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Sample records for global conformance quality

  1. A global conformance quality model. A new strategic tool for minimizing defects caused by variation, error, and complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of Japanese products in the marketplace points to the dominant role of quality in product competition. Our focus is motivated by the tremendous pressure to improve conformance quality by reducing defects to previously unimaginable limits in the range of 1 to 10 parts per million. Toward this end, we have developed a new model of conformance quality that addresses each of the three principle defect sources: (1) Variation, (2) Human Error, and (3) Complexity. Although the role of variation in conformance quality is well documented, errors occur so infrequently that their significance is not well known. We have shown that statistical methods are not useful in characterizing and controlling errors, the most common source of defects. Excessive complexity is also a root source of defects, since it increases errors and variation defects. A missing link in the defining a global model has been the lack of a sound correlation between complexity and defects. We have used Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to quantify assembly complexity and have shown that assembly times can be described in terms of the Pareto distribution in a clear exception to the Central Limit Theorem. Within individual companies we have found defects to be highly correlated with DFA measures of complexity in broad studies covering tens of millions of assembly operations. Applying the global concepts, we predicted that Motorola`s Six Sigma method would only reduce defects by roughly a factor of two rather than orders of magnitude, a prediction confirmed by Motorola`s data. We have also shown that the potential defects rates of product concepts can be compared in the earliest stages of development. The global Conformance Quality Model has demonstrated that the best strategy for improvement depends upon the quality control strengths and weaknesses.

  2. Global attractors of complete conformal foliations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukova, Nina I

    2012-03-31

    We prove that every complete conformal foliation (M,F) of codimension q{>=}3 is either Riemannian or a (Conf(S{sup q}), S{sup q})-foliation. We further prove that if (M,F) is not Riemannian, it has a global attractor which is either a nontrivial minimal set or a closed leaf or a union of two closed leaves. In this theorem we do not assume that the manifold M is compact. In particular, every proper conformal non-Riemannian foliation (M,F) has a global attractor which is either a closed leaf or a union of two closed leaves, and the space of all nonclosed leaves is a connected q-dimensional orbifold. We show that every countable group of conformal transformations of the sphere S{sup q} can be realized as the global holonomy group of a complete conformal foliation. Examples of complete conformal foliations with exceptional and exotic minimal sets as global attractors are constructed. Bibliography: 20 titles.

  3. Global Learning Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2008-01-01

    Learning, education, and training becomes more and more internationalized. As examples, study programs are exported across borders, curricula are harmonized across Europe, learners work in globally distributed groups. However, the quality of educational offers differs dramatically. In this paper, an approach to manage quality for globally…

  4. From global to heavy-light: 5-point conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkalaev, Konstantin; Belavin, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    We consider Virasoro conformal blocks in the large central charge limit. There are different regimes depending on the behavior of the conformal dimensions. The most simple regime is reduced to the global sl(2,C) conformal blocks while the most complicated one is known as the classical conformal blocks. Recently, Fitzpatrick, Kaplan, and Walters showed that the two regimes are related through the intermediate stage of the so-called heavy-light semiclassical limit. We study this idea in the particular case of the 5-point conformal block. To find the 5-point global block we use the projector technique and the Casimir operator approach. Furthermore, we discuss the relation between the global and the heavy-light limits and construct the heavy-light block from the global block. In this way we reproduce our previous results for the 5-point perturbative classical block obtained by means of the monodromy method.

  5. Meshless thin-shell simulation based on global conformal parameterization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaohu; Li, Xin; Bao, Yunfan; Gu, Xianfeng; Qin, Hong

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the physically-based thin-shell simulation of point-sampled geometry via explicit, global conformal point-surface parameterization and meshless dynamics. The point-based global parameterization is founded upon the rigorous mathematics of Riemann surface theory and Hodge theory. The parameterization is globally conformal everywhere except for a minimum number of zero points. Within our parameterization framework, any well-sampled point surface is functionally equivalent to a manifold, enabling popular and powerful surface-based modeling and physically-based simulation tools to be readily adapted for point geometry processing and animation. In addition, we propose a meshless surface computational paradigm in which the partial differential equations (for dynamic physical simulation) can be applied and solved directly over point samples via Moving Least Squares (MLS) shape functions defined on the global parametric domain without explicit connectivity information. The global conformal parameterization provides a common domain to facilitate accurate meshless simulation and efficient discontinuity modeling for complex branching cracks. Through our experiments on thin-shell elastic deformation and fracture simulation, we demonstrate that our integrative method is very natural, and that it has great potential to further broaden the application scope of point-sampled geometry in graphics and relevant fields.

  6. Quality of coverage: conformity measures for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q-R Jackie; Wessels, B W; Einstein, D B; Maciunas, R J; Kim, E Y; Kinsella, T J

    2003-01-01

    In radiosurgery, conformity indices are often used to compare competing plans, evaluate treatment techniques, and assess clinical complications. Several different indices have been reported to measure the conformity of the prescription isodose to the target volume. The PITV recommended in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) radiosurgery guidelines, defined as the ratio of the prescription isodose volume (PI) over the target volume (TV), is probably the most frequently quoted. However, these currently used conformity indices depend on target size and shape complexity. The objectives of this study are to systematically investigate the influence of target size and shape complexity on existing conformity indices, and to propose a different conformity index-the conformity distance index (CDI). The CDI is defined as the average distance between the target and the prescription isodose line. This study examines five case groups with volumes of 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, 10.0, and 30.0 cm(3). Each case group includes four simulated shapes: a sphere, a moderate ellipsoid, an extreme ellipsoid, and a concave "C" shape. Prescription dose coverages are generated for three simplified clinical scenarios, i.e., the PI completely covers the TV with 1 and 2 mm margins, and the PI over-covers one half of the TV with a 1 mm margin and under-covers the other half with a 1 mm margin. Existing conformity indices and the CDI are calculated for these five case groups as well as seven clinical cases. When these values are compared, the RTOG PITV conformity index and other similar conformity measures have much higher values than the CDI for smaller and more complex shapes. With the same quality of prescription dose coverage, the CDI yields a consistent conformity measure. For the seven clinical cases, we also find that the same PITV values can be associated with very different conformity qualities while the CDI predicts the conformity quality accurately. In summary, the proposed CDI provides

  7. Global identification of yeast chromosome interactions using Genome conformation capture.

    PubMed

    Rodley, C D M; Bertels, F; Jones, B; O'Sullivan, J M

    2009-11-01

    The association of chromosomes with each other and other nuclear components plays a critical role in nuclear organization and Genome function. Here, using a novel and generally applicable methodology (Genome conformation capture [GCC]), we reveal the network of chromosome interactions for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Inter- and intra-chromosomal interactions are non-random and the number of interactions per open reading frame depends upon the dispensability of the gene product. Chromosomal interfaces are organized and provide evidence of folding within chromosomes. Interestingly, the genomic connections also involve the 2 microm plasmid and the mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial interaction partners include genes of alpha-proteobacterial origin and the ribosomal DNA. Organization of the 2 microm plasmid aligns two inverted repeats (IR1 and IR2) and displays the stability locus on a prominent loop thus making it available for plasmid clustering. Our results form the first global map of chromosomal interactions in a eukaryotic nucleus and demonstrate the highly connected nature of the yeast genome. These results have significant implications for understanding eukaryotic genome organization.

  8. Global Air Quality and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Arlene M.; Naik, Vaishali; Steiner, Allison; Unger, Nadine; Bergmann, Dan; Prather, Michael; Righi, Mattia; Rumbold, Steven T.; Shindell, Drew T.; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Sudo, Kengo; Szopa, Sophie; Horowitz, Larry W.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Zeng, Guang; Cameron-Smith, Philip J.; Cionni, Irene; Collins, William J.; Dalsoren, Stig; Eyring, Veronika; Folberth, Gerd A.; Ginoux, Paul; Josse, Batrice; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; OConnor, Fiona M.; Mackenzie, Ian A.; Nagashima, Tatsuya; Shindell, Drew Todd; Spracklen, Dominick V.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of air pollutants and their precursors determine regional air quality and can alter climate. Climate change can perturb the long-range transport, chemical processing, and local meteorology that influence air pollution. We review the implications of projected changes in methane (CH4), ozone precursors (O3), and aerosols for climate (expressed in terms of the radiative forcing metric or changes in global surface temperature) and hemispheric-to-continental scale air quality. Reducing the O3 precursor CH4 would slow near-term warming by decreasing both CH4 and tropospheric O3. Uncertainty remains as to the net climate forcing from anthropogenic nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, which increase tropospheric O3 (warming) but also increase aerosols and decrease CH4 (both cooling). Anthropogenic emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) and non-CH4 volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) warm by increasing both O3 and CH4. Radiative impacts from secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are poorly understood. Black carbon emission controls, by reducing the absorption of sunlight in the atmosphere and on snow and ice, have the potential to slow near-term warming, but uncertainties in coincident emissions of reflective (cooling) aerosols and poorly constrained cloud indirect effects confound robust estimates of net climate impacts. Reducing sulfate and nitrate aerosols would improve air quality and lessen interference with the hydrologic cycle, but lead to warming. A holistic and balanced view is thus needed to assess how air pollution controls influence climate; a first step towards this goal involves estimating net climate impacts from individual emission sectors. Modeling and observational analyses suggest a warming climate degrades air quality (increasing surface O3 and particulate matter) in many populated regions, including during pollution episodes. Prior Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) scenarios (SRES) allowed unconstrained growth, whereas the Representative

  9. Hidden global conformal symmetry without Virasoro extension in theory of elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2016-09-01

    The theory of elasticity (a.k.a. Riva-Cardy model) has been regarded as an example of scale invariant but not conformal field theories. We argue that in d = 2 dimensions, the theory has hidden global conformal symmetry of SL(2 , R) × SL(2 , R) without its Virasoro extension. More precisely, we can embed all the correlation functions of the displacement vector into a global conformal field theory with four-derivative action in terms of two scalar potential variables, which necessarily violates the reflection positivity. The energy-momentum tensor for the potential variables cannot be improved to become traceless so that it does not show the Virasoro symmetry even with the existence of global special conformal current.

  10. Quality Improvements in Curricula for Global Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, Lena; Bereuther, Tabea; Deutsch, Elisabeth; Edlinger, Julia; Fureder, Silvia; Kaspar, Emanuel; Kottstorfer, Marlene; Mautner, Claudia; Rossegger, Christine; Samonig, Alina; Samonig, Stefan; Schuster, Christoph; Witz, Gerhard; Zotter, Victoria; Ahamer, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Based on an in-depth comparison of 20 multicultural university curricula, this article aims to provide practical and implementable suggestions about how to improve such curricula in order to ensure highest and globally compatible academic quality. The recently founded developmental Master's curriculum "Global Studies" (GS) at the…

  11. Global mapping of DNA conformational flexibility on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Menconi, Giulia; Bedini, Andrea; Barale, Roberto; Sbrana, Isabella

    2015-04-01

    In this study we provide the first comprehensive map of DNA conformational flexibility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae complete genome. Flexibility plays a key role in DNA supercoiling and DNA/protein binding, regulating DNA transcription, replication or repair. Specific interest in flexibility analysis concerns its relationship with human genome instability. Enrichment in flexible sequences has been detected in unstable regions of human genome defined fragile sites, where genes map and carry frequent deletions and rearrangements in cancer. Flexible sequences have been suggested to be the determinants of fragile gene proneness to breakage; however, their actual role and properties remain elusive. Our in silico analysis carried out genome-wide via the StabFlex algorithm, shows the conserved presence of highly flexible regions in budding yeast genome as well as in genomes of other Saccharomyces sensu stricto species. Flexibile peaks in S. cerevisiae identify 175 ORFs mapping on their 3'UTR, a region affecting mRNA translation, localization and stability. (TA)n repeats of different extension shape the central structure of peaks and co-localize with polyadenylation efficiency element (EE) signals. ORFs with flexible peaks share common features. Transcripts are characterized by decreased half-life: this is considered peculiar of genes involved in regulatory systems with high turnover; consistently, their function affects biological processes such as cell cycle regulation or stress response. Our findings support the functional importance of flexibility peaks, suggesting that the flexible sequence may be derived by an expansion of canonical TAYRTA polyadenylation efficiency element. The flexible (TA)n repeat amplification could be the outcome of an evolutionary neofunctionalization leading to a differential 3'-end processing and expression regulation in genes with peculiar function. Our study provides a new support to the functional role of flexibility in genomes and a

  12. Infectious Disinfection: "Exploring Global Water Quality"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahaya, Evans; Tippins, Deborah J.; Mueller, Michael P.; Thomson, Norman

    2009-01-01

    Learning about the water situation in other regions of the world and the devastating effects of floods on drinking water helps students study science while learning about global water quality. This article provides science activities focused on developing cultural awareness and understanding how local water resources are integrally linked to the…

  13. [Endorsement of risk management and patient safety by certification of conformity in health care quality assessment].

    PubMed

    Waßmuth, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Certification of conformity in health care should provide assurance of compliance with quality standards. This also includes risk management and patient safety. Based on a comprehensive definition of quality, beneficial effects on the management of risks and the enhancement of patient safety can be expected from certification of conformity. While these effects have strong face validity, they are currently not sufficiently supported by evidence from health care research. Whether this relates to a lack of evidence or a lack of investigation remains open. Advancing safety culture and "climate", as well as learning from adverse events rely in part on quality management and are at least in part reflected in the certification of healthcare quality. However, again, evidence of the effectiveness of such measures is limited. Moreover, additional factors related to personality, attitude and proactive action of healthcare professionals are crucial factors in advancing risk management and patient safety which are currently not adequately reflected in certification of conformity programs.

  14. 46 CFR 160.135-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of lifeboats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Production inspections, tests, quality control, and... Lifeboats (SOLAS) § 160.135-15 Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of lifeboats... appropriate, inspections, tests, and oversight required by this section. Production inspections and tests...

  15. Using Local States To Drive the Sampling of Global Conformations in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Fornili, Arianna

    2016-03-01

    Conformational changes associated with protein function often occur beyond the time scale currently accessible to unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, so that different approaches have been developed to accelerate their sampling. Here we investigate how the knowledge of backbone conformations preferentially adopted by protein fragments, as contained in precalculated libraries known as structural alphabets (SA), can be used to explore the landscape of protein conformations in MD simulations. We find that (a) enhancing the sampling of native local states in both metadynamics and steered MD simulations allows the recovery of global folded states in small proteins; (b) folded states can still be recovered when the amount of information on the native local states is reduced by using a low-resolution version of the SA, where states are clustered into macrostates; and (c) sequences of SA states derived from collections of structural motifs can be used to sample alternative conformations of preselected protein regions. The present findings have potential impact on several applications, ranging from protein model refinement to protein folding and design. PMID:26808351

  16. Global and Local Conformation of Human IgG Antibody Variants Rationalizes Loss of Thermodynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Edgeworth, Matthew J; Phillips, Jonathan J; Lowe, David C; Kippen, Alistair D; Higazi, Daniel R; Scrivens, James H

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a major class of medicines, with high specificity and affinity towards targets spanning many disease areas. The antibody Fc (fragment crystallizable) region is a vital component of existing antibody therapeutics, as well as many next generation biologic medicines. Thermodynamic stability is a critical property for the development of stable and effective therapeutic proteins. Herein, a combination of ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) approaches have been used to inform on the global and local conformation and dynamics of engineered IgG Fc variants with reduced thermodynamic stability. The changes in conformation and dynamics have been correlated with their thermodynamic stability to better understand the destabilising effect of functional IgG Fc mutations and to inform engineering of future therapeutic proteins.

  17. Unable to Conform, Unwilling to Rebel? Youth, Culture, and Motivation in Globalizing Japan

    PubMed Central

    Toivonen, Tuukka; Norasakkunkit, Vinai; Uchida, Yukiko

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of globalization on Japanese young adults from sociological and psychological perspectives. While Japan’s socio-economic institutions have shown mainly resistant (or “hot”) reactions to globalization, individual-level adaptations remain oriented toward conformity to dominant life expectations, which remain largely unchanged, despite decreasing rewards. However, a socially withdrawn sub-group (the so-called hikikomori) appears to be unable to conform yet is also unwilling to rebel. The experimental evidence we review suggests such youth deviate from typical Japanese motivational patterns but have not necessarily become more Western. This poses serious problems in an interdependence-oriented culture, but the paralysis of this group seems to be an outcome of labor market change rather than a psychopathology. Finally, we also identify a contrasting group – whom we call the quiet mavericks – that adapts in creative and integrative (or “cool”) ways by negotiating conformist pressures tactfully. Our account sheds light on just how complex and painful the psychological and sociological effects of globalization can be for young people in conformist societies, with implications to policy and social sustainability. PMID:21949510

  18. Satellite global monitoring of environmental quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffer, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The missions of two NASA satellites for the monitoring of environmental quality are described: Nimbus G, the Air Pollution and Oceanographic Observing Satellite, and the Applications Explorer Mission (AEM) satellite to be used in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE). The scientific payload of Nimbus G is described in detail with a discussion of limb infrared monitoring of the stratosphere, the stratospheric and mesospheric sounder, stratospheric aerosol measurement, the solar and backscatter UV spectrometer for ozone mapping, the earth radiation budget experiment, the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer, the coastal zone color scanner and the temperature-humidity infrared radiometer. A brief description is given of the SAGE program and future NASA plans relating to the global monitoring of environmental quality are outlined.

  19. Lattice Cleaving: Conforming Tetrahedral Meshes of Multimaterial Domains with Bounded Quality.

    PubMed

    Bronson, Jonathan R; Levine, Joshua A; Whitaker, Ross T

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for generating tetrahedral meshes that conform to physical boundaries in volumetric domains consisting of multiple materials. The proposed method allows for an arbitrary number of materials, produces high-quality tetrahedral meshes with upper and lower bounds on dihedral angles, and guarantees geometric fidelity. Moreover, the method is combinatoric so its implementation enables rapid mesh construction. These meshes are structured in a way that also allows grading, in order to reduce element counts in regions of homogeneity.

  20. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein.

    PubMed

    He, Lihua; Kota, Pradeep; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Jensen, Tim; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Riordan, John R

    2013-02-01

    Most cystic fibrosis is caused by the deletion of a single amino acid (F508) from CFTR and the resulting misfolding and destabilization of the protein. Compounds identified by high-throughput screening to improve ΔF508 CFTR maturation have already entered clinical trials, and it is important to understand their mechanisms of action to further improve their efficacy. Here, we showed that several of these compounds, including the investigational drug VX-809, caused a much greater increase (5- to 10-fold) in maturation at 27 than at 37°C (<2-fold), and the mature product remained short-lived (T(1/2)∼4.5 h) and thermally unstable, even though its overall conformational state was similar to wild type, as judged by resistance to proteolysis and interdomain cross-linking. Consistent with its inability to restore thermodynamic stability, VX-809 stimulated maturation 2-5-fold beyond that caused by several different stabilizing modifications of NBD1 and the NBD1/CL4 interface. The compound also promoted maturation of several disease-associated processing mutants on the CL4 side of this interface. Although these effects may reflect an interaction of VX-809 with this interface, an interpretation supported by computational docking, it also rescued maturation of mutants in other cytoplasmic loops, either by allosteric effects or via additional sites of action. In addition to revealing the capabilities and some of the limitations of this important investigational drug, these findings clearly demonstrate that ΔF508 CFTR can be completely assembled and evade cellular quality control systems, while remaining thermodynamically unstable. He, L., Kota, P., Aleksandrov, A. A., Cui, L., Jensen, T., Dokholyan, N. V., Riordan, J. R. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein.

  1. European conformation and fat scores have no relationship with eating quality.

    PubMed

    Bonny, S P F; Pethick, D W; Legrand, I; Wierzbicki, J; Allen, P; Farmer, L J; Polkinghorne, R J; Hocquette, J-F; Gardner, G E

    2016-06-01

    European conformation and fat grades are a major factor determining carcass value throughout Europe. The relationships between these scores and sensory scores were investigated. A total of 3786 French, Polish and Irish consumers evaluated steaks, grilled to a medium doneness, according to protocols of the ���Meat Standards Australia��� system, from 18 muscles representing 455 local, commercial cattle from commercial abattoirs. A mixed linear effects model was used for the analysis. There was a negative relationship between juiciness and European conformation score. For the other sensory scores, a maximum of three muscles out of a possible 18 demonstrated negative effects of conformation score on sensory scores. There was a positive effect of European fat score on three individual muscles. However, this was accounted for by marbling score. Thus, while the European carcass classification system may indicate yield, it has no consistent relationship with sensory scores at a carcass level that is suitable for use in a commercial system. The industry should consider using an additional system related to eating quality to aid in the determination of the monetary value of carcasses, rewarding eating quality in addition to yield.

  2. 75 FR 50730 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Transportation Conformity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ...; Transportation Conformity Consultation Requirement AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... (SIP) submitted on June 4, 2010. This revision consists of transportation conformity criteria and... Transportation Conformity regulations. DATES: Comments must be received on or before September 16,...

  3. 76 FR 77182 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; General Conformity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Conformity Requirements for Federal Agencies Applicable to Federal Actions AGENCY: Environmental Protection... adopted by Virginia for the purpose of incorporating Federal general conformity requirements revisions... approving Virginia's general conformity SIP revision and if that provision may be severed from the...

  4. [THE USE OF RISK INDICES IN PROCEDURES OF VERIFICATION OF BABY FOOD QUALITY CONFORMANCE].

    PubMed

    Buymova, S A; Bubnov, A G

    2016-01-01

    There is considered the possibility of the use of risk indices with regard to their use in certification and validation of conformity assessment and food conformance, including those recommended for children. There were investigated samples of oatmeals, potted meats, liver pate, fruit-vegetable puree. The calculation of risk values was based on original data of quantitative analysis that was performed with the use of thermogravimetric, photometric, titrimetric, and potentiometric methods, as well as methods of gas-liquid chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. On the base of data of the chemical analysis of the ingredients of a set of food products, including assigned for baby nutrition, all the tested samples were shown to meet the requirements for the controlled regulatory standards on control indices of quality. The calculation of average daily doses of the intake of metal compounds (Cu, Zn, Fe, Na, Ca, Mg) consumed by adult and child's organisms through tested food showed that such doses are allowable since they do not exceed maximum daily dose and average daily requirements. However, some samples were referred to the category of high risk food, because the used method of individual's lifetime risk calculation takes into consideration all possible negative effects (carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, embryogenic, etc) of the impact of pollutants on the human body. It is shown that in addition to the sanitary and hygienic criteria of food quality, the risks of such food consumption should be taken into consideration by the Technical Regulations and other normative documentations. PMID:27266030

  5. ATPase active-site electrostatic interactions control the global conformation of the 100 kDa SecA translocase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dorothy M; Zheng, Haiyan; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Montelione, Gaetano T; Hunt, John F

    2013-02-27

    SecA is an intensively studied mechanoenzyme that uses ATP hydrolysis to drive processive extrusion of secreted proteins through a protein-conducting channel in the cytoplasmic membrane of eubacteria. The ATPase motor of SecA is strongly homologous to that in DEAD-box RNA helicases. It remains unclear how local chemical events in its ATPase active site control the overall conformation of an ~100 kDa multidomain enzyme and drive protein transport. In this paper, we use biophysical methods to establish that a single electrostatic charge in the ATPase active site controls the global conformation of SecA. The enzyme undergoes an ATP-modulated endothermic conformational transition (ECT) believed to involve similar structural mechanics to the protein transport reaction. We have characterized the effects of an isosteric glutamate-to-glutamine mutation in the catalytic base, a mutation which mimics the immediate electrostatic consequences of ATP hydrolysis in the active site. Calorimetric studies demonstrate that this mutation facilitates the ECT in Escherichia coli SecA and triggers it completely in Bacillus subtilis SecA. Consistent with the substantial increase in entropy observed in the course of the ECT, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry demonstrates that it increases protein backbone dynamics in domain-domain interfaces at remote locations from the ATPase active site. The catalytic glutamate is one of ~250 charged amino acids in SecA, and yet neutralization of its side chain charge is sufficient to trigger a global order-disorder transition in this 100 kDa enzyme. The intricate network of structural interactions mediating this effect couples local electrostatic changes during ATP hydrolysis to global conformational and dynamic changes in SecA. This network forms the foundation of the allosteric mechanochemistry that efficiently harnesses the chemical energy stored in ATP to drive complex mechanical processes. PMID:23167435

  6. Global structure of conformal theories in the SU(3) gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, K.-I.; Iwasaki, Y.; Nakayama, Yu; Yoshie, T.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate SU(3) gauge theories in four dimensions with Nf fundamental fermions on a lattice using the Wilson fermion. Clarifying the vacuum structure in terms of Polyakov loops in spatial directions and properties of temporal propagators using a new method that we call "local analysis," we conjecture that the "conformal region" exists together with the confining region and the deconfining region in the phase structure parametrized by β and K, both in the cases of the large Nf QCD within the conformal window (referred as conformal QCD) with an IR cutoff and small Nf QCD at T/Tc>1 with Tc being the chiral transition temperature (referred to as high-temperature QCD). Our numerical simulation on a lattice of the size 163×64 shows the following evidence of the conjecture. In the conformal region, we find that the vacuum is the nontrivial Z(3) twisted vacuum modified by nonperturbative effects and that temporal propagators of mesons behave at large t as a power-law-corrected Yukawa-type decaying form. The transition from the conformal region to the deconfining region or the confining region is a sharp transition between different vacua, and therefore, it suggests a first-order transition both in conformal QCD and high-temperature QCD. To confirm the conjecture and distinguish it from the possibility of crossover phenomena, we need to take the continuum/thermodynamic limit, which we do not attempt in this work. Within our fixed-lattice simulation, we find that there is a precise correspondence between conformal QCD and high-temperature QCD in the temporal propagators under the change of the parameters Nf and T/Tc, respectively: one boundary is close to meson states, and the other is close to free quark states. In particular, conformal QCD with Nf=7 corresponds to high-temperature QCD with Nf=2 at T˜2Tc, both of which are in close relation to a meson unparticle model. From this, we estimate the anomalous mass dimension γ*=1.2(1) for Nf=7. We also show that the

  7. Population and climate pressures on global river water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yingrong; Schoups, Gerrit; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    We present a global analysis of the combined effects of population growth and climate change on river water quality. In-stream Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) concentration is calculated along global river networks using past, current and future information on gridded population and river discharge. Our model accounts for the accumulation (from populated areas), transport, dilution, and degradation of BOD to reveal the combined effects of population growth and climate change on river water quality. From 1950 to 2000, our analysis indicates that rivers that flow through regions with increasing population undergo a prominent deterioration of water quality, especially in developing countries with a lack of treatment plants. By 2050, population growth and climate change have varying effects on degradation of river water quality, with their combined effect amplified in region undergoing both population growth (more pollutant loading) and decrease in discharge (less dilution capacity). Keywords: Population growth, Climate change, River water quality, Space-time analysis, Water management

  8. Quality control autophagy degrades soluble ERAD-resistant conformers of the misfolded membrane protein GnRHR

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Scott A.; Ren, Hong Yu; Madden, Victoria J.; Bonner, Jaclyn N.; Conlin, Michael P.; Janovick, Jo Ann; Conn, P. Michael; Cyr, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular chaperones triage misfolded proteins via action as substrate selectors for quality control (QC) machines that fold or degrade clients. Herein, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) associated Hsp40 JB12 is reported to participate in partitioning mutant conformers of GnRHR, a G-protein coupled receptor, between ER-associated degradation (ERAD) and a novel ERQC-autophagy pathway for membrane proteins. ERQC-autophagy degrades E90K-GnRHR because pools of its partially folded and detergent soluble degradation intermediates are resistant to ERAD. S168R-GnRHR is globally misfolded and disposed of via ERAD, but inhibition of p97, the protein retrotranslocation motor, shunts S168R-GnRHR from ERAD to ERQC autophagy. Partially folded and grossly misfolded forms of GnRHR associate with JB12 and Hsp70. Elevation of JB12 promotes ERAD of S168R-GnRHR, with E90K-GnRHR being resistant. E90K-GnRHR elicits association of the Vps34 autophagy initiation complex with JB12. Interaction between ERassociated Hsp40s and the Vps34 complex permits the selective degradation of ERAD-resistant membrane proteins via ERQC-autophagy. PMID:24685158

  9. Overview of NASA's Observations for Global Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of pollutants are central to the study of air quality. Much focus has been placed on local-scale observations that can help specific geographic areas document their air quality issues, plan abatement strategies, and understand potential impacts. In addition, long-range atmospheric transport of pollutants can cause downwind regions to not meet attainment standards. Satellite observations have shed significant light on air quality from local to regional to global scales, especially for pollutants such as ozone, aerosols, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide. These observations have made use of multiple techniques and in some cases multiple satellite sensors. The satellite observations are complemented by surface observations, as well as atmospheric (in situ) observations typically made as part of focused airborne field campaigns. The synergy between satellite observations and field campaigns has been an important theme for recent and upcoming activities and plans. In this talk, a review of NASA's investments in observations relevant to global air quality will be presented, with examples given for a range of pollutants and measurement approaches covering the last twenty-five years. These investments have helped build national and international collaborations such that the global satellite community is now preparing to deploy a constellation of satellites that together will provide fundamental advances in global observations for air quality.

  10. Mismatched DNTP Incorporation By DNA Polymerase Beta Does Not Proceed Via Globally Different Conformational Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, K.-H.; Niebuhr, M.; Tung, C.-S.; Chan, H.-c.; Chou, C.-C.; Tsai, M.-D.

    2009-05-26

    Understanding how DNA polymerases control fidelity requires elucidation of the mechanisms of matched and mismatched dNTP incorporations. Little is known about the latter because mismatched complexes do not crystallize readily. In this report, we employed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and structural modeling to probe the conformations of different intermediate states of mammalian DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) in its wild-type and an error-prone variant, I260Q. Our structural results indicate that the mismatched ternary complex lies in-between the open and the closed forms, but more closely resembles the open form for WT and the closed form for I260Q. On the basis of molecular modeling, this over-stabilization of mismatched ternary complex of I260Q is likely caused by formation of a hydrogen bonding network between the side chains of Gln{sup 260}, Tyr{sup 296}, Glu{sup 295} and Arg{sup 258}, freeing up Asp{sup 192} to coordinate MgdNTP. These results argue against recent reports suggesting that mismatched dNTP incorporations follow a conformational path distinctly different from that of matched dNTP incorporation, or that its conformational closing is a major contributor to fidelity.

  11. Global Pressures on Education Research: Quality, Utility, and Infrastructure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrington, Carolyn D.; Summers, Katherine P.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an overview of issues likely to drive educational research globally over the next decade, and it examines the "Asia Pacific Education Review" ("APER")'s role in responding to these issues, shaping research agendas, and delivering high-quality research. We also look at the implications of these…

  12. Are Educational Governance Reforms in a Post-Conflict Society Conforming to Global Standards? Examining the Application of Education Convergence Theory in an Internationally Supervised and Politicized Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komatsu, Taro

    2016-01-01

    This article examines whether and to what extent educational reforms in a post-conflict society conform to "global (regional) standards," and explores the meaning of inconsistencies observed in the process of global reform transfer. Among the nations of the world, nowhere is the influence of external forces on educational reforms more…

  13. Global analysis of population growth and river water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yingrong; Schoups, Gerrit; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Human-related pressures on river water quality are a concern of global proportions.. However, little is known about the more specific impact of increasing population on river water quality and how it provides a vital environmental reference for water management. Combining global gridded data on population and river discharge with digitized river networks, we conduct numerical simulations to demonstrate the direct impact of population growth on river water quality. Our model traces the transport, dilution, and degradation of anthropogenic organic matter (BOD) emissions into rivers. Spanning the period from the early 20th century to the present, our analysis indicates that the pressure on downstream river networks markedly increased since the population explosion starting in 1950, especially in developing countries. The ratio of population to river discharge reveals the link between impact severity and dilution capacity. In addition, a denser population is found to be correlated with higher impact severity. Consideration of direct population influences on global river water quality becomes limited as society develops and should be studied as a fundamental reference for human-related river water management. Keywords: Population growth, River water quality, Space-time analysis, Human activities, Water Management

  14. A global conformal extension theorem for perfect fluid Bianchi space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Luebbe, Christian Tod, Paul

    2008-12-15

    A global extension theorem is established for isotropic singularities in polytropic perfect fluid Bianchi space-times. When an extension is possible, the limiting behaviour of the physical space-time near the singularity is analysed.

  15. Impact of Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy/5-Fluorouracil on Quality of Life of Patients Managed for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Michala; Halkett, Georgia; Borg, Martin; Zissiadis, Yvonne; Kneebone, Andrew; Spry, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL) results for patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients (n=41 locally advanced, n=22 postsurgery) entered the B9E-AY-S168 study and received 1 cycle of induction gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly Multiplication-Sign 3 with 1-week break) followed by 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) (54 Gy locally advanced and 45 Gy postsurgery) and concomitant continuous-infusion 5-fluorouracil (5FU) (200 mg/m{sup 2}/d throughout RT). After 4 weeks, patients received an additional 3 cycles of consolidation gemcitabine chemotherapy. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PAN26 questionnaires at baseline, before RT/5FU, at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion. Results: The patterns of change in global QOL scores differed between groups. In the locally advanced group global QOL scores were +13, +8, +3, and +1 compared with baseline before RT/5FU (P=.008), at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion, respectively. In the postsurgery group, global QOL scores were -3, +4, +15, and +17 compared with baseline at the same time points, with a significant improvement in global QOL before consolidation gemcitabine (P=.03). No significant declines in global QOL were reported by either cohort. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that global QOL and associated function and symptom profiles for pancreatic chemoradiation therapy differ between locally advanced and postsurgery patients, likely owing to differences in underlying disease status. For both groups, the treatment protocol was well tolerated and did not have a negative impact on patients' global QOL.

  16. Exploration of Multi-State Conformational Dynamics and Underlying Global Functional Landscape of Maltose Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Tang, Chun; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of biological machines have been revealed to have more than two macroscopic states. Quantifying the underlying multiple-basin functional landscape is essential for understanding their functions. However, the present models seem to be insufficient to describe such multiple-state systems. To meet this challenge, we have developed a coarse grained triple-basin structure-based model with implicit ligand. Based on our model, the constructed functional landscape is sufficiently sampled by the brute-force molecular dynamics simulation. We explored maltose-binding protein (MBP) which undergoes large-scale domain motion between open, apo-closed (partially closed) and holo-closed (fully closed) states responding to ligand binding. We revealed an underlying mechanism whereby major induced fit and minor population shift pathways co-exist by quantitative flux analysis. We found that the hinge regions play an important role in the functional dynamics as well as that increases in its flexibility promote population shifts. This finding provides a theoretical explanation of the mechanistic discrepancies in PBP protein family. We also found a functional “backtracking” behavior that favors conformational change. We further explored the underlying folding landscape in response to ligand binding. Consistent with earlier experimental findings, the presence of ligand increases the cooperativity and stability of MBP. This work provides the first study to explore the folding dynamics and functional dynamics under the same theoretical framework using our triple-basin functional model. PMID:22532792

  17. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7-14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0-5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8-14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  18. Solution NMR conformation of glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been giving a pivotal contribution to the progress of glycomics, mostly by elucidating the structural, dynamical, conformational and intermolecular binding aspects of carbohydrates. Particularly in the field of conformation, NOE resonances, scalar couplings, residual dipolar couplings, and chemical shift anisotropy offsets have been the principal NMR parameters utilized. Molecular dynamics calculations restrained by NMR-data input are usually employed in conjunction to generate glycosidic bond dihedral angles. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are a special class of sulfated polysaccharides extensively studied worldwide. Besides regulating innumerous physiological processes, these glycans are also widely explored in the global market as either clinical or nutraceutical agents. The conformational aspects of GAGs are key regulators to the quality of interactions with the functional proteins involved in biological events. This report discusses the solution conformation of each GAG type analyzed by one or more of the above-mentioned methods.

  19. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, Scott B; Kairn, Tanya; Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T; Kenny, John; Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V

    2013-12-15

    This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT.

  20. "Power quality system," a new system of quality management for globalization: towards innovation and competitive advantages.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Rahman, H; Berawi, M A

    Knowledge Management (KM) addresses the critical issues of organizational adoption, survival and competence in the face of an increasingly changing environment. KM embodies organizational processes that seek a synergistic combination of the data and information processing capabilities of information and communication technologies (ICT), and the creative and innovative capacity of human beings to improve ICT In that role, knowledge management will improve quality management and avoid or minimize losses and weakness that usually come from poor performance as well as increase the competitive level of the company and its ability to survive in the global marketplace. To achieve quality, all parties including the clients, company consultants, contractors, entrepreneurs, suppliers, and the governing bodies (i.e., all involved stake-holders) need to collaborate and commit to achieving quality. The design based organizations in major business and construction companies have to be quality driven to support healthy growth in today's competitive market. In the march towards vision 2020 and globalization (i.e., the one world community) of many companies, their design based organizations need to have superior quality management and knowledge management to anticipate changes. The implementation of a quality system such as the ISO 9000 Standards, Total Quality Management, or Quality Function Deployment (QFD) focuses the company's resources towards achieving faster and better results in the global market with less cost. To anticipate the needs of the marketplace and clients as the world and technology change, a new system, which we call Power Quality System (PQS), has been designed. PQS is a combination of information and communication technologies (ICT) and the creative and innovative capacity of human beings to meet the challenges of the new world business and to develop high quality products. PMID:12465710

  1. "Power quality system," a new system of quality management for globalization: towards innovation and competitive advantages.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Rahman, H; Berawi, M A

    Knowledge Management (KM) addresses the critical issues of organizational adoption, survival and competence in the face of an increasingly changing environment. KM embodies organizational processes that seek a synergistic combination of the data and information processing capabilities of information and communication technologies (ICT), and the creative and innovative capacity of human beings to improve ICT In that role, knowledge management will improve quality management and avoid or minimize losses and weakness that usually come from poor performance as well as increase the competitive level of the company and its ability to survive in the global marketplace. To achieve quality, all parties including the clients, company consultants, contractors, entrepreneurs, suppliers, and the governing bodies (i.e., all involved stake-holders) need to collaborate and commit to achieving quality. The design based organizations in major business and construction companies have to be quality driven to support healthy growth in today's competitive market. In the march towards vision 2020 and globalization (i.e., the one world community) of many companies, their design based organizations need to have superior quality management and knowledge management to anticipate changes. The implementation of a quality system such as the ISO 9000 Standards, Total Quality Management, or Quality Function Deployment (QFD) focuses the company's resources towards achieving faster and better results in the global market with less cost. To anticipate the needs of the marketplace and clients as the world and technology change, a new system, which we call Power Quality System (PQS), has been designed. PQS is a combination of information and communication technologies (ICT) and the creative and innovative capacity of human beings to meet the challenges of the new world business and to develop high quality products.

  2. The effects of global change upon United States air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Abraham, R.; Chung, S. H.; Avise, J.; Lamb, B.; Salathé, E. P., Jr.; Nolte, C. G.; Loughlin, D.; Guenther, A.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Duhl, T.; Zhang, Y.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-11-01

    To understand more fully the effects of global changes on ambient concentrations of ozone and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) in the United States (US), we conducted a comprehensive modeling effort to evaluate explicitly the effects of changes in climate, biogenic emissions, land use and global/regional anthropogenic emissions on ozone and PM2.5 concentrations and composition. Results from the ECHAM5 global climate model driven with the A1B emission scenario from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) were downscaled using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to provide regional meteorological fields. We developed air quality simulations using the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) chemical transport model for two nested domains with 220 and 36 km horizontal grid cell resolution for a semi-hemispheric domain and a continental United States (US) domain, respectively. The semi-hemispheric domain was used to evaluate the impact of projected global emissions changes on US air quality. WRF meteorological fields were used to calculate current (2000s) and future (2050s) biogenic emissions using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN). For the semi-hemispheric domain CMAQ simulations, present-day global emissions inventories were used and projected to the 2050s based on the IPCC A1B scenario. Regional anthropogenic emissions were obtained from the US Environmental Protection Agency National Emission Inventory 2002 (EPA NEI2002) and projected to the future using the MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) energy system model assuming a business as usual scenario that extends current decade emission regulations through 2050. Our results suggest that daily maximum 8 h average ozone (DM8O) concentrations will increase in a range between 2 to 12 parts per billion (ppb) across most of the continental US. The highest increase occurs in the South, Central and Midwest regions of the US due to

  3. Evaluation of the sustainability of contrasted pig farming systems: development of a market conformity tool for pork products based on technological quality traits.

    PubMed

    Gonzàlez, J; Gispert, M; Gil, M; Hviid, M; Dourmad, J Y; de Greef, K H; Zimmer, C; Fàbrega, E

    2014-12-01

    A market conformity tool, based on technological meat quality parameters, was developed within the Q-PorkChains project, to be included in a global sustainability evaluation of pig farming systems. The specific objective of the market conformity tool was to define a scoring system based on the suitability of meat to elaborate the main pork products, according to their market shares based on industry requirements, in different pig farming systems. The tool was based on carcass and meat quality parameters that are commonly used for the assessment of technological quality, which provide representative and repeatable data and are easily measurable. They were the following: cold carcass weight; lean meat percentage; minimum subcutaneous back fat depth at m. gluteus medius level, 45 postmortem and ultimate pH (measured at 24-h postmortem) in m. longissimus lumborum and semimembranosus; meat colour; drip losses and intramuscular fat content in a m. longissimus sample. Five categories of pork products produced at large scale in Europe were considered in the study: fresh meat, cooked products, dry products, specialties and other meat products. For each of the studied farming systems, the technological meat quality requirements, as well as the market shares for each product category within farming system, were obtained from the literature and personal communications from experts. The tool resulted in an overall conformity score that enabled to discriminate among systems according to the degree of matching of the achieved carcass and meat quality with the requirements of the targeted market. In order to improve feasibility, the tool was simplified by selecting ultimate pH at m. longissimus or semimembranosus, minimum fat thickness measured at the left half carcass over m. gluteus medius and intramuscular fat content in a m. longissimus sample as iceberg indicators. The overall suitability scores calculated by using both the complete and the reduced tools presented good

  4. Evaluation of the sustainability of contrasted pig farming systems: development of a market conformity tool for pork products based on technological quality traits.

    PubMed

    Gonzàlez, J; Gispert, M; Gil, M; Hviid, M; Dourmad, J Y; de Greef, K H; Zimmer, C; Fàbrega, E

    2014-12-01

    A market conformity tool, based on technological meat quality parameters, was developed within the Q-PorkChains project, to be included in a global sustainability evaluation of pig farming systems. The specific objective of the market conformity tool was to define a scoring system based on the suitability of meat to elaborate the main pork products, according to their market shares based on industry requirements, in different pig farming systems. The tool was based on carcass and meat quality parameters that are commonly used for the assessment of technological quality, which provide representative and repeatable data and are easily measurable. They were the following: cold carcass weight; lean meat percentage; minimum subcutaneous back fat depth at m. gluteus medius level, 45 postmortem and ultimate pH (measured at 24-h postmortem) in m. longissimus lumborum and semimembranosus; meat colour; drip losses and intramuscular fat content in a m. longissimus sample. Five categories of pork products produced at large scale in Europe were considered in the study: fresh meat, cooked products, dry products, specialties and other meat products. For each of the studied farming systems, the technological meat quality requirements, as well as the market shares for each product category within farming system, were obtained from the literature and personal communications from experts. The tool resulted in an overall conformity score that enabled to discriminate among systems according to the degree of matching of the achieved carcass and meat quality with the requirements of the targeted market. In order to improve feasibility, the tool was simplified by selecting ultimate pH at m. longissimus or semimembranosus, minimum fat thickness measured at the left half carcass over m. gluteus medius and intramuscular fat content in a m. longissimus sample as iceberg indicators. The overall suitability scores calculated by using both the complete and the reduced tools presented good

  5. Dispositional optimism and terminal decline in global quality of life.

    PubMed

    Zaslavsky, Oleg; Palgi, Yuval; Rillamas-Sun, Eileen; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Schnall, Eliezer; Woods, Nancy F; Cochrane, Barbara B; Garcia, Lorena; Hingle, Melanie; Post, Stephen; Seguin, Rebecca; Tindle, Hilary; Shrira, Amit

    2015-06-01

    We examined whether dispositional optimism relates to change in global quality of life (QOL) as a function of either chronological age or years to impending death. We used a sample of 2,096 deceased postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative clinical trials who were enrolled in the 2005-2010 Extension Study and for whom at least 1 global QOL and optimism measure were analyzed. Growth curve models were examined. Competing models were contrasted using model fit criteria. On average, levels of global QOL decreased with both higher age and closer proximity to death (e.g., M(score) = 7.7 eight years prior to death vs. M(score) = 6.1 one year prior to death). A decline in global QOL was better modeled as a function of distance to death (DtD) than as a function of chronological age (Bayesian information criterion [BIC](DtD) = 22,964.8 vs. BIC(age) = 23,322.6). Optimism was a significant correlate of both linear (estimate(DtD) = -0.01, SE(DtD) = 0.005; ρ = 0.004) and quadratic (estimate(DtD) = -0.006, SE(DtD) = 0.002; ρ = 0.004) terminal decline in global QOL so that death-related decline in global QOL was steeper among those with a high level of optimism than those with a low level of optimism. We found that dispositional optimism helps to maintain positive psychological perspective in the face of age-related decline. Optimists maintain higher QOL compared with pessimists when death-related trajectories were considered; however, the gap between those with high optimism and those with low optimism progressively attenuated with closer proximity to death, to the point that is became nonsignificant at the time of death.

  6. Status and Roadmap of the Global Air Quality Data Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, M. G.; Husar, R. B.

    2012-04-01

    With the recognition of air quality as a transboundary problem the need for harmonizing, harvesting and synthesizing air quality data on the continental and global scale has grown. Observational data from urban, rural and remote surface sites, from regular aircraft flights and from satellites are made available together with numerical analyses and forecasts of the atmospheric chemical composition through various databases, which are for historic reasons only loosely connected and rarely allow for a seamless, interoperable and easy access across different networks and data centers. A number of pilot services have been established under the auspices of the GEO Air Quality Community of Practice, and a meeting of this community in 2011 discussed the technical and semantic challenges for linking these services together and expanding the existing air quality data network. Key issues that were identified are the capability of existing server software to translate data formats and metadata requirements, the lack of a community-wide coherent set of metadata tags to identify data sets in catalogue applications, the need for clear rules to define the granularity of data sets in catalogues, the requirement of data traceability and information needs on calibration and modification records, and the ambiguities in the interpretation of current information exchange standards such as WCS and netcdf-CF. Particular challenges for exchanging air quality data result from the need for near-realtime information and from the necessity to obtain concurrent meteorological data in order to assess and interpret the air quality information. This presentation will summarize the present status of the air quality data network and provide a draft roadmap for the future development.

  7. 76 FR 77150 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; General Conformity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Conformity Requirements Rule was published in the November 30, 1993 edition of the Federal Register (58 FR... FR 17003). EPA had promulgated a new NAAQS in July 1997 (62 FR 38652) that established a separate... July 17, 2006 (71 FR 40420) and on April 5, 2010 (75 FR 17254), described above. Virginia's...

  8. Chinese vaccine products go global: vaccine development and quality control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Liang, Zhenglun; Xu, Yinghua; Wang, Junzhi

    2015-05-01

    Through the continuous efforts of several generations, China has become one of the few countries in the world that is capable of independently addressing all the requirements by the Expanded Program on Immunization. Regulatory science is applied to continuously improve the vaccine regulatory system. Passing the prequalification by WHO has allowed Chinese vaccine products to go global. Chinese vaccine products not only secure disease prevention and control domestically but also serve the needs for international public health. This article describes the history of Chinese vaccine development, the current situation of Chinese vaccine industry and its contribution to the prevention and control of infectious diseases. We also share our experience of national quality control and vaccine regulation during the past decades. China's experience in vaccine development and quality control can benefit other countries and regions worldwide, including the developing countries.

  9. Quality control and estimation of global solar radiation in China

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wenjun; He, Jie; Yang, Kun; Qin, Jun

    2010-03-15

    Measurements of surface radiation in China are too sparse to meet demand for scientific research and engineering applications. Moreover, the radiation data often include erroneous and questionable values though preliminary quality-check has been done before the data release. Therefore, quality control of radiation data is often a prerequisite for using these data. In this study, a set of quality-check procedures were implemented to control the quality of the solar radiation measurements at 97 stations in China. A hybrid model for estimating global solar radiation was then evaluated against the controlled data. The results show that the model can estimate the global radiation with accuracy of MBE less than 1.5 MJ m{sup -2} and RMSE less than 2.8 MJ m{sup -2} for daily radiation and RMSE less than 2.0 MJ m{sup -2} for monthly-mean daily radiation at individual stations over most of China except at a few stations where unsatisfactory estimates were possibly caused by severe air pollution or too dense clouds. The MBE averaged over all stations are about 0.7 MJ m{sup -2} and RMSE about 2.0 MJ m{sup -2} for daily radiation and RMSE about 1.3 MJ m{sup -2} for monthly-mean daily radiation. Finally, this model was used to fill data gaps and to expand solar radiation data set using routine meteorological station data in China. This data set would substantially contribute to some radiation-related scientific studies and engineering applications in China. (author)

  10. The effects of global change upon United States air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Abraham, R.; Avise, J.; Chung, S. H.; Lamb, B.; Salathé, E. P., Jr.; Nolte, C. G.; Loughlin, D.; Guenther, A.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Duhl, T.; Zhang, Y.; Streets, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    To understand more fully the effects of global changes on ambient concentrations of ozone and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) in the US, we conducted a comprehensive modeling effort to evaluate explicitly the effects of changes in climate, biogenic emissions, land use, and global/regional anthropogenic emissions on ozone and PM2.5 concentrations and composition. Results from the ECHAM5 global climate model driven with the A1B emission scenario from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) were downscaled using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to provide regional meteorological fields. We developed air quality simulations using the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) chemical transport model for two nested domains with 220 and 36 km horizontal grid cell resolution for a semi-hemispheric domain and a continental United States (US) domain, respectively. The semi-hemispheric domain was used to evaluate the impact of projected Asian emissions changes on US air quality. WRF meteorological fields were used to calculate current (2000s) and future (2050s) biogenic emissions using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN). For the semi-hemispheric domain CMAQ simulations, present-day global emissions inventories were used and projected to the 2050s based on the IPCC A1B scenario. Regional anthropogenic emissions were obtained from the US Environmental Protection Agency National Emission Inventory 2002 (EPA NEI2002) and projected to the future using the MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) energy system model assuming a business as usual scenario that extends current decade emission regulations through 2050. Our results suggest that daily maximum 8 h average ozone (DM8O) concentrations will increase in a range between 2 to 12 ppb across most of the continental US, with the highest increase in the South, Central, and Midwest regions of the US, due to increases in temperature, enhanced

  11. Fluorescent Protein-Based Ca2+ Sensor Reveals Global, Divalent Cation-Dependent Conformational Changes in Cardiac Troponin C

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Myriam A.; Pinto, Jose R.; Davidson, Michael W.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is a key effector in cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling as the Ca2+ sensing subunit responsible for controlling contraction. In this study, we generated several FRET sensors for divalent cations based on cTnC flanked by a donor fluorescent protein (CFP) and an acceptor fluorescent protein (YFP). The sensors report Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding, and relay global structural information about the structural relationship between cTnC’s N- and C-domains. The sensors were first characterized using end point titrations to decipher the response to Ca2+ binding in the presence or absence of Mg2+. The sensor that exhibited the largest responses in end point titrations, CTV-TnC, (Cerulean, TnC, and Venus) was characterized more extensively. Most of the divalent cation-dependent FRET signal originates from the high affinity C-terminal EF hands. CTV-TnC reconstitutes into skinned fiber preparations indicating proper assembly of troponin complex, with only ~0.2 pCa unit rightward shift of Ca2+-sensitive force development compared to WT-cTnC. Affinity of CTV-TnC for divalent cations is in agreement with known values for WT-cTnC. Analytical ultracentrifugation indicates that CTV-TnC undergoes compaction as divalent cations bind. C-terminal sites induce ion-specific (Ca2+ versus Mg2+) conformational changes in cTnC. Our data also provide support for the presence of additional, non-EF-hand sites on cTnC for Mg2+ binding. In conclusion, we successfully generated a novel FRET-Ca2+ sensor based on full length cTnC with a variety of cellular applications. Our sensor reveals global structural information about cTnC upon divalent cation binding. PMID:27736894

  12. Connecting global change science with communities: About the conformation of a social network for early warnings in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, P. A.; Vidal, L. M.; Serna, A. M.; Vieira, C.; Machado, J.; Cadavid, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The risk associated with natural and social phenomena has notably increased in modern societies. On the other hand, socio-natural hazards have increased and diversified, in association with economic development. During 2010 and 2011, Colombia faced one of the most severe wet seasons in decades. One of the most significant impacts of this flood emergency was the demonstration of poor preparedness of communities, local authorities, and regional and national authorities to confront situations of large coverage. The emergencies occurred during 2010 and 2011, induced in association with a strong La Niña event, immediately demanded environmental and risk management authorities to provide communities with basic tools to understand the dynamics associated with excesses of rainfall and mitigate the possible impacts in their populations. For this reason, the Regional Autonomous Corporation of Central Antioquia, Colombia (CORANTIOQUIA) funded a project aimed to the design and conformation of a social network for early warnings of events associated to floods, torrential floods, and mass movements in 80 municipalities of the department of Antioquia, Colombia. For the execution of this project, the Corporation invited the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Antioquia. This talk aims to socialize this inititative that looked for integrating scientific and technical knowledge with popular knowledge in order to provide Latin American communities with tools to mitigate the possible impacts of global change.

  13. Review: Automation and meat quality-global challenges.

    PubMed

    Barbut, Shai

    2014-01-01

    The global meat industry has seen significant changes in the methods used to harvest and process fresh meat over the past century. Increased use of automation has led to significant increases in line speed for beef, pork, sheep, poultry and fish operations. For example, currently the fastest line observed has been broilers at 13,500/h. Such developments have required in-depth understanding of the pre and post rigor processes to prevent defects. Procedures such as maturation chilling and electrical stimulation are now common in red meat and poultry processing; allowing shorter time to deboning, while harvesting high quality meat. Robots designed to cut meat are also appearing on the market, and replacing traditional manual operations. This is a challenge, because high speed equipment is not necessarily sensitive to variations in size/quality issues, and requires development of unique sensors and control systems. Also, progress in breeding and genetics is contributing to greater product uniformity and quality; helping in operating automated equipment.

  14. The Impact of Globalization on a Country's Quality of Life: Toward an Integrated Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirgy, M. Joseph; Lee, Dong-Jin; Miller, Chad; Littlefield, James E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to develop a set of theoretical propositions to explain the impact of globalization on a country's quality of life (QOL). In this paper, we describe how globalization impacts the quality of life of residents of a country by first articulating the globalization construct (in terms of inflows and outflows of goods,…

  15. High-quality conforming hexahedral meshes of patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms including their intraluminal thrombi.

    PubMed

    Tarjuelo-Gutierrez, J; Rodriguez-Vila, B; Pierce, D M; Fastl, T E; Verbrugghe, P; Fourneau, I; Maleux, G; Herijgers, P; Holzapfel, G A; Gomez, E J

    2014-02-01

    In order to perform finite element (FE) analyses of patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms, geometries derived from medical images must be meshed with suitable elements. We propose a semi-automatic method for generating conforming hexahedral meshes directly from contours segmented from medical images. Magnetic resonance images are generated using a protocol developed to give the abdominal aorta high contrast against the surrounding soft tissue. These data allow us to distinguish between the different structures of interest. We build novel quadrilateral meshes for each surface of the sectioned geometry and generate conforming hexahedral meshes by combining the quadrilateral meshes. The three-layered morphology of both the arterial wall and thrombus is incorporated using parameters determined from experiments. We demonstrate the quality of our patient-specific meshes using the element Scaled Jacobian. The method efficiently generates high-quality elements suitable for FE analysis, even in the bifurcation region of the aorta into the iliac arteries. For example, hexahedral meshes of up to 125,000 elements are generated in less than 130 s, with 94.8 % of elements well suited for FE analysis. We provide novel input for simulations by independently meshing both the arterial wall and intraluminal thrombus of the aneurysm, and their respective layered morphologies.

  16. The quality of rivers: From pristine stage to global pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meybeck, Michel; Helmer, Richard

    1989-12-01

    River water quality is highly variable by nature due to environmental conditions such as basin lithology, vegetation and climate. In small watersheds spatial variations extend over orders of magnitude for most major elements and nutrients, while this variability is an order of magnitude lower for major basins. A standard river water for use as reference is therefore not applicable. As a consequence natural waters can possibly be unfit for various human uses, even including drinking. The Water Quality (WQ) concept has greatly evolved since the beginning of the century in accordance with expanding water uses and analytical developments. Even in well developed countries the dissolved heavy metal measurements in rivers are not very reliable while dissolved organic micro-pollutants are even rarely analysed routinely. Major WQ problems have been identified according to river basin size, including organic pollution, salinity, total suspended solids, heavy metals, eutrophication, nitrate, organic micro-pollutants, acidification. They generally occurred in this order over a period of about 100 years in the industrialized countries. Historical records of WQ are rare but can be established indirectly through studies of lake sediments. When proper control action is taken at an early stage, numerous examples of WQ recovery have been found in rivers for most of the common pollution problems. Future WQ problems will mostly derive from mine tailings and toxic waste disposal in both developed and developing countries, industrial accidents and organic micropollutants which emerge faster than our analytical capacities. The newly industrializing countries will face all the above-mentioned problems within a very short time period without having the means to cope with them one at a time. River studies point out the global alteration of the biogeochemical cycles of many major elements and nutrients (S, Na, K, N, P). For heavy metals such as lead, present estimates of global river loads

  17. Assessing the quality of conformal treatment planning: a new tool for quantitative comparison.

    PubMed

    Menhel, J; Levin, D; Alezra, D; Symon, Z; Pfeffer, R

    2006-10-21

    We develop a novel radiotherapy plan comparison index, critical organ scoring index (COSI), which is a measure of both target coverage and critical organ overdose. COSI is defined as COSI=1-(V(OAR)>tol/TC), where V(OAR)>tol is the fraction of volume of organ at risk receiving more than tolerance dose, and TC is the target coverage, VT,PI/VT, where VT,PI is the target volume receiving at a least prescription dose and VT is the total target volume. COSI approaches unity when the critical structure is completely spared and the target coverage is unity. We propose a two-dimensional, graphical representation of COSI versus conformity index (CI), where CI is a measure of a normal tissue overdose. We show that this 2D representation is a reliable, visual quantitative tool for evaluating competing plans. We generate COSI-CI plots for three sites: head and neck, cavernous sinus, and pancreas, and evaluate competing non-coplanar 3D and IMRT treatment plans. For all three sites this novel 2D representation assisted the physician in choosing the optimal plan, both in terms of target coverage and in terms of critical organ sparing. We verified each choice by analysing individual DVHs and isodose lines. Comparing our results to the widely used conformation number, we found that in all cases where there were discrepancies in the choice of the best treatment plan, the COSI-CI choice was considered the correct one, in several cases indicating that a non-coplanar 3D plan was superior to the IMRT plans. The choice of plan was quick, simple and accurate using the new graphical representation.

