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Sample records for global heating due

  1. Global occurrence rate of elves and ionospheric heating due to cloud-to-ground lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaes, P. R.; Marshall, R. A.; Inan, U. S.

    2016-01-01

    We present ground-based observations of elves made using an optical free-running photometer along with VLF/LF observations of the lightning electromagnetic pulse (EMP) magnetic field. We use these experimental observations to investigate the properties of the lightning return stroke that control the production of optical elve emissions. Two summers of data containing observations of over 600 elves along with the LF magnetic field of the associated lightning are analyzed. By training a classifier on features of the EMP ground wave, we find that we are able to accurately predict whether or not a stroke produced an elve. We find that the peak current of the causative discharge predicts elve production with 90% accuracy. Further, we find that the production probability of elves as a function of peak current fits a linear regression, with a 50% elve probability for peak currents of 88 kA. We use this finding along with global data from the GLD360 lightning geolocation network to extrapolate the global elve production rate; we show that ˜0.8% of all cloud-to-ground lightning discharges produce elves. Finally, using GLD360 data and a numerical model of the lightning EMP, we estimate the total amount of ionospheric heating due to lightning, amounting to approximately 2 MW of continuous power dissipated globally in the lower ionosphere.

  2. Global risk of deadly heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Camilo; Dousset, Bénédicte; Caldwell, Iain R.; Powell, Farrah E.; Geronimo, Rollan C.; Bielecki, Coral R.; Counsell, Chelsie W. W.; Dietrich, Bonnie S.; Johnston, Emily T.; Louis, Leo V.; Lucas, Matthew P.; McKenzie, Marie M.; Shea, Alessandra G.; Tseng, Han; Giambelluca, Thomas W.; Leon, Lisa R.; Hawkins, Ed; Trauernicht, Clay

    2017-07-01

    Climate change can increase the risk of conditions that exceed human thermoregulatory capacity. Although numerous studies report increased mortality associated with extreme heat events, quantifying the global risk of heat-related mortality remains challenging due to a lack of comparable data on heat-related deaths. Here we conducted a global analysis of documented lethal heat events to identify the climatic conditions associated with human death and then quantified the current and projected occurrence of such deadly climatic conditions worldwide. We reviewed papers published between 1980 and 2014, and found 783 cases of excess human mortality associated with heat from 164 cities in 36 countries. Based on the climatic conditions of those lethal heat events, we identified a global threshold beyond which daily mean surface air temperature and relative humidity become deadly. Around 30% of the world's population is currently exposed to climatic conditions exceeding this deadly threshold for at least 20 days a year. By 2100, this percentage is projected to increase to ~48% under a scenario with drastic reductions of greenhouse gas emissions and ~74% under a scenario of growing emissions. An increasing threat to human life from excess heat now seems almost inevitable, but will be greatly aggravated if greenhouse gases are not considerably reduced.

  3. Public health impact of global heating due to climate change: potential effects on chronic non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Butler, Ainslie J; Lucas, Robyn M; Bonita, Ruth

    2010-04-01

    Several categories of ill health important at the global level are likely to be affected by climate change. To date the focus of this association has been on communicable diseases and injuries. This paper briefly analyzes potential impacts of global climate change on chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs). We reviewed the limited available evidence of the relationships between climate exposure and chronic and NCDs. We further reviewed likely mechanisms and pathways for climatic influences on chronic disease occurrence and impacts on pre-existing chronic diseases. There are negative impacts of climatic factors and climate change on some physiological functions and on cardio-vascular and kidney diseases. Chronic disease risks are likely to increase with climate change and related increase in air pollution, malnutrition, and extreme weather events. There are substantial research gaps in this arena. The health sector has a major role in facilitating further research and monitoring the health impacts of global climate change. Such work will also contribute to global efforts for the prevention and control of chronic NCDs in our ageing and urbanizing global population.

  4. Triton's global heat budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.; Johnson, T. V.; Goguen, J. D.; Schubert, G.; Ross, M. N.

    1991-01-01

    Internal heat flow from radioactive decay in Triton's interior along with absorbed thermal energy from Neptune total 5 to 20 percent of the isolation absorbed by Triton, thus comprising a significant fraction of Triton's surface energy balance. These additional energy inputs can raise Triton's surface temperature between about 0.5 and 1.5 K above that possible with absorbed sunlight alone, resulting in an increase of about a factor of about 1.5 to 2.5 in Triton's basal atmospheric pressure. If Triton's internal heat flow is concentrated in some areas, as is likely, local effects such as enhanced sublimation with subsequent modification of albedo could be quite large. Furthermore, indications of recent global albedo change on Triton suggest that Triton's surface temperature and pressure may not now be in steady state, further suggesting that atmospheric pressure on Triton was as much as ten times higher in the recent past.

  5. Observations of Urban Heat Island Mitigation in California Coastal Cities due to a Sea Breeze Induced Coastal-Cooling ``REVERSE-REACTION'' to Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, R. D.; Lebassi, B.; Gonzalez, J.

    2010-12-01

    The study evaluated long-term (1948-2005) air temperatures at over 300 urban and rural sites in California (CA) during summer (June-August, JJA). The aggregate CA results showed asymmetric warming, as daily min temperatures increased faster than daily max temperatures. The spatial distributions of daily max temperatures in the heavily urbanized South Coast and San Francisco Bay Area air basins, however, exhibited a complex pattern, with cooling at low-elevation (mainly urban) coastal-areas and warming at (mainly rural) inland areas. Previous studies have suggested that cooling summer max temperatures in CA were due to increased irrigation, coastal upwelling, or cloud cover. The current hypothesis, however, is that this temperature pattern arises from a “reverse-reaction” to greenhouse gas (GHG) induced global-warming. In this hypothesis, the global warming of inland areas resulted in an increased (cooling) sea breeze activity in coastal areas. That daytime summer coastal cooling was seen in coastal urban areas implies that urban heat island (UHI) warming was weaker than the reverse-reaction sea breeze cooling; if there was no UHI effect, then the cooling would have been even stronger. Analysis of daytime summer max temperatures at four adjacent pairs of urban and rural sites near the inland cooling-warming boundary, however, showed that the rural sites experienced cooling, while the urban sites showed warming due to UHI development. The rate of heat island growth was estimated as the sum of each urban warming rate and the absolute magnitude of the concurrent adjacent rural cooling rate. Values ranged from 0.12 to 0.55 K decade-1, and were proportional to changes in urban population and urban extent. As Sacramento, Modesto, Stockton, and San José have grown in aerial extent (21 to 59%) and population (40 to 118%), part of the observed increased JJA max values could be due to increased daytime UHI-intensity. Without UHI effects, the currently observed JJA SFBA

  6. Heat production due to intracellular killing activity.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Masuda, S; Miyamae, T; Yamamura, M

    1990-09-01

    Using Saccharomyces ceravisiae, Candida albicans and Stapylococcus aureus, heat production during phagocytosis was measured in U937 cells which are capable of differentiating to monocytic phagocytes. No increase in heat production of non-differentiated U937 was observed since they were not phagocytic cells. However after differentiation to monocytic phagocytes by lymphokine, U937 cells produced a remarkable amount of heat during phagocytosis. Although Ehrlich ascites tumor cells sensitized with antibody were capable of engulfing S. aureus, no increase in heat nor in superoxide anion production during phagocytosis was detected. It was also found that no heat increase occurred in neutrophils from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). It can thus be concluded that the heat production during phagocytosis is due to the intercellular killing process of phagocytic cells.

  7. Global Atmospheric Heat Distributions Observed from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Fan, Tai-Fang

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the observations of global atmospheric heat distributions using satellite measurements. Major heat components such as radiation energy, latent heat and sensible heat are considered. The uncertainties and error sources are assessed. Results show that the atmospheric heat is basically balanced, and the observed patterns of radiation and latent heat from precipitation are clearly related to general circulation.

  8. The heated debate. [Global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Balling, R.C. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Heated Debate challenges head on the popular vision' of anthropogenically-caused global warming as characterized by catastrophic sea level rise, drought-desiccated farmlands, and more frequent and intense hurricanes spinning up and out from warmer tropical seas. The message of this book is that apocalyptic devastation of natural ecosystems and human socio-economic systems will not necessarily follow from a mild warming of earth's climate. According to Balling, the specter of apocalypse is clearly the dominant view held by scientists, decisionmakers and the public specter of apocalypse is clearly the dominant view held by scientists, decisionmakers and the public at large, and, in his view, it is just as clearly incorrect based on a careful examination of the historical evidence. The Heated Debate present the other side' of global warming; a kinder, gentler greenhouse debate, the stated purpose of the book is to provide the reader with some background to the greenhouse issue, present an analysis of the certainties and uncertainties for future climate change, and examine the most probably changes in climate that may occur as the greenhouse gases increase in concentration. Ultimately the author hopes the book will more completely inform decisionmakers so that they do not commit money and resources to what may turn out to be a non-problem. Indeed, global warming may have many more benefits than costs, and, in any event, the (climate) penalty for postponing action a few years is potentially small, while our knowledge base will increase tremendously allowing society to make wiser and more informed decisions.

  9. Global Heat and Precession Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanyo, J. P.

    2006-05-01

    Precession Energy: By 1975, precession energy rates were assumed to be inadequate for a geodynamo. Most agreed in favor for a heat core model, but formal critiques on the matter were never published. A 'rigid- sphere' model and two accretion models had examined a precession geodynamo on similar energy features. The core's relative motion has two limits, the core uncoupled to its mantle and then fixed rigidly to its mantle. Both limits produce no energy. Energy rate (power) is produced only when core-mantle torque and core- mantle motion interact. Earlier researchers had estimated that a geodynamo needed approximately 10E11 W to 10E12 W, but could only find 10E8 W. The rigid-sphere model analysis starts with a theoretical solution for precession energy, subject to known Earth parameters 6x10E16 W. A derived dimensionless coefficient C/(1+ Csq) can only have a maximum value 1/2 and C = 1 with Pmax = 3x10E16 W. Precession energy rates in the rigid-sphere model is related inversely to magnetic intensity by the variable C as coupling. More magnetic coupling reduces energy rate, and less magnetic coupling increases energy rate. The theories and estimates for precession energy rates (10E8 W) did not consider the total energy rate (Pmax = 3x10E16 W). This is a zero sum game, and 10E8 W represents a great gap from 3x10E16 W. Precession research has continued, and research now supports much more energetic precession geodynamo models. Experiments have now achieved successes for geodynamo energy rates, core-mantle relative motions which suggest geomagnetic CMB patterns, viscous-electromagnetic coupling analyses, and geodynamo simulations with laminar and turbulent precession models. Global Heat: The Earth's interior has the core's liquid heat reservoir, and the Earth's surface has its water and its ice's heat reservoir. Both core and ice have potential for accretion and ablation, and both have experienced these events during Earth's creation. A geodynamo heat (accretion) model

  10. Water upwelling due to differential coastal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarenko, I.; Demchenko, N.

    2009-04-01

    Day heating / night cooling in coastal zone of large water bodies causes a specific water-exchange between coastal and off-shore regions. Experiments in 5m-long laboratory tank with inclined 2m-portion of the bottom (A=0.1, water depth in deep part D=15-20 cm) are reported, demonstrating a structure of fields of temperature and water currents under conditions of heating from the surface. In shallow regions at the top of incline, water temperature rises faster, so that horizontal temperature gradient between top and deep parts of the tank is established in some tens of minutes. The shape of the horizontal temperature profile at the surface is self-similar, with nearly constant temperature difference between top and deep parts (for fixed heat flux and bottom slope). Off-shore transport of warmer coastal waters is established in near-surface layer, with maximum of the current not at the surface, but obviously (1-3 cm) below it. The return (on-shore) flow is formed immediately below the off-shore flow, with its thickness twice larger and the speed twice smaller than that of the on-shore flow. Maximum speed of the return flow is observed at the depth of about 0.4 D. Further down, no significant currents were registered. This two-layered basin-wide exchange causes water upwelling along the inclined portion of the bottom. Simple analytical model is developed in order to explain the observed results. Using several analytic expressions for the dependency of water temperature from depth, time and horizontal co-ordinate, we analyze the field of the horizontal pressure gradient. For logarithmic and linear vertical temperature profiles, the horizontal pressure gradient in the basin has its maximum at the depth of about 0.4 D, what is in full agreement with the laboratory experiments. Thus, an upwelling along the inclined part of the bottom is caused by the basin-wide exchange of convective nature, where the driving element is the on-shore flow, arising due to thermally

  11. Lunar Heat Flow: A Global Prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegler, M. A.; Paige, D. A.; Williams, J.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Surface heat flow is a fundamental measurement for determining a body's interior composition, structure and evolution. Here we attempt to construct a global picture of heat flux from the Lunar interior including 3D thermal modeling and new measurements from Diviner Infrared Radiometer aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.___ Internal heat, due to radioactive decay, core crystallization, tidal dissipation and heat of formation, controls the occurrence of internal convection, crustal strength and thickness, volcanism, and surface tectonics. Near surface measurements, such as those of the Apollo Heat Flow Experiment [1], can therefore offer a deeper window into the Moon's origin and structure. However, the Apollo era measurements are believed to be biased by local subsurface density and radiogenic anomalies, and may not offer an easily interpretable measurement of global lunar heat flux ([2],[3]). Both the Apollo 15 and 17 landing sites lay at the edge of Mare/Highland density and crustal thickness boundaries and lay within a thorium-rich region of the Moon known as the Procellarum KREEP terrain [4]. Detailed models of the subsurface structure beneath these sites, including local crustal thickness, thermal/density properties, surface temperature and radiogenic nuclide concentration have not been feasible or fully informed in the past. Therefore, most authors simply examined a single effect or a conceptual model ([2],[3],[5]). With new computing tools (namely Comsol Multiphysics and Diviner Thermal models) and spacecraft measurement (namely gravity, topography, Gamma-ray spectra, and surface temperature) we seek to attempt to combine all available data.___ This data includes new measurements of several locations within impact craters near the lunar poles in which temperatures as low as 20 ± 2 K are observed [6], [7]. Watson [8] proposed such low temperature measurements could be used to infer internal heat flux. These low temperature values are of particular

  12. Electron heating due to resonant absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; Spielman, R.B.; DeGroot, J.S.; Bollen, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Intense, p-polarized microwaves (v/sub os//v/sub eo-/<1) are incident on an imhomogeneous plasma (10/sup 2/heated by resonantly driven electrostatic field to produce a hot Maxwellian distribution. Most of the heated electrons flow towards the overdense region and are absorbed by the anode at the far end of the overdense region. At high power (v/sub os//v/sub eo-/>0.2), strong heating of thermal electrons, large amplitude ion acoustic turbulence, and a self-consistent dc electric field are observed near the critical surface. This dc electric field is enhanced by applying a weak magnetic field (..omega../sub ce//..omega../sub o/ approx. = 10/sup -2/).

  13. Mesospheric heating due to intense tropospheric convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    A series of rocket measurements made twice daily at Wallops Island, Va., revealed a rapid heating of the mesosphere on the order of 10 K on days when thunderstorms or squall lines were in the area. This heating is explained as the result of frictional dissipation of vertically propagating internal gravity waves generated by intense tropospheric convection. Ray-tracing theory is used to determine the spectrum of gravity wave groups that actually reach mesospheric heights. This knowledge is used in an equation describing the spectral energy density of a penetrative convective element to calculate the fraction of the total energy initially available to excite those waves that do reach the level of heating. This value, converted into a vertical velocity, is used as the lower boundary condition for a multilayer model used to determine the detailed structure of the vertically propagating waves. The amount of frictional dissipation produced by the waves is calculated from the solutions of the frictionless model by use of a vertically varying eddy viscosity coefficient. The heating produced by the dissipation is then calculated from the thermodynamic equation.

  14. Occupational asthma due to heated polypropylene.

    PubMed

    Malo, J L; Cartier, A; Pineault, L; Dugas, M; Desjardins, A

    1994-02-01

    A 35 year-old nonatopic woman was referred to the hospital for possible work-related asthma. She had worked as an operator, at a plant producing polypropylene bags, for the previous four yrs. Her main complaint was a productive cough with dyspnoea and wheezing, as well as rhinitis over the past 3 yrs. She had been absent from work for 6 months on maternity leave, and had improved greatly. She was on a beta 2-adrenergic agent and had to take it at least four times daily. Baseline spirometry whilst at work showed marked airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of 43% predicted (pred). After two months away from work FEV1 improved to 89% pred; provocative concentration of histamine causing a 25% fall in FEV1 (PC20) was 3.6 mg.ml-1 (mild airway hyperresponsiveness). Return to work resulted in a marked deterioration in FEV1, and serial peak expiratory flow (PEFR) values. PC20 was 0.11 mg.ml-1 (severe airway hyperresponsiveness) one week after she had returned to work. Specific inhalation challenges with polypropylene heated to 250 degrees C resulted in a late asthmatic reaction. As formaldehyde is one of the degradation products of heating polypropylene, we exposed her to it for up to 2 h, but we elicited no bronchospastic reaction. We conclude that heated polypropylene should be listed as one of the agents that causes occupational asthma.

  15. Heat Loss Due To Thermal Bridges In Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J. B.; tarot, R. A.; Childs, K. W.; Courville, G. E.

    1984-03-01

    Building envelopes often contain numerous highly conductive heat flow paths, called thermal bridges, which are major sources of heat loss and deterioration of building materials due to moisture condensation. Some examples of thermal bridges occurring in office buildings are presented. Infrared thermography was used to identify the locations and magnitudes of thermally defective areas resulting from inadequate construction, design, or substandard workmanship in existing buildings. Due to the large thermal inertia of building components and transient conditions caused by fluctuating outdoor and indoor temperatures, long measurement periods are required. This makes thermography impractical for quantifying the heat loss. In order to estimate the heat loss rate from thermal bridges and to obtain a better understanding of the physical processes involved, a two-dimensional heat flow model has been developed for transient heat conduction within the exterior wall/intermediate floor systems. The calculated results from the mathematical model are compared with available experimental data. An in-situ measurement technique, which is currently under development at NBS for quantifying the energy loss due to thermal bridges, is described.

  16. Global Warming 'Pause' - Oceans Reshuffle Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, V.; Willis, J. K.; Patzert, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the fact that greenhouse gases are still increasing and all other indicators show warming-related change (+0.0064 °C/year since 1880 or +0.0077 °C/year during 1993-2002), surface temperatures stopped climbing steadily during the past decade at a rate of +0.0010 °C/year from 2003 to 2012. We show that in recent years, the heat was being trapped in the subsurface waters of the western Pacific and eastern Indian oceans between 100 and 300 m. The movement of warm Pacific water below the surface, also related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation climatic pattern, temporarily affected surface temperatures and accounted for the global cooling trend in surface temperature. With the Pacific Decadal Oscillation possibly changing to a warm phase, it is likely that the oceans will drive a major surge in global surface warming sometime in the next decade or two. Reference: Nieves, V., Willis, J. K., and Patzert, W. C. (2015). Recent hiatus caused by decadal shift in Indo-Pacific heating. Science, aaa4521.

  17. Constraints on hydrothermal heat flux through the oceanic lithosphere from global heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    that hydrothermal heat transfer has largely ceased. Although earlier studies suggested major differences in sealing ages for different ocean basins, we find that the sealing ages for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans are similar and consistent with the sealing age for the entire data set, 65 +/- 10 Ma. The previous inference of a young (approximately 20 Ma) sealing age for the Pacific appears to have biased downward several previous estimates of the global hydrothermal flux. The heat flow data also provide indirect evidence for the mechanism by which the hydrothermal heat flux becomes small, which has often been ascribed to isolation of the igneous crust from seawater due to the hydraulic conductivity of the intervening sediment. We find, however, that even the least sedimented sites show the systematic increase of the ratio of observed to predicted heat flow with age, although the more sedimented sites have a younger sealing age. Moreover, the heat flow discrepancy persists at heavily sedimented sites until approximately 50 Ma. It thus appears that approximately 100-200 m of sediment is neither necessary nor sufficient to stop hydrothermal heat transfer. We therefore conclude that the age of the crust is the primary control on the fraction of heat transported by hydrothermal flow and that sediment thickness has a lesser effect. This inference is consistent with models in which hydrothermal flow decreases with age due to reduced crustal porosity and hence permeability.

  18. Constraints on hydrothermal heat flux through the oceanic lithosphere from global heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    that hydrothermal heat transfer has largely ceased. Although earlier studies suggested major differences in sealing ages for different ocean basins, we find that the sealing ages for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans are similar and consistent with the sealing age for the entire data set, 65 +/- 10 Ma. The previous inference of a young (approximately 20 Ma) sealing age for the Pacific appears to have biased downward several previous estimates of the global hydrothermal flux. The heat flow data also provide indirect evidence for the mechanism by which the hydrothermal heat flux becomes small, which has often been ascribed to isolation of the igneous crust from seawater due to the hydraulic conductivity of the intervening sediment. We find, however, that even the least sedimented sites show the systematic increase of the ratio of observed to predicted heat flow with age, although the more sedimented sites have a younger sealing age. Moreover, the heat flow discrepancy persists at heavily sedimented sites until approximately 50 Ma. It thus appears that approximately 100-200 m of sediment is neither necessary nor sufficient to stop hydrothermal heat transfer. We therefore conclude that the age of the crust is the primary control on the fraction of heat transported by hydrothermal flow and that sediment thickness has a lesser effect. This inference is consistent with models in which hydrothermal flow decreases with age due to reduced crustal porosity and hence permeability.

  19. Heating Augmentation Due to Compression Pad Cavities on the Project Orion CEV Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion CEV heat-shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and Mach 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  20. Climate change in cities due to global warming and urban effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Mark P.; Best, Martin J.; Betts, Richard A.

    2010-05-01

    Urbanisation is estimated to result in 6 billion urban dwellers by 2050. Cities will be exposed to climate change from greenhouse gas induced radiative forcing, and localised effects from urbanisation such as the urban heat island. An urban land-surface model has been included in the HadAM3 Global Climate Model. It shows that regions of high population growth coincide with regions of high urban heat island potential, most notably in the Middle East, the Indian sub-continent, and East Africa. Climate change has the capacity to modify the climatic potential for urban heat islands, with increases of 30% in some locations, but a global average reduction of 6%. Warming and extreme heat events due to urbanisation and increased energy consumption are simulated to be as large as the impact of doubled CO2 in some regions, and climate change increases the disparity in extreme hot nights between rural and urban areas.

  1. Anthropogenic heating of the urban environment due to air conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanca, F.; Georgescu, M.; Mahalov, A.; Moustaoui, M.; Wang, M.

    2014-05-01

    This article investigates the effect of air conditioning (AC) systems on air temperature and examines their electricity consumption for a semiarid urban environment. We simulate a 10 day extreme heat period over the Phoenix metropolitan area (U.S.) with the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled to a multilayer building energy scheme. The performance of the modeling system is evaluated against 10 Arizona Meteorological Network weather stations and one weather station maintained by the National Weather Service for air temperature, wind speed, and wind direction. We show that explicit representation of waste heat from air conditioning systems improved the 2 m air temperature correspondence to observations. Waste heat release from AC systems was maximum during the day, but the mean effect was negligible near the surface. However, during the night, heat emitted from AC systems increased the mean 2 m air temperature by more than 1°C for some urban locations. The AC systems modified the thermal stratification of the urban boundary layer, promoting vertical mixing during nighttime hours. The anthropogenic processes examined here (i.e., explicit representation of urban energy consumption processes due to AC systems) require incorporation in future meteorological and climate investigations to improve weather and climate predictability. Our results demonstrate that releasing waste heat into the ambient environment exacerbates the nocturnal urban heat island and increases cooling demands.

  2. Heating Augmentation in Laminar Flow Due to Heat-Shield Cavities on the Project Orion CEV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion CEV heat-shield at laminar conditions. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and Mach 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements on and around the compression pads using global phosphor thermography. Consistent trends in heating augmentation levels were observed in the data and correlations of average and maximum heating at the cavities were formulated in terms of the local boundary-layer parameters and cavity dimensions. Additional heating data from prior testing of Genesis and Mars Science Laboratory models were also examined to extend the parametric range of cavity heating correlations.

  3. Detailed Specifications for Global Heat Treatment Sourcing and Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponzilli, Jared; Sponzilli, John

    2013-07-01

    The very nature of global sourcing means that components must carry clear and detailed specifications for material, heat treatment, and test methods. Qualified global heat treat facilities can achieve good control of not only the common features such as surface and gradient hardness, but also of microstructure, core hardness, residual stress, and other critical metallurgical parameters. This paper will discuss a new concept for material specifications and more detailed heat treatment specifications for the global marketplace.

  4. An adaptability limit to climate change due to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Steven C.; Huber, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Despite the uncertainty in future climate-change impacts, it is often assumed that humans would be able to adapt to any possible warming. Here we argue that heat stress imposes a robust upper limit to such adaptation. Peak heat stress, quantified by the wet-bulb temperature TW, is surprisingly similar across diverse climates today. TW never exceeds 31 °C. Any exceedence of 35 °C for extended periods should induce hyperthermia in humans and other mammals, as dissipation of metabolic heat becomes impossible. While this never happens now, it would begin to occur with global-mean warming of about 7 °C, calling the habitability of some regions into question. With 11–12 °C warming, such regions would spread to encompass the majority of the human population as currently distributed. Eventual warmings of 12 °C are possible from fossil fuel burning. One implication is that recent estimates of the costs of unmitigated climate change are too low unless the range of possible warming can somehow be narrowed. Heat stress also may help explain trends in the mammalian fossil record. PMID:20439769

  5. Globalization of agricultural pollution due to international trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, C.; Carr, J.; Seekell, D. A.; D'Odorico, P.

    2013-08-01

    Almost 90% of freshwater resources consumed globally are used to produce plant and animal commodities. Water scarce countries can balance their water needs by importing food from other countries. This process, known as virtual water transfer, represents the externalization of water use. The volume and geographic reach of virtual water transfers is increasing, but little is known about how these transfers redistribute the environmental costs of agricultural production. The grey water footprint quantifies the environmental costs of virtual water transfers. The grey water footprint is calculated as the amount of water necessary to reduce the concentrations of fertilizers and pesticides released in streams and aquifers to the allowed standards. We reconstructed the global network of virtual grey water transfers for the period 1986-2010 based on global trade data and grey water footprints for 309 commodities. We tracked changes in the structure of the grey water transfer network with network and inequality statistics. Pollution is increasing and is becoming more strongly concentrated in only a handful of countries. The global external grey water footprint, the pollution created by countries outside of their borders, increased 136% during the period. The extent of externalization of pollution is highly unequal between countries and most of this inequality is due to differences in social development status. Our results demonstrate a growing globalization of pollution due to virtual water transfers.

  6. An autopsy case of infant death due to heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, T; Maeda, H; Takayasu, T; Fujioka, Y; Nakaya, T

    1992-09-01

    We report an autopsy case of infant death due to heat stroke. On a winter day, a 52-day-old female baby was placed under a Japanese electric foot warmer with a coverlet (kotatsu) on an electric carpet warmer in a heated room at home. After about 5 h, the mother noticed that the baby was unconscious and took her to a hospital. Spontaneous respiration, however, was already absent, and the pupils were dilated. The trunk was hot; body temperature was 41.3 degrees C. The skin of the whole body was dry. Autopsy revealed second-degree burn injuries on the left side of the face and the dorsum of the left hand. Numerous marked petechiae and ecchymoses were found in the thymus (capsule and parenchyma), pleurae (visceral and parietal), pericardial cavity (internal and external surfaces), epicardium, and beneath the serosa at the origin of the aorta. In addition, there was congestion in various organs, edema in the brain and lungs, and hemorrhage in the lungs. Histopathologically, macrophages without hemosiderin granules were present in the alveoli. When the heating conditions at the accident were reproduced experimentally, the temperature in the electric kotatsu warmer rose to 50-60 degrees C. Thus, we concluded that misuse of the electric kotatsu caused heat stroke in this infant.

  7. One dimensional global and local solution for ICRF heating

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.

    1995-02-01

    A numerical code GLOSI [Global and Local One-dimensional Solution for Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating] is developed to solve one-dimensional wave equations resulting from the use of radio frequency (RF) waves to heat plasmas. The code uses a finite difference method. Due to its numerical stability, the code can be used to find both global and local solutions when imposed with appropriate boundary conditions. Three types of boundary conditions are introduced to describe wave scattering, antenna wave excitation, and fixed tangential wave magnetic field. The scattering boundary conditions are especially useful for local solutions. The antenna wave excitation boundary conditions can be used to excite fast and slow waves in a plasma. The tangential magnetic field boundary conditions are used to calculate impedance matrices, which describe plasma and antenna coupling and can be used by an antenna code to calculate antenna loading. These three types of boundary conditions can also be combined to describe various physical situations in RF plasma heating. The code also includes plasma thermal effects and calculates collisionless power absorption and kinetic energy flux. The plasma current density is approximated by a second-order Larmor radius expansion, which results in a sixth-order ordinary differential equation.

  8. Globalization of agricultural pollution due to international trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, C.; Carr, J.; Seekell, D. A.; D'Odorico, P.

    2014-02-01

    Almost 90% of freshwater resources consumed globally are used to produce plant and animal commodities. Water-scarce countries can balance their water needs by importing food from other countries. This process, known as virtual water transfer, represents the externalization of water use. The volume and geographic reach of virtual water transfers is increasing, but little is known about how these transfers redistribute the environmental costs of agricultural production. The grey water footprint quantifies the environmental costs of virtual water transfers. The grey water footprint is calculated as the amount of water necessary to reduce nitrogen concentrations from fertilizers and pesticides released into streams and aquifers to allowed standards. We reconstructed the global network of virtual grey water transfers for the period 1986-2010 based on international trade data and grey water footprints for 309 commodities. We tracked changes in the structure of the grey water transfer network with network and inequality statistics. Pollution is increasing and is becoming more strongly concentrated in only a handful of countries. The global external grey water footprint, the pollution created by countries outside of their borders, increased 136% during the period. The extent of externalization of pollution is highly unequal between countries, and most of this inequality is due to differences in social development status. Our results demonstrate a growing globalization of pollution due to virtual water transfers.

  9. General circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating: Significance of planetary rotation and polar eddy heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-04-01

    A high significance of planetary rotation and poleward eddy heat fluxes is determined for general circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating. In a high-resolution simplified Venus general circulation model, a planetary-scale mixed Rossby-gravity wave with meridional winds across the poles produces strong poleward heat flux and indirect circulation. This strong poleward heat transport induces downward momentum transport of indirect cells in the regions of weak high-latitude jets. It also reduces the meridional temperature gradient and vertical shear of the high-latitude jets in accordance with the thermal wind relation below the cloud layer. In contrast, strong equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets form in the cloud layer in the absence of polar indirect cells in an experiment involving Titan's rotation. Both the strong midlatitude jet and meridional temperature gradient are maintained in the situation that eddy horizontal heat fluxes are weak. The presence or absence of strong poleward eddy heat flux is one of the important factors determining the slow or fast superrotation state in the cloud layer through the downward angular momentum transport and the thermal wind relation. For fast Earth rotation, a weak global-scale Hadley circulation of the low-density upper atmosphere maintains equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets above the cloud layer, whereas multiple meridional circulations suppress the zonal wind speed below the cloud layer.

  10. Earth tides, global heat flow, and tectonics.

    PubMed

    Shaw, H R

    1970-05-29

    The power of a heat engine ignited by tidal energy can account for geologically reasonable rates of average magma production and sea floor spreading. These rates control similarity of heat flux over continents and oceans because of an inverse relationship between respective depth intervals for mass transfer and consequent distributions of radiogenic heat production.

  11. Earth tides, global heat flow, and tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.

    1970-01-01

    The power of a heat engine ignited by tidal energy can account for geologically reasonable rates of average magma production and sea floor spreading. These rates control similarity of heat flux over continents and oceans because of an inverse relationship between respective depth intervals for mass transfer and consequent distributions of radiogenic heat production.

  12. Heat Loads Due to Small Penetrations in Multilayer Insulation Blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. L.; Heckle, K. W.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    The main penetrations (supports and piping) through multilayer insulation systems for cryogenic tanks have been previously addressed by heat flow measurements. Smaller penetrations due to fasteners and attachments are now experimentally investigated. The use of small pins or plastic garment tag fasteners to each the handling and construction of multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets goes back many years. While it has long been understood that penetrations and other discontinuities degrade the performance of the MLI blanket, quantification of this degradation has generally been lumped into gross performance multipliers (often called degradation factors or scale factors). Small penetrations contribute both solid conduction and radiation heat transfer paths through the blanket. The conduction is down the stem of the structural element itself while the radiation is through the hole formed during installation of the pin or fastener. Analytical models were developed in conjunction with MLI perforation theory and Fouriers Law. Results of the analytical models are compared to experimental testing performed on a 10 layer MLI blanket with approximately 50 small plastic pins penetrating the test specimen. The pins were installed at 76-mm spacing inches in both directions to minimize the compounding of thermal effects due to localized compression or lateral heat transfer. The testing was performed using a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter (Cryostat-100) with the standard boundary temperatures of 293 K and 78 K. Results show that the added radiation through the holes is much more significant than the conduction down the fastener. The results are shown to be in agreement with radiation theory for perforated films.

  13. Impact of Ridge Induced Latent Heat Advection on Sea Ice Global Heat Budget.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E.; Gosselin, J.

    2008-12-01

    The effects of permeability on ice keel induced latent heat fluxes are examined using pressure ridge density statistics computed from SAR images and a prognostic simulation of forced brine advection through the bottom ice layer. Under pressure gradients generated in the wake of an ice keel sea water is pushed into and brine pumped out of the bottom ice layer. This in turn causes a new thermodynamic equilibrium to be reached. At spring when the ice permeability increases, brine export combined with sea water import translates into an advective heat flow that is balanced by the latent heat absorbed by volume melting of brine channel walls. Sea ice within the sheltered areas behind keels is modelled as an anisotropic heteregeneous mushy layer. The non-linear equation system within each cell is implemented on a finite volume grid and include volume melt of the brine channels from which porosity, water density, temperature and salinity are computed. Outputs from these simulations are then combined with ridge distribution statistics to evaluate the global impact of latent heat absorbed due to volume melting in the wake of ridges. As anticipated, results are highly dependent on permeability, nevertheless, they show that pressure ridge induced melting within the ice is a significant component of the heat budget when compared with melting at the ice water interface. This work underlines needs for further researches to improve our understanding of ice permeability changes during the melt season, it also calls for better tools to extract pressure ridge characteristics from satellite images.

  14. The global joule heat production rate and the AE index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, S.; Ahn, B.-H.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1985-01-01

    The degree of accuracy with which the AE index may be used as a measure of the joule heat production rate is evaluated for a typical substorm event on March 18, 1978, by estimating the global joule heat production rate as a function of time on the basis of data obtained from the IMS's six meridian chains. It is found that, although the AE index is statistically linearly related to the global joule heat production rate, caution is required when one assumes that details of AE index time variations during individual events are representative of those of the joule heat production rate.

  15. More hurricanes to hit Western Europe due to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarsma, Reindert; Hazeleger, Wilco; Severijns, Camiel; de Vries, Hylke; Ster, Andreas; Bintanja, Richard; van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan; van den Brink, Henk; Baatsen, Michiel

    2014-05-01

    Using a very high resolution global climate model (~25 km grid size) with prescribed sea surface temperatures we have investigated the change in the occurrence of hurricane-force (> 32.6 m/s) storms over Western Europe due to climate change. The results show a large increase during early autumn (Aug-Oct). The majority of these storms originate as a tropical cyclone. Using SST sensitivity experiments we have tested the hypothesis that the increase is due to the rise in Atlantic tropical SST thereby extending eastwards the breeding ground of tropical cyclones, yielding more frequent and intense hurricanes following pathways directed towards Europe. En route they transform into extra-tropical depressions and re-intensify after merging with the mid-latitude baroclinic unstable flow. Detailed analysis indicates that the development of a warm seclusion is the main mechanism for the re-intensification and that the hurricane winds are caused by a sting jet.

  16. Transient pool boiling heat transfer due to increasing heat inputs in subcooled water at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, K.; Shiotsu, M.; Sakurai, A.

    1995-09-01

    Understanding of transient boiling phenomenon caused by increasing heat inputs in subcooled water at high pressures is necessary to predict correctly a severe accident due to a power burst in a water-cooled nuclear reactor. Transient maximum heat fluxes, q{sub max}, on a 1.2 mm diameter horizontal cylinder in a pool of saturated and subcooled water for exponential heat inputs, q{sub o}e{sup t/T}, with periods, {tau}, ranging from about 2 ms to 20 s at pressures from atmospheric up to 2063 kPa for water subcoolings from 0 to about 80 K were measured to obtain the extended data base to investigate the effect of high subcoolings on steady-state and transient maximum heat fluxes, q{sub max}. Two main mechanisms of q{sub max} exist depending on the exponential periods at low subcoolings. One is due to the time lag of the hydrodynamic instability which starts at steady-state maximum heat flux on fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), and the other is due to the heterogenous spontaneous nucleations (HSN) in flooded cavities which coexist with vapor bubbles growing up from active cavities. The shortest period corresponding to the maximum q{sub max} for long period range belonging to the former mechanism becomes longer and the q{sub max}mechanism for long period range shifts to that due the HSN on FDNB with the increase of subcooling and pressure. The longest period corresponding to the minimum q{sub max} for the short period range belonging to the latter mechanism becomes shorter with the increase in saturated pressure. On the contrary, the longest period becomes longer with the increase in subcooling at high pressures. Correlations for steady-state and transient maximum heat fluxes were presented for a wide range of pressure and subcooling.

  17. Global assessment of human losses due to earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silva, Vitor; Jaiswal, Kishor; Weatherill, Graeme; Crowley, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Current studies have demonstrated a sharp increase in human losses due to earthquakes. These alarming levels of casualties suggest the need for large-scale investment in seismic risk mitigation, which, in turn, requires an adequate understanding of the extent of the losses, and location of the most affected regions. Recent developments in global and uniform datasets such as instrumental and historical earthquake catalogues, population spatial distribution and country-based vulnerability functions, have opened an unprecedented possibility for a reliable assessment of earthquake consequences at a global scale. In this study, a uniform probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) model was employed to derive a set of global seismic hazard curves, using the open-source software OpenQuake for seismic hazard and risk analysis. These results were combined with a collection of empirical fatality vulnerability functions and a population dataset to calculate average annual human losses at the country level. The results from this study highlight the regions/countries in the world with a higher seismic risk, and thus where risk reduction measures should be prioritized.

  18. Chromospheric heating due to internetwork magnetic flux cancellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosic, Milan; de la Cruz Rodriguez, Jaime; De Pontieu, Bart; Bellot Rubio, Luis; Ortiz, Ada; Esteban Pozuelo, Sara

    2017-08-01

    The heating of the solar chromosphere is one of the most intriguing unanswered problems in solar physics. It is believed that this phenomenon may significantly be supported by small-scale internetwork (IN) magnetic fields. Indeed, cancellations of IN magnetic flux patches might be an efficient way to transport flux and energy from the photosphere to the chromosphere. Because of this, it is essential to determine where they occur, the rates at which they proceed, and understand their influence on the chromosphere. Here we study the spatial and temporal evolution of IN cancelling patches using high resolution, multiwavelength, coordinated observations obtained with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST). Employing multi-line inversions of the Mg II h&k lines we show that cancelling events, while occurring ubiquitously over IN regions, produce clear signatures of heating in the upper atmospheric layers. Using the RADYN code we determine the energy released due to cancellations of IN elements and discuss about their impact on the dynamics and energetics of the solar chromosphere.

  19. Global hotspots of water scarcity impacts due to human interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldkamp, T.; Wada, Y.; Aerts, J.; Ward, P.; Satoh, Y.; Pokhrel, Y. N.; Masaki, Y.; Doll, P. M.; Ostberg, S.; Oki, T.; Gosling, S.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Water scarcity is rapidly increasing in many global river basins, due to both local increases in water demand and human interventions affecting stream flow. In a novel multi-model multi-forcing assessment over the period 1971-2010, we examine how several human interventions have affected water scarcity, namely land use change, reservoir operations, and upstream water withdrawals. We show that these human interventions have caused increased water scarcity for 16% of the global population, and decreased water scarcity for 13%, and have contributed to distinct patterns of water scarcity hotspots. We also show that a combination of human interventions and changes in local water demands have led to an increase in the duration of extreme water scarcity events in 30% of the global land area, inhabited by 49% of the global population. Upstream human interventions are the main dominant driver (in 86% of the cases) of negative impacts on downstream fresh water resources and water scarcity. Therefore, adaptation measures should be embedded in integrated river basin management plans, addressing upstream effects on downstream water scarcity.This study is the first in its kind to evaluate how human interventions affected water scarcity conditions as well as the exposure to and persistence of water scarcity events, using an ensemble of five global water impact models (H08, LPJmL, MATSIRO, PCR-GLOBWB, WaterGAP) driven by three global state-of-the art observations-based historical climate data-sets (PGFv2, GSWP3, WFD/WFDEI) and a set of socio-economic proxies (GDP, population density, livestock density, land use and land cover) to model historical demands. A novelty of this research is the use of the HYDE 3.1 - MIRCA dataset for simulating the time-varying effects of changes in irrigation and/or cropland patterns. With the incorporation of a spatially and temporally explicit indicator to describe minimum environmental flow requirements, i.e. the amount of water that ecosystems need

  20. HIV Due to Female Sex Work: Regional and Global Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Prüss-Ustün, Annette; Wolf, Jennyfer; Driscoll, Tim; Degenhardt, Louisa; Neira, Maria; Calleja, Jesus Maria Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Female sex workers (FSWs) are at high risk of HIV infection. Our objective was to determine the proportion of HIV prevalence in the general female adult population that is attributable to the occupational exposure of female sex work, due to unprotected sexual intercourse. Methods Population attributable fractions of HIV prevalence due to female sex work were estimated for 2011. A systematic search was conducted to retrieve required input data from available sources. Data gaps of HIV prevalence in FSWs for 2011 were filled using multilevel modeling and multivariate linear regression. The fraction of HIV attributable to female sex work was estimated as the excess HIV burden in FSWs deducting the HIV burden in FSWs due to injecting drug use. Results An estimated fifteen percent of HIV in the general female adult population is attributable to (unsafe) female sex work. The region with the highest attributable fraction is Sub Saharan Africa, but the burden is also substantial for the Caribbean, Latin America and South and Southeast Asia. We estimate 106,000 deaths from HIV are a result of female sex work globally, 98,000 of which occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. If HIV prevalence in other population groups originating from sexual contact with FSWs had been considered, the overall attributable burden would probably be much larger. Discussion Female sex work is an important contributor to HIV transmission and the global HIV burden. Effective HIV prevention measures exist and have been successfully targeted at key populations in many settings. These must be scaled up. Conclusion FSWs suffer from high HIV burden and are a crucial core population for HIV transmission. Surveillance, prevention and treatment of HIV in FSWs should benefit both this often neglected vulnerable group and the general population. PMID:23717432

  1. Small global-mean cooling due to volcanic radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, J. M.; Andrews, T.; Good, P.; Mauritsen, T.; Forster, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    In both the observational record and atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) simulations of the last ˜150 years, short-lived negative radiative forcing due to volcanic aerosol, following explosive eruptions, causes sudden global-mean cooling of up to ˜0.3 K. This is about five times smaller than expected from the transient climate response parameter (TCRP, K of global-mean surface air temperature change per W m-2 of radiative forcing increase) evaluated under atmospheric CO2 concentration increasing at 1 % yr-1. Using the step model (Good et al. in Geophys Res Lett 38:L01703, 2011. doi: 10.1029/2010GL045208), we confirm the previous finding (Held et al. in J Clim 23:2418-2427, 2010. doi: 10.1175/2009JCLI3466.1) that the main reason for the discrepancy is the damping of the response to short-lived forcing by the thermal inertia of the upper ocean. Although the step model includes this effect, it still overestimates the volcanic cooling simulated by AOGCMs by about 60 %. We show that this remaining discrepancy can be explained by the magnitude of the volcanic forcing, which may be smaller in AOGCMs (by 30 % for the HadCM3 AOGCM) than in off-line calculations that do not account for rapid cloud adjustment, and the climate sensitivity parameter, which may be smaller than for increasing CO2 (40 % smaller than for 4 × CO2 in HadCM3).

  2. Why ocean heat transport warms the global mean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herweijer, Celine; Seager, Richard; Winton, Michael; Clement, Amy

    2005-08-01

    Observational and modelling evidence suggest that poleward ocean heat transport (OHT) can vary in response to both natural climate variability and greenhouse warming. Recent modelling studies have shown that increased OHT warms both the tropical and global mean climates. Using two different coupled climate models with mixed-layer oceans, with and without OHT, along with a coupled model with a fixed-current ocean component in which the currents are uniformly reduced and increased by 50%, an attempt is made to explain why this may happen.OHT warms the global mean climate by 1 to 1.6K in the atmospheric general circulation (AGCM) ML model and 3.5K in the AGCM fixed current model. In each model the warming is attributed to an increase in atmospheric greenhouse trapping, primarily clear-sky greenhouse trapping, and a reduction in albedo. This occurs as OHT moistens the atmosphere, particularly at subtropical latitudes. This is not purely a thermodynamic response to the reduction in planetary albedo at these latitudes. It is a change in atmospheric circulation that both redistributes the water vapour and allows for a global atmospheric moistening—a positive 'dynamical' water vapour feedback. With increasing OHT the atmospheric water vapour content increases as atmospheric convection spreads out of the deep tropics. The global mean planetary albedo is decreased with increased OHT. This change is explained by a decrease in subtropical and mid-latitude low cloudiness, along with a reduction in high-latitude surface albedo due to decreased sea ice. The climate models with the mixed layer oceans underestimate both the subtropical low cloud cover and the high-latitude sea ice/surface albedo, and consequently have a smaller warming response to OHT.

  3. Changes in air temperature and its relation to ambulance transports due to heat stroke in all 47 prefectures of Japan.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shoko; Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Sakano, Noriko

    2012-09-01

    Changes in air temperature and its relation to ambulance transports due to heat stroke in all 47 prefectures, in Japan were evaluated. Data on air temperature were obtained from the Japanese Meteorological Agency. Data on ambulance transports due to heat stroke was directly obtained from the Fire and Disaster Management Agency, Japan. We also used the number of deaths due to heat stroke from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, and population data from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications. Chronological changes in parameters of air temperature were analyzed. In addition, the relation between air temperature and ambulance transports due to heat stroke in August 2010 was also evaluated by using an ecological study. Positive and significant changes in the parameters of air temperature that is, the mean air temperature, mean of the highest air temperature, and mean of the lowest air temperature were noted in all 47 prefectures. In addition, changes in air temperature were accelerated when adjusted for observation years. Ambulance transports due to heat stroke was significantly correlated with air temperature in the ecological study. The highest air temperature was significantly linked to ambulance transports due to heat stroke, especially in elderly subjects. Global warming was demonstrated in all 47 prefectures in Japan. In addition, the higher air temperature was closely associated with higher ambulance transports due to heat stroke in Japan.

  4. Can Global Warming Heat Up Environmental Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzatenta, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Bronx Community College (CUNY) launched "Global Warming Campus Awareness and Action Days" in celebration of Earth Day, 2007. The purpose of this program was to raise awareness of environmental issues in the college population, especially students. To let more students have a grasp of what Environmental Education (EE) is all about, the author…

  5. Can Global Warming Heat Up Environmental Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzatenta, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Bronx Community College (CUNY) launched "Global Warming Campus Awareness and Action Days" in celebration of Earth Day, 2007. The purpose of this program was to raise awareness of environmental issues in the college population, especially students. To let more students have a grasp of what Environmental Education (EE) is all about, the author…

  6. Atlas of the global distribution of atmospheric heating during the global weather experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaack, Todd K.; Johnson, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    Global distributions of atmospheric heating for the annual cycle of the Global Weather Experiment are estimated from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Level 3b data set. Distributions of monthly, seasonally, and annually averaged heating are presented for isentropic and isobaric layers within the troposphere and for the troposphere as a whole. The distributions depict a large-scale structure of atmospheric heating that appears spatially and temporally consistent with known features of the global circulation and the seasonal evolution.

  7. Comment on ``Long-Term Global Heating From Energy Use''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, James R.

    2008-12-01

    In a prominent article published in Tellus in 1969, Mikhail I. Budyko, with the Main Geophysical Observatory, Leningrad, Soviet Union, wrote that ``all the energy used by man is transformed into heat, the main portion of this energy being an additional source of heat as compared to the present radiation gain'' [Budyko, 1969, p. 618]. He pointed out that this heating was over and above any climate forcing from anthropogenic greenhouse gases and-since energy use was growing geometrically-it was likely to result in the retreat of the cryosphere, accompanied by excessive and potentially damaging global warming, perhaps in 200 years or less. Eric J. Chaisson, in Eos (``Long-Term Global Heating From Energy Use,'' 89(28), 253-254, 2008), does not acknowledge Budyko's research. Chaisson cites cosmic history and the history of the human species, but he provides no references to the conceptual history of the idea that human energy use could result in global heating. Budyko first published on the Earth's heat budget in 1948 and in 1998 received the Blue Planet Prize, sponsored by the Asahi Glass Foundation, for his lifetime accomplishments in quantitative climatology. His work on the energy budget of the Earth and anthropogenic influences really should have been cited (see a selection of key articles in the online National Science Digital Library, at http://wiki.nsdl.org/index.php/PALE:ClassicArticles/GlobalWarming).

  8. Global anthropogenic heat flux database with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Varquez, A. C. G.; Kanda, M.

    2017-02-01

    This study developed a top-down method for estimating global anthropogenic heat emission (AHE), with a high spatial resolution of 30 arc-seconds and temporal resolution of 1 h. Annual average AHE was derived from human metabolic heating and primary energy consumption, which was further divided into three components based on consumer sector. The first and second components were heat loss and heat emissions from industrial sectors equally distributed throughout the country and populated areas, respectively. The third component comprised the sum of emissions from commercial, residential, and transportation sectors (CRT). Bulk AHE from the CRT was proportionally distributed using a global population dataset, with a radiance-calibrated nighttime lights adjustment. An empirical function to estimate monthly fluctuations of AHE based on gridded monthly temperatures was derived from various Japanese and American city measurements. Finally, an AHE database with a global coverage was constructed for the year 2013. Comparisons between our proposed AHE and other existing datasets revealed that the problem of overestimation of AHE intensity in previous top-down models was mitigated by the separation of energy consumption sectors; furthermore, the problem of AHE underestimation at central urban areas was solved by the nighttime lights adjustment. A strong agreement in the monthly profiles of AHE between our database and other bottom-up datasets further proved the validity of the current methodology. Investigations of AHE for the 29 largest urban agglomerations globally highlighted that the share of heat emissions from CRT sectors to the total AHE at the city level was 40-95%; whereas that of metabolic heating varied with the city's level of development by a range of 2-60%. A negative correlation between gross domestic product (GDP) and the share of metabolic heating to a city's total AHE was found. Globally, peak AHE values were found to occur between December and February, while

  9. Thermally induced vibrations due to internal heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandino, Joseph Robert

    Virtually all previous research on thermally induced vibrations has investigated vibrations caused by surface heating. This is the first detailed study of a thermally induced vibration caused by surface cooling. The phenomenon is shown to be driven by thermal moments. The thermal moments are caused by convection because the vibrations occur in air but not in a vacuum. A mathematical model was developed to predict the thermal-structural behavior of an internally heated beam. The convection heat transfer for a vibrating beam is complex. In most cases it is neither completely natural nor completely forced convection. The convection heat transfer is a mix of both components. The convection is further complicated by the transition of the airflow along the beam from laminar to turbulent flow. An experimental heat transfer investigation was conducted to determine expressions for the natural and forced convection as functions of both position along the beam and velocity. The results from the model were verified using experimental data for an internally heated beam undergoing thermally induced vibrations. The model was shown to predict the steady-state temperatures accurately. The model adequately predicted the steady-state displacements, although it predicted the displacement histories with some error. The analysis showed that the thermal and structural problems are coupled by the forced convection. Once initiated, the amplitude of the vibration increases until the amplitude is such that the heat removed by convection balances the internal heating. The steady-state amplitude is not affected by the initial displacement of the beam. Thermally induced vibrations of internally heated beams belong to the class of vibrations called self-sustaining oscillations.

  10. Simulating global and local surface temperature changes due to Holocene anthropogenic land cover change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng; Vavrus, Steve J.; Kutzbach, John E.; Ruddiman, William F.; Kaplan, Jed O.; Krumhardt, Kristen M.

    2014-01-01

    Surface albedo changes from anthropogenic land cover change (ALCC) represent the second largest negative radiative forcing behind aerosol during the industrial era. Using a new reconstruction of ALCC during the Holocene era by Kaplan et al. (2011), we quantify the local and global temperature response induced by Holocene ALCC in the Community Climate System Model, version 4. We find that Holocene ALCC causes a global cooling of 0.17°C due to the biogeophysical effects of land-atmosphere exchange of momentum, moisture, and radiative and heat fluxes. On the global scale, the biogeochemical effects of Holocene ALCC from carbon emissions dominate the biogeophysical effects by causing 0.9°C global warming. The net effects of Holocene ALCC amount to a global warming of 0.73°C during the preindustrial era, which is comparable to the ~0.8°C warming during industrial times. On local to regional scales, such as parts of Europe, North America, and Asia, the biogeophysical effects of Holocene ALCC are significant and comparable to the biogeochemical effect.

  11. An analytic formula for heating due to ozone absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, R. S.; Will, D. I.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt was made to devise a simple expression or formula to describe radiative heating in the atmosphere by ozone absorption. Such absorption occurs in the Hartley, Huggins, and Chappuis bands and is only slightly temperature and pressure dependent.

  12. Global diabatic heating during FGGE SOP-1 and SOP-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Baker, Wayman E.

    1986-01-01

    With the increase in the observational data provided by FGGE and the use of global circulation models with full physics for the data assimilation, it is now becoming feasible to attempt to estimate globally the atmospheric diabatic heating. The thermodynamic equation in isobaric coordinates and the data generated by the FGGE III-b analysis of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) are employed to serve this purpose. The results of the present study generally agree with other previous investigations. However, some important differences are also revealed. (1) The diabatic heating obtained in the tropics in the present study is larger than that obtained elsewhere; (2) the relatively large heating over the mountainous areas shown in other studies does not appear; (3) no significant negative values of diabatic heating are found in the polar regions; and (4) unlike other studies, cooling is noted over parts of Eurasia in the summer.

  13. Global diabatic heating during FGGE SOP-1 and SOP-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Baker, Wayman E.

    1986-01-01

    With the increase in the observational data provided by FGGE and the use of global circulation models with full physics for the data assimilation, it is now becoming feasible to attempt to estimate globally the atmospheric diabatic heating. The thermodynamic equation in isobaric coordinates and the data generated by the FGGE III-b analysis of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) are employed to serve this purpose. The results of the present study generally agree with other previous investigations. However, some important differences are also revealed. (1) The diabatic heating obtained in the tropics in the present study is larger than that obtained elsewhere; (2) the relatively large heating over the mountainous areas shown in other studies does not appear; (3) no significant negative values of diabatic heating are found in the polar regions; and (4) unlike other studies, cooling is noted over parts of Eurasia in the summer.

  14. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hameed, S.; Cess, R. D.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al, 1978; Hameed et al, 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NO(x), and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NO(x). The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NO(x) and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  15. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Hameed, S.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone and methane might increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test this possible climatic impact, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically-averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4 and NOx. The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NOx and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could enhance global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  16. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hameed, S.; Cess, R. D.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al, 1978; Hameed et al, 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NO(x), and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NO(x). The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NO(x) and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  17. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Hameed, S.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone and methane might increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test this possible climatic impact, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically-averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4 and NOx. The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NOx and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could enhance global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  18. Long-Term Global Heating From Energy Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaisson, Eric J.

    2008-07-01

    Even if civilization on Earth stops polluting the biosphere with greenhouse gases, humanity could eventually be awash in too much heat, namely, the dissipated heat by-product generated by any nonrenewable energy source. Apart from the Sun's natural aging-which causes an approximately 1% luminosity rise for each 108 years and thus about 1°C increase in Earth's surface temperature-well within 1000 years our technological society could find itself up against a fundamental limit to growth: an unavoidable global heating of roughly 3°C dictated solely by the second law of thermodynamics, a biogeophysical effect often ignored when estimating future planetary warming scenarios.

  19. Ultrasonic verification of microstructural changes due to heat treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation was measured for polycrystalline samples of nickel and copper with various grain-size distributions produced by heat treatment. Attenuation as a function of frequency was determined for a sample having a known mean grain diameter. Once this function was determined, it could be scaled to determine the mean grain size of other samples of the same material with different mean grain diameters. These results were obtained by using broadband pulse-echo ultrasound in the 25 to 100 MHz frequency range. The results suggest an ultrasonic, nondestructive approach for verifying heat treatment of metals.

  20. Profile of heating rate due to aerosols using lidar and skyradiometer in SKYNET Hefei site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Liu, D.; Xie, C.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on climate due to their important role in modifying atmosphere energy budget. On global scale, the direct radiative forcing is estimated to be in the range of -0.9 to -0.1 Wm-2 for aerosols [1]. Yet, these estimates are subject to very large uncertainties because of uncertainties in spatial and temporal variations of aerosols. At local scales, as aerosol properties can vary spatially and temporally, radiative forcing due to aerosols can be also very different and it can exceed the global value by an order of magnitude. Hence, it is very important to investigate aerosol loading, properties, and radiative forcing due to them in detail on local regions of climate significance. Haze and dust events in Hefei, China are explored by Lidar and Skyradiometer. Aerosol optical properties including the AOD, SSA, AAE and size distribution are analysed by using the SKYRAD.PACK [2] and presented in this paper. Furthermore, the radiative forcing due to aerosols and the heating rate in the ATM are also calculated using SBDART model [3]. The results are shown that the vertical heating rate is tightly related to aerosol profile. References: 1. IPCC. 2007. Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basic. Contribution of Working Group I Contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report. Solomon S, Qing D H, Manning M, et al. eds., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, N Y, USA. 2. Nakajima, T., G. Tonna, R. Rao, Y. Kaufman, and B. Holben, 1996: Use of sky brightness measurements from ground for remote sensing of particulate poly dispersions, Appl. Opt., 35, 2672-2686. 3. Ricchiazzi et al 1998. SBDART: a research and teaching software tool for plane-parallel radiative transfer in the Earth's atmosphere,Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society,79,2101-2114.

  1. Simulating global and local surface temperature changes due to Holocene anthropogenic land cover change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, F.; Vavrus, S. J.; Kutzbach, J. E.; Ruddiman, W. F.; Kaplan, J. O.; Krumhardt, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo changes from anthropogenic land cover change (ALCC) represent the second-largest negative radiative forcing behind aerosol during the industrial era. Using a new reconstruction of ALCC during the Holocene era by Kaplan et al. [2011], we quantify the local and global temperature response induced by Holocene ALCC in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4). With 1-degree resolution of the CCSM4 slab-ocean model,we find that Holocene ALCC cause a global cooling of 0.17 °C due to the biogeophysical effects of land-atmosphere exchange of momentum, moisture, radiative and heat fluxes. On the global scale, the biogeochemical effects of Holocene ALCC from carbon emissions dominate the biogeophysical effects by causing 0.9 °C global warming. The net effects of Holocene ALCC amount to a global warming of 0.73 °C during the pre-industrial era, which is comparable to the ~0.8 °C warming during industrial times. On local to regional scales, such as parts of Europe, North America and Asia, the biogeophysical effects of Holocene ALCC are significant and comparable to the biogeochemical effect. The lack of ocean dynamics in the 1° CCSM4 slab-ocean simulations could underestimate the climate sensitivity because of the lack of feedbacks from ocean heat transport [Kutzbach et al., 2013; Manabe and Bryan, 1985]. In 1° CCSM4 fully coupled simulations, the climate sensitivity is ~65% larger than the 1° CCSM4 slab-ocean simulations during the Holocene (5.3 °C versus 3.2 °C) [Kutzbach et al., 2013]. With this greater climate sensitivity, the biogeochemical effects of Holocene ALCC could have caused a global warming of ~1.5 °C, and the net biogeophysical and biogeochemical effects of Holocene ALCC could cause a global warming of 1.2 °C during the preindustrial era in our simulations, which is 50% higher than the global warming of ~0.8 °C during industrial times.

  2. Thermal design of spiral heat exchangers and heat pipes through global best algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgut, Oğuz Emrah; Çoban, Mustafa Turhan

    2017-03-01

    This study deals with global best algorithm based thermal design of spiral heat exchangers and heat pipes. Spiral heat exchangers are devices which are highly efficient in extremely dirty and fouling process duties. Spirals inherent in design maintain high heat transfer coefficients while avoiding hazardous effects of fouling and uneven fluid distribution in the channels. Heat pipes have wide usage in industry. Thanks to the two phase cycle which takes part in operation, they can transfer high amount of heat with a negligible temperature gradient. In this work, a new stochastic based optimization method global best algorithm is applied for multi objective optimization of spiral heat exchangers as well as single objective optimization for heat pipes. Global best algorithm is easy-to-implement, free of derivatives and it can be reliably applied to any optimization problem. Case studies taken from the literature approaches are solved by the proposed algorithm and results obtained from the literature approaches are compared with thosed acquired by GBA. Comparisons reveal that GBA attains better results than literature studies in terms of solution accuracy and efficiency.

  3. A Global compilation of Heat Production in Granitic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Kiki; Sørensen, Nanna K.; Nielsen, Louise S. K.; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina M.

