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Sample records for glioma tumor volume

  1. Reliability of tumor volume estimation from MR images in patients with malignant glioma. Results from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) 6662 Trial.

    PubMed

    Ertl-Wagner, Birgit B; Blume, Jeffrey D; Peck, Donald; Udupa, Jayaram K; Herman, Benjamin; Levering, Anthony; Schmalfuss, Ilona M

    2009-03-01

    Reliable assessment of tumor growth in malignant glioma poses a common problem both clinically and when studying novel therapeutic agents. We aimed to evaluate two software-systems in their ability to estimate volume change of tumor and/or edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images of malignant gliomas. Twenty patients with malignant glioma were included from different sites. Serial post-operative MR images were assessed with two software systems representative of the two fundamental segmentation methods, single-image fuzzy analysis (3DVIEWNIX-TV) and multi-spectral-image analysis (Eigentool), and with a manual method by 16 independent readers (eight MR-certified technologists, four neuroradiology fellows, four neuroradiologists). Enhancing tumor volume and tumor volume plus edema were assessed independently by each reader. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), variance components, and prediction intervals were estimated. There were no significant differences in the average tumor volume change over time between the software systems (p > 0.05). Both software systems were much more reliable and yielded smaller prediction intervals than manual measurements. No significant differences were observed between the volume changes determined by fellows/neuroradiologists or technologists.Semi-automated software systems are reliable tools to serve as outcome parameters in clinical studies and the basis for therapeutic decision-making for malignant gliomas, whereas manual measurements are less reliable and should not be the basis for clinical or research outcome studies.

  2. Longitudinal measures of visual function, tumor volume, and prediction of visual outcomes after treatment of optic pathway gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John P; Leary, Sarah; Khanna, Paritosh; Weiss, Avery H

    2012-06-01

    To examine longitudinal changes in visual acuity, tumor volume, and visual evoked potentials (VEP) before and after treatment in children with optic pathway gliomas. Retrospective cohort study. Twenty-one patients (0.7-9 years of age). Patients initially were treated either by chemotherapy (n = 18) or radiotherapy (n = 3). Patients were followed up with serial magnetic resonance imaging, age-corrected visual acuity measurements in logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) units, and pattern VEP. Longitudinal visual outcome data were obtained on average for 9 years (range, 4-16 years). Tumor volumes before and after treatment were estimated in 15 patients. Multivariate regression was used to predict visual outcomes. Visual acuity, relative tumor volumes, and VEP. Before treatment, 81% of patients had reduced visual acuity and 81% had optic nerve pallor, whereas all had a reduced VEP in 1 or both eyes. After initial treatment, tumor volume decreased in 53%, stabilized in 27%, and progressively increased in 20%. Treatment arrested the rapid decline in visual acuity loss and stabilized visual acuity for 4 to 5 years. The rate of visual acuity decline was not correlated with tumor shrinkage. Sixty-two percent of patients required additional treatment with either chemotherapy or radiation because of tumor growth or progressive loss of visual function. Visual acuity at last examination was stable or improved in 33% of patients, but on average declined 0.4 logMAR units. Visual acuity was 20/200 or better in 1 eye of 62% of patients. The rate of visual acuity decline was predicted weakly by tumor volume at presentation (R(2) = 0.19; P<0.009). Visual acuity at last examination was predicted best by visual acuity and tumor volume at presentation (R(2) = 0.66; P<0.001). Systemic chemotherapy arrested the decline in visual acuity and stabilized vision on average for 5 years. At presentation, VEPs were a more sensitive indicator of optic pathway damage than visual

  3. The pathobiology of glioma tumors.

    PubMed

    Gladson, Candece L; Prayson, Richard A; Liu, Wei Michael

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing characterization of the genetic and epigenetic alterations in the gliomas has already improved the classification of these heterogeneous tumors and enabled the development of rodent models for analysis of the molecular pathways underlying their proliferative and invasive behavior. Effective application of the targeted therapies that are now in development will depend on pathologists' ability to provide accurate information regarding the genetic alterations and the expression of key receptors and ligands in the tumors. Here we review the mechanisms that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the gliomas and provide examples of the cooperative nature of the pathways involved, which may influence the initial therapeutic response and the potential for development of resistance.

  4. Serum levels of GFAP and EGFR in primary and recurrent high-grade gliomas: correlation to tumor volume, molecular markers, and progression-free survival.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Aida; Gardberg, Maria; Frantzén, Janek; Parkkola, Riitta; Vuorinen, Ville; Pesola, Marko; Minn, Heikki

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to study the association of two potential serum biomarkers glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with prognostic markers such as IDH1 mutation, tumor burden, and survival in patients with high-grade gliomas (HGG). Additionally, our objective was to evaluate the potential of serum EGFR as a surrogate marker for EGFR status in the tumor. Pre-operative serum samples were prospectively collected from patients with primary (n = 17) or recurrent (n = 10) HGG. Serum GFAP and EGFR levels were determined by ELISA and studied for correlation with molecular markers including EGFR amplification, tumor volume in contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI, and progression-free survival (PFS). Pre-operative serum GFAP level of ≥0.014 ng/ml was 86 % sensitive and 85 % specific for the diagnosis of glioblastoma. High GFAP was related to the lack of IDH1 mutation (P = 0.016), high Ki67 proliferation index (P < 0.001), and poor PFS (HR 5.9, CI 1.2-29.9, P = 0.032). Serum GFAP correlated with enhancing tumor volume in primary (r = 0.64 P = 0.005), but also in recurrent HGGs (r = 0.76 P = 0.011). In contrast, serum EGFR levels did not differ between HGG patients and 13 healthy controls, and were not related to EGFR status in the tumor. We conclude that high serum GFAP associates with IDH1 mutation-negative HGG, and poor PFS. Correlation with tumor burden in recurrent HGG implicates the potential of serum GFAP for detection of tumor recurrence. Our results suggest that circulating EGFR is not derived from glioma cells and cannot be used as a marker for EGFR status in the tumor.

  5. Evaluating changes in tumor volume using magnetic resonance imaging during the course of radiotherapy treatment of high-grade gliomas: Implications for conformal dose-escalation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, Christina . E-mail: ctsien@umich.edu; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel C.; Junck, L.; Chenevert, T.L.; Lawrence, T.

    2005-06-01

    Objective: To determine whether changes in tumor volume occur during the course of conformal 3D radiotherapy of high-grade gliomas by use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during treatment and whether these changes had an impact on tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: Between December 2000 and January 2004, 21 patients with WHO Grades 3 to 4 supratentorial malignant gliomas treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (median dose, 70 Gy) were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. All patients underwent T1-weighted contrast-enhancing and T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at approximately 1 to 2 weeks before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy (Weeks 1 and 3), and at routine intervals thereafter. All MRI scans were coregistered to the treatment-planning CT. Gross tumor volume (GTV Pre-Rx) was defined from a postoperative T1-weighted contrast-enhancing MRI performed 1 to 2 weeks before start of radiotherapy. A second GTV (GTV Week 3) was defined by use of an MRI performed during Week 3 of radiotherapy. A uniform 0.5 cm expansion of the respective GTV, PTV (Pre-Rx), and PTV (Week 3) was applied to the final boost plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to analyze any potential adverse changes in tumor coverage based on Week 3 MRI. Results: All MRI scans were reviewed independently by a neuroradiologist (DGH). Two patients were noted to have multifocal disease at presentation and were excluded from analysis. In 19 cases, changes in the GTV based on MRI at Week 3 during radiotherapy were as follows: 2 cases had an objective decrease in GTV ({>=}50%); 12 cases revealed a slight decrease in the rim enhancement or changes in cystic appearance of the GTV; 2 cases showed no change in GTV; and 3 cases demonstrated an increase in tumor volume. Both cases with objective decreases in GTV during treatment were Grade 3 tumors. No cases of tumor progression were noted in Grade 3 tumors during treatment. In comparison, three of 12 Grade 4

  6. Rapid magnetic heating treatment by highly charged maghemite nanoparticles on Wistar rats exocranial glioma tumors at microliter volume

    PubMed Central

    Rabias, Ioannis; Tsitrouli, Danai; Karakosta, Eleni; Kehagias, Thomas; Diamantopoulos, Georgios; Fardis, Michael; Stamopoulos, Dimosthenis; Maris, Thomas G.; Falaras, Polykarpos; Zouridakis, Nikolaos; Diamantis, Nikolaos; Panayotou, Georgios; Verganelakis, Dimitrios A.; Drossopoulou, Garyfalia I.; Tsilibari, Effie C.; Papavassiliou, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges implementing colloidal magnetic nanoparticles in medicine is the efficient heating of microliter quantities by applying a low frequency alternating magnetic field. The ultimate goal is to accomplish nonsurgically the treatment of millimeter size tumors. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis, characterization, and the in vitro as well as in vivo efficiency of a dextran coated maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) ferrofluid with an exceptional response to magnetic heating. The difference to previous synthetic attempts is the high charge of the dextran coating, which according to our study maintains the colloidal stability and good dispersion of the ferrofluid during the magnetic heating stage. Specifically, in vitro 2 μl of the ferrofluid gives an outstanding temperature rise of 33 °C within 10 min, while in vivo treatment, by infusing 150 μl of the ferrofluid in animal model (rat) glioma tumors, causes an impressive cancer tissue dissolution. PMID:20697578

  7. Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... come from ependymal cells. Tumors that display a mixture of these different cells are called mixed gliomas. ... oligodendrocytes, and ependymal cells. Tumors that display a mixture of these cells are called mixed gliomas. Astrocytoma: ...

  8. Residual Tumor Volume as Best Outcome Predictor in Low Grade Glioma – A Nine-Years Near-Randomized Survey of Surgery vs. Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Roelz, Roland; Strohmaier, David; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Kraeutle, Rainer; Egger, Karl; Coenen, Volker A.; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Reinacher, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse low grade gliomas (DLGG) are continuously progressive primary brain neoplasms that lead to neurological deficits and death. Treatment strategies are controversial. Randomized trials establishing the prognostic value of surgery do not exist. Here, we report the results of a nine-year near-randomized patient distribution between resection and biopsy. Until 2012, the Department of Neurosurgery and the Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery at the University Medical Center Freiburg were organized as separate administrative units both coordinating DLGG patient treatment independently. All consecutive adult patients with a new diagnosis of DLGG by either stereotactic biopsy or resection were included. Pre- and post-operative tumor volumetry was performed. 126 patients, 87 men (69%), 39 women (31%), median age 41 years, were included. 77 (61%) were initially managed by biopsy, 49 (39%) by resection. A significant survival benefit was found for patients with an initial management by resection (5-year OS 82% vs. 54%). The survival benefit of patients with initial resection was reserved to patients with a residual tumor volume of less than 15 cm3. Maximum safe resection is the first therapy of choice in DLGG patients if a near-complete tumor removal can be achieved. Accurate prediction of the extent-of-resection is required for selection of surgical candidates. PMID:27574036

  9. FIBULIN-3 IS UNIQUELY UPREGULATED IN MALIGNANT GLIOMAS AND PROMOTES TUMOR CELL MOTILITY AND INVASION

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bin; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi K.; Sim, Hosung; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly invasive tumors with an almost invariably rapid and lethal outcome. Surgery and chemoradiotherapy fail to remove resistant tumor cells that disperse within normal tissue, which are a major cause for disease progression and therapy failure. Infiltration of the neural parenchyma is a distinctive property of malignant gliomas compared to other solid tumors. Thus, glioma cells are thought to produce unique molecular changes that remodel the neural extracellular matrix and form a microenvironment permissive for their motility. Here we describe the unique expression and pro-invasive role of fibulin-3, a mesenchymal matrix protein specifically upregulated in gliomas. Fibulin-3 is downregulated in peripheral tumors and thought to inhibit tumor growth. However, we found fibulin-3 highly upregulated in gliomas and cultured glioma cells, although the protein was undetectable in normal brain or cultured astrocytes. Overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that fibulin-3 did not seem to affect glioma cell morphology or proliferation, but enhanced substrate-specific cell adhesion and promoted cell motility and dispersion in organotypic cultures. Moreover, orthotopic implantation of fibulin-3-overexpressing glioma cells resulted in diffuse tumors with increased volume and rostrocaudal extension compared to controls. Tumors and cultured cells overexpressing fibulin-3 also showed elevated expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases, such as MMP-2/9 and ADAMTS-5. Taken together, our results suggest that fibulin-3 has a unique expression and pro-tumoral role in gliomas, and could be a potential target against tumor progression. Strategies against this glioma-specific matrix component could disrupt invasive mechanisms and restrict dissemination of these tumors. PMID:19887559

  10. NDRG1 overexpressing gliomas are characterized by reduced tumor vascularization and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Wüstner, Marie; Harms, Christoph; Stange, Lena; Blaes, Jonas; Thomé, Carina; Harms, Ulrike; Mueller, Susanne; Weiler, Markus; Wick, Wolfgang; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia-regulated molecules play an important role in vascular resistance to antiangiogenic treatment. N-myc downstream-regulated-gene 1 (NDRG1) is significantly upregulated during hypoxia in glioma. It was the aim of the present study to analyze the role of NDRG1 on glioma angiogenesis and on antiangiogenic treatment. Orthotopically implanted NDRG1 glioma showed reduced tumor growth and vessel density compared to controls. RT-PCR gene array analysis revealed a 30-fold TNFSF15 increase in NDRG1 tumors. Consequently, the supernatant from NDRG1 transfected U87MG glioma cells resulted in reduced HUVEC proliferation, migration and angiogenic response in tube formation assays in vitro. This effect was provoked by increased TNFSF15 promoter activity in NDRG1 cells. Mutations in NF-κB and AP-1 promoter response elements suppressed TNFSF15 promoter activity. Moreover, U87MG glioma NDRG1 knockdown supernatant contained multiple proangiogenic proteins and increased HUVEC spheroid sprouting. Sunitinib treatment of orhotopically implanted mice reduced tumor volume and vessel density in controls; in NDRG1 overexpressing cells no reduction of tumor volume or vessel density was observed. NDRG1 overexpression leads to reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis in experimental glioma via upregulation of TNFSF15. In NDRG1 overexpressing glioma antiangiogenic treatment does not yield a therapeutic response.

  11. Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaem, Hossein Y.; Ahmadian, Alireza; Saberi, Hooshangh; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Khodadad, Davood

    2011-10-01

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  12. Automatic glioma characterization from dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging: brain tumor segmentation using knowledge-based fuzzy clustering.

    PubMed

    Emblem, Kyrre E; Nedregaard, Baard; Hald, John K; Nome, Terje; Due-Tonnessen, Paulina; Bjornerud, Atle

    2009-07-01

    To assess whether glioma volumes from knowledge-based fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering of multiple MR image classes can provide similar diagnostic efficacy values as manually defined tumor volumes when characterizing gliomas from dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging. Fifty patients with newly diagnosed gliomas were imaged using DSC MR imaging at 1.5 Tesla. To compare our results with manual tumor definitions, glioma volumes were also defined independently by four neuroradiologists. Using a histogram analysis method, diagnostic efficacy values for glioma grade and expected patient survival were assessed. The areas under the receiver operator characteristics curves were similar when using manual and automated tumor volumes to grade gliomas (P = 0.576-0.970). When identifying a high-risk patient group (expected survival <2 years) and a low-risk patient group (expected survival >2 years), a higher log-rank value from Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was observed when using automatic tumor volumes (14.403; P < 0.001) compared with the manual volumes (10.650-12.761; P = 0.001-0.002). Our results suggest that knowledge-based FCM clustering of multiple MR image classes provides a completely automatic, user-independent approach to selecting the target region for presurgical glioma characterization. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Differential Glioma-Associated Tumor Antigen Expression Profiles of Human Glioma Cells Grown in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N.; Hoa, Neil T.; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R.

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O2) or normoxic (21% O2) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens. PMID:22957023

  14. Differential glioma-associated tumor antigen expression profiles of human glioma cells grown in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N; Hoa, Neil T; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O(2)) or normoxic (21% O(2)) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens.

  15. Metabolic approach for tumor delineation in glioma surgery: 3D MR spectroscopy image-guided resection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Lin, Ching-Po; Wang, Tian-Liang; Qin, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Jin-Song

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The extent of resection is one of the most essential factors that influence the outcomes of glioma resection. However, conventional structural imaging has failed to accurately delineate glioma margins because of tumor cell infiltration. Three-dimensional proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) can provide metabolic information and has been used in preoperative tumor differentiation, grading, and radiotherapy planning. Resection based on glioma metabolism information may provide for a more extensive resection and yield better outcomes for glioma patients. In this study, the authors attempt to integrate 3D (1)H-MRS into neuronavigation and assess the feasibility and validity of metabolically based glioma resection. METHODS Choline (Cho)-N-acetylaspartate (NAA) index (CNI) maps were calculated and integrated into neuronavigation. The CNI thresholds were quantitatively analyzed and compared with structural MRI studies. Glioma resections were performed under 3D (1)H-MRS guidance. Volumetric analyses were performed for metabolic and structural images from a low-grade glioma (LGG) group and high-grade glioma (HGG) group. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurological assessments were performed immediately after surgery and 1 year after tumor resection. RESULTS Fifteen eligible patients with primary cerebral gliomas were included in this study. Three-dimensional (1)H-MRS maps were successfully coregistered with structural images and integrated into navigational system. Volumetric analyses showed that the differences between the metabolic volumes with different CNI thresholds were statistically significant (p < 0.05). For the LGG group, the differences between the structural and the metabolic volumes with CNI thresholds of 0.5 and 1.5 were statistically significant (p = 0.0005 and 0.0129, respectively). For the HGG group, the differences between the structural and metabolic volumes with CNI thresholds of 0.5 and 1.0 were statistically significant (p = 0.0027 and 0

  16. Noscapine inhibits tumor growth in TMZ-resistant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Niyati; Cho, Heeyeon; Torres, Shering; Wang, Weijun; Schönthal, Axel H; Petasis, Nicos A; Louie, Stan G; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C

    2011-12-22

    Noscapine, a common oral antitussive agent, has been shown to have potent antitumor activity in a variety of cancers. Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with temozolomide (TMZ), its current standard of care, is problematic because the tumor generally recurs and is then resistant to this drug. We therefore investigated the effects of noscapine on human TMZ-resistant GBM tumors. We found that noscapine significantly decreased TMZ-resistant glioma cell growth and invasion. Using the intracranial xenograft model, we showed that noscapine increased survival of animals with TMZ-resistant gliomas. Thus noscapine can provide an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of TMZ-resistant gliomas.

  17. Histogram analysis reveals a better delineation of tumor volume from background in 18F-FET PET compared to CBV maps in a hybrid PET-MR studie in gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filss, Christian P.; Stoffels, Gabriele; Galldiks, Norbert; Sabel, Michael; Wittsack, Hans J.; Coenen, Heinz H.; Shah, Nadim J.; Herzog, Hans; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently the method of first choice for diagnostic investigation of glial tumors. However, different MR sequences may over- or underestimate tumor size and thus it may not be possible to delineate tumor from adjacent brain. In order to compensate this confinement additonal MR sequences like perfusion weighted MRI (PWI) with regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) or positron emission tomography (PET) with aminoacids are used to gain further information. Recent studies suggest that both of theses image modalities provide similar diagnostic information. For comparison tumor to brain ratios (TBR) with mean and maximum values are frequently used but results from different studies can often not be checked against each other. Furthermore, especially the maximum TBR in rCBV is at risk to be falsified by artifacts (e.g. blood vessels). These confinements are reduced by the use of histograms since all information of the VOIs are equally displayed. In this study we measured and compared the intersection of tumor and reference tissue histograms in 18F-FET PET and rCBV maps in glioma patients.

  18. Prostate biopsy volume predicts final tumor volume.

    PubMed

    Zavaski, Michael E; Korus, Adam; Staff, Ilene; Champagne, Alison; Fish-Furhman, Jamie; Tortora, Joseph; Meraney, Anoop; Kesler, Stuart; Wagner, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    To assess the ability of prostate biopsy volume to effectively predict actual tumor volume, and whether increasing the number of prostate biopsy cores improves the ability to forecast actual tumor volume. 765 patients who underwent robotic radical prostatectomy (2009-2010) were identified. Of these, 663 had complete demographics, biopsy, and final pathology data available. The number ofbiopsy samples, biopsy tumor volume, and actual tumor volume were calculated from pathology reports. Data from 663 radical prostatectomy specimens indicated a positive linearrelationship between biopsy tumor volume and actual tumor volume (R=0.524, P< 0.0001). The number ofbiopsy samples collected (i.e., < or =6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, 13-14, or > or =15) did not affect the ability of biopsy tumor volume to predict final tumor volume. The routine collection of biopsy tumor volume may prove useful in predicting actual tumor volume and the construction of more effective preoperative nomograms.

  19. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  20. TRAIL conjugated to nanoparticles exhibits increased anti-tumor activities in glioma cells and glioma stem cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Perlstein, Benny; Finniss, Susan A.; Miller, Cathie; Okhrimenko, Hana; Kazimirsky, Gila; Cazacu, Simona; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lemke, Nancy; Brodie, Shlomit; Umansky, Felix; Rempel, Sandra A.; Rosenblum, Mark; Mikklesen, Tom; Margel, Shlomo; Brodie, Chaya

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are characterized by resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and therefore, alternative therapeutic approaches are needed. TRAIL induces apoptosis in cancer but not in normal cells and is considered to be a promising anti-tumor agent. However, its short in vivo half-life and lack of efficient administration modes are serious impediments to its therapeutic efficacy. Nanoparticles (NP) have been used as effective delivery tools for various anticancer drugs. TRAIL was conjugated to magnetic ferric oxide NP by binding the TRAIL primary amino groups to activated double bonds on the surface of the NP. The effect of NP-TRAIL was examined on the apoptosis of glioma cells and self-renewal of glioma stem cells (GSCs). In addition, the ability of the NP-TRAIL to track U251 cell–derived glioma xenografts and to affect cell apoptosis, tumor volume, and survival among xenografted rats was also examined. Conjugation of TRAIL to NP increased its apoptotic activity against different human glioma cells and GSCs, as compared with free recombinant TRAIL. Combined treatment with NP-TRAIL and γ-radiation or bortezomib sensitized TRAIL-resistant GSCs to NP-TRAIL. Using rhodamine-labeled NP and U251 glioma cell–derived xenografts, we demonstrated that the NP-TRAIL were found in the tumor site and induced a significant increase in glioma cell apoptosis, a decrease in tumor volume, and increased animal survival. In summary, conjugation of TRAIL to NP increased its apoptotic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, NP-TRAIL represents a targeted anticancer agent with more efficient action for the treatment of GBM and the eradication of GSCs. PMID:23144078

  1. TRAIL conjugated to nanoparticles exhibits increased anti-tumor activities in glioma cells and glioma stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Perlstein, Benny; Finniss, Susan A; Miller, Cathie; Okhrimenko, Hana; Kazimirsky, Gila; Cazacu, Simona; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lemke, Nancy; Brodie, Shlomit; Umansky, Felix; Rempel, Sandra A; Rosenblum, Mark; Mikklesen, Tom; Margel, Shlomo; Brodie, Chaya

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are characterized by resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and therefore, alternative therapeutic approaches are needed. TRAIL induces apoptosis in cancer but not in normal cells and is considered to be a promising anti-tumor agent. However, its short in vivo half-life and lack of efficient administration modes are serious impediments to its therapeutic efficacy. Nanoparticles (NP) have been used as effective delivery tools for various anticancer drugs. TRAIL was conjugated to magnetic ferric oxide NP by binding the TRAIL primary amino groups to activated double bonds on the surface of the NP. The effect of NP-TRAIL was examined on the apoptosis of glioma cells and self-renewal of glioma stem cells (GSCs). In addition, the ability of the NP-TRAIL to track U251 cell-derived glioma xenografts and to affect cell apoptosis, tumor volume, and survival among xenografted rats was also examined. Conjugation of TRAIL to NP increased its apoptotic activity against different human glioma cells and GSCs, as compared with free recombinant TRAIL. Combined treatment with NP-TRAIL and γ-radiation or bortezomib sensitized TRAIL-resistant GSCs to NP-TRAIL. Using rhodamine-labeled NP and U251 glioma cell-derived xenografts, we demonstrated that the NP-TRAIL were found in the tumor site and induced a significant increase in glioma cell apoptosis, a decrease in tumor volume, and increased animal survival. In summary, conjugation of TRAIL to NP increased its apoptotic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, NP-TRAIL represents a targeted anticancer agent with more efficient action for the treatment of GBM and the eradication of GSCs.

  2. Sulfasalazine impacts on ferroptotic cell death and alleviates the tumor microenvironment and glioma-induced brain edema

    PubMed Central

    Sehm, Tina; Fan, Zheng; Ghoochani, Ali; Rauh, Manfred; Engelhorn, Tobias; Minakaki, Georgia; Dörfler, Arnd; Klucken, Jochen; Buchfelder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The glutamate transporter xCT (SCL7a11, system Xc-, SXC) is an emerging key player in glutamate/cysteine/glutathione homeostasis in the brain and in cancer. xCT expression correlates with the grade of malignancy. Here, we report on the use of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and EMA-approved xCT inhibitor, sulfasalazine (SAS) in gliomas. SAS does not affect cell viability in gliomas at concentrations below 200 μM. At higher concentrations SAS becomes gliomatoxic. Mechanistically SAS inhibits xCT and induces ferroptotic cell death in glioma cells. There is no evidence for impact on autophagic flux following SAS application. However, SAS can potentiate the efficacy of the standard chemotherapeutic and autophagy-inducing agent temozolomide (Temcat, Temodal or Temodar®). We also investigated SAS in non-transformed cellular constituents of the brain. Neurons and brain tissue are almost non-responding to SAS whereas isolated astrocytes are less sensitive towards SAS toxicity compared to gliomas. In vivo SAS treatment does not affect experimental tumor growth and treated animals revealed comparable tumor volume as untreated controls. However, SAS treatment resulted in reduced glioma-derived edema and, hence, total tumor volume burden as revealed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Altogether, we show that SAS can be utilized for targeting the glutamate antiporter xCT activity as a tumor microenvironment-normalizing drug, while crucial cytotoxic effects in brain tumors are minor. PMID:27074570

  3. Angiopoietin-1 Promotes Tumor Angiogenesis in a Rat Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Machein, Marcia Regina; Knedla, Anette; Knoth, Rolf; Wagner, Shawn; Neuschl, Elvira; Plate, Karl H.

    2004-01-01

    Angiopoietins have been implicated in playing an important role in blood vessel formation, remodeling, maturation, and maintenance. However, the role of angiopoietins in tumor angiogenesis remains uncertain. In this study, expression of human angiopoietin-1 (hAng-1) and angiopoietin (hAng-2) was amplified in the rat glioma cell line GS9L by stable transfection using an inducible tet-off system. Transfected cells were implanted intracerebrally into syngenic Fischer 344 rats. We demonstrated by means of magnetic resonance imaging that increased hAng-1 expression promoted a significant in vivo growth of intracerebral gliomas in rats. Overexpression of hAng-1 resulted in more numerous, more highly branched vessels, which were covered by pericytes. On the other hand, tumors derived from hAng-2-overexpressing cells were smaller than empty-plasmid control tumors. The tumor vasculature in these tumors was composed of aberrant small vascular cords, which were associated with few mural cells. Our results indicate that in the presence of hAng-1, tumors induce a more functional vascular network, which led to better tumor perfusion and growth. On the other hand, overexpression of hAng-2 led to less intact tumor vessels, inhibited capillary sprouting, and impaired tumor growth. PMID:15509526

  4. Thermal imaging of brain tumors in a rat glioma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Thanassis; Thompson, Reid C.; Kateb, Babak; Sorokoumov, Oleg; Grundfest, Warren S.; Black, Keith L.

    2002-05-01

    We have explored the capability of thermal imaging for the detection of brain tumors in a rat glioma mode. Fourteen Wistar rats were injected stereotactically with 100,000 C6 glioma cells. Approximately one and two weeks post implantation, the rats underwent bilateral craniotomy and the exposed brain surface was imaged with a short wave thermal camera. Thermal images were obtained at both low (approximately 28.7 degree(s)C) and high (approximately 38 degree(s)C) core temperatures. Temperature gradients between the tumor site and the contralateral normal brain were calculated. Overall, the tumors appeared cooler than normal brain, for both high and low core temperatures. Average temperature difference between tumor and normal brain were maximal in more advanced tumors (two weeks) and at higher core temperatures. At one week (N equals 6), the average temperature gradient between tumor and normal sites was 0.1 degree(s)C and 0.2 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P(greater than)0.05). At two weeks (N equals 8), the average temperature gradient was 0.3 degree(s)C and 0.7 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P<0.05). We conclude that thermal imaging can detect temperature differences between tumor and normal brain tissue in this model, particularly in more advanced tumors. Thermal imaging may provide a novel means to identify brain tumors intraoperatively.

  5. Analysis of FET-PET imaging for target volume definition in patients with gliomas treated with conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Giesel, Frederik L; Hoffmann, Christoph; Burger, Ute; Rief, Harald; Welzel, Thomas; Haberkorn, Uwe; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2013-12-01

    Modern radiotherapy (RT) techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity-modulated RT, or particle irradiation allow local dose escalation with simultaneous sparing of critical organs. Several trials are currently investigating their benefit in glioma reirradiation and boost irradiation. Target volume definition is of critical importance especially when steep dose gradient techniques are employed. In this manuscript we investigate the impact of O-(2-(F-18)fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine-positron emission tomography/computer tomography (FET-PET/CT) on target volume definition in low and high grade glioma patients undergoing either first or re-irradiation with particles. We investigated volumetric size and uniformity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- vs. FET-PET/CT-derived gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) of 41 glioma patients. Clinical cases are presented to demonstrate potential benefits of integrating FET-PET/CT-planning into daily routine. Integrating FET-uptake into the delineation of GTVs yields larger volumes. Combined modality-derived PTVs are significantly enlarged in high grade glioma patients and in case of primary RT. The congruence of MRI and FET signals for the identification of glioma GTVs is poor with mean uniformity indices of 0.39. MRI-based PTVs miss 17% of FET-PET/CT-based GTVs. Non significant alterations were detected in low grade glioma patients and in those undergoing reirradiation. Target volume definition for malignant gliomas during initial RT may yield significantly differing results depending upon the imaging modality, which the contouring process is based upon. The integration of both MRI and FET-PET/CT may help to improve GTV coverage by avoiding larger incongruences between physical and biological imaging techniques. In low grade gliomas and in cases of reirradiation, more studies are needed in order to investigate a potential benefit of FET-PET/CT for planning of RT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  6. Number of glioma polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) associated with vasculogenic mimicry formation and tumor grade in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) contribute to solid tumor heterogeneity. This study investigated the relationships among PGCCs numbers, vasculogenic mimicry (VM) formation, and tumor grades in glioma. Methods A total of 76 paraffin-embedded glioma tissue samples, including 28 cases of low grade and 48 cases of high grade gliomas, were performed with H&E and immunohistochemical staining for Ki-67 and hemoglobin. The size of PGCCs nuclei was measured by a micrometer using H&E section and defined as at least three times larger than the nuclei of regular diploid cancer cells. The number of PGCCs and different blood supply patterns were compared in different grade gliomas. Microcirculation patterns in tumors were assessed using CD31 immunohistochemical and PAS histochemical double staining. Human glioma cancer cell line C6 was injected into the chicken embryonating eggs to form xenografts, which was used to observe the PGCCs and microcirculation patterns. Results In human glioma, the number of PGCCs increased with the grade of tumors (χ2 = 4.781, P = 0.015). There were three kinds of microcirculation pattern in human glioma including VM, mosaic vessel (MV) and endothelium dependent vessel. PGCCs were able to generate erythrocytes via budding to form VM. The walls of VM were positive (or negative) for PAS staining and negative for CD31 staining. There were more VM and MVs in high grade gliomas than those in low grade gliomas. The differences have statistical significances for VM (t = 3.745, P = 0.000) and MVs (t = 4.789, P = 0.000). PGCCs, VM and MVs can also be observed in C6 chicken embryonating eggs xenografts. Conclusions The data demonstrated presence of PGCCs, VM and MVs in glioma and PGCCs generating erythrocytes contribute the formation of VM and MVs. PMID:24422894

  7. Electrophysiology of glioma: a Rho GTPase-activating protein reduces tumor growth and spares neuron structure and function.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Eleonora; Olimpico, Francesco; Middei, Silvia; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; de Graaf, Erik L; McDonnell, Liam; Schmidt, Gudula; Fabbri, Alessia; Fiorentini, Carla; Baroncelli, Laura; Costa, Mario; Caleo, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastomas are the most aggressive type of brain tumor. A successful treatment should aim at halting tumor growth and protecting neuronal cells to prevent functional deficits and cognitive deterioration. Here, we exploited a Rho GTPase-activating bacterial protein toxin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1), to interfere with glioma cell growth in vitro and vivo. We also investigated whether this toxin spares neuron structure and function in peritumoral areas. We performed a microarray transcriptomic and in-depth proteomic analysis to characterize the molecular changes triggered by CNF1 in glioma cells. We also examined tumor cell senescence and growth in vehicle- and CNF1-treated glioma-bearing mice. Electrophysiological and morphological techniques were used to investigate neuronal alterations in peritumoral cortical areas. Administration of CNF1 triggered molecular and morphological hallmarks of senescence in mouse and human glioma cells in vitro. CNF1 treatment in vivo induced glioma cell senescence and potently reduced tumor volumes. In peritumoral areas of glioma-bearing mice, neurons showed a shrunken dendritic arbor and severe functional alterations such as increased spontaneous activity and reduced visual responsiveness. CNF1 treatment enhanced dendritic length and improved several physiological properties of pyramidal neurons, demonstrating functional preservation of the cortical network. Our findings demonstrate that CNF1 reduces glioma volume while at the same time maintaining the physiological and structural properties of peritumoral neurons. These data indicate a promising strategy for the development of more effective antiglioma therapies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Tipifarnib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, or Brain Stem Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  9. Association of carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma are two uncommon malignancies. Patients and methods We report the case of 24-year-old man who presented with respiratory disease. Imaging investigations showed a right lung tumor and histological analysis confirmed a typical carcinoid tumor. As part of initial staging, brain MRI revealed an asymptomatic right frontal lesion. First, a right pulmonary lobectomy was performed without adjuvant treatment. In second time, brain tumorectomy was performed. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of low grade glioma (LGG). The patient remained in complete remission 2.5 years after the initial diagnosis. Results This is the first case reporting the association between LGG and lung carcinoid tumor, while no association between LGG and a systemic tumor have been published to date. Association of lung carcinoid tumor with other malignant diseases has been reported but remained uncommon. Only minimal data support a potential molecular common origin. Conclusion This exceptional association may be fortuitous. However, their concomitant diagnoses suggest a potential association between both rare diseases. A genetic susceptibility remains possible. PMID:23137305

  10. Association of carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Tabouret, Emeline; Barrié, Maryline; Vicier, Cecile; Gonçalves, Anthony; Chinot, Olivier; Viens, Patrice; Madroszyk, Anne

    2012-11-08

    Lung carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma are two uncommon malignancies. We report the case of 24-year-old man who presented with respiratory disease. Imaging investigations showed a right lung tumor and histological analysis confirmed a typical carcinoid tumor. As part of initial staging, brain MRI revealed an asymptomatic right frontal lesion. First, a right pulmonary lobectomy was performed without adjuvant treatment. In second time, brain tumorectomy was performed. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of low grade glioma (LGG). The patient remained in complete remission 2.5 years after the initial diagnosis. This is the first case reporting the association between LGG and lung carcinoid tumor, while no association between LGG and a systemic tumor have been published to date. Association of lung carcinoid tumor with other malignant diseases has been reported but remained uncommon. Only minimal data support a potential molecular common origin. This exceptional association may be fortuitous. However, their concomitant diagnoses suggest a potential association between both rare diseases. A genetic susceptibility remains possible.

  11. Relationships between tumor grade and neurocognitive functioning in patients with glioma of the left temporal lobe prior to surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Kyle R.; Sullaway, Catherine; Ziu, Mateo; Weinberg, Jeffrey S.; Wefel, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Various tumor characteristics have been associated with neurocognitive functioning (NCF), though the role of tumor grade has not been adequately examined. Methods Seventy-two patients with histologically confirmed grade IV glioma (n = 37), grade III glioma (n = 20), and grade II glioma (n = 15) in the left temporal lobe completed preoperative neuropsychological assessment. Rates of impairment and mean test performances were compared by tumor grade with follow-up analysis of the influence of other tumor- and patient-related characteristics on NCF. Results NCF impairment was more frequent in patients with grade IV tumor compared with patients with lower-grade tumors in verbal learning, executive functioning, as well as language abilities. Mean performances significantly differed by tumor grade on measures of verbal learning, processing speed, executive functioning, and language, with the grade IV group exhibiting worse performances than patients with lower-grade tumors. Group differences in mean performances remained significant when controlling for T1-weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery MRI-based lesion volume. Performances did not differ by seizure status or antiepileptic and steroid use. Conclusions Compared with patients with grade II or III left temporal lobe glioma, patients with grade IV tumors exhibit greater difficulty with verbal learning, processing speed, executive functioning, and language. Differences in NCF associated with glioma grade were independent of lesion volume, seizure status, and antiepileptic or steroid use, lending support to the concept of “lesion momentum” as a primary contributor to deficits in NCF of newly diagnosed patients prior to surgery. PMID:25227126

  12. ME-09DYNAMIC EVIDENCE OF TUMOR INDUCED MICROGLIA ACTIVATION AT THE INFILTRATIVE MARGINS OF GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Joseph; Gil, Orlando; Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; Rockne, Russell; Gallaher, Jill; Massey, Susan; Anderson, Alexander; Bruce, Jeffrey; Canoll, Peter; Swanson, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Microglia are a major cellular component of malignant glioma, and in some cases, compose up to 40% of the mass of the tumor. Previous studies have shown that microglia can decrease T-cell response to glioma, and their abundance is correlated with increased histologic grade. These studies suggest that microglia facilitate the progression and infiltration of glioma, however the dynamics of the relationship between tumor cells and microglia are not well characterized. METHODS: In this work, we examined the dynamic migratory behavior of glioma and microglia cells using two-color time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of brain slices from a PDGF-driven rat model of glioma in which glioma cells and microglia were labeled with separate fluorescent markers. We quantified glioma cells and microglia motility through single cell tracking and particle image velocimetry. RESULTS: We found that microglia were predominately abundant within the tumor mass and that microglia motility was strongly correlated with the presence of glioma cells. This provides the first dynamic evidence that glioma induces microglial motility. We found that motility of glioma cells and microglia were variably correlated. Our results also show that microglia and glioma cells exhibit stark differences in migratory behavior. Microglia move by a simple random walk, while glioma cells exhibit highly persistent motion, characterized as super diffusion, within the same microenvironment indicating intrinsic differences in response to migratory cues. CONCLUSION: These results provide the first dynamic evidence of glioma cells stimulating the activation of microglia, by means of increasing motility and localization in and around the infiltrative edge of glioma. Further, these results show dynamic interactions between glioma and microglia and suggest that glioma cells and microglia are either responding to different migratory cues, or are responding to the same cues in different ways.

  13. Stereotactic brachytherapy of low-grade cerebral glioma after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Suchorska, Bogdana; Ruge, Maximilian; Treuer, Harald; Sturm, Volker; Voges, Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of stereotactic brachytherapy (SBT) on survival time and outcome when applied after resection of low-grade glioma (LGG) of World Health Organization grade II. From January 1982 through December 2006 we treated 1024 patients who had glioma with stereotactic implantation of iodine-125 seeds and SBT in accordance with a prospective protocol. For the present analysis, we selected 95 of 277 patients with LGG, in whom SBT was applied to treat progressive (43 patients) or recurrent (52 patients) tumor after resection. At 24 months after seed implantation, the tumor response rate was 35.9%, and the tumor control rate was 97.3%. The median progression-free-survival (PFS) duration after SBT was 52.7 ± 7.1 months. Five-year and 10-year PFS probabilities were 43.4% and 10.7%, respectively. Malignant tumor transformation, the diagnosis "astrocytoma," and tumor volume >20 mL were significantly associated with reduced PFS. Tumor progression or relapse after SBT (53 of 95 patients) was treated with tumor resection, a second SBT, chemotherapy, and/or radiotherapy. The median overall survival duration (from the first diagnosis of LGG until the patient's last contact) was 245.0 ± 4.9 months. Patients still under observation after seed implantation had a median follow-up time of 156.4 ± 55.7 months. Perioperative transient morbidity was 1.1%, and the frequency of permanent morbidity caused by SBT was 3.3%. In conclusion, SBT of recurrent or progressive LGG after resection located in functionally critical brain areas has high local efficacy and comparably low morbidity. Referred to individually adopted glioma treatment concepts SBT provides a reasonably long PFS, thus improving overall survival. In selected patients, SBT can lead to delays in the application of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.

  14. The effect of bumetanide on photodynamic therapy-induced peri-tumor edema of C6 glioma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xufeng; Cong, Damin; Shen, Dawei; Gao, Xin; Chen, Lei; Hu, Shaoshan

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bumetanide on peri-tumor edema caused by photodynamic therapy (PDT) of intraparenchymal C6 glioma xenografts. Seven days after inoculation with C6 cells, rats with MRI-confirmed glioma received hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-mediated PDT, injection of bumetanide or a combination of the two treatments. After treatment, tumor volume, tumor weight, brain water content, microvessel density, expression of NKCC-1, Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), and animal survival time were examined. In the PDT group, tumor growth was significantly inhibited and survival prolonged. Bumetanide enhanced the efficacy of PDT and reduced PDT-induced peri-tumor edema in the combined PDT + bumetanide treatment group where NKCC-1 expression in response to PDT was significantly suppressed. ZO-1 expression was significantly suppressed in the PDT-only group. This suppression was not observed in the combined PDT + bumetanide treatment group. PDT, in combination with bumetanide was seen to significantly inhibit the growth of C6 glioma, relieve peri-tumor edema caused by PDT alone and prolong survival. These results suggest that PDT, in combination with bumetanide, may be a useful and promising strategy in the treatment of human glioma. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Gas5 Exerts Tumor-suppressive Functions in Human Glioma Cells by Targeting miR-222

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xihe; Wang, Ping; Liu, Jing; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Yunhui; Chen, Jiajia; Xue, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of noncoding RNAs in glioma cells, including long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and microRNAs, may participate in the progression of glioma. Encoded by Growth Arrest-Specific 5 (GAS5) gene, lncRNA Gas5 was reported to be a negative regulator for survival and proliferation of several cancers. Here, Gas5 is found to be downregulated in glioma specimens and U87 and U251 glioma cell lines. We showed that the introduction of Gas5 by plasmid transfection increased the expression of tumor suppressor Bcl-2-modifying factor (bmf) and Plexin C1 via directly targeting and reducing the expression of miR-222. Downregulated expression of miR-222 inhibited U87 and U251 cell proliferation and promoted the apoptosis by upregulating bmf. As downstream signaling molecules of bmf, Bcl-2 and Bax were involved in the process. Meanwhile, knockdown of miR-222 attenuated U87 and U251 cell migration and invasion by upregulating Plexin C1, and cofilin was a crucial regulator targeted by Plexin C1. Gas5 combined with the knockdown of miR-222 resulted in the smallest tumor volumes and the longest survivals of nude mice in vivo. In summary, we show that Gas5 suppresses tumor malignancy by downregulating miR-222, which may serve as a promising therapy for glioma. PMID:26370254

  16. Gas5 Exerts Tumor-suppressive Functions in Human Glioma Cells by Targeting miR-222.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xihe; Wang, Ping; Liu, Jing; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Yunhui; Chen, Jiajia; Xue, Yixue

    2015-12-01

    Aberrant expression of noncoding RNAs in glioma cells, including long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and microRNAs, may participate in the progression of glioma. Encoded by Growth Arrest-Specific 5 (GAS5) gene, lncRNA Gas5 was reported to be a negative regulator for survival and proliferation of several cancers. Here, Gas5 is found to be downregulated in glioma specimens and U87 and U251 glioma cell lines. We showed that the introduction of Gas5 by plasmid transfection increased the expression of tumor suppressor Bcl-2-modifying factor (bmf) and Plexin C1 via directly targeting and reducing the expression of miR-222. Downregulated expression of miR-222 inhibited U87 and U251 cell proliferation and promoted the apoptosis by upregulating bmf. As downstream signaling molecules of bmf, Bcl-2 and Bax were involved in the process. Meanwhile, knockdown of miR-222 attenuated U87 and U251 cell migration and invasion by upregulating Plexin C1, and cofilin was a crucial regulator targeted by Plexin C1. Gas5 combined with the knockdown of miR-222 resulted in the smallest tumor volumes and the longest survivals of nude mice in vivo. In summary, we show that Gas5 suppresses tumor malignancy by downregulating miR-222, which may serve as a promising therapy for glioma.

  17. Inhibition of ectopic glioma tumor growth by a potent ferrocenyl drug loaded into stealth lipid nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Lainé, Anne-Laure; Clavreul, Anne; Rousseau, Audrey; Tétaud, Clément; Vessieres, Anne; Garcion, Emmanuel; Jaouen, Gerard; Aubert, Léo; Guilbert, Matthieu; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Passirani, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    In this work, a novel ferrocenyl complex (ansa-FcdiOH) was assessed for brain tumor therapy through stealth lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). Stealth LNCs, prepared according to a one-step process, showed rapid uptake by cancer cells and extended blood circulation time. The ferrocenyl complex was successfully encapsulated into these LNCs measuring 40 nm with a high loading capacity (6.4%). In vitro studies showed a potent anticancer effect of ansa-FcdiOH on 9L cells with a low IC50 value (0.1 μM) associated with an oxidative stress and a dose-dependent alteration of the cell cycle. Repeated intravenous injections of stealth ansa-FcdiOH LNCs in ectopic glioma bearing rats induced a significant tumor growth inhibition, supported by a reduced number of proliferative cells in tumors compared to control group. Additionally, no liver damage was observed in treated animals. These results indicated that stealth ansa-FcdiOH LNCs might be considered as a potential new approach for cancer chemotherapy. In this study, a novel ferrocenyl complex was assessed for brain tumor therapy through stealth lipid nanocapsules, demonstrating no liver damage, and superior tumor volume reduction compared to saline and stealth lipid nanocapsules alone in an ectopic glioma model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Circulating tumor cell is a common property of brain glioma and promotes the monitoring system

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Faliang; Cui, Yong; Jiang, Haihui; Sui, Dali; Wang, Yonggang; Jiang, Zhongli; Zhao, Jizong; Lin, Song

    2016-01-01

    Brain glioma is the most common primary intracranial tumor characterized by dismal prognosis and frequent recurrence, yet a real-time and reliable biological approach to monitor tumor response and progression is still lacking. Recently, few studies have reported that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be detected in glioblastoma multiform (GBM), providing the possibility of its application in brain glioma monitoring system. But its application limits still exist, because the detection rate of CTCs is still low and was exclusively limited to high- grade gliomas. Here, we adopted an advanced integrated cellular and molecular approach of SE-iFISH to detect CTCs in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with 7 different subtypes of brain glioma, uncovering the direct evidences of glioma migration. We identified CTCs in the PB from 24 of 31 (77%) patients with glioma in all 7 subtypes. No statistical difference of CTC incidence and count was observed in different pathological subtypes or WHO grades of glioma. Clinical data revealed that CTCs, to some extent, was superior to MRI in monitoring the treatment response and differentiating radionecrosis from recurrence of glioma. Conclusively, CTCs is a common property of brain gliomas of various pathological subtypes, which has provided an ultimate paradox for the hypothesis “soil and seed”. It can be used to monitor the microenvironment of gliomas dynamically, which will be a meaningful complement to radiographic imaging. PMID:27517490

  19. The Value of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid in Low-grade Gliomas and High-grade Gliomas Lacking Glioblastoma Imaging Features: An Analysis Based on Fluorescence, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 18F-Fluoroethyl Tyrosine Positron Emission Tomography, and Tumor Molecular Factors.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Mohammed; Wölfer, Johannes; Ewelt, Christian; Holling, Markus; Hasselblatt, Martin; Niederstadt, Thomas; Zoubi, Tarek; Weckesser, Matthias; Stummer, Walter

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 20% of grade II and most grade III gliomas fluoresce after 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) application. Conversely, approximately 30% of nonenhancing gliomas are actually high grade. The aim of this study was to identify preoperative factors (ie, age, enhancement, 18F-fluoroethyl tyrosine positron emission tomography [F-FET PET] uptake ratios) for predicting fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastomas imaging features and to determine whether fluorescence will allow prediction of tumor grade or molecular characteristics. Patients harboring gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features were given 5-ALA. Fluorescence was recorded intraoperatively, and biopsy specimens collected from fluorescing tissue. World Health Organization (WHO) grade, Ki-67/MIB-1 index, IDH1 (R132H) mutation status, O-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status, and 1p/19q co-deletion status were assessed. Predictive factors for fluorescence were derived from preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and F-FET PET. Classification and regression tree analysis and receiver-operating-characteristic curves were generated for defining predictors. Of 166 tumors, 82 were diagnosed as WHO grade II, 76 as grade III, and 8 as glioblastomas grade IV. Contrast enhancement, tumor volume, and F-FET PET uptake ratio >1.85 predicted fluorescence. Fluorescence correlated with WHO grade (P < .001) and Ki-67/MIB-1 index (P < .001), but not with MGMT promoter methylation status, IDH1 mutation status, or 1p19q co-deletion status. The Ki-67/MIB-1 index in fluorescing grade III gliomas was higher than in nonfluorescing tumors, whereas in fluorescing and nonfluorescing grade II tumors, no differences were noted. Age, tumor volume, and F-FET PET uptake are factors predicting 5-ALA-induced fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features. Fluorescence was associated with an increased Ki-67/MIB-1 index and high-grade pathology. Whether

  20. Anti-tumoral activity of native compound morelloflavone in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianfeng; Ai, Hongyan; Sun, Deke; Wu, Tao; He, Jian; Xu, Zhai; Ding, Li; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-tumoral activity of morelloflavone substances with different structures. We also studied the possible link between morelloflavone structure and its function. Various types of chromatographic techniques were used to isolate and screen morelloflavone substances from the extracts of gambogic tree trunk and the morelloflavone structures were identified by analytical techniques such as high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetism. Anti-tumoral activities of different compounds were investigated and the link between the antitumor activity and the structure of compound was exaimed. Our results showed that the isolated morelloflavone substances demonstrated a certain level of antitumor activity. The compound no. 1 had the strongest effect to inhibit glioma U87 and C6 cells followed by compound no. 2 while compound no. 5 was the weakest among them. We conducted a preliminary analysis on the structure-function relationship through the structure comparison and we concluded that the antitumor effects of morelloflavone substances with different structures were significantly different from each other. Thus, the glucose chain in C4 position of biflavone structure can enhance the antitumor activity of the compound in glioma cells. Additionally, the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in biflavone compounds may also play a role in enhancing the antitumor activity and inhibition rate. PMID:27900007

  1. IGFBP2 promotes glioma tumor stem cell expansion and survival

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, David; Hsieh, Antony; Stea, Baldassarre; Ellsworth, Ron

    2010-06-25

    IGFBP2 is overexpressed in the most common brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM), and its expression is inversely correlated to GBM patient survival. Previous reports have demonstrated a role for IGFBP2 in glioma cell invasion and astrocytoma development. However, the function of IGFBP2 in the restricted, self-renewing, and tumorigenic GBM cell population comprised of tumor-initiating stem cells has yet to be determined. Herein we demonstrate that IGFBP2 is overexpressed within the stem cell compartment of GBMs and is integral for the clonal expansion and proliferative properties of glioma stem cells (GSCs). In addition, IGFBP2 inhibition reduced Akt-dependent GSC genotoxic and drug resistance. These results suggest that IGFBP2 is a selective malignant factor that may contribute significantly to GBM pathogenesis by enriching for GSCs and mediating their survival. Given the current dearth of selective molecular targets against GSCs, we anticipate our results to be of high therapeutic relevance in combating the rapid and lethal course of GBM.

  2. Bromophenol blue staining of tumors in a rat glioma model.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Tomoko; Britz, Gavin W; Kinder, David H; Spence, Alexander M; VandenBerg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Deen, Dennis F; Berger, Mitchel S

    2005-11-01

    For patients with gliomas, decreasing the tumor burden with macroscopic surgical resection may affect quality of life, time to tumor progression, and survival. Injection of bromophenol blue (BPB) may enhance intraoperative visualization of an infiltrating tumor and its margins and improve the extent of resection. In this study, we investigated the uptake of BPB in experimental rat brain tumors. We first conducted a toxicity study with bolus intravenous injections of 5, 60, and 360 mg/kg doses of BPB in nontumor-bearing Fischer 344 rats. No adverse effects were observed in any of the animals during the 60 day observation period. We then injected 9L tumor cells intracerebrally into Fischer 344 rats and approximately 2 weeks later, administered a bolus intravenous injection of 5 to 360 mg/kg BPB. Fifteen minutes after BPB injection, we sacrificed the animals and removed their brains. In a subsequent study, we injected 180 mg/kg BPB and sacrificed animals at several time points to monitor tumor staining over time. The stain was clearly visible and localized to the tumor for all BPB concentrations 60 mg/kg or greater, and in an additional experiment, we found that tumor staining persisted for at least 8 hours after BPB injection. We conclude that BPB helped visualize experimental tumors at time points from a few minutes to several hours after injection. Because BPB also proved to be nontoxic to the animals at effective concentrations, we believe the compound may be potentially useful in helping neurosurgeons visualize brain tumors in humans.

  3. Malignant brainstem tumors in children, excluding diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Klimo, Paul; Nesvick, Cody L; Broniscer, Alberto; Orr, Brent A; Choudhri, Asim F

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Malignant tumors of the brainstem, excluding classic diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs), are a very rare, heterogeneous group of neoplasms that have been infrequently described in the literature. In this paper, the authors present their experiences with treating these unique cancers. METHODS A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify eligible cases over a 15-year period. All tumors involving the pons were, by consensus, felt not to be DIPGs based on their neuroimaging features. Demographic information, pathological specimens, neuroimaging characteristics, surgical and nonsurgical management plans, and survival data were gathered for analysis. RESULTS Between January 2000 and December 2014, 29 patients were identified. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.4 years (range 2 months to 25 years), and 17 (59%) patients were male. The most common presenting signs and symptoms were cranial neuropathies (n = 24; 83%), hemiparesis (n = 12; 41%), and ataxia or gait disturbance (n = 10; 34%). There were 18 glial and 11 embryonal tumors. Of the glial tumors, 5 were radiation-induced and 1 was a malignant transformation of a previously known low-grade tumor. Surgical intervention consisted of biopsy alone in 12 patients and some degree of resection in another 15 patients. Two tumors were diagnosed postmortem. The median overall survival for all patients was 196 days (range 15 to 3999 days). There are currently 5 (17%) patients who are still alive: 1 with an anaplastic astrocytoma and the remaining with embryonal tumors. CONCLUSIONS In general, malignant non-DIPG tumors of the brainstem carry a poor prognosis. However, maximal cytoreductive surgery may be an option for select patients with focal tumors. Long-term survival is possible in patients with nonmetastatic embryonal tumors after multimodal treatment, most importantly maximal resection.

  4. HOXB1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Regulated by miR-3175 in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liang; Liu, Dehua; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Nan; Han, Ziwu; Wang, Guang; Fu, Yao; Guo, Zhigang; Zhu, Zifeng

    2015-01-01

    The HOXB1 gene plays a critical role as an oncogene in diverse tumors. However, the functional role of HOXB1 and the mechanism regulating HOXB1 expression in glioma are not fully understood. A preliminary bioinformatics analysis showed that HOXB1 is ectopically expressed in glioma, and that HOXB1 is a possible target of miR-3175. In this study, we investigated the function of HOXB1 and the relationship between HOXB1 and miR-3175 in glioma. We show that HOXB1 expression is significantly downregulated in glioma tissues and cell lines, and that its expression may be closely associated with the degree of malignancy. Reduced HOXB1 expression promoted the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells, and inhibited their apoptosis in vitro, and the downregulation of HOXB1 was also associated with worse survival in glioma patients. More importantly, HOXB1 was shown experimentally to be a direct target of miR-3175 in this study. The downregulated expression of miR-3175 inhibited cell proliferation and invasion, and promoted apoptosis in glioma. The oncogenicity induced by low HOXB1 expression was prevented by an miR-3175 inhibitor in glioma cells. Our results suggest that HOXB1 functions as a tumor suppressor, regulated by miR-3175 in glioma. These results clarify the pathogenesis of glioma and offer a potential target for its treatment. PMID:26565624

  5. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  6. Glioma Groups Based on 1p/19q, IDH, and TERT Promoter Mutations in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Decker, Paul A.; Sicotte, Hugues; Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matt L.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Sarkar, Gobinda; Caron, Alissa A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Praska, Corinne E.; Chada, Anisha R.; Halder, Chandralekha; Hansen, Helen M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Bracci, Paige M.; Marshall, Roxanne; Zheng, Shichun; Reis, Gerald F.; Pico, Alexander R.; O’Neill, Brian P.; Buckner, Jan C.; Giannini, Caterina; Huse, Jason T.; Perry, Arie; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Jenkins, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prediction of clinical behavior, response to therapy, and outcome of infiltrative glioma is challenging. On the basis of previous studies of tumor biology, we defined five glioma molecular groups with the use of three alterations: mutations in the TERT promoter, mutations in IDH, and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion). We tested the hypothesis that within groups based on these features, tumors would have similar clinical variables, acquired somatic alterations, and germline variants. METHODS We scored tumors as negative or positive for each of these markers in 1087 gliomas and compared acquired alterations and patient characteristics among the five primary molecular groups. Using 11,590 controls, we assessed associations between these groups and known glioma germline variants. RESULTS Among 615 grade II or III gliomas, 29% had all three alterations (i.e., were triplepositive), 5% had TERT and IDH mutations, 45% had only IDH mutations, 7% were triple-negative, and 10% had only TERT mutations; 5% had other combinations. Among 472 grade IV gliomas, less than 1% were triple-positive, 2% had TERT and IDH mutations, 7% had only IDH mutations, 17% were triple-negative, and 74% had only TERT mutations. The mean age at diagnosis was lowest (37 years) among patients who had gliomas with only IDH mutations and was highest (59 years) among patients who had gliomas with only TERT mutations. The molecular groups were independently associated with overall survival among patients with grade II or III gliomas but not among patients with grade IV gliomas. The molecular groups were associated with specific germline variants. CONCLUSIONS Gliomas were classified into five principal groups on the basis of three tumor markers. The groups had different ages at onset, overall survival, and associations with germline variants, which implies that they are characterized by distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:26061753

  7. Volumetric glioma quantification: comparison of manual and semi-automatic tumor segmentation for the quantification of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Odland, Audun; Server, Andres; Saxhaug, Cathrine; Breivik, Birger; Groote, Rasmus; Vardal, Jonas; Larsson, Christopher; Bjørnerud, Atle

    2015-11-01

    Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now widely available and routinely used in the evaluation of high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Ideally, volumetric measurements should be included in this evaluation. However, manual tumor segmentation is time-consuming and suffers from inter-observer variability. Thus, tools for semi-automatic tumor segmentation are needed. To present a semi-automatic method (SAM) for segmentation of HGGs and to compare this method with manual segmentation performed by experts. The inter-observer variability among experts manually segmenting HGGs using volumetric MRIs was also examined. Twenty patients with HGGs were included. All patients underwent surgical resection prior to inclusion. Each patient underwent several MRI examinations during and after adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Three experts performed manual segmentation. The results of tumor segmentation by the experts and by the SAM were compared using Dice coefficients and kappa statistics. A relatively close agreement was seen among two of the experts and the SAM, while the third expert disagreed considerably with the other experts and the SAM. An important reason for this disagreement was a different interpretation of contrast enhancement as either surgically-induced or glioma-induced. The time required for manual tumor segmentation was an average of 16 min per scan. Editing of the tumor masks produced by the SAM required an average of less than 2 min per sample. Manual segmentation of HGG is very time-consuming and using the SAM could increase the efficiency of this process. However, the accuracy of the SAM ultimately depends on the expert doing the editing. Our study confirmed a considerable inter-observer variability among experts defining tumor volume from volumetric MRIs. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  8. Anti-tumor activity of phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride on malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian-Bin; Jiang, Lei; Ding, Mao-Hua; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Bao, Yi; Chen, Yi; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Chen-Ran; Hu, Hong-Kang; Cai, Zhen; Lu, Cheng-Yin; Zhou, Jue-Yu; Qian, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Jin, Wei-Lin; Hu, Guo-Han

    2016-03-01

    Phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride (PHEN) is a selective antagonist of both α-adrenoceptor and calmodulin that exhibits anticancer properties. The aim of this study was to explore the anti-tumor function of PHEN in glioma. Cell proliferation assay was used to assess glioma cell growth. Migration and invasion capacity of glioma cells was monitored by wound-healing and transwell assay, respectively. Neurosphere formation test was adopted for the tumorigenesis of glioma cells, which was also confirmed by soft agar cloning formation test in vitro and a nude mouse model in vivo. Finally, we explored the potential pathway utilized by PHEN using Western blot and immunofluoresce staining. PHEN exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on the proliferation of both U251 and U87MG glioma cell lines in a positive dose-dependent manner. PHEN apparently attenuated the malignancy of glioma in terms of migration and invasion and also suppressed the tumorigenic capacity both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanism study showed that PHEN promoted tumor suppression by inhibiting the TrkB-Akt pathway. The results of the present study demonstrated that PHEN suppressed the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis of glioma cells, induced LINGO-1 expression, and inhibited the TrkB-Akt pathway, which may prove to be the mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor effect of PHEN on glioma cells.

  9. Probing the Bi-directional Interaction Between Microglia and Gliomas in a Tumor Microenvironment on a Microdevice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Rui; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Ge; Tao, Tingting; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Lianqing; Dou, Ying; Li, Aiping; Qin, Jianhua

    2017-02-24

    It has been proven that microglia are involved in both early and late stages of glioma progression and contribute substantially to the tumor mass of gliomas. Because no appropriate in vitro or in vivo investigative approach is available, the dynamic interaction between microglia and gliomas during tumor formation remains unclear. In this study, three types of microfluidic assay were developed to examine the outcomes of the dynamic interaction between microglia and gliomas. Co-migration assay and two-dimensional cell co-culture assay have been used to show that microglial BV-2 cells migrate toward C6 glioma cells and inhibit tumor growth during the early stage of tumorigenesis. However, in three-dimensional cell spheres (three-dimensional cell co-culture assay) that contain a large amount of glioma cells, mimicking the late stage of glioma growth, the phagocytosis of microglia was suppressed, which suggests that glioma cells could reeducate classically activated microglia into a tumor-promoting state at some point during tumor progression. Notably, we found that microglia could contribute to tumor invasion and acquisition of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype in the glioma microenvironment during the early stage and the late stage of tumor progression. In conclusion, we have developed a potential quantitative method for in vitro study of glioma immunity and provided evidence for the duality of glioma-associated microglia.

  10. 3D bioprinted glioma stem cells for brain tumor model and applications of drug susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xingliang; Ma, Cheng; Lan, Qing; Xu, Tao

    2016-10-11

    Glioma is still difficult to treat because of its high malignancy, high recurrence rate, and high resistance to anticancer drugs. An alternative method for research of gliomagenesis and drug resistance is to use in vitro tumor model that closely mimics the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this study, we established a 3D bioprinted glioma stem cell model, using modified porous gelatin/alginate/fibrinogen hydrogel that mimics the extracellular matrix. Glioma stem cells achieved a survival rate of 86.92%, and proliferated with high cellular activity immediately following bioprinting. During the in vitro culture period, the printed glioma stem cells not only maintained their inherent characteristics of cancer stem cells (Nestin), but also showed differentiation potential (glial fibrillary acidic protein and β-tubulin III). In order to verify the vascularization potential of glioma stem cells, tumor angiogenesis biomarker, vascular endothelial growth factor was detected by immunohistochemistry, and its expression increased from week one to three during the culture period. Drug-sensitivity results showed that 3D printed tumor model was more resistant to temozolomide than 2D monolayer model at TMZ concentrations of 400-1600 μg ml(-1). In summary, 3D bioprinted glioma model provides a novel alternative tool for studying gliomagenesis, glioma stem cell biology, drug resistance, and anticancer drug susceptibility in vitro.

