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Sample records for global regulatory protein

  1. Viral complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosengard, A M; Ahearn, J M

    1999-05-01

    The inactivation of complement provides cells and tissues critical protection from complement-mediated attack and decreases the associated recruitment of other inflammatory mediators. In an attempt to evade the host immune response, viruses have evolved two mechanisms to acquire complement regulatory proteins. They can directly seize the host cell complement regulators onto their outer envelope and/or they can produce their own proteins which are either secreted into the neighboring intercellular space or expressed as membrane-bound proteins on the infected host cell. The following review will concentrate on the viral homologues of the mammalian complement regulatory proteins, specifically those containing complement control protein (CCP) repeats. PMID:10408371

  2. Global Regulatory Pathways in the Alphaproteobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    2007-04-27

    A major goal for microbiologists in the twenty-first century is to develop an understanding of the microbial cell in all its complexity. In addition to understanding the function of individual gene products we need to focus on how the cell regulates gene expression at a global level to respond to different environmental parameters. Development of genomic technologies such as complete genome sequencing, proteomics, and global comparisons of mRNA expression patterns allows us to begin to address this issue. This proposal focuses on a number of phylogenetically related bacteria that are involved in environmentally important processes such as carbon sequestration and bioremediation. Genome sequencing projects of a number of these bacteria have revealed the presence of a small family of regulatory genes found thus far only in the alpha-proteobacteria. These genes encode proteins that are related to the global regulatory protein RosR in Rhizobium etli, which is involved in determining nodulation competitiveness in this bacterium. Our goal is to examine the function of the proteins encoded by this gene family in several of the bacteria containing homologs to RosR. We will construct gene disruption mutations in a number of these bacteria and characterize the resulting mutant strains using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and genetic and biochemical techniques. We will thus determine if the other proteins also function as global regulators of gene expression. Using proteomics methods we will identify the specific proteins whose expression varies depending on the presence or absence of the RosR homolog. Over fifty loci regulated by RosR have been identified in R. etli using transposon mutagenesis; this will serve as out benchmark to which we will compare the other regulons. We expect to identify genes regulated by RosR homologs in several bacterial species, including, but not limited to Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Sphingomonas aromaticivorans. In this way we will

  3. A global regulatory science agenda for vaccines.

    PubMed

    Elmgren, Lindsay; Li, Xuguang; Wilson, Carolyn; Ball, Robert; Wang, Junzhi; Cichutek, Klaus; Pfleiderer, Michael; Kato, Atsushi; Cavaleri, Marco; Southern, James; Jivapaisarnpong, Teeranart; Minor, Philip; Griffiths, Elwyn; Sohn, Yeowon; Wood, David

    2013-04-18

    The Decade of Vaccines Collaboration and development of the Global Vaccine Action Plan provides a catalyst and unique opportunity for regulators worldwide to develop and propose a global regulatory science agenda for vaccines. Regulatory oversight is critical to allow access to vaccines that are safe, effective, and of assured quality. Methods used by regulators need to constantly evolve so that scientific and technological advances are applied to address challenges such as new products and technologies, and also to provide an increased understanding of benefits and risks of existing products. Regulatory science builds on high-quality basic research, and encompasses at least two broad categories. First, there is laboratory-based regulatory science. Illustrative examples include development of correlates of immunity; or correlates of safety; or of improved product characterization and potency assays. Included in such science would be tools to standardize assays used for regulatory purposes. Second, there is science to develop regulatory processes. Illustrative examples include adaptive clinical trial designs; or tools to analyze the benefit-risk decision-making process of regulators; or novel pharmacovigilance methodologies. Included in such science would be initiatives to standardize regulatory processes (e.g., definitions of terms for adverse events [AEs] following immunization). The aim of a global regulatory science agenda is to transform current national efforts, mainly by well-resourced regulatory agencies, into a coordinated action plan to support global immunization goals. This article provides examples of how regulatory science has, in the past, contributed to improved access to vaccines, and identifies gaps that could be addressed through a global regulatory science agenda. The article also identifies challenges to implementing a regulatory science agenda and proposes strategies and actions to fill these gaps. A global regulatory science agenda will enable

  4. Global Summit on Regulatory Science 2013.

    PubMed

    Howard, Paul C; Tong, Weida; Weichold, Frank; Healy, Marion; Slikker, William

    2014-12-01

    Regulatory science has been defined as the science that is used to develop regulatory decisions by government bodies. Regulatory science encompasses many scientific disciplines that oversee many studies producing a wide array of data. These may include fundamental research into the cellular interaction or response to a particular chemical or substance, hazard-assessment and dose-response studies in animal species, neurophysiological or neurobehavioral studies, best practices for the generation and analysis of genomics data, bioinformatics approaches, and mathematical modeling of risk. The Global Summit on Regulatory Science is an international conference with a mission to explore emerging and innovative technologies, and provide a platform to enhance translation of basic science into regulatory applications. The Third Global Summit on Regulatory Science which focused on nanotechnology is discussed.

  5. Global analysis of photosynthesis transcriptional regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Imam, Saheed; Noguera, Daniel R; Donohue, Timothy J

    2014-12-01

    Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888), which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis.

  6. Global Analysis of Photosynthesis Transcriptional Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Saheed; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888), which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis. PMID:25503406

  7. Fur-mediated global regulatory circuits in pathogenic Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-12-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein has been shown to function as a repressor of transcription in a number of diverse microorganisms. However, recent studies have established that Fur can function at a global level as both an activator and a repressor of transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms. Fur-mediated indirect activation occurs via the repression of additional repressor proteins, or small regulatory RNAs, thereby activating transcription of a previously silent gene. Fur mediates direct activation through binding of Fur to the promoter regions of genes. Whereas the repressive mechanism of Fur has been thoroughly investigated, emerging studies on direct and indirect Fur-mediated activation mechanisms have revealed novel global regulatory circuits.

  8. Fur-Mediated Global Regulatory Circuits in Pathogenic Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunxiao

    2012-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein has been shown to function as a repressor of transcription in a number of diverse microorganisms. However, recent studies have established that Fur can function at a global level as both an activator and a repressor of transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms. Fur-mediated indirect activation occurs via the repression of additional repressor proteins, or small regulatory RNAs, thereby activating transcription of a previously silent gene. Fur mediates direct activation through binding of Fur to the promoter regions of genes. Whereas the repressive mechanism of Fur has been thoroughly investigated, emerging studies on direct and indirect Fur-mediated activation mechanisms have revealed novel global regulatory circuits. PMID:22885296

  9. Antagonistic control of the turnover pathway for the global regulatory sRNA CsrB by the CsrA and CsrD proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Leng, Yuanyuan; Abe, Hazuki; Amaki, Takumi; Okayama, Akihiro; Babitzke, Paul; Suzuki, Kazushi; Romeo, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The widely conserved protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator A) globally regulates bacterial gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In many species, CsrA activity is governed by untranslated sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC in Escherichia coli, which bind to multiple CsrA dimers, sequestering them from lower affinity mRNA targets. Both the synthesis and turnover of CsrB/C are regulated. Their turnover requires the housekeeping endonuclease RNase E and is activated by the presence of a preferred carbon source via the binding of EIIAGlc of the glucose transport system to the GGDEF-EAL domain protein CsrD. We demonstrate that the CsrB 3′ segment contains the features necessary for CsrD-mediated decay. RNase E cleavage in an unstructured segment located immediately upstream from the intrinsic terminator is necessary for subsequent degradation to occur. CsrA stabilizes CsrB against RNase E cleavage by binding to two canonical sites adjacent to the necessary cleavage site, while CsrD acts by overcoming CsrA-mediated protection. Our genetic, biochemical and structural studies establish a molecular framework for sRNA turnover by the CsrD-RNase E pathway. We propose that CsrD evolution was driven by the selective advantage of decoupling Csr sRNA decay from CsrA binding, connecting it instead to the availability of a preferred carbon source. PMID:27235416

  10. Redox control of iron regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Fillebeen, Carine; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2002-01-01

    Iron regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2, are cytoplasmic proteins of the iron-sulfur cluster isomerase family and serve as major post-transcriptional regulators of cellular iron metabolism. They bind to 'iron responsive elements' (IREs) of several mRNAs and thereby control their translation or stability. IRP1 and IRP2 respond to alterations in intracellular iron levels, but also to other signals such as nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The redox regulation of IRP1 and IRP2 provides direct links between the control of iron homeostasis and oxidative stress.

  11. Global market for dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Lagrange, Veronique; Whitsett, Dacia; Burris, Cameron

    2015-03-01

    This review examines the global market for dairy ingredients by assessing the global demand for dairy products in relation to major dairy ingredient categories. Each broad category of dairy ingredients is reviewed including its definition, production and trade status, key applications, and future trends. Ingredient categories examined include whole and skim milk powders (WMPs, SMPs), whey protein concentrates (WPCs) and whey protein isolates (WPIs), milk protein concentrates (MPCs) and milk protein isolates (MPIs), caseins, and caseinates. Increases in world population and improvements in socioeconomic conditions will continue to drive the demand for dairy products and ingredients in the future. Dairy proteins are increasingly recognized to have nutritional and functional advantages compared to many protein sources, and the variety of ingredients with different protein concentrations, functionality, and flavor can meet the needs of the increasingly global dairy consumption. A thorough understanding of the variety of ingredients, how the ingredients are derived from milk, and how the demand from particular markets affects the supply situation are critical elements in understanding the current ingredient marketplace.

  12. Topological origin of global attractors in gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, YunJun; Ouyang, Qi; Geng, Zhi

    2015-02-01

    Fixed-point attractors with global stability manifest themselves in a number of gene regulatory networks. This property indicates the stability of regulatory networks against small state perturbations and is closely related to other complex dynamics. In this paper, we aim to reveal the core modules in regulatory networks that determine their global attractors and the relationship between these core modules and other motifs. This work has been done via three steps. Firstly, inspired by the signal transmission in the regulation process, we extract the model of chain-like network from regulation networks. We propose a module of "ideal transmission chain (ITC)", which is proved sufficient and necessary (under certain condition) to form a global fixed-point in the context of chain-like network. Secondly, by examining two well-studied regulatory networks (i.e., the cell-cycle regulatory networks of Budding yeast and Fission yeast), we identify the ideal modules in true regulation networks and demonstrate that the modules have a superior contribution to network stability (quantified by the relative size of the biggest attraction basin). Thirdly, in these two regulation networks, we find that the double negative feedback loops, which are the key motifs of forming bistability in regulation, are connected to these core modules with high network stability. These results have shed new light on the connection between the topological feature and the dynamic property of regulatory networks.

  13. Prediction and integration of regulatory and protein-protein interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wichadakul, Duangdao; McDermott, Jason E.; Samudrala, Ram

    2009-04-20

    Knowledge of transcriptional regulatory interactions (TRIs) is essential for exploring functional genomics and systems biology in any organism. While several results from genome-wide analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks are available, they are limited to model organisms such as yeast [1] and worm [2]. Beyond these networks, experiments on TRIs study only individual genes and proteins of specific interest. In this chapter, we present a method for the integration of various data sets to predict TRIs for 54 organisms in the Bioverse [3]. We describe how to compile and handle various formats and identifiers of data sets from different sources, and how to predict the TRIs using a homology-based approach, utilizing the compiled data sets. Integrated data sets include experimentally verified TRIs, binding sites of transcription factors, promoter sequences, protein sub-cellular localization, and protein families. Predicted TRIs expand the networks of gene regulation for a large number of organisms. The integration of experimentally verified and predicted TRIs with other known protein-protein interactions (PPIs) gives insight into specific pathways, network motifs, and the topological dynamics of an integrated network with gene expression under different conditions, essential for exploring functional genomics and systems biology.

  14. Global regulatory standards for the approval of biosimilars.

    PubMed

    Mounho, Barbara; Phillips, Audrey; Holcombe, Kay; Grampp, Gustavo; Lubiniecki, Tony; Mollerup, Inger; Jones, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which contains the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act. Biosimilars have an important role in the United States health care system, and this new law creates an abbreviated approval pathway for biosimilar products in the U.S. A biosimilar is a biologic product demonstrated to be highly similar to an approved innovator biologic product ("reference product"). While the law provides general information on the standards to demonstrate biosimilarity, Congress has authorized the FDA to define the scientific standards and content of biosimilar applications. There is an increasing global interest in the development of biosimilar products, and several regulatory authorities around the world, as well as the World Health Organization (WHO), have established regulatory guidelines for the approval of biosimilars. The scientific standards and requirements in the biosimilar guidelines of the WHO and other health authorities, including the European Union, Canada, Japan, and South Africa, are reviewed in this paper. The similarities as well as the differences among the policies adopted by these regulatory authorities may provide the FDA valuable information as the agency develops its standards and approaches for the approval of biosimilars in the U.S. At the same time, while establishing such approaches, the FDA has the opportunity to demonstrate leadership in addressing significant safety and other issues related to multi-source biologics and biosimilars that remain a global challenge. PMID:24479248

  15. Nanosilver and global public health: international regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Faunce, Thomas; Watal, Aparna

    2010-06-01

    Silver in nanoparticle form is used extensively worldwide in hospital and general practice settings, in dressings as a treatment for external wounds, burns and ulcers. Nanosilver is also an increasingly important coating over embedded medical devices, inhibiting the development of biofilm. Nanosilver disinfectant sprays and polymer coatings are being widely promoted as protective against viral infections. In addition, nanosilver is widely used for its antibacterial properties in food processing and packaging, as well as in consumer products used for domestic cleaning and clothing. This article argues that medical devices, therapeutic products, and domestic food and goods containing nanosilver, although offering therapeutic benefits, must be subject to precautionary regulation owing to associated public health and environmental risks, particularly from large volumes of nanosilver in waste water. The article first examines the use of nanosilver in a variety of contemporary medical and domestic products, the utilization of which may assist in resolving global public health problems, such as restricted access to safe food, water and medical care. It then discusses the mechanisms of toxicity for nanosilver, whether it should be classified as a new chemical entity for regulatory purposes and whether its increased usage poses significant environmental and public health risks. The article next critically analyses representative international regulatory regimes (the USA, EU, UK and Australia) for medical and domestic use of nanosilver. The conclusion includes a set of recommendations for improving international regulation of nanosilver.

  16. Nanosilver and global public health: international regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Faunce, Thomas; Watal, Aparna

    2010-06-01

    Silver in nanoparticle form is used extensively worldwide in hospital and general practice settings, in dressings as a treatment for external wounds, burns and ulcers. Nanosilver is also an increasingly important coating over embedded medical devices, inhibiting the development of biofilm. Nanosilver disinfectant sprays and polymer coatings are being widely promoted as protective against viral infections. In addition, nanosilver is widely used for its antibacterial properties in food processing and packaging, as well as in consumer products used for domestic cleaning and clothing. This article argues that medical devices, therapeutic products, and domestic food and goods containing nanosilver, although offering therapeutic benefits, must be subject to precautionary regulation owing to associated public health and environmental risks, particularly from large volumes of nanosilver in waste water. The article first examines the use of nanosilver in a variety of contemporary medical and domestic products, the utilization of which may assist in resolving global public health problems, such as restricted access to safe food, water and medical care. It then discusses the mechanisms of toxicity for nanosilver, whether it should be classified as a new chemical entity for regulatory purposes and whether its increased usage poses significant environmental and public health risks. The article next critically analyses representative international regulatory regimes (the USA, EU, UK and Australia) for medical and domestic use of nanosilver. The conclusion includes a set of recommendations for improving international regulation of nanosilver. PMID:20528456

  17. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Rotem; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Nathenson, Stanley G.; Almo, Steven C.; Fiser, Andras

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  18. CONSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF IPBR/XYLS HYBRID REGULATORY PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    IpbR and XylS are related regulatory proteins (having 56% identity). IpbR responds to isopropylbenzene as well as to a variety of hydrophobic chemicals to activate expression of the isopropylbenzene catabolic pathway operon of pRE4 from ipbOP. XylS responds to substituted benzoic...

  19. Multiple regulatory domains on the Byr2 protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, H; Barr, M; Dong, D L; Wigler, M

    1997-01-01

    Byr2 protein kinase, a homolog of mammalian mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEKK) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE11, is required for pheromone-induced sexual differentiation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Byr2 functions downstream of Ste4, Ras1, and the membrane-associated receptor-coupled heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunit, Gpa1. Byr2 has a distinctive N-terminal kinase regulatory domain and a characteristic C-terminal kinase catalytic domain. Ste4 and Ras1 interact with the regulatory domain of Byr2 directly. Here, we define the domains of Byr2 that bind Ste4 and Ras1 and show that the Byr2 regulatory domain binds to the catalytic domain in the two-hybrid system. Using Byr2 mutants, we demonstrate that these direct physical interactions are all required for proper signaling. In particular, the physical association between Byr2 regulatory and catalytic domains appears to result in autoinhibition, the loss of which results in kinase activation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Shk1, the S. pombe homolog of the STE20 protein kinase, can directly antagonize the Byr2 intramolecular interaction, possibly by phosphorylating Byr2. PMID:9315645

  20. Global Mapping of Open Chromatin Regulatory Elements by Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements Followed by Sequencing (FAIRE-seq).