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of the heat production in the crust is important for understanding the energy balance in Earth. It is assumed that the crust produces a substantial part of the heat in Earth, but its proportion in comparison to the mantle and the contribution from core solidification is not well known. Knowledge of the crustal heat production is required for assessing the mantle heat flow at the crust-mantle interface. Granites probably are the main heat producing rock types in the crust, and therefore their heat production is of crucial importance for understanding Earth heat balance. As part of a B.Sc. thesis study we have compiled a new database based on published values of heat production in various types of granites. The database has about 500 entries for concentrations of U, Th, and K and the total heat generation in different continental regions. The database also includes information on crustal age and the emplacement age of granites, where available. Some of the main conclusions that may be drawn from analyses of this new database are: • Distribution of heat production values is narrow in Archean-early Proterozoic granites but very broad in middle-late Proterozoic granites. • We observe no correlation between granite type and heat production. • Some correlation may be inferred between age and heat production - heat production is relatively low in Archaean-early Proterozoic granites. • Proterozoic granites are dominated by A-type which have high heat production; the I-type Archean granitic rocks seem to have the highest Th/U ratio. • The Th/U ratio is supposed to be 3.7-4.0 based on relative time constants. This is in general correct with a global average value of 3.7. However, it is ca. 3.8 for Phanerozoic and Archaean-early Proterozoic granites and 3.3 for middle-late Proterozoic granites. We speculate if this variation may be caused by major plate reorganization or perhaps by change in global plate tectonic style?

  4. Heat Transport due to Long-Range Collisions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollmann, Eric M.

    1999-11-01

    Cross-magnetic-field heat transport in a quiescent pure ion plasma is found to be diffusive, with measured thermal diffusivity \\chi which is independent of magnetic field strength B and plasma density n. The measured values of \\chi are up to 100 times larger than the ``classical'' thermal diffusivity \\chic = (16 √π / 15) (n barv b^2 ) r_c^2 ln (rc / b) ∝ n^1 B-2 T-1/2 expected from velocity-scattering collisions;(M.N. Rosenbluth et al., Phys. Rev. 109), 1 (1958). but are in quantitative agreement with the thermal diffusivity \\chiL = 0.49 ( n barv b^2 ) λ_D^2 ∝ n^0 B^0 T-1/2 recently predicted to result from long-range ``guiding center'' collisions.(D.H.E. Dubin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), 3868 (1997). In these long-range collisions, which occur in plasmas with λD > r_c, particles on well-separated field lines exchange parallel kinetic energy only. In the present experiments, the maximal impact parameters are ρ <= λ_D but in larger plasmas (with cross-field dimension L > 100 λ_D) the emission and absorption of plasma waves over impact parameters ρ <= L is predicted to give a further enhancement of the heat transport. The experiments are performed by heating (or cooling) the ions locally with a laser beam to create a thermal gradient. A second laser is then used to monitor the resulting radial heat flow. Remarkably, the ions are held in steady-state for periods of weeks by an applied ``rotating wall'' drive;(X.-P. Huang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), 875 (1997). this allows for accurate, repeatable heat transport measurements over a wide range of plasma parameters. To date, the thermal diffusivity has been measured over a range of 100 in density, 4 in magnetic field, and 10^4 in temperature; and it is found that long-range collisions dominate the heat transport over this entire range.(E.M. Hollmann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82). 4930 (1999). Separate measurements of the perp-to-parallel thermal isotropization rates show that short-range velocity

  5. Oceanic Fluxes of Mass, Heat and Freshwater: A Global Estimate and Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDonald, Alison Marguerite

    1995-01-01

    Data from fifteen globally distributed, modern, high resolution, hydrographic oceanic transects are combined in an inverse calculation using large scale box models. The models provide estimates of the global meridional heat and freshwater budgets and are used to examine the sensitivity of the global circulation, both inter and intra-basin exchange rates, to a variety of external constraints provided by estimates of Ekman, boundary current and throughflow transports. A solution is found which is consistent with both the model physics and the global data set, despite a twenty five year time span and a lack of seasonal consistency among the data. The overall pattern of the global circulation suggested by the models is similar to that proposed in previously published local studies and regional reviews. However, significant qualitative and quantitative differences exist. These differences are due both to the model definition and to the global nature of the data set.

  6. Oceanic Fluxes of Mass, Heat and Freshwater: A Global Estimate and Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDonald, Alison Marguerite

    1995-01-01

    Data from fifteen globally distributed, modern, high resolution, hydrographic oceanic transects are combined in an inverse calculation using large scale box models. The models provide estimates of the global meridional heat and freshwater budgets and are used to examine the sensitivity of the global circulation, both inter and intra-basin exchange rates, to a variety of external constraints provided by estimates of Ekman, boundary current and throughflow transports. A solution is found which is consistent with both the model physics and the global data set, despite a twenty five year time span and a lack of seasonal consistency among the data. The overall pattern of the global circulation suggested by the models is similar to that proposed in previously published local studies and regional reviews. However, significant qualitative and quantitative differences exist. These differences are due both to the model definition and to the global nature of the data set.

  7. Changing roles of academic societies due to globalization.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Shigeru; Aoki, Shigeki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Because of the globalization of environment around the academic society, the expected roles have changed significantly. In this short communication, we present the current situation in our international activities of the Japan Radiological Society, particularly in the academic activities and clinical practice. Establishing and reinforcing international network is one process of their promotion.

  8. Global and local Joule heating effects seen by DE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.; Coley, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    In the altitude region between 350 and 550 km, variations in the ion temperature principally reflect similar variations in the local frictional heating produced by a velocity difference between the ions and the neutrals. Here, the distribution of the ion temperature in this altitude region is shown, and its attributes in relation to previous work on local Joule heating rates are discussed. In addition to the ion temperature, instrumentation on the DE 2 satellite also provides a measure of the ion velocity vector representative of the total electric field. From this information, the local Joule heating rate is derived. From an estimate of the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity it is also possible to estimate the global (height-integrated) Joule heating rate. Here, the differences and relationships between these various parameters are described.

  9. Galaxy bimodality due to cold flows and shock heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, Avishai; Birnboim, Yuval

    2006-05-01

    We address the origin of the robust bimodality observed in galaxy properties about a characteristic stellar mass ~3 × 1010Msolar. Less massive galaxies tend to be ungrouped blue star forming discs, while more massive galaxies are typically grouped red old-star spheroids. Colour-magnitude data show a gap between the red and blue sequences, extremely red luminous galaxies already at z~ 1, a truncation of today's blue sequence above L*, and massive starbursts at z~ 2-4. We propose that these features are driven by the thermal properties of the inflowing gas and their interplay with the clustering and feedback processes, all functions of the dark matter halo mass and associated with a similar characteristic scale. In haloes below a critical shock-heating mass Mshock<~ 1012Msolar, discs are built by cold streams, not heated by a virial shock, yielding efficient early star formation. It is regulated by supernova feedback into a long sequence of bursts in blue galaxies constrained to a `fundamental line'. Cold streams penetrating through hot media in M>=Mshock haloes preferentially at z>= 2 lead to massive starbursts in L > L* galaxies. At z < 2, in M > Mshock haloes hosting groups, the gas is heated by a virial shock, and being dilute it becomes vulnerable to feedback from energetic sources such as active galactic nuclei. This shuts off gas supply and prevents further star formation, leading by passive evolution to `red-and-dead' massive spheroids starting at z~ 1. A minimum in feedback efficiency near Mshock explains the observed minimum in M/L and the qualitative features of the star formation history. The cold flows provide a hint for solving the angular momentum problem. When these processes are incorporated in simulations they recover the main bimodality features and solve other open puzzles.

  10. Bubble nucleation in superhydrophobic microchannels due to subcritical heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Adam; Maynes, Daniel; Crockett, Julie; Iverson, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We report on experiments that investigate the effects of heating on laminar flow in superhydrophobic (SH) microchannels. The parallel plate microchannels (180 μm spacing) consist of two surfaces: a rib/cavity structured SH surface and a smooth glass surface. The back of the SH surface is in contact with an aluminum strip that is heated and a camera is used to image through the glass surface to visualize the flow. Thermocouples embedded in the aluminum obtain the temperature profile along the length of the channel. The friction factor-Reynolds product (fRe) is obtained via pressure drop and volumetric flow rate measurements. Five surface types/configurations are investigated: smooth hydrophilic, smooth hydrophobic, SH with ribs perpendicular to the flow, SH with ribs parallel to the flow, and SH with both ribs parallel to the flow and sparse ribs perpendicular to the flow. Both degassed and air-saturated water are used. When air-saturated water is used, the cavities of the SH surfaces act as nucleation sites and air is desorbed out of the water. Depending on the surface type/configuration, large bubbles can form and result in a large increase in fRe and channel surface temperatures. When degassed water is used no bubble nucleation is observed, however, the air trapped in the cavities of the SH surfaces is quickly absorbed and the surfaces transition to a wetted state. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Grant No. CBET-1235881).

  11. Thermistor bolometer radiometer signal contamination due to parasitic heat diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestley, Kory J.; Mahan, J. R.; Haeffelin, Martial P.; Savransky, Maxim; Nguyen, Tai K.

    1995-12-01

    Current efforts are directed at creating a high-level end-to-end numerical model of scanning thermistor bolometer radiometers of the type used in the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and planned for the clouds and the earth's radiative energy system (CERES) platforms. The first-principle model accurately represents the physical processes relating the electrical signal output to the radiative flux incident to the instrument aperture as well as to the instrument thermal environment. Such models are useful for the optimal design of calibration procedures, data reduction strategies, and the instruments themselves. The modeled thermistor bolometer detectors are approximately 40 micrometers thick and consist of an absorber layer, the thermistor layer, and a thermal impedance layer bonded to a thick aluminum substrate which acts as a heat sink. Thermal and electrical diffusion in the thermistor bolometer detectors is represented by a several-hundred-node- finite-difference formulation, and the temperature field within the aluminum substrate is computed using the finite-element method. The detectors are electrically connected in adjacent arms of a two-active-arm bridge circuit so that the effects of common mode thermal noise are minimized. However, because of a combination of thermistor self heating, loading of the bridge by the bridge amplifier, and the nonlinear thermistor resistance-temperature relationship, bridge deflections can still be provoked by substrate temperature changes, even when the change is uniform across the substrate. Of course, transient temperature gradients which may occur in the substrate between the two detectors will be falsely interpreted as a radiation input. The paper represents the results of an investigation to define the degree of vulnerability of thermistor bolometer radiometers to false signals provoked by uncontrolled temperature fluctuations in the substrate.

  12. Specific features of waveguide heating due to transmission of high-power microwave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, I. V.; Gotselyuk, O. B.; Novikov, E. S.; Demin, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    Waveguide heating due to transmission of microwave signals is studied. Mathematical models are developed to evaluate heat liberation, and differential equations of thermal balance are derived with allowance for different working conditions of waveguides. The results prove the necessity of the further study of the effect of heat liberation in waveguides on strength and functional characteristics.

  13. Abyssal plains heat exchange could explain global deficit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-07-01

    When researchers measure the amount of heat flowing conductively from the seafloor to the ocean waters and then compare that value against a theoretical prediction of that heat loss, they observe that the global average measured heat flow is lower than expected. Researchers think that advection, a heat transfer mechanism that is difficult to measure, makes up this difference between predicted and observed heat exchange. They suggest that as seawater circulates through the permeable upper layers of the seafloor crust, driven by a thermal gradient, the water accumulates heat, drawing it into the ocean. Scientists have recently proposed that seafloor sediment plays an important role in controlling the geometry of such intraocean crust circulation. In the abyssal plains, the accumulation of millions of years' worth of low permeability sediment limits direct contact between the ocean and the crust. Where the sediment is thin or absent—for example, at outcrops—water is thought to be able to move between the ocean and the crust. Scientists propose that seawater can travel through the crust for tens of kilometers beneath the sediment, moving laterally from outcrop to outcrop.

  14. Image current heating on metal surface due to charged bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, X.

    2000-02-28

    When charged particles pass through a metal pipe, they are accompanied by an image current on the metal surface. With intense short bunches passing near the metal surface, the peak image current density can be very high. This current may result in substantial temperature rise on the surface, especially in multi-bunch operation. In this paper, the authors derive an explicit formula for the surface temperature rise due to this previously unrecognized effect, and show that it should be taken into account in structure and collimator design for future accelerators.

  15. More hurricanes to hit western Europe due to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarsma, Reindert J.; Hazeleger, Wilco; Severijns, Camiel; Vries, Hylke; Sterl, Andreas; Bintanja, Richard; Oldenborgh, Geert Jan; Brink, Henk W.

    2013-05-01

    We use a very high resolution global climate model (~25 km grid size) with prescribed sea surface temperatures to show that greenhouse warming enhances the occurrence of hurricane-force (> 32.6 m s-1) storms over western Europe during early autumn (August-October), the majority of which originate as a tropical cyclone. The rise in Atlantic tropical sea surface temperatures extends eastward the breeding ground of tropical cyclones, yielding more frequent and intense hurricanes following pathways directed toward Europe. En route they transform into extratropical depressions and reintensify after merging with the midlatitude baroclinic unstable flow. Our model simulations clearly show that future tropical cyclones are more prone to hit western Europe, and do so earlier in the season, thereby increasing the frequency and impact of hurricane force winds.

  16. Wintertime urban heat island modified by global climate change over Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, M.

    2015-12-01

    Urban thermal environment change, especially, surface air temperature (SAT) rise in metropolitan areas, is one of the major recent issues in urban areas. The urban thermal environmental change affects not only human health such as heat stroke, but also increasing infectious disease due to spreading out virus vectors habitat and increase of industry and house energy consumption. The SAT rise is mostly caused by global climate change and urban heat island (hereafter UHI) by urbanization. The population in Tokyo metropolitan area is over 30 millions and the Tokyo metropolitan area is one of the biggest megacities in the world. The temperature rise due to urbanization seems comparable to the global climate change in the major megacities. It is important to project how the urbanization and the global climate change affect to the future change of urban thermal environment to plan the adaptation and mitigation policy. To predict future SAT change in urban scale, we should estimate future UHI modified by the global climate change. This study investigates change in UHI intensity (UHII) of major metropolitan areas in Japan by effects of the global climate change. We performed a series of climate simulations. Present climate simulations with and without urban process are conducted for ten seasons using a high-resolution numerical climate model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Future climate projections with and without urban process are also conducted. The future projections are performed using the pseudo global warming method, assuming 2050s' initial and boundary conditions estimated by a GCM under the RCP scenario. Simulation results indicated that UHII would be enhanced more than 30% in Tokyo during the night due to the global climate change. The enhancement of urban heat island is mostly caused by change of lower atmospheric stability.

  17. Global crop yield response to extreme heat stress under multiple climate change futures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryng, Delphine; Conway, Declan; Ramankutty, Navin; Price, Jeff; Warren, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    Extreme heat stress during the crop reproductive period can be critical for crop productivity. Projected changes in the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events are expected to negatively impact crop yields and global food production. This study applies the global crop model PEGASUS to quantify, for the first time at the global scale, impacts of extreme heat stress on maize, spring wheat and soybean yields resulting from 72 climate change scenarios for the 21st century. Our results project maize to face progressively worse impacts under a range of RCPs but spring wheat and soybean to improve globally through to the 2080s due to CO2 fertilization effects, even though parts of the tropic and sub-tropic regions could face substantial yield declines. We find extreme heat stress at anthesis (HSA) by the 2080s (relative to the 1980s) under RCP 8.5, taking into account CO2 fertilization effects, could double global losses of maize yield (ΔY = -12.8 ± 6.7% versus - 7.0 ± 5.3% without HSA), reduce projected gains in spring wheat yield by half (ΔY = 34.3 ± 13.5% versus 72.0 ± 10.9% without HSA) and in soybean yield by a quarter (ΔY = 15.3 ± 26.5% versus 20.4 ± 22.1% without HSA). The range reflects uncertainty due to differences between climate model scenarios; soybean exhibits both positive and negative impacts, maize is generally negative and spring wheat generally positive. Furthermore, when assuming CO2 fertilization effects to be negligible, we observe drastic climate mitigation policy as in RCP 2.6 could avoid more than 80% of the global average yield losses otherwise expected by the 2080s under RCP 8.5. We show large disparities in climate impacts across regions and find extreme heat stress adversely affects major producing regions and lower income countries.

  18. Global crop yield response to extreme heat stress under multiple climate change futures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryng, D.; Conway, D.; Ramankutty, N.; Price, J.; Warren, R.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme heat stress during the crop reproductive period can be critical for crop productivity. Projected changes in the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events are expected to negatively impact crop yields and global food production. This study applies the global crop model PEGASUS to quantify, for the first time at the global scale, impacts of extreme heat stress on maize, spring wheat and soybean yields resulting from 72 climate change scenarios for the 21st century. Our results project maize to face progressively worse impacts under a range of RCPs but spring wheat and soybean to improve globally through to the 2080s due to CO2 fertilization effects, even though parts of the tropic and sub-tropic regions could face substantial yield declines. We find extreme heat stress at anthesis (HSA) by the 2080s (relative to the 1980s) under RCP 8.5, taking into account CO2 fertilization effects, could double global losses of maize yield (dY = -12.8 ± 6.7% versus -7.0 ± 5.3% without HSA), reduce projected gains in spring wheat yield by half (dY = 34.3 ± 13.5% versus 72.0 ± 10.9% without HSA) and in soybean yield by a quarter (dY = 15.3 ± 26.5% versus 20.4 ± 22.1% without HSA). The range reflects uncertainty due to differences between climate model scenarios; soybean exhibits both positive and negative impacts, maize is generally negative and spring wheat generally positive. Furthermore, when assuming CO2 fertilization effects to be negligible, we observe drastic climate mitigation policy as in RCP 2.6 could avoid more than 80% of the global average yield losses otherwise expected by the 2080s under RCP 8.5. We show large disparities in climate impacts across regions and find extreme heat stress adversely affects major producing regions and lower income countries.

  19. Transports and budgets of volume, heat, and salt from a global eddy-resolving ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, M.P.; Semtner, A.J. Jr.; Chervin, R.M.

    1994-07-01

    The results from an integration of a global ocean circulation model have been condensed into an analysis of the volume, heat, and salt transports among the major ocean basins. Transports are also broken down between the model`s Ekman, thermocline, and deep layers. Overall, the model does well. Horizontal exchanges of mass, heat, and salt between ocean basins have reasonable values: and the volume of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) transport is in general agreement with what limited observations exist. On a global basis the zonally integrated meridional heat transport is poleward at all latitudes except for the latitude band 30{degrees}S to 45{degrees}S. This anomalous transport is most likely a signature of the model`s inability to form Antarctic Intermediate (AAIW) and Antarctic bottom water (AABW) properly. Eddy heat transport is strong at the equator where its convergence heats the equatorial Pacific about twice as much as it heats the equatorial Atlantic. The greater heating in the Pacific suggests that mesoscale eddies may be a vital mechanism for warming and maintaining an upwelling portion of the global conveyor-belt circulation. The model`s fresh water transport compares well with observations. However, in the Atlantic there is an excessive southward transport of fresh water due to the absence of the Mediterranean outflow and weak northward flow of AAIW. Perhaps the model`s greatest weakness is the lack of strong AAIW and AABW circulation cells. Accurate thermohaline forcing in the North Atlantic (based on numerous hydrographic observations) helps the model adequately produce NADW. In contrast, the southern ocean is an area of sparse observation. Better thermohaline observations in this area may be needed if models such as this are to produce the deep convection that will achieve more accurate simulations of the global 3-dimensional circulation. 41 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Intercomparison of Latent Heat Fluxes Over Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Nelkin, Eric; Ardizzone, Joe; Atlas, Robert M.; Chou, Ming-Dah

    2003-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of momentum, moisture, and heat at the air-sea interface are essential for climate studies. Version 2 Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF2) has been derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) radiance measurements. This dataset, covering the period July 1987-December 2000 over global oceans, has a spatial resolution of 1 deg x 1 deg lat-long and a temporal resolution of 1 day. Turbulent fluxes are derived from the SSM/I surface winds and surface air humidity, as well as the 2-m air and sea surface temperatures (SST) of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, using a bulk aerodynamic algorithm based on the surface layer similarity theory. The GSSTF2 bulk flux model, and retrieved daily wind stress, latent heat flux, wind speed, and surface air humidity validate well with ship observations of ten field experiments over the tropical and midlatitude oceans during 1991-99. The global distributions of 1988-2000 annual- and seasonal-mean turbulent fluxes show reasonable patterns related to the atmospheric general circulation and seasonal variations. Latent heat fluxes and related input parameters over global oceans during 1992-93 have been compared among GSSTF1 (version 1), GSSTF2, HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data), NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, and one based on COADS (Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set). Our analyses suggest that the GSSTF2 latent heat flux, surface air humidity, surface wind, and SST are quite realistic compared to the other four flux datasets examined. However, significant differences are found among these five flux datasets. The GSSTF2, available at http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/CAMPAIGN_DOCS/hydrology/hd_gsstf2.O.html, is useful for climate studies.

  1. Io: Volcanic thermal sources and global heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Williams, David A.; Radebaugh, Jani

    2012-06-01

    We have examined thermal emission from 240 active or recently-active volcanic features on Io and quantified the magnitude and distribution of their volcanic heat flow during the Galileo epoch. We use spacecraft data and a geological map of Io to derive an estimate of the maximum possible contribution from small dark areas not detected as thermally active but which nevertheless appear to be sites of recent volcanic activity. We utilize a trend analysis to extrapolate from the smallest detectable volcanic heat sources to these smallest mapped dark areas. Including the additional heat from estimates for "outburst" eruptions and for a multitude of very small ("myriad") hot spots, we account for ˜62 × 1012 W (˜59 ± 7% of Io's total thermal emission). Loki Patera contributes, on average, 9.6 × 1012 W (˜9.1 ± 1%). All dark paterae contribute 45.3 × 1012 W (˜43 ± 5%). Although dark flow fields cover a much larger area than dark paterae, they contribute only 5.6 × 1012 W (˜5.3 ± 0.6%). Bright paterae contribute ˜2.6 × 1012 W (˜2.5 ± 0.3%). Outburst eruption phases and very small hot spots contribute no more than ˜4% of Io's total thermal emission: this is probably a maximum value. About 50% of Io's volcanic heat flow emanates from only 1.2% of Io's surface. Of Io's heat flow, 41 ± 7.0% remains unaccounted for in terms of identified sources. Globally, volcanic heat flow is not uniformly distributed. Power output per unit surface area is slightly biased towards mid-latitudes, although there is a stronger bias toward the northern hemisphere when Loki Patera is included. There is a slight favoring of the northern hemisphere for outbursts where locations were well constrained. Globally, we find peaks in thermal emission at ˜315°W and ˜105°W (using 30° bins). There is a minimum in thermal emission at around 200°W (almost at the anti-jovian longitude) which is a significant regional difference. These peaks and troughs suggest a shift to the east from

  2. Absorption of intense microwaves and ion acoustic turbulence due to heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    De Groot, J.S.; Liu, J.M.; Matte, J.P.

    1994-02-04

    Measurements and calculations of the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of intense microwaves are presented. The isotropic component of the electron distribution becomes flat-topped in agreement with detailed Fokker-Planck calculations. The plasma heating is reduced due to the flat-topped distributions in agreement with calculations. The calculations show that the heat flux at high microwave powers is very large, q{sub max} {approx} 0.3 n{sub e}v{sub e}T{sub e}. A new particle model to, calculate the heat transport inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence in ICF plasmas is also presented. One-dimensional PIC calculations of ion acoustic turbulence excited due to heat transport are presented. The 2-D PIC code is presently being used to perform calculations of heat flux inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence.

  3. Plasma heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Quest, K. B.; Tanaka, M.; Wu, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability, which is the finite beta (ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure) extension of the modified two stream instability, is studied. Heating rates are derived from quasi-linear theory and compared with results from particle simulations to show that electron heating relative to ion heating and heating parallel to the magnetic field relative to perpendicular heating for both the electrons and ions increase with beta. The simulations suggest that electron dynamics determine the saturation level of the instability, which is manifested by the formation of a flattop electron distribution parallel to the magnetic field. As a result, both the saturation levels of the fluctuations and the heating rates decrease sharply with beta. Applications of these results to plasma heating in simulations of shocks and the earth's bow shock are described.

  4. Investigation of heat transfer due to isothermal heater in irregular porous cavity: Part III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.

    2017-07-01

    Heat transfer in porous medium is one of the intense filed of research for many years. This paper investigates the heat transfer in a porous cavity due to an isothermal block placed at top of left vertical wall. The right vertical wall of cavity is maintained at isothermal cold temperature. The governing partial differential equations are solved by employing finite element method. Results are discussed with respect to physical parameters in terms of contour plots of isothermal and streamlines. It is found that the heat transfer due to block at top of vertical surface makes the heat to be concentrated at upper side of porous domain.

  5. Global surface temperature/heat transfer measurements using infrared imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    1992-01-01

    A series of studies were conducted to evaluate the use of scanning radiometric infrared imaging systems for providing global surface temperature/heat transfer measurements in support of hypersonic wind tunnel testing. The in situ precision of the technique with narrow temperature span setting over the temperature range of 20 to 200 C was investigated. The precision of the technique over wider temperature span settings was also determined. The accuracy of technique for providing aerodynamic heating rates was investigated by performing measurements on a 10.2-centimeter hemisphere model in the Langley 31-inch Mach 10 tunnel, and comparing the results with theoretical predictions. Data from tests conducted on a generic orbiter model in this tunnel are also presented.

  6. Global Intercomparison of 12 Land Surface Heat Flux Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, C.; Prigent, C.; Mueller, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.; McCabe, M. F.; Wood, E. F.; Rossow, W. B.; Balsamo, G.; Betts, A. K.; Dirmeyer, P. A.; hide

    2011-01-01

    A global intercomparison of 12 monthly mean land surface heat flux products for the period 1993-1995 is presented. The intercomparison includes some of the first emerging global satellite-based products (developed at Paris Observatory, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, University of California Berkeley, University of Maryland, and Princeton University) and examples of fluxes produced by reanalyses (ERA-Interim, MERRA, NCEP-DOE) and off-line land surface models (GSWP-2, GLDAS CLM/ Mosaic/Noah). An intercomparison of the global latent heat flux (Q(sub le)) annual means shows a spread of approx 20 W/sq m (all-product global average of approx 45 W/sq m). A similar spread is observed for the sensible (Q(sub h)) and net radiative (R(sub n)) fluxes. In general, the products correlate well with each other, helped by the large seasonal variability and common forcing data for some of the products. Expected spatial distributions related to the major climatic regimes and geographical features are reproduced by all products. Nevertheless, large Q(sub le)and Q(sub h) absolute differences are also observed. The fluxes were spatially averaged for 10 vegetation classes. The larger Q(sub le) differences were observed for the rain forest but, when normalized by mean fluxes, the differences were comparable to other classes. In general, the correlations between Q(sub le) and R(sub n) were higher for the satellite-based products compared with the reanalyses and off-line models. The fluxes were also averaged for 10 selected basins. The seasonality was generally well captured by all products, but large differences in the flux partitioning were observed for some products and basins.

  7. Global Intercomparison of 12 Land Surface Heat Flux Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, C.; Prigent, C.; Mueller, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.; McCabe, M. F.; Wood, E. F.; Rossow, W. B.; Balsamo, G.; Betts, A. K.; Dirmeyer, P. A.; Fisher, J. B.; Jung, M.; Kanamitsu, M.; Reichle, R. H.; Reichstein, M.; Rodell, M.; Sheffield, J.; Tu, K.; Wang, K.

    2011-01-01

    A global intercomparison of 12 monthly mean land surface heat flux products for the period 1993-1995 is presented. The intercomparison includes some of the first emerging global satellite-based products (developed at Paris Observatory, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, University of California Berkeley, University of Maryland, and Princeton University) and examples of fluxes produced by reanalyses (ERA-Interim, MERRA, NCEP-DOE) and off-line land surface models (GSWP-2, GLDAS CLM/ Mosaic/Noah). An intercomparison of the global latent heat flux (Q(sub le)) annual means shows a spread of approx 20 W/sq m (all-product global average of approx 45 W/sq m). A similar spread is observed for the sensible (Q(sub h)) and net radiative (R(sub n)) fluxes. In general, the products correlate well with each other, helped by the large seasonal variability and common forcing data for some of the products. Expected spatial distributions related to the major climatic regimes and geographical features are reproduced by all products. Nevertheless, large Q(sub le)and Q(sub h) absolute differences are also observed. The fluxes were spatially averaged for 10 vegetation classes. The larger Q(sub le) differences were observed for the rain forest but, when normalized by mean fluxes, the differences were comparable to other classes. In general, the correlations between Q(sub le) and R(sub n) were higher for the satellite-based products compared with the reanalyses and off-line models. The fluxes were also averaged for 10 selected basins. The seasonality was generally well captured by all products, but large differences in the flux partitioning were observed for some products and basins.

  8. Genome wide association of changes in feeding behavior due to heat stress in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat stress negatively impacts pork production, losses include decreased growth, reduced feed intake, and mortality. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify genetic markers associated with changes in feeding behavior due to heat stress in grow-finish pigs. Data were collected on grow-...

  9. Surface Heat Flux Corrections for Global Ocean Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garraffo, Z. D.; Hogan, P. J.; Mehra, A.; Rivin, I.; Balasubramaniyan, B.; Spindler, T. D.; Kim, H. C.; Paturi, S.

    2016-02-01

    RTOFS (Real Time Ocean Forecast System) - Global is the first global eddy resolving ocean forecast system implemented operationally at NOAA/NWS/NCEP in close collaboration with US Navy. Recently upgraded version 1.1 (which was developed and validated at NRL) uses the Hybrid Coordinates Ocean Model (HYCOM) at 1/12 degree coupled with Los Alamos Community sea ICE model (CICE). The forecast system runs once a day and produces forecasts from the daily initialization fields produced at NAVOCEANO (NAVal OCEANographic Office) which use NCODA (Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation), a 3DVAR data assimilation methodology (Cummings and Smedstad, 2013). After a two-day spin up with hourly NCEP's Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) atmospheric fluxes with the ocean model in forecast mode, the daily forecast cycle is forced with 3-hourly momentum, radiation and precipitation fluxes from NCEP's Global Forecast System fields for the next eight days. Following flux-corrections efforts at NRL (Metzger et al. 2013, NRL report), heat flux corrections are computed for the RTOFS v1.1 configuration. To assess sensitivity to upgrades in GFS/GDAS and HYCOM, these radiative corrections are compared with forecasts produced with other versions of NCEP forcing. Impacts of flux corrections in SST errors will be discussed.

  10. Continental Heat Gain in the Global Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, J. E.; Beltrami, H.; Pollack, H. N.; Huang, S.

    2001-12-01

    Observed increases in 20th century surface-air temperatures are one consequence of a net energy flux into all major components of the Earth climate system including the atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, and lithosphere. Levitus et al. [2001] have estimated the heat gained by the atmosphere, ocean and cryosphere as 18.2x1022 J, 6.6x1021 J, and 8.1x1021 J, respectively, over the past half-century. However the heat gain of the lithosphere via a heat flux across the solid surface of the continents (30% of the Earth's surface) was not addressed in the Levitus analysis. Here we calculate that final component of Earth's changing energy budget, using ground-surface temperature reconstructions for the continents [Huang et al., 2000]. These reconstructions have shown a warming of at least 0.5 K in the 20th century and were used to determine the flux estimates presented here. In the last half-century, the interval of time considered by Levitus et al., there was an average flux of 40 mW/m2 across the land surface into the subsurface, leading to 9.2x1021 J absorbed by the ground. This amount of heat is significantly less than the energy transferred into the oceans, but of the same magnitude as the energy absorbed by the atmosphere or cryosphere. The heat inputs into all the major components of the climate system - atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, lithosphere - conservatively sum to more than 20x1022 J during the last half-century, and reinforce the conclusion that the warming in this interval has been truly global. Huang, S., Pollack, H.N., and Shen, P.-Y. 2000. Temperature trends over the past five centuries reconstructed from borehole temperatures. Nature. 403. 756-758 Levitus, S., Antonov, J., Wang, J., Delworth, T. L., Dixon, K. and Broccoli, A. 2001. Anthropogenic warming of the Earth's climate system. Science, 292, 267-270

  11. Global anomalous transport of ICRH- and NBI-heated fast ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkie, G. J.; Pusztai, I.; Abel, I.; Dorland, W.; Fülöp, T.

    2017-04-01

    By taking advantage of the trace approximation, one can gain an enormous computational advantage when solving for the global turbulent transport of impurities. In particular, this makes feasible the study of non-Maxwellian transport coupled in radius and energy, allowing collisions and transport to be accounted for on similar time scales, as occurs for fast ions. In this work, we study the fully-nonlinear ITG-driven trace turbulent transport of locally heated and injected fast ions. Previous results indicated the existence of MeV-range minorities heated by cyclotron resonance, and an associated density pinch effect. Here, we build upon this result using the t3core code to solve for the distribution of these minorities, consistently including the effects of collisions, gyrokinetic turbulence, and heating. Using the same tool to study the transport of injected fast ions, we contrast the qualitative features of their transport with that of the heated minorities. Our results indicate that heated minorities are more strongly affected by microturbulence than injected fast ions. The physical interpretation of this difference provides a possible explanation for the observed synergy when neutral beam injection (NBI) heating is combined with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Furthermore, we move beyond the trace approximation to develop a model which allows one to easily account for the reduction of anomalous transport due to the presence of fast ions in electrostatic turbulence.

  12. A detailed evaluation of the stratospheric heat budget: 2. Global radiation balance and diabatic circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Portmann, Robert W.

    1999-03-01

    We present a detailed evaluation of radiative heating, radiative cooling, net heating, global radiation balance, radiative relaxation times, and diabatic circulations in the stratosphere using temperature and minor constituent data provided by instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) between 1991 and 1993 and by the limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere (LIMS) instrument which operated on the Nimbus-7 spacecraft in 1978-1979. Included in the calculations are heating due to absorption of solar radiation from ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths and radiative cooling due to emission by carbon dioxide, water vapor, and ozone from 0 to 3000 cm-1 (∞ - 3.3 μm). Infrared radiative effects of Pinatubo aerosols are also considered in some detail. In general, we find the stratosphere to be in a state of global mean radiative equilibrium on monthly timescales to within the uncertainty of the satellite-provided measurements. Radiative relaxation times are found to be larger in the lower stratosphere during UARS than LIMS because of the presence of Pinatubo aerosols. The meridional circulations in the upper stratosphere as diagnosed from the calculated fields of net heating are generally stronger in the UARS period than during the LIMS period, while the lower stratosphere meridional circulations are stronger during the LIMS period. A climatology of these calculations is available to the community via a World Wide Web interface described herein.

  13. Continued Development of a Global Heat Transfer Measurement System at AEDC Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurits, Inna; Lewis, M. J.; Hamner, M. P.; Norris, Joseph D.

    2007-01-01

    Heat transfer rates are an extremely important consideration in the design of hypersonic vehicles such as atmospheric reentry vehicles. This paper describes the development of a data reduction methodology to evaluate global heat transfer rates using surface temperature-time histories measured with the temperature sensitive paint (TSP) system at AEDC Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9. As a part of this development effort, a scale model of the NASA Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) was painted with TSP and multiple sequences of high resolution images were acquired during a five run test program. Heat transfer calculation from TSP data in Tunnel 9 is challenging due to relatively long run times, high Reynolds number environment and the desire to utilize typical stainless steel wind tunnel models used for force and moment testing. An approach to reduce TSP data into convective heat flux was developed, taking into consideration the conditions listed above. Surface temperatures from high quality quantitative global temperature maps acquired with the TSP system were then used as an input into the algorithm. Preliminary comparison of the heat flux calculated using the TSP surface temperature data with the value calculated using the standard thermocouple data is reported.

  14. Surface urban heat island across 419 global big cities.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shushi; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ottle, Catherine; Bréon, François-Marie; Nan, Huijuan; Zhou, Liming; Myneni, Ranga B

    2012-01-17

    Urban heat island is among the most evident aspects of human impacts on the earth system. Here we assess the diurnal and seasonal variation of surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII) defined as the surface temperature difference between urban area and suburban area measured from the MODIS. Differences in SUHII are analyzed across 419 global big cities, and we assess several potential biophysical and socio-economic driving factors. Across the big cities, we show that the average annual daytime SUHII (1.5 ± 1.2 °C) is higher than the annual nighttime SUHII (1.1 ± 0.5 °C) (P < 0.001). But no correlation is found between daytime and nighttime SUHII across big cities (P = 0.84), suggesting different driving mechanisms between day and night. The distribution of nighttime SUHII correlates positively with the difference in albedo and nighttime light between urban area and suburban area, while the distribution of daytime SUHII correlates negatively across cities with the difference of vegetation cover and activity between urban and suburban areas. Our results emphasize the key role of vegetation feedbacks in attenuating SUHII of big cities during the day, in particular during the growing season, further highlighting that increasing urban vegetation cover could be one effective way to mitigate the urban heat island effect.

  15. Numerical investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a cylindrical enclosure due to ultrasonic vibrations.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Maryam; Setareh, Milad; Saffar-Avval, Majid; Hosseini Abardeh, Reza

    2017-04-01

    Application of ultrasonic waves for heat transfer augmentation has been proposed in the last few decades. Due to limited researches on acoustic streaming induced by ultrasonic oscillation, the effect of ultrasonic waves on natural convection heat transfer is the main purpose of this paper. At first, natural convection on up-ward-facing heating surface in a cylindrical enclosure filled with air is investigated numerically by the finite difference method, then the effect of upper surface oscillation on convection heat transfer is considered. The conservation equations in Lagrangian approach and compressible fluid are assumed for the numerical simulation. Results show that acoustic pressure will become steady after some milliseconds also pressure oscillation amplitude and acoustic velocity components will be constant therefore steady state velocity is used for solving energy equation. Results show that Enhancement of heat transfer coefficient can be up to 175% by induced ultrasonic waves. In addition, the effect of different parameters on acoustic streaming and heat transfer has been studied.

  16. Small scale changes of geochemistry and flow field due to transient heat storage in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S.; Boockmeyer, A.; Li, D.; Beyer, C.

    2013-12-01

    Heat exchangers in the subsurface are increasingly installed for transient heat storage due to the need of heating or cooling of buildings as well as the interim storage of heat to compensate for the temporally fluctuating energy production by wind or solar energy. For heat storage to be efficient, high temperatures must be achieved in the subsurface. Significant temporal changes of the soil and groundwater temperatures however effect both the local flow field by temperature dependent fluid parameters as well as reactive mass transport through temperature dependent diffusion coefficients, geochemical reaction rates and mineral equilibria. As the use of heat storage will be concentrated in urban areas, the use of the subsurface for (drinking) water supply and heat storage will typically coincide and a reliable prognosis of the processes occurring is needed. In the present work, the effects of a temporal variation of the groundwater temperature, as induced by a local heat exchanger introduced into a groundwater aquifer, are studied. For this purpose, the coupled non-isothermal groundwater flow, heat transport and reactive mass transport is simulated in the near filed of such a heat exchanger. By explicitly discretizing and incorporating the borehole, the borehole cementation and the heat exchanger tubes, a realistic geometrical and process representation is obtained. The numerical simulation code OpenGeoSys is used in this work, which incorporates the required processes of coupled groundwater flow, heat and mass transport as well as temperature dependent geochemistry. Due to the use of a Finite Element Method, a close representation of the geometric effects can be achieved. Synthetic scenario simulations for typical settings of salt water formations in northern Germany are used to investigate the geochemical effects arising from a high temperature heat storage by quantifying changes in groundwater chemistry and overall reaction rates. This work presents the

  17. Revisit of the Global Surface Energy Balance Using the MEP Model of Surface Heat Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Wang, J.; Park, T. W.; Ming, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The recently proposed model of surface heat fluxes, based on the theory of maximum entropy production (MEP), was used to estimate the global evapotranspiration (ET) and heat fluxes. Compared to bulk transfer models, the MEP model has several remote-sensing-friendly features including fewer input variables, automatic closure of surface energy budget, being independent of bulk gradients of temperature and water vapor, not using wind speed and surface roughness as model parameters, and being less sensitive to uncertainties of input variables and model parameters. The MEP model is formulated for the entire range of soil moisture from dryness to saturation over the land surfaces and has even more advantages over water-snow-ice surfaces compared to traditional methods due to its independence of surface humidity data. The MEP model provides the first global maps of water heat fluxes at ocean surfaces as well as conductive heat fluxes at snow/ice covered polar regions. Ten years of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) earth surface radiation fluxes, surface temperature data products supplemented (when needed) by the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) surface specific humidity data are used to test the MEP model by comparing the MEP based global annual ET and heat fluxes with existing products. The MEP based fluxes over land surfaces agree closely with previous studies. Over the oceans, the MEP modeled ET tends to be lower than previous estimates while those of sensible heat fluxes are in close agreement with previous studies. A counterpart, "off-line" analysis is also carried out using the NOAA GFDL climate model output from a control experiment and a "warming" experiment. Substantial differences in the warming-related changes of ET and Bowen ratio are found over regions such as North Africa and the southwestern U.S. The implications of these differences for understanding trends and variability in regional energy and

  18. Human Health Risk Assessment due to Global Warming – A Case Study of the Gulf Countries

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Tahir; Chaudhary, Junaid Rafi

    2008-01-01

    Accelerated global warming is predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climatic Change (IPCC) due to increasing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The climate changes are anticipated to have a long-term impact on human health, marine and terrestrial ecosystems, water resources and vegetation. Due to rising sea levels, low lying coastal regions will be flooded, farmlands will be threatened and scarcity of fresh water resources will be aggravated. This will in turn cause increased human suffering in different parts of the world. Spread of disease vectors will contribute towards high mortality, along with the heat related deaths. Arid and hot climatic regions will face devastating effects risking survival of the fragile plant species, wild animals, and other desert ecosystems. The paper presents future changes in temperature, precipitation and humidity and their direct and indirect potential impacts on human health in the coastal regions of the Gulf countries including Yemen, Oman, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Bahrain. The analysis is based on the long-term changes in the values of temperature, precipitation and humidity as predicted by the global climatic simulation models under different scenarios of GHG emission levels. Monthly data on temperature, precipitation, and humidity were retrieved from IPCC databases for longitude 41.25°E to 61.875°E and latitude 9.278°N to 27.833°N. Using an average of 1970 to 2000 values as baseline, the changes in the humidity, temperature and precipitation were predicted for the period 2020 to 2050 and 2070 to 2099. Based on epidemiological studies on various diseases associated with the change in temperature, humidity and precipitation in arid and hot regions, empirical models were developed to assess human health risk in the Gulf region to predict elevated levels of diseases and mortality rates under different emission scenarios as developed by the IPCC. The preliminary assessment indicates increased mortality rates

  19. Human health risk assessment due to global warming--a case study of the Gulf countries.

    PubMed

    Husain, Tahir; Chaudhary, Junaid Rafi

    2008-12-01

    Accelerated global warming is predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climatic Change (IPCC) due to increasing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The climate changes are anticipated to have a long-term impact on human health, marine and terrestrial ecosystems, water resources and vegetation. Due to rising sea levels, low lying coastal regions will be flooded, farmlands will be threatened and scarcity of fresh water resources will be aggravated. This will in turn cause increased human suffering in different parts of the world. Spread of disease vectors will contribute towards high mortality, along with the heat related deaths. Arid and hot climatic regions will face devastating effects risking survival of the fragile plant species, wild animals, and other desert ecosystems. The paper presents future changes in temperature, precipitation and humidity and their direct and indirect potential impacts on human health in the coastal regions of the Gulf countries including Yemen, Oman, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Bahrain. The analysis is based on the long-term changes in the values of temperature, precipitation and humidity as predicted by the global climatic simulation models under different scenarios of GHG emission levels. Monthly data on temperature, precipitation, and humidity were retrieved from IPCC databases for longitude 41.25 degrees E to 61.875 degrees E and latitude 9.278 degrees N to 27.833 degrees N. Using an average of 1970 to 2000 values as baseline, the changes in the humidity, temperature and precipitation were predicted for the period 2020 to 2050 and 2070 to 2099. Based on epidemiological studies on various diseases associated with the change in temperature, humidity and precipitation in arid and hot regions, empirical models were developed to assess human health risk in the Gulf region to predict elevated levels of diseases and mortality rates under different emission scenarios as developed by the IPCC.The preliminary assessment indicates

  20. The impact of Global Warming on global crop yields due to changes in pest pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battisti, D. S.; Tewksbury, J. J.; Deutsch, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    A billion people currently lack reliable access to sufficient food and almost half of the calories feeding these people come from just three crops: rice, maize, wheat. Insect pests are among the largest factors affecting the yield of these three crops, but models assessing the effects of global warming on crops rarely consider changes in insect pest pressure on crop yields. We use well-established relationships between temperature and insect physiology to project climate-driven changes in pest pressure, defined as integrated population metabolism, for the three major crops. By the middle of this century, under most scenarios, insect pest pressure is projected to increase by more than 50% in temperate areas, while increases in tropical regions will be more modest. Yield relationships indicate that the largest increases in insect pest pressure are likely to occur in areas where yield is greatest, suggesting increased strain on global food markets.

  1. Impact of hydrotherapy on skin blood flow: How much is due to moisture and how much is due to heat?

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Gunda, Shashi; Raju, Chinna; Bains, Gurinder S; Bogseth, Michael C; Focil, Nicholas; Sirichotiratana, Melissa; Hashemi, Vahideh; Vallabhaneni, Pratima; Kim, Yumi; Madani, Piyush; Coords, Heather; McClurg, Maureen; Lohman, Everett

    2010-02-01

    Hydrotherapy and whirlpool are used to increase skin blood flow and warm tissue. However, recent evidence seems to show that part of the increase in skin blood flow is not due to the warmth itself but due to the moisture content of the heat. Therefore, two series of experiments were accomplished on 10 subjects with an average age of 24.2 +/- 9.7 years and free of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Subjects sat in a 37 degrees C hydrotherapy pool under two conditions: one in which a thin membrane protecting their skin from moisture while their arm was submerged in water and the second where their arm was allowed to be exposed to the water for 15 minutes. During this period of time, skin and body temperature were measured as well as skin blood flow by a Laser Doppler Imager. The results of the experiments showed that the vapor barrier blocked any change in skin moisture content during submersion in water, and while skin temperature was the same as during exposure to the water, the blood flow with the arm exposed to water increased from 101.1 +/- 10.4 flux to 224.9 +/- 18.2 flux, whereas blood flow increased to only 118.7 +/- 11.4 flux if the moisture of the water was blocked. Thus, a substantial portion of the increase in skin blood flow associated with warm water therapy is probably associated with moisturizing of the skin rather than the heat itself.

  2. Life expectancy impacts due to heating energy utilization in China: Distribution, relations, and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Luo, Kunli

    2018-01-01

    The relation between life expectancy and energy utilization is of particular concern. Different viewpoints concerned the health impacts of heating policy in China. However, it is still obscure that what kind of heating energy or what pattern of heating methods is the most related with the difference of life expectancies in China. The aim of this paper is to comprehensively investigate the spatial relations between life expectancy at birth (LEB) and different heating energy utilization in China by using spatial autocorrelation models including global spatial autocorrelation, local spatial autocorrelation and hot spot analysis. The results showed that: (1) Most of heating energy exhibit a distinct north-south difference, such as central heating supply, stalks and domestic coal. Whereas spatial distribution of domestic natural gas and electricity exhibited west-east differences. (2) Consumption of central heating, stalks and domestic coal show obvious spatial dependence. Whereas firewood, natural gas and electricity did not show significant spatial autocorrelation. It exhibited an extinct south-north difference of heat supply, stalks and domestic coal which were identified to show significant positive spatial autocorrelation. (3) Central heating, residential boilers and natural gas did not show any significant correlations with LEB. While, the utilization of domestic coal and biomass showed significant negative correlations with LEB, and household electricity shows positive correlations. The utilization of domestic coal in China showed a negative effect on LEB, rather than central heating. To improve the solid fuel stoves and control consumption of domestic coal consumption and other low quality solid fuel is imperative to improve the public health level in China in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of retrospective analyses of the global ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurin, Gennady A.; Carton, James A.

    1999-07-01

    In this study, we compare seven retrospective analyses of basin- to global-scale upper ocean temperature. The analyses span a minimum of 10 years during the 50-year period since World War II. Three of the analyses (WOA-94, WHITE, BMRC) are based on objective analysis and thus, do not rely on a numerical forecast model. The remaining four (NCEP, WAJSOWICZ, ROSATI, SODA) are based on data assimilation in which the numerical forecast is provided by some form of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Modular Ocean Model driven by historical winds. The comparison presented here is limited to heat content in the upper 250 m, information that is available for all analyses. The results are presented in three frequency bands: seasonal, interannual (periods of 1-5 years), and decadal (periods of 5-25 years). At seasonal frequencies, all of the analyses are quite similar. Otherwise, the differences among analyses are limited to the regions of the western boundary currents, and some regions in the Southern Hemisphere. At interannual frequencies, significant differences appear between the objective analyses and the data assimilation analyses. Along the equator in the Pacific, where variability is dominated by El Niño, the objective analyses have somewhat noisier fields, as well as reduced variance prior to 1980 due to lack of observations. Still, the correlation among analyses generally exceeds 80% in this region. Along the equator in the Atlantic, the correlation is lower (30-60%) although inspection of the time series shows that the same biennial progression of warm and cool events appears in all analyses since 1980. In the midlatitude Pacific agreement among objective analyses and data assimilation analyses is good. The analysis of Rosati et al. [Rosati, A., Gudgel, R., Miyakoda, K., 1995. Decadal analysis produced from an ocean assimilation system. Mon. Weather Rev., 123, 2, 206.] differs somewhat from the others apparently because in this analysis, the forecast model

  4. Progress in remote sensing of global land surface heat fluxes and evaporations with a turbulent heat exchange parameterization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuelong; Su, Bob

    2017-04-01

    Remote sensing has provided us an opportunity to observe Earth land surface with a much higher resolution than any of GCM simulation. Due to scarcity of information for land surface physical parameters, up-to-date GCMs still have large uncertainties in the coupled land surface process modeling. One critical issue is a large amount of parameters used in their land surface models. Thus remote sensing of land surface spectral information can be used to provide information on these parameters or assimilated to decrease the model uncertainties. Satellite imager could observe the Earth land surface with optical, thermal and microwave bands. Some basic Earth land surface status (land surface temperature, canopy height, canopy leaf area index, soil moisture etc.) has been produced with remote sensing technique, which already help scientists understanding Earth land and atmosphere interaction more precisely. However, there are some challenges when applying remote sensing variables to calculate global land-air heat and water exchange fluxes. Firstly, a global turbulent exchange parameterization scheme needs to be developed and verified, especially for global momentum and heat roughness length calculation with remote sensing information. Secondly, a compromise needs to be innovated to overcome the spatial-temporal gaps in remote sensing variables to make the remote sensing based land surface fluxes applicable for GCM model verification or comparison. A flux network data library (more 200 flux towers) was collected to verify the designed method. Important progress in remote sensing of global land flux and evaporation will be presented and its benefits for GCM models will also be discussed. Some in-situ studies on the Tibetan Plateau and problems of land surface process simulation will also be discussed.

  5. Heat flux due to poloidal electric field in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M. )

    1992-02-01

    The heat flux due to poloidally varying electrostatic potential is calculated in the banana regime. This electrostatic potential determined self-consistently from charge neutrality is shown to increase the electron heat flux by a factor {radical}{ital m}{sub {ital i}}/{ital m}{sub {ital e}} compared with that when this potential is neglected, where {ital m}{sub {ital e}} and {ital m}{sub {ital i}} are the masses of electron and ion, respectively.

  6. Global analysis of heat shock response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    SciTech Connect

    Arkin, A. P.; Wall, J. D.; Hazen, T. C.; He, Z.; Zhou, J.; Huang, K. H.; Gaucher, Sara P.; He, Q.; Hadi, Masood Z.; Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Alm, Eric J.; Singh, A. K.

    2005-08-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough belongs to a class of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and is found ubiquitously in nature. Given the importance of SRB-mediated reduction for bioremediation of metal ion contaminants, ongoing research on D. vulgaris has been in the direction of elucidating regulatory mechanisms for this organism under a variety of stress conditions. This work presents a global view of this organism's response to elevated growth temperature using whole-cell transcriptomics and proteomics tools. Transcriptional response (1.7-fold change or greater; Z {ge} 1.5) ranged from 1,135 genes at 15 min to 1,463 genes at 120 min for a temperature up-shift of 13 C from a growth temperature of 37 C for this organism and suggested both direct and indirect modes of heat sensing. Clusters of orthologous group categories that were significantly affected included posttranslational modifications; protein turnover and chaperones (up-regulated); energy production and conversion (down-regulated), nucleotide transport, metabolism (down-regulated), and translation; ribosomal structure; and biogenesis (down-regulated). Analysis of the genome sequence revealed the presence of features of both negative and positive regulation which included the CIRCE element and promoter sequences corresponding to the alternate sigma factors {sigma}{sup 32} and {sigma}{sup 54}. While mechanisms of heat shock control for some genes appeared to coincide with those established for Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the presence of unique control schemes for several other genes was also evident. Analysis of protein expression levels using differential in-gel electrophoresis suggested good agreement with transcriptional profiles of several heat shock proteins, including DnaK (DVU0811), HtpG (DVU2643), HtrA (DVU1468), and AhpC (DVU2247). The proteomics study also suggested the possibility of posttranslational modifications in the chaperones DnaK, AhpC, GroES (DVU1977), and GroEL (DVU1976

  7. Global Analysis of Heat Shock Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, S.R.; He, Q.; Huang, K.H.; Gaucher, S.P.; Alm, E.J.; He,Z.; Hadi, M.Z.; Hazen, T.C.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Arkin, A.P.; Singh, A.K.

    2005-09-16

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough belongs to a class ofsulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and is found ubiquitously in nature.Given the importance of SRB-mediated reduction for bioremediation ofmetal ion contaminants, ongoing research on D. vulgaris has been in thedirection of elucidating regulatory mechanisms for this organism under avariety of stress conditions. This work presents a global view of thisorganism's response to elevated growth temperature using whole-celltranscriptomics and proteomics tools. Transcriptional response (1.7-foldchange or greater; Z>1.5) ranged from 1,135 genes at 15 min to 1,463genes at 120 min for a temperature up-shift of 13oC from a growthtemperature of 37oC for this organism and suggested both direct andindirect modes of heat sensing. Clusters of orthologous group categoriesthat were significantly affected included posttranslationalmodifications; protein turnover and chaperones (up-regulated); energyproduction and conversion (down-regulated), nucleotide transport,metabolism (down-regulated), and translation; ribosomal structure; andbiogenesis (down-regulated). Analysis of the genome sequence revealed thepresence of features of both negative and positive regulation whichincluded the CIRCE element and promoter sequences corresponding to thealternate sigma factors ?32 and ?54. While mechanisms of heat shockcontrol for some genes appeared to coincide with those established forEscherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the presence of unique controlschemes for several other genes was also evident. Analysis of proteinexpression levels using differential in-gel electrophoresis suggestedgood agreement with transcriptional profiles of several heat shockproteins, including DnaK (DVU0811), HtpG (DVU2643), HtrA (DVU1468), andAhpC (DVU2247). The proteomics study also suggested the possibility ofposttranslational modifications in the chaperones DnaK, AhpC, GroES(DVU1977), and GroEL (DVU1976) and also several periplasmic ABCtransporters.

  8. Interstitial lung disease due to fumes from heat-cutting polymer rope.

    PubMed

    Sharman, P; Wood-Baker, R

    2013-09-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) due to inhalation of fume/smoke from heating or burning of synthetic polymers has not been reported previously. A fish farm worker developed ILD after cutting rope (polypropylene and nylon) for about 2 hours per day over an extended period using an electrically heated 'knife'. This process produced fume/smoke that entered the workers breathing zone. No other likely cause was identified. This case suggests that exposure to airborne contaminants generated by the heating or burning of synthetic polymers has the potential to cause serious lung disease.

  9. Methodology for estimation of time-dependent surface heat flux due to cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Tunnell, James W; Torres, Jorge H; Anvari, Bahman

    2002-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective technique to protect the epidermis during cutaneous laser therapies. Spraying a cryogen onto the skin surface creates a time-varying heat flux, effectively cooling the skin during and following the cryogen spurt. In previous studies mathematical models were developed to predict the human skin temperature profiles during the cryogen spraying time. However, no studies have accounted for the additional cooling due to residual cryogen left on the skin surface following the spurt termination. We formulate and solve an inverse heat conduction (IHC) problem to predict the time-varying surface heat flux both during and following a cryogen spurt. The IHC formulation uses measured temperature profiles from within a medium to estimate the surface heat flux. We implement a one-dimensional sequential function specification method (SFSM) to estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperatures measured within an in vitro model in response to a cryogen spurt. Solution accuracy and experimental errors are examined using simulated temperature data. Heat flux following spurt termination appears substantial; however, it is less than that during the spraying time. The estimated time-varying heat flux can subsequently be used in forward heat conduction models to estimate temperature profiles in skin during and following a cryogen spurt and predict appropriate timing for onset of the laser pulse.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Aerodynamic Heating Reduction due to Opposing Jet in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Y.; Eri, Q. T.

    In supersonic flight, severe aerodynamic heating takes place at the nose of blunt body and causes ablation. Accurate prediction of aerodynamic heating and construction of proper thermal protection system are required. The numerical study on a reduction of aerodynamic heating by opposing jet has been conducted. Flow field around a hemisphere model is calculated in supersonic free stream of Mach number 3.98 and the coolant gas is injected through the nozzle at the nose the model. CFD method was Finite Volume Method for time integration be used, axisymmetric full Navier-Stokes equations were applied as governing equations and k-ɛturbulence model is used. Numerical simulation demonstrated, compared with no jet, the reduction of aerodynamic heating due to opposing jet was to be proved quite effective at the nose of blunt body. Parameters in this numerical study insofar, as the pressure ratio is increased, caused the wall pressure and heat flux decrease, and recirculation region size largen. effective reduction of the aerodynamic heating remarkably. As the opposing nozzle diameter ratio was decreased, the pressure and heat flux increased, and recirculation region size lessening, the effect of reduction aerodynamic heating was reduced.

  11. Heat dissipation due to ferromagnetic resonance in a ferromagnetic metal monitored by electrical resistance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanoi, Kazuto; Yokotani, Yuki; Kimura, Takashi

    2015-11-02

    The heat dissipation due to the resonant precessional motion of the magnetization in a ferromagnetic metal has been investigated. We demonstrated that the temperature during the ferromagnetic resonance can be simply detected by the electrical resistance measurement of the Cu strip line in contact with the ferromagnetic metal. The temperature change of the Cu strip due to the ferromagnetic resonance was found to exceed 10 K, which significantly affects the spin-current transport. The influence of the thermal conductivity of the substrate on the heating was also investigated.

  12. Differences in response to heat stress due to production level and breed of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gantner, Vesna; Bobic, Tina; Gantner, Ranko; Gregic, Maja; Kuterovac, Kresimir; Novakovic, Jurica; Potocnik, Klemen

    2017-05-06

    The climatic conditions in Croatia are deteriorating which significantly increases the frequency of heat stress. This creates a need for an adequate dairy farming strategy. The impact of heat stress can be reduced in many ways, but the best long-term solution includes the genetic evaluation and selection for heat stress resistance. In order to create the basis for genetic evaluation, this research determined the variation in daily milk yield (DMY) and somatic cell count (SCC) as well as the differences in resistance to heat stress due to production level (high, low) and breed (Holstein, Simmental) of dairy cattle breed in Croatia. For statistical analysis, 1,070,554 test-day records from 70,135 Holsteins reared on 5679 farms and 1,300,683 test-day records from 86,013 Simmentals reared on 8827 farms in Croatia provided by the Croatian Agricultural Agency were used. The results of this research indicate that the high-producing cows are much more susceptible to heat stress than low-producing especially Holsteins. Also, the results of this research indicate that Simmental breed, in terms of daily milk production and somatic cell count, could be more resistant to heat stress than Holstein. The following research should determine whether Simmentals are genetically more appropriate for the challenges that are in store for the future milk production in this region. Furthermore, could an adequate production level be achieved with Simmentals by maintaining the heat resistance?

  13. Differences in response to heat stress due to production level and breed of dairy cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantner, Vesna; Bobic, Tina; Gantner, Ranko; Gregic, Maja; Kuterovac, Kresimir; Novakovic, Jurica; Potocnik, Klemen

    2017-05-01

    The climatic conditions in Croatia are deteriorating which significantly increases the frequency of heat stress. This creates a need for an adequate dairy farming strategy. The impact of heat stress can be reduced in many ways, but the best long-term solution includes the genetic evaluation and selection for heat stress resistance. In order to create the basis for genetic evaluation, this research determined the variation in daily milk yield (DMY) and somatic cell count (SCC) as well as the differences in resistance to heat stress due to production level (high, low) and breed (Holstein, Simmental) of dairy cattle breed in Croatia. For statistical analysis, 1,070,554 test-day records from 70,135 Holsteins reared on 5679 farms and 1,300,683 test-day records from 86,013 Simmentals reared on 8827 farms in Croatia provided by the Croatian Agricultural Agency were used. The results of this research indicate that the high-producing cows are much more susceptible to heat stress than low-producing especially Holsteins. Also, the results of this research indicate that Simmental breed, in terms of daily milk production and somatic cell count, could be more resistant to heat stress than Holstein. The following research should determine whether Simmentals are genetically more appropriate for the challenges that are in store for the future milk production in this region. Furthermore, could an adequate production level be achieved with Simmentals by maintaining the heat resistance?