  11. Assessment of Tumor Cells in a Mouse Model of Diffuse Infiltrative Glioma by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanahashi, Kuniaki; Natsume, Atsushi; Motomura, Kazuya; Watabe, Naoki; Muraishi, Shuichi; Nakahara, Hitoshi; Saito, Yahachi; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Glioma of infiltrative nature is challenging for surgeons to achieve tumor-specific and maximal resection. Raman spectroscopy provides structural information on the targeted materials as vibrational shifts. We utilized Raman spectroscopy to distinguish invasive tumors from normal tissues. Spectra obtained from replication-competent avian sarcoma-(RCAS-) based infiltrative glioma cells and glioma tissues (resembling low-grade human glioma) were compared with those obtained from normal mouse astrocytes and normal tissues. In cell analysis, the spectra at 950–1000, 1030, 1050–1100, 1120–1130, 1120–1200, 1200–1300, 1300–1350, and 1450 cm−1 were significantly higher in infiltrative glioma cells than in normal astrocytes. In brain tissue analysis, the spectra at 1030, 1050–1100, and 1200–1300 cm−1 were significantly higher in infiltrative glioma tissues than in normal brain tissues. These spectra reflect the structures of proteins, lipids, and DNA content. The sensitivity and specificity to predict glioma cells by distinguishing normal cells were 98.3% and 75.0%, respectively. Principal component analysis elucidated the significance of spectral difference between tumor tissues and normal tissues. It is possible to distinguish invasive tumors from normal tissues by using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:25247190

  12. Standard of care therapy for malignant glioma and its effect on tumor and stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, T S; Holland, E C

    2012-04-19

    Glioblastoma is the most common and deadly of the primary central nervous system tumors. Recent advances in molecular characterization have subdivided these tumors into at least three main groups. In addition, these tumors are cellularly complex with multiple stromal cell types contributing to the biology of the tumor and treatment response. Because essentially all glioma patients are treated with radiation, various chemotherapies and steroids, the tumor that finally kills them has been modified by these treatments. Most of the investigation of the effects of therapy on these tumors has focused on the glioma cells per se. However, despite the importance of the stromal cells in these tumors, little has been done to understand the effects of treatment on stromal cells and their contribution to disease. Understanding how current standard therapy affects the biology of the tumor and the tumor stroma may provide insight into the mechanisms that are important to the inhibition of tumor growth as well as the biology of recurrent tumors.

  13. Molecular Markers in Low-Grade Glioma-Toward Tumor Reclassification.

    PubMed

    Olar, Adriana; Sulman, Erik P

    2015-07-01

    Low-grade diffuse gliomas are a heterogeneous group of primary glial brain tumors with highly variable survival. Currently, patients with low-grade diffuse gliomas are stratified into risk subgroups by subjective histopathologic criteria with significant interobserver variability. Several key molecular signatures have emerged as diagnostic, prognostic, and predictor biomarkers for tumor classification and patient risk stratification. In this review, we discuss the effect of the most critical molecular alterations described in diffuse (IDH1/2, 1p/19q codeletion, ATRX, TERT, CIC, and FUBP1) and circumscribed (BRAF-KIAA1549, BRAF(V600E), and C11orf95-RELA fusion) gliomas. These molecular features reflect tumor heterogeneity and have specific associations with patient outcome that determine appropriate patient management. This has led to an important, fundamental shift toward developing a molecular classification of World Health Organization grade II-III diffuse glioma.

  14. Glioma Selectivity of Magnetically Targeted Nanoparticles: A Role of Abnormal Tumor Hydrodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Huang, Yongzhuo; Yang, Victor C.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic targeting is a promising strategy for achieving localized drug delivery. Application of this strategy to treat brain tumors, however, is complicated by their deep intracranial location, since magnetic field density cannot be focused at a distance from an externally applied magnet. This study intended to examine whether, with magnetic targeting, pathological alteration in brain tumor flow dynamics could be of value in discriminating the diseased site from healthy brain. To address this question, the capture of magnetic nanoparticles was first assessed in vitro using a simple flow system under theoretically estimated glioma and normal brain flow conditions. Secondly, accumulation of nanoparticles via magnetic targeting was evaluated in vivo using 9L-glioma bearing rats. In vitro results that predicted a 7.6-fold increase in nanoparticle capture at glioma-versus contralateral brain-relevant flow rates were relatively consistent with the 9.6-fold glioma selectivity of nanoparticle accumulation over the contralateral brain observed in vivo. Based on these finding, the in vitro ratio of nanoparticle capture can be viewed as a plausible indicator of in vivo glioma selectivity. Overall, it can be concluded that the decreased blood flow rate in glioma, reflecting tumor vascular abnormalities, is an important contributor to glioma-selective nanoparticle accumulation with magnetic targeting. PMID:17628157

  15. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy12

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Gregory J.; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Motsch, Sebastien; Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Mineharu, Yohei; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra Ines; Orringer, Daniel; Bannykh, Serguei; Nichols, Wesley S.; deCarvalho, Ana C.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM), and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients. PMID:25117977

  16. Mechanisms of glioma formation: iterative perivascular glioma growth and invasion leads to tumor progression, VEGF-independent vascularization, and resistance to antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Baker, Gregory J; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Motsch, Sebastien; Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Mineharu, Yohei; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra Ines; Orringer, Daniel; Bannykh, Serguei; Nichols, Wesley S; deCarvalho, Ana C; Mikkelsen, Tom; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2014-07-01

    As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM), and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gab3 overexpression in human glioma mediates Akt activation and tumor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Weiting; Zhang, Weifeng

    2017-01-01

    This current study tested expression and potential biological functions of Gab3 in human glioma. Gab3 mRNA and protein expression was significantly elevated in human glioma tissues and glioma cells. Its level was however low in normal brain tissues and primary human astrocytes. In both established (U251MG cell line) and primary human glioma cells, Gab3 knockdown by shRNA/siRNA significantly inhibited Akt activation and cell proliferation. Reversely, forced Gab3 overexpression in U251MG cells promoted Akt activation and cell proliferation. In vivo, the growth of U251MG tumors in nude mice was inhibited following expressing Gab3 shRNA. Akt activation in cancer tissues was also suppressed by Gab3 shRNA. Together, we conclude that Gab3 overexpression in human glioma mediates Akt activation and cancer cell proliferation. PMID:28291820

  18. Functional Response of Tumor Vasculature to PaCO2: Determination of Total and Microvascular Blood Volume by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Scott D; Mandeville, Joseph B; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ikeda, Keiro; Terada, Kinya; Niloff, Stephanie; Chiocca, E Antonio; Rosen, Bruce R; Marota, John J A

    2003-01-01

    Abstract In order to identify differences in functional activity, we compared the reactivity of glioma vasculature and the native cerebral vasculature to both dilate and constrict in response to altered PaCO2. Gliomas were generated by unilateral implantation of U87MGdEGFR human glioma tumor cells into the striatum of adult female athymic rats. Relative changes in total and microvascular cerebral blood volume were determined by steady state contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for transitions from normocarbia to hypercarbia and hypocarbia. Although hypercarbia induced a significant increase in both total and microvascular blood volume in normal brain and glioma, reactivity of glioma vasculature was significantly blunted in comparison to normal striatum; glioma total CBV increased by 0.6±0.1% / mm Hg CO2 whereas normal striatum increased by 1.5±0.2%/ mm Hg CO2, (P < .0001, group t-test). Reactivity of microvascular blood volume was also significantly blunted. In contrast, hypocarbia decreased both total and microvascular blood volumes more in glioma than in normal striatum. These results indicate that cerebral blood vessels derived by tumor-directed angiogenesis do retain reactivity to CO2. Furthermore, reduced reactivity of tumor vessels to a single physiological perturbation, such as hypercarbia, should not be construed as a generalized reduction of functional activity of the tumor vascular bed. PMID:14511404

  19. Expression of metastasis-associated protein 3 in human brain glioma related to tumor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shouqin; Hui, Guangyan; Hou, Fanggao; Shi, Hua; Zhou, Guoqing; Yan, Han; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jinfeng

    2015-10-01

    Glioma represents a disparate group of tumors characterized by high invasion ability, and therefore it is of clinical significance to identify molecular markers and therapeutic targets for better clinical management. Previously, metastasis-associated protein family (MTA) is considered to promote tumor cell invasion and metastasis of human malignancies. Recently, the newly identified MTA3 has been shown to play conflicting roles in human malignancies, while the expression pattern and potential clinical significance of MTA3 in human glioma have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we investigated the protein expression of MTA3 by immunohistochemistry assay and analyzed its association with glioma prognosis in 186 cases of patients. Results showed that MTA3 expression was decreased in glioma compared with that in normal brain (P < 0.05). In addition, tumors with high MTA3 expression were more likely to be of low WHO grade (P = 0.005) and reserve of body function (P = 0.014). Survival analysis showed that decreased MTA3 expression was independently associated with unfavorable overall survival of patients (P < 0.001). These results provide the first evidence that MTA3 expression was decreased in human glioma and negatively associated with prognosis of patients, suggesting that MTA3 may play a tumor suppressor role in glioma.

  20. Metabolomics profiling in plasma samples from glioma patients correlates with tumor phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Heimberger, Amy B.; Lu, Zhimin; Wu, Xifeng; Hodges, Tiffany R.; Song, Renduo; Shen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor-based molecular biomarkers have redefined in the classification gliomas. However, the association of systemic metabolomics with glioma phenotype has not been explored yet. Methods In this study, we conducted two-step (discovery and validation) metabolomic profiling in plasma samples from 87 glioma patients. The metabolomics data were tested for correlation with glioma grade (high vs low), glioblastoma (GBM) versus malignant gliomas, and IDH mutation status. Results Five metabolites, namely uracil, arginine, lactate, cystamine, and ornithine, significantly differed between high- and low-grade glioma patients in both the discovery and validation cohorts. When the discovery and validation cohorts were combined, we identified 29 significant metabolites with 18 remaining significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Those 18 significant metabolites separated high- from low-grade glioma patients with 91.1% accuracy. In the pathway analysis, a total of 18 significantly metabolic pathways were identified. Similarly, we identified 2 and 6 metabolites that significantly differed between GBM and non-GBM, and IDH mutation positive and negative patients after multiple comparison adjusting. Those 6 significant metabolites separated IDH1 mutation positive from negative glioma patients with 94.4% accuracy. Three pathways were identified to be associated with IDH mutation status. Within arginine and proline metabolism, levels of intermediate metabolites in creatine pathway were all significantly lower in IDH mutation positive than in negative patients, suggesting an increased activity of creatine pathway in IDH mutation positive tumors. Conclusion Our findings identified metabolites and metabolic pathways that differentiated tumor phenotypes. These may be useful as host biomarker candidates to further help glioma molecular classification. PMID:26967252

  1. Human and rat glioma growth, invasion, and vascularization in a novel chick embryo brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Cretu, Alexandra; Fotos, Joseph S; Little, Brian W; Galileo, Deni S

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the insidiously invasive nature of malignant gliomas are poorly understood, and their study would be facilitated by an in vivo model that is easy to manipulate and inexpensive. The developing chick embryo brain was assessed as a new xenograft model for the production, growth, and study of human and rat glioma cell lines. Three established glioma lines (U-87 MG, C6, and 9L) were injected into chick embryo brain ventricles on embryonic day (E) 5 and brains were examined after several days to two weeks after injection. All glioma lines survived, produced vascularized intraventricular tumors, and invaded the brain in a manner similar to that in rodents. Rat C6 glioma cells spread along vasculature and also invaded the neural tissue. Human U-87 glioma cells migrated along vasculature and exhibited slight invasion of neural tissue. Rat 9L gliosarcoma cells were highly motile, but migrated only along the vasculature. A derivative of 9L cells that stably expressed the cell surface adhesion molecule NgCAM/L1 was produced and also injected into chick embryo brain ventricles to see if this protein could facilitate tumor cell migration away from the vasculature into areas such as axonal tracts. 9L/NgCAM cells, however, did not migrate away from the vasculature and, thus, this protein alone cannot be responsible for diffuse invasiveness of some gliomas. 9L/NgCAM cell motility was assessed in vitro using sophisticated time-lapse microscopy and quantitative analysis, and was significantly altered compared to parental 9L cells. These studies demonstrate that the chick embryo brain is a successful and novel xenograft model for mammalian gliomas and demonstrate the potential usefulness of this new model for studying glioma tumor cell growth, vascularization, and invasiveness.

  2. Family History of Cancer in Benign Brain Tumor Subtypes Versus Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ostrom, Quinn T.; McCulloh, Christopher; Chen, Yanwen; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Davitkov, Perica; Robbins, Sarah; Cherukuri, Rajesh; Patel, Ashokkumar; Gupta, Rajnish; Cohen, Mark; Barrios, Jaime Vengoechea; Brewer, Cathy; Schilero, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; McGraw, Mary; Denk, Barbara; Naska, Theresa; Laube, Frances; Steele, Ruth; Greene, Dale; Kastl, Alison; Bell, Susan; Aziz, Dina; Chiocca, E. A.; McPherson, Christopher; Warnick, Ronald; Barnett, Gene H.; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Family history is associated with gliomas, but this association has not been established for benign brain tumors. Using information from newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients, we describe patterns of family cancer histories in patients with benign brain tumors and compare those to patients with gliomas. Methods: Newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients were identified as part of the Ohio Brain Tumor Study. Each patient was asked to participate in a telephone interview about personal medical history, family history of cancer, and other exposures. Information was available from 33 acoustic neuroma (65%), 78 meningioma (65%), 49 pituitary adenoma (73.1%), and 152 glioma patients (58.2%). The association between family history of cancer and each subtype was compared with gliomas using unconditional logistic regression models generating odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results: There was no significant difference in family history of cancer between patients with glioma and benign subtypes. Conclusion: The results suggest that benign brain tumor may have an association with family history of cancer. More studies are warranted to disentangle the potential genetic and/or environmental causes for these diseases. PMID:22649779

  3. Ablation of Neuropilin 1 from glioma-associated microglia and macrophages slows tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Jeremy T.; Chen, Danling; Choi, Matthew; Nissen, Jillian C.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Djordevic, Snezana; Zachary, Ian C.; Selwood, David; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most commonly diagnosed primary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Median times of survival are dismal regardless of the treatment approach, underlying the need to develop more effective therapies. Modulation of the immune system is a promising strategy as innate and adaptive immunity play important roles in cancer progression. Glioma associated microglia and macrophages (GAMs) can comprise over 30% of the cells in glioma biopsies. Gliomas secrete cytokines that suppress the anti-tumorigenic properties of GAMs, causing them to secrete factors that support the tumor's spread and growth. Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) is a transmembrane receptor that in mice both amplifies pro-angiogenic signaling in the tumor microenvironment and affects behavior of innate immune cells. Using a Cre-lox system, we generated mice that lack expression of Nrp1 in GAMs. We demonstrate, using an in vivo orthotopic glioma model, that tumors in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs exhibit less vascularity, grow at a slower pace, and are populated by increased numbers of anti-tumorigenic GAMs. Moreover, glioma survival times in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs were significantly longer. Treating wild-type mice with a small molecule inhibitor of Nrp1's b1 domain, EG00229, which we show here is selective for Nrp1 over Nrp2, yielded an identical outcome. Nrp1-deficient or EG00229-treated wild-type microglia exhibited a shift towards anti-tumorigenicity as evident by altered inflammatory marker profiles in vivo and decreased SMAD2/3 activation when conditioned in the presence of glioma-derived factors. These results provide support for the proposal that pharmacological inhibition of Nrp1 constitutes a potential strategy for suppressing glioma progression. PMID:26755653

  4. Taurine concentration in human gliomas and meningiomas: tumoral, peritumoral, and extratumoral tissue.

    PubMed

    Cubillos, Suzana; Obregón, Francisco; Vargas, María Fernanda; Salazar, Luis Antonio; Lima, Lucimey

    2006-01-01

    Taurine concentrations were determined in gliomas from 16 patients and in meningiomas from 15 patients. After imaging analysis and clinical evaluation to consider the level of functional deterioration by the scale of Karnosky, tissue was obtained by surgery. Tumoral, peritumoral and extratumoral samples were taken and analyzed by HPLC with fluorescence detector. The concentration of taurine (nmol/mg protein) was higher in tumoral and peritumoral tissues than in the extratumoral samples for gliomas. In the case of meningiomas, the taurine concentration was higher in tumoral than in peritumoral and extratumoral samples. These modifications might be due to specific functions of this amino acid, being either protective or involved in the proliferation of cells. The differential distribution in the two types of tumors could be related to the malignancy of them, which is higher in gliomas than in meningiomas.

  5. Significance of IDH mutations varies with tumor histology, grade, and genetics in Japanese glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Mukasa, Akitake; Takayanagi, Shunsaku; Saito, Kuniaki; Shibahara, Junji; Tabei, Yusuke; Furuya, Kazuhide; Ide, Takafumi; Narita, Yoshitaka; Nishikawa, Ryo; Ueki, Keisuke; Saito, Nobuhito

    2012-03-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are found frequently in malignant gliomas and are likely involved in early gliomagenesis. To understand the prevalence of these mutations and their relationship to other genetic alterations and impact on prognosis for Japanese glioma patients, we analyzed 250 glioma cases. Mutations of IDH1 and IDH2 were found in 73 (29%) and 2 (1%) cases, respectively. All detected mutations were heterozygous, and most mutations were an Arg132His (G395A) substitution. IDH mutations were frequent in oligodendroglial tumors (37/52, 71%) and diffuse astrocytomas (17/29, 59%), and were less frequent in anaplastic astrocytomas (8/29, 28%) and glioblastomas (13/125, 10%). The pilocytic astrocytomas and gangliogliomas did not have either mutation. Notably, 28 of 30 oligodendroglial tumors harboring the 1p/19q co-deletion also had an IDH mutation, and these alterations were significantly correlated (P < 0.001). The association between TP53 and IDH mutation was significant in diffuse astrocytomas (P = 0.0018). MGMT promoter methylation was significantly associated with IDH mutation in grade 2 (P < 0.001) and grade 3 (P = 0.02) gliomas. IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion were independent favorable prognostic factors for patients with grade 3 gliomas. For patients with grade 3 gliomas and without 1p/19q co-deletion, IDH mutation was strongly associated with increased progression-free survival (P < 0.0001) and overall survival (P < 0.0001), but no such marked correlation was observed with grade 2 gliomas or glioblastomas. Therefore, IDH mutation would be most useful when assessing prognosis of patients with grade 3 glioma with intact 1p/19q; anaplastic astrocytomas account for most of these grade 3 gliomas.

  6. Over-expression of tetraspanin 8 in malignant glioma regulates tumor cell progression

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Si-Jian; Wu, Yue-Bing; Cai, Shang; Pan, Yi-Xin; Liu, Wei; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang

    2015-03-13

    Tumor cell invasion and proliferation remain the overwhelming causes of death for malignant glioma patients. To establish effective therapeutic methods, new targets implied in these processes have to be identified. Tetraspanin 8 (Tspn8) forms complexes with a large variety of trans-membrane and/or cytosolic proteins to regulate several important cellular functions. In the current study, we found that Tspn8 was over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues, and its expression level correlated with the grade of tumors. Tspn8 expression in malignant glioma cells (U251MG and U87MG lines) is important for cell proliferation and migration. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Tspn8 markedly reduced in vitro proliferation and migration of U251MG and U87MG cells. Meanwhile, Tspn8 silencing also increased the sensitivity of temozolomide (TMZ), and significantly increased U251MG or U87MG cell death and apoptosis by TMZ were achieved with Tspn8 knockdown. We observed that Tspn8 formed a complex with activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in both human malignant glioma tissues and in above glioma cells. This complexation appeared required for FAK activation, since Tspn8 knockdown inhibited FAK activation in U251MG and U87MG cells. These results provide evidence that Tspn8 contributes to the pathogenesis of glioblastoma probably by promoting proliferation, migration and TMZ-resistance of glioma cells. Therefore, targeting Tspn8 may provide a potential therapeutic intervention for malignant glioma. - Highlights: • Tspn8 is over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues. • Tspn8 expression is correlated with the grade of malignant gliomas. • Tspn8 knockdown suppresses U251MG/U87MG proliferation and in vitro migration. • Tspn8 knockdown significantly increases TMZ sensitivity in U251MG/U87MG cells. • Tspn8 forms a complex with FAK, required for FAK activation.

  7. Renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidases in tumor growth of rat C6 gliomas implanted at the subcutaneous region.

    PubMed

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; Carrera, María Pilar; Cobo, Manuela; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2012-09-01

    Angiotensin peptides play roles in brain tumor infiltration and associated angiogenesis. We explored the roles of soluble and membrane-bound forms of renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase N (APN)-, aminopeptidase B (APB)-, glutamate aminopeptidase- and aspartate aminopeptidase (AspAP)-specific activities on tumor growth in the rat C6 glioma model with implantation into the subcutaneous abdomen of Wistar rats, evaluating these activities as biological markers. The tumor volume was assessed for three weeks and a sample of tumor was obtained every seven days to obtain the soluble and membrane-bound fraction, in order to assay enzyme activities fluorometrically using their corresponding aminoacyl-β-naphthylamide as substrates. We found a time-dependent decrease in soluble and membrane-bound APN and APB. Soluble AspAP increases with tumor growth in a time-dependent manner. Although gliomas are heterogeneous tissues, angiotensin peptides are involved in this model of tumor growth and their role could be analyzed through their corresponding regulatory proteolytic enzymes.

  8. Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticles across the blood-brain tumor barrier into malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Hemant; Kanevsky, Ariel S; Wu, Haitao; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Fung, Steve H; Sousa, Alioscka A; Auh, Sungyoung; Wilson, Colin M; Sharma, Kamal; Aronova, Maria A; Leapman, Richard D; Griffiths, Gary L; Hall, Matthew D

    2008-01-01

    Background Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutics across the blood-brain tumor barrier of malignant gliomas remains a challenge. This is due to our limited understanding of nanoparticle properties in relation to the physiologic size of pores within the blood-brain tumor barrier. Polyamidoamine dendrimers are particularly small multigenerational nanoparticles with uniform sizes within each generation. Dendrimer sizes increase by only 1 to 2 nm with each successive generation. Using functionalized polyamidoamine dendrimer generations 1 through 8, we investigated how nanoparticle size influences particle accumulation within malignant glioma cells. Methods Magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging probes were conjugated to the dendrimer terminal amines. Functionalized dendrimers were administered intravenously to rodents with orthotopically grown malignant gliomas. Transvascular transport and accumulation of the nanoparticles in brain tumor tissue was measured in vivo with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Localization of the nanoparticles within glioma cells was confirmed ex vivo with fluorescence imaging. Results We found that the intravenously administered functionalized dendrimers less than approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter were able to traverse pores of the blood-brain tumor barrier of RG-2 malignant gliomas, while larger ones could not. Of the permeable functionalized dendrimer generations, those that possessed long blood half-lives could accumulate within glioma cells. Conclusion The therapeutically relevant upper limit of blood-brain tumor barrier pore size is approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm. Therefore, effective transvascular drug delivery into malignant glioma cells can be accomplished by using nanoparticles that are smaller than 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter and possess long blood half-lives. PMID:19094226

  9. The Value of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid in Low-grade Gliomas and High-grade Gliomas Lacking Glioblastoma Imaging Features: An Analysis Based on Fluorescence, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 18F-Fluoroethyl Tyrosine Positron Emission Tomography, and Tumor Molecular Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Mohammed; Wölfer, Johannes; Ewelt, Christian; Holling, Markus; Hasselblatt, Martin; Niederstadt, Thomas; Zoubi, Tarek; Weckesser, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 20% of grade II and most grade III gliomas fluoresce after 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) application. Conversely, approximately 30% of nonenhancing gliomas are actually high grade. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify preoperative factors (ie, age, enhancement, 18F-fluoroethyl tyrosine positron emission tomography [18F-FET PET] uptake ratios) for predicting fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastomas imaging features and to determine whether fluorescence will allow prediction of tumor grade or molecular characteristics. METHODS: Patients harboring gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features were given 5-ALA. Fluorescence was recorded intraoperatively, and biopsy specimens collected from fluorescing tissue. World Health Organization (WHO) grade, Ki-67/MIB-1 index, IDH1 (R132H) mutation status, O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status, and 1p/19q co-deletion status were assessed. Predictive factors for fluorescence were derived from preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-FET PET. Classification and regression tree analysis and receiver-operating-characteristic curves were generated for defining predictors. RESULTS: Of 166 tumors, 82 were diagnosed as WHO grade II, 76 as grade III, and 8 as glioblastomas grade IV. Contrast enhancement, tumor volume, and 18F-FET PET uptake ratio >1.85 predicted fluorescence. Fluorescence correlated with WHO grade (P < .001) and Ki-67/MIB-1 index (P < .001), but not with MGMT promoter methylation status, IDH1 mutation status, or 1p19q co-deletion status. The Ki-67/MIB-1 index in fluorescing grade III gliomas was higher than in nonfluorescing tumors, whereas in fluorescing and nonfluorescing grade II tumors, no differences were noted. CONCLUSION: Age, tumor volume, and 18F-FET PET uptake are factors predicting 5-ALA-induced fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features. Fluorescence was associated with an increased

  10. Malignant glioma following radiotherapy for unrelated primary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Marus, G.; Levin, C.V.; Rutherfoord, G.S.

    1986-08-15

    Four cases are documented where a glioma was histologically verified in the irradiation field of a previously treated malignancy of a different cell line. Radiation-induced neoplasia in the central nervous system now has been established in the induction of meningioma and sarcoma. The association between therapeutic irradiation and glioma in the reported cases lends to the evidence that a causal relation does exist. This incidence is small and does not detract from the overall benefit of irradiation as a therapeutic modality.

  11. Comparison of the Effect of Vessel Size Imaging and Cerebral Blood Volume Derived from Perfusion MR Imaging on Glioma Grading.

    PubMed

    Kang, H-Y; Xiao, H-L; Chen, J-H; Tan, Y; Chen, X; Xie, T; Fang, J-Q; Wang, S; Yang, Y; Zhang, W-G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular proliferation is a major criterion for grading gliomas on the basis of histology. Relative cerebral blood volume can provide pathophysiologic information about glioma grading. Vessel size imaging, in some animals, can be used to estimate the microvascular caliber of a glioma, but its clinical use remains unclear. Herein, we aimed to compare the predictive power of relative cerebral blood volume and vessel size imaging in glioma grading, with grading based on histology. Seventy patients with glioma participated in the study; 30 patients underwent MR perfusion imaging with a spin-echo sequence and vessel size imaging with a gradient-echo and spin-echo sequence successively at 24-hour intervals before surgery. We analyzed the vessel size imaging values and relative cerebral blood volume of differently graded gliomas. The microvessel parameters were histologically evaluated and compared with those on MR imaging. The cutoff values of vessel size imaging and relative cerebral blood volume obtained from receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used to predict glioma grading in another 40 patients. Vessel size imaging values and relative cerebral blood volume were both increased in high-grade gliomas compared with low-grade gliomas (P < .01). Moreover, vessel size imaging values had higher specificity and sensitivity in differentiating high-grade from low-grade gliomas compared with relative cerebral blood volume. In addition, a significant correlation was observed between vessel size imaging values and microvessel diameters (r > 0.8, P < .05) and between relative cerebral blood volume and microvessel area (r = 0.6579, P < .05). Most important, the use of vessel size imaging cutoff values to predict glioma grading was more accurate (100%) than use of relative cerebral blood volume (85%) values. Vessel size imaging can provide more accurate information on glioma grading and may serve as an effective biomarker for the prognosis of patients with gliomas

  12. The Use of MR Perfusion Imaging in the Evaluation of Tumor Progression in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Snelling, Brian; Shah, Ashish H.; Buttrick, Simon; Benveniste, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Objective Diagnosing tumor progression and pseudoprogression remains challenging for many clinicians. Accurate recognition of these findings remains paramount given necessity of prompt treatment. However, no consensus has been reached on the optimal technique to discriminate tumor progression. We sought to investigate the role of magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP) to evaluate tumor progression in glioma patients. Methods An institutional retrospective review of glioma patients undergoing MRP with concurrent clinical follow up visit was performed. MRP was evaluated in its ability to predict tumor progression, defined clinically or radiographically, at concurrent clinical visit and at follow up visit. The data was then analyzed based on glioma grade and subtype. Resusts A total of 337 scans and associated clinical visits were reviewed from 64 patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were reported for each tumor subtype and grade. The sensitivity and specificity for high-grade glioma were 60.8% and 87.8% respectively, compared to low-grade glioma which were 85.7% and 89.0% respectively. The value of MRP to assess future tumor progression within 90 days was 46.9% (sensitivity) and 85.0% (specificity). Conclusion Based on our retrospective review, we concluded that adjunct imaging modalities such as MRP are necessary to help diagnose clinical disease progression. However, there is no clear role for stand-alone surveillance MRP imaging in glioma patients especially to predict future tumor progression. It is best used as an adjunctive measure in patients in whom progression is suspected either clinically or radiographically. PMID:28061488

  13. Overexpression of CAP1 and its significance in tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion in glioma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yue-Chao; Cui, Chen-Chen; Zhu, Yi-Shuo; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Meng; Yu, Jin-Song; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2016-09-01

    Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1), a protein related to the regulation of actin filaments and the Ras/cAMP pathway, is associated with tumor progression. Nevertheless, the expression level and effects of CAP1 in regards to glioma have not been reported. In the present study, we examined the expression of CAP1 in glioma and tumor adjacent normal brain tissues by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that CAP1 was overexpressed in glioma tissues in comparison with that noted in the tumor adjacent normal brain tissues and increased staining of CAP1 was found to be correlated with WHO stage. In addition, we discovered that knockdown of CAP1 by specific RNA interference markedly inhibited cell growth and caused downregulation of the proliferation markers, PCNA and cyclin A. We further demonstrated that knockdown of CAP1 inhibited cell metastatic abilities by downregulating N-cadherin and vimentin and upregulating E-cadherin. These findings revealed that CAP1 expression is markedly increased in human glioma and that downregulation of CAP1 in tumors may serve as a treatment for glioma patients.

  14. Effective Treatment of Established GL261 Murine Gliomas through Picornavirus Vaccination-Enhanced Tumor Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Renner, Danielle N; Jin, Fang; Litterman, Adam J; Balgeman, Alexis J; Hanson, Lisa M; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Chae, Michael; Carlson, Brett L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Parney, Ian F; Ohlfest, John R; Pirko, Istvan; Pavelko, Kevin D; Johnson, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is among the most invasive and lethal of cancers, frequently infiltrating surrounding healthy tissue and giving rise to rapid recurrence. It is therefore critical to establish experimental model systems and develop therapeutic approaches that enhance anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, we have employed a newly developed murine glioma model to assess the efficacy of a novel picornavirus vaccination approach for the treatment of established tumors. The GL261-Quad system is a variation of the GL261 syngeneic glioma that has been engineered to expresses model T cell epitopes including OVA257-264. MRI revealed that both GL261 and GL261-Quad tumors display characteristic features of human gliomas such as heterogeneous gadolinium leakage and larger T2 weighted volumes. Analysis of brain-infiltrating immune cells demonstrated that GL261-Quad gliomas generate detectable CD8+ T cell responses toward the tumor-specific Kb:OVA257-264 antigen. Enhancing this response via a single intracranial or peripheral vaccination with picornavirus expressing the OVA257-264 antigen increased anti-tumor CD8+ T cells infiltrating the brain, attenuated progression of established tumors, and extended survival of treated mice. Importantly, the efficacy of the picornavirus vaccination is dependent on functional cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells, as the beneficial response was completely abrogated in mice lacking perforin expression. Therefore, we have developed a novel system for evaluating mechanisms of anti-tumor immunity in vivo, incorporating the GL261-Quad model, 3D volumetric MRI, and picornavirus vaccination to enhance tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses and track their effectiveness at eradicating established gliomas in vivo.

  15. Convection-enhanced delivery of sulfasalazine prolongs survival in a glioma stem cell brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Haryu, Shinya; Saito, Ryuta; Jia, Wenting; Shoji, Takuhiro; Mano, Yui; Sato, Aya; Kanamori, Masayuki; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Sampetrean, Oltea; Saya, Hideyuki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-09-19

    Expression of CD44 in glioma cells was previously correlated with tumor grade and is considered a stem cell marker. CD44 stabilizes the cystine-glutamate transporter (xCT) and inhibits apoptosis in cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recently it was found that Sulfasalazine (SSZ), an anti-inflammatory drug, acts as an inhibitor of xCT and therefore has potential as a targeted therapy for CSCs. In this study, we tested an efficacy of SSZ against glioma stem cell model developed in rats. As poor penetration of blood-brain barrier resulted in insufficient efficacy of systemic SSZ treatment, SSZ was delivered locally with convection-enhanced delivery (CED). In vitro, expression of CD44 in glioma cells and efficacy of SSZ against glioma cells and glioma stem cells were confirmed. SSZ demonstrated anti-proliferative activity in a dose dependent manner against these cells. This activity was partially reversible with the addition of antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, to the medium. In vivo, CED successfully delivered SSZ into the rat brain parenchyma. When delivered at 5 mM concentration, which was the highest possible concentration when SSZ was dissolved in water, CED of SSZ resulted in almost no tissue damage. Against highly malignant bRiTs-G3 brain tumor xenografted rat model; the glioma stem cell model, CED of SSZ at 5 mM concentration induced apoptosis and prolonged survival. Consequently, CED of SSZ induced glioma stem cell death without evidence of tissue damage to normal brain parenchyma. This strategy may be a promising targeted treatment against glioma stem cells.

  16. M2-like tumor-associated macrophages drive vasculogenic mimicry through amplification of IL-6 expression in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Xu, Yangyang; Sun, Jintang; Chen, Weiliang; Zhao, Lei; Ma, Chao; Wang, Qingjie; Sun, Jia; Huang, Bin; Zhang, Yun; Li, Xingang; Qu, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) has offered a new horizon for understanding tumor angiogenesis, but the mechanisms of VM in glioma progression have not been studied explicitly until now. As a significant component of immune infiltration in tumor microenvironment, macrophages have been demonstrated to play an important role in tumor growth and angiogenesis. However, whether macrophages could play a potential key role in glioma VM is still poorly understood. Herein we reported that both VM and CD163+ cells were associated with WHO grade and reduced patient survival, and VM channel counting was correlated to the number of infiltrated CD163+ cells in glioma specimens. In vitro studies of glioma cell lines implicated that M2-like macrophages (M2) promoted glioma VM. We found that conditional medium derived from M2 amplified IL-6 expression in glioma cells. Furthermore, our data indicated that IL-6 could promote glioma VM, as blocking IL-6 with neutralizing antibodies abrogated M2-mediated VM enhancement. In addition, the potent PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I could prevent M2-induced IL-6 upregulation and further inhibited glioma VM facilitation. Taken together, our results suggested that M2-like macrophages drove glioma VM through amplifying IL-6 secretion in glioma cells via PKC pathway. PMID:27903982

  17. DICER governs characteristics of glioma stem cells and the resulting tumors in xenograft mouse models of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Alamsahebpour, Amir; Burrell, Kelly; Li, Mira; Karabork, Merve; Ekinci, Can; Koch, Elizabeth; Solaroglu, Ihsan; Chang, Jeffery T.; Wouters, Bradly; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-01-01

    The RNAse III endonuclease DICER is a key regulator of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and is frequently decreased in a variety of malignancies. We characterized the role of DICER in glioblastoma (GB), specifically demonstrating its effects on the ability of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) to form tumors in a mouse model of GB. DICER silencing in GSCs reduced their stem cell characteristics, while tumors arising from these cells were more aggressive, larger in volume, and displayed a higher proliferation index and lineage differentiation. The resulting tumors, however, were more sensitive to radiation treatment. Our results demonstrate that DICER silencing enhances the tumorigenic potential of GSCs, providing a platform for analysis of specific relevant miRNAs and development of potentially novel therapies against GB. PMID:27421140

  18. Cyclic hexapeptide-conjugated nanoparticles enhance curcumin delivery to glioma tumor cells and tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Li, Xuejuan; Hua, Hongchen; Wang, Aiping; Liu, Wanhui; Li, Youxin; Fu, Fenghua; Shi, Yanan; Sun, Kaoxiang

    2017-01-01

    Glioma has one of the highest mortality rates among primary brain tumors. The clinical treatment for glioma is very difficult due to its infiltration and specific growth locations. To achieve improved drug delivery to a brain tumor, we report the preparation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-NPs). The cyclic hexapeptide c(RGDf(N-me) VK)-C (cHP) has increased affinity for cells that overexpress integrins and was designed to target Cur-NPs to tumors. Functional polyethyleneglycol-modified poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PEG-PLGA) conjugated to cHP was synthesized, and targeted Cur-NPs were prepared using a self-assembly nanoprecipitation process. The physicochemical properties and the in vitro cytotoxicity, accuracy, and penetration capabilities of Cur-NPs targeting cells with high levels of integrin expression were investigated. The in vivo targeting and penetration capabilities of the NPs were also evaluated against glioma in rats using in vivo imaging equipment. The results showed that the in vitro cytotoxicity of the targeted cHP-modified curcumin nanoparticles (cHP/Cur-NPs) was higher than that of either free curcumin or non-targeted Cur-NPs due to the superior ability of the cHP/Cur-NPs to target tumor cells. The targeted cHP/Cur-NPs, c(RGDf(N-me)VK)-C-modified Cur-NPs, exhibited improved binding, uptake, and penetration abilities than non-targeting NPs for glioma cells, cell spheres, and glioma tissue. In conclusion, c(RGDf(N-me)VK)-C can serve as an effective targeting ligand, and cHP/Cur-NPs can be exploited as a potential drug delivery system for targeting gliomas.

  19. Cyclic hexapeptide-conjugated nanoparticles enhance curcumin delivery to glioma tumor cells and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuemei; Li, Xuejuan; Hua, Hongchen; Wang, Aiping; Liu, Wanhui; Li, Youxin; Fu, Fenghua; Shi, Yanan; Sun, Kaoxiang

    2017-01-01

    Glioma has one of the highest mortality rates among primary brain tumors. The clinical treatment for glioma is very difficult due to its infiltration and specific growth locations. To achieve improved drug delivery to a brain tumor, we report the preparation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-NPs). The cyclic hexapeptide c(RGDf(N-me) VK)-C (cHP) has increased affinity for cells that overexpress integrins and was designed to target Cur-NPs to tumors. Functional polyethyleneglycol-modified poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PEG-PLGA) conjugated to cHP was synthesized, and targeted Cur-NPs were prepared using a self-assembly nanoprecipitation process. The physicochemical properties and the in vitro cytotoxicity, accuracy, and penetration capabilities of Cur-NPs targeting cells with high levels of integrin expression were investigated. The in vivo targeting and penetration capabilities of the NPs were also evaluated against glioma in rats using in vivo imaging equipment. The results showed that the in vitro cytotoxicity of the targeted cHP-modified curcumin nanoparticles (cHP/Cur-NPs) was higher than that of either free curcumin or non-targeted Cur-NPs due to the superior ability of the cHP/Cur-NPs to target tumor cells. The targeted cHP/Cur-NPs, c(RGDf(N-me)VK)-C-modified Cur-NPs, exhibited improved binding, uptake, and penetration abilities than non-targeting NPs for glioma cells, cell spheres, and glioma tissue. In conclusion, c(RGDf(N-me)VK)-C can serve as an effective targeting ligand, and cHP/Cur-NPs can be exploited as a potential drug delivery system for targeting gliomas. PMID:28848349

  20. Salinomycin inhibits the tumor growth of glioma stem cells by selectively suppressing glioma-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tunan; Yi, Liang; Li, Fei; Hu, Rong; Hu, Shengli; Yin, Yi; Lan, Chuan; Li, Zhao; Fu, Chuhua; Cao, Liu; Chen, Zhi; Xian, Jishu; Feng, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Glioma‑initiating cells are a small population of cells that have the ability to undergo self‑renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. In the present study, the potential role of salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, on the suppression of glioma cell growth was investigated. GL261 glioma cells were maintained in a stem‑cell‑like status [GL261 neurospheres (GL261‑NS)] or induced for differentiation [GL261 adherent cells (GL261‑AC)]. It was demonstrated that salinomycin significantly reduced the cell viability of GL261‑NS and GL261‑AC cells in a dose‑dependent manner, with a more substantial inhibition of GL261‑NS proliferation (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of salinomycin on cell growth was more effective than that of 1‑(4‑amino‑2‑methyl‑5‑pyrimid l)‑methyl‑3‑(2‑chloroethyl)‑3‑nitrosourea hydrochloride and vincristine (P<0.05). Salinomycin depleted GL261‑NS from tumorspheres and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, salinomycin prolonged the median survival time of glioma‑bearing mice (P<0.05). Therefore, the present study indicated that salinomycin may preferentially inhibit glioma‑initiated cell growth by inducing apoptosis, suggesting that salinomycin may provide a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  1. Tumor Microenvironment and Angiogenic Blood Vessels Dual-Targeting for Enhanced Anti-Glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Quanyin; Kang, Ting; Feng, Jingxian; Zhu, Qianqian; Jiang, Tianze; Yao, Jianhui; Jiang, Xinguo; Chen, Jun

    2016-09-14

    Advances in active targeting drug delivery system (DDS) have revolutionized glioma diagnosis and therapy. However, the lack of the sufficient targets on glioma cells and limited penetration capability of DDS have significantly compromised the treatment efficacy. In this study, by taking advantages of the abundant extracellular matrix-derived heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) and enhanced tumor penetration ability mediated by neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) protein, we reported the ATWLPPR and CGKRK peptide dual-decorated nanoparticulate DDS (designated AC-NP) to achieve angiogenic blood vessels and tumor microenvironment dual-targeting effect. The resulted AC-NP displayed the particle size of 123 ± 19.47 nm. Enhanced cellular association of AC-NP was achieved on HUVEC cells and U87MG cells. AC-NP was internalized via caveolin- and lipid raft-mediated mechanism with the involvement of energy and lysosome in HUVEC cells and via caveolin- and lipid raft-mediated pathway with the participation of energy, microtubulin, and lysosome in U87MG cells. After loading with anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), the enhanced apoptosis induction and antiproliferative activity were achieved by AC-NP. Furthermore, in vitro U87MG tumor spheroids assays showed a deeper penetration and an enhanced inhibitory effect against the U87MG tumor spheroids achieved by AC-NP. In vivo animal experiment showed that decoration of AC peptide on the nanoparticulate DDS resulted in extensive accumulation at glioma site and improved anti-glioma efficacy. Collectively, the results suggested that AC-NP holds great promise to serve as an effective tumor blood vessel and tumor microenvironment dual-targeting DDS with enhanced penetration capability, holding great potential in improving anti-glioma efficacy.

  2. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Glioma: Improved Delineation of the Clinical Target Volume Using the Geodesic Distance Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, DanFang; Yan, SenXiang; Lu, ZhongJie; Xie, Cong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Xing; Li, Xinke; Yu, Haogang; Zhu, Xinli; Zheng, LingYan

    2014-01-01

    Objects To introduce a new method for generating the clinical target volume (CTV) from gross tumor volume (GTV) using the geodesic distance calculation for glioma. Methods One glioblastoma patient was enrolled. The GTV and natural barriers were contoured on each slice of the computer tomography (CT) simulation images. Then, a graphic processing unit based on a parallel Euclidean distance transform was used to generate the CTV considering natural barriers. Three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique was applied to show the delineation results. Speed of operation and precision were compared between this new delineation method and the traditional method. Results In considering spatial barriers, the shortest distance from the point sheltered from these barriers equals the sum of the distance along the shortest path between the two points; this consists of several segments and evades the spatial barriers, rather than being the direct Euclidean distance between two points. The CTV was generated irregularly rather than as a spherical shape. The time required to generate the CTV was greatly reduced. Moreover, this new method improved inter- and intra-observer variability in defining the CTV. Conclusions Compared with the traditional CTV delineation, this new method using geodesic distance calculation not only greatly shortens the time to modify the CTV, but also has better reproducibility. PMID:24896082

  3. Differentiation between normal and tumor vasculature of animal and human glioma by FTIR imaging.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Katia; Pineau, Raphael; Eimer, Sandrine; Vital, Anne; Loiseau, Hugues; Déléris, Gérard

    2010-12-01

    Malignant gliomas are very aggressive tumors, highly angiogenic and invading heterogeneously the surrounding brain parenchyma, making their resection very difficult. To overcome the limits of current diagnostic imaging techniques used for gliomas, we proposed using FTIR imaging, with a spatial resolution from 6 to 10 μm, to provide molecular information for their histological examination, based on discrimination between normal and tumor vasculature. Differentiation between normal and tumor blood vessel spectra by hierarchical cluster analysis was performed on tissue sections obtained from xenografted brain tumors of Rag-gamma mice 28 days after intracranial implantation of glioma cells, as well as for human brain tumors obtained in clinics. Classical pathological examination and immunohistochemistry were performed in parallel to the FTIR spectral imaging of brain tissues. First on the animal model, classification of FTIR spectra of blood vessels could be performed using spectral intervals based on fatty acyl (3050-2800 cm(-1)) and carbohydrate (1180-950 cm(-1)) absorptions, with the formation of two clusters corresponding to healthy and tumor parts of the tissue sections. Further data treatments on these two spectral intervals provided interpretable information about the molecular contents involved in the differentiation between normal and tumor blood vessels, the latter presenting a higher level of fatty acyl chain unsaturation and an unexpected loss of absorption from osidic residues. This classification method was further successfully tested on human glioma tissue sections. These findings demonstrate that FTIR imaging could highlight discriminant molecular markers to distinguish between normal and tumor vasculature, and help to delimitate areas of corresponding tissue.

  4. MGMT promoter methylation in serum and cerebrospinal fluid as a tumor-specific biomarker of glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yahong; Guo, Yang; Cong, Zheng; DU, Fangfang; Song, Bin

    2015-07-01

    O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation is a conventional technique to predict the prognosis or individualized treatment of glioma in tumor tissue following surgery or biopsy. However, the technique cannot be applied in those glioma patients with concomitant neurological dysfunctions or advanced age. The present study aimed to find a new minimally invasive and efficient alternative method for the detection of MGMT promoter methylation. The expression of MGMT promoter methylation was assessed in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and compared to the corresponding tumor tissue from glioma patients. The 89 patients in the study [32 World Health Organization (WHO) grade II, 19 WHO grade III and 38 WHO grade IV) were pathologically-diagnosed glioma and received radiation therapy following sample collection. The resected glioma tumor tissue (89), corresponding serum (89) and CSF (78) samples were collected for the detection of MGMT promoter methylation using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting MGMT promoter methylation in CSF and serum were compared. Among the tumor tissue samples, 51/89 (57.3%) showed MGMT promoter methylation. The specificity of the detection in the CSF and serum samples reached 100%. The sensitivity of MGMT promoter methylation detection in CSF and serum were 26/40 (65.0%) and 19/51 (37.3%), respectively (P<0.05). In the WHO II, III and IV subgroups, the sensitivities of MGMT promoter methylation detection using CSF were 8/12 (66.7%), 11/18 (61.1%) and 7/10 (70.0%), respectively, which were significantly higher than the sensitivities using serum (7/21, 33.3%; 7/19, 36.8%; and 5/11, 45.5%, respectively P<0.05). Among patients with residual postoperative tumors, the sensitivities of detecting MGMT promoter methylation using CSF and serum were 18/25 (72.0%) and 10/24 (41.7%), respectively, both of which were significantly higher than the corresponding

  5. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth.

    PubMed

    Solga, Anne C; Pong, Winnie W; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J; Toonen, Joseph A; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H; Mardis, Elaine R; Gutmann, David H

    2015-10-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies.

  6. Modeling and quantifying biochemical changes in C6 tumor gliomas by Fourier transform infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Beljebbar, Abdelilah; Amharref, Nadia; Lévèques, Antoine; Dukic, Sylvain; Venteo, Lydie; Schneider, Laurence; Pluot, Michel; Manfait, Michel

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of the study was to investigate molecular changes associated with glioma tissues using FT-IR microspectroscopic imaging (FT-IRM). A multivariate statistical analysis allowed one to successfully discriminate between normal, tumoral, peri-tumoral, and necrotic tissue structures. Structural changes were mainly related to qualitative and quantitative changes in lipid content, proteins, and nucleic acids that can be used as spectroscopic markers for this pathology. We have developed a spectroscopic model of glioma to quantify these chemical changes. The model constructed includes individual FT-IR spectra of normal and glioma brain constituents such as lipids, DNA, and proteins (measured on delipidized tissue). Modeling of FT-IR spectra yielded fit coefficients reflecting the chemical changes associated with a tumor. Our results demonstrate the ability of FT-IRM to assess the importance and distribution of each individual constituent and its variation in normal brain structures as well as in the different pathological states of glioma. We demonstrated that (i) cholesterol and phosphatidylethanolamine contributions are highest in corpus callosum and anterior commissure but decrease gradually towards the cortex surface as well as in the tumor, (ii) phosphatidylcholine contribution is highest in the cortex and decreases in the tumor, (iii) galactocerebroside is localized only in white, but not in gray matter, and decreases in the vital tumor region while the necrosis area shows a higher concentration of this cerebroside, (iv) DNA and oleic acid increase in the tumor as compared to gray matter. This approach could, in the future, contribute to enhance diagnostic accuracy, improve the grading, prognosis, and play a vital role in therapeutic strategy and monitoring.

  7. Modeling Tumor-Associated Edema in Gliomas during Anti-Angiogenic Therapy and Its Impact on Imageable Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; Rockne, Russell C.; Anderson, Alexander R. A.; Swanson, Kristin R.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor, is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd) and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR. Additionally, by evaluating virtual tumors with varying growth kinetics, we see tumors

  8. Modeling Tumor-Associated Edema in Gliomas during Anti-Angiogenic Therapy and Its Impact on Imageable Tumor.

    PubMed

    Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; Rockne, Russell C; Anderson, Alexander R A; Swanson, Kristin R

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor, is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd) and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR. Additionally, by evaluating virtual tumors with varying growth kinetics, we see tumors

  9. Phase II Study of Aflibercept in Recurrent Malignant Glioma: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, John F.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Aldape, Kenneth; Yao, Jun; Jackson, Edward F.; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lassman, Andrew B.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Chen, Alice; Prados, Michael D.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy is a promising treatment approach for patients with recurrent glioblastoma. This single-arm phase II study evaluated the efficacy of aflibercept (VEGF Trap), a recombinantly produced fusion protein that scavenges both VEGF and placental growth factor in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Patients and Methods Forty-two patients with glioblastoma and 16 patients with anaplastic glioma who had received concurrent radiation and temozolomide and adjuvant temozolomide were enrolled at first relapse. Aflibercept 4 mg/kg was administered intravenously on day 1 of every 2-week cycle. Results The 6-month progression-free survival rate was 7.7% for the glioblastoma cohort and 25% for patients with anaplastic glioma. Overall radiographic response rate was 24% (18% for glioblastoma and 44% for anaplastic glioma). The median progression-free survival was 24 weeks for patients with anaplastic glioma (95% CI, 5 to 31 weeks) and 12 weeks for patients with glioblastoma (95% CI, 8 to 16 weeks). A total of 14 patients (25%) were removed from the study for toxicity, on average less than 2 months from treatment initiation. The main treatment-related National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria grades 3 and 4 adverse events (38 total) included fatigue, hypertension, and lymphopenia. Two grade 4 CNS ischemias and one grade 4 systemic hemorrhage were reported. Aflibercept rapidly decreases permeability on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular analysis of baseline tumor tissue identified tumor-associated markers of response and resistance. Conclusion Aflibercept monotherapy has moderate toxicity and minimal evidence of single-agent activity in unselected patients with recurrent malignant glioma. PMID:21606416

  10. Pattern recognition of MRSI data shows regions of glioma growth that agree with DTI markers of brain tumor infiltration.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alan J; Fellows, G; Byrnes, T J; Opstad, K S; McIntyre, D J O; Griffiths, J R; Bell, B A; Clark, C A; Barrick, T R; Howe, F A

    2009-12-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors and the majority are highly malignant, with one of the worst prognoses for patients. Gliomas are characterized by invasive growth into normal brain tissue that makes complete surgical resection and accurate radiotherapy planning extremely difficult. We have performed independent component analysis of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging data from human gliomas to segment brain tissue into tumor core, tumor infiltration, and normal brain, with confirmation by diffusion tensor imaging analysis. Our data are consistent with previous studies that compared anomalies in isotropic and anisotropic diffusion images to determine regions of potential glioma infiltration. We show that coefficients of independent components can be used to create colored images for easy visual identification of regions of infiltrative tumor growth. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Chlorotoxin: A Helpful Natural Scorpion Peptide to Diagnose Glioma and Fight Tumor Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Dardevet, Lucie; Rani, Dipti; Abd El Aziz, Tarek; Bazin, Ingrid; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Fadl, Mahmoud; Brambilla, Elisabeth; De Waard, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Chlorotoxin is a small 36 amino-acid peptide identified from the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus. Initially, chlorotoxin was used as a pharmacological tool to characterize chloride channels. While studying glioma-specific chloride currents, it was soon discovered that chlorotoxin possesses targeting properties towards cancer cells including glioma, melanoma, small cell lung carcinoma, neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. The investigation of the mechanism of action of chlorotoxin has been challenging because its cell surface receptor target remains under questioning since two other receptors have been claimed besides chloride channels. Efforts on chlorotoxin-based applications focused on producing analogues helpful for glioma diagnosis, imaging and treatment. These efforts are welcome since gliomas are very aggressive brain cancers, close to impossible to cure with the current therapeutic arsenal. Among all the chlorotoxin-based strategies, the most promising one to enhance patient mean survival time appears to be the use of chlorotoxin as a targeting agent for the delivery of anti-tumor agents. Finally, the discovery of chlorotoxin has led to the screening of other scorpion venoms to identify chlorotoxin-like peptides. So far several new candidates have been identified. Only detailed research and clinical investigations will tell us if they share the same anti-tumor potential as chlorotoxin. PMID:25826056

  12. Chlorotoxin: a helpful natural scorpion peptide to diagnose glioma and fight tumor invasion.

    PubMed

    Dardevet, Lucie; Rani, Dipti; Aziz, Tarek Abd El; Bazin, Ingrid; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Fadl, Mahmoud; Brambilla, Elisabeth; De Waard, Michel

    2015-03-27

    Chlorotoxin is a small 36 amino-acid peptide identified from the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus. Initially, chlorotoxin was used as a pharmacological tool to characterize chloride channels. While studying glioma-specific chloride currents, it was soon discovered that chlorotoxin possesses targeting properties towards cancer cells including glioma, melanoma, small cell lung carcinoma, neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. The investigation of the mechanism of action of chlorotoxin has been challenging because its cell surface receptor target remains under questioning since two other receptors have been claimed besides chloride channels. Efforts on chlorotoxin-based applications focused on producing analogues helpful for glioma diagnosis, imaging and treatment. These efforts are welcome since gliomas are very aggressive brain cancers, close to impossible to cure with the current therapeutic arsenal. Among all the chlorotoxin-based strategies, the most promising one to enhance patient mean survival time appears to be the use of chlorotoxin as a targeting agent for the delivery of anti-tumor agents. Finally, the discovery of chlorotoxin has led to the screening of other scorpion venoms to identify chlorotoxin-like peptides. So far several new candidates have been identified. Only detailed research and clinical investigations will tell us if they share the same anti-tumor potential as chlorotoxin.

  13. Obesity and Risk for Brain/CNS Tumors, Gliomas and Meningiomas: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sergentanis, Theodoros N.; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Perlepe, Christina; Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis; Tzanninis, Ioannis-Georgios; Sergentanis, Ioannis N.; Psaltopoulou, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Objective This meta-analysis aims to examine the association between being overweight/obese and risk of meningiomas and gliomas as well as overall brain/central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Study Design Potentially eligible publications were sought in PubMed up to June 30, 2014. Random-effects meta-analysis and dose-response meta-regression analysis was conducted. Cochran Q statistic, I-squared and tau-squared were used for the assessment of between-study heterogeneity. The analysis was performed using Stata/SE version 13 statistical software. Results A total of 22 studies were eligible, namely 14 cohort studies (10,219 incident brain/CNS tumor cases, 1,319 meningioma and 2,418 glioma cases in a total cohort size of 10,143,803 subjects) and eight case-control studies (1,009 brain/CNS cases, 1,977 meningioma cases, 1,265 glioma cases and 8,316 controls). In females, overweight status/obesity was associated with increased risk for overall brain/CNS tumors (pooled RR = 1.12, 95%CI: 1.03–1.21, 10 study arms), meningiomas (pooled RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.13–1.43, 16 study arms) and gliomas (pooled RR = 1.17, 95%CI: 1.03–1.32, six arms). Obese (BMI>30 kg/m2) females seemed particularly aggravated in terms of brain/CNS tumor (pooled RR = 1.19, 95%CI: 1.05–1.36, six study arms) and meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.48, 95%CI: 1.28–1.71, seven arms). In males, overweight/obesity status correlated with increased meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.58, 95%CI: 1.22–2.04, nine study arms), whereas the respective association with overall brain/CNS tumor or glioma risk was not statistically significant. Dose-response meta-regression analysis further validated the findings. Conclusion Our findings highlight obesity as a risk factor for overall brain/CNS tumors, meningiomas and gliomas among females, as well as for meningiomas among males. PMID:26332834

  14. Measurable Supratentorial White Matter Volume Changes in Patients with Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Treated with an Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Agent, Steroids, and Radiation.

    PubMed

    Svolos, P; Reddick, W E; Edwards, A; Sykes, A; Li, Y; Glass, J O; Patay, Z

    2017-06-01

    Assessing the response to treatment in infiltrative brain tumors by using lesion volume-based response criteria is challenging. We hypothesized that in such tumors, volume measurements alone may not accurately capture changes in actual tumor burden during treatment. We longitudinally evaluated volume changes in both normal-appearing supratentorial white matter and the brain stem lesions in patients treated for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma to determine to what extent adjuvant systemic therapies may skew the accuracy of tumor response assessments based on volumetric analysis. The anatomic MR imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data of 26 patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment included conformal radiation therapy in conjunction with vandetanib and dexamethasone. Volumetric and diffusion data were analyzed with time, and differences between time points were evaluated statistically. Normalized brain stem lesion volume decreased during combined treatment (slope = -0.222, P < .001) and increased shortly after completion of radiation therapy (slope = 0.422, P < .001). Supratentorial white matter volume steadily and significantly decreased with time (slope = -0.057, P < .001). Longitudinal changes in brain stem lesion volume are robust; less pronounced but measurable changes occur in the supratentorial white matter. Volume changes in nonirradiated supratentorial white matter during the disease course reflect the effects of systemic medication on the water homeostasis of normal parenchyma. Our data suggest that adjuvant nontumor-targeted therapies may have a more substantial effect on lesion volume changes than previously thought; hence, an apparent volume decrease in infiltrative tumors receiving combined therapies may lead to overestimation of the actual response and tumor control. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  15. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  16. Updated therapeutic strategy for adult low-grade glioma stratified by resection and tumor subtype.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Iseki, Hiroshi; Ikuta, Soko; Konishi, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Taichi; Tamura, Manabu; Chernov, Michael; Watanabe, Atsushi; Okamoto, Saori; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    The importance of surgical resection for patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma (LGG) remains controversial. This retrospective study of patients (n = 153) treated between 2000 to 2010 at a single institution assessed whether increasing the extent of resection (EOR) was associated with improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Histological subtypes of World Health Organization grade II tumors were as follows: diffuse astrocytoma in 49 patients (32.0%), oligoastrocytoma in 45 patients (29.4%), and oligodendroglioma in 59 patients (38.6%). Median pre- and postoperative tumor volumes and median EOR were 29.0 cm(3) (range 0.7-162 cm(3)) and 1.7 cm(3) (range 0-135.7 cm(3)) and 95%, respectively. Five- and 10-year OS for all LGG patients were 95.1% and 85.4%, respectively. Eight-year OS for diffuse astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma were 70.7%, 91.2%, and 98.3%, respectively. Five-year PFS for diffuse astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma were 42.6%, 71.3%, and 62.7%, respectively. Patients were divided into two groups by EOR ≥90% and <90%, and OS and PFS were analyzed. Both OS and PFS were significantly longer in patients with ≥90% EOR. Increased EOR resulted in better PFS for diffuse astrocytoma but not for oligodendroglioma. Multivariate analysis identified age and EOR as parameters significantly associated with OS. The only parameter associated with PFS was EOR. Based on these findings, we established updated therapeutic strategies for LGG. If surgery resulted in EOR <90%, patients with astrocytoma will require second-look surgery, whereas patients with oligodendroglioma or oligoastrocytoma, which are sensitive to chemotherapy, will be treated with chemotherapy.

  17. Advanced MR imaging techniques in the evaluation of nonenhancing gliomas: perfusion-weighted imaging compared with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and tumor grade.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Neslin; Melhem, Elias R; Wang, Sumei; Krejza, Jaroslaw; Poptani, Harish; Chawla, Sanjeev; Verma, Gaurav

    2013-10-01

    A significant number of nonenhancing (NE) gliomas are reported to be malignant. The purpose of this study was to compare the value of advanced MR imaging techniques, including T2*-dynamic susceptibility contrast PWI (DSC-PWI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)HMRS) in the evaluation of NE gliomas. Twenty patients with NE gliomas underwent MRI including DSC-PWI and (1)HMRS. The relative CBV (rCBV) measurements were obtained from regions of maximum perfusion. The peak ratios of choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and myo-inositol/creatine (mIns/Cr) were measured at a TE of 30 ms. Demographic features, tumor volumes, and PWI- and (1)HMRS-derived measures were compared between low-grade gliomas (LGGs) and high-grade gliomas (HGGs). In addition, the association of initial rCBV ratio with tumor progression was evaluated in LGGs. No significant difference was noted in age, sex or tumor size between LGGs and HGGs. Cho/Cr ratios were significantly higher in HGGs (1.7±0.63) than in LGGs (1.2±0.38). The receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that a Cho/Cr ratio with a cutoff value of 1.3 could differentiate between LGG and HGG with a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 71.4%. There was no significant difference in the rCBV ratio and the mIns/Cr ratio between LGG and HGG. However, higher rCBV ratios were observed with more rapid progressions in LGGs. The results imply that Cho/Cr ratios are useful in distinguishing NE LGG from HGG and can be helpful in preoperative grading and biopsy guidance. On the other hand, rCBV ratios do not help in the distinction.

  18. Photoradiation therapy causing selective tumor kill in a rat glioma model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, A.H.; Morstyn, G.

    1987-03-01

    We evaluated the effect of photoradiation therapy using the photosensitizer, hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), and the argon-pumped rhodamine dye laser tuned to 630 nm in the rat C6 glioma model. Animal models of cerebral glioma were established by implanting 10(6) C6 glioma cells in adult Wistar rats, and craniotomies were performed on normal and tumor-bearing animals. HpD in doses of up to 80 mg/kg followed by craniotomy resulted in no damage to the normal brain, and laser light at doses of up to 1200 joules/cm2 without the prior administration of HpD produced no significant damage if the craniotomy site was irrigated with normal saline to prevent a temperature rise. Photoradiation caused no brain necrosis in non-tumor bearing animals if less than 20 mg of HpD per kg and 200 joules of red light per cm2 were used. At higher doses of HpD and light, cerebral necrosis did occur. The depth of necrosis depended on the dose of both HpD and light. Treatment with 40 mg of HpD per kg and 400 joules of light per cm2 resulted in cerebral necrosis in 50% of the treated animals. The mean depth of brain necrosis was 1.3 mm. Selective kill of a cerebral glioma with sparing of the normal brain was achieved with photoradiation therapy at doses of HpD of less than 20 mg/kg and light doses of less than 200 joules/cm2. At these doses, the mean depth of tumor kill was 4.5 mm. In 2 of 10 animals, the depth of tumor destruction was more than 6 mm.

