatment of the uniformly fatal pediatric disease of DIPG.

  11. Overview of current immunotherapeutic strategies for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Kamran, Neha; Baker, Gregory; Mineharu, Yohei; Lowenstein, Pedro Ricardo; Castro, Maria Graciela

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, numerous studies of immunotherapy for malignant glioma (glioblastoma multiforme) have brought new knowledge and new hope for improving the prognosis of this incurable disease. Some clinical trials have reached Phase III, following positive outcomes in Phase I and II, with respect to safety and immunological end points. Results are encouraging especially when considering the promise of sustained efficacy by inducing antitumor immunological memory. Progress in understanding the mechanisms of tumor-induced immune suppression led to the development of drugs targeting immunosuppressive checkpoints, which are used in active clinical trials for glioblastoma multiforme. Insights related to the heterogeneity of the disease bring new challenges for the management of glioma and underscore a likely cause of therapeutic failure. An emerging therapeutic strategy is represented by a combinatorial, personalized approach, including the standard of care: surgery, radiation, chemotherapy with added active immunotherapy and multiagent targeting of immunosuppressive checkpoints. PMID:26598957

  12. Raman spectroscopy of gliomas: an exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Mahesh; Hole, Arti R.; Shridhar, E.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar V.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Gliomas are extremely infiltrative type of brain cancers, the borders of which are difficult to locate. Gliomas largely consist of tumors of astrocytic or oligodendroglial lineage. Usually stereotactic surgery is performed to obtain tumor tissue sample. Complete excision of these tumors with preservation of uninvolved normal areas is important during brain tumor surgeries. The present study was undertaken to explore feasibility of classifying abnormal and normal glioma tissues with Raman spectroscopy (RS). RS is a nondestructive vibrational spectroscopic technique, which provides information about molecular composition, molecular structures and molecular interactions in tissue. Postoperated 33 (20-abnormal and 13-normal) gliomas tissue samples of different grades were collected under clinical supervision. Five micron section from tissue sample was used for confirmatory histopathological diagnosis while the remaining tissue was placed on CaF2 window and spectra were acquired using a fiberoptic-probe-coupled HE-785 Raman-spectrometer. Spectral acquisition parameters were laser power-80mW, integration-20s and averaged over 3 accumulations. Spectra were pre-processed and subjected to unsupervised Principal-Component Analysis (PCA) to identify trends of classification. Supervised PC-LDA (Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant Analysis) was used to develop standard-models using spectra of 12 normal and abnormal specimens each. Leave-one-out crossvalidation yielded classification-efficiency of 90% and 80% for normal and abnormal conditions, respectively. Evaluation with an independent-test data-set comprising of 135 spectra of 9 samples provided sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. Findings of this preliminary study may pave way for objective tumor margin assessment during brain surgery.

  13. Serum proteomics of glioma: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Nijaguna, Mamatha B; Kumar, Durairaj Mohan

    2009-10-01

    The prognosis of patients with glioblastoma, the most malignant adult glial brain tumor, remains poor in spite of advances in treatment procedures, including surgical resection, irradiation and chemotherapy. Genetic heterogeneity of glioblastoma warrants extensive studies in order to gain a thorough understanding of the biology of this tumor. While there have been several studies of global transcript profiling of glioma with the identification of gene signatures for diagnosis and disease management, translation into clinics is yet to happen. Serum biomarkers have the potential to revolutionize the process of cancer diagnosis, grading, prognostication and treatment response monitoring. Besides having the advantage that serum can be obtained through a less invasive procedure, it contains molecules at an extraordinary dynamic range of ten orders of magnitude in terms of their concentrations. While the conventional methods, such as 2DE, have been in use for many years, the ability to identify the proteins through mass spectrometry techniques such as MALDI-TOF led to an explosion of interest in proteomics. Relatively new high-throughput proteomics methods such as SELDI-TOF and protein microarrays are expected to hasten the process of serum biomarker discovery. This review will highlight the recent advances in the proteomics platform in discovering serum biomarkers and the current status of glioma serum markers. We aim to provide the principles and potential of the latest proteomic approaches and their applications in the biomarker discovery process. Besides providing a comprehensive list of available serum biomarkers of glioma, we will also propose how these markers will revolutionize the clinical management of glioma patients.

  14. Autophagy and Akt promote survival in glioma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qi-Wen; Weiss, William A

    2011-05-01

    Signaling through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K)-Akt-mTOR is frequently activated in cancers including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), where this kinase network regulates survival. It is thus surprising that inhibitors of these pathways induce minimal cell death in glioma. We showed that the dual PtdIns3K-mTOR inhibitor PI-103 induces autophagy in therapy-resistant, PTEN-mutant glioma, with blockade of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and complex 2 (mTORC2) contributing independently to autophagy. Inhibition of autophagosome maturation synergizes with PI-103 to induce apoptosis through the Bax-dependent intrinsic mitochondrial pathway, indicating that PI-103 induces autophagy as a survival pathway in this setting. Not all inhibitors of PtdIns3K-Akt-mTOR signaling synergize with inhibitors of autophagy. The allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin fails to induce apoptosis in conjunction with blockade of autophagy, due to feedback-activation of Akt. Apoptosis in the setting of rapamycin therapy requires concurrent inhibition of both autophagy and of PtdIns3K-Akt. Moreover, the clinical PtdIns3K-mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 cooperates with the clinical lysosomotropic autophagy inhibitor chloroquine to induce apoptosis in PTEN-mutant glioma xenografts in vivo, offering a therapeutic approach translatable to patients.

  15. Treatment of malignant glioma using hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiahang; Guo, Mian; Pang, Hengyuan; Qi, Jingtao; Zhang, Jinwei; Ge, Yunlong

    2013-01-01

    Thirty pathologically diagnosed patients with grade III–IV primary or recurrent malignant glioma (tumor diameter 3–7 cm) were randomly divided into two groups. The control group underwent conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In the hyperthermia group, primary cases received hyperthermia treatment, and patients with recurrent tumors were treated with hyperthermia in com-bination with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Hyperthermia treatment was administered using a 13.56-MHz radio frequency hyperthermia device. Electrodes were inserted into the tumor with the aid of a CT-guided stereotactic apparatus and heat was applied for 1 hour. During 3 months after hyperthermia, patients were evaluated with head CT or MRI every month. Gliomas in the hyper-thermia group exhibited growth retardation or growth termination. Necrosis was evident in 80% of the heated tumor tissue and there was a decrease in tumor diameter. Our findings indicate that ra-dio frequency hyperthermia has a beneficial effect in the treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:25206588

  16. Statistical considerations on prognostic models for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Molinaro, Annette M.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.

    2016-01-01

    Given the lack of beneficial treatments in glioma, there is a need for prognostic models for therapeutic decision making and life planning. Recently several studies defining subtypes of glioma have been published. Here, we review the statistical considerations of how to build and validate prognostic models, explain the models presented in the current glioma literature, and discuss advantages and disadvantages of each model. The 3 statistical considerations to establishing clinically useful prognostic models are: study design, model building, and validation. Careful study design helps to ensure that the model is unbiased and generalizable to the population of interest. During model building, a discovery cohort of patients can be used to choose variables, construct models, and estimate prediction performance via internal validation. Via external validation, an independent dataset can assess how well the model performs. It is imperative that published models properly detail the study design and methods for both model building and validation. This provides readers the information necessary to assess the bias in a study, compare other published models, and determine the model's clinical usefulness. As editors, reviewers, and readers of the relevant literature, we should be cognizant of the needed statistical considerations and insist on their use. PMID:26657835

  17. Steroid requirements during radiotherapy for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Marantidou, Athina; Levy, Christine; Duquesne, Alyette; Ursu, Renata; Bailon, Olivier; Coman, Irene; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is the standard treatment for high-grade gliomas. However, toxicity may develop during RT, such as brain edema or worsening of neurological symptoms. Surprisingly, no dedicated study had focused on steroid requirements during RT in adult patients with malignant gliomas. We evaluated prospectively all patients with malignant gliomas treated by RT in a single center from July 2006 to May 2009. Age, sex, initial Karnofsky performance status (KPS), tumor localization and histology, type of surgical resection, clinical target volume, total dose and duration of RT, concomitant treatment with temozolomide, and steroid dosage during RT and at 1 and 3 months after RT were recorded in all patients. Most of the 80 patients (70%) were already taking steroids before RT. Half of them (55%) required initiation or further steroids increase during RT. The median time to steroid increase was 8 days. Only 13% of patients remained free of steroids during RT, and the mean maximal dosage of prednisone was 55 ± 48 mg. At 3 months after RT, 29% of patients were free of steroids, and the mean prednisone dosage was 32 ± 50 mg. Unresected tumors and initial KPS ≤80% were the only variables associated with higher steroid requirements on multivariate analysis. In our series, almost all patients required steroids during RT. Poor initial KPS and biopsy were associated with higher steroid requirements.

  18. Perspectives in Intraoperative Diagnostics of Human Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Tyurikova, O.; Dembitskaya, Y.; Yashin, K.; Mishchenko, M.; Vedunova, M.; Medyanik, I.; Kazantsev, V.

    2015-01-01

    Amongst large a variety of oncological diseases, malignant gliomas represent one of the most severe types of tumors. They are also the most common type of the brain tumors and account for over half of the astrocytic tumors. According to different sources, the average life expectancy of patients with various glioblastomas varies between 10 and 12 months and that of patients with anaplastic astrocytic tumors between 20 and 24 months. Therefore, studies of the physiology of transformed glial cells are critical for the development of treatment methods. Modern medical approaches offer complex procedures, including the microsurgical tumor removal, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, supplemented with photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy. The most radical of them is surgical resection, which allows removing the largest part of the tumor, reduces the intracranial hypertension, and minimizes the degree of neurological deficit. However, complete removal of the tumor remains impossible. The main limitations are insufficient visualization of glioma boundaries, due to its infiltrative growth, and the necessity to preserve healthy tissue. This review is devoted to the description of advantages and disadvantages of modern intraoperative diagnostics of human gliomas and highlights potential perspectives for development of their treatment. PMID:26543495

  19. Low-grade gliomas: introduction and overview.

    PubMed

    Piepmeier, J M; Christopher, S

    1997-08-01

    This issue of the Journal of Neuro-Oncology is devoted to recent investigations of low-grade gliomas. The purpose of this issue is not to debate the relative merits and liabilities of different management strategies for low-grade gliomas, but to present new data concerning novel and innovative approaches to evaluating these lesions. The common theme of many of these reports represents a departure from grading systems that primarily depend on a morphology-based analysis from light microscopy to classify these tumors. The purpose of this review is to present the reasoning behind the selection of authors for this issue of the Journal of Neuro-Oncology and to provide a format for presentation of new ideas concerning these interesting tumors. It is clear that standard classification systems that address only the morphological characteristics of tumor cells can not adequately represent the wide variation in biological activity that is found with these lesions. It is hoped that these articles will stimulate further interest and research into low-grade gliomas that will one day lead to more effective therapy.

  20. Effect of Brain- and Tumor-Derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor on Glioma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lincoln A.; Woolard, Kevin; Son, Myung Jin; Li, Aiguo; Lee, Jeongwu; Ene, Chibawanye; Mantey, Samuel A.; Maric, Dragan; Song, Hua; Belova, Galina; Jensen, Robert T.; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Tumor cell invasion is the principal cause of treatment failure and death among patients with malignant gliomas. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been previously implicated in cancer metastasis and invasion in various tumors. We explored the mechanism of CTGF-mediated glioma cell infiltration and examined potential therapeutic targets. Methods Highly infiltrative patient-derived glioma tumor–initiating or tumor stem cells (TIC/TSCs) were harvested and used to explore a CTGF-induced signal transduction pathway via luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting. Treatment of TIC/TSCs with small-molecule inhibitors targeting integrin β1 (ITGB1) and the tyrosine kinase receptor type A (TrkA), and short hairpin RNAs targeting CTGF directly were used to reduce the levels of key protein components of CTGF-induced cancer infiltration. TIC/TSC infiltration was examined in real-time cell migration and invasion assays in vitro and by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in TIC/TSC orthotopic xenograft mouse models (n = 30; six mice per group). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Treatment of TIC/TSCs with CTGF resulted in CTGF binding to ITGB1–TrkA receptor complexes and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcriptional activation as measured by luciferase reporter assays (mean relative luciferase activity, untreated vs CTGF200 ng/mL: 0.53 vs 1.87, difference = 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69 to 2, P < .001). NF-κB activation resulted in binding of ZEB-1 to the E-cadherin promoter as demonstrated by ChIP analysis with subsequent E-cadherin suppression (fold increase in ZEB-1 binding to the E-cadherin promoter region: untreated + ZEB-1 antibody vs CTGF200 ng/mL + ZEB-1 antibody: 1.5 vs 6.4, difference = 4.9, 95% CI = 4.8 to 5.0, P < .001). Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that TrkA is selectively expressed in the most

  1. ProBDNF and its receptors are upregulated in glioma and inhibit the growth of glioma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jing; Zhou, Li; Yang, Miao; Lim, Yoon; Zhu, Yu-hong; Fu, Deng-li; Li, Zhi-wei; Zhong, Jin-hua; Xiao, Zhi-cheng; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2013-01-01

    Background High-grade glioma is incurable, with a short survival time and poor prognosis. The increased expression of p75 neurotrophin receptor (NTR) is a characteristic of high-grade glioma, but the potential significance of increased p75NTR in this tumor is not fully understood. Since p75NTR is the receptor for the precursor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF), it is suggested that proBDNF may have an impact on glioma. Methods In this study we investigated the expression of proBDNF and its receptors p75NTR and sortilin in 52 cases of human glioma and 13 cases of controls by immunochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and Western blot methods. Using C6 glioma cells as a model, we investigated the roles of proBDNF on C6 glioma cell differentiation, growth, apoptosis, and migration in vitro. Results We found that the expression levels of proBDNF, p75NTR, and sortilin were significantly increased in high-grade glioma and were positively correlated with the malignancy of the tumor. We also observed that tumors expressed proBDNF, p75NTR, and sortilin in the same cells with different subcellular distributions, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine loop. The ratio of proBDNF to mature BDNF was decreased in high-grade glioma tissues and was negatively correlated with tumor grade. Using C6 glioma cells as a model, we found that proBDNF increased apoptosis and differentiation and decreased cell growth and migration in vitro via p75NTR. Conclusions Our data indicate that proBDNF and its receptors are upregulated in high-grade glioma and might play an inhibitory effect on glioma. PMID:23576602

  2. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a fast-growing childhood brain stem glioma that is difficult to treat and has a poor prognosis. A focal glioma grows more slowly, is easier to treat, and has a better prognosis. Learn about the diagnosis, cellular classification, staging, treatment, and clinical trials for pediatric brain stem glioma in this expert-reviewed summary.

  3. Aberrant CpG Islands Hypermethylation Profiles in Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Ryeol; Kim, Ealmaan

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors analyzed whether the promoter hypermethylation of cancer-related genes was involved in the tumorigenesis of malignant gliomas. Methods A total of 29 patients received surgery and histologically confirmed to have malignant gliomas from January 2000 to December 2006. The promoter methylation status of several genes, which were reported to be frequently methylated in malignant gliomas, was investigated using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Results All cases of malignant gliomas represented the promoter hypermethylation in at least 2 or more genes tested. Of 29 tumors, 28 (96.55%) showed concurrent hypermethylation of 3 or more genes. Ras association domain family member 1, epithelial cadherin, O-6 methyl guanine DNA methyltransferase, thrombospondin 1, p14 and adenomatous polyposis coli were frequently methylated in high grade gliomas including glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Conclusion Aberrant hypermethylation profile was closely related with malignant gliomas suggesting that epigenetic change may play a role in the development of malignant gliomas. Two or three target genes may provide useful clues to the development of the useful prognostic as well as diagnostic assays for malignant gliomas. PMID:24926469

  4. Conditioned medium from neural stem cells inhibits glioma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zhong, Q; Liu, H; Liu, P; Wu, J; Ma, D; Chen, X; Yang, X

    2016-10-31

    Malignant glioma is one of the most common brain tumors in the central nervous system. Although the significant progress has been made in recent years, the mortality is still high and 5-year survival rate is still very low. One of the leading causes to the high mortality for glioma patients is metastasis and invasion. An efficient method to control the tumor metastasis is a promising way to treat the glioma. Previous reports indicated that neural stem cells (NSCs) were served as a delivery vector to the anti-glioma therapy. Here, we used the conditioned medium from rat NSCs (NSC-CM) to culture the human glioblastoma cell lines. We found that NSC-CM could inhibit the glioma cell growth, invasion and migration in vitro and attenuate the tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, this anti-glioma effect was mediated by the inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Above all, this study provided the direct evidence to put forward a simple and efficient method in the inhibition of glioma cells/tumor growth, potentially advancing the anti-glioma therapy.

  5. Unsupervised analysis of transcriptomic profiles reveals six glioma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Aiguo; Walling, Jennifer; Ahn, Susie; Kotliarov, Yuri; Su, Qin; Quezado, Martha; Oberholtzer, J Carl; Park, John; Zenklusen, Jean C; Fine, Howard A

    2009-03-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumors in adults and a significant cause of cancer-related mortality. Defining glioma subtypes based on objective genetic and molecular signatures may allow for a more rational, patient-specific approach to therapy in the future. Classifications based on gene expression data have been attempted in the past with varying success and with only some concordance between studies, possibly due to inherent bias that can be introduced through the use of analytic methodologies that make a priori selection of genes before classification. To overcome this potential source of bias, we have applied two unsupervised machine learning methods to genome-wide gene expression profiles of 159 gliomas, thereby establishing a robust glioma classification model relying only on the molecular data. The model predicts for two major groups of gliomas (oligodendroglioma-rich and glioblastoma-rich groups) separable into six hierarchically nested subtypes. We then identified six sets of classifiers that can be used to assign any given glioma to the corresponding subtype and validated these classifiers using both internal (189 additional independent samples) and two external data sets (341 patients). Application of the classification system to the external glioma data sets allowed us to identify previously unrecognized prognostic groups within previously published data and within The Cancer Genome Atlas glioblastoma samples and the different biological pathways associated with the different glioma subtypes offering a potential clue to the pathogenesis and possibly therapeutic targets for tumors within each subtype.

  6. Association between Prediagnostic Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration and Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zigmont, Victoria; Garrett, Amy; Peng, Jin; Seweryn, Michal; Rempala, Grzegorz A.; Harris, Randall; Holloman, Christopher; Gundersen, Thomas E.; Ahlbom, Anders; Feychting, Maria; Johannesen, Tom Borge; Grimsrud, Tom Kristian; Schwartzbaum, Judith

    2016-01-01

    There are no previous studies of the association between prediagnostic serum vitamin D concentration and glioma. Vitamin D has immunosuppressive properties; as does glioma. It was, therefore, our hypothesis that elevated vitamin D concentration would increase glioma risk. We conducted a nested case–control study using specimens from the Janus Serum Bank cohort in Norway. Blood donors who were subsequently diagnosed with glioma (n = 592), between 1974 and 2007, were matched to donors without glioma (n = 1112) on date and age at blood collection and sex. We measured 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), an indicator of vitamin D availability, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Seasonally adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were estimated for each control quintile of 25(OH)D using conditional logistic regression. Among men diagnosed with high grade glioma >56, we found a negative trend (P=.04). Men diagnosed ≤ 56 showed a borderline positive trend (P=.08). High levels (>66 nmol/L) of 25(OH)D in men > 56 were inversely related to high grade glioma from ≥ 2 years before diagnosis (OR=0.59; 95%CI=0.38,0.91) to ≥ 15 years before diagnosis (OR=0.61; 95%CI=0.38,0.96). Our findings are consistent long before glioma diagnosis and are therefore unlikely to reflect preclinical disease. PMID:26317248

  7. [Occurrence and molecular pathology of high grade gliomas].

    PubMed

    Murnyák, Balázs; Csonka, Tamás; Hegyi, Katalin; Méhes, Gábor; Klekner, Almos; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2013-09-30

    Glial tumours represent the most frequent type of primary brain cancers. Gliomas are characterized by heterogeneity that makes the diagnosis, histological classification and the choosing of correct therapy more difficult. Despite the advances in developing therapeutic strategies patients with malignant gliomas have a poor prognosis; therefore glial tumours represent one of the most important areas of cancer research. There are no detailed data on the epidemiology of gliomas in Hungary. In the first section of our publication, we analysed the histological diagnosed cases between 2007 and 2011 at the Institute of Pathology, University of Debrecen Medical and Health Science Centre. We analyzed the incidence of 214 high-grade gliomas by tumor grades, gender, age, and the anatomical localization. The majority of cases were glioblastoma (182 cases), and the remaining 32 cases were anaplastic gliomas. The mean age of patients was 57 years (+/- 16.4), and the male:female ratio was 1.1:1. The most frequent area of tumors was the frontal lobe followed by the temporal, parietal and occipital lobe. We include new findings published recently about glioma pathogenesis, molecular pathways, mutant genes and chromosomal regions. We explain briefly the role of selected important genes in glioma genesis and give an update on knowledge provided by modern molecular methods, which could beneficially influence future therapy and the diagnosis of gliomas.

  8. A role for ion channels in perivascular glioma invasion

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Emily G.

    2017-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are devastating tumors, frequently killing those diagnosed in little over a year. The profuse infiltration of glioma cells into healthy tissue surrounding the main tumor mass is one of the major obstacles limiting the improvement of patient survival. Migration along the abluminal side of blood vessels is one of the salient features of glioma cell invasion. Invading glioma cells are attracted to the vascular network, in part by the neuro-peptide bradykinin, where glioma cells actively modify the gliovascular interface and undergo volumetric alterations to navigate the confined space. Critical to these volume modifications is a proposed hydrodynamic model that involves the flux of ions in and out of the cell, followed by osmotically obligated water. Ion and water channels expressed by the glioma cell are essential in this model of invasion and make opportune therapeutic targets. Lastly, there is growing evidence that vascular-associated glioma cells are able to control the vascular tone, presumably to free up space for invasion and growth. The unique mechanisms that enable perivascular glioma invasion may offer critical targets for therapeutic intervention in this devastating disease. Indeed, a chloride channel-blocking peptide has already been successfully tested in human clinical trials. PMID:27424110

  9. Association Between Prediagnostic Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration and Glioma.

    PubMed

    Zigmont, Victoria; Garrett, Amy; Peng, Jin; Seweryn, Michal; Rempala, Grzegorz A; Harris, Randall; Holloman, Christopher; Gundersen, Thomas E; Ahlbom, Anders; Feychting, Maria; Johannesen, Tom Borge; Grimsrud, Tom Kristian; Schwartzbaum, Judith

    2015-01-01

    There are no previous studies of the association between prediagnostic serum vitamin D concentration and glioma. Vitamin D has immunosuppressive properties; as does glioma. It was, therefore, our hypothesis that elevated vitamin D concentration would increase glioma risk. We conducted a nested case-control study using specimens from the Janus Serum Bank cohort in Norway. Blood donors who were subsequently diagnosed with glioma (n = 592), between 1974 and 2007, were matched to donors without glioma (n = 1112) on date and age at blood collection and sex. We measured 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], an indicator of vitamin D availability, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Seasonally adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated for each control quintile of 25(OH)D using conditional logistic regression. Among men diagnosed with high grade glioma >56, we found a negative trend (P = .04). Men diagnosed ≤ 56 showed a borderline positive trend (P = .08). High levels (>66 nmol/L) of 25(OH)D in men >56 were inversely related to high grade glioma from ≥2 yr before diagnosis (OR = 0.59; 95% CI = 0.38, 0.91) to ≥15 yr before diagnosis (OR = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.38,0.96). Our findings are consistent long before glioma diagnosis and are therefore unlikely to reflect preclinical disease.

  10. Cystoid angiocentric glioma: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Sainan; Lü, Yubo; Xu, Shangchen; Liu, Qiang; Lee, Pearlene

    2015-01-01

    Angiocentric glioma is a rare subtype of neuroepithelial tumor that is associated with a history of epilepsy. We report a case of cystoid angiocentric glioma associated with an area of calcification. This 25 year old male patient presented with tonic clonic spasm. He underwent craniotomy with complete resection of the lesion. Pathologic specimen showed monomorphous bipolar cells with angiocentric growth pattern. PMID:26629293

  11. A cadherin switch underlies malignancy in high-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Appolloni, I; Barilari, M; Caviglia, S; Gambini, E; Reisoli, E; Malatesta, P

    2015-04-09

    Although the infiltrative behavior of malignant gliomas is one of their most critical aspects, the mechanisms underlying it have not yet been elucidated. To migrate in the brain parenchyma, malignant glioma cells need to bypass the cell-cell contact inhibitory signals. Here we propose that the blinding of cell-cell contact sensing in gliomas is caused by an unusual mechanism of cadherin switch, involving the replacement of N-cadherin with R-cadherin (Rcad) at the cell-cell junctions and the activation of ERK and p27. In our model of malignant glioma, we found that Rcad expression is necessary and sufficient to release cells from contact inhibition of proliferation, and is necessary, although not sufficient, for overriding contact inhibition of migration and for tumorigenicity. Altogether, these observations suggest that Rcad is a potential target for malignant glioma therapies.