    PubMed

    Bianco, Stéphanie; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Murphy, Bruce D; Gévry, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Genetic information is organized in a complex structure composed of DNA and proteins together designated chromatin. Chromatin plays a dynamic role in transcriptional processes in that alteration of the interaction between its components results in the deregulation of cellular transcriptional program. Modification of epigenetic marks, variation in the precise positioning of nucleosomes, and consequent mobilization of nucleosomes regulate the access of various transcriptional factors to its underlying DNA template. Nucleosome-depleted regions, also designated open chromatin domains, are associated with active DNA regulatory elements, including promoters, enhancers, silencers, and insulators. Here, we describe the protocol of a rapid and simple technique entitled FAIRE (formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements). Combined with high-throughput sequencing (FAIRE-seq), this procedure allows isolation of nucleosome-free regions and their mapping along the genome, thereby providing a global view of cell-specific regulatory elements.

  1. Global Hopf bifurcation in the ZIP regulatory system.

    PubMed

    Claus, Juliane; Ptashnyk, Mariya; Bohmann, Ansgar; Chavarría-Krauser, Andrés

    2015-10-01

    Regulation of zinc uptake in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana has recently been modeled by a system of ordinary differential equations based on the uptake of zinc, expression of a transporter protein and the interaction between an activator and inhibitor. For certain parameter choices the steady state of this model becomes unstable upon variation in the external zinc concentration. Numerical results show periodic orbits emerging between two critical values of the external zinc concentration. Here we show the existence of a global Hopf bifurcation with a continuous family of stable periodic orbits between two Hopf bifurcation points. The stability of the orbits in a neighborhood of the bifurcation points is analyzed by deriving the normal form, while the stability of the orbits in the global continuation is shown by calculation of the Floquet multipliers. From a biological point of view, stable periodic orbits lead to potentially toxic zinc peaks in plant cells. Buffering is believed to be an efficient way to deal with strong transient variations in zinc supply. We extend the model by a buffer reaction and analyze the stability of the steady state in dependence of the properties of this reaction. We find that a large enough equilibrium constant of the buffering reaction stabilizes the steady state and prevents the development of oscillations. Hence, our results suggest that buffering has a key role in the dynamics of zinc homeostasis in plant cells.

  2. Mechanism of action of regulatory proteins encoded by complex retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, B R

    1992-01-01

    Complex retroviruses are distinguished by their ability to control the expression of their gene products through the action of virally encoded regulatory proteins. These viral gene products modulate both the quantity and the quality of viral gene expression through regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The most intensely studied retroviral regulatory proteins, termed Tat and Rev, are encoded by the prototypic complex retrovirus human immunodeficiency virus type 1. However, considerable information also exists on regulatory proteins encoded by human T-cell leukemia virus type I, as well as several other human and animal complex retroviruses. In general, these data demonstrate that retrovirally encoded transcriptional trans-activators can exert a similar effect by several very different mechanisms. In contrast, posttranscriptional regulation of retroviral gene expression appears to occur via a single pathway that is probably dependent on the recruitment of a highly conserved cellular cofactor. These two shared regulatory pathways are proposed to be critical to the ability of complex retroviruses to establish chronic infections in the face of an ongoing host immune response. Images PMID:1406488

  3. Cell cycle control by oscillating regulatory proteins in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Holtzendorff, Julia; Reinhardt, Jens; Viollier, Patrick H

    2006-04-01

    Significant strides have been made in recent years towards understanding the molecular basis of cell cycle progression in the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. At the heart of cell cycle regulation is a multicomponent transcriptional feedback loop, governing the production of successive regulatory waves or pulses of at least three master regulatory proteins. These oscillating master regulators direct the execution of phase-specific events and, importantly, through intrinsic genetic switches not only determine the length of a given phase, but also provide the driving force that catapults the cell into the next stage of the cell cycle. The genetic switches act as fail safe mechanisms that prevent the cell cycle from relapsing and thus govern the ordered production and the periodicity of these regulatory waves. Here, we detail how the master regulators CtrA, GcrA and DnaA coordinate cell cycle progression and polar development in Caulobacter. PMID:16547950

  4. Cell cycle control by oscillating regulatory proteins in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Holtzendorff, Julia; Reinhardt, Jens; Viollier, Patrick H

    2006-04-01

    Significant strides have been made in recent years towards understanding the molecular basis of cell cycle progression in the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. At the heart of cell cycle regulation is a multicomponent transcriptional feedback loop, governing the production of successive regulatory waves or pulses of at least three master regulatory proteins. These oscillating master regulators direct the execution of phase-specific events and, importantly, through intrinsic genetic switches not only determine the length of a given phase, but also provide the driving force that catapults the cell into the next stage of the cell cycle. The genetic switches act as fail safe mechanisms that prevent the cell cycle from relapsing and thus govern the ordered production and the periodicity of these regulatory waves. Here, we detail how the master regulators CtrA, GcrA and DnaA coordinate cell cycle progression and polar development in Caulobacter.

  5. Circuitry linking the Csr and stringent response global regulatory systems.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Patterson-Fortin, Laura M; Vakulskas, Christopher A; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Potrykus, Katarzyna; Vinella, Daniel; Camacho, Martha I; Fields, Joshua A; Thompson, Stuart A; Georgellis, Dimitris; Cashel, Michael; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2011-06-01

    CsrA protein regulates important cellular processes by binding to target mRNAs and altering their translation and/or stability. In Escherichia coli, CsrA binds to sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC, which sequester CsrA and antagonize its activity. Here, mRNAs for relA, spoT and dksA of the stringent response system were found among 721 different transcripts that copurified with CsrA. Many of the transcripts that copurified with CsrA were previously determined to respond to ppGpp and/or DksA. We examined multiple regulatory interactions between the Csr and stringent response systems. Most importantly, DksA and ppGpp robustly activated csrB/C transcription (10-fold), while they modestly activated csrA expression. We propose that CsrA-mediated regulation is relieved during the stringent response. Gel shift assays confirmed high affinity binding of CsrA to relA mRNA leader and weaker interactions with dksA and spoT. Reporter fusions, qRT-PCR and immunoblotting showed that CsrA repressed relA expression, and (p)ppGpp accumulation during stringent response was enhanced in a csrA mutant. CsrA had modest to negligible effects on dksA and spoT expression. Transcription of dksA was negatively autoregulated via a feedback loop that tended to mask CsrA effects. We propose that the Csr system fine-tunes the stringent response and discuss biological implications of the composite circuitry.

  6. Circuitry Linking the Csr and Stringent Response Global Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Adrianne N.; Patterson-Fortin, Laura M.; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.; Potrykus, Katarzyna; Vinella, Daniel; Camacho, Martha I.; Fields, Joshua A.; Thompson, Stuart A.; Georgellis, Dimitris; Cashel, Michael; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Summary CsrA protein regulates important cellular processes by binding to target mRNAs and altering their translation and/or stability. In Escherichia coli, CsrA binds to sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC, which sequester CsrA and antagonize its activity. Here, mRNAs for relA, spoT and dksA of the stringent response system were found among 721 different transcripts that copurified with CsrA. Many of the transcripts that copurified with CsrA were previously determined to respond to ppGpp and/or DksA. We examined multiple regulatory interactions between the Csr and stringent response systems. Most importantly, DksA and ppGpp robustly activated csrB/C transcription (10-fold), while they modestly activated csrA expression. We propose that CsrA-mediated regulation is relieved during the stringent response. Gel shift assays confirmed high affinity binding of CsrA to relA mRNA leader and weaker interactions with dksA and spoT. Reporter fusions, qRT-PCR, and immunoblotting showed that CsrA repressed relA expression, and (p)ppGpp accumulation during stringent response was enhanced in a csrA mutant. CsrA had modest to negligible effects on dksA and spoT expression. Transcription of dksA was negatively autoregulated via a feedback loop that tended to mask CsrA effects. We propose that the Csr system fine-tunes the stringent response and discuss biological implications of the composite circuitry. PMID:21488981

  7. Structural Instability Tuning as a Regulatory Mechanism in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Balabanidou, Vassilia; Remeta, David P.; Minetti, Conceição A.S.A.; Portaliou, Athina G.; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein-protein interactions mediate a vast number of cellular processes. Here we present a regulatory mechanism in protein-protein interactions mediated by finely-tuned structural instability coupled with molecular mimicry. We show that a set of type III secretion (TTS) autoinhibited homodimeric chaperones adopt a molten-globule-like state that transiently exposes the substrate binding site as a means to become rapidly poised for binding to their cognate protein substrates. Packing defects at the homodimeric interface stimulate binding whereas correction of these defects results in less labile chaperones that give rise to non-functional biological systems. The protein substrates use structural mimicry to offset the “weak spots” in the chaperones and to counteract their autoinhibitory conformation. This regulatory mechanism of protein activity is evolutionary conserved among several TSS systems and presents a lucid example of functional advantage conferred upon a biological system by finely-tuned structural instability. PMID:22152477

  8. Quaternion maps of global protein structure.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew J; Thakur, Sidharth

    2012-09-01

    The geometric structures of proteins are vital to the understanding of biochemical interactions. However, there is much yet to be understood about the spatial arrangements of the chains of amino acids making up any given protein. In particular, while conventional analysis tools like the Ramachandran plot supply some insight into the local relative orientation of pairs of amino acid residues, they provide little information about the global relative orientations of large groups of residues. We apply quaternion maps to families of coordinate frames defined naturally by amino acid residue structures as a way to expose global spatial relationships among residues within proteins. The resulting visualizations enable comparisons of absolute orientations as well as relative orientations, and thus generalize the framework of the Ramachandran plot. There are a variety of possible quaternion frames and visual representation strategies that can be chosen, and very complex quaternion maps can result. Just as Ramachandran plots are useful for addressing particular questions and not others, quaternion tools have characteristic domains of relevance. In particular, quaternion maps show great potential for answering specific questions about global residue alignment in crystallographic data and statistical orientation properties in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data that are very difficult to treat by other methods. PMID:23099777

  9. Automated protein-DNA interaction screening of Drosophila regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Hens, Korneel; Feuz, Jean-Daniel; Isakova, Alina; Iagovitina, Antonina; Massouras, Andreas; Bryois, Julien; Callaerts, Patrick; Celniker, Susan E; Deplancke, Bart

    2011-12-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has one of the best characterized metazoan genomes in terms of functionally annotated regulatory elements. To explore how these elements contribute to gene regulation, we need convenient tools to identify the proteins that bind to them. Here we describe the development and validation of a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid platform, which enables screening of DNA elements versus an array of full-length, sequence-verified clones containing over 85% of predicted Drosophila transcription factors. Using six well-characterized regulatory elements, we identified 33 transcription factor-DNA interactions of which 27 were previously unidentified. To simultaneously validate these interactions and locate the binding sites of involved transcription factors, we implemented a powerful microfluidics-based approach that enabled us to retrieve DNA-occupancy data for each transcription factor throughout the respective target DNA elements. Finally, we biologically validated several interactions and identified two new regulators of sine oculis gene expression and hence eye development.

  10. Molecular control of vertebrate iron homeostasis by iron regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wallander, Michelle L.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Both deficiencies and excesses of iron represent major public health problems throughout the world. Understanding the cellular and organismal processes controlling iron homeostasis is critical for identifying iron-related diseases and in advancing the clinical treatments for such disorders of iron metabolism. Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 are key regulators of vertebrate iron metabolism. These RNA binding proteins post-transcriptionally control the stability or translation of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in iron homeostasis thereby controlling the uptake, utilization, storage or export of iron. Recent evidence provides insight into how IRPs selectively control the translation or stability of target mRNAs, how IRP RNA binding activity is controlled by iron-dependent and iron-independent effectors, and the pathological consequences of dysregulation of the IRP system. PMID:16872694

  11. Globally, unrelated protein sequences appear random

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Daniel T.; Pearson, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: To test whether protein folding constraints and secondary structure sequence preferences significantly reduce the space of amino acid words in proteins, we compared the frequencies of four- and five-amino acid word clumps (independent words) in proteins to the frequencies predicted by four random sequence models. Results: While the human proteome has many overrepresented word clumps, these words come from large protein families with biased compositions (e.g. Zn-fingers). In contrast, in a non-redundant sample of Pfam-AB, only 1% of four-amino acid word clumps (4.7% of 5mer words) are 2-fold overrepresented compared with our simplest random model [MC(0)], and 0.1% (4mers) to 0.5% (5mers) are 2-fold overrepresented compared with a window-shuffled random model. Using a false discovery rate q-value analysis, the number of exceptional four- or five-letter words in real proteins is similar to the number found when comparing words from one random model to another. Consensus overrepresented words are not enriched in conserved regions of proteins, but four-letter words are enriched 1.18- to 1.56-fold in α-helical secondary structures (but not β-strands). Five-residue consensus exceptional words are enriched for α-helix 1.43- to 1.61-fold. Protein word preferences in regular secondary structure do not appear to significantly restrict the use of sequence words in unrelated proteins, although the consensus exceptional words have a secondary structure bias for α-helix. Globally, words in protein sequences appear to be under very few constraints; for the most part, they appear to be random. Contact: wrp@virginia.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19948773

  12. Laboratory tests for disorders of complement and complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Shih, Angela R; Murali, Mandakolathur R

    2015-12-01

    The complement pathway is a cascade of proteases that is involved in immune surveillance and innate immunity, as well as adaptive immunity. Dysfunction of the complement cascade may be mediated by aberrations in the pathways of activation, complement regulatory proteins, or complement deficiencies, and has been linked to a number of hematologic disorders, including paroxysmal noctural hemoglobinuria (PNH), hereditary angioedema (HAE), and atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS). Here, current laboratory tests for disorders of the complement pathway are reviewed, and their utility and limitations in hematologic disorders and systemic diseases are discussed. Current therapeutic advances targeting the complement pathway in treatment of complement-mediated hematologic disorders are also reviewed.

  13. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    PubMed

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  14. Redox control of iron regulatory protein 2 stability.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Anja; Lee, Julie; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2011-02-18

    Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) is a critical switch for cellular and systemic iron homeostasis. In iron-deficient or hypoxic cells, IRP2 binds to mRNAs containing iron responsive elements (IREs) and regulates their expression. Iron promotes proteasomal degradation of IRP2 via the F-box protein FBXL5. Here, we explored the effects of oxygen and cellular redox status on IRP2 stability. We show that iron-dependent decay of tetracycline-inducible IRP2 proceeds efficiently under mild hypoxic conditions (3% oxygen) but is compromised in severe hypoxia (0.1% oxygen). A treatment of cells with exogenous H(2)O(2) protects IRP2 against iron and increases its IRE-binding activity. IRP2 is also stabilized during menadione-induced oxidative stress. These data demonstrate that the degradation of IRP2 in iron-replete cells is not only oxygen-dependent but also sensitive to redox perturbations.

  15. How to systematically evaluate immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins - regulatory considerations.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Eva-Maria; Schneider, Christian K

    2009-06-01

    Antibody formation as an immune reaction to a 'foreign' protein antigen is an expected physiological reaction that is in many cases intentionally triggered, for example in the case of vaccinations. However, an unwanted immune response to a therapeutic protein may lead to a loss of efficacy and/or to severe side effects. The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) at the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) issued a multidisciplinary guideline providing general recommendations from a marketing authorisation perspective on how to assess an unwanted immune response following the administration of a biological drug. In this article, we provide an in-depth regulatory discussion on key principles of systematic evaluation of immunogenicity during development of biotechnological medicinal products, including examples.