  19. Glioma-associated stem cells: a novel class of tumor-supporting cells able to predict prognosis of human low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bourkoula, Evgenia; Mangoni, Damiano; Ius, Tamara; Pucer, Anja; Isola, Miriam; Musiello, Daniela; Marzinotto, Stefania; Toffoletto, Barbara; Sorrentino, Marisa; Palma, Anita; Caponnetto, Federica; Gregoraci, Giorgia; Vindigni, Marco; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Falconieri, Giovanni; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pecile, Vanna; Ruaro, Maria Elisabetta; Gri, Giorgia; Parisse, Pietro; Casalis, Loredana; Scoles, Giacinto; Skrap, Miran; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    Translational medicine aims at transferring advances in basic science research into new approaches for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Low-grade gliomas (LGG) have a heterogeneous clinical behavior that can be only partially predicted employing current state-of-the-art markers, hindering the decision-making process. To deepen our comprehension on tumor heterogeneity, we dissected the mechanism of interaction between tumor cells and relevant components of the neoplastic environment, isolating, from LGG and high-grade gliomas (HGG), proliferating stem cell lines from both the glioma stroma and, where possible, the neoplasm. We isolated glioma-associated stem cells (GASC) from LGG (n=40) and HGG (n=73). GASC showed stem cell features, anchorage-independent growth, and supported the malignant properties of both A172 cells and human glioma-stem cells, mainly through the release of exosomes. Finally, starting from GASC obtained from HGG (n=13) and LGG (n=12) we defined a score, based on the expression of 9 GASC surface markers, whose prognostic value was assayed on 40 subsequent LGG-patients. At the multivariate Cox analysis, the GASC-based score was the only independent predictor of overall survival and malignant progression free-survival. The microenvironment of both LGG and HGG hosts non-tumorigenic multipotent stem cells that can increase in vitro the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating cells through the release of exosomes. The clinical importance of this finding is supported by the strong prognostic value associated with the characteristics of GASC. This patient-based approach can provide a groundbreaking method to predict prognosis and to exploit novel strategies that target the tumor stroma. © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  20. ADAM9 Expression Is Associate with Glioma Tumor Grade and Histological Type, and Acts as a Prognostic Factor in Lower-Grade Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Wang, Yongheng; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liu, Li; Yang, Sen; Wang, Yinyan; Liu, Xing; Qian, Zenghui; Fang, Shengyu; Qiao, Hui; Jiang, Tao

    2016-08-26

    The A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 9 (ADAM9) protein has been suggested to promote carcinoma invasion and appears to be overexpressed in various human cancers. However, its role has rarely been investigated in gliomas and, thus, in the current study we have evaluated ADAM9 expression in gliomas and examined the relevance of its expression in the prognosis of glioma patients. Clinical characteristics, RNA sequence data, and the case follow-ups were reviewed for 303 patients who had histological, confirmed gliomas. The ADAM9 expression between lower-grade glioma (LGG) and glioblastoma (GBM) patients was compared and its association with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed to evaluate its prognostic value. Our data suggested that GBM patients had significantly higher expression of ADAM9 in comparison to LGG patients (p < 0.001, t-test). In addition, among the LGG patients, aggressive astrocytic tumors displayed significantly higher ADAM9 expression than oligodendroglial tumors (p < 0.001, t-test). Moreover, high ADAM9 expression also correlated with poor clinical outcome (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, log-rank test, for PFS and OS, respectively) in LGG patients. Further, multivariate analysis suggested ADAM9 expression to be an independent marker of poor survival (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, for PFS and OS, respectively). These results suggest that ADAM9 mRNA expression is associated with tumor grade and histological type in gliomas and can serve as an independent prognostic factor, specifically in LGG patients.

  1. ADAM9 Expression Is Associate with Glioma Tumor Grade and Histological Type, and Acts as a Prognostic Factor in Lower-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xing; Wang, Yongheng; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liu, Li; Yang, Sen; Wang, Yinyan; Liu, Xing; Qian, Zenghui; Fang, Shengyu; Qiao, Hui; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 9 (ADAM9) protein has been suggested to promote carcinoma invasion and appears to be overexpressed in various human cancers. However, its role has rarely been investigated in gliomas and, thus, in the current study we have evaluated ADAM9 expression in gliomas and examined the relevance of its expression in the prognosis of glioma patients. Clinical characteristics, RNA sequence data, and the case follow-ups were reviewed for 303 patients who had histological, confirmed gliomas. The ADAM9 expression between lower-grade glioma (LGG) and glioblastoma (GBM) patients was compared and its association with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed to evaluate its prognostic value. Our data suggested that GBM patients had significantly higher expression of ADAM9 in comparison to LGG patients (p < 0.001, t-test). In addition, among the LGG patients, aggressive astrocytic tumors displayed significantly higher ADAM9 expression than oligodendroglial tumors (p < 0.001, t-test). Moreover, high ADAM9 expression also correlated with poor clinical outcome (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, log-rank test, for PFS and OS, respectively) in LGG patients. Further, multivariate analysis suggested ADAM9 expression to be an independent marker of poor survival (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, for PFS and OS, respectively). These results suggest that ADAM9 mRNA expression is associated with tumor grade and histological type in gliomas and can serve as an independent prognostic factor, specifically in LGG patients. PMID:27571068

  2. Radiation-associated gliomas: a report of four cases and analysis of postradiation tumors of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Liwnicz, B.H.; Berger, T.S.; Liwnicz, R.G.; Aron, B.S.

    1985-09-01

    Four cases of radiation-associated gliomas are described. All patients were white men, irradiated in childhood for craniopharyngioma, anaplastic ependymoma, retinoblastoma of the orbit, and Burkitt's lymphoma, respectively. The dose ranged from 1800 to 5900 rads, and the latency period was 5 to 25 years. All primary and secondary tumors were verified histologically, and no evidence of persistence of the primary tumors was found. All secondary tumors arose in the fields of irradiation. Ninety-six cases of radiation-induced tumors of the central nervous system have been reported in the literature to date. Twenty-four were gliomas and occurred mainly in young men.

  3. Dendritic cells pulsed with glioma lysates induce immunity against syngeneic intracranial gliomas and increase survival of tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Pellegatta, S; Poliani, P L; Corno, D; Grisoli, M; Cusimano, M; Ubiali, F; Baggi, F; Bruzzone, M G; Finocchiaro, G

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, the use of dendritic cells (DC), the most powerful antigen presenting cells, has been proposed for the creation of vaccines against gliomas. This approach has been demonstrated to be safe and non-toxic in phase I or I-II trials (2, 3). Immunotherapy plays a central role in the search for new treatments for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In particular, several phase I studies have been performed using DC pulsed by GBM proteins as a vaccine for patients with relapsing GBM. The studies demonstrated that DC vaccination is safe and may produce a significant increase in overall survival. As the first step in the preparation of appropriate conditions for a clinical evaluation in Italy, we have performed pre-clinical experiments on immune-competent mice injected intra-cerebrally with syngeneic GL261GBM cells and treated subcutaneously and intra-tumorally with DC loaded with a GL261 homogenate. These results show that vaccination with DC pulsed with a tumor lysate increases considerably survival in mice bearing intracranial glioblastomas and supports the development of DC-based clinical trials for patients with glioblastomas that do not respond to standard therapies.

  4. Toward Distinguishing Recurrent Tumor From Radiation Necrosis: DWI and MTC in a Gamma Knife–Irradiated Mouse Glioma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Torres, Carlos J.; Engelbach, John A.; Cates, Jeremy; Thotala, Dinesh; Yuan, Liya; Schmidt, Robert E.; Rich, Keith M.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Accurate noninvasive diagnosis is vital for effective treatment planning. Presently, standard anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is incapable of differentiating recurring tumor from delayed radiation injury, as both lesions are hyperintense in both postcontrast T1- and T2-weighted images. Further studies are therefore necessary to identify an MRI paradigm that can differentially diagnose these pathologies. Mouse glioma and radiation injury models provide a powerful platform for this purpose. Methods and Materials: Two MRI contrasts that are widely used in the clinic were chosen for application to a glioma/radiation-injury model: diffusion weighted imaging, from which the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is obtained, and magnetization transfer contrast, from which the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) is obtained. These metrics were evaluated longitudinally, first in each lesion type alone–glioma versus irradiation – and then in a combined irradiated glioma model. Results: MTR was found to be consistently decreased in all lesions compared to nonlesion brain tissue (contralateral hemisphere), with limited specificity between lesion types. In contrast, ADC, though less sensitive to the presence of pathology, was increased in radiation injury and decreased in tumors. In the irradiated glioma model, ADC also increased immediately after irradiation, but decreased as the tumor regrew. Conclusions: ADC is a better metric than MTR for differentiating glioma from radiation injury. However, MTR was more sensitive to both tumor and radiation injury than ADC, suggesting a possible role in detecting lesions that do not enhance strongly on T1-weighted images.

  5. The tumor microenvironment underlies acquired resistance to CSF1R inhibition in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Quail, Daniela F.; Bowman, Robert L.; Akkari, Leila; Quick, Marsha L.; Schuhmacher, Alberto J.; Huse, Jason T.; Holland, Eric C.; Sutton, James C.; Joyce, Johanna A.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages accumulate with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) progression, and can be targeted via inhibition of colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) to regress high-grade tumors in animal models of this cancer. However, whether and how resistance emerges in response to sustained CSF-1R blockade is unknown. We show that while overall survival is significantly prolonged, tumors recur in >50% of mice. Gliomas re-establish sensitivity to CSF-1R inhibition upon transplantation, indicating that resistance is tumor microenvironment-driven. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activity was elevated in recurrent GBM, driven by macrophage-derived insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and tumor cell IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R). Combining IGF-1R or PI3K blockade with CSF-1R inhibition in recurrent tumors significantly prolonged overall survival. Our findings thus reveal a potential therapeutic approach for treating resistance to CSF-1R inhibitors. PMID:27199435

  6. Pembrolizumab in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory High-Grade Gliomas, Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas, or Hypermutated Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome; Lynch Syndrome; Malignant Glioma; Recurrent Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; Refractory Brain Neoplasm; Refractory Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

  7. Tumor suppressive miRNA-34a suppresses cell proliferation and tumor growth of glioma stem cells by targeting Akt and Wnt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Sachin S; Rani, Sandhya B; Khan, Mohsina; Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Shiras, Anjali

    2014-01-01

    MiRNA-34a is considered as a potential prognostic marker for glioma, as studies suggest that its expression negatively correlates with patient survival in grade III and IV glial tumors. Here, we show that expression of miR-34a was decreased in a graded manner in glioma and glioma stem cell-lines as compared to normal brain tissues. Ectopic expression of miR-34a in glioma stem cell-lines HNGC-2 and NSG-K16 decreased the proliferative and migratory potential of these cells, induced cell cycle arrest and caused apoptosis. Notably, the miR-34a glioma cells formed significantly smaller xenografts in immuno-deficient mice as compared with control glioma stem cell-lines. Here, using a bioinformatics approach and various biological assays, we identify Rictor, as a novel target for miR-34a in glioma stem cells. Rictor, a defining component of mTORC2 complex, is involved in cell survival signaling. mTORC2 lays downstream of Akt, and thus is a direct activator of Akt. Our earlier studies have elaborated on role of Rictor in glioma invasion (Das et al., 2011). Here, we demonstrate that miR34a over-expression in glioma stem cells profoundly decreased levels of p-AKT (Ser473), increased GSK-3β levels and targeted for degradation β-catenin, an important mediator of Wnt signaling pathway. This led to diminished levels of the Wnt effectors cyclin D1 and c-myc. Collectively, we show that the tumor suppressive function of miR-34a in glioblastoma is mediated via Rictor, which through its effects on AKT/mTOR pathway and Wnt signaling causes pronounced effects on glioma malignancy.

  8. Tumor suppressive miRNA-34a suppresses cell proliferation and tumor growth of glioma stem cells by targeting Akt and Wnt signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Sachin S.; Rani, Sandhya B.; Khan, Mohsina; Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Shiras, Anjali

    2014-01-01

    MiRNA-34a is considered as a potential prognostic marker for glioma, as studies suggest that its expression negatively correlates with patient survival in grade III and IV glial tumors. Here, we show that expression of miR-34a was decreased in a graded manner in glioma and glioma stem cell-lines as compared to normal brain tissues. Ectopic expression of miR-34a in glioma stem cell-lines HNGC-2 and NSG-K16 decreased the proliferative and migratory potential of these cells, induced cell cycle arrest and caused apoptosis. Notably, the miR-34a glioma cells formed significantly smaller xenografts in immuno-deficient mice as compared with control glioma stem cell-lines. Here, using a bioinformatics approach and various biological assays, we identify Rictor, as a novel target for miR-34a in glioma stem cells. Rictor, a defining component of mTORC2 complex, is involved in cell survival signaling. mTORC2 lays downstream of Akt, and thus is a direct activator of Akt. Our earlier studies have elaborated on role of Rictor in glioma invasion (Das et al., 2011). Here, we demonstrate that miR34a over-expression in glioma stem cells profoundly decreased levels of p-AKT (Ser473), increased GSK-3β levels and targeted for degradation β-catenin, an important mediator of Wnt signaling pathway. This led to diminished levels of the Wnt effectors cyclin D1 and c-myc. Collectively, we show that the tumor suppressive function of miR-34a in glioblastoma is mediated via Rictor, which through its effects on AKT/mTOR pathway and Wnt signaling causes pronounced effects on glioma malignancy. PMID:24944883

  9. Induction of selective blood-tumor barrier permeability and macromolecular transport by a biostable kinin B1 receptor agonist in a glioma rat model.

    PubMed

    Côté, Jérôme; Bovenzi, Veronica; Savard, Martin; Dubuc, Céléna; Fortier, Audrey; Neugebauer, Witold; Tremblay, Luc; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Tsanaclis, Ana-Maria; Lepage, Martin; Fortin, David; Gobeil, Fernand

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of malignant glioma with chemotherapy is limited mostly because of delivery impediment related to the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). B1 receptors (B1R), inducible prototypical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) can regulate permeability of vessels including possibly that of brain tumors. Here, we determine the extent of BTB permeability induced by the natural and synthetic peptide B1R agonists, LysdesArg(9)BK (LDBK) and SarLys[dPhe(8)]desArg(9)BK (NG29), in syngeneic F98 glioma-implanted Fischer rats. Ten days after tumor inoculation, we detected the presence of B1R on tumor cells and associated vasculature. NG29 infusion increased brain distribution volume and uptake profiles of paramagnetic probes (Magnevist and Gadomer) at tumoral sites (T(1)-weighted imaging). These effects were blocked by B1R antagonist and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, but not by B2R antagonist and non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Consistent with MRI data, systemic co-administration of NG29 improved brain tumor delivery of Carboplatin chemotherapy (ICP-Mass spectrometry). We also detected elevated B1R expression in clinical samples of high-grade glioma. Our results documented a novel GPCR-signaling mechanism for promoting transient BTB disruption, involving activation of B1R and ensuing production of COX metabolites. They also underlined the potential value of synthetic biostable B1R agonists as selective BTB modulators for local delivery of different sized-therapeutics at (peri)tumoral sites.

  10. Induction of Selective Blood-Tumor Barrier Permeability and Macromolecular Transport by a Biostable Kinin B1 Receptor Agonist in a Glioma Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Jérôme; Bovenzi, Veronica; Savard, Martin; Dubuc, Céléna; Fortier, Audrey; Neugebauer, Witold; Tremblay, Luc; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Tsanaclis, Ana-Maria; Lepage, Martin; Fortin, David; Gobeil, Fernand

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of malignant glioma with chemotherapy is limited mostly because of delivery impediment related to the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). B1 receptors (B1R), inducible prototypical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) can regulate permeability of vessels including possibly that of brain tumors. Here, we determine the extent of BTB permeability induced by the natural and synthetic peptide B1R agonists, LysdesArg9BK (LDBK) and SarLys[dPhe8]desArg9BK (NG29), in syngeneic F98 glioma-implanted Fischer rats. Ten days after tumor inoculation, we detected the presence of B1R on tumor cells and associated vasculature. NG29 infusion increased brain distribution volume and uptake profiles of paramagnetic probes (Magnevist and Gadomer) at tumoral sites (T1-weighted imaging). These effects were blocked by B1R antagonist and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, but not by B2R antagonist and non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Consistent with MRI data, systemic co-administration of NG29 improved brain tumor delivery of Carboplatin chemotherapy (ICP-Mass spectrometry). We also detected elevated B1R expression in clinical samples of high-grade glioma. Our results documented a novel GPCR-signaling mechanism for promoting transient BTB disruption, involving activation of B1R and ensuing production of COX metabolites. They also underlined the potential value of synthetic biostable B1R agonists as selective BTB modulators for local delivery of different sized-therapeutics at (peri)tumoral sites. PMID:22629405

  11. Tumor Evolution of Glioma-Intrinsic Gene Expression Subtypes Associates with Immunological Changes in the Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianghu; Hu, Baoli; Hu, Xin; Kim, Hoon; Squatrito, Massimo; Scarpace, Lisa; deCarvalho, Ana C; Lyu, Sali; Li, Pengping; Li, Yan; Barthel, Floris; Cho, Hee Jin; Lin, Yu-Hsi; Satani, Nikunj; Martinez-Ledesma, Emmanuel; Zheng, Siyuan; Chang, Edward; Sauvé, Charles-Etienne Gabriel; Olar, Adriana; Lan, Zheng D; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Phillips, Joanna J; Berger, Mitchel S; Gabrusiewicz, Konrad R; Wang, Guocan; Eskilsson, Eskil; Hu, Jian; Mikkelsen, Tom; DePinho, Ronald A; Muller, Florian; Heimberger, Amy B; Sulman, Erik P; Nam, Do-Hyun; Verhaak, Roel G W

    2017-07-10

    We leveraged IDH wild-type glioblastomas, derivative neurospheres, and single-cell gene expression profiles to define three tumor-intrinsic transcriptional subtypes designated as proneural, mesenchymal, and classical. Transcriptomic subtype multiplicity correlated with increased intratumoral heterogeneity and presence of tumor microenvironment. In silico cell sorting identified macrophages/microglia, CD4(+) T lymphocytes, and neutrophils in the glioma microenvironment. NF1 deficiency resulted in increased tumor-associated macrophages/microglia infiltration. Longitudinal transcriptome analysis showed that expression subtype is retained in 55% of cases. Gene signature-based tumor microenvironment inference revealed a decrease in invading monocytes and a subtype-dependent increase in macrophages/microglia cells upon disease recurrence. Hypermutation at diagnosis or at recurrence associated with CD8(+) T cell enrichment. Frequency of M2 macrophages detection associated with short-term relapse after radiation therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Endothelial Differentiation of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Glioma Tumors: Implications for Cell-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagó, Juli R; Alieva, Maria; Soler, Carolina; Rubio, Núria; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent human adipose tissue mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs) are promising therapy vehicles with tumor-homing capacity that can be easily modified to deliver cytotoxicity activating systems in the proximity of tumors. In a previous work, we observed that hAMSCs are very effective delivering cytotoxicity to glioma tumors. However, these results were difficult to reconcile with the relatively few hAMSCs surviving implantation. We use a bioluminescence imaging (BLI) platform to analyze the behavior of bioluminescent hAMSCs expressing HSV-tTK in a U87 glioma model and gain insight into the therapeutic mechanisms. Tumor-implanted hAMSCs express the endothelial marker PECAM1(CD31), integrate in tumor vessels and associate with CD133-expressing glioma stem cells (GSC). Inhibition of endothelial lineage differentiation in hAMSCs by Notch1 shRNA had no effect on their tumor homing and growth-promoting capacity but abolished the association of hAMSCs with tumor vessels and CD133+ tumor cells and significantly reduced their tumor-killing capacity. The current strategy allowed the study of tumor/stroma interactions, showed that tumor promotion and tumor-killing capacities of hAMSCs are based on different mechanisms. Our data strongly suggest that the therapeutic effectiveness of hAMSCs results from their association with special tumor vascular structures that also contain GSCs. PMID:23760448

  13. Plasminogen kringle 5-engineered glioma cells block migration of tumor-associated macrophages and suppress tumor vascularization and progression.

    PubMed

    Perri, Sabrina R; Nalbantoglu, Josephine; Annabi, Borhane; Koty, Zafiro; Lejeune, Laurence; François, Moïra; Di Falco, Marcos R; Béliveau, Richard; Galipeau, Jacques

    2005-09-15

    Angiostatin, a well-characterized angiostatic agent, is a proteolytic cleavage product of human plasminogen encompassing the first four kringle structures. The fifth kringle domain (K5) of human plasminogen is distinct from angiostatin and has been shown, on its own, to act as a potent endothelial cell inhibitor. We propose that tumor-targeted K5 cDNA expression may act as an effective therapeutic intervention as part of a cancer gene therapy strategy. In this study, we provide evidence that eukaryotically expressed His-tagged human K5 cDNA (hK5His) is exported extracellularly and maintains predicted disulfide bridging conformation in solution. Functionally, hK5His protein produced by retrovirally engineered human U87MG glioma cells suppresses in vitro migration of both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human macrophages. Subcutaneous implantation of Matrigel-embedded hK5His-producing glioma cells in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice reveals that hK5His induces a marked reduction in blood vessel formation and significantly suppresses the recruitment of tumor-infiltrating CD45+ Mac3+ Gr1- macrophages. Therapeutically, we show in a nude mouse orthotopic brain cancer model that tumor-targeted K5 expression is capable of effectively suppressing glioma growth and promotes significant long-term survival (>120 days) of test animals. These data suggest that plasminogen K5 acts as a novel two-pronged anticancer agent, mediating its inhibitory effect via its action on host-derived endothelial cells and tumor-associated macrophages, resulting in a potent, clinically relevant antitumor effect.

  14. PID1 (NYGGF4), a new growth-inhibitory gene in embryonal brain tumors and gliomas.

    PubMed

    Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Robison, Nathan; Ren, Xiuhai; Zhou, Hong; Xu, Jingying; Davidson, Tom B; Schur, Mathew; Gilles, Floyd H; Ji, Lingyun; Malvar, Jemily; Shackleford, Gregory M; Margol, Ashley S; Krieger, Mark D; Judkins, Alexander R; Jones, David T W; Pfister, Stefan M; Kool, Marcel; Sposto, Richard; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Asgharazadeh, Shahab

    2014-02-15

    We present here the first report of PID1 (Phosphotyrosine Interaction Domain containing 1; NYGGF4) in cancer. PID1 was identified in 2006 as a gene that modulates insulin signaling and mitochondrial function in adipocytes and muscle cells. Using four independent medulloblastoma datasets, we show that mean PID1 mRNA levels were lower in unfavorable medulloblastomas (groups 3 and 4, and anaplastic histology) compared with favorable medulloblastomas (SHH and WNT groups, and desmoplastic/nodular histology) and with fetal cerebellum. In two large independent glioma datasets, PID1 mRNA was lower in glioblastomas (GBM), the most malignant gliomas, compared with other astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and nontumor brains. Neural and proneural GBM subtypes had higher PID1 mRNA compared with classical and mesenchymal GBM. Importantly, overall survival and radiation-free progression-free survival were longer in medulloblastoma patients whose tumors had higher PID1 mRNA (univariate and multivariate analyses). Higher PID1 mRNA also correlated with longer overall survival in patients with glioma and GBM. In cell culture, overexpression of PID1 inhibited colony formation in medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT), and GBM cell lines. Increasing PID1 also increased cell death and apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, induced mitochondrial depolaization, and decreased serum-mediated phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in medulloblastoma, ATRT, and/or GBM cell lines, whereas siRNA to PID1 diminished mitochondrial depolarization. These data are the first to link PID1 to cancer and suggest that PID1 may have a tumor inhibitory function in these pediatric and adult brain tumors. ©2013 AACR

  15. PID1 (NYGGF4), a new growth-inhibitory gene in embryonal brain tumors and gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Robison, Nathan; Ren, Xiuhai; Zhou, Hong; Xu, Jingying; Davidson, Tom B.; Schur, Mathew; Gilles, Floyd H.; Ji, Lingyun; Malvar, Jemily; Shackleford, Gregory M.; Margol, Ashley S.; Krieger, Mark D.; Judkins, Alexander R.; Jones, David T.W.; Pfister, Stefan; Kool, Marcel; Sposto, Richard; Asgharazadeh, Shahab

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We present here the first report of PID1 (Phosphotyrosine Interaction Domain containing 1; NYGGF4) in cancer. PID1 was identified in 2006 as a gene that modulates insulin signaling and mitochondrial function in adipocytes and muscle cells. Experimental Design and Results Using four independent medulloblastoma datasets, we show that mean PID1 mRNA levels were lower in unfavorable medulloblastomas (Groups 3 and 4, and anaplastic histology) compared with favorable medulloblastomas (SHH and WNT groups, and desmoplastic/nodular histology) and with fetal cerebellum. In two large independent glioma datasets PID1 mRNA was lower in glioblastomas (GBMs), the most malignant gliomas, compared to other astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and non-tumor brains. Neural and proneural GBM subtypes had higher PID1 mRNA compared to classical and mesenchymal GBM. Importantly, overall survival and radiation-free progression-free survival were longer in medulloblastoma patients with higher PID1 mRNA (univariate and multivariate analyses). Higher PID1 mRNA also correlated with longer overall survival in glioma and GBM patients. In cell culture, overexpression of PID1 inhibited colony formation in medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) and GBM cell lines. Increasing PID1 also increased cell death and apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, induced mitochondrial depolarization, and decreased serum-mediated phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in medulloblastoma, ATRT and/or GBM cell lines, whereas siRNA to PID1 diminished mitochondrial depolarization. Conclusions These data are the first to link PID1 to cancer and suggest that PID1 may have a tumor inhibitory function in these pediatric and adult brain tumors. PMID:24300787

  16. Effect of Brain- and Tumor-Derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor on Glioma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lincoln A.; Woolard, Kevin; Son, Myung Jin; Li, Aiguo; Lee, Jeongwu; Ene, Chibawanye; Mantey, Samuel A.; Maric, Dragan; Song, Hua; Belova, Galina; Jensen, Robert T.; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Tumor cell invasion is the principal cause of treatment failure and death among patients with malignant gliomas. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been previously implicated in cancer metastasis and invasion in various tumors. We explored the mechanism of CTGF-mediated glioma cell infiltration and examined potential therapeutic targets. Methods Highly infiltrative patient-derived glioma tumor–initiating or tumor stem cells (TIC/TSCs) were harvested and used to explore a CTGF-induced signal transduction pathway via luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting. Treatment of TIC/TSCs with small-molecule inhibitors targeting integrin β1 (ITGB1) and the tyrosine kinase receptor type A (TrkA), and short hairpin RNAs targeting CTGF directly were used to reduce the levels of key protein components of CTGF-induced cancer infiltration. TIC/TSC infiltration was examined in real-time cell migration and invasion assays in vitro and by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in TIC/TSC orthotopic xenograft mouse models (n = 30; six mice per group). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Treatment of TIC/TSCs with CTGF resulted in CTGF binding to ITGB1–TrkA receptor complexes and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcriptional activation as measured by luciferase reporter assays (mean relative luciferase activity, untreated vs CTGF200 ng/mL: 0.53 vs 1.87, difference = 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69 to 2, P < .001). NF-κB activation resulted in binding of ZEB-1 to the E-cadherin promoter as demonstrated by ChIP analysis with subsequent E-cadherin suppression (fold increase in ZEB-1 binding to the E-cadherin promoter region: untreated + ZEB-1 antibody vs CTGF200 ng/mL + ZEB-1 antibody: 1.5 vs 6.4, difference = 4.9, 95% CI = 4.8 to 5.0, P < .001). Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that TrkA is selectively expressed in the most

  17. Intra-Tumor Distribution and Test-Retest Comparisons of Physiological Parameters quantified by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Rat U251 Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Madhava P.; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N.; Brown, Stephen L.; Lu, Mei; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Ding, Guangliang; Panda, Swayamprava; Keenan, Kelly; Cabral, Glauber; Mikkelsen, Tom; Ewing, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) parametric estimates in a rat U251 glioma model was analyzed. Using Magnevist as contrast agent (CA), 17 nude rats implanted with U251 cerebral glioma were studied by DCE-MRI twice in a 24 h interval. A data-driven analysis selected one of three models to estimate either: 1) CA plasma volume (vp), 2) vp and forward volume transfer constant (Ktrans; or 3) vp, Ktrans, and interstitial volume fraction (ve), constituting Models 1, 2 and 3, respectively. CA interstitial distribution volume (VD) was estimated in Model 3 regions by Logan plots. Regions of interest (ROIs) were selected by model. In the Model 3 ROI, descriptors of parameter distributions – mean, median, variance and skewness – were calculated and compared between the two time points for repeatability. All distributions of parametric estimates in Model 3 ROIs were positively skewed. Test-retest differences between population summaries for any parameter were not significant (p≥0.10; Wilcoxon signed-rank and paired t tests). This and similar measures of parametric distribution and test-retest variance from other tumor models can be used to inform the choice of biomarkers that best summarize tumor status and treatment effects. PMID:25125367

  18. Radiogenomic analysis of lower grade glioma: a pilot multi-institutional study shows an association between quantitative image features and tumor genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Clark, Kal; Czarnek, Nicholas M.; Shamsesfandabadi, Parisa; Peters, Katherine B.; Saha, Ashirbani

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies showed that genomic analysis of lower grade gliomas can be very effective for stratification of patients into groups with different prognosis and proposed specific genomic classifications. In this study, we explore the association of one of those genomic classifications with imaging parameters to determine whether imaging could serve a similar role to genomics in cancer patient treatment. Specifically, we analyzed imaging and genomics data for 110 patients from 5 institutions from The Cancer Genome Atlas and The Cancer Imaging Archive datasets. The analyzed imaging data contained preoperative FLAIR sequence for each patient. The images were analyzed using the in-house algorithms which quantify 2D and 3D aspects of the tumor shape. Genomic data consisted of a cluster of clusters classification proposed in a very recent and leading publication in the field of lower grade glioma genomics. Our statistical analysis showed that there is a strong association between the tumor cluster-of-clusters subtype and two imaging features: bounding ellipsoid volume ratio and angular standard deviation. This result shows high promise for the potential use of imaging as a surrogate measure for genomics in the decision process regarding treatment of lower grade glioma patients.

  19. Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Mohamad R.; Samuels, Stuart E.; Bellile, Emily; Shalabi, Firas L.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Wolf, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC) have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP), composite nodal volumes (GTVN) and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC) had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance. PMID:26569309

  20. Relationship between extracellular osmolarity, NaCl concentration and cell volume in rat glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Rouzaire-Dubois, Béatrice; Ouanounou, Gilles; Dubois, Jean Marc

    2011-06-01

    The cell volume, which controls numerous cellular functions, is theoretically linearly related with the inverse osmolarity. However, deviations from this law have often been observed. In order to clarify the origin of these deviations we electronically measured the mean cell volume of rat glioma cells under three different experimental conditions, namely: at different osmolarities and constant NaCl concentration; at different NaCl concentrations and constant osmolarity and at different osmolarities caused by changes in NaCl concentration. In each condition, the osmolarity was maintained constant or changed with NaCl or mannitol. We showed that the cell volume was dependent on both the extracellular osmolarity and the NaCl concentration. The relationship between cell volume, osmolarity and NaCl concentration could be described by a new equation that is the product of the Boyle-van't Hoff law and the Michaelis-Menten equation at a power of 4. Together, these results suggest that in hyponatriemia, the cell volume deviates from the Boyle-van't Hoff law because either the activity of aquaporin 1, expressed in glioma cells, is decreased or the reduced NaCl influx decreases the osmotically obliged influx of water.

  1. Targeting Glioma with a Dual Mode Optical and Paramagnetic Nanoprobe across the Blood-brain Tumor Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Kishor; Ewing, James R; Ali, Meser M

    2016-01-01

    In brain tumors, delivering nanoparticles across the blood-tumor barrier presents major hurdles. A clinically relevant MRI contrast agent, GdDOTA and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, DL680 were conjugated to a G5 PAMAM dendrimer, thus producing a dual-mode MRI and NIR imaging agent. Systemic delivery of the subsequent nano-sized agent demonstrated glioma-specific accumulation, probably due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. In vivo MRI detected the agent in glioma tissue, but not in normal contralateral tissue; this observation was validated with in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging. A biodistribution study showed the agent to have accumulated in the glioma tumor and the liver, the latter being the excretion path for a G5 dendrimer-based agent. PMID:27695645

  2. Heterogeneity in malignant gliomas: a magnetic resonance analysis of spatial distribution of metabolite changes and regional blood volume.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Marlies; Nafe, Reinhold; Jurcoane, Alina; Pilatus, Ulrich; Franz, Kea; Rieger, Johannes; Steinbach, Joachim P; Hattingen, Elke

    2011-07-01

    First-pass contrast-enhanced dynamic perfusion imaging provides information about the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), an increase of which indicates neovascularization. MR spectroscopic imaging informs about metabolite changes in brain tumors, with elevated choline (Cho) values revealing cell proliferation and density, and the glial metabolite creatine (Cr) representing high-energy storage. This study investigates metabolite changes within the tumor voxel of maximal rCBV value (rCBVmax). Anatomically coregistered parameter maps of rCBV, Cho and Cr were evaluated in 36 patients with primary or recurrent WHO grade III or IV gliomas. Apart from Cho and Cr values within the voxel of rCBVmax (Choperf, Crperf), the maximal Cho and Cr values of the tumor tissue were recorded (Chomax, Crmax). The correlation between these parameters was analyzed with Spearman’s rho test while a binomial test was performed to check whether Chomax = Choperf and Crmax = Crperf. We found that, in 29 of the 36 patients, neither Cho nor Cr had their maxima in the voxel of rCBVmax (Choperf, Crperf < Chomax, Crmax, P < 0.001). However, Choperf was highly correlated with Chomax (r = 0.76, P < 0.001) and Crperf with Crmax (r = 0.47, P < 0.001). Further Choperf correlated with Crperf (r = 0.55, P < 0.001). Neither of the spectroscopic parameters (Chomax, Crmax, Choperf, Crperf,) correlated with rCBVmax. In conclusion, in WHO grade III and IV gliomas the voxel with maximal rCBV often differs from the voxel with the maximal Cho and Cr, indicating the spatial divergence between neovascularization and tumor cell proliferation, cell density and glial processes. However, tCho and tCr changes within the area of neovascularization are positively correlated with the maximal increase within the tumor tissue. These results demonstrate aspects of regional tumor heterogeneity as characterized by different MR modalities that, apart from histopathological grading might be crucial for neurosurgical biopsy

  3. MicroRNA-145 Is Downregulated in Glial Tumors and Regulates Glioma Cell Migration by Targeting Connective Tissue Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Cazacu, Simona; Finniss, Susan; Xiang, Cunli; Twito, Hodaya; Poisson, Laila M.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Slavin, Shimon; Jacoby, Elad; Yalon, Michal; Toren, Amos; Rempel, Sandra A.; Brodie, Chaya

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM), the most common and aggressive type of malignant glioma, are characterized by increased invasion into the surrounding brain tissues. Despite intensive therapeutic strategies, the median survival of GBM patients has remained dismal over the last decades. In this study we examined the expression of miR-145 in glial tumors and its function in glioma cells. Using TCGA analysis and real-time PCR we found that the expression of miR-145/143 cluster was downregulated in astrocytic tumors compared to normal brain specimens and in glioma cells and glioma stem cells (GSCs) compared to normal astrocytes and neural stem cells. Moreover, the low expression of both miR-145 and miR-143 in GBM was correlated with poor patient prognosis. Transfection of glioma cells with miR-145 mimic or transduction with a lentivirus vector expressing pre-miR 145 significantly decreased the migration and invasion of glioma cells. We identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) as a novel target of miR-145 in glioma cells; transfection of the cells with this miRNA decreased the expression of CTGF as determined by Western blot analysis and the expression of its 3′-UTR fused to luciferase. Overexpression of a CTGF plasmid lacking the 3′-UTR and administration of recombinant CTGF protein abrogated the inhibitory effect of miR-145 on glioma cell migration. Similarly, we found that silencing of CTGF decreased the migration of glioma cells. CTGF silencing also decreased the expression of SPARC, phospho-FAK and FAK and overexpression of SPARC abrogated the inhibitory effect of CTGF silencing on cell migration. These results demonstrate that miR-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and its low expression in GBM predicts poor patient prognosis. In addition miR-145 regulates glioma cell migration by targeting CTGF which downregulates SPARC expression. Therefore, miR-145 is an attractive therapeutic target for anti-invasive treatment of astrocytic tumors. PMID:23390502

  4. Seizure control as a new metric in assessing efficacy of tumor treatment in low-grade glioma trials.

    PubMed

    Avila, Edward K; Chamberlain, Marc; Schiff, David; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Armstrong, Terri S; Ruda, Roberta; Wen, Patrick Y; Weller, Michael; Koekkoek, Johan A F; Mittal, Sandeep; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Choucair, Ali; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; MacDonald, David R; Nishikawa, Ryo; Shah, Aashit; Vecht, Charles J; Warren, Paula; van den Bent, Martin J; DeAngelis, Lisa M

    2017-01-01

    Patients with low-grade glioma frequently have brain tumor-related epilepsy, which is more common than in patients with high-grade glioma. Treatment for tumor-associated epilepsy usually comprises a combination of surgery, anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Response to tumor-directed treatment is measured primarily by overall survival and progression-free survival. However, seizure frequency has been observed to respond to tumor-directed treatment with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. A review of the current literature regarding seizure assessment for low-grade glioma patients reveals a heterogeneous manner in which seizure response has been reported. There is a need for a systematic approach to seizure assessment and its influence on health-related quality-of-life outcomes in patients enrolled in low-grade glioma therapeutic trials. In view of the need to have an adjunctive metric of tumor response in these patients, a method of seizure assessment as a metric in brain tumor treatment trials is proposed. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Reirradiation of Large-Volume Recurrent Glioma With Pulsed Reduced-Dose-Rate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; Tome, Wolfgang; Seo, Songwon; Richards, Gregory M.; Robins, H. Ian; Rassmussen, Karl; Welsh, James S.; Mahler, Peter A.; Howard, Steven P.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Pulsed reduced-dose-rate radiotherapy (PRDR) is a reirradiation technique that reduces the effective dose rate and increases the treatment time, allowing sublethal damage repair during irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with recurrent glioma underwent reirradiation using PRDR (86 considered to have Grade 4 at PRDR). PRDR was delivered using a series of 0.2-Gy pulses at 3-min intervals, creating an apparent dose rate of 0.0667 Gy/min to a median dose of 50 Gy (range, 20-60) delivered in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. The mean treatment volume was 403.5 {+-} 189.4 cm{sup 3} according to T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and a 2-cm margin. Results: For the initial or upgraded Grade 4 cohort (n = 86), the median interval from the first irradiation to PRDR was 14 months. Patients undergoing PRDR within 14 months of the first irradiation (n = 43) had a median survival of 21 weeks. Those treated {>=}14 months after radiotherapy had a median survival of 28 weeks (n = 43; p = 0.004 and HR = 1.82 with a 95% CI ranging from 1.25 to 3.10). These data compared favorably to historical data sets, because only 16% of the patients were treated at first relapse (with 46% treated at the second relapse, 32% at the third or fourth relapse, and 4% at the fourth or fifth relapse). The median survival since diagnosis and retreatment was 6.3 years and 11.4 months for low-grade, 4.1 years and 5.6 months for Grade 3, and 1.6 years and 5.1 months for Grade 4 tumors, respectively, according to the initial histologic findings. Multivariate analysis revealed age at the initial diagnosis, initial low-grade disease, and Karnofsky performance score of {>=}80 to be significant predictors of survival after initiation of PRDR. Conclusion: PRDR allowed for safe retreatment of larger volumes to high doses with palliative benefit.

  6. Overexpression of DcR3 and Its Significance on Tumor Cell Differentiation and Proliferation in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Suning; Dang, Yiwu; Chen, Long-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background. Overexpression of decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) have been reported in various classes of malignancies. However, its expression and clinicopathological contribution in gliomas has not been fully elucidated. Objective. To explore the expression and clinical significance of DcR3 protein in relation to tumor cell differentiation and proliferation in glioma cell lines and tissues. Methods. One hundred and twenty-five samples of glioma patients and 18 cases of normal brain tissues were recruited. The expression of DcR3 protein was detected using immunohistochemistry. Tumor differentiation was assessed by histologic characters and the status of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Tumor cell labeling indexes (LIs) of Ki-67 and PCNA were also obtained. The relationship between the DcR3 level and clinicopathological features was investigated, including tumor differentiation, LIs, and survival. Meanwhile, the expression of DcR3 protein was also measured in the supernatants of 8 glioma cell lines and glioma cells freshly prepared from 8 human glioblastoma specimens by using western blot. Results. The level of DcR3 protein in gliomas was significantly higher than that in normal brain tissues (P < 0.01). DcR3 expression showed positive correlations with tumor pathological grade (r = 0.621, P < 0.01) and negative with GFAP expression (r = −0.489, P < 0.01). Furthermore, there were positive correlations between DcR3 expression and Ki-67, PCNA LIs (r = 0.529, P < 0.01; r = 0.556, P < 0.01). The survival in the DcR3 negative group was 50 ± 1.79 months, longer than that of the DcR3 positive group (48.36 ± 2.90), however, without significance (P = 0.149). Different levels of DcR3 could also be detected in the culturing supernatants of all the 8 glioma cell lines and glioma cells freshly obtained from 8 human glioblastoma specimens. Conclusions. The overexpression of DcR3 might play a crucial role in the tumorigenesis, differentiation, and proliferation of glioma. PMID

  7. Alterations of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Regional Perfusion in Tumor Development: MRI Insights from a Rat C6 Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Huhndorf, Monika; Moussavi, Amir; Kramann, Nadine; Will, Olga; Hattermann, Kirsten; Stadelmann, Christine; Jansen, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenetic medications play an important role in progression and therapy of glioblastoma. In this context, in vivo characterization of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor vascularization may be important for individual prognosis and therapy optimization. Methods We analyzed perfusion and capillary permeability of C6-gliomas in rats at different stages of tumor-growth by contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI at 7 Tesla. The analyses included maps of relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) and signal recovery derived from DSC data over a time period of up to 35 days after tumor cell injections. Results In all rats tumor progression was accompanied by temporal and spatial changes in CBV and capillary permeability. A leakage of the blood-brain barrier (slow contrast enhancement) was observed as soon as the tumor became detectable on T2-weighted images. Interestingly, areas of strong capillary permeability (fast signal enhancement) were predominantly localized in the center of the tumor. In contrast, the tumor rim was dominated by an increased CBV and showed the highest vessel density compared to the tumor center and the contralateral hemisphere as confirmed by histology. Conclusion Substantial regional differences in the tumor highlight the importance of parameter maps in contrast or in addition to region-of-interest analyses. The data vividly illustrate how MRI including contrast-enhanced and DSC-MRI may contribute to a better understanding of tumor development. PMID:28005983

  8. Correlation between preoperative magnetic resonance spectroscopic data on high grade gliomas and morphology of Ki-67-positive tumor cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Nafe, Reinhold; Herminghaus, Sebastian; Raab, Peter; Wagner, Sabine; Pilatus, Ulrich; Schlote, Wolfgang; Zanella, Friedhelm; Lanfermann, Heinrich

    2003-06-01

    To investigate possible statistical correlations between metabolic data from preoperative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS) and morphology of proliferating tumor cell nuclei in anaplastic gliomas and glioblastomas. Ki-67-positive tumor cell nuclei in paraffin sections of surgical specimens from 36 patients (7 anaplastic gliomas, World Health Organization grade 3; 29 glioblastomas, World Health Organization grade 4) were investigated by means of a digital image analysis system. Stringent inclusion criteria were formulated for all cases with respect to histologic quality and spectroscopic examination. As morphometric variables, nuclear area, shape variables (roundness factor, size-invariate Fourier amplitudes) and density of Ki-67-positive tumor cell nuclei per reference area were determined. Correlation analysis according to Spearman revealed a significant positive correlation between the total creatine (TCR) peak and nuclear area (P = .005). This correlation was also found within the glioblastoma group (P = .019). There was also a significant negative correlation of nuclear area with the ratio between choline and TCR in all cases (P = .014) and within the glioblastoma group (P = .046). No significant correlation of spectroscopic data was found with nuclear shape or density of Ki-67-positive tumor cell nuclei. The results demonstrate a correlation between spectroscopic data and morphology of proliferating tumor cell nuclei (nuclear size) in high grade gliomas. This study is part of a detailed investigation of the interrelationship between preoperative 1HMRS and quantitative histomorphology of gliomas.

  9. Refined deletion mapping of the chromosome 19q glioma tumor suppressor gene to the D19S412-STD interval.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J E; Lisle, D K; Burwick, J A; Ueki, K; von Deimling, A; Mohrenweiser, H W; Louis, D N

    1996-12-05

    Allelic loss of chromsome 19q occurs frequently in malignant gliomas, suggesting the presence of a chromosome 19q glioma tumor suppressor gene. Deletion mapping studies have delineated a 3.5 Mb candidate region between D19S219 and HRC. Cloned sequences from the proximal 425 kb of this interval, however, have not shown tumor-specific alterations. To refine the location of the tumor suppressor gene further, we conducted loss of heterozygosity studies on 191 malignant gliomas using nine PCR-based polymorphisms. These included the previously identified and physically mapped markers D19S219, DM, D19S112, HRC and the recently physically mapped polymorphisms at D19S412, STD, D19S596 and GYS. In addition, we isolated a novel microsatellite polymorphism that maps 400 kb telomeric to D19S112. Oligodendroglial tumors showed frequent loss of heterozygosity in all grades, and typically displayed allelic loss at all studied markers. Astrocytomas, however, showed frequent loss primarily in anaplastic astrocytomas and displayed deletion breakpoints within the candidate region. Deletion mapping revealed a minimal region of overlap between D19S412 and STD, a distance of 900 kb. These data suggest that the D19S412-STD interval represents the most likely location for a chromsome 19q glioma tumor suppressor gene involved in astrocytoma, and perhaps oligodendroglioma, tumorigenesis.

  10. Pc 4 photodynamic therapy of U87 (human glioma) orthotopic tumor in nude rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David; George, John E., III; Ahmad, Yusra; Wolfe, Michael S.; Lilge, Lothar; Morris, Rachel L.; Peterson, Allyn; Lust, W. D.; Totonchi, Ali; Varghai, Davood; Li, Xiaolin; Hoppel, Charles L.; Sun, Jiayang; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2005-04-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for Barrett"s esophagus, advanced esophageal cancer, and both early and late inoperable lung carcinoma is now FDA-approved using the first generation photosensitizer PhotofrinTM (Axcan Pharma, Birmingham, AL). Photofrin-mediated PDT of glioma is now in Phase III clinical trials. A variety of second generation photosensitizers have been developed to provide improved: (1) specificity for the target tissue, (2) tumoricidal capability, and (3) rapid clearance the vascular compartment, skin, and eyes. The phthalocyanine Pc 4 is a second generation photosensitizer that is in early phase I clinical trials for skin cancer. We have undertaken a preclinical study that seeks to determine if Pc 4-mediated PDT can be of benefit for the intra-operative localization and treatment of glioma. Methods: Using a stereotactic frame, 250,000 U87 cells were injected via Hamilton syringe through a craniotomy, and the dura, 1-2 mm below the cortical surface of nude (athymic) rat brains (N=91). The craniotomy was filled with a piece of surgical PVC and the scalp closed. After two weeks of tumor growth, the animals received 0.5 mg/kg Pc 4 via tail vein injection. One day later the scalp was re-incised, and the PVC removed. The tumor was then illuminated with either 5 or 30 Joule/cm2 of 672-nm light from a diode laser at 50 mW/cm2. The animals were sacrificed one day later and the brain was cold-perfused with formaldehyde. Two thirds of the explanted brains are now being histologically surveyed for necrosis after staining with hematoxylin and eosin and for apoptosis via immunohistochemistry (i.e., TUNEL assay). The other third were analyzed by HPLC-mass spectrometry for the presence of drug in tumor, normal brain, and plasma at sacrifice. Initial histological results show PDT-induced apoptosis and necrosis confined to the growing (live) portion of the tumor. Preliminary analysis shows an average selectivity of Pc 4 uptake in the bulk tumor to be 3

  11. ATRX loss promotes tumor growth and impairs nonhomologous end joining DNA repair in glioma.

    PubMed

    Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Nunez, Felipe J; Mackay, Alan; Fazal-Salom, Janet; Thomas, Daniel; Mendez, Flor; Kamran, Neha; Dzaman, Marta; Mulpuri, Lakshman; Krasinkiewicz, Johnathon; Doherty, Robert; Lemons, Rosemary; Brosnan-Cashman, Jacqueline A; Li, Youping; Roh, Soyeon; Zhao, Lili; Appelman, Henry; Ferguson, David; Gorbunova, Vera; Meeker, Alan; Jones, Chris; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2016-03-02

    Recent work in human glioblastoma (GBM) has documented recurrent mutations in the histone chaperone protein ATRX. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM and showed that loss of ATRX reduces median survival and increases genetic instability. Further, analysis of genome-wide data for human gliomas showed that ATRX mutation is associated with increased mutation rate at the single-nucleotide variant (SNV) level. In mouse tumors, ATRX deficiency impairs nonhomologous end joining and increases sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks. We propose that ATRX loss results in a genetically unstable tumor, which is more aggressive when left untreated but is more responsive to double-stranded DNA-damaging agents, resulting in improved overall survival. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. ATRX Loss Promotes Tumor Growth and Impairs Non-Homologous End Joining DNA Repair in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Nunez, Felipe J.; Mackay, Alan; Fazal-Salom, Janet; Thomas, Daniel; Mendez, Flor; Kamran, Neha; Dzaman, Marta; Mulpuri, Lakshman; Krasinkiewicz, Johnathon; Doherty, Robert; Lemons, Rosemary; Brosnan-Cashman, Jackie A.; Li, Youping; Roh, Soyeon; Zhao, Lili; Appelman, Henry; Ferguson, David; Gorbunova, Vera; Meeker, Alan; Jones, Chris; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2017-01-01

    Recent work in human glioblastoma (GBM) has documented recurrent mutations in the histone chaperone protein ATRX. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM and show that loss of ATRX reduces median survival and increases genetic instability. Further, analysis of genome-wide data for human gliomas showed that ATRX mutation is associated with increased mutation rate at the single nucleotide variant (SNV) level. In mouse tumors, ATRX deficiency impairs non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and increases sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks. We propose that ATRX loss results in a genetically unstable tumor, which is more aggressive when left untreated, but is more responsive to double-stranded DNA-damaging agents, resulting in improved overall survival. PMID:26936505

  13. Macrophage Ablation Reduces M2-Like Populations and Jeopardizes Tumor Growth in a MAFIA-Based Glioma Model.

    PubMed

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Hossain, Mohammad B; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Fan, Xuejun; Kaminska, Bozena; Marini, Frank C; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2015-04-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an influential component of the glioma microenvironment. However, understanding their diversity and plasticity constitute one of the most challenging areas of research due to the paucity of models to study these cells' inherent complexity. Herein, we analyzed the role of monocytes/macrophages in glioma growth by using a transgenic model that allows for conditional ablation of this cell population. We modeled glioma using intracranial GL261-bearing CSF-1R-GFP(+) macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic mice. Conditional macrophage ablation was achieved by exposure to the dimerizer AP20187. Double immunofluorescence was used to characterize M1- and M2-like monocytes/macrophages during tumor growth and after conditional ablation. During glioma growth, the monocyte/macrophage population consisted predominantly of M2 macrophages. Conditional temporal depletion of macrophages reduced the number of GFP(+) cells, targeting mainly the repopulation of M2-polarized cells, and altered the appearance of M1-like monocytes/macrophages, which suggested a shift in the M1/M2 macrophage balance. Of interest, compared with control-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had a lower tumor mitotic index, microvascular density, and reduced tumor growth. These results demonstrated the possibility of studying in vivo the role and phenotype of macrophages in gliomas and suggested that transitory depletion of CSF-1R(+) population influences the reconstitutive phenotypic pool of these cells, ultimately suppressing tumor growth. The MAFIA model provides a much needed advance in defining the role of macrophages in gliomas. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Macrophage Ablation Reduces M2-Like Populations and Jeopardizes Tumor Growth in a MAFIA-Based Glioma Model12

    PubMed Central

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Hossain, Mohammad B.; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Fan, Xuejun; Kaminska, Bozena; Marini, Frank C.; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an influential component of the glioma microenvironment. However, understanding their diversity and plasticity constitute one of the most challenging areas of research due to the paucity of models to study these cells' inherent complexity. Herein, we analyzed the role of monocytes/macrophages in glioma growth by using a transgenic model that allows for conditional ablation of this cell population. We modeled glioma using intracranial GL261-bearing CSF-1R–GFP+ macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic mice. Conditional macrophage ablation was achieved by exposure to the dimerizer AP20187. Double immunofluorescence was used to characterize M1- and M2-like monocytes/macrophages during tumor growth and after conditional ablation. During glioma growth, the monocyte/macrophage population consisted predominantly of M2 macrophages. Conditional temporal depletion of macrophages reduced the number of GFP+ cells, targeting mainly the repopulation of M2-polarized cells, and altered the appearance of M1-like monocytes/macrophages, which suggested a shift in the M1/M2 macrophage balance. Of interest, compared with control-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had a lower tumor mitotic index, microvascular density, and reduced tumor growth. These results demonstrated the possibility of studying in vivo the role and phenotype of macrophages in gliomas and suggested that transitory depletion of CSF-1R+ population influences the reconstitutive phenotypic pool of these cells, ultimately suppressing tumor growth. The MAFIA model provides a much needed advance in defining the role of macrophages in gliomas. PMID:25925380

  15. hsa-mir-181a and hsa-mir-181b function as tumor suppressors in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Cheng, Zihao; Zhang, Junxia; Li, Rui; Zhao, Peng; Fu, Zhen; You, Yongping

    2008-10-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that regulate protein expression by cleaving or repressing the translation of target mRNAs. In mammal animals, their function mainly represses the target mRNAs transcripts via imperfectly complementary to the 3' UTR of target mRNAs. Several miRNAs have been recently reported to be involved in modulation of glioma development, especially some up-regulated miRNA, such as hsa-miR-21 and hsa-miR-221. However, here we reported that the down-regulated hsa-miR-181a and hsa-miR-181b of hsa-miR-181 family were also involved in oncogenesis of glioma. Our studies showed that hsa-miR-181a and hsa-miR-181b functioned as tumor suppressors which triggered growth inhibition, induced apoptosis and inhibited invasion in glioma cells. Furthermore, the tumor-suppressive effect of hsa-miR-181b in glioma cells was more apparent than the effect of hsa-miR-181a. These findings suggest aberrantly down-regulated hsa-miR-181a and hsa-miR-181b may be critical factors that contribute to malignant appearance in human gliomas.

  16. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in high-grade glioma: judicious selection of small target volumes improves results.

    PubMed

    Bokstein, Felix; Blumenthal, Deborah T; Corn, Benjamin W; Gez, Eliahu; Matceyevsky, Diana; Shtraus, Natan; Ram, Zvi; Kanner, Andrew A

    2016-02-01

    We present a retrospective review of 55 Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) procedures performed in 47 consecutive patients with high-grade glioma (HGG). Thirty-three (70.2%) patients were diagnosed with glioblastoma and 14 (29.8%) with grade III glioma. The indications for SRS were small (up to 30 mm in diameter) locally progressing lesions in 32/47 (68%) or new distant lesions in 15/47 (32%) patients. The median target volume was 2.2 cc (0.2-9.5 cc) and the median prescription dose was 18 Gy (14-24 Gy). Three patients (5.5% incidence in 55 treatments) developed radiation necrosis. In eight cases (17%) patients received a second salvage SRS treatment to nine new lesions detected during follow-up. In 22/55 SRS treatments (40.0%) patients received concurrent chemo- or biological therapy, including temozolamide (TMZ) (15 patients), bevacizumab (BVZ) (6 patients) and carboplatin in one patient. Median time to progression after SRS was 5.0 months (1.0-96.4). Median survival time after SRS was 15.9 months (2.3-109.3) overall median survival (since diagnosis) was 37.4 months (9.6-193.6 months). Long-lasting responses (>12 months) after SRS were observed in 25/46 (54.3%) patients. We compared a matched (histology, age, KPS) cohort of patients with recurrent HGG treated with BVZ alone with the current study group. Median survival was significantly longer for SRS treated patients compared to the BVZ only cohort (12.6 vs. 7.3 months, p = 0.0102). SRS may be considered an effective salvage procedure for selected patients with small volume, recurrent high-grade gliomas. Long-term radiological control was observed in more than 50% of the patients.

  17. Evaluation of serial changes on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging after implantation of carmustine wafers in patients with malignant gliomas for differential diagnosis of tumor recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ohue, Shiro; Kohno, Shohei; Inoue, Akihiro; Yamashita, Daisuke; Suehiro, Satoshi; Seno, Toshimoto; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Ohnishi, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Carmustine wafers are approved for localized treatment of malignant glioma. In this study, overall changes in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images of malignant glioma patients treated with carmustine wafer implantation were evaluated. The subjects were 25 patients undergoing craniotomy for malignant glioma resection and carmustine wafer implantation. Changes in the appearance of wafers, the resection cavity, and the adjacent parenchyma on CT and MR imaging were evaluated retrospectively. On CT, the wafers changed from an initially high-dense to an iso-dense appearance. All MR studies showed a low-intense wafer within 2 days. The wafers changed to a high- or iso-intense appearance on fluid attenuated inversion recovery and T1-weighted imaging, whereas they changed to an iso- to low-intense appearance on T2-weighted imaging. Gas in the cavity increased gradually after surgery, achieved a peak at 1 week postoperatively, and then disappeared in 1-3 months. Increased volume of the resection cavity was observed in 48% of patients. Regarding changes in the adjacent parenchyma, obvious contrast enhancement at the wall of the resection cavity was seen in 91% of cases at 1 month, but this disappeared gradually. Edema around the resection cavity was increased in 7 patients (28%), of whom only two experienced symptoms due to edema. We conclude that these radiological changes after carmustine wafer implantation should be carefully followed up, because these changes can easily be mistaken for infectious disease or recurrent tumors.

  18. Velocity of tumor spontaneous expansion predicts long-term outcomes for diffuse low-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Pallud, Johan; Blonski, Marie; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Audureau, Etienne; Fontaine, Denys; Sanai, Nader; Bauchet, Luc; Peruzzi, Philippe; Frénay, Marc; Colin, Philippe; Guillevin, Rémy; Bernier, Valérie; Baron, Marie-Hélène; Guyotat, Jacques; Duffau, Hugues; Taillandier, Luc; Capelle, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Background Supratentorial diffuse low-grade gliomas present a slow macroscopic tumor growth that can be quantified through the measurement of their velocity of diametric expansion. We assessed whether spontaneous velocity of diametric expansion can predict long-term outcomes as a categorical variable and as a continuous predictor. Methods A total of 407 adult patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial diffuse low-grade gliomas in adults were studied. Results The mean spontaneous velocity of diametric expansion before first-line treatment was 5.8 ± 6.3 mm/year. During the follow-up (mean, 86.5 ± 59.4 months), 209 patients presented a malignant transformation, and 87 died. The malignant progression-free survival and the overall survival were significantly longer in cases of slow velocity of diametric expansion (median, 103 and 249 months, respectively) than in cases of fast velocity of diametric expansion (median, 35 and 91 months, respectively; P < .001). In multivariate analyses, spontaneous velocity of diametric expansion as a categorical variable (<4, ≥4 and <8, ≥8 and <12, ≥12 mm/year) was an independent prognostic factor for malignant progression-free survival (P < .001; hazard ratio, 3.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.67–5.52) and for overall survival (P < .001; hazard ratio, 4.62; 95% CI, 2.58–7.97). Velocity of diametric expansion was also an independent prognostic factor for overall survival as a continuous predictor, showing a linear relationship between overall survival and spontaneous velocity of diametric expansion (hazard ratio, 1.09 per one unit increase; 95% CI, 1.06–1.12; P < .001). Conclusions Independent of the molecular status, the spontaneous velocity of diametric expansion allows the identification of rapidly growing diffuse low-grade gliomas (at higher risk of worsened evolution) during the pretherapeutic period and without delaying treatment. PMID:23393207

  19. XuefuZhuyu Tang exerts antitumor effects by inhibiting glioma cell metastasis and invasion via regulating tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianmin; Zhang, Ji; Huang, Liangwen; Zhu, Xuhong; Chen, Wei; Hu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background XuefuZhuyu Tang (XZT) is a traditional Chinese herb used for destagnation and is currently being used for oncotherapy. This study was intended to assess the effects of XZT on glioma along with its anticancer mechanism. Materials and methods U251 cells were divided into five groups: CNC (cells were cultured with normal saline), TSC (cells were treated with TaohongSiwu Tang [TST]), XSC (cells were treated with XZT), THC (cells were treated with homogenate of TST), and XHC (cells were treated with homogenate of XZT). The mRNA and protein expression of VEGF/VEGFR, CXCR4/CXCL12, and TIMP1/MMP9/MMP2 were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. Moreover, MTT assay, transwell assay, wound-healing assay, and flow cytometry were conducted to assess the cell viability, cell migration and invasion, cell motility, and cell apoptosis of U251 cells, respectively. In vivo, three mice models (group CNM, gavaging saline; group TSM, gavaging TST; group XZM, gavaging XZT) were constructed after establishing xenograft mice models. Then, models were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, RT-PCR, and Western blotting. Results In vitro, XZT significantly upregulated TIMP1 expression and downregulated the expression of VEGF, VEGFR, CXCR4, CXCL12, MMP9, and MMP2 in U251 cells (all P<0.05). In addition, XZT inhibited cell proliferation, invasion, and migration and induced cell apoptosis. In vivo, the average expression level of VEGF, CXCL12, MMP9, and MMP2 was downregulated in the XZM group compared with the control and TSM groups (all P<0.05). Tumor volumes in the XZM group were significantly lower than those in the CNM and TSM groups (all P<0.05). Conclusion XZT may suppress glioma growth and decrease expression levels of VEGF, CXCL12, MMP9, and MMP2. We speculate that XZT may be a potential therapeutic herb for curing glioma. PMID:27382298

  20. Genetics of adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Goodenberger, McKinsey L; Jenkins, Robert B

    2012-12-01

    Gliomas make up approximately 30% of all brain and central nervous system tumors and 80% of all malignant brain tumors. Despite the frequency of gliomas, the etiology of these tumors remains largely unknown. Diffuse gliomas, including astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, belong to a single pathologic class but have very different histologies and molecular etiologies. Recent genomic studies have identified separate molecular subtypes within the glioma classification that appear to correlate with biological etiology, prognosis, and response to therapy. The discovery of these subtypes suggests that molecular genetic tests are and will be useful, beyond classical histology, for the clinical classification of gliomas. While a familial susceptibility to glioma has been identified, only a small percentage of gliomas are thought to be due to single-gene hereditary cancer syndromes. Through the use of linkage studies and genome-wide association studies, multiple germline variants have been identified that are beginning to define the genetic susceptibility to glioma.

  1. Handheld confocal laser endomicroscopic imaging utilizing tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to identify experimental glioma cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Georges, Joseph; Kalani, M Yashar S; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F; Feuerstein, Burt G; Preul, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    We have reported that handheld confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) can be used with various nonspecific fluorescent dyes to improve the microscopic identification of brain tumor and its boundaries. Here, we show that CLE can be used experimentally with tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to define glioma margins in vivo. Thirteen rats underwent craniectomy and in vivo imaging 21 days after implantation with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled U251 (n = 7) cells or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressing F98 cells (n = 6). Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated EGFR fluorescent antibody (FITC-EGFR) was applied for contrast in F98 tumors. Confocal images of normal brain, obvious tumor, and peritumoral zones were collected using the CLE system. Bench-top confocal microscopy and hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were correlated with CLE images. GFP and FITC-EGFR fluorescence of glioma cells were detected by in vivo visible-wavelength fluorescence CLE. CLE of GFP-labeled tumors revealed bright individual satellite tumor cells within peritumoral tissue, a definitive tumor border, and subcellular structures. Imaging with FITC-EGFR labeling provided weaker contrast in F98-EGFR tumors but was able to delineate tumor cells. Imaging with both methods in various tumor regions correlated with standard confocal imaging and clinical histology. These data suggest that in vivo CLE of selectively tagged neoplasms could allow specific interactive identification of tumoral areas. Imaging of GFP and FITC-EGFR provides real-time histologic information precisely related to the site of microscopic imaging of tumor.

  2. GPR56 is a GPCR that is overexpressed in gliomas and functions in tumor cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Shashidhar, Sumana; Lorente, Gustavo; Nagavarapu, Usha; Nelson, April; Kuo, Jane; Cummins, Jeramiah; Nikolich, Karoly; Urfer, Roman; Foehr, Erik D

    2005-03-03

    GPR56 (also known as TM7XN1) is a newly discovered orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) of the secretin family that has a role in the development of neural progenitor cells and has been linked to developmental malformations of the human brain. GPR56 diverges from other secretin-like family members in that it has an extremely large N-terminal extracellular region (381 amino acids) and contains a novel feature among this new subclass, consisting of four cysteine residues that define a GPCR proteolytic site (GPS motif) located just before the first transmembrane spanning domain. The rest of the amino-terminal domain contains a large number of possible N- and O-linked glycosylation sites similar to mucin-like proteins. These features suggest a role in cell-cell, or cell-matrix interactions. Here, we demonstrate upregulation of GPR56 in glioblastoma multiforme tumors using functional genomics. Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the expression of GPR56 protein in a majority of glioblastoma/astrocytoma tumor samples with undetectable levels of expression in normal adult brain tissue. Immunofluorescence analysis of human glioma cells using anti-GPR56 antibodies demonstrate that GPR56 is expressed on the leading edge of membrane filopodia and colocalizes with alpha-actinin. Purified recombinant GPR56 extracellular domain protein inhibits glioma cell adhesion and causes abnormal cytoskeletal morphology and cell rounding. These results indicate that the extracellular domain may compete for unidentified ligand(s), and block the normal function of GPR56 in cell attachment. In reporter assays, overexpression of GPR56 activates the NF-kappaB, PAI-1 and TCF transcriptional response elements. These pathways have been implicated in cytoskeletal signaling, adhesion and tumor biology. The above results indicate that GPR56 serves as an adhesion GPCR and is involved in adhesion signaling.