  12. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Rishi R.; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  13. Glioma coexisting with angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhui; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Chunlei; He, Jianqing; Li, Peipei; Zhou, Jingxu; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yuhai

    2016-01-01

    Angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation (AOVM) is a type of complex cerebrovascular malformation that is not visible on digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Vascular malformation coexisting with glioma is clinically rare, and glioma coexisting with AOVM is even more rare. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report glioma coexisting with AOVM in the literature. The present study reports a rare case of glioma coexisting with AOVM in a 30-year-old male patient. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed calcification, hemorrhage and edema in the right frontal lobe. CT angiography revealed a vascular malformation in the right frontal lobe, which was not observed on DSA. Finally, glioma coexisting with AOVM was confirmed by 2.0T magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative pathological examination. The present patient had a positive outcome and no neurological dysfunctions during the 6-month follow-up subsequent to surgery. PMID:27698825

  14. Androglobin knockdown inhibits growth of glioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Lu, Yi-Sheng; Li, Xia; Zhu, Zhi-Chuan; Li, Kui; Liu, Ji-Wei; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Ze-Lan

    2014-01-01

    Globin family was famous for oxygen supply function of its members such as hemoglobin and myoglobin. With the progress of research, several members of this protein family have been proven to play roles in tumors including glioma. Androglobin (ADGB) is a recently identified member of globin family with very few studies about its function. In the present study, we show that ADGB plays an oncogene role in glioma. Lentiviral vector mediated ADGB knockdown inhibited the proliferation of glioma cell lines determined by MTT assay and colony formation assay. ADGB knockdown also increased the apoptosis of glioma cell line U251 assessed by flow cytometry. In addition, western blot showed that ADGB knockdown altered levels of several proteins related to proliferation, survival or apoptosis in U251 cells. These findings suggest ADGB is involved in the progression of glioma in vitro. PMID:24966926

  15. Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaem, Hossein Y.; Ahmadian, Alireza; Saberi, Hooshangh; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Khodadad, Davood

    2011-10-01

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  16. Expression of the galectin-9-Tim-3 pathway in glioma tissues is associated with the clinical manifestations of glioma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengjin; Han, Huamin; He, Xin; Li, Shouwei; Wu, Chenxing; Yu, Chunjiang; Wang, Shengdian

    2016-03-01

    Glioma is known to induce local and systemic immunosuppression, which inhibits antitumor T cell responses. The galectin-9-Tim-3-pathway negatively regulates T cell pathways in the tumor immunosuppressive environment. The present study assessed the expression of Tim-3 and galectin-9 in glioma patients, and evaluated the association between the expression of Tim-3 and galectin-9 with clinical characteristics. The present study identified that Tim-3 expression was significantly increased in peripheral blood T cells of glioma patients compared with those of healthy controls, and was additionally increased on tumor-infiltrating T cells. The expression of Tim-3 on tumor-infiltrating T cells was associated with the World Health Organization (WHO) grade of glioma, but negatively correlated with the Karnofsky Performance Status score of the glioma patients. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of galectin-9 in tumor tissues was associated with Tim-3 expression on tumor-infiltrating T cells and the WHO grade of glioma. These findings suggest that the galectin-9-Tim-3 pathway may be critical in the immunoevasion of glioma and may be a potent target for immunotherapy in glioma patients.

  17. Clinical significance of vasculogenic mimicry in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Qing-ping; Mu, Yong-gao; Zhang, Xiang-hen; Sai, Ke; Pang, Jesse Chung-Sean; Ng, Ho-Keung; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2011-11-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is known as non-endothelial tumor cell-lined microvascular channels in aggressive tumors. We have previously found the presence of VM in high-grade gliomas. In this study, we aimed to identify VM patterns in gliomas and to explore their clinical significance. Tumor samples as well as their detailed clinical/prognostic data were collected from 101 patients. Vasculogenic mimicry in the glioma samples was determined by dual staining for endothelial marker CD34 and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). Tumor samples were also immunohistochemically stained for Ki-67, VEGF, COX-2 and MMP-9. The association between VM and the clinical characteristics of the patients were analyzed. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were performed to compare survival times of the patients. Vasculogenic mimicry was present in 13 out of 101 samples. The higher grade gliomas had a higher incidence of VM than that of lower grade gliomas (P = 0.006). Vasculogenic mimicry channels were associated with the expression of COX-2 and MMP-9 (P < 0.05). While there was no association between the existence of VM and the sex, age and preoperative epilepsy of the patients, or expression of Ki-67 and VEGF. However, patients with VM-positive gliomas survived a shorter period of time than those with VM negative gliomas (P = 0.027). Interestingly, in high-grade gliomas, the level of microvascular density was lower in VM positive tumors than those VM negative tumors (P = 0.039). Our results suggest that VM channels in gliomas correlate with increasing malignancy and higher aggressiveness, and may provide a complementation to the tumor's blood supply, especially in less vascularized regions, which may aid in the identification of glioma patients with a poorer prognosis.

  18. Morbidity profile following aggressive resection of parietal lobe gliomas.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Nader; Martino, Juan; Berger, Mitchel S

    2012-06-01

    The impact of parietal lobe gliomas is typically studied in the context of parietal lobe syndromes. However, critical language pathways traverse the parietal lobe and are susceptible during tumor resection. The authors of this study reviewed their experience with parietal gliomas to characterize the impact of resection and the morbidity associated with language. The study population included adults who had undergone resection of parietal gliomas of all grades. Tumor location was identified according to a proposed classification system for parietal region gliomas. Low- and high-grade tumors were volumetrically analyzed using FLAIR and T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR imaging. One hundred nineteen patients with parietal gliomas were identified--34 with low-grade gliomas and 85 with high-grade gliomas. The median patient age was 45 years, and most patients (53) presented with seizures, whereas only 4 patients had an appreciable parietal lobe syndrome. The median preoperative tumor volume was 31.3 cm(3), the median extent of resection was 96%, and the median postoperative tumor volume was 0.9 cm(3). Surprisingly, the most common early postoperative neurological deficit was dysphasia (16 patients), not weakness (12 patients), sensory deficits (14 patients), or parietal lobe syndrome (10 patients). A proposed parietal glioma classification system, based on surgical anatomy, was predictive of language deficits. This is the largest reported experience with parietal lobe gliomas. The findings suggested that parietal language pathways are compromised at a surprisingly high rate. The proposed parietal glioma classification system is predictive of postoperative morbidity associated with language and can assist with preoperative planning. Taken together, these data emphasize the value of identifying language pathways when operating within the parietal lobe.

  19. The Glioma International Case-Control Study: A Report From the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Amirian, E. Susan; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Zhou, Renke; Lau, Ching C.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel; Olson, Sara H.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Merrell, Ryan T.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Davis, Faith G.; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Aldape, Kenneth; Alafuzoff, Irina; Brännström, Thomas; Broholm, Helle; Collins, Peter; Giannini, Caterina; Rosenblum, Marc; Tihan, Tarik; Melin, Beatrice S.; Bondy, Melissa L.

    2016-01-01

    Decades of research have established only a few etiological factors for glioma, which is a rare and highly fatal brain cancer. Common methodological challenges among glioma studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity of tumor subtypes, and retrospective exposure assessment. Here, we briefly describe the Glioma International Case-Control (GICC) Study (recruitment, 2010–2013), a study being conducted by the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium that integrates data from multiple data collection sites, uses a common protocol and questionnaire, and includes biospecimen collection. To our knowledge, the GICC Study is the largest glioma study to date that includes collection of blood samples, which will allow for genetic analysis and interrogation of gene-environment interactions. PMID:26656478

  20. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hikaru; Hayashi, Saeko; Hattori, Natsuki; Kumon, Masanobu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs) of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, -9p, and -11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas.

  1. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hikaru; Hayashi, Saeko; Hattori, Natsuki; Kumon, Masanobu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs) of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, −9p, and −11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas. PMID:26558387

  2. Metronomic Doses of Temozolomide Enhance the Efficacy of Carbon Nanotube CpG Immunotherapy in an Invasive Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qin; Zhang, Ian; Gao, Hang; Yanyan, Song; Chen, Xuebo; Weng, Yiming; Da Fonseca, Anna; Shah, Sunny; Manuel, Edwin R.; Zhang, Leying; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Alizadeh, Darya; Berlin, Jacob M.; Badie, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Even when treated with aggressive current therapies, most patients with glioblastoma survive less than two years. Rapid tumor growth, an invasive nature, and the blood-brain barrier, which limits the penetration of large molecules into the brain, all contribute to the poor tumor response associated with conventional therapies. Immunotherapy has emerged as a therapeutic approach that may overcome these challenges. We recently reported that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be used to dramatically increase the immunotherapeutic efficacy of CpG oligonucleotides in a mouse model of glioma. Following implantation in the mouse brain, the tumor cell line used in these previous studies (GL261) tends to form a spherical tumor with limited invasion into healthy brain. In order to evaluate SWCNT/CpG therapy under more clinically-relevant conditions, here we report the treatment of a more invasive mouse glioma model (K-Luc) that better recapitulates human disease. In addition, a CpG sequence previously tested in humans was used to formulate the SWCNT/CpG which was combined with temozolomide, the standard of care chemotherapy for glioblastoma patients. We found that, following two intracranial administrations, SWCNT/CpG is well-tolerated and improves the survival of mice bearing invasive gliomas. Interestingly, the efficacy of SWCNT/CpG was enhanced when combined with temozolomide. This enhanced anti-tumor efficacy was correlated to an increase of tumor-specific cytotoxic activity in splenocytes. These results reinforce the emerging understanding that immunotherapy can be enhanced by combining it with chemotherapy and support the continued development of SWCNT/CpG. PMID:26829221

  3. Metronomic Doses of Temozolomide Enhance the Efficacy of Carbon Nanotube CpG Immunotherapy in an Invasive Glioma Model.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Mao; White, Ethan E; Ren, Hui; Guo, Qin; Zhang, Ian; Gao, Hang; Yanyan, Song; Chen, Xuebo; Weng, Yiming; Da Fonseca, Anna; Shah, Sunny; Manuel, Edwin R; Zhang, Leying; Vonderfecht, Steven L; Alizadeh, Darya; Berlin, Jacob M; Badie, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Even when treated with aggressive current therapies, most patients with glioblastoma survive less than two years. Rapid tumor growth, an invasive nature, and the blood-brain barrier, which limits the penetration of large molecules into the brain, all contribute to the poor tumor response associated with conventional therapies. Immunotherapy has emerged as a therapeutic approach that may overcome these challenges. We recently reported that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be used to dramatically increase the immunotherapeutic efficacy of CpG oligonucleotides in a mouse model of glioma. Following implantation in the mouse brain, the tumor cell line used in these previous studies (GL261) tends to form a spherical tumor with limited invasion into healthy brain. In order to evaluate SWCNT/CpG therapy under more clinically-relevant conditions, here we report the treatment of a more invasive mouse glioma model (K-Luc) that better recapitulates human disease. In addition, a CpG sequence previously tested in humans was used to formulate the SWCNT/CpG which was combined with temozolomide, the standard of care chemotherapy for glioblastoma patients. We found that, following two intracranial administrations, SWCNT/CpG is well-tolerated and improves the survival of mice bearing invasive gliomas. Interestingly, the efficacy of SWCNT/CpG was enhanced when combined with temozolomide. This enhanced anti-tumor efficacy was correlated to an increase of tumor-specific cytotoxic activity in splenocytes. These results reinforce the emerging understanding that immunotherapy can be enhanced by combining it with chemotherapy and support the continued development of SWCNT/CpG.

  4. Number of glioma polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) associated with vasculogenic mimicry formation and tumor grade in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) contribute to solid tumor heterogeneity. This study investigated the relationships among PGCCs numbers, vasculogenic mimicry (VM) formation, and tumor grades in glioma. Methods A total of 76 paraffin-embedded glioma tissue samples, including 28 cases of low grade and 48 cases of high grade gliomas, were performed with H&E and immunohistochemical staining for Ki-67 and hemoglobin. The size of PGCCs nuclei was measured by a micrometer using H&E section and defined as at least three times larger than the nuclei of regular diploid cancer cells. The number of PGCCs and different blood supply patterns were compared in different grade gliomas. Microcirculation patterns in tumors were assessed using CD31 immunohistochemical and PAS histochemical double staining. Human glioma cancer cell line C6 was injected into the chicken embryonating eggs to form xenografts, which was used to observe the PGCCs and microcirculation patterns. Results In human glioma, the number of PGCCs increased with the grade of tumors (χ2 = 4.781, P = 0.015). There were three kinds of microcirculation pattern in human glioma including VM, mosaic vessel (MV) and endothelium dependent vessel. PGCCs were able to generate erythrocytes via budding to form VM. The walls of VM were positive (or negative) for PAS staining and negative for CD31 staining. There were more VM and MVs in high grade gliomas than those in low grade gliomas. The differences have statistical significances for VM (t = 3.745, P = 0.000) and MVs (t = 4.789, P = 0.000). PGCCs, VM and MVs can also be observed in C6 chicken embryonating eggs xenografts. Conclusions The data demonstrated presence of PGCCs, VM and MVs in glioma and PGCCs generating erythrocytes contribute the formation of VM and MVs. PMID:24422894

  5. The ketogenic diet for the treatment of glioma: insights from genetic profiling.

    PubMed

    Scheck, Adrienne C; Abdelwahab, Mohammed G; Fenton, Kathryn E; Stafford, Phillip

    2012-07-01

    Seizures, particularly first onset seizures in adults, are a diagnostic hallmark of brain tumors (Giglio and Villano, 2010). Unfortunately, malignant brain tumors are almost uniformly fatal due, in part, to the limitations of available therapies. Improvement in the survival of brain cancer patients requires the design of new therapeutic modalities including those that enhance currently available therapies. One potential strategy is to exploit differences in metabolic regulation between normal cells and tumor cells through dietary approaches. Previous studies have shown that a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) extends survival in animal models of glioma; however, the mechanism for this effect is not entirely known. We examined the effects of an experimental KD on a mouse model of glioma, and compared patterns of gene expression in tumors versus contralateral non-tumor containing brain from animals fed either a KD or a standard diet. We found that the KD reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in tumor cells. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that the KD induces an overall reversion to expression patterns seen in non-tumor specimens, and a number of genes involved in modulating ROS levels and oxidative stress were altered in tumor cells. In addition, there was reduced expression of genes involved in signal transduction from growth factors known to be involved in glioma growth. These results suggest that the anti-tumor effect of the KD is multifactorial, and elucidation of genes whose expression is altered will help identify mechanisms through which ketones inhibit tumor growth, reduce seizure activity and provide neuroprotection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase That Target Chemoresistant Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Claudia R; Markert, Tahireh; Ross, Larry J; White, E Lucile; Rasmussen, Lynn; Zhang, Wei; Everts, Maaike; Moellering, Douglas R; Bailey, Shannon M; Suto, Mark J; Griguer, Corinne E

    2016-11-11

    The enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) or complex IV (EC 1.9.3.1) is a large transmembrane protein complex that serves as the last enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain of eukaryotic mitochondria. CcO promotes the switch from glycolytic to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) metabolism and has been associated with increased self-renewal characteristics in gliomas. Increased CcO activity in tumors has been associated with tumor progression after chemotherapy failure, and patients with primary glioblastoma multiforme and high tumor CcO activity have worse clinical outcomes than those with low tumor CcO activity. Therefore, CcO is an attractive target for cancer therapy. We report here the characterization of a CcO inhibitor (ADDA 5) that was identified using a high throughput screening paradigm. ADDA 5 demonstrated specificity for CcO, with no inhibition of other mitochondrial complexes or other relevant enzymes, and biochemical characterization showed that this compound is a non-competitive inhibitor of cytochrome c When tested in cellular assays, ADDA 5 dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of chemosensitive and chemoresistant glioma cells but did not display toxicity against non-cancer cells. Furthermore, treatment with ADDA 5 led to significant inhibition of tumor growth in flank xenograft mouse models. Importantly, ADDA 5 inhibited CcO activity and blocked cell proliferation and neurosphere formation in cultures of glioma stem cells, the cells implicated in tumor recurrence and resistance to therapy in patients with glioblastoma. In summary, we have identified ADDA 5 as a lead CcO inhibitor for further optimization as a novel approach for the treatment of glioblastoma and related cancers.

  7. SURVIVAL ADVANTAGE COMBINING A BRAF INHIBITOR AND RADIATION IN BRAF V600E-MUTANT GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Tina; Olow, Aleksandra K.; Yang, Xiaodong; Hashizume, Rintaro; Tom, Maxwell; Aoki, Yasuyuki; Berger, Mitchel S.; Weiss, William A.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Prados, Michael; James, C. David; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation (RT) is critical to the treatment of high-grade gliomas (HGGs) but cures remain elusive. The BRAF mutation V600E is critical to the pathogenesis of 10–20% of pediatric gliomas, and a small proportion of adult HGGs. Here we aim to determine whether PLX4720, a specific BRAF V600E inhibitor, enhances the activity of radiation (RT) in human HGGs in vitro and in vivo. Methods Patient-derived HGG lines harboring wild-type BRAF or BRAF V600E were assessed in vitro to determine IC50 values, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence and elucidate mechanisms of combinatorial activity. A BRAF V600E HGG intracranial xenograft mouse model was used to evaluate in vivo combinatorial efficacy of PLX4720+RT. Tumors were harvested for immunohistochemistry to quantify cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Results RT+PLX4720 exhibited greater anti-tumor effects than either monotherapy in BRAF V600E but not in BRAF WT lines. In vitro studies showed increased Annexin V and decreased S phase cells in BRAF V600E gliomas treated with PLX4720+RT, but no significant changes in β-galactosidase levels. In vivo, concurrent and sequential PLX4720+RT each significantly prolonged survival compared to monotherapies, in the BRAF V600E HGG model. Immunohistochemistry of in vivo tumors demonstrated that PLX4720+RT decreased Ki-67 and phospho-MAPK, and increased γH2AX and p21 compared to control mice. Conclusions BRAF V600E inhibition enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in BRAF V600E-mutated HGGs, in vitro and in vivo, effects likely mediated by apoptosis and cell cycle, but not senescence. These studies provide the pre-clinical rationale for clinical trials of concurrent radiotherapy and BRAF V600E inhibitors. PMID:26384810

  8. Survival advantage combining a BRAF inhibitor and radiation in BRAF V600E-mutant glioma.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Tina; Olow, Aleksandra K; Yang, Xiaodong; Hashizume, Rintaro; Nicolaides, Theodore P; Tom, Maxwell; Aoki, Yasuyuki; Berger, Mitchel S; Weiss, William A; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Prados, Michael; James, C David; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A

    2016-02-01

    Radiation (RT) is critical to the treatment of high-grade gliomas (HGGs) but cures remain elusive. The BRAF mutation V600E is critical to the pathogenesis of 10-20% of pediatric gliomas, and a small proportion of adult HGGs. Here we aim to determine whether PLX4720, a specific BRAF V600E inhibitor, enhances the activity of RT in human HGGs in vitro and in vivo. Patient-derived HGG lines harboring wild-type BRAF or BRAF V600E were assessed in vitro to determine IC50 values, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence and elucidate mechanisms of combinatorial activity. A BRAF V600E HGG intracranial xenograft mouse model was used to evaluate in vivo combinatorial efficacy of PLX4720+RT. Tumors were harvested for immunohistochemistry to quantify cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. RT+PLX4720 exhibited greater anti-tumor effects than either monotherapy in BRAF V600E but not in BRAF WT lines. In vitro studies showed increased Annexin V and decreased S phase cells in BRAF V600E gliomas treated with PLX4720+RT, but no significant changes in β-galactosidase levels. In vivo, concurrent and sequential PLX4720+RT each significantly prolonged survival compared to monotherapies, in the BRAF V600E HGG model. Immunohistochemistry of in vivo tumors demonstrated that PLX4720+RT decreased Ki-67 and phospho-MAPK, and increased γH2AX and p21 compared to control mice. BRAF V600E inhibition enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in BRAF V600E-mutated HGGs, in vitro and in vivo, effects likely mediated by apoptosis and cell cycle, but not senescence. These studies provide the pre-clinical rationale for clinical trials of concurrent radiotherapy and BRAF V600E inhibitors.

  9. Adoptive cell transfer therapy for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Eiichi; Takano, Shingo; Ohno, Tadao; Tsuboi, Koji

    2012-01-01

    To date, various adoptive immunotherapies have been attempted for treatment of malignant gliomas using nonspecific and/or specific effector cells. Since the late 1980s, with the development of rIL-2, the efficacy of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell therapy with or without rIL-2 for malignant gliomas had been tested with some modifications in therapeutic protocols. With advancements in technology, ex vivo expanded tumor specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) or those lineages were used in clinical trials with higher tumor response rates. In addition, combinations of those adoptive cell transfer using LAK cells, CTLs or natural killer (NK) cells with autologous tumor vaccine (ATV) therapy were attempted. Also, a strategy of high-dose (or lymphodepleting) chemotherapy followed by adoptive cell transfer has been drawing attentions recently. The most important role of these clinical studies using cell therapy was to prove that these ex vivo expanded effector cells could kill tumor cells in vivo. Although recent clinical results could demonstrate radiologic tumor shrinkage in a number of cases, cell transfer therapy alone has been utilized less frequently, because of the high cost of ex vivo cell expansion, the short duration of antitumor activity in vivo, and the recent shift of interest to vaccine immunotherapy. Nevertheless, NK cell therapy using specific feeder cells or allergenic NK cell lines have potentials to be a good choice of treatment because of easy ex vivo expansion and their efficacy especially when combined with vaccine therapy as they are complementary to each other. Also, further studies are expected to clarify the efficacy of the high-dose chemotherapy followed by a large scale cell transfer therapy as a new therapeutic strategy for malignant gliomas.