  14. Compressible Heating in the Condense Phase due to Pore Collapse in HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ju; Jackson, Thomas

    Axisymmetric pore collapse in HMX is studied numerically by solving multi-phase reactive Euler equations. The generation of hot spots in the condense phase due to compressible heating is examined. The motivation is to improve the understanding of the role of embedded cavities in the initiation of reaction in explosives, and to investigate the effect of hot spots in the condense phase due to compressible heating alone, complementing previous study on hot spots due to the reaction in the gas phase and at the interface. It is found that the shock-cavity interaction results in pressures and thus temperatures that are substantially higher than the post-shock values in the condense phase. However, these hot spots in the condense phase due to compressible heating alone do not seem to be sufficiently hot to lead to ignition at shock pressures of 1-3 GPa. Thus, compressible heating in the condense phase may be excluded as a mechanism for initiation of explosives. It should be pointed out that the ignition threshold for the temperature, the so-called ``switch-on'' temperature, of hot spots depend on chemistry kinetics parameters. Switch-on temperature is lower for faster reaction rate. The current chemistry kinetics parameters are based on previous experimental work. This work was supported in part by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Lethality of Bacillus Anthracis Spores Due to Short Duration Heating Measured Using Infrared Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    wavelengths were these differences distinguished. Individual bacterial endospores from four species of Bacillus (cereus, megaterium , subtilis, and... Bacillus (cereus, megaterium , and subtilis) at various wavelengths. Spectral comparisons were made between spores and vegetative cells. Results...LETHALITY OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS SPORES DUE TO SHORT DURATION HEATING MEASURED USING INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY THESIS Kristina M

  16. Evolution of surface sensible heat over the Tibetan Plateau under the recent global warming hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lihua; Huang, Gang; Fan, Guangzhou; Qu, Xia; Zhao, Guijie; Hua, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Based on regular surface meteorological observations and NCEP/DOE reanalysis data, this study investigates the evolution of surface sensible heat (SH) over the central and eastern Tibetan Plateau (CE-TP) under the recent global warming hiatus. The results reveal that the SH over the CE-TP presents a recovery since the slowdown of the global warming. The restored surface wind speed together with increased difference in ground-air temperature contribute to the recovery in SH. During the global warming hiatus, the persistent weakening wind speed is alleviated due to the variation of the meridional temperature gradient. Meanwhile, the ground surface temperature and the difference in ground-air temperature show a significant increasing trend in that period caused by the increased total cloud amount, especially at night. At nighttime, the increased total cloud cover reduces the surface effective radiation via a strengthening of atmospheric counter radiation and subsequently brings about a clear upward trend in ground surface temperature and the difference in ground-air temperature. Cloud-radiation feedback plays a significant role in the evolution of the surface temperature and even SH during the global warming hiatus. Consequently, besides the surface wind speed, the difference in ground-air temperature becomes another significant factor for the variation in SH since the slowdown of global warming, particularly at night.

  17. How Well Has Global Ocean Heat Content Variability Been Measured?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A.; Weiss, J.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Fabienne, G.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a new strategy that uses synthetic observations of an ensemble of model simulations to test the fidelity of an observational strategy, quantifying how well it captures the statistics of variability. We apply this test to the 0-700m global ocean heat content anomaly (OHCA) as observed with in-situ measurements by the Coriolis Dataset for Reanalysis (CORA), using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) version 3.5. One-year running mean OHCAs for the years 2005 onward are found to faithfully capture the variability. During these years, synthetic observations of the model are strongly correlated at 0.94±0.06 with the actual state of the model. Overall, sub-annual variability and data before 2005 are signi cantly a ffected by the variability of the observing system. In contrast, the sometimes-used weighted integral of observations is not a good indicator of OHCA as variability in the observing system contaminates dynamical variability.

  18. Modeling of Urban Heat Island at Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KC, B.; Ruth, M.

    2015-12-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) is the temperature difference between urban and its rural background temperature. At the local level, the choice of building materials and urban geometry are vital in determining the UHI magnitude of a city. At the city scale, economic growth, population, climate, and land use dynamics are the main drivers behind changes in UHIs. The main objective of this paper is to provide a comprehensive assessment of UHI based on these "macro variables" at regional and global scale. We based our analysis on published research for Europe, North America, and Asia, reporting data for 83 cities across the globe with unique climatic, economic, and environmental conditions. Exploratory data analysis including Pearson correlation was performed to explore the relationship between UHI and PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤5 microns), PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤10 microns), vegetation per capita, built area, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), population density and population. Additionally, dummy variables were used to capture potential influences of climate types (based on Koppen classifications) and the ways by which UHI was measured. We developed three linear regression models, one for each of the three continents (Asia, Europe, and North America) and one model for all the cities across these continents. This study provides a unique perspective for predicting UHI magnitudes at large scales based on economic activity and pollution levels of a city, which has important implications in urban planning.

  19. Potential increases in natural radon emissions due to heating of the Yucca Mountain rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Pescatore, C.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1992-02-01

    Heating of the rock mass by the spent fuel in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain will cause extra amounts of natural radon to diffuse into the fracture system and to migrate faster to the accessible environment. Indeed, free-convection currents due to heating will act to shorten the radon travel times and will cause larger releases than would be possible under undistributed conditions. To estimate the amount of additional radon released due to heating of the Yucca Mountain rock mass, we obtain an expression for the release enhancement factor, E. This factor is defined as the ratio between the total flux of radon at the surface of the mountain before and after closure of the repository assuming the only cause of disturbance to be the heating of the rock mass. With appropriate approximations and using a heat load representative of that expected at Yucca Mountain, the present calculations indicate that the average enhancement factor over the first 10,000 years will be 4.5 as a minimum. These calculations are based on the assumption that barometric pumping does not significantly influence radon release. The latter assumption will need to be substantiated.

  20. Latent heating and mixing due to entrainment in tropical deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, Clayton J.

    Recent studies have noted the role of latent heating above the freezing level in reconciling Riehl and Malkus' Hot Tower Hypothesis (HTH) with evidence of diluted tropical deep convective cores. This study evaluates recent modifications to the HTH through Lagrangian trajectory analysis of deep convective cores in an idealized, high-resolution cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation. A line of tropical convective cells develops within a high-resolution nested grid whose boundary conditions are obtained from a large-domain CRM simulation approaching radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE). Microphysical impacts on latent heating and equivalent potential temperature are analyzed along trajectories ascending within convective regions of the high-resolution nested grid. Changes in equivalent potential temperature along backward trajectories are partitioned into contributions from latent heating due to ice processes and a residual term. This residual term is composed of radiation and mixing. Due to the small magnitude of radiative heating rates in the convective inflow regions and updrafts examined here, the residual term is treated as an approximate representation of mixing within these regions. The simulations demonstrate that mixing with dry air decreases equivalent potential temperature along ascending trajectories below the freezing level, while latent heating due to freezing and vapor deposition increase equivalent potential temperature above the freezing level. The latent heating contributions along trajectories from cloud nucleation, condensation, evaporation, freezing, deposition, and sublimation are also quantified. Finally, the source regions of trajectories reaching the upper troposphere are identified; it is found that two-thirds of backward trajectories with starting points within strong updrafts or downdrafts above 10 km have their origin at levels higher than 2 km AGL. The importance of both boundary layer and mid-level inflow in moist environments is

  1. Beam heat load due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance in COLDDIAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalbuoni, S.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2012-11-01

    One of the still open issues for the development of superconductive insertion devices is the understanding of the heat intake from the electron beam. With the aim of measuring the beam heat load to a cold bore and the hope to gain a deeper understanding in the underlying mechanisms, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) was built. It is equipped with the following instrumentation: retarding field analyzers to measure the electron flux, temperature sensors to measure the beam heat load, pressure gauges, and mass spectrometers to measure the gas content. Possible beam heat load sources are: synchrotron radiation, wakefield effects due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance and electron/ion bombardment. The flexibility of the engineering design will allow the installation of the cryostat in different synchrotron light sources. COLDDIAG was first installed in the Diamond Light Source (DLS) in 2011. Due to a mechanical failure of the thermal transition of the cold liner, the cryostat had to be removed after one week of operation. After having implemented design changes in the thermal liner transition, COLDDIAG has been reinstalled in the DLS at the end of August 2012. In order to understand the beam heat load mechanism it is important to compare the measured COLDDIAG parameters with theoretical expectations. In this paper we report on the analytical and numerical computation of the COLDDIAG beam heat load due to coupling impedances deriving from unavoidable step transitions, ports used for pumping and diagnostics, surface roughness, and resistive wall. The results might have an important impact on future technological solutions to be applied to cold bore devices.

  2. Heat transfer deterioration in tubes caused by bulk flow acceleration due to thermal and frictional influences

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J. D.

    2012-07-01

    Severe deterioration of forced convection heat transfer can be encountered with compressible fluids flowing through strongly heated tubes of relatively small bore as the flow accelerates and turbulence is reduced because of the fluid density falling (as the temperature rises and the pressure falls due to thermal and frictional influence). The model presented here throws new light on how the dependence of density on both temperature and pressure can affect turbulence and heat transfer and it explains why the empirical equations currently available for calculating effectiveness of forced convection heat transfer under conditions of strong non-uniformity of fluid properties sometimes fail to reproduce observed behaviour. It provides a criterion for establishing the conditions under which such deterioration of heat transfer might be encountered and enables heat transfer coefficients to be determined when such deterioration occurs. The analysis presented here is for a gaseous fluid at normal pressure subjected strong non-uniformity of fluid properties by the application of large temperature differences. Thus the model leads to equations which describe deterioration of heat transfer in terms of familiar parameters such as Mach number, Reynolds number and Prandtl number. It is applicable to thermal power plant systems such as rocket engines, gas turbines and high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. However, the ideas involved apply equally well to fluids at supercritical pressure. Impairment of heat transfer under such conditions has become a matter of growing interest with the active consideration now being given to advanced water-cooled nuclear reactors designed to operate at pressures above the critical value. (authors)

  3. Global heating distributions for January 1979 calculated from GLA assimilated and simulated model-based datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaack, Todd K.; Lenzen, Allen J.; Johnson, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    This study surveys the large-scale distribution of heating for January 1979 obtained from five sources of information. Through intercomparison of these distributions, with emphasis on satellite-derived information, an investigation is conducted into the global distribution of atmospheric heating and the impact of observations on the diagnostic estimates of heating derived from assimilated datasets. The results indicate a substantial impact of satellite information on diagnostic estimates of heating in regions where there is a scarcity of conventional observations. The addition of satellite data provides information on the atmosphere's temperature and wind structure that is important for estimation of the global distribution of heating and energy exchange.

  4. Coupling of an acoustic wave to shear motion due to viscous heating

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J.

    2016-07-15

    Viscous heating due to shear motion in a plasma can result in the excitation of a longitudinal acoustic wave, if the shear motion is modulated in time. The coupling mechanism is a thermal effect: time-dependent shear motion causes viscous heating, which leads to a rarefaction that can couple into a longitudinal wave, such as an acoustic wave. This coupling mechanism is demonstrated in an electrostatic three-dimensional (3D) simulation of a dusty plasma, in which a localized shear flow is initiated as a pulse, resulting in a delayed outward propagation of a longitudinal acoustic wave. This coupling effect can be profound in plasmas that exhibit localized viscous heating, such as the dusty plasma we simulated using parameters typical of the PK-4 experiment. We expect that a similar phenomenon can occur with other kinds of plasma waves.

  5. Filler bar heating due to stepped tiles in the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, D. H.; Smith, D. M.; Edwards, C. L. W.; Patten, A. B.; Hamilton, H. H., II

    1983-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to investigate the excessive heating in the tile to tile gaps of the Shuttle Orbiter Thermal Protection System due to stepped tiles. The excessive heating was evidence by visible discoloration and charring of the filler bar and strain isolation pad that is used in the attachment of tiles to the aluminum substrate. Two tile locations on the Shuttle orbiter were considered, one on the lower surface of the fuselage and one on the lower surface of the wing. The gap heating analysis involved the calculation of external and internal gas pressures and temperatures, internal mass flow rates, and the transient thermal response of the thermal protection system. The results of the analysis are presented for the fuselage and wing location for several step heights. The results of a study to determine the effectiveness of a half height ceramic fiber gap filler in preventing hot gas flow in the tile gaps are also presented.

  6. Future heat waves due to climate change threaten the survival of Posidonia oceanica seedlings.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Meseguer, Laura; Marín, Arnaldo; Sanz-Lázaro, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    Extreme weather events are major drivers of ecological change, and their occurrence is likely to increase due to climate change. The transient increases in atmospheric temperatures are leading to a greater occurrence of heat waves, extreme events that can produce a substantial warming of water, especially in enclosed basins such as the Mediterranean Sea. Here, we tested the effects of current and predicted heat waves on the early stages of development of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica. Temperatures above 27 °C limited the growth of the plant by inhibiting its photosynthetic system. It suffered a reduction in leaf growth and faster leaf senescence, and in some cases mortality. This study demonstrates that the greater frequency of heat waves, along with anticipated temperature rises in coming decades, are expected to negatively affect the germination of P. oceanica seedlings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM): Global Structure and Dynamics Driven by Auroral and Joule Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; J. Il. Waite, Jr.; Majeed, T.

    2005-01-01

    A growing multispectral database plus recent Galileo descent measurements are being used to construct a self-consistent picture of the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system. The proper characterization of Jupiter s upper atmosphere, embedded ionosphere, and auroral features requires the examination of underlying processes, including the feedbacks of energetics, neutral-ion dynamics, composition, and magnetospheric coupling. A fully 3-D Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM) has been developed and exercised to address global temperatures, three-component neutral winds, and neutral-ion species distributions. The domain of this JTGCM extends from 20-microbar (capturing hydrocarbon cooling) to 1.0 x 10(exp -4) nbar (including aurora/Joule heating processes). The resulting JTGCM has been fully spun-up and integrated for greater than or equal to40 Jupiter rotations. Results from three JTGCM cases incorporating moderate auroral heating, ion drag, and moderate to strong Joule heating processes are presented. The neutral horizontal winds at ionospheric heights vary from 0.5 km/s to 1.2 km/s, atomic hydrogen is transported equatorward, and auroral exospheric temperatures range from approx.1200-1300 K to above 3000 K, depending on the magnitude of Joule heating. The equatorial temperature profiles from the JTGCM are compared with the measured temperature structure from the Galileo AS1 data set. The best fit to the Galileo data implies that the major energy source for maintaining the equatorial temperatures is due to dynamical heating induced by the low-latitude convergence of the high-latitude-driven thermospheric circulation. Overall, the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system is highly variable and is shown to be strongly dependent on magnetospheric coupling which regulates Joule heating.

  8. Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM): Global Structure and Dynamics Driven by Auroral and Joule Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; J. Il. Waite, Jr.; Majeed, T.

    2005-01-01

    A growing multispectral database plus recent Galileo descent measurements are being used to construct a self-consistent picture of the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system. The proper characterization of Jupiter s upper atmosphere, embedded ionosphere, and auroral features requires the examination of underlying processes, including the feedbacks of energetics, neutral-ion dynamics, composition, and magnetospheric coupling. A fully 3-D Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM) has been developed and exercised to address global temperatures, three-component neutral winds, and neutral-ion species distributions. The domain of this JTGCM extends from 20-microbar (capturing hydrocarbon cooling) to 1.0 x 10(exp -4) nbar (including aurora/Joule heating processes). The resulting JTGCM has been fully spun-up and integrated for greater than or equal to40 Jupiter rotations. Results from three JTGCM cases incorporating moderate auroral heating, ion drag, and moderate to strong Joule heating processes are presented. The neutral horizontal winds at ionospheric heights vary from 0.5 km/s to 1.2 km/s, atomic hydrogen is transported equatorward, and auroral exospheric temperatures range from approx.1200-1300 K to above 3000 K, depending on the magnitude of Joule heating. The equatorial temperature profiles from the JTGCM are compared with the measured temperature structure from the Galileo AS1 data set. The best fit to the Galileo data implies that the major energy source for maintaining the equatorial temperatures is due to dynamical heating induced by the low-latitude convergence of the high-latitude-driven thermospheric circulation. Overall, the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system is highly variable and is shown to be strongly dependent on magnetospheric coupling which regulates Joule heating.

  9. Mapping global sensitivity of cellular network dynamics: sensitivity heat maps and a global summation law.

    PubMed

    Rand, D A

    2008-08-06

    The dynamical systems arising from gene regulatory, signalling and metabolic networks are strongly nonlinear, have high-dimensional state spaces and depend on large numbers of parameters. Understanding the relation between the structure and the function for such systems is a considerable challenge. We need tools to identify key points of regulation, illuminate such issues as robustness and control and aid in the design of experiments. Here, I tackle this by developing new techniques for sensitivity analysis. In particular, I show how to globally analyse the sensitivity of a complex system by means of two new graphical objects: the sensitivity heat map and the parameter sensitivity spectrum. The approach to sensitivity analysis is global in the sense that it studies the variation in the whole of the model's solution rather than focusing on output variables one at a time, as in classical sensitivity analysis. This viewpoint relies on the discovery of local geometric rigidity for such systems, the mathematical insight that makes a practicable approach to such problems feasible for highly complex systems. In addition, we demonstrate a new summation theorem that substantially generalizes previous results for oscillatory and other dynamical phenomena. This theorem can be interpreted as a mathematical law stating the need for a balance between fragility and robustness in such systems.

  10. Research Spotlight: Limiting global warming may not limit heat wave risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    Recent policy discussions on climate change have focused on limiting global average temperature increases. For instance, the European Union has set a goal of limiting global warming to 2°C. However, this goal represents a global average; regional and local temperature changes may vary, and substantial increases in regional extreme heat events could occur, possibly with serious consequences for some communities.

  11. Global earthquake casualties due to secondary effects: A quantitative analysis for improving rapid loss analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marano, K.D.; Wald, D.J.; Allen, T.I.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and fire for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey's (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/significant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER's overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We find that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our findings, we have built country-specific disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  12. Global Earthquake Casualties due to Secondary Effects: A Quantitative Analysis for Improving PAGER Losses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and fire for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey’s (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/significant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER’s overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We find that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra–Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our findings, we have built country-specific disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability.

  13. Distortion of Crabbed Bunch Due to Electron Cloud and Global Crabbing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Cai, Y.; /SLAC

    2008-08-01

    Crab cavities may be used improve the luminosity in colliding beam colliders with crab crossing. In a global crab crossing correction, only one crab cavity is installed in each ring and the crab cavities generate a horizontally titled bunch oscillating around the ring. The electron cloud in positively charged rings may distort the crabbed bunch and cause the luminosity drop. This paper briefly estimates the distortion of positron bunch due to the electron cloud with global crab and estimates the effect in the KEKB and possible LHC upgrades.

  14. Thermal energy conduction in a honey bee comb due to cell-heating bees.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, J A C; Dykes, E S

    2008-01-07

    Theoretical analysis and numerical calculations are performed to characterize the unsteady two-dimensional conduction of thermal energy in an idealized honey bee comb. The situation explored corresponds to a comb containing a number of brood cells occupied by pupae. These cells are surrounded by other cells containing pollen which, in turn, are surrounded (above) by cells containing honey and (below) by vacant cells containing air. Up to five vacant cells in the brood region can be occupied by cell-heating bees which, through the isometrical contraction of their flight muscles, can generate sufficient energy to raise their body temperatures by a few degrees. In this way, the cell-heating bees alter the heat flux and temperature distributions in the brood region so as to maintain conditions that benefit the pupae. The calculations show that the number of cell-heating bees significantly affects the magnitude, time rate of change, and spatial distribution of temperature throughout the comb. They also reveal a vertically aligned asymmetry in the spatial distribution of temperature that is due to the large heat capacity and thermal conductivity of honey relative to air, whereby air-filled cells experience larger temperature increases than honey-filled cells. Analysis shows that convection and radiation represent negligible modes of thermal energy transfer at all levels in the problem considered. Also, because of its small thickness, the wax wall of a comb cell simultaneously presents negligible resistance to conduction heat transfer normal to it and very large resistance along it. As a consequence the walls of a cell play no thermal role, but simply serve as mechanical supports for the materials they contain.

  15. Ion heat pinch due to the magnetic drift resonance with the ion temperature gradient instability in a rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Debing; Xu, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaojie

    2017-03-01

    The ion heat pinch due to the magnetic drift resonance with the ion temperature gradient instability is investigated by using the Lie-transform method. In a tokamak plasma with an equilibrium parallel flow, the total heat flux is found to direct inward with a strong flow shear. The proposed heat pinch can provide possible explanations for some experimental observations.

  16. Quantitative Global Heat Transfer in a Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John P.; Schneider, Steven P.; Liu, Tianshu; Rubal, Justin; Ward, Chris; Dussling, Joseph; Rice, Cody; Foley, Ryan; Cai, Zeimin; Wang, Bo; Woodiga, Sudesh

    2012-01-01

    This project developed quantitative methods for obtaining heat transfer from temperature sensitive paint (TSP) measurements in the Mach-6 quiet tunnel at Purdue, which is a Ludwieg tube with a downstream valve, moderately-short flow duration and low levels of heat transfer. Previous difficulties with inferring heat transfer from TSP in the Mach-6 quiet tunnel were traced to (1) the large transient heat transfer that occurs during the unusually long tunnel startup and shutdown, (2) the non-uniform thickness of the insulating coating, (3) inconsistencies and imperfections in the painting process and (4) the low levels of heat transfer observed on slender models at typical stagnation temperatures near 430K. Repeated measurements were conducted on 7 degree-half-angle sharp circular cones at zero angle of attack in order to evaluate the techniques, isolate the problems and identify solutions. An attempt at developing a two-color TSP method is also summarized.

  17. Temperatures of individual ion species and heating due to charge exchange in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jhoon; Nagy, Andrew F.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    The coupled electron and multispecies ion energy equations were solved for daytime conditions in the Venus ionosphere. The heating rates due to charge exchange between hot oxygen atoms and thermal oxygen ions were calculated and incorporated into the energy equations. The combination of the traditional EUV heating and this hot oxygen energy source leads to calculated electron and individual ion temperatures significantly lower than the measured values during solar cycle maximum conditions. Calculations were also carried out for solar cycle minimum conditions, which led to considerably lower temperatures; no data are available which would allow direct comparisons of these results with measurements. In order to obtain calculated temperature values consistent with the observed ones, for solar cycle maximum conditions, topside heat inflows into the ion and electron gases have to be introduced or the thermal conductivity must be reduced by considering the effect of steady and fluctuating magnetic fields, as was done in previous studies. The addition of hot oxygen heating leads to minor increases in the calculated ion temperatures except for the case of reduced thermal conductivities. Separate temperatures were calculated for each ion species for a number of different conditions and in general the differences were found to be relatively small.

  18. Temperatures of individual ion species and heating due to charge exchange in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jhoon; Nagy, Andrew F.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    The coupled electron and multispecies ion energy equations were solved for daytime conditions in the Venus ionosphere. The heating rates due to charge exchange between hot oxygen atoms and thermal oxygen ions were calculated and incorporated into the energy equations. The combination of the traditional EUV heating and this hot oxygen energy source leads to calculated electron and individual ion temperatures significantly lower than the measured values during solar cycle maximum conditions. Calculations were also carried out for solar cycle minimum conditions, which led to considerably lower temperatures; no data are available which would allow direct comparisons of these results with measurements. In order to obtain calculated temperature values consistent with the observed ones, for solar cycle maximum conditions, topside heat inflows into the ion and electron gases have to be introduced or the thermal conductivity must be reduced by considering the effect of steady and fluctuating magnetic fields, as was done in previous studies. The addition of hot oxygen heating leads to minor increases in the calculated ion temperatures except for the case of reduced thermal conductivities. Separate temperatures were calculated for each ion species for a number of different conditions and in general the differences were found to be relatively small.

  19. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming.

    PubMed

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-02-26

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  20. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming

    PubMed Central

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-01-01

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  1. Subsurface Ocean Climate Data Records: Global Ocean Heat and Freshwater Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, T.; Locarnini, R. A.; Mishonov, A. V.; Reagan, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean is the main sink of excess heat in the Earth's climate system. It absorbs more than 90% of the Top of the Atmosphere imbalance between incoming solar radiation and outgoing long-wave radiation. The ocean, covering more than 70% of the Earth's surface, is also the major component of the planet's freshwater cycle. More than 60 years of in situ subsurface temperature and salinity data have been compiled and quality controlled in World Ocean Database of the National Centers for Environmental Information. These data have been used to calculate time series of global heat and salt changes in the ocean. Salt changes can be used to calculate freshwater changes, including from melting continental glaciers. Both time series provide a measure of the changes in the Earth's climate system: from heat sequestered in the ocean, to the rise of sea level due to thermosteric and halosteric components. The time series are updated every three months and are widely used in climate related studies. Method of quality control of the data, calculation of the time series, and dissemination and use of the time series are discussed.

  2. Decrease in penicillin susceptibility due to heat shock protein ClpL in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance and tolerance are increasing threats to global health as antibiotic-resistant bacteria can cause severe morbidity and mortality and can increase treatment cost 10-fold. Although several genes contributing to antibiotic tolerance among pneumococci have been identified, we report here that ClpL, a major heat shock protein, could modulate cell wall biosynthetic enzymes and lead to decreased penicillin susceptibility. On capsular type 1, 2, and 19 genetic backgrounds, mutants lacking ClpL were more susceptible to penicillin and had thinner cell walls than the parental strains, whereas a ClpL-overexpressing strain showed a higher resistance to penicillin and a thicker cell wall. Although exposure of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to penicillin inhibited expression of the major cell wall synthesis gene pbp2x, heat shock induced a ClpL-dependent increase in the mRNA levels and protein synthesized by pbp2x. Inducible ClpL expression correlated with PBP2x expression and penicillin susceptibility. Fractionation and electron micrograph data revealed that ClpL induced by heat shock is localized at the cell wall, and the ΔclpL showed significantly reduced net translocation of PBP2x into the cell wall. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation with either ClpL or PBP2x antibody followed by reprobing with ClpL or PBP2x antibody showed an interaction between ClpL and PBP2x after heat stress. This interaction was confirmed by His tag pulldown assay with either ClpLHis₆ or PBP2xHis₆. Thus, ClpL stabilized pbp2x expression, interacted with PBP2x, and facilitated translocation of PBP2x, a key protein of cell wall synthesis process, contributing to the decrease of antibiotic susceptibility in S. pneumoniae.

  3. 75 FR 34171 - Trueheat, Inc., a Subsidiary of Global Heating Solutions, Inc., Currently Known as Truheat, a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Trueheat, Inc., a Subsidiary of Global Heating Solutions, Inc., Currently Known as Truheat, a Division of Three Heat LLC, Allegan, MI; Electro-Heat, Inc., a Subsidiary of Global Heating Solutions, Inc., Currently Known...

  4. Global assessment of heat wave magnitudes from 1901 to 2010 and implications for the river discharge of the Alps.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Matteo; Russo, Simone; di Sabatino, Silvana; Michetti, Melania; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Gualdi, Silvio

    2016-11-15

    Heat waves represent one of the most significant climatic stressors for ecosystems, economies and societies. A main topic of debate is whether they have increased or not in intensity and/or their duration due to the observed climate change. Firstly, this is because of the lack of reliable long-term daily temperature data at the global scale; secondly, because of the intermittent nature of such phenomena. Long datasets are required to produce a reliable and meaningful assessment. In this study, we provide a global estimate of heat wave magnitudes based on the three most appropriate datasets currently available, derived from models and observations (i.e. the 20th Century Reanalyses from NOAA and ECMWF), spanning the last century and before. The magnitude of the heat waves is calculated by means of the Heat Wave Magnitude Index daily (HWMId), taking into account both duration and amplitude. We compare the magnitude of the most severe heat waves occurred across different regions of the world and we discuss the decadal variability of the larger events since the 1850s. We concentrate our analysis from 1901 onwards, where all datasets overlap. Our results agree with other studies focusing on heat waves that have occurred in the recent decades, but using different data. In addition, we found that the percentage of global area covered by heat wave exceeding a given magnitude has increased almost three times, in the last decades, with respect to that measured in the early 20th century. Finally, we discuss the specific implications of the heat waves on the river runoff generated in the Alps, for which comparatively long datasets exist, affecting the water quality and availability in a significant portion of the European region in summer.

  5. The role of zonally asymmetric heating in the vertical and temporal structure of the global scale flow fields during FGGE SOP-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paegle, J.; Kalnay, E.; Baker, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    The global scale structure of atmospheric flow is best documented on time scales longer than a few days. Theoretical and observational studies of ultralong waves have emphasized forcing due to global scale variations of topography and surface heat flux, possibly interacting with baroclinically unstable or vertically refracting basic flows. Analyses of SOP-1 data in terms of global scale spherical harmonics is documented with emphasis upon weekly transitions.

  6. A case of multiple organ failure due to heat stoke following a warm bath.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Young; Sung, Su Ah; Ko, Gang Jee; Boo, Chang Su; Jo, Sang Kyung; Cho, Won Yong; Kim, Hyoung Kyu

    2006-09-01

    Heat stroke is a potentially fatal disorder that's caused by an extreme elevation in body temperature. We report here an unusual case of multiple organ failure that was caused by classical, nonexertional heat stroke due to taking a warm bath at home. A 68 year old diabetic man was hospitalized for loss of consciousness. He was presumed to have been in a warm bath for 3 hrs and his body temperature was 41degrees C. Despite cooling and supportive care, he developed acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and fulminant liver failure. Continuous venovenous hemofiltration was started on day 3 because of the progressive oligouria and severe metabolic acidosis. On day 15, septic ascites was developed and Acinetobacter baumanii and Enterococcus faecium were isolated on the blood cultures. In spite of the best supportive care, the hepatic failure and DIC combined with septic peritonitis progressed; the patient succumbed on day 25.

  7. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Ablation of Refractory Material Due to Rocket Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael F.; Vu, Bruce T.

    2012-01-01

    CR Tech's Thermal Desktop-SINDA/FLUINT software was used in the thermal analysis of a flame deflector design for Launch Complex 39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The analysis of the flame deflector takes into account heat transfer due to plume impingement from expected vehicles to be launched at KSC. The heat flux from the plume was computed using computational fluid dynamics provided by Ames Research Center in Moffet Field, California. The results from the CFD solutions were mapped onto a 3-D Thermal Desktop model of the flame deflector using the boundary condition mapping capabilities in Thermal Desktop. The ablation subroutine in SINDA/FLUINT was then used to model the ablation of the refractory material.

  8. Global-scale analysis of river flow alterations due to water withdrawals and reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döll, P.; Fiedler, K.; Zhang, J.

    2009-12-01

    Global-scale information on natural river flows and anthropogenic river flow alterations is required to identify areas where aqueous ecosystems are expected to be strongly degraded. Such information can support the identification of environmental flow guidelines and a sustainable water management that balances the water demands of humans and ecosystems. This study presents the first global assessment of the anthropogenic alteration of river flow regimes, in particular of flow variability, by water withdrawals and dams/reservoirs. Six ecologically relevant flow indicators were quantified using an improved version of the global water model WaterGAP. WaterGAP simulated, with a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree, river discharge as affected by human water withdrawals and dams around the year 2000, as well as naturalized discharge without this type of human interference. Compared to naturalized conditions, long-term average global discharge into oceans and internal sinks has decreased by 2.7% due to water withdrawals, and by 0.8% due to dams. Mainly due to irrigation, long-term average river discharge and statistical low flow Q90 (monthly river discharge that is exceeded in 9 out of 10 months) have decreased by more than 10% on one sixth and one quarter of the global land area (excluding Antarctica and Greenland), respectively. Q90 has increased significantly on only 5% of the land area, downstream of reservoirs. Due to both water withdrawals and reservoirs, seasonal flow amplitude has decreased significantly on one sixth of the land area, while interannual variability has increased on one quarter of the land area mainly due to irrigation. It has decreased on only 8% of the land area, in areas downstream of reservoirs where consumptive water use is low. The impact of reservoirs is likely underestimated by our study as small reservoirs are not taken into account. Areas most affected by anthropogenic river flow alterations are the Western and Central USA, Mexico, the

  9. Impact of fire on global land surface air temperature and energy budget for the 20th century due to changes within ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Lawrence, David M.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Fire is a global phenomenon and tightly interacts with the biosphere and climate. This study provides the first quantitative assessment and understanding of fire’s influence on the global annual land surface air temperature and energy budget through its impact on terrestrial ecosystems. Fire impacts are quantified by comparing fire-on and fire-off simulations with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Results show that, for the 20th century average, fire-induced changes in terrestrial ecosystems significantly increase global land annual mean surface air temperature by 0.18 °C, decrease surface net radiation and latent heat flux by 1.08 W m-2 and 0.99 W m-2, respectively, and have limited influence on sensible heat flux (-0.11 W m-2) and ground heat flux (+0.02 W m-2). Fire impacts are most clearly seen in the tropical savannas. Our analyses suggest that fire increases surface air temperature predominantly by reducing latent heat flux, mainly due to fire-induced damage to the vegetation canopy, and decreases net radiation primarily because fire-induced surface warming significantly increases upward surface longwave radiation. This study provides an integrated estimate of fire and induced changes in ecosystems, climate, and energy budget at a global scale, and emphasizes the importance of a consistent and integrated understanding of fire effects.

  10. Countermeasures to Urban Heat Islands: A Global View

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan

    2006-07-17

    An important milestone was passed this year when the fraction of the world's population living in cities exceeded 50%. This shift from the countryside to urban areas is certain to continue and, for many, the destination will be large cities. Already there are over 400 cities with populations greater than one million inhabitants and twenty cities with populations greater than ten million inhabitants. With a growing fraction of the population living in an urban environment, the unique aspects of an urban climate also rise in importance. These include features like air pollution and increased humidity. Another unique feature of the urban climate is the phenomenon of the urban heat island. The urban heat island phenomenon was first observed over one hundred years ago in northern latitude cities, where the city centers were slightly warmer than the suburbs. (Instantaneous communications probably played a role in its identification, much as it did for other weather-related events.) For these cities, a heat island was generally a positive effect because it resulted in reduced heating requirements during the winters. It was only in the 1960s, as air conditioning and heavy reliance on automobiles grew, that the negative impacts of heat islands became apparent. The heat islands made summer conditions much less comfortable and increased air conditioning energy use. Since then the summer heat island has become the dominant environmental concern. Measurements in thousands of sites, plus the development of sophisticated dynamic simulations of urban air basins, has enabled us to better understand the relationships between urban temperatures, sunlight, and rates of formation of air pollutants. These models have also given us insights into the roles of vegetation and other characteristics of the land surface. More recently-roughly the last fifteen years-it has become possible to quantify the roles of the major features influencing the formation and persistence of urban heat islands

  11. Climate. Varying planetary heat sink led to global-warming slowdown and acceleration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianyao; Tung, Ka-Kit

    2014-08-22

    A vacillating global heat sink at intermediate ocean depths is associated with different climate regimes of surface warming under anthropogenic forcing: The latter part of the 20th century saw rapid global warming as more heat stayed near the surface. In the 21st century, surface warming slowed as more heat moved into deeper oceans. In situ and reanalyzed data are used to trace the pathways of ocean heat uptake. In addition to the shallow La Niña-like patterns in the Pacific that were the previous focus, we found that the slowdown is mainly caused by heat transported to deeper layers in the Atlantic and the Southern oceans, initiated by a recurrent salinity anomaly in the subpolar North Atlantic. Cooling periods associated with the latter deeper heat-sequestration mechanism historically lasted 20 to 35 years.

  12. Constraints on Pacific midplate swells from global depth-age and heat flow-age models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    Oceanic midplate swells are identified by shallow seafloor depths. In turn, models of the processes giving rise to these regions rely on assessments of how their depths, surface heat flow, and flexural properties differ from those for lithosphere which is presumed not to have been affected by these processes. Such comparisons have been inhibited because reference thermal models, which are assumed to describe unperturbed lithosphere, predict deeper depths and lower heat flow than typically observed for lithosphere older than 70 Ma. As a result, both depth and heat flow anomalies can be overestimated. To address this difficulty, we have derived model GDH1 (Global Depth and Heat flow) by joint fitting of heat flow and bathymetry. GDH1, which has a hotter and thinner lithosphere than previous models, fits the depth and heat flow data significantly better, including the data from older lithosphere previously treated as anomalous. It also provides an improved fit to depth-to-basement data for ocean drilling sites, and to geoid offsets across fracture zones. The improved fit occurs for depth-age data from both the DBDB-5 digital bathymetry, and from regional medians from ship tracks, which yield comparable depth-age curves. We use GDH1 to study three classes of midplate swells: the Hawaiian and other hot spot swells, the Darwin Rise area of widespread Cretaceous volcanism, and the Superswell, considered a present analogue to the Darwin Rise. Heat flow on the Hawaiian swell, though anomalously high with respect to previous reference models, is at most slightly high relative to GDH1. The situation is similar for the Bermuda, Cape Verde, and Crozet hot spots. The absence of a significant heat flow anomaly favors a primarily dynamic, rather than thermal, origin for these swells. Similarly, the present depths and heat flow for the Darwin Rise are consistent with GDH1, although they were anomalous with respect to previous reference models. The depth and heat flow data thus

  13. Short Time-Scale Enhancements to the Global Thermosphere Temperature and Nitric Oxide Content Resulting From Ionospheric Joule Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, D. R.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Hunt, L. A.; Sutton, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    The total Joule heating in the polar ionosphere can be derived from an empirical model of the electric fields and currents, using input measurements of the solar wind velocity and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In the thermosphere, measurements of the neutral density from accelerometers on the CHAMP and GRACE satellites are used to derive exospheric temperatures, showing that enhanced ionospheric energy dissipation produces elevated temperatures with little delay.Using the total ionospheric heating, changes in the global mean exosphere temperature as a function of time can be calculated with a simple differential equation. The results compare very well with the CHAMP and GRACE measurement. A critical part of the calculation is the rate at which the thermosphere cools after the ionospheric heating is reduced. It had been noted previously that events with significant levels of heating subsequently cool at a faster rate, and this cooling was attributed to enhanced nitric oxide emissions. This correlation with nitric oxide has been confirmed with very high correlations with measurements of nitric oxide emissions in the thermosphere, from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. These measurements were used in a recent improvement in the equations that calculate the thermosphere temperature. The global nitric oxide cooling rates are included in this calculation, and the predicted levels of nitric oxide, derived from the ionosphere heating model, match the SABER measurements very well, having correlation coefficients on the order of 0.9.These calculations are used to govern the sorting of measurements CHAMP and GRACE measurements, on the basis of the global temperature enhancements due to Joule heating, as well as various solar indices, and season. Global maps of the exospheric temperature are produced from these sorted data.

  14. A Simple Calorimetric Experiment that Highlights Aspects of Global Heat Retention and Global Warming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Joel D.; Johnston, Harold S.

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, general chemistry students measure the heating curves for three different systems: (i) 500 g of room-temperature water heated by a small desk lamp, (ii) 500 g of an ice-water mixture warmed by conduction with room-temperature surroundings, and (iii) 500 g of an ice-water mixture heated by a small desk lamp and by…

  15. A Simple Calorimetric Experiment that Highlights Aspects of Global Heat Retention and Global Warming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Joel D.; Johnston, Harold S.

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, general chemistry students measure the heating curves for three different systems: (i) 500 g of room-temperature water heated by a small desk lamp, (ii) 500 g of an ice-water mixture warmed by conduction with room-temperature surroundings, and (iii) 500 g of an ice-water mixture heated by a small desk lamp and by…

  16. Investigating sea level rise due to global warming in the teaching laboratory using Archimedes’ principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen; Pearce, Darren

    2015-11-01

    A teaching laboratory experiment is described that uses Archimedes’ principle to precisely investigate the effect of global warming on the oceans. A large component of sea level rise is due to the increase in the volume of water due to the decrease in water density with increasing temperature. Water close to 0 °C is placed in a beaker and a glass marble hung from an electronic balance immersed in the water. As the water warms, the weight of the marble increases as the water is less buoyant due to the decrease in density. In the experiment performed in this paper a balance with a precision of 0.1 mg was used with a marble 40.0 cm3 and mass of 99.3 g, yielding water density measurements with an average error of -0.008 ± 0.011%.

  17. Quantification of increased flood risk due to global climate change for urban river management planning.

    PubMed

    Morita, M

    2011-01-01

    Global climate change is expected to affect future rainfall patterns. These changes should be taken into account when assessing future flooding risks. This study presents a method for quantifying the increase in flood risk caused by global climate change for use in urban flood risk management. Flood risk in this context is defined as the product of flood damage potential and the probability of its occurrence. The study uses a geographic information system-based flood damage prediction model to calculate the flood damage caused by design storms with different return periods. Estimation of the monetary damages these storms produce and their return periods are precursors to flood risk calculations. The design storms are developed from modified intensity-duration-frequency relationships generated by simulations of global climate change scenarios (e.g. CGCM2A2). The risk assessment method is applied to the Kanda River basin in Tokyo, Japan. The assessment provides insights not only into the flood risk cost increase due to global warming, and the impact that increase may have on flood control infrastructure planning.

  18. The global tsunami hazard due to long return period subduction zone earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvholt, Finn; Bonnevie Harbitz, Carl; Glimsdal, Sylfest; Horspool, Nick; Smebye, Helge; de Bono, Andrea; Nadim, Farrokh

    2014-05-01

    Historical tsunamis and paleotsunami evidence indicate that massive megathrust earthquakes lead to the majority of the losses due to tsunamis. There is a need to quantify the tsunami hazard from megathrust events in order to compare tsunamis with other natural hazards on a global level, as previous attempts have been lacking. The global tsunami hazard induced by earthquakes is therefore computed for a return period of 500 years. To this end, the exposed elements at risk such as population, produced capital, and nuclear power plants are determined. It is shown that populous Asian countries account for the largest absolute number of people living in tsunami prone areas, more than 50% of the total exposed people live in Japan. Smaller nations like Macao and the Maldives are among the most exposed by population count. Exposed nuclear power plants are limited to Japan, China, India, Taiwan, and USA. The methods used to quantify the global hazard are obviously crude, and hence the expected accuracy using global methods are discussed.

  19. Global transcriptome analysis of the heat shock response ofshewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Sarah; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tinfeng; Wu, Liyou; Alm, Eric; Arkin, Adam P.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2004-04-30

    Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities. However, the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of S. oneidensis to survive and adapt to various environmentally relevant stresses is poorly understood. To define this organism's molecular response to elevated growth temperatures, temporal gene expression profiles were examined in cells subjected to heat stress using whole-genome DNA microarrays for S. oneidensis MR-1. Approximately 15 percent (711) of the predicted S. oneidensis genes represented on the microarray were significantly up- or down-regulated (P < 0.05) over a 25-min period following shift to the heat shock temperature (42 C). As expected, the majority of S. oneidensis genes exhibiting homology to known chaperones and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were highly and transiently induced. In addition, a number of predicted genes encoding enzymes in glycolys is and the pentose cycle, [NiFe] dehydrogenase, serine proteases, transcriptional regulators (MerR, LysR, and TetR families), histidine kinases, and hypothetical proteins were induced in response to heat stress. Genes encoding membrane proteins were differentially expressed, suggesting that cells possibly alter their membrane composition or structure in response to variations in growth temperature. A substantial number of the genes encoding ribosomal proteins displayed down-regulated co-expression patterns in response to heat stress, as did genes encoding prophage and flagellar proteins. Finally, based on computational comparative analysis of the upstream promoter regions of S.oneidensis heat-inducible genes, a putative regulatory motif, showing high conservation to the Escherichia coli sigma 32-binding consensus sequence, was identified.

  20. Vertical heat and salt fluxes due to resolved and parameterized meso-scale Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Storch, Jin-Song; Haak, Helmuth; Hertwig, Eileen; Fast, Irina

    2016-12-01

    Using a suite of simulations with the Max Planck Institute Ocean Model (MPIOM) at resolutions of about 0.1°, 0.4° and 1.5°, we study the impact of resolved and parameterized vertical eddy fluxes on the long-standing biases obtained when running MPIOM at low resolutions. In the 0.1° simulation, the eddy heat and salt fluxes have three features in common. First, their horizontal area averages are both upward, counteracting the downward fluxes due to time-mean circulations. Second, their divergences at intermediate depths are both negative, acting to cool and to freshen water masses, thereby reducing the major long-standing warm and saline biases of the low-resolution MPIOM at these depths. Third, both the heat and salt budgets are dominated by a balance between the divergence of eddy flux and that of mean flux. The vertical profiles of the tendency forcing due to parameterized eddies resemble those due to resolved eddies. This resemblance does not guarantee a bias reduction, as the tendency forcing terms are much less well compensated in the 0.4°- and 1.5°-simulation than in the 0.1°-simulation. When concentrating on the eddy-induced transports, we identify two situations in which the eddy effect is not appropriately represented by the GM-parameterization. One emphasizes the importance of the mean tracer distribution and the other the importance of the simulated isoneutral slope in determining the eddy-induced transports. Given the mean salinity distribution in the Southern ocean, characterized by a tongue of fresh Antarctic Intermediate Water, the salinity advection via eddy-induced transport tends to strengthen, rather than to weaken, the saline biases. Due to the density biases in a widened region of the Agulhas current in the low-resolution runs, the isoneutral slope vectors are erroneous and the large parameterized eddy-induced transports do not occur where they should.

  1. Variation in mouthguard thickness due to different heating conditions during fabrication: part 2.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Koide, Kaoru; Mizuhashi, Fumi

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine changes in the thickness of mouthguard sheets under different heating conditions during fabrication. Mouthguards were fabricated with polyolefin-polystyrene co-polymer (OS) and olefin co-polymer (OL) sheets (4.0-mm thick) utilizing a vacuum-forming machine under the following three conditions: (A) the sheet was moulded when it sagged 15 mm below the sheet frame (i.e. the normally used position); (B) the sheet frame was lowered to and heated at 30 mm below the top of the post and moulded when it sagged by 15 mm; and (C) the sheet frame was lowered to and heated at 50 mm below the top of the post and moulded when it sagged by 15 mm. The working model was trimmed to a height of 20 mm at the incisor and 15 mm at the first molar. Post-moulding thickness was determined for the incisal portion (incisal edge and labial surface) and molar portion (cusp, central groove and buccal surface). Dimensions were measured, and differences in the change in thickness due to heating condition were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Under condition C, OS and OL decreased in thickness from 0.36-0.54 mm to 0.26-0.30 mm, respectively, at the incisal portion and from 0.34-0.66 mm to 0.17-0.47 mm, respectively, at the molar portion. It may be clinically useful when moulding a mouthguard to maintain the thickness of the incisal and molar portions by adjusting the height of the sheet frame.

  2. Clarifying life lost due to cold and heat: a new approach using annual time series

    PubMed Central

    Rehill, Nirandeep; Armstrong, Ben; Wilkinson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective To clarify whether deaths associated with hot and cold days are among the frail who would have died anyway in the next few weeks or months. Design Time series regression analysis of annual deaths in relation to annual summaries of cold and heat. Setting London, UK. Participants 3 530 280 deaths from all natural causes among London residents between October 1949 and September 2006. Main outcome measures Change in annual risk of death (all natural cause, cardiovascular and respiratory) associated with each additional 1°C of average cold (or heat) below (above) the threshold (18°C) across each year. Results Cold years were associated with increased deaths from all causes. For each additional 1° of cold across the year, all-cause mortality increased by 2.3% (95% CI 0.7% to 3.8%), after adjustment for influenza and secular trends. The estimated association between hot years and all-cause mortality was very imprecise and thus inconclusive (effect estimate 1.7%, −2.9% to 6.5%). These estimates were broadly robust to changes in the way temperature and trend were modelled. Estimated risk increments using weekly data but otherwise comparable were cold: 2.0% (2.0% to 2.1%) and heat: 3.9% (3.4% to 3.8%). Conclusions In this London annual series, we saw an association of cold with mortality which was broadly similar in magnitude to that found in published daily studies and our own weekly analysis, suggesting that most deaths due to cold were among individuals who would not have died in the next 6 months. The estimated association with heat was imprecise, with the CI including magnitudes found in daily studies but also including zero. PMID:25877269

  3. Clarifying life lost due to cold and heat: a new approach using annual time series.

    PubMed

    Rehill, Nirandeep; Armstrong, Ben; Wilkinson, Paul

    2015-04-15

    To clarify whether deaths associated with hot and cold days are among the frail who would have died anyway in the next few weeks or months. Time series regression analysis of annual deaths in relation to annual summaries of cold and heat. London, UK. 3 530 280 deaths from all natural causes among London residents between October 1949 and September 2006. Change in annual risk of death (all natural cause, cardiovascular and respiratory) associated with each additional 1°C of average cold (or heat) below (above) the threshold (18°C) across each year. Cold years were associated with increased deaths from all causes. For each additional 1° of cold across the year, all-cause mortality increased by 2.3% (95% CI 0.7% to 3.8%), after adjustment for influenza and secular trends. The estimated association between hot years and all-cause mortality was very imprecise and thus inconclusive (effect estimate 1.7%, -2.9% to 6.5%). These estimates were broadly robust to changes in the way temperature and trend were modelled. Estimated risk increments using weekly data but otherwise comparable were cold: 2.0% (2.0% to 2.1%) and heat: 3.9% (3.4% to 3.8%). In this London annual series, we saw an association of cold with mortality which was broadly similar in magnitude to that found in published daily studies and our own weekly analysis, suggesting that most deaths due to cold were among individuals who would not have died in the next 6 months. The estimated association with heat was imprecise, with the CI including magnitudes found in daily studies but also including zero. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Nonlinear expansion and heating of a nonneutral electron plasma due to elastic collisions with background neutral gas

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Chao, E.H.

    1996-07-01

    This paper investigates theoretically the heating and nonlinear expansion of a nonneutral electron plasma due to elastic collisions with constant collision frequency {nu}{sub {ital en}} between the plasma electrons and a background neutral gas. The model treats the electrons as a strongly magnetized fluid ({omega}{sub {ital pe}}{sup 2}/{omega}{sub {ital ce}}{sup 2}{lt}1) immersed in a uniform magnetic field {ital B}{sub 0}{ital {bold {cflx e}}}{sub {ital z}}. The model also assumes an axisymmetric plasma column ({partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}{theta}=0) with negligible axial variation ({partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}{ital z}=0), and that the process of heat conduction is sufficiently fast that the electrons have relaxed through electron-electron collisions to a quasi-equilibrium state with scalar pressure {ital P}({ital r},{ital t})={ital n}({ital r},{ital t}){ital T}, and isothermal temperature {ital T}. Assuming that the electrons undergo elastic collisions with infinitely massive background gas atoms, global energy conservation is used to calculate the electron heating rate, {ital dT}({ital t})/{ital dt}, as the plasma column expands on a time scale {tau}{sub {ital diff}}{approximately}({omega}{sub {ital pe}}{sup 2}{nu}{sub {ital en}}/{omega}{sub {ital ce}}{sup 2} ){sup {minus}1}, and the electrostatic potential energy decreases. Coupled dynamical equations that describe the nonlinear evolution of the mean-square column radius {ital r}{sup 2}{sub 0}({ital t}) and electron temperature {ital T}({ital t}) are derived and solved numerically. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. An attempt to estimate the global burden of disease due to fluoride in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Fewtrell, Lorna; Smith, Stuart; Kay, Dave; Bartram, Jamie

    2006-12-01

    A study was conducted to examine the feasibility of estimating the global burden of disease due to fluoride in drinking water. Skeletal fluorosis is a serious and debilitating disease which, with the exception of one area in China, is overwhelmingly due to the presence of elevated fluoride levels in drinking water. The global burden of disease due to fluoride in drinking water was estimated by combining exposure-response curves for dental and skeletal fluorosis (derived from published data) with model-derived predicted drinking water fluoride concentrations and an estimate of the percentage population exposed. There are few data with which to validate the output but given the current uncertainties in the data used, both to form the exposure-response curves and those resulting from the prediction of fluoride concentrations, it is felt that the estimate is unlikely to be precise. However, the exercise has identified a number of data gaps and useful research avenues, especially in relation to determining exposure, which could contribute to future estimates of this problem.

  6. Global-scale analysis of river flow alterations due to water withdrawals and reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döll, P.; Fiedler, K.; Zhang, J.

    2009-07-01

    Global-scale information on natural river flows and anthropogenic river flow alterations is required to identify areas where aqueous ecosystems are expected to be strongly degraded. Such information can support the identification of environmental flow guidelines and a sustainable water management that balances the water demands of humans and ecosystems. This study presents the first global assessment of the anthropogenic alteration of river flow regimes by water withdrawals and dams, focusing in particular on the change of flow variability. Six ecologically relevant flow indicators were quantified using an improved version of the global water model WaterGAP. WaterGAP simulated, with a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree, river discharge as affected by human water withdrawals and dams, as well as naturalized discharge without this type of human interference. Mainly due to irrigation, long-term average river discharge and statistical low flow Q90 (monthly river discharge that is exceeded in 9 out of 10 months) have decreased by more than 10% on one sixth and one quarter of the global land area (excluding Antarctica and Greenland), respectively. Q90 has increased significantly on only 5% of the land area, downstream of reservoirs. Due to both water withdrawals and dams, seasonal flow amplitude has decreased significantly on one sixth of the land area, while interannual variability has increased on one quarter of the land area mainly due to irrigation. It has decreased on only 8% of the land area, in areas with little consumptive water use that are downstream of dams. Areas most affected by anthropogenic river flow alterations are the western and central USA, Mexico, the western coast of South America, the Mediterranean rim, Southern Africa, the semi-arid and arid countries of the Near East and Western Asia, Pakistan and India, Northern China and the Australian Murray-Darling Basin, as well as some Arctic rivers. Due to a large number of uncertainties related e.g. to the

  7. Numerical analysis of temperature distribution due to basement radiogenic heat production, St. Lawrence Lowlands, eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hejuan; Giroux, Bernard; Harris, Lyal B.; Mansour, John

    2017-04-01

    Although eastern Canada is considered as having a low potential for high-temperature geothermal resources, the possibility for additional localized radioactive heat sources in Mesoproterozoic Grenvillian basement to parts of the Palaeozoic St. Lawrence Lowlands in Quebec, Canada, suggests that this potential should be reassessed. However, such a task remains hard to achieve due to scarcity of heat flow data and ambiguity about the nature of the basement. To get an appraisal, the impact of radiogenic heat production for different Grenville Province crystalline basement units on temperature distribution at depth was simulated using the Underworld Geothermal numerical modelling code. The region south of Trois-Rivières was selected as representative for the St. Lawrence Lowlands. An existing 3D geological model based on well log data, seismic profiles and surface geology was used to build a catalogue of plausible thermal models. Statistical analyses of radiogenic element (U, Th, K) concentrations from neighbouring outcropping Grenville domains indicate that the radiogenic heat production of rocks in the modelled region is in the range of 0.34-3.24 μW/m3, with variations in the range of 0.94-5.83 μW/m3 for the Portneuf-Mauricie (PM) Domain, 0.02-4.13 μW/m3 for the Shawinigan Domain (Morin Terrane), and 0.34-1.96 μW/m3 for the Parc des Laurentides (PDL) Domain. Various scenarios considering basement characteristics similar to the PM domain, Morin Terrane and PDL Domain were modelled. The results show that the temperature difference between the scenarios can be as much as 12 °C at a depth of 5 km. The results also show that the temperature distribution is strongly affected by both the concentration of radiogenic elements and the thermal conductivity of the basement rocks. The thermal conductivity in the basement affects the trend of temperature change between two different geological units, and the spatial extent of thermal anomalies. The validity of the results was

  8. Toward a Quantitative Estimate of Future Heat Wave Mortality under Global Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Roger D.; Bobb, Jennifer F.; Tebaldi, Claudia; McDaniel, Larry; Bell, Michelle L.; Dominici, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    Background Climate change is anticipated to affect human health by changing the distribution of known risk factors. Heat waves have had debilitating effects on human mortality, and global climate models predict an increase in the frequency and severity of heat waves. The extent to which climate change will harm human health through changes in the distribution of heat waves and the sources of uncertainty in estimating these effects have not been studied extensively. Objectives We estimated the future excess mortality attributable to heat waves under global climate change for a major U.S. city. Methods We used a database comprising daily data from 1987 through 2005 on mortality from all nonaccidental causes, ambient levels of particulate matter and ozone, temperature, and dew point temperature for the city of Chicago, Illinois. We estimated the associations between heat waves and mortality in Chicago using Poisson regression models. Results Under three different climate change scenarios for 2081–2100 and in the absence of adaptation, the city of Chicago could experience between 166 and 2,217 excess deaths per year attributable to heat waves, based on estimates from seven global climate models. We noted considerable variability in the projections of annual heat wave mortality; the largest source of variation was the choice of climate model. Conclusions The impact of future heat waves on human health will likely be profound, and significant gains can be expected by lowering future carbon dioxide emissions. PMID:21193384

  9. More Than Taking the Heat: Crops and Global Change

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grain production per unit of land will need to more than double over this century to address rising population and demand. This at a time when the procedures that have delivered increased yields over the past 50 years may have reached their ceiling. Rising global temperature and more frequent drough...

  10. Global Warming: If You Can't Stand the Heat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    Global warming is the progressive, gradual rise of the earth's average surface temperature, thought to be caused in part by increased concentrations of "greenhouse" gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere. According to the National Academy of Sciences, the Earth's temperature has risen by about one degree Fahrenheit in the past century, with accelerated…

  11. Global Warming: If You Can't Stand the Heat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    Global warming is the progressive, gradual rise of the earth's average surface temperature, thought to be caused in part by increased concentrations of "greenhouse" gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere. According to the National Academy of Sciences, the Earth's temperature has risen by about one degree Fahrenheit in the past century, with accelerated…

  12. Quantifying Biodiversity Losses Due to Human Consumption: A Global-Scale Footprint Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilting, Harry C; Schipper, Aafke M; Bakkenes, Michel; Meijer, Johan R; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2017-03-21

    It is increasingly recognized that human consumption leads to considerable losses of biodiversity. This study is the first to systematically quantify these losses in relation to land use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production and consumption of (inter)nationally traded goods and services by presenting consumption-based biodiversity losses, in short biodiversity footprint, for 45 countries and world regions globally. Our results showed that (i) the biodiversity loss per citizen shows large variations among countries, with higher values when per-capita income increases; (ii) the share of biodiversity losses due to GHG emissions in the biodiversity footprint increases with income; (iii) food consumption is the most important driver of biodiversity loss in most of the countries and regions, with a global average of 40%; (iv) more than 50% of the biodiversity loss associated with consumption in developed economies occurs outside their territorial boundaries; and (v) the biodiversity footprint per dollar consumed is lower for wealthier countries. The insights provided by our analysis might support policymakers in developing adequate responses to avert further losses of biodiversity when population and incomes increase. Both the mitigation of GHG emissions and land use related reduction options in production and consumption should be considered in strategies to protect global biodiversity.

  13. Transient Convection Due to Imposed Heat Flux: Application to Liquid-Acquisition Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Chato, David J.; Doherty, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    A model problem is considered that addresses the effect of heat load from an ambient laboratory environment on the temperature rise of liquid nitrogen inside an enclosure. This model has applications to liquid acquisition devices inside the cryogenic storage tanks used to transport vapor-free propellant to the main engine. We show that heat loads from Q = 0.001 to 10 W, with corresponding Rayleigh numbers from Ra = 109 to 1013, yield a range of unsteady convective states and temperature rise in the liquid. The results show that Q = 1 to 10 W (Ra = 1012 to 1013) yield temperature distributions along the enclosure height that are similar in trend to experimental measurements. Unsteady convection, which shows selfsimilarity in its planforms, is predicted for the range of heat-load conditions. The onset of convection occurs from a free-convection-dominated base flow that becomes unstable against convective instability generated at the bottom of the enclosure while the top of the enclosure is convectively stable. A number of modes are generated with small-scale thermals at the bottom of the enclosure in which the flow selforganizes into two symmetric modes prior to the onset of the propagation of the instability. These symmetric vertical modes transition to asymmetric modes that propagate as a traveling-wave-type motion of convective modes and are representative of the asymptotic convective state of the flow field. Intense vorticity production is created in the core of the flow field due to the fact that there is shear instability between the vertical and horizontal modes. For the higher Rayleigh numbers, 1012 to 1013, there is a transition from a stationary to a nonstationary response time signal of the flow and temperature fields with a mean value that increases with time over various time bands and regions of the enclosure.

  14. Global existence and asymptotic stability for a nonlinear integrodifferential equation modeling heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, Deborah

    1989-06-01

    Initial value problems were studied that arise from models for 1-D heat flow (with finite wave speeds) in materials with memory. Under assumptions that ensure compatibility of the constitutive relations with the second law of thermodynamics, the resulting integrodifferential equation is hyperbolic near equilibrium. The existence is established of unique, global (in time) defined, classical solutions to the problems under consideration, provided the data are smooth and sufficiently close to equilibrium. Both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions are treated as well as the problem on the entire real line. Local existence is proved using a contraction mapping argument which involves estimates for linear hyperbolic PDE's with variable coefficients. Global existence is obtained by deriving a priori energy estimates. These estimates are based on inequalities for strongly positive Volterra kernels (including a new inequality that is needed due to the form of the constitutive relations). Furthermore, compatibility with the second law plays an essential role in the proof in order to obtain an existence result under less restrictive assumptions on the data.

  15. Flow and Heat Transfer in a Newtonian Nanoliquid due to a Curved Stretching Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddheshwar, Pradeep Ganapathi; Nerolu, Meenakshi; Pažanin, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Flow of a Newtonian nanoliquid due to a curved stretching sheet and heat transfer in it is studied. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients by using a similarity transformation. The flow characteristics are studied using plots of flow velocity components and the skin-friction coefficient as a function of suction-injection parameter, curvature, and volume fraction. Prescribed surface temperature and prescribed surface heat flux are considered for studying the temperature distribution in the flow. The thermophysical properties of 20 nanoliquids are considered in the investigation by modeling them through the use of phenomenological laws and mixture theory. The results of the corresponding problem involving a plane stretching sheet is obtained as a particular case of those obtained in the present paper. Skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are evaluated and it is observed that skin friction coefficient decreases with concentration of nanoparticles in the absence as well as presence of suction where as Nusselt number increases with increase in concentration of nanoparticles in a dilute range.