  18. Assessing the quality of conformal treatment planning: a new tool for quantitative comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menhel, J.; Levin, D.; Alezra, D.; Symon, Z.; Pfeffer, R.

    2006-10-01

    We develop a novel radiotherapy plan comparison index, critical organ scoring index (COSI), which is a measure of both target coverage and critical organ overdose. COSI is defined as COSI = 1 - (V(OAR)>tol/TC), where V(OAR)>tol is the fraction of volume of organ at risk receiving more than tolerance dose, and TC is the target coverage, VT,PI/VT, where VT,PI is the target volume receiving at a least prescription dose and VT is the total target volume. COSI approaches unity when the critical structure is completely spared and the target coverage is unity. We propose a two-dimensional, graphical representation of COSI versus conformity index (CI), where CI is a measure of a normal tissue overdose. We show that this 2D representation is a reliable, visual quantitative tool for evaluating competing plans. We generate COSI-CI plots for three sites: head and neck, cavernous sinus, and pancreas, and evaluate competing non-coplanar 3D and IMRT treatment plans. For all three sites this novel 2D representation assisted the physician in choosing the optimal plan, both in terms of target coverage and in terms of critical organ sparing. We verified each choice by analysing individual DVHs and isodose lines. Comparing our results to the widely used conformation number, we found that in all cases where there were discrepancies in the choice of the best treatment plan, the COSI-CI choice was considered the correct one, in several cases indicating that a non-coplanar 3D plan was superior to the IMRT plans. The choice of plan was quick, simple and accurate using the new graphical representation.

  19. Co-expression of a heat shock transcription factor to improve conformational quality of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shao-Yen; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Li, Shu-Jyuan; Lee, Wen-Chien

    2014-09-01

    A co-expression system was established in Escherichia coli for enhancing the cellular expression of heat shock transcription factor, sigma 32 (σ(32)). A Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the rpoH gene of E. coli, which encodes σ(32), were cloned into a bacterial plasmid containing a gene fusion encoding a doubly tagged N-acetyl-d-neuraminic acid aldolase (GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R). After the IPTG induction, a substantially higher level of sigma 32 was observed up to 3 h in the co-expression cells, but an enhancement in the solubility of target protein was manifest only in the first hour. Nevertheless, the co-expression of sigma 32 led to higher level of Neu5Ac aldolase enzymatic activity in both the soluble and insoluble (inclusion body) fractions. The Neu5Ac aldolase activity of the supernatant from the lysate of cells co-expressing GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R and recombinant σ(32) was 3.4-fold higher at 3 h postinduction than that in cells overexpressing GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R in the absence of recombinantly expressed σ(32). The results of acrylamide quenching indicated that the conformational quality of the fusion protein was improved by the co-expression of recombinant σ(32). Thus, the increased level of intracellular σ(32) might have created favorable conditions for the proper folding of recombinant proteins through the cooperative effects of chaperones/heat shock proteins expressed by the E. coli host, which resulted in smaller inclusion bodies, improved conformational quality and a higher specific activity of the overexpressed GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R protein.

  20. 46 CFR 160.132-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of davits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of this subpart. (c) Recordkeeping. The manufacturer must maintain records in accordance with 46 CFR... inspection in 46 CFR part 159, subpart 159.007 and in this section, unless the Commandant authorizes...) Manufacturer's responsibility. The manufacturer must— (1) Institute a quality control procedure to ensure...

  1. 46 CFR 160.115-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of winches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of this subpart. (c) Recordkeeping. The manufacturer must maintain records in accordance with 46 CFR... inspection in 46 CFR part 159, subpart 159.007 and in this section, unless the Commandant authorizes...) Manufacturer's responsibility. The manufacturer must— (1) Institute a quality control procedure to ensure...

  2. 46 CFR 160.132-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of davits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of this subpart. (c) Recordkeeping. The manufacturer must maintain records in accordance with 46 CFR... inspection in 46 CFR part 159, subpart 159.007 and in this section, unless the Commandant authorizes...) Manufacturer's responsibility. The manufacturer must— (1) Institute a quality control procedure to ensure...

  3. 46 CFR 160.132-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of davits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of this subpart. (c) Recordkeeping. The manufacturer must maintain records in accordance with 46 CFR... inspection in 46 CFR part 159, subpart 159.007 and in this section, unless the Commandant authorizes...) Manufacturer's responsibility. The manufacturer must— (1) Institute a quality control procedure to ensure...

  4. 46 CFR 160.115-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of winches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of this subpart. (c) Recordkeeping. The manufacturer must maintain records in accordance with 46 CFR... inspection in 46 CFR part 159, subpart 159.007 and in this section, unless the Commandant authorizes...) Manufacturer's responsibility. The manufacturer must— (1) Institute a quality control procedure to ensure...

  5. 46 CFR 160.115-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of winches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of this subpart. (c) Recordkeeping. The manufacturer must maintain records in accordance with 46 CFR... inspection in 46 CFR part 159, subpart 159.007 and in this section, unless the Commandant authorizes...) Manufacturer's responsibility. The manufacturer must— (1) Institute a quality control procedure to ensure...

  6. Global-National-Local Dynamics in Policy Processes: A Case of 'Quality' Policy in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidovich, Lesley

    2004-01-01

    This paper moves beyond a conceptualization of globalization as a top-down imposition of policy directions 'from above' to focus on the active two-way dynamics between global, national and local levels of policy processes. Arguably, the particular 'case' examined here of 'quality' policy is especially appropriate as quality policy and…

  7. An Introduction to School Leadership for Quality Global Learning in Initial Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serf, Jeff; Sinclair, Scott; Wooldridge, Julie

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a project, School Leadership for Quality Global Learning, which focuses on the relationship between leadership at different levels within educational institutions and quality global learning. The article outlines briefly the changing societal context within which education is operating currently before exploring key ideas,…

  8. Using Perceived Health to Test the Construct-Related Validity of Global Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckie, Theresa M.; Hayduk, Leslie A.

    2004-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is considered as a global, yet unidimensional, subjective assessment of one's satisfaction with life. We examine the construct validity of the available indicators of global QOL by constructing a causal model in which QOL is viewed as causally responding to several dimensions of perceived health. Global QOL is measured with…

  9. Global trends in milk quality: implications for the Irish dairy industry

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The quality of Irish agricultural product will become increasingly important with the ongoing liberalisation of international trade. This paper presents a review of the global and Irish dairy industries; considers the impact of milk quality on farm profitability, food processing and human health, examines global trends in quality; and explores several models that are successfully being used to tackle milk quality concerns. There is a growing global demand for dairy products, fuelled in part by growing consumer wealth in developing countries. Global dairy trade represents only 6.2% of global production and demand currently outstrips supply. Although the Irish dairy industry is small by global standards, approximately 85% of annual production is exported annually. It is also the world's largest producer of powdered infant formula. Milk quality has an impact on human health, milk processing and on-farm profitability. Somatic cell count (SCC) is a key measure of milk quality, with a SCC not exceeding 400,000 cells/ml (the EU milk quality standard) generally accepted as the international export standard. There have been ongoing improvements in milk quality among both established and emerging international suppliers. A number of countries have developed successful industry-led models to tackle milk quality concerns. Based on international experiences, it is likely that problems with effective translation of knowledge to practice, rather than incomplete knowledge per se, are the more important constraints to national progress towards improved milk quality. PMID:22081986

  10. Toward a Global Water Quality Observing and Forecasting System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Coastal and Inland Water Quality Working Group held a Water Quality Summit at the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in Geneva, Switzerland April 20 to 22, 2015. The goal was to define specific water quality component requirements and de...

  11. Longitudinal assessment of quality of life after surgery, conformal brachytherapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Poon, Bing Ying; Eastham, James; Vickers, Andrew; Pei, Xin; Scardino, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated quality-of-life changes (QoL) in 907 patients treated with either radical prostatectomy (open or laparoscopic), real-time planned conformal brachytherapy, or high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) on a prospective IRB-approved longitudinal study. Methods Validated questionnaires given pretreatment (baseline) and at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 24, 36, and 48 months addressed urinary function, urinary bother, bowel function, bowel bother, sexual function, and sexual bother. Results At 48 months, surgery had significantly higher urinary incontinence than others (both P<.001), but fewer urinary irritation/obstruction symptoms (all P<.001). Very low levels of bowel dysfunction were observed and only small subsets in each group showed rectal bleeding. Brachytherapy and IMRT showed better sexual function than surgery accounting for baseline function and other factors (delta 14.29 of 100, 95% CI, 8.57–20.01; and delta 10.5, 95% CI, 3.78–17.88). Sexual bother was similar. Four-year outcomes showed persistent urinary incontinence for surgery with more obstructive urinary symptoms for radiotherapy. Using modern radiotherapy delivery, bowel function deterioration is less-often observed. Sexual function was strongly affected in all groups yet significantly less for radiotherapy. Conclusions Treatment selection should include patient preferences and balance predicted disease-free survival over a projected time vs potential impairment of QoL important for the patient. PMID:26780999

  12. Quality's Higher Education Dividends: Broadened Custodianship and Global Public Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Gerrie J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper speculates on the possible contribution of the quality movement to higher education and the perceived dividends received from this, in general, over the past two decades but also, more specifically, with reference to the author's institution in South Africa. The first major quality contribution is a gradual broadening of higher…

  13. Challenges of Globalization and Quality Assurance in Nigerian University Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nkang, Iniobong Ekong

    2013-01-01

    The study was undertaken to examine the state of quality assurance mechanisms in Nigerian universities with a view to proffering measures that would enhance the quality of education obtained in the institutions. The population consisted of professors from federal universities in the south-south region of Nigeria, numbering 624. The stratified…

  14. Characterizing eye movements during temporal and global quality assessment of h.264 compressed video sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantel, Claire; Guyader, Nathalie; Ladret, Patricia; Ionescu, Gelu; Kunlin, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Studies have shown that the deployment of visual attention is closely link to the assessment of image or video quality, though this link is not yet fully understood. The influence of rating temporal quality of compressed videos over the way an observer deploys his attention is investigated in this paper. We set-up a subjective experiment in which the eye movements of observers are recorded during three different tasks: a free-viewing task (FT), a global quality assessment task and a temporal quality assessment task. The FT acts as a reference to which we compare the eye movements during the two other tasks. As previously shown, observers assessing global quality gaze at locations dissimilar to those fixated during the FT. For temporal quality assessment, it seems that the fixated locations are closer to FT than the global quality assessment fixated locations. Our results suggest that the locations observers look at do not depend on the displayed video quality level. Quality however influences the way participants look at videos: the lower the quality, the longer they gaze at a precise location. The area fixated seems to be much smaller during the quality assessment tasks than during the FT for either perfect or poor quality level. The evolution over time of all indicators suggests that, during the first 1 or 2 seconds, the signal properties of the videos are the main attractors for the participants' eye movements. Instructions only seem to play a role afterwards on the deployment of the participants' visual attention.

  15. Development and sensitivity analysis of a global drinking water quality index.

    PubMed

    Rickwood, C J; Carr, G M

    2009-09-01

    The UNEP GEMS/Water Programme is the leading international agency responsible for the development of water quality indicators and maintains the only global database of water quality for inland waters (GEMStat). The protection of source water quality for domestic use (drinking water, abstraction etc) was identified by GEMS/Water as a priority for assessment. A composite index was developed to assess source water quality across a range of inland water types, globally, and over time. The approach for development was three-fold: (1) Select guidelines from the World Health Organisation that are appropriate in assessing global water quality for human health, (2) Select variables from GEMStat that have an appropriate guideline and reasonable global coverage, and (3) determine, on an annual basis, an overall index rating for each station using the water quality index equation endorsed by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment. The index allowed measurements of the frequency and extent to which variables exceeded their respective WHO guidelines, at each individual monitoring station included within GEMStat, allowing both spatial and temporal assessment of global water quality. Development of the index was followed by preliminary sensitivity analysis and verification of the index against real water quality data.

  16. The Effects of Global Change upon United States Air Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    To understand more fully the effects of global changes on ambient concentrations of ozone and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) in the US, we conducted a comprehensive modeling effort to evaluate explicitly the effects of change...

  17. A Ca(2+)-dependent global conformational change in the 3D structure of phosphorylase kinase obtained from electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Owen W; Carlson, Gerald M; Gogol, Edward P

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK), a Ca(2+)-dependent regulatory enzyme of the glycogenolytic cascade in skeletal muscle, is a 1.3 MDa hexadecameric oligomer comprising four copies of four distinct subunits, termed alpha, beta, gamma, and delta, the last being endogenous calmodulin. The structures of both nonactivated and Ca(2+)-activated PhK were determined to elucidate Ca(2+)-induced structural changes associated with PhK's activation. Reconstructions of both conformers of the kinase, each including over 11,000 particles, yielded bridged, bilobal structures with resolutions estimated by Fourier shell correlation at 24 A using a 0.5 correlation cutoff, or at 18 A by the 3sigma (corrected for D(2) symmetry) threshold curve. Extensive Ca(2+)-induced structural changes were observed in regions encompassing both the lobes and bridges, consistent with changes in subunit interactions upon activation. The relative placement of the alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunits in the nonactivated three-dimensional structure, relying upon previous two-dimensional localizations, is in agreement with the known effects of Ca(2+) on subunit conformations and interactions in the PhK complex. PMID:11796107

  18. Quality of Life and Survival Outcome for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Receiving Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-A Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, F.-M. Chien, C.-Y.; Tsai, W.-L.; Chen, H.-C.; Hsu, H.-C.; Lui, C.-C.; Huang, T.-L.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the changes of quality of life (QoL) and survival outcomes for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Two hundred and three newly diagnosed NPC patients, who were curatively treated by 3D-CRT (n = 93) or IMRT (n = 110) between March 2002 and July 2004, were analyzed. The distributions of clinical stage according to American Joint Committee on Cancer 1997 were I: 15 (7.4%), II: 78 (38.4%), III: 74 (36.5%), and IV: 36 (17.7%). QoL was longitudinally assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 questionnaires at the five time points: before RT, during RT (36 Gy), and 3 months, 12 months, and 24 months after RT. Results: The 3-year locoregional control, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rates were 84.8%, 76.7%, and 81.7% for the 3D-CRT group, respectively, compared with 84.2%, 82.6%, and 85.4% for the IMRT group (p value > 0.05). A general trend of maximal deterioration in most QoL scales was observed during RT, followed by a gradual recovery thereafter. There was no significant difference in most scales between the two groups at each time point. The exception was that patients treated by IMRT had a both statistically and clinically significant improvement in global QoL, fatigue, taste/smell, dry mouth, and feeling ill at the time point of 3 months after RT. Conclusions: The potential advantage of IMRT over 3D-CRT in treating NPC patients might occur in QoL outcome during the recovery phase of acute toxicity.

  19. Global Influences on National Definitions of Quality Education: Examples from Spain and Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Laura C.; Rutkowski, David

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing attention worldwide to advancing quality education. Beyond a rhetorical aim, many international organizations and national education systems have articulated a commitment to promoting measures of quality education through the development of educational indicators. This article broadly explores the global influences on national…

  20. A Framework for Quality Assurance in Globalization of Higher Education: A View toward the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Job, Jennifer; Sriraman, Bharath

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we theorize a framework for discussing quality assurance of globalized models of education used internationally. The philosophical assumption that homogeneity of perspectives achieves objectivity in practice is argued against using the examples of (a) Brain drain, and (b) Profit over quality. We present a coherent real world scenario…

  1. Quality in Family Child Care Settings: The Relationship between Provider Educational Experiences and Global Quality Scores in a Statewide Quality Rating and Improvement System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallam, Rena A.; Bargreen, Kaitlin N.; Ridgley, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    This study is a secondary analysis of a statewide sample of licensed family child care providers in the Tennessee Child Care Evaluation and Report Card Program ("N"?=?1,145) that describes the general quality of family child care programs in the state and examines the relationships between provider education and global quality. Study…

  2. The ‘Alternative Quality Contract’ in Massachusetts, Based on Global Budgets, Lowered Medical Spending and Improved Quality

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zirui; Safran, Dana Gelb; Landon, Bruce E.; Landrum, Mary Beth; He, Yulei; Mechanic, Robert E.; Day, Matthew P.; Chernew, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Seven provider organizations in Massachusetts entered the Blue Cross Blue Shield Alternative Quality Contract in 2009, followed by four more organizations in 2010. This contract, based on a global budget and pay-for-performance for achieving certain quality benchmarks, places providers at risk for excessive spending and rewards them for quality, similar to the new Pioneer Accountable Care Organizations in Medicare. We analyzed changes in spending and quality associated with the Alternative Quality Contract and found that the rate of increase in spending slowed compared to control groups. Overall, participation in the contract over two years led to a savings of 3.3% (1.9% in year-1, 3.3% in year-2) compared to spending in groups not participating in the contract. The savings were even higher for groups whose previous experience had been only in fee-for-service contracting. Such groups’ quarterly savings over two years averaged 8.2% (6.3% in year-1, 9.9% in year-2). Quality of care also improved within organizations participating in the Alternative Quality Contract compared to control organizations in both years. Chronic care management, adult preventive care, and pediatric care improved from year 1 to year 2 within the contracting groups. These results suggest that global budgets coupled with pay-for-performance can begin to slow the underlying growth in medical spending while improving quality. PMID:22786651

  3. [Global views on clinical trials and data quality].

    PubMed

    Liu, Daniel; Han, Xiu-lan; Sun, Hua-long; Dai, Nan

    2015-11-01

    The quality and integrity of clinical trials and associated data are not only derived from accuracy of trial data analyses, but also closely embodied to the authenticity and integrity of those data and data documents as well as the compliant procedures obtaining those data and relevant files in the life cycle of clinical trials. The compliances of good clinical practices and standards suggest the reliability, complete and accuracy of data and data documents, which is constructing the convincible foundation of drug efficacy and safety validated via clinical trials. Therefore, the monitoring and auditing on clinical trials and associated data quality keep eyes on not only verifications of reliability and correctness on the data analytic outcomes, but also validation of science and compliance of the trial management procedure and documentations in the process of data collections. PMID:26911039

  4. Global surface water quality hotspots under climate change and anthropogenic developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Yearsley, John R.

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades, freshwater usage for various sectors (e.g. agriculture, industry, energy and domestic) has more than doubled. A growing global population will place further demands on water supplies, whereas the availability and quality of water resources will be affected by climate change and human impacts. These developments will increase imbalances between fresh water demand and supply in terms of both water quantity and water quality. Here we discuss a methodology to identify regions of the world where surface water quality is expected to deteriorate under climate change and anthropogenic developments. Our approach integrates global hydrological-water quality modelling, climate and socio-economic scenarios and relations of water quality with physical and socio-economic drivers.

  5. 78 FR 10181 - Global Quality Systems-An Integrated Approach To Improving Medical Product Safety; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Global Quality Systems--An Integrated Approach To Improving... ``Global Quality Systems--An Integrated Approach to Improving Medical Product Safety.'' This 2-day public... With Implementation of U.S.P. 35 on a Global Basis. Pilot Program for Abbreviated Drug Inspections....

  6. Megacity impacts on global air quality under present and future scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, T.; Denier Van Der Gon, H.; Stock, Z.; Russo, M.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    Over half of the population of the world now lives in cities, with the global rate of urbanisation expected to continue well into the 21st century. A significant fraction of this urban population lives in so- called "Megacities", which are commonly defined as urban areas containing more than 10 million people, although there is no formally accepted definition. These shifts in the distribution of population and economic activity are expected to lead to changes in the emissions of atmospheric pollutants, which in turn could be expected to lead to changes in air quality within Megacities, in the regions surrounding Megacities, and perhaps also at the global scale. A global model of atmospheric chemistry and transport is an essential part of any integrated assessment of the effects of megacities at these scales. Global models require global emission inventories as input, along with appropriate emission scenarios. Unfortunately there are very few global emission scenarios available which are explicitly designed to explore differences in projected rates of urbanisation. In this work we examine the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) emissions projections which are freely available as part of CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project for the IPCC AR5 report). We compare the future projections of Megacity emissions from four different RCP datasets and describe strategies of adapting these RCP projections for the study of Megacity impacts on air quality. Results of global chemical transport model studies examining these projections will also be presented.

  7. A Satellite-Based Multi-Pollutant Index of Global Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Mathew J.; Martin, Randall V.; vanDonkelaar, Aaron; Lamsal, Lok; Brauer, Michael; Brook, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution is a major health hazard that is responsible formillions of annual excess deaths worldwide. Simpleindicators are useful for comparative studies and to asses strends over time. The development of global indicators hasbeen impeded by the lack of ground-based observations in vast regions of the world. Recognition is growing of the need for amultipollutant approach to air quality to better represent human exposure. Here we introduce the prospect of amultipollutant air quality indicator based on observations from satellite remote sensing.

  8. Improving the Quality of Health Care Services for Adolescents, Globally: A Standards-Driven Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Manisha; Baltag, Valentina; Bose, Krishna; Boschi-Pinto, Cynthia; Lambrechts, Thierry; Mathai, Matthews

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The World Health Organization (WHO) undertook an extensive and elaborate process to develop eight Global Standards to improve quality of health care services for adolescents. The objectives of this article are to present the Global Standards and their method of development. Methods The Global Standards were developed through a four-stage process: (1) conducting needs assessment; (2) developing the Global Standards and their criteria; (3) expert consultations; and (4) assessing their usability. Needs assessment involved conducting a meta-review of systematic reviews and two online global surveys in 2013, one with primary health care providers and another with adolescents. The Global Standards were developed based on the needs assessment in conjunction with analysis of 26 national standards from 25 countries. The final document was reviewed by experts from the World Health Organization regional and country offices, governments, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and development partners. The standards were subsequently tested in Benin and in a regional expert consultation of Latin America and Caribbean countries for their usability. Results The process resulted in the development of eight Global Standards and 79 criteria for measuring them: (1) adolescents' health literacy; (2) community support; (3) appropriate package of services; (4) providers' competencies; (5) facility characteristics; (6) equity and nondiscrimination; (7) data and quality improvement; and (8) adolescents' participation. Conclusions The eight standards are intended to act as benchmarks against which quality of health care provided to adolescents could be compared. Health care services can use the standards as part of their internal quality assurance mechanisms or as part of an external accreditation process. PMID:26299556

  9. Self-Efficacy, Pulmonary Function, Perceived Health and Global Quality of Life of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Astrid K.; Rustoen ,Tone; Hanestad, Berit R.; Gjengedal, Eva; Moum, Torbjorn

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the extent that pulmonary function is related to perceived health status and global quality of life in adults suffering from cystic fibrosis, and the extent that self-efficacy modifies these relationships. Our sample comprised 86 adults (48% female; mean age, 29 years; age range, 18-54 years) with cystic fibrosis, recruited…

  10. Transforming University Education and Quality Assurance for Sustainable Development in Nigeria for a Globalized World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamman, F. N.

    2013-01-01

    Education has been recognized as an important tool for achieving a nation's goals, vision and objectives. The quality of Nigerian universities has been and still is an issue of concern among stakeholders due to the challenges posed by globalization and the need for continued scientific and technological advancement. Over the years, this concern…

  11. Data Quality of the JERS-1 SAR Global Rain Forest Mapping (GRFM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, B.; Alves, M.; Shimada, M.; Freeman, T.; Rosenqvist, A.; Siqueira, P.

    1998-01-01

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan's (NASDA) JERS-1 SAR began collecting data in 1995 for the Global Rain Forest Mapping Project (GRFM). The GRFM data quality has been examined for products resulting from both the NASDA and Alaska SAR facility's (ASF) processing facilities.

  12. INTERIM GUIDANCE FOR DEVELOPING GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM DATA COLLECTION STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PROJECT PLANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency Geospatial Quality Council developed this document to harmonize the process of collecting, editing, and exporting spatial data of known quality using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Each organizational entity may adopt this d...

  13. The human qualities needed to complete the global eradication of polio

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Although the 99% decrease seen in global polio incidence between 1988 and 2000 represented remarkable progress towards polio eradication, tackling the last 1% of polio has proved tantalizingly difficult. Pockets of endemic transmission currently persist both on the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan and in northern Nigeria. These pockets have permitted the reinfection of countries that were previously polio-free. Global strategic plans for polio eradication set out the activities, resources and financing needed to overcome the managerial, technical and security challenges faced by those tasked with the interruption of poliovirus transmission. However, polio eradication also depends on the less tangible but equally important human qualities of energy, realism, articulacy, determination, imagination, collaboration, adaptability, tactical awareness, innovation, openness and nimbleness (the initial letters of which give the acronym “ERADICATION”). By paying attention to these human qualities, the stakeholders involved may be more likely to achieve global polio eradication. PMID:23599552

  14. The human qualities needed to complete the global eradication of polio.

    PubMed

    Maher, Dermot

    2013-04-01

    Although the 99% decrease seen in global polio incidence between 1988 and 2000 represented remarkable progress towards polio eradication, tackling the last 1% of polio has proved tantalizingly difficult. Pockets of endemic transmission currently persist both on the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan and in northern Nigeria. These pockets have permitted the reinfection of countries that were previously polio-free. Global strategic plans for polio eradication set out the activities, resources and financing needed to overcome the managerial, technical and security challenges faced by those tasked with the interruption of poliovirus transmission. However, polio eradication also depends on the less tangible but equally important human qualities of energy, realism, articulacy, determination, imagination, collaboration, adaptability, tactical awareness, innovation, openness and nimbleness (the initial letters of which give the acronym "ERADICATION"). By paying attention to these human qualities, the stakeholders involved may be more likely to achieve global polio eradication.

  15. Co-benefits of Global Greenhouse Gas Mitigation for Future Air Quality and Human Health.

    PubMed

    West, J Jason; Smith, Steven J; Silva, Raquel A; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zachariah; Fry, Meridith M; Anenberg, Susan; Horowitz, Larry W; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

    2013-10-01

    Actions to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions often reduce co-emitted air pollutants, bringing co-benefits for air quality and human health. Past studies(1-6) typically evaluated near-term and local co-benefits, neglecting the long-range transport of air pollutants(7-9), long-term demographic changes, and the influence of climate change on air quality(10-12). Here we simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health using a global atmospheric model and consistent future scenarios, via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. We use new relationships between chronic mortality and exposure to fine particulate matter(13) and ozone(14), global modeling methods(15), and new future scenarios(16). Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation avoids 0.5±0.2, 1.3±0.5, and 2.2±0.8 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $50-380 (ton CO2)(-1), which exceed previous estimates, exceed marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and are within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-70 times the marginal cost in 2030. Air quality and health co-benefits, especially as they are mainly local and near-term, provide strong additional motivation for transitioning to a low-carbon future.

  16. Co-benefits of Global Greenhouse Gas Mitigation for Future Air Quality and Human Health.

    PubMed

    West, J Jason; Smith, Steven J; Silva, Raquel A; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zachariah; Fry, Meridith M; Anenberg, Susan; Horowitz, Larry W; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

    2013-10-01

    Actions to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions often reduce co-emitted air pollutants, bringing co-benefits for air quality and human health. Past studies(1-6) typically evaluated near-term and local co-benefits, neglecting the long-range transport of air pollutants(7-9), long-term demographic changes, and the influence of climate change on air quality(10-12). Here we simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health using a global atmospheric model and consistent future scenarios, via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. We use new relationships between chronic mortality and exposure to fine particulate matter(13) and ozone(14), global modeling methods(15), and new future scenarios(16). Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation avoids 0.5±0.2, 1.3±0.5, and 2.2±0.8 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $50-380 (ton CO2)(-1), which exceed previous estimates, exceed marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and are within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-70 times the marginal cost in 2030. Air quality and health co-benefits, especially as they are mainly local and near-term, provide strong additional motivation for transitioning to a low-carbon future. PMID:24926321

  17. Strategies for ensuring global consistency/comparability of water-quality data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    In the past 20 years the water quality of the United States has improved remarkably-the waters are safer for drinking, swimming, and fishing. However, despite many accomplishments, it is still difficult to answer such basic questions as: 'How clean is the water?' and 'How is it changing over time?' These same questions exist on a global scale as well. In order to focus water-data issues in the United States, a national Intergovernmental Task Force on Monitoring Water Quality (ITFM) was initiated for public and private organizations, whereby key elements involved in data collection, analysis, storage, and management could be made consistent and comparable. The ITFM recommended and its members are implementing a nationwide strategy to improve water-quality monitoring, assessment, and reporting activities. The intent of this paper is to suggest that a voluntary effort be initiated to ensure the comparability and utility of hydrological data on a global basis. Consistent, long-term data sets that are comparable are necessary in order to formulate ideas regarding regional and global trends in water quantity and quality. The author recommends that a voluntary effort similar to the ITFM effort be utilized. The strategy proposed would involve voluntary representation from countries and international organizations (e.g. World Health Organization) involved in drinking-water assessments and/or ambient water-quality monitoring. Voluntary partnerships such as this will improve curability to reduce health risks and achieve a better return on public and private investments in monitoring, environmental protection, and natural resource management, and result in a collaborative process that will save millions of dollars.In this work it is suggested that a voluntary effort be initiated to ensure the comparability and utility of hydrological data on a global basis. The strategy proposed would involve voluntary representation from countries and international organizations involved in

  18. Sensitivity of Surface Air Quality and Global Mortality to Global, Regional, and Sectoral Black Carbon Emission Reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anenberg, S.; Talgo, K.; Dolwick, P.; Jang, C.; Arunachalam, S.; West, J.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), a component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) released during incomplete combustion, is associated with atmospheric warming and deleterious health impacts, including premature cardiopulmonary and lung cancer mortality. A growing body of literature suggests that controlling emissions may therefore have dual benefits for climate and health. Several studies have focused on quantifying the potential impacts of reducing BC emissions from various world regions and economic sectors on radiative forcing. However, the impacts of these reductions on human health have been less well studied. Here, we use a global chemical transport model (MOZART-4) and a health impact function to quantify the surface air quality and human health benefits of controlling BC emissions. We simulate a base case and several emission control scenarios, where anthropogenic BC emissions are reduced by half globally, individually in each of eight world regions, and individually from the residential, industrial, and transportation sectors. We also simulate a global 50% reduction of both BC and organic carbon (OC) together, since they are co-emitted and both are likely to be impacted by actual control measures. Meteorology and biomass burning emissions are for the year 2002 with anthropogenic BC and OC emissions for 2000 from the IPCC AR5 inventory. Model performance is evaluated by comparing to global surface measurements of PM2.5 components. Avoided premature mortalities are calculated using the change in PM2.5 concentration between the base case and emission control scenarios and a concentration-response factor for chronic mortality from the epidemiology literature.

  19. [Schools, office buildings, leisure settings: diversity of indoor air quality issues. Global review on indoor air quality in these settings].

    PubMed

    Mandin, C; Derbez, M; Kirchner, S

    2012-07-01

    This review provides a global overview of indoor air quality issues in schools, office buildings and recreational settings. It presents the most recent scientific publications and the on-going work conducted in France in the frame of the indoor air quality Observatory. Monitoring campaigns on indoor air quality in schools have been carried out in the recent years in Europe. However, few studies have specifically addressed the role of exposure in these buildings on children's health. Indoor air quality in office buildings has been little studied so far. However, some specificities, such as emissions from electronic devices, frequent cleaning, impossibility to open windows in high-rise buildings, for example, should be examined and their role on the health and comfort studied. Finally, even if the time spent in recreational settings is short, the quality of indoor air should also be considered because of specific pollution. This is the case of indoor swimming pools (exposure to chlorination byproducts) and ice-rinks (exposure to exhaust from machines used to smooth the ice).

  20. [Schools, office buildings, leisure settings: diversity of indoor air quality issues. Global review on indoor air quality in these settings].

    PubMed

    Mandin, C; Derbez, M; Kirchner, S

    2012-07-01

    This review provides a global overview of indoor air quality issues in schools, office buildings and recreational settings. It presents the most recent scientific publications and the on-going work conducted in France in the frame of the indoor air quality Observatory. Monitoring campaigns on indoor air quality in schools have been carried out in the recent years in Europe. However, few studies have specifically addressed the role of exposure in these buildings on children's health. Indoor air quality in office buildings has been little studied so far. However, some specificities, such as emissions from electronic devices, frequent cleaning, impossibility to open windows in high-rise buildings, for example, should be examined and their role on the health and comfort studied. Finally, even if the time spent in recreational settings is short, the quality of indoor air should also be considered because of specific pollution. This is the case of indoor swimming pools (exposure to chlorination byproducts) and ice-rinks (exposure to exhaust from machines used to smooth the ice). PMID:22818262

  1. Evaluation of global water quality - the potential of a data- and model-driven analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bärlund, Ilona; Flörke, Martina; Alcamo, Joseph; Völker, Jeanette; Malsy, Marcus; Kaus, Andrew; Reder, Klara; Büttner, Olaf; Katterfeld, Christiane; Dietrich, Désirée; Borchardt, Dietrich

    2016-04-01

    The ongoing socio-economic development presents a new challenge for water quality worldwide, especially in developing and emerging countries. It is estimated that due to population growth and the extension of water supply networks, the amount of waste water will rise sharply. This can lead to an increased risk of surface water quality degradation, if the wastewater is not sufficiently treated. This development has impacts on ecosystems and human health, as well as food security. The United Nations Member States have adopted targets for sustainable development. They include, inter alia, sustainable protection of water quality and sustainable use of water resources. To achieve these goals, appropriate monitoring strategies and the development of indicators for water quality are required. Within the pre-study for a 'World Water Quality Assessment' (WWQA) led by United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), a methodology for assessing water quality, taking into account the above-mentioned objectives has been developed. The novelty of this methodology is the linked model- and data-driven approach. The focus is on parameters reflecting the key water quality issues, such as increased waste water pollution, salinization or eutrophication. The results from the pre-study show, for example, that already about one seventh of all watercourses in Latin America, Africa and Asia show high organic pollution. This is of central importance for inland fisheries and associated food security. In addition, it could be demonstrated that global water quality databases have large gaps. These must be closed in the future in order to obtain an overall picture of global water quality and to target measures more efficiently. The aim of this presentation is to introduce the methodology developed within the WWQA pre-study and to show selected examples of application in Latin America, Africa and Asia.

  2. Changes in Health Care Spending and Quality 4 Years into Global Payment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zirui; Rose, Sherri; Safran, Dana G.; Landon, Bruce E.; Day, Matthew P.; Chernew, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Spending and quality under global budgets remain unknown beyond 2 years. We evaluated spending and quality measures during the first 4 years of the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Alternative Quality Contract (AQC). METHODS We compared spending and quality among enrollees whose physician organizations entered the AQC from 2009 through 2012 with those among persons in control states. We studied spending changes according to year, category of service, site of care, experience managing risk contracts, and price versus utilization. We evaluated process and outcome quality. RESULTS In the 2009 AQC cohort, medical spending on claims grew an average of $62.21 per enrollee per quarter less than it did in the control cohort over the 4-year period (P<0.001). This amount is equivalent to a 6.8% savings when calculated as a proportion of the average post-AQC spending level in the 2009 AQC cohort. Analogously, the 2010, 2011, and 2012 cohorts had average savings of 8.8% (P<0.001), 9.1% (P<0.001), and 5.8% (P = 0.04), respectively, by the end of 2012. Claims savings were concentrated in the outpatient-facility setting and in procedures, imaging, and tests, explained by both reduced prices and reduced utilization. Claims savings were exceeded by incentive payments to providers during the period from 2009 through 2011 but exceeded incentive payments in 2012, generating net savings. Improvements in quality among AQC cohorts generally exceeded those seen elsewhere in New England and nationally. CONCLUSIONS As compared with similar populations in other states, Massachusetts AQC enrollees had lower spending growth and generally greater quality improvements after 4 years. Although other factors in Massachusetts may have contributed, particularly in the later part of the study period, global budget contracts with quality incentives may encourage changes in practice patterns that help reduce spending and improve quality. (Funded by the Commonwealth Fund and others

  3. Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health

    SciTech Connect

    West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

    2013-10-01

    Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.5±0.2, 1.3±0.6, and 2.2±1.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy is Associated With Improved Global Quality of Life Among Long-term Survivors of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Vazquez, Esther G.; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the long-term quality of life among patients treated with and without intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: University of Washington Quality of Life instrument scores were reviewed for 155 patients previously treated with radiation therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. All patients were disease free and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Eighty-four patients (54%) were treated with IMRT. The remaining 71 patients (46%) were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) by use of initial opposed lateral fields matched to a low anterior neck field. Results: The mean global quality of life scores were 67.5 and 80.1 for the IMRT patients at 1 and 2 years, respectively, compared with 55.4 and 57.0 for the 3D CRT patients, respectively (p < 0.001). At 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy, the proportion of patients who rated their global quality of life as 'very good' or 'outstanding' was 51% and 41% among patients treated by IMRT and 3DCRT, respectively (p = 0.11). At 2 years, the corresponding percentages increased to 73% and 49%, respectively (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis accounting for sex, age, radiation intent (definitive vs. postoperative), radiation dose, T stage, primary site, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and neck dissection, the use of IMRT was the only variable independently associated with improved quality of life (p = 0.01). Conclusion: The early quality of life improvements associated with IMRT not only are maintained but apparently become more magnified over time. These data provide powerful evidence attesting to the long-term benefits of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

  5. Atomistic Simulations of the Effects of Polyglutamine Chain Length and Solvent Quality on Conformational Equilibria and Spontaneous Homodimerization

    PubMed Central

    Vitalis, Andreas; Wang, Xiaoling; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Aggregation of expanded polyglutamine tracts is associated with nine different neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington’s disease. Experiments and computer simulations have demonstrated that monomeric forms of polyglutamine molecules sample heterogeneous sets of collapsed structures in water. The current work focuses on a mechanistic characterization of polyglutamine homodimerization as a function of chain length and temperature. These studies were carried out using molecular simulations based on a recently developed continuum solvation model that was designed for studying conformational and binding equilibria of intrinsically disordered molecules such as polyglutamine systems. The main results are as follows: Polyglutamine molecules form disordered, collapsed globules in aqueous solution. These molecules spontaneously associate at conditions approaching those of typical in vitro experiments for chains of length N ≥ 15. The spontaneity of these homotypic associations increases with increasing chain length and decreases with increasing temperature. Similar and generic driving forces govern both collapse and spontaneous homodimerization of polyglutamine in aqueous milieus. Collapse and dimerization maximize self-interactions and reduce the interface between polyglutamine molecules and the surrounding solvent. Other than these generic considerations, there do not appear to be any specific structural requirements for either chain collapse or chain dimerization, i.e., both collapse and dimerization are non-specific in that disordered globules form disordered dimers. In fact, it is shown that the driving force for intermolecular associations is governed by spontaneous conformational fluctuations within monomeric polyglutamine. These results suggest that polyglutamine aggregation is unlikely to follow a homogeneous nucleation mechanism with the monomer as the critical nucleus. Instead, the results support the formation of disordered, non beta

  6. Variation of Meat Quality Parameters Due to Conformation and Fat Class in Limousin Bulls Slaughtered at 25 to 27 Months of Age

    PubMed Central

    Guzek, Dominika; Głąska, Dominika; Pogorzelski, Grzegorz; Kozań, Karolina; Pietras, Jacek; Konarska, Małgorzata; Sakowska, Anna; Głąski, Krzysztof; Pogorzelska, Ewelina; Barszczewski, Jerzy; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of age of animal, hot carcass weight, pH, conformation and fat class on basic beef quality attributes (tenderness, sarcomere length, basic chemical composition, marbling and colour) in a group of purebred animals. The object of the study was beef of Limousin bulls (25 to 27 months, hot carcass weight - 432±31 kg, “U” conformation class, “2”–“3” fat class). Analysed cuts were Infraspinatus muscle from the blade and Longissimus dorsi muscle from the cube roll and the striploin. Tenderness was analysed with universal testing machine, colour - chromometer analysis, sarcomere length - microscopic method, basic chemical composition - near-infrared spectroscopy and marbling - computer image analysis. No differences in tenderness and sarcomere length were observed within the age groups of Limousin bulls (age of 25, 26, 27 months) (p>0.05). Moisture (p = 0.0123) and fat (p = 0.0250) content were significantly different for meat of animals slaughtered at the age of 25 and 27 months. No influence of pH value on tenderness was observed, but at the same time, influence on sarcomere length (p = 0.039) and b* component of colour (0.045) was found. For “U” conformation class, in subclasses, as well as for fat classes “2”–“3”, there were no differences in tenderness, sarcomere length and colour components. Higher fat content was observed in the higher fat class, rather than in lower, however this feature was not associated with marbling. PMID:25049844

  7. Quality Assessment for the First Part of the Tandem-X Global Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brautigam, B.; Martone, M.; Rizzoli, P.; Gonzalez, C.; Wecklich, C.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bachmann, M.; Schulze, D.; Zink, M.

    2015-04-01

    TanDEM-X is an innovative synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mission with the main goal to generate a global and homogeneous digital elevation model (DEM) of the Earth's land masses. The final DEM product will reach a new dimension of detail with respect to resolution and quality. The absolute horizontal and vertical accuracy shall each be less than 10 m in a 90% confidence interval at a pixel spacing of 12 m. The relative vertical accuracy specification for the TanDEM-X mission foresees a 90% point-to-point error of 2 m (4 m) for areas with predominant terrain slopes smaller than 20% (greater than 20%) within a 1° longitude by 1° latitude cell. The global DEM is derived from interferometric SAR acquisitions performed by two radar satellites flying in close orbit formation. Interferometric performance parameters like the coherence between the two radar images have been monitored and evaluated throughout the mission. In a further step, over 500,000 single SAR scenes are interferometrically processed, calibrated, and mosaicked into a global DEM product which will be completely available in the second half of 2016. This paper presents an up-todate quality status of the single interferometric acquisitions as well as of 50% of the final DEM. The overall DEM quality of these first products promises accuracies well within the specification, especially in terms of absolute height accuracy.

  8. Using a biocultural approach to examine migration/globalization, diet quality, and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Himmelgreen, David A; Cantor, Allison; Arias, Sara; Romero Daza, Nancy

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the role and impact that globalization and migration (e.g., intra-/intercontinental, urban/rural, and circular) have had on diet patterns, diet quality, and energy balance as reported on in the literature during the last 20 years. Published literature from the fields of anthropology, public health, nutrition, and other disciplines (e.g., economics) was collected and reviewed. In addition, case studies from the authors' own research are presented in order to elaborate on key points and dietary trends identified in the literature. While this review is not intended to be comprehensive, the findings suggest that the effects of migration and globalization on diet quality and energy balance are neither lineal nor direct, and that the role of social and physical environments, culture, social organization, and technology must be taken into account to better understand this relationship. Moreover, concepts such as acculturation and the nutrition transition do not necessarily explain or adequately describe all of the global processes that shape diet quality and energy balance. Theories from nutritional anthropology and critical bio-cultural medical anthropology are used to tease out some of these complex interrelationships.

  9. Global impacts of conversions from natural to agricultural ecosystems on water resources: Quantity versus quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Jolly, Ian; Sophocleous, Marios; Zhang, Lu

    2007-03-01

    Past land use changes have greatly impacted global water resources, with often opposing effects on water quantity and quality. Increases in rain-fed cropland (460%) and pastureland (560%) during the past 300 years from forest and grasslands decreased evapotranspiration and increased recharge (two orders of magnitude) and streamflow (one order of magnitude). However, increased water quantity degraded water quality by mobilization of salts, salinization caused by shallow water tables, and fertilizer leaching into underlying aquifers that discharge to streams. Since the 1950s, irrigated agriculture has expanded globally by 174%, accounting for ˜90% of global freshwater consumption. Irrigation based on surface water reduced streamflow and raised water tables resulting in waterlogging in many areas (China, India, and United States). Marked increases in groundwater-fed irrigation in the last few decades in these areas has lowered water tables (≤1 m/yr) and reduced streamflow. Degradation of water quality in irrigated areas has resulted from processes similar to those in rain-fed agriculture: salt mobilization, salinization in waterlogged areas, and fertilizer leaching. Strategies for remediating water resource problems related to agriculture often have opposing effects on water quantity and quality. Long time lags (decades to centuries) between land use changes and system response (e.g., recharge, streamflow, and water quality), particularly in semiarid regions, mean that the full impact of land use changes has not been realized in many areas and remediation to reverse impacts will also take a long time. Future land use changes should consider potential impacts on water resources, particularly trade-offs between water, salt, and nutrient balances, to develop sustainable water resources to meet human and ecosystem needs.

  10. Global impacts of conversions from natural to agricultural ecosystems on water resources: Quantity versus quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, B.R.; Jolly, I.; Sophocleous, M.; Zhang, L.

    2007-01-01

    [1] Past land use changes have greatly impacted global water resources, with often opposing effects on water quantity and quality. Increases in rain-fed cropland (460%) and pastureland (560%) during the past 300 years from forest and grasslands decreased evapotranspiration and increased recharge (two orders of magnitude) and streamflow (one order of magnitude). However, increased water quantity degraded water quality by mobilization of salts, salinization caused by shallow water tables, and fertilizer leaching into underlying aquifers that discharge to streams. Since the 1950s, irrigated agriculture has expanded globally by 174%, accounting for ???90% of global freshwater consumption. Irrigation based on surface water reduced streamflow and raised water tables resulting in waterlogging in many areas (China, India, and United States). Marked increases in groundwater-fed irrigation in the last few decades in these areas has lowered water tables (???1 m/yr) and reduced streamflow. Degradation of water quality in irrigated areas has resulted from processes similar to those in rain-fed agriculture: salt mobilization, salinization in waterlogged areas, and fertilizer leaching. Strategies for remediating water resource problems related to agriculture often have opposing effects on water quantity and quality. Long time lags (decades to centuries) between land use changes and system response (e.g., recharge, streamflow, and water quality), particularly in semiarid regions, mean that the full impact of land use changes has not been realized in many areas and remediation to reverse impacts will also take a long time. Future land use changes should consider potential impacts on water resources, particularly trade-offs between water, salt, and nutrient balances, to develop sustainable water resources to meet human and ecosystem needs. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Reflecting on the EFA Global Monitoring Report's Framework for Understanding Quality Education: A Teacher's Perspective in Eritrea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers issues concerning the quality of education in Eritrea using the Education for All (EFA) Global Monitoring Report's (GMR) framework for quality education. Drawing on 2 years school-based professional experience in the country, the multiple factors affecting quality in schooling are discussed. The applicability of the GMR…

  12. Using the ACEI Global Guidelines Assessment to Evaluate the Quality of Early Child Care in Greek Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentzou, Konstantina

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant growth of interest in ensuring that child care provision for children is of a high quality. This interest has been stimulated by research evidence according to which good quality child care has a positive influence on children's overall development. The global quality in Greek preschool and…

  13. Using global aerosol models and satellite data for air quality studies: Challenges and data needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol particles, also known as PM2.5 (particle diameter less than 2.5 pm) and PM10 (particle diameter less than 10 pm), are one of the key atmospheric components that determines air quality. Yet, air quality forecasts for PM are still in their infancy and remain a challenging task. It is difficult to simply relate PM levels to local meteorological conditions, and large uncertainties exist in regional air quality model emission inventories and initial and boundary conditions. Especially challenging are periods when a significant amount of aerosol comes from outside the regional modeling domain through long-range transport. In the past few years, NASA has launched several satellites with global aerosol measurement capabilities, providing large-scale chemical weather pictures. NASA has also supported development of global models which simulate atmospheric transport and transformation processes of important atmospheric gas and aerosol species. I will present the current modeling and satellite capabilities for PM2.5 studies, the possibilities and challenges in using satellite data for PM2.5 forecasts, and the needs of future remote sensing data for improving air quality monitoring and modeling.

  14. Availability and quality of cause-of-death data for estimating the global burden of injuries

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, James E; Shahraz, Saeid; Fingerhut, Lois A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the availability and quality of global death registration data used for estimating injury mortality. Methods The completeness and coverage of recent national death registration data from the World Health Organization mortality database were assessed. The quality of data on a specific cause of injury death was judged high if fewer than 20% of deaths were attributed to any of several partially specified causes of injury, such as “unspecified unintentional injury”. Findings Recent death registration data were available for 83 countries, comprising 28% of the global population. They included most high-income countries, most countries in Latin America and several in central Asia and the Caribbean. Categories commonly used for partially specified external causes of injury resulting in death included “undetermined intent,” “unspecified mechanism of unintentional injury,” “unspecified road injury” and “unspecified mechanism of homicide”. Only 20 countries had high-quality data. Nevertheless, because the partially specified categories do contain some information about injury mechanisms, reliable estimates of deaths due to specific external causes of injury, such as road injury, suicide and homicide, could be derived for many more countries. Conclusion Only 20 countries had high-quality death registration data that could be used for estimating injury mortality because injury deaths were frequently classified using imprecise partially specified categories. Analytical methods that can derive national estimates of injury mortality from alternative data sources are needed for countries without reliable death registration systems. PMID:21076564

  15. Predicting effects of global climate change on reservoir water quality and fish habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L H; Railsback, S F

    1989-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of general circulation models (GCMs) for assessing global climate change effects on reservoir water quality and illustrates that general conclusions about the effects of increased carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations on water resources can be made by using GCMs. These conclusions are based on GCM predictions of the climatic effects of doubling CO{sub 2} concentrations (the 2 {times} CO{sub 2} scenario). We also point out inadequacies in using information from GCM output alone to simulate reservoir water quality effects of climate change. Our investigation used Douglas Lake, a large multipurpose reservoir in eastern Tennessee, as an example. We studied water temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO), important water quality parameters that are expected to respond to a changed climate. Finally, we used the temperature and DO requirements of striped bass as an indicator of biological effects of combined changes in temperature and DO. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  16. The Water Quality in Rio Highlights the Global Public Health Concern Over Untreated Sewage

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Joseph N.S.; Bartram, Jamie; Wade, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Water quality issues in Rio have been widely publicized because of the 2016 Olympics. Recent concerns about polluted waters that athletes may be exposed to highlights the conditions that more than a billion people globally are exposed to daily. Despite these unhealthy conditions, much is unknown about the risks and exposure pathways associated with bathing in or drinking untreated or partially treated sewage. Beyond acute illness, we are learning more about the chronic sequelae that arise from repeated exposure to pathogens found in sewage. Additionally, we do not know enough about how to measure water quality, especially in developing countries. A consequence of these knowledge gaps is that data from developed countries are used to guide public health approaches in low- and middle-income settings. More data that are locally specific are needed to inform guidelines for improving sanitation and water quality in Rio and other cities in developing countries. PMID:27689546

  17. Co-benefits of global and regional greenhouse gas mitigation for US air quality in 2050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuqiang; Bowden, Jared H.; Adelman, Zachariah; Naik, Vaishali; Horowitz, Larry W.; Smith, Steven J.; West, J. Jason

    2016-08-01

    Policies to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will not only slow climate change but can also have ancillary benefits of improved air quality. Here we examine the co-benefits of both global and regional GHG mitigation for US air quality in 2050 at fine resolution, using dynamical downscaling methods, building on a previous global co-benefits study (West et al., 2013). The co-benefits for US air quality are quantified via two mechanisms: through reductions in co-emitted air pollutants from the same sources and by slowing climate change and its influence on air quality, following West et al. (2013). Additionally, we separate the total co-benefits into contributions from domestic GHG mitigation vs. mitigation in foreign countries. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to dynamically downscale future global climate to the regional scale and the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) program to directly process global anthropogenic emissions to the regional domain, and we provide dynamical boundary conditions from global simulations to the regional Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. The total co-benefits of global GHG mitigation from the RCP4.5 scenario compared with its reference are estimated to be higher in the eastern US (ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 µg m-3) than the west (0-0.4 µg m-3) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5), with an average of 0.47 µg m-3 over the US; for O3, the total co-benefits are more uniform at 2-5 ppb, with a US average of 3.55 ppb. Comparing the two mechanisms of co-benefits, we find that reductions in co-emitted air pollutants have a much greater influence on both PM2.5 (96 % of the total co-benefits) and O3 (89 % of the total) than the second co-benefits mechanism via slowing climate change, consistent with West et al. (2013). GHG mitigation from foreign countries contributes more to the US O3 reduction (76 % of the total) than that from domestic GHG mitigation only (24 %), highlighting the

  18. The Global Seismographic Network: New Sensor Developments, Quality Assessments and Continuing Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, K.; Davis, J. P.; Wilson, D.; Woodward, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) is a 151 station, globally distributed permanent network of state-of-the-art seismological and geophysical sensors that is a result of an ongoing successful partnership between IRIS, the USGS, the University of California at San Diego, NSF and numerous host institutions worldwide. In recent years, the GSN has standardized their dataloggers to the Quanterra Q330HR data acquisition system at all but three stations. Current equipment modernization efforts are focused on the development of a new very broadband borehole sensor to replace failing KS-54000 instruments and replacing the aging Streckeisen STS-1 surface instruments at many GSN stations. Aging of GSN equipment and discoveries of quality problems with GSN data (e.g., the long period response of the STS-1 sensors) have resulted in the GSN placing major emphasis on quantifying, validating and maintaining data quality. This has resulted in the implementation of MUSTANG and DQA systems for analyzing GSN data quality and enables both network operators and data end users to quickly characterize the performance of stations and networks. We will present summary data quality metrics for the GSN as obtained via these quality assurance tools. Data from the GSN are used not only for research, but on a daily basis are part of the operational missions of the USGS NEIC, NOAA tsunami warning centers, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty Organization as well as other organizations. The primary challenges for the GSN include maintaining these operational capabilities while simultaneously developing and replacing the primary borehole sensors, replacing as needed the primary vault sensors, maintaining high quality data and repairing station infrastructure, all during a period of very tight federal budgets. We will provide an overview of the operational status of the GSN, with a particular emphasis on the status of the primary borehole and vault sensors.

  19. Fake conformal symmetry in unimodular gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    We study Weyl symmetry (local conformal symmetry) in unimodular gravity. It is shown that the Noether currents for both Weyl symmetry and global scale symmetry vanish exactly as in conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. We clearly explain why in the class of conformally invariant gravitational theories, the Noether currents vanish by starting with conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. Moreover, we comment on both classical and quantum-mechanical equivalences in Einstein's general relativity, conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity, and the Weyl-transverse gravity. Finally, we discuss the Weyl current in the conformally invariant scalar action and see that it is also vanishing.

  20. A Geostationary Satellite Constellation for Observing Global Air Quality: Status of the CEOS Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saadi, J. A.; Zehner, C.

    2011-12-01

    Several countries and space agencies are currently planning to launch geostationary satellites in the 2017-2022 time frame to obtain atmospheric composition measurements for characterizing anthropogenic and natural distributions of tropospheric ozone, aerosols, and their precursors, which are important factors in understanding air quality and climate change. While a single geostationary satellite can view only a portion of the globe, it is possible for a minimum of three geostationary satellites, positioned to view Europe/Middle East/Africa, Asia/Australasia, and the Americas, to collectively provide near-global coverage. Harmonizing the planned geostationary missions to be contemporaneous and have common observing capabilities and data distribution protocols would synergistically enable critically needed understanding of the interactions between regional and global atmospheric composition and of the implications for air quality and climate. Such activities would directly address societal benefit areas of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), including Health, Energy, Climate, Disasters, and Ecosystems, and are responsive to the requirements of each mission to provide advanced user services and societal benefits. Over the past 2 years, the Atmospheric Composition Constellation (ACC) of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) has developed a white paper describing such collaboration and the benefits to be derived from it. The resulting ACC recommendations were endorsed by CEOS in May 2011. Here we will present an update on collaborative activities and next steps. This presentation is envisioned to serve as an introduction to the oral sessions associated with Session A.25.

  1. Dosimetric quality assurance of highly conformal external beam treatments: from 2D phantom comparisons to 4D patient dose reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feygelman, V.; Nelms, B.

    2013-06-01

    As IMRT technology continues to evolve, so do the dosimetric QA methods. A historical review of those is presented, starting with longstanding techniques such as film and ion chamber in a phantom and progressing towards 3D and 4D dose reconstruction in the patient. Regarding patient-specific QA, we envision that the currently prevalent limited comparison of dose distributions in the phantom by γ-analysis will be eventually replaced by clinically meaningful patient dose analyses with improved sensitivity and specificity. In a larger sense, we envision a future of QA built upon lessons from the rich history of "quality" as a science and philosophy. This future will aim to improve quality (and ultimately reduce cost) via advanced commissioning processes that succeed in detecting and rooting out systematic errors upstream of patient treatment, thus reducing our reliance on, and the resource burden associated with, per-beam/per-plan inspection.

  2. Worldwide floods are changing: Evidence from global high-quality annual maximum streamflow records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Hong; Westra, Seth; Leonard, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades, floods have led to significant human and economic impacts (in 2014 alone the global cost of floods has been estimated to be US 37.4 billion), and reported flood losses have increased significantly from just US7 billion per year in the 1980s. Recent empirical evidence of significant increasing trends in heavy rainfall has raised the concern of potential changes in flooding magnitude and frequency as a result of large-scale climatic changes. However, other driving forces, including changes in channel capacity and catchment characteristics, also play a large role in rainfall-runoff processes so trends in heavy precipitation cannot be taken as a proxy for trends in flooding. In order to test whether global floods are changing or not, this study analyses a records global discharge time series from 1966 to 2005. Trends in worldwide flood magnitude were analysed using annual maxima daily streamflow obtained from Global Runoff Data Centre database, which holds records of 9,213 stations across the globe, with an average time series length of 42 years per station. High quality records during the reference period (1966 - 2005) with no more than 2 year of missing data were selected as the input of this study (1209 stations in all). To remove streamflow records impacted by large dams, the HydroSHEDS watershed boundaries and Global Reservoir and Dam (GRanD) databases are used to identify stations with existing dams in theirs upstream drainage basins. The Mann-Kendall test at the 5% significant level is applied on selected time series to identify stations showing significant positive and negative trends. The percentage of significantly increasing or decreasing stations are investigated in different climatic regions and catchment sizes, and compared against a bootstrap-based field significant test to represent the null hypothesis. The results indicate strong evidence against the null hypothesis of no change in flood magnitude at global and regional scales.