  16. Local vs global motions in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Maisuradze, Gia G.; Liwo, Adam; Senet, Patrick; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2013-01-01

    It is of interest to know whether local fluctuations in a polypeptide chain play any role in the mechanism by which the chain folds to the native structure of a protein. This question is addressed by analyzing folding and non-folding trajectories of a protein; as an example, the analysis is applied to the 37-residue triple β-strand WW domain from the Formin binding protein 28 (FBP28) (PDB ID: 1E0L). Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories were generated with the coarse-grained united-residue force field, and one- and two-dimensional free-energy landscapes (FELs) along the backbone virtual-bond angle θ and backbone virtual-bond-dihedral angle γ of each residue, and principal components, respectively, were analyzed. The key residues involved in the folding of the FBP28 WW domain are elucidated by this analysis. The correlations between local and global motions are found. It is shown that most of the residues in the folding trajectories of the system studied here move in a concerted fashion, following the dynamics of the whole system. This demonstrates how the choice of a pathway has to involve concerted movements in order for this protein to fold. This finding also sheds light on the effectiveness of principal component analysis (PCA) for the description of the folding dynamics of the system studied. It is demonstrated that the FEL along the PCs, computed by considering only several critically-placed residues, can correctly describe the folding dynamics. PMID:23914144

  17. Global view of the protein universe

    PubMed Central

    Nepomnyachiy, Sergey; Ben-Tal, Nir; Kolodny, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    To explore protein space from a global perspective, we consider 9,710 SCOP (Structural Classification of Proteins) domains with up to 70% sequence identity and present all similarities among them as networks: In the “domain network,” nodes represent domains, and edges connect domains that share “motifs,” i.e., significantly sized segments of similar sequence and structure. We explore the dependence of the network on the thresholds that define the evolutionary relatedness of the domains. At excessively strict thresholds the network falls apart completely; for very lax thresholds, there are network paths between virtually all domains. Interestingly, at intermediate thresholds the network constitutes two regions that can be described as “continuous” versus “discrete.” The continuous region comprises a large connected component, dominated by domains with alternating alpha and beta elements, and the discrete region includes the rest of the domains in isolated islands, each generally corresponding to a fold. We also construct the “motif network,” in which nodes represent recurring motifs, and edges connect motifs that appear in the same domain. This network also features a large and highly connected component of motifs that originate from domains with alternating alpha/beta elements (and some all-alpha domains), and smaller isolated islands. Indeed, the motif network suggests that nature reuses such motifs extensively. The networks suggest evolutionary paths between domains and give hints about protein evolution and the underlying biophysics. They provide natural means of organizing protein space, and could be useful for the development of strategies for protein search and design. PMID:25071170

  18. Iron Regulatory Proteins Mediate Host Resistance to Salmonella Infection.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Casarrubea, Daniela; Sonnweber, Thomas; Viatte, Lydie; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Fang, Ferric C; Hentze, Matthias W; Weiss, Guenter; Galy, Bruno

    2015-08-12

    Macrophages are essential for systemic iron recycling, and also control iron availability to pathogens. Iron metabolism in mammalian cells is orchestrated posttranscriptionally by iron-regulatory proteins (IRP)-1 and -2. Here, we generated mice with selective and combined ablation of both IRPs in macrophages to investigate the role of IRPs in controlling iron availability. These animals are hyperferritinemic but otherwise display normal clinical iron parameters. However, mutant mice rapidly succumb to systemic infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogenic bacterium that multiplies within macrophages, with increased bacterial burdens in liver and spleen. Ex vivo infection experiments indicate that IRP function restricts bacterial access to iron via the EntC and Feo bacterial iron-acquisition systems. Further, IRPs contain Salmonella by promoting the induction of lipocalin 2, a host antimicrobial factor that inhibits bacterial uptake of iron-laden siderophores, and by suppressing the ferritin iron pool. This work reveals the importance of the IRPs in innate immunity.

  19. Regulatory Underpinnings of Global Health Security: FDA's Roles in Preventing, Detecting, and Responding to Global Health Threats

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Katherine C.; Maher, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    In February 2014, health officials from around the world announced the Global Health Security Agenda, a critical effort to strengthen national and global systems to prevent, detect, and respond to infectious disease threats and to foster stronger collaboration across borders. With its increasing global roles and broad range of regulatory responsibilities in ensuring the availability, safety, and security of medical and food products, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is engaged in a range of efforts in support of global health security. This article provides an overview of FDA's global health security roles, focusing on its responsibilities related to the development and use of medical countermeasures (MCMs) for preventing, detecting, and responding to global infectious disease and other public health emergency threats. The article also discusses several areas—antimicrobial resistance, food safety, and supply chain integrity—in which FDA's global health security roles continue to evolve and extend beyond MCMs and, in some cases, beyond traditional infectious disease threats. PMID:25254912

  20. Regulatory underpinnings of Global Health security: FDA's roles in preventing, detecting, and responding to global health threats.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Brooke; Bond, Katherine C; Maher, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    In February 2014, health officials from around the world announced the Global Health Security Agenda, a critical effort to strengthen national and global systems to prevent, detect, and respond to infectious disease threats and to foster stronger collaboration across borders. With its increasing global roles and broad range of regulatory responsibilities in ensuring the availability, safety, and security of medical and food products, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is engaged in a range of efforts in support of global health security. This article provides an overview of FDA's global health security roles, focusing on its responsibilities related to the development and use of medical countermeasures (MCMs) for preventing, detecting, and responding to global infectious disease and other public health emergency threats. The article also discusses several areas-antimicrobial resistance, food safety, and supply chain integrity-in which FDA's global health security roles continue to evolve and extend beyond MCMs and, in some cases, beyond traditional infectious disease threats. PMID:25254912

  1. Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Overexpression Correlates with Protein Kinase A Activation in Adrenocortical Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Su, Tingwei; Jiang, Lei; Jiang, Yiran; Cao, Yanan; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Wang, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    The association of pathological features of cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs) with somatic driver mutations and their molecular classification remain unclear. In this study, we explored the association between steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression and the driver mutations activating cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling to identify the pathological markers of ACAs. Immunohistochemical staining for StAR and mutations in the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha (PRKACA), protein kinase cAMP-dependent type I regulatory subunit alpha (PRKAR1A) and guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha stimulating (GNAS) genes were examined in 97 ACAs. The association of StAR expression with the clinical and mutational features of the ACAs was analyzed. ACAs with mutations in PRKACA, GNAS, and PRKAR1A showed strong immunopositive staining for StAR. The concordance between high StAR expression and mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling in the ACAs was 99.0%. ACAs with high expression of StAR had significantly smaller tumor volume (P < 0.001) and higher urinary cortisol per tumor volume (P = 0.032) than those with low expression of StAR. Our findings suggest that immunohistochemical staining for StAR is a reliable pathological approach for the diagnosis and classification of ACAs with cAMP/PKA signaling-activating mutations. PMID:27606678

  2. Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Overexpression Correlates with Protein Kinase A Activation in Adrenocortical Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wu, Luming; Xie, Jing; Su, Tingwei; Jiang, Lei; Jiang, Yiran; Cao, Yanan; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Wang, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    The association of pathological features of cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs) with somatic driver mutations and their molecular classification remain unclear. In this study, we explored the association between steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression and the driver mutations activating cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling to identify the pathological markers of ACAs. Immunohistochemical staining for StAR and mutations in the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha (PRKACA), protein kinase cAMP-dependent type I regulatory subunit alpha (PRKAR1A) and guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha stimulating (GNAS) genes were examined in 97 ACAs. The association of StAR expression with the clinical and mutational features of the ACAs was analyzed. ACAs with mutations in PRKACA, GNAS, and PRKAR1A showed strong immunopositive staining for StAR. The concordance between high StAR expression and mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling in the ACAs was 99.0%. ACAs with high expression of StAR had significantly smaller tumor volume (P < 0.001) and higher urinary cortisol per tumor volume (P = 0.032) than those with low expression of StAR. Our findings suggest that immunohistochemical staining for StAR is a reliable pathological approach for the diagnosis and classification of ACAs with cAMP/PKA signaling-activating mutations.

  3. Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Overexpression Correlates with Protein Kinase A Activation in Adrenocortical Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wu, Luming; Xie, Jing; Su, Tingwei; Jiang, Lei; Jiang, Yiran; Cao, Yanan; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Wang, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    The association of pathological features of cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs) with somatic driver mutations and their molecular classification remain unclear. In this study, we explored the association between steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression and the driver mutations activating cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling to identify the pathological markers of ACAs. Immunohistochemical staining for StAR and mutations in the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha (PRKACA), protein kinase cAMP-dependent type I regulatory subunit alpha (PRKAR1A) and guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha stimulating (GNAS) genes were examined in 97 ACAs. The association of StAR expression with the clinical and mutational features of the ACAs was analyzed. ACAs with mutations in PRKACA, GNAS, and PRKAR1A showed strong immunopositive staining for StAR. The concordance between high StAR expression and mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling in the ACAs was 99.0%. ACAs with high expression of StAR had significantly smaller tumor volume (P < 0.001) and higher urinary cortisol per tumor volume (P = 0.032) than those with low expression of StAR. Our findings suggest that immunohistochemical staining for StAR is a reliable pathological approach for the diagnosis and classification of ACAs with cAMP/PKA signaling-activating mutations. PMID:27606678

  4. An experimentally supported model of the Bacillus subtilis global transcriptional regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Ortiz, Mario L; Hafemeister, Christoph; Bate, Ashley Rose; Chu, Timothy; Greenfield, Alex; Shuster, Bentley; Barry, Samantha N; Gallitto, Matthew; Liu, Brian; Kacmarczyk, Thadeous; Santoriello, Francis; Chen, Jie; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Sato, Tsutomu; Rudner, David Z; Driks, Adam; Bonneau, Richard; Eichenberger, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Organisms from all domains of life use gene regulation networks to control cell growth, identity, function, and responses to environmental challenges. Although accurate global regulatory models would provide critical evolutionary and functional insights, they remain incomplete, even for the best studied organisms. Efforts to build comprehensive networks are confounded by challenges including network scale, degree of connectivity, complexity of organism-environment interactions, and difficulty of estimating the activity of regulatory factors. Taking advantage of the large number of known regulatory interactions in Bacillus subtilis and two transcriptomics datasets (including one with 38 separate experiments collected specifically for this study), we use a new combination of network component analysis and model selection to simultaneously estimate transcription factor activities and learn a substantially expanded transcriptional regulatory network for this bacterium. In total, we predict 2,258 novel regulatory interactions and recall 74% of the previously known interactions. We obtained experimental support for 391 (out of 635 evaluated) novel regulatory edges (62% accuracy), thus significantly increasing our understanding of various cell processes, such as spore formation. PMID:26577401

  5. The Evolution of the Secreted Regulatory Protein Progranulin

    PubMed Central

    Palfree, Roger G. E.; Bennett, Hugh P. J.; Bateman, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Progranulin is a secreted growth factor that is active in tumorigenesis, wound repair, and inflammation. Haploinsufficiency of the human progranulin gene, GRN, causes frontotemporal dementia. Progranulins are composed of chains of cysteine-rich granulin modules. Modules may be released from progranulin by proteolysis as 6kDa granulin polypeptides. Both intact progranulin and some of the granulin polypeptides are biologically active. The granulin module occurs in certain plant proteases and progranulins are present in early diverging metazoan clades such as the sponges, indicating their ancient evolutionary origin. There is only one Grn gene in mammalian genomes. More gene-rich Grn families occur in teleost fish with between 3 and 6 members per species including short-form Grns that have no tetrapod counterparts. Our goals are to elucidate progranulin and granulin module evolution by investigating (i): the origins of metazoan progranulins (ii): the evolutionary relationships between the single Grn of tetrapods and the multiple Grn genes of fish (iii): the evolution of granulin module architectures of vertebrate progranulins (iv): the conservation of mammalian granulin polypeptide sequences and how the conserved granulin amino acid sequences map to the known three dimensional structures of granulin modules. We report that progranulin-like proteins are present in unicellular eukaryotes that are closely related to metazoa suggesting that progranulin is among the earliest extracellular regulatory proteins still employed by multicellular animals. From the genomes of the elephant shark and coelacanth we identified contemporary representatives of a precursor for short-from Grn genes of ray-finned fish that is lost in tetrapods. In vertebrate Grns pathways of exon duplication resulted in a conserved module architecture at the amino-terminus that is frequently accompanied by an unusual pattern of tandem nearly identical module repeats near the carboxyl-terminus. Polypeptide

  6. Iron Regulatory Protein-1 Protects against Mitoferrin-1-deficient Porphyria*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jacky; Anderson, Sheila A.; Gwynn, Babette; Deck, Kathryn M.; Chen, Michael J.; Langer, Nathaniel B.; Shaw, George C.; Huston, Nicholas C.; Boyer, Leah F.; Datta, Sumon; Paradkar, Prasad N.; Li, Liangtao; Wei, Zong; Lambert, Amy J.; Sahr, Kenneth; Wittig, Johannes G.; Chen, Wen; Lu, Wange; Galy, Bruno; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Hentze, Matthias W.; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Peters, Luanne L.; Paw, Barry H.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial iron is essential for the biosynthesis of heme and iron-sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters in mammalian cells. In developing erythrocytes, iron is imported into the mitochondria by MFRN1 (mitoferrin-1, SLC25A37). Although loss of MFRN1 in zebrafish and mice leads to profound anemia, mutant animals showed no overt signs of porphyria, suggesting that mitochondrial iron deficiency does not result in an accumulation of protoporphyrins. Here, we developed a gene trap model to provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that iron regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) inhibits protoporphyrin accumulation. Mfrn1+/gt;Irp1−/− erythroid cells exhibit a significant increase in protoporphyrin levels. IRP1 attenuates protoporphyrin biosynthesis by binding to the 5′-iron response element (IRE) of alas2 mRNA, inhibiting its translation. Ectopic expression of alas2 harboring a mutant IRE, preventing IRP1 binding, in Mfrn1gt/gt cells mimics Irp1 deficiency. Together, our data support a model whereby impaired mitochondrial [Fe-S] cluster biogenesis in Mfrn1gt/gt cells results in elevated IRP1 RNA-binding that attenuates ALAS2 mRNA translation and protoporphyrin accumulation. PMID:24509859

  7. Iron regulatory protein-1 protects against mitoferrin-1-deficient porphyria.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jacky; Anderson, Sheila A; Gwynn, Babette; Deck, Kathryn M; Chen, Michael J; Langer, Nathaniel B; Shaw, George C; Huston, Nicholas C; Boyer, Leah F; Datta, Sumon; Paradkar, Prasad N; Li, Liangtao; Wei, Zong; Lambert, Amy J; Sahr, Kenneth; Wittig, Johannes G; Chen, Wen; Lu, Wange; Galy, Bruno; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Hentze, Matthias W; Ward, Diane M; Kaplan, Jerry; Eisenstein, Richard S; Peters, Luanne L; Paw, Barry H

    2014-03-14

    Mitochondrial iron is essential for the biosynthesis of heme and iron-sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters in mammalian cells. In developing erythrocytes, iron is imported into the mitochondria by MFRN1 (mitoferrin-1, SLC25A37). Although loss of MFRN1 in zebrafish and mice leads to profound anemia, mutant animals showed no overt signs of porphyria, suggesting that mitochondrial iron deficiency does not result in an accumulation of protoporphyrins. Here, we developed a gene trap model to provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that iron regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) inhibits protoporphyrin accumulation. Mfrn1(+/gt);Irp1(-/-) erythroid cells exhibit a significant increase in protoporphyrin levels. IRP1 attenuates protoporphyrin biosynthesis by binding to the 5'-iron response element (IRE) of alas2 mRNA, inhibiting its translation. Ectopic expression of alas2 harboring a mutant IRE, preventing IRP1 binding, in Mfrn1(gt/gt) cells mimics Irp1 deficiency. Together, our data support a model whereby impaired mitochondrial [Fe-S] cluster biogenesis in Mfrn1(gt/gt) cells results in elevated IRP1 RNA-binding that attenuates ALAS2 mRNA translation and protoporphyrin accumulation.

  8. Adaptation of Tri-molecular fluorescence complementation allows assaying of regulatory Csr RNA-protein interactions in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gelderman, Grant; Sivakumar, Anusha; Lipp, Sarah; Contreras, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    sRNAs play a significant role in controlling and regulating cellular metabolism. One of the more interesting aspects of certain sRNAs is their ability to make global changes in the cell by interacting with regulatory proteins. In this work, we demonstrate the use of an in vivo Tri-molecular Fluorescence Complementation assay to detect and visualize the central regulatory sRNA-protein interaction of the Carbon Storage Regulatory system in E. coli. The Carbon Storage Regulator consists primarily of an RNA binding protein, CsrA, that alters the activity of mRNA targets and of an sRNA, CsrB, that modulates the activity of CsrA. We describe the construction of a fluorescence complementation system that detects the interactions between CsrB and CsrA. Additionally, we demonstrate that the intensity of the fluorescence of this system is able to detect changes in the affinity of the CsrB-CsrA interaction, as caused by mutations in the protein sequence of CsrA. While previous methods have adopted this technique to study mRNA or RNA localization, this is the first attempt to use this technique to study the sRNA-protein interaction directly in bacteria. This method presents a potentially powerful tool to study complex bacterial RNA protein interactions in vivo.