  10. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  11. Gene therapy for high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of high-grade gliomas remains difficult despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. True advances may emerge from the increasing understanding in molecular biology and discovery of novel mechanisms for the delivery of tumoricidal agents. In an attempt to overcome this formidable neoplasm, molecular approaches using gene therapy have been investigated clinically since 1992. The clinical trials have mainly been classified into three approaches: suicide gene therapy, immune gene therapy and oncolytic viral therapy. In this article, we review these approaches, which have been studied in previous and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:19262115

  12. Enhancement of 5-aminolevulinic acid-based fluorescence detection of side population-defined glioma stem cells by iron chelation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenqian; Tabu, Kouichi; Hagiya, Yuichiro; Sugiyama, Yuta; Kokubu, Yasuhiro; Murota, Yoshitaka; Ogura, Shun-ichiro; Taga, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are dominantly responsible for tumor progression and chemo/radio-resistance, resulting in tumor recurrence. 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is metabolized to fluorescent protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) specifically in tumor cells, and therefore clinically used as a reagent for photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and therapy (PDT) of cancers including gliomas. However, it remains to be clarified whether this method could be effective for CSC detection. Here, using flow cytometry-based analysis, we show that side population (SP)-defined C6 glioma CSCs (GSCs) displayed much less 5-ALA-derived PpIX fluorescence than non-GSCs. Among the C6 GSCs, cells with ultralow PpIX fluorescence exhibited dramatically higher tumorigenicity when transplanted into the immune-deficient mouse brain. We further demonstrated that the low PpIX accumulation in the C6 GSCs was enhanced by deferoxamine (DFO)-mediated iron chelation, not by reserpine-mediated inhibition of PpIX-effluxing ABCG2. Finally, we found that the expression level of the gene for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a heme degradation enzyme, was high in C6 GSCs, which was further up-regulated when treated with 5-ALA. Our results provide important new insights into 5-ALA-based PDD of gliomas, particularly photodetection of SP-defined GSCs by iron chelation based on their ALA-PpIX-Heme metabolism. PMID:28169355

  13. Inositol-requiring enzyme 1α is a key regulator of angiogenesis and invasion in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Auf, Gregor; Jabouille, Arnaud; Guérit, Sylvaine; Pineau, Raphaël; Delugin, Maylis; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Magnin, Noël; Favereaux, Alexandre; Maitre, Marlène; Gaiser, Timo; von Deimling, Andreas; Czabanka, Marcus; Vajkoczy, Peter; Chevet, Eric; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Moenner, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) is a proximal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress sensor and a central mediator of the unfolded protein response. In a human glioma model, inhibition of IRE1α correlated with down-regulation of prevalent proangiogenic factors such as VEGF-A, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8. Significant up-regulation of antiangiogenic gene transcripts was also apparent. These transcripts encode SPARC, decorin, thrombospondin-1, and other matrix proteins functionally linked to mesenchymal differentiation and glioma invasiveness. In vivo, using both the chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay and a mouse orthotopic brain model, we observed in tumors underexpressing IRE1: (i) reduction of angiogenesis and blood perfusion, (ii) a decreased growth rate, and (iii) extensive invasiveness and blood vessel cooption. This phenotypic change was consistently associated with increased overall survival in glioma-implanted recipient mice. Ectopic expression of IL-6 in IRE1-deficient tumors restored angiogenesis and neutralized vessel cooption but did not reverse the mesenchymal/infiltrative cell phenotype. The ischemia-responsive IRE1 protein is thus identified as a key regulator of tumor neovascularization and invasiveness. PMID:20702765

  14. The cyclic AMP pathway is a sex-specific modifier of glioma risk in type 1 neurofibromatosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Nicole M.; Sun, Tao; Luo, Jingqin; McKinstry, Robert C.; Parkin, Patricia C.; Ganzhorn, Sara; Spoljaric, Debra; Albers, Anne C.; Merkelson, Amanda; Stewart, Douglas R.; Stevenson, David A.; Viskochil, David; Druley, Todd E.; Forys, Jason T; Reilly, Karlyne M.; Fisher, Michael J.; Tabori, Uri; Allen, Jeffrey C.; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Gutmann, David H.; Rubin, Joshua B.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying modifiers of glioma risk in patients with type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1) could help support personalized tumor surveillance, advance understanding of gliomagenesis and potentially identify novel therapeutic targets. Here we report genetic polymorphisms in the human adenylate cyclase gene ADCY8 which correlate with glioma risk in NF1 in a sex-specific manner, elevating risk in females while reducing risk in males. This finding extends earlier evidence of a role for cAMP in gliomagenesis based on results in a genetically engineered mouse model (Nf1 GEM). Thus, sexually dimorphic cAMP signaling might render males and females differentially sensitive to variation in cAMP levels. Using male and female Nf1 GEM, we found significant sex differences exist in cAMP regulation and in the growth promoting effects of cAMP suppression. Overall, our results establish a sex-specific role for cAMP regulation in human gliomagenesis, specifically identifying ADCY8 as a modifier of glioma risk in NF1. PMID:25381154

  15. Tipifarnib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, or Brain Stem Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  16. Telomere maintenance and the etiology of adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Wiencke, John K; Lachance, Daniel H; Wiemels, Joseph L; Molinaro, Annette M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2015-11-01

    A growing body of epidemiologic and tumor genomic research has identified an important role for telomere maintenance in glioma susceptibility, initiation, and prognosis. Telomere length has long been investigated in relation to cancer, but whether longer or shorter telomere length might be associated with glioma risk has remained elusive. Recent data address this question and are reviewed here. Common inherited variants near the telomerase-component genes TERC and TERT are associated both with longer telomere length and increased risk of glioma. Exome sequencing of glioma patients from families with multiple affected members has identified rare inherited mutations in POT1 (protection of telomeres protein 1) as high-penetrance glioma risk factors. These heritable POT1 mutations are also associated with increased telomere length in leukocytes. Tumor sequencing studies further indicate that acquired somatic mutations of TERT and ATRX are among the most frequent alterations found in adult gliomas. These mutations facilitate telomere lengthening, thus bypassing a critical mechanism of apoptosis. Although future research is needed, mounting evidence suggests that glioma is, at least in part, a disease of telomere dysregulation. Specifically, several inherited and acquired variants underlying gliomagenesis affect telomere pathways and are also associated with increased telomere length. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Glioma epidemiology in the central Tunisian population: 1993-2012.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Saoussen; Brahim, Dorra H'mida-Ben; Ladib, Mohamed; Mama, Nadia; Harrabi, Imed; Tlili, Kalthoum; Yacoubi, Mohamed Tahar; Krifa, Hedi; Hmissa, Sihem; Saad, Ali; Mokni, Moncef

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is a heterogeneous central nervous system (CNS) tumor group that encompasses different histological subtypes with high variability in prognosis. The lesions account for almost 80% of primary malignant brain tumors. The aim of this study is to extend our understanding of the glioma epidemiology in the central Tunisian region. We analyzed 393 gliomas recorded in cancer registry of central Tunisia from 1993 to 2012. Crude incidence rates (CR) and world age-standardized rates (ASR) were estimated using annual population data size and age structure. Statistic correlations were established using Chi-square and Kaplan-Meier test. Tunisian glioma patients were identified with a mean age at diagnosis of 48 years and 1.5 sex ratio (male/female). During the 19 years period of study the highest incidence value was observed in male group between 1998 and 2002 (CR: 0.28, ASR: 0.3). Incidence results underline increasing high grade glioma occurring in the adulthood in the last period (2007-2012). Median survival was 27 months, with 1-, 2- and 5-year survival rates of 42%, 30% and 26%, respectively. Survival was greater in patients with younger age, lower tumor grade, infratentrial tumor location and undergoing a palliative treatment. This central Tunisia gliomas registry study provides important information that could improve glioma management and healthcare practice.

  18. Long noncoding RNA profiles reveal three molecular subtypes in glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Qian, Jin; Wang, Ying-Yi; Zhang, Jun-Xia; You, Yong-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Gliomas are the most lethal type of primary brain tumor in adult. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are involved in the progression of various cancers, may offer a potential gene therapy target in glioma. We first classified gliomas into three molecular subtypes (namely LncR1, LncR2 and LncR3) in Rembrandt dataset using consensus clustering. Survival analysis indicated that LncR3 had the best prognosis, while the LncR1 subtype showed the poorest overall survival rate. The results were further validated in an independent glioma dataset GSE16011. Additionally, we collected and merged data of the two databases (Rembrandt and GSE16011 dataset) and analyzed prognosis of each subtype in WHO II, III and IV gliomas. The similar results were obtained. Gene Set Variation Analysis (GSVA) demonstrated that LncR1 subtype enriched cultured astroglia's gene signature, while LncR2 subtype was characterized by neuronal gene signature. Oligodendrocytic was rich in LncR3. In addition, IDH1 mutation and 1p/19q LOH were found rich with LncR3, and EGFR amplification showed high percentage in LncR1 in GSE16011 dataset. We report a novel molecular classification of glioma based on lncRNA expression profiles and believe that it would provide a potential platform for future studies on gene treatment for glioma and lead to more individualized therapies to improve survival rates. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of nano-magnetic fluid on malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongsheng; Zong, Hailiang; Ma, Chong; Ming, Xing; Shang, Ming; Li, Kai; He, Xiaoguang; Cao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The temperature variation rule of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field and the effect on the treatment of malignant glioma were examined. The temperature variation of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field was investigated by heating in vitro, and cell morphology was observed through optical microscopy and electron microscopy. MTT detection also was used to detect the effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) on the proliferation of human U251 glioma cell line. The Fe3O4 nano MFH experiment was used to detect the inhibition rate of the tumor volume in nude mice with tumors. The results of the experiment showed that the heating ability of magnetic fluid was positively correlated with its concentration at the same intensity of the magnetic field. The results also indicated the prominent inhibitory effect of nanometer MFH on the proliferation of glioma cells, which was a dose-dependent relationship with nanometer magnetic fluid concentration. The hyperthermia experiment of nude mice with tumors displayed a significant inhibiting effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid in glioma volume. These results explain that iron (II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) nanometer MFH can inhibit the proliferation of U251 glioma cells, and has an obvious inhibitory effect on glioma volume, which plays a certain role in the treatment of brain glioma. PMID:28356945

  20. PRG3 induces Ras-dependent oncogenic cooperation in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Eduard; Chen, Daishi; Broggini, Thomas; Sehm, Tina; Majernik, Gökce Hatipoglu; Hock, Stefan W.; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are one of the most devastating cancers in humans. One characteristic hallmark of malignant gliomas is their cellular heterogeneity with frequent genetic lesions and disturbed gene expression levels conferring selective growth advantage. Here, we report on the neuronal-associated growth promoting gene PRG3 executing oncogenic cooperation in gliomas. We have identified perturbed PRG3 levels in human malignant brain tumors displaying either elevated or down-regulated PRG3 levels compared to non-transformed specimens. Further, imbalanced PRG3 levels in gliomas foster Ras-driven oncogenic amplification with increased proliferation and cell migration although angiogenesis was unaffected. Hence, PRG3 interacts with RasGEF1 (RasGRF1/CDC25), undergoes Ras-induced challenges, whereas deletion of the C-terminal domain of PRG3 (PRG3ΔCT) inhibits Ras. Moreover PRG3 silencing makes gliomas resistant to Ras inhibition. In vivo disequilibrated PRG3 gliomas show aggravated proliferation, invasion, and deteriorate clinical outcome. Thus, our data show that the interference with PRG3 homeostasis amplifies oncogenic properties and foster the malignancy potential in gliomas. PMID:27058420

  1. Understanding inherited genetic risk of adult glioma – a review

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Terri; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Francis, Stephen S.; Wiemels, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    During the past six years, researchers have made major progress identifying common inherited genetic variation that increases risk for primary adult glioma. This paper summarizes knowledge about rare familial cancer syndromes that include adult glioma and reviews the available literature on the more recently discovered common inherited variation. Ten independent inherited variants in eight chromosomal regions have been convincingly associated with increased risk for adult glioma. Most of these variants increase relative risk of primary adult glioma by 20% to 40%, but the TP53 variant rs78378222 confers a two-fold relative risk (ie, 200%), and rs557505857 on chromosome 8 confers a six-fold relative risk of IDH-mutated astrocytomas and oligodendroglial tumors (ie, 600%). Even with a six-fold relative risk, the overall risk of developing adult glioma is too low for screening for the high-risk variant on chromosome 8. Future studies will help clarify which inherited adult glioma risk variants are associated with subtypes defined by histology and/or acquired tumor mutations. This review also provides an information sheet for primary adult glioma patients and their families. PMID:26941959

  2. Understanding inherited genetic risk of adult glioma - a review.

    PubMed

    Rice, Terri; Lachance, Daniel H; Molinaro, Annette M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Walsh, Kyle M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Ostrom, Quinn T; Francis, Stephen S; Wiemels, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert B; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2016-03-01

    During the past six years, researchers have made major progress identifying common inherited genetic variation that increases risk for primary adult glioma. This paper summarizes knowledge about rare familial cancer syndromes that include adult glioma and reviews the available literature on the more recently discovered common inherited variation. Ten independent inherited variants in eight chromosomal regions have been convincingly associated with increased risk for adult glioma. Most of these variants increase relative risk of primary adult glioma by 20% to 40%, but the TP53 variant rs78378222 confers a two-fold relative risk (ie, 200%), and rs557505857 on chromosome 8 confers a six-fold relative risk of IDH-mutated astrocytomas and oligodendroglial tumors (ie, 600%). Even with a six-fold relative risk, the overall risk of developing adult glioma is too low for screening for the high-risk variant on chromosome 8. Future studies will help clarify which inherited adult glioma risk variants are associated with subtypes defined by histology and/or acquired tumor mutations. This review also provides an information sheet for primary adult glioma patients and their families.

  3. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group f polymorphisms influence risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong-Bin; Xie, Chen; Zhang, Ru-You; Hu, Shao-Shan; Wang, Zhi; Yue, Wu

    2013-01-01

    We conducted an exploratory investigation of whether variation in six common SNPs of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F (XPF) is associated with risk of glioma in a Chinese population. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 207 glioma cases and 236 cancer-free controls by a 384-well plate format on the Sequenom MassARRAY platform (Sequenom, San Diego, USA). The rs1800067 G and rs2276466 G allele frequencies were significantly higher in the glioma group than controls. Individuals with the rs1800067 GG genotype were at greater risk of glioma when compared with the A/A genotype in the codominant model, with an OR (95% CI) of 2.63 (1.04-7.25). The rs2276466 polymorphism was significantly associated with moderate increased risk of glioma in codominant and dominant models, with ORs (95% CI) of 1.90 (1.05-3.44) and 1.55 (1.07-2.47), respectively. The combination genotype of rs1800067 G and rs2276466 G alleles was associated with a reduced risk of glioma (OR=0.44, 95% CI=0.19-0.98). These findings indicate that genetic variants of the XPF gene have critical functions in the development of glioma.

  4. Hugl-1 inhibits glioma cell growth in intracranial model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejiao; Lu, Dong; Ma, Peng; Liu, Huaqiang; Cao, Yuewen; Sang, Ben; Zhu, Xianlong; Shi, Qiong; Hu, Jinxia; Yu, Rutong; Zhou, Xiuping

    2015-10-01

    Drosophila lethal (2) giant larvae (lgl) has been reported as a tumor suppressor and could regulate the Drosophila hippo signaling. Human giant larvae-1(Hugl-1), one human homologue of Drosophila lgl, also has been reported to be involved in the development of some human cancers. However, whether Hugl-1 is associated with the pathogenesis of malignant gliomas remains poorly understood. In the present work, we examined the effect of Hugl-1 on glioma cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Firstly, we found that Hugl-1 protein levels decreased in the human glioma tissues, suggesting that Hugl-1 is involved in glioma progression. Unfortunately, either stably or transiently over-expressing Hugl-1 did not affect glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In addition, Hugl-1 over-expression did not regulate hippo signaling pathway. Interestingly, over-expression of Hugl-1 not only inhibited gliomagenesis but also markedly inhibited cell proliferation and promoted the apoptosis of U251 cells in an orthotopic model of nude mice. Taken together, this study provides the evidence that Hugl-1 inhibits glioma cell growth in intracranial model of nude mice, suggesting that Hugl-1 might be a potential tumor target for glioma therapy.

  5. Identification of molecular pathways facilitating glioma cell invasion in situ.

    PubMed

    Nevo, Ido; Woolard, Kevin; Cam, Maggie; Li, Aiguo; Webster, Joshua D; Kotliarov, Yuri; Kim, Hong Sug; Ahn, Susie; Walling, Jennifer; Kotliarova, Svetlana; Belova, Galina; Song, Hua; Bailey, Rolanda; Zhang, Wei; Fine, Howard A

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are mostly incurable secondary to their diffuse infiltrative nature. Thus, specific therapeutic targeting of invasive glioma cells is an attractive concept. As cells exit the tumor mass and infiltrate brain parenchyma, they closely interact with a changing micro-environmental landscape that sustains tumor cell invasion. In this study, we used a unique microarray profiling approach on a human glioma stem cell (GSC) xenograft model to explore gene expression changes in situ in Invading Glioma Cells (IGCs) compared to tumor core, as well as changes in host cells residing within the infiltrated microenvironment relative to the unaffected cortex. IGCs were found to have reduced expression of genes within the extracellular matrix compartment, and genes involved in cell adhesion, cell polarity and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes. The infiltrated microenvironment showed activation of wound repair and tissue remodeling networks. We confirmed by protein analysis the downregulation of EMT and polarity related genes such as CD44 and PARD3 in IGCs, and EFNB3, a tissue-remodeling agent enriched at the infiltrated microenvironment. OLIG2, a proliferation regulator and glioma progenitor cell marker upregulated in IGCs was found to function in enhancing migration and stemness of GSCs. Overall, our results unveiled a more comprehensive picture of the complex and dynamic cell autonomous and tumor-host interactive pathways of glioma invasion than has been previously demonstrated. This suggests targeting of multiple pathways at the junction of invading tumor and microenvironment as a viable option for glioma therapy.

  6. Evaluation of nano-magnetic fluid on malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongsheng; Zong, Hailiang; Ma, Chong; Ming, Xing; Shang, Ming; Li, Kai; He, Xiaoguang; Cao, Lei

    2017-02-01

    The temperature variation rule of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field and the effect on the treatment of malignant glioma were examined. The temperature variation of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field was investigated by heating in vitro, and cell morphology was observed through optical microscopy and electron microscopy. MTT detection also was used to detect the effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) on the proliferation of human U251 glioma cell line. The Fe3O4 nano MFH experiment was used to detect the inhibition rate of the tumor volume in nude mice with tumors. The results of the experiment showed that the heating ability of magnetic fluid was positively correlated with its concentration at the same intensity of the magnetic field. The results also indicated the prominent inhibitory effect of nanometer MFH on the proliferation of glioma cells, which was a dose-dependent relationship with nanometer magnetic fluid concentration. The hyperthermia experiment of nude mice with tumors displayed a significant inhibiting effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid in glioma volume. These results explain that iron (II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) nanometer MFH can inhibit the proliferation of U251 glioma cells, and has an obvious inhibitory effect on glioma volume, which plays a certain role in the treatment of brain glioma.

  7. Association between adult height, genetic susceptibility and risk of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Cari M; Wang, Sophia S; Melin, Beatrice S; Wang, Zhaoming; Braganza, Melissa; Inskip, Peter D; Albanes, Demetrius; Andersson, Ulrika; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Buring, Julie E; Carreón, Tania; Feychting, Maria; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Henriksson, Roger; Hsing, Ann W; Johansen, Christoffer; Linet, Martha S; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Michaud, Dominique S; Peters, Ulrike; Purdue, Mark P; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Stevens, Victoria L; Visvanathan, Kala; Waters, Martha A; White, Emily; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Hoover, Robert; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J; Hartge, Patricia; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2012-01-01

    Background Some, but not all, observational studies have suggested that taller stature is associated with a significant increased risk of glioma. In a pooled analysis of observational studies, we investigated the strength and consistency of this association, overall and for major sub-types, and investigated effect modification by genetic susceptibility to the disease. Methods We standardized and combined individual-level data on 1354 cases and 4734 control subjects from 13 prospective and 2 case–control studies. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for glioma and glioma sub-types were estimated using logistic regression models stratified by sex and adjusted for birth cohort and study. Pooled ORs were additionally estimated after stratifying the models according to seven recently identified glioma-related genetic variants. Results Among men, we found a positive association between height and glioma risk (≥190 vs 170–174 cm, pooled OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.11–2.61; P-trend = 0.01), which was slightly stronger after restricting to cases with glioblastoma (pooled OR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.17–3.38; P-trend = 0.02). Among women, these associations were less clear (≥175 vs 160–164 cm, pooled OR for glioma = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.70–1.62; P-trend = 0.22; pooled OR for glioblastoma = 1.36, 95% CI: 0.77–2.39; P-trend = 0.04). In general, we did not observe evidence of effect modification by glioma-related genotypes on the association between height and glioma risk. Conclusion An association of taller adult stature with glioma, particularly for men and stronger for glioblastoma, should be investigated further to clarify the role of environmental and genetic determinants of height in the etiology of this disease. PMID:22933650

  8. Use of cardiac glycosides and risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Corinna; Meier, Christoph R; Jick, Susan S; Uhl, Martin; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Hau, Peter; Leitzmann, M F

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac glycosides induce apoptotic effects on glioma cells, but whether cardiac glycosides protect against risk for glioma is unknown. We therefore explored the relation between glycoside use and glioma risk using a large and validated database. We performed a case-control analysis using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink involving 2005 glioma cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2012 that were individually matched to 20,050 controls on age, gender, general practice, and number of years of active history in the database. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between cardiac glycosides and the risk of glioma adjusting for body mass index and smoking. We also examined use of common heart failure and arrhythmia medications to differentiate between a specific glycoside effect and a generic effect of treatment for congestive heart failure or arrhythmia. Cardiac glycoside use was inversely related to glioma incidence. After adjustment for congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, diabetes, and common medications used to treat those conditions, the OR of glioma was 0.47 (95% CI 0.27-0.81, Bonferroni-corrected p value = 0.024) for use versus non-use of cardiac glycosides, based on 17 exposed cases. In contrast, no associations were noted for other medications used to treat congestive heart failure or arrhythmias. The OR of glioma in people with congestive heart failure was 0.65 (95% CI 0.40-1.04), and for arrhythmia it was 1.01 (95% CI 0.78-1.31). These data indicate that cardiac glycoside use is independently associated with reduced glioma risk.

  9. IGFBP2 expression predicts IDH-mutant glioma patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin Eric; Cohen, Adam L.; Colman, Howard; Jensen, Randy L.; Fults, Daniel W.; Couldwell, William T.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2 genes occur in ~80% of lower-grade (WHO grade II and grade III) gliomas. Mutant IDH produces (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate, which induces DNA hypermethylation and presumably drives tumorigenesis. Interestingly, IDH mutations are associated with improved survival in glioma patients, but the underlying mechanism for the difference in survival remains unclear. Through comparative analyses of 286 cases of IDH-wildtype and IDH-mutant lower-grade glioma from a TCGA data set, we report that IDH-mutant gliomas have increased expression of tumor-suppressor genes (NF1, PTEN, and PIK3R1) and decreased expression of oncogenes(AKT2, ARAF, ERBB2, FGFR3, and PDGFRB) and glioma progression genes (FOXM1, IGFBP2, and WWTR1) compared with IDH-wildtype gliomas. Furthermore, each of these genes is prognostic in overall gliomas; however, within the IDH-mutant group, none remains prognostic except IGFBP2 (encodinginsulin-like growth factor binding protein 2). Through validation in an independent cohort, we show that patients with low IGFBP2 expressiondisplay a clear advantage in overall and disease-free survival, whereas those with high IGFBP2 expressionhave worse median survival than IDH-wildtype patients. These observations hold true across different histological and molecular subtypes of lower-grade glioma. We propose therefore that an unexpected biological consequence of IDH mutations in glioma is to ameliorate patient survival by promoting tumor-suppressor signaling while inhibiting that of oncogenes, particularly IGFBP2. PMID:27852048

  10. DNA sequences within glioma-derived extracellular vesicles can cross the intact blood-brain barrier and be detected in peripheral blood of patients

    PubMed Central

    Lázaro-Ibáñez, Elisa; Peris-Celda, María; Alonso, Marta M.; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan; Fernández-Carballal, Carlos; de Mendivil, Ana Ortiz; García-Duque, Sara; Escobedo-Lucea, Carmen; Prat-Acín, Ricardo; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-cell-secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs) can cross the disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the bloodstream. However, in certain gliomas, the BBB remains intact, which might limit EVs release. To evaluate the ability of tumor-derived EVs to cross the BBB, we used an orthotopic xenotransplant mouse model of human glioma-cancer stem cells featuring an intact BBB. We demonstrated that all types of tumor cells-derived EVs−apoptotic bodies, shedding microvesicles and exosomes−cross the intact BBB and can be detected in the peripheral blood, which provides a minimally invasive method for their detection compared to liquid biopsies obtained from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Furthermore, these EVs can be readily distinguished from total murine EVs, since they carry human-specific DNA sequences relevant for GBM biology. In a small cohort of glioma patients, we finally demonstrated that peripheral blood EVs cargo can be successfully used to detect the presence of IDH1G395A, an essential biomarker in the current management of human glioma PMID:27902458

  11. Cy5.5 conjugated MnO nanoparticles for magnetic resonance/near-infrared fluorescence dual-modal imaging of brain gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Shao, Chen; Li, Shuai; Wang, Zihao; Qu, Yanming; Gu, Wei; Yu, Chunjiang; Ye, Ling

    2015-11-01

    The fusion of molecular and anatomical modalities facilitates more reliable and accurate detection of tumors. Herein, we prepared the PEG-Cy5.5 conjugated MnO nanoparticles (MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs) with magnetic resonance (MR) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging modalities. The applicability of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs as a dual-modal (MR/NIRF) imaging nanoprobe for the detection of brain gliomas was investigated. In vivo MR contrast enhancement of the MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 nanoprobe in the tumor region was demonstrated. Meanwhile, whole-body NIRF imaging of glioma bearing nude mouse exhibited distinct tumor localization upon injection of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs. Moreover, ex vivo CLSM imaging of the brain slice hosting glioma indicated the preferential accumulation of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs in the glioma region. Our results therefore demonstrated the potential of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs as a dual-modal (MR/NIRF) imaging nanoprobe in improving the diagnostic efficacy by simultaneously providing anatomical information from deep inside the body and more sensitive information at the cellular level.

  12. G protein-coupled receptors as oncogenic signals in glioma: emerging therapeutic avenues.

    PubMed

    Cherry, A E; Stella, N

    2014-10-10

    Gliomas are the most common malignant intracranial tumors. Newly developed targeted therapies for these cancers aim to inhibit oncogenic signals, many of which emanate from receptor tyrosine kinases, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). Unfortunately, the first-generation treatments targeting these oncogenic signals provide little survival benefit in both mouse xenograft models and human patients. The search for new treatment options has uncovered several G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) candidates and generated a growing interest in this class of proteins as alternative therapeutic targets for the treatment of various cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GPCRs constitute a large family of membrane receptors that influence oncogenic pathways through canonical and non-canonical signaling. Accordingly, evidence indicates that GPCRs display a unique ability to crosstalk with receptor tyrosine kinases, making them important molecular components controlling tumorigenesis. This review summarizes the current research on GPCR functionality in gliomas and explores the potential of modulating these receptors to treat this devastating disease.