  3. Online tools for uncovering data quality issues in satellite-based global precipitation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Heo, G.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate and timely available global precipitation products are important to many applications such as flood forecasting, hydrological modeling, vector-borne disease research, crop yield estimates, etc. However, data quality issues such as biases and uncertainties are common in satellite-based precipitation products and it is important to understand these issues in applications. In recent years, algorithms using multi-satellites and multi-sensors for satellite-based precipitation estimates have become popular, such as the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) and the latest Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG). Studies show that data quality issues for multi-satellite and multi-sensor products can vary with space and time and can be difficult to summarize. Online tools can provide customized results for a given area of interest, allowing customized investigation or comparison on several precipitation products. Because downloading data and software is not required, online tools can facilitate precipitation product evaluation and comparison. In this presentation, we will present online tools to uncover data quality issues in satellite-based global precipitation products. Examples will be presented as well.

  4. Creating climate quality global datasets for studying trends, variability and extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, K.; Thorne, P.

    2010-09-01

    Historical instrumental records are essential for climate monitoring and climate research, yet the data are riddled with issues of quality and inhomogeneity. This leaves uncertainty surrounding any conclusions drawn from the data. It is essential that data are quality controlled and homogenised. Furthermore, this must be done in an objective, reproducible and globally consistent manner that enables quantification of uncertainty. The Met Office Hadley Centre is pursuing the quality control and homogenisation of 6000+ stations sub-daily synoptic near-surface temperature data. The data focus mainly on temperature and dewpoint temperature but also include sea level pressure, wind speed and cloud cover. Quality control efforts address many known issues with observational data in an automated manner including outliers and spikes (individual and clusters), repeated values, wet-bulb reservoir drying/freezing and frequently occurring values to name a few. Homogenisation is still work in progress but makes use of ‘pseudo-data' to validate breakpoint detection and adjustment methods. An bootstrap approach will be used on application of homogenisation covering a wide spread of decision parameters with which to estimate uncertainties. This paper details an automated quality control system and presents efforts to date to homogenise these data.

  5. Aquatic Ecosystems, Water Quality, and Global Change: Challenges of conducting Multi-Stressor Vulnerability Assessments (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This draft report investigates the issues and challenges associated with identifying, calculating, and mapping indicators of the relative vulnerability of water quality and aquatic ecosystems, across the United States, to the potential impacts of global change. Using a large set...

  6. World Calibration Center for SF6 - supporting the quality system of the global atmosphere observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Moon, D.; Min, D.; Yun, W.

    2012-10-01

    According to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Strategic Plan: 2008-2015 (WMO, 2009a) WMO/GAW pays attention to systematical improvement of the quality of observations at global or regional monitoring sites. To ensure the comparability and compatibility of the measurements worldwide it is essential to maintain a traceability chain to the primary standard in the different laboratories around the world as well as to establish a quality control system. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), is reported to be very rare in the atmosphere at the global averaged annual mole fraction of about 7 ppt, it is one of the greenhouse gases regulated by Kyoto protocol and is increasing at a rate of 0.22 ppt yr-1. Development of a working (or transfer) standard with very low concentration of SF6 requires expert technologies and several knowhow of gas metrology. In order to meet the Data Quality Objective (DQO), the KMA has cooperated with the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), which is the National Metrology Institute in South Korea. So long as the Central Calibration Laboratory (CCL) for SF6 was established, the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) is now trying to take another step forward to systematically support GAW stations in improving their traceability and quality system for SF6, thereby making a contribution to the WMO/GAW. Through hosting the World Calibration Center for SF6, which is one of GAW facilities, KMA will contribute to harmonization of the global SF6 observations in the long run. This work performed to demonstrate some measurement results on SF6 which complies with the DQOs and is traceable to the WMO mole fraction scale for SF6. In order to produce a working standard which is traceable to the WMO scale, we developed highly precise method of a Gas Chromatography/Electron Capture Detector (GC/ECD) calibrated against the five cylinders (from NOAA, 2011) of the WMO scale. For all analysis the measurement

  7. Impact of Asian Dust on Global Surface Air Quality and Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Yu, Hongbin; Ginoux, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Dust originating from Asian deserts and desertification areas can be transported regionally and globally to affect surface air quality, visibility, and radiation budget not only at immediate downwind locations (e.g., eastern Asia) but also regions far away from the sources (e.g., North America). Deposition of Asian dust to the North Pacific Ocean basin influences the ocean productivity. In this study, we will use the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, remote sensing data form satellite and from the ground-based network, and in-situ data from aircraft and surface observations to address the following questions: - What are the effects of Asian dust on the surface air quality and visibility over Asia and North America? - What are the seasonal and spatial variations of dust deposition to the North Pacific Ocean? How does the Asian dust affect surface radiation budget?

  8. Implementation of a DOD ELAP Conforming Quality System at a FUSRAP Site Field Temporary Radiological Screening Laboratory - 13500

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, M.S.; McElheny, G.; Houston, L.M.; Masset, M.R.; Spector, H.L.

    2013-07-01

    A case study is presented on specific program elements that supported the transition of a temporary field radiological screening lab to an accredited operation capable of meeting client quality objectives for definitive results data. The temporary field lab is located at the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Linde Site in Tonawanda, NY. The site is undergoing remediation under the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, with Cabrera Services Inc. as the remediation contractor and operator of the on-site lab. Analysis methods employed in the on-site lab include gross counting of alpha and beta particle activity on swipes and air filters and gamma spectroscopy of soils and other solid samples. A discussion of key program elements and lessons learned may help other organizations considering pursuit of accreditation for on-site screening laboratories. (authors)

  9. Satellite remote sensing of particulate matter and air quality assessment over global cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Pawan; Christopher, Sundar A.; Wang, Jun; Gehrig, Robert; Lee, Yc; Kumar, Naresh

    Using 1 year of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrievals from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) on board NASA's Terra and Aqua satellite along with ground measurements of PM 2.5 mass concentration, we assess particulate matter air quality over different locations across the global urban areas spread over 26 locations in Sydney, Delhi, Hong Kong, New York City and Switzerland. An empirical relationship between AOT and PM 2.5 mass is obtained and results show that there is an excellent correlation between the bin-averaged daily mean satellite and ground-based values with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.96. Using meteorological and other ancillary datasets, we assess the effects of wind speed, cloud cover, and mixing height (MH) on particulate matter (PM) air quality and conclude that these data are necessary to further apply satellite data for air quality research. Our study clearly demonstrates that satellite-derived AOT is a good surrogate for monitoring PM air quality over the earth. However, our analysis shows that the PM 2.5-AOT relationship strongly depends on aerosol concentrations, ambient relative humidity (RH), fractional cloud cover and height of the mixing layer. Highest correlation between MODIS AOT and PM 2.5 mass is found under clear sky conditions with less than 40-50% RH and when atmospheric MH ranges from 100 to 200 m. Future remote sensing sensors such as Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) that have the capability to provide vertical distribution of aerosols will further enhance our ability to monitor and forecast air pollution. This study is among the first to examine the relationship between satellite and ground measurements over several global locations.

  10. Conformable seal

    DOEpatents

    Neef, W.S.; Lambert, D.R.

    1982-08-10

    Sealing apparatus and method, comprising first and second surfaces or membranes, at least one of which surfaces is deformable, placed in proximity to one another. Urging means cause these surfaces to contact one another in a manner such that the deformable surface deforms to conform to the geometry of the other surface, thereby creating a seal. The seal is capable of undergoing multiple cycles of sealing and unsealing.

  11. A global assessment of climate-water quality relationships in large rivers: an elasticity perspective.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiping; Sharma, Ashish; Sivakumar, Bellie; Wang, Peng

    2014-01-15

    To uncover climate-water quality relationships in large rivers on a global scale, the present study investigates the climate elasticity of river water quality (CEWQ) using long-term monthly records observed at 14 large rivers. Temperature and precipitation elasticities of 12 water quality parameters, highlighted by N- and P-nutrients, are assessed. General observations on elasticity values show the usefulness of this approach to describe the magnitude of stream water quality responses to climate change, which improves that of simple statistical correlation. Sensitivity type, intensity and variability rank of CEWQ are reported and specific characteristics and mechanism of elasticity of nutrient parameters are also revealed. Among them, the performance of ammonia, total phosphorus-air temperature models, and nitrite, orthophosphorus-precipitation models are the best. Spatial and temporal assessment shows that precipitation elasticity is more variable in space than temperature elasticity and that seasonal variation is more evident for precipitation elasticity than for temperature elasticity. Moreover, both anthropogenic activities and environmental factors are found to impact CEWQ for select variables. The major relationships that can be inferred include: (1) human population has a strong linear correlation with temperature elasticity of turbidity and total phosphorus; and (2) latitude has a strong linear correlation with precipitation elasticity of turbidity and N nutrients. As this work improves our understanding of the relation between climate factors and surface water quality, it is potentially helpful for investigating the effect of climate change on water quality in large rivers, such as on the long-term change of nutrient concentrations.

  12. Co-benefits of Global Greenhouse Gas Mitigation for Future Air Quality and Human Health via Two Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J.; Smith, S. J.; Silva, R.; Naik, V.; Adelman, Z.; Fry, M. M.; Anenberg, S.; Zhang, Y.; Horowitz, L. W.; Lamarque, J.; Emmons, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    Global actions to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will also reduce co-emitted air pollutants, with immediate air quality benefits. Climate change itself affects air quality (e.g., via meteorology and biogenic emissions); therefore, actions to reduce GHG emissions will also influence air quality by slowing global climate change. These two mechanisms of air quality co-benefits - reducing co-emitted air pollutants and slowing climate change - have not previously been quantified in a self-consistent way. Here we simulate the co-benefits of global GHG emission reductions on air quality and human health via these two mechanisms in scenarios to 2100. Future emissions scenarios were developed by the GCAM global energy-economics model as part of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) process. We simulate global air quality for a reference case scenario and a scenario with aggressive GHG controls internationally (RCP4.5). Future meteorology is from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model (AM3) simulations of the RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 scenarios. Using the global chemical transport model MOZART-4, we simulate global changes in surface concentrations of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for RCP4.5 relative to the reference case. The two co-benefit mechanisms are isolated by simulating reference case emissions with meteorology from RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. Co-benefits for future human mortality will be assessed using epidemiological concentration-response functions, and projections of future population and baseline mortality rates. Preliminary results indicate that the co-benefits of global GHG mitigation for ozone and PM2.5 are substantial globally and regionally, and that the direct co-benefits from reductions in emissions of co-emitted air pollutants exceed the co-benefits via slowing climate change. We aim to monetize the avoided mortalities as a basis for comparison with the costs of GHG mitigation.

  13. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations (13C–13C, 15N–13C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 13C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited “hand-picked” data sets, we show that ~94 % of the 13C NMR data and almost all 15N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6 % of the 13C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. −2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided command

  14. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  15. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  16. The Global Seismographic Network (GSN): Challenges and Methods for Maintaining High Quality Network Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Katrin; Davis, Peter; Wilson, David; Sumy, Danielle; Woodward, Bob

    2016-04-01

    The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) is a 152 station, globally-distributed, permanent network of state-of-the-art seismological and geophysical sensors. The GSN has been operating for over 20 years via an ongoing successful partnership between IRIS, the USGS, the University of California at San Diego, NSF and numerous host institutions worldwide. The central design goal of the GSN may be summarized as "to record with full fidelity and bandwidth all seismic signals above the Earth noise, accompanied by some efforts to reduce Earth noise by deployment strategies". While many of the technical design goals have been met, we continue to strive for higher data quality with a combination of new sensors and improved installation techniques designed to achieve the lowest noise possible under existing site conditions. Data from the GSN are used not only for research, but on a daily basis as part of the operational missions of the USGS NEIC, NOAA tsunami warning centers, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty Organization as well as other organizations. In the recent period of very tight funding budgets, the primary challenges for the GSN include maintaining these operational capabilities while simultaneously developing and replacing the primary sensors, maintaining high quality data and repairing station infrastructure. Aging of GSN equipment and station infrastructure has resulted in renewed emphasis on developing, evaluating and implementing quality control tools such as MUSTANG and DQA to maintain the high data quality from the GSN stations. These tools allow the network operators to routinely monitor and analyze waveform data to detect and track problems and develop action plans as issues are found. We will present summary data quality metrics for the GSN as obtained via these quality assurance tools. In recent years, the GSN has standardized dataloggers to the Quanterra Q330HR data acquisition system at all but three stations resulting in significantly improved

  17. Troposphere-Stratosphere Coupled Chemistry-Climate Interactions: From Global Warming Projections to Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, P. J.; Abraham, N. L.; Maycock, A. C.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in stratospheric composition can affect tropospheric composition and vice versa. Of particular interest are trace gas concentrations at the interface between these two atmospheric layers in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). This is due to the crucial importance of composition changes in the UTLS for the global energy budget. In a recent study (Nowack et al., 2015), we provided further evidence that composition changes in the tropical UTLS can significantly affect global warming projections. Using a state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean chemistry-climate model, we found a ~20% smaller global warming in response to an abrupt 4xCO2 forcing if composition feedbacks were included in the calculations as compared to simulations in which composition feedbacks were not considered. We attributed this large difference in surface warming mainly to circulation-driven decreases in tropical UTLS ozone and related changes in stratospheric water vapor, partly counteracted by simultaneous changes in ice clouds. Here, we explain why this result is expected to differ between models and how, inter alia, tropospheric chemical mechanisms can contribute to this uncertainty. We highlight that improving our understanding of processes in the tropical UTLS and their representation in Earth system models remains a key challenge in climate research.Finally, taking geoengineering as a new example, we show that changes in the stratosphere can have an impact on air quality in the troposphere. In particular, we explain for a simple solar radiation management scenario how changes in surface ozone can be linked to changes in meteorology and composition in the troposphere and stratosphere. In conclusion, we highlight the importance of considering air quality impacts when evaluating a variety of geoengineering scenarios. Reference: Nowack, P.J., Abraham, N.L., Maycock, A.C., Braesicke, P., Gregory, J.M., Joshi, M.M., Osprey, A., and Pyle, J.A. Nature Climate Change 5, 41

  18. Satellite Models for Global Environmental Change in the NASA Health and Air Quality Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, J.; Estes, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of the environment offers a unique vantage point that can fill in the gaps of environmental, spatial, and temporal data for tracking disease. Health and Air Quality providers and researchers are effective by the global environmental changes that are occurring and they need environmental data to study and understand the geographic, environmental, and meteorological differences in disease. This presentation maintains a diverse constellation of Earth observing research satellites and sponsors research in developing satellite data applications across a wide spectrum of areas including environmental health; infectious disease; air quality standards, policies, and regulations; and the impact of climate change on health and air quality. Successfully providing predictions with the accuracy and specificity required by decision makers will require advancements over current capabilities in a number of interrelated areas. These areas include observations, modeling systems, forecast development, application integration, and the research to operations transition process. This presentation will highlight many projects on which NASA satellites have been a primary partner with local, state, Federal, and international operational agencies over the past twelve years in these areas. Domestic and International officials have increasingly recognized links between environment and health. Health providers and researchers need environmental data to study and understand the geographic, environmental, and meteorological differences in disease. The presentation is directly related to Earth Observing systems and Global Health Surveillance and will present research results of the remote sensing environmental observations of earth and health applications, which can contribute to the health research. As part of NASA approach and methodology they have used Earth Observation Systems and Applications for Health Models to provide a method for bridging gaps of environmental

  19. OpenAQ: A Platform to Aggregate and Freely Share Global Air Quality Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkopf, C. A.; Flasher, J. C.; Veerman, O.; DeWitt, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    Thousands of ground-based air quality monitors around the world publicly publish real-time air quality data; however, researchers and the public do not have access to this information in the ways most useful to them. Often, air quality data are posted on obscure websites showing only current values, are programmatically inaccessible, and/or are in inconsistent data formats across sites. Yet, historical and programmatic access to such a global dataset would be transformative to several scientific fields, from epidemiology to low-cost sensor technologies to estimates of ground-level aerosol by satellite retrievals. To increase accessibility and standardize this disparate dataset, we have built OpenAQ, an innovative, open platform created by a group of scientists and open data programmers. The source code for the platform is viewable at github.com/openaq. Currently, we are aggregating, storing, and making publicly available real-time air quality data (PM2.5, PM10, SO2, NO2, and O3) via an Application Program Interface (API). We will present the OpenAQ platform, which currently has the following specific capabilities: A continuous ingest mechanism for some of the most polluted cities, generalizable to more sources An API providing data-querying, including ability to filter by location, measurement type and value and date, as well as custom sort options A generalized, chart-based visualization tool to explore data accessible via the API At this stage, we are seeking wider participation and input from multiple research communities in expanding our data retrieval sites, standardizing our protocols, receiving feedback on quality issues, and creating tools that can be built on top of this open platform.

  20. Global Clustering Quality Coefficient Assessing the Efficiency of PCA Class Assignment

    PubMed Central

    Ciochina, Stefanut

    2014-01-01

    An essential factor influencing the efficiency of the predictive models built with principal component analysis (PCA) is the quality of the data clustering revealed by the score plots. The sensitivity and selectivity of the class assignment are strongly influenced by the relative position of the clusters and by their dispersion. We are proposing a set of indicators inspired from analytical geometry that may be used for an objective quantitative assessment of the data clustering quality as well as a global clustering quality coefficient (GCQC) that is a measure of the overall predictive power of the PCA models. The use of these indicators for evaluating the efficiency of the PCA class assignment is illustrated by a comparative study performed for the identification of the preprocessing function that is generating the most efficient PCA system screening for amphetamines based on their GC-FTIR spectra. The GCQC ranking of the tested feature weights is explained based on estimated density distributions and validated by using quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA). PMID:25210644

  1. Quality indicators for implementation of safety promotion: towards valid and reliable global certification of local programmes.

    PubMed

    Timpka, Toomas; Nordqvist, Cecilia; Festin, Karin; Lindqvist, Kent

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical underpinnings of safety promotion have not yet been integrated with implementation practice to ascertain between-community programme quality. This study sets out to develop a framework for verifying of the quality of community-based safety-promotion programmes in the global context. We analysed the certification indicators deployed in the international Safe Community movement in light of systems theory. Data were collected from focus group interviews with representatives from 10 certified Swedish communities and then analysed by qualitative methods. The community representatives were found to have used the present indicators mainly for marketing the safety-promotion concept to stakeholders rather than as benchmarks for safety practice. When appraised in regard to systems theory, it was found that the indicators did not cover important aspects of health-services implementation. Attainment of outcomes at the population level was not included. Consequently, that information about programme effects in high-risk groups and in risk environments could be neglected. We conclude that programme processes and outcomes at both organisational and population levels must be assessed when the quality of safety-promotion programmes is being certified. A revised set of indicators for certification of safety-promotion programmes fulfilling these criteria is presented.

  2. Effect of thermal treatment on secondary structure and conformational change of mushroom polyphenol oxidase (PPO) as food quality related enzyme: A FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Baltacıoğlu, Hande; Bayındırlı, Alev; Severcan, Mete; Severcan, Feride

    2015-11-15

    In order to understand the conformational changes of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), which is a food quality related enzyme, after thermal treatment, secondary structure changes of the enzyme were analyzed by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and compared with the change in enzyme activity in the temperature range of 25-80 °C. Fourier self-deconvolution, neural network (NN) and curve-fitting analysis were applied to the amide I band of FTIR spectra for detail analysis of secondary structure elements. FTIR analysis indicated that PPO is an α-helix dominating enzyme. Detail analysis revealed that, as temperature increased, α-helix and β-sheet decreased, but aggregated β-sheet, turns and random coil increased. The marked changes were noted at 40 °C with the occurrence of new bands due to aggregated β-sheet structures, all of which indicate protein denaturation. These aggregation bands were still observed when the temperature was reduced back to 25 °C, from 70 °C, demonstrating an irreversible change in the structure.

  3. Simulation of in-stream water quality on global scale under changing climate and anthropogenic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Anja; Bärlund, Ilona; Punzet, Manuel; Williams, Richard; Teichert, Ellen; Malve, Olli; Voß, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Although catchment scale modelling of water and solute transport and transformations is a widely used technique to study pollution pathways and effects of natural changes, policies and mitigation measures there are only a few examples of global water quality modelling. This work will provide a description of the new continental-scale model of water quality WorldQual and the analysis of model simulations under changed climate and anthropogenic conditions with respect to changes in diffuse and point loading as well as surface water quality. BOD is used as an indicator of the level of organic pollution and its oxygen-depleting potential, and for the overall health of aquatic ecosystems. The first application of this new water quality model is to river systems of Europe. The model itself is being developed as part of the EU-funded SCENES Project which has the principal goal of developing new scenarios of the future of freshwater resources in Europe. The aim of the model is to determine chemical fluxes in different pathways combining analysis of water quantity with water quality. Simple equations, consistent with the availability of data on the continental scale, are used to simulate the response of in-stream BOD concentrations to diffuse and anthropogenic point loadings as well as flow dilution. Point sources are divided into manufacturing, domestic and urban loadings, whereas diffuse loadings come from scattered settlements, agricultural input (for instance livestock farming), and also from natural background sources. The model is tested against measured longitudinal gradients and time series data at specific river locations with different loading characteristics like the Thames that is driven by domestic loading and Ebro with relative high share of diffuse loading. With scenario studies the influence of climate and anthropogenic changes on European water resources shall be investigated with the following questions: 1. What percentage of river systems will have

  4. Global sensitivity analysis for urban water quality modelling: Terminology, convergence and comparison of different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanrolleghem, Peter A.; Mannina, Giorgio; Cosenza, Alida; Neumann, Marc B.

    2015-03-01

    Sensitivity analysis represents an important step in improving the understanding and use of environmental models. Indeed, by means of global sensitivity analysis (GSA), modellers may identify both important (factor prioritisation) and non-influential (factor fixing) model factors. No general rule has yet been defined for verifying the convergence of the GSA methods. In order to fill this gap this paper presents a convergence analysis of three widely used GSA methods (SRC, Extended FAST and Morris screening) for an urban drainage stormwater quality-quantity model. After the convergence was achieved the results of each method were compared. In particular, a discussion on peculiarities, applicability, and reliability of the three methods is presented. Moreover, a graphical Venn diagram based classification scheme and a precise terminology for better identifying important, interacting and non-influential factors for each method is proposed. In terms of convergence, it was shown that sensitivity indices related to factors of the quantity model achieve convergence faster. Results for the Morris screening method deviated considerably from the other methods. Factors related to the quality model require a much higher number of simulations than the number suggested in literature for achieving convergence with this method. In fact, the results have shown that the term "screening" is improperly used as the method may exclude important factors from further analysis. Moreover, for the presented application the convergence analysis shows more stable sensitivity coefficients for the Extended-FAST method compared to SRC and Morris screening. Substantial agreement in terms of factor fixing was found between the Morris screening and Extended FAST methods. In general, the water quality related factors exhibited more important interactions than factors related to water quantity. Furthermore, in contrast to water quantity model outputs, water quality model outputs were found to be

  5. Chemical modification of mono-cysteine mutants allows a more global look at conformations of the epsilon subunit of the ATP synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Sangeeta; Vik, Steven B

    2007-02-01

    The epsilon subunit of the ATP synthase from E. coli undergoes conformational changes while rotating through 360 degrees during catalysis. The conformation of epsilon was probed in the membrane-bound ATP synthase by reaction of mono-cysteine mutants with 3-N-maleimidyl-propionyl biocytin (MPB) under resting conditions, during ATP hydrolysis, and after inhibition by ADP-AlF(3). The relative extents of labeling were quantified after electrophoresis and blotting of the partially purified epsilon subunit. Residues from the N-terminal beta-sandwich domain showed a position-specific pattern of labeling, consistent with prior structural studies. Some residues near the epsilon-gamma interface showed changes up to two-fold if labeling occurred during ATP hydrolysis or after inhibition by ADP-AlF(3). In contrast, residues found in the C-terminal alpha-helices were all labeled to a moderate or high level with a pattern that was consistent with a partially opened helical hairpin. The results indicate that the two C-terminal alpha-helices do not adopt a fixed conformation under resting conditions, but rather exhibit intrinsic flexibility. PMID:17318395

  6. The PyPES library of high quality semi-global potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sibaev, Marat; Crittenden, Deborah L

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we present a Python-based library of high quality semi-global potential energy surfaces for 50 polyatomic molecules with up to six atoms. We anticipate that these surfaces will find widespread application in the testing of new potential energy surface construction algorithms and nuclear ro-vibrational structure theories. To this end, we provide the ability to generate the energy derivatives required for Taylor series expansions to sixth order about any point on the potential energy surface in a range of common coordinate systems, including curvilinear internal, Cartesian, and normal mode coordinates. The PyPES package, along with FORTRAN, C, MATLAB and Mathematica wrappers, is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/pypes-lib.

  7. The PyPES library of high quality semi-global potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sibaev, Marat; Crittenden, Deborah L

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we present a Python-based library of high quality semi-global potential energy surfaces for 50 polyatomic molecules with up to six atoms. We anticipate that these surfaces will find widespread application in the testing of new potential energy surface construction algorithms and nuclear ro-vibrational structure theories. To this end, we provide the ability to generate the energy derivatives required for Taylor series expansions to sixth order about any point on the potential energy surface in a range of common coordinate systems, including curvilinear internal, Cartesian, and normal mode coordinates. The PyPES package, along with FORTRAN, C, MATLAB and Mathematica wrappers, is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/pypes-lib. PMID:26407838

  8. Global Access to Safe Water: Accounting for Water Quality and the Resulting Impact on MDG Progress

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Kyle; LoBuglio, Joe; Bartram, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of progress towards the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) drinking water target relies on classification of water sources as “improved” or “unimproved” as an indicator for water safety. We adjust the current Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) estimate by accounting for microbial water quality and sanitary risk using the only-nationally representative water quality data currently available, that from the WHO and UNICEF “Rapid Assessment of Drinking Water Quality”. A principal components analysis (PCA) of national environmental and development indicators was used to create models that predicted, for most countries, the proportions of piped and of other-improved water supplies that are faecally contaminated; and of these sources, the proportions that lack basic sanitary protection against contamination. We estimate that 1.8 billion people (28% of the global population) used unsafe water in 2010. The 2010 JMP estimate is that 783 million people (11%) use unimproved sources. Our estimates revise the 1990 baseline from 23% to 37%, and the target from 12% to 18%, resulting in a shortfall of 10% of the global population towards the MDG target in 2010. In contrast, using the indicator “use of an improved source” suggests that the MDG target for drinking-water has already been achieved. We estimate that an additional 1.2 billion (18%) use water from sources or systems with significant sanitary risks. While our estimate is imprecise, the magnitude of the estimate and the health and development implications suggest that greater attention is needed to better understand and manage drinking water safety. PMID:22690170

  9. Improvement of research quality in the fields of orthopaedics and trauma: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Fayaz, Hangama C; Haas, Norbert; Kellam, James; Bavonratanavech, Suthorn; Parvizi, Javad; Dyer, George; Pohlemann, Tim; Jerosch, Jörg; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; Pape, Hans Christoph; Smith, Malcolm; Vrahas, Marc; Perka, Carsten; Siebenrock, Klaus; Elhassan, Bassem; Moran, Christopher; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2013-07-01

    The international orthopaedic community aims to achieve the best possible outcome for patient care by constantly modifying surgical techniques and expanding the surgeon's knowledge. These efforts require proper reflection within a setting that necessitates a higher quality standard for global orthopaedic publication. Furthermore, these techniques demand that surgeons acquire information at a rapid rate while enforcing higher standards in research performance. An international consensus exists on how to perform research and what rules should be considered when publishing a scientific paper. Despite this global agreement, in today's "Cross Check Era", too many authors do not give attention to the current standards of systematic research. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to describe these performance standards, the available choices for orthopaedic surgeons and the current learning curve for seasoned teams of researchers and orthopaedic surgeons with more than three decades of experience. These lead to provide an accessible overview of all important aspects of the topics that will significantly influence the research development as we arrive at an important globalisation era in orthopaedics and trauma-related research. PMID:23689761

  10. Improvement of research quality in the fields of orthopaedics and trauma: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Fayaz, Hangama C; Haas, Norbert; Kellam, James; Bavonratanavech, Suthorn; Parvizi, Javad; Dyer, George; Pohlemann, Tim; Jerosch, Jörg; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; Pape, Hans Christoph; Smith, Malcolm; Vrahas, Marc; Perka, Carsten; Siebenrock, Klaus; Elhassan, Bassem; Moran, Christopher; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2013-07-01

    The international orthopaedic community aims to achieve the best possible outcome for patient care by constantly modifying surgical techniques and expanding the surgeon's knowledge. These efforts require proper reflection within a setting that necessitates a higher quality standard for global orthopaedic publication. Furthermore, these techniques demand that surgeons acquire information at a rapid rate while enforcing higher standards in research performance. An international consensus exists on how to perform research and what rules should be considered when publishing a scientific paper. Despite this global agreement, in today's "Cross Check Era", too many authors do not give attention to the current standards of systematic research. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to describe these performance standards, the available choices for orthopaedic surgeons and the current learning curve for seasoned teams of researchers and orthopaedic surgeons with more than three decades of experience. These lead to provide an accessible overview of all important aspects of the topics that will significantly influence the research development as we arrive at an important globalisation era in orthopaedics and trauma-related research.

  11. Conformal mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Gonera, Joanna

    2013-08-15

    The SL(2,R) invariant Hamiltonian systems are discussed within the framework of the orbit method. It is shown that both the dynamics and the symmetry transformations are globally well-defined on phase space. The flexibility in the choice of the time variable and the Hamiltonian function described in the paper by de Alfaro et al. [Nuovo Cimento 34A (1976) 569] is related to the nontrivial global structure of 1+0-dimensional space–time. The operational definition of time is discussed.

  12. Global Threat Reduction Initiative Fuel-Thermo-Physical Characterization Project Quality Assurance Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Mario M.; Slonecker, Bruce D.

    2012-06-01

    The charter of the Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project is to ready Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) facilities and processes for the receipt of unirradiated and irradiated low enriched uranium (LEU) molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel element samples, and to perform analysis to support the Global Threat Reduction Initiative conversion program. PNNL’s support for the program will include the establishment of post-irradiation examination processes, including thermo-physical properties, unique to the U.S. Department of Energy laboratories. These processes will ultimately support the submission of the base fuel qualification (BFQ) to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and revisions to High Performance Research Reactor Safety Analysis Reports to enable conversion from highly enriched uranium to LEU fuel. This quality assurance plan (QAP) provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that support the NRC BFQ. This QAP is designed to be used by project staff, and prescribes the required management control elements that are to be met and how they are implemented. Additional controls are captured in Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project plans, existing procedures, and procedures to be developed that provide supplemental information on how work is conducted on the project.

  13. Forty years of improvements in European air quality: regional policy-industry interactions with global impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, Monica; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Dentener, Frank; Guizzardi, Diego; Sindelarova, Katerina; Muntean, Marilena; Van Dingenen, Rita; Granier, Claire

    2016-03-01

    The EDGARv4.3.1 (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research) global anthropogenic emissions inventory of gaseous (SO2, NOx, CO, non-methane volatile organic compounds and NH3) and particulate (PM10, PM2.5, black and organic carbon) air pollutants for the period 1970-2010 is used to develop retrospective air pollution emissions scenarios to quantify the roles and contributions of changes in energy consumption and efficiency, technology progress and end-of-pipe emission reduction measures and their resulting impact on health and crop yields at European and global scale. The reference EDGARv4.3.1 emissions include observed and reported changes in activity data, fuel consumption and air pollution abatement technologies over the past 4 decades, combined with Tier 1 and region-specific Tier 2 emission factors. Two further retrospective scenarios assess the interplay of policy and industry. The highest emission STAG_TECH scenario assesses the impact of the technology and end-of-pipe reduction measures in the European Union, by considering historical fuel consumption, along with a stagnation of technology with constant emission factors since 1970, and assuming no further abatement measures and improvement imposed by European emission standards. The lowest emission STAG_ENERGY scenario evaluates the impact of increased fuel consumption by considering unchanged energy consumption since the year 1970, but assuming the technological development, end-of-pipe reductions, fuel mix and energy efficiency of 2010. Our scenario analysis focuses on the three most important and most regulated sectors (power generation, manufacturing industry and road transport), which are subject to multi-pollutant European Union Air Quality regulations. Stagnation of technology and air pollution reduction measures at 1970 levels would have led to 129 % (or factor 2.3) higher SO2, 71 % higher NOx and 69 % higher PM2.5 emissions in Europe (EU27), demonstrating the large role that technology has

  14. Denaturant-Dependent Conformational Changes in a [beta]-Trefoil Protein: Global and Residue-Specific Aspects of an Equilibrium Denaturation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Latypov, Ramil F.; Liu, Dingjiang; Jacob, Jaby; Harvey, Timothy S.; Bondarenko, Pavel V.; Kleemann, Gerd R.; Brems, David N.; Raibekas, Andrei A.

    2010-01-12

    Conformational properties of the folded and unfolded ensembles of human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) are strongly denaturant-dependent as evidenced by high-resolution two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), limited proteolysis, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The folded ensemble was characterized in detail in the presence of different urea concentrations by 1H-15N HSQC NMR. The {beta}-trefoil fold characteristic of native IL-1ra was preserved until the unfolding transition region beginning at 4 M urea. At the same time, a subset of native resonances disappeared gradually starting at low denaturant concentrations, indicating noncooperative changes in the folded state. Additional evidence of structural perturbations came from the chemical shift analysis, nonuniform and bell-shaped peak intensity profiles, and limited proteolysis. In particular, the following nearby regions of the tertiary structure became progressively destabilized with increasing urea concentrations: the {beta}-hairpin interface of trefoils 1 and 2 and the H2a-H2 helical region. These regions underwent small-scale perturbations within the native baseline region in the absence of populated molten globule-like states. Similar regions were affected by elevated temperatures known to induce irreversible aggregation of IL-1ra. Further evidence of structural transitions invoking near-native conformations came from an optical spectroscopy analysis of its single-tryptophan variant W17A. The increase in the radius of gyration was associated with a single equilibrium unfolding transition in the case of two different denaturants, urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl). However, the compactness of urea- and GuHCl-unfolded molecules was comparable only at high denaturant concentrations and deviated under less denaturing conditions. Our results identified the role of conformational flexibility in IL-1ra aggregation and shed light on the nature of structural transitions within the

  15. A Cryo-Electron Microscopy Study Identifies the Complete H16.V5 Epitope and Reveals Global Conformational Changes Initiated by Binding of the Neutralizing Antibody Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunwook; Brendle, Sarah A.; Bywaters, Stephanie M.; Guan, Jian; Ashley, Robert E.; Yoder, Joshua D.; Makhov, Alexander M.; Conway, James F.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a worldwide health threat and an etiologic agent of cervical cancer. To understand the antigenic properties of HPV16, we pursued a structural study to elucidate HPV capsids and antibody interactions. The cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of a mature HPV16 particle and an altered capsid particle were solved individually and as complexes with fragment of antibody (Fab) from the neutralizing antibody H16.V5. Fitted crystal structures provided a pseudoatomic model of the virus-Fab complex, which identified a precise footprint of H16.V5, including previously unrecognized residues. The altered-capsid–Fab complex map showed that binding of the Fab induced significant conformational changes that were not seen in the altered-capsid structure alone. These changes included more ordered surface loops, consolidated so-called “invading-arm” structures, and tighter intercapsomeric connections at the capsid floor. The H16.V5 Fab preferentially bound hexavalent capsomers likely with a stabilizing effect that directly correlated with the number of bound Fabs. Additional cryo-EM reconstructions of the virus-Fab complex for different incubation times and structural analysis provide a model for a hyperstabilization of the capsomer by H16.V5 Fab and showed that the Fab distinguishes subtle differences between antigenic sites. IMPORTANCE Our analysis of the cryo-EM reconstructions of the HPV16 capsids and virus-Fab complexes has identified the entire HPV.V5 conformational epitope and demonstrated a detailed neutralization mechanism of this clinically important monoclonal antibody against HPV16. The Fab bound and ordered the apical loops of HPV16. This conformational change was transmitted to the lower region of the capsomer, resulting in enhanced intercapsomeric interactions evidenced by the more ordered capsid floor and “invading-arm” structures. This study advances the understanding of the neutralization mechanism used

  16. The Impact of Global Budgets on Pharmaceutical Spending and Utilization: Early Experience from the Alternative Quality Contract

    PubMed Central

    Afendulis, Christopher C.; Fendrick, A. Mark; Song, Zirui; Landon, Bruce E.; Safran, Dana Gelb; Mechanic, Robert E.; Chernew, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts implemented a global budget-based payment system, the Alternative Quality Contract (AQC), in which provider groups assumed accountability for spending. We investigate the impact of global budgets on the utilization of prescription drugs and related expenditures. Our analyses indicate no statistically significant evidence that the AQC reduced the use of drugs. Although the impact may change over time, early evidence suggests that it is premature to conclude that global budget systems may reduce access to medications. PMID:25500751

  17. Global Air Quality and Climate Impacts of Mitigating Short-lived Climate Pollution in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, K.; Unger, N.; Heyes, C.; Kiesewetter, G.; Klimont, Z.; Schoepp, W.; Wagner, F.

    2014-12-01

    China is a major emitter of harmful air pollutants, including the short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) and their precursors. Implementation of pollution control technologies provides a mechanism for simultaneously protecting human and ecosystem health and achieving near-term climate co-benefits; however, predicting the outcomes of technical and policy interventions is challenging because the SLCPs participate in both climate warming and cooling and share many common emission sources. Here, we present the results of a combined regional integrated assessment and global climate modeling study aimed at quantifying the near-term climate and air quality co-benefits of selective control of Chinese air pollution emissions. Results from IIASA's Greenhouse Gas - Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS) integrated assessment model indicate that methane emission reductions make up > 75% of possible CO2-equivalent emission reductions of the SLCPs and their precursors in China in 2030. A multi-pollutant emission reduction scenario incorporating the 2030 Chinese pollution control measures with the highest potential for future climate impact is applied to the NASA ModelE2 - Yale Interactive Terrestrial Biosphere (NASA ModelE2-YIBs) global carbon - chemistry - climate model to assess the regional and long-range impacts of Chinese SLCP mitigation measures. Using model simulations that incorporate dynamic methane emissions and photosynthesis-dependent isoprene emissions, we quantify the impacts of Chinese reductions of the short-lived air pollutants on radiative forcing and on surface ozone and particulate air pollution. Present-day modeled methane mole fractions are evaluated against SCIAMACHY methane columns and NOAA ESRL/GMD surface flask measurements.

  18. Analysis of ensemble quality of initialzed hindcasts in the global coupled climate model MPI-ESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Sebastian; Düsterhus, Andre; Baehr, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    Global coupled climate models have been used to generate long-term projections of potential climate changes for the next century. On much shorter timescales, numerical weather prediction systems forecast the atmospheric state for the next days. The first approach depends largely on the boundary conditions, i.e., the applied external forcings, while the second depends largely on the initial conditions, i.e., the observed atmospheric state. For medium range climate predictions, on interannual to decadal time scales, both initial and boundary conditions are thought to influence the climate state, because the ocean is expected to have a much larger deterministic timescale than the atmosphere. The respective climate model needs to resemble the observed climate state and its tendency at the start of the prediction. This is realized by incorporating observations into both the oceanic and atmospheric components of the climate model leading to an initialized simulation. Here, we analyze the quality of an initialized ensemble generated with the global coupled Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). We initialize for every year for the time period 1960 to 2014 an ensemble run out to 10 yaers length. This hindcast ensemble is conducted within the MiKlip framework for interannual to decadal climate prediction. In this context, the initialization of the oceanic component of the model ensemble is thought to impact the model state within the first years of prediction, however, it remains poorly known, for how much longer this impact can be detected. In our analysis we focus on the North Atlantic ocean variability and assess the evolution in time of both the probability density function (PDF) and the spread-error-ratio of the ensemble. Firstly, by comparing these characteristics of the initialized ensemble with an uninitialized ensemble we aim to (1) measure the difference in the initialized and uninitialized ensemble, (2) assess the evolution of this

  19. Global Harmonization of Quality Assurance Naming Conventions in Radiation Therapy Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Melidis, Christos; Bosch, Walther R.; Izewska, Joanna; Fidarova, Elena; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Ulin, Kenneth; Ishikura, Satoshi; Followill, David; Galvin, James; Haworth, Annette; Besuijen, Deidre; Clark, Clark H.; Miles, Elizabeth; Aird, Edwin; and others

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To review the various radiation therapy quality assurance (RTQA) procedures used by the Global Clinical Trials RTQA Harmonization Group (GHG) steering committee members and present the harmonized RTQA naming conventions by amalgamating procedures with similar objectives. Methods and Materials: A survey of the GHG steering committee members' RTQA procedures, their goals, and naming conventions was conducted. The RTQA procedures were classified as baseline, preaccrual, and prospective/retrospective data capture and analysis. After all the procedures were accumulated and described, extensive discussions took place to come to harmonized RTQA procedures and names. Results: The RTQA procedures implemented within a trial by the GHG steering committee members vary in quantity, timing, name, and compliance criteria. The procedures of each member are based on perceived chances of noncompliance, so that the quality of radiation therapy planning and treatment does not negatively influence the trial measured outcomes. A comparison of these procedures demonstrated similarities among the goals of the various methods, but the naming given to each differed. After thorough discussions, the GHG steering committee members amalgamated the 27 RTQA procedures to 10 harmonized ones with corresponding names: facility questionnaire, beam output audit, benchmark case, dummy run, complex treatment dosimetry check, virtual phantom, individual case review, review of patients' treatment records, and protocol compliance and dosimetry site visit. Conclusions: Harmonized RTQA harmonized naming conventions, which can be used in all future clinical trials involving radiation therapy, have been established. Harmonized procedures will facilitate future intergroup trial collaboration and help to ensure comparable RTQA between international trials, which enables meta-analyses and reduces RTQA workload for intergroup studies.

  20. Folding of the hammerhead ribozyme: Pyrrolo-cytosine fluorescence separates core folding from global folding and reveals a pH-dependent conformational change

    PubMed Central

    Buskiewicz, Iwona A.; Burke, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activity of the hammerhead ribozyme is limited by its ability to fold into the native tertiary structure. Analysis of folding has been hampered by a lack of assays that can independently monitor the environment of nucleobases throughout the ribozyme–substrate complex in real time. Here, we report the development and application of a new folding assay in which we use pyrrolo-cytosine (pyC) fluorescence to (1) probe active-site formation, (2) examine the ability of peripheral ribozyme domains to support native folding, (3) identify a pH-dependent conformational change within the ribozyme, and (4) explore its influence on the equilibrium between the folded and unfolded core of the hammerhead ribozyme. We conclude that the natural ribozyme folds in two distinct noncooperative steps and the pH-dependent correlation between core folding and activity is linked to formation of the G8-C3 base pair. PMID:22274955

  1. Aquatic Ecosystems, Water Quality, and Global Change: Challenges of Conducting Multi-Stressor Vulnerability Assessments (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report investigates the issues and challenges associated with identifying, calculating, and mapping indicators of the relative vulnerability of water quality and aquatic ecosystems, across the United States, to the potential impacts of global change. Using a large set of en...

  2. A Resource Package Training Framework for Producing Quality Graduates to Work in Rural, Regional and Remote Australia: A Global Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to advocate the resource package for producing quality graduates to work in rural, regional and remote Australia (TERRR Network), using a global perspective. This paper argues that the resource package achieves more than the objectives of the original project; "Developing Strategies at the Pre-service Level to…

  3. Global dynamic conformational changes in the suppressor domain of IP3 receptor by stepwise binding of the two lobes of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sunmi; Kwon, Hyuknam; Wen, He; Song, Youngmin; Frueh, Dominique; Ahn, Hee-Chul; Yoo, Seung Hyun; Wagner, Gerhard; Park, Sunghyouk

    2011-03-01

    The roles of calmodulin (CaM) have been key points of controversy in the regulation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R). To address the issue, we studied the interaction between CaM and the suppressor domain of IP(3)R, a key allosteric regulatory domain. First, by means of a pulldown and a fluorescence titration experiment, we confirmed the interaction. Through subsequent NMR binding experiments, we observed dramatic peak disappearances of the suppressor domain on interaction with apo-CaM. The data indicated that apo-CaM induces large-scale dynamic conformational changes in the suppressor domain, involving partial unfolding and subdomain rearrangement. Analysis of the NMR data of CaM surprisingly revealed that its C lobe alone can cause such changes. Further binding experiments showed that calcium allows the free N lobe to bind to the suppressor domain, which induces extra conformational changes in both of the proteins. These results were also confirmed with CaM deletion mutants with either the N or C lobe. On the basis of this novel binding mechanism, we propose a model in which the partial unfolding of the suppressor domain by apo-CaM and the stepwise binding of the N lobe of CaM to the suppressor domain are important elements of calcium/CaM inhibition of IP(3)R. We believe that our working model encompasses previous regulation mechanisms of IP(3)R by calcium/CaM and provides new insights into the CaM-target interaction. PMID:21084695

  4. Two global conformation states of a novel NAD(P) reductase like protein of the thermogenic appendix of the Sauromatum guttatum inflorescence.

    PubMed

    Skubatz, Hanna; Howald, William N

    2013-06-01

    A novel NAD(P) reductase like protein (RL) belonging to a class of reductases involved in phenylpropanoid synthesis was previously purified to homogeneity from the Sauromatum guttatum appendix. The Sauromatum appendix raises its temperature above ambient temperature to ~30 °C on the day of inflorescence opening (D-day). Changes in the charge state distribution of the protein in electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry spectra were observed during the development of the appendix. RL adopted two conformations, state A (an extended state) that appeared before heat-production (D - 4 to D - 2), and state B (a compact state) that began appearing on D - 1 and reached a maximum on D-day. RL in healthy leaves of Arabidopsis is present in state A, whereas in thermogenic sporophylls of male cones of Encephalartos ferox is present in state B. These conformational changes strongly suggest an involvement of RL in heat-production. The biophysical properties of this protein are remarkable. It is self-assembled in aqueous solutions into micrometer sizes of organized morphologies. The assembly produces a broad range of cyclic and linear morphologies that resemble micelles, rods, lamellar micelles, as well as vesicles. The assemblies could also form network structures. RL molecules entangle with each other and formed branched, interconnected networks. These unusual assemblies suggest that RL is an oligomer, and its oligomerization can provide additional information needed for thermoregulation. We hypothesize that state A controls the plant basal temperature and state B allows a shift in the temperature set point to above ambient temperature.

  5. The effects of the global budget system on cost containment and the quality of care: experience in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li; Hung, Jung-Hua

    2008-05-01

    This study is an attempt to determine whether the implementation of the Global Budget (GB) as a method of health reform has improved cost containment and quality of care in Taiwan. Panel-data analysis is used to investigate cost containment and quality of care in Taipei municipal hospitals before and after the introduction of the GB. The results suggest that there is a trade-off effect. The post-GB data indicate that cost containment comes at the expense of health-care quality. It may, therefore, be the case that policy-makers can more effectively balance cost containment and quality by refining the GB so that reimbursements would be linked to standards of quality. Another way to enhance the reforms would be a more effective monitoring and review system.

  6. THE CLIMATE-AIR QUALITY SCALE CONTINUUM AND THE GLOBAL EMISSION INVENTORY ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA), a core program activity of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program, develops data and other related information on key chemical emissions to the atmosphere and...

  7. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Jarrar, Mu’taman; Rahman, Hamzah Abdul; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Design: Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety. The country health plan of Ministry of Health (MOH) Malaysia and the MOH Malaysia Annual Reports were reviewed. Results: The MOH has set four strategies for optimizing quality and sustaining quality of life. The 10th Malaysia Health Plan promotes the theme “1 Care for 1 Malaysia” in order to sustain the quality of care. Despite of these efforts, the total number of complaints received by the medico-legal section of the MOH Malaysia is increasing. The current global initiatives indicted that quality performance generally belong to three main categories: patient; staffing; and working environment related factors. Conclusions: There is no single intervention for optimizing quality of care to maintain patient safety. Multidimensional efforts and interventions are recommended in order to optimize the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. PMID:26755459

  8. Tired telomeres: Poor global sleep quality, perceived stress, and telomere length in immune cell subsets in obese men and women.

    PubMed

    Prather, Aric A; Gurfein, Blake; Moran, Patricia; Daubenmier, Jennifer; Acree, Michael; Bacchetti, Peter; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Hecht, Frederick M; Epel, Elissa S

    2015-07-01

    Poor sleep quality and short sleep duration are associated with increased incidence and progression of a number of chronic health conditions observed at greater frequency among the obese and those experiencing high levels of stress. Accelerated cellular aging, as indexed by telomere attrition in immune cells, is a plausible pathway linking sleep and disease risk. Prior studies linking sleep and telomere length are mixed. One factor may be reliance on leukocytes, which are composed of varied immune cell types, as the sole measure of telomere length. To better clarify these associations, we investigated the relationships of global sleep quality, measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and diary-reported sleep duration with telomere length in different immune cell subsets, including granulocytes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes, and B lymphocytes in a sample of 87 obese men and women (BMI mean=35.4, SD=3.6; 81.6% women; 62.8% Caucasian). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed adjusting for age, gender, race, education, BMI, sleep apnea risk, and perceived stress. Poorer PSQI global sleep quality was associated with statistically significantly shorter telomere length in lymphocytes but not granulocytes and in particular CD8+ T cells (b=-56.8 base pairs per one point increase in PSQI, SE=20.4, p=0.007) and CD4+ T cells (b=-37.2, SE=15.9, p=0.022). Among separate aspects of global sleep quality, low perceived sleep quality and decrements in daytime function were most related to shorter telomeres. In addition, perceived stress moderated the sleep-CD8+ telomere association. Poorer global sleep quality predicted shorter telomere length in CD8+ T cells among those with high perceived stress but not in low stress participants. These findings provide preliminary evidence that poorer global sleep quality is related to telomere length in several immune cell types, which may serve as a pathway linking sleep and

  9. Tired telomeres: Poor global sleep quality, perceived stress, and telomere length in immune cell subsets in obese men and women.

    PubMed

    Prather, Aric A; Gurfein, Blake; Moran, Patricia; Daubenmier, Jennifer; Acree, Michael; Bacchetti, Peter; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Hecht, Frederick M; Epel, Elissa S

    2015-07-01

    Poor sleep quality and short sleep duration are associated with increased incidence and progression of a number of chronic health conditions observed at greater frequency among the obese and those experiencing high levels of stress. Accelerated cellular aging, as indexed by telomere attrition in immune cells, is a plausible pathway linking sleep and disease risk. Prior studies linking sleep and telomere length are mixed. One factor may be reliance on leukocytes, which are composed of varied immune cell types, as the sole measure of telomere length. To better clarify these associations, we investigated the relationships of global sleep quality, measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and diary-reported sleep duration with telomere length in different immune cell subsets, including granulocytes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes, and B lymphocytes in a sample of 87 obese men and women (BMI mean=35.4, SD=3.6; 81.6% women; 62.8% Caucasian). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed adjusting for age, gender, race, education, BMI, sleep apnea risk, and perceived stress. Poorer PSQI global sleep quality was associated with statistically significantly shorter telomere length in lymphocytes but not granulocytes and in particular CD8+ T cells (b=-56.8 base pairs per one point increase in PSQI, SE=20.4, p=0.007) and CD4+ T cells (b=-37.2, SE=15.9, p=0.022). Among separate aspects of global sleep quality, low perceived sleep quality and decrements in daytime function were most related to shorter telomeres. In addition, perceived stress moderated the sleep-CD8+ telomere association. Poorer global sleep quality predicted shorter telomere length in CD8+ T cells among those with high perceived stress but not in low stress participants. These findings provide preliminary evidence that poorer global sleep quality is related to telomere length in several immune cell types, which may serve as a pathway linking sleep and

  10. Tired Telomeres: poor global sleep quality, perceived stress, and telomere length in immune cell subsets in obese men and women

    PubMed Central

    Prather, Aric A.; Gurfein, Blake; Moran, Patricia; Daubenmier, Jennifer; Acree, Michael; Bacchetti, Peter; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Hecht, Frederick M.; Epel, Elissa S.

    2014-01-01

    Poor sleep quality and short sleep duration are associated with increased incidence and progression of a number of chronic health conditions observed at greater frequency among the obese and those experiencing high levels of stress. Accelerated cellular aging, as indexed by telomere attrition in immune cells, is a plausible pathway linking sleep and disease risk. Prior studies linking sleep and telomere length are mixed. One factor may be reliance on leukocytes, which are composed of varied immune cell types, as the sole measure of telomere length. To better clarify these associations, we investigated the relationships of global sleep quality, measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and diary-reported sleep duration with telomere length in different immune cell subsets, including granulocytes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes, and B lymphocytes in a sample of 87 obese men and women (BMI mean = 35.4, SD = 3.6; 81.6% women; 62.8% Caucasian). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed adjusting for age, gender, race, education, BMI, sleep apnea risk, and perceived stress. Poorer PSQI global sleep quality was associated with statistically significantly shorter telomere length in lymphocytes but not granulocytes and in particular CD8+ T cells (b = −56.8 base pairs per one point increase in PSQI, SE = 20.4, p=0.007) and CD4+ T cells (b = −37.2, SE = 15.9, p = 0.022). Among separate aspects of global sleep quality, low perceived sleep quality and decrements in daytime function were most related to shorter telomeres. In addition, perceived stress moderated the sleep-CD8+ telomere association. Poorer global sleep quality predicted shorter telomere length in CD8+ T cells among those with high perceived stress but not in low stress participants. These findings provide preliminary evidence that poorer global sleep quality is related to telomere length in several immune cell types, which may serve as a pathway

  11. Conformal operators in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Makeenko, Y.M.

    1981-03-01

    Utilizing the properties of the representations of the conformal group, we obtain new expressions for the conformal operators composed of spinor or scalar fields of arbitrary dimension in terms of Jacobi polynomials. These expressions generalize the known formulas in terms of Gegenbauer polynomials. Using the conformal Ward identities, we prove the multiplicative renormalizability of conformal operators in the leading logarithmic approximation.

  12. The Co-Benefits of Global and Regional Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on US Air Quality at Fine Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Bowden, J. H.; Adelman, Z.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Smith, S.; West, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Reducing greenhouse gases (GHGs) not only slows climate change, but can also have co-benefits for improved air quality. In this study, we examine the co-benefits of global and regional GHG mitigation on US air quality at fine resolution through dynamical downscaling, using the latest Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. We will investigate the co-benefits on US air quality due to domestic GHG mitigation alone, and due to mitigation outside of the US. We also quantity the co-benefits resulting from reductions in co-emitted air pollutants versus slowing climate change and its effects on air quality. Projected climate in the 2050s from the IPCC RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios is dynamically downscaled with the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF). Anthropogenic emissions projections from the RCP4.5 scenario and its reference (REF), are directly processed in SMOKE to provide temporally- and spatially-resolved CMAQ emission input files. Chemical boundary conditions (BCs) are obtained from West et al. (2013), who studied the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on global air quality and human health. Our preliminary results show that the global GHG reduction (RCP4.5 relative to REF) reduces the 1hr daily maximum ozone by 3.3 ppbv annually over entire US, as high as 6 ppbv in September. The west coast of California and the Northeast US are the regions that benefit most. By comparing different scenarios, we find that foreign countries' GHGs mitigation has a larger influence on the US ozone decreases (accounting for 77% of the total decrease), compared with 23% from domestic GHG mitigation only, highlighting the importance of methane reductions and the intercontinental transport of air pollutants. The reduction of global co-emitted air pollutants has a more pronounced effect on ozone decreasing, relative to the effect from slowing climate and its effects on air quality. We also plan to report co-benefits for PM2.5 in the US.

  13. Caspase Allostery and Conformational Selection.

    PubMed

    Clark, A Clay

    2016-06-01

    The role of caspase proteases in regulated processes such as apoptosis and inflammation has been studied for more than two decades, and the activation cascades are known in detail. Apoptotic caspases also are utilized in critical developmental processes, although it is not known how cells maintain the exquisite control over caspase activity in order to retain subthreshold levels required for a particular adaptive response while preventing entry into apoptosis. In addition to active site-directed inhibitors, caspase activity is modulated by post-translational modifications or metal binding to allosteric sites on the enzyme, which stabilize inactive states in the conformational ensemble. This review provides a comprehensive global view of the complex conformational landscape of caspases and mechanisms used to select states in the ensemble. The caspase structural database provides considerable detail on the active and inactive conformations in the ensemble, which provide the cell multiple opportunities to fine tune caspase activity. In contrast, the current database on caspase modifications is largely incomplete and thus provides only a low-resolution picture of global allosteric communications and their effects on the conformational landscape. In recent years, allosteric control has been utilized in the design of small drug compounds or other allosteric effectors to modulate caspase activity.