  9. Transcriptional and translational regulatory responses to iron limitation in the globally distributed marine bacterium Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Daniel P.; Kitner, J. B.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Clauss, Therese RW; Lipton, Mary S.; Schwalbach, M. S.; Steindler, L.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2010-05-05

    Abstract Background: Iron is recognized as an important micronutrient that limits microbial plankton productivity over vast regions of the oceans. We investigated the gene expression responses of Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique cultures to iron limitation in natural seawater media supplemented with a siderophore to chelate iron. Methodology/Principal Findings: Microarray data indicated transcription of the periplasmic iron binding protein sfuC increased by 16-fold, and iron transporter subunits, iron-sulfur center assembly genes, and the putative ferroxidase rubrerythrin transcripts increased to a lesser extent. Quantitative peptide mass spectrometry revealed that sfuC protein abundance increased 27-fold, despite an average decrease of 59% across the global proteome. Two RNA-binding proteins, CspE and CspL, correlated well with iron availability, suggesting that they may contribute to the observed differences between the transcriptome and proteome. Conclusions/Significance: We propose sfuC as a marker gene for indicating iron limitation in marine metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic ecological surveys. The marked proteome reduction was not directly correlated to changes in the transcriptome, implicating post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms as modulators of protein expression. We propose a model in which the RNA-binding activity of cspE and cspL selectively enables protein synthesis of the iron acquisition protein sfuC during transient growth-limiting episodes of iron scarcity.

  10. Iron misregulation and neurodegenerative disease in mouse models that lack iron regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Manik C.; Zhang, De-Liang; Rouault, Tracey A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2) are two cytosolic proteins that maintain cellular iron homeostasis by binding to RNA stem loops known as iron responsive elements (IREs) that are found in the untranslated regions of target mRNAs that encode proteins involved in iron metabolism. IRPs modify expression of iron metabolism genes, and global and tissue-specific knockout mice have been made to evaluate the physiological significance of these iron regulatory proteins (Irps). Here, we will discuss the results of the studies that have been performed with mice engineered to lack expression of one or both Irps, and made in different strains using different methodologies. Both Irp1 and Irp2 knockout mice are viable, but the double knockout (Irp1−/−Irp2−/−) mice die before birth, indicating that these Irps play a crucial role in maintaining iron homeostasis. Irp1−/− mice develop polycythemia and pulmonary hypertension, and when these mice are challenged with a low iron diet, they die early of abdominal hemorrhages, suggesting that Irp1 plays an essential role in erythropoiesis and in the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. Irp2−/− mice develop microcytic anemia, erythropoietic protoporphyria and a progressive neurological disorder, indicating that Irp2 has important functions in the nervous system and erythropoietic homeostasis. Several excellent review articles have recently been published on Irp knockout mice that mainly focus on Irp1−/− mice (referenced in the introduction). In this review, we will briefly describe the phenotypes and physiological implications of Irp1−/− mice, and will discuss the phenotypes observed for Irp2−/− mice in detail with a particular emphasis on the neurological problems of these mice. PMID:25771171

  11. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  12. A strategy to quantitate global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-04-15

    Current studies of protein phosphorylation focus primarily on the importance of specific phosphoproteins and their landscapes of phosphorylation in the regulation of different cellular functions. However, global changes in phosphorylation of extracellular matrix phosphoproteins measured "in bulk" are equally important. For example, correct global phosphorylation of different bone matrix proteins is critical to healthy tissue biomineralization. To study changes of bone matrix global phosphorylation, we developed a strategy that combines a procedure for in vitro phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of fully mineralized bone in addition to quantitation of the global phosphorylation levels of bone matrix proteins. For the first time, we show that it is possible to enzymatically phosphorylate/dephosphorylate fully mineralized bone originating from either cadaveric human donors or laboratory animals (mice). Using our strategy, we detected the difference in the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from wild-type and osteopontin knockout mice. We also observed that the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from human cortical bone were lower than those isolated from trabecular bone. The developed strategy has the potential to open new avenues for studies on the global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins and their role in biomineralization as well for other tissues/cells and protein-based materials.

  13. Regulatory protein BBD18 of the lyme disease spirochete: essential role during tick acquisition?

    PubMed

    Hayes, Beth M; Dulebohn, Daniel P; Sarkar, Amit; Tilly, Kit; Bestor, Aaron; Ambroggio, Xavier; Rosa, Patricia A

    2014-04-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi senses and responds to environmental cues as it transits between the tick vector and vertebrate host. Failure to properly adapt can block transmission of the spirochete and persistence in either vector or host. We previously identified BBD18, a novel plasmid-encoded protein of B. burgdorferi, as a putative repressor of the host-essential factor OspC. In this study, we investigate the in vivo role of BBD18 as a regulatory protein, using an experimental mouse-tick model system that closely resembles the natural infectious cycle of B. burgdorferi. We show that spirochetes that have been engineered to constitutively produce BBD18 can colonize and persist in ticks but do not infect mice when introduced by either tick bite or needle inoculation. Conversely, spirochetes lacking BBD18 can persistently infect mice but are not acquired by feeding ticks. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that abrogation of spirochete infection in mice by overexpression of BBD18 occurs only with bbd18 alleles that can suppress OspC synthesis. Finally, we demonstrate that BBD18-mediated regulation does not utilize a previously described ospC operator sequence required by B. burgdorferi for persistence in immunocompetent mice. These data lead us to conclude that BBD18 does not represent the putative repressor utilized by B. burgdorferi for the specific downregulation of OspC in the mammalian host. Rather, we suggest that BBD18 exhibits features more consistent with those of a global regulatory protein whose critical role occurs during spirochete acquisition by feeding ticks. IMPORTANCE Lyme disease, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common arthropod-borne disease in North America. B. burgdorferi is transmitted to humans and other vertebrate hosts by ticks as they take a blood meal. Transmission between vectors and hosts requires the bacterium to sense changes in the environment and adapt. However, the mechanisms

  14. Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 and Its Regulatory Protein Inhibitor 2 Negatively Regulate ABA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Xie, Shaojun; Batelli, Giorgia; Wang, Bangshing; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Xing, Lu; Lei, Mingguang; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The core ABA signaling pathway consists of three major components: ABA receptor (PYR1/PYLs), type 2C Protein Phosphatase (PP2C) and SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2). Nevertheless, the complexity of ABA signaling remains to be explored. To uncover new components of ABA signal transduction pathways, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen for SnRK2-interacting proteins. We found that Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 (TOPP1) and its regulatory protein, At Inhibitor-2 (AtI-2), physically interact with SnRK2s and also with PYLs. TOPP1 inhibited the kinase activity of SnRK2.6, and this inhibition could be enhanced by AtI-2. Transactivation assays showed that TOPP1 and AtI-2 negatively regulated the SnRK2.2/3/6-mediated activation of the ABA responsive reporter gene RD29B, supporting a negative role of TOPP1 and AtI-2 in ABA signaling. Consistent with these findings, topp1 and ati-2 mutant plants displayed hypersensitivities to ABA and salt treatments, and transcriptome analysis of TOPP1 and AtI-2 knockout plants revealed an increased expression of multiple ABA-responsive genes in the mutants. Taken together, our results uncover TOPP1 and AtI-2 as negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:26943172

  15. Apoptosis regulatory protein-protein interaction demonstrates hierarchical scale-free fractal network.

    PubMed

    Nafis, Shazia; Kalaiarasan, Ponnusamy; Brojen Singh, R K; Husain, Mohammad; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2015-07-01

    Dysregulation or inhibition of apoptosis favors cancer and many other diseases. Understanding of the network interaction of the genes involved in apoptotic pathway, therefore, is essential, to look for targets of therapeutic intervention. Here we used the network theory methods, using experimentally validated 25 apoptosis regulatory proteins and identified important genes for apoptosis regulation, which demonstrated a hierarchical scale-free fractal protein-protein interaction network. TP53, BRCA1, UBIQ and CASP3 were recognized as a four key regulators. BRCA1 and UBIQ were also individually found to control highly clustered modules and play an important role in the stability of the overall network. The connection among the BRCA1, UBIQ and TP53 proteins was found to be important for regulation, which controlled their own respective communities and the overall network topology. The feedback loop regulation motif was identified among NPM1, BRCA1 and TP53, and these crucial motif topologies were also reflected in high frequency. The propagation of the perturbed signal from hubs was found to be active upto some distance, after which propagation started decreasing and TP53 was the most efficient signal propagator. From the functional enrichment analysis, most of the apoptosis regulatory genes associated with cardiovascular diseases and highly expressed in brain tissues were identified. Apart from TP53, BRCA1 was observed to regulate apoptosis by influencing motif, propagation of signals and module regulation, reflecting their biological significance. In future, biochemical investigation of the observed hub-interacting partners could provide further understanding about their role in the pathophysiology of cancer.

  16. Major cancer protein amplifies global gene expression

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists may have discovered why a protein called MYC can provoke a variety of cancers. Like many proteins associated with cancer, MYC helps regulate cell growth. A new study carried out by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and colleagues

  17. Bovine viral diarrhea virus structural protein E2 as a complement regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Ostachuk, Agustín

    2016-07-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the genus Pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, and is one of the most widely distributed viruses in cattle worldwide. Approximately 60 % of cattle in endemic areas without control measures are infected with BVDV during their lifetime. This wide prevalence of BVDV in cattle populations results in significant economic losses. BVDV is capable of establishing persistent infections in its host due to its ability to infect fetuses, causing immune tolerance. However, this cannot explain how the virus evades the innate immune system. The objective of the present work was to test the potential activity of E2 as a complement regulatory protein. E2 glycoprotein, produced both in soluble and transmembrane forms in stable CHO-K1 cell lines, was able to reduce complement-mediated cell lysis up to 40 % and complement-mediated DNA fragmentation by 50 %, in comparison with cell lines not expressing the glycoprotein. This work provides the first evidence of E2 as a complement regulatory protein and, thus, the finding of a mechanism of immune evasion by BVDV. Furthermore, it is postulated that E2 acts as a self-associated molecular pattern (SAMP), enabling the virus to avoid being targeted by the immune system and to be recognized as self. PMID:27038454

  18. De Novo Evolution of Complex, Global and Hierarchical Gene Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Dafyd J.

    2010-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks exhibit complex, hierarchical features such as global regulation and network motifs. There is much debate about whether the evolutionary origins of such features are the results of adaptation, or the by-products of non-adaptive processes of DNA replication. The lack of availability of gene regulatory networks of ancestor species on evolutionary timescales makes this a particularly difficult problem to resolve. Digital organisms, however, can be used to provide a complete evolutionary record of lineages. We use a biologically realistic evolutionary model that includes gene expression, regulation, metabolism and biosynthesis, to investigate the evolution of complex function in gene regulatory networks. We discover that: (i) network architecture and complexity evolve in response to environmental complexity, (ii) global gene regulation is selected for in complex environments, (iii) complex, inter-connected, hierarchical structures evolve in stages, with energy regulation preceding stress responses, and stress responses preceding growth rate adaptations and (iv) robustness of evolved models to mutations depends on hierarchical level: energy regulation and stress responses tend not to be robust to mutations, whereas growth rate adaptations are more robust and non-lethal when mutated. These results highlight the adaptive and incremental evolution of complex biological networks, and the value and potential of studying realistic in silico evolutionary systems as a way of understanding living systems. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00239-010-9369-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20680619

  19. Global regulatory developments for clinical stem cell research: diversification and challenges to collaborations.

    PubMed

    Rosemann, Achim; Bortz, Gabriela; Vasen, Federico; Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we explore regulatory developments in stem cell medicine in seven jurisdictions: Japan, China, India, Argentina, Brazil, the USA and the EU. We will show that the research methods, ethical standards and approval procedures for the market use of clinical stem cell interventions are undergoing an important process of global diversification. We will discuss the implications of this process for international harmonization and the conduct of multicountry clinical research collaborations. It will become clear that the increasing heterogeneity of research standards and regulations in the stem cell field presents a significant challenge to international clinical trial partnerships, especially with countries that diverge from the regulatory models that have been developed in the USA and the EU. PMID:27622527

  20. Proteomics analysis of global regulatory cascades involved in clavulanic acid production and morphological development in Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Nicole L; Peña-Castillo, Lourdes; Moore, Marcus A; Bignell, Dawn R D; Tahlan, Kapil

    2016-04-01

    The genus Streptomyces comprises bacteria that undergo a complex developmental life cycle and produce many metabolites of importance to industry and medicine. Streptomyces clavuligerus produces the β-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid, which is used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics to treat certain β-lactam resistant bacterial infections. Many aspects of how clavulanic acid production is globally regulated in S. clavuligerus still remains unknown. We conducted comparative proteomics analysis using the wild type strain of S. clavuligerus and two mutants (ΔbldA and ΔbldG), which are defective in global regulators and vary in their ability to produce clavulanic acid. Approximately 33.5 % of the predicted S. clavuligerus proteome was detected and 192 known or putative regulatory proteins showed statistically differential expression levels in pairwise comparisons. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins whose corresponding genes contain TTA codons (predicted to require the bldA tRNA for translation) was unaffected in the bldA mutant.

  1. Global De Novo Protein-Protein Interactome Elucidates Interactions of Drought-Responsive Proteins in Horse Gram (Macrotyloma uniflorum).

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Gangwar, Indu; Panzade, Ganesh; Shankar, Ravi; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the availability of de novo transcriptome of horse gram (Macrotyloma uniflorum) and recent developments in systems biology studies, the first ever global protein-protein interactome (PPI) map was constructed for this highly drought-tolerant legume. Large-scale studies of PPIs and the constructed database would provide rationale behind the interplay at cascading translational levels for drought stress-adaptive mechanisms in horse gram. Using a bidirectional approach (interolog and domain-based), a high-confidence interactome map and database for horse gram was constructed. Available transcriptomic information for shoot and root tissues of a sensitive (M-191; genotype 1) and a drought-tolerant (M-249; genotype 2) genotype of horse gram was utilized to draw comparative PPI subnetworks under drought stress. High-confidence 6804 interactions were predicted among 1812 proteins covering about one-fourth of the horse gram proteome. The highest number of interactions (33.86%) in horse gram interactome matched with Arabidopsis PPI data. The top five hub nodes mostly included ubiquitin and heat-shock-related proteins. Higher numbers of PPIs were found to be responsive in shoot tissue (416) and root tissue (2228) of genotype 2 compared with shoot tissue (136) and root tissue (579) of genotype 1. Characterization of PPIs using gene ontology analysis revealed that kinase and transferase activities involved in signal transduction, cellular processes, nucleocytoplasmic transport, protein ubiquitination, and localization of molecules were most responsive to drought stress. Hence, these could be framed in stress adaptive mechanisms of horse gram. Being the first legume global PPI map, it would provide new insights into gene and protein regulatory networks for drought stress tolerance mechanisms in horse gram. Information compiled in the form of database (MauPIR) will provide the much needed high-confidence systems biology information for horse gram genes, proteins, and

  2. Global De Novo Protein-Protein Interactome Elucidates Interactions of Drought-Responsive Proteins in Horse Gram (Macrotyloma uniflorum).

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Gangwar, Indu; Panzade, Ganesh; Shankar, Ravi; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the availability of de novo transcriptome of horse gram (Macrotyloma uniflorum) and recent developments in systems biology studies, the first ever global protein-protein interactome (PPI) map was constructed for this highly drought-tolerant legume. Large-scale studies of PPIs and the constructed database would provide rationale behind the interplay at cascading translational levels for drought stress-adaptive mechanisms in horse gram. Using a bidirectional approach (interolog and domain-based), a high-confidence interactome map and database for horse gram was constructed. Available transcriptomic information for shoot and root tissues of a sensitive (M-191; genotype 1) and a drought-tolerant (M-249; genotype 2) genotype of horse gram was utilized to draw comparative PPI subnetworks under drought stress. High-confidence 6804 interactions were predicted among 1812 proteins covering about one-fourth of the horse gram proteome. The highest number of interactions (33.86%) in horse gram interactome matched with Arabidopsis PPI data. The top five hub nodes mostly included ubiquitin and heat-shock-related proteins. Higher numbers of PPIs were found to be responsive in shoot tissue (416) and root tissue (2228) of genotype 2 compared with shoot tissue (136) and root tissue (579) of genotype 1. Characterization of PPIs using gene ontology analysis revealed that kinase and transferase activities involved in signal transduction, cellular processes, nucleocytoplasmic transport, protein ubiquitination, and localization of molecules were most responsive to drought stress. Hence, these could be framed in stress adaptive mechanisms of horse gram. Being the first legume global PPI map, it would provide new insights into gene and protein regulatory networks for drought stress tolerance mechanisms in horse gram. Information compiled in the form of database (MauPIR) will provide the much needed high-confidence systems biology information for horse gram genes, proteins, and

  3. [Future Regulatory Science through a Global Product Development Strategy to Overcome the Device Lag].