  13. G protein-coupled receptors as oncogenic signals in glioma: emerging therapeutic avenues

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Allison E; Stella, Nephi

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common malignant intracranial tumors. Newly developed targeted therapies for these cancers aim to inhibit oncogenic signals, many of which emanate from receptor tyrosine kinases, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). Unfortunately, the first generation treatments targeting these oncogenic signals provide little survival benefit in both mouse xenograft models and human patients. The search for new treatment options has uncovered several G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) candidates and generated a growing interest in this class of proteins as alternative therapeutic targets for the treatment of various cancers, including GBM. GPCRs constitute a large family of membrane receptors that influence oncogenic pathways through canonical and non-canonical signaling. Accordingly, evidence indicates that GPCRs display a unique ability to crosstalk with receptor tyrosine kinases, making them important molecular components controlling tumorigenesis. This review summarizes the current research on GPCR functionality in gliomas and explores the potential of modulating these receptors to treat this devastating disease. PMID:25158675

  14. Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas. METHODS We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes. RESULTS Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma. CONCLUSIONS The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q

  15. Localisation of malignant glioma by a radiolabelled human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J; Alderson, T; Sikora, K; Watson, J

    1983-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies were produced by fusing intratumoral lymphocytes from patients with malignant gliomas with a human myeloma line. One antibody was selected for further study after screening for binding activity to glioma cell lines. The patient from whom it was derived developed recurrent glioma. 1 mg of antibody was purified, radiolabelled with 131I, and administered intravenously. The distribution of antibody was determined in the blood, CSF and tumour cyst fluid and compared with that of a control human monoclonal immunoglobulin. Antibody localisation in the tumour was observed and confirmed by external scintiscanning. Images PMID:6101173

  16. Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Brat, Daniel J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Aldape, Kenneth D; Yung, W K Alfred; Salama, Sofie R; Cooper, Lee A D; Rheinbay, Esther; Miller, C Ryan; Vitucci, Mark; Morozova, Olena; Robertson, A Gordon; Noushmehr, Houtan; Laird, Peter W; Cherniack, Andrew D; Akbani, Rehan; Huse, Jason T; Ciriello, Giovanni; Poisson, Laila M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Berger, Mitchel S; Brennan, Cameron; Colen, Rivka R; Colman, Howard; Flanders, Adam E; Giannini, Caterina; Grifford, Mia; Iavarone, Antonio; Jain, Rajan; Joseph, Isaac; Kim, Jaegil; Kasaian, Katayoon; Mikkelsen, Tom; Murray, Bradley A; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Pachter, Lior; Parsons, Donald W; Sougnez, Carrie; Sulman, Erik P; Vandenberg, Scott R; Van Meir, Erwin G; von Deimling, Andreas; Zhang, Hailei; Crain, Daniel; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Yena, Peggy; Black, Aaron; Bowen, Jay; Dicostanzo, Katie; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Leraas, Kristen M; Lichtenberg, Tara M; Pierson, Christopher R; Ramirez, Nilsa C; Taylor, Cynthia; Weaver, Stephanie; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L; Hutter, Carolyn M; Mills Shaw, Kenna R; Ozenberger, Bradley A; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Ayala, Brenda; Baboud, Julien; Chudamani, Sudha; Jensen, Mark A; Liu, Jia; Pihl, Todd; Raman, Rohini; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Ally, Adrian; Auman, J Todd; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Baylin, Stephen B; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bootwalla, Moiz S; Bowlby, Reanne; Bristow, Christopher A; Brooks, Denise; Butterfield, Yaron; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott; Chin, Lynda; Chu, Andy; Chuah, Eric; Cibulskis, Kristian; Clarke, Amanda; Coetzee, Simon G; Dhalla, Noreen; Fennell, Tim; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey; Getz, Gad; Gibbs, Richard; Guin, Ranabir; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Hayes, D Neil; Hinoue, Toshinori; Hoadley, Katherine; Holt, Robert A; Hoyle, Alan P; Jefferys, Stuart R; Jones, Steven; Jones, Corbin D; Kucherlapati, Raju; Lai, Phillip H; Lander, Eric; Lee, Semin; Lichtenstein, Lee; Ma, Yussanne; Maglinte, Dennis T; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S; Marra, Marco A; Mayo, Michael; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew L; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Moore, Richard A; Mose, Lisle E; Mungall, Andrew J; Pantazi, Angeliki; Parfenov, Michael; Park, Peter J; Parker, Joel S; Perou, Charles M; Protopopov, Alexei; Ren, Xiaojia; Roach, Jeffrey; Sabedot, Thaís S; Schein, Jacqueline; Schumacher, Steven E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seth, Sahil; Shen, Hui; Simons, Janae V; Sipahimalani, Payal; Soloway, Matthew G; Song, Xingzhi; Sun, Huandong; Tabak, Barbara; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Tang, Jiabin; Thiessen, Nina; Triche, Timothy; Van Den Berg, David J; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Waring, Scot; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Wong, Tina; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Xu, Andrew W; Yang, Lixing; Zack, Travis I; Zhang, Jianhua; Aksoy, B Arman; Arachchi, Harindra; Benz, Chris; Bernard, Brady; Carlin, Daniel; Cho, Juok; DiCara, Daniel; Frazer, Scott; Fuller, Gregory N; Gao, JianJiong; Gehlenborg, Nils; Haussler, David; Heiman, David I; Iype, Lisa; Jacobsen, Anders; Ju, Zhenlin; Katzman, Sol; Kim, Hoon; Knijnenburg, Theo; Kreisberg, Richard Bailey; Lawrence, Michael S; Lee, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Lin, Pei; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Liu, Yingchun; Liu, Yuexin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Ng, Sam; Noble, Michael S; Paull, Evan; Rao, Arvind; Reynolds, Sheila; Saksena, Gordon; Sanborn, Zack; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Shen, Ronglai; Shmulevich, Ilya; Sinha, Rileen; Stuart, Josh; Sumer, S Onur; Sun, Yichao; Tasman, Natalie; Taylor, Barry S; Voet, Doug; Weinhold, Nils; Weinstein, John N; Yang, Da; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Zheng, Siyuan; Zhang, Wei; Zou, Lihua; Abel, Ty; Sadeghi, Sara; Cohen, Mark L; Eschbacher, Jenny; Hattab, Eyas M; Raghunathan, Aditya; Schniederjan, Matthew J; Aziz, Dina; Barnett, Gene; Barrett, Wendi; Bigner, Darell D; Boice, Lori; Brewer, Cathy; Calatozzolo, Chiara; Campos, Benito; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Chan, Timothy A; Cuppini, Lucia; Curley, Erin; Cuzzubbo, Stefania; Devine, Karen; DiMeco, Francesco; Duell, Rebecca; Elder, J Bradley; Fehrenbach, Ashley; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Friedman, William; Fulop, Jordonna; Gardner, Johanna; Hermes, Beth; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jungk, Christine; Kendler, Ady; Lehman, Norman L; Lipp, Eric; Liu, Ouida; Mandt, Randy; McGraw, Mary; Mclendon, Roger; McPherson, Christopher; Neder, Luciano; Nguyen, Phuong; Noss, Ardene; Nunziata, Raffaele; Ostrom, Quinn T; Palmer, Cheryl; Perin, Alessandro; Pollo, Bianca; Potapov, Alexander; Potapova, Olga; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Rotin, Daniil; Scarpace, Lisa; Schilero, Cathy; Senecal, Kelly; Shimmel, Kristen; Shurkhay, Vsevolod; Sifri, Suzanne; Singh, Rosy; Sloan, Andrew E; Smolenski, Kathy; Staugaitis, Susan M; Steele, Ruth; Thorne, Leigh; Tirapelli, Daniela P C; Unterberg, Andreas; Vallurupalli, Mahitha; Wang, Yun; Warnick, Ronald; Williams, Felicia; Wolinsky, Yingli; Bell, Sue; Rosenberg, Mara; Stewart, Chip; Huang, Franklin; Grimsby, Jonna L; Radenbaugh, Amie J; Zhang, Jianan

    2015-06-25

    Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas. We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes. Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma. The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q codeletion or carried a TP53 mutation. Most

  17. Noscapine inhibits tumor growth in TMZ-resistant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Niyati; Cho, Heeyeon; Torres, Shering; Wang, Weijun; Schönthal, Axel H; Petasis, Nicos A; Louie, Stan G; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C

    2011-12-22

    Noscapine, a common oral antitussive agent, has been shown to have potent antitumor activity in a variety of cancers. Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with temozolomide (TMZ), its current standard of care, is problematic because the tumor generally recurs and is then resistant to this drug. We therefore investigated the effects of noscapine on human TMZ-resistant GBM tumors. We found that noscapine significantly decreased TMZ-resistant glioma cell growth and invasion. Using the intracranial xenograft model, we showed that noscapine increased survival of animals with TMZ-resistant gliomas. Thus noscapine can provide an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of TMZ-resistant gliomas.

  18. Season of Birth and Risk for Adult Onset Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.

    2010-01-01

    Adult onset glioma is a rare cancer which occurs more frequently in Caucasians than African Americans, and in men than women. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only well established environmental risk factor, and this factor explains only a small percentage of cases. Several recent studies have reported an association between season of birth and glioma risk. This paper reviews the plausibility of evidence focusing on the seasonal interrelation of farming, allergies, viruses, vitamin D, diet, birth weight, and handedness. To date, a convincing explanation for the occurrence of adult gliomas decades after a seasonal exposure at birth remains elusive. PMID:20623001

  19. Extracts from Glioma Tissues following Cryoablation Have Proapoptosis, Antiproliferation, and Anti-Invasion Effects on Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianzhu; Wang, Xin; Yin, Zhilin; Pan, Jun; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Shizhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study is to investigate the in vivo apoptotic processes in glioma tissues following cryoablation and the effects of glioma tissue extracts on GL261 glioma cells in vitro. Methods. TUNEL and flow cytometry analysis were performed to detect the apoptotic processes in the glioma tissues following cryoablation and in the GL261 cells treated with cryoablated tumor extracts. The scratch assay, the transwell assay, and Western blot analysis were carried out to evaluate the effects of cryoablated tumor extracts on the migration, invasion, and proliferation of tumor cells. Results. Our in vivo results indicated that the rapid-onset apoptosis was induced via the intrinsic pathway and the delayed apoptosis was triggered through the extrinsic pathway. The in vitro results showed that extracts from glioma tissues following cryoablation induced apoptosis via extrinsic pathways in GL261 glioma cells. Furthermore, cryoablated tumor extracts significantly inhibited the migration and proliferation of these cells, which would be related to the inhibition of ERK1/2 pathway and the activation of P38 pathway. Conclusion. Glioma cells surviving in cryoablation undergo intrinsic or extrinsic apoptosis. Augmenting the induction of apoptosis or enhancing the cryosensitization of tumor cells by coupling cryoablation with specific chemotherapy effectively increases the efficiency of this therapeutic treatment. PMID:24818132

  20. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  1. Gene therapy and targeted toxins for glioma.

    PubMed

    Castro, Maria G; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D; Curtin, James F; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Ghulam Muhammad, A K M; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2011-06-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of 15-18 months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors.

  2. Advances in Oncolytic Virus Therapy for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Haseley, Amy; Alvarez-Breckenridge, Christopher; Chaudhury, Abhik Ray; Kaur, Balveen

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization grossly classifies the various types of astrocytomas using a grade system with grade IV gliomas having the worst prognosis. Oncolytic virus therapy is a novel treatment option for GBM patients. Several patents describe various oncolytic viruses used in preclinical and clinical trials to evaluate safety and efficacy. These viruses are natural or genetically engineered from different viruses such as HSV-1, Adenovirus, Reovirus, and New Castle Disease Virus. While several anecdotal studies have indicated therapeutic advantage, recent clinical trials have revealed the safety of their usage, but demonstration of significant efficacy remains to be established. Oncolytic viruses are being redesigned with an interest in combating the tumor microenvironment in addition to defeating the cancerous cells. Several patents describe the inclusion of tumor microenvironment modulating genes within the viral backbone and in particular those which attack the tumor angiotome. The very innovative approaches being used to improve therapeutic efficacy include: design of viruses which can express cytokines to activate a systemic antitumor immune response, inclusion of angiostatic genes to combat tumor vasculature, and also enzymes capable of digesting tumor extra cellular matrix (ECM) to enhance viral spread through solid tumors. As increasingly more novel viruses are being tested and patented, the future battle against glioma looks promising. PMID:19149710

  3. Distinct methylation profiles of glioma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Karen; Rohde, Klaus; Zeller, Constanze; Szymas, Janusz; Vogel, Siegfried; Marczinek, Karola; Thiel, Gundula; Nürnberg, Peter; Laird, Peter W

    2003-08-10

    Gliomas are tumors of the central nervous system with a wide spectrum of different tumor types. They range from pilocytic astrocytoma, with a generally good prognosis, to the extremely aggressive malignant glioblastoma. In addition to these 2 types of contrasting neoplasms, several other subtypes can be distinguished, each characterized by specific phenotypic, as well as genotypic features. Recently, the epigenotype, as evident from differentially methylated DNA loci, has been proposed to be useful as a further criterion to distinguish between tumor types. In our study, we screened 139 tissue samples, including 33 pilocytic astrocytomas, 46 astrocytomas of different grades, 7 oligoastrocytomas, 10 oligodendrogliomas, 10 glioblastoma multiforme samples and 33 control tissues, for methylation at CpG islands of 15 different gene loci. We used the semiquantitative high throughput method MethyLight to analyze a gene panel comprising ARF, CDKN2B, RB1, APC, CDH1, ESR1, GSTP1, TGFBR2, THBS1, TIMP3, PTGS2, CTNNB1, CALCA, MYOD1 and HIC1. Seven of these loci showed tumor specific methylation changes. We found tissue as well as grade specific methylation profiles. Interestingly, pilocytic astrocytomas showed no evidence of CpG island hypermethylation, but were significantly hypomethylated, relative to control tissues, at MYOD1. Our results show that glioma subtypes have characteristic methylation profiles and, with the exception of pilocytic astrocytomas, show both locus specific hyper- as well as hypomethylation. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Objective tumour heterogeneity determination in gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Dirk; Klein, Jan; Rexilius, Jan; Stieltjes, Bram

    2009-02-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values are known to correlate inversely to tumour cellularity in brain tumours. The average ADC value increases after successful chemotherapy, radiotherapy or a combination of both and can be therewith used as a surrogate marker for treatment response. Moreover, high and low malignant areas can be distinguished. The main purpose of our project was to develop a software platform that enables the automated delineation and ADC quantification of different tumour sections in a fast, objective, user independent manner. Moreover, the software platform allows for an analysis of the probability density of the ADC in high and low malignant areas in ROIs drawn on conventional imaging to create a ground truth. We tested an Expectation Maximization algorithm with a Gaussian mixture model to objectively determine tumour heterogeneity in gliomas because of yielding Gaussian distributions in the different areas. Furthermore, the algorithm was initialized by seed points in the areas of the gross tumour volume and the data indicated that an automatic initialization should be possible. Thus automated clustering of high and low malignant areas and subsequent ADC determination within these areas is possible yielding reproducible ADC measurements within heterogeneous gliomas.

  5. Optic gliomas: radiation therapy and prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Horwich, A.; Bloom, H.J.G.

    1985-06-01

    A retrospective study was performed of 30 patients with optic gliomas referred to the Royal Marsden Hospital between 1951 and 1981. Twenty-nine of these had progressive disease, and were treated with radiotherapy. At presentation 12 (41%) had visual deficit to the extent of at least one blind eye. Visual acuity improved following treatment in 10 (43%) of 23 evaluable patients, was stable in 11 (48%) and deteriorated in 2 (9%). There was increase in visual fields in 4 (18%) of 22 evaluable patients, and no change in the remaining 18 (82%). The probability of survival was 100% at five years following radiotherapy, and 93% at 10 years and also at 15 years. In view of the substantial morbidity and mortality in reported series, and the tendency for referral of more serious cases to a radiotherapy center, the authors conclude from the results that radiotherapy is effective in preventing progression of optic glioma, and that the treatment early in the course of the disease is indicated to minimize the associated visual deficit.

  6. Survival after stereotactic biopsy of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, R.J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Taylor, F.H.

    1988-03-01

    For many patients with malignant gliomas in inaccessible or functionally important locations, stereotactic biopsy followed by radiation therapy (RT) may be a more appropriate initial treatment than craniotomy and tumor resection. We studied the long term survival in 91 consecutive patients with malignant gliomas diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy: 64 had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 27 had anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Sixty-four per cent of the GBMs and 33% of the AAs involved deep or midline cerebral structures. The treatment prescribed after biopsy, the tumor location, the histological findings, and the patient's age at presentation (for AAs) were statistically important factors determining patient survival. If adequate RT (tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 cGy) was not prescribed, the median survival was less than or equal to 11 weeks regardless of tumor histology or location. The median survival for patients with deep or midline tumors who completed RT was similar in AA (19.4 weeks) and GBM (27 weeks) cases. Histology was an important predictor of survival only for patients with adequately treated lobar tumors. The median survival in lobar GBM patients who completed RT was 46.9 weeks, and that in lobar AA patients who completed RT was 129 weeks. Cytoreductive surgery had no statistically significant effect on survival. Among the clinical factors examined, age of less than 40 years at presentation was associated with prolonged survival only in AA patients. Constellations of clinical features, tumor location, histological diagnosis, and treatment prescribed were related to survival time.

  7. Photodynamic therapy of recurrent cerebral glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shu-Gan; Wu, Si-En; Chen, Zong-Qian; Sun, Wei

    1993-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed on 11 cases of recurrent cerebral glioma, including 3 cases of recurrent glioblastoma, 7 of recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma, and 1 recurrent ependymoma. Hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) was administered intravenously at a dose of 4 - 7 mg/kg 5 - 24 hours before the operation. All patients underwent a craniotomy with a nearly radical excision of the tumor following which the tumor bed was irradiated with 630 nm laser light emitting either an argon pumped dye laser or frequency double YAG pumped dye laser for 30 to 80 minutes with a total dose of 50 J/cm2 (n equals 1), 100 J/cm2 (n equals 2), 200 J/cm2 (n equals 7), and 300 J/cm2 (n equals 1). The temperature was kept below 37 degree(s)C by irrigation. Two patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy. There was no evidence of increased cerebral edema, and no other toxicity by the therapy. All patients were discharged from the hospital within 15 days after surgery. We conclude that PDT using 4 - 7 mg/kg of HPD and 630 nm light with a dose of up to 300 J/cm2 can be used as an adjuvant therapy with no additional complications. Adjuvant PDT in the treatment of recurrent glioma is better than simple surgery.

  8. Dopamine induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages in rat C6 glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Tian; Wang, Chenlong; Chen, Xuewei; Duan, Chenfan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jing; Chai, Hongyan; Tang, Tian; Chen, Honglei; Yue, Jiang; Li, Ying; Yang, Jing

    2015-07-15

    Dopamine (DA), a monoamine catecholamine neurotransmitter with antiangiogenic activity, stabilizes tumor vessels in colon, prostate and ovarian cancers, thus increases chemotherapeutic efficacy. Here, in the rat C6 glioma models, we investigated the vascular normalization effects of DA and its mechanisms of action. DA (25, 50 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth, while a precursor of DA (levodopa) prolonged the survival time of rats bearing orthotopic C6 glioma. DA improved tumor perfusion, with significant effects from day 3, and a higher level at days 5 to 7. In addition, DA decreased microvessel density and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in tumor tissues, while increasing the coverage of pericyte. Conversely, an antagonist of dopamine receptor 2 (DR2) (eticlopride) but not DR1 (butaclamol) abrogated DA-induced tumor regression and vascular normalization. Furthermore, DA improved the delivery and efficacy of temozolomide therapy. Importantly, DA increased representative M1 markers (iNOS, CXCL9, etc.), while decreasing M2 markers (CD206, arginase-1, etc.). Depletion of macrophages by clodronate or zoledronic acid attenuated the effects of DA. Notably, DA treatment induced M2-to-M1 polarization in RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages, and enhanced the migration of pericyte-like cells (10T1/2), which was reversed by eticlopride or DR2-siRNA. Such changes were accompanied by the downregulation of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling. In summary, DA induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages. Thus, targeting the tumor microvasculature by DA represents a promising strategy for human glioma therapy. - Highlights: • Dopamine induces tumor growth inhibition and vascular normalization in rat C6 glioma. • Dopamine switches macrophage phenotype from M2 to M1. • Dopamine-induced vascular normalization is mediated by macrophage polarization. • Dopamine is a promising agent targeting the microvasculature in tumor

  9. SLC7A11 expression is associated with seizures and predicts poor survival in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stephanie M; Buckingham, Susan C; Campbell, Susan L; Robel, Stefanie; Holt, Kenneth T; Ogunrinu-Babarinde, Toyin; Warren, Paula P; White, David M; Reid, Meredith A; Eschbacher, Jenny M; Berens, Michael E; Lahti, Adrienne C; Nabors, Louis B; Sontheimer, Harald

    2015-05-27

    Glioma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor. Its rapid growth is aided by tumor-mediated glutamate release, creating peritumoral excitotoxic cell death and vacating space for tumor expansion. Glioma glutamate release may also be responsible for seizures, which complicate the clinical course for many patients and are often the presenting symptom. A hypothesized glutamate release pathway is the cystine/glutamate transporter System xc (-) (SXC), responsible for the cellular synthesis of glutathione (GSH). However, the relationship of SXC-mediated glutamate release, seizures, and tumor growth remains unclear. Probing expression of SLC7A11/xCT, the catalytic subunit of SXC, in patient and mouse-propagated tissues, we found that ~50% of patient tumors have elevated SLC7A11 expression. Compared with tumors lacking this transporter, in vivo propagated and intracranially implanted SLC7A11-expressing tumors grew faster, produced pronounced peritumoral glutamate excitotoxicity, induced seizures, and shortened overall survival. In agreement with animal data, increased SLC7A11 expression predicted shorter patient survival according to genomic data in the REMBRANDT (National Institutes of Health Repository for Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data) database. In a clinical pilot study, we used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine SXC-mediated glutamate release by measuring acute changes in glutamate after administration of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved SXC inhibitor, sulfasalazine (SAS). In nine glioma patients with biopsy-confirmed SXC expression, we found that expression positively correlates with glutamate release, which is acutely inhibited with oral SAS. These data suggest that SXC is the major pathway for glutamate release from gliomas and that SLC7A11 expression predicts accelerated growth and tumor-associated seizures.