  3. Tumor-specific Immunotherapy Targeting the EGFRvIII Mutation in Patients with Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, John H.; Archer, Gary E.; Mitchell, Duane A.; Heimberger, Amy B.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional therapies for malignant gliomas (MGs) fail to target tumor cells exclusively, such that their efficacy is ultimately limited by non-specific toxicity. Immunologic targeting of tumor-specific gene mutations, however, may allow more precise eradication of neoplastic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is a consistent tumor-specific mutation that is widely expressed in MGs and other neoplasms. This mutation encodes a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that enhances tumorgenicity and migration and confers radiation and chemotherapeutic resistance. This in-frame deletion mutation splits a codon resulting in the creation of a novel glycine at the fusion junction between normally distant parts of the molecule and producing a sequence rearrangement which creates a tumor-specific epitope for cellular or humoral immunotherapy in patients with MGs. We have previously shown that vaccination with a peptide that spans the EGFRvIII fusion junction is an efficacious immunotherapy in syngeneic murine models, but patients with MGs have a profound immunosuppression that may inhibit the ability of antigen presenting cells (APCs), even those generated ex vivo, to induce EGFRvIII-specific immune responses. In this report, we summarize our results in humans targeting this mutation in two consecutive and one multi-institutional Phase II immunotherapy trials. These trials demonstrated that vaccines targeting EGFRvIII are capable of inducing potent T- and B-cell immunity in these patients, and an unexpectedly long survival time. Most importantly, vaccines targeting EGFRvIII were universally successful at eliminating tumor cells expressing the targeted antigen without any evidence of symptomatic collateral toxicity. These studies establish the tumor-specific EGFRvIII mutation as a novel target for humoral- and cell-mediated immunotherapy in a variety of cancers. The recurrence of EGFRvIII-negative tumors in our patients, however, highlights the

  4. Effects of anticancer drugs on glia-glioma brain tumor model characterized by acoustic impedance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, Thomas Tiong Kwong; Chean, Tan Wei; Yamada, Hikari; Takahashi, Kenta; Hozumi, Naohiro; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshida, Sachiko

    2017-07-01

    An ultrasonic microscope is a useful tool for observing living tissue without chemical fixation or histochemical processing. Two-dimensional (2D) acoustic impedance microscopy developed in our previous study for living cell observation was employed to visualize intracellular changes. We proposed a brain tumor model by cocultivating rat glial cells and C6 gliomas to quantitatively analyze the effects of two types of anticancer drugs, cytochalasin B (CyB) and temozolomide (TMZ), when they were applied. We reported that CyB treatment (25 µg/ml, T = 90 min) significantly reduced the acoustic impedance of gliomas and has little effect on glial cells. Meanwhile, TMZ treatment (2 mg/ml, T = 90 min) impacted both cells equally, in which both cells’ acoustic impedances were decreased. As CyB targets the actin filament polymerization of the cells, we have concluded that the decrease in acoustic impedance was in fact due to actin filament depolymerization and the data can be quantitatively assessed for future studies in novel drug development.

  5. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Anne C.; Pong, Winnie W.; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J.; Toonen, Joseph A.; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L.; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies. PMID:26585233

  6. Detection of Histone H3 mutations in cerebrospinal fluid-derived tumor DNA from children with diffuse midline glioma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tina Y; Piunti, Andrea; Lulla, Rishi R; Qi, Jin; Horbinski, Craig M; Tomita, Tadanori; James, C David; Shilatifard, Ali; Saratsis, Amanda M

    2017-04-17

    Diffuse midline gliomas (including diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, DIPG) are highly morbid glial neoplasms of the thalamus or brainstem that typically arise in young children and are not surgically resectable. These tumors are characterized by a high rate of histone H3 mutation, resulting in replacement of lysine 27 with methionine (K27M) in genes encoding H3 variants H3.3 (H3F3A) and H3.1 (HIST1H3B). Detection of these gain-of-function mutations has clinical utility, as they are associated with distinct tumor biology and clinical outcomes. Given the paucity of tumor tissue available for molecular analysis and relative morbidity of midline tumor biopsy, CSF-derived tumor DNA from patients with diffuse midline glioma may serve as a viable alternative for clinical detection of histone H3 mutation. We demonstrate the feasibility of two strategies to detect H3 mutations in CSF-derived tumor DNA from children with brain tumors (n = 11) via either targeted Sanger sequencing of H3F3A and HIST1H3B, or H3F3A c.83 A > T detection via nested PCR with mutation-specific primers. Of the six CSF specimens from children with diffuse midline glioma in our cohort, tumor DNA sufficient in quantity and quality for analysis was isolated from five (83%), with H3.3K27M detected in four (66.7%). In addition, H3.3G34V was identified in tumor DNA from a patient with supratentorial glioblastoma. Test sensitivity (87.5%) and specificity (100%) was validated via immunohistochemical staining and Sanger sequencing in available matched tumor tissue specimens (n = 8). Our results indicate that histone H3 gene mutation is detectable in CSF-derived tumor DNA from children with brain tumors, including diffuse midline glioma, and suggest the feasibility of "liquid biopsy" in lieu of, or to complement, tissue diagnosis, which may prove valuable for stratification to targeted therapies and monitoring treatment response.

  7. The Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment on the Properties of Glioma Stem-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Audia, Alessandra; Conroy, Siobhan; Glass, Rainer; Bhat, Krishna P L

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and highly malignant primary brain tumor, and patients affected with this disease exhibit a uniformly dismal prognosis. Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) are a subset of cells within the bulk tumor that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation properties similar to somatic stem cells. These cells also are at the apex of the cellular hierarchy and cause tumor initiation and expansion after chemo-radiation. These traits make them an attractive target for therapeutic development. Because GSCs are dependent on the brain microenvironment for their growth, and because non-tumorigenic cell types in the microenvironment can influence GSC phenotypes and treatment response, a better understanding of these cell types is needed. In this review, we provide a focused overview of the contributions from the microenvironment to GSC homing, maintenance, phenotypic plasticity, and tumor initiation. The interaction of GSCs with the vascular compartment, mesenchymal stem cells, immune system, and normal brain cell types are discussed. Studies that provide mechanistic insight into each of these GSC-microenvironment interactions are warranted in the future.

  8. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  9. Osteopontin-CD44 signaling in the glioma perivascular niche enhances cancer stem cell phenotypes and promotes aggressive tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Pietras, Alexander; Katz, Amanda M.; Ekström, Elin J.; Wee, Boyoung; Halliday, John J.; Pitter, Kenneth L.; Werbeck, Jillian L.; Amankulor, Nduka M.; Huse, Jason T.; Holland, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Stem-like glioma cells reside within a perivascular niche and display hallmark radiation resistance. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying these properties will be vital for the development of effective therapies. Here we show that the stem cell marker CD44 promotes cancer stem cell phenotypes and radiation resistance. In a mouse model of glioma, Cd44−/− and Cd44+/− animals showed improved survival compared to controls. The CD44 ligand Osteopontin shared a perivascular expression pattern with CD44 and promoted glioma stem cell-like phenotypes. These effects were mediated via the γ-secretase regulated intracellular domain of CD44, which promoted aggressive glioma growth in vivo and stem cell-like phenotypes via CBP/p300-dependent enhancement of HIF-2α activity. In human glioblastoma multiforme, expression of CD44 correlated with hypoxia-induced gene signatures and poor survival. Together, these data suggest that in the glioma perivascular niche, Osteopontin promotes stem cell-like properties and radiation resistance in adjacent tumor cells via activation of CD44 signaling. PMID:24607407

  10. Olaparib in Treating Patients With Advanced Glioma, Cholangiocarcinoma, or Solid Tumors With IDH1 or IDH2 Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Glioblastoma; Grade II Glioma; IDH1 Gene Mutation; IDH2 Gene Mutation; Recurrent Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Glioma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; WHO Grade III Glioma

  11. Expressions of glia maturation factor-β by tumor cells and endothelia correlate with neovascularization and poor prognosis in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cong; Su, Xiao-rui; Shi, Yu; Wu, Jin-rong; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Xin-li; Cui, You-hong; Ping, Yi-fang; Bian, Xiu-wu

    2016-01-01

    Glia maturation factor-β (GMF-β) has been reported to promote glial differentiation, and act as a negative prognostic indicator in certain cancers. However, its roles in glioma progression remain unclear. Since neurogenesis and vasculogenesis were proved to share some common regulators during gliomagenesis, we aim to explore the potential impact of GMF-β on tumor neovascularization and patient survival in glioma. In this study, we first detected GMF-β expression not only in tumor cells but also in microvascular endothelia by double immunohistochemical staining. Both tumoral and endothelial GMF-β expression levels were positively correlated with tumor grade and microvessel density (MVD), while negatively associated with poor prognoses of the patients. Interestingly, multivariate analysis demonstrated that endothelial GMF-β expression level was the only independent predictor of progression-free and overall survival of glioma patients. The results of in vitro angiogenesis assay showed that GMF-β knockdown significantly inhibited tubulogenesis of human U87 glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, GMF-β knockdown suppressed tumor growth and the formation of human-CD31 positive (glioma cell-derived) microvessels in a mouse orthotopic U87 glioma model. Our results demonstrated that GMF-β is an important player in glioma progression via promoting neovascularization. GMF-β may therefore be a novel prognostic marker as well as a potential therapeutic target for glioma. PMID:26515590

  12. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages in an experimental glioma model with a recombinant immunotoxin to folate receptor beta.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku; Tanaka, Masashi; Tsuneyoshi, Yasuhiro; Xu, Baohui; Michie, Sara A; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Hirano, Hirofumi; Arita, Kazunori; Matsuyama, Takami

    2009-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in glioblastomas and a high degree of macrophage infiltration is associated with a poor prognosis for glioblastoma patients. However, it is unclear whether TAMs in glioblastomas promote tumor growth. In this study, we found that folate receptor beta (FR beta) was expressed on macrophages in human glioblastomas and a rat C6 glioma implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. To target FR beta-expressing TAMs, we produced a recombinant immunotoxin consisting of immunoglobulin heavy and light chain Fv portions of an anti-mouse FR beta monoclonal antibody and Pseudomonas exotoxin A. Injection of the immunotoxin into C6 glioma xenografts in nude mice significantly depleted TAMs and reduced tumor growth. The immunotoxin targeting FR beta-expressing macrophages will provide a therapeutic tool for human glioblastomas.

  13. Monitoring glioma growth and tumor necrosis with the U-SPECT-II/CT scanner by targeting integrin αvβ3.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guoqiang; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) as an imaging tool to monitor α(v)β(3) expression and tumor necrosis. The animal model was established by subcutaneous injection of 5 × 10(6) U87MG cells into the shoulder flank of each mouse. Imaging was performed using the U-SPECT-II/CT scanner (Milabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). Tumor volumes were determined, and the tumor uptake of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) was calculated on the basis of SPECT/CT and compared to that from biodistribution. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine CD31 and α(v)β(3) expression levels. We found that the tumor detection limit was ≈ 0.5 mm(3) by (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) SPECT/CT. The tumor uptake of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) from SPECT/CT was almost identical to that from biodistribution. The α(v)β(3) was expressed mainly on blood vessels for the tumors of 0.2 to 0.5 cm(3). In larger tumors, tumor α(v)β(3) expression increased due to more contribution from glioma cells. When tumors were > 0.5 cm(3), the %ID/cm(3) uptake of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) decreased because of necrosis. The overall relationship between the tumor size and %ID of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) was modeled as a quadratic polynomial fitting curve, with R(2) being > .95. (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) SPECT/CT is excellent for monitoring α(v)β(3) expression and tumor necrosis during tumor growth and may become a screening tool for patient selection before anti-α(v)β(3) therapy.

  14. Impact of epidemiological characteristics of supratentorial gliomas in adults brought about by the 2016 world health organization classification of tumors of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihui; Cui, Yong; Wang, Junmei; Lin, Song

    2016-11-24

    The latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) integrates both histological and molecular features in the definition of diagnostic entities. This new approach enrolls novel entities of gliomas. In this study, we aimed to reveal the epidemiological characteristics, including age at diagnosis, gender ratio, tumor distribution and survival, of these new entities. We retrospectively reclassified 1210 glioma samples according to the 2016 CNS WHO diagnostic criteria. In our cohort, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with wildtype isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) was the most common malignant tumor in the brain. Almost all gliomas were more prevalent in males, especially in the cluster of WHO grade III gliomas and IDH-wildtype GBM. Age at diagnosis was directly proportional to tumor grade. With respect to the distribution by histology, we found that gliomas concurrent with IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted or with single IDH-mutant were mainly distributed in frontal lobe, while those with IDH-wildtype were dominant in temporal lobe. Lesions located in insular lobe were more likely to be IDH-mutant astrocytoma. In summary, our results elucidated the epidemiological characteristics as well as the regional constituents of these new gliomas entities, which could bring insights into tumorigenesis and personalized treatment of Chinese glioma population.

  15. Morbidity profile following aggressive resection of parietal lobe gliomas.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Nader; Martino, Juan; Berger, Mitchel S

    2012-06-01

    The impact of parietal lobe gliomas is typically studied in the context of parietal lobe syndromes. However, critical language pathways traverse the parietal lobe and are susceptible during tumor resection. The authors of this study reviewed their experience with parietal gliomas to characterize the impact of resection and the morbidity associated with language. The study population included adults who had undergone resection of parietal gliomas of all grades. Tumor location was identified according to a proposed classification system for parietal region gliomas. Low- and high-grade tumors were volumetrically analyzed using FLAIR and T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR imaging. One hundred nineteen patients with parietal gliomas were identified--34 with low-grade gliomas and 85 with high-grade gliomas. The median patient age was 45 years, and most patients (53) presented with seizures, whereas only 4 patients had an appreciable parietal lobe syndrome. The median preoperative tumor volume was 31.3 cm(3), the median extent of resection was 96%, and the median postoperative tumor volume was 0.9 cm(3). Surprisingly, the most common early postoperative neurological deficit was dysphasia (16 patients), not weakness (12 patients), sensory deficits (14 patients), or parietal lobe syndrome (10 patients). A proposed parietal glioma classification system, based on surgical anatomy, was predictive of language deficits. This is the largest reported experience with parietal lobe gliomas. The findings suggested that parietal language pathways are compromised at a surprisingly high rate. The proposed parietal glioma classification system is predictive of postoperative morbidity associated with language and can assist with preoperative planning. Taken together, these data emphasize the value of identifying language pathways when operating within the parietal lobe.

  16. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI parameters and tumor cellularity in a rat model of cerebral glioma at 7T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Madhava Prasad

    This dissertation mainly focuses on establishing and evaluating a stable and reproducible procedure for assessing tumor microvasculature by measuring the tissue parameters: plasma volume (vp), forward transfer constant (Ktrans), interstitial volume (ve) and distribution volume (VD), utilizing T1-weighted dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and examining their relationship with a histo measure, cell counting. In the first part of the work, two T1-weighted DCE-MRI studies at 24 hrs time interval, using a dual-echo gradient-echo pulse sequence, were performed in 18 athymic rats implanted with U251 cerebral glioma. Using the "standard," or "consensus" model, and a separate Logan graphical analysis, T1-weighted images before, during and after the injection of a gadolinium contrast agent were used to estimate the tissue parameters mentioned above. After MRI study rats were sacrificed, and sectioned brain tissues were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin for cell counting. Measurements in a region where a model selection process demonstrates that it can be reliably shown that contrast agent leaks from the capillary into the interstitial space quickly enough, and a concentration sufficient to measure its back flux to the vasculature, especially for Ktrans and ve, showed a remarkable stability. The combined mean parameter values in this region were: vp = (0.79+/-0.36)%, Ktrans = (2.23+/-0.71) x10-2 min -1, ve = (6.99+/-2.14)%, and VD = (7.57+/-2.32)%. In the second part of this work, the Logan graphical approach, after establishing its stability in an untreated control group, was applied to investigate a cohort of animals in which a therapeutic dose of 20 Gy radiation had been administered. In this cohort, tissue normalization appeared to be the most effective at 8 h after irradiation; this implies that the 8 hrs post-treatment time might be an ideal combination time for optimized therapeutic outcome in combined modalities. The relationship between non-invasive DCE

  17. Monitoring of tumor growth and post-irradiation recurrence in a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Caretti, Viola; Zondervan, Ilse; Meijer, Dimphna H; Idema, Sander; Vos, Wim; Hamans, Bob; Bugiani, Marianna; Hulleman, Esther; Wesseling, Pieter; Vandertop, W Peter; Noske, David P; Kaspers, Gertjan; Molthoff, Carla F M; Wurdinger, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a fatal malignancy because of its diffuse infiltrative growth pattern. Translational research suffers from the lack of a representative DIPG animal model. Hence, human E98 glioma cells were stereotactically injected into the pons of nude mice. The E98 DIPG tumors presented a strikingly similar histhopathology to autopsy material of a DIPG patient, including diffuse and perivascular growth, brainstem- and supratentorial invasiveness and leptomeningeal growth. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was effectively employed to image the E98 DIPG tumor. [(18) F] 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18) F]fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was applied to assess the subcutaneous (s.c.) E98 tumor proliferation status but no orthotopic DIPG activity could be visualized. Next, E98 cells were cultured in vitro and engineered to express firefly luciferase and mCherry (E98-Fluc-mCherry). These cultured E98-Fluc-mCherry cells developed focal pontine glioma when injected into the pons directly. However, the diffuse E98 DIPG infiltrative phenotype was restored when cells were injected into the pons immediately after an intermediate s.c. passage. The diffuse E98-Fluc-mCherry model was subsequently used to test escalating doses of irradiation, applying the bioluminescent Fluc signal to monitor tumor recurrence over time. Altogether, we here describe an accurate DIPG mouse model that can be of clinical relevance for testing experimental therapeutics in vivo.

  18. Upregulation of B23 promotes tumor cell proliferation and predicts poor prognosis in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jianguo; Sun, Jie; Yang, Liu; Yan, Yaohua; Shi, Wei; Shi, Jinlong; Huang, Qingfeng; Chen, Jian; Lan, Qing

    2015-10-09

    B23 (also known as Nucleophosmin, NPM, numatrin or NO38) is a ubiquitously expressed phosphoprotein belonging to the nucleoplasmin family of chaperones. In this study we intended to investigate the clinical significance of B23 expression in human glioma and its biological function in glioma cells. Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that B23 was overexpressed in glioma tissues and glioma cell lines. In addition, the expression level of B23 was positively correlated with glioma pathological grade and Ki-67 expression. Kaplan–Meier analysis revealed that a higher B23 expression in patients with glioma was associated with a poorer prognosis. In vitro, after the release of glioma cell lines from serum starvation, the expression of B23 was upregulated, as well as PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) and cyclin A. In addition, knockdown of B23 by small interfering RNA transfection diminished the expression of PCNA, cyclin D1 and arrested cell growth at G1 phase. Taken together, our results implied that B23 could be a candidate prognostic biomarker as well as a potential therapeutical target of glioma. - Highlights: • B23 expression increased as the malignant degree of glioma increased, which was consistent with Ki-67 expression. • High expression of B23 could be a strong determinant of poor prognosis in glioma. • B23 may be involved in the proliferation of glioma in a cell-cycle-dependent pathway. • Knockdown of B23 expression by siRNA could affect the progression of glioma. • B23 may be a potential prognosis biomarker and a possible therapeutic target for glioma.

  19. BAFF, APRIL, TWEAK, BCMA, TACI and Fn14 proteins are related to human glioma tumor grade: immunohistochemistry and public microarray data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pelekanou, Vassiliki; Notas, George; Kampa, Marilena; Tsentelierou, Eleftheria; Stathopoulos, Efstathios N; Tsapis, Andreas; Castanas, Elias

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are common and lethal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Genetic alterations, inflammatory and angiogenic processes have been identified throughout tumor progression; however, treatment still remains palliative for most cases. Biological research on parameters influencing cell survival, invasion and tumor heterogeneity identified several cytokines interfering in CNS inflammation, oxidative stress and malignant transformation, including TNF-superfamily (TNFSF) members. In this report we performed a meta-analysis of public gene-array data on the expression of a group of TNFSF ligands (BAFF, APRIL, TWEAK) and their receptors (BAFF-R, TACI, BCMA, Fn14) in gliomas. In addition, we investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) the tumor cells' expression of these ligands and receptors in a series of 56 gliomas of different grade. We show that in IHC, BAFF and APRIL as well as their cognate receptors (BCMA, TACI) and Fn14 expression correlate with tumor grade. This result was not evidenced in micro-arrays meta-analysis. Finally, we detected for the first time Fn14, BAFF, BCMA and TACI in glioma-related vascular endothelium. Our data, combined with our previous report in glioma cell lines, suggest a role for these receptors and ligands in glioma biology and advance these molecules as potential markers for the classification of these tumors to the proliferative, angiogenic or stem-like molecular subtype.

  20. Long Non-coding RNA TUSC7, a Target of miR-23b, Plays Tumor-Suppressing Roles in Human Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Chao; Guo, Yan; Hong, Yang; Xue, Yi-xue

    2016-01-01

    Tumour suppressor candidate 7 (TUSC7) is a novel tumor suppressor gene generating long non-coding RNA (lncRNAs) in several types of human cancers. The expression and function of TUSC7 in human brain glioma has yet to be elucidated. In this study, TUSC7 was poorly expressed in tissues and cell lines of glioma, and the lower expression was correlated with glioma of the worse histological grade. Moreover, TUSC7 is a prognostic biomarker of glioma patients. Up-regulation of TUSC7 suppressed cellular proliferation and invasion of glioma cells, and accelerated cellular apoptosis. Bioinformatics analysis showed that TUSC7 specifically binds to miR-23b. MiR-23b was up-regulated in glioma and negatively correlated with the expression of TUSC7. The miR-23b expression was inhibited remarkably by the upregulation of TUSC7 and the reciprocal inhibition was determined between TUSC7 and miR-23b.RNA pull-down and luciferase reporter assays were used to validate the sequence-specific correlation between miR-23b and TUSC7. TUSC7 inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells and promoted cellular apoptosis largely bypassing miR-23b. We conclude that the lncRNA TUSC7 acted as a tumor suppressor gene negatively regulated by miR-23b, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy against gliomas. PMID:27766072

  1. Incidence of gliomas by anatomic location

    PubMed Central

    Larjavaara, Suvi; Mäntylä, Riitta; Salminen, Tiina; Haapasalo, Hannu; Raitanen, Jani; Jääskeläinen, Juha; Auvinen, Anssi

    2007-01-01

    The anatomic location of a glioma influences prognosis and treatment options. The aim of our study was to describe the distribution of gliomas in different anatomic areas of the brain. A representative population-based sample of 331 adults with glioma was used for preliminary analyses. The anatomic locations for 89 patients from a single center were analyzed in more detail from radiologic imaging and recorded on a three-dimensional 1 × 1 × 1– cm grid. The age-standardized incidence rate of gliomas was 4.7 per 100,000 person-years. The most frequent subtypes were glioblastoma (47%) and grade II–III astrocytoma (23%), followed by oligodendroglioma and mixed glioma. The gliomas were located in the frontal lobe in 40% of the cases, temporal in 29%, parietal in 14%, and occipital lobe in 3%, with 14% in the deeper structures. The difference in distribution between lobes remained after adjustment for their tissue volume: the tumor:volume ratio was 4.5 for frontal, 4.8 for temporal, and 2.3 for parietal relative to the occipital lobe. The area with the densest occurrence was the anterior subcortical brain. Statistically significant spatial clustering was found in the three-dimensional analysis. No differences in location were found among glioblastoma, diffuse astrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma. Our results demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in the anatomic distribution of gliomas within the brain. PMID:17522333

  2. Evaluation of nano-magnetic fluid on malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongsheng; Zong, Hailiang; Ma, Chong; Ming, Xing; Shang, Ming; Li, Kai; He, Xiaoguang; Cao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The temperature variation rule of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field and the effect on the treatment of malignant glioma were examined. The temperature variation of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field was investigated by heating in vitro, and cell morphology was observed through optical microscopy and electron microscopy. MTT detection also was used to detect the effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) on the proliferation of human U251 glioma cell line. The Fe3O4 nano MFH experiment was used to detect the inhibition rate of the tumor volume in nude mice with tumors. The results of the experiment showed that the heating ability of magnetic fluid was positively correlated with its concentration at the same intensity of the magnetic field. The results also indicated the prominent inhibitory effect of nanometer MFH on the proliferation of glioma cells, which was a dose-dependent relationship with nanometer magnetic fluid concentration. The hyperthermia experiment of nude mice with tumors displayed a significant inhibiting effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid in glioma volume. These results explain that iron (II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) nanometer MFH can inhibit the proliferation of U251 glioma cells, and has an obvious inhibitory effect on glioma volume, which plays a certain role in the treatment of brain glioma. PMID:28356945

  3. Evaluation of nano-magnetic fluid on malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongsheng; Zong, Hailiang; Ma, Chong; Ming, Xing; Shang, Ming; Li, Kai; He, Xiaoguang; Cao, Lei

    2017-02-01

    The temperature variation rule of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field and the effect on the treatment of malignant glioma were examined. The temperature variation of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field was investigated by heating in vitro, and cell morphology was observed through optical microscopy and electron microscopy. MTT detection also was used to detect the effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) on the proliferation of human U251 glioma cell line. The Fe3O4 nano MFH experiment was used to detect the inhibition rate of the tumor volume in nude mice with tumors. The results of the experiment showed that the heating ability of magnetic fluid was positively correlated with its concentration at the same intensity of the magnetic field. The results also indicated the prominent inhibitory effect of nanometer MFH on the proliferation of glioma cells, which was a dose-dependent relationship with nanometer magnetic fluid concentration. The hyperthermia experiment of nude mice with tumors displayed a significant inhibiting effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid in glioma volume. These results explain that iron (II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) nanometer MFH can inhibit the proliferation of U251 glioma cells, and has an obvious inhibitory effect on glioma volume, which plays a certain role in the treatment of brain glioma.

  4. Intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment modulates the glioma microenvironment and facilitates systemic tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jian; Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L; Kim, Julius W; Miska, Jason; Ling, Alex; M Nettlebeck, Dirk; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor and is associated with poor survival. Virotherapy is a promising candidate for the development of effective, novel treatments for GBM. Recent studies have underscored the potential of virotherapy in enhancing antitumor immunity despite the fact that its mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, using a syngeneic GBM mouse model, we report that intratumoral virotherapy significantly modulates the tumor microenvironment. We found that intratumoral administration of an oncolytic adenovirus, AdCMVdelta24, decreased tumor-infiltrating CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and increased IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in treated tumors, even in late stage disease in which a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment is considered to be a significant barrier to immunotherapy. Importantly, intratumoral AdCMVdelta24 treatment augmented systemically transferred tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy. Furthermore, mechanistic studies showed (1) downregulation of Foxp3 in Tregs that were incubated with media conditioned by virus-infected tumor cells, (2) downregulation of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO) in glioma cells upon infection by AdCMVdelta24, and (3) reprograming of Tregs from an immunosuppressive to a stimulatory state. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potency of intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment in enhancing antitumor immunity through the regulation of multiple aspects of immune suppression in the context of glioma, supporting further clinical development of oncolytic adenovirus-based immune therapies for malignant brain cancer. PMID:26405578

  5. A ketogenic diet increases transport and oxidation of ketone bodies in RG2 and 9L gliomas without affecting tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    De Feyter, Henk M.; Behar, Kevin L.; Rao, Jyotsna U.; Madden-Hennessey, Kirby; Ip, Kevan L.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Drewes, Lester R.; Geschwind, Jean-François; de Graaf, Robin A.; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The dependence of tumor cells, particularly those originating in the brain, on glucose is the target of the ketogenic diet, which creates a plasma nutrient profile similar to fasting: increased levels of ketone bodies and reduced plasma glucose concentrations. The use of ketogenic diets has been of particular interest for therapy in brain tumors, which reportedly lack the ability to oxidize ketone bodies and therefore would be starved during ketosis. Because studies assessing the tumors' ability to oxidize ketone bodies are lacking, we investigated in vivo the extent of ketone body oxidation in 2 rodent glioma models. Methods Ketone body oxidation was studied using 13C MR spectroscopy in combination with infusion of a 13C-labeled ketone body (beta-hydroxybutyrate) in RG2 and 9L glioma models. The level of ketone body oxidation was compared with nontumorous cortical brain tissue. Results The level of 13C–beta-hydroxybutyrate oxidation in 2 rat glioma models was similar to that of contralateral brain. In addition, when glioma-bearing animals were fed a ketogenic diet, the ketone body monocarboxylate transporter was upregulated, facilitating uptake and oxidation of ketone bodies in the gliomas. Conclusions These results demonstrate that rat gliomas can oxidize ketone bodies and indicate upregulation of ketone body transport when fed a ketogenic diet. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that brain tumors are metabolically inflexible and show the need for additional research on the use of ketogenic diets as therapy targeting brain tumor metabolism. PMID:27142056

  6. NI-79RAPID ASSESSMENT OF LESION VOLUMES FOR PATIENTS WITH GLIOMA USING THE SMARTBRUSH SOFTWARE PACKAGE

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Sana; Lafontaine, Marisa; Olson, Beck; Crane, Jason C.; Chang, Susan; Lupo, Janine; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing interest in enhancing the RANO criteria by using quantitative assessments of changes in lesion size and image intensities has highlighted the need for rapid, easy-to-use tools that provide DICOM compatible outputs for evaluation of patients with glioma. To evaluate the performance of the SmartBrush software (Brainlab AG), which provides computer-assisted definitions of regions of interest (ROIs), a cohort of 20 patients with glioma (equal number having high and low grade and treated and un-treated) were scanned using a 3T whole-body MR system prior to surgical resection. The T2-weighted FLAIR, pre- and post-contrast T1-weighted gradient echo DICOM images were pushed from the scanner to an offline workstation where analysis of lesion volumes was performed using SmartBrush. Volumes of the T2Ls ranged from 7.9 to 110.2cm3 and the volumes of the CELs was 0.1 to 28.5 cm3 with 19/20 of the subjects having CELs and all 20 having T2Ls. the computer-assisted analysis was performed rapidly and efficiently, with the mean time for defining both lesions per subject was 5.77 (range 3.5 to 7.5) minutes. Prior analysis of ROIS with the SLICER package (www.slicer.org) took approximately 30 minutes/subject. SmartBrush provides lesion volumes and cross-sectional diameter as a PDF report, which can be stored in DICOM. The ROIs were also saved as DICOM objects and transferred to other packages for performing histogram analysis from ADC or other functional parameter maps. Ongoing studies that will be reported in this presentation are performing a similar analysis with multiple users in order to compare the relative intra- and inter-operator variations in terms of both the speed of analysis and the ROIs that are identified. Acknowledgements: The authors would like to acknowledge Rowena Thomson and Natalie Wright from Brainlab for helping to set up this study.

  7. Short echo time MR spectroscopy of brain tumors: grading of cerebral gliomas by correlation analysis of normalized spectral amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Weis, Jan; Ring, Patrik; Olofsson, Tommie; Ortiz-Nieto, Francisco; Wikström, Johan

    2010-01-01

    To process single voxel spectra of low- and high-grade gliomas. To propose correlation analysis of the scatter plots of normalized spectral amplitudes as a pattern recognition tool for the classification (grading) of brain tumors. To propose a spectrum processing approach that improves the differentiation of proton spectra with dominating macromolecule and lipid peaks. LCModel was used to process spectra. Mean metabolite concentrations and mean normalized spectra were obtained for normal white matter and for gliomas. The mean spectra of macromolecules and lipids (ML) in the range 1.4-0.9 ppm, and mean difference spectra (DS) without ML and lactate were computed. Correlation analysis of the scatter plot of the patient and mean normalized spectral amplitudes and dispersion of the scatter plot points were used for classification and grading of tumors. It was found advantageous to perform the classifications using DS spectra. The shape of ML spectrum and concentration of tCr seem to be a good markers for glioma grade. Combining a qualitative comparison of the patient and mean DS spectra of the tumors using correlation analysis of normalized spectra amplitudes with a quantitative comparison of metabolite concentrations is a powerful tool in studying brain lesions. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Combination of vatalanib and a 20-HETE synthesis inhibitor results in decreased tumor growth in an animal model of human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Adarsh; Borin, Thaiz F; Iskander, Asm; Varma, Nadimpalli RS; Achyut, Bhagelu R; Jain, Meenu; Mikkelsen, Tom; Guo, Austin M; Chwang, Wilson B; Ewing, James R; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Arbab, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the hypervascular nature of glioblastoma (GBM), antiangiogenic treatments, such as vatalanib, have been added as an adjuvant to control angiogenesis and tumor growth. However, evidence of progressive tumor growth and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment has been observed. To counter the unwanted effect of vatalanib on GBM growth, we have added a new agent known as N-hydroxy-N′-(4-butyl-2 methylphenyl)formamidine (HET0016), which is a selective inhibitor of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthesis. The aims of the studies were to determine 1) whether the addition of HET0016 can attenuate the unwanted effect of vatalanib on tumor growth and 2) whether the treatment schedule would have a crucial impact on controlling GBM. Methods U251 human glioma cells (4×105) were implanted orthotopically. Two different treatment schedules were investigated. Treatment starting on day 8 (8–21 days treatment) of the tumor implantation was to mimic treatment following detection of tumor, where tumor would have hypoxic microenvironment and well-developed neovascularization. Drug treatment starting on the same day of tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment) was to mimic cases following radiation therapy or surgery. There were four different treatment groups: vehicle, vatalanib (oral treatment 50 mg/kg/d), HET0016 (intraperitoneal treatment 10 mg/kg/d), and combined (vatalanib and HET0016). Following scheduled treatments, all animals underwent magnetic resonance imaging on day 22, followed by euthanasia. Brain specimens were equally divided for immunohistochemistry and protein array analysis. Results Our results demonstrated a trend that HET0016, alone or in combination with vatalanib, is capable of controlling the tumor growth compared with that of vatalanib alone, indicating attenuation of the unwanted effect of vatalanib. When both vatalanib and HET0016 were administered together on the day of the tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment), tumor

  9. Handheld confocal laser endomicroscopic imaging utilizing tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to identify experimental glioma cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Georges, Joseph; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F.; Feuerstein, Burt G.; Preul, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have reported that handheld confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) can be used with various nonspecific fluorescent dyes to improve the microscopic identification of brain tumor and its boundaries. Here, we show that CLE can be used experimentally with tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to define glioma margins in vivo. Methods: Thirteen rats underwent craniectomy and in vivo imaging 21 days after implantation with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled U251 (n = 7) cells or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressing F98 cells (n = 6). Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated EGFR fluorescent antibody (FITC-EGFR) was applied for contrast in F98 tumors. Confocal images of normal brain, obvious tumor, and peritumoral zones were collected using the CLE system. Bench-top confocal microscopy and hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were correlated with CLE images. Results: GFP and FITC-EGFR fluorescence of glioma cells were detected by in vivo visible-wavelength fluorescence CLE. CLE of GFP-labeled tumors revealed bright individual satellite tumor cells within peritumoral tissue, a definitive tumor border, and subcellular structures. Imaging with FITC-EGFR labeling provided weaker contrast in F98-EGFR tumors but was able to delineate tumor cells. Imaging with both methods in various tumor regions correlated with standard confocal imaging and clinical histology. Conclusions: These data suggest that in vivo CLE of selectively tagged neoplasms could allow specific interactive identification of tumoral areas. Imaging of GFP and FITC-EGFR provides real-time histologic information precisely related to the site of microscopic imaging of tumor. PMID:28144472

  10. ECRG4 is a candidate tumor suppressor gene frequently hypermethylated in colorectal carcinoma and glioma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancer cells display widespread changes in DNA methylation that may lead to genetic instability by global hypomethylation and aberrant silencing of tumor suppressor genes by focal hypermethylation. In turn, altered DNA methylation patterns have been used to identify putative tumor suppressor genes. Methods In a methylation screening approach, we identified ECRG4 as a differentially methylated gene. We analyzed different cancer cells for ECRG4 promoter methylation by COBRA and bisulfite sequencing. Gene expression analysis was carried out by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The ECRG4 coding region was cloned and transfected into colorectal carcinoma cells. Cell growth was assessed by MTT and BrdU assays. ECRG4 localization was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and Western blotting after transfection of an ECRG4-eGFP fusion gene. Results We found a high frequency of ECRG4 promoter methylation in various cancer cell lines. Remarkably, aberrant methylation of ECRG4 was also found in primary human tumor tissues, including samples from colorectal carcinoma and from malignant gliomas. ECRG4 hypermethylation associated strongly with transcriptional silencing and its expression could be re-activated in vitro by demethylating treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Overexpression of ECRG4 in colorectal carcinoma cells led to a significant decrease in cell growth. In transfected cells, ECRG4 protein was detectable within the Golgi secretion machinery as well as in the culture medium. Conclusions ECRG4 is silenced via promoter hypermethylation in different types of human cancer cells. Its gene product may act as inhibitor of cell proliferation in colorectal carcinoma cells and may play a role as extracellular signaling molecule. PMID:20017917

  11. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tumor Volume with Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Wood, Bradford J.; Merino, Maria J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. Materials and Methods We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm3) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. Results There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p <0.0001), but a weak correlation between prostate specific antigen and histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p=0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r2=0.401, p <0.00001). On ROC analysis AUC values for magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age in estimating tumors larger than 0.5 cm3 at histopathology were 0.949 (p <0.0000001), 0.685 (p=0.001) and 0.627 (p=0

  12. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging tumor volume with histopathology.

    PubMed

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L; Linehan, W Marston; Wood, Bradford J; Merino, Maria J; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2012-10-01

    The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm(3)) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p <0.0001), but a weak correlation between prostate specific antigen and histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p = 0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r(2) = 0.401, p <0.00001). On ROC analysis AUC values for magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age in estimating tumors larger than 0.5 cm(3) at histopathology were 0.949 (p <0.0000001), 0.685 (p = 0.001) and 0.627 (p = 0.02), respectively. Similar

  13. Investigation on the role of integrated PET/MRI for target volume definition and radiotherapy planning in patients with high grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Navarria, Pierina; Reggiori, Giacomo; Pessina, Federico; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Tomatis, Stefano; Mancosu, Pietro; Lobefalo, Francesca; Clerici, Elena; Lopci, Egesta; Bizzi, Alberto; Grimaldi, Marco; Chiti, Arturo; Simonelli, Matteo; Santoro, Armando; Bello, Lorenzo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of fluid-attenuated-inversion-recovery MRI (FLAIR/MRI) and Carbon-11-labeled-methionine PET (11C-MET-PET) on high grade glioma (HGG) tumor volume delineation for radiotherapy planning. Sixty-nine patients with HGG were evaluated. The clinical target volumes (CTV1, generated by adding a 10mm margin to FLAIRMRI area, CTV2 by adding a 20mm margin to enhanced T1MRI) and biological target volume (BTV) were delineated on pre-operative MRI images and 11CMETPET respectively. The overlap between CTV1 and CTV2 showed a low correlation between the two volumes with CTV1 not always fully included into the CTV2. In all cases the whole BTV was included into the CTV1, while in 35/69 patients (50%) part of BTV was outside the CTV2 despite larger margins were added. In all cases recurrences were within the CTV1 volume and in 19/38 (50%) partially outside the CTV2. In all patients relapse corresponded to the BTV area. Our data suggest that the target volume definition using FLAIR-MRI is more adequate compared to enhanced T1MRI. 11C-METPET uptake could help identify microscopic residual areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Decreased expression of NDRG1 in glioma is related to tumor progression and survival of patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boqian; Chu, Dake; Li, Wei; Chu, Xiaodan; Li, Yunming; Wei, Dun; Li, Haiping

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the expression of NDRG1 gene in glioma samples with different WHO grades and its association with survival. About 168 glioma specimens and 21 normal control tissues were collected. Immunochemistry assay, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis were carried out to investigate the expression of NDRG1 and Myc. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox's proportional hazards model were used in survival analysis. Immunohistochemistry showed that Ndrg1 expression was reduced in glioma. NDRG1 mRNA and protein levels were lower in glioma compared to control on real-time PCR and Western blot analysis (P < 0.001). Its expression levels increase from grade IV to grade I glioma on real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry analysis (P < 0.001) and Western blot. On the contrary, the expression of Myc by real-time PCR and Western blot showed the opposite trend of NDRG1. The survival rate of Ndrg1-negative patients was lower than that of Ndrg1-positive patients. We confirmed that the loss of NDRG1 expression was a significant and independent prognostic indicator in glioma by multivariate analysis. NDRG1 may play an inhibitory role during the development of glioma and may be a potential prognosis predictor of glioma.

  15. 18F-FDOPA PET/CT or PET/MRI in Measuring Tumors in Patients With Newly-Diagnosed or Recurrent Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Protoplasmic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma; Untreated Childhood

  16. Honokiol Crosses BBB and BCSFB, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Rat 9L Intracerebral Gliosarcoma Model and Human U251 Xenograft Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Linyu; Zheng, Hao; Deng, Chongyang; Wen, Jiaolin; Wang, Ning; Peng, Cheng; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yuquan; Chen, Lijuan

    2011-01-01

    Background Gliosarcoma is one of the most common malignant brain tumors, and anti-angiogenesis is a promising approach for the treatment of gliosarcoma. However, chemotherapy is obstructed by the physical obstacle formed by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Honokiol has been known to possess potent activities in the central nervous system diseases, and anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor properties. Here, we hypothesized that honokiol could cross the BBB and BCSFB for the treatment of gliosarcoma. Methodologies We first evaluated the abilities of honokiol to cross the BBB and BCSFB by measuring the penetration of honokiol into brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid, and compared the honokiol amount taken up by brain with that by other tissues. Then we investigated the effect of honokiol on the growth inhibition of rat 9L gliosarcoma cells and human U251 glioma cells in vitro. Finally we established rat 9L intracerebral gliosarcoma model in Fisher 344 rats and human U251 xenograft glioma model in nude mice to investigate the anti-tumor activity. Principal Findings We showed for the first time that honokiol could effectively cross BBB and BCSFB. The ratios of brain/plasma concentration were respectively 1.29, 2.54, 2.56 and 2.72 at 5, 30, 60 and 120 min. And about 10% of honokiol in plasma crossed BCSFB into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In vitro, honokiol produced dose-dependent inhibition of the growth of rat 9L gliosarcoma cells and human U251 glioma cells with IC50 of 15.61 µg/mL and 16.38 µg/mL, respectively. In vivo, treatment with 20 mg/kg body weight of honokiol (honokiol was given twice per week for 3 weeks by intravenous injection) resulted in significant reduction of tumor volume (112.70±10.16 mm3) compared with vehicle group (238.63±19.69 mm3, P = 0.000), with 52.77% inhibiting rate in rat 9L intracerebral gliosarcoma model, and (1450.83±348.36 mm3) compared with vehicle group (2914.17±780.52 mm3, P = 0

  17. Honokiol crosses BBB and BCSFB, and inhibits brain tumor growth in rat 9L intracerebral gliosarcoma model and human U251 xenograft glioma model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhuo; Duan, Xingmei; Yang, Guangli; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Linyu; Zheng, Hao; Deng, Chongyang; Wen, Jiaolin; Wang, Ning; Peng, Cheng; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yuquan; Chen, Lijuan

    2011-04-29

    Gliosarcoma is one of the most common malignant brain tumors, and anti-angiogenesis is a promising approach for the treatment of gliosarcoma. However, chemotherapy is obstructed by the physical obstacle formed by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Honokiol has been known to possess potent activities in the central nervous system diseases, and anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor properties. Here, we hypothesized that honokiol could cross the BBB and BCSFB for the treatment of gliosarcoma. We first evaluated the abilities of honokiol to cross the BBB and BCSFB by measuring the penetration of honokiol into brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid, and compared the honokiol amount taken up by brain with that by other tissues. Then we investigated the effect of honokiol on the growth inhibition of rat 9L gliosarcoma cells and human U251 glioma cells in vitro. Finally we established rat 9L intracerebral gliosarcoma model in Fisher 344 rats and human U251 xenograft glioma model in nude mice to investigate the anti-tumor activity. We showed for the first time that honokiol could effectively cross BBB and BCSFB. The ratios of brain/plasma concentration were respectively 1.29, 2.54, 2.56 and 2.72 at 5, 30, 60 and 120 min. And about 10% of honokiol in plasma crossed BCSFB into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In vitro, honokiol produced dose-dependent inhibition of the growth of rat 9L gliosarcoma cells and human U251 glioma cells with IC(50) of 15.61 µg/mL and 16.38 µg/mL, respectively. In vivo, treatment with 20 mg/kg body weight of honokiol (honokiol was given twice per week for 3 weeks by intravenous injection) resulted in significant reduction of tumor volume (112.70±10.16 mm(3)) compared with vehicle group (238.63±19.69 mm(3), P = 0.000), with 52.77% inhibiting rate in rat 9L intracerebral gliosarcoma model, and (1450.83±348.36 mm(3)) compared with vehicle group (2914.17±780.52 mm(3), P = 0.002), with 50.21% inhibiting rate in

  18. Proposed therapeutic strategy for adult low-grade glioma based on aggressive tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Ikuta, Soko; Komori, Takashi; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Iseki, Hiroshi; Tamura, Manabu; Saito, Taiichi; Okamoto, Saori; Chernov, Mikhail; Hayashi, Motohiro; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT There is no standard therapeutic strategy for low-grade glioma (LGG). The authors hypothesized that adjuvant therapy might not be necessary for LGG cases in which total radiological resection was achieved. Accordingly, they established a treatment strategy based on the extent of resection (EOR) and the MIB-1 index: patients with a high EOR and low MIB-1 index were observed without postoperative treatment, whereas those with a low EOR and/or high MIB-1 index received radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy. In the present retrospective study, the authors reviewed clinical data on patients with primarily diagnosed LGGs who had been treated according to the above-mentioned strategy, and they validated the treatment policy. Given their results, they will establish a new treatment strategy for LGGs stratified by EOR, histological subtype, and molecular status. METHODS One hundred fifty-three patients with diagnosed LGG who had undergone resection or biopsy at Tokyo Women's Medical University between January 2000 and August 2010 were analyzed. The patients consisted of 84 men and 69 women, all with ages ≥ 15 years. A total of 146 patients underwent surgical removal of the tumor, and 7 patients underwent biopsy. RESULTS Postoperative RT and nitrosourea-based chemotherapy were administered in 48 and 35 patients, respectively. Extent of resection was significantly associated with both overall survival (OS; p = 0.0096) and progression-free survival (PFS; p = 0.0007) in patients with diffuse astrocytoma but not in those with oligodendroglial subtypes. Chemotherapy significantly prolonged PFS, especially in patients with oligodendroglial subtypes (p = 0.0009). Patients with a mutant IDH1 gene had significantly longer OS (p = 0.034). Multivariate analysis did not identify MIB-1 index or RT as prognostic factors, but it did identify chemotherapy as a prognostic factor for PFS and EOR as a prognostic factor for OS and PFS. CONCLUSIONS The findings demonstrated that EOR was

  19. Molecular genetics of pediatric brain stem gliomas. Application of PCR techniques to small and archival brain tumor specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N.; Rubio, M.P.; Correa, K.M.; Gusella, J.F.; Deimling, A. von )

    1993-09-01

    Brain stem gliomas are pediatric astrocytomas that histologically resemble adult supratentorial astrocytomas such as gliobastomas multiforme (GBM). The molecular genetic studies have suggested that adult GBM can be divided into two genetic subsets: Tumors with p53 tumor suppressor gene mutations and chromosome 17p loss that occur more commonly in younger patients; and tumors with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification that occur more commonly in older patients. Brain stem gliomas have not been studied since biopsies of these tumors are rare and extremely small. The authors investigated the molecular genetic composition of seven brain stem glioblastomas (two small biopsies, five autopsies) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for chromosomal loss, gene mutation and gene amplification. Four cases lost portions of chromosome 17p that included the 53p gene. These four cases and one additional case had mutations in the p53 gene. None of the cases showed amplification of the EGFR gene. Allelic losses of the long arm of chromosome 10 were noted in four cases. These results suggest similarities between pediatric brain stem glioblastomas and those GBM that occur in younger adult patients, and confirm the utility of PCR-based means of studying small and archival brain tumor specimens. 47 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Tumor-specific contrast agent based on ferric oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles for visualization of gliomas by magnetic resonance tomography.

    PubMed

    Abakumov, M A; Grinenko, N F; Baklaushev, V P; Sandalova, T O; Nukolova, N V; Semyonova, A V; Sokol'ski-Papkov, M; Vishvasrao, H; Kabanov, A V; Chekhonin, V P

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to create vector superparamagnetic nanoparticles for tumor cell visualization in vivo by magnetic resonance tomography. A method for obtaining superparamagnetic nanoparticles based on ferric oxide with the magnetic nucleus diameter of 12 ± 3 nm coated with BSA and forming stable water dispersions was developed. The structure and size of the nanoparticles were studied by transmissive electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and x-ray phase analysis. Their T2 relaxivity was comparable with that of the available commercial analog. Low cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles was demonstrated by MTT test on primary and immortalized cell cultures. The nanoparticles were vectorized by monoclonal antibodies to connexin 43 (Cx43). Specific binding of vectorized nanoparticles to C6 glioma Cx43-positive cell membranes was demonstrated. Hence, vector biocompatible nanoparticles with high relaxivity, fit for use as MRT contrast for the diagnosis of poorly differentiated gliomas, were created.

  1. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment: Immune Targets for Glioma Therapeutics12

    PubMed Central

    Candolfi, Marianela; King, Gwendalyn D; Yagiz, Kader; Curtin, James F; Mineharu, Yohei; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Kroeger, Kurt M; Barnett, Nick; Josien, Regis; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated delivery of the immune-stimulatory cytokine Flt3L and the conditionally cytotoxic thymidine kinase (TK) induces tumor regression and long-term survival in preclinical glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM]) models. Flt3L induces expansion and recruitment of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) into the brain. Although pDCs can present antigen and produce powerful inflammatory cytokines, that is, interferon α (IFN-α), their role in tumor immunology remains debated. Thus, we studied the role of pDCs and IFN-α in Ad.TK/GCV+ Ad.Flt3L-mediated anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy. Our data indicate that the combined gene therapy induced recruitment of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) into the tumor mass; which were capable of in vivo phagocytosis, IFN-α release, and T-cell priming. Thus, we next used either pDCs or an Ad vector encoding IFN-α delivered within the tumor microenvironment. When rats were treated with Ad.TK/GCV in combination with pDCs or Ad-IFN-α, they exhibited 35% and 50% survival, respectively. However, whereas intracranial administration of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L exhibited a high safety profile, Ad-IFN-α led to severe local inflammation, with neurologic and systemic adverse effects. To elucidate whether the efficacy of the immunotherapy was dependent on IFN-α-secreting pDCs, we administered an Ad vector encoding B18R, an IFN-α antagonist, which abrogated the antitumoral effect of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. Our data suggest that IFN-α release by activated pDCs plays a critical role in the antitumor effect mediated by Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. In summary, taken together, our results demonstrate that pDCs mediate anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy through the production of IFN-α, thus manipulation of pDCs constitutes an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM. PMID:22952428

  2. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the tumor microenvironment: immune targets for glioma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Candolfi, Marianela; King, Gwendalyn D; Yagiz, Kader; Curtin, James F; Mineharu, Yohei; Muhammad, A K M Ghulam; Foulad, David; Kroeger, Kurt M; Barnett, Nick; Josien, Regis; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2012-08-01

    Adenovirus-mediated delivery of the immune-stimulatory cytokine Flt3L and the conditionally cytotoxic thymidine kinase (TK) induces tumor regression and long-term survival in preclinical glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM]) models. Flt3L induces expansion and recruitment of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) into the brain. Although pDCs can present antigen and produce powerful inflammatory cytokines, that is, interferon α (IFN-α), their role in tumor immunology remains debated. Thus, we studied the role of pDCs and IFN-α in Ad.TK/GCV+ Ad.Flt3L-mediated anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy. Our data indicate that the combined gene therapy induced recruitment of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) into the tumor mass; which were capable of in vivo phagocytosis, IFN-α release, and T-cell priming. Thus, we next used either pDCs or an Ad vector encoding IFN-α delivered within the tumor microenvironment. When rats were treated with Ad.TK/GCV in combination with pDCs or Ad-IFN-α, they exhibited 35% and 50% survival, respectively. However, whereas intracranial administration of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L exhibited a high safety profile, Ad-IFN-α led to severe local inflammation, with neurologic and systemic adverse effects. To elucidate whether the efficacy of the immunotherapy was dependent on IFN-α-secreting pDCs, we administered an Ad vector encoding B18R, an IFN-α antagonist, which abrogated the antitumoral effect of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. Our data suggest that IFN-α release by activated pDCs plays a critical role in the antitumor effect mediated by Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. In summary, taken together, our results demonstrate that pDCs mediate anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy through the production of IFN-α, thus manipulation of pDCs constitutes an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM.

  3. Potent tumor tropism of induced pluripotent stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells in the mouse intracerebral glioma model.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Tomohiro; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Amano, Shinji; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Although neural and mesenchymal stem cells have been well-known to have a strong glioma tropism, this activity in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has not yet been fully studied. In the present study, we tested tumor tropic activity of mouse iPSCs and neural stem cells derived from the iPSC (iPS-NSCs) using in vitro Matrigel invasion chamber assay and in vivo mouse intracranial tumor model. Both iPSC and iPS-NSC had a similar potent in vitro tropism for glioma conditioned media. The migrated iPSCs to the gliomas kept expressing Nanog-GFP gene, suggesting no neuronal or glial differentiation. iPSCs or iPS-NSCs labeled with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine were intracranially implanted in the contralateral hemisphere to the GL261 glioma cell implantation in the allogeneic C57BL/6 mouse. Active migration of both stem cells was observed 7 days after implantation. Again, the iPSCs located in the tumor area expressed Nanog-GFP gene, suggesting that the migrated cells were still iPSCs. These findings demonstrated that both iPSCs and iPS-NSCs had potent glioma tropism and could be candidates as vehicles in stem cell-based glioma therapy.

  4. Efficacy of salvage stereotactic radiotherapy for recurrent glioma: impact of tumor morphology and method of target delineation on local control

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Kengo; Mizowaki, Takashi; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Miyamoto, Susumu; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the efficacy of salvage stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for recurrent glioma. From August 2008 to December 2012, 30 patients with recurrent glioma underwent salvage SRT. The initial histological diagnoses were World Health Organization (WHO) grades II, III, and IV in 6, 9, and 15 patients, respectively. Morphologically, the type of recurrence was classified as diffuse or other. Two methods of clinical target delineation were used: A, a contrast-enhancing tumor; or B, a contrast-enhancing tumor with a 3–10-mm margin and/or surrounding fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) high-intensity areas. The prescribed dose was 22.5–35 Gy delivered in five fractions at an isocenter using a dynamic conformal arc technique. The overall survival (OS) and local control probability (LCP) after SRT were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. A univariate analysis was used to test the effect of clinical variables on OS/LCP. The median follow-up period was 272 days after SRT. The OS and LCP were 83% and 56% at 6 months after SRT, respectively. Morphologically, the tumor type correlated significantly with both OS and LCP (P = 0.006 and <0.001, respectively). The method of target delineation also had a significant influence on LCP (P = 0.016). Grade 3 radiation necrosis was observed in two patients according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. Salvage SRT was safe and effective for recurrent glioma, especially non-diffuse recurrences. Improved local control might be obtained by adding a margin to contrast-enhancing tumors or including increased FLAIR high-intensity areas. PMID:24403268

  5. A role for ion channels in perivascular glioma invasion

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Emily G.

    2017-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are devastating tumors, frequently killing those diagnosed in little over a year. The profuse infiltration of glioma cells into healthy tissue surrounding the main tumor mass is one of the major obstacles limiting the improvement of patient survival. Migration along the abluminal side of blood vessels is one of the salient features of glioma cell invasion. Invading glioma cells are attracted to the vascular network, in part by the neuro-peptide bradykinin, where glioma cells actively modify the gliovascular interface and undergo volumetric alterations to navigate the confined space. Critical to these volume modifications is a proposed hydrodynamic model that involves the flux of ions in and out of the cell, followed by osmotically obligated water. Ion and water channels expressed by the glioma cell are essential in this model of invasion and make opportune therapeutic targets. Lastly, there is growing evidence that vascular-associated glioma cells are able to control the vascular tone, presumably to free up space for invasion and growth. The unique mechanisms that enable perivascular glioma invasion may offer critical targets for therapeutic intervention in this devastating disease. Indeed, a chloride channel-blocking peptide has already been successfully tested in human clinical trials. PMID:27424110

  6. [Transplantation and magnetic resonance imaging of transplantable human glioma tissue in the brain of nude mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Ru-Jun; Diao, Yi; Huang, Qiang; Shen, Jun-Kang; Lan, Qing

    2007-09-01

    In previous reports, orthotopic transplantation models of glioma were produced by injecting cell suspension into the brain of mice, which is complex, time-consuming, and nearly impossible to prepare in a large scale within a short period. This study was to establish human glioma orthotopic transplantation model in nude mice by transplanting tumor tissue in the brain, and investigate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the transplanted tumors. Human glioma cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice to form human glioma. The transplantable human glioma tissues (2 mm3) were put into trocar and directly injected into the caudate nucleus of nude mice. Thirty days later, the tumors were detected by 1.5T superconduct MR machine with micro-23 coil and measured by Dicomworks (V1.35) software. Tumor morphology was observed under light microscope with HE staining. Tumor volume was measured under stereomicroscope. The feasibility of measuring tumor volume according to MRI data was evaluated. MRI showed that in the 15 nude mice received orthotopic transplantation in the caudate nucleus, 14 developed glioma. Under microscope, glioma tissues were found at the same sites as where MRI indicated. Tumor volume was (23.45+/-11.64) mm3 as measured by MRI and (23.19+/-10.18) mm3 as detected under stereomicroscope (P>0.05). The successful rate of tumor model preparation was 93% (14/15). The successful rate of tumor imaging by MRI was 100% (14/14). Tissue quantitative transplantation via trocar is simple, time-saving, and easy to construct tumor model in a large scale with high successful rate. The 1.5T MR machine with micro-23 coil can be used to observe tumor position and size of orthotopic transplantation models of human glioma in nude mice.

  7. Molecular genetics of adult grade II gliomas: towards a comprehensive tumor classification system.

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Bouvier, Corinne; de Paula, André Maues; Mokhtari, Karima; Colin, Carole; Loundou, Anderson; Chinot, Olivier; Metellus, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Adult grade II low-grade gliomas (LGG) are classified according to the WHO as astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas or mixed gliomas. TP53 mutations and 1p19q codeletion are the main molecular abnormalities recorded, respectively, in astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas and in mixed gliomas. Although IDH mutations (IDH1 or IDH2) are recorded in up to 85 % of low-grade gliomas, IDH negative gliomas do occur. We have searched for p53 expression, 1p19q codeletion and IDH status (immunohistochemical detection of the common R132H IDH1 mutation and IDH direct sequencing). Internexin alpha (INA) expression previously recorded to be associated with 1p19q codeletion (1p19q+) gliomas was also analysed. Low-grade gliomas were accurately classified into four groups: group 1, IDH+/p53-/1p19q-; group 2, IDH+/p53-/1p19q+; group 3, IDH+/p53+/1p19q-; and group 4, triple negative gliomas. In contrast to the WHO classification, this molecular classification predicts overall survival on uni- and multivariate analysis (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively). Group 4 carries the worst prognosis and group 2 the best. Interestingly, p53 +/INA- expression predicts lack of 1p19q codeletion (specificity 100 %, VPP 100 %). The combined use of these three molecular markers allow for an accurate prediction of survival in LGG. These findings could significantly modify LGG classification and may represent a new tool to guide patient-tailored therapy. Moreover, immunohistochemical detection of p53, INA and mR132H IDH1 expression could represent an interesting prescreening test to be performed before 1p19q codeletion, IDH1 minor mutation and IDH2 mutation detection.

  8. Molecular neuropathology of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Markus J; Reifenberger, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies.

  9. Altered Resting-State Functional Connectivity in the Hand Motor Network in Glioma Patients.

    PubMed

    Mallela, Arka N; Peck, Kyung K; Petrovich-Brennan, Nicole M; Zhang, Zhigang; Lou, William; Holodny, Andrei I

    2016-08-22

    To examine the functional connectivity of the primary and supplementary motor areas (SMA) in glioma patients using resting-state functional MRI (rfMRI). To correlate rfMRI data with tumor characteristics and clinical information to characterize functional reorganization of resting-state networks (RSN) and the limitations of this method. This study was IRB approved and in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Informed consent was waived in this retrospective study. We analyzed rfMRI in 24 glioma patients and 12 age- and sex-matched controls. We compared global activation, interhemispheric connectivity, and functional connectivity in the hand motor RSNs using hemispheric voxel counts, pairwise Pearson correlation, and pairwise total spectral coherence. We explored the relationship between tumor grade, volume, location, and the patient's clinical status to functional connectivity. Global network activation and interhemispheric connectivity were reduced in gliomas (p < 0.05). Functional connectivity between the bilateral motor cortices and the SMA was reduced in gliomas (p < 0.01). High-grade gliomas had lower functional connectivity than low-grade gliomas (p < 0.05). Tumor volume and distance to ipsilateral motor cortex demonstrated no association with functional connectivity loss. Functional connectivity loss is associated with motor deficits in low-grade gliomas, but not in high-grade gliomas. Global reduction in resting-state connectivity in areas distal to tumor suggests that radiological tumor boundaries underestimate areas affected by glioma. Association between motor deficits and rfMRI suggests that rfMRI may accurately reflect functional changes in low-grade gliomas. Lack of association between rfMRI and clinical motor deficits implies decreased sensitivity of rfMRI in high-grade gliomas, possibly due to neurovascular uncoupling.

  10. Epidemiology of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Quinn T; Gittleman, Haley; Stetson, Lindsay; Virk, Selene M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary intracranial tumors. Some glioma subtypes cause significant mortality and morbidity that are disproportionate to their relatively rare incidence. A very small proportion of glioma cases can be attributed to inherited genetic disorders. Many potential risk factors for glioma have been studied to date, but few provide explanation for the number of brain tumors identified. The most significant of these factors includes increased risk due to exposure to ionizing radiation, and decreased risk with history of allergy or atopic disease. The potential effect of exposure to cellular phones has been studied extensively, but the results remain inconclusive. Recent genomic analyses, using the genome-wide association study (GWAS) design, have identified several inherited risk variants that are associated with increased glioma risk. The following chapter provides an overview of the current state of research in the epidemiology of intracranial glioma.

  11. Irradiation enhances the tumor tropism and therapeutic potential of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-secreting human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Muk; Oh, Ji Hyeon; Park, Soon A; Ryu, Chung Heon; Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Dal-Soo; Chang, Jong Wook; Oh, Wonil; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2010-12-01

    Irradiation is a standard therapy for gliomas and many other cancers. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is one of the most promising candidates for cancer gene therapy. Here, we show that tumor irradiation enhances the tumor tropism of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) and the therapeutic effect of TRAIL delivered by UCB-MSCs. The sequential treatment with irradiation followed by TRAIL-secreting UCB-MSCs (MSC-TRAIL) synergistically enhanced apoptosis in either TRAIL-sensitive or TRAIL-resistant glioma cells by upregulating the death receptor 5 and by inducing caspase activation. Migration assays showed greater MSC migration toward irradiated glioma cells and the tumor site in glioma-bearing mice compared with unirradiated tumors. Irradiated glioma cells had increased expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8), which leads to the upregulation of the IL-8 receptor on MSCs. This upregulation, which is involved in the migratory capacity of UCB-MSCs, was confirmed by siRNA inhibition and an antibody-neutralizing assay. In vivo survival experiments in orthotopic xenografted mice showed that MSC-based TRAIL gene delivery to irradiated tumors had greater therapeutic efficacy than a single treatment. These results suggest that clinically relevant tumor irradiation increases the therapeutic efficacy of MSC-TRAIL by increasing tropism of MSCs and TRAIL-induced apoptosis, which may be a more useful strategy for cancer gene therapy.