  14. Conformational Analysis of Free and Bound Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zheng; Li, Xue; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    The conformational profiles of unbound all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acid (RA) have been determined using classical and quantum mechanical calculations. Sixty-six all-trans-RA (ATRA) and forty-eight 9-cis-RA energy minimum conformers were identified via HF/6-31G* geometry optimizations in vacuo. Their relative conformational energies were estimated utilizing the M06, M06-2x and MP2 methods combined with the 6-311+G(d,p), aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets, as well as complete basis set MP2 extrapolations using the latter two basis sets. Single-point energy calculations performed with the M06-2x density functional were found to yield similar results to MP2/CBS for the low-energy retinoic acid conformations. Not unexpectedly, the conformational propensities of retinoic acid were governed by the orientation and arrangement of the torsion angles associated with the polyene tail. We also used previously reported QM/MM X-ray refinement results on four ATRA-protein crystal structures plus one newly refined 9-cis-RA complex (PDB ID 1XDK) in order to investigate the conformational preferences of bound retinoic acid. In the re-refined RA conformers the conjugated double bonds are nearly coplanar, which is consistent with the global minimum identified by the Omega/QM method rather than the corresponding crystallographically determined conformations given in the PDB. Consequently, a 91.3% average reduction of the local strain energy in the gas phase, as well as 92.1% in PCM solvent, was observed using the QM/MM refined structures versus the PDB deposited RA conformations. These results thus demonstrate that our QM/MM X-ray refinement approach can significantly enhance the quality of X-ray crystal structures refined by conventional refinement protocols, thereby providing reliable drug-target structural information for use in structure-based drug discovery applications. PMID:22844234

  15. Assessing Student Engagement in China: Responding to Local and Global Discourse on Raising Educational Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Heidi; Cen, Yuhao; Zhou, Zejun

    2011-01-01

    China's heated education policy climate in 2010 indicated an increasing national concern for improving educational quality and educational quality assessment. Despite glowing portraits of Chinese education painted by international observers, the Chinese public has expressed consistent dissatisfaction with educational quality. The inter-related…

  16. Arts Contribution to the Quality of Living in the Global Village through "Enlightened Cherishing"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrmohammadi, Mahmoud

    2006-01-01

    Pursuing a paradoxical educational strategy, embracing global and local forces at the same time (globalization) is indeed a tremendous task before any education system. This task can not be taken lightly by policymakers except by inviting failure and disappointment resulting from the mismatch between the education and the requirements of time,…

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer After 76 Gy Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy vs. 70 Gy Conformal Radiotherapy in a Prospective and Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lips, Irene Dehnad, Human; Kruger, Arto Boeken; Moorselaar, Jeroen van; Heide, Uulke van; Battermann, Jan; Vulpen, Marco van

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of life (QoL) after 70 Gy conformal radiotherapy with QoL after 76 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were treated with 70 Gy three-field conformal radiotherapy, and 92 patients received 76 Gy IMRT with fiducial markers for position verification. Quality of life was measured by RAND-36, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30(+3)), and the prostate-specific EORTC QLQ-PR25, before radiotherapy (baseline) and 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Quality of life changes in time (baseline vs. 1 month and baseline vs. 6 months) of {>=}10 points were considered clinically relevant. Results: Differences between the treatment groups for QoL changes over time occurred in several QoL domains. The 76-Gy group revealed no significant deterioration in QoL compared with the 70-Gy group. The IMRT 76-Gy group even demonstrated a significantly better change in QoL from baseline to 1 month in several domains. The conformal 70-Gy group revealed temporary deterioration in pain, role functioning, and urinary symptoms; for the IMRT 76-Gy group a better QoL in terms of change in health existed after 1 month, which persisted after 6 months. For both treatment groups temporary deterioration in physical role restriction occurred after 1 month, and an improvement in emotional role restriction occurred after 6 months. Sexual activity was reduced after treatment for both groups and remained decreased after 6 months. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and accurate position verification seem to provide a possibility to increase the radiation dose for prostate cancer without deterioration in QoL.

  18. Improving the Representation of Near Source and Downwind Smoke Plume Chemistry in Regional and Global Air Quality Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Lonsdale, C. R.; Yokelson, R. J.; Travis, K.; Lin, J. C.; McNeill, V. F.; Blake, D. R.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Lee, T.; May, A.; McMeeking, G. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I. J.; Sullivan, A.; Urbanski, S. P.; Weise, D.

    2015-12-01

    The complex photochemistry within a biomass burning smoke plume can cause large changes in the concentration, size distribution, composition, and optical properties of the fine particles (PM2.5) emitted by the fires, as well as significant formation of ozone (O3) and organic nitrate species like peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). The Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP) is designed to simulate this chemical evolution of biomass burning plumes under a wide variety of conditions, and can be used to parameterize this chemistry in regional and global air quality models. Here we present ASP simulations of the evolution of biomass burning aerosol from South Carolina prescribed fires in October and November of 2011. This data set contains more detailed measurements of the non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) in the smoke than the data sets previously used to develop and test ASP, allowing for a more detailed evaluation of the model's gas- and particle-phase chemistry. We also assess the potential impact of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from glyoxal and isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) on the growth of biomass burning aerosols by incorporating the simpleGAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis) model into ASP. Finally, we will discuss our efforts to use the ASP model to build a sub-grid scale parameterization of the near-source chemistry of biomass burning plumes for use in regional and global air quality models, using examples from the global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem and the stochastic Lagrangian air quality model STILT-Chem.

  19. Toward Focusing Conformational Ensembles on Bioactive Conformations: A Molecular Mechanics/Quantum Mechanics Study.

    PubMed

    Avgy-David, Hannah H; Senderowitz, Hanoch

    2015-10-26

    The identification of bound conformations, namely, conformations adopted by ligands when binding their target is critical for target-based and ligand-based drug design. Bound conformations could be obtained computationally from unbound conformational ensembles generated by conformational search tools. However, these tools also generate many nonrelevant conformations thus requiring a focusing mechanism. To identify such a mechanism, this work focuses on a comparison of energies and structural properties of bound and unbound conformations for a set of FDA approved drugs whose complexes are available in the PDB. Unbound conformational ensembles were initially obtained with three force fields. These were merged, clustered, and reminimized using the same force fields and four QM methods. Bound conformations of all ligands were represented by their crystal structures or by approximations to these structures. Energy differences were calculated between global minima of the unbound state or the Boltzmann averaged energies of the unbound ensemble and the approximated bound conformations. Ligand conformations which resemble the X-ray conformation (RMSD < 1.0 Å) were obtained in 91%-97% and 96%-98% of the cases using the ensembles generated by the individual force fields and the reminimized ensembles, respectively, yet only in 52%-56% (original ensembles) and 47%-65% (reminimized ensembles) as global energy minima. The energy window within which the different methods identified the bound conformation (approximated by its closest local energy minimum) was found to be at 4-6 kcal/mol with respect to the global minimum and marginally lower with respect to a Boltzmann averaged energy of the unbound ensemble. Better approximations to the bound conformation obtained with a constrained minimization using the crystallographic B-factors or with a newly developed Knee Point Detection (KPD) method gave lower values (2-5 kcal/mol). Overall, QM methods gave lower energy differences than

  20. 76 FR 55060 - Aquatic Ecosystems, Water Quality, and Global Change: Challenges of Conducting Multi-Stressor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... resilience of ecosystems and human systems to a variety of existing stresses and mal- adaptations. DATES: The... a result of existing global change stresses and mal-adaptations. The work described in this...

  1. Global ozone and air quality: a multi-model assessment of risks to human health and crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, K.; Gauss, M.; van Dingenen, R.; Dentener, F. J.; Emberson, L.; Fiore, A. M.; Schultz, M. G.; Stevenson, D. S.; Ashmore, M. R.; Atherton, C. S.; Bergmann, D. J.; Bey, I.; Butler, T.; Drevet, J.; Eskes, H.; Hauglustaine, D. A.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Horowitz, L. W.; Krol, M.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lawrence, M. G.; van Noije, T.; Pyle, J.; Rast, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Savage, N.; Strahan, S.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Wild, O.

    2008-02-01

    Within ACCENT, a European Network of Excellence, eighteen atmospheric models from the U.S., Europe, and Japan calculated present (2000) and future (2030) concentrations of ozone at the Earth's surface with hourly temporal resolution. Comparison of model results with surface ozone measurements in 14 world regions indicates that levels and seasonality of surface ozone in North America and Europe are characterized well by global models, with annual average biases typically within 5-10 nmol/mol. However, comparison with rather sparse observations over some regions suggest that most models overestimate annual ozone by 15-20 nmol/mol in some locations. Two scenarios from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) and one from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (IPCC SRES) have been implemented in the models. This study focuses on changes in near-surface ozone and their effects on human health and vegetation. Different indices and air quality standards are used to characterise air quality. We show that often the calculated changes in the different indices are closely inter-related. Indices using lower thresholds are more consistent between the models, and are recommended for global model analysis. Our analysis indicates that currently about two-thirds of the regions considered do not meet health air quality standards, whereas only 2-4 regions remain below the threshold. Calculated air quality exceedances show moderate deterioration by 2030 if current emissions legislation is followed and slight improvements if current emissions reduction technology is used optimally. For the "business as usual" scenario severe air quality problems are predicted. We show that model simulations of air quality indices are particularly sensitive to how well ozone is represented, and improved accuracy is needed for future projections. Additional measurements are needed to allow a more quantitative assessment of the risks to

  2. Automated Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA/QC) in Developing Decadal Global Lake Dynamics Products using Landsat-7 and 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y.; Song, C.; Wang, J.; Garibay, D.; Woods, J.; Lyons, E. A.; Smith, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    Inland lakes, important water resources, play a crucial role in the global water cycle and are sensitive to climate change and human activities. There clearly is a pressing need to understand temporal and spatial variations of lakes at global and continental scales. To inventory dynamics of global lakes is rather challenging due to their high abundance and low accessibility. With its broad spatial coverage and monitoring capability, satellite remote sensing is the only feasible approach to inventory global lake dynamics, but requires tens of thousands of high-resolution satellite images, automated mapping algorithms, and more importantly tedious yet essential quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) procedures. Millions of lakes have been mapped out using over 20 thousands Landsat images acquired at lake-stable seasons. Even though a set of highly replicable and automated lake mapping algorithms and tools have been developed, commission and omission errors still exist and some lake boundaries may not be adequately delineated. These errors need to be identified and fixed through intensive QA/QC processes. However, QA/QC of such a huge quantity of lakes remains a great challenge, and the currently available lake datasets from remote sensing were not produced through a rigorous QA/QC process. We have developed two QA/QC strategies with automation. Automated QA requires mapping the Earth twice in the same seasons for lakes and identifies "inconsistent" lakes for further QA/QC. Other lakes without significant changes are considered quality assured, and labor-intensive QA/QC is only limited to those "inconsistent" lakes. We have also developed semi-automated QC tools to further reduce the workload for manpower, and have produced a high-resolution systematically-generated circa-2000 global lake database with adequate QA/QC using Landsat-7. The recent operation of Landsat 8 extends the unprecedented Landsat record to over 40 years, allowing long-term, large-scale lake

  3. Improving Teacher Quality: The U.S. Teaching Force in Global Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiba, Motoko; LeTendre, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This groundbreaking work examines teacher quality, work norms, and professional learning opportunities, using data from 15 countries. The authors compare and contrast the United States with two high-achieving countries--Japan and Australia--that have implemented very different approaches to improving teacher quality. Drawing on both large…

  4. Variational quality control of hydrographic profile data with non-Gaussian errors for global ocean variational data assimilation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storto, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Quality control procedures aiming at identifying observations suspected of gross errors are an important component of modern ocean data assimilation systems. On the one hand, assimilating observations whose departures from the background state are large may result in detrimental analyses and compromise the stability of the ocean analysis system. On the other hand, the rejection of these observations may prevent the analysis from ingesting useful information, especially in areas of large variability. In this work, we investigate the quality control of in-situ hydrographic profiles through modifying the probability density function (PDF) of the observational errors and relaxing the assumption of Gaussian PDF. The new PDF is heavier-tailed than Gaussian, thus accommodating the assimilation of observations with large misfits, albeit with smaller weight given to them in the analysis. This implies a different observational term in the analysis equation, and an adaptive quality control procedure based on the innovation statistics themselves. Implemented in a global ocean variational data assimilation system at moderate horizontal resolution, the scheme proves robust and successful in assimilating more observations with respect to the simpler background quality check scheme. This leads to better skill scores against both conventional and satellite observing systems. This approach proves superior also to the case where no quality control is considered. Furthermore, the implementation considers switching on the modified cost function at the 10th iteration of the minimization so that innovation statistics are based on a good approximation of the analysis. Neglecting this strategy and turning on the variational quality control since the beginning of the minimization exhibits worse scores, qualitatively similar to those of the experiment without quality control, suggesting that in this case quality control procedures are too gentle. A specific study investigating the upper

  5. Modeling the Complex Photochemistry of Biomass Burning Plumes in Plume-Scale, Regional, and Global Air Quality Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Lonsdale, C. R.; Yokelson, R. J.; Travis, K.; Fischer, E. V.; Lin, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Forecasting the impacts of biomass burning (BB) plumes on air quality is difficult due to the complex photochemistry that takes place in the concentrated young BB plumes. The spatial grid of global and regional scale Eulerian models is generally too large to resolve BB photochemistry, which can lead to errors in predicting the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and O3, as well as the partitioning of NOyspecies. AER's Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP v2.1) can be used within plume-scale Lagrangian models to simulate this complex photochemistry. We will present results of validation studies of the ASP model against aircraft observations of young BB smoke plumes. We will also present initial results from the coupling of ASP v2.1 into the Lagrangian particle dispersion model STILT-Chem in order to better examine the interactions between BB plume chemistry and dispersion. In addition, we have used ASP to develop a sub-grid scale parameterization of the near-source chemistry of BB plumes for use in regional and global air quality models. The parameterization takes inputs from the host model, such as solar zenith angle, temperature, and fire fuel type, and calculates enhancement ratios of O3, NOx, PAN, aerosol nitrate, and other NOy species, as well as organic aerosol (OA). We will present results from the ASP-based BB parameterization as well as its implementation into the global atmospheric composition model GEOS-Chem for the SEAC4RS campaign.

  6. Ensuring the global availability of high-quality dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Ferracane, J; Fisher, J; Eiselé, J L; Fox, C H

    2013-11-01

    The Minamata Convention, a global legally binding instrument (treaty) on mercury, has been the catalyst for the emerging agenda on global dental materials research. If the current and future challenges of oral health maintenance and healing on a global scale are to be met, a logical and effective research agenda for the discovery and introduction of new, environmentally sustainable, dental materials must be developed through a coordinated effort involving materials scientists, dental clinicians, representatives of industry, members of regional and national regulatory bodies, and advocacy from research organizations. For universal impact, this agenda should be created with awareness of several important ongoing initiatives, such as the WHO non-communicable diseases action plan, the UN sustainable development agenda, and the IADR Global Oral Health In Inequalities Research Agenda (GOHIRA). A significant contributor to this cause is the FDI and its membership, who, through their Vision 2020 initiative, acknowledge their role and responsibility in globally preventing and managing dental disease and providing leadership to the profession in terms of information dissemination and affecting change. Dental researchers also have an obligation to advocate for appropriate funding to match the identified research needs, thus enhancing the possibility that key decision-makers will provide the needed support to achieve the research agenda agreed upon by this diverse group of stakeholders.

  7. [Conformal radiotherapy of brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Haie-Meder, C; Beaudré, A; Breton, C; Biron, B; Cordova, A; Dubray, B; Mazeron, J J

    1999-01-01

    Conformal irradiation of brain tumours is based on the three-dimensional reconstruction of the targeted volumes and at-risk organ images, the three-dimensional calculation of the dose distribution and a treatment device (immobilisation, beam energy, collimation, etc.) adapted to the high precision required by the procedure. Each step requires an appropriate methodology and a quality insurance program. Specific difficulties in brain tumour management are related to GTV and CTV definition depending upon the histological type, the quality of the surgical resection and the medical team. Clinical studies have reported dose escalation trials, mostly in high-grade gliomas and tumours at the base of the skull. Clinical data are now providing a better knowledge of the tolerance of normal tissues. As for small tumours, the implementation of beam intensity modulation is likely to narrow the gap between conformal and stereotaxic radiotherapy. PMID:10572510

  8. Global Trends in Tertiary Education Quality Assurance: Implications for the Anglophone Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Vivienne

    2001-01-01

    Review of literature on trends in quality-assurance systems for tertiary education throughout the world followed by a discussion of the implications of these trends for tertiary education in the Caribbean. (Contains 26 references.) (PKP)

  9. Higher Education for National Development: Quality Assurance and Fostering Global Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magzan, Masa; Aleksic-Maslac, Karmela

    2011-01-01

    Responding to the impact of globalization on delivering education and the increasing need to adapt to the needs of economic and social life, higher education institutions (HEI) effectiveness is depending on the use of technology and contribution to national development. While increasing access to higher education remains to be an important…

  10. LAND USE AS A MITIGATION STRATEGY FOR THE WATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF GLOBAL WARMING: A SCENARIO ANALYSIS ON TWO WATERSHEDS IN THE OHIO RIVER BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study uses an integrative approach to study the water quality impacts of future global climate and land use changes. In this study, changing land use types was used as a mitigation strategy to reduce the adverse impacts of global climate change on water resources. The climat...

  11. LAND USE AS A MITIGATON STRATEGY FOR THE WATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF GLOBAL WARMING: A SCENARIO ANALYSIS ON TWO WATERSHEDS IN THE OHIO RIVER BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study uses an integrative approach to study the water quality impacts of future global climate and land use changes. Changing land use types was used as a nitigation strategy to reduce the adverse impacts of global climate change on water resources. The climate scenarios wer...

  12. LAND USE AS A MITIGATION STRATEGY FOR THE WATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF GLOBAL WARMING: A SCENARIO ANALYSIS ON TWO WATERSHEDS IN THE OHIO RIVER BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study uses an integrative approach to study the water quality impacts of future global climate and land use changes. In this study, changing land use types were used as a mitigation strategy to reduce the adverse impacts of global climate change on water resources. The Thorn...

  13. The National Mastitis Council: A Global Organization for Mastitis Control and Milk Quality, 50 Years and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Middleton, John R; Saeman, Anne; Fox, Larry K; Lombard, Jason; Hogan, Joe S; Smith, K Larry

    2014-12-01

    The National Mastitis Council was founded in 1961 based on the desire of a forward-thinking group of individuals to bring together "all forces of organized agriculture in the United States to combat, through every practical device, the mastitis threat to the Nation's health and food safety". What started as a small organization focused on mastitis of dairy cattle in the United States has grown into a global organization for mastitis and milk quality. Over the last 50-plus years the concerted efforts of the membership have led to the synthesis and dissemination of a considerable body of knowledge regarding udder health, milk quality, and food safety which has improved dairy cattle health and well-being and farm productivity.

  14. Predicting order of conformational changes during protein conformational transitions using an interpolated elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Tekpinar, Mustafa; Zheng, Wenjun

    2010-08-15

    The decryption of sequence of structural events during protein conformational transitions is essential to a detailed understanding of molecular functions of various biological nanomachines. Coarse-grained models have proven useful by allowing highly efficient simulations of protein conformational dynamics. By combining two coarse-grained elastic network models constructed based on the beginning and end conformations of a transition, we have developed an interpolated elastic network model to generate a transition pathway between the two protein conformations. For validation, we have predicted the order of local and global conformational changes during key ATP-driven transitions in three important biological nanomachines (myosin, F(1) ATPase and chaperonin GroEL). We have found that the local conformational change associated with the closing of active site precedes the global conformational change leading to mechanical motions. Our finding is in good agreement with the distribution of intermediate experimental structures, and it supports the importance of local motions at active site to drive or gate various conformational transitions underlying the workings of a diverse range of biological nanomachines.

  15. ASSESSING THE WATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE IN SOUTHWESTERN OHIO, U.S.A

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper uses a watershed-scale hydrologic model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) to simulate the water quality impacts of future climate change in the Little Miami River (LMR) watershed in southwestern Ohio. The LMR watershed, the principal source of drinking water for 1.6 mi...

  16. Lost in Translation: Degree Definition and Quality in a Globalized World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Madeleine F.

    2011-01-01

    Within the United States, defining the meaning of a degree and comparing the quality of institutions on a common set of metrics is no simple matter. In fact, there is no common definition of a US college degree beyond a general consensus that an undergraduate degree generally includes about 120 credits and consists of a general education…

  17. Mind the Gap: Global Quality Norms, National Policy Interpretations and Local Praxis in Timor-Leste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Ritesh; Quinn, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, the imperative for improving educational quality in schooling systems throughout the developing world is harnessed to a particular set of teaching and learning practices, such as child-centred, child-friendly or learner-centred pedagogy (LCP). Such was the case in Timor-Leste where, after independence, LCP was heavily promoted as a…

  18. Why India should become a global leader in high-quality, affordable TB diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Small, Peter

    2012-05-01

    The scale up of DOTS in India is one of the greatest public health accomplishments, and yet undiagnosed and poorly managed TB continues to fuel the epidemic such that India continues to have the highest number of TB cases in the world. Recognizing these challenges, the Government of India has set an ambitious goal of providing universal access to quality diagnosis and treatment for all TB patients in the country. Innovative tools and delivery systems in both the public and private sectors are essential for reaching this goal. Fortunately, India has the potential to solve its TB problem with "home-grown" solutions. Just as Indian pharmaceutical companies revolutionized access to high-quality, affordable AIDS drugs through generic production, Indian diagnostic companies could also become the world's hub for high-quality generic diagnostics. In the long term, India has the potential to lead the world in developing innovative TB diagnostics. For this to happen, Indian industry must move from the import and imitation approach to genuine innovation in both product development as well as delivery. This must be supported by permissive policies and enhanced funding by the Indian government and the private sector. Strict regulation of diagnostics, increased attention to quality assurance in laboratories, and greater engagement of the private health care providers are also needed to effectively deliver innovative products and approaches. PMID:22771602

  19. Predictors of Global Quality in Family Child Care Homes: Structural and Belief Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes-Belding, Kere; Hegland, Susan; Stein, Amanda; Sideris, John; Bryant, Donna

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: With a substantial number of young children receiving care in family child care settings, an examination of the characteristics, both structural and attitudinal, that predict program quality is warranted. The current study examines gaps in the research by examining both structural characteristics and provider beliefs that…

  20. The Global Challenge: Education in a Competitive World. Quality Counts, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Quality Counts 2012," the 16th edition of "Education Week"'s annual examination of issues and challenges facing America's public schools, takes aim at topics high on the policy agenda, from the White House and Congress down to the level of local school boards and chambers of commerce: the nation's international standing in education, and lessons…

  1. Comparing Beginning Teachers' Instructional Quality Growth on Subject-Specific and Global Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neergaard, Laura; Smith, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Observation measures of instructional quality tend to fall into two broad categories--those for use across subject areas and those intended for use in specific subject areas. The move toward content-specific measures is a result of research suggesting that effective teaching looks different across subject areas and that both content knowledge and…

  2. Quality in health care and globalization of health services: accreditation and regulatory oversight of medical tourism companies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Leigh G

    2011-02-01

    Patients are crossing national borders in search of affordable and timely health care. Many medical tourism companies are now involved in organizing cross-border health services. Despite the rapid expansion of the medical tourism industry, few standards exist to ensure that these businesses organize high-quality, competent international health care. Addressing the regulatory vacuum, 10 standards are proposed as a framework for regulating the medical tourism industry. Medical tourism companies should have to undergo accreditation review. Care should be arranged only at accredited international health-care facilities. Standards should be established to ensure that clients of medical tourism companies make informed choices. Continuity of care needs to become an integral feature of cross-border care. Restrictions should be placed on the use of waiver of liability forms by medical tourism companies. Medical tourism companies must ensure that they conform to relevant legislation governing privacy and confidentiality of patient information. Restrictions must be placed on the types of health services marketed by medical tourism companies. Representatives of medical tourism agencies should have to undergo training and certification. Medical travel insurance and medical complications insurance should be included in the health-care plans of patients traveling for care. To protect clients from financial losses, medical tourism companies should be mandated to contribute to compensation funds. Establishing high standards for the operation of medical tourism companies should reduce risks facing patients when they travel abroad for health care.

  3. Standards of the Instructional Performances in Higher-Education Institutions; Conformity to Quality Requirements: Ar-Rass College of Science and Arts--Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alharbi, Jobier Suliman

    2015-01-01

    The paper studies the standard of the educational process in higher institutions and the extent of compliance with quality requirements. The college of science and Arts, Qassim University is considered as a case study. In order to assure the success of the study there are a questionnaire is designed and prepared for this purpose. It contains main…

  4. Online Tools for Uncovering Data Quality (DQ) Issues in Satellite-Based Global Precipitation Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhong; Heo, Gil

    2015-01-01

    Data quality (DQ) has many attributes or facets (i.e., errors, biases, systematic differences, uncertainties, benchmark, false trends, false alarm ratio, etc.)Sources can be complicated (measurements, environmental conditions, surface types, algorithms, etc.) and difficult to be identified especially for multi-sensor and multi-satellite products with bias correction (TMPA, IMERG, etc.) How to obtain DQ info fast and easily, especially quantified info in ROI Existing parameters (random error), literature, DIY, etc.How to apply the knowledge in research and applications.Here, we focus on online systems for integration of products and parameters, visualization and analysis as well as investigation and extraction of DQ information.

  5. Combustion emissions from refining lower quality oil: what is the global warming potential?

    PubMed

    Karras, Greg

    2010-12-15

    The greenhouse gas emission intensity of refining lower quality petroleum was estimated from fuel combustion for energy used by operating plants to process crude oils of varying quality. Refinery crude feed, processing, yield, and fuel data from four regions accounting for 97% of U.S. refining capacity from 1999 to 2008 were compared among regions and years for effects on processing and energy consumption predicted by the processing characteristics of heavier, higher sulfur oils. Crude feed density and sulfur content could predict 94% of processing intensity, 90% of energy intensity, and 85% of carbon dioxide emission intensity differences among regions and years and drove a 39% increase in emissions across regions and years. Fuel combustion energy for processing increased by approximately 61 MJ/m(3) crude feed for each 1 kg/m(3) sulfur and 44 MJ/m(3) for each 1 kg/m(3) density of crude refined. Differences in products, capacity utilized, and fuels burned were not confounding factors. Fuel combustion increments observed predict that a switch to heavy oil and tar sands could double or triple refinery emissions and add 1.6-3.7 gigatons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere annually from fuel combustion to process the oil.

  6. Combustion emissions from refining lower quality oil: what is the global warming potential?

    PubMed

    Karras, Greg

    2010-12-15

    The greenhouse gas emission intensity of refining lower quality petroleum was estimated from fuel combustion for energy used by operating plants to process crude oils of varying quality. Refinery crude feed, processing, yield, and fuel data from four regions accounting for 97% of U.S. refining capacity from 1999 to 2008 were compared among regions and years for effects on processing and energy consumption predicted by the processing characteristics of heavier, higher sulfur oils. Crude feed density and sulfur content could predict 94% of processing intensity, 90% of energy intensity, and 85% of carbon dioxide emission intensity differences among regions and years and drove a 39% increase in emissions across regions and years. Fuel combustion energy for processing increased by approximately 61 MJ/m(3) crude feed for each 1 kg/m(3) sulfur and 44 MJ/m(3) for each 1 kg/m(3) density of crude refined. Differences in products, capacity utilized, and fuels burned were not confounding factors. Fuel combustion increments observed predict that a switch to heavy oil and tar sands could double or triple refinery emissions and add 1.6-3.7 gigatons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere annually from fuel combustion to process the oil. PMID:21114339

  7. Spectral Analysis of a Protein Conformational Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackovsky, S.

    2011-06-01

    The existence of conformational switching in proteins, induced by single amino acid mutations, presents an important challenge to our understanding of the physics of protein folding. Sequence-local methods, commonly used to detect structural homology, are incapable of accounting for this phenomenon. We examine a set of proteins, derived from the GA and GB domains of Streptococcus protein G, which are known to show a dramatic conformational change as a result of single-residue replacement. It is shown that these sequences, which are almost identical locally, can have very different global patterns of physical properties. These differences are consistent with the observed complete change in conformation. These results suggest that sequence-local methods for identifying structural homology can be misleading. They point to the importance of global sequence analysis in understanding sequence-structure relationships.

  8. Notes on conformal invariance of gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnich, Glenn; Bekaert, Xavier; Grigoriev, Maxim

    2015-12-01

    In Lagrangian gauge systems, the vector space of global reducibility parameters forms a module under the Lie algebra of symmetries of the action. Since the classification of global reducibility parameters is generically easier than the classification of symmetries of the action, this fact can be used to constrain the latter when knowing the former. We apply this strategy and its generalization for the non-Lagrangian setting to the problem of conformal symmetry of various free higher spin gauge fields. This scheme allows one to show that, in terms of potentials, massless higher spin gauge fields in Minkowski space and partially massless (PM) fields in (A)dS space are not conformal for spin strictly greater than one, while in terms of curvatures, maximal-depth PM fields in four dimensions are also not conformal, unlike the closely related, but less constrained, maximal-depth Fradkin-Tseytlin fields.

  9. CONSENSUS AND CONFORMITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALLEN, VERNON L.; LEVINE, JOHN M.

    IN THIS STUDY, PROFESSOR ALLEN EMPLOYS TWO METHODS OF BREAKING GROUP CONSENSUS, AND HE MEASURES THE EFFECTS ON THE RESPONSES OF COLLEGE SUBJECTS TO BOTH OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE STIMULI. THE RESULTS SUGGEST THE NEED FOR MODIFICATION OF EXISTING THEORIES OF CONFORMITY BEHAVIOR. IN ADDITION, THESE RESULTS EMPHASIZE THE DIFFERENCES IN CONFORMITY OF…

  10. Facilitators and barriers to quality of care in maternal, newborn and child health: a global situational analysis through metareview

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Manisha; Yoshida, Sachiyo; Lambrechts, Thierry; Boschi-Pinto, Cynthia; Bose, Krishna; Mason, Elizabeth Mary; Mathai, Matthews

    2014-01-01

    Objective Conduct a global situational analysis to identify the current facilitators and barriers to improving quality of care (QoC) for pregnant women, newborns and children. Study design Metareview of published and unpublished systematic reviews and meta-analyses conducted between January 2000 and March 2013 in any language. Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) is used to assess the methodological quality of systematic reviews. Settings Health systems of all countries. Study outcome: QoC measured using surrogate indicators––effective, efficient, accessible, acceptable/patient centred, equitable and safe. Analysis Conducted in two phases (1) qualitative synthesis of extracted data to identify and group the facilitators and barriers to improving QoC, for each of the three population groups, into the six domains of WHO's framework and explore new domains and (2) an analysis grid to map the common facilitators and barriers. Results We included 98 systematic reviews with 110 interventions to improve QoC from countries globally. The facilitators and barriers identified fitted the six domains of WHO's framework––information, patient–population engagement, leadership, regulations and standards, organisational capacity and models of care. Two new domains, ‘communication’ and ‘satisfaction’, were generated. Facilitators included active and regular interpersonal communication between users and providers; respect, confidentiality, comfort and support during care provision; engaging users in decision-making; continuity of care and effective audit and feedback mechanisms. Key barriers identified were language barriers in information and communication; power difference between users and providers; health systems not accounting for user satisfaction; variable standards of implementation of standard guidelines; shortage of resources in health facilities and lack of studies assessing the role of leadership in improving QoC. These were common across

  11. Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum from conformal invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Rubakov, V.A.

    2009-09-01

    We show that flat spectrum of small perturbations of field(s) is generated in a simple way in a theory of multi-component scalar field provided this theory is conformally invariant, it has some global symmetry and the quartic potential is negative. We suggest a mechanism of converting these field perturbations into adiabatic scalar perturbations with flat spectrum.

  12. Potential significance of photoexcited NO2 on global air quality with the NMMB/BSC chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorba, O.; Dabdub, D.; Blaszczak-Boxe, C.; PéRez, C.; Janjic, Z.; Baldasano, J. M.; Spada, M.; Badia, A.; GonçAlves, M.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric chemists have recently focused on the relevance of the NO2* + H2O → OH + HONO reaction to local air quality. This chemistry has been considered not relevant for the troposphere from known reaction rates until nowadays. New experiments suggested a rate constant of 1.7 × 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, which is an order of magnitude faster than the previously estimated upper limit of 1.2 × 10-14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, determined by Crowley and Carl (1997). Using the new global model, NMMB/BSC Chemical Transport Model (NMMB/BSC-CTM), simulations are presented that assess the potential significance of this chemistry on global air quality. Results show that if the NO2* chemistry is considered following the upper limit kinetics recommended by Crowley and Carl (1997), it produces an enhancement of ozone surface concentrations of 4-6 ppbv in rural areas and 6-15 ppbv in urban locations, reaching a maximum enhancement of 30 ppbv in eastern Asia. Moreover, NO2 enhancements are minor (<0.01 ppbv) in background regions and reach maximum daytime values of 1-6 ppbv. Similarly, HONO exhibits negligible increases, 8-9 pptv in urban settings. Enhancements in the concentration of OH are around 14-17 × 105 molec cm-3. Decreases in the concentration of O3 and its precursors are also identified but to a lesser degree. In order to quantify the role of the two kinetic rates measured, model simulations are compared after incorporating both reaction rate constants. Maximum O3 difference enhancements from 5 to 10 ppbv are modeled over locations where high NOx emissions are present; however, differences are small in most parts of the globe.

  13. Role of vaccine manufacturers in developing countries towards global healthcare by providing quality vaccines at affordable prices.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, S; Gautam, M; Gairola, S

    2014-05-01

    Vaccines represent one of the greatest achievements of science and medicine in the fight against infectious diseases. Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective public health tools to prevent infectious diseases. Significant progress has been made in expanding the coverage of vaccines globally, resulting in the prevention of more than two million deaths annually. In 2010, nearly 200 countries endorsed a shared vision to extend the benefits of vaccines to every person by 2020, known as the Decade of Vaccine Initiative (DoV). Vaccine manufacturers in developing countries, as represented by the Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers Network (DCVMN), make a significant contribution to DoV by supplying quality vaccines at affordable prices to the people who need them most. About 70% of the global Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) vaccine supplies are met by DCVMN. Besides EPI vaccine supplies, DCVMN is also targeting vaccines against rotavirus, Japanese encephalitis, pneumonia, human papillomavirus, meningitis and neglected tropical diseases. This article reviews the roles and contributions of DCVMN in making the vaccines accessible and affordable to all. PMID:24476201

  14. Role of vaccine manufacturers in developing countries towards global healthcare by providing quality vaccines at affordable prices.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, S; Gautam, M; Gairola, S

    2014-05-01

    Vaccines represent one of the greatest achievements of science and medicine in the fight against infectious diseases. Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective public health tools to prevent infectious diseases. Significant progress has been made in expanding the coverage of vaccines globally, resulting in the prevention of more than two million deaths annually. In 2010, nearly 200 countries endorsed a shared vision to extend the benefits of vaccines to every person by 2020, known as the Decade of Vaccine Initiative (DoV). Vaccine manufacturers in developing countries, as represented by the Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers Network (DCVMN), make a significant contribution to DoV by supplying quality vaccines at affordable prices to the people who need them most. About 70% of the global Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) vaccine supplies are met by DCVMN. Besides EPI vaccine supplies, DCVMN is also targeting vaccines against rotavirus, Japanese encephalitis, pneumonia, human papillomavirus, meningitis and neglected tropical diseases. This article reviews the roles and contributions of DCVMN in making the vaccines accessible and affordable to all.

  15. Combination of spaceborne sensor(s) and 3-D aerosol models to assess global daily near-surface air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol Particulate Matter (PM), measured by ground-based monitoring stations, is used as a standard by the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) to evaluate daily air quality. PM monitoring is particularly important for human health protection because the exposure to suspended particles can contribute, among others, to lung and respiratory diseases and even premature death. However, most of the PM monitoring stations are located close to cities, leaving large areas without any operational data. Satellite remote sensing is well suited for a global coverage of the aerosol load and can provide an independent and supplemental data source to in situ monitoring. Nevertheless, PM at the ground cannot easily be determined from satellite AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) without additional information on the optical/microphysical properties and vertical distribution of the aerosols. The objective of this study is to explore the efficacy and accuracy of combining a 3-D aerosol transport model and satellite remote sensing as a cost-effective approach for estimating ground-level PM on a global and daily basis. The estimation of the near-surface PM will use the vertical distribution (and, if possible, the physicochemical properties) of the aerosols inferred from a transport model and the measured total load of particles in the atmospheric column retrieved by satellite sensor(s). The first step is to select a chemical transport model (CTM) that provides “good” simulated aerosol vertical profiles. A few global (e.g., WRF-Chem-GOCART) or regional (e.g., MM5-CMAQ, PM-CAMx) CTM will be compared during selected airborne campaigns like ARCTAS-CARB (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites- California Air Resources Board). The next step will be to devise an algorithm that combines the satellite and model data to infer PM mass estimates at the ground, after evaluating different spaceborne instruments and possible multi-sensor combinations.

  16. Semen quality trends in French regions are consistent with a global change in environmental exposure.

    PubMed

    Le Moal, Joëlle; Rolland, Matthieu; Goria, Sarah; Wagner, Vérène; De Crouy-Chanel, Perrine; Rigou, Annabel; De Mouzon, Jacques; Royère, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective study carried out recently in a large sample of men, close to the general population, has reported a significant and strong decline in sperm concentration and morphology in the whole of France between 1989 and 2005. We studied these trends within each region of France. Data were obtained from the Fivnat database. The study sample comprised male partners of sterile women in whom both tubes were absent or blocked. They were located at the assisted reproductive technology center. A Bayesian spatio-temporal model with parametric time trends, adjusted for age, was used to model overall time trends for each region. The results show that sperm concentration decreased in almost all regions of France. Among them, Aquitaine showed the highest decrease and Midi-Pyrénées had the lowest average for the whole period. Regarding total motility, most regions showed a slight increase while Bourgogne showed a steep and significant decrease. While considering sperm morphology, there was a decrease in most of the regions. The decrease in Aquitaine and Midi-Pyrénées was stronger when compared with the overall trend. In conclusion, a decrease in sperm concentration and morphology, already shown at the French metropolitan territory level, was observed in most regions of France. This is consistent with a global change in environmental exposure, according to the endocrine disruptor hypothesis especially. Indeed, ubiquitary exposure to chemicals has been growing in the general population of France since the 1950s, and the results do not appear to support the lifestyle hypothesis. The highest decreases and lowest values are consistently observed in two proximate regions that are both highly agricultural and densely populated.

  17. Conformance Testing: Measurement Decision Rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mimbs, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of a Quality Management System (QMS) as specified in ISO 9001 and AS9100 is to provide assurance to the customer that end products meet specifications. Measuring devices, often called measuring and test equipment (MTE), are used to provide the evidence of product conformity to specified requirements. Unfortunately, processes that employ MTE can become a weak link to the overall QMS if proper attention is not given to the measurement process design, capability, and implementation. Documented "decision rules" establish the requirements to ensure measurement processes provide the measurement data that supports the needs of the QMS. Measurement data are used to make the decisions that impact all areas of technology. Whether measurements support research, design, production, or maintenance, ensuring the data supports the decision is crucial. Measurement data quality can be critical to the resulting consequences of measurement-based decisions. Historically, most industries required simplistic, one-size-fits-all decision rules for measurements. One-size-fits-all rules in some cases are not rigorous enough to provide adequate measurement results, while in other cases are overly conservative and too costly to implement. Ideally, decision rules should be rigorous enough to match the criticality of the parameter being measured, while being flexible enough to be cost effective. The goal of a decision rule is to ensure that measurement processes provide data with a sufficient level of quality to support the decisions being made - no more, no less. This paper discusses the basic concepts of providing measurement-based evidence that end products meet specifications. Although relevant to all measurement-based conformance tests, the target audience is the MTE end-user, which is anyone using MTE other than calibration service providers. Topics include measurement fundamentals, the associated decision risks, verifying conformance to specifications, and basic measurement

  18. Is environmental health a determinant or an afterthought in policies ranging from water quality to global warming?

    PubMed

    Listorti, J A

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this discussion is to draw attention to the regrettable fact that health repercussions are not being addressed in policy setting. This absence covers a spectrum from policies as technically focused as that governing water quality, where the health dimensions are well known, to policies as broad as those dealing with global warming, where the health dimensions are still being defined. This situation is likely to worsen unless the environmental health community accepts the responsibility to do more outreach. The presentation also gives examples of how inclusion of environmental health in policy deliberations can increase economically quantifiable benefits and can help justify investments that are otherwise considered too costly. Despite advances in environmental health, many, if not most, important decisions affecting human health are being made without the input of health specialists. At best, considerations of environmental health are afterthoughts in the policies of business, commerce, industry, and many government agencies that are involved--even if inadvertently--with creating most environmental health problems, and by implication, are potentially responsible for their solutions. Examples of situations where the health dimensions are well known, such as with water quality, are provided from some 200 past World Bank projects in water supply, waste disposal, transportation, housing, urban development, and telecommunications, designed mainly by engineers and economists. The absence of health input is not necessarily detrimental if agency policies or environmental reviews can compensate for the absence of direct health input by other means such as environmental assessments, which currently do not systematically include health.

  19. Global Air Quality Predictions of Particulate Matter in the Middle East and Sensitivity to Future Emissions Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzo, E. A.; Holmes, C. D.; Paltsev, S.; Alawad, A.; Selin, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the influence of natural and anthropogenic drivers of future PM in the Middle East region using two future emissions scenarios to drive the GEOS-Chem atmospheric chemistry model. The Arabian Peninsula is a major source of windblown dust as well as anthropogenic aerosols. Future emissions - driven jointly and individually by climate change and anthropogenic emissions from this rapidly growing region - will play an important role in both climate forcing and human health impacts from particulate matter. We use two scenarios to compare their climate and air quality implications. First, we use the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) for four radiative forcing cases. Second, we develop a consistent future greenhouse gas and conventional pollutant emission inventory using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, which is a general equilibrium model of the global economy that calculates how economic growth and anthropogenic emissions change as a result of policies and other stressors. With EPPA, we examine three emissions cases, a business-as-usual case and two stabilization cases leading to anthropogenic radiative forcings of 3.7 W/m2 and 4.5 W/m2. We use these scenarios to drive GEOS-Chem for present and future climate, assessing changes in chemical composition of aerosol and drivers, both natural and anthropogenic, out to 2050. We find that projected anthropogenic emissions are strong determinants of future particulate matter air quality in the Middle East region.

  20. A global quality assurance system for personalized radiation therapy treatment planning for the prostate (or other sites)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Obioma; Sihono, Dwi Seno K.; Schneider, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2014-09-01

    likely dose that OARs will receive before treatment planning. This prospective knowledge could be used to implement a global quality assurance system for personalized radiation therapy treatment planning.

  1. Studies of quality control of 99mTc-labelled macroaggregated albumin--Part 1. Aggregation of non-mercaptalbumin and its conformation.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, M; Kobayashi, T; Satoh, T; Tanaka, A; Kubodera, A

    1993-07-01

    The aggregative condition of albumin was investigated using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model for quality control of 99mTc-macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA). Uniformalized aggregates were obtained from the oxidized non-mercapt-type of BSA by heating. The size of the aggregates was affected by the pH and the types of buffer solutions used as well as the concentrations of albumin and buffers. The beta form structure of the albumin was more stable on heating and this may contribute to its aggregation. Aggregation of oxidized non-mercaptalbumin afforded a portion of smaller sized particles in MAA, this being an inappropriate factor for scintiscanning of lungs. Our results suggest that it is necessary to remove oxidized type albumin from human serum albumin as the starting material, in order to prepare MAA with a uniform and larger particle size.

  2. Data Mining for Tectonic Tremor in a Large Global Seismogram Database using Preprocessed Data Quality Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasor, B. A.; Brudzinski, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The collision of plates at subduction zones yields the potential for disastrous earthquakes, yet the processes that lead up to these events are still largely unclear and make them difficult to forecast. Recent advancements in seismic monitoring has revealed subtle ground vibrations termed tectonic tremor that occur as long-lived swarms of narrow bandwidth activity, different from local earthquakes of comparable amplitude that create brief signals of broader, higher frequency. The close proximity of detected tremor events to the lower edge of the seismogenic zone along the subduction interface suggests a potential triggering relationship between tremor and megathrust earthquakes. Most tremor catalogs are constructed with detection methods that involve an exhausting download of years of high sample rate seismic data, as well as large computation power to process the large data volume and identify temporal patterns of tremor activity. We have developed a tremor detection method that employs the underutilized Quality Analysis Control Kit (QuACK), originally built to analyze station performance and identify instrument problems across the many seismic networks that contribute data to one of the largest seismogram databases in the world (IRIS DMC). The QuACK dataset stores seismogram amplitudes at a wide range of frequencies calculated every hour since 2005 for most stations achieved in the IRIS DMC. Such a preprocessed dataset is advantageous considering several tremor detection techniques use hourly seismic amplitudes in the frequency band where tremor is most active (2-5 Hz) to characterize the time history of tremor. Yet these previous detection techniques have relied on downloading years of 40-100 sample-per-second data to make the calculations, which typically takes several days on a 36-node high-performance cluster to calculate the amplitude variations for a single station. Processing times are even longer for a recently developed detection algorithm that utilize

  3. Assemblies of Conformal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

  4. Vacuum energy sequestering and conformal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Richter, Robert; Ruehle, Fabian; Westphal, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    In a series of recent papers Kaloper and Padilla proposed a mechanism to sequester standard model vacuum contributions to the cosmological constant. We study the consequences of embedding their proposal into a fully local quantum theory. In the original work, the bare cosmological constant Λ and a scaling parameter λ are introduced as global fields. We find that in the local case the resulting Lagrangian is that of a spontaneously broken conformal field theory where λ plays the role of the dilaton. A vanishing or a small cosmological constant is thus a consequence of the underlying conformal field theory structure.

  5. Incorporating TRMM and Other High-Quality Estimates into the One-Degree Daily (1DD) Global Precipitation Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Bolvin, David T.

    1999-01-01

    The One-Degree Daily (1DD) precipitation dataset was recently developed for the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). The IDD provides a globally-complete, observation-only estimate of precipitation on a daily 1 deg x 1 deg grid for the period 1997 through late 1999 (by the time of the conference). In the latitude band 40 N - 40 S the IDD uses the Threshold-Matched Precipitation Index (TMPI), a GPI-like IR product with the T(sub b) threshold and (single) conditional rain rate determined locally for each month by the frequency of precipitation in the GPROF SSNU product and by the precipitation amount in the GPCP satellite-gauge (SG) combination. Outside 40 N - 40 S the 1DD uses a scaled TOVS precipitation estimate that has adjustments based on the TMPI and the SG. This first-generation 1DD has been in beta test preparatory to release as an official GPCP product. In this paper we discuss further development of the 1DD framework to allow the direct incorporation of TRMM and other high-quality precipitation estimates. First, these data are generally sparse (typically from low-orbit satellites), so a fair amount of work was devoted to data boundaries. Second, these data are not the same as the original 1DD estimates, so we had to give careful consideration to the best scheme for forcing the 1DD to sum to the SG for the month. Finally, the non-sun-synchronous, low-inclination orbit occupied by TRMM creates interesting variations against the sun-synchronous, high-inclination orbits occupied by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellites that carry the SSM/I. Examples will be given of each of the development issues, then comparisons will be made to daily raingauge analyses.

  6. Global Quality of Life (QOL), Health and Ability Are Primarily Determined by Our Consciousness: Research Findings from Denmark 1991-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventegodt, Soren; Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Andersen, Niels Jorgen; Nielsen, Michael; Mohammed, Morad; Merrick, Joav

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explain the global quality of life (QOL) from 2000 indicators representing all aspects of life. Design and setting: Two cross sectional population studies, one prospective cohort study and one retrospective cohort study. Participants: (1) Representative sample of 2500 Danes (18-88 years), (2) 7222 members of the Copenhagen Perinatal…

  7. Confronting the Impact of HIV and AIDS: The Consequences of the Pandemics for Education Supply, Demand and Quality--A Global Review from a Southern African Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombe, Carol

    2004-01-01

    The global spread of the HIV and AIDS pandemics will, for the next three generations at least, underline education access, quality and provision. Reforms within the sector will necessarily take account of the implications of this plague within national, provincial and local contexts. This article is based on several assumptions. The first is that…

  8. 48 CFR 46.315 - Certificate of conformance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certificate of conformance. 46.315 Section 46.315 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Contract Clauses 46.315 Certificate of conformance. The contracting...

  9. An assessment of African test sites in the context of a global network of quality-assured reference standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Xiong, X.; Angal, A.; Choi, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Infrared and Visible Optical Sensors (IVOS) subgroup members established a set of CEOS-endorsed globally distributed reference standard test sites for the postlaunch calibration of space-based optical imaging sensors. This paper discusses the top five African pseudo-invariant sites (Libya 4, Mauritania 1/2, Algeria 3, Libya 1, and Algeria 5) that were identified by the IVOS subgroup. This paper focuses on monitoring the long-term radiometric stability of the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) sensors using near-simultaneous and cloud-free image pairs acquired from launch to December 2008 over the five African desert sites. Residual errors and coefficients of determination were also generated to support the quality assessment of the calibration differences between the two sensors. An effort was also made to evaluate the relative stability of these sites for long-term monitoring of the optical sensors. ??2009 IEEE.

  10. soil organic matter pools and quality are sensitive to global climate change in tropical forests from India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Shanmugam; Merino, Agustín; García-Oliva, Felipe; Riotte, Jean; Sukumar, Raman

    2016-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and quality are some of the most important factors determining ecological process in tropical forests, which are especially sensitive to global climate change (GCC). In India, the GCC scenarios expect increasing of drought period and wildfire, which may affect the SOC, and therefore the capacity of forest for C sequestration. The aim of the study was to evaluate the amount of soil C and its quality in the mineral soil across precipitation gradient with different factors (vegetation, pH, soil texture and bedrock composition) for generate SOC predictions under GCC. Six soil samples were collected (top 10 cm depth) from 19 1-ha permanent plots in the Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary of southern India, which are characterised by four types of forest vegetation (i.e. dry thorn, dry deciduous, moist deciduous and semi-evergreen forest) distributed along to rainfall gradient. The driest sites are dominated by sandy soils, while the soil clay proportion increased in the wet sites. Total organic C (Leco CN analyser), and the SOM quality was assessed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Solid-state 13CCP-MAS NMR analyses. Soil organic C was positively correlated with precipitation (R2 = 0.502, p<0.01) and with soil clay content (R2 =0.15, p<0.05), and negatively with soil sand content (R2=0.308, p<0.001) and with pH (R2=0.529, p<0.01); while the C/N was only found positive correlation with clay (R2= 0.350, p<0.01). The driest sites (dry thorn forest) has the lowest proportion of thermal combustion of recalcitrant organic matter (Q2,375-475 °C) than the other sites (p<0.05) and this SOC fraction correlated positively with rainfall (R2=0.27, p=0.01). The Q2 model with best fit included rainfall, pH, sand, clay, C and C/N (R2=0.52, p=0.01). Principal component analysis explains 77% of total variance. The sites on the fist component are distributed along the rainfall gradient. These results suggest that the 50% of variance was explained

  11. A systematic review and quality appraisal of international guidelines for early breast cancer systemic therapy: Are recommendations sensitive to different global resources?

    PubMed

    Gandhi, S; Verma, S; Ethier, J-L; Simmons, C; Burnett, H; Alibhai, S M H

    2015-08-01

    The breast cancer incidence in low and middle income countries (LMCs) is increasing globally, and patient outcomes are generally worse in these nations compared to high income countries (HICs). This is partly due to resource constraints associated with implementing recommended breast cancer therapies. Clinical practice guideline (CPG) adherence can improve breast cancer outcomes, however, many CPGs are created in HICs, and include costly recommendations that may not be feasible in LMCs. In addition, the quality of CPGs can be variable. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of CPGs on early breast cancer systemic therapy with potential international impact, to evaluate their content, quality, and resource sensitivity. A MEDLINE and gray literature search was completed for English language CPGs published between 2005 and 2010, and then updated to July 2014. Extracted guidelines were evaluated using the AGREE 2 instrument. Guidelines were specifically analyzed for resource sensitivity. Most of the extracted CPGs had similar recommendations with regards to systemic therapy. However, only one, the Breast Health Global Initiative, made recommendations with consideration of different global resources. Overall, the CPGs were of variable quality, and most scored poorly in the quality domain evaluating implementation barriers such as resources. Published CPGs for early breast cancer are created in HICs, have similar recommendations, and are generally resource-insensitive. Given the visibility and influence of these CPGs on LMCs, efforts to create higher quality, resource-sensitive guidelines with less redundancy are needed.

  12. A systematic review and quality appraisal of international guidelines for early breast cancer systemic therapy: Are recommendations sensitive to different global resources?

    PubMed

    Gandhi, S; Verma, S; Ethier, J-L; Simmons, C; Burnett, H; Alibhai, S M H

    2015-08-01

    The breast cancer incidence in low and middle income countries (LMCs) is increasing globally, and patient outcomes are generally worse in these nations compared to high income countries (HICs). This is partly due to resource constraints associated with implementing recommended breast cancer therapies. Clinical practice guideline (CPG) adherence can improve breast cancer outcomes, however, many CPGs are created in HICs, and include costly recommendations that may not be feasible in LMCs. In addition, the quality of CPGs can be variable. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of CPGs on early breast cancer systemic therapy with potential international impact, to evaluate their content, quality, and resource sensitivity. A MEDLINE and gray literature search was completed for English language CPGs published between 2005 and 2010, and then updated to July 2014. Extracted guidelines were evaluated using the AGREE 2 instrument. Guidelines were specifically analyzed for resource sensitivity. Most of the extracted CPGs had similar recommendations with regards to systemic therapy. However, only one, the Breast Health Global Initiative, made recommendations with consideration of different global resources. Overall, the CPGs were of variable quality, and most scored poorly in the quality domain evaluating implementation barriers such as resources. Published CPGs for early breast cancer are created in HICs, have similar recommendations, and are generally resource-insensitive. Given the visibility and influence of these CPGs on LMCs, efforts to create higher quality, resource-sensitive guidelines with less redundancy are needed. PMID:25900382

  13. Metrics with Galilean conformal isometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Arjun; Kundu, Arnab

    2011-03-15

    The Galilean conformal algebra (GCA) arises in taking the nonrelativistic limit of the symmetries of a relativistic conformal field theory in any dimensions. It is known to be infinite dimensional in all spacetime dimensions. In particular, the 2d GCA emerges out of a scaling limit of linear combinations of two copies of the Virasoro algebra. In this paper, we find metrics in dimensions greater than 2 which realize the finite 2d GCA (the global part of the infinite algebra) as their isometry by systematically looking at a construction in terms of cosets of this finite algebra. We list all possible subalgebras consistent with some physical considerations motivated by earlier work in this direction and construct all possible higher-dimensional nondegenerate metrics. We briefly study the properties of the metrics obtained. In the standard one higher-dimensional ''holographic'' setting, we find that the only nondegenerate metric is Minkowskian. In four and five dimensions, we find families of nontrivial metrics with a rather exotic signature. A curious feature of these metrics is that all but one of them are Ricci-scalar flat.

  14. Approaching Conformality with Ten Flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, Thomas; Brower, Richard C.; Buchoff, Michael I.; Cheng, Michael; Cohen, Saul D.; Fleming, George T.; Kiskis, Joe; Lin, Meifeng; Na, Heechang; Neil, Ethan T.; Osborn, James C.

    2012-04-01

    We present first results for lattice simulations, on a single volume, of the low-lying spectrum of an SU(3) Yang-Mills gauge theory with N{sub f} = 10 light fermions in the fundamental representation. Fits to the fermion mass dependence of various observables are found to be globally consistent with the hypothesis that this theory is within or just outside the strongly-coupled edge of the conformal window, with mass anomalous dimension {gamma}* {approx} 1 over the range of scales simulated. We stress that we cannot rule out the possibility of spontaneous chiral-symmetry breaking at scales well below our infrared cutoff. We discuss important systematic effects, including finite-volume corrections, and consider directions for future improvement.

  15. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  16. 21 CFR 26.69 - Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM... COMMUNITY âFrameworkâ Provisions § 26.69 Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies. The following...

  17. Data quality through a web-based QA/QC system: implementation for atmospheric mercury data from the global mercury observation system.

    PubMed

    D'Amore, Francesco; Bencardino, Mariantonia; Cinnirella, Sergio; Sprovieri, Francesca; Pirrone, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    The overall goal of the on-going Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project is to develop a coordinated global monitoring network for mercury, including ground-based, high altitude and sea level stations. In order to ensure data reliability and comparability, a significant effort has been made to implement a centralized system, which is designed to quality assure and quality control atmospheric mercury datasets. This system, GMOS-Data Quality Management (G-DQM), uses a web-based approach with real-time adaptive monitoring procedures aimed at preventing the production of poor-quality data. G-DQM is plugged on a cyberinfrastructure and deployed as a service. Atmospheric mercury datasets, produced during the first-three years of the GMOS project, are used as the input to demonstrate the application of the G-DQM and how it identifies a number of key issues concerning data quality. The major issues influencing data quality are presented and discussed for the GMOS stations under study. Atmospheric mercury data collected at the Longobucco (Italy) station is used as a detailed case study. PMID:26174740

  18. Data quality through a web-based QA/QC system: implementation for atmospheric mercury data from the global mercury observation system.

    PubMed

    D'Amore, Francesco; Bencardino, Mariantonia; Cinnirella, Sergio; Sprovieri, Francesca; Pirrone, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    The overall goal of the on-going Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project is to develop a coordinated global monitoring network for mercury, including ground-based, high altitude and sea level stations. In order to ensure data reliability and comparability, a significant effort has been made to implement a centralized system, which is designed to quality assure and quality control atmospheric mercury datasets. This system, GMOS-Data Quality Management (G-DQM), uses a web-based approach with real-time adaptive monitoring procedures aimed at preventing the production of poor-quality data. G-DQM is plugged on a cyberinfrastructure and deployed as a service. Atmospheric mercury datasets, produced during the first-three years of the GMOS project, are used as the input to demonstrate the application of the G-DQM and how it identifies a number of key issues concerning data quality. The major issues influencing data quality are presented and discussed for the GMOS stations under study. Atmospheric mercury data collected at the Longobucco (Italy) station is used as a detailed case study.