  16. Global premature mortality due to anthropogenic outdoor air pollution and the contribution of past climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Raquel A.; West, J. Jason; Zhang, Yuqiang; Anenberg, Susan C.; Lamarque, Jean-François; Shindell, Drew T.; Collins, William J.; Dalsoren, Stig; Faluvegi, Greg; Folberth, Gerd; Horowitz, Larry W.; Nagashima, Tatsuya; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, Steven; Skeie, Ragnhild; Sudo, Kengo; Takemura, Toshihiko; Bergmann, Daniel; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Cionni, Irene; Doherty, Ruth M.; Eyring, Veronika; Josse, Beatrice; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Righi, Mattia; Stevenson, David S.; Strode, Sarah; Szopa, Sophie; Zeng, Guang

    2013-09-01

    Increased concentrations of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) since preindustrial times reflect increased emissions, but also contributions of past climate change. Here we use modeled concentrations from an ensemble of chemistry-climate models to estimate the global burden of anthropogenic outdoor air pollution on present-day premature human mortality, and the component of that burden attributable to past climate change. Using simulated concentrations for 2000 and 1850 and concentration-response functions (CRFs), we estimate that, at present, 470 000 (95% confidence interval, 140 000 to 900 000) premature respiratory deaths are associated globally and annually with anthropogenic ozone, and 2.1 (1.3 to 3.0) million deaths with anthropogenic PM2.5-related cardiopulmonary diseases (93%) and lung cancer (7%). These estimates are smaller than ones from previous studies because we use modeled 1850 air pollution rather than a counterfactual low concentration, and because of different emissions. Uncertainty in CRFs contributes more to overall uncertainty than the spread of model results. Mortality attributed to the effects of past climate change on air quality is considerably smaller than the global burden: 1500 (-20 000 to 27 000) deaths yr-1 due to ozone and 2200 (-350 000 to 140 000) due to PM2.5. The small multi-model means are coincidental, as there are larger ranges of results for individual models, reflected in the large uncertainties, with some models suggesting that past climate change has reduced air pollution mortality.

  17. A new global anthropogenic heat estimation based on high-resolution nighttime light data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wangming; Luan, Yibo; Liu, Xiaolei; Yu, Xiaoyong; Miao, Lijuan; Cui, Xuefeng

    2017-08-22

    Consumption of fossil fuel resources leads to global warming and climate change. Apart from the negative impact of greenhouse gases on the climate, the increasing emission of anthropogenic heat from energy consumption also brings significant impacts on urban ecosystems and the surface energy balance. The objective of this work is to develop a new method of estimating the global anthropogenic heat budget and validate it on the global scale with a high precision and resolution dataset. A statistical algorithm was applied to estimate the annual mean anthropogenic heat (AH-DMSP) from 1992 to 2010 at 1×1 km(2) spatial resolution for the entire planet. AH-DMSP was validated for both provincial and city scales, and results indicate that our dataset performs well at both scales. Compared with other global anthropogenic heat datasets, the AH-DMSP has a higher precision and finer spatial distribution. Although there are some limitations, the AH-DMSP could provide reliable, multi-scale anthropogenic heat information, which could be used for further research on regional or global climate change and urban ecosystems.

  18. Inferring the State of Tidally-heated Satellite Ice Shells from Global Shape Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Thomas, P. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Moore, W. B.

    2006-12-01

    Several icy satellites of the outer solar system, notably Europa and Enceladus, are sufficiently tidally heated that they likely possess ice shells overlying oceans. Because tidal heating varies spatially [1], variations in ice shell thickness are likely to occur [2]. Lateral variations in shell thickness will in turn give rise to global topographic variations. The amplitude of this long-wavelength topography is potentially comparable to shape variations due to tidal and rotational stresses [3]. Thus, careful measurement of satellite shapes from limb profiles may be used to infer the nature of shell thickness variations, and thus the state of the ice shell. We demonstrate that limb profiles of Europa give no evidence for lateral shell thickness variations, in contrast to theoretical predictions [2] for a conductive ice shell above liquid water. There are two possible explanations: 1) the ice shell is sufficiently thick (> ~10 km) that lateral shell flow has smoothed out any variations; 2) the shell is heated mainly from below, resulting in a uniform, thin (~3 km) shell. Based on local topography from limb profiles and stereo topography [4] we favour the former explanation: a constant shell thickness rules out isostatic support, and the thin shell model is unable to flexurally support topography with amplitudes of ~1 km. Given sufficiently good limb profiles, a similar analysis may be carried out for Enceladus. Lateral variations in ice shell thickness also affect the tendency of a satellite to reorient itself [5]; thus, reorientation of Enceladus [6] may provide another constraint on the nature of the ice shell there. [1] G. Tobie et al., Icarus 177, 534-549, 2005. [2] Ojakangas and Stevenson, Icarus 81, 220-241, 1989 [3] Murray and Dermott, Solar System Dynamics, 2000 [4] Prockter and Schenk, Icarus 177, 305-326, 2005. [5] Ojakangas and Stevenson, Icarus 81, 242-270, 1989 [6] Nimmo and Pappalardo, Nature 441, 614-616, 2006.

  19. Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M Z

    2001-02-08

    Aerosols affect the Earth's temperature and climate by altering the radiative properties of the atmosphere. A large positive component of this radiative forcing from aerosols is due to black carbon--soot--that is released from the burning of fossil fuel and biomass, and, to a lesser extent, natural fires, but the exact forcing is affected by how black carbon is mixed with other aerosol constituents. From studies of aerosol radiative forcing, it is known that black carbon can exist in one of several possible mixing states; distinct from other aerosol particles (externally mixed) or incorporated within them (internally mixed), or a black-carbon core could be surrounded by a well mixed shell. But so far it has been assumed that aerosols exist predominantly as an external mixture. Here I simulate the evolution of the chemical composition of aerosols, finding that the mixing state and direct forcing of the black-carbon component approach those of an internal mixture, largely due to coagulation and growth of aerosol particles. This finding implies a higher positive forcing from black carbon than previously thought, suggesting that the warming effect from black carbon may nearly balance the net cooling effect of other anthropogenic aerosol constituents. The magnitude of the direct radiative forcing from black carbon itself exceeds that due to CH4, suggesting that black carbon may be the second most important component of global warming after CO2 in terms of direct forcing.

  20. Correlations for Boundary-Layer Transition on Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle Due to Heat-Shield Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Liechty, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of cavities (for attachment bolts) on the heat-shield of the proposed Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle has been investigated experimentally and computationally in order to develop a criterion for assessing whether the boundary layer becomes turbulent downstream of the cavity. Wind tunnel tests were conducted on the 70-deg sphere-cone vehicle geometry with various cavity sizes and locations in order to assess their influence on convective heating and boundary layer transition. Heat-transfer coefficients and boundary-layer states (laminar, transitional, or turbulent) were determined using global phosphor thermography.

  1. An examination of heat rate improvements due to waste heat integration in an oxycombustion pulverized coal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Joshua M.

    Oxyfuel, or oxycombustion, technology has been proposed as one carbon capture technology for coal-fired power plants. An oxycombustion plant would fire coal in an oxidizer consisting primarily of CO2, oxygen, and water vapor. Flue gas with high CO2 concentrations is produced and can be compressed for sequestration. Since this compression generates large amounts of heat, it was theorized that this heat could be utilized elsewhere in the plant. Process models of the oxycombustion boiler, steam cycle, and compressors were created in ASPEN Plus and Excel to test this hypothesis. Using these models, heat from compression stages was integrated to the flue gas recirculation heater, feedwater heaters, and to a fluidized bed coal dryer. All possible combinations of these heat sinks were examined, with improvements in coal flow rate, Qcoal, net power, and unit heat rate being noted. These improvements would help offset the large efficiency impacts inherent to oxycombustion technology.

  2. Intensity of heat stress in winter wheat—phenology compensates for the adverse effect of global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyshi Rezaei, Ehsan; Siebert, Stefan; Ewert, Frank

    2015-02-01

    Higher temperatures during the growing season are likely to reduce crop yields with implications for crop production and food security. The negative impact of heat stress has also been predicted to increase even further for cereals such as wheat under climate change. Previous empirical modeling studies have focused on the magnitude and frequency of extreme events during the growth period but did not consider the effect of higher temperature on crop phenology. Based on an extensive set of climate and phenology observations for Germany and period 1951-2009, interpolated to 1 × 1 km resolution and provided as supplementary data to this article (available at stacks.iop.org/ERL/10/024012/mmedia), we demonstrate a strong relationship between the mean temperature in spring and the day of heading (DOH) of winter wheat. We show that the cooling effect due to the 14 days earlier DOH almost fully compensates for the adverse effect of global warming on frequency and magnitude of crop heat stress. Earlier heading caused by the warmer spring period can prevent exposure to extreme heat events around anthesis, which is the most sensitive growth stage to heat stress. Consequently, the intensity of heat stress around anthesis in winter crops cultivated in Germany may not increase under climate change even if the number and duration of extreme heat waves increase. However, this does not mean that global warning would not harm crop production because of other impacts, e.g. shortening of the grain filling period. Based on the trends for the last 34 years in Germany, heat stress (stress thermal time) around anthesis would be 59% higher in year 2009 if the effect of high temperatures on accelerating wheat phenology were ignored. We conclude that climate impact assessments need to consider both the effect of high temperature on grain set at anthesis but also on crop phenology.

  3. Variations and Trends in Health Burden of Visual Impairment Due to Cataract: A Global Analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Wang, Wei; Huang, Wenyong

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the global trends in health burden of people visually impaired from cataract in terms of disability-adjusted life years (DALY) and its correlations with national levels of socioeconomic development. Global, regional, and national DALY numbers, crude rate, and age-standardized rate of cataract vision loss by age and sex were obtained from the database of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The human development index, per capita gross domestic product, and other country-level data were derived from international open databases. Regression analysis was used to assess the correlations between age-standardized DALY rate and socioeconomic variables. The global DALY numbers of cataract vision loss increased by 89.42%, from 2048.18 (95%CI [confidence interval]: 1457.60-2761.80) thousands in 1990 to 3879.74 (95% CI: 2766.07-5232.43) thousands in 2015 (P < 0.001). Females had higher DALY number 315.83 (95%CI: 237.17-394.4) and crude rate 38.29 (95%CI: 35.35-41.23) after adjusting for age and country (all P < 0.001). The age-standardized DALY rate was higher in countries with low human development index (HDI), with 91.03 (95%CI: 73.04-108.75) for low HDI, 81.67 (95%CI: 53.24-108.82) for medium HDI, 55.89 (95%CI: 36.87-69.63) for high HDI, and 17.10 (95%CI: 13.91-26.84) for very high HDI countries (P < 0.01), respectively. The national age-standardized DALY rates in 2015 were negatively associated with both HDI (R2 = 0.489, P < 0.001) and per capita gross domestic product (R2 = 0.331, P < 0.001). Stepwise multiple regression showed that HDI was significantly correlated with national age-standardized DALY rates in 2015 after adjusting for other confounding factors (P < 0.001). The global health burden of vision loss due to cataract increased between 1990 and 2015 despite considerable efforts from the World Health Organization and VISION 2020 initiatives.

  4. Biophysical Climate Forcings due to Recent Changes in Global Forest Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescatti, A.; Alkama, R.

    2015-12-01

    Deforestation impacts climate in two major ways: affecting the atmospheric CO2 concentration and modulating the land-atmosphere fluxes of energy and water vapor. Given the important role of forests in the global carbon cycle, climate treaties account for land-based mitigation options like afforestation, reforestation and avoided deforestation or forest degradation. On the contrary, predicted climate impacts of biophysical processes, such as the exchange of energy and water vapor, are still uncertain in sign and magnitude, and therefore have not been considered in climate negotiations to date. Direct observations of the biophysical climate effects of forest losses and gains are therefore required to constrain model predictions, reduce the uncertainty of model ensembles, and provide robust recommendations to climate policy. In this work we report an observation-driven global analysis of the biophysical impacts of forest losses and gains on the local climate, based on a combination of Earth observations of recent changes in forest cover, surface radiometric temperatures and in-situ air temperatures. Our study documents that deforestation causes local changes in skin and air temperature that varies in sign and magnitude according to the climate zone. Results show that forest losses amplify the diurnal temperature variation and increase the mean and maximum air temperature, with the largest signal in arid zones, followed by temperate, tropical and boreal zones. In the decade 2003-2012, variations of forest cover generated a global biophysical warming corresponding to 31% of the biogeochemical signal due to CO2 emission from land use change. These experimental evidences provide a global and robust quantification of the local climate sensitivities to deforestation and a novel assessment of the mitigation potentials of forests on mean/maximum air temperatures and on the diurnal temperature variations. Overall, the observation-driven, global quantification of the

  5. Factors Contributing to Urban Heat Island Development: A Global Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, W.; Snyder, P. K.; Twine, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) are the result of the urban core of a city encountering temperatures that are warmer than the surrounding rural areas. Temperature in the urban core can be 2-5°C warmer during the day and as much as 10°C warmer at night compared to outlying areas. This modification of the local climate can contribute to significant health-related impacts during heat waves, increased energy consumption, a decrease in air quality, deteriorating urban ecosystems, and enhancing the thermal pollution into urban water bodies. To understand the mechanisms contributing to the formation of UHIs and to identify sound mitigation strategies requires examining the UHIs of cities around the world to look for factors that enhance or minimize the heat island effect. Numerous factors influence the strength of the UHI, and vary from city to city. Population size and density influence the magnitude and spatial extent of the UHI. The ecosystem in which the city resides affects the rural climatology. Regional weather patterns can also influence the development of UHIs, with the frequency of certain types of weather conducive to the development of strong UHIs. Local geography such as proximity to water bodies and topography can influence UHI development. Cultural and regional influences such as the use of certain types of building materials, architecture, and the density of vegetation can all contribute towards the strength of a city's UHI. To better understand how UHIs develop and to understand the factors that influence them, we have undertaken the Islands in the Sun project, which includes an analysis of the UHIs of the largest cities in the world. In this study we examine how different factors have influenced the structure of the UHI and to identify factors that can mitigate and minimize their impact. Here we present a preliminary analysis of four metropolitan areas: Minneapolis-St. Paul, Buenos Aires, Riyadh, and Jakarta. In this study we investigate how various factors

  6. Cross-tolerance effects due to adult heat hardening, desiccation and starvation acclimation of tropical drosophilid-Zaprionus indianus.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Bhawna; Tamang, Aditya Moktan; Parkash, Ravi

    2017-07-01

    Some insect taxa from polar or temperate habitats have shown cross-tolerance for multiple stressors but tropical insect taxa have received less attention. Accordingly, we considered adult flies of a tropical drosophilid-Zaprionus indianus for testing direct as well as cross-tolerance effects of rapid heat hardening (HH), desiccation acclimation (DA) and starvation acclimation (SA) after rearing under warmer and drier season specific simulated conditions. We observed significant direct acclimation effects of HH, DA and SA; and four cases of cross-tolerance effects but no cross-tolerance between desiccation and starvation. Cross-tolerance due to heat hardening on desiccation showed 20% higher effect than its reciprocal effect. There is greater reduction of water loss in heat hardened flies (due to increase in amount of cuticular lipids) as compared with desiccation acclimated flies. However, cross-tolerance effect of SA on heat knockdown was two times higher than its reciprocal. Heat hardened and desiccation acclimated adult flies showed substantial increase in the level of trehalose and proline while body lipids increased due to heat hardening or starvation acclimation. However, maximum increase in energy metabolites was stressor specific i.e. trehalose due to DA; proline due to HH and total body lipids due to SA. Rapid changes in energy metabolites due to heat hardening seem compensatory for possible depletion of trehalose and proline due to desiccation stress; and body lipids due to starvation stress. Thus, observed cross-tolerance effects in Z. indianus represent physiological changes to cope with multiple stressors related to warmer and drier subtropical habitats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Constitutive relationships and physical basis of fault strength due to flash heating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Goldsby, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    We develop a model of fault strength loss resulting from phase change at asperity contacts due to flash heating that considers a distribution of contact sizes and nonsteady state evolution of fault strength with displacement. Laboratory faulting experiments conducted at high sliding velocities, which show dramatic strength reduction below the threshold for bulk melting, are well fit by the model. The predicted slip speed for the onset of weakening is in the range of 0.05 to 2 m/s, qualitatively consistent with the limited published observations. For this model, earthquake stress drops and effective shear fracture energy should be linearly pressure-dependent, whereas the onset speed may be pressure-independent or weakly pressure-dependent. On the basis of the theory, flash weakening is expected to produce large dynamic stress drops, small effective shear fracture energy, and undershoot. Estimates of the threshold slip speed, stress drop, and fracture energy are uncertain due to poor knowledge of the average ontact dimension, shear zone thickness and gouge particle size at seismogenic depths. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Methodological framework for projecting the potential loss of intraspecific genetic diversity due to global climate change

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While research on the impact of global climate change (GCC) on ecosystems and species is flourishing, a fundamental component of biodiversity – molecular variation – has not yet received its due attention in such studies. Here we present a methodological framework for projecting the loss of intraspecific genetic diversity due to GCC. Methods The framework consists of multiple steps that combines 1) hierarchical genetic clustering methods to define comparable units of inference, 2) species accumulation curves (SAC) to infer sampling completeness, and 3) species distribution modelling (SDM) to project the genetic diversity loss under GCC. We suggest procedures for existing data sets as well as specifically designed studies. We illustrate the approach with two worked examples from a land snail (Trochulus villosus) and a caddisfly (Smicridea (S.) mucronata). Results Sampling completeness was diagnosed on the third coarsest haplotype clade level for T. villosus and the second coarsest for S. mucronata. For both species, a substantial species range loss was projected under the chosen climate scenario. However, despite substantial differences in data set quality concerning spatial sampling and sampling depth, no loss of haplotype clades due to GCC was predicted for either species. Conclusions The suggested approach presents a feasible method to tap the rich resources of existing phylogeographic data sets and guide the design and analysis of studies explicitly designed to estimate the impact of GCC on a currently still neglected level of biodiversity. PMID:23176586

  9. Methodological framework for projecting the potential loss of intraspecific genetic diversity due to global climate change.

    PubMed

    Pfenninger, Markus; Bálint, Miklós; Pauls, Steffen U

    2012-11-24

    While research on the impact of global climate change (GCC) on ecosystems and species is flourishing, a fundamental component of biodiversity - molecular variation - has not yet received its due attention in such studies. Here we present a methodological framework for projecting the loss of intraspecific genetic diversity due to GCC. The framework consists of multiple steps that combines 1) hierarchical genetic clustering methods to define comparable units of inference, 2) species accumulation curves (SAC) to infer sampling completeness, and 3) species distribution modelling (SDM) to project the genetic diversity loss under GCC. We suggest procedures for existing data sets as well as specifically designed studies. We illustrate the approach with two worked examples from a land snail (Trochulus villosus) and a caddisfly (Smicridea (S.) mucronata). Sampling completeness was diagnosed on the third coarsest haplotype clade level for T. villosus and the second coarsest for S. mucronata. For both species, a substantial species range loss was projected under the chosen climate scenario. However, despite substantial differences in data set quality concerning spatial sampling and sampling depth, no loss of haplotype clades due to GCC was predicted for either species. The suggested approach presents a feasible method to tap the rich resources of existing phylogeographic data sets and guide the design and analysis of studies explicitly designed to estimate the impact of GCC on a currently still neglected level of biodiversity.

  10. January and July global distributions of atmospheric heating for 1986, 1987, and 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaack, Todd K.; Johnson, Donald R.

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional global distributions of atmospheric heating are estimated for January and July of the 3-year period 1986-88 from the European Center for Medium Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) assimilated datasets. Emphasis is placed on the interseasonal and interannual variability of heating both locally and regionally. Large fluctuations in the magnitude of heating and the disposition of maxima/minima in the Tropics occur over the 3-year period. This variability, which is largely in accord with anomalous precipitation expected during the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle, appears realistic. In both January and July, interannual differences of 1.0-1.5 K/day in the vertically averaged heating occur over the tropical Pacific. These interannual regional differences are substantial in comparison with maximum monthly averaged heating rates of 2.0-2.5 K/day. In the extratropics, the most prominent interannual variability occurs along the wintertime North Atlantic cyclone track. Vertical profiles of heating from selected regions also reveal large interannual variability. Clearly evident is the modulation of the heating within tropical regions of deep moist convection associated with the evolution of the ENSO cycle. The heating integrated over continental and oceanic basins emphasizes the impact of land and ocean surfaces on atmospheric energy balance and depicts marked interseasonal and interannual large-scale variability.

  11. Global Coastal Exposure due to Sea-level Rise beyond Tipping Points with Multiple Warming Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawatari, R.; Iseri, Y.; Kiguchi, M.; Kanae, S.

    2016-12-01

    Sea-level is observed and estimated to continue rising. In the future, the rise could be abrupt and irreversible in century to millennial timescale even if we conduct strong reduction of greenhouse gas emission. Greenland ice sheet and West Antarctic ice sheet are considered as attributable climate systems which would significantly enhance presently-projected sea-level rise by several meters if global mean temperature passes certain "Tipping points" which would exist around +1-5 degree Celsius above present temperature (1980-1999 average). Therefore, vulnerable coastal low-lying area, especially small islands, deltas or poor developing countries, would suffer from semi-permanent inundation and forced to counteract due to the enhanced sea-level rise. This study estimate range of sea-level rise until the year 2300 and 3000 considering excess of tipping points with using multiple levels of temperature scenarios which consist of excess tipping points and non-excess tipping points pathways. We extract state-of-the-art knowledge of tipping elements from paper reviewing to express reasonable relationship between temperature and abruptly-changing sea-level transition across the ages. This study also calculate coastal exposure globally as affected population, area and asset below the estimated sea-level for each countries with overlaying 30 arc-second gridded topography, population distribution and the sea-level. The result indicates which country would be critically affected if we follow overshooting pathways. Furthermore, this study visualize uncertain coastal exposure due to sea-level rise in the future from the multiple warming pathways. This estimation of possible future beyond tipping point would be useful information for decision-makers to establish new planning of defense, migration or mitigation for the future societies.

  12. Boiling phenomenon due to quasi-steadily and rapidly increasing heat inputs in LN 2 and LHe I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, A.; Shiotsu, M.; Hata, K.

    Dynamic boiling processes, including the transition from a single-phase non-boiling regime to film boiling caused by exponentially increasing heat inputs, Q 0e t/τ for a wide range of periods and pressures on horizontal wires in LN 2 and LHe I were investigated. The main problem is that there are no active cavities on the wire surfaces for initial boiling in the liquids. The heat transfer processes due to increasing heat inputs with increasing rates ranging from quasi-steady to rapidly increasing ones in LN 2 were classified into three types for the pressures. The dynamic boiling processes in LHe I due to rapidly increasing heat inputs at the pressures tested here correspond to Type 3 processes including semi-direct transitions in LN 2 at pressures higher than about 1 MPa. The lower limit temperatures of boiling initiation on the wire surfaces for initial boiling in liquids at pressures due to quasi-steadily increasing heat inputs are clearly lower than the homogeneous spontaneous nucleation temperatures corresponding to these pressures. Liquid superheat close to the solid surface in LHe I was evaluated from the value of the wire surface temperature, taking off the temperature drop due to Kapitza resistance. The initial boiling temperatures due to quasi-steady heat inputs at pressures in saturated LN 2 and LHe I agreed with the values derived from the theoretical model based on the heterogeneous spontaneous nucleation in flooded cavities on the solid surface.

  13. The post-2002 global surface warming slowdown caused by the subtropical Southern Ocean heating acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, A.; Watanabe, M.

    2017-04-01

    The warming rate of global mean surface temperature slowed down during 1998-2012. Previous studies pointed out role of increasing ocean heat uptake during this global warming slowdown, but its mechanism remains under discussion. Our numerical simulations, in which wind stress anomaly in the equatorial Pacific is imposed from reanalysis data, suggest that subsurface warming in the equatorial Pacific took place during initial phase of the global warming slowdown (1998-2002), as previously reported. It is newly clarified that the Ekman transport from tropics to subtropics is enhanced during the later phase of the slowdown (after 2002) and enhanced subtropical Ekman downwelling causes accelerated heat storage below depth of 700 m in the subtropical Southern Ocean, leading to the post-2002 global warming slowdown. Observational data of ocean temperature also support this scenario. This study provides clear evidence that deeper parts of the Southern Ocean play a critical role in the post-2002 warming slowdown.

  14. Biases in the surface climatology from Global Climate Models due to the representation of the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2014-05-01

    This study assessed 36 Global Climate Models (GCMs) that contributed to the latest phase of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) for their ability to reproduce the mean climate and climate change of the surface air temperature (SAT) in the historical scenario. The model results were assessed individually through comparison to a reanalysis product (ERA-Interim), and collectively by assessing the inter-model mean and spread. We have demonstrated that the models perform worse, both individually and collectively, under conditions of stable stratification - related to shallow boundary layers. The models generally under-estimate the SAT trends and variability in stably-stratified conditions, where they have a bias towards deeper PBLs. These results are interpreted within the framework of the PBL response mechanism. GCMs use a variety of parameterizations to represent the PBL, and these result in different climatologies of the PBL depth. These models have difficulty reproducing the observed climatology of the PBL with a general bias towards over-estimating the depth of the PBL, especially in stably-stratified conditions. The PBL depth is linearly related to the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which modulates SAT response to forcing. This effect is especially important in shallow PBLs due to the reciprocal relationship between the strength of the changes to the SAT (the trend and variability) and the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere (the PBL depth). Therefore, structural problems in a GCM's ability to describe the PBL may be expected to lead to errors in the climatology of the SAT. When a model over-estimates the PBL depth we may expect it to under-estimate the strength of SAT trends and variability, and vice versa. These errors are expected to be most apparent in shallow PBLs where the models have large errors in their climatology of the PBL and (since the shallow layers most strongly effect the SAT response to forcing) this leads to

  15. Heat illnesses: a hot topic in the setting of global climate change.

    PubMed

    Sankoff, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Heat illnesses affect a large number of people every year and are becoming an increasing cause of pathology as climate change results in increasing global temperatures. This article will review the physiological responses to heat, as well as the pathophysiological processes that result in heat illnesses. The emphasis will be on providing general practitioners (GPs) with an understanding of how to prevent heat illness in their patients and how to predict who is most at risk. Heat illnesses may be thought of as minor or major illnesses, any of which may present to the GP. Consideration must be given to identifying those who need more critical intervention and on when to transfer for higher-level of care.

  16. First neonatal case of fungaemia due to Pseudozyma aphidis and a global literature review.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Anupam; Wankhede, Sandeep; Singh, Pradeep K; Agarwal, Kshitij; Kathuria, Shallu; Sengupta, Sharmila; Barman, Purabi; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    The Ustilaginomycetous basidiomycete yeast, Pseudozyma aphidis has recently been implicated in potentially fatal disorders ranging from subcutaneous mycoses to disseminated infections. Till date a solitary case of P. aphidis fungaemia in a paediatric patient has been reported. We present a case of fungaemia due to P. aphidis in a rhesus factor-isoimmunised, low-birth-weight neonate. The isolate was identified by sequencing the D1/D2 domain of the LSU region. Antifungal susceptibility of the isolate revealed susceptibility to amphotericin B, voriconazole, itraconazole, isavuconazole and posaconazole. It had high minimum inhibitory concentrations of fluconazole and was resistant to flucytosine and echinocandins. Consequently, the patient was successfully treated with intravenous amphotericin B. Although the source of infection could not be traced, as the neonate developed fungaemia on the first day of life, it could possibly be from the maternal urogenital tract or intrahospital transmission. A review of previously published cases revealed that risk factors for invasive Pseudozyma spp. infections were similar to those previously reported for non-albicans Candida spp. Pseudozyma species are underreported due to the difficulty of identifying this rare yeast pathogen by commercial identification systems. Considering that Pseudozyma spp. cause invasive fungal infections globally and are resistant to flucytosine, fluconazole and echinocandins, this pathogen assumes a greater clinical significance.

  17. Occurrence of spontaneous and audiogenic seizures following global brain ischaemia due to cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Kocki, Janusz; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Januszewski, Sławomir; Czuczwar, Stanisław J; Pluta, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Transient cardiac arrest due to cardiac vessel bundle occlusion was used to produce a rat model of spontaneous and audiogenic seizures. Among the rats, spontaneous seizures were present in 64%, and audiogenic seizures could be evoked in 86%, during two weeks of survival after cardiac arrest, by exposure to a loud sound produced by rattling keys, beginning one day after the post-ischaemic injury. Data from literature suggested a key role for GABA-ergic system widespread dysfunction especially in the hippocampus in post-cardiac arrest onset of audiogenic seizures. Reduced GABA inhibition in the hippocampus seems responsible for audiogenic seizures following cardiac arrest. In summary it may be considered that the occurrence of audiogenic seizures following cardiac arrest is determined not only by a neuronal loss, especially in the hippocampus, but also by a condition of synapse modification by a regenerative phenomenon. Data from our study clearly indicate that global brain ischaemia due to cardiac arrest may induce the susceptibility to spontaneous and audiogenic seizures, but this effect is transient.

  18. Measurement of Heat Flux and Heat Transfer Coefficient Due to Spray Application for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant spray application experiments were conducted for the die casting process. The heat flux was measured in situ using a differential thermopile sensor for three application techniques. First, the lubricant was applied under a constant flowrate while the nozzle was held in the same position. Second, the lubricant was applied in a pulsed, static manner, in which the nozzle was held over the same surface while it was turned on and off several times. Third, the lubricant was applied in a sweeping manner, in which the nozzle was moved along the die surface while it was held open. The experiments were conducted at several die temperatures and at sweep speeds of 20, 23, and 68 cm/s. The heat flux data, which were obtained with a sensor that was located in the centre of the test plate, were presented and discussed. The sensor can be used to evaluate lubricants, monitor the consistency of die lubrication process, and obtain useful process data, such as surface temperature, heat flux, and heat transfer coefficients. The heat removed from the die surface during lubricant application is necessary for (a) designing the cooling channels in the die, i.e. their size and placement, and (b) performing accurate numerical simulations of the die casting process.

  19. Communicating the deadly consequences of global warming for human heat stress.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Tom K R; Wilby, Robert L; Murphy, Conor

    2017-04-11

    In December of 2015, the international community pledged to limit global warming to below 2 °C above preindustrial (PI) to prevent dangerous climate change. However, to what extent, and for whom, is danger avoided if this ambitious target is realized? We address these questions by scrutinizing heat stress, because the frequency of extremely hot weather is expected to continue to rise in the approach to the 2 °C limit. We use analogs and the extreme South Asian heat of 2015 as a focusing event to help interpret the increasing frequency of deadly heat under specified amounts of global warming. Using a large ensemble of climate models, our results confirm that global mean air temperature is nonlinearly related to heat stress, meaning that the same future warming as realized to date could trigger larger increases in societal impacts than historically experienced. This nonlinearity is higher for heat stress metrics that integrate the effect of rising humidity. We show that, even in a climate held to 2 °C above PI, Karachi (Pakistan) and Kolkata (India) could expect conditions equivalent to their deadly 2015 heatwaves every year. With only 1.5 °C of global warming, twice as many megacities (such as Lagos, Nigeria, and Shanghai, China) could become heat stressed, exposing more than 350 million more people to deadly heat by 2050 under a midrange population growth scenario. The results underscore that, even if the Paris targets are realized, there could still be a significant adaptation imperative for vulnerable urban populations.

  20. Communicating the deadly consequences of global warming for human heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Tom K. R.; Wilby, Robert L.; Murphy, Conor

    2017-04-01

    In December of 2015, the international community pledged to limit global warming to below 2 °C above preindustrial (PI) to prevent dangerous climate change. However, to what extent, and for whom, is danger avoided if this ambitious target is realized? We address these questions by scrutinizing heat stress, because the frequency of extremely hot weather is expected to continue to rise in the approach to the 2 °C limit. We use analogs and the extreme South Asian heat of 2015 as a focusing event to help interpret the increasing frequency of deadly heat under specified amounts of global warming. Using a large ensemble of climate models, our results confirm that global mean air temperature is nonlinearly related to heat stress, meaning that the same future warming as realized to date could trigger larger increases in societal impacts than historically experienced. This nonlinearity is higher for heat stress metrics that integrate the effect of rising humidity. We show that, even in a climate held to 2 °C above PI, Karachi (Pakistan) and Kolkata (India) could expect conditions equivalent to their deadly 2015 heatwaves every year. With only 1.5 °C of global warming, twice as many megacities (such as Lagos, Nigeria, and Shanghai, China) could become heat stressed, exposing more than 350 million more people to deadly heat by 2050 under a midrange population growth scenario. The results underscore that, even if the Paris targets are realized, there could still be a significant adaptation imperative for vulnerable urban populations.

  1. CFD-Predicted Tile Heating Bump Factors Due to Tile Overlay Repairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    2006-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics investigation of the Orbiter's Tile Overlay Repair (TOR) is performed to assess the aeroheating Damage Assessment Team's (DAT) existing heating correlation method for protuberance interference heating on the surrounding thermal protection system. Aerothermodynamic heating analyses are performed for TORs at the design reference damage locations body points 1800 and 1075 for a Mach 17.9 and a=39deg STS-107 flight trajectory point with laminar flow. Six different cases are considered. The computed peak heating bump factor on the surrounding tiles are below the DAT's heating bump factor values for smooth tile cases. However, for the uneven tiles cases the peak interference heating is shown to be considerably higher than the existing correlation prediction.

  2. Revisiting the global surface energy budgets with maximum-entropy-production model of surface heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Yu; Deng, Yi; Wang, Jingfeng

    2016-10-01

    The maximum-entropy-production (MEP) model of surface heat fluxes, based on contemporary non-equilibrium thermodynamics, information theory, and atmospheric turbulence theory, is used to re-estimate the global surface heat fluxes. The MEP model predicted surface fluxes automatically balance the surface energy budgets at all time and space scales without the explicit use of near-surface temperature and moisture gradient, wind speed and surface roughness data. The new MEP-based global annual mean fluxes over the land surface, using input data of surface radiation, temperature data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (NASA CERES) supplemented by surface specific humidity data from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), agree closely with previous estimates. The new estimate of ocean evaporation, not using the MERRA reanalysis data as model inputs, is lower than previous estimates, while the new estimate of ocean sensible heat flux is higher than previously reported. The MEP model also produces the first global map of ocean surface heat flux that is not available from existing global reanalysis products.

  3. Revisiting the global surface energy budgets with maximum-entropy-production model of surface heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Yu; Deng, Yi; Wang, Jingfeng

    2017-09-01

    The maximum-entropy-production (MEP) model of surface heat fluxes, based on contemporary non-equilibrium thermodynamics, information theory, and atmospheric turbulence theory, is used to re-estimate the global surface heat fluxes. The MEP model predicted surface fluxes automatically balance the surface energy budgets at all time and space scales without the explicit use of near-surface temperature and moisture gradient, wind speed and surface roughness data. The new MEP-based global annual mean fluxes over the land surface, using input data of surface radiation, temperature data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (NASA CERES) supplemented by surface specific humidity data from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), agree closely with previous estimates. The new estimate of ocean evaporation, not using the MERRA reanalysis data as model inputs, is lower than previous estimates, while the new estimate of ocean sensible heat flux is higher than previously reported. The MEP model also produces the first global map of ocean surface heat flux that is not available from existing global reanalysis products.

  4. Global effect of auroral particle and Joule heating in the undisturbed thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, B. B.

    1978-01-01

    From the compositional variations observed with the neutral atmosphere composition experiment on OGO 6 and a simplified model of thermospheric dynamics, global average values of non-EUV heating are deduced. These are 0.19-0.25 mW/sq m for quiet days and 0.44-0.58 mW/sq m for ordinary days.

  5. The influence of global self-heating on the Yarkovsky and YORP effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozitis, B.; Green, S. F.

    2013-07-01

    In addition to collisions and gravitational forces, there is a growing amount of evidence that photon recoil forces from the asymmetric reflection and thermal re-radiation of absorbed sunlight are primary mechanisms that are fundamental to the physical and dynamical evolution of small asteroids. The Yarkovsky effect causes orbital drift, and the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect causes changes in the rotation rate and pole orientation. We present an adaptation of the Advanced Thermophysical Model to simultaneously predict the Yarkovsky and YORP effects in the presence of global self-heating that occurs within the large concavities of irregularly shaped asteroids, which has been neglected or dismissed in all previous models. It is also combined with rough surface thermal-infrared beaming effects, which have been previously shown to enhance the Yarkovsky orbital drift and dampen on average the YORP rotational acceleration by orders of several tens of per cent. Tests on all published concave shape models of near-Earth asteroids, and also on 100 Gaussian random spheres, show that the Yarkovsky effect is sensitive to shadowing and global self-heating effects at the few per cent level or less. For simplicity, Yarkovsky models can neglect these effects if the level of accuracy desired is of this order. Unlike the Yarkovsky effect, the YORP effect can be very sensitive to shadowing and global self-heating effects. Its sensitivity increases with decreasing relative strength of the YORP rotational acceleration, and does not appear to depend greatly on the degree of asteroid concavity. Global self-heating tends to produce a vertical offset in an asteroid's YORP-rotational-acceleration versus obliquity curve which is in opposite direction to that produced by shadowing effects. It also ensures that at least one critical obliquity angle exists at which zero YORP rotational acceleration occurs. Global self-heating must be included for accurate predictions of the

  6. Global Vision Impairment and Blindness Due to Uncorrected Refractive Error, 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Leasher, Janet; Bourne, Rupert R; Flaxman, Seth R; Jonas, Jost B; Keeffe, Jill; Limburg, Hans; Pesudovs, Konrad; Price, Holly; White, Richard A; Wong, Tien Y; Taylor, Hugh R; Resnikoff, Serge

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to estimate worldwide the number of people with moderate and severe visual impairment (MSVI; presenting visual acuity <6/18, ≥3/60) or blindness (presenting visual acuity <3/60) due to uncorrected refractive error (URE), to estimate trends in prevalence from 1990 to 2010, and to analyze regional differences. The review focuses on uncorrected refractive error which is now the most common cause of avoidable visual impairment globally. : The systematic review of 14,908 relevant manuscripts from 1990 to 2010 using Medline, Embase, and WHOLIS yielded 243 high-quality, population-based cross-sectional studies which informed a meta-analysis of trends by region. The results showed that in 2010, 6.8 million (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.7-8.8 million) people were blind (7.9% increase from 1990) and 101.2 million (95% CI: 87.88-125.5 million) vision impaired due to URE (15% increase since 1990), while the global population increased by 30% (1990-2010). The all-age age-standardized prevalence of URE blindness decreased 33% from 0.2% (95% CI: 0.1-0.2%) in 1990 to 0.1% (95% CI: 0.1-0.1%) in 2010, whereas the prevalence of URE MSVI decreased 25% from 2.1% (95% CI: 1.6-2.4%) in 1990 to 1.5% (95% CI: 1.3-1.9%) in 2010. In 2010, URE contributed 20.9% (95% CI: 15.2-25.9%) of all blindness and 52.9% (95% CI: 47.2-57.3%) of all MSVI worldwide. The contribution of URE to all MSVI ranged from 44.2 to 48.1% in all regions except in South Asia which was at 65.4% (95% CI: 62-72%). : We conclude that in 2010, uncorrected refractive error continues as the leading cause of vision impairment and the second leading cause of blindness worldwide, affecting a total of 108 million people or 1 in 90 persons.

  7. Erythema Ab Igne due to Heating Pad Use: A Case Report and Review of Clinical Presentation, Prevention, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Milchak, Marissa; Smucker, Joanne; Chung, Catherine G.; Seiverling, Elizabeth V.

    2016-01-01

    Erythema ab igne is an asymptomatic cutaneous condition caused by exposure to heat. Cases of erythema ab igne may prove to be diagnostically challenging due to lack of familiarity with the condition. While this dermatosis carries a favorable prognosis, nonmelanoma skin cancers have been reported to arise within lesions of erythema ab igne. Erythema ab igne is preventable, and, thus, clinicians should provide education regarding safe use of heating devices to patients using these products in both outpatient and inpatient settings. PMID:26880929

  8. Erythema Ab Igne due to Heating Pad Use: A Case Report and Review of Clinical Presentation, Prevention, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Milchak, Marissa; Smucker, Joanne; Chung, Catherine G; Seiverling, Elizabeth V

    2016-01-01

    Erythema ab igne is an asymptomatic cutaneous condition caused by exposure to heat. Cases of erythema ab igne may prove to be diagnostically challenging due to lack of familiarity with the condition. While this dermatosis carries a favorable prognosis, nonmelanoma skin cancers have been reported to arise within lesions of erythema ab igne. Erythema ab igne is preventable, and, thus, clinicians should provide education regarding safe use of heating devices to patients using these products in both outpatient and inpatient settings.

  9. Magnetically Modulated Heat Transport in a Global Simulation of Solar Magneto-convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Charbonneau, Paul; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Rast, Mark P.

    2017-05-01

    We present results from a global MHD simulation of solar convection in which the heat transported by convective flows varies in-phase with the total magnetic energy. The purely random initial magnetic field specified in this experiment develops into a well-organized large-scale antisymmetric component undergoing hemispherically synchronized polarity reversals on a 40 year period. A key feature of the simulation is the use of a Newtonian cooling term in the entropy equation to maintain a convectively unstable stratification and drive convection, as opposed to the specification of heating and cooling terms at the bottom and top boundaries. When taken together, the solar-like magnetic cycle and the convective heat flux signature suggest that a cyclic modulation of the large-scale heat-carrying convective flows could be operating inside the real Sun. We carry out an analysis of the entropy and momentum equations to uncover the physical mechanism responsible for the enhanced heat transport. The analysis suggests that the modulation is caused by a magnetic tension imbalance inside upflows and downflows, which perturbs their respective contributions to heat transport in such a way as to enhance the total convective heat flux at cycle maximum. Potential consequences of the heat transport modulation for solar irradiance variability are briefly discussed.

  10. Did hydrographic sampling capture global and regional deep ocean heat content trends accurately between 1990-2010?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garry, Freya; McDonagh, Elaine; Blaker, Adam; Roberts, Chris; Desbruyères, Damien; King, Brian

    2017-04-01

    Estimates of heat content change in the deep oceans (below 2000 m) over the last thirty years are obtained from temperature measurements made by hydrographic survey ships. Cruises occupy the same tracks across an ocean basin approximately every 5+ years. Measurements may not be sufficiently frequent in time or space to allow accurate evaluation of total ocean heat content (OHC) and its rate of change. It is widely thought that additional deep ocean sampling will also aid understanding of the mechanisms for OHC change on annual to decadal timescales, including how OHC varies regionally under natural and anthropogenically forced climate change. Here a 0.25˚ ocean model is used to investigate the magnitude of uncertainties and biases that exist in estimates of deep ocean temperature change from hydrographic sections due to their infrequent timing and sparse spatial distribution during 1990 - 2010. Biases in the observational data may be due to lack of spatial coverage (not enough sections covering the basin), lack of data between occupations (typically 5-10 years apart) and due to occupations not closely spanning the time period of interest. Between 1990 - 2010, the modelled biases globally are comparatively small in the abyssal ocean below 3500 m although regionally certain biases in heat flux into the 4000 - 6000 m layer can be up to 0.05 Wm-2. Biases in the heat flux into the deep 2000 - 4000 m layer due to either temporal or spatial sampling uncertainties are typically much larger and can be over 0.1 Wm-2 across an ocean. Overall, 82% of the warming trend below 2000 m is captured by observational-style sampling in the model. However, at 2500 m (too deep for additional temperature information to be inferred from upper ocean Argo) less than two thirds of the magnitude of the global warming trend is obtained, and regionally large biases exist in the Atlantic, Southern and Indian Oceans, highlighting the need for widespread improved deep ocean temperature sampling

  11. Estimating Global Burden of Disease due to congenital anomaly: an analysis of European data.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Breidge; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Csáky-Szunyogh, Melinda; de Walle, Hermien E K; Dias, Carlos Matias; Draper, Elizabeth; Gatt, Miriam; Garne, Ester; Haeusler, Martin; Källén, Karin; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; McDonnell, Bob; Mullaney, Carmel; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O'Mahony, Mary; Queisser-Wahrendorf, Annette; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Ritvanen, Annukka; Rounding, Catherine; Tucker, David; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Wellesley, Diana; Wreyford, Ben; Zymak-Zakutnia, Natalia; Dolk, Helen

    2017-06-30

    To validate the estimates of Global Burden of Disease (GBD) due to congenital anomaly for Europe by comparing infant mortality data collected by EUROCAT registries with the WHO Mortality Database, and by assessing the significance of stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly (TOPFA) in the interpretation of infant mortality statistics. EUROCAT is a network of congenital anomaly registries collecting data on live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks' gestation and TOPFA. Data from 29 registries in 19 countries were analysed for 2005-2009, and infant mortality (deaths of live births at age <1 year) compared with the WHO Mortality Database. Eight EUROCAT countries were excluded from further analysis on the basis that this comparison showed poor ascertainment of survival status. According to WHO, 17%-42% of infant mortality was attributed to congenital anomaly. In 11 EUROCAT countries, average infant mortality with congenital anomaly was 1.1 per 1000 births, with higher rates where TOPFA is illegal (Malta 3.0, Ireland 2.1). The rate of stillbirths with congenital anomaly was 0.6 per 1000. The average TOPFA prevalence was 4.6 per 1000, nearly three times more prevalent than stillbirths and infant deaths combined. TOPFA also impacted on the prevalence of postneonatal survivors with non-lethal congenital anomaly. By excluding TOPFA and stillbirths from GBD years of life lost (YLL) estimates, GBD underestimates the burden of disease due to congenital anomaly, and thus declining YLL over time may obscure lack of progress in primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Electron heating and superthermal electron enhancement due to electron cyclotron heating in ISX-B at 28 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, G.B.; Hsuan, H.; England, A.C.

    1983-05-01

    A series of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) experiments was performed with a 28-GHz gyrotron on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Up to 70 kW of microwave power was injected into ISX-B from the high field side. Bulk heating was observed with a central temperature rise of approx. 370 eV from an original temperature of approx. 600 eV, as measured by Thomson scattering. With ECH and under low density conditions, large nonthermal signals were observed on electron cyclotron emission diagnostics at the first, second, and third harmonics. These signals sometimes became quite large after the end of the ECH pulse. The effects observed can be attributed to relatively small changes in the electron distribution function. The temporal behavior of the enhanced emission is tentatively attributed to the pitch angle scattering of superthermal electrons.

  13. Heat transfer enhancement due to bubble pumping in FC-72 near the saturation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eren, Ali S.

    1991-03-01

    The use of boiling heat transfer in the liquid immersion cooling of electronic components has always been hampered by the excessive superheat necessary to initiate nucleation in the fluorinated hydrocarbons used as dielectric cooling fluids. In an attempt to overcome some of these difficulties, an experimental study of the effects of nucleate pooling boiling, on the heat transfer from surface near the boiling surface was conducted. An experimental chamber was constructed which had a column of four horizontal wires spaced 2.5 cm vertically from each other. The lowest wire was progressively heated from the natural convection region through the nucleate boiling region. A study was made of the effects of the boiling wake from the lowest wire on heat transfer from the upper wires. Under certain conditions heat transfer enhancements of up to 30 pct. were obtained.

  14. A global overview of drought and heat-induced tree mortality reveals emerging climate change risks for forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, C.D.; Macalady, A.K.; Chenchouni, H.; Bachelet, D.; McDowell, N.; Vennetier, M.; Kitzberger, T.; Rigling, A.; Breshears, D.D.; Hogg, E.H.(T.); Gonzalez, P.; Fensham, R.; Zhang, Z.; Castro, J.; Demidova, N.; Lim, J.-H.; Allard, G.; Running, S.W.; Semerci, A.; Cobb, N.

    2010-01-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions have significantly altered global climate, and will continue to do so in the future. Increases in the frequency, duration, and/or severity of drought and heat stress associated with climate change could fundamentally alter the composition, structure, and biogeography of forests in many regions. Of particular concern are potential increases in tree mortality associated with climate-induced physiological stress and interactions with other climate-mediated processes such as insect outbreaks and wildfire. Despite this risk, existing projections of tree mortality are based on models that lack functionally realistic mortality mechanisms, and there has been no attempt to track observations of climate-driven tree mortality globally. Here we present the first global assessment of recent tree mortality attributed to drought and heat stress. Although episodic mortality occurs in the absence of climate change, studies compiled here suggest that at least some of the world's forested ecosystems already may be responding to climate change and raise concern that forests may become increasingly vulnerable to higher background tree mortality rates and die-off in response to future warming and drought, even in environments that are not normally considered water-limited. This further suggests risks to ecosystem services, including the loss of sequestered forest carbon and associated atmospheric feedbacks. Our review also identifies key information gaps and scientific uncertainties that currently hinder our ability to predict tree mortality in response to climate change and emphasizes the need for a globally coordinated observation system. Overall, our review reveals the potential for amplified tree mortality due to drought and heat in forests worldwide.

  15. Acceleration of global warming due to carbon-cycle feedbacks in a coupled climate model.

    PubMed

    Cox, P M; Betts, R A; Jones, C D; Spall, S A; Totterdell, I J

    2000-11-09

    The continued increase in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide due to anthropogenic emissions is predicted to lead to significant changes in climate. About half of the current emissions are being absorbed by the ocean and by land ecosystems, but this absorption is sensitive to climate as well as to atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, creating a feedback loop. General circulation models have generally excluded the feedback between climate and the biosphere, using static vegetation distributions and CO2 concentrations from simple carbon-cycle models that do not include climate change. Here we present results from a fully coupled, three-dimensional carbon-climate model, indicating that carbon-cycle feedbacks could significantly accelerate climate change over the twenty-first century. We find that under a 'business as usual' scenario, the terrestrial biosphere acts as an overall carbon sink until about 2050, but turns into a source thereafter. By 2100, the ocean uptake rate of 5 Gt C yr(-1) is balanced by the terrestrial carbon source, and atmospheric CO2 concentrations are 250 p.p.m.v. higher in our fully coupled simulation than in uncoupled carbon models, resulting in a global-mean warming of 5.5 K, as compared to 4 K without the carbon-cycle feedback.

  16. Response of ENSO amplitude to global warming in CESM large ensemble: uncertainty due to internal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiao-Tong; Hui, Chang; Yeh, Sang-Wook

    2017-08-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of variability in the coupled ocean-atmospheric system. Future projections of ENSO change under global warming are highly uncertain among models. In this study, the effect of internal variability on ENSO amplitude change in future climate projections is investigated based on a 40-member ensemble from the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble (CESM-LE) project. A large uncertainty is identified among ensemble members due to internal variability. The inter-member diversity is associated with a zonal dipole pattern of sea surface temperature (SST) change in the mean along the equator, which is similar to the second empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode of tropical Pacific decadal variability (TPDV) in the unforced control simulation. The uncertainty in CESM-LE is comparable in magnitude to that among models of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5), suggesting the contribution of internal variability to the intermodel uncertainty in ENSO amplitude change. However, the causations between changes in ENSO amplitude and the mean state are distinct between CESM-LE and CMIP5 ensemble. The CESM-LE results indicate that a large ensemble of 15 members is needed to separate the relative contributions to ENSO amplitude change over the twenty-first century between forced response and internal variability.

  17. Shifts in phenology due to global climate change: the need for a yardstick

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Marcel E; Both, Christiaan

    2005-01-01

    Climate change has led to shifts in phenology in many species distributed widely across taxonomic groups. It is, however, unclear how we should interpret these shifts without some sort of a yardstick: a measure that will reflect how much a species should be shifting to match the change in its environment caused by climate change. Here, we assume that the shift in the phenology of a species' food abundance is, by a first approximation, an appropriate yardstick. We review the few examples that are available, ranging from birds to marine plankton. In almost all of these examples, the phenology of the focal species shifts either too little (five out of 11) or too much (three out of 11) compared to the yardstick. Thus, many species are becoming mistimed due to climate change. We urge researchers with long-term datasets on phenology to link their data with those that may serve as a yardstick, because documentation of the incidence of climate change-induced mistiming is crucial in assessing the impact of global climate change on the natural world. PMID:16321776

  18. Explanation of how to run the global local optimization code (GLO) to find surface heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S; Sahai, V; Stein, W

    1999-03-01

    From the evaluation[1] of the inverse techniques available, it was determined that the Global Local Optimization Code[2] can determine the surface heat flux using known experimental data at various points in the geometry. This code uses a whole domain approach in which an analysis code (such as TOPAZ2D or ABAQUS) can be run to get the appropriate data needed to minimize the heat flux function. This document is a compilation of our notes on how to run this code to find the surface heat flux. First, the code is described and the overall set-up procedure is reviewed. Then, creation of the configuration file is described. A specific configuration file is given with appropriate explanation. Using this information, the reader should be able to run GLO to find the surface heat flux.

  19. Interhemispheric Changes in Atlantic Ocean Heat Content and Their Link to Global Monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, H.; Lee, S. K.; Dong, S.; Goni, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis whether low frequency decadal variability of the South Atlantic meridional heat transport (SAMHT) influences decadal variability of the global monsoons. A multi-century run from a state-of-the-art coupled general circulation model is used as basis for the analysis. Our findings indicate that multi-decadal variability of the South Atlantic Ocean plays a key role in modulating atmospheric circulation via interhemispheric changes in Atlantic Ocean heat content. Weaker SAMHT produces anomalous ocean heat divergence over the South Atlantic resulting in negative ocean heat content anomaly about 15 years later. This, in turn, forces a thermally direct anomalous interhemispheric Hadley circulation in the atmosphere, transporting heat from the northern hemisphere (NH) to the southern hemisphere (SH) and moisture from the SH to the NH, thereby intensify (weaken) summer (winter) monsoon in the NH and winter (summer) monsoon in the SH. Results also show that anomalous atmospheric eddies, both transient and stationary, transport heat northward in both hemispheres producing eddy heat flux convergence (divergence) in the NH (SH) around 15-30°, reinforcing the anomalous Hadley circulation. The effect of eddies on the NH (SH) poleward of 30° is opposite with heat flux divergence (convergence), which must be balanced by sinking (rising) motion, consistent with a poleward (equatorward) displacement of the jet stream and mean storm track. The mechanism described here could easily be interpreted for the case of strong SAMHT, with the reverse influence on the interhemispheric atmospheric circulation and monsoons. Overall, SAMHT decadal variability leads its atmospheric response by about 15 years, suggesting that the South Atlantic is a potential predictor of global climate variability.

  20. A revised estimate of the processes contributing to global warming due to climate-carbon feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadule, P.; Bopp, L.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2009-07-01

    Coupled climate-carbon cycle models have shown that anthropogenic climate change has a negative effect on natural carbon sinks i.e., climate change induces a reduction in both land and ocean carbon uptake leading to an additional amount of CO2 in the atmosphere. Friedlingstein et al. (2006) concluded that such supplementary CO2 in the atmosphere would lead to an additional climate warming in 2100. However, as given by Friedlingstein et al. (2006), the role of non-CO2 greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols was neglected both for their direct impact on climate and their indirect impact on the carbon cycle. Besides, the climate models used for IPCC AR4 accounted for the radiative forcing of all GHGs and anthropogenic aerosols but neglected the climate-carbon cycle feedback. In IPCC AR4, Meehl et al. (2007) attempted to reconcile these two methods in order to derive the global warming that would arise from both all anthropogenic forcings and climate-carbon cycle feedback. Here we show that the approach they used is wrong for several reasons. First, as previously done by Friedlingstein et al. (2006), they considered that the warming is proportional to the change in atmospheric CO2 concentration. This assumption leads to consider that the gain in temperature is equal to the gain in CO2. However, because of the non-linearity of the climate response to increased CO2 concentrations, the gain in temperature is lower than the gain in CO2. Second, they assumed that the temperature gains of the climate-carbon cycle feedback generated by CO2, non-CO2 GHGs and aerosols are all equal. We show here that, because of the specific spatial and temporal distribution of the radiative forcing exerted by those external perturbations, the temperature gains are all different. Based on our revised method, we found that, for the SRES A2 scenario, the projected global warming in 2100, due to increases in atmospheric CO2, non-CO2 GHGs and anthropogenic sulphate aerosols, is 2.3-5.6°C. This is

  1. Projection of Heat Waves over China under Different Global Warming Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaojun; Luo, Yong; Huang, Jianbin; Zhao, Zongci

    2015-04-01

    Global warming targets, which are determined in terms of global mean temperature increases relative to pre-industrial temperature levels, have been one of the heated issues recently. And the climate change (especially climate extremes) and its impacts under different targets have been paid extensive concerns. In this study, evaluation and projection of heat waves in China were carried out by five CMIP5 global climate models (GCMs) with a 0.5°×0.5° horizontal resolution which were derived from EU WATCH project. A new daily observed gridded dataset CN05.1 (0.5°×0.5°) was also used to evaluate the GCMs. And four indices (heat waves frequency, longest heat waves duration, heat waves days and high temperature days) were adopted to analyze the heat waves. Compared with the observations, the five GCMs and its Multi-Model Ensemble (MME) have a remarkable capacity of reproducing the spatial and temporal characteristic of heat waves. The time correlation coefficients between MME and the observation results can all reach 0.05 significant levels. Based on the projection data of five GCMs, both the median year of crossing 1.5°C, 2°C, 2.5°, 3°C, 3.5°C, 4°C, 4.5°C and 5°C global warming targets and the corresponding climate change over China were analyzed under RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios, respectively. The results show that when the global mean surface air temperature rise to different targets with respect to the pre-industrial times (1861-1880), the frequency and intensity of heat waves will increase dramatically. To take the high emission scenario RCP8.5 as an example, under the RCP8.5 scenario, the warming rate over China is stronger than that over the globe, the temperature rise(median year) over China projected by MME are 1.77°C(2025), 2.63°C(2039), 3.39°C(2050), 3.97°C(2060), 4.82°C(2070), 5.47°C(2079) and 6.2°C(2089) under 1.5°C, 2°C, 2.5°C, 3°C, 3.5°C, 4°C and 4.5°C global warming targets, respectively. With the increase of the global

  2. Analysis of gap heating due to stepped tiles in the shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, D. H.; Smith, D. M.; Edwards, C. L. W.; Carlson, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical methods used to investigate entry gap heating in the Shuttle orbiter thermal protection system are described. Analytical results are given for a fuselage lower-surface location and a wing lower-surface location. These are locations where excessive gap heating occurred on the first flight of the Shuttle. The results of a study to determine the effectiveness of a half-height ceramic fiber gap filler in preventing hot-gas flow in the tile gaps are also given.

  3. A reduction in the asymmetry of ENSO amplitude due to global warming: The role of atmospheric feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Yoo-Geun

    2017-08-01

    This study analyzes a reduction in the asymmetry of El Niño Southern-Oscillation (ENSO) amplitude due to global warming in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models. The multimodel-averaged Niño3 skewness during December-February season decreased approximately 40% in the RCP4.5 scenario compared to that in the historical simulation. The change in the nonlinear relationship between sea surface temperature (SST) and precipitation is a key factor for understanding the reduction in ENSO asymmetry due to global warming. In the historical simulations, the background SST leading to the greatest precipitation sensitivity (SST for Maximum Precipitation Sensitivity, SST_MPS) occurs when the positive SST anomaly is located over the equatorial central Pacific. Therefore, an increase in climatological SST due to global warming weakens the atmospheric response during El Niño over the central Pacific. However, the climatological SST over this region in the historical simulation is still lower than the SST_MPS for the negative SST anomaly; therefore, a background SST increase due to global warming can further increase precipitation sensitivity. The atmospheric feedbacks during La Niña are enhanced and increase the La Niña amplitude due to global warming.

  4. The influence of local versus global heat on the healing of chronic wounds in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Lawson, Daryl; Suh, Hye Jin; Rossi, Christine; Zapata, Karina; Broadwell, Erin; Littleton, Lindsay

    2007-12-01

    In a previous study, it was shown that placing a subject with chronic diabetic ulcers in a warm room prior to the use of electrical stimulation dramatically increased the healing rate. However, global heating is impractical in many therapeutic environments, and therefore in the present investigation the effect of global heat versus using a local heat source to warm the wound was investigated. Twenty-nine male and female subjects participated in a series of experiments to determine the healing associated with electrical stimulation with the application of local heat through a heat lamp compared to global heating of the subject in a warm room. Treatment consisted of biphasic electrical stimulation at currents at 20 mA for 30 min three times per week for 4 weeks in either a 32 degrees C room or, with the application of local heat, to raise skin temperature to 37 degrees C. Skin blood flow was measured by a laser Doppler imager. Blood flow increased with either local or global heating. During electrical stimulation, blood flow almost doubled on the outside and on the edge of the wound with a smaller increase in the center of the wound. However, the largest increase in blood flow was in the subjects exposed to global heating. Further, healing rates, while insignificant for subjects who did not receive electrical stimulation, showed 74.5 +/- 23.4% healing with global heat and 55.3 +/- 31.1% healing with local heat in 1 month; controls actually had a worsening of their wounds. The best healing modality was global heat. However, there was still a significant advantage in healing with local heat.

  5. Marangoni convective MHD flow of SWCNT and MWCNT nanoliquids due to a disk with solar radiation and irregular heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanthesh, B.; Gireesha, B. J.; Shashikumar, N. S.; Shehzad, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    Present study addresses the Marangoni transport of dissipating SWCNT and MWCNT nanofluids under the influence of magnetic force and radiation. A novel exponential space dependent heat source is considered. The flow is generated due to a disk with surface tension created by thermal gradient. The partial differential equations system governing the flow of carbon-water nanoliquids and heat transfer through Marangoni convection is established. Subsequent system is reduced to nonlinear ordinary boundary value problem via generalized Karman transformations. Numerical solutions are developed of the arising nonlinear problem via Runge-Kutta based shooting approach. Impacts of embedded parameters are focused on Nusselt number, velocity and heat transport distributions through graphical illustrations. Our simulations figured out that the heat transfer rate increased via Marangoni convection; however it is decayed by applied magnetic force. The temperature of SWCNT-H2O nanoliquid dominates MWCNT-H2O nanoliquid.

  6. Calculations of Solar Shortwave Heating Rates due to Black Carbon and Ozone Absorption Using in Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Swartz, W. H.; Spackman, J. R.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Aikin, K. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Bui, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the solar heating rates in ambient air due to absorption by black-carbon (BC) containing particles and ozone are presented as calculated from airborne observations made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in January-February 2006. The method uses airborne in situ observations of BC particles, ozone and actinic flux. Total BC mass is obtained along the flight track by summing the masses of individually detected BC particles in the range 90 to 600-nm volume-equivalent diameter, which includes most of the BC mass. Ozone mixing ratios and upwelling and partial downwelling solar actinic fluxes were measured concurrently with BC mass. Two estimates used for the BC wavelength-dependent absorption cross section yielded similar heating rates. For mean altitudes of 16.5, 17.5, and 18.5 km (0.5 km) in the tropics, average BC heating rates were near 0.0002 K/d. Observed BC coatings on individual particles approximately double derived BC heating rates. Ozone heating rates exceeded BC heating rates by approximately a factor of 100 on average and at least a factor of 4, suggesting that BC heating rates in this region are negligible in comparison.