  10. Bradykinin-induced chemotaxis of human gliomas requires the activation of KCa3.1 and ClC-3

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Vishnu Anand; Turner, Kathryn L.; Seifert, Stefanie; Sontheimer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrate that cell migration in the nervous system is associated with stereotypic changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), yet the target of these changes are largely unknown. We examined chemotactic migration/invasion of human gliomas to study how [Ca2+]i regulates cellular movement and to identify downstream targets. Gliomas are primary brain cancers which spread exclusively within the brain, frequently migrating along blood vessels to which they are chemotactically attracted by bradykinin activating G protein-coupled receptors. Using simultaneous Fura-2 Ca2+ imaging and amphotericin B perforated patch-clamp electrophysiology, we find that bradykinin raises [Ca2+]i and induces a biphasic voltage response. This voltage response is mediated by the coordinated activation of Ca2+-dependent, TRAM-34-sensitive KCa3.1 channels, and Ca2+-depdenent, DIDS- and gluconate-sensitive Cl− channels. A significant portion of these Cl− currents can be attributed to Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activation of ClC-3, a voltage-gated Cl−channel/transporter, since pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII or shRNA-mediated knockdown of ClC-3 inhibited Ca2+-activated Cl− currents. Western blots show that KCa3.1 and ClC-3 are expressed in tissue samples obtained from patients diagnosed with Grade IV gliomas. Both KCa3.1 and ClC-3 co-localize to the invading processes of glioma cells. Importantly, inhibition of either channel abrogates bradykinin-induced chemotaxis and reduces tumor expansion in mouse brain slices in situ. These channels should be further explored as future targets for anti-invasive drugs. Furthermore, this data elucidates a novel mechanism placing cation and anion channels downstream of ligand-mediated [Ca2+]i increases, which likely play similar roles in other migratory cells in the nervous system. PMID:23345219

  11. ATRX loss promotes tumor growth and impairs nonhomologous end joining DNA repair in glioma.

    PubMed

    Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Nunez, Felipe J; Mackay, Alan; Fazal-Salom, Janet; Thomas, Daniel; Mendez, Flor; Kamran, Neha; Dzaman, Marta; Mulpuri, Lakshman; Krasinkiewicz, Johnathon; Doherty, Robert; Lemons, Rosemary; Brosnan-Cashman, Jacqueline A; Li, Youping; Roh, Soyeon; Zhao, Lili; Appelman, Henry; Ferguson, David; Gorbunova, Vera; Meeker, Alan; Jones, Chris; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2016-03-02

    Recent work in human glioblastoma (GBM) has documented recurrent mutations in the histone chaperone protein ATRX. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM and showed that loss of ATRX reduces median survival and increases genetic instability. Further, analysis of genome-wide data for human gliomas showed that ATRX mutation is associated with increased mutation rate at the single-nucleotide variant (SNV) level. In mouse tumors, ATRX deficiency impairs nonhomologous end joining and increases sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks. We propose that ATRX loss results in a genetically unstable tumor, which is more aggressive when left untreated but is more responsive to double-stranded DNA-damaging agents, resulting in improved overall survival. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Most human non-GCIMP glioblastoma subtypes evolve from a common proneural-like precursor glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Tatsuya; Riester, Markus; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Huse, Jason T; Squatrito, Massimo; Helmy, Karim; Charles, Nikki; Michor, Franziska; Holland, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To understand the relationships between the non-GCIMP glioblastoma (GBM) subgroups, we performed mathematical modeling to predict the temporal sequence of driver events during tumorigenesis. The most common order of evolutionary events is 1) chromosome (chr) 7 gain and chr10 loss, followed by 2) CDKN2A loss and/or TP53 mutation, and 3) alterations canonical for specific subtypes. We then developed a computational methodology to identify drivers of broad copy number changes, identifying PDGFA (chr7) and PTEN (chr10) as driving initial non-disjunction events. These predictions were validated using mouse modeling, showing that PDGFA is sufficient to induce proneural-like gliomas, and additional NF1 loss converts proneural to the mesenchymal subtype. Our findings suggest most non-GCIMP-mesenchymal GBMs arise as, and evolve from, a proneural-like precursor. PMID:25117714

  13. Challenges in Drug Discovery for Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Associated Low-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ricker, Cora A.; Pan, Yuan; Gutmann, David H.; Keller, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results from germline mutations of the NF1 gene, creating a predisposition to low-grade gliomas (LGGs; pilocytic astrocytoma) in young children. Insufficient data and resources represent major challenges to identifying the best possible drug therapies for children with this tumor. Herein, we summarize the currently available cell lines, genetically engineered mouse models, and therapeutic targets for these LGGs. Conspicuously absent are human tumor-derived cell lines or patient-derived xenograft models for NF1-LGG. New collaborative initiatives between patients and their families, research groups, and pharmaceutical companies are needed to create transformative resources and broaden the knowledge base relevant to identifying cooperating genetic drivers and possible drug therapeutics for this common pediatric brain tumor. PMID:28066715

  14. ATRX Loss Promotes Tumor Growth and Impairs Non-Homologous End Joining DNA Repair in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Nunez, Felipe J.; Mackay, Alan; Fazal-Salom, Janet; Thomas, Daniel; Mendez, Flor; Kamran, Neha; Dzaman, Marta; Mulpuri, Lakshman; Krasinkiewicz, Johnathon; Doherty, Robert; Lemons, Rosemary; Brosnan-Cashman, Jackie A.; Li, Youping; Roh, Soyeon; Zhao, Lili; Appelman, Henry; Ferguson, David; Gorbunova, Vera; Meeker, Alan; Jones, Chris; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2017-01-01

    Recent work in human glioblastoma (GBM) has documented recurrent mutations in the histone chaperone protein ATRX. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM and show that loss of ATRX reduces median survival and increases genetic instability. Further, analysis of genome-wide data for human gliomas showed that ATRX mutation is associated with increased mutation rate at the single nucleotide variant (SNV) level. In mouse tumors, ATRX deficiency impairs non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and increases sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks. We propose that ATRX loss results in a genetically unstable tumor, which is more aggressive when left untreated, but is more responsive to double-stranded DNA-damaging agents, resulting in improved overall survival. PMID:26936505

  15. Experimental therapy of human glioma by means of a genetically engineered virus mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Martuza, R.L.; Malick, A.; Markert, J.M.; Ruffner, K.L.; Coen, D.M. )

    1991-05-10

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant brain tumors and are almost always fatal. A thymidine kinase-negative mutant of herpes simplex virus-1 (dlsptk) that is attenuated for neurovirulence was tested as a possible treatment for gliomas. In cell culture, dlsptk killed two long-term human glioma lines and three short-term human glioma cell populations. In nude mice with implanted subcutaneous and subrenal U87 human gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk caused growth inhibition. In nude mice with intracranial U87 gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk prolonged survival. Genetically engineered viruses such as dlsptk merit further evaluation as novel antineoplastic agents.

  16. Alpinetin targets glioma stem cells by suppressing Notch pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianpeng; Yan, Zhiyong; Liu, Xia; Che, Shusheng; Wang, Chao; Yao, Weicheng

    2016-07-01

    Glioma is among the most common human malignancies with poor prognosis. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are the culprit of glioma, suggesting that GSCs are potential therapeutic targets. Notch signaling pathway plays a pivotal role for the function of GSCs, implying that suppression of Notch pathway may be an effective strategy for GSC-targeting therapy. In this study, we found that alpinetin, a natural compound, can suppress the proliferation and invasiveness of GSCs and induce apoptosis in GSCs. Immunoblot analysis and luciferase assay revealed that Notch signaling was suppressed by alpinetin. Furthermore, restoration of Notch signaling activity rescued the effect of alpinetin on GSC's function. The anti-tumor activity of alpinetin was further confirmed in an animal model. Collectively, targeting of GSC by alpinetin is an effective strategy for glioma therapy.

  17. Cognition and resective surgery for diffuse infiltrative glioma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Klein, Martin; Duffau, Hugues; De Witt Hamer, Philip C

    2012-06-01

    Compared to classical oncological outcome measures such as time to progression and survival, the importance of cognitive functioning in patients with diffuse infiltrative brain tumors has only recently been recognized. Apart from the relatively low incidence and the invariably fatal outcome of gliomas, the general assumption that cognitive assessment is time-consuming and burdensome contributes to this notion. Our understanding of the effects of brain surgery on cognition, for instance, is largely based on studies in surgical patients with refractory epilepsy, with only a limited number of studies in surgical patients with gliomas. The impact of other factors affecting cognition in glioma patients such as direct tumor effects, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and medical treatment, including anti-epileptic drugs and steroids, have been studied more extensively. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of cognition in patients with diffuse infiltrative gliomas and the impact of resective surgery as well as other tumor and treatment-related factors.

  18. Erlotinib and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  19. Glioma Stemlike Cells Enhance the Killing of Glioma Differentiated Cells by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Chiusolo, Valentina; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Riccadonna, Cristina; Walker, Paul R.; Martinvalet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive primary brain tumor, is maintained by a subpopulation of glioma cells with self-renewal properties that are able to recapitulate the entire tumor even after surgical resection or chemo-radiotherapy. This typifies the vast heterogeneity of this tumor with the two extremes represented on one end by the glioma stemlike cells (GSC) and on the other by the glioma differentiated cells (GDC). Interestingly, GSC are more sensitive to immune effector cells than the GDC counterpart. However, how GSC impact on the killing on the GDC and vice versa is not clear. Using a newly developed cytotoxicity assay allowing to simultaneously monitor cytotoxic lymphocytes-mediated killing of GSC and GDC, we found that although GSC were always better killed and that their presence enhanced the killing of GDC. In contrast, an excess of GDC had a mild protective effect on the killing of GSC, depending on the CTL type. Overall, our results suggest that during combination therapy, immunotherapy would be the most effective after prior treatment with conventional therapies. PMID:27073883

  20. Salinomycin inhibits the tumor growth of glioma stem cells by selectively suppressing glioma-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tunan; Yi, Liang; Li, Fei; Hu, Rong; Hu, Shengli; Yin, Yi; Lan, Chuan; Li, Zhao; Fu, Chuhua; Cao, Liu; Chen, Zhi; Xian, Jishu; Feng, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Glioma‑initiating cells are a small population of cells that have the ability to undergo self‑renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. In the present study, the potential role of salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, on the suppression of glioma cell growth was investigated. GL261 glioma cells were maintained in a stem‑cell‑like status [GL261 neurospheres (GL261‑NS)] or induced for differentiation [GL261 adherent cells (GL261‑AC)]. It was demonstrated that salinomycin significantly reduced the cell viability of GL261‑NS and GL261‑AC cells in a dose‑dependent manner, with a more substantial inhibition of GL261‑NS proliferation (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of salinomycin on cell growth was more effective than that of 1‑(4‑amino‑2‑methyl‑5‑pyrimid l)‑methyl‑3‑(2‑chloroethyl)‑3‑nitrosourea hydrochloride and vincristine (P<0.05). Salinomycin depleted GL261‑NS from tumorspheres and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, salinomycin prolonged the median survival time of glioma‑bearing mice (P<0.05). Therefore, the present study indicated that salinomycin may preferentially inhibit glioma‑initiated cell growth by inducing apoptosis, suggesting that salinomycin may provide a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  1. The inflammatory cytokine IL-22 promotes murine gliomas via proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiguo; Yang, Junjing; Deng, Wankai

    2017-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22 is newly identified proinflammatory cytokine involved in the T helper (Th)17 and Th22 response. However, the possible role of IL-22 in glioma remains uncertain. The results of the present study demonstrated higher expression levels of IL-22 and the receptor IL-22BP in the brain of GL261 glioma-inoculation mice, suggesting the regulatory role of IL-22 in glioma. Injection of IL-22 increased the severity of glioma in vivo and higher expression levels of IL-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were detected in the brain using ELISA following IL-22 injection. To elucidate the mechanism underlying the effects of IL-22, the present study aimed firstly to determine the expression levels of IL-22 receptor in a glioma cell line via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. IL-22 treatment significantly increased the expression levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 and the mRNA expression levels of STAT6 compared with the vehicle control. These results suggested that IL-22 may activate the Janus kinase (JAK)/STAT signaling pathway in glioma. Furthermore, IL-22 positively regulated the proliferation of glioma, consistent with its role in vivo. Conversely, IL-22-deficient mice exhibited prolonged survival compared with wild-type (WT) mice, and the expression levels of inflammatory cytokines were decreased in the brain of IL-22 knock-out (KO) mice compared with WT mice. Concordant with these results, it was observed that IL-22-neutralising antibody was able to increase the survival of mice with glioma and attenuate the disease by significantly reducing the cytokine levels in the brain. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that expression levels of IL-22 in the brain of mice with glioma may enhance symptoms due to the increased cytokine production of IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α; this is consistent with IL-6/JAK/STAT signalling activation in vitro. Decreasing the expression levels of

  2. Targeting Pediatric Glioma with Apoptosis and Autophagy Manipulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Gliomas are the most common and most deadly solid tumors that affect children . Treatment options are limited and...Gliomas are the most common and most deadly solid tumors that affect children . Treatment options are limited and cure rates are dismal. My laboratory has...tyrosine kinase inhibition. Society for Neuro- Oncology International Meetings Poster Presentation. November 2013. -Pierce AM, Keating AK. TAM Receptor

  3. Malignant glioma following radiotherapy for unrelated primary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Marus, G.; Levin, C.V.; Rutherfoord, G.S.

    1986-08-15

    Four cases are documented where a glioma was histologically verified in the irradiation field of a previously treated malignancy of a different cell line. Radiation-induced neoplasia in the central nervous system now has been established in the induction of meningioma and sarcoma. The association between therapeutic irradiation and glioma in the reported cases lends to the evidence that a causal relation does exist. This incidence is small and does not detract from the overall benefit of irradiation as a therapeutic modality.

  4. Nicotinic acid inhibits glioma invasion by facilitating Snail1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiejing; Qu, Jiagui; Shi, Yu; Perfetto, Mark; Ping, Zhuxian; Christian, Laura; Niu, Hua; Mei, Shuting; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Xiangcai; Wei, Shuo

    2017-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a formidable disease that commonly leads to death, mainly due to the invasion of tumor cells into neighboring tissues. Therefore, inhibition of tumor cell invasion may provide an effective therapy for malignant glioma. Here we report that nicotinic acid (NA), an essential vitamin, inhibits glioma cell invasion in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of the U251 glioma cells with NA in vitro results in reduced invasion, which is accompanied by a loss of mesenchymal phenotype and an increase in cell-cell adhesion. At the molecular level, transcription of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin is upregulated, leading to accumulation of E-cadherin protein at the cell-cell boundary. This can be attributed to NA’s ability to facilitate the ubiquitination and degradation of Snail1, a transcription factor that represses E-cadherin expression. Similarly, NA transiently inhibits neural crest migration in Xenopus embryos in a Snail1-dependent manner, indicating that the mechanism of action for NA in cell migration is evolutionarily conserved. We further show that NA injection blocks the infiltration of tumor cells into the adjacent brain tissues and improves animal survival in a rat model of glioma. These results suggest that NA treatment may be developed into a potential therapy for malignant glioma. PMID:28256591

  5. Identification of intrinsic in vitro cellular mechanisms for glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    Tektonidis, Marco; Hatzikirou, Haralambos; Chauvière, Arnaud; Simon, Matthias; Schaller, Karl; Deutsch, Andreas

    2011-10-21

    Invasion of malignant glioma is a highly complex phenomenon involving molecular and cellular processes at various spatio-temporal scales, whose precise interplay is still not fully understood. In order to identify the intrinsic cellular mechanisms of glioma invasion, we study an in vitro culture of glioma cells. By means of a computational approach, based on a cellular automaton model, we compare simulation results to the experimental data and deduce cellular mechanisms from microscopic and macroscopic observables (experimental data). For the first time, it is shown that the migration/proliferation dichotomy plays a central role in the invasion of glioma cells. Interestingly, we conclude that a diverging invasive zone is a consequence of this dichotomy. Additionally, we observe that radial persistence of glioma cells in the vicinity of dense areas accelerates the invasion process. We argue that this persistence results from a cell-cell repulsion mechanism. If glioma cell behavior is regulated through a migration/proliferation dichotomy and a self-repellent mechanism, our simulations faithfully reproduce all the experimental observations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Moving toward molecular classification of diffuse gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Theeler, Brett J; Yung, W K Alfred; Fuller, Gregory N; De Groot, John F

    2012-10-30

    Diffuse gliomas are a heterogenous group of neoplasms traditionally classified as grades II to IV based on histologic features, and with prognosis determined mainly by histologic grade and pretreatment clinical factors. Our understanding of the molecular basis of glioma initiation, tumor progression, and treatment failure is rapidly evolving. A molecular profile of diffuse gliomas is emerging. Studies evaluating gene expression and DNA methylation profile have found multiple glioma subtypes and an association between subtype and survival. The recent discovery of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) mutations in glioma has provided reproducible prognostic biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets. Glioblastomas that exhibit CpG island hypermethylator phenotype, proneural gene expression, or IDH1 mutation identify a subset of patients with markedly improved prognosis. Accumulated evidence supports the stratification of both low-grade and anaplastic diffuse gliomas into prognostic groups using 1p/19q codeletion and IDH mutation status. A classification scheme incorporating clinical, pathologic, and molecular information may facilitate improved prognostication for patients treated in the clinic, the development of more effective clinical trials, and rational testing of targeted therapeutics.

  7. Fluorescence-Guided Resection of Malignant Glioma with 5-ALA

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Sadahiro

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are extremely difficult to treat with no specific curative treatment. On the other hand, photodynamic medicine represents a promising technique for neurosurgeons in the treatment of malignant glioma. The resection rate of malignant glioma has increased from 40% to 80% owing to 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic diagnosis (ALA-PDD). Furthermore, ALA is very useful because it has no serious complications. Based on previous research, it is apparent that protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulates abundantly in malignant glioma tissues after ALA administration. Moreover, it is evident that the mechanism underlying PpIX accumulation in malignant glioma tissues involves an abnormality in porphyrin-heme metabolism, specifically decreased ferrochelatase enzyme activity. During resection surgery, the macroscopic fluorescence of PpIX to the naked eye is more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging, and the alert real time spectrum of PpIX is the most sensitive method. In the future, chemotherapy with new anticancer agents, immunotherapy, and new methods of radiotherapy and gene therapy will be developed; however, ALA will play a key role in malignant glioma treatment before the development of these new treatments. In this paper, we provide an overview and present the results of our clinical research on ALA-PDD. PMID:27429612

  8. P41IDENTIFICATION OF GLIOMA SPECIFIC APTAMER TARGETS

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Mohit; Alder, Jane; Lawrence, Clare; Davis, Charles; Dawson, Tim; Hall, Greg; Shaw, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Aptamers are in vitro generated DNA and RNA sequences which are randomly created as a library, with multiple permutations and combinations. These are then exposed to the target structure against which we want an aptamer ‘selected’ using Sequential Enumeration of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX). METHOD: Commercially available glioma and glial cell lines and in-house generated primary glioma cultures were used. Modified aptamers based on published sequences against glioma cell lines and newly generated sequences were used in the project to identify their binding targets. Cy3 or biotin- conjugated aptamers were incubated with live glioma cell cultures and imaged using confocal or light microscopy.To determine the target ligand, aptamers were then reacted with glial cell lysate and subjected to precipitation using streptavidin agarose beads and SDS polyacrylamide electrophoresis. Proteins were analysed by mass spectroscopy. RESULTS: Known and unknown aptamer protein ligands were co-precipitated. Ku70, Ku80 were precipitated along with nucleolin and related proteins. CONCLUSION: The aptamer has shown preferential binding to glioma cells and could act as a delivery system for therapeutic payloads. The aptamer targets Ku70 and Ku80, which are known to be over expressed in other forms of cancer but their role in gliomagenesis has not been fully elucidated. Other novel proteins have also been identified. Thus the aptamer co-precipitation technique has identified potential glioma biomarkers that may be of clinical significance.

  9. Risk of seizures in children with tectal gliomas.

    PubMed

    Dabscheck, Gabriel; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Manley, Peter E; Goumnerova, Liliana; Ullrich, Nicole J

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of seizures in children with tectal gliomas and to determine if there are common clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), or radiologic findings that predict risk of seizures in these patients. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with tectal gliomas over a 22-year period at a single institution. Data extraction included sex, age at presentation of tectal glioma and age of presentation with seizures, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, seizure frequency and semiology, and EEG findings. We identified 79 patients, 66 of whom had adequate imaging and clinical data for further analysis. Eight patients (12.1%) had a history of seizures. Three patients had a clear symptomatic cause of seizures. Three patients were diagnosed with a tectal glioma as an incidental finding after a first seizure. One patient had a history of febrile convulsions. One patient had a generalized seizure 5 years after presenting with macrocephaly. Although the risk of seizure in children with known tectal glioma was relatively high, we did not identify specific clinical, radiologic, EEG, or MRI features that are predictive of increased risk. Thus, in children with tectal gliomas who have seizures, alternative causes for the seizures must be sought.

  10. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas: Pharmacotherapeutic Potential of Natural Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Guntuku, Lalita; Naidu, G.M.; Yerra, Veera Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors either benign or malignant originating from the glial tissue. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most prevalent and aggressive form among all gliomas, associated with decimal prognosis due to it's high invasive nature. GBM is also characterized by high recurrence rate and apoptosis resistance features which make the therapeutic targeting very challenging. Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that are acting as focal points in diverse array of cellular functions such as cellular energy metabolism, regulation of ion homeostasis, redox signaling and cell death. Eventual findings of mitochondrial dysfunction include preference of glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation, enhanced reactive oxygen species generation and abnormal mitochondria mediated apoptotic machinery are frequently observed in various malignancies including gliomas. In particular, gliomas harbor mitochondrial structure abnormalities, genomic mutations in mtDNA, altered energy metabolism (Warburg effect) along with mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) enzyme. Numerous natural compounds have shown efficacy in the treatment of gliomas by targeting mitochondrial aberrant signaling cascades. Some of the natural compounds directly target the components of mitochondria whereas others act indirectly through modulating metabolic abnormalities that are consequence of the mitochondrial dysfunction. The present review offers a molecular insight into mitochondrial pathology in gliomas and therapeutic mechanisms of some of the promising natural compounds that target mitochondrial dysfunction. This review also sheds light on the challenges and possible ways to overcome the hurdles associated with these natural compounds to enter into the clinical market. PMID:26791479

  11. Human immunoglobulin G levels of viruses and associated glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Sara; Hjalmars, Ulf; Juto, Per; Wadell, Göran; Hallmans, Göran; Tjönneland, Anne; Halkjaer, Jytte; Manjer, Jonas; Almquist, Martin; Melin, Beatrice S

    2011-09-01

    Few consistent etiological factors have been identified for primary brain tumors. Inverse associations to asthma and low levels of varicella-zoster virus, immunoglobulin (Ig) levels in prevalent cases have indicted a role for the immune system in the development of glioma. Because samples from prevalent cases of glioma could be influenced by treatments such as steroids and chemotherapy, we investigated pre-diagnostic samples from three large Scandinavian cohorts. To test the hypothesis that immune response levels to these viruses are associated etiologically with glioma risk, we investigated pre-diagnostic immunoglobulin levels for cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), adenovirus (Ad), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) including the nuclear antigen (EBNA1) using plasma samples from 197 cases of adult glioma and 394 controls collected from population-based cohorts in Sweden and Denmark. Low VZV IgG levels were marginally significantly more common in glioma cases than the controls (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% CI 0.41-1.13) for the fourth compared with the first quartile (p = 0.06 for trend). These results were more prominent when analyzing cases with blood sampling at least 2 years before diagnosis (OR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.37-1.08) (p = 0.03). No association with glioma risk was observed for CMV, EBV, and adenovirus.

  12. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wenliang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Bin; Chen, Aanjing; He, Ying; Wang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-03-15

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic mimicry. With suspension microarray technology and in vitro tube formation assays, we identified that astrocytes relied on TGF-β1 to enhance vasculogenic mimicry. We also found that vasculogenic mimicry was inhibited by galunisertib, a promising TGF-β1 inhibitor currently being studied in an ongoing trial in glioma patients. The inhibition was partially attributed to a decrease in autophagy after galunisertib treatment. Moreover, we observed a decrease in VE-cadherin and smooth muscle actin-α expression, as well as down-regulation of Akt and Flk phosphorylation in galunisertib-treated glioma cells. By comparing tumor weight and volume in a xenograft model, we acquired promising results to support our theory. This study expands our understanding of the role of astrocytes in gliomas and demonstrates that galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry induced by astrocytes.

  13. Plexin-B2 promotes invasive growth of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Le, Audrey P; Huang, Yong; Pingle, Sandeep C; Kesari, Santosh; Wang, Huaien; Yong, Raymund L; Zou, Hongyan; Friedel, Roland H

    2015-03-30

    Invasive growth is a major determinant of the high lethality of malignant gliomas. Plexin-B2, an axon guidance receptor important for mediating neural progenitor cell migration during development, is upregulated in gliomas, but its function therein remains poorly understood. Combining bioinformatic analyses, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry of patient samples, we demonstrate that Plexin-B2 is consistently upregulated in all types of human gliomas and that its expression levels correlate with glioma grade and poor survival. Activation of Plexin-B2 by Sema4C ligand in glioblastoma cells induced actin-based cytoskeletal dynamics and invasive migration in vitro. This proinvasive effect was associated with activation of the cell motility mediators RhoA and Rac1. Furthermore, costimulation of Plexin-B2 and the receptor tyrosine kinase Met led to synergistic Met phosphorylation. In intracranial glioblastoma transplants, Plexin-B2 knockdown hindered invasive growth and perivascular spreading, and resulted in decreased tumor vascularity. Our results demonstrate that Plexin-B2 promotes glioma invasion and vascularization, and they identify Plexin-B2 as a potential novel prognostic marker for glioma malignancy. Targeting the Plexin-B2 pathway may represent a novel therapeutic approach to curtail invasive growth of glioblastoma.

  14. Gamma-glutamylcyclotransferase promotes the growth of human glioma cells by activating Notch-Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shang-Hang; Yu, Ning; Liu, Xi-Yao; Tan, Guo-Wei; Wang, Zhan-Xiang

    2016-03-18

    Glioma as an aggressive type tumor is rapidly growing and has become one of the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT) has been shown as a diagnostic marker in various cancers. To reveal whether there is a correlation between GGCT and human glioma, GGCT expression in human glioma tissues and cell lines was first determined. We found that GGCT expression was up-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. Further, we demonstrate that GGCT knockdown inhibits glioma cell T98G and U251 proliferation and colony formation, whereas GGCT overexpression leads to oppose effects. GGCT overexpression promotes the expression of Notch receptors and activates Akt signaling in glioma cells, and Notch-Akt signaling is activated in glioma tissues with high expression of GGCT. Finally, we show that inhibition of Notch-Akt signaling with Notch inhibitor MK-0752 blocks the effects of GGCT on glioma proliferation and colony formation. In conclusion, GGCT plays a critical role in glioma cell proliferation and may be a potential cancer therapeutic target. - Highlights: • GGCT expression is up-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. • GGCT promotes glioma cell growth and colony formation. • GGCT promotes the activation of Notch-Akt signaling in glioma cells and tissues. • Notch inhibition blocks the role of GGCT in human glioma cells.

  15. Efficacy of Perfusion Computed Tomography (PCT) in Differentiating High-Grade Gliomas from Low Grade Gliomas, Lymphomas, Metastases and Abscess.