  12. A tumor-suppressive microRNA, miRNA-485-5p, inhibits glioma cell proliferation and invasion by down-regulating TPD52L2

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Wu, Shi-Wen; Wu, Wei-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most deadly primary brain tumor and has no effective treatment. Therefore, it is important to identify novel and effective therapies that impede glioma tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are helpful analytical biomarkers and may be useful targets for treating multiple human cancers. Previous reports suggest that miRNA-485-5p is dysregulated and contributes to tumorigenesis in some cancer types. Nevertheless, the biological role of miRNA-485-5p in glioma is not well understood. In this study, we demonstrated that miRNA-485-5p expression was reduced in gliomat issues and cell lines. In addition, miRNA-485-5p overexpression inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in glioma cell lines. Additionally, we identified Tumor Protein D52 Like 2 (TPD52L2) as a direct target of miRNA-485-5p. Moreover, we showed that miRNA-485-5p regulated glioma tumorigenesis by down-regulating TPD52L2 expression in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that miRNA-485-5p is a suppressor of glioma tumorigenesis and could serve as a novel candidate for therapeutic applications in glioma treatment. PMID:28804551

  13. Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase inhibitor Avasimibe affect survival and proliferation of glioma tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bemlih, Sana; Poirier, Marie-Denise; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar

    2010-06-15

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and one of its hallmarks is resistance to apoptosis. Acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is an intracellular membrane-bound enzyme that uses cholesterol and long chain fatty acyl-CoA as substrates to produce cholesteryl esters. The presence of cholesteryl esters in glioblastoma may be related to vascular and/or cell neoplastic proliferation in the tumor mass, two prerequisites for tumor cell growth. ACAT activity has been detected in glioblastoma cell homogenates. The present study is the first report on the effect of Avasimibe, a specific inhibitor of ACAT, on glioma cell lines (U87, A172 and GL261). Our results showed that Avasimibe inhibited ACAT-1 expression and cholesterol ester synthesis in glioma cell lines. Moreover, Avasimibe inhibited the growth of the cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis as a result of caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation. Also, Our findings provide proof of principle that targeting ACAT-1 with the inhibitor Avasimibe could be an efficient therapy in the treatment of glioblastoma.

  14. Tumor-suppressive function of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 in glioma cells by suppressing miR-155 expression and activating FBXW7 function

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shuanzhu; Wang, Yanzhou; Li, Jinquan; Lv, Mingliang; Niu, Haitao; Tian, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The human metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a long non-coding RNA associated with metastasis, and is a favorable prognostic factor for lung cancer. Recent studies have shown that MALAT1 plays an important role in many malignancies. However, little is known about the role of MALAT1 in glioma. In this study, we determined the expression of MALAT1 and explored its prognostic value in glioma. Further, we investigated the regulatory mechanism of MALAT1 in glioma progression. Our results showed that the expression of MALAT1 was significantly decreased in glioma specimens than in noncancerous brain tissues. In addition, MALAT1 expression was significantly correlated with tumor size, WHO grade and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), and was an independent prognostic factor for survival of glioma patients. The gain- and loss-of-function experiments revealed miR-155 down-regulation by MALAT1, resulting in reciprocal effects. Further, MALAT1 suppresses cell viability by down-regulating miR-155. FBXW7 mRNA was identified as a direct target of miR-155 in glioma. The miR-155-induced tumorigenesis is mediated through FBXW7 function. Finally, we found that MALAT1 positively regulated FBXW7 expression, which was responsible for glioma progression mediated by MALAT1-miR-155 pathway. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that MALAT1 may be a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target in glioma. Restoration of MALAT1 levels represents a novel therapeutic strategy against glioma. PMID:27904771

  15. High-Grade Glioma Radiation Therapy Target Volumes and Patterns of Failure Obtained From Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-FDOPA Positron Emission Tomography Delineations From Multiple Observers

    SciTech Connect

    Kosztyla, Robert; Chan, Elisa K.; Hsu, Fred; Wilson, Don; Ma, Roy; Cheung, Arthur; Zhang, Susan; Moiseenko, Vitali; Benard, Francois; Nichol, Alan

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy with pretreatment delineations of high-grade gliomas from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) using contours delineated by multiple observers. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas underwent computed tomography (CT), gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, and {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT. The image sets (CT, MRI, and PET/CT) were registered, and 5 observers contoured gross tumor volumes (GTVs) using MRI and PET. Consensus contours were obtained by simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE). Interobserver variability was quantified by the percentage of volume overlap. Recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy were contoured by each observer using CT or MRI. Consensus recurrence contours were obtained with STAPLE. Results: The mean interobserver volume overlap for PET GTVs (42% ± 22%) and MRI GTVs (41% ± 22%) was not significantly different (P=.67). The mean consensus volume was significantly larger for PET GTVs (58.6 ± 52.4 cm{sup 3}) than for MRI GTVs (30.8 ± 26.0 cm{sup 3}, P=.003). More than 95% of the consensus recurrence volume was within the 95% isodose surface for 11 of 12 (92%) cases with recurrent tumor imaging. Ten (91%) of these cases extended beyond the PET GTV, and 9 (82%) were contained within a 2-cm margin on the MRI GTV. One recurrence (8%) was located outside the 95% isodose surface. Conclusions: High-grade glioma contours obtained with {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET had similar interobserver agreement to volumes obtained with MRI. Although PET-based consensus target volumes were larger than MRI-based volumes, treatment planning using PET-based volumes may not have yielded better treatment outcomes, given that all but 1 recurrence extended beyond the PET GTV and most were contained by a 2-cm

  16. Metronomic cyclophosphamide schedule-dependence of innate immune cell recruitment and tumor regression in an implanted glioma model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junjie; Waxman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Metronomic cyclophosphamide (CPA) treatment activates robust innate anti-tumor immunity and induces major regression of large, implanted brain tumor xenografts when administered on an intermittent, every 6-day schedule, but not on a daily low-dose or a maximum-tolerated dose CPA schedule. Here, we used an implanted GL261 glioma model to compare five intermittent metronomic CPA schedules to elucidate the kinetics and schedule dependence of innate immune cell recruitment and tumor regression. Tumor-recruited natural killer cells induced by two every 6-day treatment cycles were significantly ablated one day after a third CPA treatment, but largely recovered several days later. Natural killer and other tumor-infiltrating innate immune cells peaked 12 days after the last CPA treatment on the every 6-day schedule, suggesting that drug-free intervals longer than 6 days may show increased efficacy. Metronomic CPA treatments spaced 9 or 12 days apart, or on an alternating 6 and 9 day schedule, induced extensive tumor regression, similar to the 6-day schedule, however, the tumor-infiltrating natural killer cell responses were not sustained, leading to rapid resumption of tumor regrowth after day 24, despite ongoing metronomic CPA treatment. Increasing the CPA dose prolonged the period of tumor regression on the every 9-day schedule, but natural killer cell activation was markedly decreased. Thus, while several intermittent metronomic CPA treatment schedules can activate innate immune cell recruitment leading to major tumor regression, sustained immune and anti-tumor responses are only achieved on the 6-day schedule. However, even with this schedule, some tumors eventually relapse, indicating a need for further improvements in immunogenic metronomic therapies. PMID:25069038

  17. Enhancement in blood-tumor barrier permeability and delivery of liposomal doxorubicin using focused ultrasound and microbubbles: evaluation during tumor progression in a rat glioma model

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Park, Juyoung; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Effective drug delivery to brain tumors is often challenging because of the heterogeneous permeability of the “blood tumor barrier” (BTB) along with other factors such as increased interstitial pressure and drug efflux pumps. Focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles can enhance the permeability of the BTB in brain tumors, as well as the blood-brain barrier in the surrounding tissue. In this study, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was used to characterize the FUS-induced permeability changes of the BTB in a rat glioma model at different times after implantation. 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted in both hemispheres in male rats. At day 9, 14, or 17 days after implantation, FUS-induced BTB disruption using 690 kHz ultrasound and Definity microbubbles was performed in one tumor in each animal. Before FUS, liposomal doxorubicin was administered at a dose of 5.67 mg/kg. This chemotherapy agent was shown previously to improve survival in animal glioma models. The transfer coefficient Ktrans describing extravasation of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA was measured via DCE-MRI before and after sonication. We found that tumor doxorubicin concentrations increased monotonically (823±600, 1817±732 and 2432±448 ng/g) in the control tumors at 9, 14 and 17 days. With FUS-induced BTB disruption, the doxorubicin concentrations were enhanced significantly (P<0.05, P<0.01, and P<0.0001 at days 9, 14, and 17, respectively) and were greater than the control tumors by a factor of two or more (2222±784, 3687±796 and 5658±821 ng/g) regardless of the stage of tumor growth. The transfer coefficient Ktrans was significantly (p<0.05) enhanced compared to control tumors only at day 9 but not at day 14 or 17. These results suggest that FUS-induced enhancements in tumor drug delivery are relatively consistent over time, at least in this tumor model. These results are encouraging for the use of large drug carriers, as they suggest that even large/late-stage tumors can

  18. Practical implications of integrated glioma classification according to the World Health Organization classification of tumors of the central nervous system 2016.

    PubMed

    Malzkorn, Bastian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-11-01

    Morphological features identifiable by light microscopy have been the basis of brain tumor diagnostics for many decades. The revised WHO classification of tumors of the central nervous system 2016 combines histological and molecular features for an integrated classification. This new approach builds upon advances in brain tumor molecular genetics and has important practical implications. Molecular genetic studies revealed distinct glioma entities with specific genetic and epigenetic profiles. Evidence has been accumulated that molecular classification more reliably discriminates glioma entities and better predicts patient outcome than histological classification. Major glioma entities can be distinguished by four molecular biomarkers included in the new WHO classification, namely isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation, codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q, codon 27 lysine-to-methionine mutation in H3 histones, and C11orf95-RELA gene fusions. Each is detectable by common techniques in routinely processed tissue specimens. Their integration into glioma classification greatly improves diagnostic accuracy but also has practical implications concerning establishment and quality control of novel techniques, increased costs and prolonged time to diagnosis. We summarize the relevant changes in the revised WHO classification of gliomas, outline the integrated approach, and discuss its practical implications and potential challenges.

  19. A ketogenic diet increases transport and oxidation of ketone bodies in RG2 and 9L gliomas without affecting tumor growth.

    PubMed

    De Feyter, Henk M; Behar, Kevin L; Rao, Jyotsna U; Madden-Hennessey, Kirby; Ip, Kevan L; Hyder, Fahmeed; Drewes, Lester R; Geschwind, Jean-François; de Graaf, Robin A; Rothman, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    The dependence of tumor cells, particularly those originating in the brain, on glucose is the target of the ketogenic diet, which creates a plasma nutrient profile similar to fasting: increased levels of ketone bodies and reduced plasma glucose concentrations. The use of ketogenic diets has been of particular interest for therapy in brain tumors, which reportedly lack the ability to oxidize ketone bodies and therefore would be starved during ketosis. Because studies assessing the tumors' ability to oxidize ketone bodies are lacking, we investigated in vivo the extent of ketone body oxidation in 2 rodent glioma models. Ketone body oxidation was studied using (13)C MR spectroscopy in combination with infusion of a (13)C-labeled ketone body (beta-hydroxybutyrate) in RG2 and 9L glioma models. The level of ketone body oxidation was compared with nontumorous cortical brain tissue. The level of (13)C-beta-hydroxybutyrate oxidation in 2 rat glioma models was similar to that of contralateral brain. In addition, when glioma-bearing animals were fed a ketogenic diet, the ketone body monocarboxylate transporter was upregulated, facilitating uptake and oxidation of ketone bodies in the gliomas. These results demonstrate that rat gliomas can oxidize ketone bodies and indicate upregulation of ketone body transport when fed a ketogenic diet. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that brain tumors are metabolically inflexible and show the need for additional research on the use of ketogenic diets as therapy targeting brain tumor metabolism. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. A dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, PI-103, cooperates with stem cell-delivered TRAIL in experimental glioma models.

    PubMed

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Anderegg, Maarten; Cameron, Cody; Shah, Khalid

    2011-01-01

    The resistance of glioma cells to a number of antitumor agents and the highly invasive nature of glioma cells that escape the primary tumor mass are key impediments to the eradication of tumors in glioma patients. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of a novel PI3-kinase/mTOR inhibitor, PI-103, in established glioma lines and primary CD133(+) glioma-initiating cells and explored the potential of combining PI-103 with stem cell-delivered secretable tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (S-TRAIL) both in vitro and in orthotopic mouse models of gliomas. We show that PI-103 inhibits proliferation and invasion, causes G(0)-G(1) arrest in cell cycle, and results in significant attenuation of orthotopic tumor growth in vivo. Establishing cocultures of neural stem cells (NSC) and glioma cells, we show that PI-103 augments the response of glioma cells to stem cell-delivered S-TRAIL. Using bimodal optical imaging, we show that when different regimens of systemic PI-103 delivery are combined with NSC-derived S-TRAIL, a significant reduction in tumor volumes is observed compared with PI-103 treatment alone. To our knowledge, this is the first study that reveals the antitumor effect of PI-103 in intracranial gliomas. Our findings offer a preclinical rationale for application of mechanism-based systemically delivered antiproliferative agents and novel stem cell-based proapoptotic therapies to improve treatment of malignant gliomas.

  1. CpG-1826 immunotherapy potentiates chemotherapeutic and anti-tumor immune responses to metronomic cyclophosphamide in a preclinical glioma model.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Marie; Waxman, David J

    2016-04-01

    Cyclophosphamide administered on an intermittent metronomic schedule induces strong immune-dependent regression in several glioma models. Here we investigate whether this immunogenic chemotherapy can be potentiated by combination with the immune stimulatory TLR9 agonist CpG-1826. CpG-1826 treatment of GL261 gliomas implanted in immune competent mice induced tumor growth delay associated with increased tumor recruitment of macrophages and B cells. Anti-tumor responses varied between individuals, with CpG-1826 inducing robust tumor growth delay in ~50% of treated mice. Both high and low CpG-1826-responsive mice showed striking improvements when CpG-1826 was combined with cyclophosphamide treatment. Tumor-associated macrophages, B cells, dendritic cells, and cytotoxic T cells were increased, T regulatory cells were not induced, and long-term GL261 glioma regression with immune memory was achieved when CpG-1826 was combined with either single cyclophosphamide dosing (90 mg/kg) or metronomic cyclophosphamide treatment (two cycles at 45 mg/kg, spaced 12-days apart). B16F10 melanoma, a low immunogenic tumor model, also showed enhanced immune and anti-tumor responses to cyclophosphamide/CpG-1826 chemoimmunotherapy, but unlike GL261 tumors, did not regress. TLR9-based immunotherapy can thus be effectively combined with immunogenic cyclophosphamide treatment to enhance immune-based anti-tumor responses, even in poorly immunogenic cancer models.

  2. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine promotes glioma invasion and delays tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Chad; Lemke, Nancy; Ge, Shugang; Golembieski, William A; Rempel, Sandra A

    2002-11-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is highly expressed in human astrocytomas, grades II-IV. We demonstrated previously that SPARC promotes invasion in vitro using the U87MG-derived clone U87T2 and U87T2-derived SPARC-transfected clones, A2b2, A2bi, and C2a4, in the spheroid confrontation assay. Additional in vitro studies demonstrated that SPARC delays growth, increases attachment, and modulates migration of tumor cells in extracellular matrix-specific and concentration-dependent manners. Therefore, we propose that SPARC functionally contributes to brain tumor invasion and delays tumor growth in vivo, and that the effects of SPARC are related to the level of SPARC secreted into the extracellular matrix. To test these hypotheses, we stereotactically injected these clones into nude rat brains (six animals were injected per clone). Animals were sacrificed on day 7 to assess growth and invasion for all clones at the same time in tumor development. To determine whether SPARC delayed but did not inhibit growth, rats were injected with U87T2 or clone A2b2, and the animals were sacrificed on days 9 (U87T2) and 20 (A2b2), when the animals demonstrated neurological deficit. Brains were removed, fixed, photographed, paraffin embedded, and sectioned. Sections were then serially stained with H&E for morphological assessment of invasion and to measure tumor volume, immunohistochemically stained to visualize SPARC, subjected to in situ hybridization with the human AluII DNA-binding probe to identify human cells, and immunohistochemically stained with MIB-1 to measure proliferation index. The results demonstrate that SPARC promotes invasion in vivo at day 7. Both the low (A2bi) and the high (A2b2) SPARC-secreting clones produced invasive tumors, invading with fingerlike projections and satellite masses into adjacent brain, as well as along the corpus collosum. The intermediate SPARC secreting clone (C2a4) primarily migrated as a bulk tumor along the corpus

  3. Stochastic modelling of slow-progressing tumors: Analysis and applications to the cell interplay and control of low grade gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Clara Rojas; Fernández Calvo, Gabriel; Ramis-Conde, Ignacio; Belmonte-Beitia, Juan

    2017-08-01

    Tumor-normal cell interplay defines the course of a neoplastic malignancy. The outcome of this dual relation is the ultimate prevailing of one of the cells and the death or retreat of the other. In this paper we study the mathematical principles that underlay one important scenario: that of slow-progressing cancers. For this, we develop, within a stochastic framework, a mathematical model to account for tumor-normal cell interaction in such a clinically relevant situation and derive a number of deterministic approximations from the stochastic model. We consider in detail the existence and uniqueness of the solutions of the deterministic model and study the stability analysis. We then focus our model to the specific case of low grade gliomas, where we introduce an optimal control problem for different objective functionals under the administration of chemotherapy. We derive the conditions for which singular and bang-bang control exist and calculate the optimal control and states.

  4. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  5. Decreased non-specific adhesivity, receptor targeted (DART) nanoparticles exhibit improved dispersion, cellular uptake, and tumor retention in invasive gliomas.

    PubMed

    Wadajkar, Aniket S; Dancy, Jimena G; Roberts, Nathan B; Connolly, Nina P; Strickland, Dudley K; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Woodworth, Graeme F; Kim, Anthony J

    2017-09-05

    The most common and deadly form of primary brain cancer, glioblastoma (GBM), is characterized by significant intratumoral heterogeneity, microvascular proliferation, immune system suppression, and brain tissue invasion. Delivering effective and sustained treatments to the invasive GBM cells intermixed with functioning neural elements is a major goal of advanced therapeutic systems for brain cancer. Previously, we investigated the nanoparticle characteristics that enable targeting of invasive GBM cells. This revealed the importance of minimizing non-specific binding within the relatively adhesive, 'sticky' microenvironment of the brain and brain tumors in particular. We refer to such nanoformulations with decreased non-specific adhesivity and receptor targeting as 'DART' therapeutics. In this work, we applied this information toward the design and characterization of biodegradable nanocarriers, and in vivo testing in orthotopic experimental gliomas. We formulated particulate nanocarriers using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PLGA-polyethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG) polymers to generate sub-100nm nanoparticles with minimal binding to extracellular brain components and strong binding to the Fn14 receptor - an upregulated, conserved component in invasive GBM. Multiple particle tracking in brain tissue slices and in vivo testing in orthotopic murine malignant glioma revealed preserved nanoparticle diffusivity and increased uptake in brain tumor cells. These combined characteristics also resulted in longer retention of the DART nanoparticles within the orthotopic tumors compared to non-targeted versions. Taken together, these results and nanoparticle design considerations offer promising new methods to optimize therapeutic nanocarriers for improving drug delivery and treatment for invasive brain tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Contrast Enhanced Maximum Intensity Projection Ultrasound Imaging for Assessing Angiogenesis in Murine Glioma and Breast Tumor Models: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Flemming; Ro, Raymond J.; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Chiou, See-Ying; Potoczek, Magdalena; Goldberg, Barry B

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively compare noninvasive, quantitative measures of vascularity obtained from 4 contrast enhanced ultrasound (US) techniques to 4 invasive immunohistochemical markers of tumor angiogenesis in a large group of murine xenografts. Glioma (C6) or breast cancer (NMU) cells were implanted in 144 rats. The contrast agent Optison (GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 0.4ml/kg). Power Doppler imaging (PDI), pulse-subtraction harmonic imaging (PSHI), flash-echo imaging (FEI), and Microflow imaging (MFI; a technique creating maximum intensity projection images over time) was performed with an Aplio scanner (Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA) and a 7.5 MHz linear array. Fractional tumor neovascularity was calculated from digital clips of contrast US, while the relative area stained was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using a factorial, repeated measures ANOVA, linear regression and z-tests. The tortuous morphology of tumor neovessels was visualized better with MFI than with the other US modes. Cell line, implantation method and contrast US imaging technique were significant parameters in the ANOVA model (p<0.05). The strongest correlation determined by linear regression in the C6 model was between PSHI and percent area stained with CD31 (r=0.37, p<0.0001). In the NMU model the strongest correlation was between FEI and COX-2 (r=0.46, p<0.0001). There were no statistically significant differences between correlations obtained with the various US methods (p>0.05). In conclusion, the largest study of contrast US of murine xenografts to date has been conducted and quantitative contrast enhanced US measures of tumor neovascularity in glioma and breast cancer xenograft models appear to provide a noninvasive marker for angiogenesis; although the best method for monitoring angiogenesis was not conclusively established. PMID:21144542

  7. Tryptophan PET in pretreatment delineation of newly-diagnosed gliomas: MRI and histopathologic correlates.

    PubMed

    Kamson, David O; Juhász, Csaba; Buth, Amy; Kupsky, William J; Barger, Geoffrey R; Chakraborty, Pulak K; Muzik, Otto; Mittal, Sandeep

    2013-03-01

    Pretreatment delineation of infiltrating glioma volume remains suboptimal with current neuroimaging techniques. Gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1-Gad) MR images often underestimate the true extent of the tumor, while T2-weighted images preferentially highlight peritumoral edema. Accumulation of α-[(11)C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT) on positron emission tomography (PET) has been shown in gliomas. To determine whether increased uptake on AMT-PET would detect tumor-infiltrated brain tissue outside the contrast-enhancing region and differentiate it from peritumoral vasogenic edema, volumes and spatial concordance of T1-Gad and T2 MRI abnormalities as well as AMT-PET abnormalities were analyzed in 28 patients with newly-diagnosed WHO grade II-IV gliomas. AMT-accumulating grade I meningiomas were used to define an AMT uptake cutoff threshold that detects the tumor but excludes peri-meningioma vasogenic edema. Tumor infiltration in AMT-accumulating areas was studied in stereotactically-resected specimens from patients with glioblastoma. In the 28 gliomas, mean AMT-PET-defined tumor volumes were greater than the contrast-enhancing volume, but smaller than T2 abnormalities. Volume of AMT-accumulating tissue outside MRI abnormalities increased with higher tumor proliferative index and was the largest in glioblastomas. Tumor infiltration was confirmed by histopathology from AMT-positive regions outside contrast-enhancing glioblastoma mass, while no or minimal tumor cells were found in AMT-negative specimens. These results demonstrate that increased AMT accumulation on PET detects glioma-infiltrated brain tissue extending beyond the contrast-enhanced tumor mass. While tryptophan uptake is low in peritumoral vasogenic edema, AMT-PET can detect tumor-infiltrated brain outside T2-lesions. Thus, AMT-PET may assist pretreatment delineation of tumor infiltration, particularly in high-grade gliomas.

  8. Tumor cells with neuronal intermediate progenitor features define a subgroup of 1p/19q co-deleted anaplastic gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bielle, Franck; Ducray, François; Mokhtari, Karima; Dehais, Caroline; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Carpentier, Catherine; Chanut, Anaïs; Polivka, Marc; Poggioli, Sylvie; Rosenberg, Shai; Giry, Marine; Marie, Yannick; Duyckaerts, Charles; Sanson, Marc; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2016-08-20

    The integrated diagnosis of anaplastic oligodendroglioma, IDH mutant and 1p/19q co-deleted, grade III (O3(id) ) is a histomolecular entity that WHO 2016 classification distinguished from other diffuse gliomas by specific molecular alterations. In contrast, its cell portrait is less well known. The present study is focused on intertumor and intratumor, cell lineage-oriented, heterogeneity in O3(id) . Based on pathological, transcriptomic and immunophenotypic studies, a novel subgroup of newly diagnosed O3(id) overexpressing neuronal intermediate progenitor (NIP) genes was identified. This NIP overexpression pattern in O3(id) is associated with: (i) morphological and immunohistochemical similarities with embryonic subventricular zone, (ii) proliferating tumor cell subpopulation with NIP features including expression of INSM1 and no expression of SOX9, (iii) mutations in critical genes involved in NIP biology and, (iv) increased tumor necrosis. Interestingly, NIP tumor cell subpopulation increases in O3(id) recurrence compared with paired newly diagnosed tumors. Our results, validated in an independent cohort, emphasize intertumor and intratumor heterogeneity in O3(id) and identified a tumor cell subpopulation exhibiting NIP characteristics that is potentially critical in oncogenesis of O3(id) . A better understanding of spatial and temporal intratumor cell heterogeneity in O3(id) will open new therapeutic avenues overcoming resistance to current antitumor treatments.

  9. In vivo imaging of hypoxia-inducible factor regulation in a subcutaneous and orthotopic GL261 glioma tumor model using a reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Bürgi, Sandra; Seuwen, Aline; Keist, Ruth; Vom Berg, Johannes; Grandjean, Joanes; Rudin, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia changes the metabolism of gliomas, leading to a more aggressive phenotype with increased resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. Hypoxia triggers a signaling cascade with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) as a key regulator. We monitored activation of the HIF pathway longitudinally in murine glioma tumors. GL261 cells, stably transfected with a luciferase reporter driven under the control of a promoter comprising the HIF target gene motive hypoxia response element, were implanted either subcutaneously or orthotopically. In vivo experiments were carried out using bioluminescence imaging. Tumors were subsequently analyzed using immunofluorescence staining for hypoxia, endothelial cells, tumor perfusion, and glucose transporter expression. Transient upregulation of the HIF signaling was observed in both subcutaneous and orthotopic gliomas. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed hypoxic regions in subcutaneous and, to a lesser extent, intracranial tumors. Subcutaneous tumors showed substantial necrosis, which might contribute to the decreased bioluminescence output observed toward the end of the experiment. Orthotopic tumors were less hypoxic than subcutaneous ones and did not develop extensive necrotic areas. Although this may be the result of the overall smaller size of orthotopic tumors, it might also reflect differences in the local environment, such as the better intrinsic vascularization of brain tissue compared to the subcutaneous tissue compartment.

  10. Comparative permeability of different glioma models to horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Groothuis, D R; Fischer, J M; Vick, N A; Bigner, D D

    1981-01-01

    Seven different experimental glioma models were studied to determine their capillary permeability to horseradish peroxidase. The models were the autochthonous ASV-viral model, intracerebral (ic) and (sc) injections of rat 9L and RG-2 tumor cell lines, the sc rat S-69C15 tumor cell line, and human glioblastoma cell lines in nude mice. The ASV-viral model showed an average HRP permeability of 63% of tumor volume, the ic RG-2 tumors were 100% permeable, and the ic 9L tumors were 41% permeable. The permeability of the marginal zone (brain-tumor interface) showed similar variation from group to group. In contrast, all of the sc tumors were 100% permeable regardless of the cell line used to create the tumors. Our results show the variability between these glioma models, and suggest that RG-2 ic gliomas and all sc gliomas should be optimal to assess the tumoricidal effect of drugs, because access to the tumor compartment from the vascular compartment is complete.

  11. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  12. Metallothinein 1E Enhances Glioma Invasion through Modulation Matrix Metalloproteinases-2 and 9 in U87MG Mouse Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hyuk; Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Li, Chun-Hao; Kim, In Young; Jang, Woo-Youl

    2016-01-01

    Malignant glioma cells invading surrounding normal brain are inoperable and resistant to radio- and chemotherapy, and eventually lead to tumor regrowth. Identification of genes related to motility is important for understanding the molecular biological behavior of invasive gliomas. According to our previous studies, Metallothionein 1E (MT1E) was identified to enhance migration of human malignant glioma cells. The purpose of this study was to confirm that MT1E could modulate glioma invasion in vivo. Firstly we established 2 cell lines; MTS23, overexpressed by MT1E complementary DNA construct and pV12 as control. The expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, -9 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 were increased in MTS23 compared with pV12. Furthermore it was confirmed that MT1E could modulate MMPs secretion and translocation of NFkB p50 and B-cell lymphoma-3 through small interfering ribonucleic acid knocked U87MG cells. Then MTS23 and pV12 were injected into intracranial region of 5 week old male nude mouse. After 4 weeks, for brain tissues of these two groups, histological analysis, and immunohistochemical stain of MMP-2, 9 and Nestin were performed. As results, the group injected with MTS23 showed irregular margin and tumor cells infiltrating the surrounding normal brain, while that of pV12 (control) had round and clear margin. And regrowth of tumor cells in MTS23 group was observed in another site apart from tumor cell inoculation. MT1E could enhance tumor proliferation and invasion of malignant glioma through regulation of activation and expression of MMPs. PMID:27847566

  13. Antroquinonol Targets FAK-Signaling Pathway Suppressed Cell Migration, Invasion, and Tumor Growth of C6 Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Tsai, May-Jywan; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine that is overexpressed in many types of tumors and plays a pivotal role in multiple cell signaling pathways involved in cell survival, migration, and proliferation. This study attempts to determine the effect of synthesized antroquinonol on the modulation of FAK signaling pathways and explore their underlying mechanisms. Antroquinonol significantly inhibits cell viability with an MTT assay in both N18 neuroblastoma and C6 glioma cell lines, which exhibits sub G1 phase cell cycle, and further induction of apoptosis is confirmed by a TUNEL assay. Antroquinonol decreases anti-apoptotic proteins, whereas it increases p53 and pro-apoptotic proteins. Alterations of cell morphology are observed after treatment by atomic force microscopy. Molecular docking results reveal that antroquinonol has an H-bond with the Arg 86 residue of FAK. The protein levels of Src, pSrc, FAK, pFAK, Rac1, and cdc42 are decreased after antroquinonol treatment. Additionally, antroquinonol also regulates the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) proteins. Furthermore, antroquinonol suppresses the C6 glioma growth in xenograft studies. Together, these results suggest that antroquinonol is a potential anti-tumorigenesis and anti-metastasis inhibitor of FAK. PMID:26517117

  14. Tissue pO{sub 2} of Orthotopic 9L and C6 Gliomas and Tumor-Specific Response to Radiotherapy and Hyperoxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Nadeem Li Hongbin; Hou, Huagang; Lariviere, Jean P.; Gladstone, David J.; Demidenko, Eugene; Swartz, Harold M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is a well-known therapeutic problem; however, a lack of methods for repeated measurements of glioma partial pressure of oxygen (pO{sub 2}) limits the ability to optimize the therapeutic approaches. We report the effects of 9.3 Gy of radiation and carbogen inhalation on orthotopic 9L and C6 gliomas and on the contralateral brain pO{sub 2} in rats using a new and potentially widely useful method, multisite in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry. Methods and Materials: Intracerebral 9L and C6 tumors were established in the left hemisphere of syngeneic rats, and electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was successfully used for repeated tissue pO{sub 2} measurements after 9.3 Gy of radiation and during carbogen breathing for 5 consecutive days. Results: Intracerebral 9L gliomas had a pO{sub 2} of 30-32 mm Hg and C6 gliomas were relatively hypoxic, with a pO{sub 2} of 12-14 mm Hg (p < 0.05). The tissue pO{sub 2} of the contralateral brain was 40-45 mm Hg in rats with either 9L or C6 gliomas. Irradiation resulted in a significant increase in pO{sub 2} of the 9L gliomas only. A significant increase in the pO{sub 2} of the 9L and C6 gliomas was observed in rats breathing carbogen, but this effect decreased during 5 days of repeated experiments in the 9L gliomas. Conclusion: These results highlight the tumor-specific effect of radiation (9.3.Gy) on tissue pO{sub 2} and the different responses to carbogen inhalation. The ability of electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry to provide direct repeated measurements of tissue pO{sub 2} could have a vital role in understanding the dynamics of hypoxia during therapy that could then be optimized by scheduling doses at times of improved tumor oxygenation.

  15. CS-26FIBULIN-3 REGULATES CANONICAL NFkB SIGNALING IN GLIOMA CELLS AND SURROUNDING STROMAL CELLS TO PROMOTE TUMOR INVASION

    PubMed Central

    Nandhu, Mohan; Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Hu, Bin; Viapiano, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Fibulin-3 (also known as EFEMP1) is an extracellular matrix protein secreted by glioma cells but absent from normal brain, which increases tumor invasion and resistance to apoptosis. Fibulin-3 activates the Notch pathway in glioma but its downstream mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that fibulin-3 activates canonical NFkB by TNFα- and Notch-dependent mechanisms, both in glioma and surrounding normal cells in the brain. Moreover, we demonstrate that activation of NFkB is necessary to mediate the pro-invasive effects of fibulin-3 in glioma. Addition of purified fibulin-3 to glioma cells activated the classical NFkB cascade (IKKa/b, IkBa, and p65/RelA), increasing the expression of NFkB-regulated genes (MMP9, MMP13, TnC, MLCK, VEGF). Conversely, fibulin-3 knockdown inhibited NFkB signaling, even in presence of TNFα, and reduced the expression of NFkB-downstream genes. Further mechanistic analysis demonstrated that fibulin-3 activated the TNFα convertase ADAM17 that releases soluble TNFα to activate NFkB signaling. At the same time, fibulin-3 downregulated the expression of the deubiquitinase CYLD, which is regulated by Notch and inhibits canonical NFkB signaling. Soluble fibulin-3 activated RelA/p65 not only in glioma cells but also in cultured astrocytes and brain microvascular endothelial cells. Moreover, quantitative immunohistochemistry demonstrated increased expression of phosphor-p65 in GFAP-positive cells surrounding fibulin-3-overexpressing tumors compared to control tumors. Inhibition of NFkB signaling, both pharmacologically and with p65-specific siRNAs, significantly reduced the pro-invasive effects of fibulin-3 in glioblastoma cells seeded in cultured brain slices. Taken together, our results suggest that NFkB is a novel major mechanism triggered by fibulin-3 in glioma cells and their microenvironment, and underlies the pro-invasive role of this ECM protein. Given the specific expression of fibulin-3 by glioma cells and its tight control of NFkB we

  16. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation.

  17. Do tumor volume, percent tumor volume predict biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yang; Li, He; Xu, Peng; Wang, Jia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore the effects of tumor volume (TV) and percent tumor volume (PTV) on biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). An electronic search of Medline, Embase and CENTRAL was performed for relevant studies. Studies evaluated the effects of TV and/or PTV on BCR after RP and provided detailed results of multivariate analyses were included. Combined hazard ratios (HRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects or fixed-effects models. A total of 15 studies with 16 datasets were included in the meta-analysis. Our study showed that both TV (HR 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00-1.07; P=0.03) and PTV (HR 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00-1.02; P=0.02) were predictors of BCR after RP. The subgroup analyses revealed that TV predicted BCR in studies from Asia, PTV was significantly correlative with BCR in studies in which PTV was measured by computer planimetry, and both TV and PTV predicted BCR in studies with small sample sizes (<1000). In conclusion, our meta-analysis demonstrated that both TV and PTV were significantly associated with BCR after RP. Therefore, TV and PTV should be considered when assessing the risk of BCR in RP specimens.

  18. Multimodal Imaging of Patients With Gliomas Confirms (11)C-MET PET as a Complementary Marker to MRI for Noninvasive Tumor Grading and Intraindividual Follow-Up After Therapy.

    PubMed

    Laukamp, Kai R; Lindemann, Florian; Weckesser, Matthias; Hesselmann, Volker; Ligges, Sandra; Wölfer, Johannes; Jeibmann, Astrid; Zinnhardt, Bastian; Viel, Thomas; Schäfers, Michael; Paulus, Werner; Stummer, Walter; Schober, Otmar; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2017-01-01

    The value of combined L-( methyl-[(11)C]) methionine positron-emitting tomography (MET-PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with regard to tumor extent, entity prediction, and therapy effects in clinical routine in patients with suspicion of a brain tumor was investigated. In n = 65 patients with histologically verified brain lesions n = 70 MET-PET and MRI (T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced [T1w-Gd] and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery or T2-weighted [FLAIR/T2w]) examinations were performed. The computer software "visualization and analysis framework volume rendering engine (Voreen)" was used for analysis of extent and intersection of tumor compartments. Binary logistic regression models were developed to differentiate between World Health Organization (WHO) tumor types/grades. Tumor sizes as defined by thresholding based on tumor-to-background ratios were significantly different as determined by MET-PET (21.6 ± 36.8 cm(3)), T1w-Gd-MRI (3.9 ± 7.8 cm(3)), and FLAIR/T2-MRI (64.8 ± 60.4 cm(3); P < .001). The MET-PET visualized tumor activity where MRI parameters were negative: PET positive tumor volume without Gd enhancement was 19.8 ± 35.0 cm(3) and without changes in FLAIR/T2 10.3 ± 25.7 cm(3). FLAIR/T2-MRI visualized greatest tumor extent with differences to MET-PET being greater in posttherapy (64.6 ± 62.7 cm(3)) than in newly diagnosed patients (20.5 ± 52.6 cm(3)). The binary logistic regression model differentiated between WHO tumor types (fibrillary astrocytoma II n = 10 from other gliomas n = 16) with an accuracy of 80.8% in patients at primary diagnosis. Combined PET and MRI improve the evaluation of tumor activity, extent, type/grade prediction, and therapy-induced changes in patients with glioma and serve information highly relevant for diagnosis and management.

  19. Brain tumor locating in 3D MR volume using symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Pavel; Bartusek, Karel

    2014-03-01

    This work deals with the automatic determination of a brain tumor location in 3D magnetic resonance volumes. The aim of this work is not the precise segmentation of the tumor and its parts but only the detection of its location. This work is the first step in the tumor segmentation process, an important topic in neuro-image processing. The algorithm expects 3D magnetic resonance volumes of brain containing a tumor. The detection is based on locating the area that breaks the left-right symmetry of the brain. This is done by multi-resolution comparing of corresponding regions in left and right hemisphere. The output of the computation is the probabilistic map of the tumor location. The created algorithm was tested on 80 volumes from publicly available BRATS databases containing 3D brain volumes afflicted by a brain tumor. These pathological structures had various sizes and shapes and were located in various parts of the brain. The locating performance of the algorithm was 85% for T1-weighted volumes, 91% for T1-weighted contrast enhanced volumes, 96% for FLAIR and T2-wieghted volumes and 95% for their combinations.

  20. Brain tumor target volume determination for radiation therapy treatment planning through the use of automated MRI segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzara, Gloria Patrika

    Radiation therapy seeks to effectively irradiate the tumor cells while minimizing the dose to adjacent normal cells. Prior research found that the low success rates for treating brain tumors would be improved with higher radiation doses to the tumor area. This is feasible only if the target volume can be precisely identified. However, the definition of tumor volume is still based on time-intensive, highly subjective manual outlining by radiation oncologists. In this study the effectiveness of two automated Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) segmentation methods, k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN) and Knowledge-Guided (KG), in determining the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) of brain tumors for use in radiation therapy was assessed. Three criteria were applied: accuracy of the contours; quality of the resulting treatment plan in terms of dose to the tumor; and a novel treatment plan evaluation technique based on post-treatment images. The kNN method was able to segment all cases while the KG method was limited to enhancing tumors and gliomas with clear enhancing edges. Various software applications were developed to create a closed smooth contour that encompassed the tumor pixels from the segmentations and to integrate these results into the treatment planning software. A novel, probabilistic measurement of accuracy was introduced to compare the agreement of the segmentation methods with the weighted average physician volume. Both computer methods under-segment the tumor volume when compared with the physicians but performed within the variability of manual contouring (28% +/- 12% for inter-operator variability). Computer segmentations were modified vertically to compensate for their under-segmentation. When comparing radiation treatment plans designed from physician-defined tumor volumes with treatment plans developed from the modified segmentation results, the reference target volume was irradiated within the same level of conformity. Analysis of the plans based on post

  1. Deletion mapping of gliomas suggests the presence of two small regions for candidate tumor-suppressor genes in a 17-cM interval on chromosome 10q

    SciTech Connect

    Albarosa, R.; Colombo, B.M.; Roz, L.

    1996-06-01

    The loss of genetic material on chromosome 10q is frequent in different tumors and particularly in malignant gliomas. We analyzed 90 of these tumors and found loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in > 90% of the informative loci in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Initial studies restricted the common LOH region to 10q24-qter. Subsequently, the study of a pediatric GBM suggested D10S221 and D10S209, respectively, as centromeric and telomeric markers of a 4-cM LOH region. It is interesting to note that, in one subset of cells from this tumor, locus D10S209 seems involved in the allelic imbalance of a larger region, with D10S214 as telomeric marker. This 17-cM region contains the D10S587-D10S216 interval of common deletion recently defined on another set of gliomas. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Comparison of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography in detection of tumor recurrence in posttreatment of glioma: A diagnostic meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Hu, Xudong; Xie, Peng; Li, Wanhu; Li, Xiaoling; Ma, Li

    2015-06-01

    It is important to distinguish between tumor recurrence and treatment effects in posttreatment patients with high-grade gliomas. Several imaging modalities have been reported in differentiating between tumor recurrence and treatment effects. However, there were no consistent conclusions between different studies. We performed a meta-analysis of 23 studies that compared the diagnostic values of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) and (11)C-methionine ((11)C-MET) PET (positron emission tomography) or PET/CT (computed tomography) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in predicting tumor recurrence of gliomas. The pooled estimated sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios, negative likelihood ratios and summary receiver operating characteristic curves of (18)F-FDG and (11)C-MET PET or PET/CT and MRS in detecting tumor recurrence were calculated. In conclusion, MRS is highly sensitive in the detection of tumor recurrence in glioma.(18)F-FDG PET or PET/CT is highly specific in recurrence diagnosis. (11)C-MET does not have noticeable advantage over (18)F-FDG. The current evidence shows no statistical difference between MRS and PET on the accuracy.

  3. Effects of the nitric oxide donor JS-K on the blood-tumor barrier and on orthotopic U87 rat gliomas assessed by MRI.

    PubMed

    Weidensteiner, Claudia; Reichardt, Wilfried; Shami, Paul J; Saavedra, Joseph E; Keefer, Larry K; Baumer, Brunhilde; Werres, Anna; Jasinski, Robert; Osterberg, Nadja; Weyerbrock, Astrid

    2013-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) released from NO donors can be cytotoxic in tumor cells and can enhance the transport of drugs into brain tumors by altering blood-tumor barrier permeability. The NO donor JS-K [O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) 1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate] releases NO upon enzymatic activation selectively in cells overexpressing glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) such as gliomas. Thus, JS-K-dependent NO effects - especially on cell viability and vascular permeability - were investigated in U87 glioma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic U87 xenograft model in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vitro experiments showed dose-dependent antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects in U87 cells. In addition, treatment of U87 cells with JS-K resulted in a dose-dependent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and intracellular accumulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) which was irreversibly inhibited by the selective inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo(4,3a)quinoxaline-1-one). Using dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) as a minimally invasive technique, we demonstrated for the first time a significant increase in the DCE-MRI read-out initial area under the concentration curve (iAUC60) indicating an acute increase in blood-tumor barrier permeability after i.v. treatment with JS-K. Repeated MR imaging of animals with intracranial U87 gliomas under treatment with JS-K (3.5 μmol/kg JS-K 3×/week) and of untreated controls on day 12 and 19 after tumor inoculation revealed no significant changes in tumor growth, edema formation or tumor perfusion. Immunohistochemical workup of the brains showed a significant antiproliferative effect of JS-K in the gliomas. Taken together, in vitro and in vivo data suggest that JS-K has antiproliferative effects in U87 gliomas and opens the blood-tumor barrier by activation of the NO/cGMP signaling pathway. This might be a novel approach to facilitate entry of therapeutic

  4. SHMT2 drives glioma cell survival in the tumor microenvironment but imposes a dependence on glycine clearance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohoon; Fiske, Brian P.; Birsoy, Kivanc; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Kami, Kenjiro; Possemato, Richard; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Pacold, Michael E.; Chen, Walter W.; Cantor, Jason R.; Shelton, Laura M.; Gui, Dan Y.; Kwon, Manjae; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Ligon, Keith L.; Kang, Seong Woo; Snuderl, Matija; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer cells adapt their metabolic processes to support rapid proliferation, but less is known about how cancer cells alter metabolism to promote cell survival in a poorly vascularized tumor microenvironment1–3. Here, we identify a key role for serine and glycine metabolism in the survival of brain cancer cells within the ischemic zones of gliomas. In human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT2) and glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) are highly expressed in the pseudopalisading cells that surround necrotic foci. We find that SHMT2 activity limits that of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) and reduces oxygen consumption, eliciting a metabolic state that confers a profound survival advantage to cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions. GLDC inhibition impairs cells with high SHMT2 levels as the excess glycine not metabolized by GLDC can be converted to the toxic molecules aminoacetone and methylglyoxal. Thus, SHMT2 is required for cancer cells to adapt to the tumor environment, but also renders these cells sensitive to glycine cleavage system inhibition. PMID:25855294

  5. Enhancement in blood-tumor barrier permeability and delivery of liposomal doxorubicin using focused ultrasound and microbubbles: evaluation during tumor progression in a rat glioma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Muna; Park, Juyoung; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Effective drug delivery to brain tumors is often challenging because of the heterogeneous permeability of the ‘blood tumor barrier’ (BTB) along with other factors such as increased interstitial pressure and drug efflux pumps. Focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles can enhance the permeability of the BTB in brain tumors, as well as the blood-brain barrier in the surrounding tissue. In this study, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to characterize the FUS-induced permeability changes of the BTB in a rat glioma model at different times after implantation. 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted in both hemispheres in male rats. At day 9, 14, or 17 days after implantation, FUS-induced BTB disruption using 690 kHz ultrasound and definity microbubbles was performed in one tumor in each animal. Before FUS, liposomal doxorubicin was administered at a dose of 5.67 mg kg-1. This chemotherapy agent was previously shown to improve survival in animal glioma models. The transfer coefficient Ktrans describing extravasation of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA was measured via DCE-MRI before and after sonication. We found that tumor doxorubicin concentrations increased monotonically (823  ±  600, 1817  ±  732 and 2432  ±  448 ng g-1) in the control tumors at 9, 14 and 17 d. With FUS-induced BTB disruption, the doxorubicin concentrations were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.0001 at days 9, 14, and 17, respectively) and were greater than the control tumors by a factor of two or more (2222  ±  784, 3687  ±  796 and 5658  ±  821 ng g-1) regardless of the stage of tumor growth. The transfer coefficient Ktrans was significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced compared to control tumors only at day 9 but not at day 14 or 17. These results suggest that FUS-induced enhancements in tumor drug delivery are relatively consistent over time, at least in this tumor model. These results are

  6. Anatomical location differences between mutated and wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 in low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinhua; Shi, Zhifeng; Ji, Chunhong; Lian, Yuxi; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2017-01-06

    Anatomical location of gliomas has been considered as a factor implicating the contributions of a specific precursor cells during the tumor growth. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is a pathognomonic biomarker with a significant impact on the development of gliomas and remarkable prognostic effect. The correlation between anatomical location of tumor and IDH1 states for low-grade gliomas was analyzed quantitatively in this study. Ninety-two patients diagnosed of low-grade glioma pathologically were recruited in this study, including 65 patients with IDH1-mutated glioma and 27 patients with wide-type IDH1. A convolutional neural network was designed to segment the tumor from three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging images. Voxel-based lesion symptom mapping was then employed to study the tumor location distribution differences between gliomas with mutated and wild-type IDH1. In order to characterize the location differences quantitatively, the Automated Anatomical Labeling Atlas was used to partition the standard brain atlas into 116 anatomical volumes of interests (AVOIs). The percentages of tumors with different IDH1 states in 116 AVOIs were calculated and compared. Support vector machine and AdaBoost algorithms were used to estimate the IDH1 status based on the 116 location features of each patient. Experimental results proved that the quantitative tumor location measurement could be a very important group of imaging features in biomarker estimation based on radiomics analysis of glioma.

  7. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wenliang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Bin; Chen, Aanjing; He, Ying; Wang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-03-15

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic mimicry. With suspension microarray technology and in vitro tube formation assays, we identified that astrocytes relied on TGF-β1 to enhance vasculogenic mimicry. We also found that vasculogenic mimicry was inhibited by galunisertib, a promising TGF-β1 inhibitor currently being studied in an ongoing trial in glioma patients. The inhibition was partially attributed to a decrease in autophagy after galunisertib treatment. Moreover, we observed a decrease in VE-cadherin and smooth muscle actin-α expression, as well as down-regulation of Akt and Flk phosphorylation in galunisertib-treated glioma cells. By comparing tumor weight and volume in a xenograft model, we acquired promising results to support our theory. This study expands our understanding of the role of astrocytes in gliomas and demonstrates that galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry induced by astrocytes.

  8. Visualization of microvascular proliferation as a tumor infiltration structure in rat glioma specimens using the diffraction-enhanced imaging in-plane CT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Seung-Jun; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ando, Masami; Choi, Gi-Hwan; Kim, Hong-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hong; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2012-03-01

    In order to study potent microenvironments of malignant gliomas with a high- resolution x-ray imaging technique, an injection orthotopic glioma model was made using the Sprague-Dawley rat. Total brain tissue, taken out as an ex vivo model, was examined with diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) computed tomography (CT) acquired with a 35 keV monochromatic x-ray. In the convolution-reconstructed 2D/3D images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 × 12.5 × 25 µm, distinction among necrosis, typical ring-shaped viable tumors, edemas and healthy tissues was clearly observed near the frontal lobe in front of the rat's caudate nucleus. Multiple microvascular proliferations (MVPs) were observed surrounding peritumoral edemas as a tumor infiltration structure. Typical dimensions of tubular MVPs were 130 (diameter) ×250 (length) µm with a partial sprout structure revealed in the 3D reconstructed image. Hyperplasia of cells around vessel walls was revealed with tumor cell infiltration along the perivascular space in microscopic observations of mild MVP during histological analysis. In conclusion, DEI-CT is capable of imaging potent tumor-infiltrating MVP structures surrounding high-grade gliomas.

  9. TERT PROMOTER MUTATIONS OCCUR FREQUENTLY IN GLIOMAS AND A SUBSET OF TUMORS DERIVED FROM CELLS WITH LOW RATES OF SELF-RENEWAL

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hai; Killela, P.J.; Reitman, Z.J.; Jiao, Y.; Bettegowda, C.; Agrawal, N.; Diaz, L.A.; Friedman, A.H.; Friedman, H.; Gallia, G.L.; Giovanella, B.C.; Grollman, A.P.; He, T.C.; He, Y.; Hruban, R.H.; Jallo, G.I.; Mandahl, N.; Meeker, A.K.; Mertens, F.; Netto, G.J.; Rasheed, B.A.; Riggins, G.J.; Rosenquist, T.A.; Schiffman, M.; Shih, IeM; Theodorescu, D.; Torbenson, M.S.; Velculescu, V.E.; Wang, T.L.; Wentzensen, N.; Wood, L.D.; Zhang, M.; Healy, P.; Yang, R.; Diplas, B.; Wang, Z.H.; Greer, P.; Zhu, H.S.; Wang, C.; Carpenter, A.; Herndon, J.E.; McLendon, R.E.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B.; Papadopoulos, N.; Bigner, D.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malignant cells must maintain their telomeres, but genetic mechanisms responsible for telomere maintenance in tumors have only recently been discovered. In particular, mutations of the telomere binding proteins alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) or death-domain associated protein (DAXX) have been shown to underlie a telomere maintenance mechanism not involving telomerase (alternative lengthening of telomeres), and point mutations in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene increase telomerase expression and have been shown to occur in melanomas. METHODS: To further define the tumor types in which TERT plays a role, we surveyed 1,230 tumors of 60 different types. We also analyzed the relationship between median overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH1/2 and TERT promoter mutations in a panel of 473 adult gliomas with the hypothesis that genetic signatures capable of distinguishing among several types of gliomas could be established providing clinically relevant information that can serve as an adjunct to histopathological diagnosis. RESULTS: We found that tumors could be divided into types with low and high frequencies of TERT promoter mutations. The nine TERT-high tumor types almost always originated in tissues with relatively low rates of self renewal, including melanomas, liposarcomas, hepatocellular carcinomas, urothelial carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas of the tongue, medulloblastomas, and subtypes of gliomas. TERT and ATRX mutations were mutually exclusive, suggesting that these two genetic mechanisms confer equivalent selective growth advantages. We found that mutations in the TERT promoter occurred in 74.2% of glioblastomas (GBM), but occurred in a minority of Grade II-III astrocytomas (18.2%). In contrast, IDH1/2 mutations were observed in 78.4% of Grade II-III astrocytomas, but were uncommon in primary GBM. In oligodendrogliomas, TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations co-occurred in 79% of

  10. Application of histogram analysis for the evaluation of vascular permeability in glioma by the K2 parameter obtained with the dynamic susceptibility contrast method: Comparisons with Ktrans obtained with the dynamic contrast enhance method and cerebral blood volume.

    PubMed

    Taoka, Toshiaki; Kawai, Hisashi; Nakane, Toshiki; Hori, Saeka; Ochi, Tomoko; Miyasaka, Toshiteru; Sakamoto, Masahiko; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Naganawa, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    The "K2" value is a factor that represents the vascular permeability of tumors and can be calculated from datasets obtained with the dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) method. The purpose of the current study was to correlate K2 with Ktrans, which is a well-established permeability parameter obtained with the dynamic contrast enhance (DCE) method, and determine the usefulness of K2 for glioma grading with histogram analysis. The subjects were 22 glioma patients (Grade II: 5, III: 6, IV: 11) who underwent DSC studies, including eight patients in which both DSC and DCE studies were performed on separate days within 10days. We performed histogram analysis of regions of interest of the tumors and acquired 20th percentile values for leakage-corrected cerebral blood volume (rCBV20%ile), K2 (K220%ile), and for patients who underwent a DCE study, Ktrans (Ktrans20%ile). We evaluated the correlation between K220%ile and Ktrans20%ile and the statistical difference between rCBV20%ile and K220%ile. We found a statistically significant correlation between K220%ile and Ktrans20%ile (r=0.717, p<0.05). rCBV20%ile showed a significant difference between Grades II and III and between Grades II and IV, whereas K220%ile showed a statistically significant (p<0.05) difference between Grades II and IV and between Grades III and IV. The K2 value calculated from the DSC dataset, which can be obtained with a short acquisition time, showed a correlation with Ktrans obtained with the DCE method and may be useful for glioma grading when analyzed with histogram analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.; and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  12. Unsupervised measurement of brain tumor volume on MR images.

    PubMed

    Velthuizen, R P; Clarke, L P; Phuphanich, S; Hall, L O; Bensaid, A M; Arrington, J A; Greenberg, H M; Silbiger, M L

    1995-01-01

    We examined unsupervised methods of segmentation of MR images of the brain for measuring tumor volume in response to treatment. Two clustering methods were used: fuzzy c-means and a nonfuzzy clustering algorithm. Results were compared with volume segmentations by two supervised methods, k-nearest neighbors and region growing, and all results were compared with manual labelings. Results of individual segmentations are presented as well as comparisons on the application of the different methods with 10 data sets of patients with brain tumors. Unsupervised segmentation is preferred for measuring tumor volumes in response to treatment, as it eliminates operator dependency and may be adequate for delineation of the target volume in radiation therapy. Some obstacles need to be overcome, in particular regarding the detection of anatomically relevant tissue classes. This study shows that these improvements are possible.

  13. Detecting response of rat C6 glioma tumors to radiotherapy using hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate and 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Day, Sam E.; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Cherkuri, Murali Krishna; Mitchell, James B.; Lizak, Martin J.; Morris, H. Douglas; Koretsky, Alan P.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    13C chemical shift images acquired following intravenous injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate into rats with implanted C6 gliomas showed significant labeling of lactate within the tumors but not in surrounding brain tissue. Signal from pyruvate was observed in blood vessels above the brain and from other major vessels elsewhere in the rat head. Pyruvate was largely undetectable within the tumor or surrounding normal brain tissue. The ratio of hyperpolarized 13C label in the injected pyruvate and endogenous lactate was decreased from 0.25 +/− 0.13 to 0.13 +/− 0.08, (a reduction of 48%) at 96 h following whole brain irradiation with 15 Gy. These data suggest that hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate may be useful in detecting treatment response in gliomas, where the use of 18FDG-PET is limited by the high background signals from normal brain tissue. PMID:21264939

  14. Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor (PEDF) Expression Induced by EGFRvIII Promotes Self-renewal and Tumor Progression of Glioma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Hong, Jun Hee; Kim, Youn-Jae; Jin, Xiong; Kang, Sangjo; Jung, Ji-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Yub; Yun, Hyeongsun; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Minkyung; Chung, Junho; Kim, Hyunggee; Nakano, Ichiro; Gwak, Ho-Shin; Yoo, Heon; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Jong Heon; Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Jeongwu; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Myung-Jin; Park, Jong Bae

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been associated with glioma stemness, but the direct molecular mechanism linking the two is largely unknown. Here, we show that EGFRvIII induces the expression and secretion of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), thereby promoting self-renewal and tumor progression of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Mechanistically, PEDF sustained GSC self-renewal by Notch1 cleavage, and the generated intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD) induced the expression of Sox2 through interaction with its promoter region. Furthermore, a subpopulation with high levels of PEDF was capable of infiltration along corpus callosum. Inhibition of PEDF diminished GSC self-renewal and increased survival of orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Together, these data indicate the novel role of PEDF as a key regulator of GSC and suggest clinical implications. PMID:25992628

  15. Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor (PEDF) Expression Induced by EGFRvIII Promotes Self-renewal and Tumor Progression of Glioma Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jinlong; Park, Gunwoo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Hong, Jun Hee; Kim, Youn-Jae; Jin, Xiong; Kang, Sangjo; Jung, Ji-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Yub; Yun, Hyeongsun; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Minkyung; Chung, Junho; Kim, Hyunggee; Nakano, Ichiro; Gwak, Ho-Shin; Yoo, Heon; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Jong Heon; Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Jeongwu; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Myung-Jin; Park, Jong Bae

    2015-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been associated with glioma stemness, but the direct molecular mechanism linking the two is largely unknown. Here, we show that EGFRvIII induces the expression and secretion of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), thereby promoting self-renewal and tumor progression of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Mechanistically, PEDF sustained GSC self-renewal by Notch1 cleavage, and the generated intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD) induced the expression of Sox2 through interaction with its promoter region. Furthermore, a subpopulation with high levels of PEDF was capable of infiltration along corpus callosum. Inhibition of PEDF diminished GSC self-renewal and increased survival of orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Together, these data indicate the novel role of PEDF as a key regulator of GSC and suggest clinical implications.

  16. A new 111In-bleomycin complex for tumor imaging: preparation, stability, and distribution in glioma-bearing mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, D.Y.; Hoch, H.; Johnston, G.S.; Tsou, K.C.; Jones, A.E.; Farkas, R.J.; Miller, E.E.

    1984-03-01

    A new 111In-bleomycin complex (111In-BLMC) is here reported. Its radiochemical purity was 99% by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) (Rf 0.65) and in 5% agarose gel electrophoresis in 0.02 M NaHCO3 it migrated toward the anode. Autoradiographs of TLC and gel electrophoresis plates showed no change on storage for 3 weeks. Urine and plasma from untreated or glioma-bearing mice after injection of 111In-BLMC were analyzed by TLC and gel electrophoresis. Results indicated stability in vivo, nonbinding to transferrin, affinity to viable tumor, and excretion faster than 111In-BLM-B2, 111In-BLM, or 57Co-BLM. Tissue distributions 24 hr after injection of radiopharmaceutical showed activity ratios of tumor to blood, muscle, and brain of 13.1, 12.4, and 81.6, respectively, which were significantly higher than those for previously prepared 111In-BLM-B2 or 111In-BLM (except for brain, 0.05 less than P less than 0.1). The new 111In-BLM complex may be useful in clinical imaging and for combining radionuclide radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  17. Genetically engineered rat gliomas: PDGF-driven tumor initiation and progression in tv-a transgenic rats recreate key features of human brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Nina P; Stokum, Jesse A; Schneider, Craig S; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Xu, Su; Galisteo, Rebeca; Castellani, Rudolph J; Kim, Anthony J; Simard, J Marc; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Holland, Eric C; Woodworth, Graeme F

    2017-01-01

    Previously rodent preclinical research in gliomas frequently involved implantation of cell lines such as C6 and 9L into the rat brain. More recently, mouse models have taken over, the genetic manipulability of the mouse allowing the creation of genetically accurate models outweighed the disadvantage of its smaller brain size that limited time allowed for tumor progression. Here we illustrate a method that allows glioma formation in the rat using the replication competent avian-like sarcoma (RCAS) virus / tumor virus receptor-A (tv-a) transgenic system of post-natal cell type-specific gene transfer. The RCAS/tv-a model has emerged as a particularly versatile and accurate modeling technology by enabling spatial, temporal, and cell type-specific control of individual gene transformations and providing de novo formed glial tumors with distinct molecular subtypes mirroring human GBM. Nestin promoter-driven tv-a (Ntv-a) transgenic Sprague-Dawley rat founder lines were created and RCAS PDGFA and p53 shRNA constructs were used to initiate intracranial brain tumor formation. Tumor formation and progression were confirmed and visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy. The tumors were analyzed using histopathological and immunofluorescent techniques. All experimental animals developed large, heterogeneous brain tumors that closely resembled human GBM. Median survival was 92 days from tumor initiation and 62 days from the first point of tumor visualization on MRI. Each tumor-bearing animal showed time dependent evidence of malignant progression to high-grade glioma by MRI and neurological examination. Post-mortem tumor analysis demonstrated the presence of several key characteristics of human GBM, including high levels of tumor cell proliferation, pseudopalisading necrosis, microvascular proliferation, invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, peri-tumoral reactive astrogliosis, lymphocyte infiltration, presence of numerous tumor

  18. Genetically engineered rat gliomas: PDGF-driven tumor initiation and progression in tv-a transgenic rats recreate key features of human brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stokum, Jesse A.; Schneider, Craig S.; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Xu, Su; Galisteo, Rebeca; Castellani, Rudolph J.; Kim, Anthony J.; Simard, J. Marc; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Holland, Eric C.; Woodworth, Graeme F.

    2017-01-01

    Previously rodent preclinical research in gliomas frequently involved implantation of cell lines such as C6 and 9L into the rat brain. More recently, mouse models have taken over, the genetic manipulability of the mouse allowing the creation of genetically accurate models outweighed the disadvantage of its smaller brain size that limited time allowed for tumor progression. Here we illustrate a method that allows glioma formation in the rat using the replication competent avian-like sarcoma (RCAS) virus / tumor virus receptor-A (tv-a) transgenic system of post-natal cell type-specific gene transfer. The RCAS/tv-a model has emerged as a particularly versatile and accurate modeling technology by enabling spatial, temporal, and cell type-specific control of individual gene transformations and providing de novo formed glial tumors with distinct molecular subtypes mirroring human GBM. Nestin promoter-driven tv-a (Ntv-a) transgenic Sprague-Dawley rat founder lines were created and RCAS PDGFA and p53 shRNA constructs were used to initiate intracranial brain tumor formation. Tumor formation and progression were confirmed and visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy. The tumors were analyzed using histopathological and immunofluorescent techniques. All experimental animals developed large, heterogeneous brain tumors that closely resembled human GBM. Median survival was 92 days from tumor initiation and 62 days from the first point of tumor visualization on MRI. Each tumor-bearing animal showed time dependent evidence of malignant progression to high-grade glioma by MRI and neurological examination. Post-mortem tumor analysis demonstrated the presence of several key characteristics of human GBM, including high levels of tumor cell proliferation, pseudopalisading necrosis, microvascular proliferation, invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, peri-tumoral reactive astrogliosis, lymphocyte infiltration, presence of numerous tumor

  19. The tumoral A genotype of the MGMT rs34180180 single-nucleotide polymorphism in aggressive gliomas is associated with shorter patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Anne; Chautard, Emmanuel; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Pereira, Bruno; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Court, Franck; Biau, Julian; Pinto, Afonso Almeida; Kémény, Jean-Louis; Khalil, Toufic; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie; Verrelle, Pierre; Costa, Bruno Marques; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Grade III and IV gliomas harboring wild-type IDH1/2 are the most aggressive. In addition to surgery and radiotherapy, concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) significantly improves overall survival (OS). The methylation status of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is predictive of TMZ response and a prognostic marker of cancer outcome. However, the promoter regions the methylation of which correlates best with survival in aggressive glioma and whether the promoter methylation status predictive value could be refined or improved by other MGMT-associated molecular markers are not precisely known. In a cohort of 87 malignant gliomas treated with radiotherapy and TMZ-based chemotherapy, we retrospectively determined the MGMT promoter methylation status, genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region and quantified MGMT mRNA expression level. Each of these variables was correlated with each other and with the patients' OS. We found that methylation of the CpG sites within MGMT exon 1 best correlated with OS and MGMT expression levels, and confirmed MGMT methylation as a stronger independent prognostic factor compared to MGMT transcription levels. Our main finding is that the presence of only the A allele at the rs34180180 SNP in the tumor was significantly associated with shorter OS, independently of the MGMT methylation status. In conclusion, in the clinic, rs34180180 SNP genotyping could improve the prognostic value of the MGMT promoter methylation assay in patients with aggressive glioma treated with TMZ.