  7. 1-km Global Anthropogenic Heat Flux Database for Urban Climate Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Varquez, A. C. G.; Kanda, M.

    2016-12-01

    Among various factors contributing to warming in cities, anthropogenic heat emission (AHE), defined by heat fluxes arising from human consumption of energy, has the most obvious influence. Despite this, estimation of the AHE distribution is challenging and assumed almost uniform in investigations of the regional atmospheric environment. In this study, we introduce a top-down method for estimating a global distribution of AHE (see attachment), with a high spatial resolution of 30 arc-seconds and temporal resolution of 1 hour. Annual average AHE was derived from human metabolic heating and primary energy consumption, which was further divided into three components based on consumer sector: heat loss, heat emissions from industrial-related sectors and heat emissions from commercial, residential and transport sectors (CRT). The first and second components were equally distributed throughout the country and populated areas, respectively. Bulk AHE from the CRT was proportionally distributed using a global population dataset with a nighttime lights adjustment. An empirical function to estimate monthly fluctuations of AHE based on monthly temperatures was derived from various city measurements. Finally, a global AHE database was constructed for the year 2013. Comparisons between our proposed AHE and other existing datasets revealed that a problem of AHE underestimation at central urban areas existing in previous top-down models was significantly mitigated by the nighttime lights adjustment. A strong agreement in the monthly profiles of AHE between our database and other bottom-up datasets further proved the validity of our current methodology. Investigations of AHE in the 29 largest urban agglomerations globally highlighted that the share of heat emissions from CRT sectors to the total AHE at the city level was 40-95%, whereas the share of metabolic heating varied closely depending on the level of economic development in the city. Incorporation of our proposed AHE data

  8. Heat balance statistics derived from four-dimensional assimilations with a global circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, S. D.; Herman, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    The reported investigation was conducted to develop a reliable procedure for obtaining the diabatic and vertical terms required for atmospheric heat balance studies. The method developed employs a four-dimensional assimilation mode in connection with the general circulation model of NASA's Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences. The initial analysis was conducted with data obtained in connection with the 1976 Data Systems Test. On the basis of the results of the investigation, it appears possible to use the model's observationally constrained diagnostics to provide estimates of the global distribution of virtually all of the quantities which are needed to compute the atmosphere's heat and energy balance.

  9. Total Human-Caused Global Ocean Heat Uptake Nearly Doubles During Recent Surface Warming Hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, P. J.; Durack, P. J.; Stouffer, R. J.; Johnson, G. C.; Forest, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Formal detection and attribution studies have used observations and climate models to identify an anthropogenic warming signature in the upper (0­-700 m) ocean. Recently, as a result of the so-called surface warming hiatus, there has been considerable interest in global ocean heat content (OHC) changes in the deeper ocean, including natural and anthropogenically forced changes evidenced in observational, modelling, and data re-analysis studies. We rely on OHC change estimates from a diverse collection of measurement systems including data from the 19th Century Challenger expedition, a multi-decadal record of ship-based in-situ mostly upper ocean measurements, the more recent near-global Argo floats profiling to intermediate (2000m) depths, and full-depth repeated transoceanic sections. By diagnosing simulated global OHC changes in historically-forced climate models in three depth layers, we show that the current generation of climate models is broadly consistent with multi-decadal estimates of upper, intermediate (700­-2000m) and deep (2000m - ­bottom) global OHC changes as well as with Argo-based estimates over the most recent period. Our results suggest that nearly half of the 1860-­present human-caused increases in global ocean heat content may have occurred since 1998.

  10. Supravital energy production in early post-mortem phase - estimate based on heat loss due to radiation and natural convection.

    PubMed

    Mall, Gita; Hubig, Michael; Beier, Gundolf; Büttner, Andreas; Eisenmenger, Wolfgang

    2002-06-01

    The temperature-based determination of the time since death in the early post-mortem (pm) period plays an important role in medico-legal practice. In contrast to the common opinion according to which convection and conduction are mainly responsible for post-mortem heat loss, a considerable part of energy is emitted by thermal radiation. The present paper concentrates on the heat loss due to radiation and natural convection. Since both heat transfer mechanisms depend on the temperature gradient between skin and environment, the skin temperature was measured in corpses of different constitution (lean, medium and obese) and its decrease fitted by a single-exponential model. Heat loss due to radiation was calculated according to the non-linearized form of the law of Stefan and Boltzmann, heat loss due to natural convection according to the semi-empirical thermodynamic laws; the shape of the body in supine position was approximated to a semi-cylinder of finite length. The power due to radiation ranged between 386kJ/h (lean) and 550kJ/h (obese), that due to natural convection between 307kJ/h (lean) and 429kJ/h (obese) initially. Cumulative energy loss amounted to 2167kJ (lean) and 4239kJ (obese) by radiation and 1485kJ (lean) and 2922kJ (obese) by natural convection up to 20h pm. The energy loss due to radiation plus natural convection initially exceeded the energy loss due the decrease of the energy content of the body (mass x heat capacity x temperature decrease). This surplus can be explained only by exothermal processes in the phase of intermediary life and directly provides lower bounds for supravital energy production. Cumulative supravital energy ranges between 1139kJ up to 5h pm in the lean and 2516kJ up to 10h pm in the obese corpses. The courses of supravital energies and powers are presented as functions of time. Under standard conditions like still air (no forced convection) and insulating ground (little conductive heat transfer), the lower bounds represent

  11. Evaluation of RF heating due to various implants during MR procedures.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Hiroyuki; Horiguchi, Takayoshi; Ueda, Yoshitake; Tanki, Nobuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated radiofrequency (RF) heating of various implants embedded in a gel phantom during magnetic resonance (MR) procedures. We examined the dependence of RF heating on variation in specific absorption rate (SAR) and angle between the implant and the static magnetic field (B(0)) and on the displacement of the phantom in the irradiation coil using a 1.5-tesla MR system, and we compared the influence of RF heating on the same implant using a 3.0T MR system. Our results support the occurrence of RF heating of implants made of non-magnetizing metal. We observed greater RF heating when the implant was set parallel to B(0), embedded at a shallower depth, and placed at the center of the RF irradiation coil. We also confirmed that the rise in temperature was proportionate to the increase in SAR. We considered the difference in temperature elevation on depth of embedding to reflect the skin-depth effect of RF intensity for both the 1.5- and 3.0-T MR systems.

  12. A new analytical approach for heat generation in tissue due to laser excitation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkol, Hakan; Nouizi, Farouk; Luk, Alex T.; Unlu, Mehmet B.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we present a fast analytical approach for laser induced temperature increase in biological tissue. The whole problem consists of two main steps. These steps are the light propagation and heat transfer in tissue. We first obtain a detailed analytical solution for the diffusion equation based on an integral approach for specific boundary conditions. Secondly, we also solve the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation analytically using the separation of variables technique and obtain the temperature induced by optical absorption of tissue. Here, heat source term consists of the local absorption and photon density, which will be determined from the diffusion equation. We find a very comprehensive solution for the diffusion equation by using an integral method for the Robin boundary condition. In other words, we obtain a particular Green's function in a different way. Next, we use this solution as a source term in the Pennes' bio-heat equation by utilizing the heat convection boundary condition. It is important to note that these boundary conditions are good approximations for imaging of biological tissue. As a result, we obtain spatio-temporal temperature distribution inside the medium. First, our approach is validated by a numerical approach using a Finite Element Method (FEM). Next, we also validate our method by performing phantom and tissue experiments. Experimental data corresponding to spatio-temporal temperature distribution are recorded using magnetic resonance thermometry. The analytical results obtained by our method are in a very good agreement with ones obtained by the FEM and experiment.

  13. Modelling of labour productivity loss due to climate change: HEAT-SHIELD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Daanen, Hein

    2016-04-01

    Climate change will bring higher heat levels (temperature and humidity combined) to large parts of the world. When these levels reach above thresholds well defined by human physiology, the ability to maintain physical activity levels decrease and labour productivity is reduced. This impact is of particular importance in work situations in areas with long high intensity hot seasons, but also affects cooler areas during heat waves. Our modelling of labour productivity loss includes climate model data of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Inter-comparison Project (ISI-MIP), calculations of heat stress indexes during different months, estimations of work capacity loss and its annual impacts in different parts of the world. Different climate models will be compared for the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and the outcomes of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21) agreements. The validation includes comparisons of modelling outputs with actual field studies using historical heat data. These modelling approaches are a first stage contribution to the European Commission funded HEAT-SHIELD project.

  14. Estimating Temperature Rise Due to Flashlamp Heating Using Irreversible Temperature Indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the nondestructive thermography inspection techniques uses photographic flashlamps. The flashlamps provide a short duration (about 0.005 sec) heat pulse. The short burst of energy results in a momentary rise in the surface temperature of the part. The temperature rise may be detrimental to the top layer of the part being exposed. Therefore, it is necessary to ensure the nondestructive nature of the technique. Amount of the temperature rise determines whether the flashlamp heating would be detrimental to the part. A direct method for the temperature measurement is to use of an infrared pyrometer that has much shorter response time than the flash duration. In this paper, an alternative technique is given using the irreversible temperature 'indicators. This is an indirect technique and it measures the temperature rise on the irreversible temperature indicators and computes the incident heat flux. Once the heat flux is known, the temperature rise on the part can be computed. A wedge shaped irreversible temperature indicator for measuring the heat flux is proposed. A procedure is given to use the wedge indicator.

  15. Unsteady Turbine Blade and Tip Heat Transfer Due to Wake Passing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Rigby, David L.; Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Heidmann, James; Fabian, John C.

    2007-01-01

    The geometry and the flow conditions of the first stage turbine blade of GE s E3 engine have been used to obtain the unsteady three-dimensional blade and tip heat transfer. The isothermal wall boundary condition was used. The effect of the upstream wake of the first stage vane was of interest and was simulated by provision of a gust type boundary condition upstream of the blades. A one blade periodic domain was used. The consequence of this choice was explored in a preliminary study which showed little difference in the time mean heat transfer between 1:1 and 2:3 vane/blade domains. The full three-dimensional computations are of the blade having a clearance gap of 2 percent the span. Comparison between the time averaged unsteady and steady heat transfer is provided. It is shown that there is a significant difference between the steady and time mean of unsteady blade heat transfer in localized regions. The differences on the suction side of the blade in the near hub and near tip regions were found to be rather significant. Steady analysis underestimated the blade heat transfer by as much as 20 percent as compared to the time average obtained from the unsteady analysis. As for the blade tip, the steady analysis and the unsteady analysis gave results to within 2 percent.

  16. Study of Dynamic Buckling of FG Plate Due to Heat Flux Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, L.

    2015-02-01

    The paper deals with a FEM analysis of dynamic buckling of functionally graded clamped plates under heat flux loading with huge power. The materials of structures as well as their properties are varying in each layer across the plate thickness formulated by the power law distribution. The heat flux was applied evenly to the whole ceramic surface. The analysis was developed in the ANSYS 14.5 software. The duration of the heat flux loading equal to a period of natural fundamental flexural vibrations of given structures was taken into consideration. To implement large deflections of structures, the Green-Lagrange nonlinear-displacement equations and the incremental Newton-Raphson algorithm were applied. An evaluation of the dynamic response of structures was carried out on basis of the Budiansky-Hutchinson criterion. The studies were conducted for different volume fraction distributions and different shapes of the heat flux loading. The computation results of the heat flux versus maximal plate deflection are shown and discussed.

  17. Modelling of pepsin digestibility of myofibrillar proteins and of variations due to heating.

    PubMed

    Kondjoyan, Alain; Daudin, Jean-Dominique; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique

    2015-04-01

    Digestibility of myofibrillar proteins by pepsin was determined by in vitro trials and mathematical modelling. A primary model was developed to predict in vitro digestion kinetics, and a secondary model based on the mechanisms of protein denaturation was then added to take into account the effect of meat heating. Model predictions agreed with measurements in the pH and pepsin concentration ranges 1.8-3.8 and 6-50 U mg(-1) respectively. The utility of the model is illustrated by a simple example where meat is assumed to be heated homogeneously, and myofibrillar proteins to be directly in contact with pepsin. The combined effects of heating time, temperature, enzyme concentration and pH modified the digestibility value, which also depends on residence time in the stomach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes on Mid-Latitude Cyclones due to Global Warming Simulated by a Global 20-km-mesh Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, K.

    2005-12-01

    I investigate how the intensity and the activity of mid-latitude cyclones change as a result of global warming, based on a time-slice experiment with a super-high resolution Atmospheric General Circulation Model (20-km mesh TL959L60 MRI/JMA AGCM). The model was developed by the RR2002 project "Development of Super High Resolution Global and Regional Climate Models" funded by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. In this context, I use a 10-year control simulation with the climatological SST and a 10-year time-slice global warming simulation using the SST anomalies derived from the SRES A1B scenario run with the MRI-CGCM2.3 (T42L30 atmosphere, 0.5-2.0 x 2.5 L23 ocean) corresponding to the end of the 21st century. I have analyzed the sea-level pressure field and the kinetic energy field of the wind at the 500 hPa pressure level associated with mid-latitude transients from October through April. According to a comparison of 10-day average fields between present and future in the North Pacific, some statistically significant changes are found in a warmer climate for the both of sea-level pressure and the kinetic energy fields. In particular, from late winter through early spring, the sea-level pressure decreases on many parts of the whole Pacific. The kinetic energy of the wind becomes higher on center of the basin. Therefore, I suppose the Aleutian Low is likely to settle in longer by about one month than the present. Hereafter, I plan to investigate what kind of phenomena may accompany the changes on mid-latitude transients.

  19. Changes In The Heating Degree-days In Norway Due Toglobal Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaugen, T. E.; Tveito, O. E.; Hanssen-Bauer, I.

    A continuous spatial representation of temperature improves the possibility topro- duce maps of temperature-dependent variables. A temperature scenario for the period 2021-2050 is obtained for Norway from the Max-Planck-Institute? AOGCM, GSDIO ECHAM4/OPEC 3. This is done by an ?empirical downscaling method? which in- volves the use of empirical links between large-scale fields and local variables to de- duce estimates of the local variables. The analysis is obtained at forty-six sites in Norway. Spatial representation of the anomalies of temperature in the scenario period compared to the normal period (1961-1990) is obtained with the use of spatial interpo- lation in a GIS. The temperature scenario indicates that we will have a warmer climate in Norway in the future, especially during the winter season. The heating degree-days (HDD) is defined as the accumulated Celsius degrees be- tween the daily mean temperature and a threshold temperature. For Scandinavian countries, this threshold temperature is 17 Celsius degrees. The HDD is found to be a good estimate of accumulated cold. It is therefore a useful index for heating energy consumption within the heating season, and thus to power production planning. As a consequence of the increasing temperatures, the length of the heating season and the HDD within this season will decrease in Norway in the future. The calculations of the heating season and the HDD is estimated at grid level with the use of a GIS. The spatial representation of the heating season and the HDD can then easily be plotted. Local information of the variables being analysed can be withdrawn from the spatial grid in a GIS. The variable is prepared for further spatial analysis. It may also be used as an input to decision making systems.

  20. Evaluation of photobioreactor heat balance for predicting changes in culture medium temperature due to light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Morita, M; Watanabe, Y; Saiki, H

    2001-09-20

    Microalgal photosynthesis requires appropriate culture medium temperatures to achieve high photosynthetic performance and to maintain production of a high-quality biomass product. Enclosed systems, such as our conical, helical tubular photobioreactor (HTP), can accomplish high photosynthetic efficiency and the small amount of culture medium used by these systems means that the culture medium temperature may be effectively controlled. On the other hand, because a high ratio of surface area to culture medium volume leads to rapid heating under the illumination condition and substantial heat loss at night, maintaining a suitable culture medium temperature is necessary to achieve efficient, commercially practical biomass production. In order to predict changes in the culture medium temperature caused by changes in solar irradiance and ambient temperature, it is necessary to understand the heat balance within the photobioreactor. We therefore investigated the heat balance in three major parts (photostage, degasser, and helical heat exchanger) of our conical HTP, analyzed the time-dependent changes in medium temperature at various room temperatures and radiant energy inputs, and predicted changes in the culture medium temperature based on the characteristics of heat transfer among the three parts. Using this model, the predicted changes in culture medium temperature were very similar to the changes observed experimentally in the laboratory and under field conditions. This means that by calculating the time-dependent changes in the culture medium temperature, based on measurements of solar energy input and ambient temperature, we should be able to estimate the energy required to maintain the culture medium temperature within a range where photosynthetic performance of microalgae is high. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Impacts of Soil-aquifer Heat and Water Fluxes on Simulated Global Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krakauer, N.Y.; Puma, Michael J.; Cook, B. I.

    2013-01-01

    Climate models have traditionally only represented heat and water fluxes within relatively shallow soil layers, but there is increasing interest in the possible role of heat and water exchanges with the deeper subsurface. Here, we integrate an idealized 50m deep aquifer into the land surface module of the GISS ModelE general circulation model to test the influence of aquifer-soil moisture and heat exchanges on climate variables. We evaluate the impact on the modeled climate of aquifer-soil heat and water fluxes separately, as well as in combination. The addition of the aquifer to ModelE has limited impact on annual-mean climate, with little change in global mean land temperature, precipitation, or evaporation. The seasonal amplitude of deep soil temperature is strongly damped by the soil-aquifer heat flux. This not only improves the model representation of permafrost area but propagates to the surface, resulting in an increase in the seasonal amplitude of surface air temperature of >1K in the Arctic. The soil-aquifer water and heat fluxes both slightly decrease interannual variability in soil moisture and in landsurface temperature, and decrease the soil moisture memory of the land surface on seasonal to annual timescales. The results of this experiment suggest that deepening the modeled land surface, compared to modeling only a shallower soil column with a no-flux bottom boundary condition, has limited impact on mean climate but does affect seasonality and interannual persistence.

  2. Recent severe heat waves: how to view them in a 'global warming' perspective?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysely, J.

    2010-03-01

    The area of western and central Europe has recently been affected by several long-lasting and severe heat waves, particularly in July-August 2003, June-July 2006, and July 2007. The heat waves influenced various sectors of human activities, with enormous socio-economic impacts. With an estimated death toll exceeding 50000 over Europe, the August 2003 heat wave was the worst natural disaster in Europe during the last 50 years, yielding an example of how seriously may also high-income countries be affected by climate change. The aims of the study are to assess whether recent occurrences of severe heat waves in central Europe were exceptional in the context of past fluctuations, and to estimate their recurrence probabilities under future climate change scenarios. We focus on analogs of the 2006 heat wave which lasted 33 consecutive days in Prague and was the longest and most severe heat wave since the beginning of air temperature measurements in 1775. Probabilities of long and severe heat waves are estimated from daily temperature series generated by a first-order autoregressive model with a deterministic component, incorporating the seasonal cycle and the long-term trend. The model is validated with respect to the simulation of heat waves in present climate (1961-2006) and subsequently run under several assumptions reflecting various rates of summer warming over the 21st century, based on climate model projections. The return period of a heat wave reaching or exceeding the length of the 2006 heat wave is estimated to be around 120 years in 2006. Due to an increase in mean summer temperatures, probabilities of very long heat waves have already risen by an order of magnitude over the recent 25 years, and they are likely to increase by another order of magnitude by around 2040 under the summer warming rate assumed by the mid-scenario. Even the lower-bound scenario yields a considerable decline of return periods associated with intense heat waves. Although positive socio

  3. Enhanced sheath heating in capacitively coupled discharges due to non-sinusoidal voltage waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Boswell, R. W.; Booth, J. P.

    2012-05-07

    Through the use of particle-in-cell simulations, we demonstrate that the power deposition in capacitively coupled discharges (in argon) can be increased by replacing sinusoidal waveforms with Gaussian-shaped voltage pulses (with a repetition frequency of 13.56 MHz). By changing the Gaussian pulse width, electron heating can be directly controlled, allowing for an increased plasma density and ion flux for the same gas pressure and geometrical operating conditions. Analysis of the power deposition profiles and electron distribution functions shows that enhanced electron-sheath heating is responsible for the increased power absorption.

  4. Investigation of heat transfer due to isothermal heater in irregular porous cavity: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.

    2017-07-01

    The present work is undertaken to investigate the effect of isothermal block placed at center of left vertical surface of porous cavity. The block is heated with isothermal temperature and right vertical surface of cavity is maintained at lowest temperature in domain. Finite element method is used to convert the governing equations into a simpler form. It is found that the heat transfer behavior for present case is different from that of the case when isothermal block is placed at bottom or top of the cavity.

  5. Projected Shifts in Coffea arabica Suitability among Major Global Producing Regions Due to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Ovalle-Rivera, Oriana; Läderach, Peter; Bunn, Christian; Obersteiner, Michael; Schroth, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Regional studies have shown that climate change will affect climatic suitability for Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) within current regions of production. Increases in temperature and changes in precipitation patterns will decrease yield, reduce quality and increase pest and disease pressure. This is the first global study on the impact of climate change on suitability to grow Arabica coffee. We modeled the global distribution of Arabica coffee under changes in climatic suitability by 2050s as projected by 21 global circulation models. The results suggest decreased areas suitable for Arabica coffee in Mesoamerica at lower altitudes. In South America close to the equator higher elevations could benefit, but higher latitudes lose suitability. Coffee regions in Ethiopia and Kenya are projected to become more suitable but those in India and Vietnam to become less suitable. Globally, we predict decreases in climatic suitability at lower altitudes and high latitudes, which may shift production among the major regions that produce Arabica coffee. PMID:25875230

  6. Projected shifts in Coffea arabica suitability among major global producing regions due to climate change.

    PubMed

    Ovalle-Rivera, Oriana; Läderach, Peter; Bunn, Christian; Obersteiner, Michael; Schroth, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Regional studies have shown that climate change will affect climatic suitability for Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) within current regions of production. Increases in temperature and changes in precipitation patterns will decrease yield, reduce quality and increase pest and disease pressure. This is the first global study on the impact of climate change on suitability to grow Arabica coffee. We modeled the global distribution of Arabica coffee under changes in climatic suitability by 2050s as projected by 21 global circulation models. The results suggest decreased areas suitable for Arabica coffee in Mesoamerica at lower altitudes. In South America close to the equator higher elevations could benefit, but higher latitudes lose suitability. Coffee regions in Ethiopia and Kenya are projected to become more suitable but those in India and Vietnam to become less suitable. Globally, we predict decreases in climatic suitability at lower altitudes and high latitudes, which may shift production among the major regions that produce Arabica coffee.

  7. Measurements and modeling of cosmic noise absorption changes due to radio heating of the D region ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senior, A.; Rietveld, M. T.; Honary, F.; Singer, W.; Kosch, M. J.

    2011-04-01

    Powerful high-frequency radio waves can heat the electrons in the D region of the ionosphere. This heating increases the electron-neutral collision frequency which modifies the absorption of other radio waves propagating through the heated plasma. A high spatial resolution imaging riometer was used to observe changes in cosmic radio noise absorption (CNA) induced by heating from the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) HF facility, and the results were compared to a theoretical model using observed electron densities as an input. The model is found to overestimate the observed effect by a factor close to 2, despite different background electron density profiles and heater powers. However, the model reproduced the spatial morphology of the change in CNA rather well, and the same absorption calculation used in the heating model also reproduced the changes in CNA due to electron precipitation in the absence of heating well. When the assumption of a perfectly conducting ground is replaced with a more realistic model in the calculation of the HF radiated power, the power is reduced to about 75% of its original value, and the model overestimate of the CNA change is reduced to a factor of about 1.3.

  8. The role of Pacific Trade Wind trends in driving ocean heat uptake and global hiatuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Nicola; England, Matthew; Gupta, Alexander Sen; Spence, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Previous work has noted the importance of the tropical Pacific in modulating global temperatures and in offsetting anthropogenic surface warming over decadal periods. This project investigates the role of Pacific Trade Wind changes in modulating the exchange of heat into and out of the sub-surface tropical Pacific Ocean. In particular, the trade wind acceleration observed since the early 1990's is examined, with a focus on ocean heat uptake dynamics associated with phase changes of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). A number of simulations are performed in an eddy-permitting global ocean model (MOM5) coupled to a sea ice model (SIS). To examine the recent period, the ocean model is forced with atmospheric CORE normal year forcing, with the observed Pacific wind trend from 1992-2013 superimposed linearly over the tropical Pacific region. The role of seasonally varying wind trends is further investigated by running a second experiment with seasonally varying wind anomalies added in the Pacific. To investigate how and when the subducted heat might re-surfaces from the ocean interior in the future, additional experiments are performed that include a ramp down of the trade winds under a variety of scenarios to mimic a future phase change in the IPO. This work has implications for decadal predictions of future global climate change.

  9. Effects of Unsteadiness Due to Wake Passing on Rotor Blade Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Rigby, David L.; Heidmann, James; Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Fabian, John C.

    2007-01-01

    14. ABSTRACT In a gas turbine engine, the turbine rotor blades are buffeted by the wakes of the vanes located upstream. There is a transient effect from the passing of wakes on the blade heat transfer. This transient effect has been computed for a representative rotor by introducing a wake upstream via an unsteady inlet flow boundary condition, or "gust" condition. Two cases of turbulent flow and laminar flow with Reynolds numbers of 385,000 and 385 respectively were considered. For the turbulent flow case a quasi-steady calculation was also performed. The variation in the unsteady heat transfer coefficient was found to be as high as 120 percent of the mean. For the turbulent flow case a quasisteady calculation was also performed. The time mean of the unsteady heat transfer, the mean of the quasi-steady variations and the steady results agree reasonably well on all blade locations except for the turbulent results which differ near the leading edge. The quasi-steady heat transfer results do not agree with the instantaneous unsteady results, although the time-mean values are similar.

  10. Augmentation of Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Due to Turbulence from a DLN Can Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanFossen, G. James; Bunker, Ronald S.

    2001-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements have been made in the stagnation region of a flat plate with a circular leading edge. Electrically heated aluminum strips placed symmetrically about the leading edge stagnation region were used to measure spanwise-averaged heat transfer coefficients. The maximum Reynolds number obtained, based on leading edge diameter, was about 100,000. The model was immersed in the flow field downstream of an approximately half-scale model of a can-type combustor from a low NO(x), ground-based power-generating turbine. The tests were conducted with room temperature air; no fuel was added. Room air flowed into the combustor through six vane-type fuel/air swirlers. The combustor can contained no dilution holes. The fuel/air swirlers all swirled the incoming airflow in a counterclockwise direction (facing downstream). A five-hole probe flow field survey in the plane of the model stagnation point showed the flow was one big vortex with flow angles up to 36 deg at the outer edges of the rectangular test section. Hot-wire measurements showed test section flow had very high levels of turbulence, around 28.5%, and had a relatively large axial-length scale-to-leading edge diameter ratio of 0.5. X-wire measurements showed the turbulence to be nearly isotropic. Stagnation heat transfer augmentation over laminar levels was around 77% and was about 14% higher than predicted by a previously developed correlation for isotropic grid-generated turbulence.

  11. Augmentation of Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Due to Turbulence from a DLN Can Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanFossen, G. James; Bunker, Ronald S.

    2001-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements have been made in the stagnation region of a flat plate with a circular leading edge. Electrically heated aluminum strips placed symmetrically about the leading edge stagnation region were used to measure spanwise-averaged heat transfer coefficients. The maximum Reynolds number obtained, based on leading edge diameter, was about 100,000. The model was immersed in the flow field downstream of an approximately half-scale model of a can-type combustor from a low NO(x), ground-based power-generating turbine. The tests were conducted with room temperature air; no fuel was added. Room air flowed into the combustor through six vane-type fuel/air swirlers. The combustor can contained no dilution holes. The fuel/air swirlers all swirled the incoming airflow in a counterclockwise direction (facing downstream). A five-hole probe flow field survey in the plane of the model stagnation point showed the flow was one big vortex with flow angles up to 36 deg at the outer edges of the rectangular test section. Hot-wire measurements showed test section flow had very high levels of turbulence, around 28.5%, and had a relatively large axial-length scale-to-leading edge diameter ratio of 0.5. X-wire measurements showed the turbulence to be nearly isotropic. Stagnation heat transfer augmentation over laminar levels was around 77% and was about 14% higher than predicted by a previously developed correlation for isotropic grid-generated turbulence.

  12. On the Uncertainty in Estimates of Atmospheric Heating Due to Data Postprocessing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerling, Martin P.; Sanford, Laurel L.

    1993-01-01

    Using a general circulation model (GCM) dataset, the impact of postprocessing interpolation from model sigma to pressure coordinates on a diagnostic analysis of the atmospheric energy balance is examined. Various isobaric resolutions are chosen that correspond to those provided in existing analysis archives generated by the National Meteorological Center and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts.Large differences are found between diabatic heating computed residually in isobaric coordinates versus sigma coordinates. Vertically averaged heating reconstructed from pressure level circulation data is found to be in error locally by 10%-50%, with poorer results occurring at coarser vertical resolution. For the zonally averaged isobaric beat balance, the error exceeds the total zonally averaged heating near the tropopause and near the surface. In the former region, the beating is quite small, whereas in the latter region it exceeds 1 K day1In contrast, reconstructing the beat balance directly from the GCM sigma-level circulation data introduces errors generally less than 5% of the model's explicit heating. Although uncertainties exist in our results stemming from the use of a single GCM dataset and a particular vertical interpolation method, they suggest the importance of performing analyses on an assimilating model's coordinate surfaces for the purpose of quantitative climate monitoring.

  13. Enhanced O2 Loss at Mars Due to an Ambipolar Electric Field from Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; Mcenulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (T sub e) in Mars dayside ionosphere above approx. 180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to approx. 500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher T(sub e) (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher T(sub e) may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced T(sub e) in Mars ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (e) of several k(sub b)T(sub e), which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  14. Enhanced O2+ loss at Mars due to an ambipolar electric field from electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; McEnulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (Te) in Mars' dayside ionosphere above ~180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to ~500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher Te (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher Te may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced Te in Mars' ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (eΦ) of several kBTe, which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron, and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  15. Plasma heating and acceleration due to Landau damping of hydromagnetic waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, A.; Hung, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    We analyze energy and momentum exchange associated with Landau damping of hydromagnetic waves, from a macroscopic viewpoint, and compare the conclusions with those of the resonant quasi-linear theory. It is found that the heating of protons and electrons is correctly given by the resonant theory, but that the momentum exchange is not correctly described by the resonant theory.

  16. Augmentation of Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Due to Turbulence From a DLN Can Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanFossen, G. James; Bunker, Ronald S.

    2000-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements have been made in the stagnation region of a flat plate with a circular leading edge. Electrically heated aluminum strips placed symmetrically about the leading edge stagnation region were used to measure spanwise averaged heat transfer coefficients. The maximum Reynolds number obtained, based on leading edge diameter, was about 100,000. The model was immersed in the flow field downstream of an approximately half scale model of a can-type combustor from a low NO(x), ground based power-generating turbine. The tests were conducted with room temperature air; no fuel was added. Room air flowed into the combustor through six vane type fuel/air swirlers. The combustor can contained no dilution holes. The fuel/air swirlers all swirled the incoming airflow in a counter clockwise direction (facing downstream). A 5-hole probe flow field survey in the plane of the model stagnation point showed the flow was one big vortex with flow angles up to 36' at the outer edges of the rectangular test section. Hot wire measurements showed test section flow had very high levels of turbulence, around 28.5 percent, and had a relatively large axial-length scale-to-leading edge diameter ratio of 0.5. X-wire measurements showed the turbulence to be nearly isotropic. Stagnation heat transfer augmentation over laminar levels was around 77 percent and was about 14 percent higher than predicted by a previously developed correlation for isotropic grid generated turbulence.

  17. Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) heat exchange project: A summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Niiler, P. P.

    1985-01-01

    A pilot data center to compute ocean atmosphere heat exchange over the tropical ocean is prposed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in response to the scientific needs of the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Program. Optimal methods will be used to estimate sea surface temperature (SET), surface wind speed, and humidity from spaceborne observations. A monthly summary of these parameters will be used to compute ocean atmosphere latent heat exchanges. Monthly fields of surface heat flux over tropical oceans will be constructed using estimations of latent heat exchanges and short wave radiation from satellite data. Verification of all satellite data sets with in situ measurements at a few locations will be provided. The data center will be an experimental active archive where the quality and quantity of data required for TOGA flux computation are managed. The center is essential to facilitate the construction of composite data sets from global measurements taken from different sensors on various satellites. It will provide efficient utilization and easy access to the large volume of satellite data available for studies of ocean atmosphere energy exchanges.

  18. Investigation of Neutral Wind Effects on the Global Joule Heating Rate Using MHD and TI Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalafatoglu, E.; Kaymaz, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Precise calculation of global Joule heating rate is a long standing question in thermosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. The absence of the complete and direct, in-situ measurements of the parameters involved in the calculation of Joule heating such as the conductivity of the medium, small-scale variations of electric fields, and neutral winds at the ionospheric heights poses a great uncertainty in its determination. In this work, we study the effects of the neutral wind on the global Joule heating rate. Most of the time, owing to above mentioned difficulties the effects of the neutral wind have been neglected in the calculations. We investigate their effects using BATSRUS MHD model, TIEGCM and GITM. Using horizontal current density, Cowling conductivity, and Pedersen conductivities from the MHD model, we calculate the joule heating rate with and without the neutral wind contribution. We apply the procedure for March 2008 magnetospheric substorm events and quantify the differences to show the neutral wind contribution. We compare the results with those obtained using neutral wind velocities from TIEGCM and GITM models. This way while we compare and demonstrate the discrepancies between the models, we also provide an assessment for the integration of thermospheric and magnetospheric models.

  19. Built Expansion and Global Climate Change Drive Projected Urban Heat: Relative Magnitudes, Interactions, and Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krayenhoff, E. S.; Georgescu, M.; Moustaoui, M.

    2016-12-01

    Surface climates are projected to warm due to global climate change over the course of the 21st century, and demographic projections suggest urban areas in the United States will continue to expand and develop, with associated local climate outcomes. Interactions between these two drivers of urban heat have not been robustly quantified to date. Here, simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model (coupled to a Single-Layer Urban Canopy Model) are performed at 20 km resolution over the continental U.S. for two 10-year periods: contemporary (2000-2009) and end-of-century (2090-2099). Present and end of century urban land use are derived from the Environmental Protection Agency's Integrated Climate and Land-Use Scenarios. Modelled effects on urban climates are evaluated regionally. Sensitivity to climate projection (Community Climate System Model 4.0, RCP 4.5 vs. RCP 8.5) and associated urban development scenarios are assessed. Effects on near-surface urban air temperature of RCP8.5 climate change are greater than those attributable to the corresponding urban development in many regions. Interaction effects vary by region, and while of lesser magnitude, are not negligible. Moreover, urban development and its interactions with RCP8.5 climate change modify the distribution of convective precipitation over the eastern US. Interaction effects result from the different meteorological effects of urban areas under current and future climate. Finally, the potential for design implementations such as green roofs and high albedo roofs to offset the projected warming is considered. Impacts of these implementations on precipitation are also assessed.

  20. A Global Perspective on the Composition of the Continental Crust from the Distribution of Heat Producing Elements: Comparison Between Heat Flow Data and Seismological Crustal Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iarotsky, L.; Mareschal, J. C.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal evolution and the strength of continents critically depend on the amount and vertical distribution of heat producing elements in the crust. In turn, these two crustal characteristics provide constraints on the origin of the crust and its internal differentiation processes. Neither of them can be determined directly and they must be inferred from geochemical and geophysical data. One method relies on global crustal models such as CRUST1.0 which gives the structure of the continental crustal column on a 1o}x1{o grid. The crustal model is made up of sedimentary layers over basement consisting of upper, middle, and lower crust whose thicknesses and physical properties vary between provinces depending on age and tectonic type. One may then plug in the average values of heat production for these crustal layers from global geochemical studies. An alternative method consists of measuring the surface heat flow and subtracting the estimated Moho heat flux. Using the global crustal models, we have calculated the crustal heat production for the continents. We have also averaged and placed on the same worldwide grid all the land heat flow measurements. After removing the mantle heat flux and excluding the tectonically active regions, we have compared these two maps. On the global scale, the model based heat production map shows much less variability (σ = 7 mW m-2) than the map based on heat flow measurements (σ = 14 mW m^{-2}). Adjusting the heat production values to fit the heat flux measurements can cancel the difference between the means, but does not reduce the root mean square difference between the two sets. On a regional scale, abundant heat flow in southeastern Canada allow a very detailed comparison. Long wavelength trends of the heat flux data set are obliterated by the model. We attempted to change the crustal heat production values but found that it is impossible to obtain a good fit. Even when considering only the Archean Superior Province, using a

  1. Recent decline in the global land evapotranspiration trend due to limited moisture supply.

    PubMed

    Jung, Martin; Reichstein, Markus; Ciais, Philippe; Seneviratne, Sonia I; Sheffield, Justin; Goulden, Michael L; Bonan, Gordon; Cescatti, Alessandro; Chen, Jiquan; de Jeu, Richard; Dolman, A Johannes; Eugster, Werner; Gerten, Dieter; Gianelle, Damiano; Gobron, Nadine; Heinke, Jens; Kimball, John; Law, Beverly E; Montagnani, Leonardo; Mu, Qiaozhen; Mueller, Brigitte; Oleson, Keith; Papale, Dario; Richardson, Andrew D; Roupsard, Olivier; Running, Steve; Tomelleri, Enrico; Viovy, Nicolas; Weber, Ulrich; Williams, Christopher; Wood, Eric; Zaehle, Sönke; Zhang, Ke

    2010-10-21

    More than half of the solar energy absorbed by land surfaces is currently used to evaporate water. Climate change is expected to intensify the hydrological cycle and to alter evapotranspiration, with implications for ecosystem services and feedback to regional and global climate. Evapotranspiration changes may already be under way, but direct observational constraints are lacking at the global scale. Until such evidence is available, changes in the water cycle on land−a key diagnostic criterion of the effects of climate change and variability−remain uncertain. Here we provide a data-driven estimate of global land evapotranspiration from 1982 to 2008, compiled using a global monitoring network, meteorological and remote-sensing observations, and a machine-learning algorithm. In addition, we have assessed evapotranspiration variations over the same time period using an ensemble of process-based land-surface models. Our results suggest that global annual evapotranspiration increased on average by 7.1 ± 1.0 millimetres per year per decade from 1982 to 1997. After that, coincident with the last major El Niño event in 1998, the global evapotranspiration increase seems to have ceased until 2008. This change was driven primarily by moisture limitation in the Southern Hemisphere, particularly Africa and Australia. In these regions, microwave satellite observations indicate that soil moisture decreased from 1998 to 2008. Hence, increasing soil-moisture limitations on evapotranspiration largely explain the recent decline of the global land-evapotranspiration trend. Whether the changing behaviour of evapotranspiration is representative of natural climate variability or reflects a more permanent reorganization of the land water cycle is a key question for earth system science.

  2. Final Technical Report for "Radiative Heating Associated with Tropical Convective Cloud Systems: Its Importance at Meso and Global Scales"

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Courtney

    2012-12-13

    Heating associated with tropical cloud systems drive the global circulation. The overall research objectives of this project were to i) further quantify and understand the importance of heating in tropical convective cloud systems with innovative observational techniques, and ii) use global models to determine the large-scale circulation response to variability in tropical heating profiles, including anvil and cirrus cloud radiative forcing. The innovative observational techniques used a diversity of radar systems to create a climatology of vertical velocities associated with the full tropical convective cloud spectrum along with a dissection of the of the total heating profile of tropical cloud systems into separate components (i.e., the latent, radiative, and eddy sensible heating). These properties were used to validate storm-scale and global climate models (GCMs) and were further used to force two different types of GCMs (one with and one without interactive physics). While radiative heating was shown to account for about 20% of the total heating and did not have a strong direct response on the global circulation, the indirect response was important via its impact on convection, esp. in how radiative heating impacts the tilt of heating associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a phenomenon that accounts for most tropical intraseasonal variability. This work shows strong promise in determining the sensitivity of climate models and climate processes to heating variations associated with cloud systems.

  3. Industrial-era global ocean heat uptake doubles in recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, Peter J.; Durack, Paul J.; Stouffer, Ronald J.; Johnson, Gregory C.; Forest, Chris E.

    2016-04-01

    Formal detection and attribution studies have used observations and climate models to identify an anthropogenic warming signature in the upper (0-700 m) ocean. Recently, as a result of the so-called surface warming hiatus, there has been considerable interest in global ocean heat content (OHC) changes in the deeper ocean, including natural and anthropogenically forced changes identified in observational, modelling and data re-analysis studies. Here, we examine OHC changes in the context of the Earth’s global energy budget since early in the industrial era (circa 1865-2015) for a range of depths. We rely on OHC change estimates from a diverse collection of measurement systems including data from the nineteenth-century Challenger expedition, a multi-decadal record of ship-based in situ mostly upper-ocean measurements, the more recent near-global Argo floats profiling to intermediate (2,000 m) depths, and full-depth repeated transoceanic sections. We show that the multi-model mean constructed from the current generation of historically forced climate models is consistent with the OHC changes from this diverse collection of observational systems. Our model-based analysis suggests that nearly half of the industrial-era increases in global OHC have occurred in recent decades, with over a third of the accumulated heat occurring below 700 m and steadily rising.

  4. Millennial-scale projection of oceanic oxygen change due to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akitomo; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Shigemitsu, Masahito; Oka, Akira; Takahashi, Kunio; Ohgaito, Rumi; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Global warming is expected to globally decrease ocean oxygen concentrations by sea surface warming and ocean circulation change. Oxygen reduction is expected to persist for a thousand years or more, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. However, long-term changes in ocean oxygen and circulation are still unclear. Here we simulate multimillennium changes in ocean circulation and oxygen under doubling and quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, using GCM (MIROC) and an offline biogeochemical model. In the first 500 years, global oxygen concentration decreases, consistent with previous studies. Thereafter, however, the oxygen concentration in the deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots at the end of the simulations, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker AMOC. This is because, after the initial cessation, the recovery and overshooting of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea enhance ventilation and supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean. Another contributor to deep ocean oxygenation is seawater warming, which reduces the export production and shifts the organic matter remineralization to the upper water column. Our results indicate that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in deep ocean, which is opposite to the centennial-scale global oxygen reduction and general expectation.

  5. Mortality due to noncommunicable diseases in Brazil, 1990 to 2015, according to estimates from the Global Burden of Disease study.

    PubMed

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; França, Elisabeth; Abreu, Daisy Maria Xavier; Perillo, Rosângela Durso; Salmen, Maíra Coube; Teixeira, Renato Azeredo; Passos, Valeria; Souza, Maria de Fátima Marinho; Mooney, Meghan; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading health problem globally and generate high numbers of premature deaths and loss of quality of life. The aim here was to describe the major groups of causes of death due to NCDs and the ranking of the leading causes of premature death between 1990 and 2015, according to the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2015 study estimates for Brazil. Cross-sectional study covering Brazil and its 27 federal states. This was a descriptive study on rates of mortality due to NCDs, with corrections for garbage codes and underreporting of deaths. This study shows the epidemiological transition in Brazil between 1990 and 2015, with increasing proportional mortality due to NCDs, followed by violence, and decreasing mortality due to communicable, maternal and neonatal causes within the global burden of diseases. NCDs had the highest mortality rates over the whole period, but with reductions in cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases and cancer. Diabetes increased over this period. NCDs were the leading causes of premature death (30 to 69 years): ischemic heart diseases and cerebrovascular diseases, followed by interpersonal violence, traffic injuries and HIV/AIDS. The decline in mortality due to NCDs confirms that improvements in disease control have been achieved in Brazil. Nonetheless, the high mortality due to violence is a warning sign. Through maintaining the current decline in NCDs, Brazil should meet the target of 25% reduction proposed by the World Health Organization by 2025.

  6. Measurement of preheating due to radiation and nonlocal electron heat transport in laser-irradiated targets

    SciTech Connect

    Otani, K.; Shigemori, K.; Kadono, T.; Hironaka, Y.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H.; Mima, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kimura, T.; Miyanishi, K.; Kodama, R.; Sakaiya, T.; Sunahara, A.

    2010-03-15

    This paper reports an experimental study on preheating of laser-irradiated targets. We performed temperature measurements at the rear surface of laser-irradiated targets under conditions of two different laser wavelengths (0.35 or 0.53 mum) and several intensities (2x10{sup 13}-1x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) in order to verify an effect of radiation and nonlocal electron heat transport. The preheating temperature was evaluated by observing self-emission, reflectivity, and expansion velocity at the rear surface of planar polyimide foils. The experimental results show that the x-ray radiation is dominant for preheating for 0.35-mum laser irradiation, but contribution of nonlocal electron heat transport is not negligible for 0.53-mum laser irradiation conditions.

  7. Postponement of incipient collapse due to work-induced heat stress by limited cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blockley, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Four subjects completed five treadmill training sessions under comfortable to cool conditions and were calibrated to find an optimum combination of speed and grade on the treadmill which would produce a metabolic rate of 2000 Btu-hr. Dressed in an Apollo liquid cooling garment, each man underwent a total of four experiments in which the rate of heat extraction from the liquid cooling garment was adjusted to an amount which would cause a storage within the body of 1000 Btu/hr. Physiological measurements included skin temperature at 9 locations, rectal and ear canal probes, and heart rate. The increases in tolerance time for the various subjects and the various methods of emergency cooling, ranged from a low of six minutes to a high of 48 minutes, or from 8 to 102% of the baseline tolerance times. The largest gains were achieved in a subject whose tolerance endpoint was atypical, and whose baseline heat tolerance was unsually low.

  8. Formation of laves phase in a refractory austenitic steel due to long-term heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, L. V.; Shal'kevich, A. B.

    2011-07-01

    Steels of the Fe - Cr - Ni -Mo - Nb - Al - C system are studied by methods of phase physicochemical analysis and electron microscopy with the aim to determine the causes of changes in mechanical properties after long-term heating at a temperature of 600 - 700°C. Grain-boundary formation of particles of a Laves phase is shown to cause decrease in the impact toughness and transformation of particles of γ'-phase under conditions of creep. The effect of alloying elements on the chemical composition of the multicomponent Laves phase is studied depending on the temperatures of hardening, aging, and subsequent heating. Concentration correspondence between the chemical composition of the austenite and the intermetallic tcp phase formed in aging is discovered. A computational scheme for predicting the possibility of formation of Laves phases in multicomponent alloys is suggested.

  9. Aerodynamic heating on AFE due to nonequilibrium flow with variable entropy at boundary layer edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, P. C.; Rochelle, W. C.; Bouslog, S. A.; Tam, L. T.; Scott, C. D.; Curry, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A method of predicting the aerobrake aerothermodynamic environment on the NASA Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle is described. Results of a three dimensional inviscid nonequilibrium solution are used as input to an axisymmetric nonequilibrium boundary layer program to predict AFE convective heating rates. Inviscid flow field properties are obtained from the Euler option of the Viscous Reacting Flow (VRFLO) code at the boundary layer edge. Heating rates on the AFE surface are generated with the Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMP) code for a partially catalytic surface composed of Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) times. The 1864 kg AFE will fly an aerobraking trajectory, simulating return from geosynchronous Earth orbit, with a 75 km perigee and a 10 km/sec entry velocity. Results of this analysis will provide principal investigators and thermal analysts with aeroheating environments to perform experiment and thermal protection system design.

  10. Heat Transfer Enhancement due to Bubble Pumping in FC-72 Near the Saturation Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    Surface Boiling ," Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, vol. 41, No. 9, 1949. Mudawar, I., and D.E. Maddox, Critical Heat Flux in Subcooled Flow Boiling ...BACKGROUND Research on pool boiling in electronic cooling systems has focused on three primary areas: (1) reducing the temperature excursion at incipient...problems: (i) Boiling restricts the- physical design of the system . (ii) A high degree of superheat may be required if the surface is very smooth in order

  11. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H. )

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  12. Estimating heat stress from climate-based indicators: present-day biases and future spreads in the CMIP5 global climate model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Ducharne, A.; Sultan, B.; Braconnot, P.; Vautard, R.

    2015-08-01

    The increased exposure of human populations to heat stress is one of the likely consequences of global warming, and it has detrimental effects on health and labor capacity. Here, we consider the evolution of heat stress under climate change using 21 general circulation models (GCMs). Three heat stress indicators, based on both temperature and humidity conditions, are used to investigate present-day model biases and spreads in future climate projections. Present day estimates of heat stress indicators from observational data shows that humid tropical areas tend to experience more frequent heat stress than other regions do, with a total frequency of heat stress 250-300 d yr-1. The most severe heat stress is found in the Sahel and south India. Present-day GCM simulations tend to underestimate heat stress over the tropics due to dry and cold model biases. The model based estimates are in better agreement with observation in mid to high latitudes, but this is due to compensating errors in humidity and temperature. The severity of heat stress is projected to increase by the end of the century under climate change scenario RCP8.5, reaching unprecedented levels in some regions compared with observations. An analysis of the different factors contributing to the total spread of projected heat stress shows that spread is primarily driven by the choice of GCMs rather than the choice of indicators, even when the simulated indicators are bias-corrected. This supports the utility of the multi-model ensemble approach to assess the impacts of climate change on heat stress.

  13. Transient heat transfer in helium II due to a sudden vacuum break

    SciTech Connect

    Bosque, Ernesto S.; Dhuley, Ram C.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-29

    To ensure future cryogenic devices meet safety and operational specifications, significant value is gained from a developed understanding of the transient heat fluxes that result from failure of an insulating vacuum jacket around a helium II (He II)-cooled device. A novel, one-dimensional experiment is successfully performed examining the phenomena immediately following a vacuum rupture onto a cryosurface. In the experiment, a fast-opening (∼10 ms) valve isolates a rigid container of ultra high purity nitrogen (N{sub 2}) gas kept at room temperature and adjustable pressure from a vertically oriented, highly evacuated (∼10{sup −3} Pa) tube roughly 1 m in length. The bottom of the evacuated tube is sealed via a 2.54 mm thick copper disk, whose bottom surface is in intimate contact with an open column of He II (∼1.8 K). The evacuated tube, disk, and He II column share a diameter of 24 mm. Opening the valve results in a vacuum rupture. N{sub 2} gas is immediately drawn into the evacuated space and cryopumped onto the disk as a growing layer of solid cryodeposit. Various coupled transient heat transfer processes proceed as the internal energy of the warm gas is transferred through the growing layer of solid N{sub 2}, through the copper disk, and into the He II column. This work examines the qualitative nature of these transient phenomena and the magnitude of the heat fluxes present through each of the series of thermal resistances.

  14. Transient heat transfer in helium II due to a sudden vacuum break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosque, Ernesto S.; Dhuley, Ram C.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    To ensure future cryogenic devices meet safety and operational specifications, significant value is gained from a developed understanding of the transient heat fluxes that result from failure of an insulating vacuum jacket around a helium II (He II)-cooled device. A novel, one-dimensional experiment is successfully performed examining the phenomena immediately following a vacuum rupture onto a cryosurface. In the experiment, a fast-opening (˜10 ms) valve isolates a rigid container of ultra high purity nitrogen (N2) gas kept at room temperature and adjustable pressure from a vertically oriented, highly evacuated (˜10-3 Pa) tube roughly 1 m in length. The bottom of the evacuated tube is sealed via a 2.54 mm thick copper disk, whose bottom surface is in intimate contact with an open column of He II (˜1.8 K). The evacuated tube, disk, and He II column share a diameter of 24 mm. Opening the valve results in a vacuum rupture. N2 gas is immediately drawn into the evacuated space and cryopumped onto the disk as a growing layer of solid cryodeposit. Various coupled transient heat transfer processes proceed as the internal energy of the warm gas is transferred through the growing layer of solid N2, through the copper disk, and into the He II column. This work examines the qualitative nature of these transient phenomena and the magnitude of the heat fluxes present through each of the series of thermal resistances.

  15. Investigating the Role of Diabatic Heating in Global Atmospheric Circulation and Climate Sensitivity: An Energetics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanski, J.; Rossow, W. B.

    2009-12-01

    The generation of zonal and eddy available potential energy (Gz and Ge) as envisioned by Lorenz (1955) are computed on a global, daily, synoptic-scale basis. Using global, mostly satellite-derived datasets for the diabatic heating components and the temperature enables us to obtain Gz and especially Ge with greater accuracy and at higher temporal and spatial resolution than previously possible. In particular, we are able to consider the contribution of each diabatic heating component separately and in combination. We use this information to determine how various processes contribute to the energy available for the general and eddy circulations. Contributions to the global mean daily mean Gz and Ge are computed at a horizontal resolution of 2.5 degrees for the lower troposphere (surface to 680mb), middle troposphere (680-440mb), upper troposphere (440mb to 100mb) and stratosphere (100mb to TOA) for 1997 through 2000. Comparisons to earlier estimates of the generation terms by Lorenz (1967) and Peixoto and Oort (1992) are made. The seasonal and spatial variability of the total generation and of the individual contributions of heating by radiative flux convergence, latent heating and sensible heat flux from the surface are discussed. The generation of zonal and eddy potential energy (Gz and Ge) as envisioned by Lorenz (1955) is computed for seven climate models from the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP's) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) multi-model dataset (Meehl et al 2007). Gz and Ge are computed directly from the temperature and diabatic heating fields of the current climate and a doubled CO2 climate. The seasonal and spatial variability of the total generation and of the individual contributions of heating by radiative flux convergence, latent heating and sensible heat flux from the surface of each model are compared to one another, and evaluated with respect to the same quantities computed from observations. In contrast to a recent

  16. Model calculated global, regional and megacity premature mortality due to air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Barlas, C.; Giannadaki, D.; Pozzer, A.

    2013-03-01

    Air pollution by fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) has increased strongly with industrialization and urbanization. We estimated the premature mortality rates and the years of human life lost (YLL) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 and O3 in 2005 for epidemiological regions defined by the World Health Organization. We carried out high-resolution global model calculations to resolve urban and industrial regions in greater detail compared to previous work. We applied a health impact function to estimate premature mortality for people of 30 yr and older, using parameters derived from epidemiological cohort studies. Our results suggest that especially in large countries with extensive suburban and rural populations, air pollution-induced mortality rates have previously been underestimated. We calculate a global respiratory mortality of about 773 thousand yr-1 (YLL ≈ 5.2 million yr-1), 186 thousand yr-1 by lung cancer (YLL ≈ 1.7 million yr-1) and 2.0 million yr-1 by cardiovascular disease (YLL ≈ 14.3 million yr-1). The global mean per capita mortality caused by air pollution is about 0.1 % yr-1. The highest premature mortality rates are found in the Southeast Asia and Western Pacific regions (about 25% and 46% of the global rate, respectively) where more than a dozen of the most highly polluted megacities are located.

  17. Overestimation of stereo thresholds by the TNO stereotest is not due to global stereopsis.

    PubMed

    Vancleef, Kathleen; Read, Jenny C A; Herbert, William; Goodship, Nicola; Woodhouse, Maeve; Serrano-Pedraza, Ignacio

    2017-07-01

    It has been repeatedly shown that the TNO stereotest overestimates stereo threshold compared to other clinical stereotests. In the current study, we test whether this overestimation can be attributed to a distinction between 'global' (or 'cyclopean') and 'local' (feature or contour-based) stereopsis. We compared stereo thresholds of a global (TNO) and a local clinical stereotest (Randot Circles). In addition, a global and a local psychophysical stereotest were added to the design. One hundred and forty-nine children between 4 and 16 years old were included in the study. Stereo threshold estimates with TNO were a factor of two higher than with any of the other stereotests. No significant differences were found between the other tests. Bland-Altman analyses also indicated low agreement between TNO and the other stereotests, especially for higher stereo threshold estimates. Simulations indicated that the TNO test protocol and test disparities can account for part of this effect. The results indicate that the global - local distinction is an unlikely explanation for the overestimated thresholds of TNO. Test protocol and disparities are one contributing factor. Potential additional factors include the nature of the task (TNO requires depth discrimination rather than detection) and the use of anaglyph red/green 3D glasses rather than polarizing filters, which may reduce binocular fusion. © 2017 The Authors. Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of College of Optometrists.

  18. Expression of heat shock proteins (hsp) 27 and 70 in various organ systems in cases of death due to fire.

    PubMed

    Doberentz, E; Genneper, L; Böker, D; Lignitz, E; Madea, B

    2014-11-01

    The expression of heat shock proteins (hsp) increases in case of variable types of endogenous and exogenous cellular stress, as for example thermal stress. Immunohistochemical staining with hsp antibodies can visualize these stress proteins. Fifty-three cases of death due to heat and a control group of 100 deaths without any antemortem thermic stress were examined regarding hsp27 and hsp70 expression in myocardial, pulmonary, and renal tissues. The results revealed a correlation between hsp expression, survival time, and cause of death. In cases of death due to fire, the expression of hsp is more extensive than in the control group, especially in pulmonary and renal tissues. The immunohistochemical investigation of an hsp expression can support the proof of vitality in cases of death related to fire.

  19. Model calculated global, regional and megacity premature mortality due to air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Barlas, C.; Giannadaki, D.; Pozzer, A.

    2013-07-01

    Air pollution by fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) has increased strongly with industrialization and urbanization. We estimate the premature mortality rates and the years of human life lost (YLL) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 and O3 in 2005 for epidemiological regions defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). This is based upon high-resolution global model calculations that resolve urban and industrial regions in greater detail compared to previous work. Results indicate that 69% of the global population is exposed to an annual mean anthropogenic PM2.5 concentration of >10 μg m-3 (WHO guideline) and 33% to > 25 μg m-3 (EU directive). We applied an epidemiological health impact function and find that especially in large countries with extensive suburban and rural populations, air pollution-induced mortality rates have been underestimated given that previous studies largely focused on the urban environment. We calculate a global respiratory mortality of about 773 thousand/year (YLL ≈ 5.2 million/year), 186 thousand/year by lung cancer (YLL ≈ 1.7 million/year) and 2.0 million/year by cardiovascular disease (YLL ≈ 14.3 million/year). The global mean per capita mortality caused by air pollution is about 0.1% yr-1. The highest premature mortality rates are found in the Southeast Asia and Western Pacific regions (about 25% and 46% of the global rate, respectively) where more than a dozen of the most highly polluted megacities are located.

  20. Global variations in Magnetosphere-Ionosphere system due to Sudden Impulses under different IMF By conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, D. S.; Zou, S.; Slavin, J. A.; Ridley, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    A sudden impulse (SI) event is a rapid increase in solar wind dynamic pressure, which compresses the Earth's magnetosphere from the dayside and travels towards the Earth's tail. During the SI events, compression front reconfigures the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (MI) current systems. This compression launches fast magnetosonic waves that carry the SI through magnetosphere and Alfven waves that enhance the field-aligned currents (FACs) at high-latitudes. FAC systems can be measured by Active Magnetosphere and Polar Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE). The propagation front also creates travelling convection vortices (TCVs) in the ionosphere that map to the equatorial flank regions of the Earth's magnetosphere. The TCVs then move from dayside to the nightside ionosphere. To understand these SI-driven disturbances globally, we use the University of Michigan Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) with Global Magnetosphere (GM), Inner Magnetosphere (IM) and Ionosphere (IE) modules. We study the changes in the FAC systems, which link ionospheric and magnetospheric propagating disturbances under different IMF By conditions and trace the ionospheric disturbances to magnetospheric system to better understand the connection between two systems. As shown by previous studies, IMF By can cause asymmetries in the magnetic perturbations measured by the ground magnetometers. By using model results we determine the global latitudinal and longitudinal dependencies of the SI signatures on the ground. We also use the SWMF results to drive the Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) to reveal how the Ionosphere-Thermosphere system is affected by the SI propagation. Comparisons are carried out between the IE model output and high latitude convection patterns from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) measurements and SuperMAG ground magnetic field perturbations. In closing we have modeled the field-aligned currents, ionospheric convection patterns, temperature and

  1. Predicted changes in energy demands for heating and cooling due to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinar, Mojca; Vidrih, Boris; Kajfež-Bogataj, Lučka; Medved, Sašo

    In the last 3 years in Slovenia we experienced extremely hot summers and demand for cooling the buildings have risen significantly. Since climate change scenarios predict higher temperatures for the whole country and for all seasons, we expect that energy demand for heating would decrease while demand for cooling would increase. An analysis for building with permitted energy demand and for low-energy demand building in two typical urban climates in Slovenia was performed. The transient systems simulation program (TRNSYS) was used for simulation of the indoor conditions and the energy use for heating and cooling. Climate change scenarios were presented in form of “future” Test Reference Years (TRY). The time series of hourly data for all meteorological variables for different scenarios were chosen from actual measurements, using the method of highest likelihood. The climate change scenarios predicted temperature rise (+1 °C and +3 °C) and solar radiation increase (+3% and +6%). With the selection of these scenarios we covered the spectra of possible predicted climate changes in Slovenia. The results show that energy use for heating would decrease from 16% to 25% (depends on the intensity of warming) in subalpine region, while in Mediterranean region the rate of change would not be significant. In summer time we would need up to six times more energy for cooling in subalpine region and approximately two times more in Mediterranean region. low-energy building proved to be very economical in wintertime while on average higher energy consumption for cooling is expected in those buildings in summertime. In case of significant warmer and more solar energy intensive climate, the good isolated buildings are more efficient than standard buildings. TRY proved not to be efficient for studying extreme conditions like installed power of the cooling system.

  2. The exterior unsteady viscous flow and heat transfer due to a porous expanding or contracting cylinder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Si, Xinhui; Shen, Yanan; Zheng, Liancun; Lin, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Since the vessels in the biological tissues are characterized by low seepage Reynolds numbers and contracting or expanding walls, more attention is paid on the viscous flow outside the porous pipe with small expansion or contraction. This paper presents a numerical solution of the flow and heat transfer outside an expanding or contracting porous cylinder. The coupled nonlinear similarity equations are solved by Bvp4c, which is a collocation method with MATLAB. The effects of the different physical parameters, namely the permeability Reynolds number,the expansion ratio and the Prandtl number, on the velocity and temperature distribution are obtained and the results are shown graphically.

  3. Heat transfer from a liquid bath due to an impinging gas jet: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, F.; Farouk, B.; Mutharasan, R.