    PubMed

    Karegowda, Lakshmikanth Halegubbi; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Shenoy, Poonam Mohan; Paruthikunnan, Samir Mustaffa

    2017-05-01

    Tumoural angioneogenesis and its quantification are important in predicting the tumour grade and in the management with respect to the treatment available and to assess the response to treatment and the prognosis. It also plays major role in the growth and spread of tumours. Hence, a need arises for non-invasive in vivo methods to assess tumour angioneogenesis and tumour grade at the time of presentation and for monitoring the response during treatment and follow up. In this regard Perfusion Computed Tomography (PCT) can be easily added into routine CT studies to obtain such information on lesion physiology along with its morphology. Prospective evaluation of the efficacy of PCT in differentiating high grade gliomas from low grade glioma lymphomas, metastases and abscess. Perfusion CT was performed in 68 patients (17 high-grade gliomas, 10 low-grade gliomas, 7 lymphomas, 27 metastases and 7 abscess). Perfusion parameters which include Cerebral Blood Volume (CBV), Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), Mean Transit Time (MTT) and Time To Peak (TTP) were derived both from the lesion and the normal parenchyma and were Normalized (n) by obtaining the ratio. Statistical analysis for high grade versus low-grade gliomas, high grade gliomas versus lymphomas, metastases and abscess was performed. Difference in the mean nCBV and nCBF in high grade gliomas were statistically significant from low grade gliomas with cut off of > 3.07 for nCBV and > 2.08 for nCBF yielding good sensitivity and specificity. Difference in the mean nCBV and nMTT in the lymphomas were statistically significant from high grade gliomas (p<0.05) with cut off of <3.40 for nCBV and >1.83 for nMTT yielding good sensitivity and specificity. Difference in the mean nCBV and nMTT in the metastases were statistically significant from high grade gliomas (p<0.05) with cut off of >4.95 for nCBV and >1.88 for nMTT yielding a fair sensitivity and specificity. No statistical significant difference seen among the parameters in

  16. [Bilateral cerebellar hematoma after supratentorial glioma surgery].

    PubMed

    Czepko, Ryszard; Kwinta, Borys; Uhl, Henryka; Urbanik, Andrzej; Libionka, Witold; Pietraszko, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    We present a case of bilateral hematoma in cerebellar hemispheres in a 30-year-old man after surgical treatment of extensive left frontal glioma. 16 hours after surgery the patient lost consciousness. An immediate CT revealed hematoma in both cerebellar hemispheres. The hematoma was subsequently removed via bilateral suboccipital craniectomy. After the operation the clinical status of the patient gradually improved - he was discharged in a good general condition. In the presented case the hematoma developed presumably as a consequence of extensive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) loss (670 ml) via postoperative wound drainage. The resulting cerebellar displacement caused strain of the draining veins, affecting blood outflow, and causing parenchymal hemorrhage. In order to prevent the complication, massive CSF loss during and after operation should be avoided. Careful monitoring of the patient's condition in the postoperative period, even if the general status is good, is important because only an immediate intervention may prevent the development of irreversible consequences of cerebellar hematoma formation.

  17. Molecularly Targeted Therapies for Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Argyriou, Andreas A; Kalofonos, Haralabos P

    2009-01-01

    This review critically evaluates current knowledge of molecularly targeted therapies of malignant gliomas. Various molecularly targeted single-agent therapies, including targeted therapies of growth and survival, have been evaluated in clinical trials but have failed to demonstrate a significant survival benefit compared with standard treatment regimens. The efficacy of multi-targeted kinase inhibitors or combinations of single-targeted kinase inhibitors is a promising strategy, but requires additional clinical evaluation before definitive conclusions can be made. Important areas for further research include the assessment of serum or tissue biomarkers, the elucidation of prognostic molecular markers, and the determination of whether the mechanism of action of a drug is appropriate to the genetic alterations observed within individual tumors. PMID:19148300

  18. Three-dimensional cultured glioma cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Marley, Garry M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional glioma spheroids were produced in vitro with size and histological differentiation previously unattained. The spheroids were grown in liquid media suspension in a Johnson Space Center (JSC) Rotating Wall Bioreactor without using support matrices such as microcarrier beads. Spheroid volumes of greater than 3.5 cu mm and diameters of 2.5 mm were achieved with a viable external layer or rim of proliferating cells, a transitional layer beneath the external layer with histological differentiation, and a degenerative central region with a hypoxic necrotic core. Cell debris was evident in the degenerative central region. The necrotics centers of some of the spheroids had hyaline droplets. Granular bodies were detected predominantly in the necrotic center.

  19. Ganglioside GD3 Enhances Invasiveness of Gliomas by Forming a Complex with Platelet-derived Growth Factor Receptor α and Yes Kinase.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Yuki; Momota, Hiroyuki; Kato, Akira; Hashimoto, Noboru; Tsuda, Yusuke; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi; Suzumura, Akio; Furukawa, Keiko; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Natsume, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2015-06-26

    There have been a few studies on the ganglioside expression in human glioma tissues. However, the role of these gangliosides such as GD3 and GD2 has not been well understood. In this study we employed a genetically engineered mouse model of glioma to clarify the functions of GD3 in gliomas. Forced expression of platelet-derived growth factor B in cultured astrocytes derived from p53-deficient mice resulted in the expression of GD3 and GD2. GD3-positive astrocytes exhibited increased cell growth and invasion activities along with elevated phosphorylation of Akt and Yes kinase. By enzyme-mediated activation of radical sources reaction and mass spectrometry, we identified PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) as a GD3-associated molecule. GD3-positive astrocytes showed a significant amount of PDGFRα in glycolipid-enriched microdomains/rafts compared with GD3-negative cells. Src kinase family Yes was co-precipitated with PDGFRα, and its pivotal role in the increased cell invasion of GD3-positive astrocytes was demonstrated by silencing with anti-Yes siRNA. Direct association between PDGFRα and GD3 was also shown, suggesting that GD3 forms ternary complex with PDGFRα and Yes. The fact that GD3, PDGFRα, and activated Yes were colocalized in lamellipodia and the edge of tumors in cultured cells and glioma tissues, respectively, suggests that GD3 induced by platelet-derived growth factor B enhances PDGF signals in glycolipid-enriched microdomain/rafts, leading to the promotion of malignant phenotypes such as cell proliferation and invasion in gliomas.

  20. Ganglioside GD3 Enhances Invasiveness of Gliomas by Forming a Complex with Platelet-derived Growth Factor Receptor α and Yes Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, Yuki; Momota, Hiroyuki; Kato, Akira; Hashimoto, Noboru; Tsuda, Yusuke; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi; Suzumura, Akio; Furukawa, Keiko; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Natsume, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    There have been a few studies on the ganglioside expression in human glioma tissues. However, the role of these gangliosides such as GD3 and GD2 has not been well understood. In this study we employed a genetically engineered mouse model of glioma to clarify the functions of GD3 in gliomas. Forced expression of platelet-derived growth factor B in cultured astrocytes derived from p53-deficient mice resulted in the expression of GD3 and GD2. GD3-positive astrocytes exhibited increased cell growth and invasion activities along with elevated phosphorylation of Akt and Yes kinase. By enzyme-mediated activation of radical sources reaction and mass spectrometry, we identified PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) as a GD3-associated molecule. GD3-positive astrocytes showed a significant amount of PDGFRα in glycolipid-enriched microdomains/rafts compared with GD3-negative cells. Src kinase family Yes was co-precipitated with PDGFRα, and its pivotal role in the increased cell invasion of GD3-positive astrocytes was demonstrated by silencing with anti-Yes siRNA. Direct association between PDGFRα and GD3 was also shown, suggesting that GD3 forms ternary complex with PDGFRα and Yes. The fact that GD3, PDGFRα, and activated Yes were colocalized in lamellipodia and the edge of tumors in cultured cells and glioma tissues, respectively, suggests that GD3 induced by platelet-derived growth factor B enhances PDGF signals in glycolipid-enriched microdomain/rafts, leading to the promotion of malignant phenotypes such as cell proliferation and invasion in gliomas. PMID:25940087

  1. History of chickenpox in glioma risk: a report from the glioma international case-control study (GICC).

    PubMed

    Amirian, E Susan; Scheurer, Michael E; Zhou, Renke; Wrensch, Margaret R; Armstrong, Georgina N; Lachance, Daniel; Olson, Sara H; Lau, Ching C; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Jenkins, Robert B; Bernstein, Jonine L; Merrell, Ryan T; Davis, Faith G; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2016-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic α-herpesvirus that causes chickenpox and establishes life-long latency in the cranial nerve and dorsal root ganglia of the host. To date, VZV is the only virus consistently reported to have an inverse association with glioma. The Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC) is a large, multisite consortium with data on 4533 cases and 4171 controls collected across five countries. Here, we utilized the GICC data to confirm the previously reported associations between history of chickenpox and glioma risk in one of the largest studies to date on this topic. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling, we found that a positive history of chickenpox was associated with a 21% lower glioma risk, adjusting for age and sex (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.65-0.96). Furthermore, the protective effect of chickenpox was stronger for high-grade gliomas. Our study provides additional evidence that the observed protective effect of chickenpox against glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. Future studies, including meta-analyses of the literature and investigations of the potential biological mechanism, are warranted. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. DNA content and chromosomal composition of malignant human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bigner, S H; Bjerkvig, R; Laerum, O D

    1985-11-01

    A short review is given on DNA aberrations and chromosomal composition of malignant human gliomas. By flow cytometric DNA analysis, a wide range of different ploidies has been reported in biopsied gliomas, from diploid to strongly aneuploid nuclear DNA. However, with the preparation and analysis methods used so far, no clear relationship between the type of ploidy and histology or prognosis has been established. A high proportion of glioblastomas is near-diploid, indicating a high degree of biologic malignancy is not necessarily connected to aberration of the nuclear DNA content. It is possible that improved methods giving a higher degree of resolution will allow separation of the near-diploid populations of malignant human gliomas from normal diploid cells and permit the detection of subpopulations with small differences from the dominant DNA mode. Chromosomal studies of malignant gliomas have confirmed that the majority of them have near-diploid stemlines. These populations are seldom normal diploid, however, as both numerical and structural abnormalities are usually present. In addition, chromosomal analyses have shown that when gliomas are bimodal, the polyploid populations are usually doubled versions of the near-diploid ones. In contrast to the near-diploid populations that characterize biopsied malignant gliomas, both FCM studies and karyotyping have demonstrated that permanent cultured cell lines derived from malignant gliomas are usually near-triploid or near-tetraploid. Sequential karyotypic studies of these tumors from biopsy through establishment in vitro have shown an evolutionary pattern consisting of doubling of the original stemline, followed by gains or losses of individual chromosomes with new marker formation in late culture. Evaluation of biopsied malignant gliomas by karyotyping has also demonstrated that subgroups of them are characterized by specific numerical and structural deviations. These groupings may prove useful in predicting prognosis

  3. Functionally Active Gap Junctions between Connexin 43-Positive Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Gabashvili, A N; Baklaushev, V P; Grinenko, N F; Levinskii, A B; Mel'nikov, P A; Cherepanov, S A; Chekhonin, V P

    2015-05-01

    The formation of functional gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and cells of low-grade rat glioma C6 cells was studied in in vitro experiments. Immunocytochemical analysis with antibodies to connexin 43 extracellular loop 2 showed that mesenchymal stem cells as well as C6 glioma cells express the main astroglial gap junction protein connexin 43. Analysis of migration activity showed that mesenchymal stem cells actively migrate towards C6 glioma cells. During co-culturing, mesenchymal stem cells and glioma C6 form functionally active gap junctions mediating the transport of cytoplasmic dye from glioma cells to mesenchymal stem cells in the opposite direction. Fluorometry showed that the intensity of transport of low-molecular substances through heterologous gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and glioma cells is similar to that through homologous gap junctions between glioma cells. This phenomenon can be used for the development of new methods of cell therapy of high-grade gliomas.

  4. Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Low Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Melanocytic Lesion; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  5. ME-09DYNAMIC EVIDENCE OF TUMOR INDUCED MICROGLIA ACTIVATION AT THE INFILTRATIVE MARGINS OF GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Joseph; Gil, Orlando; Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; Rockne, Russell; Gallaher, Jill; Massey, Susan; Anderson, Alexander; Bruce, Jeffrey; Canoll, Peter; Swanson, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Microglia are a major cellular component of malignant glioma, and in some cases, compose up to 40% of the mass of the tumor. Previous studies have shown that microglia can decrease T-cell response to glioma, and their abundance is correlated with increased histologic grade. These studies suggest that microglia facilitate the progression and infiltration of glioma, however the dynamics of the relationship between tumor cells and microglia are not well characterized. METHODS: In this work, we examined the dynamic migratory behavior of glioma and microglia cells using two-color time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of brain slices from a PDGF-driven rat model of glioma in which glioma cells and microglia were labeled with separate fluorescent markers. We quantified glioma cells and microglia motility through single cell tracking and particle image velocimetry. RESULTS: We found that microglia were predominately abundant within the tumor mass and that microglia motility was strongly correlated with the presence of glioma cells. This provides the first dynamic evidence that glioma induces microglial motility. We found that motility of glioma cells and microglia were variably correlated. Our results also show that microglia and glioma cells exhibit stark differences in migratory behavior. Microglia move by a simple random walk, while glioma cells exhibit highly persistent motion, characterized as super diffusion, within the same microenvironment indicating intrinsic differences in response to migratory cues. CONCLUSION: These results provide the first dynamic evidence of glioma cells stimulating the activation of microglia, by means of increasing motility and localization in and around the infiltrative edge of glioma. Further, these results show dynamic interactions between glioma and microglia and suggest that glioma cells and microglia are either responding to different migratory cues, or are responding to the same cues in different ways.

  6. The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Terakawa, Yuzo; Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A.; Croul, Sidney E.; Rutka, James T.

    2013-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ► Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ► Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ► We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ► Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

  7. Surgical Outcomes of High-Grade Spinal Cord Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Syunsuke; Aoyama, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to obtain useful information for establishing the guidelines for treating high-grade spinal cord gliomas. Overview of Literature The optimal management of high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains controversial. We report the outcomes of the surgical management of 14 high-grade spinal glioma. Methods We analyzed the outcomes of 14 patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas who were surgically treated between 1989 and 2012. Survival was charted with the Kaplan-Meier plots and comparisons were made with the log-rank test. Results None of the patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas underwent total resection. Subtotal resection was performed in two patients, partial resection was performed in nine patients, and open biopsy was performed in three patients. All patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy and six patients further underwent radiation cordotomy. The median survival time for patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas was 15 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 22.2%. The median survival time for patients with World Health Organization grade III tumors was 25.5 months, whereas the median survival time for patients with glioblastoma multiforme was 12.5 months. Both univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated a significant effect only in the group that did not include cervical cord lesion as a factor associated with survival (p=0.04 and 0.03). Conclusions The surgical outcome of patients diagnosed with high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains poor. Notably, only the model which excluded cervical cord lesions as a factor significantly predicted survival. PMID:26713128

  8. Reproductive factors and risk of glioma in women.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kui; Whelan, Elizabeth A; Ruder, Avima M; Ward, Elizabeth M; Deddens, James A; Davis-King, Karen E; Carreón, Tania; Waters, Martha A; Butler, Mary Ann; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Schulte, Paul A; Zivkovich, Zachary; Heineman, Ellen F; Mandel, Jack S; Morton, Roscoe F; Reding, Douglas J; Rosenman, Kenneth D

    2004-10-01

    Glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults, responsible for 75% of adult primary malignant brain tumors, yet aside from its association with ionizing radiation, its etiology is poorly understood. Sex differences in brain tumor incidence suggest that hormonal factors may play a role in the etiology of these tumors, but few studies have examined this association in detail. The objective of this study was to explore the role of reproductive factors in the etiology of glioma in women. As part of a population-based case-control study, histologically confirmed primary glioma cases (n = 341 women) diagnosed between January 1, 1995 and January 31, 1997 were identified through clinics and hospitals in four Midwest U.S. states. Controls (n = 527 women) were randomly selected from lists of licensed drivers and Health Care Finance Administration enrollees. In-person interviews with subjects (81%) or their proxies (19%) collected reproductive history and other exposure information. Glioma risk increased with older age at menarche (P for trend = 0.009) but only among postmenopausal women. Compared with women who never breast-fed, women who breast-fed >18 months over their lifetime were at increased risk of glioma (odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.9). Women who reported using hormones for symptoms of menopause had a decreased risk of glioma compared with women who never used such hormones (odds ratio, 0.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.5-1.1). These results support the hypothesis that reproductive hormones play a role in the etiology of glioma among women.

  9. Overexpression of IL-7 enhances cisplatin resistance in glioma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Fu, Jun; Pang, Jesse Chung-Sean; Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Liu, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Fu-Rong; Shi, Hong-Liu; Ng, Ho-Keung; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2012-05-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents for glioma patients. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was used to identify genes associated with cisplatin resistance in a human glioma cell line. The cisplatin-resistant U251/CP2 cell line was derived by stepwise selection using cisplatin. The genetic aberrations of the U251 parental cell line and the U251/CP2 cells were analyzed using aCGH. RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of the altered genes revealed by aCGH. The sensitivity of glioma cells to cisplatin was determined by using the MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using flow cytometry and western blot analysis. The IC 50 value of cisplatin in U251/CP2 cells was five times higher than its IC 50 in U251 cells. The U251 cells lost at least one copy each of the CFHR1 and CFHR3 genes, and both CFHR1 and CFHR3 were homozygously deleted in U251/CP2 cells. The U251/CP2 cells gained two to three copies of C8orf70 and IL-7 genes. IL-7 mRNA expression was studied in 12 glioma cell lines, and expression was positively correlated with the IC 50 of cisplatin. Furthermore, IL-7 mRNA expression was also positively correlated with the IC 50 of cisplatin in 91 clinical glioma specimens. Additionally, treatment with recombinant human IL-7 (rhIL-7) enhanced cisplatin resistance and increased the relative growth rate of the glioma cells. Moreover, the apoptosis induced by cisplatin could be inhibited by IL-7. In conclusion, our results suggest that IL-7 may play an important role in cisplatin resistance in glioma.

  10. Corpus callosum involvement and postoperative outcomes of patients with gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ko-Ting; Wu, Tai-Wei Erich; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Hsin; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Chang, Chen-Nen; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Pai, Ping-Ching; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Corpus callosum involvement is associated with poorer survival in high grade glioma (HGG), but the prognostic value in low grade glioma (LGG) is unclear. To determine the prognostic impact of corpus callosum involvement on progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in HGG and LGG, the records of 233 glioma patients treated from 2008 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images were used to identify corpus callosum involvement. Age, sex, preoperative Karnofsky performance scale, postoperative Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score and extent of resection (EOR) were evaluated with respect to PFS and OS. The incidence of corpus callosum involvement was similar among HGG (14 %) and LGG (14.5 %). Univariate analysis revealed that PFS and OS were significantly shorter in both WHO grade II and grade IV glioma with corpus callosum involvement (both, p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that grade II glioma with corpus callosum involvement have shorter PFS (p = 0.03), while EOR, instead of corpus callosum involvement (p = 0.16), was an independent factor associated with PFS in grade IV glioma (p < 0.05). Corpus callosum involvement was no longer significantly associated with OS after adjusting age, gender, EOR, preoperative and postoperative performance status (p = 0.16, 0.17 and 0.56 in grade II, III and IV gliomas, respectively). Corpus callosum involvement happened in both LGG and HGG, and is associated with lower EOR and higher postoperative ECOG score both in LGG and HGG. Corpus callosum involvement tends to be an independent prognostic factor for PFS in LGG, but not for OS in LGG or in HGG.

  11. Gap junctions modulate glioma invasion by direct transfer of microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xiaoting; Sin, Wun Chey; Harris, Andrew L.; Naus, Christian C.

    2015-01-01

    The invasiveness of high-grade glioma is the primary reason for poor survival following treatment. Interaction between glioma cells and surrounding astrocytes are crucial to invasion. We investigated the role of gap junction mediated miRNA transfer in this context. By manipulating gap junctions with a gap junction inhibitor, siRNAs, and a dominant negative connexin mutant, we showed that functional glioma-glioma gap junctions suppress glioma invasion while glioma-astrocyte and astrocyte-astrocyte gap junctions promote it in an in vitro transwell invasion assay. After demonstrating that glioma-astrocyte gap junctions are permeable to microRNA, we compared the microRNA profiles of astrocytes before and after co-culture with glioma cells, identifying specific microRNAs as candidates for transfer through gap junctions from glioma cells to astrocytes. Further analysis showed that transfer of miR-5096 from glioma cells to astrocytes is through gap junctions; this transfer is responsible, in part, for the pro-invasive effect. Our results establish a role for glioma-astrocyte gap junction mediated microRNA signaling in modulation of glioma invasive behavior, and that gap junction coupling among astrocytes magnifies the pro-invasive signaling. Our findings reveal the potential for therapeutic interventions based on abolishing alteration of stromal cells by tumor cells via manipulation of microRNA and gap junction channel activity. PMID:25978028

  12. Gap junctions modulate glioma invasion by direct transfer of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiaoting; Sin, Wun Chey; Harris, Andrew L; Naus, Christian C

    2015-06-20

    The invasiveness of high-grade glioma is the primary reason for poor survival following treatment. Interaction between glioma cells and surrounding astrocytes are crucial to invasion. We investigated the role of gap junction mediated miRNA transfer in this context. By manipulating gap junctions with a gap junction inhibitor, siRNAs, and a dominant negative connexin mutant, we showed that functional glioma-glioma gap junctions suppress glioma invasion while glioma-astrocyte and astrocyte-astrocyte gap junctions promote it in an in vitro transwell invasion assay. After demonstrating that glioma-astrocyte gap junctions are permeable to microRNA, we compared the microRNA profiles of astrocytes before and after co-culture with glioma cells, identifying specific microRNAs as candidates for transfer through gap junctions from glioma cells to astrocytes. Further analysis showed that transfer of miR-5096 from glioma cells to astrocytes is through gap junctions; this transfer is responsible, in part, for the pro-invasive effect. Our results establish a role for glioma-astrocyte gap junction mediated microRNA signaling in modulation of glioma invasive behavior, and that gap junction coupling among astrocytes magnifies the pro-invasive signaling. Our findings reveal the potential for therapeutic interventions based on abolishing alteration of stromal cells by tumor cells via manipulation of microRNA and gap junction channel activity.

  13. Stem cell-mediated delivery of therapies in the treatment of glioma.

    PubMed

    Frosina, G

    2011-06-01

    High grade gliomas can be seldom controlled, due to the infiltrative nature of these tumors and the presence of cell populations resistant to radio- and chemotherapy. Current research aims to develop novel therapeutic approaches to track and eliminate the disseminated glioma-driving cells. Selected delivery of therapeutic agents taking advantage of the tropism of normal stem cells for glioma cells might be one.