  20. Living T9 glioma cells expressing membrane macrophage colony-stimulating factor produce immediate tumor destruction by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages via a "paraptosis"-induced pathway that promotes systemic immunity against intracranial T9 gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yijun; Douglass, Thomas; Jeffes, Edward W B; Xu, Qingcheng; Williams, Christopher C; Arpajirakul, Neary; Delgado, Christina; Kleinman, Michael; Sanchez, Ramon; Dan, Qinghong; Kim, Ronald C; Wepsic, H Terry; Jadus, Martin R

    2002-08-15

    Cloned T9-C2 glioma cells transfected with membrane macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mM-CSF) never formed subcutaneous tumors when implanted into Fischer rats, whereas control T9 cells did. The T9-C2 cells were completely killed within 1 day through a mechanism that resembled paraptosis. Vacuolization of the T9-C2 cell's mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum started within 4 hours after implantation. By 24 hours, the dead tumor cells were swollen and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive. Bcl2-transduced T9-C2 cells failed to form tumors in rats. Both T9 and T9-C2 cells produced cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant that recruited the granulocytes into the tumor injection sites, where they interacted with the tumor cells. Freshly isolated macrophages killed the T9-C2 cells in vitro by a mechanism independent of phagocytosis. Nude athymic rats treated with antiasialo GM1 antibody formed T9-C2 tumors, whereas rats treated with a natural killer cell (NK)-specific antibody failed to form tumors. When treated with antipolymorphonuclear leukocyte (anti-PMN) and antimacrophage antibodies, 80% of nude rats formed tumors, whereas only 40% of the rats developed a tumor when a single antibody was used. This suggests that both PMNs and macrophages are involved in the killing of T9-C2 tumor cells. Immunocompetent rats that rejected the living T9-C2 cells were immune to the intracranial rechallenge with T9 cells. No vaccinating effect occurred if the T9-C2 cells were freeze-thawed, x-irradiated, or treated with mitomycin-C prior to injection. Optimal tumor immunization using mM-CSF-transduced T9 cells requires viable tumor cells. In this study optimal tumor immunization occurred when a strong inflammatory response at the injection of the tumor cells was induced.

  1. Increasing of Blood-Brain Tumor Barrier Permeability through Transcellular and Paracellular Pathways by Microbubble-Enhanced Diagnostic Ultrasound in a C6 Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinlong; Liu, Heng; Du, Xuesong; Guo, Yu; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Shunan; Fang, Jingqin; Cao, Peng; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2017-01-01

    Most of the anticancer agents cannot be efficiently delivered into the brain tumor because of the existence of blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). The objective of this study was to explore the effect of microbubble-enhanced diagnostic ultrasound (MEUS) on the BTB permeability and the possible mechanism. Glioma-bearing rats were randomized into three groups as follows: the microbubble-enhanced continued diagnostic ultrasound (MECUS) group; the microbubble-enhanced intermittent diagnostic ultrasound (MEIUS) group and the control group. The gliomas were insonicated through the skull with a diagnostic ultrasound and injected with microbubbles through the tail veins. Evans Blue (EB) and dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI were used to test changes in the BTB permeability. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to observe the deposition of the EB in the tumor tissues. The distribution and expression of junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) and calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa channels) were detected by a Western blot, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemical staining. In the MEUS groups, the EB extravasation (11.0 ± 2.2 μg/g in MECUS group and 17.9 ± 2.3 μg/g in MEIUS group) exhibited a significant increase compared with the control group (5.3 ± 0.9 μg/g). The MEIUS group had more EB extravasation than the MECUS group. The Ktrans value of the dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI in the MEUS groups was higher than that of the control group and correlated strongly with the EB extravasation in the tumor (R2 = 0.97). This showed that the Ktrans value might be a non-invasive method to evaluate the BTB permeability in rat glioma after microbubble-enhanced ultrasound treatment.Western blot, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining revealed that MEUS increased the KCa channels expression and reduced JAM-A expression in glioma. This change was more obvious in the MEIUS group than in the MECUS group. The results demonstrated that MEUS effectively increased the BTB permeability in

  2. Prognostic factors for deep situated malignant gliomas treated with linac radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Yan; Yang, Guo-Kuan; Li, Shu-Ying; Baol, Xiu-Feng; Wu, Cheng-Yuan

    2004-06-01

    To study the function of radiosurgery on malignant glioma by analyzing prognostic factors affecting malignant gliomas treated with linac radiosurgery. Fifty-eight patients with deep situated malignant gliomas, aged 7 to 70 years, 28 anaplastic astrocytomas and 30 glioblastomas multiforme were analyzed. The median volume of tumor was 10.67 cm3, and median prescription dose for linac radiosurgery was 20 Gy. Results were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curve and Cox regression. In follow-up 44.8 percent tumors (26 patients) decreased in size. Median tumor local control interval was 10 months, 15 months for anaplastic astrocytomas, and 9 months for glioblastoma multiforme. Tumor local control probability was 37.9 percent for 1 year and 10.3 percent for 2 years. Median survival was 22.5 months for anaplastic astrocytoma, 13 months for glioblastoma multiforme, and 15 months for all patients. The survival probability was 79.3 percent at 1 year and 20.6 percent at 2 years. Isocenter numbers and tumor volume were the prognostic factors for tumor control, but conformity index was the prognostic factor for survival by Cox regression analysis. Considering pathology, only isocenter number and target volume significantly affected tumor control interval. Complications appeared in 44.8 percent patients and the median interval of complication onset was 8 months. Symptomatic cerebral edema was observed in 31.0 percent patients. Linac radiosurgery can effectively improve tumor local control and prolong survival for deep situated malignant gliomas.

  3. Immunotherapeutic Approaches for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hideho; Kohanbash, Gary; Zhu, Xinmei; Kastenhuber, Edward R.; Hoji, Aki; Ueda, Ryo; Fujita, Mitsugu

    2009-01-01

    The development of effective immunotherapy strategies for glioma requires adequate understanding of the unique immunological microenvironment in the central nervous system (CNS) and CNS tumors. Although the CNS is often considered to be an immunologically privileged site and poses unique challenges for the delivery of effector cells and molecules, recent advances in technology and discoveries in CNS immunology suggest novel mechanisms that may significantly improve the efficacy of immunotherapy against gliomas. In this review, we first summarize recent advances in the CNS and CNS tumor immunology. We address factors that may promote immune escape of gliomas. We also review advances in passive and active immunotherapy strategies for glioma, with an emphasis on lessons learned from recent early-phase clinical trials. We also discuss novel immunotherapy strategies that have been recently tested in non-CNS tumors and show great potential for application to gliomas. Finally, we discuss how each of these promising strategies can be combined to achieve clinical benefit for patients with gliomas. PMID:19348609

  4. CD8+ T cell independent tumor regression induced by Fc-OX40L and therapeutic vaccination in a mouse model of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Katherine A.; Erickson, Jami R.; Johnson, Charles S.; Seiler, Charles E.; Bedi, Jessica; Hu, Peisheng; Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Epstein, Alan L.; Ohlfest, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing number of pre-clinical and clinical trials focused on immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas, the prognosis for this disease remains grim. Although some promising advances have been made, the immune response stimulated as a result of immunotherapeutic protocols has been inefficient at complete tumor elimination, primarily due to our lack of understanding of the necessary effector functions of the immune system. We previously demonstrated that a tumor lysate vaccine/Fc-OX40L therapy is capable of inducing enhanced survival and tumor elimination in the GL261 mouse glioma model. The following experiments were performed to determine the mechanism(s) of action of this therapy that elicits a potent anti-tumor immune response. The evidence subsequently outlined indicates a CD8+ T cell independent and CD4+ T cell, NK cell, and B cell dependent means of prolonged survival. CD8+ T cell independent tumor clearance is surprising considering the current focus of many cancer immunotherapy protocols. These results provide evidence for CD8+ T cell independent means of anti-tumor response and should lead to additional examination of the potential manipulation of this mechanism for future treatment strategies. PMID:24293627

  5. MiR-15a/16 deficiency enhances anti-tumor immunity of glioma-infiltrating CD8+ T cells through targeting mTOR.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiao; Liu, Ronghua; Deng, Yuting; Qian, Jiawen; Lu, Zhou; Wang, Yuedi; Zhang, Dan; Luo, Feifei; Chu, Yiwei

    2017-11-15

    MiR-15a/16, a miRNA cluster located at chromosome 13q14, has been reported to act as an immune regulator in inflammatory disorders besides its aberrant expression in cancers. However, little is known about its regulation in tumor-infiltrating immune cells. In our study, using an orthotropic GL261 mouse glioma model, we found that miR-15a/16 deficiency in host inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mice survival, which might be associated with the accumulation of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. More importantly, tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells without miR-15a/16 showed lower expression of PD-1, Tim-3 and LAG-3, and stronger secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α than WT tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. Also, our in vitro experiments further confirmed that miR-15a/16(-/-) CD8+ T displayed higher active phenotypes, more cytokines secretion and faster expansion, compared to WT CD8+ T cells. Mechanismly, mTOR was identified as a target gene of miR-15a/16 to negatively regulate the activation of CD8+ T cells. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-15a/16 deficiency resists the exhaustion and maintains the activation of glioma-infiltrating CD8+ T cells to alleviate glioma progression via targeting mTOR. Our findings provide evidence for the potential immunotherapy through targeting miR-15a/16 in tumor-infiltrating immune cells. © 2017 UICC.

  6. Autophagy and the functional roles of Atg5 and beclin-1 in the anti-tumor effects of 3beta androstene 17alpha diol neuro-steroid on malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Graf, Martin R; Jia, Wentao; Johnson, Ross S; Dent, Paul; Mitchell, Clint; Loria, Roger M

    2009-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity of the neuro-steroid, 3beta androstene 17alpha diol (17alpha-AED) on malignant glioma cells is mediated by the induction of autophagy. 17alpha-AED can inhibit the proliferation an induce cell death of multiple, unrelated gliomas with an IC(50) between 8 and 25muM. 17alpha-AED treatment induced the formation of autophagosomes and acidic vesicular organelles in human malignant gliomas which was blocked by bafilomycin A1 or 3-methyladenine. Cleavage of microtubule-associated protein-light chain 3 (LC3), an essential step in autophagosome formation, was detected in human malignant glioma cells exposed to 17alpha-AED. In 17alpha-AED treated T98G glioma cells there was an increase in the autophagy related proteins Atg5 and beclin-1. Silencing of ATG5 or beclin-1 with small interfering RNA significantly reduced the incidence of autophagy in 17alpha-AED treated malignant gliomas and attenuated the cytotoxic effects of the neuro-steroid indicating that the induction of autophagy mediates the anti-glioma activity of 17alpha-AED rather than serving as a cyto-protective response. These results demonstrate that 17alpha-AED possesses significant anti-glioma activity when used at pharmacologically relevant concentrations in vitro and the cytotoxic effects are resultant from the induction of autophagy.

  7. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Parameters and Tumor Cellularity in a Rat Model of Cerebral Glioma at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Madhava P.; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N.; Keenan, Kelly A.; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Panda, Swayamprava; Brown, Stephen L.; Cabral, Glauber; Fenstermacher, Joseph D.; Ewing, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that a non-invasive dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) derived interstitial volume fraction (ve) and/or distribution volume (VD) were correlated with tumor cellularity in cerebral tumor. Methods T1-weighted DCE-MRI studies were performed in 18 athymic rats implanted with U251 xenografts. After DCE-MRI, sectioned brain tissues were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin for cell counting. Using a Standard Model (SM) analysis and Logan graphical plot, DCE-MRI image sets during and after the injection of a gadolinium contrast agent were used to estimate the parameters plasma volume (vp), forward transfer constant (Ktrans), ve, and VD. Results Mean parameter values in regions where the SM was selected as the best model were: (mean ± S.D.): vp = (0.81±0.40)%, Ktrans = (2.09±0.65) ×10−2 min−1, ve = (6.65±1.86)%, and VD = (7.21±1.98)%. The Logan-estimated VD was strongly correlated with the SM’s vp+ve (r = 0.91, p < 0.001). The parameters, ve and/or VD, were significantly correlated with tumor cellularity (r ≥ −0.75, p < 0.001 for both). Conclusion These data suggest that tumor cellularity can be estimated non-invasively by DCE-MRI, thus supporting its utility in assessing tumor pathophysiology. PMID:23878070

  8. Photochemical internalization (PCI) enhanced nonviral transfection of tumor suppressor and pro-drug activating genes; a potential treatment modality for gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Frederick; Zamora, Genesis; Sun, Chung-Ho; Trinidad, Anthony; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen; Kwon, Young Jik; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-03-01

    The overall objective of the research is to investigate the utility of photochemical internalization for the enhanced nonviral transfection of genes into cells. We have examined, in detail, the evaluation of photochemical internalization (PCI) as a method for the non-viral introduction of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and the PCI mediated transfection of the cytosine deaminase (CD) pro drug activating gene into glioma cell monolayers and multi-cell tumor spheroids. Expression of the CD gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU).

  9. [Prognostic factors for deep situated malignant gliomas treated with linac radiosurgery].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-yan; Bao, Xiu-feng; Li, Shu-ying; Wu, Cheng-yuan

    2002-10-01

    Though radiosurgery has been used for more than 10 years, the value of radiosurgery for malignant glioma has not been clarified. This paper was designed to investigate efficacy of radiosurgery to malignant glioma by analyzing the prognostic factors affecting prognosis of malignant gliomas treated with linac radiosurgery. Fifty-eight patients with deep situated malignant gliomas, 28 anaplastic astrocytomas(AA) and 30 glioblastomas (GBM), aged from 7 to 70 years, were analyzed. The mean volume of tumor was 12.08 cm3, and mean prescription dose for linac radiosurgery was 19.42 Gy. The results were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curve and Cox regression. There were 44.8% of the tumors shrank. Median tumor local control interval was 10 months(15 months for AA and 9 months for GBM). Tumor local control probability was 37.9% for 1 year and 10.3% for 2 years. Median survival was 22.5 months for AA and 13 months for GBM and 15 months for all patients. The survival probability was 79.3% at 1 year and 20.6% at 2 years. Isocenter numbers and tumor volume were the prognostic factors for tumor control, but conformity index was prognostic factor for survival as determined by Cox regression analysis. Considered of pathology, only isocenter number and target volume significantly affected the tumor control interval. Complication appeared in 44.8% of the patients and the median interval of complication onset was 8 months. Symptomatic cerebral edema was observed in 31.0% of the patients. Linac radiosurgery can effectively improve tumor local control and elongate survival for the patients with deep situated malignant gliomas. Tumor volume is the prognostic factor for tumor control, while conformity index is prognostic factor for survival.

  10. Comparison of CT and MRI brain tumor imaging using a canine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Whelan, H T; Clanton, J A; Wilson, R E; Tulipan, N B

    1988-01-01

    A canine gliosarcoma model was used to study the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast enhancement in defining the histologic margins of brain tumors. The effectiveness of this technique was compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) using iodinated contrast enhancement. Cultured canine gliosarcoma cells were injected into the left hemisphere of adult mongrel dogs. The dogs developed brain tumors and progressive clinical signs. Serial MRI with and without gadolinium diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid was compared to serial CT with and without sodium iothalamate obtained on the same days. After the final scans, animals were sacrificed; the brains were removed and processed for routine histopathologic study. All tumors were visualized with contrast-enhanced MRI which proved most sensitive. Gadolinium di-ethylene triamine penta-acetic acid caused bright enhancement of tumors in a distribution that consistently corresponded to areas of pathologically proved tumor infiltration. Gross and microscopic autopsy findings correlated better with MRI than with CT which tended to produce poorer resolution and underrepresent the size of viable tumor. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is more accurate than unenhanced MRI, unenhanced CT, or enhanced CT in defining the histologic margins of tumors.

  11. Probing the infiltrating character of brain tumors: inhibition of RhoA/ROK-mediated CD44 cell surface shedding from glioma cells by the green tea catechin EGCg.

    PubMed

    Annabi, Borhane; Bouzeghrane, Mounia; Moumdjian, Robert; Moghrabi, Albert; Béliveau, Richard

    2005-08-01

    Glioma cell-surface binding to hyaluronan (HA), a major constituent of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) environment, is regulated through a complex membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)/CD44/caveolin interaction that takes place at the leading edges of invading cells. In the present study, intracellular transduction pathways required for the HA-mediated recognition by infiltrating glioma cells in brain was investigated. We show that the overexpression of the GTPase RhoA up-regulated MT1-MMP expression and triggered CD44 shedding from the U-87 glioma cell surface. This potential implication in cerebral metastatic processes was also observed in cells overexpressing the full-length recombinant MT1-MMP, while the overexpression of a cytoplasmic domain truncated from of MT1-MMP failed to do so. This suggests that the cytoplasmic domain of MT1-MMP transduces intracellular signaling leading to RhoA-mediated CD44 shedding. Treatment of glioma cells with the Rho-kinase (ROK) inhibitor Y27632, or with EGCg, a green tea catechin with anti-MMP and anti-angiogenesis activities, antagonized both RhoA- and MT1-MMP-induced CD44 shedding. Conversely, overexpression of recombinant ROK stimulated CD44 release. Taken together, our results suggest that RhoA/ROK intracellular signaling regulates MT1-MMP-mediated CD44 recognition of HA. These molecular processes may partly explain the diffuse brain-infiltrating character of glioma cells within the surrounding parenchyma and thus be a target for new approaches to anti-tumor therapy.

  12. Cerebral microdialysis in glioma studies, from theory to application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Zhang, Xiangyi; Lou, Yan; Rao, Yuefeng; Zhang, Xingguo

    2014-08-05

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of solid tumors, there are few effective treatments for malignant gliomas due to the infiltrative nature, and the protective shield of blood-brain barrier or blood-tumor barriers that restrict the passage of chemotherapy drugs into the brain. Imaging techniques, such as PET and MRI, have allowed the assessment of tumor function in vivo, but they are indirect measures of activity and do not easily allow continuous repeated evaluations. Because the biology of glioma on a cellular and molecular level is fairly unknown, especially in relation to various treatments, the development of novel therapeutic approaches to this devastating condition requires a strong need for a deeper understanding of the tumor's pathophysiology and biochemistry. Cerebral microdialysis, a probe-based sampling technique, allows a discrete volume of the brain to be sampled for neurochemical analysis of neurotransmitters, metabolites, biomarkers, and chemotherapy drugs, which has been employed in studying brain tumors, and is significant for improving the treatment of glioma. In this review, the current concepts of cerebral microdialysis for glioma are elucidated, with a special emphasis on its application to neurochemistry and pharmacokinetic studies.

  13. Pharmacological doses of daily ascorbate protect tumors from radiation damage after a single dose of radiation in an intracranial mouse glioma model.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah V; Castro, M Leticia; Field, Cameron S; Schleich, Nanette; McConnell, Melanie J; Herst, Patries M

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumor environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionizing radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitizing GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here, we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy) of radiation combined with a 1 h exposure to ascorbate (5 mM) sensitized murine glioma GL261 cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy) of whole brain radiation combined with daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg) in an intracranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain 8 days after tumor implantation, a second group received daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8-45) after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumor progression, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumor progression. Tumor progression was faster in tumor-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than in those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumors treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumor microenvironment, which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant, or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant.

  14. Sustained radiosensitization of hypoxic glioma cells after oxygen pretreatment in an animal model of glioblastoma and in vitro models of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Ryon H; Moosa, Shayan; Anzivino, Matthew; Wang, Yi; Floyd, Desiree Hunt; Purow, Benjamin W; Lee, Kevin S

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal form of brain cancer and these tumors are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy. Radioresistance is thought to result from a paucity of molecular oxygen in hypoxic tumor regions, resulting in reduced DNA damage and enhanced cellular defense mechanisms. Efforts to counteract tumor hypoxia during radiotherapy are limited by an attendant increase in the sensitivity of healthy brain tissue to radiation. However, the presence of heightened levels of molecular oxygen during radiotherapy, while conventionally deemed critical for adjuvant oxygen therapy to sensitize hypoxic tumor tissue, might not actually be necessary. We evaluated the concept that pre-treating tumor tissue by transiently elevating tissue oxygenation prior to radiation exposure could increase the efficacy of radiotherapy, even when radiotherapy is administered after the return of tumor tissue oxygen to hypoxic baseline levels. Using nude mice bearing intracranial U87-luciferase xenografts, and in vitro models of tumor hypoxia, the efficacy of oxygen pretreatment for producing radiosensitization was tested. Oxygen-induced radiosensitization of tumor tissue was observed in GBM xenografts, as seen by suppression of tumor growth and increased survival. Additionally, rodent and human glioma cells, and human glioma stem cells, exhibited prolonged enhanced vulnerability to radiation after oxygen pretreatment in vitro, even when radiation was delivered under hypoxic conditions. Over-expression of HIF-1α reduced this radiosensitization, indicating that this effect is mediated, in part, via a change in HIF-1-dependent mechanisms. Importantly, an identical duration of transient hyperoxic exposure does not sensitize normal human astrocytes to radiation in vitro. Taken together, these results indicate that briefly pre-treating tumors with elevated levels of oxygen prior to radiotherapy may represent a means for selectively targeting radiation

  15. Detecting response of rat C6 glioma tumors to radiotherapy using hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Day, Sam E; Kettunen, Mikko I; Cherukuri, Murali Krishna; Mitchell, James B; Lizak, Martin J; Morris, H Douglas; Matsumoto, Shingo; Koretsky, Alan P; Brindle, Kevin M

    2011-02-01

    We show here that hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate can be used to detect treatment response in a glioma tumor model; a tumor type where detection of response with (18) fluoro-2-deoxyglucose, using positron emission tomography, is limited by the high background signals from normal brain tissue. (13) C chemical shift images acquired following intravenous injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate into rats with implanted C6 gliomas showed significant labeling of lactate within the tumors but comparatively low levels in surrounding brain.Labeled pyruvate was observed at high levels in blood vessels above the brain and from other major vessels elsewhere but was detected at only low levels in tumor and brain.The ratio of hyperpolarized (13) C label in tumor lactate compared to the maximum pyruvate signal in the blood vessels was decreased from 0.38 ± 0.16 to 0.23 ± 0.13, (a reduction of 34%) by 72 h following whole brain irradiation with 15 Gy.

  16. Galectins and Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Le Mercier, Marie; Fortin, Shannon; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert; Lefranc, Florence

    2010-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, especially glioblastomas, are associated with a dismal prognosis. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, glioblastoma patients still have a median survival expectancy of only 14 months. This poor prognosis can be at least partly explained by the fact that glioma cells diffusely infiltrate the brain parenchyma and exhibit decreased levels of apoptosis, and thus resistance to cytotoxic drugs. Galectins are a family of mammalian beta-galactoside-binding proteins characterized by a shared characteristic amino acid sequence. They are expressed differentially in normal vs. neoplastic tissues and are known to play important roles in several biological processes such as cell proliferation, death and migration. This review focuses on the role played by galectins, especially galectin-1 and galectin-3, in glioma biology. The involvement of these galectins in different steps of glioma malignant progression such as migration, angiogenesis or chemoresistance makes them potentially good targets for the development of new drugs to combat these malignant tumors. PMID:19371355

  17. Autologous tumor cell vaccination plus infusion of GM-CSF by a programmable pump in the treatment of recurrent malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Clavreul, Anne; Piard, Nicole; Tanguy, Jean-Yves; Gamelin, Eric; Rousselet, Marie-Christine; Leynia, Pierre; Menei, Philippe

    2010-07-01

    We report on the safety and feasibility of autologous tumor cell vaccination combined with infusion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by a programmable pump in the treatment of recurrent malignant gliomas. The programmable pump is a promising tool used to infuse cytokines subcutaneously for vaccination. Our trial enrolled nine patients who had undergone surgery, radiation and had been successfully weaned off steroids. Unfortunately, only five patients completed the protocol and were monitored for side effects, local reactions, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and survival. The treatment was well tolerated. Two patients developed DTH reactions after vaccination and three patients had an unusually long survival without any other treatment. Despite the few patients treated, the results of this trial are encouraging. This study also highlights the specific difficulties encountered in vaccination programs for the treatment of glioma.

  18. Autocrine VEGF–VEGFR2–Neuropilin-1 signaling promotes glioma stem-like cell viability and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Hamerlik, Petra; Lathia, Justin D.; Rasmussen, Rikke; Wu, Qiulian; Bartkova, Jirina; Lee, MyungHee; Moudry, Pavel; Bartek, Jiri; Fischer, Walter; Lukas, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Although vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is traditionally regarded as an endothelial cell protein, evidence suggests that VEGFRs may be expressed by cancer cells. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal cancer characterized by florid vascularization and aberrantly elevated VEGF. Antiangiogenic therapy with the humanized VEGF antibody bevacizumab reduces GBM tumor growth; however, the clinical benefits are transient and invariably followed by tumor recurrence. In this study, we show that VEGFR2 is preferentially expressed on the cell surface of the CD133+ human glioma stem-like cells (GSCs), whose viability, self-renewal, and tumorigenicity rely, at least in part, on signaling through the VEGF-VEGFR2–Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) axis. We find that the limited impact of bevacizumab-mediated VEGF blockage may reflect ongoing autocrine signaling through VEGF–VEGFR2–NRP1, which is associated with VEGFR2–NRP1 recycling and a pool of active VEGFR2 within a cytosolic compartment of a subset of human GBM cells. Whereas bevacizumab failed to inhibit prosurvival effects of VEGFR2-mediated signaling, GSC viability under unperturbed or radiation-evoked stress conditions was attenuated by direct inhibition of VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase activity and/or shRNA-mediated knockdown of VEGFR2 or NRP1. We propose that direct inhibition of VEGFR2 kinase may block the highly dynamic VEGF–VEGFR2–NRP1 pathway and inspire a GBM treatment strategy to complement the currently prevalent ligand neutralization approach. PMID:22393126

  19. Liposome encapsulated of temozolomide for the treatment of glioma tumor: preparation, characterization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinhua; Wang, Zhonglan; Liu, Honghai; Wang, Longmei; Huang, Guihua

    2015-06-01

    Temozolomide plays a critical role in curing glioma at present. The purpose of this work was to develop a suitable drug delivery system which could prolong the half-life, improve the brain targeting, and reduce the systemic effect of the drug. Temozolomide-liposomes were formulated by the method of proliposomes. They were found to be relatively uniform in size of 156.70 ± 11.40 nm with a narrow polydispersity index (PI) of 0.29 ± 0.04. The average drug entrapment efficiency and loading capacity were 35.45 ± 1.48% and 2.81 ± 0.20%, respectively. The pH of temozolomide-liposomes was 6.46. In vitro release studies were conducted by a dynamic dialysis. The results showed that temozolomide released slowly from liposomes compared with the solution group. The release behavior of temozolomide-liposomes was in line with First-order kinetics and Weibull equation. The pharmacokinetics study was evaluated by pharmacokinetics parameters. The t(1/2β) and MRT of temozolomide-liposomes were 3.57 times and 1.27 times greater than that of temozolomide solution. The Cmax and AUC values of temozolomide-liposomes were 1.10 times and 1.55 times greater than that of temozolomide solution. The results of pharmacokinetics study showed temozolomide-liposomes prolonged the in vivo circulation time and increased AUC. Furthermore, the biodistribution in mice showed that temozolomide-liposomes preferentially decreased the accumulation of temozolomide in heart and lung and increased the drug concentration in brain after i.v. injection, which implied that temozolomide-liposomes improved the therapeutic effect in the brain and reduced the toxicity in lung and heart.

  20. Multiple treatments with liposomal doxorubicin and ultrasound-induced disruption of blood-tumor and blood-brain barriers improves outcomes in a rat glioma model

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Park, Juyoung; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the central nervous system and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels, along with several other factors, creates additional barriers for drug treatment for brain tumors. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and the “blood-tumor barrier”. Here, we tested the impact of three weekly sessions of FUS and liposomal doxorubicin (DOX) in 9L rat glioma tumors. Animals that received FUS + DOX (N = 8) had a median survival time that was increased significantly (P < 0.001) compared to animals who received DOX only (N = 6), FUS only (N = 8), or no treatment (N = 7). Median survival for animals that received FUS + DOX was increased by 100% relative to untreated controls, whereas animals who received DOX alone had only a 16% improvement. Animals who received only FUS showed no improvement. No tumor cells were found in histology in 4/8 animals in the FUS + DOX group, and in two animals, only a few tumor cells were detected. Adverse events in the treatment group included skin toxicity, impaired activity, damage to surrounding brain tissue, and tissue loss at the tumor site. In one animal, intratumoral hemorrhage was observed. These events are largely consistent with known side effects of doxorubicin and with an extensive tumor burden. Overall this work demonstrates that multiple sessions using this FUS technique to enhance the delivery of liposomal doxorubicin has a pronounced therapeutic effect in this rat glioma model. PMID:23603615

  1. Progression of motor deficits in glioma-bearing mice: impact of CNF1 therapy at symptomatic stages.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Eleonora; Maltese, Federica; Olimpico, Francesco; Fabbri, Alessia; Costa, Mario; Caleo, Matteo; Baroncelli, Laura

    2017-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive type of brain tumor. In this context, animal models represent excellent tools for the early detection and longitudinal mapping of neuronal dysfunction, that are critical in the preclinical validation of new therapeutic strategies. In a mouse glioma model, we developed sensitive behavioral readouts that allow early recognizing and following neurological symptoms. We injected GL261 cells into the primary motor cortex of syngenic mice and we used a battery of behavioral tests to longitudinally monitor the dysfunction induced by tumor growth. Grip strength test revealed an early onset of functional deficit associated to the glioma growth, with a significant forelimb weakness appearing 9 days after tumor inoculation. A later deficit was observed in the rotarod and in the grid walk tasks. Using this model, we found reduced tumor growth and maintenance of behavioral functions following treatment with Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1) at a symptomatic stage. Our data provide a detailed and precise examination of how tumor growth reverberates on the behavioral functions of glioma-bearing mice, providing normative data for the study of therapeutic strategies for glioma treatment. The reduced tumor volume and robust functional sparing observed in CNF1-treated, glioma-bearing mice strengthen the notion that CNF1 delivery is a promising strategy for glioma therapy.

  2. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  3. Single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

    PubMed

    El-Shehaby, Amr M N; Reda, Wael A; Abdel Karim, Khaled M; Emad Eldin, Reem M; Nabeel, Ahmed M

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Because of their critical and central location, it is deemed necessary to fractionate when considering irradiating optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy is considered safer when dealing with gliomas in this location. In this study, the safety and efficacy of single-session stereotactic radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were reviewed. METHODS Between December 2004 and June 2014, 22 patients with optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were treated by single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Twenty patients were available for follow-up for a minimum of 1 year after treatment. The patients were 5 to 43 years (median 16 years) of age. The tumor volume was 0.15 to 18.2 cm(3) (median 3.1 cm(3)). The prescription dose ranged from 8 to 14 Gy (median 11.5 Gy). RESULTS The mean follow-up period was 43 months. Five tumors involved the optic nerve only, and 15 tumors involved the chiasm/hypothalamus. Two patients died during the follow-up period. The tumors shrank in 12 cases, remained stable in 6 cases, and progressed in 2 cases, thereby making the tumor control rate 90%. Vision remained stable in 12 cases, improved in 6 cases, and worsened in 2 cases in which there was tumor progression. Progression-free survival was 83% at 3 years. CONCLUSIONS The initial results indicate that single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

  4. 70-kDa heat shock protein coated magnetic nanocarriers as a nanovaccine for induction of anti-tumor immune response in experimental glioma.

    PubMed

    Shevtsov, Maxim A; Nikolaev, Boris P; Yakovleva, Liudmila Y; Parr, Marina A; Marchenko, Yaroslav Y; Eliseev, Igor; Yudenko, Anna; Dobrodumov, Anatolii V; Zlobina, Olga; Zhakhov, Alexander; Ischenko, Alexander M; Pitkin, Emil; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2015-12-28

    Nanovaccines based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) provide a novel approach to induce the humoral and cell-based immune system to fight cancer. Herein, we increased the immunostimulatory capacity of SPIONs by coating them with recombinant heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) which is known to chaperone antigenic peptides. After binding, Hsp70-SPIONs deliver immunogenic peptides from tumor lysates to dendritiс cells (DCs) and thus stimulate a tumor-specific, CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response. We could show that binding activity of Hsp70-SPIONs to the substrate-binding domain (SBD) is highly dependent on the ATPase activity of its nucleotide-binding domain NBD), as shown by (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Immunization of C6 glioma-bearing rats with DCs pulsed with Hsp70-SPIONs and tumor lysates resulted in a delayed tumor progression (as measured by MRI) and an increased overall survival. In parallel an increased IFNγ secretion were detected in the serum of these animals and immunohistological analysis of subsequent cryosections of the glioma revealed an enhanced infiltration of memory CD45RO+ and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Taken together the study demonstrates that magnetic nanocarriers such as SPIONs coated with Hsp70 can be applied as a platform for boosting anti-cancer immune responses.

  5. Standard of care and future pharmacological treatment options for malignant glioma: an urgent need for screening and identification of novel tumor-specific antigens

    PubMed Central

    Batich, Kristen A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malignant gliomas (MGs) represent the most common primary brain tumors in adults, the most deadly of which is grade IV glioblastoma. Patients with glioblastoma undergoing current standard-of-care therapy have a median survival of 12 – 15 months. Areas covered Over the past 25 years, there have been modest advancements in the treatment of MGs. Assessment of therapeutic responses has continued to evolve to account for the increasing number of agents being tested in the clinic. Currently approved therapies for primary tumors have been extended for use in the setting of recurrent disease with modest efficacy. Agents initially approved for recurrent gliomas have begun to demonstrate efficacy against de novo tumors but will ultimately need to be evaluated in future studies for scheduling, timing and dosing relative to chemotherapy. Expert opinion Screening and identification of tumor-specific mutations is critical for the advancement of effective therapy that is both safe and precise for the patient. Two unique antigens found in glioblastoma are currently being employed as targets for immunotherapeutic vaccines, one of which has advanced to Phase III testing. Whole genome sequencing of MGs has yielded two other novel mutations that offer great promise for the development of molecular inhibitors. PMID:25139628

  6. Anatomic Location of Tumor Predicts the Accuracy of Motor Function Localization in Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas Involving the Hand Knob Area.

    PubMed

    Fang, S; Liang, J; Qian, T; Wang, Y; Liu, X; Fan, X; Li, S; Wang, Y; Jiang, T

    2017-08-24

    The accuracy of preoperative blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI remains controversial. This study assessed the association between the anatomic location of a tumor and the accuracy of fMRI-based motor function mapping in diffuse lower-grade gliomas. Thirty-five patients with lower-grade gliomas involving motor areas underwent preoperative blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI scans with grasping tasks and received intraoperative direct cortical stimulation. Patients were classified into an overlapping group and a nonoverlapping group, depending on the extent to which blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI and direct cortical stimulation results concurred. Tumor location was quantitatively measured, including the shortest distance from the tumor to the hand knob and the deviation distance of the midpoint of the hand knob in the lesion hemisphere relative to the midline compared with the normal contralateral hemisphere. A 4-mm shortest distance from the tumor to the hand knob value was identified as optimal for differentiating the overlapping and nonoverlapping group with the receiver operating characteristic curve (sensitivity, 84.6%; specificity, 77.8%). The shortest distances from the tumor to the hand knob of ≤4 mm were associated with inaccurate fMRI-based localizations of the hand motor cortex. The shortest distances from the tumor to the hand knob were larger (P = .002), and the deviation distances for the midpoint of the hand knob in the lesion hemisphere were smaller (P = .003) in the overlapping group than in the nonoverlapping group. This study suggests that the shortest distance from the tumor to the hand knob and the deviation distance for the midpoint of the hand knob on the lesion hemisphere are predictive of the accuracy of blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI results. Smaller shortest distances from the tumor to the hand knob and larger deviation distances for the midpoint of hand knob on the lesion hemisphere are associated with less accuracy of motor cortex

  7. Clinical investigation survival prediction in high-grade gliomas by MRI perfusion before and during early stage of RT

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Yue . E-mail: yuecao@med.umich.edu; Tsien, Christina I.; Nagesh, Vijaya; Junck, Larry; Haken, Randall ten; Ross, Brian D.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow can predict the response of high-grade gliomas to radiotherapy (RT) by taking into account spatial heterogeneity and temporal changes in perfusion. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with high-grade gliomas underwent conformal RT, with magnetic resonance imaging perfusion before and at Weeks 1-2 and 3-4 during RT. Tumor perfusion was classified as high, medium, or low. The prognostic values of pre-RT perfusion and the changes during RT for early prediction of tumor response to RT were evaluated. Results: The fractional high-CBV tumor volume before RT and the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging tumor volume were identified as predictors for survival (p = 0.01). Changes in tumor CBV during the early treatment course also predicted for survival. Better survival was predicted by a decrease in the fractional low-CBV tumor volume at Week 1 of RT vs. before RT, a decrease in the fractional high-CBV tumor volume at Week 3 vs. Week 1 of RT, and a smaller pre-RT fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging tumor volume (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Early temporal changes during RT in heterogeneous regions of high and low perfusion in gliomas might predict for different physiologic responses to RT. This might also open the opportunity to identify tumor subvolumes that are radioresistant and might benefit from intensified RT.

  8. Akt- or MEK-mediated mTOR inhibition suppresses Nf1 optic glioma growth

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Aparna; Toonen, Joseph A.; Cimino, Patrick J.; Gianino, Scott M.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop optic pathway gliomas, which result from impaired NF1 protein regulation of Ras activity. One obstacle to the implementation of biologically targeted therapies is an incomplete understanding of the individual contributions of the downstream Ras effectors (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase [MEK], Akt) to optic glioma maintenance. This study was designed to address the importance of MEK and Akt signaling to Nf1 optic glioma growth. Methods Primary neonatal mouse astrocyte cultures were employed to determine the consequence of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MEK inhibition on Nf1-deficient astrocyte growth. Nf1 optic glioma–bearing mice were used to assess the effect of Akt and MEK inhibition on tumor volume, proliferation, and retinal ganglion cell dysfunction. Results Both MEK and Akt were hyperactivated in Nf1-deficient astrocytes in vitro and in Nf1 murine optic gliomas in vivo. Pharmacologic PI3K or Akt inhibition reduced Nf1-deficient astrocyte proliferation to wild-type levels, while PI3K inhibition decreased Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Akt inhibition of Nf1-deficient astrocyte and optic glioma growth reflected Akt-dependent activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Sustained MEK pharmacologic blockade also attenuated Nf1-deficient astrocytes as well as Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Importantly, these MEK inhibitory effects resulted from p90RSK-mediated, Akt-independent mTOR activation. Finally, both PI3K and MEK inhibition reduced optic glioma–associated retinal ganglion cell loss and nerve fiber layer thinning. Conclusion These findings establish that the convergence of 2 distinct Ras effector pathways on mTOR signaling maintains Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth, supporting the evaluation of pharmacologic inhibitors that target mTOR function in future human NF1–optic pathway glioma clinical trials. PMID:25534823

  9. Impact of tumor location and pathological discordance on survival of children with midline high-grade gliomas treated on Children's Cancer Group high-grade glioma study CCG-945.

    PubMed

    Eisenstat, David D; Pollack, Ian F; Demers, Alain; Sapp, Mark V; Lambert, Pascal; Weisfeld-Adams, James D; Burger, Peter C; Gilles, Floyd; Davis, Richard L; Packer, Roger; Boyett, James M; Finlay, Jonathan L

    2015-02-01

    Children with high-grade glioma (HGG) have a poor prognosis compared to those with low-grade glioma (LGG). Adjuvant chemotherapy may be beneficial, but its optimal use remains undetermined. Histology and extent of resection are important prognostic factors. We tested the hypothesis that patients with midline HGG treated on Children's Cancer Group Study (CCG) CCG-945 have a worse prognosis compared to the entire group. Of 172 children eligible for analysis, 60 had midline tumors primarily localized to the thalamus, hypothalamus and basal ganglia. Time-to-progression and death were determined from the date of initial diagnosis, and survival curves were calculated. Univariate analyses were undertaken for extent of resection, chemotherapy regimen, anatomic location, histology, proliferation index, MGMT status and p53 over-expression. For the entire midline tumor group, 5-year PFS and OS were 18.3 ± 4.8 and 25 ± 5.4 %, respectively. Many patients only had a biopsy (43.3 %). The sub-groups with near/total resection and hypothalamic location appeared to have better PFS and OS. However, the effect of tumor histology on OS was significant for children with discordant diagnoses on central pathology review of LGG compared to HGG. Proliferative index (MIB-1 > 36 %), MGMT and p53 over-expression correlated with poor outcomes. Children treated on CCG-945 with midline HGG have a worse prognosis when compared to the entire group. The midline location may directly influence the extent of resection. Central pathology review and entry of patients on clinical trials continue to be priorities to improve outcomes for children with HGG.

  10. A multivariate analysis of factors determining tumor progression in childhood low-grade glioma: a population-based cohort study (CCLG CNS9702)

    PubMed Central

    Stokland, Tore; Liu, Jo-Fen; Ironside, James W.; Ellison, David W.; Taylor, Roger; Robinson, Kathryn J.; Picton, Susan V.; Walker, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for the progression of low-grade glioma in children from a large population-based cohort. Patient and tumor details of a national cohort of children with low-grade glioma, recruited into an international multidisciplinary clinical strategy, were subjected to univariate and multivariate analyses of progression-free survival and overall survival. From the cohort of 798 patients, 639 patients were eligible, with a median age 6.71 years (0.26–16.75 years); 49% were males; 15.9% had neurofibromatosis type 1, 63.7% pilocytic astrocytoma, 5.9% fibrillary astrocytoma, 4.2% mixed neuronal-glial tumors, and 3.6% others; 21.1% were diagnosed clinically. Anatomically implicated were 31.6% cerebellum, 24.6% chiasma/hypothalamus, 16.0% cerebral hemispheres, 9.9% brain stem, 6.1% other supratentorial midline structures, 5.9% optic nerve only, 4.5% spinal cord, and 1.4% others. The 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival in the whole cohort were 94.6% and 69.4%, respectively. There was a significant association between age and site (P < .001) and extent of tumor resection and site (P < .001). Multivariate analysis identified young age, fibrillary astrocytoma, and extent of surgical resection as significant independent risk factors for progression. Hypothalamic/chiasmatic tumors demonstrated the most sustained tendency to progress. In conclusion, the influence of age and anatomical site upon the risk of tumor progression suggests that these factors strongly influence tumor behavior for the majority of pilocytic tumors. Age <1 year and 1–5 years, fibrillary histology, completeness of resection, and chiasmatic location are candidates for stratification in future studies. PMID:20861086

  11. Linarin sensitizes tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis (TRAIL)-induced ligand-triggered apoptosis in human glioma cells and in xenograft nude mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zan-Feng; Sun, Xiao-Ke; Lan, Ying; Han, Chao; Zhang, Yong-Dong; Chen, Gang

    2017-09-22

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-induced ligand (TRAIL) is reported as a promising anti-cancer therapeutic agent. Nevertheless, a variety of cancer cells, including human malignant glioma cells, are resistant to TRAIL treatment, indicating that it is necessary to find effective strategies to overcome the TRAIL resistance. Linarin (LIN), a natural flavonoid compound in Flos Chrysanthemi Indici (FCI), has been exhibited to exert various pharmacological activities, including anti-cancer. Here in our study, we found that non-cytotoxic doses of LIN (5μM) dramatically potentiated TRAIL (80ng/ml)-induced cytotoxicity (52.36±1.58%) and apoptosis (68.50±1.23%) using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry assays, respectively, in human glioma cells of U87MG. Apoptosis was evidenced by enhanced cleavage of Caspase-8/-9/-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and reduced anti-apoptotic proteins, including B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), mantle cell lymphoma (Mcl)-1, and Survivin. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways were included in apoptosis induced by LIN and TRAIL co-treatment, along with high release of Cyto-c into cytoplasm and enhancement of fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), death receptor 4 (DR) 4 and DR5, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, up to 39.86±2.32%, was also highly triggered by TRAIL and LIN combinational treatment, which was accompanied with high phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK). In vivo, TRAIL and LIN double treatment significantly reduced the tumor growth using xenograft tumor model through inducing apoptosis. We demonstrated that combining LIN with TRAIL treatments might be effective against TRAIL-resistant glioma cells through inducing apoptosis regulated by ROS generation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Cognitive Rehabilitation in Patients with Gliomas and Other Brain Tumors: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, G.; Pambuku, A.; Della Puppa, A.; Bellu, L.; D'Avella, D.; Zagonel, V.

    2016-01-01

    Disease prognosis is very poor in patients with brain tumors. Cognitive deficits due to disease or due to its treatment have an important weight on the quality of life of patients and caregivers. Studies often take into account quality of life as a fundamental element in the management of disease and interventions have been developed for cognitive rehabilitation of neuropsychological deficits with the aim of improving the quality of life and daily-life autonomy of patients. In this literature review, we will consider the published studies of cognitive rehabilitation over the past 20 years. PMID:27493954

  13. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients.

  14. Steroid requirements during radiotherapy for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Marantidou, Athina; Levy, Christine; Duquesne, Alyette; Ursu, Renata; Bailon, Olivier; Coman, Irene; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is the standard treatment for high-grade gliomas. However, toxicity may develop during RT, such as brain edema or worsening of neurological symptoms. Surprisingly, no dedicated study had focused on steroid requirements during RT in adult patients with malignant gliomas. We evaluated prospectively all patients with malignant gliomas treated by RT in a single center from July 2006 to May 2009. Age, sex, initial Karnofsky performance status (KPS), tumor localization and histology, type of surgical resection, clinical target volume, total dose and duration of RT, concomitant treatment with temozolomide, and steroid dosage during RT and at 1 and 3 months after RT were recorded in all patients. Most of the 80 patients (70%) were already taking steroids before RT. Half of them (55%) required initiation or further steroids increase during RT. The median time to steroid increase was 8 days. Only 13% of patients remained free of steroids during RT, and the mean maximal dosage of prednisone was 55 ± 48 mg. At 3 months after RT, 29% of patients were free of steroids, and the mean prednisone dosage was 32 ± 50 mg. Unresected tumors and initial KPS ≤80% were the only variables associated with higher steroid requirements on multivariate analysis. In our series, almost all patients required steroids during RT. Poor initial KPS and biopsy were associated with higher steroid requirements.

  15. A phase II study of gefitinib and irradiation in children with newly diagnosed brainstem gliomas: A report from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Ian F.; Stewart, Clinton F.; Kocak, Mehmet; Poussaint, Tina Young; Broniscer, Alberto; Banerjee, Anu; Douglas, James G.; Kun, Larry E.; Boyett, James M.; Geyer, J. Russell

    2011-01-01

    This phase II study was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of gefitinib given with and following radiation therapy in children newly diagnosed with a poor prognosis brainstem glioma. Eligible patients were those with a previously untreated nondisseminated diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma. Histological confirmation was not required, provided patients had a characteristic clinical history and MRI findings. Treatment consisted of gefitinib, administered orally, 250 mg/m2/day, during standard external beam radiotherapy, continuing for up to 13 monthly courses in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Toxicities, particularly intratumoral hemorrhage, were monitored. Pharmacokinetics and investigational imaging studies were performed in consenting patients. Forty-three eligible patients were included in the study. Therapy was well tolerated; only 4 patients were withdrawn from the study for dose-limiting toxicity after receiving therapy for 6, 9, 17, and 24 weeks. The 12- and 24-month progression-free survival rates were 20.9 ±5.6 % and 9.3 ±4%, respectively. Overall survival rates were 56.4 ±7.6% and 19.6 ±5.9%, respectively, which appear nominally superior to other contemporaneous Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium trials. Three patients remain progression-free survivors with ≥36 months follow-up. The observation that a subset of children with this generally fatal tumor experienced long-term progression-free survival, coupled with recent observations regarding the molecular features of brainstem gliomas, raises the possibility that prospective molecular characterization may allow enrichment of treatment responders and improvement in outcome results in future studies of biologically targeted agents. PMID:21292687

  16. Localisation of the central sulcus region in glioma patients with three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and volume rendering: comparison with functional and conventional magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Willemse, Ronald B; Pouwels, Petra J W; Barkhof, Frederik; Vandertop, W Peter

    2011-04-01

    Volume rendering (VR) of three-dimensional (3D) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images shows regional intensity differences, reflecting the central sulcus (CS) region and occipital cortex. The purpose of this study was to determine whether 3D FLAIR with VR could be used as an alternative method to localise the CS region in comparison with functional and conventional MR-imaging in patients with perirolandic glioma. Eleven patients with intracranial gliomas were studied with single-slab 3D FLAIR including VR and conventional T1-weighted imaging. In all patients, preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed with a motor paradigm of the hand. The hypo-intense central gyri on 3D FLAIR with VR were interpreted as the CS area. Localisation of the motor hand knob on anatomical images and fMRI results were used for identification of the primary motor cortex. Anatomical localisation of the motor hand knob on T1-weighted images was possible in 91% of both hemispheres. In 73% of the affected hemispheres (AH) and 91% of the unaffected hemispheres (UH) the hand knob and CS region could be identified on 3D FLAIR axial and VR images, respectively. With one exception, fMRI activation confirmed the CS region as observed with 3D FLAIR with VR. Volume rendering of 3D FLAIR MR images shows central hypo-intensities frequently corresponding with the CS region. Two-dimensional localisation of the CS region on conventional T1-weighted images and fMRI seems favourable compared to 3D FLAIR. However, in selected cases, especially where fMRI is not possible or feasible, volume rendering with 3D FLAIR may enhance the 3D visualisation of gliomas in relation to the CS region which can be used as an alternative method in the presurgical structural and functional evaluation of neurosurgical patients.

  17. Pharmacological Doses of Daily Ascorbate Protect Tumors from Radiation Damage after a Single Dose of Radiation in an Intracranial Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah V.; Castro, M. Leticia; Field, Cameron S.; Schleich, Nanette; McConnell, Melanie J.; Herst, Patries M.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumor environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionizing radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitizing GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here, we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy) of radiation combined with a 1 h exposure to ascorbate (5 mM) sensitized murine glioma GL261 cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy) of whole brain radiation combined with daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg) in an intracranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain 8 days after tumor implantation, a second group received daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8–45) after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumor progression, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumor progression. Tumor progression was faster in tumor-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than in those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumors treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumor microenvironment, which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant, or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant. PMID:25566497

  18. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing in Molecular Subtyping of Lower-Grade Diffuse Gliomas: Application of the World Health Organization's 2016 Revised Criteria for Central Nervous System Tumors.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jamal H; McNulty, Samantha N; Cimino, Patrick J; Cottrell, Catherine E; Heusel, Jonathan W; Vigh-Conrad, Katinka A; Duncavage, Eric J

    2017-03-01

    The 2007 World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System classifies lower-grade gliomas [LGGs (grades II to III diffuse gliomas)] morphologically as astrocytomas or oligodendrogliomas, and tumors with unclear ambiguous morphology as oligoastrocytomas. The World Health Organization's newly released (2016) classification incorporates molecular data. A single, targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel was used for detecting single-nucleotide variation and copy number variation in 50 LGG cases originally classified using the 2007 criteria, including 36 oligoastrocytomas, 11 oligodendrogliomas, 2 astrocytomas, and 1 LGG not otherwise specified. NGS results were compared with those from IHC analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization to assess concordance and to categorize the tumors according to the 2016 criteria. NGS results were concordant with those from IHC analysis in all cases. In 3 cases, NGS was superior to fluorescence in situ hybridization in distinguishing segmental chromosomal losses from whole-arm deletions. The NGS approach was effective in reclassifying 36 oligoastrocytomas as 30 astrocytomas (20 IDH1/2 mutant and 10 IDH1/2 wild type) and 6 oligodendrogliomas, and 1 oligodendroglioma as an astrocytoma (IDH1/2 mutant). Here we show that a single, targeted NGS assay can serve as the sole testing modality for categorizing LGG according to the World Health Organization's 2016 diagnostic scheme. This modality affords greater accuracy and efficiency while reducing specimen tissue requirements compared with multimodal approaches.

  19. Inhibition of autophagy induced by quercetin at a late stage enhances cytotoxic effects on glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yunke; Shen, Chen; Li, Chenguang; Liu, Yaohua; Gao, Dandan; Shi, Chen; Peng, Fei; Liu, Zhendong; Zhao, Boxian; Zheng, Zhixing; Wang, Xiaoxiong; Hou, Xu; Liu, Huailei; Wu, Jianing; Zou, Huichao; Wang, Kaikai; Zhong, Chen; Zhang, Jiakang; Shi, Changbin; Zhao, Shiguang

    2016-03-01

    Glioma is the most common primary brain tumor in the central nervous system (CNS) with high morbidity and mortality in adults. Although standardized comprehensive therapy has been adapted, the prognosis of glioma patients is still frustrating and thus novel therapeutic strategies are urgently in need. Quercetin (Quer), an important flavonoid compound found in many herbs, is shown to be effective in some tumor models including glioma. Recently, it is reported that adequate regulation of autophagy can strengthen cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs. However, it is not yet fully clear how we should modulate autophagy to achieve a satisfactory therapeutic effect. 3-Methyladenine (3-MA) and Beclin1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were used to inhibit the early stage of autophage while chloroquine (CQ) to inhibit the late stage. MTT assay was implemented to determine cell viability. Transmission electron microscopy, western blot, and immunohistochemistry were adopted to evaluate autophagy. Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry were used to detect apoptosis. C6 glioma xenograft models were established to assess the therapeutic effect (the body weight change, the median survival time, and tumor volume) in vivo. Quercetin can inhibit cell viability and induce autophagy of U87 and U251 glioma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of early-stage autophagy by 3-MA or shRNA against Beclin1 attenuated the quercetin-induced cytotoxicity. In contrast, suppression of autophagy at a late stage by CQ enhanced the anti-glioma efficiency of quercetin. Therapeutic effect of quercetin for malignant glioma can be strengthened by inhibition of autophagy at a late stage, not initial stage, which may provide a novel opportunity for glioma therapy.

  20. Transferrin modified PEG-PLA-resveratrol conjugates: in vitro and in vivo studies for glioma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wanhua; Li, Aimei; Jia, Zhijun; Yuan, Yi; Dai, Haifeng; Li, Hongxiu

    2013-10-15

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant brain tumors with a poor prognosis. In this study, we examined the effects of transferrin (Tf)-modified poly ethyleneglycol-poly lactic acid (PEG-PLA) nanoparticles conjugated with resveratrol (Tf-PEG-PLA-RSV) to glioma therapy in vitro and in vivo. The cell viability of Tf-PEG-PLA-RSV on C6 and U87 glioma cells was determined by the MTT assay. In vivo biodistribution and antitumor activity were investigated in Brain glioma bearing rat model of C6 glioma by i.p. administration of RSV-polymer conjugates. We found that the average diameter of each Tf-PEG-PLA-RSV is around 150 nm with 32 molecules of Tf on surface. In vitro cytotoxicity of PEG-PLA-RSV against C6 and U87 cells was higher than that of free RSV, and further the modification of Tf enhanced the cytotoxicity of the RSV-polymer conjugates as a result of the increased cellular uptake of the RSV-modified conjugates by glioma cells. In comparison with free RSV, RSV conjugates could significantly decrease tumor volume and accumulate in brain tumor, which resulted in prolonging the survival of C6 glioma-bearing rats. These results suggest that Tf-NP-RSV had a potential of therapeutic effect to glioma both in vitro and in vivo and might be a potential candidate for targeted therapy of glioma and worthy of further investigation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pten signaling in gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Knobbe, Christiane B.; Merlo, Adrian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the PTEN gene (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) was identified as a tumor suppressor gene on the long arm of chromosome 10. Since then, important progress has been made with respect to the understanding of the role of the Pten protein in the normal development of the brain as well as in the molecular pathogenesis of human gliomas. This review summarizes the current state of the art concerning the involvement of aberrant Pten function in the development of different biologic features of malignant gliomas, such as loss of cell-cycle control and uncontrolled cell proliferation, escape from apoptosis, brain invasion, and aberrant neoangiogenesis. Most of the tumor-suppressive properties of Pten are dependent on its lipid phosphatase activity, which inhibits the phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway through dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)-triphosphate. The additional function of Pten as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase may also play a role in glioma pathogenesis. Besides the wealth of data elucidating the functional roles of Pten, recent studies suggest a diagnostic significance of PTEN gene alterations as a molecular marker for poor prognosis in anaplastic astrocytomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Furthermore, the possibility of selective targeting of PTEN mutant tumor cells by specific pharmacologic inhibitors of members of the Pten/PI3K/Akt pathway opens up new perspectives for a targeted molecular therapy of malignant gliomas. PMID:12084351

  2. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of 282 Pediatric Low- and High-Grade Gliomas Reveals Genomic Drivers, Tumor Mutational Burden, and Hypermutation Signatures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adrienne; Severson, Eric; Gay, Laurie; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Elvin, Julia; Suh, James; Daniel, Sugganth; Covert, Mandy; Frampton, Garrett M; Hsu, Sigmund; Lesser, Glenn J; Stogner-Underwood, Kimberly; Mott, Ryan T; Rush, Sarah Z; Stanke, Jennifer J; Dahiya, Sonika; Sun, James; Reddy, Prasanth; Chalmers, Zachary R; Erlich, Rachel; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Fabrizio, David; Schrock, Alexa B; Ali, Siraj; Miller, Vincent; Stephens, Philip J; Ross, Jeffrey; Crawford, John R; Ramkissoon, Shakti H

    2017-09-14

    Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of death for children with cancer in the U.S. Incorporating next-generation sequencing data for both pediatric low-grade (pLGGs) and high-grade gliomas (pHGGs) can inform diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic decision-making. We performed comprehensive genomic profiling on 282 pediatric gliomas (157 pHGGs, 125 pLGGs), sequencing 315 cancer-related genes and calculating the tumor mutational burden (TMB; mutations per megabase [Mb]). In pLGGs, we detected genomic alterations (GA) in 95.2% (119/125) of tumors. BRAF was most frequently altered (48%; 60/125), and FGFR1 missense (17.6%; 22/125), NF1 loss of function (8.8%; 11/125), and TP53 (5.6%; 7/125) mutations were also detected. Rearrangements were identified in 35% of pLGGs, including KIAA1549-BRAF, QKI-RAF1, FGFR3-TACC3, CEP85L-ROS1, and GOPC-ROS1 fusions. Among pHGGs, GA were identified in 96.8% (152/157). The genes most frequently mutated were TP53 (49%; 77/157), H3F3A (37.6%; 59/157), ATRX (24.2%; 38/157), NF1 (22.2%; 35/157), and PDGFRA (21.7%; 34/157). Interestingly, most H3F3A mutations (81.4%; 35/43) were the variant K28M. Midline tumor analysis revealed H3F3A mutations (40%; 40/100) consisted solely of the K28M variant. Pediatric high-grade gliomas harbored oncogenic EML4-ALK, DGKB-ETV1, ATG7-RAF1, and EWSR1-PATZ1 fusions. Six percent (9/157) of pHGGs were hypermutated (TMB >20 mutations per Mb; range 43-581 mutations per Mb), harboring mutations deleterious for DNA repair in MSH6, MSH2, MLH1, PMS2, POLE, and POLD1 genes (78% of cases). Comprehensive genomic profiling of pediatric gliomas provides objective data that promote diagnostic accuracy and enhance clinical decision-making. Additionally, TMB could be a biomarker to identify pediatric glioblastoma (GBM) patients who may benefit from immunotherapy. By providing objective data to support diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic decision-making, comprehensive genomic profiling is necessary for advancing

  3. [Therapeutic strategies and prospects of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Taillibert, Sophie; Pedretti, Marta; Sanson, Marc

    2004-10-23

    The prognosis and the treatment of gliomas depend on age, performance status and histological grade. Symptomatic treatment relies on steroids against cerebral edema, anti-epileptic drugs for seizures and perioperatively, prevention of thrombo-embolism and digestive complications, physiotherapy. Specific therapies include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Surgery is necessary for histological diagnosis. In low grade gliomas, it has a significant impact in terms of survival. In malignant gliomas, surgery provides symptomic relief without clearly improving survival. Radiation therapy has been shown to improve survival in malignant glioma, but not in asymptomatic low grade tumors. Chemotherapy has a modest efficacy in glioblastomas, whereas oligodendrogliomas with 1p 19q deletion are chemosensitive tumors.

  4. Comprehensive management of head and neck tumors, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Thawley, S.E.; Panje, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 14 parts, each containing several papers. The parts are: General Considerations in the Management of Patients with Head and Neck Tumors, Tumors of the Ear, Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses, Tumors of the Oral Cavity, Tumors of the Pharynx, Tumors of the Larynx, Tumors of the Skin, Dental and Jaw Tumors, Tumors of the Thyroid and Parathyroid Glands, Tumors of the Trachea, Tumors of the Eye, Orbit, and Lacrimal Apparatus, and Special Topics.

  5. MiRNA-181b suppresses IGF-1R and functions as a tumor suppressor gene in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhu-Mei; Wang, Xie-Feng; Qian, Xu; Tao, Tao; Wang, Lin; Chen, Qiu-Dan; Wang, Xi-Rui; Cao, Lei; Wang, Ying-Yi; Zhang, Jun-Xia; Jiang, Tao; Kang, Chun-Sheng; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Liu, Ning; You, Yong-Ping

    2013-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded, 18- to 23-nt RNA molecules that function as regulators of gene expression. Previous studies have shown that microRNAs play important roles in human cancers, including gliomas. Here, we found that expression levels of miR-181b were decreased in gliomas, and we identified IGF-1R as a novel direct target of miR-181b. MiR-181b overexpression inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis by targeting IGF-1R and its downstream signaling pathways, PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK1/2. Overexpression of IGF-1R rescued the inhibitory effects of miR-181b. In clinical specimens, IGF-1R was overexpressed, and its protein levels were inversely correlated with miR-181b expression. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-181b functions in gliomas to suppress growth by targeting the IGF-1R oncogene and that miR-181b may serve as a novel therapeutic target for gliomas.

  6. ELTD1, an effective anti-angiogenic target for gliomas: preclinical assessment in mouse GL261 and human G55 xenograft glioma models.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jadith; Pody, Richard; Coutinho de Souza, Patricia; Evans, Blake; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Mallory, Samantha; Njoku, Charity; Dong, Yunzhou; Chen, Hong; Dong, Jiali; Lerner, Megan; Mian, Osamah; Tummala, Sai; Battiste, James; Fung, Kar-Ming; Wren, Jonathan D; Towner, Rheal A

    2017-02-01

    Despite current therapies, glioblastoma is a devastating cancer, and validation of effective biomarkers for it will enable better diagnosis and therapeutic intervention for this disease. We recently discovered a new biomarker for high-grade gliomas, ELTD1 (epidermal growth factor, latrophilin, and 7 transmembrane domain-containing protein 1 on chromosome 1) via bioinformatics, and validated that ELTD1 protein levels are significantly higher in human and rodent gliomas. The focus of this study was to assess the effect on tumor growth of an antibody against ELTD1 in orthotopic, GL261, and G55 xenograft glioma models. The effect of anti-ELTD1 antibody therapy was assessed by animal survival, MRI measured tumor volumes, MR angiography, MR perfusion imaging, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) characterization of microvessel density in mouse glioma models. Comparative treatments included anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and anti-c-Met antibody therapies, compared with untreated controls. Tumor volume and survival data in this study show that antibodies against ELTD1 inhibit glioma growth just as effectively or even more so compared with other therapeutic targets studied, including anti-VEGF antibody therapy. Untreated GL261 or G55 tumors were found to have significantly higher ELTD1 levels (IHC) compared with contralateral normal brain. The anti-angiogenic effect of ELTD1 antibody therapy was observed in assessment of microvessel density, as well as from MR angiography and perfusion measurements, which indicated that anti-ELTD1 antibody therapy significantly decreased vascularization compared with untreated controls. Either as a single therapy or in conjunction with other therapeutic approaches, anti-ELTD1 antibodies could be a valuable new clinical anti-angiogenic therapeutic for high-grade gliomas.