  19. Global chemical profiling based quality evaluation approach of rhubarb using ultra performance liquid chromatography with tandem quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Haiyu; Qin, Lingling; Zhang, Zhixin; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Qingqing; Lu, Zhiwei; Wei, Shengli; Gao, Xiaoyan; Tu, Pengfei

    2015-02-01

    A global chemical profiling based quality evaluation approach using ultra performance liquid chromatography with tandem quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was developed for the quality evaluation of three rhubarb species, including Rheum palmatum L., Rheum tanguticum Maxim. ex Balf., and Rheum officinale Baill. Considering that comprehensive detection of chemical components is crucial for the global profile, a systemic column performance evaluation method was developed. Based on this, a Cortecs column was used to acquire the chemical profile, and Chempattern software was employed to conduct similarity evaluation and hierarchical cluster analysis. The results showed R. tanguticum could be differentiated from R. palmatum and R. officinale at the similarity value 0.65, but R. palmatum and R. officinale could not be distinguished effectively. Therefore, a common pattern based on three rhubarb species was developed to conduct the quality evaluation, and the similarity value 0.50 was set as an appropriate threshold to control the quality of rhubarb. A total of 88 common peaks were identified by their accurate mass and fragmentation, and partially verified by reference standards. Through the verification, the newly developed method could be successfully used for evaluating the holistic quality of rhubarb. It would provide a reference for the quality control of other herbal medicines.

  20. Extended conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Anne

    1990-08-01

    Some extended conformal field theories are briefly reviewed. They illustrate how non minimal models of the Virasoro algebra (c≥1) can become minimal with respect to a larger algebra. The accent is put on N-extended superconformal algebras, which are relevant in superstring compactification.

  1. A major upgrade of the global Mercator Océan ocean monitoring and forecasting system and corresponding product quality improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowsky, Eric; Drillet, Yann; Legalloudec, Olivier; Lellouche, Jean Michel; Regnier, Charly

    2013-04-01

    Mercator Océan (the French ocean forecast service provider) was setup in France about 10 years ago by all the French organizations holding stakes in ocean forecasting. It has since then constantly developed and is currently operating operational ocean forecasting systems based on state-of-the-art Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCM, we use the NEMO code) assimilating the observations of the Global Ocean Observing System (remote sensing + in situ). The mandate of Mercator Océan is to cover the global ocean at a resolution sufficient to both simulate the physics including the eddies (eddy resolving) and take the maximum benefit from the GOOS via data assimilation. To do so, Mercator Océan is strongly connected to the ocean modeling and data assimilation research communities, at French, European and international levels. Mercator Océan is engaged in the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) European initiative and is currently coordinating a European consortium (~60 partners) gathering all the European skills in ocean monitoring and forecasting to build the Marine forecast component of the GMES service. This is currently done in the MyOcean II EU funded project (project started in 2012). Within the MyOcean consortium, among other commitments, Mercator Océan is the operator of the global ocean forecasting system, and one of the providers of global ocean reanalysis products. In this context (MyOcean V3 service), we have implemented a major upgrade of the systems operated at Mercator Océan ., including improvements in the model configurations, in data assimilation and product elaboration and serving. This concerns especially the global eddy resolving system (1/12° global) which is operational providing daily service. We focus our presentation on product quality, showing how these upgrades correspond to product improvements, and illustrating how the users are served with better quality products, thanks to this upgrade.

  2. Conformational changes in biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vassili

    2005-12-01

    Biopolymer conformational changes are involved in many biological processes. This thesis summarizes some theoretical and experimental approaches which I have taken at UCLA to explore conformational changes in biopolymers. The reversible thermal denaturation of the DNA double helix is, perhaps, the simplest example of biopolymer conformational change. I have developed a statistical mechanics model of DNA melting with reduced degrees of freedom, which allows base stacking interaction to be taken into account and treat base pairing and stacking separately. Unlike previous models, this model describes both the unpairing and unstacking parts of the experimental melting curves and explains the observed temperature dependence of the effective thermodynamic parameters used in models of the nearest neighbor type. I developed a basic kinetic model for irreversible thermal denaturation of F-actin, which incorporates depolymerization of F-actin from the ends and breaking of F-actin fiber in the middle. The model explains the cooperativity of F-actin thermal denaturation observed by D. Pavlov et al. in differential calorimetry measurements. CG-rich DNA sequences form left-handed Z-DNA at high ionic strength or upon binding of polyvalent ions and some proteins. I studied experimentally the B-to-Z transition of the (CG)6 dodecamer. Improvement of the locally linearized model used to interpret the data gives evidence for an intermediate state in the B-to-Z transition of DNA, contrary to previous research on this subject. In the past 15 years it has become possible to study the conformational changes of biomolecules using single-molecule techniques. In collaboration with other lab members I performed a single-molecule experiment, where we monitored the displacement of a micrometer-size bead tethered to a surface by a DNA probe undergoing the conformational change. This technique allows probing of conformational changes with subnanometer accuracy. We applied the method to detect

  3. Quantifying polypeptide conformational space: sensitivity to conformation and ensemble definition.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, David C; Lim, Carmay

    2006-08-24

    Quantifying the density of conformations over phase space (the conformational distribution) is needed to model important macromolecular processes such as protein folding. In this work, we quantify the conformational distribution for a simple polypeptide (N-mer polyalanine) using the cumulative distribution function (CDF), which gives the probability that two randomly selected conformations are separated by less than a "conformational" distance and whose inverse gives conformation counts as a function of conformational radius. An important finding is that the conformation counts obtained by the CDF inverse depend critically on the assignment of a conformation's distance span and the ensemble (e.g., unfolded state model): varying ensemble and conformation definition (1 --> 2 A) varies the CDF-based conformation counts for Ala(50) from 10(11) to 10(69). In particular, relatively short molecular dynamics (MD) relaxation of Ala(50)'s random-walk ensemble reduces the number of conformers from 10(55) to 10(14) (using a 1 A root-mean-square-deviation radius conformation definition) pointing to potential disconnections in comparing the results from simplified models of unfolded proteins with those from all-atom MD simulations. Explicit waters are found to roughen the landscape considerably. Under some common conformation definitions, the results herein provide (i) an upper limit to the number of accessible conformations that compose unfolded states of proteins, (ii) the optimal clustering radius/conformation radius for counting conformations for a given energy and solvent model, (iii) a means of comparing various studies, and (iv) an assessment of the applicability of random search in protein folding.

  4. Ratings, Quality, and Accreditation: Policy Implications for Educational Communications and Technology Programs in a Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Ellen S.

    2013-01-01

    At a time when higher education is being pushed not only to increase efficiencies to provide greater value and to innovate to meet new global challenges, processes of accountability and accreditation to demonstrate quality may be leading to conformance and a one-size-fits-all model of what institutions and programs should be. Further, in the…

  5. A robust force field based method for calculating conformational energies of charged drug-like molecules.

    PubMed

    Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Harpsøe, Kasper; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Olsen, Lars

    2012-02-27

    The binding affinity of a drug-like molecule depends among other things on the availability of the bioactive conformation. If the bioactive conformation has a significantly higher energy than the global minimum energy conformation, then the molecule is unlikely to bind to its target. Determination of the global minimum energy conformation and calculation of conformational penalties of binding is a prerequisite for prediction of reliable binding affinities. Here, we present a simple and computationally efficient procedure to estimate the global energy minimum for a wide variety of structurally diverse molecules, including polar and charged compounds. Identifying global energy minimum conformations of such compounds with force field methods is problematic due to the exaggeration of intramolecular electrostatic interactions. We demonstrate that the global energy minimum conformations of zwitterionic compounds generated by conformational analysis with modified electrostatics are good approximations of the conformational distributions predicted by experimental data and with molecular dynamics performed in explicit solvent. Finally the method is used to calculate conformational penalties for zwitterionic GluA2 agonists and to filter false positives from a docking study. PMID:21985436

  6. Japan's efforts to promote global health using satellite remote sensing data from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency for prediction of infectious diseases and air quality.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Tamotsu; Kuze, Akihiko; Sobue, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Aya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Oyoshi, Kei; Imaoka, Keiji; Fukuda, Toru

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we review the status of new applications research of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) for global health promotion using information derived from Earth observation data by satellites in cooperation with inter-disciplinary collaborators. Current research effort at JAXA to promote global public health is focused primarily on the use of remote sensing to address two themes: (i) prediction models for malaria and cholera in Kenya, Africa; and (ii) air quality assessment of small, particulate matter (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3). Respiratory and cardivascular diseases constitute cross-boundary public health risk issues on a global scale. The authors report here on results of current of a collaborative research to call attention to the need to take preventive measures against threats to public health using newly arising remote sensing information from space.

  7. Japan's efforts to promote global health using satellite remote sensing data from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency for prediction of infectious diseases and air quality.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Tamotsu; Kuze, Akihiko; Sobue, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Aya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Oyoshi, Kei; Imaoka, Keiji; Fukuda, Toru

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the status of new applications research of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) for global health promotion using information derived from Earth observation data by satellites in cooperation with inter-disciplinary collaborators. Current research effort at JAXA to promote global public health is focused primarily on the use of remote sensing to address two themes: (i) prediction models for malaria and cholera in Kenya, Africa; and (ii) air quality assessment of small, particulate matter (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3). Respiratory and cardivascular diseases constitute cross-boundary public health risk issues on a global scale. The authors report here on results of current of a collaborative research to call attention to the need to take preventive measures against threats to public health using newly arising remote sensing information from space. PMID:25599641

  8. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016. PMID:27038223

  9. Conformal complementarity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbón, José L. F.; Rabinovici, Eliezer

    2013-12-01

    We study quantum cosmological models for certain classes of bang/crunch singularities, using the duality between expanding bubbles in AdS with a FRW interior cosmology and perturbed CFTs on de Sitter space-time. It is pointed out that horizon complementarity in the AdS bulk geometries is realized as a conformal transformation in the dual deformed CFT. The quantum version of this map is described in full detail in a toy model involving conformal quantum mechanics. In this system the complementarity map acts as an exact duality between eternal and apocalyptic Hamiltonian evolutions. We calculate the commutation relation between the Hamiltonians corresponding to the different frames. It vanishes only on scale invariant states.

  10. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer.

    PubMed

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  11. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  12. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics.

  13. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016.

  14. Consistent High-Quality Global SO2 and HCHO Datasets from EOS Aura/OMI and Suomi NPP/OMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Joiner, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Fioletov, V.; McLinden, C. A.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We report on recent effort and progress at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in developing consistent SO2 and HCHO retrieval products from Aura/Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP)/Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) nadir mapper. Given the substantial differences between OMI and OMPS in several key aspects, such as spatial and spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, a major challenge in ensuring data continuity between the two instruments is to properly account for different instrument characteristics as well as instruments' degradation over time. To this end, we have developed an innovative approach based on principal component analysis (PCA) of measured Earthshine radiances. We utilize a PCA technique to extract a series of spectral features (principal components or PCs) explaining the variance of measured reflectance spectra, associated with both physical processes (e.g., ozone absorption, rotational Raman scattering) and measurement details (e.g., wavelength shift). By fitting these PCs along with pre-computed Jacobians for our target species (SO2 or HCHO) to the measured radiance spectra, we can estimate the atmospheric loading of SO2 or HCHO while minimizing the impacts of interfering processes and measurement imperfection on retrievals. Since no explicit instrument-specific radiance data correction scheme is required, the PCA method is easily implemented with both OMI and OMPS and maximizes data continuity. The PCA algorithm currently runs operationally in the production of the new generation NASA standard OMI planetary boundary layer (PBL) SO2 data that have been shown to improve the detection limit of anthropogenic SO2 emission sources by a factor of two, as compared with the previous generation product. In this presentation, we will demonstrate that the PCA algorithm can produce SO2 and HCHO retrievals from OMPS that have comparable data quality with our OMI retrievals. We will also demonstrate

  15. Conformal scalar field wormholes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Jonathan J.; Laflamme, Raymond

    1989-01-01

    The Euclidian Einstein equations with a cosmological constant and a conformally coupled scalar field are solved, taking the metric to be of the Robertson-Walker type. In the case Lambda = 0, solutions are found which represent a wormhole connecting two asymptotically flat Euclidian regions. In the case Lambda greater than 0, the solutions represent tunneling from a small Tolman-like universe to a large Robertson-Walker universe.

  16. The conformal bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, David; Simmons-Duffin, David

    2016-06-01

    The conformal bootstrap was proposed in the 1970s as a strategy for calculating the properties of second-order phase transitions. After spectacular success elucidating two-dimensional systems, little progress was made on systems in higher dimensions until a recent renaissance beginning in 2008. We report on some of the main results and ideas from this renaissance, focusing on new determinations of critical exponents and correlation functions in the three-dimensional Ising and O(N) models.

  17. The effect of add-on memantine on global function and quality of life in schizophrenia: A randomized, double-blind, controlled, clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Omranifard, Victoria; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Mohammadian-Sichani, Maryam; Maracy, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia severely influences function and quality of life. The benefit of newer antipsychotics in improving the quality of life in schizophrenia still remains controversial. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of memantine on global function and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial on inpatient cases of schizophrenia in Noor University Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A number of 64 patients were selected through sequential sampling; patients were randomly allocated in intervention and placebo groups. The intervention group was treated with memantine plus previously administered, stabled-dose, atypical antipsychotic, while the control group received placebo plus previously administered, stabled-dose, atypical antipsychotic. Memantine administration was initiated at 5 mg daily; the dosage was increased at weekly intervals by 5 mg and finally up-titrated to 20 mg daily within 4 weeks. All patients were assessed by means of Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) and quality of life scale (QLS) initially and every four weeks to the end of the 12th week. Results: Analysis of baseline GAF and QLS scores showed no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.081 and P = 0.225, respectively). GAF and QLS scores increased in both groups; but it was higher in the intervention group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant. (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively) memantine was well tolerated, with no significant side effects. Conclusion: Add-on memantine was significantly effective in improving the global function of patients as well as their quality of life. PMID:26605240

  18. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 force field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.

  19. Conformational stability of apoflavodoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Genzor, C. G.; Beldarraín, A.; Gómez-Moreno, C.; López-Lacomba, J. L.; Cortijo, M.; Sancho, J.

    1996-01-01

    Flavodoxins are alpha/beta proteins that mediate electron transfer reactions. The conformational stability of apoflavodoxin from Anaboena PCC 7119 has been studied by calorimetry and urea denaturation as a function of pH and ionic strength. At pH > 12, the protein is unfolded. Between pH 11 and pH 6, the apoprotein is folded properly as judged from near-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD) and high-field 1H NMR spectra. In this pH interval, apoflavodoxin is a monomer and its unfolding by urea or temperature follows a simple two-state mechanism. The specific heat capacity of unfolding for this native conformation is unusually low. Near its isoelectric point (3.9), the protein is highly insoluble. At lower pH values (pH 3.5-2.0), apoflavodoxin adopts a conformation with the properties of a molten globule. Although apoflavodoxin at pH 2 unfolds cooperatively with urea in a reversible fashion and the fluorescence and far-UV CD unfolding curves coincide, the transition midpoint depends on the concentration of protein, ruling out a simple two-state process at acidic pH. Apoflavodoxin constitutes a promising system for the analysis of the stability and folding of alpha/beta proteins and for the study of the interaction between apoflavoproteins and their corresponding redox cofactors. PMID:8819170

  20. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    DOE PAGES

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 forcemore » field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.« less

  1. Protein local conformations arise from a mixture of Gaussian distributions.

    PubMed

    Tendulkar, Ashish V; Ogunnaike, Babatunde; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2007-08-01

    The classical approaches for protein structure prediction rely either on homology of the protein sequence with a template structure or on ab initio calculations for energy minimization. These methods suffer from disadvantages such as the lack of availability of homologous template structures or intractably large conformational search space, respectively. The recently proposed fragment library based approaches first predict the local structures,which can be used in conjunction with the classical approaches of protein structure prediction. The accuracy of the predictions is dependent on the quality of the fragment library. In this work, we have constructed a library of local conformation classes purely based on geometric similarity. The local conformations are represented using Geometric Invariants, properties that remain unchanged under transformations such as translation and rotation, followed by dimension reduction via principal component analysis. The local conformations are then modeled as a mixture of Gaussian probability distribution functions (PDF). Each one of the Gaussian PDF's corresponds to a conformational class with the centroid representing the average structure of that class. We find 46 classes when we use an octapeptide as a unit of local conformation. The protein 3-D structure can now be described as a sequence of local conformational classes. Further, it was of interest to see whether the local conformations can be predicted from the amino acid sequences. To that end,we have analyzed the correlation between sequence features and the conformational classes. PMID:17914232

  2. Addressing the Role of Conformational Diversity in Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Nicolas; Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, Maria Silvina

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tertiary structures has become of standard use to study proteins that lack experimental characterization. Unfortunately, 3D structure prediction methods and model quality assessment programs often overlook that an ensemble of conformers in equilibrium populates the native state of proteins. In this work we collected sets of publicly available protein models and the corresponding target structures experimentally solved and studied how they describe the conformational diversity of the protein. For each protein, we assessed the quality of the models against known conformers by several standard measures and identified those models ranked best. We found that model rankings are defined by both the selected target conformer and the similarity measure used. 70% of the proteins in our datasets show that different models are structurally closest to different conformers of the same protein target. We observed that model building protocols such as template-based or ab initio approaches describe in similar ways the conformational diversity of the protein, although for template-based methods this description may depend on the sequence similarity between target and template sequences. Taken together, our results support the idea that protein structure modeling could help to identify members of the native ensemble, highlight the importance of considering conformational diversity in protein 3D quality evaluations and endorse the study of the variability of the native structure for a meaningful biological analysis. PMID:27159429

  3. Addressing the Role of Conformational Diversity in Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, Maria Silvina

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tertiary structures has become of standard use to study proteins that lack experimental characterization. Unfortunately, 3D structure prediction methods and model quality assessment programs often overlook that an ensemble of conformers in equilibrium populates the native state of proteins. In this work we collected sets of publicly available protein models and the corresponding target structures experimentally solved and studied how they describe the conformational diversity of the protein. For each protein, we assessed the quality of the models against known conformers by several standard measures and identified those models ranked best. We found that model rankings are defined by both the selected target conformer and the similarity measure used. 70% of the proteins in our datasets show that different models are structurally closest to different conformers of the same protein target. We observed that model building protocols such as template-based or ab initio approaches describe in similar ways the conformational diversity of the protein, although for template-based methods this description may depend on the sequence similarity between target and template sequences. Taken together, our results support the idea that protein structure modeling could help to identify members of the native ensemble, highlight the importance of considering conformational diversity in protein 3D quality evaluations and endorse the study of the variability of the native structure for a meaningful biological analysis. PMID:27159429

  4. Simulating Massive Conformation Changes within Polypeptide Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaspinder Paul

    In this dissertation I employ all-atom structure based models with stable energy basins to several existing and novel polypeptide systems (postulated conformation changes of the mammalian prion protein and structurally dual proteins). The common themes are finding unfolding and refolding pathways between highly dissimilar protein structures as a means of understanding exactly how and why a protein may misfold. The modeling is based on the energy funnel landscape theory of protein conformation space. The principle of minimal frustration is considered as the model includes parameters which vary the roughness of the landscape and give rise to off-pathway misfoldings. The dual basin model is applied to the C-terminal (residues 166-226) of the mammalian prion protein. One basin represents the known alpha-helical (aH) structure while the other represents the same residues in a lefthanded beta-helical (LHBH) conformation. The LHBH structure has been proposed to help describe one class of in vitro grown fibrils, as well as possibly self-templating the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to the infectious form. Yet, it is unclear how the protein may make this global rearrangement. Our results demonstrate that the conformation changes are not strongly limited by large-scale geometry modification and that there may exist an overall preference for the LHBH conformation. Furthermore, our model presents novel intermediate trapping conformations with twisted LHBH structure. Polypeptides that display structural duality have primary structures that can give rise to different potential native conformations. We apply the structure-based all-atom model to a leucine zipper protein template with a stable aH structure that has been shown in experiment to switch to a β hairpin structure when exposed to a low-pH environment. We show that the model can be used to perform large-scale temperature-dependent conformational switching by simulating this switching behavior. We augmented

  5. Conformation and hydration of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y K

    1991-07-01

    Conformational free energy calculations using an empirical potential (ECEPP/2) and the hydration shell model were carried out on the neutral, acidic, zwitterionic, and basic forms of aspartame in the hydrated state. The results indicate that as the molecule becomes more charged, the number of low energy conformations becomes smaller and the molecule becomes less flexible. The calculated free energies of hydration of charged aspartames show that hydration has a significant effect on the conformation in solution. Only two feasible conformations were found for the zwitterionic form, and these are consistent with the conformations deduced from NMR and X-ray diffraction experiments. The calculated free energy difference between these two conformations was 1.25 kcal/mol. The less favored of the two solvated conformations can be expected to be stabilized by hydrophobic interaction of the phenyl groups in the crystal.

  6. Conformal superalgebras via tractor calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-01

    We use the manifestly conformally invariant description of a Lorentzian conformal structure in terms of a parabolic Cartan geometry in order to introduce a superalgebra structure on the space of twistor spinors and normal conformal vector fields formulated in purely algebraic terms on parallel sections in tractor bundles. Via a fixed metric in the conformal class, one reproduces a conformal superalgebra structure that has been considered in the literature before. The tractor approach, however, makes clear that the failure of this object to be a Lie superalgebra in certain cases is due to purely algebraic identities on the spinor module and to special properties of the conformal holonomy representation. Moreover, it naturally generalizes to higher signatures. This yields new formulas for constructing new twistor spinors and higher order normal conformal Killing forms out of existing ones, generalizing the well-known spinorial Lie derivative. Moreover, we derive restrictions on the possible dimension of the space of twistor spinors in any metric signature.

  7. Conformational Preferences in Small Peptide Models: The Relevance of cis/trans-Conformations.

    PubMed

    Jangra, Harish; Haindl, Michael H; Achrainer, Florian; Hioe, Johnny; Gschwind, Ruth M; Zipse, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    The accurate description of cis/trans peptide structures is of fundamental relevance for the field of protein modeling and protein structure determination. A comprehensive conformational analysis of dipeptide model Ace-Gly-NMe (1) has been carried out by using a combination of theoretical calculations and experimental ((1) H and (13) C NMR and NOESY) spectroscopic measurements to assess the relevance of cis-peptide conformers. NMR measurements in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution and calculations employing a continuum solvation model both point to the extended trans,trans conformer C5_tt as the global minimum. The cis-peptide structures C5_ct and C5_tc, with the N- or C-terminal amide group in cis-conformation, are observed separately and located 13.0±2 kJ mol(-1) higher in energy. This is in close agreement with the theoretical prediction of around 12 kJ mol(-1) in DMSO. The ability of common protein force fields to reproduce the energies of the cis-amide conformers C5_ct and C5_tc in 1 is limited, making these methods unsuitable for the description of cis-peptide structures in protein simulations. PMID:27535479

  8. Impact of Globalization: A Study of Quality Assurance Systems of Higher Education in Hong Kong and Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Ka Ho

    2000-01-01

    Compares the implementation of quality assurance mechanisms at the City University of Hong Kong and the National University of Singapore. Discusses public policy contexts in the two countries, the introduction of "quality process reviews" in Hong Kong, managerialism and the new emphasis on educational efficiency, institutional self-assessment, and…

  9. Conformal dome aberration correction by designing the inner surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wang; Chen, Shouqian; Fan, Zhigang

    2016-12-01

    The ray transmission models of optical domes were established, and the characteristics of the rays while passing through a hemispherical dome and a conformal dome were comparatively analysed. Acquiring the minimum deviated angles from the inner surface of the conformal dome was then determined to be the designing goal for reducing the dynamic aberrations. Based on this, the inner surface of the conformal dome was optimized and thus, the dynamic aberrations were reduced. Finally, a completely cooled conformal optical system was designed. The results show that the optical system have produced good imaging quality within all the fields of regard, which further illustrates that designing the inner surface of a conformal dome is an effective method for aberration correction.

  10. Leaf growth is conformal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I.; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-10-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour.

  11. Leaf growth is conformal.

    PubMed

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour. PMID:27597439

  12. OSI Conformance Testing for Bibliographic Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbez, Gilbert; Swain, Leigh

    1990-01-01

    Describes the development of Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) conformance testing sites, conformance testing tools, and conformance testing services. Discusses related topics such as interoperability testing, arbitration testing, and international harmonization of conformance testing. A glossary is included. (24 references) (SD)

  13. Improving the global SST record: estimates of biases from engine room intake SST using high quality satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carella, Giulia; Kent, Elizabeth C.; Berry, David I.; Morak-Bozzo, Simone; Merchant, Christopher J.

    2016-04-01

    Sea Surface Temperature (SST) is the marine component of the global surface temperature record, a primary metric of climate change. SST observations from ships form one of the longest instrumental records of surface marine climate. However, over the years several different methods of measuring SST have been used, each with different bias characteristics. The estimation of systematic biases in the SST record is critical for climatic decadal predictions, and uncertainties in long-term trends are expected to be dominated by uncertainties in biases introduced by changes of instrumentation and measurement practices. Although the largest systematic errors in SST observations relate to the period before about 1940, where SST measurements were mostly made using buckets, there are also issues with modern data, in particular when the SST reported is the temperature of the engine-room cooling water intake (ERI). Physical models for biases in ERI SSTs have not been developed as the details of the individual setup on each ship are extremely important, and almost always unknown. Existing studies estimate that the typical ERI biases are around 0.2°C and most estimates of the mean bias fall between 0.1°C and 0.3°C, but there is some evidence of much larger differences. However, these analyses provide only broad estimates, being based only on subsamples of the data and ignoring ship-by-ship differences. Here we take advantage of a new, high spatial resolution, gap-filled, daily SST for the period 1992-2010 from the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA CCI) for SST dataset version 1.1. In this study, we use a Bayesian statistical model to characterise the uncertainty in reports of ERI SST for individual ships using the ESA CCI SST as a reference. A Bayesian spatial analysis is used to model the differences of the observed SST from the ESA CCI SST for each ship as a constant offset plus a function of the climatological SST. This was found to be an important term

  14. Conformational Dynamics and Allostery in Pyruvate Kinase.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Katherine A; Zhu, Shaolong; Liuni, Peter; Peng, Fen; Kessans, Sarah A; Wilson, Derek J; Dobson, Renwick C J

    2016-04-22

    Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the final step in glycolysis and is allosterically regulated to control flux through the pathway. Two models are proposed to explain how Escherichia coli pyruvate kinase type 1 is allosterically regulated: the "domain rotation model" suggests that both the domains within the monomer and the monomers within the tetramer reorient with respect to one another; the "rigid body reorientation model" proposes only a reorientation of the monomers within the tetramer causing rigidification of the active site. To test these hypotheses and elucidate the conformational and dynamic changes that drive allostery, we performed time-resolved electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled to hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies followed by mutagenic analysis to test the activation mechanism. Global exchange experiments, supported by thermostability studies, demonstrate that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate binding to the allosteric domain causes a shift toward a globally more dynamic ensemble of conformations. Mapping deuterium exchange to peptides within the enzyme highlight site-specific regions with altered conformational dynamics, many of which increase in conformational flexibility. Based upon these and mutagenic studies, we propose an allosteric mechanism whereby the binding of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate destabilizes an α-helix that bridges the allosteric and active site domains within the monomeric unit. This destabilizes the β-strands within the (β/α)8-barrel domain and the linked active site loops that are responsible for substrate binding. Our data are consistent with the domain rotation model but inconsistent with the rigid body reorientation model given the increased flexibility at the interdomain interface, and we can for the first time explain how fructose 1,6-bisphosphate affects the active site. PMID:26879751

  15. Targeting Inactive Enzyme Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sijiu; Zeng, Li-Fan; Wu, Li; Yu, Xiao; Xue, Ting; Gunawan, Andrea M.; Ya-Qiu, Long; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2009-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a therapeutic target for diabetes, obesity, as well as cancer. Identifying inhibitory compounds with good bioavailability is a major challenge of drug discovery programs targeted toward PTPs. Most current PTP active site-directed pharmacophores are negatively charged pTyr mimetics which cannot readily enter the cell. This lack of cell permeability limits the utility of such compounds in signaling studies and further therapeutic development. We identify aryl diketoacids as novel pTyr surrogates and show that neutral amide-linked aryl diketoacid dimers also exhibit excellent PTP inhibitory activity. Kinetic studies establish that these aryl diketoacid derivatives act as noncompetitive inhibitors of PTP1B. Crystal structures of ligand-bound PTP1B reveal that both the aryl diketoacid and its dimeric derivative bind PTP1B at the active site, albeit with distinct modes of interaction, in the catalytically inactive, WPD loop open conformation. Furthermore, dimeric aryl diketoacids are cell permeable and enhance insulin signaling in hepatoma cells, suggesting that targeting the inactive conformation may provide a unique opportunity for creating active site-directed PTP1B inhibitors with improved pharmacological properties. PMID:19012396

  16. Conformally symmetric traversable wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2007-10-15

    Exact solutions of traversable wormholes are found under the assumption of spherical symmetry and the existence of a nonstatic conformal symmetry, which presents a more systematic approach in searching for exact wormhole solutions. In this work, a wide variety of solutions are deduced by considering choices for the form function, a specific linear equation of state relating the energy density and the pressure anisotropy, and various phantom wormhole geometries are explored. A large class of solutions impose that the spatial distribution of the exotic matter is restricted to the throat neighborhood, with a cutoff of the stress-energy tensor at a finite junction interface, although asymptotically flat exact solutions are also found. Using the 'volume integral quantifier', it is found that the conformally symmetric phantom wormhole geometries may, in principle, be constructed by infinitesimally small amounts of averaged null energy condition violating matter. Considering the tidal acceleration traversability conditions for the phantom wormhole geometry, specific wormhole dimensions and the traversal velocity are also deduced.

  17. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T] also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock space exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.

  18. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T]ℓ also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock spacemore » exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.« less

  19. Effecting change in primary care management of respiratory conditions: a global scoping exercise and literature review of educational interventions to inform the IPCRG's E-Quality initiative.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Juliet; Williams, Siân; Chavannes, Niels H; Correia de Sousa, Jaime; Fardy, H John; Fletcher, Monica; Stout, James; Tomlins, Ron; Yusuf, Osman M; Pinnock, Hilary

    2012-12-01

    This discussion paper describes a scoping exercise and literature review commissioned by the International Primary Care Respiratory Group (IPCRG) to inform their E-Quality programme which seeks to support small-scale educational projects to improve respiratory management in primary care. Our narrative review synthesises information from three sources: publications concerning the global context and health systems development; a literature search of Medline, CINAHL and Cochrane databases; and a series of eight interviews conducted with members of the IPCRG faculty. Educational interventions sit within complex healthcare, economic, and policy contexts. It is essential that any development project considers the local circumstances in terms of economic resources, political circumstances, organisation and administrative capacities, as well as the specific quality issue to be addressed. There is limited evidence (in terms of changed clinician behaviour and/or improved health outcomes) regarding the merits of different educational and quality improvement approaches. Features of educational interventions that were most likely to show some evidence of effectiveness included being carefully designed, multifaceted, engaged health professionals in their learning, provided ongoing support, were sensitive to local circumstances, and delivered in combination with other quality improvement strategies. To be effective, educational interventions must consider the complex healthcare systems within which they operate. The criteria for the IPCRG E-Quality awards thus require applicants not only to describe their proposed educational initiative but also to consider the practical and local barriers to successful implementation, and to propose a robust evaluation in terms of changed clinician behaviour or improved health outcomes. PMID:22875141

  20. An evaluation study of the determinants of future perspective and global Quality of Life in Spanish long-term premenopausal early-stage breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Illarramendi, Jose Juan; Salgado, Esteban; de la Cruz, Susana; Asin, Gemma; Manterola, Ana; Ibañez, Berta; Zarandona, Uxue; Dominguez, Miguel Angel; Vera, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Quality of life (QL) is important in premenopausal long-term breast cancer survivors. In this study we assessed QL and factors associated with future perspective and global QL in premenopausal early-stage long-term breast cancer survivors from Spain. Material and methods 243 premenopausal stage I-IIIA relapse-free breast cancer patients who had received surgery 5–20 years previously completed EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires once during follow-up. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results QL mean scores were high in most areas (> 80 in functioning; < 20 in symptoms). The main factors for future perspective were emotional and social functioning, fatigue, breast symptom, and body image. The main factors for global QL were fatigue, pain and physical functioning, and emotional and social functioning. The best logistic model to explain future perspective associated high emotional and social functioning and low breast symptoms with a lower risk of low future perspective (R2 = 0.56). Higher scores in physical and emotional functioning and lower scores in fatigue were associated with a lower risk of low global QL (R2 = 0.50). Conclusions Psychological, social, and physical factors were found to be possible determinants of global QL and future perspective. QL in premenopausal early-stage long-term breast cancer survivors may benefit from multidisciplinary treatment. PMID:27358597

  1. Impacts on quality-induced water scarcity: drivers of nitrogen-related water pollution transfer under globalization from 1995 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Liyang; Cai, Wenjia; Jiang, Yongkai; Wang, Can

    2016-07-01

    Globalization enables the transfer of impacts on water availability. We argue that the threat should be evaluated not only by decrease of quantity, but more importantly by the degradation of water quality in exporting countries. Grouping the world into fourteen regions, this paper establishes a multi-region input-output framework to calculate the nitrogen-related grey water footprint and a water quality-induced scarcity index caused by pollution, for the period of 1995 to 2009. It is discovered that grey water embodied in international trade has been growing faster than total grey water footprint. China, the USA and India were the three top grey water exporters which accounted for more than half the total traded grey water. Dilemma rose when China and India were facing highest grey water scarcity. The EU and the USA were biggest grey water importers that alleviated their water stress by outsourcing water pollution. A structural decomposition analysis is conducted to study the drivers to the evolution of virtual flows of grey water under globalization during the period of 1995 to 2009. The results show that despite the technical progress that offset the growth of traded grey water, structural effects under globalization including both evolution in the globalized economic system and consumption structure, together with consumption volume made a positive contribution. It is found that the structural effect intensified the pollution-induced water scarcity of exporters as it generally increased all nations’ imported grey water while resulting in increases in only a few nations’ exported grey water, such as Brazil, China and Indonesia. At last, drawing from the ‘cap-and-trade’ and ‘boarder-tax-adjustment’ schemes, we propose policy recommendations that ensure water security and achieve environmentally sustainable trade from both the sides of production and consumption.

  2. Assessment of the Impacts of Global Change on Regional U.S. Air Quality (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared by the Global Change Research Program (GCRP) in the National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) of the Office of Research and Development (ORD) at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It is intended for managers and scientists worki...

  3. How Can Urban Policies Improve Air Quality and Help Mitigate Global Climate Change: a Systematic Mapping Review.

    PubMed

    Slovic, Anne Dorothée; de Oliveira, Maria Aparecida; Biehl, João; Ribeiro, Helena

    2016-02-01

    Tackling climate change at the global level is central to a growing field of scientific research on topics such as environmental health, disease burden, and its resulting economic impacts. At the local level, cities constitute an important hub of atmospheric pollution due to the large amount of pollutants that they emit. As the world population shifts to urban centers, cities will increasingly concentrate more exposed populations. Yet, there is still significant progress to be made in understanding the contribution of urban pollutants other than CO2, such as vehicle emissions, to global climate change. It is therefore particularly important to study how local governments are managing urban air pollution. This paper presents an overview of local air pollution control policies and programs that aim to reduce air pollution levels in megacities. It also presents evidence measuring their efficacy. The paper argues that local air pollution policies are not only beneficial for cities but are also important for mitigating and adapting to global climate change. The results systematize several policy approaches used around the world and suggest the need for more in-depth cross-city studies with the potential to highlight best practices both locally and globally. Finally, it calls for the inclusion of a more human rights-based approach as a mean of guaranteeing of clean air for all and reducing factors that exacerbate climate change.

  4. Effect of Global Posture Reeducation and of Static Stretching on Pain, Range of Motion, and Quality of Life in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Ana Cláudia Violino; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Compare the effect of conventional static stretching and muscle chain stretching, as proposed by the global posture reeducation method, in the manual therapy of patients with chronic neck pain. METHODS Thirty-three female patients aged 35 to 60 years old, 31 of whom completed the program, were randomly divided into two groups: The global posture reeducation group (n=15) performed muscle chain stretching, while the conventional stretching group (n=16) performed conventional static muscle stretching. Both groups also underwent manual therapy. Patients were evaluated before and after treatment and at a six-week follow-up appointment and tested for pain intensity (by means of visual analog scale), range of motion (by goniometry), and health-related quality of life (by the SF-36 questionnaire). The treatment program consisted of two 1-hour individual sessions per week for six weeks. Data were statistically analyzed at a significance level of p<0.05. RESULTS Significant pain relief and range of motion improvement were observed after treatment in both groups, with a slight reduction at follow-up time. Quality of life also improved after treatment, except for the global posture reeducation group in one domain; at follow-up, there was improvement in all domains, except that both groups reported increased pain. There were no significant differences between groups CONCLUSION Conventional stretching and muscle chain stretching in association with manual therapy were equally effective in reducing pain and improving the range of motion and quality of life of female patients with chronic neck pain, both immediately after treatment and at a six-week follow-up, suggesting that stretching exercises should be prescribed to chronic neck pain patients. PMID:19060998

  5. Modeling the Impacts of Global Climate and Regional Land Use Change on Regional Climate, Air Quality and Public Health in the New York Metropolitan Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, J. E.; Knowlton, K. M.; Kinney, P. L.

    2002-12-01

    There is an imminent need to downscale the global climate models used by international consortiums like the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) to predict the future regional impacts of climate change. To meet this need, a "place-based" climate model that makes specific regional projections about future environmental conditions local inhabitants could face is being created by the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, in collaboration with other researchers and universities, for New York City and the 31 surrounding counties. This presentation describes the design and initial results of this modeling study, aimed at simulating the effects of global climate change and regional land use change on climate and air quality over the northeastern United States in order to project the associated public health impacts in the region. Heat waves and elevated concentrations of ozone and fine particles are significant current public health stressors in the New York metropolitan area. The New York Climate and Health Project is linking human dimension and natural sciences models to assess the potential for future public health impacts from heat stress and air quality, and yield improved tools for assessing climate change impacts. The model will be applied to the NY metropolitan east coast region. The following questions will be addressed: 1. What changes in the frequency and severity of extreme heat events are likely to occur over the next 80 years due to a range of possible scenarios of land use and land cover (LU/LC) and climate change in the region? 2. How might the frequency and severity of episodic concentrations of ozone (O3) and airborne particulate matter smaller than 2.5 æm in diameter (PM2.5) change over the next 80 years due to a range of possible scenarios of land use and climate change in the metropolitan region? 3. What is the range of possible human health impacts of these changes in the region? 4. How might projected future human

  6. Recent Advances in Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James; Chaykov, Spasen

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in alternative gravitational theories. Although MOND remains the leading candidate among the alternative models, Conformal Gravity has been studied by Mannheim and O'Brien to solve the rotation curve problem without the need for dark matter. Recently, Mannheim, O'Brien and Chaykov have begun solving other gravitational questions in Conformal Gravity. In this presentation, we highlight the new work of Conformal Gravity's application to random motions of clusters (the original Zwicky problem), gravitational bending of light, gravitational lensing and a very recent survey of dwarf galaxy rotation curves. We will show in each case that Conformal Gravity can provide an accurate explanation and prediction of the data without the need for dark matter. Coupled with the fact that Conformal Gravity is a fully re-normalizable metric theory of gravity, these results help to push Conformal Gravity onto a competitive stage against other alternative models.

  7. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  8. Killing and conformal Killing tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Konstantin; Moroianu, Andrei; Semmelmann, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    We introduce an appropriate formalism in order to study conformal Killing (symmetric) tensors on Riemannian manifolds. We reprove in a simple way some known results in the field and obtain several new results, like the classification of conformal Killing 2-tensors on Riemannian products of compact manifolds, Weitzenböck formulas leading to non-existence results, and construct various examples of manifolds with conformal Killing tensors.

  9. Global model estimates of carbon and nitrogen storage in litter and soil pools: response to changes in vegetation quality and biomass allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Christopher S.; Klooster, Steven A.

    1997-02-01

    Changes in plant production, structure, and tissue composition are primary drivers for terrestrial biogeochemistry under future environmental conditions. Consequently, there is a need for process-oriented assessment of the potential global importance of vegetation controls over extended periods of C and N sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, plant litter quality (lignin content) and carbon allocation to woody tissues are used as surrogates for testing the hypothetical effects of vegetation change on C and N cycles. We tested the CASA (Carnegie-Ames-Stanford approach) biosphere model, which uses global gridded (1°) satellite imagery on a monthly time interval to simulate seasonal patterns in net ecosystem carbon balance and near steady-state C/N storage in detritus and soils. Under contemporary "reference" settings, combined organic matter storage (litter plus surface soil to c. 30cm depth) for C and N is estimated highest in tropical and boreal forest ecosystem zones, and in cultivated ecosystems. The worldwide C:N ratio (by weight) for standing litter plus surface soil organic matter (SOM) is estimated at 23. About 14% of the projected global pool of 1327Pg (1015 g) soil C resides in "modern" form, in the sense that this proportion is in near-steady state exchange with plant production and decomposition on time scales of several decades. Likewise, about 12% of the projected global pool of 104Pg soil N is in modern form. Sensitivity tests treated litter quality and allocation effects independently from other direct effects of changes in climate, atmospheric CO2 levels, and primary production. For forested ecosystems, the model predicts that a hypothetical 50% decrease in litter lignin concentration would result in a long-term net loss of about 10% C from surface litter and soil organic matter pools. A 50% decrease in C allocation to woody tissues would invoke approximately the same net loss of C as a 50% decrease in litter lignin. With respect

  10. Reflections on conformal spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungrok; Kravchuk, Petr; Ooguri, Hirosi

    2016-04-01

    We use modular invariance and crossing symmetry of conformal field theory to reveal approximate reflection symmetries in the spectral decompositions of the partition function in two dimensions in the limit of large central charge and of the four-point function in any dimension in the limit of large scaling dimensions Δ0 of external operators. We use these symmetries to motivate universal upper bounds on the spectrum and the operator product expansion coefficients, which we then derive by independent techniques. Some of the bounds for four-point functions are valid for finite Δ0 as well as for large Δ0. We discuss a similar symmetry in a large spacetime dimension limit. Finally, we comment on the analogue of the Cardy formula and sparse light spectrum condition for the four-point function.

  11. Capturing Chromosome Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Job; Rippe, Karsten; Dekker, Martijn; Kleckner, Nancy

    2002-02-01

    We describe an approach to detect the frequency of interaction between any two genomic loci. Generation of a matrix of interaction frequencies between sites on the same or different chromosomes reveals their relative spatial disposition and provides information about the physical properties of the chromatin fiber. This methodology can be applied to the spatial organization of entire genomes in organisms from bacteria to human. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we could confirm known qualitative features of chromosome organization within the nucleus and dynamic changes in that organization during meiosis. We also analyzed yeast chromosome III at the G1 stage of the cell cycle. We found that chromatin is highly flexible throughout. Furthermore, functionally distinct AT- and GC-rich domains were found to exhibit different conformations, and a population-average 3D model of chromosome III could be determined. Chromosome III emerges as a contorted ring.

  12. Causal inference for bivariate longitudinal quality of life data in presence of death by using global odds ratios.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keunbaik; Daniels, Michael J

    2013-10-30

    In longitudinal clinical trials, if a subject drops out due to death, certain responses, such as those measuring quality of life (QoL), will not be defined after the time of death. Thus, standard missing data analyses, e.g., under ignorable dropout, are problematic because these approaches implicitly 'impute' values of the response after death. In this paper we define a new survivor average causal effect for a bivariate response in a longitudinal quality of life study that had a high dropout rate with the dropout often due to death (or tumor progression). We show how principal stratification, with a few sensitivity parameters, can be used to draw causal inferences about the joint distribution of these two ordinal quality of life measures.

  13. Conforming Morse-Smale Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, Attila; Gunther, David; Levine, Joshua A.; Tierny, Julien; Pascucci, Valerio

    2014-08-11

    Morse-Smale (MS) complexes have been gaining popularity as a tool for feature-driven data analysis and visualization. However, the quality of their geometric embedding and the sole dependence on the input scalar field data can limit their applicability when expressing application-dependent features. In this paper we introduce a new combinatorial technique to compute an MS complex that conforms to both an input scalar field and an additional, prior segmentation of the domain. The segmentation constrains the MS complex computation guaranteeing that boundaries in the segmentation are captured as separatrices of the MS complex. We demonstrate the utility and versatility of our approach with two applications. First, we use streamline integration to determine numerically computed basins/mountains and use the resulting segmentation as an input to our algorithm. This strategy enables the incorporation of prior flow path knowledge, effectively resulting in an MS complex that is as geometrically accurate as the employed numerical integration. Our second use case is motivated by the observation that often the data itself does not explicitly contain features known to be present by a domain expert. We introduce edit operations for MS complexes so that a user can directly modify their features while maintaining all the advantages of a robust topology-based representation.

  14. Conforming Morse-Smale Complexes.

    PubMed

    Gyulassy, Attila; Günther, David; Levine, Joshua A; Tierny, Julien; Pascucci, Valerio

    2014-12-01

    Morse-Smale (MS) complexes have been gaining popularity as a tool for feature-driven data analysis and visualization. However, the quality of their geometric embedding and the sole dependence on the input scalar field data can limit their applicability when expressing application-dependent features. In this paper we introduce a new combinatorial technique to compute an MS complex that conforms to both an input scalar field and an additional, prior segmentation of the domain. The segmentation constrains the MS complex computation guaranteeing that boundaries in the segmentation are captured as separatrices of the MS complex. We demonstrate the utility and versatility of our approach with two applications. First, we use streamline integration to determine numerically computed basins/mountains and use the resulting segmentation as an input to our algorithm. This strategy enables the incorporation of prior flow path knowledge, effectively resulting in an MS complex that is as geometrically accurate as the employed numerical integration. Our second use case is motivated by the observation that often the data itself does not explicitly contain features known to be present by a domain expert. We introduce edit operations for MS complexes so that a user can directly modify their features while maintaining all the advantages of a robust topology-based representation.

  15. Scoring docking conformations using predicted protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since proteins function by interacting with other molecules, analysis of protein-protein interactions is essential for comprehending biological processes. Whereas understanding of atomic interactions within a complex is especially useful for drug design, limitations of experimental techniques have restricted their practical use. Despite progress in docking predictions, there is still room for improvement. In this study, we contribute to this topic by proposing T-PioDock, a framework for detection of a native-like docked complex 3D structure. T-PioDock supports the identification of near-native conformations from 3D models that docking software produced by scoring those models using binding interfaces predicted by the interface predictor, Template based Protein Interface Prediction (T-PIP). Results First, exhaustive evaluation of interface predictors demonstrates that T-PIP, whose predictions are customised to target complexity, is a state-of-the-art method. Second, comparative study between T-PioDock and other state-of-the-art scoring methods establishes T-PioDock as the best performing approach. Moreover, there is good correlation between T-PioDock performance and quality of docking models, which suggests that progress in docking will lead to even better results at recognising near-native conformations. Conclusion Accurate identification of near-native conformations remains a challenging task. Although availability of 3D complexes will benefit from template-based methods such as T-PioDock, we have identified specific limitations which need to be addressed. First, docking software are still not able to produce native like models for every target. Second, current interface predictors do not explicitly consider pairwise residue interactions between proteins and their interacting partners which leaves ambiguity when assessing quality of complex conformations. PMID:24906633

  16. Replacement between conformity and counter-conformity in consumption decisions.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ting-Jui; Chang, En-Chung; Dai, Qi; Wong, Veronica

    2013-02-01

    This study assessed, in a Chinese context, how self-esteem interacts with perceived similarity and uniqueness to yield cognitive dissonance, and whether the dissonance leads to self-reported conformity or counter-conformity behavior. Participants were 408 respondents from 4 major Chinese cities (M age = 33.0 yr., SD = 4.3; 48% men). Self-perceptions of uniqueness, similarity, cognitive dissonance, self-esteem and need to behave in conformity or counter-conformity were measured. A theoretical model was assessed in four situations, relating the ratings of self-esteem and perceived similarity/uniqueness to the way other people at a wedding were dressed, and the resultant cognitive dissonance and conformity/ counter-conformity behavior. Regardless of high or low self-esteem, all participants reported cognitive dissonance when they were told that they were dressed extremely similarly to or extremely differently from the other people attending the wedding. However, the conforming/counter-conforming strategies used by participants to resolve the cognitive dissonance differed. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme uniqueness of dress, participants with low self-esteem tended to say they would dress next time so as to conform with the way others were dressed, while those with high self-esteem indicated they would continue their counter-conformity in attire. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme similarity to others, both those with high and low self-esteem tended to say they would dress in an unorthodox manner to surprise other people in the future. PMID:23654033

  17. Replacement between conformity and counter-conformity in consumption decisions.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ting-Jui; Chang, En-Chung; Dai, Qi; Wong, Veronica

    2013-02-01

    This study assessed, in a Chinese context, how self-esteem interacts with perceived similarity and uniqueness to yield cognitive dissonance, and whether the dissonance leads to self-reported conformity or counter-conformity behavior. Participants were 408 respondents from 4 major Chinese cities (M age = 33.0 yr., SD = 4.3; 48% men). Self-perceptions of uniqueness, similarity, cognitive dissonance, self-esteem and need to behave in conformity or counter-conformity were measured. A theoretical model was assessed in four situations, relating the ratings of self-esteem and perceived similarity/uniqueness to the way other people at a wedding were dressed, and the resultant cognitive dissonance and conformity/ counter-conformity behavior. Regardless of high or low self-esteem, all participants reported cognitive dissonance when they were told that they were dressed extremely similarly to or extremely differently from the other people attending the wedding. However, the conforming/counter-conforming strategies used by participants to resolve the cognitive dissonance differed. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme uniqueness of dress, participants with low self-esteem tended to say they would dress next time so as to conform with the way others were dressed, while those with high self-esteem indicated they would continue their counter-conformity in attire. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme similarity to others, both those with high and low self-esteem tended to say they would dress in an unorthodox manner to surprise other people in the future.

  18. PROJECTING FUTURE-YEAR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS: EMERGING APPROACHES FROM THE EPA ORD GLOBAL CHANGE AIR QUALITY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development is exploring approaches for assessing the relative impacts of climate and emissions changes on future-year air quality. A challenge related to this effort is the development of emissions inventories out to the year 2050. This pap...

  19. Conformal gravity and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazboun, Jeffrey Shafiq

    2014-10-01

    Cartan geometry provides a rich formalism from which to look at various geometrically motivated extensions to general relativity. In this manuscript, we start by motivating reasons to extend the theory of general relativity. We then introduce the reader to our technique, called the quotient manifold method, for extending the geometry of spacetime. We will specifically look at the class of theories formed from the various quotients of the conformal group. Starting with the conformal symmetries of Euclidean space, we construct a manifold where time manifests as a part of the geometry. Though there is no matter present in the geome- try studied here, geometric terms analogous to dark energy and dark matter appear when we write down the Einstein tensor. Specifically, the quotient of the conformal group of Euclidean four-space by its Weyl subgroup results in a geometry possessing many of the properties of relativistic phase space, including both a natural symplectic form and nondegenerate Killing metric. We show the general solution possesses orthogonal Lagrangian submanifolds, with the induced metric and the spin connection on the submanifolds necessarily Lorentzian, despite the Euclidean starting point. By examining the structure equations of the biconformal space in an orthonormal frame adapted to its phase space properties, we also find two new tensor fields exist in this geometry, not present in Riemannian geometry. The first is a combination of the Weyl vector with the scale factor on the metric, and determines the time-like directions on the submanifolds. The second comes from the components of the spin connection, symmetric with respect to the new metric. Though this field comes from the spin connection, it transforms ho- mogeneously. Finally, we show in the absence of Cartan curvature or sources, the configuration space has geometric terms equivalent to a perfect fluid and a cosmological constant. We complete the analysis of this homogeneous space by

  20. Conformal Transformations and Space Travel.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S N

    1961-10-27

    Conformal transformations are applied to the motion of a space ship experiencing a constant acceleration. The role of proper time is interpreted in terms of atomic periods, and the relationship between the conformal transformations and the general theory of relativity is clarified.

  1. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  2. [Conformal radiotherapy: principles and classification].

    PubMed

    Rosenwald, J C; Gaboriaud, G; Pontvert, D

    1999-01-01

    'Conformal radiotherapy' is the name fixed by usage and given to a new form of radiotherapy resulting from the technological improvements observed during, the last ten years. While this terminology is now widely used, no precise definition can be found in the literature. Conformal radiotherapy refers to an approach in which the dose distribution is more closely 'conformed' or adapted to the actual shape of the target volume. However, the achievement of a consensus on a more specific definition is hampered by various difficulties, namely in characterizing the degree of 'conformality'. We have therefore suggested a classification scheme be established on the basis of the tools and the procedures actually used for all steps of the process, i.e., from prescription to treatment completion. Our classification consists of four levels: schematically, at level 0, there is no conformation (rectangular fields); at level 1, a simple conformation takes place, on the basis of conventional 2D imaging; at level 2, a 3D reconstruction of the structures is used for a more accurate conformation; and level 3 includes research and advanced dynamic techniques. We have used our personal experience, contacts with colleagues and data from the literature to analyze all the steps of the planning process, and to define the tools and procedures relevant to a given level. The corresponding tables have been discussed and approved at the European level within the Dynarad concerted action. It is proposed that the term 'conformal radiotherapy' be restricted to procedures where all steps are at least at level 2.

  3. Quality, compatibility, and synergy analyses of global aerosol products derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Li, Zhanqing

    2005-05-01

    A number of global aerosol products of varying quality, strengths, and weaknesses have been generated. Presented here are synthetic analyses with regard to the quality, compatibility, and synergy of two long-term global (1983-2000) aerosol products derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Four essential aerosol parameters, namely, aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from AVHRR under the Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP), TOMS AOT, Ångström exponent (AE) from AVHRR, and TOMS aerosol index (AI) are analyzed together with various ancillary data sets on meteorological fields, ocean color, and ground-based AOT measurements. While the two satellite products reveal some common features, significant discrepancies exist. Reflectances measured at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths from the two sensors are incompatible in terms of the magnitude of AE computed from AOT derived from the two channels. The spatial distributions of the aerosol products from AVHRR and TOMS are complimentary in revealing different aspects of aerosol characteristics. In-depth analyses were carried out over several regions under the influence of different types of aerosols such as biomass burning, dust, sea salt, air pollution, and their mixtures. A classification algorithm was developed to identify dominant types of aerosols around the globe using aerosol products from the two instruments. Aerosol type information is used to develop and apply relationships between the AVHRR AOT and the TOMS AOT. The latter was used to extend the AOT at 0.55 μm over land around the globe. Comparisons of monthly mean AOTs with AERONET monthly mean AOTs showed a general agreement to within an estimated error range of ±0.08 ± 0.20τ. Finally, a comparison between the estimated AOT with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOT over land showed good agreement in terms of magnitude and seasonality, suggesting a means of

  4. HadISD: a quality-controlled global synoptic report database for selected variables at long-term stations from 1973-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, R. J. H.; Willett, K. M.; Thorne, P. W.; Woolley, E. V.; Durre, I.; Dai, A.; Parker, D. E.; Vose, R. S.

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes the creation of HadISD: an automatically quality-controlled synoptic resolution dataset of temperature, dewpoint temperature, sea-level pressure, wind speed, wind direction and cloud cover from global weather stations for 1973-2011. The full dataset consists of over 6000 stations, with 3427 long-term stations deemed to have sufficient sampling and quality for climate applications requiring sub-daily resolution. As with other surface datasets, coverage is heavily skewed towards Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes. The dataset is constructed from a large pre-existing ASCII flatfile data bank that represents over a decade of substantial effort at data retrieval, reformatting and provision. These raw data have had varying levels of quality control applied to them by individual data providers. The work proceeded in several steps: merging stations with multiple reporting identifiers; reformatting to netCDF; quality control; and then filtering to form a final dataset. Particular attention has been paid to maintaining true extreme values where possible within an automated, objective process. Detailed validation has been performed on a subset of global stations and also on UK data using known extreme events to help finalise the QC tests. Further validation was performed on a selection of extreme events world-wide (Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the cold snap in Alaska in 1989 and heat waves in SE Australia in 2009). Some very initial analyses are performed to illustrate some of the types of problems to which the final data could be applied. Although the filtering has removed the poorest station records, no attempt has been made to homogenise the data thus far, due to the complexity of retaining the true distribution of high-resolution data when applying adjustments. Hence non-climatic, time-varying errors may still exist in many of the individual station records and care is needed in inferring long-term trends from these data. This dataset will allow the

  5. Comparison of Visuospatial and Verbal Abilities in First Psychotic Episode of Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder: Impact on Global Functioning and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Mabel; Spaniel, Filip; Konradova, Lucie; Sedlakova, Katerina; Dvorska, Karolina; Prajsova, Jitka; Kratochvilova, Zuzana; Levcik, David; Vlcek, Kamil; Fajnerova, Iveta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Deficit in visuospatial functions can influence both simple and complex daily life activities. Despite the fact that visuospatial deficit was reported in schizophrenia, research on visuospatial functions as an independent entity is limited. Our study aims to elucidate the impact of visuospatial deficit in comparison with verbal deficit on global functioning and quality of life in the first psychotic episode of schizophrenia spectrum disorder (FES). The significance of clinical symptoms and antipsychotic medication was also studied. Methods: Thirty-six FES patients and a matched group of healthy controls (HC group) were assessed with a neuropsychological battery focused on visuospatial (VIS) and verbal (VERB) functions. Using multiple regression analysis, we evaluated the cumulative effect of VERB and VIS functions, psychiatric symptoms (PANSS) and antipsychotic medication on global functioning (GAF) and quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) in the FES group. Results: The FES group demonstrated significant impairment both in VIS and VERB cognitive abilities compared to the HC group. Antipsychotic medication did not significantly affect either VIS or VERB functioning. PANSS was not related to cognitive functioning, apart from the Trail Making Test B. In the FES group, the GAF score was significantly affected by the severity of positive symptoms and VERB functioning, explaining together 60% of GAF variability. The severity of negative and positive symptoms affected only the Physical health domain of WHOQOL-BREF. The degree of VERB deficit was associated with both Physical and Psychological health. Although we did not find any relation between VIS functioning, GAF, and WHOQOL-BREF, a paradoxical finding emerged in the Environment quality domain, where a worse quality of the environment was associated with better VIS functioning. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the deficit in VIS functions is an integral part of cognitive deficit in schizophrenia spectrum

  6. Recursion relations for conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penedones, João; Trevisani, Emilio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-09-01

    In the context of conformal field theories in general space-time dimension, we find all the possible singularities of the conformal blocks as functions of the scaling dimension Δ of the exchanged operator. In particular, we argue, using representation theory of parabolic Verma modules, that in odd spacetime dimension the singularities are only simple poles. We discuss how to use this information to write recursion relations that determine the conformal blocks. We first recover the recursion relation introduced in [1] for conformal blocks of external scalar operators. We then generalize this recursion relation for the conformal blocks associated to the four point function of three scalar and one vector operator. Finally we specialize to the case in which the vector operator is a conserved current.