    1995-12-31

    An impinging gasjet on a liquid surface is found in many industrial processes such as electric arc furnace steel-making and welding. Fundamental understanding of the interaction of a gas or plasmajet impinging on a liquid pool can provide important insights into process behavior resulting in improved efficiency. A numerical model is developed for solving both the impinging gas jet and the liquid pool temperature and flow fields along with the deformed interface shape for the above processing operation. Using curvilinear coordinates, the Navier-Stokes equations of each phase are solved separately and then coupled via continuity of static pressure, shear stress, temperature and heat flux at the interface.

  4. Investigation of heat transfer due to isothermal heater in irregular porous cavity: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum

    2017-07-01

    An investigation is carried out to predict the heat transfer characteristics in an irregular square porous cavity having a small isothermal heater placed at bottom left corner of cavity. The heater is of step shape with vertical right and horizontal top edges which are maintained at an isothermal temperature and right vertical surface of domain is maintained at cold temperature. The top and bottom edges of porous domain are maintained adiabatically. The governing equations are solved iteratively with the help of finite element method. Results are discussed with respect to isothermal and streamline distribution inside the porous domain.

  5. Circulation in the high-latitude thermosphere due to electric fields and Joule heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Megill, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    Electric fields in the earth's upper atmosphere are capable of setting the neutral atmosphere in motion via ion-neutral collisions as well as pressure gradients from resultant Joule heating. By means of simple models for the high-latitude thermosphere and electric fields a simplified set of coupled equations is solved which show that moderate electric fields, when present for a period of several hours, are capable of displacing the neutral atmosphere of the order of 50 km in the vertical, a few hundred kilometers in the north-south direction and over 1000 km in the east-west direction.

  6. Circulation in the high-latitude thermosphere due to electric fields and Joule heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Megill, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    Electric fields in the earth's upper atmosphere are capable of setting the neutral atmosphere in motion via ion-neutral collisions as well as pressure gradients from resultant Joule heating. By means of simple models for the high-latitude thermosphere and electric fields a simplified set of coupled equations is solved which show that moderate electric fields, when present for a period of several hours, are capable of displacing the neutral atmosphere of the order of 50 km in the vertical, a few hundred kilometers in the north-south direction and over 1000 km in the east-west direction.

  7. New techniques for calculating heat and particle source rates due to neutral-beam injection in axisymmetric tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.; McCune, D.C.; Towner, H.H.; Davis, S.L.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1981-02-01

    A set of numerical techniques are described for calculating heat and particle source rates due to neutral beam injection in axisymmetric tokamaks. While these techniques consume a substantial amount of computer time, they take into account a number of significant, and normally neglected, effects. Examples of these effects are reionization of escaping charge exchanged beam particles, finite fast ion orbit excursions, beam deposition through collisions of beam neutrals with circulating beam ions, and the transport of thermal neutrals in the plasma due to charge changing collisions with beam ions.

  8. A global approach for solving evolutive heat transfer for image denoising and inpainting.

    PubMed

    Auclair-Fortier, Marie-Flavie; Ziou, Djemel

    2006-09-01

    This paper proposes an alternative to partial differential equations (PDEs) for solving problems in computer vision based on evolutive heat transfer. Traditionally, the method for solving such physics-based problems is to discretize and solve a PDE by a purely mathematical process. Instead of using the PDE, we propose to use the global heat principle and to decompose it into basic laws. We show that some of these laws admit an exact global version since they arise from conservative principles. We also show that the assumptions made about the other basic Iaws can be made wisely, taking into account knowledge about the problem and the domain. The numerical scheme is derived in a straightforward way from the modeled problem, thus providing a physical explanation for each step in the solution. The advantage of such an approach is that it minimizes the approximations made during the whole process and it modularizes it, allowing changing the application to a great number of problems. We apply the scheme to two applications: image denoising and inpainting which are modeled with heat transfer. For denoising, we propose a new approximation for the conductivity coefficient and we add thin lines to the features in order to block diffusion.

  9. Sensitivity of global ocean heat content from reanalyses to the atmospheric reanalysis forcing: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storto, Andrea; Yang, Chunxue; Masina, Simona

    2016-05-01

    The global ocean heat content evolution is a key component of the Earth's energy budget and can be consistently determined by ocean reanalyses that assimilate hydrographic profiles. This work investigates the impact of the atmospheric reanalysis forcing through a multiforcing ensemble ocean reanalysis, where the ensemble members are forced by five state-of-the-art atmospheric reanalyses during the meteorological satellite era (1979-2013). Data assimilation leads the ensemble to converge toward robust estimates of ocean warming rates and significantly reduces the spread (1.48 ± 0.18 W/m2, per unit area of the World Ocean); hence, the impact of the atmospheric forcing appears only marginal for the global heat content estimates in both upper and deeper oceans. A sensitivity assessment performed through realistic perturbation of the main sources of uncertainty in ocean reanalyses highlights that bias correction and preprocessing of in situ observations represent the most crucial component of the reanalysis, whose perturbation accounts for up to 60% of the ocean heat content anomaly variability in the pre-Argo period. Although these results may depend on the single reanalysis system used, they reveal useful information for the ocean observation community and for the optimal generation of perturbations in ocean ensemble systems.

  10. Projection of heat waves over China for eight different global warming targets using 12 CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaojun; Huang, Jianbin; Luo, Yong; Zhao, Zongci; Xu, Ying

    2017-05-01

    Simulation and projection of the characteristics of heat waves over China were investigated using 12 CMIP5 global climate models and the CN05.1 observational gridded dataset. Four heat wave indices (heat wave frequency, longest heat wave duration, heat wave days, and high temperature days) were adopted in the analysis. Evaluations of the 12 CMIP5 models and their ensemble indicated that the multi-model ensemble could capture the spatiotemporal characteristics of heat wave variation over China. The inter-decadal variations of heat waves during 1961-2005 can be well simulated by multi-model ensemble. Based on model projections, the features of heat waves over China for eight different global warming targets (1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0 °C) were explored. The results showed that the frequency and intensity of heat waves would increase more dramatically as the global mean temperature rise attained higher warming targets. Under the RCP8.5 scenario, the four China-averaged heat wave indices would increase from about 1.0 times/year, 2.5, 5.4, and 13.8 days/year to about 3.2 times/year, 14.0, 32.0, and 31.9 days/year for 1.5 and 5.0 °C warming targets, respectively. Those regions that suffer severe heat waves in the base climate would experience the heat waves with greater frequency and severity following global temperature rise. It is also noteworthy that the areas in which a greater number of severe heat waves occur displayed considerable expansion. Moreover, the model uncertainties exhibit a gradual enhancement with projected time extending from 2006 to 2099.

  11. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam Chakhmachi, Amir; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-15

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  12. Strong radiative heating due to wintertime black carbon aerosols in the Brahmaputra River Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Garro, Mark A.; Wilcox, Eric M.; Moosmüller, Hans

    2012-05-01

    The Brahmaputra River Valley (BRV) of Southeast Asia recently has been experiencing extreme regional climate change. A week-long study using a micro-Aethalometer was conducted during January-February 2011 to measure black carbon (BC) aerosol mass concentrations in Guwahati (India), the largest city in the BRV region. Daily median values of BC mass concentration were 9-41 μgm-3, with maxima over 50 μgm-3 during evenings and early mornings. Median BC concentrations were higher than in mega cities of India and China, and significantly higher than in urban locations of Europe and USA. The corresponding mean cloud-free aerosol radiative forcing is -63.4 Wm-2 at the surface and +11.1 Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere with the difference giving the net atmospheric BC solar absorption, which translates to a lower atmospheric heating rate of ˜2 K/d. Potential regional climatic impacts associated with large surface cooling and high lower-atmospheric heating are discussed.

  13. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Chakhmachi, Amir; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-01

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  14. Climate change. Projected increase in lightning strikes in the United States due to global warming.

    PubMed

    Romps, David M; Seeley, Jacob T; Vollaro, David; Molinari, John

    2014-11-14

    Lightning plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry and in the initiation of wildfires, but the impact of global warming on lightning rates is poorly constrained. Here we propose that the lightning flash rate is proportional to the convective available potential energy (CAPE) times the precipitation rate. Using observations, the product of CAPE and precipitation explains 77% of the variance in the time series of total cloud-to-ground lightning flashes over the contiguous United States (CONUS). Storms convert CAPE times precipitated water mass to discharged lightning energy with an efficiency of 1%. When this proxy is applied to 11 climate models, CONUS lightning strikes are predicted to increase 12 ± 5% per degree Celsius of global warming and about 50% over this century. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Improved estimates of global ocean circulation, heat transport and mixing from hydrographic data.

    PubMed

    Ganachaud, A; Wunsch, C

    2000-11-23

    Through its ability to transport large amounts of heat, fresh water and nutrients, the ocean is an essential regulator of climate. The pathways and mechanisms of this transport and its stability are critical issues in understanding the present state of climate and the possibilities of future changes. Recently, global high-quality hydrographic data have been gathered in the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), to obtain an accurate picture of the present circulation. Here we combine the new data from high-resolution trans-oceanic sections and current meters with climatological wind fields, biogeochemical balances and improved a priori error estimates in an inverse model, to improve estimates of the global circulation and heat fluxes. Our solution resolves globally vertical mixing across surfaces of equal density, with coefficients in the range (3-12) x 10(-4) m2 s(-1). Net deep-water production rates amount to (15 +/- 12) x 10(6) m3 s(-1) in the North Atlantic Ocean and (21 +/- 6) x 10(6) m3 s(-1) in the Southern Ocean. Our estimates provide a new reference state for future climate studies with rigorous estimates of the uncertainties.

  16. Fluctuation of Electron Temperature due to Global Alfvén Eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amagishi, Yoshimitsu; Hishida, Takanori; Kobayashi, Motoshi; Tsushima, Akira

    2003-06-01

    Two kinds of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes were observed in a cylindrical magnetized plasma produced by a magneto-plasma-dynamic (MPD) arcjet plasma source. Each mode belongs to the "Compressional Alfvén Wave (CAW)" with the azimuthal mode number of m = 1 and the "Global Alfvén Eigenmode (GAE)" with m = 0, respectively. We found that the latter was responsible for the fluctuation of electron temperature.

  17. Global Health Benefits from Reductions in Background Tropospheric Ozone due to Methane Emission Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. J.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2005-05-01

    Increases in background ozone throughout the troposphere are partially attributed to rising anthropogenic methane concentrations, which are projected to continue to increase in the future. Because methane is long-lived and affects background ozone, controls on methane emissions would reduce surface ozone concentrations fairly uniformly around the globe. Epidemiological research indicates that exposure to ozone increases incidence of respiratory ailments and premature mortality. In addition, exposure to ozone reduces agricultural yields and damages natural ecosystems. We use the MOZART-2 global atmospheric chemistry and transport model to estimate the effects on global surface ozone of perturbations in methane emissions. We consider a baseline scenario for 2000 and the 2030 A2 scenario (emissions from the IPCC AR-4 2030 atmospheric chemistry experiments), and examine the impact on ozone of decreasing anthropogenic methane emissions relative to this baseline by 20%. Using the simulated spatially-distributed decreases in surface ozone concentrations resulting from these reductions in methane emissions, we estimate the global benefits to human health in the methane emission reduction scenario. We focus on human mortality, and consider the sensitivity of our estimates to different assumptions of health effect thresholds at low ozone concentrations.

  18. Interannual and Spatial Variability of Global Ocean Heat/Freshwater Content Identified from GTSPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, P. C.; Sun, C.

    2013-12-01

    Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) is a cooperative international project since 1990. The GTSPP handles all temperature and salinity profile data including XBT, CTDs, thermistor chain data, and Argo observations. Near-real time gridded (T, S) dataset was established from GTSPP since 1990 with horizontal resolution of (1o×1o) and temporal increment of 1 month using the recently developed optimal spectral decomposition (OSD) method. With this new monthly varying gridded dataset, the upper ocean (surface to 300 m depth) heat content OHC300 and freshwater content FWC300 were calculated at each horizontal grid point. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was conducted on the temporally varying global 2D OHC300 anomaly relative to its seasonal variation. A new phenomenon, global ocean tripole, was discovered. The EOF-1 mode (44.2% variance) represents the classical El Nino/La Nina phenomenon. The EOF-2 mode (14.6%) represents the Indian Ocean Dipole mode and the El Nino Modoki. Its features and connection to climate variability is also discussed. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was conducted on the temporally varying global 2D FWC300 anomaly relative to its seasonal variation. The EOF-1 mode (73.7% variance) represents near global-scale variability with the largest anomaly appearing in the Indian Ocean near southeast of Africa. The first principal component (PC1) shows decadal variability. The temporal-spatial variability represented by the EOF-1 mode shows rapid increasing of global FWC300 from 1999 to 2005 and sustaining the high values after 2005. Interpretations of the observational results to recent global warming will also be presented.

  19. Increased heat transfer to elliptical leading edges due to spanwise variations in the freestream momentum: Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the effect of spanwise variation in momentum on leading edge heat transfer is discussed. Numerical and experimental results are presented for both a circular leading edge and a 3:1 elliptical leading edge. Reynolds numbers in the range of 10,000 to 240,000 based on leading edge diameter are investigated. The surface of the body is held at a constant uniform temperature. Numerical and experimental results with and without spanwise variations are presented. Direct comparison of the two-dimensional results, that is, with no spanwise variations, to the analytical results of Frossling is very good. The numerical calculation, which uses the PARC3D code, solves the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, assuming steady laminar flow on the leading edge region. Experimentally, increases in the spanwise-averaged heat transfer coefficient as high as 50 percent above the two-dimensional value were observed. Numerically, the heat transfer coefficient was seen to increase by as much as 25 percent. In general, under the same flow conditions, the circular leading edge produced a higher heat transfer rate than the elliptical leading edge. As a percentage of the respective two-dimensional values, the circular and elliptical leading edges showed similar sensitivity to span wise variations in momentum. By equating the root mean square of the amplitude of the spanwise variation in momentum to the turbulence intensity, a qualitative comparison between the present work and turbulent results was possible. It is shown that increases in leading edge heat transfer due to spanwise variations in freestream momentum are comparable to those due to freestream turbulence.

  20. Wind-chill-equivalent temperatures: regarding the impact due to the variability of the environmental convective heat transfer coefficient.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    The wind-chill index (WCI), developed in Antarctica in the 1940s and recently updated by the weather services in the USA and Canada, expresses the enhancement of heat loss in cold climates from exposed body parts, e.g., face, due to wind. The index provides a simple and practical means for assessing the thermal effects of wind on humans outdoors. It is also used for indicating weather conditions that may pose adverse risks of freezing at subfreezing environmental temperatures. Values of the WCI depend on a number of parameters, i.e, temperatures, physical properties of the air, wind speed, etc., and on insolation and evaporation. This paper focuses on the effects of various empirical correlations used in the literature for calculating the convective heat transfer coefficients between humans and their environment. Insolation and evaporation are not included in the presentation. Large differences in calculated values among these correlations are demonstrated and quantified. Steady-state wind-chill-equivalent temperatures (WCETs) are estimated by a simple, one-dimensional heat-conducting hollow-cylindrical model using these empirical correlations. Partial comparison of these values with the published "new" WCETs is presented. The variability of the estimated WCETs, due to different correlations employed to calculate them, is clearly demonstrated. The results of this study clearly suggest the need for establishing a "gold standard" for estimating convective heat exchange between exposed body elements and the cold and windy environment. This should be done prior to the introduction and adoption of further modifications to WCETs and indices. Correlations to estimate the convective heat transfer coefficients between exposed body parts of humans in windy and cold environments influence the WCETs and need to be standardized.

  1. Wind-chill-equivalent temperatures: regarding the impact due to the variability of the environmental convective heat transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    The wind-chill index (WCI), developed in Antarctica in the 1940s and recently updated by the weather services in the USA and Canada, expresses the enhancement of heat loss in cold climates from exposed body parts, e.g., face, due to wind. The index provides a simple and practical means for assessing the thermal effects of wind on humans outdoors. It is also used for indicating weather conditions that may pose adverse risks of freezing at subfreezing environmental temperatures. Values of the WCI depend on a number of parameters, i.e, temperatures, physical properties of the air, wind speed, etc., and on insolation and evaporation. This paper focuses on the effects of various empirical correlations used in the literature for calculating the convective heat transfer coefficients between humans and their environment. Insolation and evaporation are not included in the presentation. Large differences in calculated values among these correlations are demonstrated and quantified. Steady-state wind-chill-equivalent temperatures (WCETs) are estimated by a simple, one-dimensional heat-conducting hollow-cylindrical model using these empirical correlations. Partial comparison of these values with the published “new” WCETs is presented. The variability of the estimated WCETs, due to different correlations employed to calculate them, is clearly demonstrated. The results of this study clearly suggest the need for establishing a “gold standard” for estimating convective heat exchange between exposed body elements and the cold and windy environment. This should be done prior to the introduction and adoption of further modifications to WCETs and indices. Correlations to estimate the convective heat transfer coefficients between exposed body parts of humans in windy and cold environments influence the WCETs and need to be standardized.

  2. Global Warming Impacts on Heating and Cooling Degree-Days in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Y.; Caldeira, K.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is expected to significantly alter residential air conditioning and space heating requirements, which account for 41% of U.S. household energy expenditures. The degree-day method can be used for reliable estimation of weather related building energy consumption and costs, as well as outdoor climatic thermal comfort. Here, we use U.S. Climate Normals developed by NOAA based on weather station observations along with Climate Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) multi-model ensemble simulations. We add the projected change in heating and cooling degree-days based on the climate models to the estimates based on the NOAA U.S. Climate Normals to project future heating and cooling degree-days. We find locations with the lowest and highest combined index of cooling (CDDs) and heating degree-days (HDDs) for the historical period (1981 - 2010) and future period (2080 - 2099) under the Representation Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) climate change scenario. Our results indicate that in both time frames and among the lower 48 states, coastal areas in the West and South California will have the smallest degree-day sum (CDD + HDD), and hence from a climatic perspective become the best candidates for residential real estate. The Rocky Mountains region in Wyoming, in addition to northern Minnesota and North Dakota, will have the greatest CDD + HDD. While global warming is projected to reduce the median heating and cooling demand (- 5%) at the end of the century, CDD + HDD will decrease in the North, with an opposite effect in the South. This work could be helpful in deciding where to live in the United States based on present and future thermal comfort, and could also provide a basis for estimates of changes in heating and cooling energy demand.

  3. Uncertainties in global ocean surface heat flux climatologies derived from ship observations

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P.J.; Weare, B.C.

    1995-08-01

    A methodology to define uncertainties associated with ocean surface heat flux calculations has been developed and applied to a revised version of the Oberhuber global climatology, which utilizes a summary of the COADS surface observations. Systematic and random uncertainties in the net oceanic heat flux and each of its four components at individual grid points and for zonal averages have been estimated for each calendar month and the annual mean. The most important uncertainties of the 2{degree} x 2{degree} grid cell values of each of the heat fluxes are described. Annual mean net shortwave flux random uncertainties associated with errors in estimating cloud cover in the tropics yield total uncertainties which are greater than 25 W m{sup {minus}2}. In the northern latitudes, where the large number of observations substantially reduce the influence of these random errors, the systematic uncertainties in the utilized parameterization are largely responsible for total uncertainties in the shortwave fluxes which usually remain greater than 10 W m{sup {minus}2}. Systematic uncertainties dominate in the zonal means because spatial averaging has led to a further reduction of the random errors. The situation for the annual mean latent heat flux is somewhat different in that even for grid point values the contributions of the systematic uncertainties tend to be larger than those of the random uncertainties at most all latitudes. Latent heat flux uncertainties are greater than 20 W m{sup {minus}2} nearly everywhere south of 40{degree}N, and in excess of 30 W m{sup {minus}2} over broad areas of the subtropics, even those with large numbers of observations. Resulting zonal mean latent heat flux uncertainties are largest ({approximately}30 W m{sup {minus}2}) in the middle latitudes and subtropics and smallest ({approximately}10--25 W m{sup {minus}2}) near the equator and over the northernmost regions.

  4. Wall Area of Influence and Growing Wall Heat Transfer due to Sliding Bubbles in Subcooled Boiling Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Junsoo; Estrada-Perez, Carlos E.; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2016-04-01

    A variety of dynamical features of sliding bubbles and their impact on wall heat transfer were observed at subcooled flow boiling conditions in a vertical square test channel. Among the wide range of parameters observed, we particularly focus in this paper on (i) the sliding bubbles’ effect on wall heat transfer (supplemantry discussion to the authors’ previous work in Yoo et al. (2016a,b)) and (ii) the wall area influenced by sliding bubbles in subcooled boiling flow. At first, this study reveals that the degree of wall heat transfer improvement due to sliding bubbles depended less on the wall superheat condition as the mass flux increased. Also, the sliding bubble trajectory was found to be one of the critical factors in order to properly describe the wall heat transfer associated with sliding bubbles. In particular, the wall area influenced by sliding bubbles depended strongly on both sliding bubble trajectory and sliding bubble size; the sliding bubble trajectory was also observed to be closely related to the sliding bubble size. Importantly, these results indicate the limitation of current approach in CFD analyses especially for the wall area of bubble influence. In addition, the analyses on the temporal fraction of bubbles’ residence (FR) along the heated wall show that the sliding bubbles typically travel through narrow path with high frequency while the opposite was observed downstream. That is, both FR and sliding bubble trajectory depended substantially on the distance from nucleation site, which is expected to be similar for the quenching heat transfer mode induced by sliding bubbles.

  5. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  6. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  7. The synchronous instability of a compressor rotor due to bearing journal differential heating

    SciTech Connect

    Jongh, F.M. de; Morton, P.G.

    1996-10-01

    The paper describes a synchronous vibration instability problem encountered on a centrifugal compressor with oil-lubricated bearings. The problem was solved by modification of the compressor rotor; however, the root cause was not completely understood at that time. A possible explanation was based on a theory that suggested differential heating of the bearing journals. It was decided to verify this theory by experiments. Therefore a test rotor was designed with identical rotor dynamic characteristics to those of the compressor rotor. To fill a gap in the published research on bearing thermohydrodynamics, an experimental technique was devised to measure the surface temperature variations around one of the journals of this rotor. The dependence of significant temperature differentials across the journal upon its orbit was confirmed.

  8. Numerical analysis of the electrical failure of a metallic nanowire mesh due to Joule heating.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Tsuchiya, Kaoru; Tohmyoh, Hironori; Saka, Masumi

    2013-08-30

    To precisely examine the electrical failure behavior of a metallic nanowire mesh induced by Joule heating (i.e., melting), a previously developed numerical method was modified with regard to the maximum temperature in the mesh and the electrical resistivity of the nanowire. A sample case of an Ag nanowire mesh under specific working conditions was analyzed with highly accurate numerical results. By monitoring the temperature in the mesh, the current required to trigger the melting of a mesh segment (i.e., the melting current) could be obtained. The melting process of a mesh equipped with a current source during actual operation was predicted on the basis of the obtained relationship between the melting current and the corresponding melting voltage in the numerical melting process. Local unstable and stable melting could be precisely identified for both the current-controlled and voltage-controlled current sources in the present example.

  9. Changes in the explanation of global crop yields due to climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D. K.; Gerber, J. S.; MacDonald, G. K.; West, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    Crop productivity varies each year on account of several factors, primarily variations in temperature and precipitation. How much of the variability in crop yields is explained by climate variations is important for stabilizing future food production. Even more important is determining whether the proportion of crop yields explained by climate is changing. In this presentation we will show how much of the yield variability observed for maize, rice, wheat, and soybean is explained by climate variability. We have also identified regions where this explanation is changing and will present global maps of these changes.

  10. Predictive study on the risk of malaria spreading due to global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masaji

    1996-12-31

    Global warming will bring about a temperature elevation, and the habitat of vectors of infectious diseases, such as malaria and dengue fever, will spread into subtropical or temperate zone. The purpose of this study is to simulate the spreading of these diseases through reexamination of existing data and collection of some additional information by field survey. From these data, the author will establish the relationship between meteorological conditions, vector density and malaria occurrence. And then he will simulate and predict the malaria epidemics in case of temperature elevation in southeast Asia and Japan.

  11. Global methane and nitrous oxide emissions from terrestrial ecosystems due to multiple environmental changes

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Hanqin; Chen, Guangsheng; Lu, Chaoqun; ...

    2015-03-16

    Greenhouse gas (GHG)-induced climate change is among the most pressing sustainability challenges facing humanity today, posing serious risks for ecosystem health. Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the two most important GHGs after carbon dioxide (CO2), but their regional and global budgets are not well known. In this paper, we applied a process-based coupled biogeochemical model to concurrently estimate the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of CH4 and N2O fluxes as driven by multiple environmental changes, including climate variability, rising atmospheric CO2, increasing nitrogen deposition, tropospheric ozone pollution, land use change, and nitrogen fertilizer use.

  12. Low-frequency variability of sea level as related to the heat balance of global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Niiler, P.; Patzert, W.

    1991-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON mission will determine global changes of sea level with unprecedented accuracy. Our main objective is the use TOPEX/POSEIDON data, concurrent in situ ocean measurements, and other satellite observations to document and diagnose physical processes by which heat is exchanged with the atmosphere, stored in the ocean, or transported by ocean circulation. During the prelaunch period, our objectives are to advise the project on an improved method of retrieving sea level data and prepare for the application of TOPEX/POSEIDON data by developing a diagnostic model using in situ measurements and altimeter observations from Geosat and the European Remote Sensing satellite.

  13. Global distribution of moisture, evaporation-precipitation, and diabatic heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Global archives were established for ECMWF 12-hour, multilevel analysis beginning 1 January 1985; day and night IR temperatures, and solar incoming and solar absorbed. Routines were written to access these data conveniently from NASA/MSFC MASSTOR facility for diagnostic analysis. Calculations of diabatic heating rates were performed from the ECMWF data using 4-day intervals. Calculations of precipitable water (W) from 1 May 1985 were carried out using the ECMWF data. Because a major operational change on 1 May 1985 had a significant impact on the moisture field, values prior to that date are incompatible with subsequent analyses.

  14. Measurements of thermal electron heating and the formation of a non-Maxwellian energy distribution due to ion acoustic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Hargreaves, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of intense microwaves with an inhomogeneous plasma is studied in the U.C. Davis Prometheus III Device. P-polarized microwaves (f = 1.2 GHz, P/sub 0/ less than or equal to 5 KW) are incident on an essentially collisionless plasma with a long scale length in an oversized waveguide. For modest powers, large amplitude ion acoustic turbulence is observed on the underdense plasma shelf due to a combination of the parametric decay and the electron drift instabilities. Suprathermal and thermal electrons are strongly heated in this region with the thermal heating due to scattering with the ion turbulence. Since the cross section for interaction decreases rapidly as the electron energy increases, the low energy electrons are preferentially heated. The electron distribution function is measured and agrees with theory; the power absorption is reduced by up to a factor of two compared to a Maxwellian distribution. After the microwaves have been measured to decay, the electron distribution function is seen to relax back to its initial Maxwellian form. This occurs, as theory predicts, roughly on the electron-electron collision time scale.

  15. Multiple gene evidence for expansion of extant penguins out of Antarctica due to global cooling.

    PubMed

    Baker, Allan J; Pereira, Sergio Luiz; Haddrath, Oliver P; Edge, Kerri-Anne

    2006-01-07

    Classic problems in historical biogeography are where did penguins originate, and why are such mobile birds restricted to the Southern Hemisphere? Competing hypotheses posit they arose in tropical-warm temperate waters, species-diverse cool temperate regions, or in Gondwanaland approximately 100 mya when it was further north. To test these hypotheses we constructed a strongly supported phylogeny of extant penguins from 5851 bp of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Using Bayesian inference of ancestral areas we show that an Antarctic origin of extant taxa is highly likely, and that more derived taxa occur in lower latitudes. Molecular dating estimated penguins originated about 71 million years ago in Gondwanaland when it was further south and cooler. Moreover, extant taxa are inferred to have originated in the Eocene, coincident with the extinction of the larger-bodied fossil taxa as global climate cooled. We hypothesize that, as Antarctica became ice-encrusted, modern penguins expanded via the circumpolar current to oceanic islands within the Antarctic Convergence, and later to the southern continents. Thus, global cooling has had a major impact on penguin evolution, as it has on vertebrates generally. Penguins only reached cooler tropical waters in the Galapagos about 4 mya, and have not crossed the equatorial thermal barrier.

  16. Multiple gene evidence for expansion of extant penguins out of Antarctica due to global cooling

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Allan J; Pereira, Sergio Luiz; Haddrath, Oliver P; Edge, Kerri-Anne

    2005-01-01

    Classic problems in historical biogeography are where did penguins originate, and why are such mobile birds restricted to the Southern Hemisphere? Competing hypotheses posit they arose in tropical–warm temperate waters, species-diverse cool temperate regions, or in Gondwanaland ∼100 mya when it was further north. To test these hypotheses we constructed a strongly supported phylogeny of extant penguins from 5851 bp of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Using Bayesian inference of ancestral areas we show that an Antarctic origin of extant taxa is highly likely, and that more derived taxa occur in lower latitudes. Molecular dating estimated penguins originated about 71 million years ago in Gondwanaland when it was further south and cooler. Moreover, extant taxa are inferred to have originated in the Eocene, coincident with the extinction of the larger-bodied fossil taxa as global climate cooled. We hypothesize that, as Antarctica became ice-encrusted, modern penguins expanded via the circumpolar current to oceanic islands within the Antarctic Convergence, and later to the southern continents. Thus, global cooling has had a major impact on penguin evolution, as it has on vertebrates generally. Penguins only reached cooler tropical waters in the Galapagos about 4 mya, and have not crossed the equatorial thermal barrier. PMID:16519228

  17. Mapping Uncertainty Due to Missing Data in the Global Ocean Health Index

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Catherine; Halpern, Benjamin S.

    2016-01-01

    Indicators are increasingly used to measure environmental systems; however, they are often criticized for failing to measure and describe uncertainty. Uncertainty is particularly difficult to evaluate and communicate in the case of composite indicators which aggregate many indicators of ecosystem condition. One of the ongoing goals of the Ocean Health Index (OHI) has been to improve our approach to dealing with missing data, which is a major source of uncertainty. Here we: (1) quantify the potential influence of gapfilled data on index scores from the 2015 global OHI assessment; (2) develop effective methods of tracking, quantifying, and communicating this information; and (3) provide general guidance for implementing gapfilling procedures for existing and emerging indicators, including regional OHI assessments. For the overall OHI global index score, the percent contribution of gapfilled data was relatively small (18.5%); however, it varied substantially among regions and goals. In general, smaller territorial jurisdictions and the food provision and tourism and recreation goals required the most gapfilling. We found the best approach for managing gapfilled data was to mirror the general framework used to organize, calculate, and communicate the Index data and scores. Quantifying gapfilling provides a measure of the reliability of the scores for different regions and components of an indicator. Importantly, this information highlights the importance of the underlying datasets used to calculate composite indicators and can inform and incentivize future data collection. PMID:27483378

  18. Mapping Uncertainty Due to Missing Data in the Global Ocean Health Index.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Melanie; Longo, Catherine; Halpern, Benjamin S

    2016-01-01

    Indicators are increasingly used to measure environmental systems; however, they are often criticized for failing to measure and describe uncertainty. Uncertainty is particularly difficult to evaluate and communicate in the case of composite indicators which aggregate many indicators of ecosystem condition. One of the ongoing goals of the Ocean Health Index (OHI) has been to improve our approach to dealing with missing data, which is a major source of uncertainty. Here we: (1) quantify the potential influence of gapfilled data on index scores from the 2015 global OHI assessment; (2) develop effective methods of tracking, quantifying, and communicating this information; and (3) provide general guidance for implementing gapfilling procedures for existing and emerging indicators, including regional OHI assessments. For the overall OHI global index score, the percent contribution of gapfilled data was relatively small (18.5%); however, it varied substantially among regions and goals. In general, smaller territorial jurisdictions and the food provision and tourism and recreation goals required the most gapfilling. We found the best approach for managing gapfilled data was to mirror the general framework used to organize, calculate, and communicate the Index data and scores. Quantifying gapfilling provides a measure of the reliability of the scores for different regions and components of an indicator. Importantly, this information highlights the importance of the underlying datasets used to calculate composite indicators and can inform and incentivize future data collection.

  19. Decrease in Penicillin Susceptibility Due to Heat Shock Protein ClpL in Streptococcus pneumoniae▿†

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E.; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance and tolerance are increasing threats to global health as antibiotic-resistant bacteria can cause severe morbidity and mortality and can increase treatment cost 10-fold. Although several genes contributing to antibiotic tolerance among pneumococci have been identified, we report here that ClpL, a major heat shock protein, could modulate cell wall biosynthetic enzymes and lead to decreased penicillin susceptibility. On capsular type 1, 2, and 19 genetic backgrounds, mutants lacking ClpL were more susceptible to penicillin and had thinner cell walls than the parental strains, whereas a ClpL-overexpressing strain showed a higher resistance to penicillin and a thicker cell wall. Although exposure of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to penicillin inhibited expression of the major cell wall synthesis gene pbp2x, heat shock induced a ClpL-dependent increase in the mRNA levels and protein synthesized by pbp2x. Inducible ClpL expression correlated with PBP2x expression and penicillin susceptibility. Fractionation and electron micrograph data revealed that ClpL induced by heat shock is localized at the cell wall, and the ΔclpL showed significantly reduced net translocation of PBP2x into the cell wall. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation with either ClpL or PBP2x antibody followed by reprobing with ClpL or PBP2x antibody showed an interaction between ClpL and PBP2x after heat stress. This interaction was confirmed by His tag pulldown assay with either ClpLHis6 or PBP2xHis6. Thus, ClpL stabilized pbp2x expression, interacted with PBP2x, and facilitated translocation of PBP2x, a key protein of cell wall synthesis process, contributing to the decrease of antibiotic susceptibility in S. pneumoniae. PMID:21422206

  20. Gravity wave forcing in the middle atmosphere due to reduced ozone heating during a solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Luo, Zhangai

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of the gravity wave structure and the associated forcing of the middle atmosphere induced by the screening of the ozone layer from solar heating during a solar eclipse. Fourier integral techniques and numerical evaluation of the integral solutions were used to assess the wave field structure and to compute the gravity wave forcing of the atmosphere at greater heights. Our solutions reveal dominant periods of a few hours, characteristic horizontal and vertical scales of about 5000 to 10,000 km and 200 km, respectively, and an integrated momentum flux in the direction of eclipse motion of about 5.6 x 10 exp 8 N at each height above the forcing level. These results suggest that responses to solar eclipses may be difficult to detect above background gravity wave and tidal fluctuations until well into the thermosphere. Conversely, the induced body forces may penetrate to considerable heights because of the large wave scales and will have significant effects at levels where the wave field is dissipated.

  1. Increased heat transfer to a cylindrical leading edge due to spanwise variations in the freestream velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The present study numerically demonstrates how small spanwise variations in velocity upstream of a body can cause relatively large increases in the spanwise-averaged heat transfer to the leading edge. Vorticity introduced by spanwise variations, first decays as it drifts downstream, then amplifies in the stagnation region as a result of vortex stretching. This amplification can cause a periodic array of 3 D structures, similar to horseshoe vortices, to form. The numerical results indicate that, for the given wavelength, there is an amplitude threshold below which a structure does not form. A one-dimensional analysis, to predict the decay of vorticity in the absence of the body, in conjunction with the full numerical results indicated that the threshold is more accurately stated as minimum level of vorticity required in the leading edge region for a structure to form. It is possible, using the one-dimensional analysis, to compute an optimum wavelength in terms of the maximum vorticity reaching the leading edge region for given amplitude. A discussion is presented which relates experimentally observed trends to the trends of the present phenomena.

  2. Cold tolerance in sealworm ( Pseudoterranova decipiens) due to heat-shock adaptations.

    PubMed

    Stormo, S K; Praebel, K; Elvevoll, E O

    2009-09-01

    Third-stage larvae of Pseudoterranova decipiens commonly infect whitefish such as cod, and the parasite can be transferred to humans through lightly prepared (sushi) meals. Because little is known about the nematode's cold tolerance capacity, we examined the nematode's ability to supercool, and whether or not cold acclimation could induce physiological changes that might increase its ability to tolerate freezing conditions. Even if third-stage Pseudoterranova decipiens larvae have some supercooling ability, they show no potential for freezing avoidance because they are not able to withstand inoculative freezing. Still, they have the ability to survive freezing at high subzero temperatures, something which suggests that these nematodes have a moderate freeze tolerance. We also show that acclimation to high temperatures triggers trehalose accumulation to an even greater extent than cold acclimation. Trehalose is a potential cryoprotectant which has been shown to play a vital role in the freeze tolerance of nematodes. We suggest that the trehalose accumulation observed for the cold acclimation is a general response to thermal stress, and that the nematode's moderate freeze tolerance may be acquired through adaptation to heat rather than coldness.

  3. Hot-spot heating susceptibility due to reverse bias operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Because of field experience (indicating that cell and module degradation could occur as a result of hot spot heating), a laboratory test was developed at JPL to determine hot spot susceptibility of modules. The initial hot spot testing work at JPL formed a foundation for the test development. Test parameters are selected as follows. For high shunt resistance cells, the applied back bias test current is set equal to the test cell current at maximum power. For low shunt resistance cells, the test current is set equal to the cell short circuit current. The shadow level is selected to conform to that which would lead to maximum back bias voltage under the appropriate test current level. The test voltage is determined by the bypass diode frequency. The test conditions are meant to simulate the thermal boundary conditions for 100 mW/sq cm, 40C ambient environment. The test lasts 100 hours. A key assumption made during the development of the test is that no current imbalance results from the connecting of multiparallel cell strings. Therefore, the test as originally developed was applicable for single string case only.

  4. Gravity wave forcing in the middle atmosphere due to reduced ozone heating during a solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, D.C.; Zhangai Luo )

    1993-02-20

    The authors present an analysis of the gravity wave structure and the associated forcing of the middle atmosphere induced by the screening of the ozone layer from solar heating during a solar eclipse. Fourier integral techniques and numerical evaluation of the integral solutions were used to assess the wave field structure and to compute the gravity wave forcing of the atmosphere at greater heights. Their solutions reveal dominant periods of a few hours, characteristic horizontal and vertical scales of [approximately]5,000 to 10,000 km and 200 km, respectively, and an integrated momentum flux in the direction of eclipse motion of [approximately]5.6 [times] 10[sup 8] N at each height above the forcing level. These results suggest that responses to solar eclipses may be difficult to detect above background gravity wave and tidal fluctuations until well into the thermosphere. Conversely, the induced body forces may penetrate to considerable heights because of the large wave scales and will have significant effects at levels where the wave field is dissipated. 38 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Heat transfer due to electroconvulsive therapy: Influence of anisotropic thermal and electrical skull conductivity.

    PubMed

    Menezes de Oliveira, Marilia; Wen, Peng; Ahfock, Tony

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and head models to investigate temperature profiles arising when anisotropic thermal and electrical conductivities are considered in the skull layer. The aim was to numerically investigate the threshold for which this therapy operates safely to the brain, from the thermal point of view. A six-layer spherical head model consisting of scalp, fat, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid, grey matter and white matter was developed. Later on, a realistic human head model was also implemented. These models were built up using the packages from COMSOL Inc. and Simpleware Ltd. In these models, three of the most common electrode montages used in ECT were applied. Anisotropic conductivities were derived using volume constraint and included in both spherical and realistic head models. The bio-heat transferring problem governed by Laplace equation was solved numerically. The results show that both the tensor eigenvalues of electrical conductivity and the electrode montage affect the maximum temperature, but thermal anisotropy does not have a significant influence. Temperature increases occur mainly in the scalp and fat, and no harm is caused to the brain by the current applied during ECT. The work assures the thermal safety of ECT and also provides a numerical method to investigate other non-invasive therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Far-field optical degradation due to near-field transmission through a turbulent heated jet.

    PubMed

    Cicchiello, J M; Jumper, E J

    1997-09-01

    When a laser beam traverses an optically active, turbulent flow field, the laser wave front is aberrated by the flow. Density variations in a heated two-dimensional jet, for example, correspond to index-of-refraction variations, and this modulation of the index in the fluid can imprint an optical phase disturbance, or phase error, onto the laser wave front. Adaptive-optic systems seek to correct the phase error of the wave front, and thus restore the integrity of the far-field irradiance pattern. Given a near-field spatial mapping of a phase disturbance, the far-field irradiance pattern of the affected wave front can be calculated with Fourier-optics techniques. A Fourier-optics computer code was used to study the far-field irradiance patterns arising from actual time-varying measurements of a fluid-induced phase error. The time-averaged Strehl ratio was studied to provide insight into the spatial and temporal design requirements for adaptive-optic systems applied to the time series of near-field spatial phase-error maps.

  7. Flow regulation and river fragmentation in large basins due to global dam development (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, G. O.; Lehner, B.

    2013-12-01

    Dam construction has recently received new interest as an alternative and renewable source of energy, especially in developing countries, and as a means to provide water security in regions with naturally variable water flows. On the other hand, the negative effects from increased fragmentation of the world's large rivers through hydropower and irrigation dams is a matter of great concern for ecologists and conservationists. The main negative effects of dams result from their role as a barrier for migratory fish species, as well as the alteration of the natural flow regime owing to artificial water release schedules. While the trade-offs between these antagonistic effects are usually assessed locally by conducting environmental impact assessments at and in the vicinity of the construction site, the cumulative effects of multiple dams located in the same basin are generally neglected in such plans. To address the cumulative effects at the scale of large river networks, we developed a new impact assessment approach by combining state-of-the-art global scale hydrographic (HydroSHEDS) and hydrological models (WaterGAP) with a river routing scheme (HydroROUT). This combination enables modelers to simulate scenarios for historic, current and future conditions that allow for comparisons between the large river basins of the world. We derive indices that can describe the relative impact of individual and multiple dams regarding flow alteration and habitat fragmentation at a global scale. Our model also allows for the application of tailor-made weighting schemes to include information of eco-hydrological classifications, as well as species richness and diversity. Furthermore, we include natural barriers such as waterfalls, and examine their effect on river network connectivity. Results for the Greater Mekong Region show that ecosystem connectivity and flow alteration are most strongly affected by dams located at the mainstream rivers, particularly for basins where the main

  8. Lithospheric stresses due to radiogenic heating of an ice-silicate planetary body - Implications for Ganymede's tectonic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal evolution models of differentiated and undifferentiated ice-silicate bodies containing long-lived radiogenic heat sources are examined. Lithospheric sresses arise due to volume change of the interior and temperature change in the lithosphere. For an undifferentiated body, the surface stress peaks early in the evolution, while in the differentiated case, stresses peak later and continue to accumulate for longer periods of time. The variation of near-surface stress with depth shows that stresses for the undifferentiated body initially penetrate to great depths, but rapidly concentrate within a few kilometers of the surface. For the differentiated body, elastic stresses never accumulate at a depth greater than a few kilometers. These models are applied to consider long-term rdioactive heating as a possible mechanism of tectonic activity and bright terrain formation on Ganymede.

  9. Global response of the low-latitude to midlatitude ionosphere due to the Bastille Day flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Warren, H. P.; Joyce, G.; Pi, X.; Iijima, B.; Coker, C.

    2005-08-01

    The first global simulation study and comparison to data of the ionospheric effects associated with the enhanced EUV irradiance of the Bastille Day flare are presented. This is done by incorporating a time-dependent EUV spectrum, based on data and hydrodynamic modeling, into the NRL ionosphere model SAMI3. The simulation results indicate that the total electron content (TEC) increases to over 7 TEC units in the daytime, low-latitude ionosphere. In addition, it is predicted that the maximum density in the F-layer (NmF2) increases by $\\lesssim$20% and that the height of the maximum electron density (HmF2) decreases by $\\lesssim$20%. These results are explained by the increased ionization at altitudes <400 km which increases TEC and NmF2 while decreasing HmF2. The results are in reasonably good agreement with data obtained from GPS satellites and the TOPEX satellite.

  10. Global methane and nitrous oxide emissions from terrestrial ecosystems due to multiple environmental changes

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hanqin; Chen, Guangsheng; Lu, Chaoqun; Xu, Xiaofeng; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Bowen; Banger, Kamaljit; Tao, Bo; Pan, Shufen; Chu, Mingliang; Zhang, Chi; Bruhwiler, Lori; Wofsy, Steven

    2015-03-16

    Greenhouse gas (GHG)-induced climate change is among the most pressing sustainability challenges facing humanity today, posing serious risks for ecosystem health. Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the two most important GHGs after carbon dioxide (CO2), but their regional and global budgets are not well known. In this paper, we applied a process-based coupled biogeochemical model to concurrently estimate the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of CH4 and N2O fluxes as driven by multiple environmental changes, including climate variability, rising atmospheric CO2, increasing nitrogen deposition, tropospheric ozone pollution, land use change, and nitrogen fertilizer use.

  11. Shock-induced heating and millisecond boiling in gels and tissue due to high intensity focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Michael S.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Bessonova, Olga V.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear propagation causes high intensity ultrasound waves to distort and generate higher harmonics, which are more readily absorbed and converted to heat than the fundamental frequency. Although such nonlinear effects have previously been investigated and found not to significantly alter high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments, two results reported here change this paradigm. One is that at clinically relevant intensity levels, HIFU waves not only become distorted but form shock waves in tissue. The other is that the generated shock waves heat the tissue to boiling in much less time than predicted for undistorted or weakly distorted waves. In this study, a 2-MHz HIFU source operating at peak intensities up to 25,000 W/cm2 was used to heat transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo bovine liver samples. Initiation of boiling was detected using high-speed photography, a 20-MHz passive cavitation detector, and fluctuation of the drive voltage at the HIFU source. The time to boil obtained experimentally was used to quantify heating rates and was compared to calculations using weak shock theory and the shock amplitudes obtained from nonlinear modeling and from measurements with a fiber optic hydrophone. As observed experimentally and predicted by calculations, shocked focal waveforms produced boiling in as little as 3 ms and the time to initiate boiling was sensitive to small changes in HIFU output. Nonlinear heating due to shock waves is therefore important to HIFU and clinicians should be aware of the potential for very rapid boiling since it alters treatments. PMID:20018433

  12. Rapid Melting and Solidification of a Surface Due to a Moving Heat Flux,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-22

    HSU, R MEHRABIAN N00014-78-C-0 75 U7NCLASSIFIED NL*nuu..nn...I m hEhhhhE EllElllllEEE-mu.!IIIII .. ..........- 7 FŘ RAPID MELTING AND...JOLIDIFICATION OF AJURFACE DUE TO; S. iou,4"S. C./Hsu *m tR ,ehrabian ~~~~~ABST RA CT.. // /{a ’ \\Rapid melting and solidification of a semi-infinite substrate...constant and equal. It is also assumed that the substrate, pure aluminum used as example, melts and solidifies at a single temperature. Temperature

  13. Thermoacoustic Contrast of Prostate Cancer due to Heating by Very High Frequency Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hull, D; Thomas, M; Griep, SK; Jacobsohn, K; See, WA

    2015-01-01

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo thermoacoustic computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology. PMID:25554968

  14. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation.

    PubMed

    Patch, S K; Hull, D; Thomas, M; Griep, S K; Jacobsohn, K; See, W A

    2015-01-21

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology.

  15. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patch, S. K.; Hull, D.; Thomas, M.; Griep, SK; Jacobsohn, K.; See, WA

    2015-01-01

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology.

  16. Modeling Subducting Slabs: Structural Variations due to Thermal Models, Latent Heat Feedback, and Thermal Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, F. C.

    2001-12-01

    The thermal, mineralogical, and buoyancy structures of thermal-kinetic models of subducting slabs are highly dependent upon a number of parameters, especially if the metastable persistence of olivine in the transition zone is investigated. The choice of starting thermal model for the lithosphere, whether a cooling halfspace (HS) or plate model, can have a significant effect, resulting in metastable wedges of olivine that differ in size by up to two to three times for high values of the thermal parameter (ǎrphi). Moreover, as ǎrphi is the product of the age of the lithosphere at the trench, convergence rate, and dip angle, slabs with similar ǎrphis can show great variations in structures as these constituents change. This is especially true for old lithosphere, as the lithosphere continually cools and thickens with age for HS models, but plate models, with parameters from Parson and Sclater [1977] (PS) or Stein and Stein [1992] (GDH1), achieve a thermal steady-state and constant thickness in about 70 My. In addition, the latent heats (q) of the phase transformations of the Mg2SiO4 polymorphs can also have significant effects in the slabs. Including q feedback in models raises the temperature and reduces the extent of metastable olivine, causing the sizes of the metastable wedges to vary by factors of up to two times. The effects of the choice of thermal model, inclusion and non-inclusion of q feedback, and variations in the constituents of ǎrphi are investigated for several model slabs.

  17. Stage-specific heat effects: timing and duration of heat waves alter demographic rates of a global insect pest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Rudolf, Volker H W; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2015-12-01

    The frequency and duration of periods with high temperatures are expected to increase under global warming. Thus, even short-lived organisms are increasingly likely to experience periods of hot temperatures at some point of their life-cycle. Despite recent progress, it remains unclear how various temperature experiences during the life-cycle of organisms affect demographic traits. We simulated hot days (daily mean temperature of 30 °C) increasingly experienced under field conditions and investigated how the timing and duration of such hot days during the life cycle of Plutella xylostella affects adult traits. We show that hot days experienced during some life stages (but not all) altered adult lifespan, fecundity, and oviposition patterns. Importantly, the effects of hot days were contingent on which stage was affected, and these stage-specific effects were not always additive. Thus, adults that experience different temporal patterns of hot periods (i.e., changes in timing and duration) during their life-cycle often had different demographic rates and reproductive patterns. These results indicate that we cannot predict the effects of current and future climate on natural populations by simply focusing on changes in the mean temperature. Instead, we need to incorporate the temporal patterns of heat events relative to the life-cycle of organisms to describe population dynamics and how they will respond to future climate change.

  18. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  19. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  20. Ground heat flux: An analytical review of 6 models evaluated at 88 sites and globally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, A. J.; Fisher, J. B.; Goulden, M. L.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainty in ground heat flux (G) means that evaluation of the other terms in the surface energy balance (e.g., latent and sensible heat fluxes (LE and H)) remains problematic. Algorithms that calculate LE and H require available energy, the difference between net radiation, RNET, and G. There are a wide range of approaches to model G for large-scale applications, with a subsequent wide range of estimates and accuracies. We provide the largest review of these methods to date (N = 6), evaluating modeled G against measured G from 88 FLUXNET sites. The instantaneous midday variability in G is best captured by models forced with net radiation, while models forced by temperature show the least error at both instantaneous and daily time scales. We produce global decadal data sets of G to illustrate regional and seasonal sensitivities, as well as uncertainty. Global model mean midmorning instantaneous G is highest during September, October, and November at 63.42 (±16.84) Wm-2, while over December, January, and February G is lowest at 53.86 (±18.09) Wm-2 but shows greater intermodel uncertainty. Results from this work have the potential to improve evapotranspiration estimates and guide appropriate G model selection and development for various land uses.

  1. Satellite-based detection of global urban heat-island temperature influence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallo, K.P.; Adegoke, Jimmy O.; Owen, T.W.; Elvidge, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes a satellite-based methodology to assess the urban heat-island influence during warm season months for over 4400 stations included in the Global Historical Climatology Network of climate stations. The methodology includes local and regional satellite retrievals of an indicator of the presence green photosynthetically active vegetation at and around the stations. The difference in local and regional samples of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to estimate differences in mean air temperature. Stations classified as urban averaged 0.90??C (N. Hemisphere) and 0.92??C (S. Hemisphere) warmer than the surrounding environment on the basis of the NDVI-derived temperature estimates. Additionally, stations classified as rural averaged 0.19??C (N. Hemisphere) and 0.16??C (S. Hemisphere) warmer than the surrounding environment. The NDVI-derived temperature estimates were found to be in reasonable agreement with temperature differences observed between climate stations. The results suggest that satellite-derived data sets can be used to estimate the urban heat-island temperature influence on a global basis and that a more detailed analysis of rural stations and their surrounding environment may be necessary to assure that temperature trends derived from assumed rural environments are not influenced by changes in land use/land cover. Copyright 2002 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Global alteration of ocean ecosystem functioning due to increasing human CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Nagelkerken, Ivan; Connell, Sean D

    2015-10-27

    Rising anthropogenic CO2 emissions are anticipated to drive change to ocean ecosystems, but a conceptualization of biological change derived from quantitative analyses is lacking. Derived from multiple ecosystems and latitudes, our metaanalysis of 632 published experiments quantified the direction and magnitude of ecological change resulting from ocean acidification and warming to conceptualize broadly based change. Primary production by temperate noncalcifying plankton increases with elevated temperature and CO2, whereas tropical plankton decreases productivity because of acidification. Temperature increases consumption by and metabolic rates of herbivores, but this response does not translate into greater secondary production, which instead decreases with acidification in calcifying and noncalcifying species. This effect creates a mismatch with carnivores whose metabolic and foraging costs increase with temperature. Species diversity and abundances of tropical as well as temperate species decline with acidification, with shifts favoring novel community compositions dominated by noncalcifiers and microorganisms. Both warming and acidification instigate reduced calcification in tropical and temperate reef-building species. Acidification leads to a decline in dimethylsulfide production by ocean plankton, which as a climate gas, contributes to cloud formation and maintenance of the Earth's heat budget. Analysis of responses in short- and long-term experiments and of studies at natural CO2 vents reveals little evidence of acclimation to acidification or temperature changes, except for microbes. This conceptualization of change across whole communities and their trophic linkages forecast a reduction in diversity and abundances of various key species that underpin current functioning of marine ecosystems.

  3. Global alteration of ocean ecosystem functioning due to increasing human CO2 emissions

    PubMed Central

    Nagelkerken, Ivan; Connell, Sean D.

    2015-01-01

    Rising anthropogenic CO2 emissions are anticipated to drive change to ocean ecosystems, but a conceptualization of biological change derived from quantitative analyses is lacking. Derived from multiple ecosystems and latitudes, our metaanalysis of 632 published experiments quantified the direction and magnitude of ecological change resulting from ocean acidification and warming to conceptualize broadly based change. Primary production by temperate noncalcifying plankton increases with elevated temperature and CO2, whereas tropical plankton decreases productivity because of acidification. Temperature increases consumption by and metabolic rates of herbivores, but this response does not translate into greater secondary production, which instead decreases with acidification in calcifying and noncalcifying species. This effect creates a mismatch with carnivores whose metabolic and foraging costs increase with temperature. Species diversity and abundances of tropical as well as temperate species decline with acidification, with shifts favoring novel community compositions dominated by noncalcifiers and microorganisms. Both warming and acidification instigate reduced calcification in tropical and temperate reef-building species. Acidification leads to a decline in dimethylsulfide production by ocean plankton, which as a climate gas, contributes to cloud formation and maintenance of the Earth’s heat budget. Analysis of responses in short- and long-term experiments and of studies at natural CO2 vents reveals little evidence of acclimation to acidification or temperature changes, except for microbes. This conceptualization of change across whole communities and their trophic linkages forecast a reduction in diversity and abundances of various key species that underpin current functioning of marine ecosystems. PMID:26460052

  4. Change in climate and nature over Toyama prefecture due to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsushika, H.; Kawasaki, K.; Oritani, T.; Kondo, T.; Mizoguchi, T.; Kido, M.; Tsuchihara, Y.; Wada, N.; Horikawa, K.

    2007-12-01

    Toyama prefecture is located in the center of the mainland of Japan and is surrounded by steep mountains called Tateyama at about 3,000m above sea level and by the deep Toyama bay at about 1,000m depth. In summer, since Pacific high covers mainland of Japan and East Asian summer monsoon brings a lot of rainfalls, climate in Toyama is suitable for cropping the highest qualified rice and vegetables. In winter, the dominant East Asian winter monsoon brings water from the Japan Sea by heavy snowfalls onto Tateyama. As the snow melts gradually from spring to early autumn, the abundant pure water is utilized for generating hydroelectric power and for a variety of other purposes, making it a vital resource for industries, agriculture, fishery, and human life as well as for wildlife on both sides of the plains and the mountains of Toyama. In recent, by the IPCC-AR4, influence of global warming is reported in many aspects of nature and human lives all over the world. However, we have yet to realize whether these signs are also appeared in Toyama. Therefore, we carried out statistical analyses to investigate change of nature, climate, and human lives in Toyama by global warming. Some of main results are as follows. Using the phenological data of a sample maple (Acer palmatum) tree growing at the garden in Toyama Local Meteorological Observatory, we analyzed that the leaf-color-change date is delayed ca. 20 days and the leaf-falling date is delayed ca. 10 days during recent 30 years. Using daily snowfall data between 1958 and 2007, we found that snow amounts and snowfall days are decreased significantly on the plains, while there is no trend on the mountain side. Using AMeDAS's hourly temperature data between 1978 and 2006, we detected increases in winter time minimum temperature, summer time maximum temperature, and "typical summer days" which is defined as total days that the daily maximum temperature exceeds 30 degree C. It can be inferred from these findings that the

  5. Changes in US background ozone due to global anthropogenic emissions from 1970 to 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nopmongcol, Uarporn; Jung, Jaegun; Kumar, Naresh; Yarwood, Greg

    2016-09-01

    Estimates of North American and US Background (NAB and USB) ozone (O3) are critical in setting and implementing the US National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and therefore influence population exposure to O3 across the US. NAB is defined as the O3 concentration in the absence of anthropogenic O3 precursor emissions from North America whereas USB excludes anthropogenic emissions inside the US alone. NAB and USB vary geographically and with time of year. Analyses of O3 trends at rural locations near the west coast suggest that background O3 is rising in response to increasing non-US emissions. As the O3 NAAQS is lowered, rising background O3 would make attaining the NAAQS more difficult. Most studies of changing US background O3 have inferred trends from observations whereas air quality management decisions tend to rely on models. Thus, it is important that the models used to develop O3 management strategies are able to represent the changes in background O3 in order to increase confidence that air quality management strategies will succeed. We focus on how changing global emissions influence USB rather than the effects of inter-annual meteorological variation or long-term climate change. We use a regional model (CAMx) nested within a global model (GEOS-Chem) to refine our grid resolution over high terrain in the western US and near US borders where USB tends to be higher. We determine USB from CAMx simulations that exclude US anthropogenic emissions. Over five decades, from 1970 to 2020, estimated USB for the annual fourth highest maximum daily 8-h average O3 (H4MDA8) in the western US increased from mostly in the range of 40-55 ppb to 45-60 ppb, but remained below 45 ppb in the eastern US. USB increases in the southwestern US are consistent with rising emissions in Asia and Mexico. USB decreases in the northeast US after 1990 follow declining Canadian emissions. Our results show that the USB increases both for the top 30 MDA8 days and the H4MDA8 (the former

  6. Estimating Orion Heat Shield Failure Due To Ablator Cracking During The EFT-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Kam, Jeremy C.; Gage, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Orion EFT-1 heatshield suffered from two major certification challenges: First, the mechanical properties used in design were not evident in the flight hardware and second, the flight article itself cracked during fabrication. The combination of these events motivated the Orion Program to pursue an engineering-level Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) as part of heatshield certification rationale. The PRA provided loss of Mission (LOM) likelihoods considering the probability of a crack occurring during the mission and the likelihood of subsequent structure over-temperature. The methods and input data for the PRA are presented along with a discussion of the test data used to anchor the results. The Orion program accepted an EFT-1 Loss of Vehicle (LOV) risk of 1-in-160,000 due to in-mission Avcoat cracking based on the results of this analysis. Conservatisms in the result, along with future considerations for Exploration Missions (EM) are also addressed.

  7. Gamma-effects on 2-dimensional transonic aerodynamics. [specific heat ratio due to shock induced separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzla, K.; Russell, D. A.; Wai, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Nonlifting 10% biconvex airfoils are mounted in a 30 x 40 cm Ludwieg-tube-driven transonic test-section and the flow field recorded with a holographic interferometer. Nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide are used as the principal test gases. Experiments are conducted with Reynolds number based on chord of (0.5-3.5) x 10 to the 6th with Mach numbers of 0.70, 0.75, and 0.80. Supporting calculations use inviscid transonic small-disturbance and full-potential computer codes coupled with simple integral boundary-layer modeling. Systematic studies show that significant gamma-effects can occur due to shock-induced separation.

  8. Electron density changes in the nighttime D region due to heating by very-low-frequency transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Juan V.; Inan, Umran S.

    1994-01-01

    Modification of the nighttime D region electron density (N(sub e)) due to heating by very-low-frequency (VLF) transmitters is investigated theoretically using a four-species model of the ion chemistry. The effects of a 100 kW, a 265 kW, and a 1000 kW VLF transmitter are calculated for three ambient N(sub e) profiles. Results indicate that N(sub e) is reduced by up to 26% at approximately 80 km altitude over a 1000 kW transmitter.

  9. Electron density changes in the nighttime D region due to heating by very-low-frequency transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Juan V.; Inan, Umran S.

    1994-01-01

    Modification of the nighttime D region electron density (N(sub e)) due to heating by very-low-frequency (VLF) transmitters is investigated theoretically using a four-species model of the ion chemistry. The effects of a 100 kW, a 265 kW, and a 1000 kW VLF transmitter are calculated for three ambient N(sub e) profiles. Results indicate that N(sub e) is reduced by up to 26% at approximately 80 km altitude over a 1000 kW transmitter.

  10. Solar Effects on Global Climate Due to Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Raeder, J.; DAuria, R.

    2005-01-01

    Although the work reported here does not directly connect solar variability with global climate change, this research establishes a plausible quantitative causative link between observed solar activity and apparently correlated variations in terrestrial climate parameters. Specifically, we have demonstrated that ion-mediated nucleation of atmospheric particles is a likely, and likely widespread, phenomenon that relates solar variability to changes in the microphysical properties of clouds. To investigate this relationship, we have constructed and applied a new model describing the formation and evolution of ionic clusters under a range of atmospheric conditions throughout the lower atmosphere. The activation of large ionic clusters into cloud nuclei is predicted to be favorable in the upper troposphere and mesosphere, and possibly in the lower stratosphere. The model developed under this grant needs to be extended to include additional cluster families, and should be incorporated into microphysical models to further test the cause-and-effect linkages that may ultimately explain key aspects of the connections between solar variability and climate.