    PubMed

    Tsuchii, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Environment that created "medical device lag (MDL)" has changed dramatically, and currently that term is not heard often. This was mainly achieved through the leadership of three groups: government, which determined to overcome MDL and took steps to do so; medical societies, which exhibited accountability in trial participation; and MD companies, which underwent a change in mindset that allowed comprehensive tripartite cooperation to reach the current stage. In particular, the global product development strategy (GPDS) of companies in a changing social environment has taken a new-turn with international harmonization trends, like Global Harmonization Task Force and International Council for Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. As a result, this evolution has created opportunities for treatment with cutting-edge MDs in Japanese society. Simultaneously, it has had a major impact on the planning process of GPDS of companies. At the same time, the interest of global companies has shifted to emerging economies for future potential profit since Japan no longer faces MDL issue. This economic trend makes MDLs a greater problem for manufacturers. From the regulatory science viewpoint, this new environment has not made it easy to plan a global strategy that will be adaptable to local societies. Without taking hasty action, flexible thinking from the global point of view is necessary to enable the adjustment of local strategies to fit the situation on the ground so that the innovative Japanese medical technology can be exported to a broad range of societies. PMID:27040334

  4. The Multifaceted Activity of the VirF Regulatory Protein in the Shigella Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Falconi, Maurizio; Micheli, Gioacchino; Colonna, Bianca; Prosseda, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a highly adapted human pathogen, mainly found in the developing world and causing a severe enteric syndrome. The highly sophisticated infectious strategy of Shigella banks on the capacity to invade the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause its inflammatory destruction. The cellular pathogenesis and clinical presentation of shigellosis are the sum of the complex action of a large number of bacterial virulence factors mainly located on a large virulence plasmid (pINV). The expression of pINV genes is controlled by multiple environmental stimuli through a regulatory cascade involving proteins and sRNAs encoded by both the pINV and the chromosome. The primary regulator of the virulence phenotype is VirF, a DNA-binding protein belonging to the AraC family of transcriptional regulators. The virF gene, located on the pINV, is expressed only within the host, mainly in response to the temperature transition occurring when the bacterium transits from the outer environment to the intestinal milieu. VirF then acts as anti-H-NS protein and directly activates the icsA and virB genes, triggering the full expression of the invasion program of Shigella. In this review we will focus on the structure of VirF, on its sophisticated regulation, and on its role as major player in the path leading from the non-invasive to the invasive phenotype of Shigella. We will address also the involvement of VirF in mechanisms aimed at withstanding adverse conditions inside the host, indicating that this protein is emerging as a global regulator whose action is not limited to virulence systems. Finally, we will discuss recent observations conferring VirF the potential of a novel antibacterial target for shigellosis. PMID:27747215

  5. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein.

    PubMed

    Choi, Il-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  6. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, IL-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  7. Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2014-11-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers.

  8. [Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways].

    PubMed

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers.

  9. Improving Global Access to New Vaccines: Intellectual Property, Technology Transfer, and Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers. PMID:25211753

  10. Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2014-11-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers. PMID:25211753

  11. Integration of a complex regulatory cascade involving the SirA/BarA and Csr global regulatory systems that controls expression of the Salmonella SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence regulons through HilD.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Luary C; Yakhnin, Helen; Camacho, Martha I; Georgellis, Dimitris; Babitzke, Paul; Puente, José L; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) play key roles in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica. Previously, we showed that when Salmonella grows in Luria-Bertani medium, HilD, encoded in SPI-1, first induces the expression of hilA, located in SPI-1, and subsequently of the ssrAB operon, located in SPI-2. These genes code for HilA and the SsrA/B two-component system, the positive regulators of the SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulons respectively. In this study, we demonstrate that CsrA, a global regulatory RNA binding protein, post-transcriptionally regulates hilD expression by directly binding near the Shine-Dalgarno and translation initiation codon sequences of the hilD mRNA, preventing its translation and leading to its accelerated turnover. Negative regulation is counteracted by the global SirA/BarA two-component system, which directly activates the expression of CsrB and CsrC, two non-coding regulatory RNAs that sequester CsrA, thereby preventing it from binding to its target mRNAs. Our results illustrate the integration of global and specific regulators into a multifactorial regulatory cascade controlling the expression of virulence genes acquired by horizontal transfer events.

  12. The global regulatory landscape regarding micronutrient fortification of condiments and seasonings.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Luis A; Bower, Allyson M

    2015-11-01

    Fortification of staple foods has been a successful strategy for combatting micronutrient deficiency. Recently, fortification of condiments and seasonings has been considered as a new approach to mitigate micronutrient deficiencies worldwide. The regulatory environment of already existing programs must be examined to assess their safety, efficacy, and sustainability as this strategy expands globally. The objective of this review is to summarize the global regulatory landscape for the fortification of condiments and seasonings. Presently, legislation regarding the fortification of condiments and seasonings is primarily voluntary and limited to a few nations in Asia. The only dietary vehicles addressed are salt, soy sauce, and fish sauce, and the micronutrients addressed are iron and iodine. A marketing-driven introduction of fortified seasoning powders with iron, and indirectly with iodine, is also gaining popularity in Africa, Central America, and Caribbean countries. It is recommended that legislation regarding food fortification be mandatory in nature and follow established CODEX and World Trade Organization principles as well as World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations fortification guidelines to ensure that these programs are safe, effective, and sustainable. PMID:26251126

  13. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation as a tool to study interactions of regulatory proteins in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Yuan, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important aspect of the gene regulation process. The expression of a gene in response to certain stimuli, within a specific cell type or at a particular developmental stage, involves a complex network of interactions between different regulatory proteins and the cis-regulatory elements present in the promoter of the gene. A number of methods have been developed to study protein-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo in plant cells, one of which is bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). BiFC is a relatively simple technique based upon the reconstitution of a fluorescent protein. The interacting protein complex can be visualized directly in a living plant cell when two non-fluorescent fragments, of an otherwise fluorescent protein, are fused to proteins found within that complex. Interaction of tagged proteins brings the two non-fluorescent fragments into close proximity and reconstitutes the fluorescent protein. In addition, the subcellular location of an interacting protein complex in the cell can be simultaneously determined. Using this approach, we have successfully demonstrated a protein-protein interaction between a R2R3 MYB and a basic helix-loop-helix MYC transcription factor related to flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in tobacco protoplasts.

  14. Complement regulatory protein genes in channel catfish and their involvement in disease defense response.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chen; Zhang, Jiaren; Yao, Jun; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yun; Song, Lin; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is one of the most important defense systems of innate immunity, which plays a crucial role in disease defense responses in channel catfish. However, inappropriate and excessive complement activation could lead to potential damage to the host cells. Therefore the complement system is controlled by a set of complement regulatory proteins to allow normal defensive functions, but prevent hazardous complement activation to host tissues. In this study, we identified nine complement regulatory protein genes from the channel catfish genome. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses were conducted to determine their orthology relationships, supporting their correct annotation and potential functional inferences. The expression profiles of the complement regulatory protein genes were determined in channel catfish healthy tissues and after infection with the two main bacterial pathogens, Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare. The vast majority of complement regulatory protein genes were significantly regulated after bacterial infections, but interestingly were generally up-regulated after E. ictaluri infection while mostly down-regulated after F. columnare infection, suggesting a pathogen-specific pattern of regulation. Collectively, these findings suggested that complement regulatory protein genes may play complex roles in the host immune responses to bacterial pathogens in channel catfish.

  15. A high-throughput method to examine protein-nucleotide interactions identifies targets of the bacterial transcriptional regulatory protein fur.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Lopez, Carlos A; Hu, Han; Xia, Yu; Freedman, David S; Reddington, Alexander P; Daaboul, George G; Unlü, M Selim; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2014-01-01

    The Ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) is a transcriptional regulatory protein that functions to control gene transcription in response to iron in a number of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we applied a label-free, quantitative and high-throughput analysis method, Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS), to rapidly characterize Fur-DNA interactions in vitro with predicted Fur binding sequences in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. IRIS can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide complexes simultaneously and demonstrated here that seventy percent of the predicted Fur boxes in promoter regions of iron-induced genes bound to Fur in vitro with a range of affinities as observed using this microarray screening technology. Combining binding data with mRNA expression levels in a gonococcal fur mutant strain allowed us to identify five new gonococcal genes under Fur-mediated direct regulation.

  16. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  17. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity.

    PubMed

    Farinha, Carlos M; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  18. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L.; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease. PMID:26835446

  19. From local to global changes in proteins: a network view.

    PubMed

    Vuillon, Laurent; Lesieur, Claire

    2015-04-01

    To fulfill the biological activities in living organisms, proteins are endowed with dynamics, robustness and adaptability. The three properties co-exist because they allow global changes in structure to arise from local perturbations (dynamics). Robustness refers to the ability of the protein to incur such changes without suffering loss of function; adaptability is the emergence of a new biological activity. Since loss of function may jeopardize the survival of the organism and lead to disease, adaptability may occur through the combination of two local perturbations that together rescue the initial function. The review highlights the relevancy of computational network analysis to understand how a local change produces global changes. PMID:25791607

  20. Identification of a gamma subunit associated with the adenylyl cyclase regulatory proteins Ns and Ni.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, J D; Codina, J; Risinger, R; Birnbaumer, L

    1984-02-25

    The subunit composition of the Ns and Ni, the human erythrocyte stimulatory and inhibitory regulatory proteins of adenylyl cyclase, respectively, were analyzed by a sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing discontinuous urea and polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis system designed for the study of low molecular weight polypeptides. This system disclosed that these proteins, in addition to their known alpha and beta subunits, contain an additional small peptide of apparent molecular weight of 5,000 (5K). This "5K peptide" is also present in preparations of another protein which we termed "40K protein" on the basis of its hydrodynamic behavior and whose primary protein constituent is the Mr 35,000 beta subunit of the above regulatory proteins. Analyzing Ni, the 5K peptide was functionally related to the protein by showing that its apparent Stokes radius changes from 5.9 to 5.1 nm after treatment with guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate and magnesium in parallel with the alpha and beta subunits. These data are interpreted as evidence for the existence of a third subunit associated with the regulatory proteins of adenylyl cyclase. We call this subunit gamma and propose a minimum subunit structure for these proteins of the alpha beta gamma type. PMID:6321456

  1. A role for HOX13 proteins in the regulatory switch between TADs at the HoxD locus

    PubMed Central

    Beccari, Leonardo; Yakushiji-Kaminatsui, Nayuta; Woltering, Joost M.; Necsulea, Anamaria; Lonfat, Nicolas; Rodríguez-Carballo, Eddie; Mascrez, Benedicte; Yamamoto, Shiori; Kuroiwa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate limb development, Hoxd genes are regulated following a bimodal strategy involving two topologically associating domains (TADs) located on either side of the gene cluster. These regulatory landscapes alternatively control different subsets of Hoxd targets, first into the arm and subsequently into the digits. We studied the transition between these two global regulations, a switch that correlates with the positioning of the wrist, which articulates these two main limb segments. We show that the HOX13 proteins themselves help switch off the telomeric TAD, likely through a global repressive mechanism. At the same time, they directly interact with distal enhancers to sustain the activity of the centromeric TAD, thus explaining both the sequential and exclusive operating processes of these two regulatory domains. We propose a model in which the activation of Hox13 gene expression in distal limb cells both interrupts the proximal Hox gene regulation and re-enforces the distal regulation. In the absence of HOX13 proteins, a proximal limb structure grows without any sign of wrist articulation, likely related to an ancestral fish-like condition. PMID:27198226

  2. A role for HOX13 proteins in the regulatory switch between TADs at the HoxD locus.

    PubMed

    Beccari, Leonardo; Yakushiji-Kaminatsui, Nayuta; Woltering, Joost M; Necsulea, Anamaria; Lonfat, Nicolas; Rodríguez-Carballo, Eddie; Mascrez, Benedicte; Yamamoto, Shiori; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Duboule, Denis

    2016-05-15

    During vertebrate limb development, Hoxd genes are regulated following a bimodal strategy involving two topologically associating domains (TADs) located on either side of the gene cluster. These regulatory landscapes alternatively control different subsets of Hoxd targets, first into the arm and subsequently into the digits. We studied the transition between these two global regulations, a switch that correlates with the positioning of the wrist, which articulates these two main limb segments. We show that the HOX13 proteins themselves help switch off the telomeric TAD, likely through a global repressive mechanism. At the same time, they directly interact with distal enhancers to sustain the activity of the centromeric TAD, thus explaining both the sequential and exclusive operating processes of these two regulatory domains. We propose a model in which the activation of Hox13 gene expression in distal limb cells both interrupts the proximal Hox gene regulation and re-enforces the distal regulation. In the absence of HOX13 proteins, a proximal limb structure grows without any sign of wrist articulation, likely related to an ancestral fish-like condition. PMID:27198226

  3. The Global Regulatory Architecture of Transcription during the Caulobacter Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo; Schrader, Jared M.; Kalogeraki, Virginia S.; Abeliuk, Eduardo; Dinh, Cong B.; Pham, James Q.; Cui, Zhongying Z.; Dill, David L.; McAdams, Harley H.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Each Caulobacter cell cycle involves differentiation and an asymmetric cell division driven by a cyclical regulatory circuit comprised of four transcription factors (TFs) and a DNA methyltransferase. Using a modified global 5′ RACE protocol, we globally mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) at base-pair resolution, measured their transcription levels at multiple times in the cell cycle, and identified their transcription factor binding sites. Out of 2726 TSSs, 586 were shown to be cell cycle-regulated and we identified 529 binding sites for the cell cycle master regulators. Twenty-three percent of the cell cycle-regulated promoters were found to be under the combinatorial control of two or more of the global regulators. Previously unknown features of the core cell cycle circuit were identified, including 107 antisense TSSs which exhibit cell cycle-control, and 241 genes with multiple TSSs whose transcription levels often exhibited different cell cycle timing. Cumulatively, this study uncovered novel new layers of transcriptional regulation mediating the bacterial cell cycle. PMID:25569173

  4. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins Involved in a Posttranscriptional Iron Regulatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E.; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S.; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis. PMID:26703754

  5. Peptides as modulators of enzymes and regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Troitskaya, Larisa A; Kodadek, Thomas

    2004-04-01

    There is currently great interest in the development of methods to modulate the function of diverse classes of target proteins with chemicals (agonists or antagonists). These would be valuable reagents for biomedical research and some might serve as potential drug leads. Traditionally, most chemicals that modulate protein function have been enzyme inhibitors isolated in functional screens specific for the enzyme of interest. However, recent efforts from many laboratories have suggested that relatively simple binding assays may provide a more convenient and general route to chemical modulators. We review here this work with a particular emphasis on peptide modulators. PMID:15003603

  6. A global representation of the protein fold space.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingtong; Sims, Gregory E; Zhang, Chao; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2003-03-01

    One of the principal goals of the structural genomics initiative is to identify the total repertoire of protein folds and obtain a global view of the "protein structure universe." Here, we present a 3D map of the protein fold space in which structurally related folds are represented by spatially adjacent points. Such a representation reveals a high-level organization of the fold space that is intuitively interpretable. The shape of the fold space and the overall distribution of the folds are defined by three dominant trends: secondary structure class, chain topology, and protein domain size. Random coil-like structures of small proteins and peptides are mapped to a region where the three trends converge, offering an interesting perspective on both the demography of fold space and the evolution of protein structures. PMID:12606708

  7. A global optimization algorithm for protein surface alignment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A relevant problem in drug design is the comparison and recognition of protein binding sites. Binding sites recognition is generally based on geometry often combined with physico-chemical properties of the site since the conformation, size and chemical composition of the protein surface are all relevant for the interaction with a specific ligand. Several matching strategies have been designed for the recognition of protein-ligand binding sites and of protein-protein interfaces but the problem cannot be considered solved. Results In this paper we propose a new method for local structural alignment of protein surfaces based on continuous global optimization techniques. Given the three-dimensional structures of two proteins, the method finds the isometric transformation (rotation plus translation) that best superimposes active regions of two structures. We draw our inspiration from the well-known Iterative Closest Point (ICP) method for three-dimensional (3D) shapes registration. Our main contribution is in the adoption of a controlled random search as a more efficient global optimization approach along with a new dissimilarity measure. The reported computational experience and comparison show viability of the proposed approach. Conclusions Our method performs well to detect similarity in binding sites when this in fact exists. In the future we plan to do a more comprehensive evaluation of the method by considering large datasets of non-redundant proteins and applying a clustering technique to the results of all comparisons to classify binding sites. PMID:20920230

  8. Global Topology Analysis of Pancreatic Zymogen Granule Membrane Proteins *S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuequn; Ulintz, Peter J.; Simon, Eric S.; Williams, John A.; Andrews, Philip C.