  7. The Principle of Maximum Conformality

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J; Giustino, Di; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    A key problem in making precise perturbative QCD predictions is the uncertainty in determining the renormalization scale of the running coupling {alpha}{sub s}({mu}{sup 2}). It is common practice to guess a physical scale {mu} = Q which is of order of a typical momentum transfer Q in the process, and then vary the scale over a range Q/2 and 2Q. This procedure is clearly problematic since the resulting fixed-order pQCD prediction will depend on the renormalization scheme, and it can even predict negative QCD cross sections at next-to-leading-order. Other heuristic methods to set the renormalization scale, such as the 'principle of minimal sensitivity', give unphysical results for jet physics, sum physics into the running coupling not associated with renormalization, and violate the transitivity property of the renormalization group. Such scale-setting methods also give incorrect results when applied to Abelian QED. Note that the factorization scale in QCD is introduced to match nonperturbative and perturbative aspects of the parton distributions in hadrons; it is present even in conformal theory and thus is a completely separate issue from renormalization scale setting. The PMC provides a consistent method for determining the renormalization scale in pQCD. The PMC scale-fixed prediction is independent of the choice of renormalization scheme, a key requirement of renormalization group invariance. The results avoid renormalon resummation and agree with QED scale-setting in the Abelian limit. The PMC global scale can be derived efficiently at NLO from basic properties of the PQCD cross section. The elimination of the renormalization scheme ambiguity using the PMC will not only increases the precision of QCD tests, but it will also increase the sensitivity of colliders to new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  8. Protein Conformational Switches: From Nature to Design

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jeung-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Protein conformational switches alter their shape upon receiving an input signal, such as ligand binding, chemical modification, or change in environment. The apparent simplicity of this transformation—which can be carried out by a molecule as small as a thousand atoms or so—belies its critical importance to the life of the cell as well as its capacity for engineering by humans. In the realm of molecular switches, proteins are unique because they are capable of performing a variety of biological functions. Switchable proteins are therefore of high interest to the fields of biology, bio-technology, and medicine. These molecules are beginning to be exploited as the core machinery behind a new generation of biosensors, functionally regulated enzymes, and “smart” biomaterials that react to their surroundings. As inspirations for these designs, researchers continue to analyze existing examples of allosteric proteins. Recent years have also witnessed the development of new methodologies for introducing conformational change into proteins that previously had none. Herein we review examples of both natural and engineered protein switches in the context of four basic modes of conformational change: rigid-body domain movement, limited structural rearrangement, global fold switching, and folding–unfolding. Our purpose is to highlight examples that can potentially serve as platforms for the design of custom switches. Accordingly, we focus on inducible conformational changes that are substantial enough to produce a functional response (e.g., in a second protein to which it is fused), yet are relatively simple, structurally well-characterized, and amenable to protein engineering efforts. PMID:22688954

  9. Downscaling a Global Climate Model to Simulate Climate Change Impacts on U.S. Regional and Urban Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trail, M.; Tsimpidi, A. P.; Liu, P.; Tsigaridis, K.; Hu, Y.; Nenes, A.; Russell, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change can exacerbate future regional air pollution events by making conditions more favorable to form high levels of ozone. In this study, we use spectral nudging with WRF to downscale NASA earth system GISS modelE2 results during the years 2006 to 2010 and 2048 to 2052 over the continental United States in order to compare the resulting meteorological fields from the air quality perspective during the four seasons of five-year historic and future climatological periods. GISS results are used as initial and boundary conditions by the WRF RCM to produce hourly meteorological fields. The downscaling technique and choice of physics parameterizations used are evaluated by comparing them with in situ observations. This study investigates changes of similar regional climate conditions down to a 12km by 12km resolution, as well as the effect of evolving climate conditions on the air quality at major U.S. cities. The high resolution simulations produce somewhat different results than the coarse resolution simulations in some regions. Also, through the analysis of the meteorological variables that most strongly influence air quality, we find consistent changes in regional climate that would enhance ozone levels in four regions of the U.S. during fall (Western U.S., Texas, Northeastern, and Southeastern U.S), one region during summer (Texas), and one region where changes potentially would lead to better air quality during spring (Northeast). We also find that daily peak temperatures tend to increase in most major cities in the U.S. which would increase the risk of health problems associated with heat stress. Future work will address a more comprehensive assessment of emissions and chemistry involved in the formation and removal of air pollutants.

  10. Conformal Fermi Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Liang; Pajer, Enrico; Schmidt, Fabian E-mail: Enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2015-11-01

    Fermi Normal Coordinates (FNC) are a useful frame for isolating the locally observable, physical effects of a long-wavelength spacetime perturbation. Their cosmological application, however, is hampered by the fact that they are only valid on scales much smaller than the horizon. We introduce a generalization that we call Conformal Fermi Coordinates (CFC). CFC preserve all the advantages of FNC, but in addition are valid outside the horizon. They allow us to calculate the coupling of long- and short-wavelength modes on all scales larger than the sound horizon of the cosmological fluid, starting from the epoch of inflation until today, by removing the complications of the second order Einstein equations to a large extent, and eliminating all gauge ambiguities. As an application, we present a calculation of the effect of long-wavelength tensor modes on small scale density fluctuations. We recover previous results, but clarify the physical content of the individual contributions in terms of locally measurable effects and ''projection'' terms.

  11. Dynamics of protein conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Maria

    2010-10-01

    A novel theoretical methodology is introduced to identify dynamic structural domains and analyze local flexibility in proteins. The methodology employs a multiscale approach combining identification of essential collective coordinates based on the covariance analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories, construction of the Mori projection operator with these essential coordinates, and analysis of the corresponding generalized Langevin equations [M.Stepanova, Phys.Rev.E 76(2007)051918]. Because the approach employs a rigorous theory, the outcomes are physically transparent: the dynamic domains are associated with regions of relative rigidity in the protein, whereas off-domain regions are relatively soft. This also allows scoring the flexibility in the macromolecule with atomic-level resolution [N.Blinov, M.Berjanskii, D.S.Wishart, and M.Stepanova, Biochemistry, 48(2009)1488]. The applications include the domain coarse-graining and characterization of conformational stability in protein G and prion proteins. The results are compared with published NMR experiments. Potential applications for structural biology, bioinformatics, and drug design are discussed.

  12. Access and Quality of HIV-Related Point-of-Care Diagnostic Testing in Global Health Programs.

    PubMed

    Fonjungo, Peter N; Boeras, Debrah I; Zeh, Clement; Alexander, Heather; Parekh, Bharat S; Nkengasong, John N

    2016-02-01

    Access to point-of-care testing (POCT) improves patient care, especially in resource-limited settings where laboratory infrastructure is poor and the bulk of the population lives in rural settings. However, because of challenges in rolling out the technology and weak quality assurance measures, the promise of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related POCT in resource-limited settings has not been fully exploited to improve patient care and impact public health. Because of these challenges, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), in partnership with other organizations, recently launched the Diagnostics Access Initiative. Expanding HIV programs, including the "test and treat" strategies and the newly established UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets, will require increased access to reliable and accurate POCT results. In this review, we examine various components that could improve access and uptake of quality-assured POC tests to ensure coverage and public health impact. These components include evaluation, policy, regulation, and innovative approaches to strengthen the quality of POCT. PMID:26423384

  13. Conformational requirements for glycoprotein reglucosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, E S; Helenius, A

    2000-03-20

    Newly synthesized glycoproteins interact during folding and quality control in the ER with calnexin and calreticulin, two lectins specific for monoglucosylated oligosaccharides. Binding and release are regulated by two enzymes, glucosidase II and UDP-Glc:glycoprotein:glycosyltransferase (GT), which cyclically remove and reattach the essential glucose residues on the N-linked oligosaccharides. GT acts as a folding sensor in the cycle, selectively reglucosylating incompletely folded glycoproteins and promoting binding of its substrates to the lectins. To investigate how nonnative protein conformations are recognized and directed to this unique chaperone system, we analyzed the interaction of GT with a series of model substrates with well defined conformations derived from RNaseB. We found that conformations with slight perturbations were not reglucosylated by GT. In contrast, a partially structured nonnative form was efficiently recognized by the enzyme. When this form was converted back to a nativelike state, concomitant loss of recognition by GT occurred, reproducing the reglucosylation conditions observed in vivo with isolated components. Moreover, fully unfolded conformers were poorly recognized. The results indicated that GT is able to distinguish between different nonnative conformations with a distinct preference for partially structured conformers. The findings suggest that discrete populations of nonnative conformations are selectively reglucosylated to participate in the calnexin/calreticulin chaperone pathway. PMID:10725325

  14. Remote conformational control of a molecular switch via methylation and deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Knipe, Peter C; Jones, Ian M; Thompson, Sam; Hamilton, Andrew D

    2014-12-14

    Exacting control over conformation in response to an external stimulus is the central focus of molecular switching. Here we describe the synthesis of a series of diphenylacetylene-based molecular switches, and examine their response to covalent modification and deprotonation at remote phenolic positions. A complex interplay between multiple intramolecular hydrogen bond donors and acceptors determines the global conformation.

  15. Leisure as a context for active living, recovery, health and life quality for persons with mental illness in a global context

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Coyle, Catherine P.; Shank, John W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Globally, the mental health system is being transformed into a strengths-based, recovery-oriented system of care, to which the concept of active living is central. Based on an integrative review of the literature, this paper presents a heuristic conceptual framework of the potential contribution that enjoyable and meaningful leisure experiences can have in active living, recovery, health and life quality among persons with mental illness. This framework is holistic and reflects the humanistic approach to mental illness endorsed by the United Nations and the World Health Organization. It also includes ecological factors such as health care systems and environmental factors as well as cultural influences that can facilitate and/or hamper recovery, active living and health/life quality. Unique to this framework is our conceptualization of active living from a broad-based and meaning-oriented perspective rather than the traditional, narrower conceptualization which focuses on physical activity and exercise. Conceptualizing active living in this manner suggests a unique and culturally sensitive potential for leisure experiences to contribute to recovery, health and life quality. In particular, this paper highlights the potential of leisure engagements as a positive, strengths-based and potentially cost-effective means for helping people better deal with the challenges of living with mental illness. PMID:20543204

  16. Conformal refinement of unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Garmella, Rao

    2009-01-01

    We present a multilevel adaptive refinement technique for unstructured quadrilateral meshes in which the mesh is kept conformal at all times. This means that the refined mesh, like the original, is formed of only quadrilateral elements that intersect strictly along edges or at vertices, i.e., vertices of one quadrilateral element do not lie in an edge of another quadrilateral. Elements are refined using templates based on 1:3 refinement of edges. We demonstrate that by careful design of the refinement and coarsening strategy, we can maintain high quality elements in the refined mesh. We demonstrate the method on a number of examples with dynamically changing refinement regions.

  17. Exploring synergies between climate and air quality policies using long-term global and regional emission scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braspenning Radu, Olivia; van den Berg, Maarten; Klimont, Zbigniew; Deetman, Sebastiaan; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Muntean, Marilena; Heyes, Chris; Dentener, Frank; van Vuuren, Detlef P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present ten scenarios developed using the IMAGE2.4 framework (Integrated Model to Assess the Global Environment) to explore how different assumptions on future climate and air pollution policies influence emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants. These scenarios describe emission developments in 26 world regions for the 21st century, using a matrix of climate and air pollution policies. For climate policy, the study uses a baseline resulting in forcing levels slightly above RCP6.0 and an ambitious climate policy scenario similar to RCP2.6. For air pollution, the study explores increasingly tight emission standards, ranging from no improvement, current legislation and three variants assuming further improvements. For all pollutants, the results show that more stringent control policies are needed after 2030 to prevent a rise in emissions due to increased activities and further reduce emissions. The results also show that climate mitigation policies have the highest impact on SO2 and NOX emissions, while their impact on BC and OC emissions is relatively low, determined by the overlap between greenhouse gas and air pollutant emission sources. Climate policy can have important co-benefits; a 10% decrease in global CO2 emissions by 2100 leads to a decrease of SO2 and NOX emissions by about 10% and 5%, respectively compared to 2005 levels. In most regions, low levels of air pollutant emissions can also be achieved by solely implementing stringent air pollution policies. The largest differences across the scenarios are found in Asia and other developing regions, where a combination of climate and air pollution policy is needed to bring air pollution levels below those of today.

  18. Towards conformal loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H-T Wang, Charles

    2006-03-01

    A discussion is given of recent developments in canonical gravity that assimilates the conformal analysis of gravitational degrees of freedom. The work is motivated by the problem of time in quantum gravity and is carried out at the metric and the triad levels. At the metric level, it is shown that by extending the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) phase space of general relativity (GR), a conformal form of geometrodynamics can be constructed. In addition to the Hamiltonian and Diffeomorphism constraints, an extra first class constraint is introduced to generate conformal transformations. This phase space consists of York's mean extrinsic curvature time, conformal three-metric and their momenta. At the triad level, the phase space of GR is further enlarged by incorporating spin-gauge as well as conformal symmetries. This leads to a canonical formulation of GR using a new set of real spin connection variables. The resulting gravitational constraints are first class, consisting of the Hamiltonian constraint and the canonical generators for spin-gauge and conformorphism transformations. The formulation has a remarkable feature of being parameter-free. Indeed, it is shown that a conformal parameter of the Barbero-Immirzi type can be absorbed by the conformal symmetry of the extended phase space. This gives rise to an alternative approach to loop quantum gravity that addresses both the conceptual problem of time and the technical problem of functional calculus in quantum gravity.

  19. AirNow Information Management System - Global Earth Observation System of Systems Data Processor for Real-Time Air Quality Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haderman, M.; Dye, T. S.; White, J. E.; Dickerson, P.; Pasch, A. N.; Miller, D. S.; Chan, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    Built upon the success of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) AirNow program (www.AirNow.gov), the AirNow-International (AirNow-I) system contains an enhanced suite of software programs that process and quality control real-time air quality and environmental data and distribute customized maps, files, and data feeds. The goals of the AirNow-I program are similar to those of the successful U.S. program and include fostering the exchange of environmental data; making advances in air quality knowledge and applications; and building a community of people, organizations, and decision makers in environmental management. In 2010, Shanghai became the first city in China to run this state-of-the-art air quality data management and notification system. AirNow-I consists of a suite of modules (software programs and schedulers) centered on a database. One such module is the Information Management System (IMS), which can automatically produce maps and other data products through the use of GIS software to provide the most current air quality information to the public. Developed with Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) interoperability in mind, IMS is based on non-proprietary standards, with preference to formal international standards. The system depends on data and information providers accepting and implementing a set of interoperability arrangements, including technical specifications for collecting, processing, storing, and disseminating shared data, metadata, and products. In particular, the specifications include standards for service-oriented architecture and web-based interfaces, such as a web mapping service (WMS), web coverage service (WCS), web feature service (WFS), sensor web services, and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds. IMS is flexible, open, redundant, and modular. It also allows the merging of data grids to create complex grids that show comprehensive air quality conditions. For example, the AirNow Satellite Data Processor

  20. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  1. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2002-02-28

    This technical progress report describes work performed from June 20 through December 19, 2001, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels''. Interest has increased in some new polymeric products that purport to substantially reduce permeability to water while causing minimum permeability reduction to oil. In view of this interest, we are currently studying BJ's Aqua Con. Results from six corefloods revealed that the Aqua Con gelant consistently reduced permeability to water more than that to oil. However, the magnitude of the disproportionate permeability reduction varied significantly for the various experiments. Thus, as with most materials tested to date, the issue of reproducibility and control of the disproportionate permeability remains to be resolved. Concern exists about the ability of gels to resist washout after placement in fractures. We examined whether a width constriction in the middle of a fracture would cause different gel washout behavior upstream versus downstream of the constriction. Tests were performed using a formed Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel in a 48-in.-long fracture with three sections of equal length, but with widths of 0.08-, 0.02-, and 0.08-in., respectively. The pressure gradients during gel extrusion (i.e., placement) were similar in the two 0.08-in.-wide fracture sections, even though they were separated by a 0.02-in.-wide fracture section. The constriction associated with the middle fracture section may have inhibited gel washout during the first pulse of brine injection after gel placement. However, during subsequent phases of brine injection, the constriction did not inhibit washout in the upstream fracture section any more than in the downstream section.

  2. HadISD: a quality controlled global synoptic report database for selected variables at long-term stations from 1973-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, R. J. H.; Willett, K. M.; Thorne, P. W.; Woolley, E. V.; Durre, I.; Dai, A.; Parker, D. E.; Vose, R. S.

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes the creation of HadISD; an automatically quality-controlled synoptic resolution dataset of temperature, dewpoint temperature, sea-level pressure, wind speed, wind direction and cloud cover from global weather stations for 1973-2010. The full dataset consists of over 6000 stations, with 3375 long-term stations deemed to have sufficient sampling and quality for climate applications requiring sub-daily resolution. As with other surface datasets, coverage is heavily skewed towards Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes. The dataset is constructed from a large pre-existing ASCII flatfile data bank that represents over a decade of substantial effort at data retrieval, reformatting and provision. The work proceeded in several steps: merging stations with multiple reporting identifiers; reformatting to netcdf; quality control; and then filtering to form a final dataset. Particular attention has been paid to maintaining true extreme values where possible within an automated objective process. Detailed validation has been performed on a subset of global stations and also on UK data using known extreme events to help finalise the QC tests. Further validation was performed on a selection of extreme events world-wide (Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the cold snap in Alaska in 1989 and heat waves in SE Australia in 2009). Some very initial analyses are performed to illustrate some of the types of problems to which the final data could be applied. Although the filtering has removed the poorest station records, no attempt has been made to homogenise the data thus far, due to the complexity of retaining the true distribution of high-resolution data when applying adjustments. Hence non-climatic, time-varying errors may still exist in many of the individual station records and care is needed in inferring long-term trends from these data. This dataset will allow the study of high frequency variations of temperature, pressure and humidity on a global basis over the last four

  3. Conformational dynamics of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I during catalysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cuiling; Maxwell, Brian A; Suo, Zucai

    2014-08-12

    Despite the fact that DNA polymerases have been investigated for many years and are commonly used as tools in a number of molecular biology assays, many details of the kinetic mechanism they use to catalyze DNA synthesis remain unclear. Structural and kinetic studies have characterized a rapid, pre-catalytic open-to-close conformational change of the Finger domain during nucleotide binding for many DNA polymerases including Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I (Taq Pol), a thermostable enzyme commonly used for DNA amplification in PCR. However, little has been performed to characterize the motions of other structural domains of Taq Pol or any other DNA polymerase during catalysis. Here, we used stopped-flow Förster resonance energy transfer to investigate the conformational dynamics of all five structural domains of the full-length Taq Pol relative to the DNA substrate during nucleotide binding and incorporation. Our study provides evidence for a rapid conformational change step induced by dNTP binding and a subsequent global conformational transition involving all domains of Taq Pol during catalysis. Additionally, our study shows that the rate of the global transition was greatly increased with the truncated form of Taq Pol lacking the N-terminal domain. Finally, we utilized a mutant of Taq Pol containing a de novo disulfide bond to demonstrate that limiting protein conformational flexibility greatly reduced the polymerization activity of Taq Pol. PMID:24931550

  4. Hierarchical Biomolecular Dynamics: Picosecond Hydrogen Bonding Regulates Microsecond Conformational Transitions.

    PubMed

    Buchenberg, Sebastian; Schaudinnus, Norbert; Stock, Gerhard

    2015-03-10

    Biomolecules exhibit structural dynamics on a number of time scales, including picosecond (ps) motions of a few atoms, nanosecond (ns) local conformational transitions, and microsecond (μs) global conformational rearrangements. Despite this substantial separation of time scales, fast and slow degrees of freedom appear to be coupled in a nonlinear manner; for example, there is theoretical and experimental evidence that fast structural fluctuations are required for slow functional motion to happen. To elucidate a microscopic mechanism of this multiscale behavior, Aib peptide is adopted as a simple model system. Combining extensive molecular dynamics simulations with principal component analysis techniques, a hierarchy of (at least) three tiers of the molecule's free energy landscape is discovered. They correspond to chiral left- to right-handed transitions of the entire peptide that happen on a μs time scale, conformational transitions of individual residues that take about 1 ns, and the opening and closing of structure-stabilizing hydrogen bonds that occur within tens of ps and are triggered by sub-ps structural fluctuations. Providing a simple mechanism of hierarchical dynamics, fast hydrogen bond dynamics is found to be a prerequisite for the ns local conformational transitions, which in turn are a prerequisite for the slow global conformational rearrangement of the peptide. As a consequence of the hierarchical coupling, the various processes exhibit a similar temperature behavior which may be interpreted as a dynamic transition. PMID:26579778

  5. Conformational Landscape of Nicotinoids: Solving the "conformational - Rity" of Anabasine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Evangelisti, Luca; Suenram, Richard D.; Caminati, Walther; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2010-06-01

    The conformational landscape of the alkaloid anabasine (neonicotine) has been investigated using rotational spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The results allow a detailed comparison of the structural properties of the prototype piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nicotinoids (anabasine vs. nicotine). Anabasine adopts two most stable conformations in isolation conditions, for which we determined accurate rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling parameters. The preferred conformations are characterized by an equatorial pyridine moiety and additional N-H equatorial stereochemistry at the piperidine ring (Eq-Eq). The two rings of anabasine are close to a bisecting arrangement, with the observed conformations differing in a ca. 180° rotation of the pyridine subunit, denoted either Syn or Anti. The preference of anabasine for the Eq-Eq-Syn conformation has been established by relative intensity measurements (Syn/Anti˜5(2)). The conformational preferences of free anabasine are directed by a N\\cdot\\cdot\\cdotH-C weak hydrogen bond interaction between the nitrogen lone pair at piperidine and the closest hydrogen bond in pyridine, with N\\cdot\\cdot\\cdotN distances ranging from 4.750 Å (Syn) to 4.233 Å (Anti). R. J. Lavrich, R. D. Suenram, D. F. Plusquellic and S. Davis, 58^th OSU Int. Symp. on Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2003, Comm. RH13.

  6. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  7. Use of North American and European air quality networks to evaluate global chemistry-climate modeling of surface ozone

    DOE PAGES

    Schnell, J. L.; Prather, M. J.; Josse, B.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Bergmann, D.; Zeng, G.; Plummer, D. A.; Sudo, K.; et al

    2015-04-16

    We test the current generation of global chemistry-climate models in their ability to simulate observed, present-day surface ozone. Models are evaluated against hourly surface ozone from 4217 stations in North America and Europe that are averaged over 1° × 1° grid cells, allowing commensurate model-measurement comparison. Models are generally biased high during all hours of the day and in all regions. Most models simulate the shape of regional summertime diurnal and annual cycles well, correctly matching the timing of hourly (~ 15:00) and monthly (mid-June) peak surface ozone abundance. The amplitude of these cycles is less successfully matched. The observedmore » summertime diurnal range (~ 25 ppb) is underestimated in all regions by about 7 ppb, and the observed seasonal range (~ 21 ppb) is underestimated by about 5 ppb except in the most polluted regions where it is overestimated by about 5 ppb. The models generally match the pattern of the observed summertime ozone enhancement, but they overestimate its magnitude in most regions. Most models capture the observed distribution of extreme episode sizes, correctly showing that about 80% of individual extreme events occur in large-scale, multi-day episodes of more than 100 grid cells. The observed linear relationship showing increases in ozone by up to 6 ppb for larger-sized episodes is also matched.« less

  8. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate, (3) using partially formed gels, (4

  9. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-03-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from September 1, 2003, through February 29, 2004, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' We examined the properties of several ''partially formed'' gels that were formulated with a combination of high and low molecular weight HPAM polymers. After placement in 4-mm-wide fractures, these gels required about 25 psi/ft for brine to breach the gel (the best performance to date in fractures this wide). After this breach, stabilized residual resistance factors decreased significantly with increased flow rate. Also, residual resistance factors were up to 9 times greater for water than for oil. Nevertheless, permeability reduction factors were substantial for both water and oil flow. Gel with 2.5% chopped fiberglass effectively plugged 4-mm-wide fractures if a 0.5-mm-wide constriction was present. The ability to screen-out at a constriction appears crucial for particulate incorporation to be useful in plugging fractures. In addition to fiberglass, we examined incorporation of polypropylene fibers into gels. Once dispersed in brine or gelant, the polypropylene fibers exhibited the least gravity segregation of any particulate that we have tested to date. In fractures with widths of at least 2 mm, 24-hr-old gels (0.5% high molecular weight HPAM) with 0.5% fiber did not exhibit progressive plugging during placement and showed extrusion pressure gradients similar to those of gels without the fiber. The presence of the fiber roughly doubled the gel's resistance to first breach by brine flow. The breaching pressure gradients were not as large as for gels made with high and low molecular weight polymers (mentioned above). However, their material requirements and costs (i.e., polymer and/or particulate concentrations) were substantially lower than for those gels. A partially formed gel made with 0.5% HPAM did not enter a 0.052-mm-wide fracture when applying a pressure gradient of 65 psi/ft. This result

  10. Radial coordinates for conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogervorst, Matthijs; Rychkov, Slava

    2013-05-01

    We develop the theory of conformal blocks in CFTd expressing them as power series with Gegenbauer polynomial coefficients. Such series have a clear physical meaning when the conformal block is analyzed in radial quantization: individual terms describe contributions of descendants of a given spin. Convergence of these series can be optimized by a judicious choice of the radial quantization origin. We argue that the best choice is to insert the operators symmetrically. We analyze in detail the resulting “ρ-series” and show that it converges much more rapidly than for the commonly used variable z. We discuss how these conformal block representations can be used in the conformal bootstrap. In particular, we use them to derive analytically some bootstrap bounds whose existence was previously found numerically.

  11. Conformal mapping of rectangular heptagons

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatyrev, Andrei B

    2012-12-31

    A new effective approach to calculating the direct and inverse conformal mapping of rectangular polygons onto a half-plane is put forward; it is based on the use of Riemann theta functions. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  12. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE PAGES

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore » does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  13. Opinions on Fresh Produce Food Safety and Quality Standards by Fresh Produce Supply Chain Experts from the Global South and North.

    PubMed

    Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Van Boxstael, Sigrid; Nanyunja, Jessica; Jordaan, Danie; Luning, Pieternel; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-10-01

    This study describes the results of an on-line survey of fresh produce supply chain experts who work with producers from the Global North (n = 41, 20 countries) and the Global South (n = 63, 29 countries). They expressed their opinion using 1 to 5 Likert scales on several items related to four types of food safety and quality standards and legislation: Codex Alimentarius standards, European Union legislation, national legislation, and private standards. The results reflect the different circumstances under which the Southern and Northern producers operate in relation to the local organization, regulation, and support of the sector; but they also indicate similar challenges, in particular, the challenge of private standards, which were perceived to demand a higher implementation effort than the other three types of standards. Private standards were also strongly perceived to exclude Southern and Northern small- and medium-scale producers from high-value markets, whereas European Union legislation was perceived to strongly exclude, in particular, small- and medium-scale Southern producers. The results further highlight concerns about costly control measures and third-party certification that are required by downstream buyers but that are mostly paid for by upstream suppliers. Food standards are seen in their dual role as a catalyst for implementation of structured food safety management systems on the one hand and as a nontariff barrier to trade on the other hand. The results of the survey also pointed up the advantages of enforcing food safety and food quality standards in terms of knowledge spillover to noncertified activities, increased revenues, and improved food safety of delivered produce. Survey results highlight the importance of technical assistance and support of producers by governments and producer cooperatives or trade associations in the implementation and certification of food standards, along with increased awareness of and training of individuals in

  14. Opinions on Fresh Produce Food Safety and Quality Standards by Fresh Produce Supply Chain Experts from the Global South and North.

    PubMed

    Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Van Boxstael, Sigrid; Nanyunja, Jessica; Jordaan, Danie; Luning, Pieternel; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-10-01

    This study describes the results of an on-line survey of fresh produce supply chain experts who work with producers from the Global North (n = 41, 20 countries) and the Global South (n = 63, 29 countries). They expressed their opinion using 1 to 5 Likert scales on several items related to four types of food safety and quality standards and legislation: Codex Alimentarius standards, European Union legislation, national legislation, and private standards. The results reflect the different circumstances under which the Southern and Northern producers operate in relation to the local organization, regulation, and support of the sector; but they also indicate similar challenges, in particular, the challenge of private standards, which were perceived to demand a higher implementation effort than the other three types of standards. Private standards were also strongly perceived to exclude Southern and Northern small- and medium-scale producers from high-value markets, whereas European Union legislation was perceived to strongly exclude, in particular, small- and medium-scale Southern producers. The results further highlight concerns about costly control measures and third-party certification that are required by downstream buyers but that are mostly paid for by upstream suppliers. Food standards are seen in their dual role as a catalyst for implementation of structured food safety management systems on the one hand and as a nontariff barrier to trade on the other hand. The results of the survey also pointed up the advantages of enforcing food safety and food quality standards in terms of knowledge spillover to noncertified activities, increased revenues, and improved food safety of delivered produce. Survey results highlight the importance of technical assistance and support of producers by governments and producer cooperatives or trade associations in the implementation and certification of food standards, along with increased awareness of and training of individuals in

  15. Quality and compatibility analyses of global aerosol products derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Li, Zhanqing; Chu, D. Allen; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2005-05-01

    There exist numerous global aerosol products derived from various satellite sensors, but little insight has been gained about their compatibility and quality. This study presents a comparison of two prominent global aerosol products derived over oceans from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) under the Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP) (Mishchenko et al., 1999) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (Tanré et al., 1997). The comparisons are for monthly mean aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and Ångström exponent (α) at a spatial resolution of 1 × 1 degree. The two monthly AOT products showed substantial discrepancies, with a tendency of higher values from MODIS than from GACP/AVHRR, especially near the coasts of major aerosol outbreak regions. Individual monthly AOT values have poor correlation, but their regional means are moderately correlated (correlation coefficient 0.5 < R < 1.0). While cloud screening has often been argued to be a major factor explaining large discrepancies, this study shows that differences in aerosol models in the two retrieval algorithms can lead to large discrepancies. Contributions of the size distribution are more significant than the refractive index. The noisiness of the GACP/AVHRR aerosol retrievals seem to be partially influenced by radiometric uncertainties in the AVHRR system, but it is unlikely a major factor to explain the observed systematic discrepancies between the MODIS and GACP/AVHRR AOTs. For α, correlations between MODIS and GACP/AVHRR are lower (0.2 < R < 0.7) than AOT. The MODIS α shows a well-behaved dependence on the AOT contingent upon the aerosol type, while the GACP/AVHRR α has little correlation with the AOT. The high sensitivity in the selection of aerosol models to radiometric errors may be a primary reason for the worse comparison of α. Part of the discrepancies in α is attributed to different aerosol size distributions.

  16. Scale invariance vs conformal invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2015-03-01

    In this review article, we discuss the distinction and possible equivalence between scale invariance and conformal invariance in relativistic quantum field theories. Under some technical assumptions, we can prove that scale invariant quantum field theories in d = 2 space-time dimensions necessarily possess the enhanced conformal symmetry. The use of the conformal symmetry is well appreciated in the literature, but the fact that all the scale invariant phenomena in d = 2 space-time dimensions enjoy the conformal property relies on the deep structure of the renormalization group. The outstanding question is whether this feature is specific to d = 2 space-time dimensions or it holds in higher dimensions, too. As of January 2014, our consensus is that there is no known example of scale invariant but non-conformal field theories in d = 4 space-time dimensions under the assumptions of (1) unitarity, (2) Poincaré invariance (causality), (3) discrete spectrum in scaling dimensions, (4) existence of scale current and (5) unbroken scale invariance in the vacuum. We have a perturbative proof of the enhancement of conformal invariance from scale invariance based on the higher dimensional analogue of Zamolodchikov's c-theorem, but the non-perturbative proof is yet to come. As a reference we have tried to collect as many interesting examples of scale invariance in relativistic quantum field theories as possible in this article. We give a complementary holographic argument based on the energy-condition of the gravitational system and the space-time diffeomorphism in order to support the claim of the symmetry enhancement. We believe that the possible enhancement of conformal invariance from scale invariance reveals the sublime nature of the renormalization group and space-time with holography. This review is based on a lecture note on scale invariance vs conformal invariance, on which the author gave lectures at Taiwan Central University for the 5th Taiwan School on Strings and

  17. Use of North American and European air quality networks to evaluate global chemistry–climate modeling of surface ozone

    DOE PAGES

    Schnell, J. L.; Prather, M. J.; Josse, B.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Bergmann, D.; Zeng, G.; Plummer, D. A.; Sudo, K.; et al

    2015-09-25

    We test the current generation of global chemistry–climate models in their ability to simulate observed, present-day surface ozone. Models are evaluated against hourly surface ozone from 4217 stations in North America and Europe that are averaged over 1° × 1° grid cells, allowing commensurate model–measurement comparison. Models are generally biased high during all hours of the day and in all regions. Most models simulate the shape of regional summertime diurnal and annual cycles well, correctly matching the timing of hourly (~ 15:00 local time (LT)) and monthly (mid-June) peak surface ozone abundance. The amplitude of these cycles is less successfullymore » matched. The observed summertime diurnal range (~ 25 ppb) is underestimated in all regions by about 7 ppb, and the observed seasonal range (~ 21 ppb) is underestimated by about 5 ppb except in the most polluted regions, where it is overestimated by about 5 ppb. The models generally match the pattern of the observed summertime ozone enhancement, but they overestimate its magnitude in most regions. Most models capture the observed distribution of extreme episode sizes, correctly showing that about 80 % of individual extreme events occur in large-scale, multi-day episodes of more than 100 grid cells. The models also match the observed linear relationship between episode size and a measure of episode intensity, which shows increases in ozone abundance by up to 6 ppb for larger-sized episodes. We conclude that the skill of the models evaluated here provides confidence in their projections of future surface ozone.« less

  18. Use of North American and European Air Quality Networks to Evaluate Global Chemistry-Climate Modeling of Surface Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnell, J. L.; Prather, M. J.; Josse, B.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Bergmann, D.; Zeng, G.; Plummer, D. A.; Sudo, K.; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, D. T.; Faluvegi, G.; Strode, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    We test the current generation of global chemistry-climate models in their ability to simulate observed, present-day surface ozone. Models are evaluated against hourly surface ozone from 4217 stations in North America and Europe that are averaged over 1 degree by 1 degree grid cells, allowing commensurate model-measurement comparison. Models are generally biased high during all hours of the day and in all regions. Most models simulate the shape of regional summertime diurnal and annual cycles well, correctly matching the timing of hourly (approximately 15:00 local time (LT)) and monthly (mid-June) peak surface ozone abundance. The amplitude of these cycles is less successfully matched. The observed summertime diurnal range (25 ppb) is underestimated in all regions by about 7 parts per billion, and the observed seasonal range (approximately 21 parts per billion) is underestimated by about 5 parts per billion except in the most polluted regions, where it is overestimated by about 5 parts per billion. The models generally match the pattern of the observed summertime ozone enhancement, but they overestimate its magnitude in most regions. Most models capture the observed distribution of extreme episode sizes, correctly showing that about 80 percent of individual extreme events occur in large-scale, multi-day episodes of more than 100 grid cells. The models also match the observed linear relationship between episode size and a measure of episode intensity, which shows increases in ozone abundance by up to 6 parts per billion for larger-sized episodes. We conclude that the skill of the models evaluated here provides confidence in their projections of future surface ozone.

  19. 78 FR 19434 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ...; Transportation Conformity Regulations AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule... incorporate Federal revisions to transportation conformity requirements. In the Final Rules section of this... Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Transportation Conformity Regulations,'' that is located in...

  20. Introspection into institutional database allows for focused quality improvement plan in cardiac surgery: example for a new global healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Elizabeth; Postel, Mackenzie; Satou, Nancy; Shemin, Richard; Benharash, Peyman

    2013-10-01

    Reducing readmission rates is vital to improving quality of care and reducing healthcare costs. In accordance with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Medicare will cut payments to hospitals with high 30-day readmission rates. We retrospectively reviewed an institutional database to identify risk factors predisposing adult cardiac surgery patients to rehospitalization within 30 days of discharge. Of 2302 adult cardiac surgery patients within the study period from 2008 to 2011, a total of 218 patients (9.5%) were readmitted within 30 days. Factors found to be significant predictors of readmission were nonwhite race (P = 0.003), government health insurance (P = 0.02), ejection fraction less than 40 per cent (P = 0.001), chronic lung disease (P < 0.001), and hospital length of stay greater than 7 days (P = 0.02). Patients undergoing aortic and mitral valve operations had an increased risk of readmission compared with other cardiac operations (P < 0.001). The most common reasons for rehospitalization were pneumonia and other respiratory complications (n = 27 [12.4%]). Recognition of risk factors is crucial to reducing readmissions and improving patient care. Our data suggest that optimizing cardiopulmonary status in patients with comorbidities such as heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, increasing directed pneumonia prophylaxis, patient education tailored to specific patient social needs, earlier patient follow-up, and better communication between inpatient and outpatient physicians may reduce readmission rates. PMID:24160795

  1. Global Air Quality and Health Co-benefits of Mitigating Near-term Climate Change Through Methane and Black Carbon Emission Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anenberg, Susan C.; Schwartz, Joel; Shindell, Drew Todd; Amann, Markus; Faluvegi, Gregory S.; Klimont, Zbigniew; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Pozzoli, Luca; Dingenen, Rita Van; Vignati, Elisabetta; Emberson, Lisa; Muller, Nicholas Z.; West, J. Jason; Williams, Martin; Demkine, Volodymyr; Hicks, W. Kevin; Kuylenstierna, Johan; Raes, Frank; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    2012-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone and black carbon (BC), a component of fine particulate matter (PM < or = 2.5 microns in aerodynamic diameter; PM2.5), are associated with premature mortality and they disrupt global and regional climate. Objectives: We examined the air quality and health benefits of 14 specific emission control measures targeting BC and methane, an ozone precursor, that were selected because of their potential to reduce the rate of climate change over the next 20-40 years. Methods: We simulated the impacts of mitigation measures on outdoor concentrations of PM2.5 and ozone using two composition-climate models, and calculated associated changes in premature PM2.5- and ozone-related deaths using epidemiologically derived concentration-response functions. Results: We estimated that, for PM2.5 and ozone, respectively, fully implementing these measures could reduce global population-weighted average surface concentrations by 23-34% and 7-17% and avoid 0.6-4.4 and 0.04-0.52 million annual premature deaths globally in 2030. More than 80% of the health benefits are estimated to occur in Asia. We estimated that BC mitigation measures would achieve approximately 98% of the deaths that would be avoided if all BC and methane mitigation measures were implemented, due to reduced BC and associated reductions of nonmethane ozone precursor and organic carbon emissions as well as stronger mortality relationships for PM2.5 relative to ozone. Although subject to large uncertainty, these estimates and conclusions are not strongly dependent on assumptions for the concentration-response function. Conclusions: In addition to climate benefits, our findings indicate that the methane and BC emission control measures would have substantial co-benefits for air quality and public health worldwide, potentially reversing trends of increasing air pollution concentrations and mortality in Africa and South, West, and Central Asia. These projected benefits are independent of carbon dioxide

  2. Global Air Quality and Health Co-benefits of Mitigating Near-Term Climate Change through Methane and Black Carbon Emission Controls

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Joel; Shindell, Drew; Amann, Markus; Faluvegi, Greg; Klimont, Zbigniew; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Pozzoli, Luca; Van Dingenen, Rita; Vignati, Elisabetta; Emberson, Lisa; Muller, Nicholas Z.; West, J. Jason; Williams, Martin; Demkine, Volodymyr; Hicks, W. Kevin; Kuylenstierna, Johan; Raes, Frank; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tropospheric ozone and black carbon (BC), a component of fine particulate matter (PM ≤ 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter; PM2.5), are associated with premature mortality and they disrupt global and regional climate. Objectives: We examined the air quality and health benefits of 14 specific emission control measures targeting BC and methane, an ozone precursor, that were selected because of their potential to reduce the rate of climate change over the next 20–40 years. Methods: We simulated the impacts of mitigation measures on outdoor concentrations of PM2.5 and ozone using two composition-climate models, and calculated associated changes in premature PM2.5- and ozone-related deaths using epidemiologically derived concentration–response functions. Results: We estimated that, for PM2.5 and ozone, respectively, fully implementing these measures could reduce global population-weighted average surface concentrations by 23–34% and 7–17% and avoid 0.6–4.4 and 0.04–0.52 million annual premature deaths globally in 2030. More than 80% of the health benefits are estimated to occur in Asia. We estimated that BC mitigation measures would achieve approximately 98% of the deaths that would be avoided if all BC and methane mitigation measures were implemented, due to reduced BC and associated reductions of nonmethane ozone precursor and organic carbon emissions as well as stronger mortality relationships for PM2.5 relative to ozone. Although subject to large uncertainty, these estimates and conclusions are not strongly dependent on assumptions for the concentration–response function. Conclusions: In addition to climate benefits, our findings indicate that the methane and BC emission control measures would have substantial co-benefits for air quality and public health worldwide, potentially reversing trends of increasing air pollution concentrations and mortality in Africa and South, West, and Central Asia. These projected benefits are independent of

  3. Conformational preferences of 1,4,7-trithiacyclononane: a molecular mechanics and density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Jagannadh, Bulusu; Reddy, Surasani Sumathi; Thangavelu, Ramagounder P

    2004-02-01

    Conformational preferences of 1,4,7-trithiacyclononane were studied using a highly efficient sampling technique based on local nonstochastic deformations and the MM2(91) force field. The results show that conformers that the molecule adopts in the crystal state were found to be low-energy conformers (LECs) within 5 kcal mol(-1) of the global minimum. A conformation with C1 symmetry was the global minimum and the C3 and C2 conformations were calculated to be 0.03 and 1.78 kcal mol(-1) higher in energy, respectively. The structures were further minimized using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations with two different functionals. The C2 and the C1 conformations were found to be LECs with the C3 conformation more than 4.0 kcal mol(-1) above the global minimum. The relative energies and structural ordering obtained using the BP86 functional are in agreement with the previously reported relative energies calculated using second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2) ab initio calculations. With the energy ordering being dependent on the molecular mechanics force field used, the approach of MM-->DFT (searching exhaustively the available conformational space at the MM level followed by generating the energy ordering through DFT calculations) appears to be appropriate for thiacrown ethers.

  4. An overview of the SeaWiFS project and strategies for producing a climate research quality global ocean bio-optical time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Feldman, Gene C.; Hooker, Stanford B.

    2004-01-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Project Office was formally initiated at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in 1990. Seven years later, the sensor was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation under a data-buy contract to provide 5 years of science quality data for global ocean biogeochemistry research. To date, the SeaWiFS program has greatly exceeded the mission goals established over a decade ago in terms of data quality, data accessibility and usability, ocean community infrastructure development, cost efficiency, and community service. The SeaWiFS Project Office and its collaborators in the scientific community have made substantial contributions in the areas of satellite calibration, product validation, near-real time data access, field data collection, protocol development, in situ instrumentation technology, operational data system development, and desktop level-0 to level-3 processing software. One important aspect of the SeaWiFS program is the high level of science community cooperation and participation. This article summarizes the key activities and approaches the SeaWiFS Project Office pursued to define, achieve, and maintain the mission objectives. These achievements have enabled the user community to publish a large and growing volume of research such as those contributed to this special volume of Deep-Sea Research. Finally, some examples of major geophysical events (oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial) captured by SeaWiFS are presented to demonstrate the versatility of the sensor.

  5. Chiral scale and conformal invariance in 2D quantum field theory.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Diego M; Strominger, Andrew

    2011-10-14

    It is well known that a local, unitary Poincaré-invariant 2D quantum field theory with a global scaling symmetry and a discrete non-negative spectrum of scaling dimensions necessarily has both a left and a right local conformal symmetry. In this Letter, we consider a chiral situation beginning with only a left global scaling symmetry and do not assume Lorentz invariance. We find that a left conformal symmetry is still implied, while right translations are enhanced either to a right conformal symmetry or a left U(1) Kac-Moody symmetry.

  6. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... advance the project; or initiation of a supplemental environmental document for air quality purposes.... 93.104 Section 93.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Conformity to State or Federal Implementation Plans of Transportation Plans, Programs, and Projects...

  7. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... advance the project; or initiation of a supplemental environmental document for air quality purposes.... 93.104 Section 93.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Conformity to State or Federal Implementation Plans of Transportation Plans, Programs, and Projects...

  8. 48 CFR 246.504 - Certificate of conformance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certificate of conformance. 246.504 Section 246.504 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Acceptance 246.504 Certificate of...

  9. 21 CFR 26.69 - Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies. 26.69 Section 26.69 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN...

  10. 21 CFR 26.70 - Conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Conformity assessment bodies. 26.70 Section 26.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  11. 21 CFR 26.70 - Conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Conformity assessment bodies. 26.70 Section 26.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  12. 21 CFR 26.70 - Conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Conformity assessment bodies. 26.70 Section 26.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  13. 21 CFR 26.69 - Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies. 26.69 Section 26.69 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY...

  14. 21 CFR 26.69 - Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies. 26.69 Section 26.69 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY...

  15. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2003-09-01

    This report describes work performed during the second year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' The project has two objectives. The first objective is to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective is to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil. Pore-level images from X-ray computed microtomography were re-examined for Berea sandstone and porous polyethylene. This analysis suggests that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than a gel-ripping mechanism. This finding helps to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil. We analyzed a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel treatment in a production well in the Arbuckle formation. The availability of accurate pressure data before, during, and after the treatment was critical for the analysis. After the gel treatment, water productivity was fairly constant at about 20% of the pre-treatment value. However, oil productivity was stimulated by a factor of 18 immediately after the treatment. During the six months after the treatment, oil productivity gradually decreased to approach the pre-treatment value. To explain this behavior, we proposed that the fracture area open to oil flow was increased substantially by the gel treatment, followed by a gradual closing of the fractures during subsequent production. For a conventional Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel, the delay between gelant preparation and injection into a fracture impacts the placement, leakoff, and permeability reduction behavior. Formulations placed as partially formed gels showed relatively low pressure gradients during placement, and yet substantially reduced the flow capacity of

  16. Enthalpy Differences of the n-Pentane Conformers.

    PubMed

    Csontos, József; Nagy, Balázs; Gyevi-Nagy, László; Kállay, Mihály; Tasi, Gyula

    2016-06-14

    The energy and enthalpy differences of alkane conformers in various temperature ranges have been the subject for both experimental and theoretical studies over the last few decades. It was shown previously for the conformers of butane [G. Tasi et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 8, 479-486] that quantum chemical results can compete with spectroscopic techniques and results obtained even from the most carefully performed experiments could be biased due to the improper statistical model utilized to evaluate the raw experimental data. In the current study, on one hand, the experimental values and their uncertainties for the enthalpy differences for pentane conformers are re-evaluated using the appropriate statistical model. On the other hand, a coupled-cluster-based focal-point analysis has been performed to calculate energy and enthalpy differences for the conformers of pentane. The model chemistry defined in this study includes contributions up to the perturbative quadruple excitations augmented with further small correction terms beyond the Born-Oppenheimer and nonrelativistic approximations. Benchmark quality energy and enthalpy differences for the pentane conformers are given at temperatures 0 and 298.15 K as well as for the various temperature ranges used in the gas-phase experimental measurements. Furthermore, a slight positive shift for the experimental enthalpy differences is also predicted due to an additional Raman active band belonging to the gauche-gauche conformer.

  17. Enthalpy Differences of the n-Pentane Conformers.

    PubMed

    Csontos, József; Nagy, Balázs; Gyevi-Nagy, László; Kállay, Mihály; Tasi, Gyula

    2016-06-14

    The energy and enthalpy differences of alkane conformers in various temperature ranges have been the subject for both experimental and theoretical studies over the last few decades. It was shown previously for the conformers of butane [G. Tasi et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 8, 479-486] that quantum chemical results can compete with spectroscopic techniques and results obtained even from the most carefully performed experiments could be biased due to the improper statistical model utilized to evaluate the raw experimental data. In the current study, on one hand, the experimental values and their uncertainties for the enthalpy differences for pentane conformers are re-evaluated using the appropriate statistical model. On the other hand, a coupled-cluster-based focal-point analysis has been performed to calculate energy and enthalpy differences for the conformers of pentane. The model chemistry defined in this study includes contributions up to the perturbative quadruple excitations augmented with further small correction terms beyond the Born-Oppenheimer and nonrelativistic approximations. Benchmark quality energy and enthalpy differences for the pentane conformers are given at temperatures 0 and 298.15 K as well as for the various temperature ranges used in the gas-phase experimental measurements. Furthermore, a slight positive shift for the experimental enthalpy differences is also predicted due to an additional Raman active band belonging to the gauche-gauche conformer. PMID:27096811

  18. To conform or not to conform: spontaneous conformity diminishes the sensitivity to monetary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongjun; Sun, Sai

    2013-01-01

    When people have different opinions in a group, they often adjust their own attitudes and behaviors to match the group opinion, known as social conformity. The affiliation account of normative conformity states that people conform to norms in order to 'fit in', whereas the accuracy account of informative conformity posits that the motive to learn from others produces herding. Here, we test another possibility that following the crowd reduces the experienced negative emotion when the group decision turns out to be a bad one. Using event related potential (ERP) combined with a novel group gambling task, we found that participants were more likely to choose the option that was predominately chosen by other players in previous trials, although there was little explicit normative pressure at the decision stage and group choices were not informative. When individuals' choices were different from others, the feedback related negativity (FRN), an ERP component sensitive to losses and errors, was enhanced, suggesting that being independent is aversive. At the outcome stage, the losses minus wins FRN effect was significantly reduced following conformity choices than following independent choices. Analyses of the P300 revealed similar patterns both in the response and outcome period. Our study suggests that social conformity serves as an emotional buffer that protects individuals from experiencing strong negative emotion when the outcomes are bad.

  19. 40 CFR 93.154 - Conformity analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conformity analysis. 93.154 Section 93...) DETERMINING CONFORMITY OF FEDERAL ACTIONS TO STATE OR FEDERAL IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Determining Conformity of General Federal Actions to State or Federal Implementation Plans § 93.154 Conformity analysis. Any...

  20. Scale invariance, conformality, and generalized free fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymarsky, Anatoly; Farnsworth, Kara; Komargodski, Zohar; Luty, Markus A.; Prilepina, Valentina

    2016-02-01

    This paper addresses the question of whether there are 4D Lorentz invariant unitary quantum field theories with scale invariance but not conformal invariance. An important loophole in the arguments of Luty-Polchinski-Rattazzi and Dymarsky-Komargodski-Schwimmer-Theisen is that trace of the energy-momentum tensor T could be a generalized free field. In this paper we rule out this possibility. The key ingredient is the observation that a unitary theory with scale but not conformal invariance necessarily has a non-vanishing anomaly for global scale transformations. We show that this anomaly cannot be reproduced if T is a generalized free field unless the theory also contains a dimension-2 scalar operator. In the special case where such an operator is present it can be used to redefine ("improve") the energy-momentum tensor, and we show that there is at least one energy-momentum tensor that is not a generalized free field. In addition, we emphasize that, in general, large momentum limits of correlation functions cannot be understood from the leading terms of the coordinate space OPE. This invalidates a recent argument by Farnsworth-Luty-Prilepina (FLP). Despite the invalidity of the general argument of FLP, some of the techniques turn out to be useful in the present context.

  1. Characterization of DNA conformation inside bacterial viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Anton S.; Locker, C. Rebecca; Harvey, Stephen C.

    2009-08-01

    In this study we develop a formalism to describe the organization of DNA inside bacteriophage capsids during genome packaging. We have previously shown that DNA inside bacteriophage phi29 (ϕ29) is organized into folded toroids [A. S. Petrov and S. C. Harvey, Structure 15, 21 (2007)], whereas epsilon15 (ɛ15) reveals the coaxial organization of the genetic material [A. S. Petrov, K. Lim-Hing, and S. C. Harvey, Structure 15, 807 (2007)]. We now show that each system undergoes two consecutive transitions. The first transition corresponds to the formation of global conformations and is analogous to a disorder-order conformational transition. The second transition is characterized by a significant loss of DNA mobility at the local level leading to glasslike dynamic behavior. Packing genetic material inside bacteriophages can be used as a general model to study the behavior of semiflexible chains inside confined spaces, and the proposed formalism developed here can be used to study other systems of linear polymer chains confined to closed spaces.

  2. Scale invariance, conformality, and generalized free fields

    DOE PAGES

    Dymarsky, Anatoly; Farnsworth, Kara; Komargodski, Zohar; Luty, Markus A.; Prilepina, Valentina

    2016-02-16

    This paper addresses the question of whether there are 4D Lorentz invariant unitary quantum fi eld theories with scale invariance but not conformal invariance. We present an important loophole in the arguments of Luty-Polchinski-Rattazzi and Dymarsky-Komargodski-Schwimmer-Theisen that is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor T could be a generalized free field. In this paper we rule out this possibility. The key ingredient is the observation that a unitary theory with scale but not conformal invariance necessarily has a non-vanishing anomaly for global scale transformations. We show that this anomaly cannot be reproduced if T is a generalized free field unlessmore » the theory also contains a dimension-2 scalar operator. In the special case where such an operator is present it can be used to redefine ("improve") the energy-momentum tensor, and we show that there is at least one energy-momentum tensor that is not a generalized free field. In addition, we emphasize that, in general, large momentum limits of correlation functions cannot be understood from the leading terms of the coordinate space OPE. This invalidates a recent argument by Farnsworth-Luty-Prilepina (FLP). Finally, despite the invalidity of the general argument of FLP, some of the techniques turn out to be useful in the present context.« less

  3. Cyclo-biphenalenyl Biradicaloid Molecular Materials: Conformation, Tautomerization, Magnetism, and Thermochromism

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jingsong; Meunier, Vincent; Tian, Yong-Hui; Kertesz, Prof. Miklos

    2010-01-01

    Phenalenyl and its derivatives have recently attracted a great deal of interest as a result of a two-electron multicenter (2e/mc) - bonding between two -stacked phenalenyl units. The 2e/mc bonded -dimers are close in energy to the -dimers of phenalenyl and therefore fickle properties may emerge from bond fluctuation, yielding smart -functional materials. Here, we examine the valence tautomerization of two cyclo-biphenalenyl biradicaloid molecular materials with chair and boat conformations by spin-restricted (R) and unrestricted (U) DFT using the M06 and B3LYP functionals. We found that the chair conformation involves a 2e/4c - bonded structure, whereas the boat conformation involves a 2e/12c - bonded structure on their potential energy surfaces. The global minimum for the chair conformation is the -bonded structure, whereas it is the - bonded structure for the boat conformation. The chair conformation exhibits a stepwise [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement, and calculations predict a negligible paramagnetic susceptibility near room temperature. In comparison, the paramagnetism of the boat conformation should be observable by SQUID and ESR. According to the energy differences of the respective - and -dimers of the two conformations and the UV-vis calculations, the color of the chair conformation is expected to become darker, whereas that of the boat conformation should become lighter with increasing temperature.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACTS OF GLOBAL CHANGE ON REGIONAL U.S. AIR QUALITY: A SYNTHESIS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON GROUND-LEVEL OZONE (AN INTERIM REPORT OF THE U.S. EPA GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH PROGRAM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air Quality Assessment Final Report is intended for managers and scientists working on air quality to provide them with information on the potential effects of climate change on regional air quality in the United States.

  5. Universality class in conformal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu

    2013-07-01

    We develop a new class of chaotic inflation models with spontaneously broken conformal invariance. Observational consequences of a broad class of such models are stable with respect to strong deformations of the scalar potential. This universality is a critical phenomenon near the point of enhanced symmetry, SO(1,1), in case of conformal inflation. It appears because of the exponential stretching of the moduli space and the resulting exponential flattening of scalar potentials upon switching from the Jordan frame to the Einstein frame in this class of models. This result resembles stretching and flattening of inhomogeneities during inflationary expansion. It has a simple interpretation in terms of velocity versus rapidity near the Kähler cone in the moduli space, similar to the light cone of special theory of relativity. This effect makes inflation possible even in the models with very steep potentials. We describe conformal and superconformal versions of this cosmological attractor mechanism.

  6. Effects of tourism and globalization on land cover and the influence on the quality of life of Paphos area in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Italos, Chrysostomos; Akylas, Evangelos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2014-08-01

    Since 1960 most of the coastal area cites across the Mediterranean Sea concentrates people due mass immigration of people from the rural to urban areas. The extensive tourism development especially across the coastal areas, create demand of infrastructures and new work positions and intensive pressure to the environment. The new spirit of the globalization creates movability of people and goods around the word. The free transfer of people from countries with big population and low economical wealth, which are moved to areas where they can work. All the above generate demands of labor and Paphos is one of these areas where during the last decades was transformed from a small agriculture village in one excellent tourist destination. Across the coastal areas big tourist infrastructure was built and lot of different people travel from all areas around the word especially during the summer months. All these generate continuous changes to the environment, to the people and the society. The globalization of the universe commerce and the free transfer of goods and people modify the community stratification. The inflow of agricultures products from third countries reduces the local production and generates degradation and desertification of the rural areas. The periodical variation of the population of the area during the summer and winter periods affect to the environment. The increment demand of sources (water, energy and food) during the summer months pressurize the coastal strip area. By estimating a ratio of inflows by the outflows of goods, people and services of the study area and a ratio of the tourists by the local population, a general index can by arise which will clarify the effects on the environment on the study area. This paper presents the results obtained by this study by examining the effects of tourism on land cover and effects on quality of life for the Paphos area in Cyprus. The authors explores the potential of blending in the sustainability study the

  7. Design of fixed correctors used in conformal optical system based on diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wang; Zuo, Baojun; Chen, Shouqian; Xiao, Haosu; Fan, Zhigang

    2013-01-20

    A conformal dome was designed and the aberration characteristics of the dome were analyzed using Zernike aberration theory. By deriving the equation used to correct Zernike aberrations, the phase coefficients and the phase orders of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) used to correct primary Zernike aberrations were obtained. DOEs were simulated to correct the aberrations of the conformal dome by using optical design software, and the aberrations of the conformal dome decreased dramatically. Finally, a complete cooled conformal optical system was designed. The results show that the number of the fixed corrector's elements decreases by using DOEs, and the optical system has better imaging quality.