  14. Mitochondrial Lon is over-expressed in high-grade gliomas, and mediates hypoxic adaptation: potential role of Lon as a therapeutic target in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Di, Kaijun; Lomeli, Naomi; Wood, Spencer D.; Vanderwal, Christopher D.; Bota, Daniela A.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of cancer biology. Tumor mitochondrial metabolism is characterized by an abnormal ability to function in scarce oxygen conditions through glycolysis (the Warburg effect), and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA defects are present in both hereditary neoplasia and sporadic cancers. Mitochondrial Lon is a major regulator of mitochondrial metabolism and the mitochondrial response to free radical damage, and plays an essential role in the maintenance and repair of mitochondrial DNA. Despite these critical cellular functions of Lon, very little has been reported regarding its role in glioma. Lon expression in gliomas and its relevance with patient survival was examined using published databases and human tissue sections. The effect of Lon in glioma biology was investigated through siRNA targeting Lon. We also tested the in vitro antitumor activity of Lon inhibitor, CC4, in the glioma cell lines D-54 and U-251. High Lon expression was associated with high glioma tumor grade and poor patient survival. While Lon expression was elevated in response to a variety of stimuli, Lon knockdown in glioma cell lines decreased cell viability under normal conditions, and dramatically impaired glioma cell survival under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, the Lon inhibitor, CC4, efficiently prohibited glioma cell proliferation and synergistically enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agents, temozolomide (TMZ) and cisplatin. We demonstrate that Lon plays a key role in glioma cell hypoxic survival and mitochondrial respiration, and propose Lon as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:27764809

  15. Spontaneous immune responses against glioma-associated antigens in a long term survivor with malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Ryo; Low, Keri L; Zhu, Xinmei; Fujita, Mitsugu; Sasaki, Kotaro; Whiteside, Theresa L; Butterfield, Lisa H; Okada, Hideho

    2007-01-01

    Background In patients with high grade glioma, little is known regarding existence of naturally occurring adaptive T cell reactivity against glioma-associated antigens (GAAs). In this report, we characterized GAA-specific CD8+ T cells and innate immune cells in a patient who has survived with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) for over 12 years without recurrence. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from the long term survivor with AA were evaluated for the frequency, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and differentiation status of CD8+ cells recognizing GAA-derived epitopes as well as relative numbers of other immune cell subsets. This patient's AA tissue was evaluated for expression of two GAAs EphA2 and interleukin-13 receptor α2 subunit (IL-13Rα2) by immunohistochemistry. Results The patient's tumor expressed both EphA2 and IL-13Rα2, and in vitro stimulated PBMC demonstrated superior EphA2883–891 and IL-13Rα2345–353-specific CTL reactivity compared to PBMC samples from two other patients with progressing malignant glioma. Unstimulated EphA2883–891-reactive CD8+ T cells contained high numbers of CD45RA-/CCR7- late effector and CD45RA-/CCR7+ central memory cells. Among other leukocyte subsets, elevated numbers of NK-T cells were found. Conclusion To our knowledge, the current study is one of the first demonstrating the presence of antigen-experienced, GAA-reactive CD8+ T cells in a patient who has survived with AA for over 12 years without recurrence. Further studies are warranted to determine whether the status of GAA-reactive CD8+ T cells dictates survival of patients and/or response to therapeutic vaccines. PMID:18093336

  16. Mutant IDH1 Disrupts the Mouse Subventricular Zone and Alters Brain Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Christopher J; Carpenter, Austin B; Waitkus, Matthew S; Wang, Catherine Y; Zhu, Huishan; Hansen, Landon J; Chen, Lee H; Greer, Paula K; Feng, Jie; Wang, Yu; Bock, Cheryl B; Fan, Ping; Spasojevic, Ivan; McLendon, Roger E; Bigner, Darell D; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai

    2017-02-01

    IDH1 mutations occur in the majority of low-grade gliomas and lead to the production of the oncometabolite, D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). To understand the effects of tumor-associated mutant IDH1 (IDH1-R132H) on both the neural stem cell (NSC) population and brain tumorigenesis, genetically faithful cell lines and mouse model systems were generated. Here, it is reported that mouse NSCs expressing Idh1-R132H displayed reduced proliferation due to p53-mediated cell cycle arrest as well as a decreased ability to undergo neuronal differentiation. In vivo, Idh1-R132H expression reduced proliferation of cells within the germinal zone of the subventricular zone (SVZ). The NSCs within this area were dispersed and disorganized in mutant animals, suggesting that Idh1-R132H perturbed the NSCs and the microenvironment from which gliomas arise. Additionally, tumor-bearing animals expressing mutant Idh1 displayed a prolonged survival and also overexpressed Olig2, features consistent with IDH1-mutated human gliomas. These data indicate that mutant Idh1 disrupts the NSC microenvironment and the candidate cell of origin for glioma; thus, altering the progression of tumorigenesis. Additionally, this study provides a mutant Idh1 brain tumor model that genetically recapitulates human disease, laying the foundation for future investigations on mutant IDH1-mediated brain tumorigenesis and targeted therapy.

  17. Novel cancer-testis antigen expression on glioma cell lines derived from high-grade glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Komiyama, Masaru; Miyata, Haruo; Yagoto, Mika; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Iizuka, Akira; Oshita, Chie; Kume, Akiko; Nogami, Masahiro; Ito, Ichiro; Watanabe, Reiko; Sugino, Takashi; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most malignant and aggressive tumors, and has a very poor prognosis with a mean survival time of <2 years, despite intensive treatment using chemo-radiation. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches including immunotherapy have been developed against GBM. For the purpose of identifying novel target antigens contributing to GBM treatment, we developed 17 primary glioma cell lines derived from high-grade glioma patients, and analyzed the expression of various tumor antigens and glioma-associated markers using a quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC). A quantitative PCR using 54 cancer-testis (CT) antigen-specific primers showed that 36 CT antigens were positive in at least 1 of 17 serum-derived cell lines, and 17 antigens were positive in >50% cell lines. Impressively, 6 genes (BAGE, MAGE-A12, CASC5, CTAGE1, DDX43 and IL-13RA2) were detected in all cell lines. The expression of other 13 glioma-associated antigens than CT genes were also investigated, and 10 genes were detected in >70% cell lines. The expression of CT antigen and glioma-associated antigen genes with a high frequency were also verified in IHC analysis. Moreover, a relationship of antigen gene expressions with a high frequency to overall survival was investigated using the Repository of Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) database of the National Cancer Institute, and expression of 6 genes including IL-13RA2 was inversely correlated to overall survival time. Furthermore, 4 genes including DDX43, TDRD1, HER2 and gp100 were identified as MGMT-relevant factors. In the present study, several CT antigen including novel genes were detected in high-grade glioma primary cell lines, which might contribute to developing novel immunotherapy and glioma-specific biomarkers in future.

  18. Fenretinide Activates Caspases and Induces Apoptosis in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Puduvalli, Vinaykumar K.; Saito, Yoshiki; Xu, Ruishu; Kouraklis, Gregory P.; Levin, Victor A.; Kyritsis, Athanassios P.

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic retinoid fenretinide (N-[4-hydroxyphenyl] retinamide or 4HPR) has been shown to not only inhibit cell growth but also to induce apoptosis in a variety of malignant cell lines. It is being tested presently for its potential as a chemopreventive agent against several cancers. A related retinoid, 13-cis-retinoic acid (cRA), has been shown to have activity against gliomas in vitro as well as in a recent clinical study. The present study aimed at assessing the activity of fenretinide against glioma cells in vitro and comparing it with that of cRA at pharmacologically relevant doses. We hypothesized that the ability of fenretinide to induce apoptosis would make it more potent against gliomas than cRA. Four glioma cell lines (D54, U251, U87MG, and EFC-2) were treated with fenretinide (1–100 µM) and showed dose- and time-dependent induction of cell death. At pharmacologically relevant doses, fenretinide was more active against glioma cells than cRA because of its ability to induce apoptosis. Flow cytometric studies using D54 cells demonstrated no significant changes in the cell cycle distribution compared with untreated control, but a sub-G1 fraction consistent with apoptosis was detected. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assay indicated that the apoptotic fraction was cell cycle nonspecific. Fenretinide treatment resulted in cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase, indicating an activation of the caspase 3. Immunofluorescence studies using the nuclear stain 4′,6-diamidine-2′-phenylindole dihydrochloride showed nuclear condensation and an apoptotic morphology. Hence, this study demonstrates that, at clinically relevant doses, fenretinide is a potent inducer of apoptosis in gliomas acting via the caspase pathway. We also show that at clinically achievable doses, fenretinide has more activity against gliomas than comparable doses of cRA. The favorable side effect profile seen in previous clinical studies and the in vitro

  19. Deciphering the 8q24.21 association for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Enciso-Mora, Victor; Hosking, Fay J.; Kinnersley, Ben; Wang, Yufei; Shete, Sanjay; Zelenika, Diana; Broderick, Peter; Idbaih, Ahmed; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Marie, Yannick; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Labussière, Marianne; Dobbins, Sara; Boisselier, Blandine; Ciccarino, Pietro; Rossetto, Marta; Armstrong, Georgina; Liu, Yanhong; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Lau, Ching; Hepworth, Sarah J.; Strauch, Konstantin; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Moebus, Susanne; Eisele, Lewin; Forsti, Asta; Hemminki, Kari; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Lathrop, Mark; Simon, Matthias; Bondy, Melissa; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified tagSNPs at 8q24.21 influencing glioma risk. We have sought to fine-map the location of the functional basis of this association using data from four genome-wide association studies, comprising a total of 4147 glioma cases and 7435 controls. To improve marker density across the 700 kb region, we imputed genotypes using 1000 Genomes Project data and high-coverage sequencing data generated on 253 individuals. Analysis revealed an imputed low-frequency SNP rs55705857 (P = 2.24 × 10−38) which was sufficient to fully capture the 8q24.21 association. Analysis by glioma subtype showed the association with rs55705857 confined to non-glioblastoma multiforme (non-GBM) tumours (P = 1.07 × 10−67). Validation of the non-GBM association was shown in three additional datasets (625 non-GBM cases, 2412 controls; P = 1.41 × 10−28). In the pooled analysis, the odds ratio for low-grade glioma associated with rs55705857 was 4.3 (P = 2.31 × 10−94). rs55705857 maps to a highly evolutionarily conserved sequence within the long non-coding RNA CCDC26 raising the possibility of direct functionality. These data provide additional insights into the aetiological basis of glioma development. PMID:23399484

  20. The molecular biology of WHO grade II gliomas.

    PubMed

    Marko, Nicholas F; Weil, Robert J

    2013-02-01

    The WHO grading scheme for glial neoplasms assigns Grade II to 5 distinct tumors of astrocytic or oligodendroglial lineage: diffuse astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, oligoastrocytoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, and pilomyxoid astrocytoma. Although commonly referred to collectively as among the "low-grade gliomas," these 5 tumors represent molecularly and clinically unique entities. Each is the subject of active basic research aimed at developing a more complete understanding of its molecular biology, and the pace of such research continues to accelerate. Additionally, because managing and predicting the course of these tumors has historically proven challenging, translational research regarding Grade II gliomas continues in the hopes of identifying novel molecular features that can better inform diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic strategies. Unfortunately, the basic and translational literature regarding the molecular biology of WHO Grade II gliomas remains nebulous. The authors' goal for this review was to present a comprehensive discussion of current knowledge regarding the molecular characteristics of these 5 WHO Grade II tumors on the chromosomal, genomic, and epigenomic levels. Additionally, they discuss the emerging evidence suggesting molecular differences between adult and pediatric Grade II gliomas. Finally, they present an overview of current strategies for using molecular data to classify low-grade gliomas into clinically relevant categories based on tumor biology.

  1. Clinicopathologic implications of NF1 gene alterations in diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Vizcaíno, M Adelita; Shah, Smit; Eberhart, Charles G; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have identified somatic alterations in the gene encoding for neurofibromin (NF1) in a subset of glioblastoma (GBM), usually associated with the mesenchymal molecular subtype. To understand the significance of NF1 genetic alterations in diffuse gliomas in general, we evaluated public databases and tested for NF1 copy number alterations in a cohort using fluorescence in situ hybridization. NF1 genetic loss (homozygous NF1 deletions or mutations with predicted functional consequences) was present in 30 (of 281) (11%) GBM and 21 (of 286) (7%) lower-grade gliomas in The Cancer Genome Atlas data. Furthermore, NF1 loss was associated with worse overall and disease-specific survival in the lower-grade glioma, but not GBM, Group in The Cancer Genome Atlas cohort. IDH1 or 2 mutations co-existed in lower-grade gliomas with NF1 loss (36%) but not in GBM. In our cohort studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization, NF1/17q (n = 2) or whole Ch17 (n = 3) losses were only identified in the GBM group (5/86 [6%]). Tumors with NF1/Ch17 loss were predominantly adult GBM (4/5); lacked EGFR amplification (0/4), strong p53 immunolabeling (1/5), or IDH1 (R132H) protein expression (0/5); but expressed the mesenchymal marker podoplanin in 4/5. NF1 genetic loss occurs in a subset of diffuse gliomas, and its significance deserves further exploration.

  2. A Graphic Method for Identification of Novel Glioma Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Yang, Lei; He, Yi-Chun; Li, Li-Peng; Huang, GuaHua; Li, Hai-Peng

    2014-01-01

    Glioma, as the most common and lethal intracranial tumor, is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. Good comprehension of the mechanism underlying this disease is very helpful to design effective treatments. However, up to now, the knowledge of this disease is still limited. It is an important step to understand the mechanism underlying this disease by uncovering its related genes. In this study, a graphic method was proposed to identify novel glioma related genes based on known glioma related genes. A weighted graph was constructed according to the protein-protein interaction information retrieved from STRING and the well-known shortest path algorithm was employed to discover novel genes. The following analysis suggests that some of them are related to the biological process of glioma, proving that our method was effective in identifying novel glioma related genes. We hope that the proposed method would be applied to study other diseases and provide useful information to medical workers, thereby designing effective treatments of different diseases. PMID:25050377

  3. Concurrent thermochemoradiotherapy for brain high-grade glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, A. I.; Novikov, V. A.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Bober, E. E.; Frolova, I. G.; Baranova, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the achievements in the current strategies for treatment, the prognosis in malignant glioma patients remains unsatisfactory. Hyperthermia is currently considered to be the most effective and universal modifier of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preliminary treatment outcomes for 28 patients with newly diagnosed (23) and recurrent (5) high-grade gliomas were presented. All the patients received multimodality treatment including surgery, thermoche-moradiotherapy followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. All the patients endured thermochemoradiotherapy well. A complication, limited skin burn (II stage), was diagnosed in two cases and treated conservatively without treatment interruption. A month after thermochemoradiotherapy the results were as follows: complete regression was achieved in 4 cases, partial regression in 4 cases, stable disease in 14 cases and disease progression in 6 cases (one of them is pseudo-progression). After completing the adjuvant chemotherapy 2 more patients demonstrated complete response and 1 patient had disease progression. Introduction of local hyperthermia in multimodal therapy of malignant glioma does not impair the combined modality treatment tolerability of patients with malignant gliomas. A small number of studied patients and short follow-up time do not allow making reliable conclusions about the impact of local hyperthermia on the treatment outcomes; however, there is a tendency towards the increase in disease-free survival in the patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas.

  4. Epo is involved in angiogenesis in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Nico, Beatrice; Annese, Tiziana; Guidolin, Diego; Finato, Nicoletta; Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the extent of angiogenesis, evaluated as microvascular density, and the immunoreactivity of tumor cells to erythropoietin (Epo) and of endothelial cells to Epo receptor (EpoR) have been correlated in human glioma specimens, and the effect of anti-Epo antibody on glioma-induced angiogenesis in vivo in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) has been investigated. Results show that: (1) Epo/EpoR expression correlates with angiogenesis, (2) in the CAM assay, tumor bioptic specimens induce a strong angiogenic response, comparable to that induced by VEGF, and (3) an anti-Epo antibody co-administered with tumor bioptic specimens significantly inhibits the angiogenic response. These findings suggest the presence of a loop in the Epo/EpoR system, i.e. Epo is secreted by glioma tumor cells and it affects glioma vascular endothelial cells via its receptor and promotes angiogenesis in a paracrine manner. Moreover, as demonstrated by in vivo experiments, Epo is responsible for the strong angiogenic response induced by human glioma bioptic specimens, because an anti-Epo antibody is able to significantly inhibit this response.

  5. Multidimensional assessment of empathic abilities in patients with insular glioma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Wang, Guangming; Ma, Ru; Jing, Fang; Zhang, Yongjun; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Peng; Niu, Chaoshi; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that there are two possible systems for empathy: affective empathy (AE) and cognitive empathy (CE). Neuroimaging paradigms have proven that the insular cortex is involved in empathy processing, particularly in AE. However, these observations do not provide causal evidence for the role of the insula in empathy. Although impairments in empathy have been described following insular damage in a few case studies, it is not clear whether insular cortex is involved in CE and whether these two systems are impaired independently or laterally in patients with insular gliomas. In this study, we assessed 17 patients with an insular glioma, 17 patients with a noninsular glioma, and 30 healthy controls using a method that combined a self-report empathy questionnaire with the emotion recognition task, assessment of empathy for others' pain, and the emotional perspective-taking paradigm. We found that patients with an insular glioma had lower scores for empathic concern and perspective taking than did either healthy controls or lesion controls. The patients' abilities to recognize facial emotions, perceive others' pain, and understand the emotional perspectives of others were also significantly impaired. Furthermore, we did not observe a laterality effect on either AE or CE among those with insular lesions. These findings revealed that both AE and CE are impaired in patients with an insular glioma and that the insular cortex may be a central neuroanatomical structure in both the AE and CE systems.

  6. Expression Sites of Colligin 2 in Glioma Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Dana; van der Weiden, Marcel; Zheng, PingPin; Nigg, Alex; Luider, Theo M; Kros, Johan M

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study using state-of-the-art proteomic techniques, we identified colligin 2 (HSP47) as a glioma blood vessel-specific protein. In the present study we precisely localized the expression of colligin 2 in the blood vessels of diffusely infiltrating gliomas and relate the expression to the distinct cellular components of the vessels by using multiple immunolabeling and confocal microscopy. We grouped the glioma blood vessels into morphological categories ranging from normal looking capillaries to vessels with hypertrophic and sclerotic changes. The expression patterns of various markers of endothelial and pericytic differentiation were correlated with the position of the cells in the vessels and the expression of colligin 2. We found that colligin 2 is expressed in all categories of glioma blood vessels in cells with endothelial and pericytic lineage. Expression of colligin 2 was also found in cells scattered around blood vessels and in few glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells within the blood vessels. There is overlap in the expression of colligin 2 and the collagens type I and IV for which colligin 2 is a chaperon. We conclude that colligin 2 is expressed in all cellular components of glioma blood vessels and may serve as a general marker for active angiogenesis. PMID:19067716

  7. A graphic method for identification of novel glioma related genes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Shu, Yang; Yang, Lei; He, Yi-Chun; Li, Li-Peng; Huang, GuaHua; Li, Hai-Peng; Jiang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Glioma, as the most common and lethal intracranial tumor, is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. Good comprehension of the mechanism underlying this disease is very helpful to design effective treatments. However, up to now, the knowledge of this disease is still limited. It is an important step to understand the mechanism underlying this disease by uncovering its related genes. In this study, a graphic method was proposed to identify novel glioma related genes based on known glioma related genes. A weighted graph was constructed according to the protein-protein interaction information retrieved from STRING and the well-known shortest path algorithm was employed to discover novel genes. The following analysis suggests that some of them are related to the biological process of glioma, proving that our method was effective in identifying novel glioma related genes. We hope that the proposed method would be applied to study other diseases and provide useful information to medical workers, thereby designing effective treatments of different diseases.

  8. Concurrent thermochemoradiotherapy for brain high-grade glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, A. I. Novikov, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Bober, E. E.; Frolova, I. G.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Gribova, O. V.; Baranova, A. V.

    2016-08-02

    Despite the achievements in the current strategies for treatment, the prognosis in malignant glioma patients remains unsatisfactory. Hyperthermia is currently considered to be the most effective and universal modifier of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preliminary treatment outcomes for 28 patients with newly diagnosed (23) and recurrent (5) high-grade gliomas were presented. All the patients received multimodality treatment including surgery, thermoche-moradiotherapy followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. All the patients endured thermochemoradiotherapy well. A complication, limited skin burn (II stage), was diagnosed in two cases and treated conservatively without treatment interruption. A month after thermochemoradiotherapy the results were as follows: complete regression was achieved in 4 cases, partial regression in 4 cases, stable disease in 14 cases and disease progression in 6 cases (one of them is pseudo-progression). After completing the adjuvant chemotherapy 2 more patients demonstrated complete response and 1 patient had disease progression. Introduction of local hyperthermia in multimodal therapy of malignant glioma does not impair the combined modality treatment tolerability of patients with malignant gliomas. A small number of studied patients and short follow-up time do not allow making reliable conclusions about the impact of local hyperthermia on the treatment outcomes; however, there is a tendency towards the increase in disease-free survival in the patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas.

  9. 2-methoxyestradiol as a potential cytostatic drug in gliomas?

    PubMed

    Kirches, E; Warich-Kirches, M

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas of astrocytic origin show only a limited chemotherapy response. Chemoresistance is most pronounced in glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and most malignant glioma, with median survival times not much longer than one year. Failure of chemotherapy partly relies on protective mechanisms against the commonly used DNA alkylating agents, but also on the constitutive activation of the pro-survival PI3K-Akt pathway in glioma cells, which inhibits apoptosis. Therefore, new drugs with an alternative mechanism, independent of DNA alkylation, are required. The microtubule targeting drug 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) efficiently induces mitotic arrest, apoptosis, but also autophagic cell death in glioma cells in vitro. Moreover, it may be able to inhibit vascularization of the highly vascular gliobastomas, because the drug influences blood vessel sprouting via a HIF-1-dependent mechanism. Although high doses of i.p. injected 2-ME were recently shown to be effective in an orthothopic rat glioma model, clinical phase I/II trials revealed low oral bioavailability. One of the most exciting future perspectives will be the currently ongoing development of improved 2-ME analogs. Compounds, sulphamoylated at positions 3 and 17, combine sufficient toxicity against tumor cells with resistance against metabolic degradation and sufficient plasma levels in experimental animals. They were found to be superior in some animal models of tumor growth and vascularization, following oral application.

  10. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Marteau, Lena; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Roussel, Simon; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele; Bernaudin, Myriam; Petit, Edwige

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  11. Multidisciplinary management of adult low grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Mariş, D; Nica, D; Mohan, D; Moisa, H; Ciurea, A V

    2014-01-01

    Adult hemispheric low grade gliomas (LGG) cover a pathologic spectrum which has specific clinical, histological and molecular characteristics. The optimal management of these tumors is still a controversial topic in international literature. We evaluated scientific papers from the literature (Medline and Cochrane Library to date) and we compared the results found there with our experience, trying to create a pattern of treatment of our own. The advances in microsurgical and neuromonitoring techniques, as well as in neuroimaging, allow for a more aggressive resection of LGG with a significant improvement in overall survival and quality of life. The potential risks of the "wait and see" policy and the neurotoxicity of radiotherapy are challenged by the benefits of careful surgical resection and up-front chemotherapy. The present day treatment strategy, based on recent evidence, should include a maximal surgical resection when possible, with the full preservation of the patients ability, and delayed radiotherapy. The role of temozolomide in the management of LGG and the identification of the therapeutic modality with the best quality of life profile will be determined by ongoing trials. The further characterization of prognostic relevance of molecular markers and data from advanced imaging techniques needs an intensification of research and validation efforts. LGG: low grade gliomas, WHO: World Health Organization, OS: overall survival, PFS: progression-free survival, MRI: Magnetic resonance imaging, MRS: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, MPFS: malignant progression-free survival, rCBV: Relative Cerebral Blood Volume, QOL: quality of life, FLAIR: Fluid attenuated inversion recovery, MGMT: O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase enzyme, DSC MR imaging: Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MR imaging, 1H-MRS: Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, IDH1: isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene, SPECT: Single-photon emission computed tomography, PET: Positron emission

  12. Boldine: a potential new antiproliferative drug against glioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Daniéli; Horn, Ana Paula; Gaelzer, Mariana Maier; Frozza, Rudimar Luiz; Delgado-Cañedo, Andrés; Pelegrini, Alessandra Luiza; Henriques, Amélia T; Lenz, Guido; Salbego, Christianne

    2009-12-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and devastating primary tumors of the central nervous system. Currently no efficient treatment is available. This study evaluated the effect and underlying mechanisms of boldine, an aporphine alkaloid of Peumus boldus, on glioma proliferation and cell death. Boldine decreased the cell number of U138-MG, U87-MG and C6 glioma lines at concentrations of 80, 250 and 500 muM. We observed that cell death caused by boldine was cell-type specific and dose-dependent. Exposure to boldine for 24 h did not activate key mediators of apoptosis. However, it induced alterations in the cell cycle suggesting a G(2)/M arrest in U138-MG cells. Boldine had no toxic effect on non-tumor cells when used at the same concentrations as those used on tumor cells. Based on these results, we speculate that boldine may be a promising compound for evaluation as an anti-cancer agent.

  13. [Gliomas – What I Have to Know in ten Questions].

    PubMed

    Gulden-Sala, Wiebke; Roth, Patrick; Brown, Michelle; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Weller, Michael; Stupp, Roger

    2016-03-16

    Gliomas are the most common primary tumors involving the central nervous system. They can manifest with diverse and non-specific general and neurological symptoms. The diagnostic gold standard is cerebral magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent histological confirmation of the diagnosis. Steroids, especially dexamethasone, are used in case of focal symptoms and of symptoms caused by increased intracranial pressure, and antiepileptic drugs are used to manage epileptic seizures. Non-enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs are preferable. Glioma patients have an inherently elevated thromboembolic risk, and therapeutic anticoagulation is indicated following a thromboembolic event. Surgery, radiotherapy and systemic therapy are used as tumor-specific therapy modalities in gliomas. Molecular markers play an increasing role in the prognosis and selection of therapy in daily oncological routine.