  11. Histopathologic Alterations Associated with Global Gene Expression Due to Chronic Dietary TCDD Exposure in Juvenile Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Cariou, Ronan; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Jiang, Nan; Goetz, Giles; Hutz, Reinhold J.; Tonellato, Peter J.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the effects and possible developmental disease implication of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on global gene expression anchored to histopathologic analysis in juvenile zebrafish by functional genomic, histopathologic and analytic chemistry methods. Specifically, juvenile zebrafish were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb, and fish were sampled following 0, 7, 14, 28 and 42 d after initiation of the exposure. TCDD accumulated in a dose- and time-dependent manner and 100 ppb TCDD caused TCDD accumulation in female (15.49 ppb) and male (18.04 ppb) fish at 28 d post exposure. Dietary TCDD caused multiple lesions in liver, kidney, intestine and ovary of zebrafish and functional dysregulation such as depletion of glycogen in liver, retrobulbar edema, degeneration of nasal neurosensory epithelium, underdevelopment of intestine, and diminution in the fraction of ovarian follicles containing vitellogenic oocytes. Importantly, lesions in nasal epithelium and evidence of endocrine disruption based on alternatively spliced vasa transcripts are two novel and significant results of this study. Microarray gene expression analysis comparing vehicle control to dietary TCDD revealed dysregulated genes involved in pathways associated with cardiac necrosis/cell death, cardiac fibrosis, renal necrosis/cell death and liver necrosis/cell death. These baseline toxicological effects provide evidence for the potential mechanisms of developmental dysfunctions induced by TCDD and vasa as a biomarker for ovarian developmental disruption. PMID:24988445

  12. Global pattern of soil carbon losses due to the conversion of forests to agricultural land.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaorong; Shao, Mingan; Gale, William; Li, Linhai

    2014-02-11

    Several reviews have analyzed the factors that affect the change in soil organic C (SOC) when forest is converted to agricultural land; however, the effects of forest type and cultivation stage on these changes have generally been overlooked. We collated observations from 453 paired or chronosequential sites where forests have been converted to agricultural land and then assessed the effects of forest type, cultivation stage, climate factors, and soil properties on the change in the SOC stock and the SOC turnover rate constant (k). The percent decrease in SOC stocks and the turnover rate constants both varied significantly according to forest type and cultivation stage. The largest decrease in SOC stocks was observed in temperate regions (52% decrease), followed by tropical regions (41% decrease) and boreal regions (31% decrease). Climate and soil factors affected the decrease in SOC stocks. The SOC turnover rate constant after the conversion of forests to agricultural land increased with the mean annual precipitation and temperature. To our knowledge, this is the first time that original forest type was considered when evaluating changes in SOC after being converted to agricultural land. The differences between forest types should be considered when calculating global changes in SOC stocks.

  13. Global pattern of soil carbon losses due to the conversion of forests to agricultural land

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaorong; Shao, Mingan; Gale, William; Li, Linhai

    2014-01-01

    Several reviews have analyzed the factors that affect the change in soil organic C (SOC) when forest is converted to agricultural land; however, the effects of forest type and cultivation stage on these changes have generally been overlooked. We collated observations from 453 paired or chronosequential sites where forests have been converted to agricultural land and then assessed the effects of forest type, cultivation stage, climate factors, and soil properties on the change in the SOC stock and the SOC turnover rate constant (k). The percent decrease in SOC stocks and the turnover rate constants both varied significantly according to forest type and cultivation stage. The largest decrease in SOC stocks was observed in temperate regions (52% decrease), followed by tropical regions (41% decrease) and boreal regions (31% decrease). Climate and soil factors affected the decrease in SOC stocks. The SOC turnover rate constant after the conversion of forests to agricultural land increased with the mean annual precipitation and temperature. To our knowledge, this is the first time that original forest type was considered when evaluating changes in SOC after being converted to agricultural land. The differences between forest types should be considered when calculating global changes in SOC stocks. PMID:24513580

  14. Global Simulation of Proton Precipitation Due to Field Line Curvature During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, M. L.; Raeder, J.; Donovan, E.; Ge, Y. S.; Kepko, L.

    2012-01-01

    The low latitude boundary of the proton aurora (known as the Isotropy Boundary or IB) marks an important boundary between empty and full downgoing loss cones. There is significant evidence that the IB maps to a region in the magnetosphere where the ion gyroradius becomes comparable to the local field line curvature. However, the location of the IB in the magnetosphere remains in question. In this paper, we show simulated proton precipitation derived from the Field Line Curvature (FLC) model of proton scattering and a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation during two substorms. The simulated proton precipitation drifts equatorward during the growth phase, intensifies at onset and reproduces the azimuthal splitting published in previous studies. In the simulation, the pre-onset IB maps to 7-8 RE for the substorms presented and the azimuthal splitting is caused by the development of the substorm current wedge. The simulation also demonstrates that the central plasma sheet temperature can significantly influence when and where the azimuthal splitting takes place.

  15. Arctic North Atlantic Water pathways and heat fluxes in Eddy-Admitting and Eddy-Permitting Global Ocean Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Yevgeny; Kelly, Stephen; Popova, Ekaterina; Bacon, Sheldon; Nurser, A. J. George; Yool, Andrew; Coward, Andrew C.

    2017-04-01

    Results from the model tracer releases in global NEMO configurations at 1/4 and 1/12 degree resolution are presented. We examine North Atlantic water (NAW) inflows in the Arctic Ocean in the models in "eddying" regimes and investigate the role of the eddies in the NAW dynamics and heat transports. In the model experiments the NAW tracers have been released in the eastern Fram Strait and the western Barents Sea and traced in the Arctic Ocean and Nordic Sea for the 2000-2015. The model results demonstrate that NAW follows continental shelf slopes within the Arctic Boundary Current and also flows across the shelf slopes in the Arctic Ocean, with the eddy transport being a principal mechanism for the NAW spread. We investigate cascading of the dense northern Barents Sea water into the deep Arctic Ocean, which is another mechanism to transport the modified NAW into the deep Arctic Ocean. The study quantifies eddy heat fluxes across Siberian shelf slopes towards the central Arctic Ocean. By comparing the eddying runs with the similar runs at a lower resolution, the study highlights difference in the NAW model dynamics due to eddy resolving model capabilities.

  16. Future change in global fisheries biomass and harvest due to changes in temperature and primary production: A study with a simple global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, D.; Carozza, D. A.; Galbraith, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    The overharvesting of living marine resources and the global-scale environmental alterations due to climate change are expected to have significant negative impacts on fish biomass over the 21st century. We use the BiOeconomic mArine Trophic Size-spectrum (BOATS) model, together with future scenarios from global climate models to examine the interactive effects of ocean warming and net primary production changes on global fish biomass, with and without economic harvest. In an unharvested world, we find that a reduction of net primary production and a rise in temperature have important negative impacts, reducing biomass by approximately 30% under the RCP8.5 scenario by year 2100. In BOATS, the biomass decrease is dominated by a large increase of fish mortality due to the increase in temperature, which shrinks the standing stock of biomass despite more rapid growth rates. However, under harvest, climate change plays a less important role. With harvest, net primary production becomes less important in limiting fish growth since there is more food available per fish. Moreover, harvest replaces natural fish mortality and limits the ability of temperature to affect mortality rates, thereby mitigating the effects of warming. The negative impact of climate warming is entirely eliminated in a future scenario in which rapid increases in fishing technology and weak management lead to a catastrophic decrease of fish biomass. It is important to point out that BOATS does not attempt to resolve the effects of ocean acidification or deoxygenation, or the impacts that harvesting and climate change can have on ecosystem structure and habitat quality, all of which may exacerbate future fish biomass decreases. Nonetheless, our results suggest that the future of global fisheries will be mostly determined by fisheries management strategies, with the effects of climate change on net primary production and metabolic rates playing a secondary role.

  17. A Simple Model Study of Bjerknes Compensation in Meridional Heat Transports under Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qianzi; Zhao, Yingying; Yang, Haijun

    2017-04-01

    The Bjerknes Compensation (BJC) under global warming is studied in a coupled box model. This study suggests that BJC could be valid during the transient period of climate change in response to global warming. The theoretical BJC is derived. The OHT change can be decomposed into two components, one is related to the vertical stratification and the other is related to the strength of meridional overturning (MOC) circulation. The AHT change depends on meridional temperature gradient. Therefore, whether the BJC would happen depends largely on the relative magnitudes between vertical and meridional temperature gradients. During the transient period of global warming, the ocean vertical temperature gradient is enhanced while the AMOC strength does not change too much. The OHT is thus enhanced. At the same time, the surface poleward temperature gradient is weakened due to the polar amplification, so the AHT is reduced, compensating the enhanced OHT. The BJC is valid even the global energy is not conserved during the transient stage. In the equilibrium stage of global warming, the OHT is weakened because both the vertical stratification and the MOC are weakened. The AHT change is in-phase with the OHT change, so the BJC fails.

  18. Improved time-space method for 3-D heat transfer problems including global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, T.S.; Wakashima, Shinichiro

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, the Time-Space Method (TSM) which has been proposed for solving general heat transfer and fluid flow problems was improved in order to cover global and urban warming. The TSM is effective in almost all-transient heat transfer and fluid flow problems, and has been already applied to the 2-D melting problems (or moving boundary problems). The computer running time will be reduced to only 1/100th--1/1000th of the existing schemes for 2-D and 3-D problems. However, in order to apply to much larger-scale problems, for example, global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, the SOR method (or other iterative methods) in four dimensions is somewhat tedious and provokingly slow. Motivated by the above situation, the authors improved the speed of iteration of the previous TSM by introducing the following ideas: (1) Timewise chopping: Time domain is chopped into small peaches to save memory requirement; (2) Adaptive iteration: Converged region is eliminated for further iteration; (3) Internal selective iteration: Equation with slow iteration speed in iterative procedure is selectively iterated to accelerate entire convergence; and (4) False transient integration: False transient term is added to the Poisson-type equation and the relevant solution is regarded as a parabolic equation. By adopting the above improvements, the higher-order finite different schemes and the hybrid mesh, the computer running time for the TSM is reduced to some 1/4600th of the conventional explicit method for a typical 3-D natural convection problem in a closed cavity. The proposed TSM will be more efficacious for large-scale environmental problems, such as global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, in which a tremendous computing time would be required.

  19. Changes in optical properties of ex vivo rat prostate due to heating.

    PubMed

    Skinner, M G; Everts, S; Reid, A D; Vitkin, I A; Lilge, L; Sherar, M D

    2000-05-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a single, first-order Arrhenius process in accurately modelling the thermally induced changes in the optical properties, particularly the reduced scattering coefficient, mu(s)', and the absorption coefficient, mu(a), of ex vivo rat prostate. Recent work has shown that mu(s)' can increase as much as five-fold due to thermal coagulation, and the observed change in mu(s)' has been modelled well according to a first-order rate process in albumen. Conversely, optical property measurements conducted using pig liver suggest that this change in mu(s)' cannot suitably be described using a single rate parameter. In canine prostate, measurements have indicated that while the absorption coefficient varies with temperature, it does not do so according to first-order kinetics. A double integrating sphere system was used to measure the reflectance and transmittance of light at 810 nm through a thin sample of prostate. Using prostate samples collected from Sprague Dawley rats, optical properties were measured at a constant elevated temperature. Tissue samples were measured over the range 54-83 degrees C. The optical properties of the sample were determined through comparison with reflectance and transmittance values predicted by a Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation in turbid media. A first order Arrhenius model was applied to the observed change in mu(s)' and mu(a) to determine the rate process parameters for thermal coagulation. The measured rate coefficients were Ea = (7.18 +/- 1.74) x 10(4) J mol(-1) and Afreq = 3.14 x 10(8) s(-1) for mu(s)'. It was determined that the change in mu(s)' is well described by a single first-order rate process. Similar analysis performed on the changes in mu(a) due to increased temperatures yielded Ea = (1.01 +/- 0.35) x 10(5) J mol(-1) and Afreq = 8.92 x 10(12) s(-1). The results for mu(a) suggest that the Arrhenius model may be applicable to the changes in absorption.

  20. The Impact of Individual Anthropogenic Emissions Sectors on the Global Burden of Human Mortality due to Ambient Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    Silva, Raquel A; Adelman, Zachariah; Fry, Meridith M; West, J Jason

    2016-11-01

    Exposure to ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) can cause adverse health effects, including premature mortality due to cardiopulmonary diseases and lung cancer. Recent studies quantify global air pollution mortality but not the contribution of different emissions sectors, or they focus on a specific sector. We estimated the global mortality burden of anthropogenic ozone and PM2.5, and the impact of five emissions sectors, using a global chemical transport model at a finer horizontal resolution (0.67° × 0.5°) than previous studies. We performed simulations for 2005 using the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4), zeroing out all anthropogenic emissions and emissions from specific sectors (All Transportation, Land Transportation, Energy, Industry, and Residential and Commercial). We estimated premature mortality using a log-linear concentration-response function for ozone and an integrated exposure-response model for PM2.5. We estimated 2.23 (95% CI: 1.04, 3.33) million deaths/year related to anthropogenic PM2.5, with the highest mortality in East Asia (48%). The Residential and Commercial sector had the greatest impact globally-675 (95% CI: 428, 899) thousand deaths/year-and in most regions. Land Transportation dominated in North America (32% of total anthropogenic PM2.5 mortality), and it had nearly the same impact (24%) as Residential and Commercial (27%) in Europe. Anthropogenic ozone was associated with 493 (95% CI: 122, 989) thousand deaths/year, with the Land Transportation sector having the greatest impact globally (16%). The contributions of emissions sectors to ambient air pollution-related mortality differ among regions, suggesting region-specific air pollution control strategies. Global sector-specific actions targeting Land Transportation (ozone) and Residential and Commercial (PM2.5) sectors would particularly benefit human health. Citation: Silva RA, Adelman Z, Fry MM, West JJ. 2016. The impact of individual

  1. Cognitive performance in transient global hypoxic brain injury due to moderate drowning.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Mariana Penteado; Lukasova, Katerina; Vieira, Gilson; Sato, João Ricardo; Amaro Júnior, Edson

    2017-09-19

    Drowning is a serious and frequently neglected public health threat. Primary respiratory impairment after submersion often leads to brain dysfunction. Depending on the period of global hypoxia (respiratory failure), clinical aspects of neurological dysfunction are evident on the first evaluation after the water rescue. Nowadays, many neuropsychological assessments after drowning are inconclusive, with some studies reporting only minor neurological or cognitive impairments. The aim of this study is to identify measures in neuropsychological tests that most contribute to classify volunteers as moderate drowning subjects or healthy controls. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first neuropsychological prospective case-control study of moderate drowning in a country with large coastal cities. Fifteen moderate drowning patients (DP), who met the inclusion criteria, were compared with 18 healthy controls (HC). All subjects were assessed on memory, learning, visual spatial ability, executive function, attention, and general intellectual functioning and underwent structural magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain at 3.0 T, in order to exclude subjects with anatomic abnormalities. Neuropsychological tests assessing learning, execution function, and verbal fluency-Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) general learning ability, Digit Span total, Phonological Verbal Fluency (total FAS correct), and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test Revised (BVMT) correct recognition-have the strongest discriminating ability, using predictive models via the partial least squares (PLS) approach for data classification, while the other tests have shown similar predictive values between groups. Learning, execution function, and verbal fluency domains were the most critically affected domains. Serious impairments in the same domains have already been reported in severe drowning cases, and we hypothesize that subtle alterations found in moderate drowning cases, although not

  2. Change of tropical cyclone heat potential in response to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ran; Chen, Changlin; Wang, Guihua

    2016-04-01

    Tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP) in the ocean can affect tropical cyclone intensity and intensification. In this paper, TCHP change under global warming is presented based on 35 models from CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5). As the upper ocean warms up, the TCHP of the global ocean is projected to increase by 140.6% in the 21st century under the RCP4.5 (+4.5 W m-2 Representative Concentration Pathway) scenario. The increase is particularly significant in the western Pacific, northwestern Indian and western tropical Atlantic oceans. The increase of TCHP results from the ocean temperature warming above the depth of the 26°C isotherm (D26), the deepening of D26, and the horizontal area expansion of SST above 26°C. Their contributions are 69.4%, 22.5% and 8.1%, respectively. Further, a suite of numerical experiments with an Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) is conducted to investigate the relative importance of wind stress and buoyancy forcing to the TCHP change under global warming. Results show that sea surface warming is the dominant forcing for the TCHP change, while wind stress and sea surface salinity change are secondary.

  3. Gamma ray heating and neutrino cooling rates due to weak interaction processes on sd-shell nuclei in stellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayaz, Muhammad; Nabi, Jameel-Un; Majid, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    Gamma ray heating and neutrino cooling rates, due to weak interaction processes, on sd-shell nuclei in stellar core are calculated using the proton neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. The recent extensive experimental mass compilation of Wang et al. (Chin. Phys. C 36:1603, 2012), other improved model input parameters including nuclear quadrupole deformation (Raman et al. in At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 78(1):1-128, 2001; Möller et al. in At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 109:1-204, 2016) and physical constants are taken into account in the current calculation. The purpose of this work is two fold, one is to improve the earlier calculation of weak rates performed by Nabi and Klapdor-Kleingrothaus (At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 71:149, 1999a) using the same theory. We further compare our results with previous calculations. The selected sd-shell nuclei, considered in this work, are of special interest for the evolution of O-Ne-Mg core in 8-10 M_{⊙} stars due to competitive gamma ray heating rates and cooling by URCA processes. The outcome of these competitions is to determine, whether the stars end up as a white dwarf (Nabi in Phys. Rev. C 78(4):045801, 2008b), an electron-capture supernova (Jones et al. in Astrophys. J. 772(2):150, 2013) or Fe core-collapse supernova (Suzuki et al. in Astrophys. J. 817(2):163, 2016). The selected sd-shell nuclei for calculation of associated weak-interaction rates include ^{20,23}O, ^{20,23}F, ^{20,23,24}Ne, {}^{20,23-25}Na, and {}^{23-25}Mg. The cooling and heating rates are calculated for density range (10 ≤ ρ (g cm^{-3}) ≤ 10^{11}) and temperature range (0.01× 109≤ T(K)≤ 30× 109). The calculated gamma heating rates are orders of magnitude bigger than the shell model rates (except for ^{25}Mg at low densities). At high temperatures the gamma heating rates are in reasonable agreement. The calculated cooling rates are up to an order of magnitude bigger for odd-A nuclei.

  4. Characterizing waveform uncertainty due to ambient noise for the Global Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guandique, J. A.; Burdick, S.; Lekic, V.

    2015-12-01

    Ambient seismic noise is the vibration present on seismograms not due by any earthquake or discrete source. It can be caused by trees swaying in the wind or trucks rumbling on the freeway, but the main source of noise is the microseism caused by ocean waves. The frequency content and amplitude of seismic noise varies due to weather, season, and the location of a station, among other factors. Because noise affects recordings of earthquake waveforms, better understanding it could improve the detection of small earthquakes, reduce false positives in earthquake early warning, and quantify uncertainty in waveform-based studies In this study, we used two years of 3-component accelerograms from stations in the GSN. We eliminate days with major earthquakes, aggregate analysis by month, and calculate the mean power spectrum for each component and the transfer function between components. For each power spectrum, we determine the dominant frequency and amplitude of the primary (PM) and secondary (SM) microseisms which appear at periods of ~14s and ~7s, as well as any other prominent peaks. The cross-component terms show that noise recorded on different components cannot be treated as independent. Trends in coherence and phase delay suggest directionality in the noise and information about in which modes it propagates. Preliminary results show that the noise on island stations exhibits less monthly variability, and its PM peaks tend to be much weaker than the SM peaks. The continental stations show much less consistent behavior, with higher variability in the PM peaks between stations and higher frequency content during winter months. Stations that are further inland have smaller SM peaks compared to coastal stations, which are more similar to island stations. Using these spectra and cross-component results, we develop a method for generating realistic 3-component seismic noise and covariance matrices, which can be used across various seismic applications.

  5. Hiatus-like decades in the absence of equatorial Pacific cooling and accelerated global ocean heat uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Känel, Lukas; Frölicher, Thomas L.; Gruber, Nicolas

    2017-08-01

    A surface cooling pattern in the equatorial Pacific associated with a negative phase of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation is the leading hypothesis to explain the smaller rate of global warming during 1998-2012, with these cooler than normal conditions thought to have accelerated the oceanic heat uptake. Here using a 30-member ensemble simulation of a global Earth system model, we show that in 10% of all simulated decades with a global cooling trend, the eastern equatorial Pacific actually warms. This implies that there is a 1 in 10 chance that decadal hiatus periods may occur without the equatorial Pacific being the dominant pacemaker. In addition, the global ocean heat uptake tends to slow down during hiatus decades implying a fundamentally different global climate feedback factor on decadal time scales than on centennial time scales and calling for caution inferring climate sensitivity from decadal-scale variability.

  6. An Efficient Approximation of the Coronal Heating Rate for use in Global Sun-Heliosphere Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2010-02-01

    The origins of the hot solar corona and the supersonically expanding solar wind are still the subject of debate. A key obstacle in the way of producing realistic simulations of the Sun-heliosphere system is the lack of a physically motivated way of specifying the coronal heating rate. Recent one-dimensional models have been found to reproduce many observed features of the solar wind by assuming the energy comes from Alfvén waves that are partially reflected, then dissipated by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. However, the nonlocal physics of wave reflection has made it difficult to apply these processes to more sophisticated (three-dimensional) models. This paper presents a set of robust approximations to the solutions of the linear Alfvén wave reflection equations. A key ingredient of the turbulent heating rate is the ratio of inward-to-outward wave power, and the approximations developed here allow this to be written explicitly in terms of local plasma properties at any given location. The coronal heating also depends on the frequency spectrum of Alfvén waves in the open-field corona, which has not yet been measured directly. A model-based assumption is used here for the spectrum, but the results of future measurements can be incorporated easily. The resulting expression for the coronal heating rate is self-contained, computationally efficient, and applicable directly to global models of the corona and heliosphere. This paper tests and validates the approximations by comparing the results to exact solutions of the wave transport equations in several cases relevant to the fast and slow solar wind.

  7. Heat fluxes of the Indian Ocean from a global eddy-resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garternicht, U.; Schott, F.

    1997-09-01

    The output of the global eddy-resolving ¼° ocean model of Semtner/Chervin (run by the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California) has been used to study the oceanic temperature and heat flux in the Indian Ocean. The meridional heat flux in the northern Indian Ocean is at the low end of the observed values. A vertical overturning cell in the upper 500 m is the main contributor to the annual mean meridional heat flux across 5°S, whereas the horizontal gyre circulation, confined to the upper 500 m, dominates north of the equator. The change of monsoon winds is manifested in a reversal of the meridional circulation throughout the whole water column. The most notable result is a strong linear relationship of the meridional temperature flux and the zonal wind stress component north of 20°S. The model's Pacific-Indian Ocean throughflow across the section at 120°E accounts for -8.8±5.1 Sv (1 Sv≡106 m3 s-1). A strong interannual variability during the model run of 3 years shows a maximum range of 12 Sv in January/February and a minimum during March through June. The inflow from the Pacific into the Indian Ocean results in a total annual mean temperature flux of -0.9 PW (1 PW≡1015 W). In the model the temperature flux from the Pacific through the Indian Ocean to the south dominates in comparison with the input of solar heat from the northern Indian Ocean.

  8. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics Using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in straitform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMXX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM- LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  9. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM rainfall products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2001. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DE 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs. west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in strtaiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  10. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics Using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in straitform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMXX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM- LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  11. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  12. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM rainfall products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2001. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DE 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs. west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in strtaiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  13. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  14. Available potential energy gain from mixing due to the nonlinearity of the equation of state in a global ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakawa, L. S.; Saenz, J. A.; Hogg, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    Densification in the ocean interior upon mixing at high latitudes, due to the nonlinear equation of state (EoS) of seawater, enhances the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). However, recent calculations using numerical simulations of global ocean circulation have shown that the nonlinearity of the EoS leads to a sink of gravitational potential energy (PE), from which one might infer that there is less energy available to be released to the MOC. Here the available PE (APE) budget of the global ocean is investigated using a numerical model with a nonlinear EoS under a realistic configuration. The results show that, while the nonlinearity of the EoS leads to a loss of gravitational PE, it is a source of APE. For the model used in this study, nonlinearity of the EoS is as significant as surface buoyancy forcing in generating APE.

  15. Numerical study of sea level and kuroshio volume transport change contributed by steric effect due to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Woo, S. B.

    2016-02-01

    For direct consideration of seawater volume change by steric effect due to global warming, this study uses a MOM (Modular Ocean Model) version4 oceanic general circulation model, which does not use Boussinesq approximation. The model was improved to regional scale by increasing the grid resolution. Global simulation model results of CM2.1, HADCM3, MIROC3.2 provided by the IPCC AR4 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) were used as initial and boundary conditions, and SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios) A1B was selected as a global warming scenario. The Northwestern Pacific region, which includes the Korean Peninsula, was selected as the study area, and the Yellow Sea which has a complex coastline, was expressed in detail by increasing grid resolution. By averaging the results of the three numerical experiments, we found that temperature & mean sea level(MSL) are increased by approximately 3℃/35cm from 2000 to 2100, respectively. Interestingly, The East Sea (Japan sea) appeared to show the largest change of MSL due to steric effect compared with Yellow and East China Sea. Numerical results showed that larger influence on East/Japan Sea is caused by the temperature and volume transport change in Tsushima Warm Current, which passes through the Korea Strait. A direct simulation of steric effect results in higher sea level rise compared with in-direct simulation of steric effect. Also, the Kuroshio Current, which is one of the major currents in the Northwestern Pacific, showed a decrease in transport as global warming progressed. Although there were differences between models, approximately 4 5SV of transport was reduced in 2100. However, there was no huge change in the transport of the Tsushima Warm Current.

  16. Update on Blindness Due to Retinopathy of Prematurity Globally and in India.

    PubMed

    Blencowe, Hannah; Moxon, Sarah; Gilbert, Clare

    2016-11-07

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a well-known complication of preterm birth that can result in avoidable blindness and visual impairment, is especially sensitive to the quality of neonatal inpatient care and appropriate, well-monitored oxygen. In 2010, the annual incidence of blindness and visual impairment from ROP was estimated to be 32,200 cases worldwide. The greatest burden is seen in middle-income countries, particularly where coverage of neonatal inpatient care has expanded without due attention to the quality of care provided, and the neonatal nursing skills and training of those providing this care. India accounted for nearly 10% of all estimated worldwide visual impairment following ROP in 2010, with at least 5,000 developing severe disease and 2,900 children surviving with visual impairment related to ROP. Screening all those at risk and providing treatment for those with severe disease will require investment to increase the capacities and competencies of eye-care providers. Scale-up of neonatal services must be coupled with implementation of standards for high quality care, including safe oxygen management, and detection and treatment of ROP. Otherwise the number of children surviving preterm birth with visual impairment secondary to ROP will continue to increase in India and worldwide.

  17. Quantitative Assessment of the Integrated Response in Global Heat and Moisture Budgets to Changing Solar Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Warren B.; Cayan, Daniel R.; Dettinger, Michael; Sharber, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Earlier, we found time sequences of basin- and global-average upper ocean temperature (that is, diabatic heat storage above the main pycnocline) for 40 years from 1955-1994 and of sea surface temperature for 95 years from 1900-1994 associated with changes in the Sun's radiative forcing on decadal and interdecadal timescales, lagging by 10 deg.- 30 deg. of phase and confined to the upper 60-120 m. Yet, the observed changes in upper ocean temperature (approx. 0.1 K) were approximately twice those expected from the Stefan-Boltzmann black-body radiation law for the Earth's surface, with phase lags (0 deg. to 30 deg. of phase) much shorter than the 90 deg. phase shift expected as well. Moreover, White et al. (1997, 1998) found the Earth's global decadal mode in covarying SST and SLP anomalies phase locked to the decadal signal in the Sun's irradiance. Yet, Allan (2000) found this decadal signal also characterized by patterns similar to those observed on biennial and interannual time scales; that is, the Troposphere Biennial Oscillation (TBO) and the El Nino and the Southern Oscillation (ENSO). This suggested that small changes in the Sun's total irradiance could excite this global decadal mode in the Earth's ocean-atmosphere-terrestrial system similar to those excited internally on biennial and interannual period scales. This is a significant finding, proving that energy budget models (that is, models based on globally-averaged radiation balances) yield unrealistic responses. Thus, the true response must include positive and negative feedbacks in the Earth's ocean-atmosphere-terrestrial system as its internal mode (that is, the natural mode of the system) respond in damped resonance to quasi-periodic decadal changes in the Sun's irradiance. Moreover, these responses are not much different from those occurring internally on biennial and interannual period scales.

  18. The Impact of Individual Anthropogenic Emissions Sectors on the Global Burden of Human Mortality due to Ambient Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Raquel A.; Adelman, Zachariah; Fry, Meridith M.; West, J. Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) can cause adverse health effects, including premature mortality due to cardiopulmonary diseases and lung cancer. Recent studies quantify global air pollution mortality but not the contribution of different emissions sectors, or they focus on a specific sector. Objectives: We estimated the global mortality burden of anthropogenic ozone and PM2.5, and the impact of five emissions sectors, using a global chemical transport model at a finer horizontal resolution (0.67° × 0.5°) than previous studies. Methods: We performed simulations for 2005 using the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4), zeroing out all anthropogenic emissions and emissions from specific sectors (All Transportation, Land Transportation, Energy, Industry, and Residential and Commercial). We estimated premature mortality using a log-linear concentration–response function for ozone and an integrated exposure–response model for PM2.5. Results: We estimated 2.23 (95% CI: 1.04, 3.33) million deaths/year related to anthropogenic PM2.5, with the highest mortality in East Asia (48%). The Residential and Commercial sector had the greatest impact globally—675 (95% CI: 428, 899) thousand deaths/year—and in most regions. Land Transportation dominated in North America (32% of total anthropogenic PM2.5 mortality), and it had nearly the same impact (24%) as Residential and Commercial (27%) in Europe. Anthropogenic ozone was associated with 493 (95% CI: 122, 989) thousand deaths/year, with the Land Transportation sector having the greatest impact globally (16%). Conclusions: The contributions of emissions sectors to ambient air pollution–related mortality differ among regions, suggesting region-specific air pollution control strategies. Global sector-specific actions targeting Land Transportation (ozone) and Residential and Commercial (PM2.5) sectors would particularly benefit human health. Citation: Silva RA

  19. A Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical modeling of fracture opening and closing due heat extraction from geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nand Pandey, Sachchida; Chaudhuri, Abhijit; Kelkar, Sharad

    2015-04-01

    Increasing the carbon dioxide concentration in atmosphere become challenging task for the scientific community. To achieve the sustainable growth with minimum pollution in atmosphere requires the development of low carbon technology or switch towards renewable energy. Geothermal energy is one of the promising source of clean energy. Geothermal energy is also considered a sustainable, reliable and least-expensive. This study presents a numerical modeling of subsurface heat extraction from the reservoir. The combine flow, heat transfer and geo-mechanical problem are modeled using FEHM code, which was validated against existing field data, numerical code and commercial software. In FEHM the flow and heat transfer in reservoir are solved by control volume method while for mechanical deformation finite element technique is used. The 3-D computational domain (230m × 200m × 1000m) has single horizontal fault/fracture, which is located at 800 m depth from the ground surface. The fracture connects the injection and production wells. The distance between the wells is 100 m. A geothermal gradient 0.08 °C/m is considered. The temperatures at top and bottom boundaries are held fixed as 20 and 100 °C respectively. The zero heat and mass flux boundary conditions are imposed to all vertical side boundaries of the domain. The simulation results for 100 days suggests that the computational domain is sufficiently large as the temperature along the vertical boundaries are not affected by cold-water injection. To model the thermo-poro-elastic deformation, zero all three components of displacement are specified as zero at the bottom. The zero stress condition along all other boundaries allows the boundaries to move freely. The temperature and pressure dependent fluid properties such as density and viscosity with single phase flow in saturated medium is considered. We performed a series of thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) simulations to show aperture alteration due to cold

  20. Characterizing Urban Heat Islands of Global Settlements Using MODIS and Nighttime Lights Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ping; Imhoff, Marc L.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Bounoua, Lahouari

    2010-01-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and land surface temperature (LST) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) averaged over three annual cycles (2003-2005) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the urban heat island (UHI) signature on LST amplitude and its relationship with development intensity, size, and ecological setting for more than 3000 urban settlements globally. Development intensity zones based on fractional ISA are defined for each urban area emanating outward from the urban core to the nearby nonurban rural areas and used to stratify sampling for LST. Sampling is further constrained by biome type and elevation data to ensure objective intercomparisons between zones and between cities in different biomes. We find that the ecological context and settlement size significantly influence the amplitude of summer daytime UHI. Globally, an average of 3.8 C UHI is found in cities built in biomes dominated by forests; 1.9 C UHI in cities embedded in grass shrubs biomes; and only a weak UHI or sometimes an urban heat sink (UHS) in cities in arid and semi-arid biomes. Overall, the amplitude of the UHI is negatively correlated (R = -0.66) with the difference in vegetation density between urban and rural zones represented by the MODIS normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Globally averaged, the daytime UHI amplitude for all settlements is 2.6 C in summer and 1.4 C in winter. Globally, the average summer daytime UHI is 4.7 C for settlements larger than 500 square kilometers compared with 2.5 C for settlements smaller than 50 square kilometers and larger than 10 square kilometers. The stratification of cities by size indicates that the aggregated amount of ISA is the primary driver of UHI amplitude, with variations between ecological contexts and latitudinal zones. More than 60% of the total LST variance is explained by ISA for urban settlements within forests at mid to high latitudes. This

  1. Characterizing Urban Heat Islands of Global Settlements Using MODIS and Nighttime Lights Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ping; Imhoff, Marc L.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Bounoua, Lahouari

    2010-01-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and land surface temperature (LST) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) averaged over three annual cycles (2003-2005) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the urban heat island (UHI) signature on LST amplitude and its relationship with development intensity, size, and ecological setting for more than 3000 urban settlements globally. Development intensity zones based on fractional ISA are defined for each urban area emanating outward from the urban core to the nearby nonurban rural areas and used to stratify sampling for LST. Sampling is further constrained by biome type and elevation data to ensure objective intercomparisons between zones and between cities in different biomes. We find that the ecological context and settlement size significantly influence the amplitude of summer daytime UHI. Globally, an average of 3.8 C UHI is found in cities built in biomes dominated by forests; 1.9 C UHI in cities embedded in grass shrubs biomes; and only a weak UHI or sometimes an urban heat sink (UHS) in cities in arid and semi-arid biomes. Overall, the amplitude of the UHI is negatively correlated (R = -0.66) with the difference in vegetation density between urban and rural zones represented by the MODIS normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Globally averaged, the daytime UHI amplitude for all settlements is 2.6 C in summer and 1.4 C in winter. Globally, the average summer daytime UHI is 4.7 C for settlements larger than 500 square kilometers compared with 2.5 C for settlements smaller than 50 square kilometers and larger than 10 square kilometers. The stratification of cities by size indicates that the aggregated amount of ISA is the primary driver of UHI amplitude, with variations between ecological contexts and latitudinal zones. More than 60% of the total LST variance is explained by ISA for urban settlements within forests at mid to high latitudes. This

  2. A Comparison of Latent Heat Fluxes over Global Oceans for Four Flux Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Nelkin, Eric; Ardizzone, Joe; Atlas, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    To improve our understanding of global energy and water cycle variability, and to improve model simulations of climate variations, it is vital to have accurate latent heat fluxes (LHF) over global oceans. Monthly LHF, 10-m wind speed (U10m), 10-m specific humidity (Q10h), and sea-air humidity difference (Qs-Q10m) of GSSTF2 (version 2 Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes) over global Oceans during 1992-93 are compared with those of HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data), NCEP (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis). The mean differences, standard deviations of differences, and temporal correlation of these monthly variables over global Oceans during 1992-93 between GSSTF2 and each of the three datasets are analyzed. The large-scale patterns of the 2yr-mean fields for these variables are similar among these four datasets, but significant quantitative differences are found. The temporal correlation is higher in the northern extratropics than in the south for all variables, with the contrast being especially large for da Silva as a result of more missing ship data in the south. The da Silva has extremely low temporal correlation and large differences with GSSTF2 for all variables in the southern extratropics, indicating that da Silva hardly produces a realistic variability in these variables. The NCEP has extremely low temporal correlation (0.27) and large spatial variations of differences with GSSTF2 for Qs-Q10m in the tropics, which causes the low correlation for LHF. Over the tropics, the HOAPS LHF is significantly smaller than GSSTF2 by approx. 31% (37 W/sq m), whereas the other two datasets are comparable to GSSTF2. This is because the HOAPS has systematically smaller LHF than GSSTF2 in space, while the other two datasets have very large spatial variations of large positive and negative LHF differences with GSSTF2 to cancel and to produce smaller regional-mean differences. Our analyses suggest that the GSSTF2 latent heat flux

  3. Hotzone design and optimization for 2-in. AlN PVT growth process through global heat transfer modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. H.; Deng, X. L.; Cao, K.; Wang, J.; Wu, L.

    2017-09-01

    A tungsten based reactor to grow 2-in. PVT AlN crystals by induction heating was designed. In order to investigate the effect of the hotzone structure layout on the temperature distribution in the growth chamber, a series of global quasi-steady numerical simulations with and without gas convection was performed using the FEMAG software. Simulation results show that the temperature gradient between the AlN powder sources and the deposition interface is influenced profoundly by the size of the induction heater and the crucible thickness. Also the tungsten heat shields have obvious effects on the global temperature distribution and heater power consumption during the growth process. However, the number of tungsten shield layers plays a trivial role on the temperature gradient between the ALN powder sources and the crucible top. Global heat transfer simulations show that the designed hotzone can provide an optimized and flexible environment for 2-in. AlN PVT growth.

  4. Property fluxes at 30 deg S and their implications for the Pacific-Indian throughflow and the global heat budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, Alison M.

    1993-01-01

    The extent of exchange between the Pacific and Indian Oceans through the Indonesian Archipelago and the net global oceanic heat flux are determined using six hydrographic basinwide sections, two in each of the three major ocean basins. Globally, at 30 deg S, the estimated net oceanic heat flux is -0.7 +/- 0.1 PW, dominated by a large southward flux in the Indian Ocean. Large equatorward heat flux values in the South Atlantic Basin are not consistent with the data. Although the data are consistent with some water following the 'warm water' return path for North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), the 'cold water' path must play the dominant role in the maintenance of the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation process of NADW.

  5. Heat, Human Performance, and Occupational Health: A Key Issue for the Assessment of Global Climate Change Impacts.

    PubMed

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Briggs, David; Freyberg, Chris; Lemke, Bruno; Otto, Matthias; Hyatt, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Ambient heat exposure is a well-known health hazard, which reduces human performance and work capacity at heat levels already common in tropical and subtropical areas. Various health problems have been reported. Increasing heat exposure during the hottest seasons of each year is a key feature of global climate change. Heat exhaustion and reduced human performance are often overlooked in climate change health impact analysis. Later this century, many among the four billion people who live in hot areas worldwide will experience significantly reduced work capacity owing to climate change. In some areas, 30-40% of annual daylight hours will become too hot for work to be carried out. The social and economic impacts will be considerable, with global gross domestic product (GDP) losses greater than 20% by 2100. The analysis to date is piecemeal. More analysis of climate change-related occupational health impact assessments is greatly needed.

  6. Elementary analytic models of climate. 1: The mean global heat balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Climate models based on global radiative equilibrium are normally so complicated that they require extensive computer codes to provide adequate accuracy. However, by simply modifying the concept of a gray atmosphere, a reasonably correct mean global temperature is obtained. This elementary model is then used to estimate the effects of changes in the abundances of minor infrared absorbers and changes in the solar constant or earth albedo. When applied to a Budyko-Sellers zonally averaged model, the quasi-gray model could give a physical basis for the latitude dependence of outgoing radiation and of opacity due to H2O vapor content. The latter effect constitutes an important positive feedback on surface temperature.

  7. Global strong solution to compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ran; Guo, Ai; Zhu, Changjiang

    2017-04-01

    We obtain existence and uniqueness of global strong solution to one-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for ideal polytropic gas flow, with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity under stress-free and thermally insulated boundary conditions. Here we assume viscosity coefficient μ (ρ) = 1 +ρα and heat conductivity coefficient κ (θ) =θβ for all α ∈ [ 0 , ∞) and β ∈ (0 , + ∞).

  8. Global ocean circulation and equator-pole heat transport as a function of ocean GCM resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C.

    1994-06-01

    To determine whether resolution of smaller scales is necessary to simulate large-scale ocean climate correctly, I examine results from a global ocean GCM run with horizontal grid spacings spanning a range from coarse resolutions traditionally used in climate modeling to nearly the highest resolution attained with today`s computers. The experiments include four cases employing 4{degrees}, 2{degrees}, 1{degrees} and 1/2{degrees} spacing in latitude and longitude, which were run with minimal differences among them, i.e., in a controlled experiment. Two additional cases-1/2{degrees} spacing with a more scale-selective sub-gridscale mixing of heat and momentum, and approximate 1/4{degrees} spacing-are also included. The 1/4{degrees} run resolves most of the observed mesoscale eddy energy in the ocean. Several artificial constraints on the model tend to minimize differences among the different resolution cases. Nevertheless, for quantities of interest to global climate studies,the simulations show significant changes as resolution increases.

  9. Global crop yield reductions due to surface ozone exposure: 1. Year 2000 crop production losses and economic damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avnery, Shiri; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Liu, Junfeng; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to elevated concentrations of surface ozone (O 3) causes substantial reductions in the agricultural yields of many crops. As emissions of O 3 precursors rise in many parts of the world over the next few decades, yield reductions from O 3 exposure appear likely to increase the challenges of feeding a global population projected to grow from 6 to 9 billion between 2000 and 2050. This study estimates year 2000 global yield reductions of three key staple crops (soybean, maize, and wheat) due to surface ozone exposure using hourly O 3 concentrations simulated by the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers version 2.4 (MOZART-2). We calculate crop losses according to two metrics of ozone exposure - seasonal daytime (08:00-19:59) mean O 3 (M12) and accumulated O 3 above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40) - and predict crop yield losses using crop-specific O 3 concentration:response functions established by field studies. Our results indicate that year 2000 O 3-induced global yield reductions ranged, depending on the metric used, from 8.5-14% for soybean, 3.9-15% for wheat, and 2.2-5.5% for maize. Global crop production losses totaled 79-121 million metric tons, worth $11-18 billion annually (USD 2000). Our calculated yield reductions agree well with previous estimates, providing further evidence that yields of major crops across the globe are already being substantially reduced by exposure to surface ozone - a risk that will grow unless O 3-precursor emissions are curbed in the future or crop cultivars are developed and utilized that are resistant to O 3.

  10. Perceived temperature in the course of climate change: an analysis of global heat index from 1979-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Brenner, T.

    2015-03-01

    The increase in global mean temperatures resulting from climate change has wide reaching consequences for the earth's ecosystems and other natural systems. Many studies have been devoted to evaluating the distribution and effects of these changes. We go a step further and evaluate global changes to the heat index, a measure of temperature as perceived by humans. Heat index, which is computed from temperature and relative humidity, is more important than temperature for the health of humans and other animals. Even in cases where the heat index does not reach dangerous levels from a health perspective, it has been shown to be an important factor in worker productivity and thus in economic productivity. We compute heat index from dewpoint temperature and absolute temperature 2 m above ground from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset for the years 1979-2013. The data is provided aggregated to daily minima, means and maxima (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.841057). Furthermore, the data is temporally aggregated to monthly and yearly values and spatially aggregated to the level of countries after being weighted by population density in order to demonstrate its usefulness for the analysis of its impact on human health and productivity. The resulting data deliver insights into the spatiotemporal development of near-ground heat index during the course of the past 3 decades. It is shown that the impact of changing heat index is unevenly distributed through space and time, affecting some areas differently than others. The likelihood of dangerous heat index events has increased globally. Also, heat index climate groups that would formerly be expected closer to the tropics have spread latitudinally to include areas closer to the poles. The data can serve in future studies as a basis for evaluating and understanding the evolution of heat index in the course of climate change, as well as its impact on human health and productivity.

  11. Numerical study of unsteady MHD oblique stagnation point flow and heat transfer due to an oscillating stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, T.; Ghaffari, A.; Ahmad, H.

    2016-05-01

    The unsteady stagnation point flow impinging obliquely on a flat plate in presence of a uniform applied magnetic field due to an oscillating stream has been studied. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into dimensionless form and the stream function is expressed in terms of Hiemenz and tangential components. The dimensionless partial differential equations are solved numerically by using well-known implicit finite difference scheme named as Keller-box method. The obtained results are compared with those available in the literature. It is observed that the results are in excellent agreement with the previous studies. The effects of pertinent parameters involved in the problem namely magnetic parameter, Prandtl number and impinging angle on flow and heat transfer characteristics are illustrated through graphs. It is observed that the influence of magnetic field strength increases the fluid velocity and by the increase of obliqueness parameter, the skin friction increases.

  12. Projected changes in atmospheric heating due to changes in fire disturbance and the snow season in the western Arctic, 2003-2100

    Treesearch

    E.S. Euskirchen; A.D. McGuire; T.S. Rupp; F.S. Chapin; J.E. Walsh

    2009-01-01

    In high latitudes, changes in climate impact fire regimes and snow cover duration, altering the surface albedo and the heating of the regional atmosphere. In the western Arctic, under four scenarios of future climate change and future fire regimes (2003-2100), we examined changes in surface albedo and the related changes in regional atmospheric heating due to: (1)...

  13. Characterizing Urban Heat Islands of Global Settlements Using MODIS and Nighttime Lights Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ping; Imhoff, Marc L.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Bounoua, Lahouari

    2010-01-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and land surface temperature (LST) from MODIS averaged over three annual cycles (2003-2005) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the urban heat island (UHI) signature on LST amplitude and its relationship to development intensity, size, and ecological setting for more than 3000 urban settlements over the globe. Development intensity zones based on fractional ISA are defined for each urban area emanating outward from the urban core to the nearby non-urban rural areas and used to stratify sampling for LST. Sampling is further constrained by biome type and elevation data to insure objective inter-comparisons between zones and between cities in different biomes. We find that the ecological context and settlement size significantly influence the amplitude of summer daytime UHI. Globally, an average of 3.8 C UHI is found in cities built in biomes dominated by forests; 1.9 C UHI in cities embedded in grass/shrub biomes, and only a weak UHI or sometimes an Urban Heat Sink (UHS) in cities in and and semi-arid biomes. Overall, the amplitude of the UHI is negatively correlated (R = -0.66) to the difference in vegetation density between urban and rural zones represented by MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Globally averaged, the daytime UHI amplitude for all settlement is 2.6 C in summer and 1.4 C in winter. Globally, the average summer daytime UHI is 4.7 C for settlements larger than 500 square kilometers, compared to 2.5 C for settlements smaller than 50 square kilometers and larger than 10 square kilometers. The stratification of cities by size indicates that the aggregated amount of ISA is the primary driver of UHI amplitude with variations between ecological contexts and latitudinal zones. More than 60% of the total LST variances is explained by ISA for urban settlements within forests at mid-to-high latitudes. This percentage will increase to more than 80% when only USA

  14. Perceived temperature in the course of climate change: an analysis of global heat index from 1979 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Brenner, T.

    2015-08-01

    The increase in global mean temperatures resulting from climate change has wide reaching consequences for the earth's ecosystems and other natural systems. Many studies have been devoted to evaluating the distribution and effects of these changes. We go a step further and propose the use of the heat index, a measure of the temperature as perceived by humans, to evaluate global changes. The heat index, which is computed from temperature and relative humidity, is more important than temperature for the health of humans and animals. Even in cases where the heat index does not reach dangerous levels from a health perspective, it has been shown to be an important factor in worker productivity and thus in economic productivity. We compute the heat index from dew point temperature and absolute temperature 2 m above ground from the ERA-Interim reanalysis data set for the years 1979-2013. The described data set provides global heat index aggregated to daily minima, means and maxima per day (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.841057). This paper examines these data, as well as showing aggregations to monthly and yearly values. Furthermore, the data are spatially aggregated to the level of countries after being weighted by population density in order to facilitate the analysis of its impact on human health and productivity. The resulting data deliver insights into the spatiotemporal development of near-ground heat index during the course of the past three decades. It is shown that the impact of changing heat index is unevenly distributed through space and time, affecting some areas differently than others. The data can serve as a basis for evaluating and understanding the evolution of heat index in the course of climate change, as well as its impact on human health and productivity.

  15. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Tynan, George R.; Cattolica, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 ×) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance.

  16. Management adaptation of invertebrate fisheries to an extreme marine heat wave event at a global warming hot spot.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Nick; Kangas, Mervi; Denham, Ainslie; Feng, Ming; Pearce, Alan; Hetzel, Yasha; Chandrapavan, Arani

    2016-06-01

    An extreme marine heat wave which affected 2000 km of the midwest coast of Australia occurred in the 2010/11 austral summer, with sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies of 2-5°C above normal climatology. The heat wave was influenced by a strong Leeuwin Current during an extreme La Niña event at a global warming hot spot in the Indian Ocean. This event had a significant effect on the marine ecosystem with changes to seagrass/algae and coral habitats, as well as fish kills and southern extension of the range of some tropical species. The effect has been exacerbated by above-average SST in the following two summers, 2011/12 and 2012/13. This study examined the major impact the event had on invertebrate fisheries and the management adaption applied. A 99% mortality of Roei abalone (Haliotis roei) and major reductions in recruitment of scallops (Amusium balloti), king (Penaeus latisulcatus) and tiger (P. esculentus) prawns, and blue swimmer crabs were detected with management adapting with effort reductions or spatial/temporal closures to protect the spawning stock and restocking being evaluated. This study illustrates that fisheries management under extreme temperature events requires an early identification of temperature hot spots, early detection of abundance changes (preferably using pre-recruit surveys), and flexible harvest strategies which allow a quick response to minimize the effect of heavy fishing on poor recruitment to enable protection of the spawning stock. This has required researchers, managers, and industry to adapt to fish stocks affected by an extreme environmental event that may become more frequent due to climate change.

  17. Wheat yield loss attributable to heat waves, drought and water excess at the global, national and subnational scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampieri, M.; Ceglar, A.; Dentener, F.; Toreti, A.

    2017-06-01

    Heat waves and drought are often considered the most damaging climatic stressors for wheat. In this study, we characterize and attribute the effects of these climate extremes on wheat yield anomalies (at global and national scales) from 1980 to 2010. Using a combination of up-to-date heat wave and drought indexes (the latter capturing both excessively dry and wet conditions), we have developed a composite indicator that is able to capture the spatio-temporal characteristics of the underlying physical processes in the different agro-climatic regions of the world. At the global level, our diagnostic explains a significant portion (more than 40%) of the inter-annual production variability. By quantifying the contribution of national yield anomalies to global fluctuations, we have found that just two concurrent yield anomalies affecting the larger producers of the world could be responsible for more than half of the global annual fluctuations. The relative importance of heat stress and drought in determining the yield anomalies depends on the region. Moreover, in contrast to common perception, water excess affects wheat production more than drought in several countries. We have also performed the same analysis at the subnational level for France, which is the largest wheat producer of the European Union, and home to a range of climatic zones. Large subnational variability of inter-annual wheat yield is mostly captured by the heat and water stress indicators, consistently with the country-level result.

  18. An estimation of the global burden of disease due to skin lesions caused by arsenic in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Fewtrell, Lorna; Fuge, Ron; Kay, David

    2005-06-01

    The global burden of disease due to skin lesions caused by arsenic in drinking water was estimated by combining country-based exposure data with selected exposure-response relationships derived from the literature. Populations were considered to be exposed to elevated arsenic levels if their drinking water contained arsenic concentrations of 50 microg I(-1) or greater. Elevated arsenic concentrations in drinking water result in a significant global burden of disease, even when confining the health outcome to skin lesions. The burden of disease was particularly marked in the World Health Organization (WHO) comparative risk assessment (CRA) 'Sear D' region, which includes Bangladesh, India and Nepal. Unsurprisingly, Bangladesh was the worst affected country with 143 disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per 1,000 population. Although this initial estimate is subject to a large degree of uncertainty, it does represent an important first step in allowing the comparison of the problem relating to elevated arsenic in drinking water to other environmental health outcomes.

  19. Experimental observation of microwave absorption and electron heating due to the two plasmon decay instability and resonance absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of intense microwaves with an inhomogeneous plasma is studied in two experimental devices. In the first device an investigation was made of microwave absorption and electron heating due to the parametric decay of microwaves into electron plasma waves (Two Plasmon Decay instability, TPDI), modeling a process which can occur near the quarter critical surface in laser driven pellets. P-polarized microwave (f = 1.2 GHz, P/sub 0/ less than or equal to 12 kW) are applied to an essentially collisionless, inhomogeneous plasma, in an oversized waveguide, in the U.C. Davis Prometheus III device. The initial density scale length near the quarter critical surface is quite long (L/lambda/sub De/ approx. = 3000 or k/sub 0/L approx. = 15). The observed threshold power for the TPDI is quite low (P/sub T/approx. = 0.1 kW or v/sub os//v/sub e/ approx. = 0.1). Near the threshold the decay waves only occur near the quarter critical surface. As the incident power is increased above threshold, the decay waves spread to lower densities, and for P/sub 0/ greater than or equal to lkW, (v/sub os//v/sub e/ greater than or equal to 0.3) suprathermal electron heating is strong for high powers (T/sub H/ less than or equal to 12 T/sub e/ for P/sub 0/ less than or equal to 8 kW or v/sub os//v/sub e/ less than or equal to 0.9).

  20. Enhancement of Eddy Heat Transport due to the Anticyclonic Submesoscale Eddies around Ryukyu Islands near Kuroshio in East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamidaira, Y.; Uchiyama, Y.; Mitarai, S.; Miyazawa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A synoptic, regional downscaling experiment of Kuroshio off Ryukyu Islands, Japan, exhibits the evident predominance of submesoscale anticyclonic eddies over cyclones in the narrow strip between Kuroshio and the islands (Uchiyama et al., 2013). In the present study, the mechanism and impacts of the anticyclone dominance are examined with a detailed oceanic downscaling model in a double nested ROMS configuration at the horizontal resolution of 3km (ROMS-L1) and 1km (ROMS-L2), forced by the assimilative JCOPE2 oceanic reanalysis and the JMA GPV-MSM atmospheric hindcast. The model results are extensively validated against a variety of data including shipboard hydrography and satellite altimetry and temperature data to show a good agreement. An alternative ROMS-L2 experiment is also conducted to examine topographic effects on the anticyclones around the Ryukyu Islands by eliminating all the island topography above z > -1000 m, while the other configurations are held unchanged. If the islands are removed, the submesoscale negative vortices on the eastern side of the Kuroshio become much weaker than those of the original case with the islands. The experiment clearly demonstrates that dominance of the negative vorticity between Kuroshio and the Ryukyu Islands is caused by enhanced lateral shear due to the concentrated Kuroshio mean current associated with appropriate formation of the eastern branch, the northward-drifting Ryuku Current, and resultant eddy shedding in the narrow channel between the continental shelf of the East China Sea and the Okinawan ridge. A diagnostic eddy heat flux analysis illustrates that the submesoscale anticyclonic eddies play a crucial role in enhancing the eddy heat transport and thus the lateral mixing between Kuroshio and the islands as compared to those in the coarser resolution models (L1 and JCOPE2), resulting in promoting regional larval and material transport from Kuroshio to the islands.

  1. Projected changes in atmospheric heating due to changes in fire disturbance and the snow season in the western Arctic, 2003–2100

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euskirchen, E.S.; McGuire, Anthony; Rupp, T.S.; Chapin, F. S.; Walsh, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In high latitudes, changes in climate impact fire regimes and snow cover duration, altering the surface albedo and the heating of the regional atmosphere. In the western Arctic, under four scenarios of future climate change and future fire regimes (2003–2100), we examined changes in surface albedo and the related changes in regional atmospheric heating due to: (1) vegetation changes following a changing fire regime, and (2) changes in snow cover duration. We used a spatially explicit dynamic vegetation model (Alaskan Frame-based Ecosystem Code) to simulate changes in successional dynamics associated with fire under the future climate scenarios, and the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model to simulate changes in snow cover. Changes in summer heating due to the changes in the forest stand age distributions under future fire regimes showed a slight cooling effect due to increases in summer albedo (mean across climates of −0.9 W m−2 decade−1). Over this same time period, decreases in snow cover (mean reduction in the snow season of 4.5 d decade−1) caused a reduction in albedo, and a heating effect (mean across climates of 4.3 W m−2 decade−1). Adding both the summer negative change in atmospheric heating due to changes in fire regimes to the positive changes in atmospheric heating due to changes in the length of the snow season resulted in a 3.4 W m−2 decade−1 increase in atmospheric heating. These findings highlight the importance of gaining a better understanding of the influences of changes in surface albedo on atmospheric heating due to both changes in the fire regime and changes in snow cover duration.

  2. Dynamical consequences on fast subducting slabs from a self-regulating mechanism due to viscous heating in variable viscosity convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Tine B.; Yuen, David A.; Malevsky, Andrei V.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied 2-D time-dependent convection for a rheology which is both non-Newtonian and temperature-dependent. Strong effects associated with viscous heating are found in the downwelling sheets, which are heated on both sides with an intensity around O(100) times the chondritic value. The magnitude of viscous heating increases strongly with the subduction speed. The slab interior is weakened by viscous heating and slab breakoff then takes place. This process provides a self-regulating mechanism for governing the speed of intact slabs able to reach the deep mantle. Timescales associated with viscous heating are quite short, a few million years. Internal heating by radioactivity decreases the amount of shear heating.

  3. Dynamical consequences on fast subducting slabs from a self-regulating mechanism due to viscous heating in variable viscosity convection

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, T.B.; Yuen, D.A.

    1995-05-15

    The authors have studied 2-D time-dependent convection for a rheology which is both non-Newtonian and temperature-dependent. Strong effects associated with viscous heating are found in the downwelling sheets, which are heated on both sides with an intensity around O(10{sup 2}) times the chondritic value. The magnitude of viscous heating increases strongly with the subduction speed. The slab interior is weakened by viscous heating and slab breakoff then takes place. This process provides a self-regulating mechanism for governing the speed of intact slabs able to reach the deep mantle. Timescales associated with viscous heating are quite short, a few million years. Internal heating by radioactivity decreases the amount of shear heating. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Global heat transport scaling in plume-controlled regime in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Kai Leong; Huang, Shi-Di; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2016-11-01

    Previous study by Chong et al. has introduced a normalized aspect-ratio Γ /Γopt (Γopt = 29 . 37 Ra - 0 . 31) where the plume coverage at fixed Γ /Γopt is invariant with respect to Ra in the so-called plume-controlled regime in Rayleigh-Bénard convection. We have studied the global heat transport scaling (expressed as Nusselt number Nu) at fixed Γ /Γopt with the Rayleigh number Ra between 107 and 1010 at fixed Prandtl number Pr = 4 . 38 by direct numerical simulations. It is found that at Γ /Γopt = 1 where the thermal plume becomes highly coherent and system-sized, Nu exhibits the scaling Nu - 1 Ra 0 . 327 +/- 0 . 001 over three decades of Ra . This scaling is different from that found at Γ = 1 for which Nu - 1 Ra 0 . 308 +/- 0 . 001 , and this difference in scaling can be shown evidently in the compensated plots. This work was supported by RGC of HKSAR (No. CUHK404513), CUHK Direct Grant (No. 3132740) and through a HKPhD Fellowship.

  5. Mirror buckling of freestanding graphene membranes induced by local heating due to a scanning tunneling microscope tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoelz, J. K.; Neek Amal, M.; Xu, P.; Barber, S. D.; Ackerman, M. L.; Thibado, P. M.; Sadeghi, A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-03-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has been an invaluable tool in the study of graphene at the atomic scale. Several STM groups have managed to obtain atomic scale images of freestanding graphene membranes providing insight into the behavior of the stabilized ripple geometry. However, we found that the interaction between the STM tip and the freestanding graphene sample may induce additional effects. By varying the tunneling parameters, we can tune the position of the sample, in either a smooth or step like fashion. These phenomena were investigated by STM experiments, continuum elasticity theory and large scale molecular dynamics simulations. These results confirm that by increasing the tip bias, the electrostatic attraction between the tip and sample increases. When applied on a concave surface, this can result in mirror buckling which leads to a large scale movement of the sample. Interestingly, due in part to the negative coefficient of thermal expansion of graphene, buckling transitions can also be induced through local heating of the surface using the STM tip. Financial support by O.N.R. grant N00014-10-1-0181, N.S.F grant DMR-0855358, EU-Marie Curie IIF postdoc Fellowship/299855 (for M. N. A.), ESF-EuroGRAPHENE project CONGRAN, F.S.F (FWO-Vl), and Methusalem Foundation of the Flemish Government.

  6. Population-specificity of heat stress gene induction in northern and southern eelgrass Zostera marina populations under simulated global warming.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Nina; Winters, Gidon; Rauch, Gisep; Eizaguirre, Christophe; Gu, Jenny; Nelle, Peter; Fricke, Birgit; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2010-07-01

    Summer heat waves have already resulted in mortality of coastal communities, including ecologically important seagrass meadows. Gene expression studies from controlled experiments can provide important insight as to how species/genotypes react to extreme events that will increase under global warming. In a common stress garden, we exposed three populations of eelgrass, Zostera marina, to extreme sea surface temperatures, simulating the 2003-European heat wave. Populations came from locations widely differing in their thermal regime, two northern European locations [Ebeltoft (Kattegat), Doverodde (Limfjord, Baltic Sea)], and one southern population from Gabicce Mare (Adriatic Sea), allowing to test for population specificity in the response to a realistic heat stress event. Eelgrass survival and growth as well as the expression of 12 stress associated candidate genes were assessed during and after the heat wave. Contrary to expectations, all populations suffered equally from 3 weeks of heat stress in terms of shoot loss. In contrast, populations markedly differed in multivariate measures of gene expression. While the gene expression profiles converged to pre-stress values directly after the heat wave, stress correlated genes were upregulated again 4 weeks later, in line with the observed delay in shoot loss. Target genes had to be selected based on functional knowledge in terrestrial plants, nevertheless, 10/12 genes were induced relative to the control treatment at least once during the heat wave in the fully marine plant Z. marina. This study underlines the importance of realistic stress and recovery scenarios in studying the impact of predicted climate change.