    2008-01-01

    The zymogen granule is the specialized organelle in pancreatic acinar cells for digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion and is a classic model for studying secretory granule function. Our long term goal is to develop a comprehensive architectural model for zymogen granule membrane (ZGM) proteins that would direct new hypotheses for subsequent functional studies. Our initial proteomics analysis focused on identification of proteins from purified ZGM (Chen, X., Walker, A. K., Strahler, J. R., Simon, E. S., Tomanicek-Volk, S. L., Nelson, B. B., Hurley, M. C., Ernst, S. A., Williams, J. A., and Andrews, P. C. (2006) Organellar proteomics: analysis of pancreatic zymogen granule membranes. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 5, 306–312). In the current study, a new global topology analysis of ZGM proteins is described that applies isotope enrichment methods to a protease protection protocol. Our results showed that tryptic peptides of ZGM proteins were separated into two distinct clusters according to their isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) ratios for proteinase K-treated versus control zymogen granules. The low iTRAQ ratio cluster included cytoplasm-orientated membrane and membrane-associated proteins including myosin V, vesicle-associated membrane proteins, syntaxins, and all the Rab proteins. The second cluster having unchanged ratios included predominantly luminal proteins. Because quantification is at the peptide level, this technique is also capable of mapping both cytoplasm- and lumen-orientated domains from the same transmembrane protein. To more accurately assign the topology, we developed a statistical mixture model to provide probabilities for identified peptides to be cytoplasmic or luminal based on their iTRAQ ratios. By implementing this approach to global topology analysis of ZGM proteins, we report here an experimentally constrained, comprehensive topology model of identified zymogen granule membrane proteins. This model

  9. Subnuclear organization and trafficking of regulatory proteins: implications for biological control and cancer.

    PubMed

    Stein, G S; van Wijnen, A J; Stein, J L; Lian, J B; Montecino, M; Zaidi, K; Javed, A

    2000-01-01

    The regulated and regulatory components that interrelate nuclear structure and function must be experimentally established. A formidable challenge is to define further the control of transcription factor targeting to acceptor sites associated with the nuclear matrix. It will be important to determine whether acceptor proteins are associated with a pre-existing core-filament structural lattice or whether a compositely organized scaffold of regulatory factors is dynamically assembled. An inclusive model for all steps in the targeting of proteins to subnuclear sites cannot yet be proposed. However, this model must account for the apparent diversity of intranuclear targeting signals. It is also important to assess the extent to which regulatory discrimination is mediated by subnuclear domain-specific trafficking signals. Furthermore, the checkpoints that monitor subnuclear distribution of regulatory factors and the sorting steps that ensure both structural and functional fidelity of nuclear domains in which replication and expression of genes occur must be biochemically and mechanistically defined. There is emerging recognition that placement of regulatory components of gene expression must be temporally and spatially coordinated to facilitate biological control. The consequences of breaches in nuclear structure-function relationships are observed in an expanding series of diseases that include cancer [Weis et al., 1994; Rogaia et al., 1997; Yano et al., 1997; Rowley, 1998; Zeng et al., 1998; McNeil et al., 1999; Tao and Levine, 1999a] and neurological disorders [Skinner et al., 1997]. As the repertoire of architecture-associated regulatory factors and cofactors expands, workers in the field are becoming increasingly confident that nuclear organization contributes significantly to control of transcription. To gain increased appreciation for the complexities of subnuclear organization and gene regulation, we must continue to characterize mechanisms that direct

  10. Autoimmune Hepatitis: Progress from Global Immunosuppression to Personalised Regulatory T Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Than, Nwe Ni; Jeffery, Hannah C.; Oo, Ye H.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an immune mediated liver injury. The precise aetiology of AIH is still unknown but current evidence suggests both genetic and environmental factors are involved. Breakdown in peripheral self-tolerance, and impaired functions of FOXP3+ regulatory T cell along with effector cell resistance to suppression at the tissue level seem to play an important role in AIH immunopathogenesis. AIH is predominantly a T lymphocytes driven disease but B lymphocytes are also involved in the immunopathology. Innate immune cells are crucial in the initial onset of disease and their response is followed by adaptive T (Th1, Th17, and cytotoxic T cells) and B cell responses evidenced by liver histology and peripheral blood serology. Standard treatment regimens involving steroid and immunosuppressive medications lead to global immune suppression requiring life-long therapy with many side effects. Biologic therapies have been attempted but duration of remission is short-lived. Future direction of diagnosis and treatment for AIH should be guided by “omics” and the immunology profile of the individual patient and clinicians should aim to deliver personalised medicine for their patients. Cell therapy such as infusion of autologous, antigen-specific, and liver-homing regulatory T cells to restore hepatic immune tolerance may soon be a potential future treatment for AIH patients. PMID:27446862

  11. Membrane orientation of the Na,K-ATPase regulatory membrane protein CHIF determined by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Franzin, Carla M.; Teriete, Peter; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroid hormone-induced factor (CHIF) is a major regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, and a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of membrane proteins that regulate the function of the enzyme complex in a tissue-specific and physiological-state-specific manner. Here we present the structure of CHIF oriented in the membrane, determined by solid-state NMR orientation-dependent restraints. Because CHIF adopts a similar structure in lipid micelles and bilayers, it is possible to assign the solid-state NMR spectrum measured for 15N-labeled CHIF in oriented bilayers from the structure determined in micelles, to obtain the global orientation of the protein in the membrane. PMID:18098352

  12. Inhibition of mRNA export and dimerization of interferon regulatory factor 3 by Theiler's virus leader protein.

    PubMed

    Ricour, Céline; Delhaye, Sophie; Hato, Stanleyson V; Olenyik, Tamara D; Michel, Bénédicte; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Gustin, Kurt E; Michiels, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV or Theiler's virus) is a neurotropic picornavirus that can persist lifelong in the central nervous system of infected mice, causing a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease. The leader (L) protein of the virus is an important determinant of viral persistence and has been shown to inhibit transcription of type I interferon (IFN) genes and to cause nucleocytoplasmic redistribution of host proteins. In this study, it was shown that expression of the L protein shuts off synthesis of the reporter proteins green fluorescent protein and firefly luciferase, suggesting that it induces a global shut-off of host protein expression. The L protein did not inhibit transcription or translation of the reporter genes, but blocked cellular mRNA export from the nucleus. This activity correlated with the phosphorylation of nucleoporin 98 (Nup98), an essential component of the nuclear pore complex. In contrast, the data confirmed that the L protein inhibited IFN expression at the transcriptional level, and showed that transcription of other chemokine or cytokine genes was affected by the L protein. This transcriptional inhibition correlated with inhibition of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) dimerization. Whether inhibition of IRF-3 dimerization and dysfunction of the nuclear pore complex are related phenomena remains an open question. In vivo, IFN antagonism appears to be an important role of the L protein early in infection, as a virus bearing a mutation in the zinc finger of the L protein replicated as efficiently as the wild-type virus in type I IFN receptor-deficient mice, but had impaired fitness in IFN-competent mice.

  13. The Arabidopsis pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase regulatory proteins encode a novel, unprecedented Ser/Thr protein kinase primary structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) is a ubiquitous, low abundance metabolic enzyme of undetermined function in C3 plants. Its activity in C3 chloroplasts is light-regulated via reversible phosphorylation of an active-site Thr residue by the PPDK regulatory protein (RP), a most unusual, bifuncti...

  14. Regulatory roles of Oct proteins in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2016-06-01

    The expression of Oct-1 and -2 and their binding to the octamer motif in the mammary gland are developmentally and hormonally regulated, consistent with the expression of milk proteins. Both of these transcription factors constitutively bind to the proximal promoter of the milk protein gene β-casein and might be involved in the inhibition or activation of promoter activity via interactions with other transcription factors or cofactors at different developmental stages. In particular, the lactogenic hormone prolactin and glucocorticoids induce Oct-1 and Oct-2 binding and interaction with both the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and the glucocorticoid receptor on the β-casein promoter to activate β-casein expression. In addition, increasing evidence has shown the involvement of another Oct factor, Oct-3/4, in mammary tumorigenesis, making Oct-3/4 an emerging prognostic marker of breast cancer and a molecular target for the gene-directed therapeutic intervention, prevention and treatment of breast cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin.

  15. Regulatory roles of Oct proteins in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2016-06-01

    The expression of Oct-1 and -2 and their binding to the octamer motif in the mammary gland are developmentally and hormonally regulated, consistent with the expression of milk proteins. Both of these transcription factors constitutively bind to the proximal promoter of the milk protein gene β-casein and might be involved in the inhibition or activation of promoter activity via interactions with other transcription factors or cofactors at different developmental stages. In particular, the lactogenic hormone prolactin and glucocorticoids induce Oct-1 and Oct-2 binding and interaction with both the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and the glucocorticoid receptor on the β-casein promoter to activate β-casein expression. In addition, increasing evidence has shown the involvement of another Oct factor, Oct-3/4, in mammary tumorigenesis, making Oct-3/4 an emerging prognostic marker of breast cancer and a molecular target for the gene-directed therapeutic intervention, prevention and treatment of breast cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin. PMID:27044595

  16. Regulatory effects of matrix protein variations on influenza virus growth.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, J; Toyoda, T; Nakayama, M; Ishihama, A

    1993-01-01

    Influenza virus A/WSN/33 forms large plaques (> 3 mm diameter) on MDCK cells whereas A/Aichi/2/68 forms only small plaques (< 1 mm diameter). Fast growing reassortants (AWM), isolated by mixed infection of MDCK cells with these two virus strains in the presence of anti-WSN antibodies, all carried the M gene from WSN. On MDCK cells, these reassortants produced progeny viruses as rapidly as did WSN, and the virus yield was as high as Aichi. The fast-growing reassortants overcame the growth inhibitory effect of lignins. Pulse-labeling experiments at various times after virus infection showed that the reassortant AWM started to synthesize viral proteins earlier than Aichi. Taken together, we conclude that upon infecting MDCK cells, the reassortant viruses advance rapidly into the growth cycle, thereby leading to an elevated level of progeny viruses in the early period of infection. Possible mechanisms of the M gene involvement in the determination of virus growth rate are discussed, in connection with multiple functions of the M proteins. PMID:8257290

  17. Global and robust stability analysis of genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays and parameter uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Fang-Xiang Wu

    2011-08-01

    The study of stability is essential for designing or controlling genetic regulatory networks. This paper addresses global and robust stability of genetic regulatory networks with time delays and parameter uncertainties. Most existing results on this issue are based on the linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) approach, which results in checking the existence of a feasible solution to high dimensional LMIs. Based on M-matrix theory, we will present several novel global stability conditions for genetic regulatory networks with time-varying and time-invariant delays. All of these stability conditions are given in terms of M-matrices, for which there are many and very easy ways to be verified. Then, we extend these results to genetic regulatory networks with time delays and parameter uncertainties. To illustrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results, several genetic regulatory networks are analyzed. Compared with existing results in the literature, we also show that our results are less conservative than existing ones with these illustrative genetic regulatory networks.

  18. Transcriptional Analysis of the Global Regulatory Networks Active in Pseudomonas syringae during Leaf Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xilan; Lund, Steven P.; Greenwald, Jessica W.; Records, Angela H.; Scott, Russell A.; Nettleton, Dan; Lindow, Steven E.; Gross, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a grows and survives on leaf surfaces and in the leaf apoplast of its host, bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). To understand the contribution of distinct regulators to B728a fitness and pathogenicity, we performed a transcriptome analysis of strain B728a and nine regulatory mutants recovered from the surfaces and interior of leaves and exposed to environmental stresses in culture. The quorum-sensing regulators AhlR and AefR influenced few genes in planta or in vitro. In contrast, GacS and a downstream regulator, SalA, formed a large regulatory network that included a branch that regulated diverse traits and was independent of plant-specific environmental signals and a plant signal-dependent branch that positively regulated secondary metabolite genes and negatively regulated the type III secretion system. SalA functioned as a central regulator of iron status based on its reciprocal regulation of pyoverdine and achromobactin genes and also sulfur uptake, suggesting a role in the iron-sulfur balance. RetS functioned almost exclusively to repress secondary metabolite genes when the cells were not on leaves. Among the sigma factors examined, AlgU influenced many more genes than RpoS, and most AlgU-regulated genes depended on RpoN. RpoN differentially impacted many AlgU- and GacS-activated genes in cells recovered from apoplastic versus epiphytic sites, suggesting differences in environmental signals or bacterial stress status in these two habitats. Collectively, our findings illustrate a central role for GacS, SalA, RpoN, and AlgU in global regulation in B728a in planta and a high level of plasticity in these regulators’ responses to distinct environmental signals. PMID:25182327

  19. DNA sequence and translational product of a new nodulation-regulatory locus: syrM has sequence similarity to NodD proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, M J; Long, S R

    1990-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti nodulation (nod) genes are expressed when activated by trans-acting proteins in the NodD family. The nodD1 and nodD2 gene products activate nod promoters when cells are exposed to plant-synthesized signal molecules. Alternatively, the same nod promoters are activated by the nodD3 gene when nodD3 is carried in trans along with a closely linked global regulatory locus, syrM (symbiotic regulator) (J. T. Mulligan and S. R. Long, Genetics 122:7-18, 1989). In this article we report the nucleotide sequence of a 2.6-kilobase SphI fragment from R. meliloti SU47 containing syrM. Expression from this locus was confirmed by using in vitro transcription-translation assays. The open reading frame encoded a protein of either 33 or 36 kilodaltons whose sequence shows similarity to NodD regulatory proteins. Images PMID:2361944

  20. Boosting heterologous protein production in transgenic dicotyledonous seeds using Phaseolus vulgaris regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    De Jaeger, Geert; Scheffer, Stanley; Jacobs, Anni; Zambre, Mukund; Zobell, Oliver; Goossens, Alain; Depicker, Ann; Angenon, Geert

    2002-12-01

    Over the past decade, several high value proteins have been produced in different transgenic plant tissues such as leaves, tubers, and seeds. Despite recent advances, many heterologous proteins accumulate to low concentrations, and the optimization of expression cassettes to make in planta production and purification economically feasible remains critical. Here, the regulatory sequences of the seed storage protein gene arcelin 5-I (arc5-I) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) were evaluated for producing heterologous proteins in dicotyledonous seeds. The murine single chain variable fragment (scFv) G4 (ref. 4) was chosen as model protein because of the current industrial interest in producing antibodies and derived fragments in crops. In transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana seed stocks, the scFv under control of the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) accumulated to approximately 1% of total soluble protein (TSP). However, a set of seed storage promoter constructs boosted the scFv accumulation to exceptionally high concentrations, reaching no less than 36.5% of TSP in homozygous seeds. Even at these high concentrations, the scFv proteins had antigen-binding activity and affinity similar to those produced in Escherichia coli. The feasibility of heterologous protein production under control of arc5-I regulatory sequences was also demonstrated in Phaseolus acutifolius, a promising crop for large scale production.

  1. Dynamic control of the complement system by modulated expression of regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Joshua M; Renner, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    The complement system serves many biological functions, including the eradication of invasive pathogens and the removal of damaged cells and immune-complexes. Uncontrolled complement activation causes injury to host cells, however, so adequate regulation of the system is essential. Control of the complement system is maintained by a group of cell surface and circulating proteins referred to as complement regulatory proteins. The expression of the cell surface complement regulatory proteins varies from tissue to tissue. Furthermore, specific cell types can upregulate or downregulate the expression of these proteins in response to a variety of signals or insults. Altered regulation of the complement regulatory proteins can have important effects on local complement activation. In some circumstances this can be beneficial, such as in the setting of certain infections. In other circumstances, however, this can be a cause of complement-mediated injury of the tissue. A full understanding of the mechanisms by which the complement system is modulated at the local level can have important implications for how we diagnose and treat a wide range of inflammatory diseases.