  7. Circulating glioma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kros, Johan M.; Mustafa, Dana M.; Dekker, Lennard J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.; Luider, Theo M.; Zheng, Ping-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Validated biomarkers for patients suffering from gliomas are urgently needed for standardizing measurements of the effects of treatment in daily clinical practice and trials. Circulating body fluids offer easily accessible sources for such markers. This review highlights various categories of tumor-associated circulating biomarkers identified in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioma patients, including circulating tumor cells, exosomes, nucleic acids, proteins, and oncometabolites. The validation and potential clinical utility of these biomarkers is briefly discussed. Although many candidate circulating protein biomarkers were reported, none of these have reached the required validation to be introduced for clinical practice. Recent developments in tracing circulating tumor cells and their derivatives as exosomes and circulating nuclear acids may become more successful in providing useful biomarkers. It is to be expected that current technical developments will contribute to the finding and validation of circulating biomarkers. PMID:25253418

  8. Tumor response parameters for head and neck cancer derived from tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The main goal of this paper is to reconstruct a distribution of cell survival fractions from tumor-volume variation for a heterogeneous group of head and neck cancer patients and compare this distribution to the data from predictive assays. Methods: To characterize the tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy treatment, the authors use a two-level tumor-volume model of cell population that separates the entire tumor cell population into two subpopulations of viable cells and lethally damaged cells. This parameterized radiobiological model is integrated with a least squares objective function and a simulated annealing optimization algorithm to describe time-dependent tumor-volume variation rates in individual patients. Several constraints have been used in the optimization problem because tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy is described by a sum of exponentials; therefore, the problem of accurately fitting a model to measured data is ill-posed. The model was applied to measured tumor-volume variation curves from a clinical study on tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy for 14 head and neck cancer patients in which an integrated CT/linear particle accelerator (LINAC) system was used for tumor-volume measurements. Results: The two-level cell population tumor-volume modeling is capable of describing tumor-volume variation throughout the entire treatment for 11 of the 14 patients. For three patients, the tumor-volume variation was described only during the initial part of treatment, a fact that may be related to the neglected hypoxia in the two-level approximation. The predicted probability density distribution for the survival fractions agrees with the data obtained using in vitro studies with predictive assays. The mean value 0.35 of survival fraction obtained in this study is larger than the value 0.32 from in vitro studies, which could be expected because of greater repair in vivo. The mean half-life obtained in this study for the head

  9. AngioMatrix, a signature of the tumor angiogenic switch-specific matrisome, correlates with poor prognosis for glioma and colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Tristan; Arnold, Christiane; van der Heyden, Michaël; Orend, Gertraud; Hussenet, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis represents a rate-limiting step during tumor progression. Targeting angiogenesis is already applied in cancer treatment, yet limits of anti-angiogenic therapies have emerged, notably because tumors adapt and recur after treatment. Therefore, there is a strong need to better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying tumor angiogenesis. Using the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic murine model, we identified 298 genes that are deregulated during the angiogenic switch, revealing an ingression/expansion of specific stromal cell types including endothelial cells and pericytes, but also macrophages and perivascular mesenchymal cells. Canonical TGF-β signaling is up-regulated during the angiogenic switch, especially in tumor-associated macrophages and fibroblasts. The matrisome, comprising extracellular matrix (ECM) and ECM-associated molecules, is significantly enriched, which allowed us to define the AngioMatrix signature as the 110 matrisomal genes induced during the RIP1-Tag2 angiogenic switch. Several AngioMatrix molecules were validated at expression level. Ablation of tenascin-C, one of the most highly induced ECM molecules during the switch, resulted in reduced angiogenesis confirming its important role. In human glioma and colorectal samples, the AngioMatrix signature correlates with the expression of endothelial cell markers, is increased with tumor progression and finally correlates with poor prognosis demonstrating its diagnostic and therapeutic potential. PMID:25301723

  10. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    ICHIKAWA, Tomotsugu; OTANI, Yoshihiro; KUROZUMI, Kazuhiko; DATE, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:27169497

  11. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Otani, Yoshihiro; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Date, Isao

    2016-07-15

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies.

  12. The impact of coexisting genetic mutations on murine optic glioma biology

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Aparna; Toonen, Joseph A.; Gianino, Scott M.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor predisposition syndrome are prone to the development of optic pathway gliomas resulting from biallelic inactivation of the NF1 gene. Recent studies have revealed the presence of other molecular alterations in a small portion of these NF1-associated brain tumors. The purpose of this study was to leverage Nf1 genetically engineered mouse strains to define the functional significance of these changes to optic glioma biology. Methods Nf1+/− mice were intercrossed with Nf1flox/flox mice, which were then crossed with Nf1flox/flox; GFAP-Cre mice, to generate Nf1flox/mut; GFAP-Cre (FMC) mice. These mice were additionally mated with conditional KIAA1549:BRAF knock-in or Ptenflox/wt mice to generate Nf1flox/mut; f-BRAF; GFAP-Cre (FMBC) mice or Nf1flox/mut; Ptenflox/wt; GFAP-Cre (FMPC) mice, respectively. The resulting optic gliomas were analyzed for changes in tumor volume, proliferation, and retinal ganglion cell loss. Results While KIAA1549:BRAF conferred no additional biological properties on Nf1 optic glioma, FMPC mice had larger optic gliomas with greater proliferative indices and microglial infiltration. In addition, all 3 Nf1 murine optic glioma strains exhibited reduced retinal ganglion cell survival and numbers; however, FMPC mice had greater retinal nerve fiber layer thinning near the optic head relative to FMC and FMBC mice. Conclusions Collectively, these experiments demonstrate genetic cooperativity between Nf1 loss and Pten heterozygosity relevant to optic glioma biology and further underscore the value of employing genetically engineered mouse strains to define the contribution of discovered molecular alterations to brain tumor pathogenesis. PMID:25246427

  13. In vivo micro-CT imaging of rat brain glioma: a comparison with 3T MRI and histology.

    PubMed

    Engelhorn, Tobias; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y; Schwarz, Marc A; Karolczak, Marek; Bruenner, Holger; Struffert, Tobias; Kalender, Willi; Doerfler, Arnd

    2009-07-10

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of a novel micro-CT system to image in vivo the extent of tumor in a rat model of malignant glioma compared to 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. Fourteen animals underwent double dose contrast-enhanced imaging with micro-CT and 3T MRI using a clinical machine at day 10 after stereotactic F98 glioma cell implantation. Calculation of the volume of the contrast-uptaking part of the tumor was done by manually outlining the tumor contours by two experienced neuroradiologists. The micro-CT- and MRI-derived tumor volumes were compared to histology as gold standard (hematoxylin and eosin staining and fluorescence staining). There was high interobserver reability regarding the tumor volumes (Crombach's alpha>0.81). Also, there was good correlation of micro-CT- and high-field MRI-derived tumor volumes compared to histology: 72+/-21 mm3 and 69+/-23 mm3 compared to 81+/-14 mm3, respectively (r>0.76). Both the micro-CT- and MRI-derived tumor volumes were not significantly smaller compared to histology (P>0.14). In conclusion, micro-CT allows in vivo imaging of the contrast-enhancing part of experimental gliomas with an accuracy comparable to high-field MRI.

  14. Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Low Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Melanocytic Lesion; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  15. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Yu; Liu, Pin; Zhao, Weiguo

    2016-08-05

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients’ poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. - Highlights: • Nek1 is upregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and cell lines. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with glioma grades and patients’ KPS score. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with patients’ poor overall survival. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 inhibits glioma cell growth. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide.

  16. Further Confirmation of Germline Glioma Risk Variant rs78378222 in TP53 and Its Implication in Tumor Tissues via Integrative Analysis of TCGA Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoming; Rajaraman, Preetha; Melin, Beatrice S.; Chung, Charles C.; Zhang, Weijia; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Michaud, Dominique; Yeager, Meredith; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Andersson, Ulrika; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Carreón, Tania; Feychting, Maria; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Hallmans, Goran; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Inskip, Peter D.; Kitahara, Cari M.; Le Marchand, Loic; Linet, Martha S.; Li, Shengchao; Peters, Ulrike; Purdue, Mark P.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Stampfer, Meir; Stevens, Victoria L.; Visvanathan, Kala; Wang, Sophia S.; White, Emily; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Hoover, Robert; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Hartge, Patricia; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    We confirmed strong association of rs78378222:A>C (per allele odds ratio [OR] = 3.14; P = 6.48 × 10−11), a germline rare single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in TP53, via imputation of a genome-wide association study of glioma (1,856 cases and 4,955 controls). We subsequently performed integrative analyses on the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data for GBM (glioblastoma multiforme) and LUAD (lung adenocarcinoma). Based on SNP data, we imputed genotypes for rs78378222 and selected individuals carrying rare risk allele (C). Using RNA sequencing data, we observed aberrant transcripts with ~3 kb longer than normal for those individuals. Using exome sequencing data, we further showed that loss of haplotype carrying common protective allele (A) occurred somatically in GBM but not in LUAD. Our bioinformatic analysis suggests rare risk allele (C) disrupts mRNA termination, and an allelic loss of a genomic region harboring common protective allele (A) occurs during tumor initiation or progression for glioma. PMID:25907361

  17. LDI-glycerol polyurethane implants exhibit controlled release of DB-67 and anti-tumor activity in vitro against malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Wesley N; Pollack, Ian F; Petoud, Stéphane; Zamboni, William C; Zhang, Jianying; Beckman, Eric J

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a biodegradable and biocompatible polyurethane drug delivery system based on lysine diisocyanate (LDI) and glycerol for the controlled release of 7-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (DB-67). DB-67 has yet to be implemented in any clinical therapies due to the inability to delivered it in sufficient quantities to impact tumor growth and disease progression. To remedy this, DB-67 was covalently incorporated into our delivery system by way of an organometallic urethane catalyst and was found to be dispersed evenly throughout the LDI-glycerol polyurethane discs. Scanning electron micrographs indicate that the LDI-glycerol discs are uniform and possess a pore distribution typical of the non-solvent casting technique used to prepare them. The release rates of DB-67 from the LDI-glycerol discs were found to vary with both time and temperature and were shown capable of delivering therapeutic concentrations of DB-67 in vitro. Cellular proliferation assays demonstrate that empty LDI-glycerol discs alone do not significantly alter the growth of malignant human glioma cell lines (U87, T98G, LN229 and SG388). DB-67-loaded LDI-glycerol polyurethane discs were found to inhibit cellular proliferation by 50% on average in all the malignant glioma cell lines tested. These results clearly demonstrate the long-term, slow release of DB-67 from LDI-glycerol polyurethane discs and their potential for postoperative intracranial chemotherapy of cancers.

  18. Photodynamic therapy mediated by 5-aminolevulinic acid suppresses gliomas growth by decreasing the microvessels.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wei; Xu, Hai-tao; Tian, Dao-feng; Wu, Li-quan; Zhang, Shen-qi; Wang, Long; Ji, Bao-wei; Zhu, Xiao-nan; Okechi, Humphrey; Liu, Gang; Chen, Qian-xue

    2015-04-01

    Although 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been demonstrated to be a novel and effective therapeutic modality for some human malignancies, its effect and mechanism on glioma are still controversial. Previous studies have reported that 5-ALA-PDT induced necrosis of C6 rat glioma cells in vitro. The aim of this study was to further investigate the effect and mechanism of 5-ALA-PDT on C6 gliomas implanted in rats in vivo. Twenty-four rats bearing similar size of subcutaneously implanted C6 rat glioma were randomly divided into 3 groups: receiving 5-ALA-PDT (group A), laser irradiation (group B), and mock procedures but without any treatment (group C), respectively. The growth, histology, microvessel density (MVD), and apoptosis of the grafts in each group were determined after the treatments. As compared with groups B and C, the volume of tumor grafts was significantly reduced (P<0.05), MVD was significantly decreased (P<0.001), and the cellular necrosis was obviously increased in group A. There was no significant difference in apoptosis among the three groups. The in vivo studies confirmed that 5-ALA-PDT may be an effective treatment for gliomas by inhibiting the tumor growth. The mechanism underlying may involve increasing the cellular necrosis but not inducing the cellular apoptosis, which may result from the destruction of the tumor microvessels.

  19. Enhancement of blood-tumor barrier permeability by Sar-[D-Phe8]des-Arg9BK, a metabolically resistant bradykinin B1 agonist, in a rat C6 glioma model

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Ronie Cleverson; Lobão-Soares, Bruno; Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Walz, Roger; Alvarez-Silva, Márcio; Trentin, Andréa Gonçalves; Nicolau, Mauro

    2004-01-01

    Background While it is well known that bradykinin B2 agonists increase plasma protein extravasation (PPE) in brain tumors, the bradykinin B1 agonists tested thus far are unable to produce this effect. Here we examine the effect of the selective B1 agonist bradykinin (BK) Sar-[D-Phe8]des-Arg9BK (SAR), a compound resistant to enzymatic degradation with prolonged activity on PPE in the blood circulation in the C6 rat glioma model. Results SAR administration significantly enhanced PPE in C6 rat brain glioma compared to saline or BK (p < 0.01). Pre-administration of the bradykinin B1 antagonist [Leu8]-des-Arg (100 nmol/Kg) blocked the SAR-induced PPE in the tumor area. Conclusions Our data suggest that the B1 receptor modulates PPE in the blood tumor barrier of C6 glioma. A possible role for the use of SAR in the chemotherapy of gliomas deserves further study. PMID:15458573

  20. Mutant IDH1 and thrombosis in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Dusten; Schwarze, Steven R; Khoury, Laith; Thomas, Cheddhi; Wu, Meijing; Chen, Li; Chen, Rui; Liu, Yinxing; Schwartz, Margaret A; Amidei, Christina; Kumthekar, Priya; Benjamin, Carolina G; Song, Kristine; Dawson, Caleb; Rispoli, Joanne M; Fatterpekar, Girish; Golfinos, John G; Kondziolka, Douglas; Karajannis, Matthias; Pacione, Donato; Zagzag, David; McIntyre, Thomas; Snuderl, Matija; Horbinski, Craig

    2016-12-01

    Mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is common in gliomas, and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG). The full effects of IDH1 mutations on glioma biology and tumor microenvironment are unknown. We analyzed a discovery cohort of 169 World Health Organization (WHO) grade II-IV gliomas, followed by a validation cohort of 148 cases, for IDH1 mutations, intratumoral microthrombi, and venous thromboemboli (VTE). 430 gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas were analyzed for mRNAs associated with coagulation, and 95 gliomas in a tissue microarray were assessed for tissue factor (TF) protein. In vitro and in vivo assays evaluated platelet aggregation and clotting time in the presence of mutant IDH1 or D-2-HG. VTE occurred in 26-30 % of patients with wild-type IDH1 gliomas, but not in patients with mutant IDH1 gliomas (0 %). IDH1 mutation status was the most powerful predictive marker for VTE, independent of variables such as GBM diagnosis and prolonged hospital stay. Microthrombi were far less common within mutant IDH1 gliomas regardless of WHO grade (85-90 % in wild-type versus 2-6 % in mutant), and were an independent predictor of IDH1 wild-type status. Among all 35 coagulation-associated genes, F3 mRNA, encoding TF, showed the strongest inverse relationship with IDH1 mutations. Mutant IDH1 gliomas had F3 gene promoter hypermethylation, with lower TF protein expression. D-2-HG rapidly inhibited platelet aggregation and blood clotting via a novel calcium-dependent, methylation-independent mechanism. Mutant IDH1 glioma engraftment in mice significantly prolonged bleeding time. Our data suggest that mutant IDH1 has potent antithrombotic activity within gliomas and throughout the peripheral circulation. These findings have implications for the pathologic evaluation of gliomas, the effect of altered isocitrate metabolism on tumor microenvironment, and risk assessment of glioma patients for VTE.

  1. A simple, quantitative method using alginate gel to determine rat colonic tumor volume in vivo.

    PubMed

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-04-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the Apc(Pirc/+) rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm³. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained.

  2. A Simple, Quantitative Method Using Alginate Gel to Determine Rat Colonic Tumor Volume In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-01-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the ApcPirc/+ rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm3. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained. PMID:24674588

  3. Canine spontaneous glioma: A translational model system for convection-enhanced delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Peter J.; LeCouteur, Richard A.; Higgins, Robert J.; Bringas, John R.; Larson, Richard F.; Yamashita, Yoji; Krauze, Michal T.; Forsayeth, John; Noble, Charles O.; Drummond, Daryl C.; Kirpotin, Dmitri B.; Park, John W.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2010-01-01

    Canine spontaneous intracranial tumors bear striking similarities to their human tumor counterparts and have the potential to provide a large animal model system for more realistic validation of novel therapies typically developed in small rodent models. We used spontaneously occurring canine gliomas to investigate the use of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of liposomal nanoparticles, containing topoisomerase inhibitor CPT-11. To facilitate visualization of intratumoral infusions by real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we included identically formulated liposomes loaded with Gadoteridol. Real-time MRI defined distribution of infusate within both tumor and normal brain tissues. The most important limiting factor for volume of distribution within tumor tissue was the leakage of infusate into ventricular or subarachnoid spaces. Decreased tumor volume, tumor necrosis, and modulation of tumor phenotype correlated with volume of distribution of infusate (Vd), infusion location, and leakage as determined by real-time MRI and histopathology. This study demonstrates the potential for canine spontaneous gliomas as a model system for the validation and development of novel therapeutic strategies for human brain tumors. Data obtained from infusions monitored in real time in a large, spontaneous tumor may provide information, allowing more accurate prediction and optimization of infusion parameters. Variability in Vd between tumors strongly suggests that real-time imaging should be an essential component of CED therapeutic trials to allow minimization of inappropriate infusions and accurate assessment of clinical outcomes. PMID:20488958

  4. Canine spontaneous glioma: a translational model system for convection-enhanced delivery.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Peter J; LeCouteur, Richard A; Higgins, Robert J; Bringas, John R; Larson, Richard F; Yamashita, Yoji; Krauze, Michal T; Forsayeth, John; Noble, Charles O; Drummond, Daryl C; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Park, John W; Berger, Mitchel S; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2010-09-01

    Canine spontaneous intracranial tumors bear striking similarities to their human tumor counterparts and have the potential to provide a large animal model system for more realistic validation of novel therapies typically developed in small rodent models. We used spontaneously occurring canine gliomas to investigate the use of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of liposomal nanoparticles, containing topoisomerase inhibitor CPT-11. To facilitate visualization of intratumoral infusions by real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we included identically formulated liposomes loaded with Gadoteridol. Real-time MRI defined distribution of infusate within both tumor and normal brain tissues. The most important limiting factor for volume of distribution within tumor tissue was the leakage of infusate into ventricular or subarachnoid spaces. Decreased tumor volume, tumor necrosis, and modulation of tumor phenotype correlated with volume of distribution of infusate (Vd), infusion location, and leakage as determined by real-time MRI and histopathology. This study demonstrates the potential for canine spontaneous gliomas as a model system for the validation and development of novel therapeutic strategies for human brain tumors. Data obtained from infusions monitored in real time in a large, spontaneous tumor may provide information, allowing more accurate prediction and optimization of infusion parameters. Variability in Vd between tumors strongly suggests that real-time imaging should be an essential component of CED therapeutic trials to allow minimization of inappropriate infusions and accurate assessment of clinical outcomes.

  5. Endogenous GABAA receptor activity suppresses glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Blanchart, A; Fernando, R; Häring, M; Assaife-Lopes, N; Romanov, R A; Andäng, M; Harkany, T; Ernfors, P

    2017-02-09

    Although genome alterations driving glioma by fueling cell malignancy have largely been resolved, less is known of the impact of tumor environment on disease progression. Here, we demonstrate functional GABAA receptor-activated currents in human glioblastoma cells and show the existence of a continuous GABA signaling within the tumor cell mass that significantly affects tumor growth and survival expectancy in mouse models. Endogenous GABA released by tumor cells, attenuates proliferation of the glioma cells with enriched expression of stem/progenitor markers and with competence to seed growth of new tumors. Our results suggest that GABA levels rapidly increase in tumors impeding further growth. Thus, shunting chloride ions by a maintained local GABAA receptor activity within glioma cells has a significant impact on tumor development by attenuating proliferation, reducing tumor growth and prolonging survival, a mechanism that may have important impact on therapy resistance and recurrence following tumor resection.

  6. Quantitative MRI for analysis of peritumoral edema in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Warntjes, J. B. Marcel; Smedby, Örjan; Lundberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Damage to the blood-brain barrier with subsequent contrast enhancement is a hallmark of glioblastoma. Non-enhancing tumor invasion into the peritumoral edema is, however, not usually visible on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. New quantitative techniques using relaxometry offer additional information about tissue properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate longitudinal relaxation R1, transverse relaxation R2, and proton density in the peritumoral edema in a group of patients with malignant glioma before surgery to assess whether relaxometry can detect changes not visible on conventional images. Methods In a prospective study, 24 patients with suspected malignant glioma were examined before surgery. A standard MRI protocol was used with the addition of a quantitative MR method (MAGIC), which measured R1, R2, and proton density. The diagnosis of malignant glioma was confirmed after biopsy/surgery. In 19 patients synthetic MR images were then created from the MAGIC scan, and ROIs were placed in the peritumoral edema to obtain the quantitative values. Dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion was used to obtain cerebral blood volume (rCBV) data of the peritumoral edema. Voxel-based statistical analysis was performed using a mixed linear model. Results R1, R2, and rCBV decrease with increasing distance from the contrast-enhancing part of the tumor. There is a significant increase in R1 gradient after contrast agent injection (P < .0001). There is a heterogeneous pattern of relaxation values in the peritumoral edema adjacent to the contrast-enhancing part of the tumor. Conclusion Quantitative analysis with relaxometry of peritumoral edema in malignant gliomas detects tissue changes not visualized on conventional MR images. The finding of decreasing R1 and R2 means shorter relaxation times closer to the tumor, which could reflect tumor invasion into the peritumoral edema. However, these findings need to be validated in the future. PMID

  7. [Controversy on treatments for gliomas].

    PubMed

    Nomura, K

    1998-09-01

    Gliomas are representative primary malignant brain tumors, and with such tumors it is difficult to define the advanced stage. If the advanced stage indicates no curability by surgery alone, most gliomas would belong to this criterion because of their poor prognosis without any completely effective treatment. In this sense, no one could show a standard therapy to treat these unfortunate patients, for example, patients with glioblastoma, they could permit only 1 year survived even they had any applicable treatments to the lesions, these days. Treatment for low-grade gliomas has been most controversial for a long time, and no standard treatments have been determined so far. In this paper, as the treatment of low-grade gliomas it was intended to report what must be done for this patient and the present results of opinion survey for the treatment of gliomas which was done to professors of 80 institutes, from schools of medicine at all universities and medical colleges in Japan. For high-grade gliomas, some effectiveness of radiation therapy was disclosed as well as chemotherapy from recent papers. Gene therapy was also discussed briefly, its present status and future.

  8. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zoe Z.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Sun, David A.; Zhang, Yi Ping; Hunt, Matthew A.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    A major dilemma in brain-tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture, which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of (1) image-based navigation, (2) intraoperative sampling, (3) electrophysiological monitoring, and (4) enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease. PMID:26284196

  9. [Management of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Lévy, S; Chapet, S; Mazeron, J-J

    2014-10-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumors. Their care is difficult because of the proximity of organs at risk. The treatment of glioblastoma includes surgery followed by chemoradiation with the protocol of Stupp et al. The addition of bevacizumab allows an increase in progression-free survival by 4 months but it does not improve overall survival. This treatment is reserved for clinical trials. Intensity modulation radiotherapy may be useful to reduce the neurocognitive late effects in different types of gliomas. In elderly patients an accelerated radiotherapy 40 Gy in 15 fractions allows a similar survival to standard radiotherapy. O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) status may help to choose between chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There is no standard for the treatment of recurrent gliomas. Re-irradiation in stereotactic conditions allows a median survival of 8 to 12.4 months. Anaplastic gliomas with 1p19q mutation have a greater sensibility to chemotherapy by procarbazine, lomustine and vincristine. Chemoradiotherapy in these patients has become the standard treatment. Many studies are underway testing targeted therapies, their place in the therapeutic management and new radiotherapy techniques. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Isocitrate dehydrogenase status and molecular subclasses of glioma and glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Aldape, Kenneth D; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs) that develop from low-grade gliomas are a common and incurable class of brain tumor. Mutations in the metabolic enzyme glioblastomas (IDH1) represent a distinguishing feature of low-grade gliomas and secondary GBMs. IDH1 mutations are one of the most common and earliest detectable genetic alterations in low-grade diffuse gliomas, and evidence supports this mutation as a driver of gliomagenesis. Here, the authors highlight the biological consequences of IDH1 mutations in gliomas, the clinical and therapeutic/diagnostic implications, and the molecular subtypes of these tumors. They also explore, in brief, the non-IDH1-mutated gliomas, including primary GBMs, and the molecular subtypes and drivers of these tumors. A fundamental understanding of the diversity of GBMs and lower-grade gliomas will ultimately allow for more effective treatments and predictors of survival.

  11. Tumor volume, luxury perfusion, and regional blood volume changes in man visualized by subtraction computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Penn, R D; Walser, R; Kurtz, D; Ackerman, L

    1976-04-01

    Computer and photographic methods for producing subtractions of computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scans have been developed. By subtracting point for point a normal scan from one taken after intravenous infusion of contrast material, a picture of the contrast in the cerebral vessels is created. By this method, tumor size and degree of vascularity may be assessed. Furthermore, abnormalities in perfusion and changes in blood volume due to mass effects and edema may be detected. Subtracting scans should add to the diagnostic potential of CAT and provide a noninvasive way to study vascular changes in cerebral disease.

  12. Comparison of Cerebral Blood Volume and Plasma Volume in Untreated Intracranial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, Joana; Eldeniz, Cihat; An, Hongyu; Lee, Yueh Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Plasma volume and blood volume are imaging-derived parameters that are often used to evaluation intracranial tumors. Physiologically, these parameters are directly related, but their two different methods of measurements, T1-dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)- and T2-dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MR utilize different model assumptions and approaches. This poses the question of whether the interchangeable use of T1-DCE-MRI derived fractionated plasma volume (vp) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) assessed using DSC-MRI, particularly in glioblastoma, is reliable, and if this relationship can be generalized to other types of brain tumors. Our goal was to examine the hypothetical correlation between these parameters in three most common intracranial tumor types. Methods Twenty-four newly diagnosed, treatment naïve brain tumor patients, who had undergone DCE- and DSC-MRI, were classified in three histologically proven groups: glioblastoma (n = 7), meningioma (n = 9), and intraparenchymal metastases (n = 8). The rCBV was obtained from DSC after normalization with the normal-appearing anatomically symmetrical contralateral white matter. Correlations between these parameters were evaluated using Pearson (r), Spearman's (ρ) and Kendall’s tau-b (τB) rank correlation coefficient. Results The Pearson, Spearman and Kendall’s correlation between vp with rCBV were r = 0.193, ρ = 0.253 and τB = 0.33 (p-Pearson = 0.326, p-Spearman = 0.814 and p-Kendall = 0.823) in glioblastoma, r = -0.007, ρ = 0.051 and τB = 0.135 (p-Pearson = 0.970, p-Spearman = 0.765 and p-Kendall = 0.358) in meningiomas, and r = 0.289, ρ = 0.228 and τB = 0.239 (p-Pearson = 0.109, p-Spearman = 0.210 and p-Kendall = 0.095) in metastasis. Conclusion Results indicate that no correlation exists between vp with rCBV in glioblastomas, meningiomas and intraparenchymal metastatic lesions. Consequently, these parameters, as calculated in this study, should not be used interchangeably in

  13. MicroRNA in Human Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengfeng; Li, Jun; Liu, Lei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Glioma represents a serious health problem worldwide. Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeting therapy, the disease remains one of the most lethal malignancies in humans, and new approaches to improvement of the efficacy of anti-glioma treatments are urgently needed. Thus, new therapeutic targets and tools should be developed based on a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glioma. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, play a pivotal role in the development of the malignant phenotype of glioma cells, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, tumor angiogenesis, and stem cell generation. This review will discuss the biological functions of miRNAs in human glioma and their implications in improving clinical diagnosis, prediction of prognosis, and anti-glioma therapy. PMID:24202447

  14. Dynamic contrast enhancement of experimental glioma an intra-individual comparative study to assess the optimal time delay.

    PubMed

    Engelhorn, Tobias; Schwarz, Marc A; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y; Kloska, Stephan P; Struffert, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare tumor signal and contrast media uptake characteristics on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences at 3 Tesla over 30 minutes after double-dose administration of different contrast agents in an animal model of brain glioma. Nine rats underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after stereotactic F98 glioma cell implantation before and repetitively for 30 minutes after injection of gadobutrol, gadopentetate, and gadobenate, respectively. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and tumor contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were evaluated and MRI-derived tumor volumes were compared to histology. Postcontrast tumor SNR and CNR peaked at 4 minutes after contrast application. While contrast-enhancement within the tumor was fading, tumor volume increased by continuous contrast-uptake of peripheral parts between 4 minutes (137 + or - 29 mm(3), 126 + or - 16 mm(3), 141 + or - 24 mm(3)) and 20 minutes (182 + or - 35 mm(3), 164 + or - 32 mm(3), 191 + or - 25 mm(3)), respectively. At 8 and 12 minutes, 84% and 91% of the tumor volume were definable, respectively. Optimal correlation between MRI-derived tumor volume and histology is achieved by imaging up to 20 minutes after contrast application. At 4 minutes (this delay is mostly used in clinical routine), only 75% of the enhancing tumor volume is assessable. A delay of 8 minutes already reveals 84% of the tumor and seems to be a practical clinical compromise. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Up-regulation of USP2a and FASN in gliomas correlates strongly with glioma grade.

    PubMed

    Tao, Bang-Bao; He, Hua; Shi, Xiu-hua; Wang, Chun-lin; Li, Wei-qing; Li, Bing; Dong, Yan; Hu, Guo-Han; Hou, Li-Jun; Luo, Chun; Chen, Ju-xiang; Chen, Huai-rui; Yu, Yu-hong; Sun, Qing-fang; Lu, Yi-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Gliomas are the most common neoplasms in the central nervous system. The lack of efficacy of glioma therapies necessitates in-depth studies of glioma pathology, especially of the underlying molecular mechanisms that transform normal glial cells into tumor cells. Here we report that a deubiquitinating enzyme, ubiquitin-specific protease 2a (USP2a), and its substrate, fatty acid synthase (FASN), are over-expressed in glioma tissue. Using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression and cellular distribution of USP2a and FASN in human glioma tissues. The expression patterns of USP2a and FASN correlated with the pathologic and clinical characteristics of the patients. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of USP2a and its substrate FASN were higher in high-grade (World Health Organization [WHO] grades III and IV) glioma tissues than in low-grade (WHO grades I and II) glioma tissues. Western blot analysis indicated that the average optical densitometry ratio of USP2a and its substrate FASN in high-grade gliomas was higher than in low-grade gliomas. Moreover, statistical analysis of grade-classified glioma samples showed that the level of USP2a and FASN expression increased with the elevation of the WHO grade of glioma. USP2a protein expression was detected in the nucleus of glioma tissues and an increase in expression was significantly associated with the elevation of the WHO grade of glioma by immunohistochemistry. These findings expand our understanding of the molecular profiling of glioma and could shed light on new diagnostic criteria for gliomas.

  16. 3-D imaging mass spectrometry of protein distributions in mouse Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1)-associated optic glioma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David M G; Van de Plas, Raf; Rose, Kristie L; Hill, Salisha; Schey, Kevin L; Solga, Anne C; Gutmann, David H; Caprioli, Richard M

    2016-10-21

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common neurogenetic disorder, in which affected individuals develop tumors of the nervous system. Children with NF1 are particularly prone to brain tumors (gliomas) involving the optic pathway that can result in impaired vision. Since tumor formation and expansion requires a cooperative tumor microenvironment, it is important to identify the cellular and acellular components associated with glioma development and growth. In this study, we used 3-D matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) to measure the distributions of multiple molecular species throughout optic nerve tissue in mice with and without glioma, and to explore their spatial relationships within the 3-D volume of the optic nerve and chiasm. 3-D IMS studies often involve extensive workflows due to the high volume of sections required to generate high quality 3-D images. Herein, we present a workflow for 3-D data acquisition and volume reconstruction using mouse optic nerve tissue. The resulting 3-D IMS data yield both molecular similarities and differences between glioma-bearing and wild-type (WT) tissues, including protein distributions localizing to different anatomical subregions.

  17. Glutamine Metabolism in Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Szeliga, Monika; Albrecht, Jan

    2016-01-01

    By histological, morphological criteria, and malignancy, brain tumors are classified by WHO into grades I (most benign) to IV (highly malignant), and gliomas are the most frequently occurring class throughout the grades. Similar to peripheral tumors, the growth of glia-derived tumor cells largely depends on glutamine (Gln), which is vividly taken up by the cells, using mostly ASCT2 and SN1 as Gln carriers. Tumor growth-promoting effects of Gln are associated with its phosphate-activated glutaminase (GA) (specifically KGA)-mediated degradation to glutamate (Glu) and/or with its entry to the energy- and intermediate metabolite-generating pathways related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. However, a subclass of liver-type GA are absent in glioma cells, a circumstance which allows phenotype manipulations upon their transfection to the cells. Gln-derived Glu plays a major role in promoting tumor proliferation and invasion. Glu is relatively inefficiently recycled to Gln and readily leaves the cells by exchange with the extracellular pool of the glutathione (GSH) precursor Cys mediated by xc- transporter. This results in (a) cell invasion-fostering interaction of Glu with ionotropic Glu receptors in the surrounding tissue, (b) intracellular accumulation of GSH which increases tumor resistance to radio- and chemotherapy.

  18. Wnt inhibition is dysregulated in gliomas and its re-establishment inhibits proliferation and tumor sphere formation.

    PubMed

    Kierulf-Vieira, Kirsten Strømme; Sandberg, Cecilie J; Grieg, Zanina; Günther, Clara-Cecilie; Langmoen, Iver A; Vik-Mo, Einar O

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that the growth of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant primary brain cancer, is driven by glioma stem cells (GSCs) resistant to current treatment. As Wnt-signaling is pivotal in stem cell maintenance, we wanted to explore its role in GSCs with the objective of finding distinct signaling mechanisms that could serve as potential therapeutic targets. We compared gene expression in GSCs (n=9) and neural stem cells from the adult human brain (ahNSC; n=3) to identify dysregulated genes in the Wnt signaling pathway. This identified a six-gene Wnt signature present in all nine primary GSC cultures, and the combined expression of three of these genes (SFRP1, SFRP4 and FZD7) reduced median survival of glioma patients from 38 to 17 months. Treatment with recombinant SFRP1 protein in primary cell cultures downregulated nuclear β-catenin and decreased in vitro proliferation and sphere formation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, expressional and functional analysis of SFRP1-treated GSCs revealed that SFRP1 halts cell cycling and induces apoptosis. These observations demonstrate that Wnt signaling is dysregulated in GSC, and that inhibition of the Wnt pathway could serve as a therapeutic strategy in the treatment of GBM. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Convection-enhanced Delivery of Therapeutics for Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Ryuta; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2017-01-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) circumvents the blood–brain barrier by delivering agents directly into the tumor and surrounding parenchyma. CED can achieve large volumes of distribution by continuous positive-pressure infusion. Although promising as an effective drug delivery method in concept, the administration of therapeutic agents via CED is not without challenges. Limitations of distribution remain a problem in large brains, such as those of humans. Accurate and consistent delivery of an agent is another challenge associated with CED. Similar to the difficulties caused by immunosuppressive environments associated with gliomas, there are several mechanisms that make effective local drug distribution difficult in malignant gliomas. In this review, methods for local drug application targeting gliomas are discussed with special emphasis on CED. Although early clinical trials have failed to demonstrate the efficacy of CED against gliomas, CED potentially can be a platform for translating the molecular understanding of glioblastomas achieved in the laboratory into effective clinical treatments. Several clinical studies using CED of chemotherapeutic agents are ongoing. Successful delivery of effective agents should prove the efficacy of CED in the near future. PMID:27980285

  20. SU-E-J-79: Internal Tumor Volume Motion and Volume Size Assessment Using 4D CT Lung Data

    SciTech Connect

    Jurkovic, I; Stathakis, S; Li, Y; Patel, A; Vincent, J; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess internal tumor volume change through breathing cycle and associated tumor motion using the 4DCT data. Methods: Respiration induced volume change through breathing cycle and associated motion was analyzed for nine patients that were scanned during the different respiratory phases. The examined datasets were the maximum and average intensity projections (MIP and AIP) and the 10 phases of the respiratory cycle. The internal target volume (ITV) was delineated on each of the phases and the planning target volume (PTV) was then created by adding setup margins to the ITV. Tumor motion through the phases was assessed using the acquired 4DCT dataset, which was then used to determine if the margins used for the ITV creation successfully encompassed the tumor in three dimensions. Results: Results showed that GTV motion along the superior inferior axes was the largest in all the cases independent of the tumor location and/or size or the use of abdomen compression. The extent of the tumor motion was found to be connected with the size of the GTV. The smallest GTVs exhibited largest motion vector independent of the tumor location. The motion vector size varied through the phases depending on the tumor size and location and it was smallest for phases 20 and 30. The smaller the volume of the delineated GTV, the greater its volume difference through the different respiratory phases was. The average GTV volume change was largest for the phases 60 and 70. Conclusion: Even if GTV is delineated using both AIP and MIP datasets, its motion extent will exceed the used margins especially for the very small GTV volumes. When the GTV size is less than 10 cc it is recommended to use fusion of the GTVs through all the phases to create the planning ITV.

  1. The H3.3 K27M mutation results in a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas than thalamic gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Hao, Shuyu; Pan, Changcun; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting; Yan, Hai; Zhang, Liwei; Wan, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Brainstem and thalamic gliomas are rare, and they are poorly understood in adults. Genetic aberrations that occur in these tumors are still unknown. In this study, we investigated whether thalamic gliomas have different genetic aberrations and clinical outcomes compared with brainstem gliomas in adults. Forty-three glioma samples were selected, including 28 brainstem and 15 thalamic gliomas. The frequency of the K27M mutation in adult midline gliomas was 58.1%. High-grade gliomas in the thalamus were statistically significantly more numerous than brainstem gliomas. Patients with K27M mutant brainstem gliomas had a significantly shorter overall survival than patients with wild-type tumors (P = .020) by Cox regression after adjustment for other independent risk factors. However, there was no statistical tendency toward a poorer overall survival in thalamic gliomas containing the K27M mutation compared with wild-type tumors. The presence of the K27M mutation significantly corresponded with mutations in TP53 in thalamic gliomas. Interestingly, the K27M mutation was mutually exclusive with mutations in IDH1, which was detected only in brainstem gliomas. The microarray data identified 86 differentially expressed genes between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with the K27M mutation. The cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) gene, which plays an important role in cancer pathways, was found to be differentially expressed between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with K27M mutations. Although the K27M mutation was frequently observed in adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, this mutation tended to be associated with a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas but not in thalamic gliomas. Brainstem gliomas may present different genetic aberrations from thalamic gliomas. These differences may provide guidance for therapeutic decisions for the treatment of adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, which may have different molecular targets.

  2. [Classification and documentation of diffuse gliomas].

    PubMed

    Romeike, B F M

    2007-06-01

    Most current grading systems of diffuse gliomas are based solely on the microscopic evaluation of surgical specimens and the TNM classification does not have a value for brain tumors. Here additional parameters are presented, which are suitable for a classification and documentation of diffuse gliomas. As additional parameters to the WHO typing and grading we discuss age groups, different tumor devolutions, circumstances such as a second malignant neoplasm or hereditary tumors, tumor expansion based on anatomically defined brain regions, Karnofsky Scale, eloquence of the brain regions, diag-nostic certainty and informativity of tissue samples. This work shows that clinical data and imaging studies can contribute substantially to the classification of diffuse gliomas. The additional parameters presented here constitute a significant improvement of glioma documentation. Especially complex courses of long duration and repeated therapeutic interventions can be better surveyed and digitally processed.

  3. Synergistic antitumor effect with indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase inhibition and temozolomide in a murine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Hanihara, Mitsuto; Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Oh-Oka, Kyoko; Mitsuka, Kentaro; Nakao, Atsuhito; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a key enzyme of tryptophan (Trp) metabolism, is involved in tumor-derived immune suppression through depletion of Trp and accumulation of the metabolite kynurenine, resulting in inactivation of natural killer cells and generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). It has been reported that high expression of IDO in cancer cells is associated with suppression of the antitumor immune response and is consistent with a poor prognosis. Thus, IDO may be a therapeutic target for malignant cancer. The authors have recently shown that IDO expression is markedly increased in human glioblastoma and secondary glioblastoma with malignant change, suggesting that IDO targeting may also have therapeutic potential for patients with glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of IDO inhibition and to examine the synergistic function of IDO inhibitor and temozolomide (TMZ) in a murine glioma model. METHODS Murine glioma GL261 cells and human glioma U87 cells were included in this study. The authors used 3 mouse models to study glioma cell growth: 1) a subcutaneous ectopic model, 2) a syngeneic intracranial orthotopic model, and 3) an allogenic intracranial orthotopic model. IDO inhibition was achieved via knockdown of IDO in GL261 cells using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and through oral administration of the IDO inhibitor, 1-methyl-l-tryptophan (1-MT). Tumor volume in the subcutaneous model and survival time in the intracranial model were evaluated. RESULTS In the subcutaneous model, oral administration of 1-MT significantly suppressed tumor growth, and synergistic antitumor effects of 1-MT and TMZ were observed (p < 0.01). Mice containing intracranially inoculated IDO knockdown cells had a significantly longer survival period as compared with control mice (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that IDO expression is implicated in immunosuppression and tumor progression in glioma cells. Therefore, combining IDO

  4. Canine spinal cord glioma.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Barber, Renee; Burnum, Annabelle; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord glioma is uncommonly reported in dogs. We describe the clinicopathologic and diagnostic features of 7 cases of canine spinal cord glioma and briefly review the veterinary literature on this topic. The median age at presentation was 7.2 y. Six females and 1 male were affected and 4 dogs were brachycephalic. The clinical course lasted from 3 d to 12 wk, and clinical signs were progressive and associated with multiple suspected neuroanatomic locations in the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging of 6 cases revealed T2-weighted hyperintense lesions with variable contrast enhancement in the spinal cord. All dogs had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of intraparenchymal neoplasia or myelitis based on history, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Euthanasia was elected in all cases because of poor outcome despite anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive treatment or because of poor prognosis at the time of diagnosis. Tumor location during autopsy ranged from C1 to L6, with no clear predilection for a specific spinal cord segment. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the immunohistochemistry expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, and Ki-67. Diagnoses consisted of 4 cases of oligodendroglioma, 2 cases of gliomatosis cerebri, and 1 astrocytoma. This case series further defines the clinicopathologic features of canine spinal glioma and highlights the need for comprehensive immunohistochemistry in addition to routine histopathology to confirm the diagnosis of these tumors.

  5. Plerixafor After Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High Grade Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglial Tumors; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET)

  6. Emerging targeted therapies for glioma.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie J; Wen, Patrick Y

    2016-12-01

    Gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Despite aggressive treatment with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, these tumors are incurable and invariably recur. Molecular characterization of these tumors in recent years has advanced our understanding of gliomagenesis and offered an array of pathways that can be specifically targeted. Areas covered: The most commonly dysregulated signaling pathways found in gliomas will be discussed, as well as the biologic importance of these disrupted pathways and how each may contribute to tumor development. Our knowledge regarding these pathways are most relevant to Grade IV glioma/glioblastoma, but we will also discuss genomic categorization of low grade glioma. Further, drugs targeting single pathways, which have undergone early phase clinical trials will be reviewed, followed by an in depth discussion of emerging treatments on the horizon, which will include inhibitors of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and receptor tyrosine kinases, Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase (PI3K), angiogenesis, cell cycle and mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations. Expert opinion: Results from single agent targeted therapy trials have been modest. Lack of efficacy may stem from a combination of poor blood brain barrier penetration, the genetically heterogeneous make-up of the tumors and the emergence of resistance mechanisms. These factors can be overcome by rational drug design that capitalizes on ways to target critical pathways and limits upregulation of redundant pathways.

  7. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes. PMID:27782153

  8. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-10-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes.

  9. Sensitivity Analysis of the MGMT-STP27 Model and Impact of Genetic and Epigenetic Context to Predict the MGMT Methylation Status in Gliomas and Other Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bady, Pierre; Delorenzi, Mauro; Hegi, Monika E

    2016-05-01

    The methylation status of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene is an important predictive biomarker for benefit from alkylating agent therapy in glioblastoma. Our model MGMT-STP27 allows prediction of the methylation status of the MGMT promoter using data from the Illumina's Human Methylation BeadChips (HM-27K and HM-450K) that is publically available for many cancer data sets. Here, we investigate the impact of the context of genetic and epigenetic alterations and tumor type on the classification and report on technical aspects, such as robustness of cutoff definition and preprocessing of the data. The association between gene copy number variation, predicted MGMT methylation, and MGMT expression revealed a gene dosage effect on MGMT expression in lower grade glioma (World Health Organization grade II/III) that in contrast to glioblastoma usually carry two copies of chromosome 10 on which MGMT resides (10q26.3). This implies some MGMT expression, potentially conferring residual repair function blunting the therapeutic effect of alkylating agents. A sensitivity analyses corroborated the performance of the original cutoff for various optimization criteria and for most data preprocessing methods. Finally, we propose an R package mgmtstp27 that allows prediction of the methylation status of the MGMT promoter and calculation of appropriate confidence and/or prediction intervals. Overall, MGMT-STP27 is a robust model for MGMT classification that is independent of tumor type and is adapted for single sample prediction.

  10. Tumor volume as a prognostic factor for local control and overall survival in advanced larynx cancer.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Adriana J; Lange, Charlotte A H; de Bois, Josien A; van Werkhoven, Erik; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Hilgers, Frans J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2016-02-01

    Tumor volume has been postulated to be an important prognostic factor for oncological outcome after radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. This postulate was retrospectively investigated in a consecutively treated cohort of T3-T4 larynx cancer patients. Retrospective cohort study. For 166 patients with T3-T4 larynx cancer (1999-2008), pretreatment computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans were available for tumor volume delineation. Patients were treated with radiotherapy, chemoradiotherapy, or total laryngectomy with postoperative radiotherapy. Both a dedicated head and neck radiologist and the first author determined all tumor volumes. Statistical analysis was by Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazard models. Patients with T3 larynx cancer had significantly smaller tumor volumes than patients with T4 larynx cancer (median = 8.1 cm(3) and 15.8 cm(3), respectively; P < .0001). In the group treated with total laryngectomy and postoperative radiotherapy, no association was found between tumor volume and local or locoregional control or overall survival. In the group treated with radiotherapy, a nonsignificant trend was observed between local control and tumor volume. In the chemoradiotherapy group, however, a significant impact of tumor volume was found on local control (hazard ratio = 1.07; 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.13; P = .028). Tumor volume was not significantly associated with local control, locoregional control, or overall survival in the surgically treated group. In the group treated with radiotherapy, there was no statistically significant association, but a trend was observed between local control and tumor volume. Only in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy was a significant impact of tumor volume on local control found. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  12. Impact of [18F]-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine PET imaging on target definition for radiation therapy of high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Munck af Rosenschold, Per; Costa, Junia; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Lundemann, Michael J.; Law, Ian; Ohlhues, Lars; Engelholm, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to assess the impact of amino-acid 18F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine (FET) positron emission tomography (PET) on the volumetric target definition for radiation therapy of high-grade glioma versus the current standard using MRI alone. Specifically, we investigated the influence of tumor grade, MR-defined tumor volume, and the extent of surgical resection on PET positivity. Methods Fifty-four consecutive high-grade glioma patients (World Health Organization grades III–IV) with confirmed histology were scanned using FET-PET/CT and T1 and T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery MRI. Gross tumor volume and clinical target volumes (CTVs) were defined in a blinded fashion based on MRI and subsequently PET, and volumetric analysis was performed. The extent of the surgical resection was reviewed using postoperative MRI. Results Overall, for ∼90% of the patients, the PET-positive volumes were encompassed by T1 MRI with contrast-defined tumor plus a 20-mm margin. The tumor volume defined by PET was larger for glioma grade IV (P < .001) and smaller for patients with more extensive surgical resection (P = .004). The margin required to be added to the MRI-defined tumor in order to fully encompass the FET-PET positive volume tended to be larger for grade IV tumors (P = .018). Conclusion With an unchanged CTV margin and by including FET-PET for gross tumor volume definition, the CTV will increase moderately for most patients, and quite substantially for a minority of patients. Patients with grade IV glioma were found to be the primary candidates for PET-guided radiation therapy planning. PMID:25537018

  13. Statistical evaluation of manual segmentation of a diffuse low-grade glioma MRI dataset.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Meriem; Blonski, Marie; Wantz-Mezieres, Sophie; Gaudeau, Yann; Taillandier, Luc; Moureaux, Jean-Marie

    2016-08-01

    Software-based manual segmentation is critical to the supervision of diffuse low-grade glioma patients and to the optimal treatment's choice. However, manual segmentation being time-consuming, it is difficult to include it in the clinical routine. An alternative to circumvent the time cost of manual segmentation could be to share the task among different practitioners, providing it can be reproduced. The goal of our work is to assess diffuse low-grade gliomas' manual segmentation's reproducibility on MRI scans, with regard to practitioners, their experience and field of expertise. A panel of 13 experts manually segmented 12 diffuse low-grade glioma clinical MRI datasets using the OSIRIX software. A statistical analysis gave promising results, as the practitioner factor, the medical specialty and the years of experience seem to have no significant impact on the average values of the tumor volume variable.

  14. Evaluation of an Automatic Registration-Based Algorithm for Direct Measurement of Volume Change in Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Saradwata; Johnson, Timothy D.; Ma, Bing; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Bland, Peyton H.; Park, Hyunjin; Schott, Anne F.; Ross, Brian D.; Meyer, Charles R.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Assuming that early tumor volume change is a biomarker for response to therapy, accurate quantification of early volume changes could aid in adapting an individual patient's therapy and lead to shorter clinical trials. We investigated an image registration-based approach for tumor volume change quantification that may more reliably detect smaller changes that occur in shorter intervals than can be detected by existing algorithms. Methods and Materials: Variance and bias of the registration-based approach were evaluated using retrospective, in vivo, very-short-interval diffusion magnetic resonance imaging scans where true zero tumor volume change is unequivocally known and synthetic data, respectively. The interval scans were nonlinearly registered using two similarity measures: mutual information (MI) and normalized cross-correlation (NCC). Results: The 95% confidence interval of the percentage volume change error was (-8.93% to 10.49%) for MI-based and (-7.69%, 8.83%) for NCC-based registrations. Linear mixed-effects models demonstrated that error in measuring volume change increased with increase in tumor volume and decreased with the increase in the tumor's normalized mutual information, even when NCC was the similarity measure being optimized during registration. The 95% confidence interval of the relative volume change error for the synthetic examinations with known changes over {+-}80% of reference tumor volume was (-3.02% to 3.86%). Statistically significant bias was not demonstrated. Conclusion: A low-noise, low-bias tumor volume change measurement algorithm using nonlinear registration is described. Errors in change measurement were a function of tumor volume and the normalized mutual information content of the tumor.

  15. Inter-Fraction Tumor Volume Response during Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Correlated to Patient Variables.

    PubMed

    Salamekh, Samer; Rong, Yi; Ayan, Ahmet S; Mo, Xiaokui; Williams, Terence M; Mayr, Nina A; Grecula, John C; Chakravarti, Arnab; Xu-Welliver, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Analyze inter-fraction volumetric changes of lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and determine if the volume changes during treatment can be predicted and thus considered in treatment planning. Kilo-voltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT) images obtained immediately prior to each fraction were used to monitor inter-fraction volumetric changes of 15 consecutive patients (18 lung nodules) treated with lung SBRT at our institution (45-54 Gy in 3-5 fractions) in the year of 2011-2012. Spearman's (ρ) correlation and Spearman's partial correlation analysis was performed with respect to patient/tumor and treatment characteristics. Multiple hypothesis correction was performed using False Discovery Rate (FDR) and q-values were reported. All tumors studied experienced volume change during treatment. Tumor increased in volume by an average of 15% and regressed by an average of 11%. The overall volume increase during treatment is contained within the planning target volume (PTV) for all tumors. Larger tumors increased in volume more than smaller tumors during treatment (q = 0.0029). The volume increase on CBCT was correlated to the treatment planning gross target volume (GTV) as well as internal target volumes (ITV) (q = 0.0085 and q = 0.0039 respectively) and could be predicted for tumors with a GTV less than 22 mL. The volume increase was correlated to the integral dose (ID) in the ITV at every fraction (q = 0.0049). The peak inter-fraction volume occurred at an earlier fraction in younger patients (q = 0.0122). We introduced a new analysis method to follow inter-fraction tumor volume changes and determined that the observed changes during lung SBRT treatment are correlated to the initial tumor volume, integral dose (ID), and patient age. Furthermore, the volume increase during treatment of tumors less than 22mL can be predicted during treatment planning. The volume increase remained significantly less than the overall PTV expansion, and radiation re

  16. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormuth, David A., II; Weis, Jared A.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Miga, Michael I.; Rericha, Erin C.; Quaranta, Vito; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    Reaction-diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction-diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction-diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error <8.8%, Dice >0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction-diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocol Optimization for Delineation of Gross Tumor Volume in Hypopharyngeal and Laryngeal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Verduijn, Gerda M.; Bartels, Lambertus W. Ph.D.; Pameijer, Frank A.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To optimize the use of MRI for delineation of gross tumor volume for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal tumors. Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance images (T1 weighted and T2 weighted) of a healthy volunteer were acquired using a 1.5 T and 3.0 T MR scanner. Various receiver coils were investigated that were compatible with the immobilization mask needed for reliable coregistration with computed tomography data. For the optimal receiver coil, the influence of resolution, slice thickness, and strength of magnetic field on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was studied. Feasibility of the definitive protocol was tested on patients with hypopharyngeal (n = 19) and laryngeal (n = 42) carcinoma. Results: Large differences in SNR were obtained for the various coils. The SNR values obtained using surface coils that were compatible with the immobilization mask were three times higher than those obtained using a standard head-and-neck coil and five times higher than those obtained using a body coil. High-resolution images (0.4 x 0.4 x 4 mm{sup 3}) showed superior anatomic detail and resulted in a 4-min scan time. Image quality at 3.0 T was not significantly better compared with 1.5 T. In 3 patients the MR study could not be performed; for 5 patients images were severely deteriorated by motion artefacts. High-quality MR images were obtained in 53 patients. Conclusions: High-resolution MR images of the hypopharynx and larynx can be obtained in the majority of patients using surface receiver coils in combination with the radiotherapy mask. These MR images can be successfully used for tumor delineation in radiotherapy.

  18. Gross tumor volume and clinical target volume in prostate cancer: How do satellites relate to the index lesion.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, Birgit G; van Triest, Baukelien; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Groenendaal, Greetje; de Jong, Jeroen; van der Poel, Henk G; van der Heide, Uulke A

    2015-04-01

    There is an increasing interest for dose differentiation in prostate radiotherapy. The purpose of our study was to analyze the spatial distribution of tumor satellites inside the prostate. 61 prostatectomy specimens were stained with H&E. Tumor regions were delineated by the uro-pathologist. Volumes, distances and cell densities of all delineated tumor regions were measured and further analyzed. Multifocal disease was seen in 84% of the patients. The median number of tumor foci was 3. The median distance between the index lesion and the satellites was 1.0 cm, with a maximum of 4.4 cm. The index lesions accounted for 88% of the total tumor volume. The contribution of tumor foci<0.1 cm(3) to the total tumor volume was 2%. The median cell density of the index lesion and all satellites, regardless of size, were significantly higher than that of the prostate. Satellites do not appear in a limited margin around the index lesion (GTV). Consequently, a fixed CTV margin would not effectively cover all satellites. Thus if the aim is to treat all tumor foci, the entire prostate gland should be considered CTV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Water permeability through aquaporin-4 is regulated by protein kinase C and becomes rate-limiting for glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    McCoy, E S; Haas, B R; Sontheimer, H

    2010-07-28

    Glial-derived tumors, gliomas, are highly invasive cancers that invade normal brain through the extracellular space. To navigate the tortuous extracellular spaces, cells undergo dynamic changes in cell volume, which entails water flux across the membrane through aquaporins (AQPs). Two members of this family, AQP1 and AQP4 are highly expressed in primary brain tumor biopsies and both have a consensus phosphorylation site for protein kinase C (PKC), which is a known regulator of glioma cell invasion. AQP4 colocalizes with PKC to the leading edge of invading processes and clustered with chloride channel (ClC2) and K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter 1 (KCC1), believed to provide the pathways for Cl(-) and K(+) secretion to accomplish volume changes. Using D54MG glioma cells stably transfected with either AQP1 or AQP4, we show that PKC activity regulates water permeability through phosphorylation of AQP4. Activation of PKC with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or thrombin enhanced AQP4 phosphorylation, reduced water permeability and significantly decreased cell invasion. Conversely, inhibition of PKC activity with chelerythrine reduced AQP4 phosphorylation, enhanced water permeability and significantly enhanced tumor invasion. PKC regulation of AQP4 was lost after mutational inactivation of the consensus PKC phosphorylation site S180A. Interestingly, AQP1 expressing glioma cells, by contrast, were completely unaffected by changes in PKC activity. To demonstrate a role for AQPs in glioma invasion in vivo, cells selectively expressing AQP1, AQP4 or the mutated S180A-AQP4 were implanted intracranially into SCID mice. AQP4 expressing glioma cells showed significantly reduced invasion compared to AQP1 and S180 expressing tumors as determined by quantitative stereology, consistent with a differential role for AQP1 and AQP4 in this process. Copyright (c) 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Postirradiation cerebellar glioma. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Raffel, C.; Edwards, M.S.; Davis, R.L.; Ablin, A.R.

    1985-02-01

    A 13-year-old girl developed an anaplastic astrocytoma of the cerebellum 7 years after irradiation of the central nervous system and prophylactic chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The fact that the astrocytoma was anaplastic and infiltrative was unusual for astroglial tumors at this site. It is proposed that this is a radiation-induced glioma.

  1. Assessment of interpatient heterogeneity in tumor radiosensitivity for nonsmall cell lung cancer using tumor-volume variation data

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, Alexei V. Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Mayr, Nina; Yartsev, Slav

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous work, the authors showed that a distribution of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients could be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. In this research study, the authors show that this algorithm can be applied to other tumors, specifically in nonsmall cell lung cancer. This new application includes larger patient volumes and includes comparison of data sets obtained at independent institutions. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage computed tomography. Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} and clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T{sub 1/2} have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population model of tumor response and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Nonsmall cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} for nonsmall cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Conclusions: The data obtained

  2. Occupation and adult gliomas.

    PubMed

    Carozza, S E; Wrensch, M; Miike, R; Newman, B; Olshan, A F; Savitz, D A; Yost, M; Lee, M

    2000-11-01

    Lifetime job histories from a population-based, case-control study of gliomas diagnosed among adults in the San Francisco Bay area between August 1991 and April 1994 were evaluated to assess occupational risk factors. Occupational data for 476 cases and 462 controls were analyzed, with adjustment for age, gender, education, and race. Imprecise increased risks were observed for physicians and surgeons (odds ratio (OR) = 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7, 17.6), artists (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 0.5, 6.5), foundry and smelter workers (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 13.1), petroleum and gas workers (OR = 4.9, 95% CI: 0.6, 42.2), and painters (OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 4.9). Legal and social service workers, shippers, janitors, motor vehicle operators, and aircraft operators had increased odds ratios only with longer duration of employment. Physicians and surgeons, foundry and smelter workers, petroleum and gas workers, and painters showed increased risk for both astrocytic and nonastrocytic tumors. Artists and firemen had increased risk for astrocytic tumors only, while messengers, textile workers, aircraft operators, and vehicle manufacturing workers showed increased risk only for nonastrocytic tumors. Despite study limitations, including small numbers for many of the occupational groups, a high percentage of proxy respondents among cases, and lack of specific exposure information, associations were observed for several occupations previously reported to be at higher risk for brain tumors generally and gliomas specifically.

  3. Acute Temporal Changes of MRI-Tracked Tumor Vascular Parameters after Combined Anti-angiogenic and Radiation Treatments in a Rat Glioma Model: Identifying Signatures of Synergism.

    PubMed

    Elmghirbi, Rasha; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N; Brown, Stephen L; Panda, Swayamprava; Aryal, Madhava P; Keenan, Kelly A; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Cabral, Glauber; Ewing, James R

    2017-01-01

    In this study we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers to monitor the acute temporal changes in tumor vascular physiology with the aim of identifying the vascular signatures that predict response to combined anti-angiogenic and radiation treatments. Forty-three athymic rats implanted with orthotopic U-251 glioma cells were studied for approximately 21 days after implantation. Two MRI studies were performed on each animal, pre- and post-treatment, to measure tumor vascular parameters. Two animal groups received treatment comprised of Cilengitide, an anti-angiogenic agent and radiation. The first group received a subcurative regimen of Cilengitide 1 h before irradiation, while the second group received a curative regimen of Cilengitide 8 h before irradiation. Cilengitide was given as a single dose (4 mg/kg; intraperitoneal) after the pretreatment MRI study and before receiving a 20 Gy radiation dose. After irradiation, the post-treatment MRI study was performed at selected time points: 2, 4, 8 and 12 h (n = ≥5 per time point). Significant changes in vascular parameters were observed at early time points after combined treatments in both treatment groups (1 and 8 h). The temporal changes in vascular parameters in the first group (treated 1 h before exposure) resembled a previously reported pattern associated with radiation exposure alone. Conversely, in the second group (treated 8 h before exposure), all vascular parameters showed an initial response at 2-4 h postirradiation, followed by an apparent lack of response at later time points. The signature time point to define the "synergy" of Cilengitide and radiation was 4 h postirradiation. For example, 4 h after combined treatments using a 1 h separation (which followed the subcurative regimen), tumor blood flow was significantly decreased, nearly 50% below baseline (P = 0.007), whereas 4 h after combined treatments using an 8 h separation (which followed the curative regimen), tumor blood flow was only 10

  4. [Relationship between tumor volume and PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Momose, Akishi; Okamoto, Akiko; Yamamoto, Hayato; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Iwabuchi, Ikuya; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Kamimura, Noritaka; Ohyama, Chikara

    2010-02-01

    We examined whether the tumor volume (TV) is a good predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Data were collected for 158 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy in our hospital since April 2005 to September 2007. Along with the routine pathological assessment, TV was assessed in all prostatectomy specimens. PSA recurrence was defined as PSA levels of greater than 0.2 ng/ml. The TVs were 1.81+/-1.66 ml (mean +/-SD) ranging from 0.02 to 8.20 ml. The TV in cT1c was 1.77+/-1.64, and 1.89+/-1.72 ml in cT2 (not significant). Significant differences were observed between TV and pT. The TVs in pT2a, pT2b and pT3/4 were 0.54+/-0.54, 1.63+/-1.47 and 2.67+/-1.80 ml, respectively. The median follow-up period was 32.3 months (range from 15 to 45) after radical prostatectomy, and PSA recurrence was observed in 32 cases. Patients with smaller TV (TV <1.3 ml) had a higher PSA-free survival rate (89.5%) than those with a larger TV (TV > or = 1.3 ml, 66.7%) with a significant difference atp <0.001 (log-rank test). A multivariate analysis was performed for PSA, TV, pT, Gleason Score (GS), and surgical margins. Significant differences were observed for GS, and surgical margins, but not for TV. Clinically organ-confined disease in Japanese patients with prostate cancer included various cancers from clinically insignificant to locally advanced ones. In our series, TV was not regarded as a predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

  5. Glioma targeting and blood-brain barrier penetration by dual-targeting doxorubincin liposomes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Qing; Lv, Qing; Li, Li-Ming; Tang, Xin-Jiang; Li, Fan-Zhu; Hu, Yu-Lan; Han, Min

    2013-07-01

    Effective chemotherapy for glioblastoma requires a carrier that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequently target the glioma cells. Dual-targeting doxorubincin (Dox) liposomes were produced by conjugating liposomes with both folate (F) and transferrin (Tf), which were proven effective in penetrating the BBB and targeting tumors, respectively. The liposome was characterized by particle size, Dox entrapment efficiency, and in vitro release profile. Drug accumulation in cells, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression, and drug transport across the BBB in the dual-targeting liposome group were examined by using bEnd3 BBB models. In vivo studies demonstrated that the dual-targeting Dox liposomes could transport across the BBB and mainly distribute in the brain glioma. The anti-tumor effect of the dual-targeting liposome was also demonstrated by the increased survival time, decreased tumor volume, and results of both hematoxylin-eosin staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling analysis. The dual-targeting Dox liposome could improve the therapeutic efficacy of brain glioma and were less toxic than the Dox solution, showing a dual-targeting effect. These results indicate that this dual-targeting liposome can be used as a potential carrier for glioma chemotherapy.