  7. Decadal Ocean Heat Content Westward Shift in the Indian Ocean during the Global Surface Warming and Hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Yan, X. H.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the ocean's role in Earth's energy budget is fundamental to evaluate climate variability and change, including the rate of global warming and the recent 18-years' so-called Global Surface Warming Hiatus (GSWH). Previous studies have shown that basin-wide warming in the Atlantic Ocean triggers the intensification of trade wind and wind-driven circulation since late 1990s, resulting in Global Surface Warming Hiatus (GSWH). A recent work revealed that missing heat in the Pacific during the GSWH was transported to the Indian Ocean by the Indonesia throughflow. It brings the Indian Ocean to the platform of the GSWH study and suggests that the global ocean is at play in the GSWH and in the ocean heat content (OHC) westwards shifting. The westwards shifting of the OHC was detected from in-situ data and model/in-situ reanalysis data. The shifting has a period of about 30 years, and takes about 60 years to travel from the eastern Pacific to the western Atlantic. Heat was distributed to deeper layers after the warm OHC passed the southern tip of the Africa continent. This may shed light on the understanding of the physical mechanisms for the multi-decadal climate variability.

  8. Global burden of mortalities due to chronic exposure to ambient PM2.5 from open combustion of domestic waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodros, John K.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Ford, Bonne; Cucinotta, Rachel; Gan, Ryan; Magzamen, Sheryl; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-12-01

    Uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste has been observed in many countries, creating concerns for air quality; however, the health implications have not yet been quantified. We incorporate the Wiedinmyer et al (2014 Environ. Sci. Technol. 48 9523-30) emissions inventory into the global chemical-transport model, GEOS-Chem, and provide a first estimate of premature adult mortalities from chronic exposure to ambient PM2.5 from uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste. Using the concentration-response functions (CRFs) of Burnett et al (2014 Environ. Health Perspect. 122 397-403), we estimate that waste-combustion emissions result in 270 000 (5th-95th: 213 000-328 000) premature adult mortalities per year. The confidence interval results only from uncertainty in the CRFs and assumes equal toxicity of waste-combustion PM2.5 to all other PM2.5 sources. We acknowledge that this result is likely sensitive to choice of chemical-transport model, CRFs, and emission inventories. Our central estimate equates to 9% of adult mortalities from exposure to ambient PM2.5 reported in the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. Exposure to PM2.5 from waste combustion increases the risk of premature mortality by more than 0.5% for greater than 50% of the population. We consider sensitivity simulations to uncertainty in waste-combustion emission mass, the removal of waste-combustion emissions, and model resolution. A factor-of-2 uncertainty in waste-combustion PM2.5 leads to central estimates ranging from 138 000 to 518 000 mortalities per year for factors-of-2 reductions and increases, respectively. Complete removal of waste combustion would only avoid 191 000 (5th-95th: 151 000-224 000) mortalities per year (smaller than the total contributed premature mortalities due to nonlinear CRFs). Decreasing model resolution from 2° × 2.5° to 4° × 5° results in 16% fewer mortalities attributed to waste-combustion PM2.5, and over Asia, decreasing resolution from 0.5° × 0.666° to 2° × 2

  9. Global transcriptome analysis of the heat shock response of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huahua; Li, Shengkang; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Xiao, Xiang

    2016-12-01

    For microorganisms, heat shock is a major stressful condition. Heat shock is characterized by sudden temperature increases that damage important protein structures and interfere with essential cellular functions. In this study, global gene expression patterns of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 in response to heat shock were studied by DNA microarray analysis. Overall, 438, 573, and 627 genes were found to be differentially expressed after heat shock for 30, 60, and 90min, respectively. Functional classification of differentially transcribed genes was performed using the Clusters of Orthologous Groups of Proteins database. Additionally, 361 genes were identified as common differentially expressed genes. These genes may comprise the core genes responsible for coping with heat shock stress of WP3. Moreover, comparative analysis of gene expression pattern in WP3 and other bacteria indicated the presence of different adaptive strategies. These data represent the first transcriptome resource for the response of this deep-sea bacterium to high-temperature stress. This study contributes to the understanding of the global adaptation mechanisms of benthic bacteria toward environmental stresses.

  10. Predictions on heat transport and plasma rotation from global gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Abiteboul, J.; Allfrey, S.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Latu, G.; Strugarek, A.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Diamond, P. H.; Ku, S.; Chang, C. S.; McMillan, B. F.; Tran, T. M.; Villard, L.; Jolliet, S.; Bottino, A.; Angelino, P.

    2011-10-01

    Flux-driven global gyrokinetic codes are now mature enough to make predictions in terms of turbulence and transport in tokamak plasmas. Some of the recent breakthroughs of three such codes, namely GYSELA, ORB5 and XGC1, are reported and compared wherever appropriate. In all three codes, turbulent transport appears to be mediated by avalanche-like events, for a broad range of ρ* = ρi/a values, ratio of the gyro-radius over the minor radius. Still, the radial correlation length scales with ρi, leading to the gyro-Bohm scaling of the effective transport coefficient below ρ* ≈ 1/300. The possible explanation could be due to the fact that avalanches remain meso-scale due to the interaction with zonal flows, whose characteristic radial wavelength appears to be almost independent of the system size. As a result of the radial corrugation of the turbulence driven zonal and mean flows, the shear of the radial electric field can be significantly underestimated if poloidal rotation is assumed to be governed by the neoclassical theory, especially at low collisionality. Indeed, the turbulence contribution to the poloidal rotation increases when collisionality decreases. Finally, the numerical verification of toroidal momentum balance shows that both neoclassical and turbulent contributions to the Reynolds' stress tensor play the dominant role. The phase space analysis further reveals that barely passing supra-thermal particles mostly contribute to the toroidal flow generation, consistently with quasi-linear predictions.

  11. Robust scaling with global mean temperature of future heat stress projections within CMIP5 and CESM LENS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, J. R.; Huber, M.

    2016-12-01

    Heat stress is of global concern because it threatens human and animal health and productivity. Here we use the HumanIndexMod to calculate 3 moist thermodynamic quantities and 9 commonly and operationally used heat stress metrics (Buzan et al., 2015). We drive the HumanIndexMod with output from CMIP5 and the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble (LENS) using the greenhouse gasses forcing, representative concentration pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5). We limit our analysis to models that provide 4x daily output of surface pressure, reference height temperature and moisture, and use lowest model level winds where available, 18 CMIP5 and 40 LENS simulations. We show three novel results: Comparing time slices (2081-2100 and 2026-2045 for CMIP5, and 2071-2080 and 2026-2035 for LENS), we note that each individual heat stress metric extreme, within the multi-model mean, has spatial patterns that are highly correlated (>0.99). Moist thermodynamics and heat stress extremes are intrinsically linked to the thermodynamics of the climate, and scales simply with global mean surface temperature (GMT) changes. For example, large swaths of land surface area from 30°N to 30°S, excluding the Sahel, the Arabian Peninsula, and Himalayan Plateau, show the response of wet bulb temperature to be 0.85°C/°C GMT (standard deviation <0.25) for CMIP5 and 0.85°C/°C GMT (standard deviation <0.2) for LENS in agreement with prior work by Sherwood and Huber (2010). Many heat stress metrics, after being normalized by global mean surface temperature changes, are highly spatially correlated with each other, and may reduce the necessity of numerous metrics to properly quantify total heat stress. The three results establish that different climate models, with various underlying assumptions (CMIP5) and ranges of internal variability (LENS), show similar responses in heat stress with respect to global mean temperature changes. Thus, we find the uncertainty of heat stress extremes, even changes at the fine

  12. Origin and correction of errors in the XBT data and their effect on global heat content calculations. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouretski, V. V.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements by means of expendable bathythermographs (XBTs) since late 1960s provided the majority of the subsurface temperature profiles in the global ocean down to about 750 m, until the profiling floats have increasingly become the main data source in the beginning of 2000s. Being not designed initially to provide temperature data for climate applications XBT measurements are prone to systematic errors which are comparable in magnitude to typical decadal temperature changes in the ocean. Neglecting these errors has lead to the overestimation of the decadal scale variability in some earlier global heat content calculations. We use the World Ocean Database 2009 to estimate temperature and sample depth biases of expendable and mechanical (MBT) bathythermographs by comparing bathythermograph temperature profiles with more accurate bottle and conductivity/temperature/depth (CTD) data. It is shown that the application of depth corrections estimated earlier from side-by-side XBT/CTD inter-comparisons, without accounting for a pure thermal bias, leads to even larger disagreement with the CTD and bottle reference temperatures. Our calculations give evidence for a depth-variable multiplicative fall-rate correction with the original depths being underestimated in the upper 150-200 m and overestimated below this depth. These results are in agreement with side-by-side inter-comparisons and direct fall-rate estimates. Correcting XBT sample depths by a multiplicative factor which is constant with depth does not allow an effective elimination of the total temperature bias throughout the whole water column. The analysis further suggests a dependence of the fall rate on the water temperature which was also reported earlier in the literature. Comparisons among different correction schemes show a significant impact of systematic biases on the estimates of the global ocean heat content anomaly. Using monthly temperature climatology based on CTD and Argo profiling float data for the

  13. Impact of the filling level on the global heat transfer coefficient of a plate cross section for sorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, Florine; Hamitouche, Yacine; Vallon, Pierrick; Tremeac, Brice

    2017-02-01

    Compact evaporator like plate heat exchangers can play a significant role in reducing the investment cost of low cooling power sorption systems. However, when water is used as refrigerant, the working pressure is very low and vaporization phenomena are really different than vaporization phenomena occurring at higher pressures. Few studies focus on this subject and there is a lack of knowledge about vaporization (boiling or evaporation) phenomena occurring in compact evaporators at low pressure. The design of such evaporators remain manly empirical. There is thus a need of better characterization of the influence of the driving parameters in order to optimize the evaporator design. The objective of this article is thus to go further in the understanding of phenomena occurring in compact plate-type evaporators. In that goal, an experimental campaign was conducted to study continuously the performance of a smooth plate type evaporator as a function of the filling levels. The influence of the saturation pressure and the secondary fluid temperature on an overall heat transfer coefficient is studied. It is show that there is a dependence of the maximal overall heat transfer coefficient to these parameters. It is also shown that there seems to be a strong dependence between phenomena observed and phenomena that happens before. Thus, dynamic and inertia effects must be taken into account and model developed in absorption configuration cannot be applied for this study.

  14. Global carbon impacts of using forest harvest residues for district heating in Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    McLain, H.A.

    1998-07-01

    Forests in Vermont are selectively logged periodically to generate wood products and useful energy. Carbon remains stored in the wood products during their lifetime and in fossil fuel displaced by using these products in place of energy-intensive products. Additional carbon is sequestered by new forest growth, and the forest inventory is sustained using this procedure. A significant portion of the harvest residue can be used as biofuel in central plants to generate electricity and thermal energy, which also displaces the use of fossil fuels. The impact of this action on the global carbon balance was analyzed using a model derived from the Graz/Oak Ridge Carbon Accounting Model (GORCAM). The analysis showed that when forests are harvested only to manufacture wood products, more than 100 years are required to match the sequestered carbon present if the forest is left undisturbed. If part of the harvest residue is collected and used as biofuel in place of oil or natural gas, it is possible to reduce this time to about 90 years, but it is usually longer. Given that harvesting the forest for products will continue, carbon emission benefits relative to this practice can start within 10 to 70 years if part of the harvest residue is used as biofuel. This time is usually higher for electric generation plants, but it can be reduced substantially by converting to cogeneration operation. Cogeneration makes possible a ratio of carbon emission reduction for district heating to carbon emission increase for electricity generation in the range of 3 to 5. Additional sequestering benefits can be realized by using discarded wood products as biofuels.

  15. Transport and frictional properties of core samples from Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project and its association with the heat generation due to frictional heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, W.; Mizoguchi, K.; Takahashi, M.; Masuda, K.; Hirono, T.; Lin, W.; Soh, W.; Song, S.

    2006-12-01

    Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP) was started from 2002 to investigate the faulting mechanism of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake. TCDP was succeeded in penetrating the Chelungpu fault and recovered core samples from two holes, Hole A and Hole B. In Hole B, three fault zones, FZB1136 (1134-1137 m), FZB1194 (1194-1197 m), and FZB1243 (1242-1244 m), were recognized in the core samples (Hirono et al., 2006). Micro- textual observation and rock magnetic analyses of fault zones implied the evidence of heat generation, though the temperature did not reach the melting point. Borehole temperature measurement in Hole A observed the very low temperature anomaly around the fault zone (Kano et al., 2006). These results suggest the low degree of the frictional heating due to very low friction during the slip. The possible low friction might be explained by the slip within clay rich fault gouge with low shear strength. The other possible mechanisms are dynamic weakening behaviors of the fault zone, such as thermal pressurization and elast-hydrodynamic lubrication. To demonstrate the assumptions, the transport properties and the strength of the fault rocks are measured using core samples. Core samples of three fault zones in Hole B (FZB1136, FZB1194, and FZB1243) are selected for our laboratory experiments. Permeability and specific storage for fault rocks were measured under high confining pressure up to 100 MPa. Nitrogen gas was used as a pore fluid, and gas permeability was transformed to water permeability from gas permeability dependence on pore pressure of Klinkenberg equation. In FZB1136, permeability for fault breccia showed around 10-16 m2 at 1km depth which is similar value to that for host rock of siltstone and fracture rocks. In FZB1194, permeability of black fault gouge was about 10^{-15} m2, is larger than surrounding rocks. Frictional tests were also conducted using fault gouge samples with less than 100 μm of grain size. Tests are performed under the

  16. Impact of fire on global land surface air temperature and energy budget for the 20th century due to changes within ecosystems

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Fang; Lawrence, David M.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben

    2017-04-03

    Fire is a global phenomenon and tightly interacts with the biosphere and climate. This study provides the first quantitative assessment of fire’s influence on the global land air temperature during the 20th century through its impact on terrestrial ecosystems. We quantify the impact of fire by comparing 20th century fire-on and fire-off simulations with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) as the model platform. Here, results show that fire-induced changes in terrestrial ecosystems increased global land surface air temperature by 0.04 °C. Such changes significantly warmed the tropical savannas and southern Asia mainly by reducing latent heat flux, but cooledmore » Southeast China by enhancing the East Asian winter monsoon. 20% of the early 20th century global land warming can be attributed to fire-induced changes in terrestrial ecosystems, providing a new mechanism for explaining the poorly-understood climate change.« less

  17. Global simulation of the induction heating TSSG process of SiC for the effects of Marangoni convection, free surface deformation and seed rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Okano, Yasunori; Ujihara, Toru; Dost, Sadik

    2017-07-01

    A global numerical simulation was performed for the induction heating Top-Seeded Solution Growth (TSSG) process of SiC. Analysis included the furnace and growth melt. The effects of interfacial force due to free surface tension gradient, the RF coil-induced electromagnetic body force, buoyancy, melt free surface deformation, and seed rotation were examined. The simulation results showed that the contributions of free surface tension gradient and the electromagnetic body force to the melt flow are significant. Marangoni convection affects the growth process adversely by making the melt flow downward in the region under the seed crystal. This downward flow reduces carbon flux into the seed and consequently lowers growth rate. The effects of free surface deformation and seed rotation, although positive, are not so significant compared with those of free surface tension gradient and the electromagnetic body force. Due to the small size of the melt the contribution of buoyancy is also small.

  18. Ion temperature anisotropy due to perpendicular heating by Alfvén wave propagating along magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, C.-R.; Woo, M.-H.; Dokgo, K.; Min, K.-W.; Lee, D.-Y.; Yoon, Peter H.; Hwang, J.; Lee, J.-J.; Park, Y.-D.

    2016-09-01

    The perpendicular heating and acceleration of ions by linearly polarized Alfvén wave, which is propagating along constant background magnetic field, is studied. The perpendicular diffusion coefficient of ions is calculated through the autocorrelation function based on linear perturbation theory, which unambiguously demonstrates that ion heating is attained by non-resonant wave-particle interaction. It is found that the perpendicular heating and acceleration of ions occur by the Alfvén wave during a relatively short time interval, i.e., approximately 20 ion gyro period (Ωi0t ) even though the perturbation amplitude is quite low. Also, it is shown that the temperature anisotropy of ions A , where A =T⊥/T∥-1 , increases with the increasing perturbation amplitude while the parallel ion heating does not occur. Test particle simulation is also carried out in order to investigate the non-resonant perpendicular heating process.

  19. The dynamic warm pool: A new paradigm for understanding the role of the tropics in the global heat balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. J.; Hoyos, C. D.

    2008-12-01

    The region of atmospheric heating in the tropics, here termed the dynamic warm pool, represents the "boiler box" of the planetary heat engine and plays a determining role in global climate and tropical weather variability, modulating the genesis and intensification of tropical cyclones, the ascending branches of the Walker and Hadley circulations, monsoons and ENSO variability, and the nature of global teleconnections emanating from the tropics. Hence, it is important to understand how the tropical warm pool has changed in the past and how it may change in the future, and how these changes may alter climate both regionally and globally. The concept of the dynamic warm pool, which encloses the region of net atmospheric convective heating in the tropics, is fundamentally different to the traditionally defined oceanic warm pool corresponding to the area occupied by sea surface temperatures above a pre-defined threshold, typically 28C. While the traditionally defined warm pool has expanded as a result of global warming, the dynamical warm pool has remained constant as a result of an increasing column integrated heating-sea surface temperature threshold. In other words, in a warming climate the convective area does not expand with the area of SST>28C. However, despite the near constancy of the dynamic warm pool area, the magnitude of the column integrated heating in the tropics increases substantially. In light of these results, the traditional warm pool definition and the thresholds for convection and cyclogenesis are not climatically meaningful and lack a physical basis. Rather than a static definition set by a constant temperature, the climatically active warm pool should be defined dynamically by the large-scale coupled ocean-atmosphere system rather than just by the temperature of the ocean surface. In this work we use the concept of the dynamical warm pool as a physical basis to explore and understand long-term variability of tropical cyclogenesis and

  20. Permanent El Nino Conditions in the Early Pliocene, the Poleward Heat Transport Paradox, and Contemporary Global Warming.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Brierley, C.

    2007-12-01

    Proxy temperature records show that in the early Pliocene, approximately 3 to 5 million years ago, the tropics were characterized by permanently warm El Nino-like conditions. The equatorial Pacific was as warm as in the east as it is in the west today, and the zonal SST gradient along the equator was significantly reduced or absent. Concurrently, major coastal upwelling regions were up to 10 degrees C warmer than they are today. The globally averaged temperatures of the Earth's surface were also substantially higher. This climate state persisted even though the external factors that control climate were essentially the same as at present and the Earth was experiencing greenhouse conditions similar to today's, with the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere comparable to present day values. Thus far, there is no satisfactory explanation for the climate state of the Pliocene, especially for the climate conditions in the tropics and subtropics. State-of-the-art climate models fail to reproduce a permanent El Nino even when forced by CO2 concentrations many times larger than those estimated for the early Pliocene. Predicting the impact on the tropics of global warming caused by anthropogenic factors also remains a serious challenge for climate scientists. Coupled general circulation models yield a wide range of possible scenarios for the region, but many suggest a slightly higher likelihood of an El Nino-like state in global warming. Efforts to predict future global warming should benefit enormously from a better understanding of the state of permanent El Nino which imposes a strong dynamical constraint on both oceanic and atmospheric circulations. Modeling permanent El Nino with atmospheric and oceanic GCMs reveals a poleward heat transport paradox: Calculations with ocean-only models suggest that a permanent El Nino should correspond to a reduced poleward heat transport by the ocean. This is related to a deeper thermocline in the eastern equatorial Pacific, which

  1. Random regression models to account for the effect of genotype by environment interaction due to heat stress on the milk yield of Holstein cows under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Santana, Mário L; Bignardi, Annaiza Braga; Pereira, Rodrigo Junqueira; Menéndez-Buxadera, Alberto; El Faro, Lenira

    2016-02-01

    The present study had the following objectives: to compare random regression models (RRM) considering the time-dependent (days in milk, DIM) and/or temperature × humidity-dependent (THI) covariate for genetic evaluation; to identify the effect of genotype by environment interaction (G×E) due to heat stress on milk yield; and to quantify the loss of milk yield due to heat stress across lactation of cows under tropical conditions. A total of 937,771 test-day records from 3603 first lactations of Brazilian Holstein cows obtained between 2007 and 2013 were analyzed. An important reduction in milk yield due to heat stress was observed for THI values above 66 (-0.23 kg/day/THI). Three phases of milk yield loss were identified during lactation, the most damaging one at the end of lactation (-0.27 kg/day/THI). Using the most complex RRM, the additive genetic variance could be altered simultaneously as a function of both DIM and THI values. This model could be recommended for the genetic evaluation taking into account the effect of G×E. The response to selection in the comfort zone (THI ≤ 66) is expected to be higher than that obtained in the heat stress zone (THI > 66) of the animals. The genetic correlations between milk yield in the comfort and heat stress zones were less than unity at opposite extremes of the environmental gradient. Thus, the best animals for milk yield in the comfort zone are not necessarily the best in the zone of heat stress and, therefore, G×E due to heat stress should not be neglected in the genetic evaluation.

  2. F2-region atmospheric gravity waves due to high-power HF heating and subauroral polarization streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E.; Sutton, E.; Milikh, G.; Galkin, I.; Roth, C.; Förster, M.

    2012-06-01

    We report the first evidence of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) generated in the F2 region by high-power HF heating and subauroral polarization streams. Data come from the CHAMP and GRACE spacecraft overflying the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility. These observations facilitate a new method of studying the ionosphere-thermosphere coupling in a controlled fashion by using various HF-heating regimes. They also reveal the subauroral F2 region to be a significant source of substorm AGWs, in addition to the well-known auroral E region.

  3. Global and regional changes in exposure to extreme heat and the relative contributions of climate and population change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao; Anderson, Bruce; Yan, Kai; Dong, Weihua; Liao, Hua; Shi, Peijun

    2017-03-01

    The frequency and intensity of extreme heat wave events have increased in the past several decades and are likely to continue to increase in the future under the influence of human-induced climate change. Exposure refers to people, property, systems, or other elements present in hazard zones that are thereby subject to potential losses. Exposure to extreme heat and changes therein are not just determined by climate changes but also population changes. Here we analyze output for three scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions and socio-economic growth to estimate future exposure change taking account of both climate and population factors. We find that for the higher emission scenario (RCP8.5-SSP3), the global exposure increases nearly 30-fold by 2100. The average exposure for Africa is over 118 times greater than it has been historically, while the exposure for Europe increases by only a factor of four. Importantly, in the absence of climate change, exposure is reduced by 75–95% globally and across all geographic regions, as compared with exposure under the high emission scenario. Under lower emission scenarios RCP4.5-SSP2 and RCP2.6-SSP1, the global exposure is reduced by 65% and 85% respectively, highlighting the efficacy of mitigation efforts in reducing exposure to extreme heat.

  4. Global and regional changes in exposure to extreme heat and the relative contributions of climate and population change

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao; Anderson, Bruce; Yan, Kai; Dong, Weihua; Liao, Hua; Shi, Peijun

    2017-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of extreme heat wave events have increased in the past several decades and are likely to continue to increase in the future under the influence of human-induced climate change. Exposure refers to people, property, systems, or other elements present in hazard zones that are thereby subject to potential losses. Exposure to extreme heat and changes therein are not just determined by climate changes but also population changes. Here we analyze output for three scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions and socio-economic growth to estimate future exposure change taking account of both climate and population factors. We find that for the higher emission scenario (RCP8.5-SSP3), the global exposure increases nearly 30-fold by 2100. The average exposure for Africa is over 118 times greater than it has been historically, while the exposure for Europe increases by only a factor of four. Importantly, in the absence of climate change, exposure is reduced by 75–95% globally and across all geographic regions, as compared with exposure under the high emission scenario. Under lower emission scenarios RCP4.5-SSP2 and RCP2.6-SSP1, the global exposure is reduced by 65% and 85% respectively, highlighting the efficacy of mitigation efforts in reducing exposure to extreme heat. PMID:28266567

  5. Global and regional changes in exposure to extreme heat and the relative contributions of climate and population change.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao; Anderson, Bruce; Yan, Kai; Dong, Weihua; Liao, Hua; Shi, Peijun

    2017-03-07

    The frequency and intensity of extreme heat wave events have increased in the past several decades and are likely to continue to increase in the future under the influence of human-induced climate change. Exposure refers to people, property, systems, or other elements present in hazard zones that are thereby subject to potential losses. Exposure to extreme heat and changes therein are not just determined by climate changes but also population changes. Here we analyze output for three scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions and socio-economic growth to estimate future exposure change taking account of both climate and population factors. We find that for the higher emission scenario (RCP8.5-SSP3), the global exposure increases nearly 30-fold by 2100. The average exposure for Africa is over 118 times greater than it has been historically, while the exposure for Europe increases by only a factor of four. Importantly, in the absence of climate change, exposure is reduced by 75-95% globally and across all geographic regions, as compared with exposure under the high emission scenario. Under lower emission scenarios RCP4.5-SSP2 and RCP2.6-SSP1, the global exposure is reduced by 65% and 85% respectively, highlighting the efficacy of mitigation efforts in reducing exposure to extreme heat.

  6. Precise Measurement of the Reionization Optical Depth from the Global 21 cm Signal Accounting for Cosmic Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    As a result of our limited data on reionization, the total optical depth for electron scattering, τ, limits precision measurements of cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). It was recently shown that the predicted 21 cm signal of neutral hydrogen contains enough information to reconstruct τ with sub-percent accuracy, assuming that the neutral gas was much hotter than the CMB throughout the entire epoch of reionization (EoR). Here we relax this assumption and use the global 21 cm signal alone to extract τ for realistic X-ray heating scenarios. We test our model-independent approach using mock data for a wide range of ionization and heating histories and show that an accurate measurement of the reionization optical depth at a sub-percent level is possible in most of the considered scenarios even when heating is not saturated during the EoR, assuming that the foregrounds are mitigated. However, we find that in cases where heating sources had hard X-ray spectra and their luminosity was close to or lower than what is predicted based on low-redshift observations, the global 21 cm signal alone is not a good tracer of the reionization history.

  7. PRECISE MEASUREMENT OF THE REIONIZATION OPTICAL DEPTH FROM THE GLOBAL 21 cm SIGNAL ACCOUNTING FOR COSMIC HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2016-04-10

    As a result of our limited data on reionization, the total optical depth for electron scattering, τ, limits precision measurements of cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). It was recently shown that the predicted 21 cm signal of neutral hydrogen contains enough information to reconstruct τ with sub-percent accuracy, assuming that the neutral gas was much hotter than the CMB throughout the entire epoch of reionization (EoR). Here we relax this assumption and use the global 21 cm signal alone to extract τ for realistic X-ray heating scenarios. We test our model-independent approach using mock data for a wide range of ionization and heating histories and show that an accurate measurement of the reionization optical depth at a sub-percent level is possible in most of the considered scenarios even when heating is not saturated during the EoR, assuming that the foregrounds are mitigated. However, we find that in cases where heating sources had hard X-ray spectra and their luminosity was close to or lower than what is predicted based on low-redshift observations, the global 21 cm signal alone is not a good tracer of the reionization history.

  8. Heat-Shocked Monocytes Are Resistant to Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Apoptotic DNA Fragmentation due to Expression of HSP72

    PubMed Central

    Guzik, Krzysztof; Bzowska, Małgorzata; Dobrucki, Jerzy; Pryjma, Juliusz

    1999-01-01

    Human peripheral blood monocytes became apoptotic following phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus. The consequences of heat stress for monocytes were studied with regard to the effect on S. aureus-induced apoptosis. Exposure of monocytes to 41.5°C for 1 h resulted in HSP72 expression and had no influence on phagocytosis of bacteria; moreover, phagocytosis of S. aureus immediately or shortly after heat shock had no effect on the S. aureus-induced monocyte apoptosis, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation assay. In contrast, cells which recovered from heat shock for 18 to 24 h, although active as phagocytes, were resistant to the S. aureus-induced apoptosis. The observed protective effect was related to the induction of HSP72, since blocking of HSP72 synthesis by an antisense oligomer abolished the protective effect of heat shock on bacterium-induced monocyte apoptosis. PMID:10417194

  9. Mediating Water Temperature Increases Due to Livestock and Global Change in High Elevation Meadow Streams of the Golden Trout Wilderness.

    PubMed

    Nusslé, Sébastien; Matthews, Kathleen R; Carlson, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Rising temperatures due to climate change are pushing the thermal limits of many species, but how climate warming interacts with other anthropogenic disturbances such as land use remains poorly understood. To understand the interactive effects of climate warming and livestock grazing on water temperature in three high elevation meadow streams in the Golden Trout Wilderness, California, we measured riparian vegetation and monitored water temperature in three meadow streams between 2008 and 2013, including two "resting" meadows and one meadow that is partially grazed. All three meadows have been subject to grazing by cattle and sheep since the 1800s and their streams are home to the imperiled California golden trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss aguabonita). In 1991, a livestock exclosure was constructed in one of the meadows (Mulkey), leaving a portion of stream ungrazed to minimize the negative effects of cattle. In 2001, cattle were removed completely from two other meadows (Big Whitney and Ramshaw), which have been in a "resting" state since that time. Inside the livestock exclosure in Mulkey, we found that riverbank vegetation was both larger and denser than outside the exclosure where cattle were present, resulting in more shaded waters and cooler maximal temperatures inside the exclosure. In addition, between meadows comparisons showed that water temperatures were cooler in the ungrazed meadows compared to the grazed area in the partially grazed meadow. Finally, we found that predicted temperatures under different global warming scenarios were likely to be higher in presence of livestock grazing. Our results highlight that land use can interact with climate change to worsen the local thermal conditions for taxa on the edge and that protecting riparian vegetation is likely to increase the resiliency of these ecosystems to climate change.

  10. Mediating Water Temperature Increases Due to Livestock and Global Change in High Elevation Meadow Streams of the Golden Trout Wilderness

    PubMed Central

    Nusslé, Sébastien; Matthews, Kathleen R.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Rising temperatures due to climate change are pushing the thermal limits of many species, but how climate warming interacts with other anthropogenic disturbances such as land use remains poorly understood. To understand the interactive effects of climate warming and livestock grazing on water temperature in three high elevation meadow streams in the Golden Trout Wilderness, California, we measured riparian vegetation and monitored water temperature in three meadow streams between 2008 and 2013, including two “resting” meadows and one meadow that is partially grazed. All three meadows have been subject to grazing by cattle and sheep since the 1800s and their streams are home to the imperiled California golden trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss aguabonita). In 1991, a livestock exclosure was constructed in one of the meadows (Mulkey), leaving a portion of stream ungrazed to minimize the negative effects of cattle. In 2001, cattle were removed completely from two other meadows (Big Whitney and Ramshaw), which have been in a “resting” state since that time. Inside the livestock exclosure in Mulkey, we found that riverbank vegetation was both larger and denser than outside the exclosure where cattle were present, resulting in more shaded waters and cooler maximal temperatures inside the exclosure. In addition, between meadows comparisons showed that water temperatures were cooler in the ungrazed meadows compared to the grazed area in the partially grazed meadow. Finally, we found that predicted temperatures under different global warming scenarios were likely to be higher in presence of livestock grazing. Our results highlight that land use can interact with climate change to worsen the local thermal conditions for taxa on the edge and that protecting riparian vegetation is likely to increase the resiliency of these ecosystems to climate change. PMID:26565706

  11. Schooling and wage income losses due to early-childhood growth faltering in developing countries: national, regional, and global estimates.

    PubMed

    Fink, Günther; Peet, Evan; Danaei, Goodarz; Andrews, Kathryn; McCoy, Dana Charles; Sudfeld, Christopher R; Smith Fawzi, Mary C; Ezzati, Majid; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2016-07-01

    The growth of >300 million children <5 y old was mildly, moderately, or severely stunted worldwide in 2010. However, national estimates of the human capital and financial losses due to growth faltering in early childhood are not available. We quantified the economic cost of growth faltering in developing countries. We combined the most recent country-level estimates of linear growth delays from the Nutrition Impact Model Study with estimates of returns to education in developing countries to estimate the impact of early-life growth faltering on educational attainment and future incomes. Primary outcomes were total years of educational attainment lost as well as the net present value of future wage earnings lost per child and birth cohort due to growth faltering in 137 developing countries. Bootstrapped standard errors were computed to account for uncertainty in modeling inputs. Our estimates suggest that early-life growth faltering in developing countries caused a total loss of 69.4 million y of educational attainment (95% CI: 41.7 million, 92.6 million y) per birth cohort. Educational attainment losses were largest in South Asia (27.6 million y; 95% CI: 20.0 million, 35.8 million y) as well as in Eastern (10.3 million y; 95% CI: 7.2 million, 12.9 million y) and Western sub-Saharan Africa (8.8 million y; 95% CI: 6.4 million, 11.5 million y). Globally, growth faltering in developing countries caused a total economic cost of $176.8 billion (95% CI: $100.9 billion, $262.6 billion)/birth cohort at nominal exchange rates, and $616.5 billion (95% CI: $365.3 billion, $898.9 billion) at purchasing power parity-adjusted exchange rates. At the regional level, economic costs were largest in South Asia ($46.6 billion; 95% CI: $33.3 billion, $61.1 billion), followed by Latin America ($44.7 billion; 95% CI: $19.2 billion, $74.6 billion) and sub-Saharan Africa ($34.2 billion; 95% CI: $24.4 billion, $45.3 billion). Our results indicate that the annual cost of early

  12. Heating rate profiles and radiative forcing due to a dust storm in the Western Mediterranean using satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peris-Ferrús, C.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Marcos, C.; Freile-Aranda, M. D.; Utrillas, M. P.; Martínez-Lozano, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the vertically-resolved radiative impact due to a dust storm in the Western Mediterranean. The dust plume travels around 3-5 km altitude and the aerosol optical depth derived by MODIS at 550 nm ranges from 0.33 to 0.52 at the overpass time (13:05 UT). The aerosol radiative forcing (ARF), forcing efficiency (FE) and heating rate profile (AHR) are determined throughout the dust trajectory in shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) ranges. To do this, we integrate different satellite observations (CALIPSO and MODIS) and detailed radiative transfer modeling. The combined (SW + LW) effect of the dust event induces a net cooling in the studied region. On average, the FE at 22.4° solar zenith angle is -190.3 W m-2 and -38.1 W m-2, at surface and TOA, respectively. The corresponding LW/SW offset is 14% and 38% at surface and TOA, respectively. Our results at TOA are sensitive to the surface albedo in the SW and surface temperature in the LW. The absolute value of FE decrease (increase) in the SW (LW) with the surface albedo, resulting in an increasing LW/SW offset, up to 76%. The AHR profiles show a net warming within the dust layer, with a maximum value of 3.3 Kd-1. The ARF, FE and AHR are also highly sensitive to the dust optical properties in SW and LW. We evaluate this sensitivity by comparing the results obtained using two set of dust properties as input in our simulations: a) the prescribed dust model by Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) and; b) the dust optical properties derived from measurements of the size distribution and refractive index. Experimentally derived dust properties present larger SSA and asymmetry parameter in the SW than OPAC dust. Conversely, OPAC dust presents higher AOD in the LW range. These parameters drive the FE and AHR sensitivities in the SW and LW ranges, respectively. Therefore, when measured dust properties are used in our simulations: the ARF in the LW substantially reduces at surface and TOA (up to 57%); the

  13. Analyzing the effect on heat transfer due to nonuniform distribution of liquid flow among the tubes of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkevich, A. I.; Sharifullin, V. N.; Sharifullin, A. V.

    2010-09-01

    A method is proposed using which nonuniform distribution of liquid flow among the tubes of a shell-and-tube apparatus can be taken into account by means of a statistical distribution function. A formula showing interrelation of this function with the indicator of heat transfer intensity in the apparatus tube space is given.

  14. Diabatic heating fields and the generation of available potential energy during FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salstein, David A.; Rosen, Richard D.; Baker, Wayman E.; Kalnay, Eugenia

    1986-01-01

    Global diabatic heating is estimated using fields of directly computed heating components, in particular those due to shortwave radiation, longwave radiation, sensible heating, and latent heating produced every 6 hours. The role of average fields of diabatic heating in the generation of available potential energy is examined. It is observed that latent heating is most significant in generating available potential energy.

  15. Diabatic heating fields and the generation of available potential energy during FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salstein, David A.; Rosen, Richard D.; Baker, Wayman E.; Kalnay, Eugenia

    1986-01-01

    Global diabatic heating is estimated using fields of directly computed heating components, in particular those due to shortwave radiation, longwave radiation, sensible heating, and latent heating produced every 6 hours. The role of average fields of diabatic heating in the generation of available potential energy is examined. It is observed that latent heating is most significant in generating available potential energy.

  16. Investigating the role of individual diabatic heating components in global atmospheric circulation and climate sensitivity: An energetics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanski, Joy

    The generation of zonal and eddy available potential energy (Gz and Ge) as envisioned by Lorenz (1955) are computed on a global, daily, synoptic-scale basis. Using global, mostly satellite-derived datasets for the diabatic heating components and the temperature enables us to obtain Gz and especially Ge with greater accuracy and at higher temporal and spatial resolution than previously possible. In particular, we are able to consider the contribution of each diabatic heating component separately and in combination. We use this information to determine how various processes contribute to the energy available for the general and eddy circulations. Contributions to the global mean daily mean Gz and G e are computed at a horizontal resolution of 2.5° for the lower troposphere (surface to 680mb), middle troposphere (680--440mb), upper troposphere (440mb to 100mb) and stratosphere (100mb to TOA) for 1997 through 2000. Comparisons to earlier estimates of the generation terms by Lorenz (1967) and Peixoto and Oort (1992) are made. The seasonal and spatial variability of the total generation and of the individual contributions of heating by radiative flux convergence, latent heating and sensible heat flux from the surface are discussed. The generation of zonal and eddy potential energy (Gz and Ge) as envisioned by Lorenz (1955) is computed for seven climate models from the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP's) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) multimodel dataset (Meehl et al 2007). Gz and Ge are computed directly from the temperature and diabatic heating fields of the current climate and a doubled CO2 climate. The seasonal and spatial variability of the total generation and of the individual contributions of heating by radiative flux convergence, latent heating and sensible heat flux from the surface of each model are compared to one another, and evaluated with respect to the same quantities computed from observations. In contrast to a recent study

  17. Impact of oceanic heat transport on global thermodynamical properties in the climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Alexander; Lunkeit, Frank; Lucarini, Valerio

    2014-05-01

    We investigate how properties of macroscale thermodynamics of the climate system respond to changes in the intensity of the oceanic heat transport by utilising PlaSim, an Earth-like general circulation model of intermediate complexity, in an aqua-planet configuration. By increasing the magnitude of the meridional heat transport in the ocean, characterised by an export out of the tropics and a poleward convergence, we observe a surface warming of about 10K and a decrease in the equator-to-pole temperature difference, while the total poleward heat transport remains unchanged. The Carnot efficiency, the intensity of the Lorenz energy cycle and the material entropy production of the system decline with increasing oceanic heat transport. These results suggest that the climate system becomes less efficient and turns into a state of reduced entropy production, as the oceanic transport of heat out of the tropics is reinforced.

  18. Heat-evoked vasodilatation in human hairy skin: axon reflexes due to low-level activity of nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed Central

    Magerl, W; Treede, R D

    1996-01-01

    1. Spreading vasodilatation of the axon reflex type was evoked by contact heat stimulation of the hairy skin in the human forearm (13.3 cm2 stimulus area) and was detected by laser Doppler flowmetry at 8, 19 and 30 mm distance. 2. From a base temperature of 35 degrees C, rapidly rising short heat stimuli (4 degrees C s-1, 2 s plateau) elicited vasodilatation at an average threshold of 39.4 degrees C. For slowly rising sustained heat stimuli (64 s duration) the average threshold was 39.6 degrees C (n.s.) Laser Doppler flowmetry revealed a rapid onset within about 4 s, a long duration of several minutes beyond the end of the stimulus, and a rapid spread of vasodilatation to remote skin areas. These characteristics are typical for vasodilatation by an axon reflex of nociceptive afferents. 3. Axon reflex thresholds matched the lower range of C fibre nociceptor heat thresholds. Thermal stimuli that were adjusted to elicit about half-maximal phasic responses in warm fibres (steps from 30 to 35 degrees C), but were below the range of C fibre nociceptor thresholds, did not cause any vasodilatation. 4. Pain thresholds were higher than axon reflex thresholds for both rapidly and slowly rising heat stimuli and strongly depended on the stimulus pattern (40.1 degrees C for rapidly rising stimuli and > 43 degrees C for slowly rising stimuli). This observation is consistent with recent reports that the phasic response of nociceptive afferents is essential to overcome the summation requirements at central synapses. 5. In conclusion, axon reflex vasodilatation in response to heat stimuli in the hairy skin of humans is elicited by activation of heat-sensitive nociceptors, even in the absence of a conscious perception of heat pain. The dissociation of pain and vasodilatation thresholds supports the concept of two operating ranges of primary nociceptive afferents. Warm fibres do not contribute to axon reflex vasodilatation in the hairy skin of the human forearm. Release of vasoactive

  19. Aerothermodynamic heating due to shock wave/laminar boundary-layer interactions in high-enthalpy hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between a swept shock wave and a laminar boundary layer was investigated experimentally in high-enthalpy hypersonic flow. The effect of high-temperature, real gas physics on the interaction was examined by conducting tests in air and helium. Heat transfer measurements were made on the surface of a flat plate and a shock-generating fin using thin-film resistance sensors for fin incidence angles of 0, 5, and 10 deg at Mach numbers of 6.9 in air and 7.2 in helium. The experiments were conducted in the NASA HYPULSE expansion tube, an impulse-type facility capable of generating high-enthalpy, high-velocity flow with freestream levels of dissociated species that are particularly low. The measurements indicate that the swept shock wave creates high local heat transfer levels in the interaction region, with the highest heating found in the strongest interaction. The maximum measured heating rates in the interaction are order of magnitude greater than laminar flat plate boundary layer heating levels at the same location.

  20. A statistical approach to estimating the geothermal heat flux in Greenland using the global heat flow dataset, ice sheet modeling, and ice core data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvanbehbahani, S.; Stearns, L. A.; van der Veen, C. J.; Walker, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The reliability of ice sheet models is hindered by unknown or poorly constrained boundary conditions. Among these unknown boundary conditions, the Geothermal Heat Flux (GHF) is the least constrained by observations because direct measurements are not available except at a few deep ice cores. The importance of spatial variability of the GHF for modeling ice sheet mass balance is well known; it affects the thermal properties and rheology of ice, which alters the velocity and surface geometry of the ice sheet. In this study, we provide a new map of GHF for the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) by establishing a statistical relationship between globally measured GHF and geological features of the continental crust. Compilations of global heat flux measurements on the continental crust consist of nearly 40,000 locations distributed on all the continents. By assuming that GHF is a complex function of geologic features including crustal thickness, magnetic anomaly, gravity field, rock type, age, elevation, and proximity to spreading ridge, we construct a machine learning algorithm to obtain the statistical relationship between geologic features and GHF. Based on the obtained relationship, we predict the GHF for the GrIS and calibrate the machine learning algorithm by matching the predicted vs. in situ GHF measurements at ice core locations. We then implement the predicted GHF map into the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) and assess the accuracy of the GHF values. Based on the uncertainties associated with geologic features in Greenland, which are used as inputs to the machine learning algorithm, we quantify the error and range of variability in GHF for the GrIS and generate a heat flux map that matches our best understanding of the basal state of the GrIS.

  1. Soybean Roots Grown under Heat Stress Show Global Changes in Their Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Batek, Josef; Gomez-Hernandez, Nicolas; Nguyen, Cuong T; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C; Zhang, Ning; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Hixson, Kim K; Weitz, Karl K; Aldrich, Joshua T; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is likely to be a key factor in the negative impact of climate change on crop production. Heat stress significantly influences the functions of roots, which provide support, water, and nutrients to other plant organs. Likewise, roots play an important role in the establishment of symbiotic associations with different microorganisms. Despite the physiological relevance of roots, few studies have examined their response to heat stress. In this study, we performed genome-wide transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on isolated root hairs, which are a single, epidermal cell type, and compared their response to stripped roots. On average, we identified 1849 and 3091 genes differentially regulated in root hairs and stripped roots, respectively, in response to heat stress. Our gene regulatory module analysis identified 10 key modules that might control the majority of the transcriptional response to heat stress. We also conducted proteomic analysis on membrane fractions isolated from root hairs and compared these responses to stripped roots. These experiments identified a variety of proteins whose expression changed within 3 h of application of heat stress. Most of these proteins were predicted to play a significant role in thermo-tolerance, as well as in chromatin remodeling and post-transcriptional regulation. The data presented represent an in-depth analysis of the heat stress response of a single cell type in soybean.

  2. Soybean Roots Grown under Heat Stress Show Global Changes in Their Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Batek, Josef; Gomez-Hernandez, Nicolas; Nguyen, Cuong T.; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C.; Zhang, Ning; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Hixson, Kim K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is likely to be a key factor in the negative impact of climate change on crop production. Heat stress significantly influences the functions of roots, which provide support, water, and nutrients to other plant organs. Likewise, roots play an important role in the establishment of symbiotic associations with different microorganisms. Despite the physiological relevance of roots, few studies have examined their response to heat stress. In this study, we performed genome-wide transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on isolated root hairs, which are a single, epidermal cell type, and compared their response to stripped roots. On average, we identified 1849 and 3091 genes differentially regulated in root hairs and stripped roots, respectively, in response to heat stress. Our gene regulatory module analysis identified 10 key modules that might control the majority of the transcriptional response to heat stress. We also conducted proteomic analysis on membrane fractions isolated from root hairs and compared these responses to stripped roots. These experiments identified a variety of proteins whose expression changed within 3 h of application of heat stress. Most of these proteins were predicted to play a significant role in thermo-tolerance, as well as in chromatin remodeling and post-transcriptional regulation. The data presented represent an in-depth analysis of the heat stress response of a single cell type in soybean. PMID:27200004

  3. The global effect of heat on gene expression in cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Sun, Yu; Wu, Jie; Li, Xiaojuan; Luo, Man; Wang, Genlin

    2015-03-01

    Heat stress (HS) in hot climates is a major cause that strongly negatively affects milk yield in dairy cattle, leading to immeasurable economic loss. The heat stress response of bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs) is one component of the acute systemic response to HS. Gene networks of BMECs respond to environmental heat loads with both intra- and extracellular signals that coordinate cellular and whole-animal metabolism. Our experimental objective was to characterize the direct effects of heat stress on the cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells by microarray analyses. The data identified 2716 differentially expressed genes in 43,000 transcripts which were changed significantly between heat-stressed and normal bovine mammary epithelial cells (fold change ≥2, P ≤ 0.001). Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that these differentially expressed genes are involved in different pathways that regulate cytoskeleton, cell cycle, and stress response processes. Our study provides an overview of gene expression profile and the interaction between gene expression and heat stress, which will lead to further understanding of the potential effects of heat stress on bovine mammary glands.

  4. Soybean Roots Grown under Heat Stress Show Global Changes in Their Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiles

    DOE PAGES

    Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Batek, Josef; Gomez-Hernandez, Nicolas; ...

    2016-04-25

    Heat stress is likely to be a key factor in the negative impact of climate change on crop production. Heat stress significantly influences the functions of roots, which provide support, water, and nutrients to other plant organs. Likewise, roots play an important role in the establishment of symbiotic associations with different microorganisms. Despite the physiological relevance of roots, few studies have examined their response to heat stress. Here in this study, we performed genome-wide transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on isolated root hairs, which are a single, epidermal cell type, and compared their response to stripped roots. On average, we identifiedmore » 1849 and 3091 genes differentially regulated in root hairs and stripped roots, respectively, in response to heat stress. Our gene regulatory module analysis identified 10 key modules that might control the majority of the transcriptional response to heat stress. We also conducted proteomic analysis on membrane fractions isolated from root hairs and compared these responses to stripped roots. These experiments identified a variety of proteins whose expression changed within 3 h of application of heat stress. Most of these proteins were predicted to play a significant role in thermo-tolerance, as well as in chromatin remodeling and post-transcriptional regulation. In conclusion, the data presented represent an in-depth analysis of the heat stress response of a single cell type in soybean.« less

  5. Soybean Roots Grown under Heat Stress Show Global Changes in Their Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Batek, Josef; Gomez-Hernandez, Nicolas; Nguyen, Cuong T.; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C.; Zhang, Ning; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Hixson, Kim K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary

    2016-04-25

    Heat stress is likely to be a key factor in the negative impact of climate change on crop production. Heat stress significantly influences the functions of roots, which provide support, water, and nutrients to other plant organs. Likewise, roots play an important role in the establishment of symbiotic associations with different microorganisms. Despite the physiological relevance of roots, few studies have examined their response to heat stress. Here in this study, we performed genome-wide transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on isolated root hairs, which are a single, epidermal cell type, and compared their response to stripped roots. On average, we identified 1849 and 3091 genes differentially regulated in root hairs and stripped roots, respectively, in response to heat stress. Our gene regulatory module analysis identified 10 key modules that might control the majority of the transcriptional response to heat stress. We also conducted proteomic analysis on membrane fractions isolated from root hairs and compared these responses to stripped roots. These experiments identified a variety of proteins whose expression changed within 3 h of application of heat stress. Most of these proteins were predicted to play a significant role in thermo-tolerance, as well as in chromatin remodeling and post-transcriptional regulation. In conclusion, the data presented represent an in-depth analysis of the heat stress response of a single cell type in soybean.

  6. Atmospheric heating due to black carbon aerosol during the summer monsoon period over Ballia: A rural environment over Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S.; Dumka, U. C.; Hopke, P. K.; Tunved, P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Bisht, D. S.; Chakrabarty, R. K.

    2016-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols are one of the most uncertain drivers of global climate change. The prevailing view is that BC mass concentrations are low in rural areas where industrialization and vehicular emissions are at a minimum. As part of a national research program called the "Ganga Basin Ground Based Experiment-2014 under the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) Phase-III" of Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India, the continuous measurements of BC and particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations, were conducted in a rural environment in the highly-polluted Indo-Gangetic Plain region during 16th June to 15th August (monsoon period), 2014. The mean mass concentration of BC was 4.03 (± 0.85) μg m- 3 with a daily variability between 2.4 and 5.64 μg m- 3, however, the mean mass PM concentrations [near ultrafine (PM1.0), fine (PM2.5) and inhalable (PM10)] were 29.1(± 16.2), 34.7 (± 19.9) and 43.7 (± 28.3) μg m- 3, respectively. The contribution of BC in PM1.0 was approximately 13%, which is one of the highest being recorded. Diurnally, the BC mass concentrations were highest (mean: 5.89 μg m- 3) between 20:00 to 22:00 local time (LT) due to the burning of biofuels/biomass such as wood, dung, straw and crop residue mixed with dung by the local residents for cooking purposes. The atmospheric direct radiative forcing values due to the composite and BC aerosols were determined to be + 78.3, + 44.9, and + 45.0 W m- 2 and + 42.2, + 35.4 and + 34.3 W m- 2 during the months of June, July and August, respectively. The corresponding atmospheric heating rates (AHR) for composite and BC aerosols were 2.21, 1.26 and 1.26; and 1.19, 0.99 and 0.96 K day- 1 for the month of June, July and August, respectively, with a mean of 1.57 and 1.05 K day- 1 which was 33% lower AHR (BC) than for the composite particles during the study period. This high AHR underscores the importance of absorbing aerosols such as BC contributed by

  7. Biological Heating in a Global Operational Ocean Forecast System: Using VIIRS Products and a Two-band Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. C.; Mehra, A.; Garraffo, Z. D.; Nadiga, S.; Bayler, E. J.; Behringer, D.

    2015-12-01

    A key long-term goal for the NWS/NCEP Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) is integrating biogeochemical variables within NOAA's Global Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS-Global), implementing, as appropriate, the assimilation of relevant observations for an enhanced spectrum and accuracy of forecasts. In this initial effort, we combined VIIRS products with a recent algorithm (Lee et al., 2005) that can resolve vertical distribution of downwelling solar irradiance at two separate bands (EVIS: 400-700 nm and EIR: 700-2000 nm), and examined the heat transfer and its effects on the upper oceanic thermal structure in the operational RTOFS-Global. Our near-term future goals include: coupling of a global ocean biogeochemical model (Gregg, 2008) to the operational RTOFS-Global; and validation of free runs with VIIRS-derived ocean color products. This will eventually lead to the end-point goal, building data assimilative lower trophic ecosystem components in the context of "setting/updating baselines of daily marine ecosystem processes." Assimilation of VIIRS data will provide a unique and timely opportunity to establish a path toward ecological forecasting through biogeochemical analyses and forecasts. This proposed effort fully aligns with NOAA's ecological forecasting roadmap's objectives to: establish the infrastructure capability for operational biogeochemical modeling; quantify forecast accuracy and utility; identify gaps; and prioritize improvements in ecological products and services.

  8. Flow and Heat Transfer of Powell-Eyring Fluid due to an Exponential Stretching Sheet with Heat Flux and Variable Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megahed, Ahmed M.

    2015-03-01

    An analysis was carried out to describe the problem of flow and heat transfer of Powell-Eyring fluid in boundary layers on an exponentially stretching continuous permeable surface with an exponential temperature distribution in the presence of heat flux and variable thermal conductivity. The governing partial differential equations describing the problem were transformed into a set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations and then solved with a numerical technique using appropriate boundary conditions for various physical parameters. The numerical solution for the governing non-linear boundary value problem is based on applying the shooting method over the entire range of physical parameters. The effects of various parameters like the thermal conductivity parameter, suction parameter, dimensionless Powell-Eyring parameters and the Prandtl number on the flow and temperature profiles as well as on the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are presented and discussed. In this work, special attention was given to investigate the effect of the thermal conductivity parameter on the velocity and temperature fields above the sheet in the presence of heat flux. The numerical results were also validated with results from a previously published work on various special cases of the problem, and good agreements were seen.

  9. Utility of birefringence changes due to collagen thermal denaturation rate process analysis: vessel wall temperature estimation for new short term heating balloon angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kenji; Shimazaki, Natsumi; Gotoh, Maya; Nakatani, Eriko; Arai, Tsunenori

    2007-02-01

    Our photo thermal reaction heating architecture balloon realizes less than 10 s short term heating that can soften vessel wall collagen without damaging surrounding tissue thermally. New thermal balloon angioplasty, photo-thermo dynamic balloon angioplasty (PTDBA) has experimentally shown sufficient opening with 2 atm low pressure dilation and prevention of chronic phase restenosis and acute phase thrombus in vivo. Even though PTDBA has high therapeutic potential, the most efficient heating condition is still under study, because relationship of treatment and thermal dose to vessel wall is not clarified yet. To study and set the most efficient heating condition, we have been working on establishment of temperature history estimation method from our previous experimental results. Heating target of PTDBA, collagen, thermally denatures following rate process. Denaturation is able to be quantified with measured collagen birefringence value. To express the denaturation with equation of rate process, the following ex vivo experiments were performed. Porcine extracted carotid artery was soaked in two different temperature saline baths to enforce constant temperature heating. Higher temperature bath was set to 40 to 80 degree Celsius and soaking duration was 5 to 40 s. Samples were observed by a polarizing microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The birefringence was measured by polarizing microscopic system using Brace-Koehler compensator 1/30 wavelength. The measured birefringence showed temperature dependency and quite fit with the rate process equation. We think vessel wall temperature is able to be estimated using the birefringence changes due to thermal denaturation.

  10. Slip Flow of Powell-Eyring Liquid Film Due to an Unsteady Stretching Sheet with Heat Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Mostafa A. A.; Megahed, Ahmed M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on the study of the viscous Powell-Eyring liquid thin film flow and heat transfer driven by an unsteady stretching sheet in the presence of slip velocity and non-uniform heat generation. A system of equations for momentum and thermal energy are reduced to a set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations with the aid of dimensionless transformation. The resulting seven-parameter problem has been solved numerically by using an efficient shooting technique coupled with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm over the entire range of physical parameters. To interpret various physical parameters governing the flow and heat transfer which appear in the momentum and energy equations, the results are presented graphically. The present results are compared with some of the earlier published work in some limiting cases and are found to be in an excellent agreement. This favorable comparison lends confidence in the numerical results to be reported in the present work. Furthermore, the effects of the parameters governing the thin film flow and heat transfer are examined and discussed through graphs and tables. Also, the values of the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number for different values of physical parameters are presented through tables. Additionally, the obtained results for some particular cases of the present problem appear in good agreement with the literature review.

  11. Underestimates of sensible heat flux due to vertical velocity measurement errors in non-orthogonal sonic anemometers

    Treesearch

    John M. Frank; William J. Massman; Brent E. Ewers

    2013-01-01

    Sonic thermometry and anemometry are fundamental to all eddy-covariance studies of surface energy balance. Recent studies have suggested that sonic anemometers with non-orthogonal transducers can underestimate vertical wind velocity (w) and sensible heat flux (H) when compared to orthogonal designs. In this study we tested whether a non-orthogonal sonic anemometer (...

  12. Soil heating during wildfires and prescribed burns: a global evaluation based on existing and new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, Stefan; Santin, Cristina; Reardon, James; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Stoof, Cathelijne; Bryant, Rob; Miesel, Jessica; Badia, David

    2017-04-01

    Heat transfer from the combustion of ground fuels and soil organic matter during vegetation fires can cause substantial changes to the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of soils. Numerous studies have investigated the effects of wildfires and prescribed burns on soil properties based either on field samples or using laboratory experiments. Critical thresholds for changes in soil properties, however, have been determined largely based on laboratory heating experimentation. These experimental approaches have been criticized for being inadequate for reflecting the actual heating patterns soil experienced in vegetation fires, which remain poorly understood. To address this research gap, this study reviews existing and evaluates new field data on key soil heating parameters determined during wildfires and prescribed burns from a wide range of environments. The results highlight the high spatial and temporal variability in soil heating patters not only between, but also within fires. Most wildfires and prescribed burns are associated with heat pulses that are much shorter than those typically applied in laboratory studies, which can lead to erroneous conclusions when results from laboratory studies are used to predict fire impacts on soils in the field.

  13. Soybean Roots Grown under Heat Stress Show Global Changes in Their Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Batek, Josef; Gomez-Hernandez, Nicolas; Nguyen, Cuong T.; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C.; Zhang, Ning; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Hixson, Kim K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary

    2016-04-25

    Heat stress is likely to be a key factor in the negative impact of climate change on crop production. Roots provide support, water and nutrients to other plant organs. Likewise, roots play an important role in the establishment of symbiotic associations with different microorganisms. Despite the physiological relevance of roots, few studies have examined the response of these plant organs to heat stress. In this study, we performed genome-wide transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on isolated root hairs, which are a single, epidermal cell type, and compared their response to whole roots. We identified 2,013 genes differentially regulated in root hairs in response to heat stress. Our gene regulatory module analysis identified ten, key modules that controlled the majority of the transcriptional response to heat stress. We also conducted proteomic analysis on membrane fractions isolated from roots and root hairs. These experiments identified a variety of proteins whose expression changed within 3 hours of application of heat stress. Most of these proteins were predicted to play a role in thermotolerance, as well as in chromatin remodeling and post-transcriptional regulation. The data presented represent an in-depth analysis of the heat stress response of a single cell type in soybean.

  14. Global patterns of land-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent heat, and sensible heat derived from eddy covariance, satellite, and meteorological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Martin; Reichstein, Markus; Margolis, Hank A.; Cescatti, Alessandro; Richardson, Andrew D.; Arain, M. Altaf; Arneth, Almut; Bernhofer, Christian; Bonal, Damien; Chen, Jiquan; Gianelle, Damiano; Gobron, Nadine; Kiely, Gerald; Kutsch, Werner; Lasslop, Gitta; Law, Beverly E.; Lindroth, Anders; Merbold, Lutz; Montagnani, Leonardo; Moors, Eddy J.; Papale, Dario; Sottocornola, Matteo; Vaccari, Francesco; Williams, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    We upscaled FLUXNET observations of carbon dioxide, water, and energy fluxes to the global scale using the machine learning technique, model tree ensembles (MTE). We trained MTE to predict site-level gross primary productivity (GPP), terrestrial ecosystem respiration (TER), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), latent energy (LE), and sensible heat (H) based on remote sensing indices, climate and meteorological data, and information on land use. We applied the trained MTEs to generate global flux fields at a 0.5° × 0.5° spatial resolution and a monthly temporal resolution from 1982 to 2008. Cross-validation analyses revealed good performance of MTE in predicting among-site flux variability with modeling efficiencies (MEf) between 0.64 and 0.84, except for NEE (MEf = 0.32). Performance was also good for predicting seasonal patterns (MEf between 0.84 and 0.89, except for NEE (0.64)). By comparison, predictions of monthly anomalies were not as strong (MEf between 0.29 and 0.52). Improved accounting of disturbance and lagged environmental effects, along with improved characterization of errors in the training data set, would contribute most to further reducing uncertainties. Our global estimates of LE (158 ± 7 J × 1018 yr-1), H (164 ± 15 J × 1018 yr-1), and GPP (119 ± 6 Pg C yr-1) were similar to independent estimates. Our global TER estimate (96 ± 6 Pg C yr-1) was likely underestimated by 5-10%. Hot spot regions of interannual variability in carbon fluxes occurred in semiarid to semihumid regions and were controlled by moisture supply. Overall, GPP was more important to interannual variability in NEE than TER. Our empirically derived fluxes may be used for calibration and evaluation of land surface process models and for exploratory and diagnostic assessments of the biosphere.

  15. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation due to neighboring nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David P.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Hooper, Ryan J.; Manuel, Michelle V.