  2. The global regulatory system Csr senses glucose through the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2016-02-01

    A novel connection between two regulatory systems controlling crucial biological processes in bacteria, the carbon storage regulator (Csr) system and the glucose-specific phosphotransferase system (PTS), is reported by Leng et al. in this issue. This involves the interaction of unphosphorylated EIIA(Glc), a component of the glucose-specific PTS, with the CsrD protein, which accelerates the decay of the CsrB and CsrC small RNAs via RNase E in Escherichia coli. As unphosphorylated EIIA(G) (lc) is generated in the presence of glucose, the PTS thus acts as a sensor of glucose for the Csr system. Interestingly, another pathway can operate for communication between the Csr system and the glucose-specific PTS. The absence of glucose generates phosphorylated EIIA(Glc) , which activates the enzyme adenylate cyclase to produce cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) that, in turn, binds to the regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP). Leng et al. show that the complex cAMP-CRP modestly reduces CsrB decay independently of CsrD. On the other hand, a previous study indicates that the complex cAMP-CRP positively regulates the transcription of CsrB and CsrC in Salmonella enterica. Therefore, EIIA(G) (lc) could work as a molecular switch that regulates the activity of the Csr system, in response to its phosphorylation state determined by the presence or absence of glucose, in order to control gene expression.

  3. Protein surface matching by combining local and global geometric information.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Leif; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Comparison of the binding sites of proteins is an effective means for predicting protein functions based on their structure information. Despite the importance of this problem and much research in the past, it is still very challenging to predict the binding ligands from the atomic structures of protein binding sites. Here, we designed a new algorithm, TIPSA (Triangulation-based Iterative-closest-point for Protein Surface Alignment), based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. TIPSA aims to find the maximum number of atoms that can be superposed between two protein binding sites, where any pair of superposed atoms has a distance smaller than a given threshold. The search starts from similar tetrahedra between two binding sites obtained from 3D Delaunay triangulation and uses the Hungarian algorithm to find additional matched atoms. We found that, due to the plasticity of protein binding sites, matching the rigid body of point clouds of protein binding sites is not adequate for satisfactory binding ligand prediction. We further incorporated global geometric information, the radius of gyration of binding site atoms, and used nearest neighbor classification for binding site prediction. Tested on benchmark data, our method achieved a performance comparable to the best methods in the literature, while simultaneously providing the common atom set and atom correspondences.

  4. Global discovery of protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins, such as protein kinases, ATPases and GTP-binding proteins, are among the most important families of proteins that are involved in a number of pivotal cellular processes. However, global study of the structure, function, and expression level of nucleotide-binding proteins as well as protein-nucleotide interactions can hardly be achieved with the use of conventional approaches owing to enormous diversity of the nucleotide-binding protein family. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation, coupled with a variety of nucleotide-binding protein enrichment methods, rendered MS-based proteomics a powerful tool for the comprehensive characterizations of the nucleotide-binding proteome, especially the kinome. Here, we review the recent developments in the use of mass spectrometry, together with general and widely used affinity enrichment approaches, for the proteome-wide capture, identification and quantification of nucleotide-binding proteins, including protein kinases, ATPases, GTPases, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. The working principles, advantages, and limitations of each enrichment platform in identifying nucleotide-binding proteins as well as profiling protein-nucleotide interactions are summarized. The perspectives in developing novel MS-based nucleotide-binding protein detection platform are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:601-619, 2016.

  5. Investigation of the regulatory function of archaeal ribosomal protein L4.

    PubMed

    Mikhaylina, A O; Kostareva, O S; Sarskikh, A V; Fedorov, R V; Piendl, W; Garber, M B; Tishchenko, S V

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L4 is a regulator of protein synthesis in the Escherichia coli S10 operon, which contains genes of 11 ribosomal proteins. In this work, we have investigated regulatory functions of ribosomal protein L4 of the thermophilic archaea Methanococcus jannaschii. The S10-like operon from M. jannaschii encodes not 11, but only five ribosomal proteins (L3, L4, L23, L2, S19), and the first protein is L3 instead of S10. We have shown that MjaL4 and its mutant form lacking an elongated loop specifically inhibit expression of the first gene of the S10-like operon from the same organism in a coupled transcription-translation system in vitro. By deletion analysis, an L4-binding regulatory site has been found on MjaL3 mRNA, and a fragment of mRNA with length of 40 nucleotides has been prepared that is necessary and sufficient for the specific interaction with the MjaL4 protein.

  6. Drug policy and global regulatory capitalism: the case of new psychoactive substances (NPS).

    PubMed

    Seddon, Toby

    2014-09-01

    The recent emergence of vibrant markets in 'new psychoactive substances' or 'legal highs' has posed significant new challenges for drug policy. These partly concern what to do about them but the speed and complexity of change has also raised difficulties for how policy responses should be developed. Existing drug policy systems appear too slow and cumbersome to keep up with the pace of change, remaining locked in large part within 'old' ways of thinking that centre almost exclusively around the deployment (or not) of the criminal law and its related enforcement apparatus. In this paper, it is argued that we need to rethink the problem through the lens of regulation, in order to learn lessons from other sectors where more agile responses to changing markets and business innovation have often proved possible. By examining examples drawn from these other areas, an alternative policy-making framework can be developed, involving a more flexible mix of state regulation, civil society action and private law mechanisms. This new approach is founded on a recognition of the networked and polycentric character of effective market governance in an era of global regulatory capitalism. PMID:24768473

  7. Global Regulatory T-Cell Research from 2000 to 2015: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zongyi, Yin; Dongying, Chen; Baifeng, Li

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the global scientific output of regulatory T-cell (Treg) research and built a model to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate publications from 2000 to 2015. Data were obtained from the Web of Science Core Collection (WoSCC) of Thomson Reuters on January 1, 2016. The bibliometric method and Citespace III were used to analyze authors, journals, publication outputs, institutions, countries, research areas, research hotspots, and trends. In total, we identified 35,741 publications on Treg research from 2000 to 2015, and observed that the annual publication rate increased with time. The Journal of Immunology published the highest number of articles, the leading country was the USA, and the leading institute was Harvard University. Sakaguchi, Hori, Fontenot, and Wang were the top authors in Treg research. Immunology accounted for the highest number of publications, followed by oncology, experimental medicine, cell biology, and hematology. Keyword analysis indicated that autoimmunity, inflammation, cytokine, gene expression, foxp3, and immunotherapy were the research hotspots, whereas autoimmune inflammation, gene therapy, granzyme B, RORγt, and th17 were the frontiers of Treg research. This bibliometric analysis revealed that Treg-related studies are still research hotspots, and that Treg-related clinical therapies are the research frontiers; however, further study and collaborations are needed worldwide. Overall, our findings provide valuable information for the editors of immunology journals to identify new perspectives and shape future research directions. PMID:27611317

  8. Global Regulatory T-Cell Research from 2000 to 2015: A Bibliometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zongyi, Yin; Dongying, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the global scientific output of regulatory T-cell (Treg) research and built a model to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate publications from 2000 to 2015. Data were obtained from the Web of Science Core Collection (WoSCC) of Thomson Reuters on January 1, 2016. The bibliometric method and Citespace III were used to analyze authors, journals, publication outputs, institutions, countries, research areas, research hotspots, and trends. In total, we identified 35,741 publications on Treg research from 2000 to 2015, and observed that the annual publication rate increased with time. The Journal of Immunology published the highest number of articles, the leading country was the USA, and the leading institute was Harvard University. Sakaguchi, Hori, Fontenot, and Wang were the top authors in Treg research. Immunology accounted for the highest number of publications, followed by oncology, experimental medicine, cell biology, and hematology. Keyword analysis indicated that autoimmunity, inflammation, cytokine, gene expression, foxp3, and immunotherapy were the research hotspots, whereas autoimmune inflammation, gene therapy, granzyme B, RORγt, and th17 were the frontiers of Treg research. This bibliometric analysis revealed that Treg-related studies are still research hotspots, and that Treg-related clinical therapies are the research frontiers; however, further study and collaborations are needed worldwide. Overall, our findings provide valuable information for the editors of immunology journals to identify new perspectives and shape future research directions. PMID:27611317

  9. Drug policy and global regulatory capitalism: the case of new psychoactive substances (NPS).

    PubMed

    Seddon, Toby

    2014-09-01

    The recent emergence of vibrant markets in 'new psychoactive substances' or 'legal highs' has posed significant new challenges for drug policy. These partly concern what to do about them but the speed and complexity of change has also raised difficulties for how policy responses should be developed. Existing drug policy systems appear too slow and cumbersome to keep up with the pace of change, remaining locked in large part within 'old' ways of thinking that centre almost exclusively around the deployment (or not) of the criminal law and its related enforcement apparatus. In this paper, it is argued that we need to rethink the problem through the lens of regulation, in order to learn lessons from other sectors where more agile responses to changing markets and business innovation have often proved possible. By examining examples drawn from these other areas, an alternative policy-making framework can be developed, involving a more flexible mix of state regulation, civil society action and private law mechanisms. This new approach is founded on a recognition of the networked and polycentric character of effective market governance in an era of global regulatory capitalism.

  10. Optimizing a global alignment of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Ma, Cheng-Yu; Liao, Chung-Shou; Berger, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The global alignment of protein interaction networks is a widely studied problem. It is an important first step in understanding the relationship between the proteins in different species and identifying functional orthologs. Furthermore, it can provide useful insights into the species’ evolution. Results: We propose a novel algorithm, PISwap, for optimizing global pairwise alignments of protein interaction networks, based on a local optimization heuristic that has previously demonstrated its effectiveness for a variety of other intractable problems. PISwap can begin with different types of network alignment approaches and then iteratively adjust the initial alignments by incorporating network topology information, trading it off for sequence information. In practice, our algorithm efficiently refines other well-studied alignment techniques with almost no additional time cost. We also show the robustness of the algorithm to noise in protein interaction data. In addition, the flexible nature of this algorithm makes it suitable for different applications of network alignment. This algorithm can yield interesting insights into the evolutionary dynamics of related species. Availability: Our software is freely available for non-commercial purposes from our Web site, http://piswap.csail.mit.edu/. Contact: bab@csail.mit.edu or csliao@ie.nthu.edu.tw Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24048352

  11. Interaction between Major Nitrogen Regulatory Protein NIT2 and Pathway-Specific Regulatory Factor NIT4 Is Required for Their Synergistic Activation of Gene Expression in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bo; Marzluf, George A.

    1998-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the major nitrogen regulatory protein, NIT2, a member of the GATA family of transcription factors, controls positively the expression of numerous genes which specify nitrogen catabolic enzymes. Expression of the highly regulated structural gene nit-3, which encodes nitrate reductase, is dependent upon a synergistic interaction of NIT2 with a pathway-specific control protein, NIT4, a member of the GAL4 family of fungal regulatory factors. The NIT2 and NIT4 proteins both bind at specific recognition elements in the nit-3 promoter, but, in addition, we show that a direct protein-protein interaction between NIT2 and NIT4 is essential for optimal expression of the nit-3 structural gene. Neurospora possesses at least five different GATA factors which control different areas of cellular function, but which have a similar DNA binding specificity. Significantly, only NIT2, of the several Neurospora GATA factors examined, interacts with NIT4. We propose that protein-protein interactions of the individual GATA factors with additional pathway-specific regulatory factors determine each of their specific regulatory functions. PMID:9632783

  12. Divisome and segrosome components of Deinococcus radiodurans interact through cell division regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Ganesh K; Modi, Kruti; Misra, Hari S

    2016-08-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes many of the known components of divisome as well as four sets of genome partitioning proteins, ParA and ParB on its multipartite genome. Interdependent regulation of cell division and genome segregation is not understood. In vivo interactions of D. radiodurans' sdivisome, segrosome and other cell division regulatory proteins expressed on multicopy plasmids were studied in Escherichia coli using a bacterial two-hybrid system and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation with the proteins made in E. coli. Many of these showed interactions both with the self and with other proteins. For example, DrFtsA, DrFtsZ, DrMinD, DrMinC, DrDivIVA and all four ParB proteins individually formed at least homodimers, while DrFtsA interacted with DrFtsZ, DrFtsW, DrFtsE, DrFtsK and DrMinD. DrMinD also showed interaction with DrFtsW, DrFtsE and DrMinC. Interestingly, septum site determining protein, DrDivIVA showed interactions with secondary genome ParAs as well as ParB1, ParB3 and ParB4 while DrMinC interacted with ParB1 and ParB3. PprA, a pleiotropic protein recently implicated in cell division regulation, neither interacted with divisome proteins nor ParBs but interacted at different levels with all four ParAs. These results suggest the formation of independent multiprotein complexes of 'DrFts' proteins, segrosome proteins and cell division regulatory proteins, and these complexes could interact with each other through DrMinC and DrDivIVA, and PprA in D. radiodurans.

  13. Governing effect of regulatory proteins for Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger 2 activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yon Soo; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Anion exchanger 2 (AE2) has a critical role in epithelial cells and is involved in the ionic homeostasis such as Cl(-) uptake and HCO3(-) secretion. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism of AE2. The main goal of the present study was to investigate potential regulators, such as spinophilin (SPL), inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [IP3] receptors binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT), STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) kinase, and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA XII). We found that SPL binds to AE2 and markedly increased the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity of AE2. Especially SPL 1-480 domain is required for enhancing AE2 activity. For other regulatory components that affect the fidelity of fluid and HCO3(-) secretion, IRBIT and SPAK had no effect on the activity of AE2 and no protein-protein interaction with AE2. It has been proposed that CA activity is closely associated with AE activity. In this study, we provide evidence that the basolateral membrane-associated CA isoform CA XII significantly increased the activity of AE2 and co-localized with AE2 to the plasma membrane. Collectively, SPL and CA XII enhanced the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity of AE2. The modulating action of these regulatory proteins could serve as potential therapeutic targets for secretory diseases mediated by AE2.

  14. Membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for SLE.

    PubMed

    Das, Nibhriti; Biswas, Bintili; Khera, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    For the last two decades, there had been remarkable advancement in understanding the role of complement regulatory proteins in autoimmune disorders and importance of complement inhibitors as therapeutics. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a prototype of systemic autoimmune disorders. The disease, though rare, is potentially fatal and afflicts women at their reproductive age. It is a complex disease with multiorgan involvement, and each patient presents with a different set of symptoms. The diagnosis is often difficult and is based on the diagnostic criteria set by the American Rheumatology Association. Presence of antinuclear antibodies and more specifically antidouble-stranded DNA indicates SLE. Since the disease is multifactorial and its phenotypes are highly heterogeneous, there is a need to identify multiple noninvasive biomarkers for SLE. Lack of validated biomarkers for SLE disease activity or response to treatment is a barrier to the efficient management of the disease, drug discovery, as well as development of new therapeutics. Recent studies with gene knockout mice have suggested that membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) may critically determine the sensitivity of host tissues to complement injury in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Case-controlled and followup studies carried out in our laboratory suggest an intimate relation between the level of DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 transcripts and the disease activity in SLE. Based on comparative evaluation of our data on these four membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins, we envisaged CR1 and MCP transcripts as putative noninvasive disease activity markers and the respective proteins as therapeutic targets for SLE. Following is a brief appraisal on membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for SLE. PMID:23402019

  15. Hypoxia regulates global membrane protein endocytosis through caveolin-1 in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bourseau-Guilmain, E; Menard, J A; Lindqvist, E; Indira Chandran, V; Christianson, H C; Cerezo Magaña, M; Lidfeldt, J; Marko-Varga, G; Welinder, C; Belting, M

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia promotes tumour aggressiveness and resistance of cancers to oncological treatment. The identification of cancer cell internalizing antigens for drug targeting to the hypoxic tumour niche remains a challenge of high clinical relevance. Here we show that hypoxia down-regulates the surface proteome at the global level and, more specifically, membrane proteome internalization. We find that hypoxic down-regulation of constitutive endocytosis is HIF-independent, and involves caveolin-1-mediated inhibition of dynamin-dependent, membrane raft endocytosis. Caveolin-1 overexpression inhibits protein internalization, suggesting a general negative regulatory role of caveolin-1 in endocytosis. In contrast to this global inhibitory effect, we identify several proteins that can override caveolin-1 negative regulation, exhibiting increased internalization at hypoxia. We demonstrate antibody-mediated cytotoxin delivery and killing specifically of hypoxic cells through one of these proteins, carbonic anhydrase IX. Our data reveal that caveolin-1 modulates cell-surface proteome turnover at hypoxia with potential implications for specific targeting of the hypoxic tumour microenvironment. PMID:27094744