  6. Calculating the tumor volume of acoustic neuromas: comparison of ABC/2 formula with planimetry method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Lin; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Juan, Chun-Jung; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    The ABC/2 equation is commonly applied to measure the volume of intracranial hematoma. However, the precision of ABC/2 equation in estimating the tumor volume of acoustic neuromas is less addressed. The study is to evaluate the accuracy of the ABC/2 formula by comparing with planimetry method for estimating the tumor volumes. Thirty-two patients diagnosed with acoustic neuroma received contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of brain were recruited. The volume was calculated by the ABC/2 equation and planimetry method (defined as exact volume) at the same time. The 32 patients were divided into three groups by tumor volume to avoid volume-dependent overestimation (<3 ml, 3-6 ml and >6 ml). The tumor volume by ABC/2 method was highly correlated to that calculated by planimetry method using linear regression analysis (R2=0.985). Pearson correlation coefficient (r=0.993, p<0.001) demonstrates nearly perfect association between two methods. The ABC/2 formula is an easy method in estimating the tumor volume of acoustic neuromas that is not inferior to planimetry method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Microglia-glioma cross-talk: a two way approach to new strategies against glioma.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, Cataldo; Fioretti, Bernard; Bianchi, Roberta; Mecca, Carmen; Tubaro, Claudia; Beccari, Tommaso; Franciolini, Fabio; Giambanco, Ileana; Donato, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant and aggressive among primary brain tumors, characterized by very low life expectancy. In vivo, glioma and glioblastoma in particular contain large numbers of immune cells (myeloid cells) such as microglia and tumour-infiltrating macrophages (or glioma associated macrophages). These glioma-infiltrating myeloid cells comprise up to 30% of total tumor mass and have been suggested to play several roles in glioma progression including proliferation, survival, motility and immunosuppression. Although tumor microglia and macrophages can acquire proinflammatory (M1) phenotype being capable of releasing proinflammatory cytokines, phagocytosing and presenting antigens, their effector immune function in gliomas appears to be suppressed by the acquisition of an anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. In the present work we review the microglia-glioma interactions to highlight the close relationship between the two cell types and the factors that can influence their properties (chemokines, cytokines, S100B protein). A future therapeutic possibility might be to simultaneously targeting, for example with nanomedicine, glioma cells and microglia to push the microglia towards an antitumor phenotype (M1) and/or prevent glioma cells from "conditioning" by microglia.

  8. Inherited predisposition to glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kyritsis, Athanassios P.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rao, Jasti S.; Sioka, Chrissa

    2010-01-01

    In gliomas, germline gene alterations play a significant role during malignant transformation of progenitor glial cells, at least for families with occurrence of multiple cancers or with specific hereditary cancer syndromes. Scientific evidence during the last few years has revealed several constitutive genetic abnormalities that may influence glioma formation. These germline abnormalities are manifested as either gene polymorphisms or hemizygous mutations of key regulatory genes that are involved either in DNA repair or in apoptosis. Such changes, among others, include hemizygous alterations of the neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and p53 genes that are involved in apoptotic pathways, and alterations in multiple DNA repair genes such as mismatch repair (MMR) genes, x-ray cross-complementary genes (XRCC), and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) genes. Subsequent cellular changes include somatic mutations in cell cycle regulatory genes and genes involved in angiogenesis and invasion, leading eventually to tumor formation in various stages. Future molecular diagnosis may identify new genomic regions that could harbor genes important for glioma predisposition and aid in the early diagnosis of these patients and genetic counseling of their families. PMID:20150373

  9. Surgical assessment of the insula. Part 2: validation of the Berger-Sanai zone classification system for predicting extent of glioma resection.

    PubMed

    Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Li, Jing; Osorio, Joseph A; Lau, Darryl; Molinaro, Annette M; Benet, Arnau; Berger, Mitchel S

    2016-02-01

    Though challenging, maximal safe resection of insular gliomas enhances overall and progression-free survival and deters malignant transformation. Previously published reports have shown that surgery can be performed with low morbidity. The authors previously described a Berger-Sanai zone classification system for insular gliomas. Using a subsequent dataset, they undertook this study to validate this zone classification system for predictability of extent of resection (EOR) in patients with insular gliomas. The study population included adults who had undergone resection of WHO Grade II, III, or IV insular gliomas. In accordance with our prior published report, tumor location was classified according to the Berger-Sanai quadrant-style classification system into Zones I through IV. Interobserver variability was analyzed using a cohort of newly diagnosed insular gliomas and independent classification scores given by 3 neurosurgeons at various career stages. Glioma volumes were analyzed using FLAIR and T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR images. One hundred twenty-nine procedures involving 114 consecutive patients were identified. The study population from the authors' previously published experience included 115 procedures involving 104 patients. Thus, the total experience included 244 procedures involving 218 patients with insular gliomas treated at the authors' institution. The most common presenting symptoms were seizure (68.2%) and asymptomatic recurrence (17.8%). WHO Grade II glioma histology was the most common (54.3%), followed by Grades III (34.1%) and IV (11.6%). The median tumor volume was 48.5 cm(3). The majority of insular gliomas were located in the anterior portion of the insula with 31.0% in Zone I, 10.9% in Zone IV, and 16.3% in Zones I+IV. The Berger-Sanai zone classification system was highly reliable, with a kappa coefficient of 0.857. The median EOR for all zones was 85%. Comparison of EOR between the current and prior series showed no change and Zone

  10. Antiproliferative effect of thalidomide alone and combined with carmustine against C6 rat glioma

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta, Oscar; Guevara, Patricia; Tamariz, Joaquín; Rembao, Daniel; Rivera, Erika; Sotelo, Julio

    2002-01-01

    Thalidomide could have therapeutic applications in neoplasms and in other diseases, particularly those of autoimmune origin. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of various doses of thalidomide on the growth of C6 glioma in rats, and to determine its effects on parameters of cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Additionally, we investigated a potential enhancement of the antitumoral action of thalidomide when combined with a low dose of the antineoplastic carmustine. C6 glioma cells were implanted subcutaneously in Wistar rats. A highly malignant glioma developed in 80% of animals. When the tumour reached 2.0 cm diameter thalidomide was administered at doses of 100, 200 or 400 mg/kg/day. When given at a dose of 400 mg/kg/day thalidomide significantly reduced the tumour volume, the mitotic index and cell proliferation but not the vascular density. The combination of thalidomide plus carmustine increased the inhibitory effect on tumoral growth. Our results indicate that thalidomide is effective against malignant glioma; apparently by an antiproliferative effect, rather than by inhibition of angiogenesis; when combined with carmustine it could increase the response of glioma to antineoplastic treatment. PMID:12084046

  11. Molecular Diagnostics of Gliomas Using Next Generation Sequencing of a Glioma-Tailored Gene Panel.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Angela; Kaulich, Kerstin; Stepanow, Stefanie; Wolter, Marietta; Köhrer, Karl; Felsberg, Jörg; Malzkorn, Bastian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Current classification of gliomas is based on histological criteria according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. Over the past years, characteristic genetic profiles have been identified in various glioma types. These can refine tumor diagnostics and provide important prognostic and predictive information. We report on the establishment and validation of gene panel next generation sequencing (NGS) for the molecular diagnostics of gliomas. We designed a glioma-tailored gene panel covering 660 amplicons derived from 20 genes frequently aberrant in different glioma types. Sensitivity and specificity of glioma gene panel NGS for detection of DNA sequence variants and copy number changes were validated by single gene analyses. NGS-based mutation detection was optimized for application on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens including small stereotactic biopsy samples. NGS data obtained in a retrospective analysis of 121 gliomas allowed for their molecular classification into distinct biological groups, including (i) isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH) 1 or 2 mutant astrocytic gliomas with frequent α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) gene mutations, (ii) IDH mutant oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q codeletion, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation and frequent Drosophila homolog of capicua (CIC) gene mutation, as well as (iii) IDH wildtype glioblastomas with frequent TERT promoter mutation, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification. Oligoastrocytic gliomas were genetically assigned to either of these groups. Our findings implicate gene panel NGS as a promising diagnostic technique that may facilitate integrated histological and molecular glioma classification.

  12. Genome-wide association study of glioma subtypes identifies specific differences in genetic susceptibility to glioblastoma and non-glioblastoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Melin, Beatrice S; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Wrensch, Margaret R; Johansen, Christoffer; Il'yasova, Dora; Kinnersley, Ben; Ostrom, Quinn T; Labreche, Karim; Chen, Yanwen; Armstrong, Georgina; Liu, Yanhong; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Decker, Paul A; Labussière, Marianne; Idbaih, Ahmed; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Di Stefano, Anna-Luisa; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Broderick, Peter; Galan, Pilar; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Fleming, Sarah J; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann, Stefanie; Nöthen, Markus M; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Schreiber, Stefan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Lathrop, Mark; Simon, Matthias; Sanson, Marc; Andersson, Ulrika; Rajaraman, Preetha; Chanock, Stephen; Linet, Martha; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Wiencke, John K; Hansen, Helen; McCoy, Lucie; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matthew L; Sicotte, Hugues; Amos, Christopher I; Bernstein, Jonine L; Davis, Faith; Lachance, Dan; Lau, Ching; Merrell, Ryan T; Shildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Scheurer, Michael; Shete, Sanjay; Lai, Rose K; Claus, Elizabeth B; Olson, Sara H; Jenkins, Robert B; Houlston, Richard S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2017-03-27

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have transformed our understanding of glioma susceptibility, but individual studies have had limited power to identify risk loci. We performed a meta-analysis of existing GWAS and two new GWAS, which totaled 12,496 cases and 18,190 controls. We identified five new loci for glioblastoma (GBM) at 1p31.3 (rs12752552; P = 2.04 × 10(-9), odds ratio (OR) = 1.22), 11q14.1 (rs11233250; P = 9.95 × 10(-10), OR = 1.24), 16p13.3 (rs2562152; P = 1.93 × 10(-8), OR = 1.21), 16q12.1 (rs10852606; P = 1.29 × 10(-11), OR = 1.18) and 22q13.1 (rs2235573; P = 1.76 × 10(-10), OR = 1.15), as well as eight loci for non-GBM tumors at 1q32.1 (rs4252707; P = 3.34 × 10(-9), OR = 1.19), 1q44 (rs12076373; P = 2.63 × 10(-10), OR = 1.23), 2q33.3 (rs7572263; P = 2.18 × 10(-10), OR = 1.20), 3p14.1 (rs11706832; P = 7.66 × 10(-9), OR = 1.15), 10q24.33 (rs11598018; P = 3.39 × 10(-8), OR = 1.14), 11q21 (rs7107785; P = 3.87 × 10(-10), OR = 1.16), 14q12 (rs10131032; P = 5.07 × 10(-11), OR = 1.33) and 16p13.3 (rs3751667; P = 2.61 × 10(-9), OR = 1.18). These data substantiate that genetic susceptibility to GBM and non-GBM tumors are highly distinct, which likely reflects different etiology.

  13. Impact of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on glioma cell growth and invasion: requirement for the C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Altinoz, Meric; Wosik, Karolina; Larochelle, Nancy; Koty, Zafiro; Zhu, Lixia; Holland, Paul C; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2005-02-20

    Expression of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is downregulated in malignant glioma cell lines and is barely detectable in high-grade primary astrocytoma (glioblastoma multiforme). We determined the effect of forced CAR expression on the invasion and growth of the human glioma cell line U87-MG, which does not express any CAR. Although retrovirally mediated expression of full-length CAR in U87-MG cells did not affect monolayer growth in vitro, it did reduce glioma cell invasion in a 3-dimensional spheroid model. Furthermore, in xenograft experiments, intracerebral implantation of glioma cells expressing full-length CAR resulted in tumors with a significantly reduced volume compared to tumors generated by control vector-transduced U87-MG cells. In contrast, U87-MG cells expressing transmembrane CAR with a deletion of the entire cytoplasmic domain (except for the first 2 intracellular juxtamembrane cysteine amino acids) had rates of invasion and tumor growth that were similar to those of the control cells. This difference in behavior between the 2 forms of CAR was not due to improper cell surface localization of the cytoplasmically deleted CAR as determined by comparable immunostaining of unpermeabilized cells, equivalent adenoviral transduction of the cells and similar extent of fractionation into lipid-rich domains. Taken together, these results suggest that the decrease or loss of CAR expression in malignant glioma may confer a selective advantage in growth and invasion to these tumors.

  14. Treatment of malignant glioma using hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiahang; Guo, Mian; Pang, Hengyuan; Qi, Jingtao; Zhang, Jinwei; Ge, Yunlong

    2013-10-15

    Thirty pathologically diagnosed patients with grade III-IV primary or recurrent malignant glioma (tumor diameter 3-7 cm) were randomly divided into two groups. The control group underwent conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In the hyperthermia group, primary cases received hyperthermia treatment, and patients with recurrent tumors were treated with hyperthermia in com-bination with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Hyperthermia treatment was administered using a 13.56-MHz radio frequency hyperthermia device. Electrodes were inserted into the tumor with the aid of a CT-guided stereotactic apparatus and heat was applied for 1 hour. During 3 months after hyperthermia, patients were evaluated with head CT or MRI every month. Gliomas in the hyper-thermia group exhibited growth retardation or growth termination. Necrosis was evident in 80% of the heated tumor tissue and there was a decrease in tumor diameter. Our findings indicate that ra-dio frequency hyperthermia has a beneficial effect in the treatment of malignant glioma.

  15. The Effect of Antitumor Glycosides on Glioma Cells and Tissues as Studied by Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Isabel; Garrido, Leoncio; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; Campos-Olivas, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the treatment with glycolipid derivatives on the metabolic profile of intact glioma cells and tumor tissues, investigated using proton high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, is reported here. Two compounds were used, a glycoside and its thioglycoside analogue, both showing anti-proliferative activity on glioma C6 cell cultures; however, only the thioglycoside exhibited antitumor activity in vivo. At the drug concentrations showing anti-proliferative activity in cell culture (20 and 40 µM), significant increases in choline containing metabolites were observed in the 1H NMR spectra of the same intact cells. In vivo experiments in nude mice bearing tumors derived from implanted C6 glioma cells, showed that reduction of tumor volume was associated with significant changes in the metabolic profile of the same intact tumor tissues; and were similar to those observed in cell culture. Specifically, the activity of the compounds is mainly associated with an increase in choline and phosphocholine, in both the cell cultures and tumoral tissues. Taurine, a metabolite that has been considered a biomarker of apoptosis, correlated with the reduction of tumor volume. Thus, the results indicate that the mode of action of the glycoside involves, at least in part, alteration of phospholipid metabolism, resulting in cell death. PMID:24194925

  16. Tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography: association with N categories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hang; Chen, Xiao-li; Li, Jun-ru; Li, Zhen-lin; Chen, Tian-wu; Pu, Hong; Yin, Long-lin; Xu, Guo-hui; Li, Zhen-wen; Reng, Jing; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Zhu-zhong; Cao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict the presence of regional lymph node metastasis and could determine N categories. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 202 consecutive patients with gastric adenocarcinoma who had undergone gastrectomy 1 week after contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography were retrospectively identified. The gross tumor volume was evaluated on multidetector computed tomography images. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine whether the gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis, and the Mann-Whitney U test was performed to compare the gross tumor volume among N categories. Additionally, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to identify the accuracy of the gross tumor volume in differentiating N categories. RESULTS: The gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis (p<0.0001) in the univariate analysis, and the multivariate analyses indicated that the gross tumor volume was an independent risk factor for regional lymph node metastasis (p=0.005, odds ratio=1.364). The Mann-Whitney U test showed that the gross tumor volume could distinguish N0 from the N1-N3 categories, N0-N1 from N2-N3, and N0-N2 from N3 (all p<0.0001). In the T1-T4a categories, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 12.3 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 16.6 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24.6 cm3). In the T4a category, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 15.8 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 17.8 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24 cm3). CONCLUSION: The gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict regional lymph node metastasis and N categories. PMID:27166769

  17. Telomere Length and Risk of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Walcott, Farzana; Rajaraman, Preetha; Gadalla, Shahinaz M.; Inskip, Peter D.; Purdue, Mark P.; Albanes, Demetrius; Orr, Esther; De Vivo, Immaculata; Savage, Sharon A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Telomere length in blood or buccal cell DNA has been associated with risk of various cancers. Glioma can be a highly malignant brain tumor and has few known risk factors. Genetic variants in or near RTEL1 and TERT, key components of telomere biology, are associated with glioma risk. Therefore, we evaluated the association between relative telomere length (RTL) and glioma in a prospective study. Materials and Methods We performed a nested case-control study within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. RTL was determined by quantitative PCR on blood or buccal cell DNA obtained at least two years prior to diagnosis from 101 individuals with glioma cases. Healthy controls (n=198) were matched to cases (2:1) on age, gender, smoking status, calendar year, and DNA source. Conditional logistic regression was used to investigate the association between RTL and glioma. Results As expected, RTL declined with increasing age in both cases and controls. There was no statistically significant association between RTL and glioma overall. An analysis stratified by gender suggested that short RTL (1st tertile) in males was associated with glioma (odds ratio, [OR] = 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-5.11); this association was not observed for females (OR=0.41, 95% CI 0.14-1.17). Conclusions This prospective study did not identify significant associations between RTL and glioma risk, but there may be gender-specific differences. Larger, prospective studies are needed to evaluate these findings. PMID:24231251

  18. Enhanced detection and comprehensive in situ phenotypic characterization of circulating and disseminated heteroploid epithelial and glioma tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daisy Dandan; Li, Linda; Lin, Peter Ping

    2015-01-01

    Conventional strategy of anti-EpCAM capture and immunostaining of cytokeratins (CKs) to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is limited by highly heterogeneous and dynamic expression or absence of EpCAM and/or CKs in CTCs. In this study, a novel integrated cellular and molecular approach of subtraction enrichment (SE) and immunostaining-FISH (iFISH) was successfully developed. Both large or small size CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) in various biofluid samples including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of cancer patients and patient-derived-xenograft (PDX) mouse models were efficiently enriched and comprehensively identified and characterized by SE-iFISH. Non-hematopoietic CTCs with heteroploid chromosome 8 were detected in 87–92% of lung, esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Characterization of CTCs performed by CK18-iFISH showed that CK18, the dual epithelial marker and tumor biomarker, was strong positive in only 14% of lung and 24% of esophageal CTCs, respectively. Unlike conventional methodologies restricted only to the large and/or both EpCAM and CK positive CTCs, SE-iFISH enables efficient enrichment and performing in situ phenotypic and karyotypic identification and characterization of the highly heterogeneous CTC subtypes classified by both chromosome ploidy and the expression of various tumor biomarkers. Each CTC subtype may possess distinct clinical significance relative to tumor metastasis, relapse, therapeutic drug sensitivity or resistance, etc. PMID:26267323

  19. Efficient measurement of total tumor microvascularity ex vivo using a mathematical model to optimize volume subsampling

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Palanisami, Akilan; Zheng, Lei Zak; Blatt, Amy E.; Bryan Sears, R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We introduce immunofluorescence and automated image processing protocols for serial tumor sections to objectively and efficiently quantify tumor microvasculature following antivascular therapy. To determine the trade-off between tumor subsampling and throughput versus microvessel quantification accuracy, we provide a mathematical model that accounts for tumor-specific vascular heterogeneity. This mathematical model can be applied broadly to define tumor volume samplings needed to reach statistical significance, depending on the biomarker in question and the number of subjects. Here, we demonstrate these concepts for tumor microvessel density and total microvascularity (TMV) quantification in whole pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumors ex vivo. The results suggest that TMV is a more sensitive biomarker for detecting reductions in tumor vasculature following antivascular treatment. TMV imaging is a broadly accessible technique that offers robust assessment of antivascular therapies, and it offers promise as a tool for developing high-throughput assays to quantify treatment-induced microvascular alterations for therapeutic screening and development.

  20. Targeting different types of human meningioma and glioma cells using a novel adenoviral vector expressing GFP-TRAIL fusion protein from hTERT promoter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of Ad/gTRAIL (an adenoviral vector in which expression of GFP and TRAIL is driven by a human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, hTERT) on malignant meningiomas and gliomas. Background Gliomas and meningiomas are the two most common types of human brain tumors. Currently there is no effective cure for recurrent malignant meningiomas or for gliomas. Ad/gTRAIL has been shown to be effective in killing selected lung, colon and breast cancer cells, but there have been no studies reporting its antitumor effects on malignant meningiomas. Therefore, we tested the antitumor effect of Ad/gTRAIL for the first time in human malignant meningioma and glioma cell lines, and in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts. Methods Materials and Methods: Human malignant meningioma and glioma cells were infected with adenoviruses, Ad/gTRAIL and Ad/CMV-GFP. Cell viability was determined by proliferation assay. FACS analysis and quantification of TRAIL were used to measure apoptosis in these cells. We injected Ad/gTRAIL viruses in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts, and measured the brain tumor volume, quantified apoptosis by TUNEL assay in the brain tumor tissue. Results Our studies demonstrate that in vitro/in vivo treatment with Ad/gTRAIL virus resulted in significant increase of TRAIL activity, and elicited a greater tumor cell apoptosis in malignant brain tumor cells as compared to treatment with the control, Ad/CMV-GFP virus without TRAIL activity. Conclusions We showed for the first time that adenovirus Ad/gTRAIL had significant antitumor effects against high grade malignant meningiomas as well as gliomas. Although more work needs to be done, our data suggests that Ad/gTRAIL has the potential to be useful as a tool against malignant brain tumors. PMID:22035360

  1. Glial Progenitors as Targets for Transformation in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ilkanizadeh, Shirin; Lau, Jasmine; Huang, Miller; Foster, Daniel J.; Wong, Robyn; Frantz, Aaron; Wang, Susan; Weiss, William A.; Persson, Anders I.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor and arises throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent focus on stem-like glioma cells has implicated neural stem cells (NSCs), a minor precursor population restricted to germinal zones, as a potential source of gliomas. In this review, we will focus on the relationship between oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), the largest population of cycling glial progenitors in the postnatal brain, and gliomas. Recent studies suggest that OPCs can give rise to gliomas. Furthermore, signaling pathways often associated with NSCs also play key roles during OPC lineage development. Recent advances suggesting that gliomas can undergo a switch from progenitor- to stem-like phenotype after therapy, implicating that an OPC-origin is more likely than previously recognized. Future in-depth studies of OPC biology may shed light on the etiology of OPC-derived gliomas and reveal new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24889528

  2. Rehabilitation of patients with glioma.

    PubMed

    Vargo, Mary; Henriksson, Roger; Salander, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Disabling sequelae occur in a majority of patients diagnosed with brain tumor, including glioma, such as cognitive deficits, weakness, and visual perceptual changes. Often, multiple impairments are present concurrently. Healthcare staff must be aware of the "biographic disruption" the patient with glioma has experienced. While prognostic considerations factor into rehabilitation goals and expectations, regardless of prognosis the treatment team must offer cohesive support, facilitating hope, function, and quality of life. Awareness of family and caregiver concerns plays an important role in the overall care. Inpatient rehabilitation, especially after surgical resection, has been shown to result in functional improvement and homegoing rates on a par with individuals with other neurologic conditions, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury. Community integration comprises a significant element of life satisfaction, as has been shown in childhood glioma survivors. Employment is often affected by the glioma diagnosis, but may be ameliorated, when appropriate, by addressing modifiable factors such as depression, fatigue, or sleep disturbance, or by workplace accommodations. Further research is needed into many facets of rehabilitation in the setting of glioma, including establishing better care models for consistently identifying and addressing functional limitations in this population, measuring outcomes of various levels of rehabilitation care, identifying optimal physical activity strategies, delineating the long-term effects of rehabilitation interventions, and exploring impact of rehabilitation interventions on caregiver burden. The effective elements of cognitive rehabilitation, including transition of cognitive strategies to everyday living, need to be better defined.

  3. Prognostic value of tumor volume for patients with advanced lung cancer treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Ke, Bo-Han; Wu, Nain-Ying; Kuo, Joseph; Hsu, Hsian-He

    2017-06-01

    We aim to develop a reference system utilizing computed tomography to calculate changes in tumor volume of lung cancer patients after chemotherapy to assist physicians in clinical treatment and evaluation. Image processing techniques were used to analyze the computed tomography of lung cancer, locate the tumor, and calculate the tumor volume. The medical indicator was then evaluated and analyzed. We examined the correlation between reduced tumor volume and survival duration of 88 patients after chemotherapy at Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan. The innovative survival prediction index was obtained by four statistical methods: receiver operating characteristic curve, Youden index, Kaplan-Meier method, and log rank test. From the image processing techniques, tumor volume from each patient were obtained within an average of 7.25 seconds. The proposed method was shown to achieve rapid positioning of lung tumors and volume reconstruction with an estimation error of 1.92% when calibrated with an irregularly shaped stone. In medical indicator evaluation and analysis, the area below the receiver operating characteristic curve is greater than 0.8, indicating good predictability of the medical index used herein. The Youden index spotted the best cut-off point of volume, and the correlation between the volume's cut-off point and survival time was confirmed again by Kaplan-Meier and log rank test. The p-values were all less than 0.05, presenting a high degree of correlation between the two, indicating that this medical indicator is highly reliable. The proposed techniques can automatically find the location of tumors in the lung, reconstruct the volume, and calculate changes in volume before and after treatment, thus obtaining an innovative survival prediction index. This will help facilitate early and accurate predictions of disease outcomes during the course of therapy, and categorize patient stratification into risk groups for more efficient therapies. Copyright © 2017

  4. Iterative volume morphing and learning for mobile tumor based on 4DCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Songan; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George; Fang, Shiaofen

    2017-02-01

    During image-guided cancer radiation treatment, three-dimensional (3D) tumor volumetric information is important for treatment success. However, it is typically not feasible to image a patient’s 3D tumor continuously in real time during treatment due to concern over excessive patient radiation dose. We present a new iterative morphing algorithm to predict the real-time 3D tumor volume based on time-resolved computed tomography (4DCT) acquired before treatment. An offline iterative learning process has been designed to derive a target volumetric deformation function from one breathing phase to another. Real-time volumetric prediction is performed to derive the target 3D volume during treatment delivery. The proposed iterative deformable approach for tumor volume morphing and prediction based on 4DCT is innovative because it makes three major contributions: (1) a novel approach to landmark selection on 3D tumor surfaces using a minimum bounding box; (2) an iterative morphing algorithm to generate the 3D tumor volume using mapped landmarks; and (3) an online tumor volume prediction strategy based on previously trained deformation functions utilizing 4DCT. The experimental performance showed that the maximum morphing deviations are 0.27% and 1.25% for original patient data and artificially generated data, which is promising. This newly developed algorithm and implementation will have important applications for treatment planning, dose calculation and treatment validation in cancer radiation treatment.

  5. Iterative volume morphing and learning for mobile tumor based on 4DCT.

    PubMed

    Mao, Songan; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George; Fang, Shiaofen

    2017-02-21

    During image-guided cancer radiation treatment, three-dimensional (3D) tumor volumetric information is important for treatment success. However, it is typically not feasible to image a patient's 3D tumor continuously in real time during treatment due to concern over excessive patient radiation dose. We present a new iterative morphing algorithm to predict the real-time 3D tumor volume based on time-resolved computed tomography (4DCT) acquired before treatment. An offline iterative learning process has been designed to derive a target volumetric deformation function from one breathing phase to another. Real-time volumetric prediction is performed to derive the target 3D volume during treatment delivery. The proposed iterative deformable approach for tumor volume morphing and prediction based on 4DCT is innovative because it makes three major contributions: (1) a novel approach to landmark selection on 3D tumor surfaces using a minimum bounding box; (2) an iterative morphing algorithm to generate the 3D tumor volume using mapped landmarks; and (3) an online tumor volume prediction strategy based on previously trained deformation functions utilizing 4DCT. The experimental performance showed that the maximum morphing deviations are 0.27% and 1.25% for original patient data and artificially generated data, which is promising. This newly developed algorithm and implementation will have important applications for treatment planning, dose calculation and treatment validation in cancer radiation treatment.

  6. Stochastic modeling of the tumor volume assessment and growth patterns in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sãftoiu, Adrian; Ciurea, Tudorel; Gorunescu, Florin; Rogoveanu, Ion; Georgescu, Claudia

    2004-06-01

    The growth pattern of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) arising from cirrhosis is variable and depends on the degree of differentiation and vascularization. Because growth is not constant in the natural history of HCC, prediction of subsequent growth rate based on tumor volume doubling time and correlation with histological and ultrasonographical characteristics at the moment of initial diagnosis are usually unreliable. The aim of our study was to assess the growth patterns of HCC with the aid of stochastic modeling. Thus, we included in our study 27 patients with histologically proven HCC, which had multiple (more than three)follow-up ultrasound studies in a six months interval. The patients did not receive any treatment during the observation period. HCC was visualized by computer aided ultrasound imaging, obtaining both the primary size quantification and the edge-detection enhancement. By a bi-cubic B-spline interpolation of points on the edges (3-D Bezier approximation) we approximated the surfaces shapes, and using the hit or miss Monte Carlo method we accurately estimate the tumor volume. Starting from the previous tumor volumes time series recorded during the first six months of evolution we applied both a linear, exponential and logarithmic smoothing to forecast the future size of the HCC tumor in the next six months. Our conclusion was that a dynamic forecasting model of HCC volumes could be very accurate for the assessment of tumor volume doubling time usually obtained by two discrete volume measurements of the tumor.

  7. Targeting the SMO oncogene by miR-326 inhibits glioma biological behaviors and stemness

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenzhong; Liu, Xing; Chen, Lingchao; Dou, Zhijin; Lei, Xuhui; Chang, Liang; Cai, Jinquan; Cui, Yuqiong; Yang, Dongbo; Sun, Ying; Li, Yongli; Jiang, Chuanlu

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have associated microRNAs (miRNAs) with the hedgehog (Hh) pathway. Here, we investigated whether targeting smoothened (SMO) with miR-326 would affect glioma biological behavior and stemness. Methods To investigate the expression of SMO and miR-326 in glioma specimens and cell lines, we utilized quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR, Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The luciferase reporter assay was used to verify the relationship between SMO and miR-326. We performed cell counting kit-8, transwell, and flow cytometric assays using annexin-V labeling to detect changes after transfection with siRNA against SMO or miR-326. qRT-PCR assays, neurosphere formation, and immunofluorescence were utilized to detect the modification of self-renewal and stemness in U251tumor stem cells. A U251-implanted intracranial model was used to study the effect of miR-326 on tumor volume and SMO suppression efficacy. Results SMO was upregulated in gliomas and was associated with tumor grade and survival period. SMO inhibition suppressed the biological behaviors of glioma cells. SMO expression was inversely correlated with miR-326 and was identified as a novel direct target of miR-326. miR-326 overexpression not only repressed SMO and downstream genes but also decreased the activity of the Hh pathway. Moreover, miR-326 overexpression decreased self-renewal and stemness and partially prompted differentiation in U251 tumor stem cells. In turn, the inhibition of Hh partially elevated miR-326 expression. Intracranial tumorigenicity induced by the transfection of miR-326 was reduced and was partially mediated by the decreased SMO expression. Conclusions This work suggests a possible molecular mechanism of the miR- 326/SMO axis, which can be a potential alternative therapeutic pathway for gliomas. PMID:25173582

  8. Tumor Volume Is a Prognostic Factor in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Brian M.; Othus, Megan; Caglar, Hale B.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether primary tumor and nodal volumes defined on radiotherapy planning scans are correlated with outcome (survival and recurrence) after combined-modality treatment. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiation at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute from 2000 to 2006 was performed. Tumor and nodal volume measurements, as computed by Eclipse (Varian, Palo Alto, CA), were used as independent variables, along with existing clinical factors, in univariate and multivariate analyses for association with outcomes. Results: For patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy, both nodal volume (hazard ratio [HR], 1.09; p < 0.01) and tumor volume (HR, 1.03; p < 0.01) were associated with overall survival on multivariate analysis. Both nodal volume (HR, 1.10; p < 0.01) and tumor volume (HR, 1.04; p < 0.01) were also associated with local control but not distant metastases. Conclusions: In addition to traditional surgical staging variables, disease burden, measured by primary tumor and nodal metastases volume, provides information that may be helpful in determining prognosis and identifying groups of patients for which more aggressive local therapy is warranted.

  9. Targeting immune checkpoints in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tete; Liu, Yong-Jun; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jingtao

    2017-01-01

    Malignant glioma is the most common and a highly aggressive cancer in the central nervous system (CNS). Cancer immunotherapy, strategies to boost the bodys anti-cancer immune responses instead of directly targeting tumor cells, recently achieved great success in treating several human solid tumors. Although once considered immune privileged and devoid of normal immunological functions, CNS is now considered a promising target for cancer immunotherapy, featuring the recent progresses in neurobiology and neuroimmunology and a highly immunosuppressive state in malignant glioma. In this review, we focus on immune checkpoint inhibitors, specifically, antagonizing monoclonal antibodies for programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). We discuss advances in the working mechanisms of these immune checkpoint molecules, their status in malignant glioma, and current preclinical and clinical trials targeting these molecules in malignant glioma. PMID:27756892

  10. Surgical management of low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Carter S; Straus, David; Byrne, Richard W

    2014-08-01

    Low-grade gliomas represent a wide spectrum of intra-axial brain tumors with diverse presentations, radiographic and surgical appearances, and prognoses. While there remains a role for biopsy, a growing body of evidence shows that aggressive surgical resection of low-grade gliomas may improve symptoms, extend progression-free survival (PFS), and even cure a select few patients. With the application of preoperative functional imaging, intraoperative navigation, and cortical stimulation, neurosurgeons are able to perform more complete resections while limiting the risk to patients. In this article, we describe the surgical management and current operative techniques used in the treatment of low-grade gliomas.

  11. Multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes for treating brain glioma along with eliminating glioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-tao; Tang, Wei; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-min; Wang, Yan-hong; Cheng, Lan; Meng, Xian-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain glioma is the most lethal and aggressive type of cancer. Surgery and radiotherapy cannot eliminate all glioma stem cells (GSCs) and blood–brain barrier (BBB) restricts the movement of antitumor drugs from blood to brain, thus leading to the poor prognosis with high recurrence rate. In the present study, the targeting conjugates of cholesterol polyethylene glycol polyethylenimine (CHOL-PEG2000-PEI) and D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate vapreotide (TPGS1000-VAP) were newly synthesized for transporting drugs across the BBB and targeting glioma cells and GSCs. The multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes were constructed by modifying the targeting conjugates. The studies were undertaken on BBB model, glioma cells, GSCs, and glioma-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes with suitable physicochemical property could enhance the transport drugs across the BBB, increase the intracellular uptake, inhibit glioma cells and GSCs, penetrate and destruct the GSCs spheroids, and induce apoptosis via activating related apoptotic proteins. In vivo results demonstrated that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes could significantly accumulate into brain tumor location, show the specificity to tumor sites, and result in a robust overall antitumor efficacy in glioma-bearing mice. These data suggested that the multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes could offer a promising strategy for treating brain glioma. PMID:27029055

  12. Depot delivery of dexamethasone and cediranib for the treatment of brain tumor associated edema in an intracranial rat glioma model.

    PubMed

    Ong, Qunya; Hochberg, Fred H; Cima, Michael J

    2015-11-10

    Treatments of brain tumor associated edema with systemically delivered dexamethasone, the standard of care, and cediranib, a novel anti-edema agent, are associated with systemic toxicities in brain tumor patients. A tunable, reservoir-based drug delivery device was developed to investigate the effects of delivering dexamethasone and cediranib locally in the brain in an intracranial 9L gliosarcoma rat model. Reproducible, sustained releases of both dexamethasone and solid dispersion of cediranib in polyvinylpyrrolidone (AZD/PVP) from these devices were achieved. The water-soluble AZD/PVP, which exhibited similar bioactivity as cediranib, was developed to enhance the release of cediranib from the device. Local and systemic administration of both dexamethasone and cediranib was equally efficacious in alleviating edema but had no effect on tumor growth. Edema reduction led to modest but significant improvement in survival. Local delivery of dexamethasone prevented dexamethasone-induced weight loss, an adverse effect seen in animals treated with systemic dexamethasone. Local deliveries of dexamethasone and cediranib via these devices used only 2.36% and 0.21% of the systemic doses respectively, but achieved similar efficacy as systemic drug deliveries without the side effects associated with systemic administration. Other therapeutic agents targeting brain tumor can be delivered locally in the brain to provide similar improved treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Noninvasive Monitoring of Glioma Growth in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrini, Francesco; Ceresa, Davide; Appolloni, Irene; Marubbi, Daniela; Malatesta, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and deadly primary malignant brain tumors. In vivo orthotopic models could doubtless represent an appropriate tool to test novel treatment for gliomas. However, methods commonly used to monitor the growth of glioma inside the mouse brain are time consuming and invasive. We tested the reliability of a minimally invasive procedure, based on a secreted luciferase (Gaussia luciferase), to frequently monitor the changes of glioma size. Gluc activity was evaluated from blood samples collected from the tail tip of mice twice a week, allowing to make a growth curve for the tumors. We validated the correlation between Gluc activity and tumor size by analysing the tumor after brain dissection. We found that this method is reliable for monitoring human glioma transplanted in immunodeficient mice, but it has strong limitation in immunocompetent models, where an immune response against the luciferase is developed during the first weeks after transplant. PMID:27698917

  14. Noninvasive Monitoring of Glioma Growth in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Alessandrini, Francesco; Ceresa, Davide; Appolloni, Irene; Marubbi, Daniela; Malatesta, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and deadly primary malignant brain tumors. In vivo orthotopic models could doubtless represent an appropriate tool to test novel treatment for gliomas. However, methods commonly used to monitor the growth of glioma inside the mouse brain are time consuming and invasive. We tested the reliability of a minimally invasive procedure, based on a secreted luciferase (Gaussia luciferase), to frequently monitor the changes of glioma size. Gluc activity was evaluated from blood samples collected from the tail tip of mice twice a week, allowing to make a growth curve for the tumors. We validated the correlation between Gluc activity and tumor size by analysing the tumor after brain dissection. We found that this method is reliable for monitoring human glioma transplanted in immunodeficient mice, but it has strong limitation in immunocompetent models, where an immune response against the luciferase is developed during the first weeks after transplant.

  15. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Rishi R.; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  16. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwangzoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Results Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Conclusion Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary. PMID:27592514

  17. Oncolytic adenoviruses: A thorny path to glioma cure

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, I.V.; Borovjagin, A.V.; Schroeder, B.A.; Baryshnikov, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a rapidly progressing brain tumor. Despite the relatively low percentage of cancer patients with glioma diagnoses, recent statistics indicate that the number of glioma patients may have increased over the past decade. Current therapeutic options for glioma patients include tumor resection, chemotherapy, and concomitant radiation therapy with an average survival of approximately 16 months. The rapid progression of gliomas has spurred the development of novel treatment options, such as cancer gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. Preclinical testing of oncolytic adenoviruses using glioma models revealed both positive and negative sides of the virotherapy approach. Here we present a detailed overview of the glioma virotherapy field and discuss auxiliary therapeutic strategies with the potential for augmenting clinical efficacy of GBM virotherapy treatment. PMID:25685829

  18. BMPs as Therapeutic Targets and Biomarkers in Astrocytic Glioma

    PubMed Central

    González-Gómez, Pilar; Anselmo, Nilson Praia; Mira, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic glioma is the most common brain tumor. The glioma initiating cell (GIC) fraction of the tumor is considered as highly chemoresistant, suggesting that GICs are responsible for glioma relapse. A potential treatment for glioma is to induce differentiation of GICs to a more benign and/or druggable cell type. Given BMPs are among the most potent inducers of GIC differentiation, they have been considered as noncytotoxic therapeutic compounds that may be of use to prevent growth and recurrence of glioma. We herein summarize advances made in the understanding of the role of BMP signaling in astrocytic glioma, with a particular emphasis on the effects exerted on GICs. We discuss the prognostic value of BMP signaling components and the implications of BMPs in the differentiation of GICs and in their sensitization to alkylating drugs and oncolytic therapy/chemotherapy. This mechanistic insight may provide new opportunities for therapeutic intervention of brain cancer. PMID:24877113

  19. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Ying; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS). The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  20. White Matter Change Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Il; Kim, Chi Heon; Park, Chul-Kee; Koo, Bang-Bon; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor-related white matter change is detected at late stages with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when mass effect or prominent edema is present. We analyzed if diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) white matter change earlier than conventional MRI. Methods Twenty-six patients with gliomas (World Health Organization grade II, 5; grade III, 12; and grade IV, 9) within 2 cm from the posterior limb of the internal capsule (IC) were studied. Fifteen normal adults were enrolled as controls. Fluid attenuation inversion recovery MRI showed a high signal change at the posterior limb of the IC (HSIC) in 9 patients with grade III or IV gliomas. We classified the gliomas as WHO grade II (gliomas II), grade III or IV without HSIC [gliomas III/IV(-)] and grade III or IV with HSIC [gliomas III/IV(+)], as an indicator of the increase in the severity of the white matter changes. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were calculated for the pyramidal tract. Tumor progression along pyramidal tract was evaluated by follow-up MRI in 16 patients at 40±18 months. Results FA showed no significant difference between gliomas II and control (p=0.694), but was lower in gliomas III/IV(-) and gliomas III/IV(+) (p<0.001). ADCs were higher in gliomas II, gliomas III/IV(-) and gliomas III/IV(+) than control (p<0.001). Tumor progression was detected in 2/16 patients. Conclusion DTI detected white matter changes that appeared to be normal in MRI. ADC changed even in low grade glioma, indicating ADC may be a better parameter for the early detection of white matter change. PMID:27867919

  1. Use of EF5 to Measure the Oxygen Level in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  2. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08 mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical

  3. Treatment Planning and Volumetric Response Assessment for Yttrium-90 Radioembolization: Semiautomated Determination of Liver Volume and Volume of Tumor Necrosis in Patients with Hepatic Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Monsky, Wayne L.; Garza, Armando S.; Kim, Isaac; Loh, Shaun; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Li Chinshang; Fisher, Jerron; Sandhu, Parmbir; Sidhar, Vishal; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Lin, Frank; Deutsch, Larry-Stuart; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility for novel semiautomated measurements of hepatic volume used for Yttrium-90 dose calculations as well as whole-liver and necrotic-liver (hypodense/nonenhancing) tumor volume after radioembolization. The secondary aim was to provide initial comparisons of tumor volumetric measurements with linear measurements, as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, and survival outcomes. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 23 consecutive radioembolization procedures were performed for 14 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 cases of hepatic metastases. Baseline and follow-up computed tomography obtained 1 month after treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Three observers measured liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volumes twice using semiautomated software. Results: Good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility was demonstrated (intraclass correlation [ICC] > 0.9) for tumor and liver volumes. Semiautomated measurements of liver volumes were statistically similar to those obtained with manual tracing (ICC = 0.868), but they required significantly less time to perform (p < 0.0001, ICC = 0.088). There was a positive association between change in linear tumor measurements and whole-tumor volume (p < 0.0001). However, linear measurements did not correlate with volume of necrosis (p > 0.05). Dose, change in tumor diameters, tumor volume, and necrotic volume did not correlate with survival (p > 0.05 in all instances). However, Kaplan-Meier curves suggest that a >10% increase in necrotic volume correlated with survival (p = 0.0472). Conclusion: Semiautomated volumetric analysis of liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volume can be performed with good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility. In this small retrospective study, measurements of tumor necrosis were suggested to correlate with survival.

  4. Characteristics of gliomas in patients with somatic IDH mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Charlotte; Thomas, Laure; Psimaras, Dimitri; Bielle, Franck; Vauléon, Elodie; Loiseau, Hugues; Cartalat-Carel, Stéphanie; Meyronet, David; Dehais, Caroline; Honnorat, Jérôme; Sanson, Marc; Ducray, François

    2016-03-31

    IDH mutations are found in the majority of adult, diffuse, low-grade and anaplastic gliomas and are also frequently found in cartilaginous tumors. Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are two enchondromatosis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple benign cartilaginous tumors due to post-zygotic acquisition of IDH mutations. In addition to skeletal tumors, enchondromatosis patients sometimes develop gliomas. The aim of the present study was to determine whether gliomas in enchondromatosis patients might also result from somatic IDH mosaicism and whether their characteristics are similar to those of sporadic IDH-mutated gliomas. For this purpose, we analyzed the characteristics of 6 newly diagnosed and 32 previously reported cases of enchondromatosis patients who developed gliomas and compared them to those of a consecutive series of 159 patients with sporadic IDH-mutated gliomas. As was the case with sporadic IDH mutated gliomas, enchondromatosis gliomas were frequently located in the frontal lobe (54 %) and consisted of diffuse low-grade (73 %) or anaplastic gliomas (21 %). However, they were diagnosed at an earlier age (25.6 years versus 44 years, p < 0.001) and were more frequently multicentric (32 % versus 1 %, p < 0.001) and more frequently located within the brainstem than sporadic IDH mutated gliomas (21 % versus 1 %, p < 0.001). Their molecular profile was characterized by IDH mutations and loss of ATRX expression. In two patients, the same IDH mutation was demonstrated in the glioma and in a cartilaginous tumor. In contrast to sporadic IDH mutated gliomas, no enchondromatosis glioma harbored a 1p/19q co-deletion (0/6 versus 59/123, p = 0.03). The characteristics of gliomas in patients with enchondromatosis suggest that these tumors, as cartilaginous tumors, result from somatic IDH mosaicism and that the timing of IDH mutation acquisition might affect the location and molecular characteristics of gliomas. Early

  5. A neurocentric perspective on glioma invasion

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Vishnu Anand; Robel, Stefanie; Watkins, Stacey; Sontheimer, Harald

    2017-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are devastating tumours that frequently kill patients within 1 year of diagnosis. The major obstacle to a cure is diffuse invasion, which enables tumours to escape complete surgical resection and chemo- and radiation therapy. Gliomas use the same tortuous extracellular routes of migration that are travelled by immature neurons and stem cells, frequently using blood vessels as guides. They repurpose ion channels to dynamically adjust their cell volume to accommodate to narrow spaces and breach the blood-brain barrier through disruption of astrocytic endfeet, which envelop blood vessels. The unique biology of glioma invasion provides hitherto unexplored brain-specific therapeutic targets for this devastating disease. PMID:24946761

  6. Enhanced and selective delivery of enzyme therapy to 9L-glioma tumor via magnetic targeting of PEG-modified, β-glucosidase-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Wenxi

    2014-01-01

    The stability of enzyme-conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in plasma is of great importance for in vivo delivery of the conjugated enzyme. In this study, β-glucosidase was conjugated on aminated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the glutaraldehyde method (β-Glu-MNP), and further PEGylated via N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry. The PEG-modified, β-glucosidase-immobilized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PEG-β-Glu-MNPs) were characterized by hydrodynamic diameter distribution, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and a superconducting quantum interference device. The results showed that the multidomain structure and magnetization properties of these nanoparticles were conserved well throughout the synthesis steps, with an expected diameter increase and zeta potential shifts. The Michaelis constant was calculated to evaluate the activity of conjugated β-glucosidase on the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, indicating 73.0% and 65.4% of enzyme activity remaining for β-Glu-MNP and PEG-β-Glu-MNP, respectively. Both magnetophoretic mobility analysis and pharmacokinetics showed improved in vitro/in vivo stability of PEG-β-Glu-MNP compared with β-Glu-MNP. In vivo magnetic targeting of PEG-β-Glu-MNP was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and electron spin resonance analysis in a mouse model of subcutaneous 9L-glioma. Satisfactory accumulation of PEG-β-Glu-MNP in tumor tissue was successfully achieved, with an iron content of 627±45 nmol Fe/g tissue and β-glucosidase activity of 32.2±8.0 mU/g tissue. PMID:24959078

  7. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Bin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  8. Tissue Proteome Analysis of Different Grades of Human Gliomas Provides Major Cues for Glioma Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gollapalli, Kishore; Ghantasala, Saicharan; Atak, Apurva; Rapole, Srikanth; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Epari, Sridhar; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2017-05-01

    Gliomas are heterogeneous and most commonly occurring brain tumors. Blood-brain barrier restricts the entry of brain tumor proteins into blood stream thus limiting the usage of serum or plasma for proteomic analysis. Our study aimed at understanding the molecular basis of aggressiveness of various grades of brain tumors using isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) based mass spectrometry. Tissue proteomic analysis of various grades of gliomas was performed using four-plex iTRAQ. We labeled five sets (each set consists of control, grade-II, III, and IV tumor samples) of individual glioma patients using iTRAQ reagents. Significantly altered proteins were subjected to bioinformatics analysis using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). Various metabolic pathways like glycolysis, TCA-cycle, electron transport chain, lactate metabolism, and blood coagulation pathways were majorly observed to be perturbed in gliomas. Most of the identified proteins involved in redox reactions, protein folding, pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) processing, antiapoptosis, and blood coagulation were found to be upregulated in gliomas. Transcriptomics data of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), low-grade gliomas (LGGs), and controls were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data portal and further analyzed using BRB-Array tools. Expression levels of a few significantly altered proteins like lactate dehydrogenase, alpha-1 antitrypsin, fibrinogen alpha chain, nucleophosmin, annexin A5, thioredoxin, ferritin light chain, thymosin beta-4-like protein 3, superoxide dismutase-2, and peroxiredoxin-1 and 6 showed a positive correlation with increasing grade of gliomas thereby offering an insight into molecular basis behind their aggressive nature. Several proteins identified in different grades of gliomas are potential grade-specific markers, and perturbed pathways provide comprehensive overview of molecular cues involved in glioma

  9. Experimental therapy of human glioma by means of a genetically engineered virus mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Martuza, R.L.; Malick, A.; Markert, J.M.; Ruffner, K.L.; Coen, D.M. )

    1991-05-10

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant brain tumors and are almost always fatal. A thymidine kinase-negative mutant of herpes simplex virus-1 (dlsptk) that is attenuated for neurovirulence was tested as a possible treatment for gliomas. In cell culture, dlsptk killed two long-term human glioma lines and three short-term human glioma cell populations. In nude mice with implanted subcutaneous and subrenal U87 human gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk caused growth inhibition. In nude mice with intracranial U87 gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk prolonged survival. Genetically engineered viruses such as dlsptk merit further evaluation as novel antineoplastic agents.

  10. Does the Prostate Health Index Depend on Tumor Volume?—A Study on 196 Patients after Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Friedersdorff, Frank; Groß, Britt; Maxeiner, Andreas; Jung, Klaus; Miller, Kurt; Stephan, Carsten; Busch, Jonas; Kilic, Ergin

    2017-01-01

    The Prostate Health Index (PHI) has been used increasingly in the context of prostate cancer (PCa) diagnostics since 2010. Previous studies have shown an association between PHI and a tumor volume of >0.5 cm3. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between PHI and tumor volume as well as the Gleason score. A total of 196 selected patients with prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy at our institution were included in our study. The tumor volume was calculated and preoperative serum parameters total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA), free PSA (fPSA), [−2]proPSA, and PHI were evaluated. The association between the pathological findings such as Gleason score, pathological T-stage (pT stage), and tumor volume were evaluated. We further used logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses for assessing the association between tumor volume and PHI and for predicting biochemical recurrence. With an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.79, PHI is the most accurate predictor of a tumor volumes >0.5 cm3. Moreover, PHI correlates significantly with the tumor volume (r = 0.588), which is significantly different (p = 0.008) from the correlation of the Gleason score with tumor volume (r = 0.385). PHI correlates more strongly with the tumor volume than does the Gleason score. Using PHI improves the prediction of larger tumor volume and subsequently clinically significant cancer. PMID:28245570

  11. Expression of the galectin-9-Tim-3 pathway in glioma tissues is associated with the clinical manifestations of glioma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengjin; Han, Huamin; He, Xin; Li, Shouwei; Wu, Chenxing; Yu, Chunjiang; Wang, Shengdian

    2016-03-01

    Glioma is known to induce local and systemic immunosuppression, which inhibits antitumor T cell responses. The galectin-9-Tim-3-pathway negatively regulates T cell pathways in the tumor immunosuppressive environment. The present study assessed the expression of Tim-3 and galectin-9 in glioma patients, and evaluated the association between the expression of Tim-3 and galectin-9 with clinical characteristics. The present study identified that Tim-3 expression was significantly increased in peripheral blood T cells of glioma patients compared with those of healthy controls, and was additionally increased on tumor-infiltrating T cells. The expression of Tim-3 on tumor-infiltrating T cells was associated with the World Health Organization (WHO) grade of glioma, but negatively correlated with the Karnofsky Performance Status score of the glioma patients. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of galectin-9 in tumor tissues was associated with Tim-3 expression on tumor-infiltrating T cells and the WHO grade of glioma. These findings suggest that the galectin-9-Tim-3 pathway may be critical in the immunoevasion of glioma and may be a potent target for immunotherapy in glioma patients.

  12. Clinical significance of vasculogenic mimicry in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Qing-ping; Mu, Yong-gao; Zhang, Xiang-hen; Sai, Ke; Pang, Jesse Chung-Sean; Ng, Ho-Keung; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2011-11-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is known as non-endothelial tumor cell-lined microvascular channels in aggressive tumors. We have previously found the presence of VM in high-grade gliomas. In this study, we aimed to identify VM patterns in gliomas and to explore their clinical significance. Tumor samples as well as their detailed clinical/prognostic data were collected from 101 patients. Vasculogenic mimicry in the glioma samples was determined by dual staining for endothelial marker CD34 and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). Tumor samples were also immunohistochemically stained for Ki-67, VEGF, COX-2 and MMP-9. The association between VM and the clinical characteristics of the patients were analyzed. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were performed to compare survival times of the patients. Vasculogenic mimicry was present in 13 out of 101 samples. The higher grade gliomas had a higher incidence of VM than that of lower grade gliomas (P = 0.006). Vasculogenic mimicry channels were associated with the expression of COX-2 and MMP-9 (P < 0.05). While there was no association between the existence of VM and the sex, age and preoperative epilepsy of the patients, or expression of Ki-67 and VEGF. However, patients with VM-positive gliomas survived a shorter period of time than those with VM negative gliomas (P = 0.027). Interestingly, in high-grade gliomas, the level of microvascular density was lower in VM positive tumors than those VM negative tumors (P = 0.039). Our results suggest that VM channels in gliomas correlate with increasing malignancy and higher aggressiveness, and may provide a complementation to the tumor's blood supply, especially in less vascularized regions, which may aid in the identification of glioma patients with a poorer prognosis.

  13. Stem cell-mediated delivery of therapies in the treatment of glioma.

    PubMed

    Frosina, G

    2011-06-01

    High grade gliomas can be seldom controlled, due to the infiltrative nature of these tumors and the presence of cell populations resistant to radio- and chemotherapy. Current research aims to develop novel therapeutic approaches to track and eliminate the disseminated glioma-driving cells. Selected delivery of therapeutic agents taking advantage of the tropism of normal stem cells for glioma cells might be one.

  14. 5-Fluorouracil and 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) followed by hydroxyurea, misonidazole, and irradiation for brain stem gliomas: a pilot study of the Brain Tumor Research Center and the Childrens Cancer Group

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, V.A.; Edwards, M.S.; Wara, W.M.; Allen, J.; Ortega, J.; Vestnys, P.

    1984-06-01

    Twenty-eight evaluable children with the diagnosis of brain stem glioma were treated with 5-fluorouracil and CCNU before posterior fossa irradiation (5500 rads); during irradiation, the children received hydroxyurea and misonidazole. The treatment was well tolerated, and minimal toxicity was produced. The median relapse-free survival was 32 weeks, and the median survival was 44 weeks. Analysis of covariates showed that, in patients between the ages of 2 and 19 years, survival was longest in the older children (P less than 0.02). Tumor histology, sex, extent of operation (if any), Karnofsky score, and radiation dose did not correlate with survival.

  15. [Blood DNA Radiosensitivity May Be Predictive Marker for Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in Glioma Tumorbearing Individuals].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S D; Korytova, L I; Yamshanov, V A; Zhabina, R M; Semenov, A L; Krasnikova, V G

    2015-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies were conducted to evaluate the association between the blood DNA radiosensitivity, assessed by determining the original S-index ex vivo, and the response of gliomas to irradiation in vivo. Possible modifications of the latter after administration of iron-containing water (ICW) in rats were also explored. The study was performed on the rats with subcutaneously implanted experimental glioma-35. The tumors were locally X-irradiated with a single 15 Gy dose as a radiation therapy (RT). ICW (60-63 mg · Fe 2+/l) was administered as a drinking water for 3 days before treatment. The animals underwent blood sampling for analysis of the DNA concentration and leukocyte count. The DNA index was estimated 24 h after RT. The S-index was evaluated within 4 h before RT. The mean initial S-index in the blood samples of glioma-bearing rats was 0.73 ± 0.05. Addition of ICW ex vivo resulted in a significantly increased S-index in a half of the samples. In general, the irradiated rats, which had been given pretreatment with ICW and demonstrated an ex vivo increase of the S-index to > 1.0, showed the most marked inhibition of tumor progression and the smallest tumor volume 25 days after irradiation. They also exhibited the lowest rate of growth and the longest survival. Determination of the biochemical S-index and evaluation of its changes ex vivo caused by ICW may be predictive of the response of experimental glioma to irradiation with radiomodification. The S-index may serve as a predictive indicator in clinic of the efficient evaluation of RT in patients with glioma.

  16. [Differential diagnosis of brain gliomas by positron emission tomography using various radiopharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Kostenikov, N A; Tiutin, L A; Fadeev, N P; Panfilenko, A F; Zykov, E M; Iliushchenko, Iu R; Makeeva, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    To comparatively study the diagnostic capabilities of positron emission tomography (PET) with various tumorotropic radiopharmaceuticals (TRPs) in detecting malignant brain gliomas (BG) and estimating their degree. One hundred and fourteen patients, including 47 with histologically verified glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), 27 with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA), 23 with benign astrocytoma (BA), and 17 with postoperative cysts, were examined. PET was performed using TRPs: 18F-fluorodesoxyglucose (18F-FDG), 11C-sodium butyrate (11C-SB), 11C-L-methionine (11C-MET), and 11C-choline (11C-COL). Malignant gliomas (GBM and AA) were clearly visualized by PET using 11C-MET, 11C-CHOL, and 11C-SB. 18F-FDG PET visualization of tumors was difficult because of increased RP accumulation in the cerebral cortex. WHO grades II-III gliomas were completely visualized by 11C-MET PET. Only some tumors were clearly displayed by PET with 11C-CHOL and 11C-SB. The accumulation indices (AI) obtained by 11C-CHOL PET in patients with malignant gliomas were, on average, 4.0- and 5.5-fold higher than those by 11C-MET and 11C-SB PET, respectively. Significant differences (p < 0.001) in AI obtained by "C-CHOL ("C-CHOL-AI) PET were first established between the patients with GBM (WHO grade IV) and those with AA (WHO grade III). 11C-CHOL PET is the most sensitive method to identify gliomas and estimate their grade. The advantage of 11C-MET PET is the possible imaging of the entire volume of viable tumor tissue.

  17. The role of radiotherapy in the management of patients with diffuse low grade glioma: A systematic review and evidence-based clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Ryken, Timothy C; Parney, Ian; Buatti, John; Kalkanis, Steven N; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2015-12-01

    (1) What is the optimal role of external beam radiotherapy in the management of adult patients with newly diagnosed low-grade glioma (LGG) in terms of improving outcome (i.e., survival, complications, seizure control or other reported outcomes of interest)? (2) Which radiation strategies (dose, timing, fractionation, stereotactic radiation, brachytherapy, chemotherapy) improve outcomes compared to standard external beam radiation therapy in the initial management of low grade gliomas in adults? (3) Do specific factors (e.g., age, volume, extent of resection, genetic subtype) identify subgroups with better outcomes following radiation therapy than the general population of adults with newly diagnosed low-grade gliomas? These recommendations apply to adults with newly diagnosed diffuse LGG. OUTCOMES IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED LOW GRADE GLIOMA TREATED WITH RADIOTHERAPY: Level I Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low-grade glioma in adults to prolong progression free survival, irrespective of extent of resection. Level II Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low grade glioma in adults as an equivalent alternative to observation in preserving cognitive function, irrespective of extent of resection. Level III Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low grade glioma in adults to improve seizure control in patients with epilepsy and subtotal resection. Level III Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low-grade glioma in adults to prolong overall survival in patients with subtotal resection. Level III Consideration of the risk of radiation induced morbidity, including cognitive decline, imaging abnormalities, metabolic dysfunction and malignant transformation, is recommended when the delivery of radiotherapy is selected in the management of newly diagnosed low-grade glioma in adults. STRATEGIES OF RADIOTHERAPY IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED LOW

  18. Surgically Acquired Deficits and Diffusion Weighted MRI Changes after Glioma Resection - A Matched Case-Control Study with Blinded Neuroradiological Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jakola, Asgeir S.; Berntsen, Erik M.; Christensen, Pål; Gulati, Sasha; Unsgård, Geirmund; Kvistad, Kjell A.; Solheim, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Background Acquired deficits following glioma resection may not only occur due to accidental resection of normal brain tissue. The possible importance of ischemic injuries in causing neurological deficits after brain tumor surgery is not much studied. We aimed to study the volume and frequency of early postoperative circulatory changes (i.e. infarctions) detected by diffusion weighted resonance imaging (DWI) in patients with surgically acquired neurological deficits compared to controls. Methods We designed a 1∶1 matched case-control study in patients with diffuse gliomas (WHO grade II–IV) operated with 3D ultrasound guided resection. 42 consecutive patients with acquired postoperative dysphasia and/or new motor deficits were compared to 42 matched controls without acquired deficits. Controls were matched with respect to histopathology, preoperative tumor volumes, and eloquence of location. Two independent radiologists blinded for clinical status assessed the postoperative DWI findings. Results Postoperative peri-tumoral infarctions were more often seen in patients with acquired deficits (63% versus 41%, p = 0.046) and volumes of DWI abnormalities were larger in cases than in controls with median 1.08 cm3 (IQR 0–2.39) versus median 0 cm3 (IQR 0–1.67), p = 0.047. Inter-rater agreement was substantial (67/82, κ = 0.64, p<0.001) for diagnosing radiological significant DWI abnormalities. Conclusion Peri-tumoral infarctions were more common and were larger in patients with acquired deficits after glioma surgery compared to glioma patients without deficits when assessed by early postoperative DWI. Infarctions may be a frequent and underestimated cause of acquired deficits after glioma resection. DWI changes may be an attractive endpoint in brain tumor surgery with both good inter-rater reliability among radiologists and clinical relevance. PMID:24992634

  19. Surgically acquired deficits and diffusion weighted MRI changes after glioma resection--a matched case-control study with blinded neuroradiological assessment.

    PubMed

    Jakola, Asgeir S; Berntsen, Erik M; Christensen, Pål; Gulati, Sasha; Unsgård, Geirmund; Kvistad, Kjell A; Solheim, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Acquired deficits following glioma resection may not only occur due to accidental resection of normal brain tissue. The possible importance of ischemic injuries in causing neurological deficits after brain tumor surgery is not much studied. We aimed to study the volume and frequency of early postoperative circulatory changes (i.e. infarctions) detected by diffusion weighted resonance imaging (DWI) in patients with surgically acquired neurological deficits compared to controls. We designed a 1 ∶ 1 matched case-control study in patients with diffuse gliomas (WHO grade II-IV) operated with 3D ultrasound guided resection. 42 consecutive patients with acquired postoperative dysphasia and/or new motor deficits were compared to 42 matched controls without acquired deficits. Controls were matched with respect to histopathology, preoperative tumor volumes, and eloquence of location. Two independent radiologists blinded for clinical status assessed the postoperative DWI findings. Postoperative peri-tumoral infarctions were more often seen in patients with acquired deficits (63% versus 41%, p = 0.046) and volumes of DWI abnormalities were larger in cases than in controls with median 1.08 cm3 (IQR 0-2.39) versus median 0 cm3 (IQR 0-1.67), p = 0.047. Inter-rater agreement was substantial (67/82, κ = 0.64, p<0.001) for diagnosing radiological significant DWI abnormalities. Peri-tumoral infarctions were more common and were larger in patients with acquired deficits after glioma surgery compared to glioma patients without deficits when assessed by early postoperative DWI. Infarctions may be a frequent and underestimated cause of acquired deficits after glioma resection. DWI changes may be an attractive endpoint in brain tumor surgery with both good inter-rater reliability among radiologists and clinical relevance.

  20. [The dose-volume factor in radiotherapy. Significance of the focal or tumor volume for the evaluation of radiotherapeutic effect].

    PubMed

    Busch, M; Popp, F A

    1975-01-01

    The absorbed energy dose, in dependence on the irradiated tissue volume or tumor volume (dose-volume-relations) has great significance for the valuation of radiation injuries and of the prognosis of the disease. The present paper includes an analysis, formal demonstrations and interpretation of these relations. Clinical observations and radiobiological experiments in literature were the basis of the present investigation. The assessment is kept simple, the models derived from it interprete well the clinical findings. Through these models, radiobiological findings and clinical experimental principles are connected. This results in a clear conception of the future development of irradiation planning, and the application technique of radiation. The range of validity of the cited models includes the treated volumes usual in radiotherapy. An extrapolation to the cellulary area or to the whole body may only be made with great reservations.