  14. Silver nanoparticles: a novel radiation sensitizer for glioma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peidang; Huang, Zhihai; Chen, Zhongwen; Xu, Ruizhi; Wu, Hao; Zang, Fengchao; Wang, Cailian; Gu, Ning

    2013-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors with a dismal prognosis. Previous investigations by our group demonstrated the radiosensitizing effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on glioma cells in vitro. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of intratumoral administration of AgNPs in combination with a single dose of ionizing radiation at clinically relevant MV energies for the treatment of C6 glioma-bearing rats. AgNPs (10 or 20 μg/10 μl) were stereotactically administered on day 8 after tumor implantation. One day after AgNP injection, rats bearing glioma received 10 Gy radiation. The mean survival times were 100.5 and 98 days, the corresponding percent increase in life spans was 513.2% and 497.7%, and the cure rates were 41.7 and 38.5% at 200 days for the 10 and 20 μg AgNPs and radiation combination groups, respectively. In contrast, the mean survival times for irradiated controls, 10 and 20 μg AgNPs alone, and untreated controls were 24.5, 16.1, 19.4, and 16.4 days, respectively. Furthermore, a cooperative antiproliferative and proapoptotic effect was obtained when gliomas were treated with AgNPs followed by radiotherapy. Our results showed the therapeutic efficacy of AgNPs in combination with radiotherapy without apparent systemic toxicity, suggesting the clinical potential of AgNPs in improving the outcome of malignant glioma radiotherapy.Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors with a dismal prognosis. Previous investigations by our group demonstrated the radiosensitizing effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on glioma cells in vitro. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of intratumoral administration of AgNPs in combination with a single dose of ionizing radiation at clinically relevant MV energies for the treatment of C6 glioma-bearing rats. AgNPs (10 or 20 μg/10 μl) were stereotactically administered on day 8 after tumor implantation. One day after Ag

  15. Clinical implications of molecular neuropathology and biomarkers for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Hegi, Monika; Stupp, Roger; Weller, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Malignant gliomas are currently diagnosed based on morphological criteria and graded according to the World Health Organization classification of primary brain tumors. This algorithm of diagnosis and classification provides clinicians with an estimated prognosis of the natural course of the disease. It does not reflect the expected response to specific treatments beyond surgery (eg, radiotherapy or alkylating chemotherapy). Clinical experience has revealed that gliomas sharing similar histomorphological criteria might indeed have different clinical courses and exhibit highly heterogenous responses to treatments. This was very impressively demonstrated first for oligodendrogliomas. The presence or lack of combined deletions of the chromosomal segments 1p/19q was associated with different benefit from radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We review current molecular markers for malignant gliomas and discuss their current and future impact on clinical neuro-oncology.

  16. MRI in treatment of adult gliomas.

    PubMed

    Henson, John W; Gaviani, Paola; Gonzalez, R Gilberto

    2005-03-01

    Diffuse astrocytomas of the adult cerebral hemispheres are unique among tumours in human beings in the extent to which their imaging features are related to histopathological characteristics and clinical behaviour. However, understanding is still restricted about the value of imaging features in the measurement of response and of progression in these tumours. The present approach used in clinical trials, which consists of an anatomical measurement of the enhancing tumour on MRI, has many problems, and might not be acceptable as a surrogate endpoint for survival in patients with glioblastoma who are enrolled in clinical trials. Dynamic imaging techniques, such as capillary permeability mapping, are being used in studies of new drugs that target specific molecular features of gliomas; however, the validity of these techniques has not been elucidated. Diffusion imaging can be valuable for fibre-tract mapping to assist surgical planning and might become useful in measuring early response to treatment in densely cellular tumours. Functional imaging techniques can be used to localise motor, sensory, and language-control areas before surgery. Intraoperative MRI has produced improvements in the extent of tumour resection, and molecular imaging is another technique on the horizon, which could come to have a role in clinical trials in the near future. Thus, as a rapidly expanding sphere of investigation, brain-tumour imaging is producing great excitement. The aim of these new techniques is to aid the identification of more effective treatments.

  17. Functional MRI for radiotherapy of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jenghwa; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we review the applications of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for target delineation and critical organ avoidance for brain radiotherapy. In this article we distinguish functional MRI from brain functional MRI (fMRI). Functional MRI includes magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and brain fMRI. These functional MRI modalities can provide unique metabolic, pathological and physiological information that are not available in anatomic MRI and can potentially improve the treatment outcomes of brain tumors. For example, both choline (Cho) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and Cho to creatine (Cr) ratios from MRSI increase with increasing tumor malignancy and can be used to grade gliomas. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) measurements from dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) are superior to conventional contrast-enhanced MRI in predicting tumor biology and may be even superior to pathologic assessment in predicting patient clinical outcomes. Brain fMRI can help identify and avoid functionally critical areas when constructing treatment plans for brain radiotherapy. In the past, functional MRI measurements have not been routinely used in a clinical arena due to the experimental nature of these imaging modalities. As these methods become more commonly used and effective image co-registration algorithms become available, integration of functional MRI into the treatment process of brain radiotherapy now appears to be clinically feasible, at least in major medical centers.

  18. Insights From Molecular Profiling of Adult Glioma.

    PubMed

    Diamandis, Phedias; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2017-07-20

    The comprehensive molecular profiling of cancer has resulted in new insights into the biology and classification of numerous tumor types. In the case of primary brain tumors that commonly affect adults, an emerging set of disease-defining biomarker sets is reshaping existing diagnostic entities that had previously been defined on the basis of their microscopic appearance. Substantial progress has been made in this regard for common primary brain tumors in adults, especially diffuse gliomas, where large-scale profiling efforts have led to the incorporation of highly prevalent molecular alterations that promote a biologically based classification as an adjunct to the traditional histopathologic approach. The growing awareness that histologically indistinguishable tumors can be divided into more precise and biologically relevant subgroups has demanded a more global routine approach to biomarker assessment. These considerations have begun to intersect with the decreasing costs and availability of genome-wide analysis tools and, thus, incorporation into routine practice. We review how molecular profiling already has led to an evolution in the classification of brain tumors. In addition, we discuss the likely trajectory of incorporation of global molecular profiling platforms into the routine clinical classification of adult brain tumors.

  19. Antibody-based immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Gedeon, Patrick C.; Riccione, Katherine A.; Fecci, Peter E.; Sampson, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional therapy for malignant glioma (MG) fails to specifically eliminate tumor cells, resulting in toxicity that limits therapeutic efficacy. In contrast, antibody-based immunotherapy utilizes the immune system to eliminate tumor cells with exquisite specificity. Increased understanding of the pathobiology of MG and the profound immunosuppression present among patients with MG has revealed several biologic targets amenable to antibody-based immunotherapy. Novel antibody engineering techniques allow for the production of fully human antibodies or antibody fragments with vastly reduced antigen-binding dissociation constants, increasing safety when used clinically as therapeutics. In this report, we summarize the use of antibody-based immunotherapy for MG. Approaches currently under investigation include the use of antibodies or antibody fragments to: 1) redirect immune effector cells to target tumor mutations, 2) inhibit immunosuppressive signals and thereby stimulate an immunological response against tumor cells, and 3) provide co-stimulatory signals to evoke immunologic targeting of tumor cells. These approaches demonstrate highly compelling safety and efficacy for the treatment of MG, providing a viable adjunct to current standard-of-care therapy for MG. PMID:25173142

  20. Genomic Insights into Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lapin, Danielle H.; Tsoli, Maria; Ziegler, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a highly aggressive pediatric brainstem tumor with a peak incidence in middle childhood and a median survival of less than 1 year. The dismal prognosis associated with DIPG has been exacerbated by the failure of over 250 clinical trials to meaningfully improve survival compared with radiotherapy, the current standard of care. The traditional practice to not biopsy DIPG led to a scarcity in available tissue samples for laboratory analysis that till recently hindered therapeutic advances. Over the past few years, the acquisition of patient derived tumor samples through biopsy and autopsy protocols has led to distinct breakthroughs in the identification of key oncogenic drivers implicated in DIPG development. Aberrations have been discovered in critical genetic drivers including histone H3, ACVR1, TP53, PDGFRA, and Myc. Mutations, previously not identified in other malignancies, highlight DIPG as a distinct biological entity. Identification of novel markers has already greatly influenced the direction of preclinical investigations and offers the exciting possibility of establishing biologically targeted therapies. This review will outline the current knowledge of the genomic landscape related to DIPG, overview preclinical investigations, and reflect how biological advances have influenced the focus of clinical trials toward targeted therapies. PMID:28401062

  1. The emergent role of exosomes in glioma.

    PubMed

    Gourlay, J; Morokoff, A P; Luwor, R B; Zhu, H-J; Kaye, A H; Stylli, S S

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are known mediators of intercellular communication for both normal and tumour cells. With the capability to transfer nucleic acids, proteins and lipids, EVs are able to influence numerous functional and pathological aspects of both donor and recipient cells. The tumour microenvironment possesses a high level of complex heterogeneity, particularly within the most prominent brain malignancy, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This complexity relies on a network-based communication between many different components of the local niche, including the various cell types, stroma, blood vessels, secreted factors and surrounding matrix. Exosomes are one type of EV which facilitates this intercellular communication and cross-talk within the tumour microenvironment. Exosomes secreted by tumour cells are increasingly recognized in a number of processes underlying tumour progression including facilitating the transport of receptors, signalling molecules, oncogenic genes and miRNA. They are emerging as a key component in the biogenesis of glioma, in addition to contributing to the modification of the surrounding microenvironment to support tumour progression. In this review we describe advancements in the understanding of the biology of exosomes, as well as their roles in tumour progression, as a tumour biomarker for tracking cancer progression, and as a potential therapeutic target/delivery system, with a contextual emphasis on GBM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of IL-6 in the invasiveness and prognosis of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Yongzhi; He, Xin; Song, Wei; Han, Dong; Niu, Jianxing; Wang, Jianzhen

    2015-01-01

    IL-6 is a cytokine secreted by glioma cells and plays an important role in the tumor growth. However, the impact of IL-6 on the invasiveness and prognosis of glioma is still unclear. In this study, immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of IL-6 in 86 glioma tissues, and ELISA to measure IL-6 in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of these patients. Results showed, as ccompared with normal controls, the IL-6 in the glioma, CSF and serumincreased remarkably, and increased with the elevation of glioma grade. In addition, IL-6 in the supernatant was also detectable in glioma cell lines U251, U87, A172 and T98G. Transwell invasion assay showed that the invasiveness of glioma U87 cells and U251 cells increased remarkably after exogenous IL-6 treatment. Survival analysis indicated higher IL-6 before surgery and significantly reduction in IL-6 after operation in the serum and CSF predicted a poor prognosis. Thus, we speculate that, the poor prognosis of glioma is related to the IL-6 autocrine in the glioma and the IL-6 induced tumor growth and invasion. IL-6 may serve as a therapeutic target for glioma patients and IL-6 in the CSF and serum of glioma may be used to predict the prognosis of these patients. PMID:26309566

  3. Expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and correlation with pathological malignancy in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Mitsuka, Kentaro; Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Satoh, Eiji; Asahara, Takayuki; Horikoshi, Toru; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-01

    : Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a tryptophan catabolic enzyme involved in immune tolerance and tumor immune escape processes. Recently, IDO expression has been found to correlate with the prognosis of malignant tumors, but the implication of IDO in glioma progression remains unknown. : To investigate the relationship between IDO expression and histological malignancy in gliomas. : IDO expression was examined in a total of 75 surgical specimens obtained from 68 patients with glioma using immunohistochemical staining. The 75 specimens included 15 diffuse astrocytomas, 21 anaplastic astrocytomas, and 39 glioblastomas. Six of 39 glioblastomas were secondary glioblastomas, transforming from grade II or III gliomas that had been determined at the first surgery. IDO expression rate was compared in each histological grade, and patient survival was analyzed. : Expression of IDO was found in 72 of 75 gliomas at varying intensities. Stronger expression of IDO was more likely to be observed in malignant gliomas compared with low-grade gliomas. IDO expression in the 6 cases of secondary glioblastoma was stronger than in the initial low-grade glioma. Survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method revealed that grade IV patients with strong IDO expression had significantly worse overall survival rates (P = .04) than patients with weak IDO expression. : IDO is expressed more strongly in both primary and secondary glioblastoma tissue than low-grade glioma and may affect clinical outcome. If IDO promotes glioma cells to escape from the immune system, IDO may be a crucial therapeutic target for malignant gliomas.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging suggests extrapontine extension of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W.; Bell, W. Robert; Kern, Jason; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Mhlanga, Joyce; Carson, Kathryn A.; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Raabe, Eric H.; Rodriguez, Fausto; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To apply DTI to detect early extrapontine extension of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma along the corticospinal tracts. Methods In children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, low-grade brainstem glioma, and age-matched controls, DTI metrics were measured in the posterior limb of the internal capsule and posterior centrum semiovale. Histological examination was available in one patient. Results 6 diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, 8 low-grade brainstem glioma, and two groups of 25 controls were included. In diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma compared to controls, fractional anisotropy was lower in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule, axial diffusivity was lower in the bilateral posterior centrum semiovale and posterior limb of the internal capsule, while radial diffusivity was higher in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule. No significant differences were found between low-grade brainstem glioma and controls. In diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma compared to low-grade brainstem glioma, axial diffusivity was lower in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule. Histological examination in one child showed tumor cells in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. Conclusion Reduction in fractional anisotropy and axial diffusivity and increase in radial diffusivity in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma may reflect tumor extension along the corticospinal tracts as shown by histology. DTI may detect early extrapontine tumor extension in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma before it becomes apparent on conventional MRI sequences. PMID:26971411

  5. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours -- a case-control gene association study.

    PubMed

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M; Andersson, Ulrika; Wang, Zhaoming; Henriksson, Roger; Hallmans, Göran; Bondy, Melissa L; Johansen, Christoffer; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Kitahara, Cari M; Wang, Sophia S; Ruder, Avima M; Carreón, Tania; Butler, Mary Ann; Inskip, Peter D; Purdue, Mark; Hsing, Ann W; Mechanic, Leah; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Yeager, Meredith; Linet, Martha; Chanock, Stephen J; Hartge, Patricia; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2013-05-15

    Familial cancer can be used to leverage genetic association studies. Recent genome-wide association studies have reported independent associations between seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether glioma cases with a positive family history of brain tumours, defined as having at least one first- or second-degree relative with a history of brain tumour, are associated with known glioma risk loci. One thousand four hundred and thirty-one glioma cases and 2,868 cancer-free controls were identified from four case-control studies and two prospective cohorts from USA, Sweden and Denmark and genotyped for seven SNPs previously reported to be associated with glioma risk in case-control designed studies. Odds ratios were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. In analyses including glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours (n = 104) and control subjects free of glioma at baseline, three of seven SNPs were associated with glioma risk: rs2736100 (5p15.33, TERT), rs4977756 (9p21.3, CDKN2A-CDKN2B) and rs6010620 (20q13.33, RTEL1). After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, only one marker was statistically significantly associated with glioma risk, rs6010620 (ORtrend for the minor (A) allele, 0.39; 95% CI: 0.25-0.61; Bonferroni adjusted ptrend , 1.7 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, as previously shown for glioma regardless of family history of brain tumours, rs6010620 (RTEL1) was associated with an increased risk of glioma when restricting to cases with family history of brain tumours. These findings require confirmation in further studies with a larger number of glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  6. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours - a case-control gene association study

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M.; Andersson, Ulrika; Wang, Zhaoming; Henriksson, Roger; Hallmans, Göran; Bondy, Melissa L.; Johansen, Christoffer; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Kitahara, Cari M.; Wang, Sophia S.; Ruder, Avima M.; Carreón, Tania; Butler, Mary Ann; Inskip, Peter D.; Purdue, Mark; Hsing, Ann W.; Mechanic, Leah; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Yeager, Meredith; Linet, Martha; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hartge, Patricia; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2012-01-01

    Familial cancer can be used to leverage genetic association studies. Recent genome-wide association studies have reported independent associations between seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether glioma cases with a positive family history of brain tumours, defined as having at least one first or second degree relative with a history of brain tumour, are associated with known glioma risk loci. 1431 glioma cases and 2868 cancer-free controls were identified from four case-control studies and two prospective cohorts from USA, Sweden, and Denmark and genotyped for seven SNPs previously reported to be associated with glioma risk in case-control designed studies. Odds ratios were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. In analyses including glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours (n=104) and control subjects free of glioma at baseline, three out of seven SNPs were associated with glioma risk; rs2736100 (5p15.33, TERT), rs4977756 (9p21.3, CDKN2A-CDKN2B), and rs6010620 (20q13.33, RTEL1). After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, only one marker was statistically significantly associated with glioma risk, rs6010620 (ORtrend for the minor (A) allele, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.25–0.61; Bonferroni adjusted ptrend, 1.7×10−4). In conclusion, as previously shown for glioma regardless of family history of brain tumours, rs6010620 (RTEL1) was associated with an increased risk of glioma when restricting to cases with family history of brain tumours. These findings require confirmation in further studies with a larger number of glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours. PMID:23115063

  7. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  8. Anatomic mapping of molecular subtypes in diffuse glioma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qisheng; Lian, Yuxi; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Shi, Zhifeng; Chen, Liang

    2017-09-15

    Tumor location served as an important prognostic factor in glioma patients was considered to postulate molecular features according to cell origin theory. However, anatomic distribution of unique molecular subtypes was not widely investigated. The relationship between molecular phenotype and histological subgroup were also vague based on tumor location. Our group focuses on the study of glioma anatomic location of distinctive molecular subgroups and histology subtypes, and explores the possibility of their consistency based on clinical background. We retrospectively reviewed 143 cases with both molecular information (IDH1/TERT/1p19q) and MRI images diagnosed as cerebral diffuse gliomas. The anatomic distribution was analyzed between distinctive molecular subgroups and its relationship with histological subtypes. The influence of tumor location, molecular stratification and histology diagnosis on survival outcome was investigated as well. Anatomic locations of cerebral diffuse glioma indicate varied clinical outcome. Based on that, it can be stratified into five principal molecular subgroups according to IDH1/TERT/1p19q status. Triple-positive (IDH1 and TERT mutation with 1p19q codeletion) glioma tended to be oligodendroglioma present with much better clinical outcome compared to TERT mutation only group who is glioblastoma inclined (median overall survival 39 months VS 18 months). Five molecular subgroups were demonstrated with distinctive locational distribution. This kind of anatomic feature is consistent with its corresponding histological subtypes. Each molecular subgroup in glioma has unique anatomic location which indicates distinctive clinical outcome. Molecular diagnosis can be served as perfect complementary tool for the precise diagnosis. Integration of histomolecular diagnosis will be much more helpful in routine clinical practice in the future.

  9. The transglutaminase 2 gene is aberrantly hypermethylated in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Lisa M.; Schooler, Kevin P.; Ai, Lingbao; Klop, Corinne; Qiu, Jingxin; Robertson, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that catalyzes protein/protein crosslinking. Because extracellular TG2 crosslinks components of the extracellular matrix, TG2 is thought to function as a suppressor of cellular invasion. We have recently uncovered that the TG2 gene (TGM2) is a target for epigenetic silencing in breast cancer, highlighting a molecular mechanism that drives reduced TG2 expression, and this aberrant molecular event may contribute to invasiveness in this tumor type. Because tumor invasiveness is a primary determinant of brain tumor aggressiveness, we sought to determine if TGM2 is targeted for epigenetic silencing in glioma. Analysis of TGM2 gene methylation in a panel of cultured human glioma cells indicated that the 5′ flanking region of the TGM2 gene is hypermethylated and that this feature is associated with reduced TG2 expression as judged by immunoblotting. Further, culturing glioma cells in the presence of the global DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A resulted in re-expression of TG2 in these lines. In primary brain tumors we observed that the TGM2 promoter is commonly hypermethylated and that this feature is a cancer-associated phenomenon. Using publically available databases, TG2 expression in gliomas was found to vary widely, with many tumors showing overexpression or underexpression of this gene. Since overexpression of TG2 leads to resistance to doxorubicin through the ectopic activation of NFκB, we sought to examine the effects of recombinant TG2 expression in glioma cells treated with commonly used brain tumor therapeutics. We observed that in addition to doxorubicin, TG2 expression drove resistance to CCNU; however, TG2 expression did not alter sensitivity to other drugs tested. Finally, a catalytically null mutant of TG2 was also able to support doxorubicin resistance in glioma cells indicating that transglutaminase activity is not necessary

  10. Chemosensitivity of IDH1 mutant gliomas due to an impairment in PARP1-mediated DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanxin; Kwintkiewicz, Jakub; Liu, Yang; Tech, Katherine; Frady, Lauren N; Su, Yu-Ting; Bautista, Wendy; Moon, Seog In; MacDonald, Jeffrey; Edwend, Matthew G; Gilbert, Mark R; Yang, Chunzhang; Wu, Jing

    2017-02-15

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) are the most prevalent genetic abnormalities in lower grade gliomas. The presence of these mutations in glioma is prognostic for better clinical outcomes with longer patient survival. In the present study, we found that defects in oxidative metabolism and 2-HG production confer chemosensitization in IDH1-mutated glioma cells. In addition, temozolomide (TMZ) treatment induced greater DNA damage and apoptotic changes in mutant glioma cells. The PARP1-associated DNA repair pathway was extensively compromised in mutant cells due to decreased NAD+ availability. Targeting the PARP DNA repair pathway extensively sensitized IDH1-mutated glioma cells to TMZ. Our findings demonstrate a novel molecular mechanism that defines chemosensitivity in IDH mutant gliomas. Targeting PARP-associated DNA repair may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for gliomas.

  11. CREB1 regulates glucose transport of glioma cell line U87 by targeting GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiaying; Zhang, Can; Mi, Yang; Chen, Fuxue; Du, Dongshu

    2017-06-23

    Glioma is stemmed from the glial cells in the brain, which is accounted for about 45% of all intracranial tumors. The characteristic of glioma is invasive growth, as well as there is no obvious boundary between normal brain tissue and glioma tissue, so it is difficult to resect completely with worst prognosis. The metabolism of glioma is following the Warburg effect. Previous researches have shown that GLUT1, as a glucose transporter carrier, affected the Warburg effect, but the molecular mechanism is not very clear. CREB1 (cAMP responsive element-binding protein1) is involved in various biological processes, and relevant studies confirmed that CREB1 protein regulated the expression of GLUT1, thus mediating glucose transport in cells. Our experiments mainly reveal that the CREB1 could affect glucose transport in glioma cells by regulating the expression of GLUT1, which controlled the metabolism of glioma and affected the progression of glioma.

  12. The safety of allogeneic innate lymphocyte therapy for glioma patients with prior cranial irradiation.

    PubMed

    Pereboeva, Larisa; Harkins, Lualhati; Wong, Shun; Lamb, Lawrence S

    2015-05-01

    The standard treatment of high-grade glioma presents a combination of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. Immunotherapy is proposed as a potential adjunct to standard cytotoxic regimens to target remaining microscopic disease following resection. We have shown ex vivo expanded/activated γδ T cells to be a promising innate lymphocyte therapy based on their recognition of stress antigens expressed on gliomas. However, successful integration of γδ T cell therapy protocols requires understanding the efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred immune cells in the post-treatment environment. The unique features of γδ T cell product and the environment (hypoxia, inflammation) can affect levels of expression of key cell receptors and secreted factors and either promote or hinder the feasibility of γδ T cell therapy. We investigated the potential for the γδ T cells to injure normal brain tissue that may have been stressed by treatment. We evaluated γδ T cell toxicity by assessing actual and correlative toxicity indicators in several available models including: (1) expression of stress markers on normal primary human astrocytes (as surrogate for brain parenchyma) after irradiation and temozolomide treatment, (2) cytotoxicity of γδ T cells on normal and irradiated primary astrocytes, (3) microglial activation and expression of stress-induced ligands in mouse brain after whole-brain irradiation and (4) expression of stress-induced markers on human brain tumors and on normal brain tissue. The lack of expression of stress-induced ligands in all tested models suggests that γδ T cell therapy is safe for brain tumor patients who undergo standard cytotoxic therapies.

  13. [Arteriovenous malformation-glioma association: study of four cases].

    PubMed

    Borges, Lia Raquel R; Malheiros, Suzana M F; Pelaez, Maria Paula; Stávale, João Norberto; Santos, Adrialdo J; Carrete, Henrique; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Ferraz, Fernando A P; Gabbai, Alberto A

    2003-06-01

    We reviewed the clinical presentation, imaging and histopathologic findings in 4 patients with the diagnosis of arteriovenous malformation associated with glioma that were operated on from 1991 to 2000 in our institution. Four patients (2 males; age between 15 and 52 years) presented with progressive headache with clinical evidence of intracranial hypertension (in 3) and partial seizures (in 1). CT scan showed a brain tumor without any detectable pathologic vessels. Histologic examination revealed astrocytic tumors associated with arteriovenous malformation. No patient presented the vascular component intermixed with the tumor. The arteriovenous-glioma association is rare and must be identified by a clear demarcation between the malformation and the tumor.

  14. Decreased Expression of MiRNA-204-5p Contributes to Glioma Progression and Promotes Glioma Cell Growth, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhiqiang; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults and exhibit a spectrum of aberrantly aggressive phenotype. Although increasing evidence indicated that the deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) contributes to tumorigenesis and invasion, little is known about the roles of miR-204-5p in human gliomas. In the present study, the expression of miR-204-5p in clinical glioma tissues was measured by qRT-PCR. The effects of miR-204-5p on glioma cell growth and metastasis were examined by overexpressing or inhibiting miR-204-5p. We found that the expression level of miR-204-5p was significantly reduced in clinical glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. Moreover, we revealed that the introduction of miR-204-5p dramatically suppressed glioma cell growth, migration and invasion. Furthermore, mechanistic investigations revealed that RAB22A, a member of the RAS oncogene family, is a direct functional target of miR-204-5p in gliomas. In vivo, restoring miR-204-5p expression in glioma cells suppressed t