  8. Ultrathin conformal coating for complex magneto-photonic structures.

    PubMed

    Pascu, Oana; Caicedo, José Manuel; López-García, Martín; Canalejas, Víctor; Blanco, Álvaro; López, Cefe; Arbiol, Jordi; Fontcuberta, Josep; Roig, Anna; Herranz, Gervasi

    2011-11-01

    We report on an extremely fast and versatile synthetic approach, based on microwave assisted sol-gel chemistry, that allows a conformal nanometric coating of intricate three-dimensional structures. Using this methodology, we have achieved a conformal coverage of large areas of three-dimensional opals with a superparamagnetic manganese ferrite layer, yielding magneto-photonic crystals with excellent quality. The use of a ternary oxide for the ultrathin coating demonstrates the potential of this methodology to realize three-dimensional structures with complex materials that may find applications beyond photonics, such as energy, sensing or catalysis. PMID:21987109

  9. Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Emma Jane

    2011-01-01

    Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis (CSCE) is a rapid, high-throughput screening method that can be applied to any region of a genome for detection of sequence variants. Slab gel-based conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis was first described by Ganguly et al., and the transfer from slab gels to capillaries for higher throughput was reported by Rozycka et al. CSCE is based on the principle that DNA homoduplexes and heteroduplexes migrate at different rates during electrophoresis under mildly denaturing conditions. Fragments showing an altered peak morphology compared to the wild type are then sequenced to determine the precise nature of the sequence variant detected.

  10. Conformal field theories with infinitely many conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, Ivan

    2013-02-15

    Globally conformal invariant quantum field theories in a D-dimensional space-time (D even) have rational correlation functions and admit an infinite number of conserved (symmetric traceless) tensor currents. In a theory of a scalar field of dimension D-2 they were demonstrated to be generated by bilocal normal products of free massless scalar fields with an O(N), U(N), or Sp(2N) (global) gauge symmetry [B. Bakalov, N. M. Nikolov, K.-H. Rehren, and I. Todorov, 'Unitary positive energy representations of scalar bilocal fields,' Commun. Math. Phys. 271, 223-246 (2007); e-print arXiv:math-ph/0604069v3; and 'Infinite dimensional Lie algebras in 4D conformal quantum field theory,' J. Phys. A Math Theor. 41, 194002 (2008); e-print arXiv:0711.0627v2 [hep-th

  11. Temperature: Human Regulating, Ants Conforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clopton, Joe R.

    2007-01-01

    Biological processes speed up as temperature rises. Procedures for demonstrating this with ants traveling on trails, and data gathered by students on the Argentine ant ("Linepithema humile") are presented. The concepts of temperature regulation and conformity are detailed with a focus on the processes rather than on terms that label the organisms.

  12. Conformal coating using parylene polymers.

    PubMed

    Noordegraaf, J

    1997-01-01

    Parylene, a conformal polymer film, is being used increasingly in Europe to provide environmental and dielectric isolation. Application areas include electronic circuitry, sensors, and medical substrates. This article describes the variants of parylene and their characteristics, together with the process and applications of parylene coating. PMID:10167681

  13. The conformational analysis of 2-halocyclooctanones.

    PubMed

    Rozada, Thiago C; Gauze, Gisele F; Rosa, Fernanda A; Favaro, Denize C; Rittner, Roberto; Pontes, Rodrigo M; Basso, Ernani A

    2015-02-25

    The establishment of the most stable structures of eight membered rings is a challenging task to the field of conformational analysis. In this work, a series of 2-halocyclooctanones were synthesized (including fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine derivatives) and submitted to conformational studies using a combination of theoretical calculation and infrared spectroscopy. For each compound, four conformations were identified as the most important ones. These conformations are derived from the chair-boat conformation of cyclooctanone. The pseudo-equatorial (with respect to the halogen) conformer is preferred in vacuum and in low polarity solvents for chlorine, bromine and iodine derivatives. For 2-fluorocyclooctanone, the preferred conformation in vacuum is pseudo-axial. In acetonitrile, the pseudo-axial conformer becomes the most stable for the chlorine derivative. According to NBO calculations, the conformational preference is not dictated by electron delocalization, but by classical electrostatic repulsions.

  14. 'Translation is not enough': using the Global Person Generated Index (GPGI) to assess individual quality of life in Bangladesh, Thailand, and Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Camfield, Laura; Ruta, Danny

    2007-08-01

    Currently few subjective measures of Quality of Life (QoL) are available for use in developing countries, which limits their theoretical, methodological, and practical contribution (for example, exploring the relationship between economic development and QoL, and ensuring effective and equitable service provision). One reason for this is the difficulty of ensuring that translated measures preserve conceptual, item, semantic, operational, measurement; and functional equivalence (Herdman, M., Fox-Rushby, J., & Badia, X. (1998). Quality of Life Research, 7, 331), which is illustrated by an account of the translation, pre-piloting, and administration of a new individualised QoL measure, the Global Person Generated Index or 'GPGI'. The GPGI is based on the widely used Patient Generated Index (Ruta, Camfield, & Martin, (2004) Quality of Life Research, 13, 1545.) and offers many of the advantages of the participatory approaches commonly used in developing countries, with added methodological rigour, and quantitative outcomes. It was successfully validated in Bangladesh, Thailand, and Ethiopia, using quantitative and qualitative methods--open-ended, semi-structured interviews (SSIs), conducted immediately post-administration. Both the measure and method of 'qualitative validation' described later in the paper offer an exciting alternative for future researchers and practitioners in this field. The quantitative results suggest the GPGI shows cultural sensitivity, and is able to capture both the areas that are important to respondents, and aspects of life one would expect to impact on QoL in developing countries. There were strong correlation between scores from the GPGI and SSIs for the area of health, and moderate correlations for 'material wellbeing' (MWB)('Material wellbeing' refers to respondents' perceptions of their achievement in the areas of farming, debt reduction, assets, crops, livestock, job, land, property, and agriculture) and children. Weak to moderate

  15. 'Translation is not enough': using the Global Person Generated Index (GPGI) to assess individual quality of life in Bangladesh, Thailand, and Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Camfield, Laura; Ruta, Danny

    2007-08-01

    Currently few subjective measures of Quality of Life (QoL) are available for use in developing countries, which limits their theoretical, methodological, and practical contribution (for example, exploring the relationship between economic development and QoL, and ensuring effective and equitable service provision). One reason for this is the difficulty of ensuring that translated measures preserve conceptual, item, semantic, operational, measurement; and functional equivalence (Herdman, M., Fox-Rushby, J., & Badia, X. (1998). Quality of Life Research, 7, 331), which is illustrated by an account of the translation, pre-piloting, and administration of a new individualised QoL measure, the Global Person Generated Index or 'GPGI'. The GPGI is based on the widely used Patient Generated Index (Ruta, Camfield, & Martin, (2004) Quality of Life Research, 13, 1545.) and offers many of the advantages of the participatory approaches commonly used in developing countries, with added methodological rigour, and quantitative outcomes. It was successfully validated in Bangladesh, Thailand, and Ethiopia, using quantitative and qualitative methods--open-ended, semi-structured interviews (SSIs), conducted immediately post-administration. Both the measure and method of 'qualitative validation' described later in the paper offer an exciting alternative for future researchers and practitioners in this field. The quantitative results suggest the GPGI shows cultural sensitivity, and is able to capture both the areas that are important to respondents, and aspects of life one would expect to impact on QoL in developing countries. There were strong correlation between scores from the GPGI and SSIs for the area of health, and moderate correlations for 'material wellbeing' (MWB)('Material wellbeing' refers to respondents' perceptions of their achievement in the areas of farming, debt reduction, assets, crops, livestock, job, land, property, and agriculture) and children. Weak to moderate

  16. Conformational studies of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, D.A.

    1984-11-01

    Techniques are developed for thorough examinations of the conformational energetics of nucleic acids and their constituents. The first one is a method for modeling the furanose sugar ring in nucleic acids. This method allows the coordinates corresponding to any sugar conformation to be generated rapidly and unambiguously from just the phase angle of pseudorotation. Taking advantage of this simplification, we carry out the first calculations to completely explore the conformational spaces available to the eight commonly occurring nucleosides using experimentally consistent furanose geometries and an appropriate classical potential energy force field. Results are in excellent agreement with experiment. We also develop empirically fit multiple correlation functions between the torsion angles of nucleic acids. This reduces the number of conformations which need to be considered in a thorough energetic survey for a nucleic acid. Such surveys are then carried out for two single-stranded nucleic acid tetramers: d(ApApApA) and ApApApA. We create energy contour maps for each of the 21 possible torsion angle pairs in a nucleotide repeating unit. The maps are quite consistent with the experimental distribution of oligonucleotide data and provide rationalizations for several experimentally observed angle-angle correlations. Complete energy minimization is carried out on all local minima found in the surveys. Both the maps and minimizations indicate DNA and RNA to be highly polymorphic. Conformational changes in DNA upon damage by uv radiation are also studied using energy minimization techniques. Finally, we derive a set of partial charges for a nucleotide (2'-deoxycytidine 5'-monophosphate monohydrate) from high resolution x-ray data.

  17. Conforming to cancer staging, prognostic indicators and national treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Dykstra-Long, Gwendylen R

    2011-01-01

    Clinical cancer staging and prognostic indicators guide treatment planning, and as such the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer Commission on Cancer (ACoS CoC) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) have recognized this as quality patient care. Overton Brooks Veterans Administration (OBVAMC) developed an organizational policy and procedure, flow algorithms, treatment plan templates, and education strategies in order to conform to this quality care approach. The purpose of this article is to share this systematic approach that is able to support clinical and working cancer stage and prognostic indicators which have been recognized by national standard setting organizations as quality patient care.

  18. The detection of conformational disorder by thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B.

    1988-01-01

    Conformational disorder in crystals is found in many molecules that possess a plurality of conformational isomers. Typical examples are linear macromolecules such as polyethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene and trans-1,4-polybutadiene; and small molecules such as paraffins, cycloparaffins, soaps, lipids and many liquid-crystal forming molecules. Conformational motion is often coupled with the cooperative creation of disorder. In this case a heat and entropy of transition is observed by thermal analysis. Levels of transition entropies can be estimated, assuming most of the disorder can be traced to conformational isomerism. In case there is conformational disorder frozen-in at low temperature, thermal analysis can be used to find the glass transition of a condis crystal. An Advanced Thermal Analysis System has been developed, and will be described that permits a detailed interpretation of the thermal analysis traces. It rests with the establishment of high quality heat capacity for the rigid solid state (vibration only) and the mobile liquid state (vibrations and large amplitude cooperative motion). 36 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Conformal Gravity rotation curves with a conformal Higgs halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Keith

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the effect of a conformally coupled Higgs field on conformal gravity (CG) predictions for the rotation curves of galaxies. The Mannheim-Kazanas (MK) metric is a valid vacuum solution of CG's fourth-order Poisson equation if and only if the Higgs field has a particular radial profile, S(r) = S0 a/(r + a), decreasing from S0 at r = 0 with radial scalelength a. Since particle rest masses scale with S(r)/S0, their world lines do not follow time-like geodesics of the MK metric gμν, as previously assumed, but rather those of the Higgs-frame MK metric tilde{g}_{μ ν }=Ω ^2 g_{μ ν }, with the conformal factor Ω(r) = S(r)/S0. We show that the required stretching of the MK metric exactly cancels the linear potential that has been invoked to fit galaxy rotation curves without dark matter. We also formulate, for spherical structures with a Higgs halo S(r), the CG equations that must be solved for viable astrophysical tests of CG using galaxy and cluster dynamics and lensing.

  20. Conformation of ionizable poly Para phenylene ethynylene in dilute solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Wijesinghe, Sidath; Maskey, Sabina; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-11-03

    The conformation of dinonyl poly para phenylene ethynylenes (PPEs) with carboxylate side chains, equilibrated in solvents of different quality is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. PPEs are of interest because of their tunable electro-optical properties, chemical diversity, and functionality which are essential in wide range of applications. The polymer conformation determines the conjugation length and their assembly mode and affects electro-optical properties which are critical in their current and potential uses. The current study investigates the effect of carboxylate fraction on PPEs side chains on the conformation of chains in the dilute limit, in solvents of different quality. The dinonylmore » PPE chains are modeled atomistically, where the solvents are modeled both implicitly and explicitly. Dinonyl PPEs maintained a stretched out conformation up to a carboxylate fraction f of 0.7 in all solvents studied. The nonyl side chains are extended and oriented away from the PPE backbone in toluene and in implicit good solvent whereas in water and implicit poor solvent, the nonyl side chains are collapsed towards the PPE backbone. Thus, rotation around the aromatic ring is fast and no long range correlations are seen within the backbone.« less

  1. Conformal Window and Correlation Functions in Lattice Conformal QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Y.

    We discuss various aspects of Conformal Field Theories on the Lattice. We mainly investigate the SU(3) gauge theory with Nf degenerate fermions in the fundamental representation, employing the one-plaquette gauge action and the Wilson fermion action. First we make a brief review of our previous works on the phase structure of lattice gauge theories in terms of the gauge coupling constant and the quark mass. We thereby clarify the reason why we conjecture that the conformal window is 7 ≤ Nf ≤ 16. Secondly, we introduce a new concept, "conformal theories with IR cutof" and point out that any numerical simulation on a lattice is bounded by an IR cutoff ∧IR. Then we make predictions that when Nf is within the conformal window, the propagator of a meson G(t) behaves at large t, as G(t) = c exp (-mHt)/tα, that is, a modified Yukawa-type decay form, instead of the usual exponential decay form exp (-mHt), in the small quark mass region. This holds on an any lattice for any coupling constant g, as far as g is between 0 and g*, where g* is the IR fixed point. We verify that numerical results really satisfy the predictions for the Nf = 7 case and the Nf = 16 case. Thirdly, we discuss small number of flavors (Nf = 2 ˜ 6) QCD at finite temperatures. We point out theoretically and verify numerically that the correlation functions at T/Tc > 1 exhibit the characteristics of the conformal function with IR cutoff, an exponential decay with power correction. Investigating our numerical data by a new method which we call the "local-analysis" of propagators, we observe that the Nf = 7 case and the Nf = 2 at T ˜ 2Tc case are similar to each other, while the Nf = 16 case and the Nf = 2 at T = 102 ˜ 105Tc cases are similar to each other. Further, we observe our data are consistent with the picture that the Nf = 7 case and the Nf = 2 at T ˜ 2Tc case are close to the meson unparticle model. On the other hand, the Nf = 16 case and the Nf = 2 at T = 102 ˜ 105Tc cases are close to

  2. Conformal triality of the Kepler problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariglia, Marco

    2016-08-01

    We show that the Kepler problem is projectively equivalent to null geodesic motion on the conformal compactification of Minkowski-4 space. This space realises the conformal triality of Minkowski, dS and AdS spaces.

  3. Gauge natural formulation of conformal gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Campigotto, M.; Fatibene, L.

    2015-03-15

    We consider conformal gravity as a gauge natural theory. We study its conservation laws and superpotentials. We also consider the Mannheim and Kazanas spherically symmetric vacuum solution and discuss conserved quantities associated to conformal and diffeomorphism symmetries.

  4. Killing Initial Data on spacelike conformal boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetz, Tim-Torben

    2016-08-01

    We analyze Killing Initial Data on Cauchy surfaces in conformally rescaled vacuum space-times satisfying Friedrich's conformal field equations. As an application, we derive the KID equations on a spacelike ℐ-.

  5. The Conformational Behaviour of Glucosamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Isabel; Kolesniková, Lucie; Cabezas, Carlos; Bermúdez, Celina; Berdakin, Matías; Simao, Alcides; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    A laser ablation method has been successfully used to vaporize the bioactive amino monosaccharide D-glucosamine. Three cyclic α-4C1 pyranose forms have been identified using a combination of CP-FTMW and LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy. Stereoelectronic hyperconjugative factors, like those associated with anomeric or gauche effects, as well as the cooperative OH\\cdotsO, OH\\cdotsN and NH\\cdotsO chains, extended along the entire molecule, are the main factors driving the conformational behavior. All observed conformers exhibit a counter-clockwise arrangement (cc) of the network of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The results are compared with those recently obtained for D-glucose. J. L. Alonso, M. A. Lozoya, I. Peña, J. C. López, C. Cabezas, S. Mata, S. Blanco, Chem. Sci. 2014, 5, 515.

  6. The conformational cycle of kinesin.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, R A; Crevel, I; Carter, N J; Alonso, M C; Hirose, K; Amos, L A

    2000-01-01

    The stepping mechanism of kinesin can be thought of as a programme of conformational changes. We briefly review protein chemical, electron microscopic and transient kinetic evidence for conformational changes, and working from this evidence, outline a model for the mechanism. In the model, both kinesin heads initially trap Mg x ADP. Microtubule binding releases ADP from one head only (the trailing head). Subsequent ATP binding and hydrolysis by the trailing head progressively accelerate attachment of the leading head, by positioning it closer to its next site. Once attached, the leading head releases its ADP and exerts a sustained pull on the trailing head. The rate of closure of the molecular gate which traps ADP on the trailing head governs its detachment rate. A speculative but crucial coordinating feature is that this rate is strain sensitive, slowing down under negative strain and accelerating under positive strain. PMID:10836499

  7. Holographic multiverse and conformal invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu

    2009-11-01

    We consider a holographic description of the inflationary multiverse, according to which the wave function of the universe is interpreted as the generating functional for a lower dimensional Euclidean theory. We analyze a simple model where transitions between inflationary vacua occur through bubble nucleation, and the inflating part of spacetime consists of de Sitter regions separated by thin bubble walls. In this model, we present some evidence that the dual theory is conformally invariant in the UV.

  8. Anomalous dimensions of conformal baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three-color theory as functions of the number of massless flavors within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small, within the δ expansion, for a wide range of number of flavors. We also find that this is always smaller than the anomalous dimension of the fermion mass operator. These findings challenge the partial compositeness paradigm.

  9. Stabilizing the boat conformation of cyclohexane rings

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.; Goddard, W.A. III; Moldowan, J.M.; Carlson, R.M.K.; Goddard, W.A. III.

    1995-06-21

    In calculating the energetics for various conformers of the A, B, and C series of hopanoid hydrocarbons present in mature oil reservoirs, we find that the B series prefers the boat conformation (by 1.3-2.5 kcal/mol) for the D cyclohexane ring. We analyze the structural elements responsible for stabilizing this boat conformation, identify the key features, and illustrate how one might stabilize boat conformations of other systems. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space {M} is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail {N}=(2,2) and {N}=(0,2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and {N}=2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads to new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is Kähler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing Kähler class. For {N}=(2,2) theories in d = 2 and {N}=2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the Kähler potential of {M} follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.

  11. Conformal Invariance of Graphene Sheets.

    PubMed

    Giordanelli, I; Posé, N; Mendoza, M; Herrmann, H J

    2016-03-10

    Suspended graphene sheets exhibit correlated random deformations that can be studied under the framework of rough surfaces with a Hurst (roughness) exponent 0.72 ± 0.01. Here, we show that, independent of the temperature, the iso-height lines at the percolation threshold have a well-defined fractal dimension and are conformally invariant, sharing the same statistical properties as Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLEκ) curves with κ = 2.24 ± 0.07. Interestingly, iso-height lines of other rough surfaces are not necessarily conformally invariant even if they have the same Hurst exponent, e.g. random Gaussian surfaces. We have found that the distribution of the modulus of the Fourier coefficients plays an important role on this property. Our results not only introduce a new universality class and place the study of suspended graphene membranes within the theory of critical phenomena, but also provide hints on the long-standing question about the origin of conformal invariance in iso-height lines of rough surfaces.

  12. Limit cycles and conformal invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Jean-François; Grinstein, Benjamín; Stergiou, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    There is a widely held belief that conformal field theories (CFTs) require zero beta functions. Nevertheless, the work of Jack and Osborn implies that the beta functions are not actually the quantites that decide conformality, but until recently no such behavior had been exhibited. Our recent work has led to the discovery of CFTs with nonzero beta functions, more precisely CFTs that live on recurrent trajectories, e.g., limit cycles, of the beta-function vector field. To demonstrate this we study the S function of Jack and Osborn. We use Weyl consistency conditions to show that it vanishes at fixed points and agrees with the generator Q of limit cycles on them. Moreover, we compute S to third order in perturbation theory, and explicitly verify that it agrees with our previous determinations of Q. A byproduct of our analysis is that, in perturbation theory, unitarity and scale invariance imply conformal invariance in four-dimensional quantum field theories. Finally, we study some properties of these new, "cyclic" CFTs, and point out that the a-theorem still governs the asymptotic behavior of renormalization-group flows.

  13. The Conformational Landscape of Serinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, M. Eugenia; Loru, Donatella; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of the amino alcohol serinol CH_2OH--CH(NH_2)--CH_2OH, which constitutes the hydrophilic head of the lipid sphingosine, has been investigated using chirped-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in combination with laser ablation Five different forms of serinol have been observed and conclusively identified by the comparison between the experimental values of their rotational and 14N quadrupole coupling constants and those predicted by ab initio calculations. In all observed conformers several hydrogen bonds are established between the two hydroxyl groups and the amino groups in a chain or circular arrangement. The most abundant conformer is stabilised by O--H···N and N--H···O hydrogen bonds forming a chain rather than a cycle. One of the detected conformers presents a tunnelling motion of the hydrogen atoms of the functional groups similar to that observed in glycerol. S. Mata, I. Peña, C. Cabezas, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 2012, 280, 91 V. V. Ilyushin, R. A. Motiyenko, F. J. Lovas, D. F. Plusquellic, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 2008, 251, 129.

  14. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    DOE PAGES

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads tomore » new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.« less

  15. Electrophysiological precursors of social conformity.

    PubMed

    Shestakova, Anna; Rieskamp, Jörg; Tugin, Sergey; Ossadtchi, Alexey; Krutitskaya, Janina; Klucharev, Vasily

    2013-10-01

    Humans often change their beliefs or behavior due to the behavior or opinions of others. This study explored, with the use of human event-related potentials (ERPs), whether social conformity is based on a general performance-monitoring mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that conflicts with a normative group opinion evoke a feedback-related negativity (FRN) often associated with performance monitoring and subsequent adjustment of behavior. The experimental results show that individual judgments of facial attractiveness were adjusted in line with a normative group opinion. A mismatch between individual and group opinions triggered a frontocentral negative deflection with the maximum at 200 ms, similar to FRN. Overall, a conflict with a normative group opinion triggered a cascade of neuronal responses: from an earlier FRN response reflecting a conflict with the normative opinion to a later ERP component (peaking at 380 ms) reflecting a conforming behavioral adjustment. These results add to the growing literature on neuronal mechanisms of social influence by disentangling the conflict-monitoring signal in response to the perceived violation of social norms and the neural signal of a conforming behavioral adjustment.

  16. Conformal Invariance of Graphene Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Giordanelli, I.; Posé, N.; Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Suspended graphene sheets exhibit correlated random deformations that can be studied under the framework of rough surfaces with a Hurst (roughness) exponent 0.72 ± 0.01. Here, we show that, independent of the temperature, the iso-height lines at the percolation threshold have a well-defined fractal dimension and are conformally invariant, sharing the same statistical properties as Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLEκ) curves with κ = 2.24 ± 0.07. Interestingly, iso-height lines of other rough surfaces are not necessarily conformally invariant even if they have the same Hurst exponent, e.g. random Gaussian surfaces. We have found that the distribution of the modulus of the Fourier coefficients plays an important role on this property. Our results not only introduce a new universality class and place the study of suspended graphene membranes within the theory of critical phenomena, but also provide hints on the long-standing question about the origin of conformal invariance in iso-height lines of rough surfaces. PMID:26961723

  17. Electrophysiological precursors of social conformity.

    PubMed

    Shestakova, Anna; Rieskamp, Jörg; Tugin, Sergey; Ossadtchi, Alexey; Krutitskaya, Janina; Klucharev, Vasily

    2013-10-01

    Humans often change their beliefs or behavior due to the behavior or opinions of others. This study explored, with the use of human event-related potentials (ERPs), whether social conformity is based on a general performance-monitoring mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that conflicts with a normative group opinion evoke a feedback-related negativity (FRN) often associated with performance monitoring and subsequent adjustment of behavior. The experimental results show that individual judgments of facial attractiveness were adjusted in line with a normative group opinion. A mismatch between individual and group opinions triggered a frontocentral negative deflection with the maximum at 200 ms, similar to FRN. Overall, a conflict with a normative group opinion triggered a cascade of neuronal responses: from an earlier FRN response reflecting a conflict with the normative opinion to a later ERP component (peaking at 380 ms) reflecting a conforming behavioral adjustment. These results add to the growing literature on neuronal mechanisms of social influence by disentangling the conflict-monitoring signal in response to the perceived violation of social norms and the neural signal of a conforming behavioral adjustment. PMID:22683703

  18. On the cohomology of Leibniz conformal algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiao

    2015-04-01

    We construct a new cohomology complex of Leibniz conformal algebras with coefficients in a representation instead of a module. The low-dimensional cohomology groups of this complex are computed. Meanwhile, we construct a Leibniz algebra from a Leibniz conformal algebra and prove that the category of Leibniz conformal algebras is equivalent to the category of equivalence classes of formal distribution Leibniz algebras.

  19. Flexible ligand docking using conformational ensembles.

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, D. M.; Shoichet, B. K.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular docking algorithms suggest possible structures for molecular complexes. They are used to model biological function and to discover potential ligands. A present challenge for docking algorithms is the treatment of molecular flexibility. Here, the rigid body program, DOCK, is modified to allow it to rapidly fit multiple conformations of ligands. Conformations of a given molecule are pre-calculated in the same frame of reference, so that each conformer shares a common rigid fragment with all other conformations. The ligand conformers are then docked together, as an ensemble, into a receptor binding site. This takes advantage of the redundancy present in differing conformers of the same molecule. The algorithm was tested using three organic ligand protein systems and two protein-protein systems. Both the bound and unbound conformations of the receptors were used. The ligand ensemble method found conformations that resembled those determined in X-ray crystal structures (RMS values typically less than 1.5 A). To test the method's usefulness for inhibitor discovery, multi-compound and multi-conformer databases were screened for compounds known to bind to dihydrofolate reductase and compounds known to bind to thymidylate synthase. In both cases, known inhibitors and substrates were identified in conformations resembling those observed experimentally. The ligand ensemble method was 100-fold faster than docking a single conformation at a time and was able to screen a database of over 34 million conformations from 117,000 molecules in one to four CPU days on a workstation. PMID:9568900

  20. 40 CFR 52.799 - Transportation conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transportation conformity. 52.799... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.799 Transportation conformity. On June 4, 2010, Indiana submitted the Transportation Conformity Consultation SIP consisting...

  1. 40 CFR 52.799 - Transportation conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transportation conformity. 52.799... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.799 Transportation conformity. On June 4, 2010, Indiana submitted the Transportation Conformity Consultation SIP consisting...

  2. 40 CFR 52.799 - Transportation conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transportation conformity. 52.799... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.799 Transportation conformity. On June 4, 2010, Indiana submitted the Transportation Conformity Consultation SIP consisting...

  3. 40 CFR 52.799 - Transportation conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transportation conformity. 52.799... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.799 Transportation conformity. On June 4, 2010, Indiana submitted the Transportation Conformity Consultation SIP consisting...

  4. 40 CFR 51.854 - Conformity analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conformity analysis. 51.854 Section 51... FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Determining Conformity of General Federal Actions to State or Federal Implementation Plans § 51.854 Conformity analysis. Link to...

  5. Cyclo-biphenalenyl biradicaloid molecular materials: conformation, tautomerization, magnetism, and thermochromism

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Tian, Yong-Hui; Kertesz, Prof. Miklos

    2011-01-01

    Phenalenyl and its derivatives have recently attracted a great deal of interest as a result of a 2-electron multicenter (2e/mc) covalent pi-pi bonding between two pi-stacked phenalenyl units. The 2e/mc bonded pi-dimers are close in energy to the sigma-dimers of phenalenyl and therefore fickle properties may emerge from bond fluctuation, yielding smart pi-functional materials. Here we examine the valence tautomerization of two cyclo-biphenalenyl biradicaloid molecular materials with chair- and boat-conformations by spin-restricted (R) and unrestricted (U) DFT using the M06 and B3LYP functionals. We found that the chair-conformation involves a 2e/4c pi-pi bonded structure while the boat-conformation involves a 2e/12c pi-pi bonded structure on their potential energy surfaces. The global minimum for the chair-conformation is the sigma-bonded structure while it is the pi-pi bonded structure for the boat-conformation. The chair-conformation exhibits a stepwise [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement, and calculations predict a negligible paramagnetic susceptibility near room temperature. In comparison, the paramagnetism of the boat-conformation should be observable by SQUID and/or ESR. According to the difference of the global minima of the two conformations and the parameterized UV-Vis calculations, the color of the chair-conformation is expected to become darker while that of the boat-conformation become lighter with increasing temperature.

  6. Electronic ground state conformers of β-carotene and their role in ultrafast spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukeš, Vladimír; Christensson, Niklas; Milota, Franz; Kauffmann, Harald F.; Hauer, Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    We present a study of ground state conformations of all-trans β-carotene using Density Functional Theory (DFT). To reproduce the carotenoid spectrum, the DFT approach was combined with the Multi-Reference Configuration Interaction. Our results show that the global minimum corresponds to an asymmetric structure where the β-ionone rings are twisted with respect to the polyene chain. The next higher-lying conformer is more s-cis symmetric and is populated at room temperature (30%). We discuss the relation of these conformers to S∗ and show that our model readily explains the temperature dependence and the narrowing of the ground state bleach at long population times.

  7. Simple space-time symmetries: Generalizing conformal field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Gerhard; Riese, Mathias de

    2007-05-15

    We study simple space-time symmetry groups G which act on a space-time manifold M=G/H which admits a G-invariant global causal structure. We classify pairs (G,M) which share the following additional properties of conformal field theory. (1) The stability subgroup H of o set-membership sign M is the identity component of a parabolic subgroup of G, implying factorization H=MAN{sup -}, where M generalizes Lorentz transformations, A dilatations, and N{sup -} special conformal transformations. (2) Special conformal transformations {xi} set-membership sign N{sup -} act trivially on tangent vectors v set-membership sign T{sub o}M. The allowed simple Lie groups G are the universal coverings of SU(m,m),SO(2,D),Sp(l,R),SO*(4n), and E{sub 7(-25)} and H are particular maximal parabolic subgroups. They coincide with the groups of fractional linear transformations of Euclidean Jordan algebras whose use as generalizations of Minkowski space-time was advocated by Guenaydin [Mod. Phys. Lett. A 8, 1407 (1993)]. All these groups G admit positive energy representations. It will also be shown that the classical conformal groups SO(2,D) are the only allowed groups which possess an automorphism with properties appropriate for a time reflection.

  8. Models of the Joint Structure of Domain-Related and Global Distress: Implications for the Reconciliation of Quality of Life and Mental Health Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, William; St-Arnaud, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    Research on subjective wellbeing includes studies of both domain-related and global distress. The mental health literature, though, focuses almost exclusively on global distress. This seems to be partly due to a common belief that psychological distress, and the moods that comprise distress, necessarily lack referential content. However, if that…

  9. The Biological Bases of Conformity

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, T. J. H.; Laland, K. N.

    2012-01-01

    Humans are characterized by an extreme dependence on culturally transmitted information and recent formal theory predicts that natural selection should favor adaptive learning strategies that facilitate effective copying and decision making. One strategy that has attracted particular attention is conformist transmission, defined as the disproportionately likely adoption of the most common variant. Conformity has historically been emphasized as significant in the social psychology literature, and recently there have also been reports of conformist behavior in non-human animals. However, mathematical analyses differ in how important and widespread they expect conformity to be, and relevant experimental work is scarce, and generates findings that are both mutually contradictory and inconsistent with the predictions of the models. We review the relevant literature considering the causation, function, history, and ontogeny of conformity, and describe a computer-based experiment on human subjects that we carried out in order to resolve ambiguities. We found that only when many demonstrators were available and subjects were uncertain was subject behavior conformist. A further analysis found that the underlying response to social information alone was generally conformist. Thus, our data are consistent with a conformist use of social information, but as subjects’ behavior is the result of both social and asocial influences, the resultant behavior may not be conformist. We end by relating these findings to an embryonic cognitive neuroscience literature that has recently begun to explore the neural bases of social learning. Here conformist transmission may be a particularly useful case study, not only because there are well-defined and tractable opportunities to characterize the biological underpinnings of this form of social learning, but also because early findings imply that humans may possess specific cognitive adaptations for effective social learning. PMID:22712006

  10. Conformance Verification of Privacy Policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiang

    Web applications are both the consumers and providers of information. To increase customer confidence, many websites choose to publish their privacy protection policies. However, policy conformance is often neglected. We propose a logic based framework for formally specifying and reasoning about the implementation of privacy protection by a web application. A first order extension of computation tree logic is used to specify a policy. A verification paradigm, built upon a static control/data flow analysis, is presented to verify if a policy is satisfied.

  11. Chromosome Conformation Capture in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Linear chromatin fiber is packed inside the nuclei as a complex three-dimensional structure, and the organization of the chromatin has important roles in the appropriate spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression. To understand how chromatin organizes inside nuclei, and how regulatory proteins physically interact with genes, chromosome conformation capture (3C) technique provides a powerful and sensitive tool to detect both short- and long-range DNA-DNA interaction. Here I describe the 3C technique to detect the DNA-DNA interactions mediated by insulator proteins that are closely related to PcG in Drosophila, which is also broadly applicable to other systems. PMID:27659987

  12. Conformational Transitions in Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, M.; Janke, W.

    2008-11-01

    Proteins are the "work horses" in biological systems. In almost all functions specific proteins are involved. They control molecular transport processes, stabilize the cell structure, enzymatically catalyze chemical reactions; others act as molecular motors in the complex machinery of molecular synthetization processes. Due to their significance, misfolds and malfunctions of proteins typically entail disastrous diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Therefore, the understanding of the trinity of amino acid composition, geometric structure, and biological function is one of the most essential challenges for the natural sciences. Here, we glance at conformational transitions accompanying the structure formation in protein folding processes.

  13. Toward TeV Conformality

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, T; Avakian, A; Babich, R; Brower, R C; Cheng, M; Clark, M A; Cohen, S D; Fleming, G T; Kiskis, J; Neil, E T; Osborn, J C; Rebbi, C; Schaich, D; Soltz, R; Vranas, P

    2009-11-30

    We study the chiral condensate <{bar {psi}}{psi}> for an SU(3) gauge theory with N{sub f} massless Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation when N{sub f} is increased from 2 to 6. For N{sub f} = 2, our lattice simulations of <{bar {psi}}{psi}>/F{sup 3}, where F is the Nambu-Goldstone-boson decay constant, agree with the measured QCD value. For N{sub f} = 6, this ratio shows significant enhancement, presaging an even larger enhancement anticipated as N{sub f} increases further, toward the critical value for transition from confinement to infrared conformality.

  14. Assessing communication quality of consultations in primary care: initial reliability of the Global Consultation Rating Scale, based on the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to the Medical Interview

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Jenni; Abel, Gary; Elmore, Natasha; Campbell, John; Roland, Martin; Benson, John; Silverman, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate initial reliability of the Global Consultation Rating Scale (GCRS: an instrument to assess the effectiveness of communication across an entire doctor–patient consultation, based on the Calgary-Cambridge guide to the medical interview), in simulated patient consultations. Design Multiple ratings of simulated general practitioner (GP)–patient consultations by trained GP evaluators. Setting UK primary care. Participants 21 GPs and six trained GP evaluators. Outcome measures GCRS score. Methods 6 GP raters used GCRS to rate randomly assigned video recordings of GP consultations with simulated patients. Each of the 42 consultations was rated separately by four raters. We considered whether a fixed difference between scores had the same meaning at all levels of performance. We then examined the reliability of GCRS using mixed linear regression models. We augmented our regression model to also examine whether there were systematic biases between the scores given by different raters and to look for possible order effects. Results Assessing the communication quality of individual consultations, GCRS achieved a reliability of 0.73 (95% CI 0.44 to 0.79) for two raters, 0.80 (0.54 to 0.85) for three and 0.85 (0.61 to 0.88) for four. We found an average difference of 1.65 (on a 0–10 scale) in the scores given by the least and most generous raters: adjusting for this evaluator bias increased reliability to 0.78 (0.53 to 0.83) for two raters; 0.85 (0.63 to 0.88) for three and 0.88 (0.69 to 0.91) for four. There were considerable order effects, with later consultations (after 15–20 ratings) receiving, on average, scores more than one point higher on a 0–10 scale. Conclusions GCRS shows good reliability with three raters assessing each consultation. We are currently developing the scale further by assessing a large sample of real-world consultations. PMID:24604483

  15. Quality of Vitamin K Antagonist Control and 1-Year Outcomes in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: A Global Perspective from the GARFIELD-AF Registry

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Sylvia; ten Cate, Hugo; Accetta, Gabriele; Angchaisuksiri, Pantep; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Camm, A. John; Corbalan, Ramon; Darius, Harald; Fitzmaurice, David A.; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.; Goto, Shinya; Jacobson, Barry; Kayani, Gloria; Mantovani, Lorenzo G.; Misselwitz, Frank; Pieper, Karen; Schellong, Sebastian M.; Stepinska, Janina; Turpie, Alexander G. G.; van Eickels, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) need to be individually dosed. International guidelines recommend a target range of international normalised ratio (INR) of 2.0–3.0 for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). We analysed the time in this therapeutic range (TTR) of VKA-treated patients with newly diagnosed AF in the ongoing, global, observational registry GARFIELD-AF. Taking TTR as a measure of the quality of patient management, we analysed its relationship with 1-year outcomes, including stroke/systemic embolism (SE), major bleeding, and all-cause mortality. Methods and Results TTR was calculated for 9934 patients using 136,082 INR measurements during 1-year follow-up. The mean TTR was 55.0%; values were similar for different VKAs. 5851 (58.9%) patients had TTR<65%; 4083 (41.1%) TTR≥65%. The proportion of patients with TTR≥65% varied from 16.7% in Asia to 49.4% in Europe. There was a 2.6-fold increase in the risk of stroke/SE, 1.5-fold increase in the risk of major bleeding, and 2.4-fold increase in the risk of all-cause mortality with TTR<65% versus ≥65% after adjusting for potential confounders. The population attributable fraction, i.e. the proportion of events attributable to suboptimal anticoagulation among VKA users, was 47.7% for stroke/SE, 16.7% for major bleeding, and 45.4% for all-cause mortality. In patients with TTR<65%, the risk of first stroke/SE was highest in the first 4 months and decreased thereafter (test for trend, p = 0.021). In these patients, the risk of first major bleed declined during follow-up (p = 0.005), whereas in patients with TTR≥65%, the risk increased over time (p = 0.027). Conclusion A large proportion of patients with AF had poor VKA control and these patients had higher risks of stroke/SE, major bleeding, and all-cause mortality. Our data suggest that there is room for improvement of VKA control in routine clinical practice and that this could substantially reduce adverse outcomes. Trial Registration Clinical

  16. Virasoro conformal blocks and thermality from classical background fields

    DOE PAGES

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.

    2015-11-30

    We show that in 2d CFTs at large central charge, the coupling of the stress tensor to heavy operators can be re-absorbed by placing the CFT in a non-trivial background metric. This leads to a more precise computation of the Virasoro conformal blocks between heavy and light operators, which are shown to be equivalent to global conformal blocks evaluated in the new background. We also generalize to the case where the operators carry U(1) charges. The refined Virasoro blocks can be used as the seed for a new Virasoro block recursion relation expanded in the heavy-light limit. Furthermore, we commentmore » on the implications of our results for the universality of black hole thermality in AdS3 , or equivalently, the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis for CFT2 at large central charge.« less

  17. Virasoro conformal blocks and thermality from classical background fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.

    2015-11-30

    We show that in 2d CFTs at large central charge, the coupling of the stress tensor to heavy operators can be re-absorbed by placing the CFT in a non-trivial background metric. This leads to a more precise computation of the Virasoro conformal blocks between heavy and light operators, which are shown to be equivalent to global conformal blocks evaluated in the new background. We also generalize to the case where the operators carry U(1) charges. The refined Virasoro blocks can be used as the seed for a new Virasoro block recursion relation expanded in the heavy-light limit. Furthermore, we comment on the implications of our results for the universality of black hole thermality in AdS3 , or equivalently, the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis for CFT2 at large central charge.

  18. A new clustering of antibody CDR loop conformations

    PubMed Central

    North, Benjamin; Lehmann, Andreas; Dunbrack, Roland L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous analyses of the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of antibodies have focused on a small number of “canonical” conformations for each loop. This is primarily the result of the work of Chothia and colleagues, most recently in 1997. Because of the widespread utility of antibodies, we have revisited the clustering of conformations of the six CDR loops with the much larger amount of structural information currently available. In this work, we were careful to use a high-quality data set by eliminating low-resolution structures and CDRs with high B-factors or high conformational energies. We used a distance function based on directional statistics and an effective clustering algorithm using affinity propagation. With this data set of over 300 non-redundant antibody structures, we were able to cover 28 CDR-length combinations (e.g., L1 length 11, or “L1-11” in our nomenclature) for L1, L2, L3, H1 and H2. The Chothia analysis covered only 20 CDR-lengths. Only four of these had more than one conformational cluster, of which two could easily be distinguished by gene source (mouse/human; κ/λ) and one purely by the presence and positions of Pro residues (L3-9). Thus using the Chothia analysis does not require the complicated set of “structure-determining residues” that is often assumed. Of our 28 CDR-lengths, 15 of them have multiple conformational clusters including ten for which Chothia had only one canonical class. We have a total of 72 clusters for the non-H3 CDRs; approximately 85% of the non-H3 sequences can be assigned to a conformational cluster based on gene source and/or sequence. We found that earlier predictions of “bulged” vs. “non-bulged” conformations based on the presence or absence of anchor residues Arg/Lys94 and Asp101 of H3 have not held up, since all four combinations lead to a majority of conformations that are bulged. Thus the earlier analyses have been significantly enhanced by the increased data. We believe the

  19. At what chain length do unbranched alkanes prefer folded conformations?

    PubMed

    Byrd, Jason N; Bartlett, Rodney J; Montgomery, John A

    2014-03-01

    Short unbranched alkanes are known to prefer linear conformations, whereas long unbranched alkanes are folded. It is not known with certainty at what chain length the linear conformation is no longer the global minimum. To clarify this point, we use ab initio and density functional methods to compute the relative energies of the linear and hairpin alkane conformers for increasing chain lengths. Extensive electronic structure calculations are performed to obtain optimized geometries, harmonic frequencies, and accurate single point energies for the selected alkane conformers from octane through octadecane. Benchmark CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ single point calculations are performed for chains through tetradecane, whereas approximate methods are required for the longer chains up to octadecane. Using frozen natural orbitals to unambiguously truncate the virtual orbital space, we are able to compute composite CCSD FNO(T) single point energies for all the chain lengths. This approximate composite method has significant computational savings compared to full CCSD(T) while retaining ∼0.15 kcal/mol accuracy compared to the benchmark results. More approximate dual-basis resolution-of-the-identity double-hybrid DFT calculations are also performed and shown to have reasonable 0.2-0.4 kcal/mol errors compared with our benchmark values. After including contributions from temperature dependent internal energy shifts, we find the preference for folded conformations to lie between hexadecane and octadecane, in excellent agreement with recent experiments [ Lüttschwager , N. O. ; Wassermann , T. N. ; Mata , R. A. ; Suhm , M. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013 , 52 , 463 ]. PMID:24524689

  20. Conformational gating of DNA conductance

    PubMed Central

    Artés, Juan Manuel; Li, Yuanhui; Qi, Jianqing; Anantram, M. P.; Hihath, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    DNA is a promising molecule for applications in molecular electronics because of its unique electronic and self-assembly properties. Here we report that the conductance of DNA duplexes increases by approximately one order of magnitude when its conformation is changed from the B-form to the A-form. This large conductance increase is fully reversible, and by controlling the chemical environment, the conductance can be repeatedly switched between the two values. The conductance of the two conformations displays weak length dependencies, as is expected for guanine-rich sequences, and can be fit with a coherence-corrected hopping model. These results are supported by ab initio electronic structure calculations that indicate that the highest occupied molecular orbital is more disperse in the A-form DNA case. These results demonstrate that DNA can behave as a promising molecular switch for molecular electronics applications and also provide additional insights into the huge dispersion of DNA conductance values found in the literature. PMID:26648400

  1. Charged gravastars admitting conformal motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmani, A. A.; Rahaman, F.; Ray, Saibal; Nandi, K. K.; Kuhfittig, Peter K. F.; Rakib, Sk. A.; Hasan, Z.

    2011-07-01

    We propose a new model of a gravastar admitting conformal motion. While retaining the framework of the Mazur-Mottola model, the gravastar is assumed to be internally charged, with an exterior defined by a Reissner-Nordström instead of a Schwarzschild line element. The solutions, obtained by exploiting an assumed conformal Killing vector, involve (i) the interior region, (ii) the shell, and (iii) the exterior region of the sphere. Of these three cases the first one is of primary interest since the total gravitational mass here turns out to be an electromagnetic mass under some specific conditions. This suggests that the interior de Sitter vacuum of a charged gravastar is essentially an electromagnetic mass model that must generate gravitational mass which provides a stable configuration by balancing the repulsive pressure arising from charge with its attractive gravity to avert a singularity. Therefore the present model, like the Mazur-Mottola model, results in the construction of a compact astrophysical object, as an alternative to a black hole. We have also analyzed various other aspects such as the stress energy tensor in the thin shell and the entropy of the system.

  2. Conformational gating of DNA conductance.

    PubMed

    Artés, Juan Manuel; Li, Yuanhui; Qi, Jianqing; Anantram, M P; Hihath, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    DNA is a promising molecule for applications in molecular electronics because of its unique electronic and self-assembly properties. Here we report that the conductance of DNA duplexes increases by approximately one order of magnitude when its conformation is changed from the B-form to the A-form. This large conductance increase is fully reversible, and by controlling the chemical environment, the conductance can be repeatedly switched between the two values. The conductance of the two conformations displays weak length dependencies, as is expected for guanine-rich sequences, and can be fit with a coherence-corrected hopping model. These results are supported by ab initio electronic structure calculations that indicate that the highest occupied molecular orbital is more disperse in the A-form DNA case. These results demonstrate that DNA can behave as a promising molecular switch for molecular electronics applications and also provide additional insights into the huge dispersion of DNA conductance values found in the literature. PMID:26648400

  3. Quantifying macromolecular conformational transition pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, Sean; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, Michael; Beckstein, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    Diverse classes of proteins function through large-scale conformational changes that are challenging for computer simulations. A range of fast path-sampling techniques have been used to generate transitions, but it has been difficult to compare paths from (and assess the relative strengths of) different methods. We introduce a comprehensive method (pathway similarity analysis, PSA) for quantitatively characterizing and comparing macromolecular pathways. The Hausdorff and Fréchet metrics (known from computational geometry) are used to quantify the degree of similarity between polygonal curves in configuration space. A strength of PSA is its use of the full information available from the 3 N-dimensional configuration space trajectory without requiring additional specific knowledge about the system. We compare a sample of eleven different methods for the closed-to-open transitions of the apo enzyme adenylate kinase (AdK) and also apply PSA to an ensemble of 400 AdK trajectories produced by dynamic importance sampling MD and the Geometrical Pathways algorithm. We discuss the method's potential to enhance our understanding of transition path sampling methods, validate them, and help guide future research toward deeper physical insights into conformational transitions.

  4. Conformal inflation coupled to matter

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    We formulate new conformal models of inflation and dark energy which generalise the Higgs-Dilaton scenario. We embed these models in unimodular gravity whose effect is to break scale invariance in the late time Universe. In the early Universe, inflation occurs close to a maximum of both the scalar potential and the scalar coupling to the Ricci scalar in the Jordan frame. At late times, the dilaton, which decouples from the dynamics during inflation, receives a potential term from unimodular gravity and leads to the acceleration of the Universe. We address two central issues in this scenario. First we show that the Damour-Polyalov mechanism, when non-relativistic matter is present prior to the start of inflation, sets the initial conditions for inflation at the maximum of the scalar potential. We then show that conformal invariance implies that matter particles are not coupled to the dilaton in the late Universe at the classical level. When fermions acquire masses at low energy, scale invariance is broken and quantum corrections induce a coupling between the dilaton and matter which is still small enough to evade the gravitational constraints in the solar system.

  5. Modeling conformational changes in cyclosporin A.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donohue, M. F.; Burgess, A. W.; Walkinshaw, M. D.; Treutlein, H. R.

    1995-01-01

    NMR and X-ray structures for the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA) reveal a remarkable difference between the unbound (free) conformation in organic solvents and the conformation bound to cyclophilin. We have performed computer simulations of the molecular dynamics of CsA under a variety of conditions and confirmed the stability of these two conformations at room temperature in water and in vacuum. However, when the free conformation was modeled in vacuum at 600 K, a transition pathway leading to the bound conformation was observed. This involved a change in the cis MeLeu-9 peptide bond to a trans conformation and the movement of the side chains forming the dominant hydrophobic cluster (residues MeBmt-1, MeLeu-4, MeLeu-6, and MeLeu-10) to the opposite side of the plane formed by the backbone atoms in the molecular ring. The final conformation had a backbone RMS deviation from the bound conformation of 0.53 A and was as stable in dynamics simulations as the bound conformation. Our calculations allowed us to make a detailed analysis of a transition pathway between the free and the bound conformations of CsA and to identify two distinct regions of coordinated movement in CsA, both of which underwent transitions independently. PMID:8535256

  6. A quantitative measure for protein conformational heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lyle, Nicholas; Das, Rahul K.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2013-01-01

    Conformational heterogeneity is a defining characteristic of proteins. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and denatured state ensembles are extreme manifestations of this heterogeneity. Inferences regarding globule versus coil formation can be drawn from analysis of polymeric properties such as average size, shape, and density fluctuations. Here we introduce a new parameter to quantify the degree of conformational heterogeneity within an ensemble to complement polymeric descriptors. The design of this parameter is guided by the need to distinguish between systems that couple their unfolding-folding transitions with coil-to-globule transitions and those systems that undergo coil-to-globule transitions with no evidence of acquiring a homogeneous ensemble of conformations upon collapse. The approach is as follows: Each conformation in an ensemble is converted into a conformational vector where the elements are inter-residue distances. Similarity between pairs of conformations is quantified using the projection between the corresponding conformational vectors. An ensemble of conformations yields a distribution of pairwise projections, which is converted into a distribution of pairwise conformational dissimilarities. The first moment of this dissimilarity distribution is normalized against the first moment of the distribution obtained by comparing conformations from the ensemble of interest to conformations drawn from a Flory random coil model. The latter sets an upper bound on conformational heterogeneity thus ensuring that the proposed measure for intra-ensemble heterogeneity is properly calibrated and can be used to compare ensembles for different sequences and across different temperatures. The new measure of conformational heterogeneity will be useful in quantitative studies of coupled folding and binding of IDPs and in de novo sequence design efforts that are geared toward controlling the degree of heterogeneity in unbound forms of IDPs. PMID:24089719

  7. Cajal bodies are linked to genome conformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiuyan; Sawyer, Iain A.; Sung, Myong-Hee; Sturgill, David; Shevtsov, Sergey P.; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Hakim, Ofir; Baek, Songjoon; Hager, Gordon L.; Dundr, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying nuclear body (NB) formation and their contribution to genome function are unknown. Here we examined the non-random positioning of Cajal bodies (CBs), major NBs involved in spliceosomal snRNP assembly and their role in genome organization. CBs are predominantly located at the periphery of chromosome territories at a multi-chromosome interface. Genome-wide chromosome conformation capture analysis (4C-seq) using CB-interacting loci revealed that CB-associated regions are enriched with highly expressed histone genes and U small nuclear or nucleolar RNA (sn/snoRNA) loci that form intra- and inter-chromosomal clusters. In particular, we observed a number of CB-dependent gene-positioning events on chromosome 1. RNAi-mediated disassembly of CBs disrupts the CB-targeting gene clusters and suppresses the expression of U sn/snoRNA and histone genes. This loss of spliceosomal snRNP production results in increased splicing noise, even in CB-distal regions. Therefore, we conclude that CBs contribute to genome organization with global effects on gene expression and RNA splicing fidelity. PMID:26997247

  8. Global Fluency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosti, Donald T.

    1999-01-01

    Defines global fluency as a facility with cultural behaviors that help an organization thrive in an ever-changing global business environment; and discusses business culture, global culture, an example of a change effort at a global company, leadership values, company values, and defining global values and practices. (Author/LRW)

  9. Characterization of IgG1 Conformation and Conformational Dynamics by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Damian; Arndt, Joseph; Domeier, Wayne; Berkowitz, Steven; Engen, John R.

    2009-04-22

    Protein function is dictated by protein conformation. For the protein biopharmaceutical industry, therefore, it is important to have analytical tools that can detect changes in protein conformation rapidly, accurately, and with high sensitivity. In this paper we show that hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS) can play an important role in fulfilling this need within the industry. H/DX-MS was used to assess both global and local conformational behavior of a recombinant monoclonal IgG1 antibody, a major class of biopharmaceuticals. Analysis of exchange into the intact, glycosylated IgG1 (and the Fab and Fc regions thereof) showed that the molecule was folded, highly stable, and highly amenable to analysis by this method using less than a nanomole of material. With improved chromatographic methods, peptide identification algorithms and data-processing steps, the analysis of deuterium levels in peptic peptides produced after labeling was accomplished in 1--2 days. On the basis of peptic peptide data, exchange was localized to specific regions of the antibody. Changes to IgG1 conformation as a result of deglycosylation were determined by comparing exchange into the glycosylated and deglycosylated forms of the antibody. Two regions of the IgG1 (residues 236-253 and 292-308) were found to have altered exchange properties upon deglycosylation. These results are consistent with previous findings concerning the role of glycosylation in the interaction of IgG1 with Fc receptors. Moreover, the data clearly illustrate how H/DX-MS can provide important characterization information on the higher order structure of antibodies and conformational changes that these molecules may experience upon modification.

  10. Measuring the mechanical properties of molecular conformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, S. P.; Taylor, S.; Baran, J. D.; Champness, N. R.; Larsson, J. A.; Moriarty, P.

    2015-09-01

    Scanning probe-actuated single molecule manipulation has proven to be an exceptionally powerful tool for the systematic atomic-scale interrogation of molecular adsorbates. To date, however, the extent to which molecular conformation affects the force required to push or pull a single molecule has not been explored. Here we probe the mechanochemical response of two tetra(4-bromophenyl)porphyrin conformers using non-contact atomic force microscopy where we find a large difference between the lateral forces required for manipulation. Remarkably, despite sharing very similar adsorption characteristics, variations in the potential energy surface are capable of prohibiting probe-induced positioning of one conformer, while simultaneously permitting manipulation of the alternative conformational form. Our results are interpreted in the context of dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations which reveal significant differences in the diffusion barriers for each conformer. These results demonstrate that conformational variation significantly modifies the mechanical response of even simple porpyhrins, potentially affecting many other flexible molecules.

  11. Board Certification: The Global Perspective.

    PubMed

    Day, Susan H

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews globalization of quality standards in medicine, with emphasis on accreditation and certification. In conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the American Board of Ophthalmology, the author explores globalization movements, standards of quality, expectations of others seeking certification, the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) International, interrelationships with the ABMS, and considerations both pragmatic and philosophical in addressing globalization of standards. PMID:27550006

  12. Global Initiatives for Early Childhood Care and Education: Global Guidelines and Global Guidelines Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trube, Mary Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This report focuses on the Association for Childhood Education International's (ACEI) Global Guidelines (GG) and Global Guidelines Assessment (GGA), which were developed in response to and in keeping with the prominence that the issue of quality early childhood care, development, and education has reached globally. Further, the paper positions the…

  13. Conformal Electromagnetic Particle in Cell: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Meierbachtol, Collin S.; Greenwood, Andrew D.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2015-10-26

    We review conformal (or body-fitted) electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) numerical solution schemes. Included is a chronological history of relevant particle physics algorithms often employed in these conformal simulations. We also provide brief mathematical descriptions of particle-tracking algorithms and current weighting schemes, along with a brief summary of major time-dependent electromagnetic solution methods. Several research areas are also highlighted for recommended future development of new conformal EM-PIC methods.

  14. Globalization and global health.

    PubMed

    Berlinguer, G

    1999-01-01

    Along with the positive or negative consequences of the globalization of health, we can consider global health as a goal, responding to human rights and to common interests. History tells us that after the "microbial unification" of the world, which began in 1492, over three centuries elapsed before the recognition of common risks and attempts to cope with them in a cross-boundary effort. In the 19th and 20th centuries, the struggle against epidemics united countries, world health became a common goal, and considerable results were achieved. However, in recent decades the notion of health as a cornerstone of economic development has been replaced by the idea that public health and health services are an obstacle to the wealth of nations. Meanwhile, new common threats are growing: among them, the exacerbation of old infections and emergence of new ones, the impact of environmental changes, drug traffic on a world scale, and destructive and self-destructive violence. New and stronger empirical motives relate the interests of peoples to universal rights and to global health. The author concludes with some proposals for policies.

  15. Conformal frame dependence of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Domènech, Guillem; Sasaki, Misao E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2015-04-01

    Physical equivalence between different conformal frames in scalar-tensor theory of gravity is a known fact. However, assuming that matter minimally couples to the metric of a particular frame, which we call the matter Jordan frame, the matter point of view of the universe may vary from frame to frame. Thus, there is a clear distinction between gravitational sector (curvature and scalar field) and matter sector. In this paper, focusing on a simple power-law inflation model in the Einstein frame, two examples are considered; a super-inflationary and a bouncing universe Jordan frames. Then we consider a spectator curvaton minimally coupled to a Jordan frame, and compute its contribution to the curvature perturbation power spectrum. In these specific examples, we find a blue tilt at short scales for the super-inflationary case, and a blue tilt at large scales for the bouncing case.

  16. Conformal approach to cylindrical DLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taloni, A.; Caglioti, E.; Loreto, V.; Pietronero, L.

    2006-09-01

    We extend the conformal mapping approach elaborated for the radial diffusion limited aggregation model (DLA) to cylindrical geometry. We introduce in particular a complex function which allows a cylindrical cluster to be grown using as an intermediate step a radial aggregate. The aggregate grown exhibits the same self-affine features as the original cylindrical DLA. The specific choice of the transformation allows us to study the relationship between the radial and the cylindrical geometry. In particular the cylindrical aggregate can be seen as a radial aggregate with particles of size increasing with the radius. On the other hand, the radial aggregate can be seen as a cylindrical aggregate with particles of size decreasing with the height. This framework, which shifts the point of view from the geometry to the size of the particles, can open the way to more quantitative studies on the relationship between radial and cylindrical DLA.

  17. Conformable eddy current array delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summan, Rahul; Pierce, Gareth; Macleod, Charles; Mineo, Carmelo; Riise, Jonathan; Morozov, Maxim; Dobie, Gordon; Bolton, Gary; Raude, Angélique; Dalpé, Colombe; Braumann, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The external surface of stainless steel containers used for the interim storage of nuclear material may be subject to Atmospherically Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (AISCC). The inspection of such containers poses a significant challenge due to the large quantities involved; therefore, automating the inspection process is of considerable interest. This paper reports upon a proof-of-concept project concerning the automated NDT of a set of test containers containing artificially generated AISCCs. An Eddy current array probe with a conformable padded surface from Eddyfi was used as the NDT sensor and end effector on a KUKA KR5 arc HW robot. A kinematically valid cylindrical raster scan path was designed using the KUKA|PRC path planning software. Custom software was then written to interface measurement acquisition from the Eddyfi hardware with the motion control of the robot. Preliminary results and analysis are presented from scanning two canisters.

  18. Electromagnetic characterization of conformal antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, John L.; Kempel, Leo C.; Alexanian, Angelos; Jin, J. M.; Yu, C. L.; Woo, Alex C.

    1992-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this project is to develop a new technique which permits an accurate simulation of microstrip patch antennas or arrays with various feed, superstrate and/or substrate configurations residing in a recessed cavity whose aperture is planar, cylindrical or otherwise conformed to the substructure. The technique combines the finite element and boundary integral methods to formulate a system suitable for solution via the conjugate gradient method in conjunction with the fast Fourier transform. The final code is intended to compute both scattering and radiation patterns of the structure with an affordable memory demand. With upgraded capabilities, the four included papers examined the radar cross section (RCS), input impedance, gain, and resonant frequency of several rectangular configurations using different loading and substrate/superstrate configurations.

  19. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity.

    PubMed

    Saldaño, Tadeo E; Monzon, Alexander M; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  20. Rotational Spectroscopy Unveils Eleven Conformers of Adrenaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Cortijo, V.; Mata, S.; Lopez, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Recent improvements in our LA-MB-FTMW instrumentation have allowed the characterization of eleven and eight conformers for the neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline respectively. The observation of this rich conformational behavior is in accordance with the recent observation of seven conformers for dopamine and in sharp contrast with the conformational reduction proposed for catecholamines. C. Cabezas, I. Peña, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 486. H. Mitsuda, M. Miyazaki, I. B. Nielsen, P. Carcabal,C. Dedonder, C. Jouvet, S. Ishiuchi, M. Fujii J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2010, 1, 1130.

  1. Pyrrolidine nucleotide analogs with a tunable conformation

    PubMed Central

    Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; Rejman, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Summary Conformational preferences of the pyrrolidine ring in nucleotide analogs 7–14 were investigated by means of NMR and molecular modeling. The effect of the relative configuration of hydroxy and nucleobase substituents as well as the effect of the alkylation or acylation of the pyrrolidine nitrogen atom on the conformation of the pyrrolidine ring were studied. The results of a conformational analysis show that the alkylation/acylation can be effectively used for tuning the pyrrolidine conformation over the whole pseudorotation cycle. PMID:25246956

  2. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Saldaño, Tadeo E.; Monzon, Alexander M.; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  3. Fabrication challenges associated with conformal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, John; Eichholtz, Richard A.; Sulzbach, Frank C.

    2001-09-01

    A conformal optic is typically an optical window that conforms smoothly to the external shape of a system platform to improve aerodynamics. Conformal optics can be on-axis, such as an ogive missile dome, or off-axis, such as in a free form airplane wing. A common example of conformal optics is the automotive head light window that conforms to the body of the car aerodynamics and aesthetics. The unusual shape of conformal optics creates tremendous challenges for design, manufacturing, and testing. This paper will discuss fabrication methods that have been successfully demonstrated to produce conformal missile domes and associated wavefront corrector elements. It will identify challenges foreseen with more complex free-form configurations. Work presented in this paper was directed by the Precision Conformal Optics Consortium (PCOT). PCOT is comprised of both industrial and academic members who teamed to develop and demonstrate conformal optical systems suitable for insertion into future military programs. The consortium was funded under DARPA agreement number MDA972-96-9-08000.

  4. Present and potential future contributions of sulfate, black and organic carbon aerosols from China to global air quality, premature mortality and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikawa, E.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Liu, J.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosols are harmful to human health and have both direct and indirect effects on climate. China is a major contributor to global emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a sulfate (SO42-) precursor, organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) aerosols. Although increasingly examined, the effect of present and potential future levels of these emissions on global premature mortality and climate change has not been well quantified. Through both direct and indirect effects, SO42- and OC exert negative radiative forcing (cooling) while BC exerts positive forcing (warming). We analyze the effect of China's emissions of SO2, SO42-, OC and BC in 2000 and for three emission scenarios in 2030 on global surface aerosol concentrations, premature mortality, and radiative forcing. Using global models of chemical transport (MOZART-2) and radiative transfer (GFDL RTM), and combining simulation results with gridded population data, mortality rates, and concentration-response relationships from the epidemiological literature, we estimate the contribution of Chinese aerosols to global annual premature mortality and to radiative forcing in 2000 and 2030. In 2000, we estimate these aerosols cause 385,320 premature deaths in China and an additional 18 240 globally. In 2030, aggressive emission controls lead to a reduction in premature deaths to 200,370 in China and 7,740 elsewhere, while under a high emissions scenario premature deaths would increase to 602,950 in China and to 29,750 elsewhere. Because the negative radiative forcing from SO42- and OC is larger than the positive forcing from BC, the Chinese aerosols lead to global net direct radiative forcing of -74 mW m-2 in 2000 and between -15 and -97 mW m-2 in 2030 based on the emissions scenario. Our analysis suggests that environmental policies that simultaneously improve public health and mitigate climate change would be highly beneficial (eg. reductions in BC emissions).

  5. Intrinsic time in Wheeler-DeWitt conformal superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. E.; Pervushin, V. N.

    In Geometrodynamics, the York's extrinsic time, constructed of the tensor of extrinsic curvature and the Misner's intrinsic time, built of the spatial metric tensor, coexist. In our paper, we prove the preference of selecting the internal time. To extract the intrinsic time, we generalize the Dirac's mapping of transition to conformal variables. In Friedmann cosmology, the many-fingered intrinsic time obtains a sense of a global time of the Universe. An accounting of metric scalar linear perturbations leads to adding some corrections not dominated to the effective energy density in the Hubble law. The metric vector and tensor perturbations do not influence the internal time in linear approximation.

  6. Picosecond to nanosecond dynamics provide a source of conformational entropy for protein folding.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Andreas M; Demmel, Franz; Ollivier, Jacques; Seydel, Tilo

    2016-08-01

    Myoglobin can be trapped in fully folded structures, partially folded molten globules, and unfolded states under stable equilibrium conditions. Here, we report an experimental study on the conformational dynamics of different folded conformational states of apo- and holomyoglobin in solution. Global protein diffusion and internal molecular motions were probed by neutron time-of-flight and neutron backscattering spectroscopy on the picosecond and nanosecond time scales. Global protein diffusion was found to depend on the α-helical content of the protein suggesting that charges on the macromolecule increase the short-time diffusion of protein. With regard to the molten globules, a gel-like phase due to protein entanglement and interactions with neighbouring macromolecules was visible due to a reduction of the global diffusion coefficients on the nanosecond time scale. Diffusion coefficients, residence and relaxation times of internal protein dynamics and root mean square displacements of localised internal motions were determined for the investigated structural states. The difference in conformational entropy ΔSconf of the protein between the unfolded and the partially or fully folded conformations was extracted from the measured root mean square displacements. Using thermodynamic parameters from the literature and the experimentally determined ΔSconf values we could identify the entropic contribution of the hydration shell ΔShydr of the different folded states. Our results point out the relevance of conformational entropy of the protein and the hydration shell for stability and folding of myoglobin. PMID:27425443

  7. Conformational transitions of weak polyacids grafted to nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, S. A.; Panagiotopoulos, A. Z.

    2012-10-01

    The charge distribution on polyelectrolytes is a key factor, which controls their conformation and interactions. In weak polyelectrolytes, this distribution is determined by a number of factors, including the solvent conditions and local environment. In this work, we investigate charge distributions of chains end-grafted on a spherical nanoparticle in a salt solution, using grand canonical titration Monte Carlo simulations of a coarse-grained polymer model. In this approach, the ionization state of each polymer bead fluctuates based on the dissociation constant, pH of the solution, and interactions with other particles in the system. We determine charge and polymer conformations as functions of the pH and solvent quality. We compare the results to a fixed charge model and also investigate the role of grafting density and the effect of curvature on the film morphologies.

  8. Sharp interfaces in two-dimensional free boundary problems: interface calculation via matched conformal maps.

    PubMed

    Kent, Stuart; Venkataramani, Shankar C

    2014-07-01

    We use conformal maps to study a free boundary problem for a two-fluid electromechanical system, where the interface between the fluids is determined by the combined effects of electrostatic forces, gravity, and surface tension. The free boundary in our system develops sharp corners or singularities in certain parameter regimes, and this is an impediment to using existing "single-scale" numerical conformal mapping methods. The difficulty is due to the phenomenon of crowding, i.e., the tendency of nodes in the preimage plane to concentrate near the sharp regions of the boundary, leaving the smooth regions of the boundary poorly resolved. A natural idea is to exploit the scale separation between the sharp regions and smooth regions to solve for each region separately and then stitch the solutions together. However, this is not straightforward as conformal maps are rigid "global" objects, and it is not obvious how one would patch two conformal maps together to obtain a new conformal map. We develop a "multiscale" (i.e., adaptive) conformal mapping method that allows us to carry out this program of stitching conformal maps on different scales together. We successfully apply our method to the electromechanical model problem. PMID:25122315

  9. Cyclo-biphenalenyl biradicaloid molecular materials: conformation, rearrangement, magnetism, and thermochromism

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Tian, Yong-Hui; Kertesz, Prof. Miklos

    2010-01-01

    Cyclo-biphenalenyl biradicaloid molecular materials with chair- and boat-conformations are studied by restricted and broken-symmetry DFT using the M06 family of meta-GGA functionals. The global minima of these molecular materials are magnetically silent due to the sigma-bond connecting the two phenalenyls, while the sigma-bond may undergo low-barrier sigmatropic rearrangements via pi-pi bonded paramagnetic intermediates. The validation of theory is performed for the chair-conformation by comparing the sigma-bonded structures and the rearrangement barriers with experimental data. The boat-conformation is then studied using the validated functional. The electronic spectra of both chair- and boat-conformations are calculated and their applications in thermochromism are discussed.

  10. Computing Nonequilibrium Conformational Dynamics of Structured Nucleic Acid Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Sedeh, Reza Sharifi; Pan, Keyao; Adendorff, Matthew Ralph; Hallatschek, Oskar; Bathe, Klaus-Jürgen; Bathe, Mark

    2016-01-12

    Synthetic nucleic acids can be programmed to form precise three-dimensional structures on the nanometer-scale. These thermodynamically stable complexes can serve as structural scaffolds to spatially organize functional molecules including multiple enzymes, chromophores, and force-sensing elements with internal dynamics that include substrate reaction-diffusion, excitonic energy transfer, and force-displacement response that often depend critically on both the local and global conformational dynamics of the nucleic acid assembly. However, high molecular weight assemblies exhibit long time-scale and large length-scale motions that cannot easily be sampled using all-atom computational procedures such as molecular dynamics. As an alternative, here we present a computational framework to compute the overdamped conformational dynamics of structured nucleic acid assemblies and apply it to a DNA-based tweezer, a nine-layer DNA origami ring, and a pointer-shaped DNA origami object, which consist of 204, 3,600, and over 7,000 basepairs, respectively. The framework employs a mechanical finite element model for the DNA nanostructure combined with an implicit solvent model to either simulate the Brownian dynamics of the assembly or alternatively compute its Brownian modes. Computational results are compared with an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the DNA-based tweezer. Several hundred microseconds of Brownian dynamics are simulated for the nine-layer ring origami object to reveal its long time-scale conformational dynamics, and the first ten Brownian modes of the pointer-shaped structure are predicted. PMID:26636351

  11. A conceptual design methodology for enhanced conformance quality

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, C.M.; Barkan, P.

    1995-12-31

    Traditional manufacturing practice has depended upon Statistical Process Control (SPC) to eliminate defects. However, our research demonstrates that these sampling based methods significantly underestimate the tails of a distribution. As a consequence of the limitations of SPC, mistakes require different methods of control to achieve defect rates in the tens of parts per million range. Furthermore, product complexity contributes to defects resulting from both mistakes and excess variation. Correlations between defects and complexity lead to a new opportunity for selecting superior product concepts.

  12. Conformity assessment for seismic monitoring and reservoir simulation at the Ketzin pilot site - how much conformity can be reached?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüth, Stefan; Ivanova, Alexandra; Kempka, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The EU CCS Directive defines three high-level criteria which have to be fulfilled by a site operator in the post closure phase of a storage site before liability can be transferred to the public after site closure. One of these high-level requirements is "Demonstrating conformity between observed and simulated plume behaviour". The observed plume behaviour is derived from geophysical and/or geochemical monitoring. Repeated 3D seismic observations have proven to provide the most comprehensive image of a CO2 plume in various projects such as Sleipner, Weyburn, or Ketzin. The simulated plume behaviour is derived from reservoir simulation using a model calibrated with monitoring results. Plume observations using any monitoring method are always affected by limited resolution and detection ability, and reservoir simulations will only be able to provide an approximated representation of the occurring reservoir processes. Therefore, full conformity between observed and simulated plume behaviour is difficult to achieve, if it is at all. It is therefore of crucial importance for each storage site to understand to what degree conformity can be achieved under realistic conditions, comprising noise affected monitoring data and reservoir models based on geological uncertainties. We applied performance criteria (plume footprint area, lateral migration distance, plume volume, and similarity index) for a comparison between monitoring results (4D seismic measurements) and reservoir simulations, considering a range of seismic amplitude values as noise threshold and a range of minimum thickness of the simulated CO2 plume. Relating the performance criteria to the noise and thickness threshold values allows assessing the quality of conformance between simulated and observed behaviour of a CO2 plume. The Ketzin site is provided with a comprehensive monitoring data set and a history-matched reservoir model. Considering the relatively high noise level, which is inherent for land

  13. Conformational readout of RNA by small ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kligun, Efrat; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules have highly versatile structures that can fold into myriad conformations, providing many potential pockets for binding small molecules. The increasing number of available RNA structures, in complex with proteins, small ligands and in free form, enables the design of new therapeutically useful RNA-binding ligands. Here we studied RNA ligand complexes from 10 RNA groups extracted from the protein data bank (PDB), including adaptive and non-adaptive complexes. We analyzed the chemical, physical, structural and conformational properties of binding pockets around the ligand. Comparing the properties of ligand-binding pockets to the properties of computed pockets extracted from all available RNA structures and RNA-protein interfaces, revealed that ligand-binding pockets, mainly the adaptive pockets, are characterized by unique properties, specifically enriched in rare conformations of the nucleobase and the sugar pucker. Further, we demonstrate that nucleotides possessing the rare conformations are preferentially involved in direct interactions with the ligand. Overall, based on our comprehensive analysis of RNA-ligand complexes, we suggest that the unique conformations adopted by RNA nucleotides play an important role in RNA recognition by small ligands. We term the recognition of a binding site by a ligand via the unique RNA conformations “RNA conformational readout.” We propose that “conformational readout” is a general way by which RNA binding pockets are recognized and selected from an ensemble of different RNA states. PMID:23618839

  14. Conformational Sampling of Peptides in Cellular Environments☆

    PubMed Central

    Tanizaki, Seiichiro; Clifford, Jacob; Connelly, Brian D.; Feig, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Biological systems provide a complex environment that can be understood in terms of its dielectric properties. High concentrations of macromolecules and cosolvents effectively reduce the dielectric constant of cellular environments, thereby affecting the conformational sampling of biomolecules. To examine this effect in more detail, the conformational preference of alanine dipeptide, poly-alanine, and melittin in different dielectric environments is studied with computer simulations based on recently developed generalized Born methodology. Results from these simulations suggest that extended conformations are favored over α-helical conformations at the dipeptide level at and below dielectric constants of 5–10. Furthermore, lower-dielectric environments begin to significantly stabilize helical structures in poly-alanine at ɛ = 20. In the more complex peptide melittin, different dielectric environments shift the equilibrium between two main conformations: a nearly fully extended helix that is most stable in low dielectrics and a compact, V-shaped conformation consisting of two helices that is preferred in higher dielectric environments. An additional conformation is only found to be significantly populated at intermediate dielectric constants. Good agreement with previous studies of different peptides in specific, less-polar solvent environments, suggest that helix stabilization and shifts in conformational preferences in such environments are primarily due to a reduced dielectric environment rather than specific molecular details. The findings presented here make predictions of how peptide sampling may be altered in dense cellular environments with reduced dielectric response. PMID:17905846

  15. 40 CFR 52.938 - General conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Implementation Plan (SIP). The Commonwealth of Kentucky incorporated by reference regulations 40 CFR part 51... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General conformity. 52.938 Section 52...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.938 General conformity. The...

  16. 14 CFR 17.45 - Conforming amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conforming amendments. 17.45 Section 17.45 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES PROCEDURES FOR PROTESTS AND CONTRACTS DISPUTES Finality and Review § 17.45 Conforming amendments. The...

  17. Conformity to Peer Pressure in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haun, Daniel B. M.; Tomasello, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Both adults and adolescents often conform their behavior and opinions to peer groups, even when they themselves know better. The current study investigated this phenomenon in 24 groups of 4 children between 4;2 and 4;9 years of age. Children often made their judgments conform to those of 3 peers, who had made obviously erroneous but unanimous…

  18. Regulatory Conformance Checking: Logic and Logical Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinesh, Nikhil

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of checking whether an organization conforms to a body of regulation. Conformance is studied in a runtime verification setting. The regulation is translated to a logic, from which we synthesize monitors. The monitors are evaluated as the state of an organization evolves over time, raising an alarm if a violation is…

  19. CCProf: exploring conformational change profile of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Che-Wei; Chou, Chai-Wei; Chang, Darby Tien-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In many biological processes, proteins have important interactions with various molecules such as proteins, ions or ligands. Many proteins undergo conformational changes upon these interactions, where regions with large conformational changes are critical to the interactions. This work presents the CCProf platform, which provides conformational changes of entire proteins, named conformational change profile (CCP) in the context. CCProf aims to be a platform where users can study potential causes of novel conformational changes. It provides 10 biological features, including conformational change, potential binding target site, secondary structure, conservation, disorder propensity, hydropathy propensity, sequence domain, structural domain, phosphorylation site and catalytic site. All these information are integrated into a well-aligned view, so that researchers can capture important relevance between different biological features visually. The CCProf contains 986 187 protein structure pairs for 3123 proteins. In addition, CCProf provides a 3D view in which users can see the protein structures before and after conformational changes as well as binding targets that induce conformational changes. All information (e.g. CCP, binding targets and protein structures) shown in CCProf, including intermediate data are available for download to expedite further analyses. Database URL: http://zoro.ee.ncku.edu.tw/ccprof/ PMID:27016699

  20. PDB ligand conformational energies calculated quantum-mechanically.

    PubMed

    Sitzmann, Markus; Weidlich, Iwona E; Filippov, Igor V; Liao, Chenzhong; Peach, Megan L; Ihlenfeldt, Wolf-Dietrich; Karki, Rajeshri G; Borodina, Yulia V; Cachau, Raul E; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2012-03-26

    We present here a greatly updated version of an earlier study on the conformational energies of protein-ligand complexes in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) [Nicklaus et al. Bioorg. Med. Chem. 1995, 3, 411-428], with the goal of improving on all possible aspects such as number and selection of ligand instances, energy calculations performed, and additional analyses conducted. Starting from about 357,000 ligand instances deposited in the 2008 version of the Ligand Expo database of the experimental 3D coordinates of all small-molecule instances in the PDB, we created a "high-quality" subset of ligand instances by various filtering steps including application of crystallographic quality criteria and structural unambiguousness. Submission of 640 Gaussian 03 jobs yielded a set of about 415 successfully concluded runs. We used a stepwise optimization of internal degrees of freedom at the DFT level of theory with the B3LYP/6-31G(d) basis set and a single-point energy calculation at B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) after each round of (partial) optimization to separate energy changes due to bond length stretches vs bond angle changes vs torsion changes. Even for the most "conservative" choice of all the possible conformational energies-the energy difference between the conformation in which all internal degrees of freedom except torsions have been optimized and the fully optimized conformer-significant energy values were found. The range of 0 to ~25 kcal/mol was populated quite evenly and independently of the crystallographic resolution. A smaller number of "outliers" of yet higher energies were seen only at resolutions above 1.3 Å. The energies showed some correlation with molecular size and flexibility but not with crystallographic quality metrics such as the Cruickshank diffraction-component precision index (DPI) and R(free)-R, or with the ligand instance-specific metrics such as occupancy-weighted B-factor (OWAB), real-space R factor (RSR), and real-space correlation coefficient

  1. Technidilaton at the conformal edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Michio; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Technidilaton (TD) was proposed long ago in the technicolor near criticality/conformality. To reveal the critical behavior of TD, we explicitly compute the nonperturbative contributions to the scale anomaly <{theta}{sub {mu}}{sup {mu}>} and to the technigluon condensate <{alpha}G{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup 2}>, which are generated by the dynamical mass m of the technifermions. Our computation is based on the (improved) ladder Schwinger-Dyson equation, with the gauge coupling {alpha} replaced by the two-loop running coupling {alpha}({mu}) having the Caswell-Banks-Zaks infrared fixed point {alpha}{sub *}: {alpha}({mu}){approx_equal}{alpha}={alpha}{sub *} for the infrared region m<{mu}<{Lambda}{sub TC}, where {Lambda}{sub TC} is the intrinsic scale (analogue of {Lambda}{sub QCD} of QCD) relevant to the perturbative scale anomaly. We find that -<{theta}{sub {mu}}{sup {mu}}>/m{sup 4}{yields}const{ne}0 and <{alpha}G{sub {mu}}{nu}{sup 2}>/m{sup 4}{yields}({alpha}/{alpha}{sub cr}-1){sup -3/2}{yields}{infinity} in the criticality limit m/{Lambda}{sub TC}{approx}exp(-{pi}/({alpha}/{alpha}{sub cr}-1){sup 1/2}){yields}0 ({alpha}={alpha}{sub *}=>{alpha}{sub cr}, or N{sub f} approaches N{sub f}{sup cr}) ('conformal edge'). Our result precisely reproduces the formal identity <{theta}{sub {mu}}{sup {mu}>}=({beta}({alpha})/4{alpha}{sup 2})<{alpha}G{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup 2}>, where {beta}({alpha})={Lambda}{sub TC}({partial_derivative}{alpha}/{partial_derivative}{Lambda}{sub TC})=-(2{alpha}{sub cr}/{pi}){center_dot}({alpha}/{alpha}{sub cr}-1){sup 3/2} is the nonperturbative beta function corresponding to the above essential singularity scaling of m/{Lambda}{sub TC}. Accordingly, the partially conserved dilatation current implies (M{sub TD}/m){sup 2}(F{sub TD}/m){sup 2}=-4<{theta}{sub {mu}}{sup {mu}}>/m{sup 4}{yields}const{ne}0 at criticality limit, where M{sub TD} is the mass of TD and F{sub TD} the decay constant of TD. We thus conclude that at criticality limit the TD could become a ''true

  2. Technidilaton at the conformal edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Technidilaton (TD) was proposed long ago in the technicolor near criticality/conformality. To reveal the critical behavior of TD, we explicitly compute the nonperturbative contributions to the scale anomaly ⟨θμμ⟩ and to the technigluon condensate ⟨αGμν2⟩, which are generated by the dynamical mass m of the technifermions. Our computation is based on the (improved) ladder Schwinger-Dyson equation, with the gauge coupling α replaced by the two-loop running coupling α(μ) having the Caswell-Banks-Zaks infrared fixed point α*: α(μ)≃α=α* for the infrared region m<μ<ΛTC, where ΛTC is the intrinsic scale (analogue of ΛQCD of QCD) relevant to the perturbative scale anomaly. We find that -⟨θμμ⟩/m4→const≠0 and ⟨αGμν2⟩/m4→(α/αcr-1)-3/2→∞ in the criticality limit m/ΛTC˜exp⁡(-π/(α/αcr-1)1/2)→0 (α=α*↘αcr, or Nf↗Nfcr) (“conformal edge”). Our result precisely reproduces the formal identity ⟨θμμ⟩=(β(α)/4α2)⟨αGμν2⟩, where β(α)=ΛTC(∂α)/(∂ΛTC)=-(2αcr/π)·(α/αcr-1)3/2 is the nonperturbative beta function corresponding to the above essential singularity scaling of m/ΛTC. Accordingly, the partially conserved dilatation current implies (MTD/m)2(FTD/m)2=-4⟨θμμ⟩/m4→const≠0 at criticality limit, where MTD is the mass of TD and FTD the decay constant of TD. We thus conclude that at criticality limit the TD could become a “true (massless) Nambu-Goldstone boson” MTD/m→0, only when m/FTD→0, namely, getting decoupled, as was the case of “holographic technidilaton” of Haba-Matsuzaki-Yamawaki. The decoupled TD can be a candidate of dark matter.

  3. Educational Reform in the Global City: The Case of the Quality-Schools-for-the-Poor Initiative in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiller, Jessica T.

    2007-01-01

    Globalization has not only created the conditions that have made such educational reforms necessary, but it has also provided market-based ideology to undergird reform efforts from Santiago to New York City. Although a neoliberal approach to education is clearly en vogue, many educators and critics nonetheless have questioned the premises behind…

  4. Superintegrability of d-Dimensional Conformal Blocks.

    PubMed

    Isachenkov, Mikhail; Schomerus, Volker

    2016-08-12

    We observe that conformal blocks of scalar four-point functions in a d-dimensional conformal field theory can be mapped to eigenfunctions of a two-particle hyperbolic Calogero-Sutherland Hamiltonian. The latter describes two coupled Pöschl-Teller particles. Their interaction, whose strength depends smoothly on the dimension d, is known to be superintegrable. Our observation enables us to exploit the rich mathematical literature on Calogero-Sutherland models in deriving various results for conformal field theory. These include an explicit construction of conformal blocks in terms of Heckman-Opdam hypergeometric functions. We conclude with a short outlook, in particular, on the consequences of integrability for the theory of conformal blocks. PMID:27563949

  5. Performance of Conformable Ablators in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, J.; Fan, W.; Skokova, K.; Stackpoole, M.; Beck, R.; Chavez-Garcia, J.

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICAs performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  6. Superintegrability of d -Dimensional Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isachenkov, Mikhail; Schomerus, Volker

    2016-08-01

    We observe that conformal blocks of scalar four-point functions in a d -dimensional conformal field theory can be mapped to eigenfunctions of a two-particle hyperbolic Calogero-Sutherland Hamiltonian. The latter describes two coupled Pöschl-Teller particles. Their interaction, whose strength depends smoothly on the dimension d , is known to be superintegrable. Our observation enables us to exploit the rich mathematical literature on Calogero-Sutherland models in deriving various results for conformal field theory. These include an explicit construction of conformal blocks in terms of Heckman-Opdam hypergeometric functions. We conclude with a short outlook, in particular, on the consequences of integrability for the theory of conformal blocks.

  7. Vibrational and vibronic spectra of tryptamine conformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorkas, Nitzan; Bernat, Amir; Izbitski, Shay; Bar, Ilana

    2013-03-01

    Conformation-specific ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectra, including both Raman loss and Raman gain lines, along with visible-visible-ultraviolet hole-burning spectra of tryptamine (TRA) conformers have been measured simultaneously, with the aim of obtaining new data for identifying them. The slightly different orientations of the ethylamine side chain relative to the indole lead to unique spectral signatures, pointing to the presence of seven TRA conformers in the molecular beam. Comparison of ionization-loss stimulated Raman spectra to computationally scaled harmonic Raman spectra, especially in the alkyl C-H and amine N-H stretch regions together with the retrieved information on the stabilities of the TRA conformers assisted their characterization and structural identification. The prospects and limitations of using these spectroscopic methods as potential conformational probes of flexible molecules are discussed.

  8. Dolastatin 11 conformations, analogues and pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ahad; Bates, Robert B; Crane, Zackary D; Dicus, Christopher W; Gramme, Michelle R; Hamel, Ernest; Marcischak, Jacob; Martinez, David S; McClure, Kelly J; Nakkiew, Pichaya; Pettit, George R; Stessman, Chad C; Sufi, Bilal A; Yarick, Gayle V

    2005-07-01

    Twenty analogues of the natural antitumor agent dolastatin 11, including majusculamide C, were synthesized and tested for cytotoxicity against human cancer cells and stimulation of actin polymerization. Only analogues containing the 30-membered ring were active. Molecular modeling and NMR evidence showed the low-energy conformations. The amide bonds are all trans except for the one between the Tyr and Val units, which is cis. Since an analogue restricted to negative 2-3-4-5 angles stimulated actin polymerization but was inactive in cells, the binding conformation (most likely the lowest-energy conformation in water) has a negative 2-3-4-5 angle, whereas a conformation with a positive 2-3-4-5 angle (most likely the lowest energy conformation in chloroform) goes through cell walls. The highly active R alcohol from borohydride reduction of dolastatin 11 is a candidate for conversion to prodrugs.

  9. Conformational implications of asparagine-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed Central

    Imperiali, B; Rickert, K W

    1995-01-01

    The effects of cotranslational protein modification on the process of protein folding are poorly understood. Time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer has been used to assess the impact of glycosylation on the conformational dynamics of flexible oligopeptides. The peptide sequences examined are selected from glycoproteins of known three-dimensional structure. The energy transfer modulation associated with N-linked glycosylation is consistent with the glycopeptides sampling different conformational profiles in water. Results show that glycosylation causes the modified peptides to adopt a different ensemble of conformations, and for some peptides this change may lead to conformations that are more compact and better approximate the conformation of these peptides in the final folded protein. This result further implies that cotranslational glycosylation can trigger the timely formation of structural nucleation elements and thus assist in the complex process of protein folding. PMID:7816856

  10. Protein biosynthesis with conformationally restricted amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Ellman, J.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1993-05-19

    The incorporation of conformationally constrained amino acids into peptides is a powerful approach for generating structurally defined peptides as conformational probes and bioactive agents. The ability to site-specifically introduce constrained amino acids into large polypeptide chains would provide a similar opportunity to probe the flexibility, conformation, folding and stability of proteins. To this end, we have examined the competence of the Escherichia coli protein biosynthetic machinery to incorporate a number of these unnatural amino acids into the 164 residue protein T4 lysozyme (T4L). Results clearly demonstrate that the protein biosynthetic machinery can accommodate a wide variety of conformationally constrained amino acids. The expansion of structural motifs that can be biosynthetically incorporated into proteins to include a large number of conformationally constrained amino acids significantly increases the power of mutagenesis methods as probes of protein structure and function and provides additional insights into the steric requirements of the translational machinery. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Shape dynamics and Mach's principles: Gravity from conformal geometrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryb, Sean

    2012-04-01

    In this PhD thesis, we develop a new approach to classical gravity starting from Mach's principles and the idea that the local shape of spatial configurations is fundamental. This new theory, "shape dynamics", is equivalent to general relativity but differs in an important respect: shape dynamics is a theory of dynamic conformal 3-geometry, not a theory of spacetime. Equivalence is achieved by trading foliation invariance for local conformal invariance (up to a global scale). After the trading, what is left is a gauge theory invariant under 3d diffeomorphisms and conformal transformations that preserve the volume of space. The local canonical constraints are linear and the constraint algebra closes with structure constants. Shape dynamics, thus, provides a novel new starting point for quantum gravity. The procedure for the trading of symmetries was inspired by a technique called "best matching". We explain best matching and its relation to Mach's principles. The key features of best matching are illustrated through finite dimensional toy models. A general picture is then established where relational theories are treated as gauge theories on configuration space. Shape dynamics is then constructed by applying best matching to conformal geometry. We then study shape dynamics in more detail by computing its Hamiltonian and Hamilton-Jacobi functional perturbatively. This thesis is intended as a pedagogical but complete introduction to shape dynamics and the Machian ideas that led to its discovery. The reader is encouraged to start with the introduction, which gives a conceptual outline and links to the relevant sections in the text for a more rigorous exposition. When full rigor is lacking, references to the literature are given. It is hoped that this thesis may provide a starting point for anyone interested in learning about shape dynamics.

  12. Dissecting the dynamic conformations of the metamorphic protein lymphotactin.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Sophie R; Porrini, Massimiliano; Konijnenberg, Albert; Clarke, David J; Tyler, Robert C; Langridge-Smith, Patrick R R; MacPhee, Cait E; Volkman, Brian F; Barran, Perdita E

    2014-10-30

    A mass spectrometer provides an ideal laboratory to probe the structure and stability of isolated protein ions. Interrogation of each discrete mass/charge-separated species enables the determination of the intrinsic stability of a protein fold, gaining snapshots of unfolding pathways. In solution, the metamorphic protein lymphotactin (Ltn) exists in equilibrium between two distinct conformations, a monomeric (Ltn10) and a dimeric (Ltn40) fold. Here, we use electron capture dissociation (ECD) and drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (DT IM-MS) to analyze both forms and use molecular dynamics (MD) to consider how the solution fold alters in a solvent-free environment. DT IM-MS reveals significant conformational flexibility for the monomer, while the dimer appears more conformationally restricted. These findings are supported by MD calculations, which reveal how salt bridges stabilize the conformers in vacuo. Following ECD experiments, a distinctive fragmentation pattern is obtained for both the monomer and dimer. Monomer fragmentation becomes more pronounced with increasing charge state especially in the disordered regions and C-terminal α-helix in the solution fold. Lower levels of fragmentation are seen in the β-sheet regions and in regions that contain salt bridges, identified by MD simulations. The lowest charge state of the dimer for which we obtain ECD data ([D+9H](9+)) exhibits extensive fragmentation with no relationship to the solution fold and has a smaller collision cross section (CCS) than charge states 10-13+, suggesting a "collapsed" encounter complex. Other charge states of the dimer, as for the monomer, are resistant to fragmentation in regions of β-sheets in the solution fold. This study provides evidence for preservation and loss of global fold and secondary structural elements, providing a tantalizing glimpse into the power of the emerging field of native top-down mass spectrometry.

  13. Conformational properties of amphotericin B amide derivatives--impact on selective toxicity.

    PubMed

    Resat, H; Sungur, F A; Baginski, M; Borowski, E; Aviyente, V

    2000-10-01

    Even though it is highly toxic, Amphotericin B (AmB), an amphipathic polyene macrolide antibiotic, is used in the treatment of severe systemic fungal infections as a life-saving drug. To examine the influence of conformational factors on selective toxicity of these compounds, we have investigated the conformational properties of five AmB amide derivatives. It was found that the extended conformation with torsional angles (phi,psi)=(290 degrees,180 degrees) is a common minimum of the potential energy surfaces (PES) of unsubstituted AmB and its amide derivatives. The extended conformation of the studied compounds allows for the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen bond network between adjacent antibiotic molecules in the open channel configuration. Therefore, the extended conformation is expected to be the dominant conformer in an open AmB (or its amide derivatives) membrane channel. The derivative compounds for calculations were chosen according to their selective toxicity compared to AmB and they had a wide range of selective toxicity. Except for two AmB derivatives, the PES maps of the derivatives reveal that the molecules can coexist in more than one conformer. Taking into account the cumulative conclusions drawn from the earlier MD simulation studies of AmB membrane channel, the results of the potential energy surface maps, and the physical considerations of the molecular structures, we hypothesize a new model of structure-selective toxicity of AmB derivatives. In this proposed model the presence of the extended conformation as the only well defined global conformer for AmB derivatives is taken as the indicator of their higher selective toxicity. This model successfully explains our results. To further test our model, we also investigated an AmB derivative whose selective toxicity has not been experimentally measured before. Our prediction for the selective toxicity of this compound can be tested in experiments to validate or invalidate the proposed model

  14. Conformal Higgs, or Techni-Dilaton -- Composite Higgs Near Conformality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the folklore that Technicolor (TC) is a "Higgsless theory", we shall discuss existence of a composite Higgs boson, Techni-Dilaton (TD), a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of the scale invariance in the Scale-invariant/Walking/Conformal TC (SWC TC) which generates a large anomalous dimension γm ≃ 1 in a wide region from the dynamical mass m = {O} ({TeV}) of the techni-fermion all the way up to the intrinsic scale ΛTC of the SWC TC (analogue of ΛQCD), where ΛTC is taken typically as the scale of the Extended TC scale ΛETC: ΛTC ≃ ΛETC 103 TeV (≫ m). All the techni-hadrons have mass on the same order {O}(m), which in SWC TC is extremely smaller than the intrinsic scale ΛTC ≃ ΛETC, in sharp contrast to QCD where both are of the same order. The mass of TD arises from the non-perturbative scale anomaly associated with the techni-fermion mass generation and is typically 500-600 GeV, even smaller than other techni-hadrons of the same order of {O}(m), in another contrast to QCD which is believed to have no scalar bar qq bound state lighter than other hadrons. We discuss the TD mass in various methods, Gauged NJL model via ladder Schwinger-Dyson (SD) equation, straightforward calculations in the ladder SD/ Bethe-Salpeter equation, and the holographic approach including techni-gluon condensate. The TD may be discovered in LHC.

  15. Perceived Symbols of Authority and Their Influence on Conformity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushman, Brad J.

    Although there are many variables that influence conformity, Bickman (1974) found that the apparel of the person making a request had a significant influence on conformity. To evaluate other factorswhicn may influence conformity (gender, age, status of the conforming subject, and altruism in conforming), 150 adult pedestrians (45% female, 71%…

  16. 47 CFR 2.1072 - Limitation on Declaration of Conformity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitation on Declaration of Conformity. 2.1072... Conformity § 2.1072 Limitation on Declaration of Conformity. (a) The Declaration of Conformity signifies that...'s rules. (b) A Declaration of Conformity by the responsible party is effective until a...

  17. [ISO 9001 conformity in research, teaching and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Howorka, K; Kletschka, G; Pumprla, J; Thoma, H

    1998-01-01

    Quality assurance, in particular in the areas of development and production of medical devices, is one of the tasks of biomedical engineering. The interdisciplinary working group "Functional Rehabilitation and Group Education, Vienna" is committed to the development and implementation of group education models on three levels: (1) direct education/instruction of patients with chronic diseases, (2) university research and teaching, and (3) development of technical aids for rehabilitation and the means for disseminating group education models in rehabilitation and therapy. Major aims were, by generating conformity with ISO 9001 standards, to achieve greater transparency and process optimization with very small resources in university (teaching, research, technical aids) and extra-university (rehabilitation) areas. A secondary aim was the establishment of interdisciplinary (clinical and biomedical) cooperation at university level. In all main areas (research, teaching and group education/instruction), ISO 9001-conformity was achieved by our activities on three methodological levels: (1) description and analysis of processes, (2) use of ISO 9001 standards for evaluating internal processes, and (3) optimization measures. The following article contains relevant elements of the quality manual and quality assurance system, and offers a typical example of innovative cooperation between medicine and medical engineering.

  18. Conformal field theories with infinitely many conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Ivan

    2013-02-01

    Globally conformal invariant quantum field theories in a D-dimensional space-time (D even) have rational correlation functions and admit an infinite number of conserved (symmetric traceless) tensor currents. In a theory of a scalar field of dimension D-2 they were demonstrated to be generated by bilocal normal products of free massless scalar fields with an O(N), U(N), or Sp(2N) (global) gauge symmetry [B. Bakalov, N. M. Nikolov, K.-H. Rehren, and I. Todorov, "Unitary positive energy representations of scalar bilocal fields," Commun. Math. Phys. 271, 223-246 (2007), 10.1007/s00220-006-0182-2; e-print arXiv:math-ph/0604069v3; B. Bakalov, N. M. Nikolov, K.-H. Rehren, and I. Todorov, "Infinite dimensional Lie algebras in 4D conformal quantum field theory," J. Phys. A Math Theor. 41, 194002 (2008), 10.1088/1751-8113/41/19/194002; e-print arXiv:0711.0627v2 [hep-th

  19. Representation of target-bound drugs by computed conformers: implications for conformational libraries

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Stefan; Senger, Christian; Michalsky, Elke; Goede, Andrean; Preissner, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Background The increasing number of known protein structures provides valuable information about pharmaceutical targets. Drug binding sites are identifiable and suitable lead compounds can be proposed. The flexibility of ligands is a critical point for the selection of potential drugs. Since computed 3D structures of millions of compounds are available, the knowledge of their binding conformations would be a great benefit for the development of efficient screening methods. Results Integration of two public databases allowed superposition of conformers for 193 approved drugs with 5507 crystallised target-bound counterparts. The generation of 9600 drug conformers using an atomic force field was carried out to obtain an optimal coverage of the conformational space. Bioactive conformations are best described by a conformational ensemble: half of all drugs exhibit multiple active states, distributed over the entire range of the reachable energy and conformational space. A number of up to 100 conformers per drug enabled us to reproduce the bound states within a similarity threshold of 1.0 Å in 70% of all cases. This fraction rises to about 90% for smaller or average sized drugs. Conclusion Single drugs adopt multiple bioactive conformations if they interact with different target proteins. Due to the structural diversity of binding sites they adopt conformations that are distributed over a broad conformational space and wide energy range. Since the majority of drugs is well represented by a predefined low number of conformers (up to 100) this procedure is a valuable method to compare compounds by three-dimensional features or for fast similarity searches starting with pharmacophores. The underlying 9600 generated drug conformers are downloadable from the Super Drug Web site [1]. All superpositions are visualised at the same source. Additional conformers (110,000) of 2400 classified WHO-drugs are also available. PMID:16764718

  20. Optimal Coordination and Synchronization in Local Air Quality and GHG Emissions: An Economic Study of Multiple Gases Issue in Integrated Assessment of Global Change

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zili

    2009-03-19

    In the duration of this project, we finished the main tasks set up in the initial proposal. These tasks include: collecting needed data of regional aerosol emissions (mainly SO2); building the RICES model; conducting preliminary simulation runs on some policy scenarios. We established a unified and transparent IA modeling platform that connecting climate change and local air pollution. The RICES model is the pioneering IA model that treats climate change and local air pollution as correlated global and local stock externalities.

  1. Silk-based conformal, adhesive, edible food sensors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu; Brenckle, Mark A; Yang, Miaomiao; Zhang, Jingdi; Liu, Mengkun; Siebert, Sean M; Averitt, Richard D; Mannoor, Manu S; McAlpine, Michael C; Rogers, John A; Kaplan, David L; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2012-02-21

    An array of passive metamaterial antennas fabricated on all protein-based silk substrates were conformally transferred and adhered to the surface of an apple. This process allows the opportunity for intimate contact of micro- and nanostructures that can probe, and accordingly monitor changes in, their surrounding environment. This provides in situ monitoring of food quality. It is to be noted that this type of sensor consists of all edible and biodegradable components, holding utility and potential relevance for healthcare and food/consumer products and markets.

  2. Global trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megie, G.; Chanin, M.-L.; Ehhalt, D.; Fraser, P.; Frederick, J. F.; Gille, J. C.; Mccormick, M. P.; Schoebert, M.; Bishop, L.; Bojkov, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    Measuring trends in ozone, and most other geophysical variables, requires that a small systematic change with time be determined from signals that have large periodic and aperiodic variations. Their time scales range from the day-to-day changes due to atmospheric motions through seasonal and annual variations to 11 year cycles resulting from changes in the sun UV output. Because of the magnitude of all of these variations is not well known and highly variable, it is necessary to measure over more than one period of the variations to remove their effects. This means that at least 2 or more times the 11 year sunspot cycle. Thus, the first requirement is for a long term data record. The second related requirement is that the record be consistent. A third requirement is for reasonable global sampling, to ensure that the effects are representative of the entire Earth. The various observational methods relevant to trend detection are reviewed to characterize their quality and time and space coverage. Available data are then examined for long term trends or recent changes in ozone total content and vertical distribution, as well as related parameters such as stratospheric temperature, source gases and aerosols.

  3. Atomic levers control pyranose ring conformations

    PubMed Central

    Marszalek, Piotr E.; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Li, Hongbin; Yazal, Jamal El; Oberhauser, Andres F.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    1999-01-01

    Atomic force microscope manipulations of single polysaccharide molecules have recently expanded conformational chemistry to include force-driven transitions between the chair and boat conformers of the pyranose ring structure. We now expand these observations to include chair inversion, a common phenomenon in the conformational chemistry of six-membered ring molecules. We demonstrate that by stretching single pectin molecules (1 → 4-linked α-d-galactouronic acid polymer), we could change the pyranose ring conformation from a chair to a boat and then to an inverted chair in a clearly resolved two-step conversion: 4C1 ⇄ boat ⇄ 1C4. The two-step extension of the distance between the glycosidic oxygen atoms O1 and O4 determined by atomic force microscope manipulations is corroborated by ab initio calculations of the increase in length of the residue vector O1O4 on chair inversion. We postulate that this conformational change results from the torque generated by the glycosidic bonds when a force is applied to the pectin molecule. Hence, the glycosidic bonds act as mechanical levers, driving the conformational transitions of the pyranose ring. When the glycosidic bonds are equatorial (e), the torque is zero, causing no conformational change. However, when the glycosidic bond is axial (a), torque is generated, causing a rotation around C—C bonds and a conformational change. This hypothesis readily predicts the number of transitions observed in pyranose monomers with 1a-4a linkages (two), 1a-4e (one), and 1e-4e (none). Our results demonstrate single-molecule mechanochemistry with the capability of resolving complex conformational transitions. PMID:10393918

  4. Factors Influencing Conformity Index in Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Sinead M. Thirion, Pierre; Buckney, Steve; Shea, Carmel O.; Armstrong, John

    2010-04-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  5. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sinead M; Thirion, Pierre; Buckney, Steve; Shea, Carmel O; Armstrong, John

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  6. Improving the Quality of Basic Education for the Future Youth of Yemen Post Arab Spring. Global Economy & Development. Working Paper 59

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuki, Takako; Kameyama, Yuriko

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the issue of the quality of education in Yemen. It uses micro-data from TIMSS and from surveys conducted in underserved rural areas, as well as macro-level policy information from the System Assessment for Better Education Results (SABER) database. The analysis indicates that the availability of teachers and resources at…

  7. Conformation sensitive charge transport in conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Mattias Andersson, L.; Hedström, Svante; Persson, Petter

    2013-11-18

    Temperature dependent charge carrier mobility measurements using field effect transistors and density functional theory calculations are combined to show how the conformation dependent frontier orbital delocalization influences the hole- and electron mobilities in a donor-acceptor based polymer. A conformationally sensitive lowest unoccupied molecular orbital results in an electron mobility that decreases with increasing temperature above room temperature, while a conformationally stable highest occupied molecular orbital is consistent with a conventional hole mobility behavior and also proposed to be one of the reasons for why the material works well as a hole transporter in amorphous bulk heterojunction solar cells.

  8. The conformal window from the worldline formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armoni, Adi

    2010-02-01

    We use the worldline formalism to derive a universal relation for the lower boundary of the conformal window in non-supersymmetric QCD-like theories. The derivation relies on the convergence of the expansion of the fermionic determinant in terms of Wilson loops. The expansion shares a similarity with the lattice strong coupling expansion and the genus expansion in string theory. Our result relates the lower boundary of the conformal window in theories with different representations and different gauge groups. Finally, we use SQCD to estimate the boundary of the conformal window in QCD-like theories and compare it with other approaches.

  9. Novel Approach to Conformal FINFET Extension Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Zschaetzsch, G.; Vandervorst, W.; Hoffmann, T. Y.; Horiguchi, N.; Hautala, J.; Shao, Y.

    2011-01-07

    This paper presents a novel strategy to achieve conformal FINFET extension doping with low tilt-angle beam-line ion implantation. The process relies on the self-aligned cap layer formation exclusively on top of the FIN to tune doping levels in this particular area by partial dopant trapping. The conformality itself is evaluated for n- and p-type dopants by a novel extraction method applied to FIN resistor test structures. Furthermore, the process was integrated into a full NMOS device flow and compared to a highly tilted and more conformal As implant condition.

  10. Conformational and Vibrational Studies of Triclosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özişik, Haci; Bayari, S. Haman; Saǧlam, Semran

    2010-01-01

    The conformational equilibrium of triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2, 4-dichlorophenoxy) phenol) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFTe/B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p)) method. Four different geometries were found to correspond to energy minimum conformations. The IR spectrum of triclosan was measured in the 4000-400 cm-1 region. We calculated the harmonic frequencies and intensities of the most stable conformers in order to assist in the assignment of the vibrational bands in the experimental spectrum. The fundamental vibrational modes were characterized depending on their total energy distribution (TED%) using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) force field method.

  11. Conformable Fractional Nikiforov—Uvarov Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayer, H.; Demirhan, D.; Büyükkılıç, F.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce conformable fractional Nikiforov—Uvarov (NU) method by means of conformable fractional derivative which is the most natural definition in non-integer calculus. Since, NU method gives exact eigenstate solutions of Schrödinger equation (SE) for certain potentials in quantum mechanics, this method is carried into the domain of fractional calculus to obtain the solutions of fractional SE. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the conformable fractional NU method, we solve fractional SE for harmonic oscillator potential, Woods—Saxon potential, and Hulthen potential.

  12. Anticholinergic substances: A single consistent conformation

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Peter; Datta, Narayandas

    1980-01-01

    An interactive computer-graphics analysis of 24 antagonists of acetylcholine at peripheral autonomic post-ganglionic (muscarinic) nervous junctions and at similar junctions in the central nervous system, the crystal structures of which are known, has led to the determination of a single, consistent, energetically favorable conformation for all 24 substances, although their observed crystal structure conformations vary widely. The absolute configuration and the single, consistent (ideal) conformation of the chemical groups required for maximum anticholinergic activity are described quantitatively. Images PMID:16592775

  13. Conformity and Dissonance in Generalized Voter Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Scott E.; Sander, Leonard M.; Schneider-Mizell, Casey M.

    2007-09-01

    We generalize the voter model to include social forces that produce conformity among voters and avoidance of cognitive dissonance of opinions within a voter. The time for both conformity and consistency (which we call the exit time) is, in general, much longer than for either process alone. We show that our generalized model can be applied quite widely: it is a form of Wright's island model of population genetics, and is related to problems in the physical sciences. We give scaling arguments, numerical simulations, and analytic estimates for the exit time for a range of relative strengths in the tendency to conform and to avoid dissonance.

  14. The determination of the conformational properties of nucleic acids in solution from NMR data.

    PubMed

    Lane, A N

    1990-06-21

    A program, NUCFIT, has been written for simulating the effects of conformational averaging on nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) intensities for the spin systems found in nucleic acids. Arbitrary structures can be generated, and the NOE time courses can be calculated for truncated one-dimensional NOEs, two-dimensional NOE and rotating frame NOE spectroscopy (NOESY and ROESY) experiments. Both isotropic and anisotropic molecular rotation can be treated, using Woessner's formalism (J. Chem. Phys. (1962) 37, 647-654). The effects of slow conformational averaging are simulated by taking population-weighted means of the conformations present. Rapid motions are allowed for by using order parameters which can be supplied by the user, or calculated for specific motional models using the formalism of Tropp (J. Chem. Phys. (1980) 72, 6035-6043). NOE time courses have been simulated for a wide variety of conformations and used to determine the quality of structure determinations using NMR data for nucleic acids. The program also allows grid-searching with least-squares fitting of structures to experimental data, including the effects of spin-diffusion, conformational averaging and rapid internal motions. The effects of variation of intra and internucleotide conformational parameters on NOE intensities has been systematically explored. It is found that (i) the conformation of nucleotides is well determined by realistic NOE data sets, (ii) some of the helical parameters, particularly the base pair roll, are poorly determined even for extensive, noise-free data sets, (iii) conformational averaging of the sugars by pseudorotation has at most second-order influence on the determination of other parameters and (iv) averaging about the glycosidic torsion bond also has, in most cases, an insignificant effect on the determination of the conformation of nucleotides.

  15. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Conformation of Oligo(ethylene glycol) Grafted Polystyrene in Dilute Solutions: Effect of the Backbone Length

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Hong, Kunlun; Hua, Fengjun; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Wignall, George D; Mays, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    The conformation and clusterization of comb like polymers of polystyrene densely grafted with oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) side chains in 1.0 wt% solutions of D2O, toluene-d8 and methanol-d4 was investigated as a function of the degree of polymerization (DP) of the backbone by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Each side chain had four EG repeat units and the DP of the polystyrene backbone was varied from 8 to 85. The global conformation of the polymers in toluene and methanol was shown to assume ellipsoidal, cylindrical or worm-like chain morphologies with increasing DP of the polystyrene backbone. At the same time, in D2O, the polymer conformation was described by the form factor of rigid cylinders. The second viral coefficient was measured for the polymer with a DP of 85 in all three solvents and the solvent quality of toluene, methanol and D2O was identified as good, marginal and poor for this polymer. Due to a poor solvent quality, the PS backbone (DP = 85) is partially collapsed in D2O whereas it is moderately expanded in toluene and methanol. Polymers with the DP of 8 were found to aggregate into clusters in all three solvents, with the characteristic size between 100 and 200 ?and a fractal dimension of 2. With increase of the DP, the clusters diminished in D2O and completely disappeared in toluene and methanol. This observation suggests that the clusterization of these short side-chain polymers is caused by end group and hydrogen bonding interactions between different chains.

  16. Global HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on global human resource development (HRD). "Globalization of Human Resource Management (HRM) in Government: A Cross-Cultural Perspective" (Pan Suk Kim) relates HRM to national cultures and addresses its specific functional aspects with a unique dimension in a global organization. "An…

  17. Global Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkley, June, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    The articles in this collection deal with various methods of global education--education to prepare students to function as understanding and informed citizens of the world. Topics discussed in the 26 articles include: (1) the necessity of global education; (2) global education in the elementary school language arts curriculum; (3) science fiction…

  18. Global Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longstreet, Wilma S., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This issue contains an introduction ("The Promise and Perplexity of Globalism," by W. Longstreet) and seven articles dedicated to exploring the meaning of global education for today's schools. "Global Education: An Overview" (J. Becker) develops possible definitions, identifies objectives and skills, and addresses questions and issues in this…

  19. Generating properly weighted ensemble of conformations of proteins from sparse or indirect distance constraints.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Chen, Rong; Liang, Jie

    2008-09-01

    Inferring three-dimensional structural information of biomacromolecules such as proteins from limited experimental data is an important and challenging task. Nuclear Overhauser effect measurements based on nucleic magnetic resonance, disulfide linking, and electron paramagnetic resonance labeling studies can all provide useful partial distance constraint characteristic of the conformations of proteins. In this study, we describe a general approach for reconstructing conformations of biomolecules that are consistent with given distance constraints. Such constraints can be in the form of upper bounds and lower bounds of distances between residue pairs, contact maps based on specific contact distance cutoff values, or indirect distance constraints such as experimental phi-value measurement. Our approach is based on the framework of sequential Monte Carlo method, a chain growth-based method. We have developed a novel growth potential function to guide the generation of conformations that satisfy given distance constraints. This potential function incorporates not only the distance information of current residue during growth but also the distance information of future residues by introducing global distance upper bounds between residue pairs and the placement of reference points. To obtain protein conformations from indirect distance constraints in the form of experimental phi-values, we first generate properly weighted contact maps satisfying phi-value constraints, we then generate conformations from these contact maps. We show that our approach can faithfully generate conformations that satisfy the given constraints, which approach the native structures when distance constraints for all residue pairs are given.

  20. Conformal geometry and its applications on 3D shape matching, recognition, and stitching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Yang; Jin, Miao; Gu, Xianfeng David; Samaras, Dimitris

    2007-07-01

    Three-dimensional shape matching is a fundamental issue in computer vision with many applications such as shape registration, 3D object recognition, and classification. However, shape matching with noise, occlusion, and clutter is a challenging problem. In this paper, we analyze a family of quasi-conformal maps including harmonic maps, conformal maps, and least-squares conformal maps with regards to 3D shape matching. As a result, we propose a novel and computationally efficient shape matching framework by using least-squares conformal maps. According to conformal geometry theory, each 3D surface with disk topology can be mapped to a 2D domain through a global optimization and the resulting map is a diffeomorphism, i.e., one-to-one and onto. This allows us to simplify the 3D shape-matching problem to a 2D image-matching problem, by comparing the resulting 2D parametric maps, which are stable, insensitive to resolution changes and robust to occlusion, and noise. Therefore, highly accurate and efficient 3D shape matching algorithms can be achieved by using the above three parametric maps. Finally, the robustness of least-squares conformal maps is evaluated and analyzed comprehensively in 3D shape matching with occlusion, noise, and resolution variation. In order to further demonstrate the performance of our proposed method, we also conduct a series of experiments on two computer vision applications, i.e., 3D face recognition and 3D nonrigid surface alignment and stitching. PMID:17496378