  16. Hypoxia regulates global membrane protein endocytosis through caveolin-1 in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bourseau-Guilmain, E.; Menard, J. A.; Lindqvist, E.; Indira Chandran, V.; Christianson, H. C.; Cerezo Magaña, M.; Lidfeldt, J.; Marko-Varga, G.; Welinder, C.; Belting, M.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia promotes tumour aggressiveness and resistance of cancers to oncological treatment. The identification of cancer cell internalizing antigens for drug targeting to the hypoxic tumour niche remains a challenge of high clinical relevance. Here we show that hypoxia down-regulates the surface proteome at the global level and, more specifically, membrane proteome internalization. We find that hypoxic down-regulation of constitutive endocytosis is HIF-independent, and involves caveolin-1-mediated inhibition of dynamin-dependent, membrane raft endocytosis. Caveolin-1 overexpression inhibits protein internalization, suggesting a general negative regulatory role of caveolin-1 in endocytosis. In contrast to this global inhibitory effect, we identify several proteins that can override caveolin-1 negative regulation, exhibiting increased internalization at hypoxia. We demonstrate antibody-mediated cytotoxin delivery and killing specifically of hypoxic cells through one of these proteins, carbonic anhydrase IX. Our data reveal that caveolin-1 modulates cell-surface proteome turnover at hypoxia with potential implications for specific targeting of the hypoxic tumour microenvironment. PMID:27094744

  17. Global, quantitative and dynamic mapping of protein subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Itzhak, Daniel N; Tyanova, Stefka; Cox, Jürgen; Borner, Georg HH

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular localization critically influences protein function, and cells control protein localization to regulate biological processes. We have developed and applied Dynamic Organellar Maps, a proteomic method that allows global mapping of protein translocation events. We initially used maps statically to generate a database with localization and absolute copy number information for over 8700 proteins from HeLa cells, approaching comprehensive coverage. All major organelles were resolved, with exceptional prediction accuracy (estimated at >92%). Combining spatial and abundance information yielded an unprecedented quantitative view of HeLa cell anatomy and organellar composition, at the protein level. We subsequently demonstrated the dynamic capabilities of the approach by capturing translocation events following EGF stimulation, which we integrated into a quantitative model. Dynamic Organellar Maps enable the proteome-wide analysis of physiological protein movements, without requiring any reagents specific to the investigated process, and will thus be widely applicable in cell biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16950.001 PMID:27278775

  18. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Biau, Julian; Chautard, Emmanuel; Court, Frank; Pereira, Bruno; Verrelle, Pierre; Devun, Flavien; De Koning, Leanne; Dutreix, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery. PMID:27567954

  19. Activation of protein phosphatase 1 by a small molecule designed to bind to the enzyme's regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Tappan, Erin; Chamberlin, A Richard

    2008-02-01

    The activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a serine-threonine phosphatase that participates ubiquitously in cellular signaling, is controlled by a wide variety of regulatory proteins that interact with PP1 at an allosteric regulatory site that recognizes a "loose" consensus sequence (usually designated as RVXF) found in all such regulatory proteins. Peptides containing the regulatory consensus sequence have been found to recapitulate the binding and PP1 activity modulation of the regulatory proteins, suggesting that it might be possible to design small-molecule surrogates that activate PP1 rather than inhibiting it. This prospect constitutes a largely unexplored way of controlling signaling pathways that could be functionally complementary to the much more extensively explored stratagem of kinase inhibition. Based on these principles, we have designed a microcystin analog that activates PP1. PMID:18291321

  20. Binding of regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase to cyclic CMP agarose.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Andreas; Chatterji, Bijon; Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1) synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target. PMID:22808067

  1. Interaction and localization diversities of global and local hubs in human protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Kiran, M; Nagarajaram, H A

    2016-08-16

    Hubs, the highly connected nodes in protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs), are associated with several characteristic properties and are known to perform vital roles in cells. We defined two classes of hubs, global (housekeeping) and local (tissue-specific) hubs. These two categories of hubs are distinct from each other with respect to their abundance, structure and function. However, how distinct are the spatial expression pattern and other characteristics of their interacting partners is still not known. Our investigations revealed that the partners of the local hubs compared with those of global hubs are conserved across the tissues in which they are expressed. Partners of local hubs show diverse subcellular localizations as compared with the partners of global hubs. We examined the nature of interacting domains in both categories of hubs and found that they are promiscuous in global hubs but not so in local hubs. Deletion of some of the local and global hubs has an impact on the characteristic path length of the network indicating that those hubs are inter-modular in nature. Our present study has, therefore, shed further light on the characteristic features of the local and global hubs in human PPIN. This knowledge of different topological aspects of hubs with regard to their types and subtypes is essential as it helps in better understanding of roles of hub proteins in various cellular processes under various conditions including those caused by host-pathogen interactions and therefore useful in prioritizing targets for drug design and repositioning.

  2. Interaction and localization diversities of global and local hubs in human protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Kiran, M; Nagarajaram, H A

    2016-08-16

    Hubs, the highly connected nodes in protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs), are associated with several characteristic properties and are known to perform vital roles in cells. We defined two classes of hubs, global (housekeeping) and local (tissue-specific) hubs. These two categories of hubs are distinct from each other with respect to their abundance, structure and function. However, how distinct are the spatial expression pattern and other characteristics of their interacting partners is still not known. Our investigations revealed that the partners of the local hubs compared with those of global hubs are conserved across the tissues in which they are expressed. Partners of local hubs show diverse subcellular localizations as compared with the partners of global hubs. We examined the nature of interacting domains in both categories of hubs and found that they are promiscuous in global hubs but not so in local hubs. Deletion of some of the local and global hubs has an impact on the characteristic path length of the network indicating that those hubs are inter-modular in nature. Our present study has, therefore, shed further light on the characteristic features of the local and global hubs in human PPIN. This knowledge of different topological aspects of hubs with regard to their types and subtypes is essential as it helps in better understanding of roles of hub proteins in various cellular processes under various conditions including those caused by host-pathogen interactions and therefore useful in prioritizing targets for drug design and repositioning. PMID:27400769

  3. A High-Throughput Method to Examine Protein-Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets of the Bacterial Transcriptional Regulatory Protein Fur

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Han; Xia, Yu; Freedman, David S.; Reddington, Alexander P.; Daaboul, George G.; Ünlü, M. Selim; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2014-01-01

    The Ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) is a transcriptional regulatory protein that functions to control gene transcription in response to iron in a number of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we applied a label-free, quantitative and high-throughput analysis method, Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS), to rapidly characterize Fur-DNA interactions in vitro with predicted Fur binding sequences in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. IRIS can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide complexes simultaneously and demonstrated here that seventy percent of the predicted Fur boxes in promoter regions of iron-induced genes bound to Fur in vitro with a range of affinities as observed using this microarray screening technology. Combining binding data with mRNA expression levels in a gonococcal fur mutant strain allowed us to identify five new gonococcal genes under Fur-mediated direct regulation. PMID:24811061

  4. Overexpression of KH-type splicing regulatory protein regulates proliferation, migration, and implantation ability of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Teeyakasem, Pimpisa; Klangjorhor, Jeerawan; Chaiyawat, Parunya; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Diskul-Na-Ayudthaya, Penchatr; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Srisomsap, Chantragan

    2016-09-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. The current 5-year survival rate is ~60% and that seems to be reaching a plateau. In order to improve treatment outcomes of osteosarcoma, a better understanding of tumorigenesis and underlying molecular mechanisms is required for searching out possible new treatment targets. This study aimed to identify the potential proteins involving the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma using a proteomics approach. Proteins extracted from primary cell culture of osteosarcoma (n=7) and osteoblasts of cancellous bone (n=7) were studied. Using 2-DE based proteomics and LC-MS/MS analysis, we successfully determined seven differentially expressed protein spots. Four upregulated proteins and three downregulated proteins were observed in this study in which KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) was selected for further exploration. KSRP was significantly upregulated in osteosarcoma cells compared to osteoblasts using western blot assay. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that KSRP was also highly expressed in osteosarcoma tissue of independent cases from the experimental group. More importantly, KSRP silencing of osteosarcoma cell lines significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration ability, as well as implantation and growth ability in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, that KSRP plays important roles in regulatory controls of osteosarcoma pathogenesis and serves as a potentially therapeutic target of osteosarcoma. PMID:27573585

  5. Overexpression of KH-type splicing regulatory protein regulates proliferation, migration, and implantation ability of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Teeyakasem, Pimpisa; Klangjorhor, Jeerawan; Chaiyawat, Parunya; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Diskul-Na-Ayudthaya, Penchatr; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Srisomsap, Chantragan

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. The current 5-year survival rate is ~60% and that seems to be reaching a plateau. In order to improve treatment outcomes of osteosarcoma, a better understanding of tumorigenesis and underlying molecular mechanisms is required for searching out possible new treatment targets. This study aimed to identify the potential proteins involving the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma using a proteomics approach. Proteins extracted from primary cell culture of osteosarcoma (n=7) and osteoblasts of cancellous bone (n=7) were studied. Using 2-DE based proteomics and LC-MS/MS analysis, we successfully determined seven differentially expressed protein spots. Four upregulated proteins and three downregulated proteins were observed in this study in which KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) was selected for further exploration. KSRP was significantly upregulated in osteosarcoma cells compared to osteoblasts using western blot assay. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that KSRP was also highly expressed in osteosarcoma tissue of independent cases from the experimental group. More importantly, KSRP silencing of osteosarcoma cell lines significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration ability, as well as implantation and growth ability in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, that KSRP plays important roles in regulatory controls of osteosarcoma pathogenesis and serves as a potentially therapeutic target of osteosarcoma. PMID:27573585

  6. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, B.F.

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a {open_quote}receiver domain{close_quote} in the family of {open_quote}two-component{close_quote} regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  7. Global Systems-Level Analysis of Hfq and SmpB Deletion Mutants in Salmonella: Implications for Virulence and Global Protein Translation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Yoon, Hyunjin; Porwollik, Steffen; Mottaz-Brewer, Heather; Petritis, Brianne O.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Adkins, Joshua N.; Mcclelland, Michael; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-03-11

    In recent years the profound importance of sRNA-mediated translational/post-transcriptional regulation has been increasingly appreciated. However, the global role played by translational regulation in control of gene expression has never been elucidated in any organism for the simple reason that global proteomics methods required to accurately characterize post-transcriptional processes and the knowledge of translational control mechanisms have only become available within the last few years. The proteins Hfq and SmpB are essential for the biological activity of a range of regulatory sRNAs and thus provide a means to identify potential targets of sRNA regulation. We performed a sample-matched global proteomics and transcriptional analysis to examine the role of Hfq and SmpB in global protein translation and virulence using the Salmonella typhimurium model system. Samples were analyzed from bacteria grown under four different conditions; two laboratory conditions and two that are thought to mimic the intracellular environment. We show that mutants of hfq and smpB directly or indirectly modulate at least 20% and 4% of all Salmonella proteins, respectively, with limited correlation between transcription and protein expression. This is the first report suggesting that SmpB could be a general translational regulator. The broad spectrum of proteins modulated by Hfq was also surprising including central metabolism, LPS biosynthesis, two-component regulatory systems, quorum sensing, SP1-TTSS, oxidative stress, fatty acid metabolism, nucleoside and nucleotide metabolism, envelope stress, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, amino acid biosynthesis, peptide transport, and motility.. The extent of global regulation of translation by Hfq is unexpected, with profound effects in all stages of Salmonella’s life cycle. Our results represent the first global systems-level analysis of translational regulation; the elucidated potential targets of sRNA regulation from our analysis will

  8. [The effect of extremely low doses of the novel regulatory plant proteins ].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, M S; Margasiuk, D V; Iamskov, I A; Iamskova, V P

    2003-01-01

    Searching and study on regulatory proteins, which can keep under control the scope of important processes as like as cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis, is an actual aim of the current biochemistry. Recently we have identified S-100 proteins in plants of following species: plantain (Plantago major L.), aloe (Aloe arborescens L.), and bilberry (Vaccinum myrtillus L.). Extraction and purification of S-100 proteins gotten from these plants were performed by the method we developed earlier for adhesion proteins of animal tissues. Homogeneity of the studied plant proteins was evaluated and confirmed by HPLC and SDS-electrophoresis in PAAG. Both, plant and animal proteins have appeared to be biologically active at extremely low doses. The tests were performed by adhesiometrical method in short-term tissue culture of mouse's liver in vitro. As a result it was established that the plant proteins insert a membranotropic effect being added in extremely low doses, corresponding to 10(-10)-10(-13) mg/ml. Keeping in mind that the plantain is well known remedy for wound protection and healing, in several experiments we studied the biological effect of plant S-100 proteins on animal cells. It was found that S-100 proteins obtained from plantain influences proliferation of human fibroblasts in vitro. It was found that after the treatment with this protein in low doses the cell growth rate increases essentially. PMID:12881977

  9. [The effect of extremely low doses of the novel regulatory plant proteins ].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, M S; Margasiuk, D V; Iamskov, I A; Iamskova, V P

    2003-01-01

    Searching and study on regulatory proteins, which can keep under control the scope of important processes as like as cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis, is an actual aim of the current biochemistry. Recently we have identified S-100 proteins in plants of following species: plantain (Plantago major L.), aloe (Aloe arborescens L.), and bilberry (Vaccinum myrtillus L.). Extraction and purification of S-100 proteins gotten from these plants were performed by the method we developed earlier for adhesion proteins of animal tissues. Homogeneity of the studied plant proteins was evaluated and confirmed by HPLC and SDS-electrophoresis in PAAG. Both, plant and animal proteins have appeared to be biologically active at extremely low doses. The tests were performed by adhesiometrical method in short-term tissue culture of mouse's liver in vitro. As a result it was established that the plant proteins insert a membranotropic effect being added in extremely low doses, corresponding to 10(-10)-10(-13) mg/ml. Keeping in mind that the plantain is well known remedy for wound protection and healing, in several experiments we studied the biological effect of plant S-100 proteins on animal cells. It was found that S-100 proteins obtained from plantain influences proliferation of human fibroblasts in vitro. It was found that after the treatment with this protein in low doses the cell growth rate increases essentially.

  10. Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (Crmp2) Regulates Trafficking by Linking Endocytic Regulatory Proteins to Dynein Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Rahajeng, Juliati; Giridharan, Sai S. P.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Endocytosis is a conserved cellular process in which nutrients, lipids, and receptors are internalized and transported to early endosomes, where they are sorted and either channeled to degradative pathways or recycled to the plasma membrane. MICAL-L1 and EHD1 are important regulatory proteins that control key endocytic transport steps. However, the precise mechanisms by which they mediate transport, and particularly the mode by which they connect to motor proteins, have remained enigmatic. Here we have identified the collapsin response mediator protein-2 (Crmp2) as an interaction partner of MICAL-L1 in non-neuronal cells. Crmp2 interacts with tubulin dimers and kinesin and negatively regulates dynein-based transport in neuronal cells, but its expression and function in non-neuronal cells have remained poorly characterized. Upon Crmp2 depletion, we observed dramatic relocalization of internalized transferrin (Tf) from peripheral vesicles to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), similar to the effect of depleting either MICAL-L1 or EHD1. Moreover, Tf relocalization to the ERC could be inhibited by interfering with microtubule polymerization, consistent with a role for uncoupled motor protein-based transport upon depletion of Crmp2, MICAL-L1, or EHD1. Finally, transfection of dynamitin, a component of the dynactin complex whose overexpression inhibits dynein activity, prevented the relocalization of internalized Tf to the ERC upon depletion of Crmp2, MICAL-L1, or EHD1. These data provide the first trafficking regulatory role for Crmp2 in non-neuronal cells and support a model in which Crmp2 is an important endocytic regulatory protein that links MICAL-L1·EHD1-based vesicular transport to dynein motors. PMID:20801876

  11. Differential expression of bone matrix regulatory proteins in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Dhore, C R; Cleutjens, J P; Lutgens, E; Cleutjens, K B; Geusens, P P; Kitslaar, P J; Tordoir, J H; Spronk, H M; Vermeer, C; Daemen, M J

    2001-12-01

    In the present study, we examined the expression of regulators of bone formation and osteoclastogenesis in human atherosclerosis because accumulating evidence suggests that atherosclerotic calcification shares features with bone calcification. The most striking finding of this study was the constitutive immunoreactivity of matrix Gla protein, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein in nondiseased aortas and the absence of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, BMP-4, osteopontin, and osteonectin in nondiseased aortas and early atherosclerotic lesions. When atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated calcification or bone formation, BMP-2, BMP-4, osteopontin, and osteonectin were upregulated. Interestingly, this upregulation was associated with a sustained immunoreactivity of matrix Gla protein, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein. The 2 modulators of osteoclastogenesis (osteoprotegerin [OPG] and its ligand, OPGL) were present in the nondiseased vessel wall and in early atherosclerotic lesions. In advanced calcified lesions, OPG was present in bone structures, whereas OPGL was only present in the extracellular matrix surrounding calcium deposits. The observed expression patterns suggest a tight regulation of the expression of bone matrix regulatory proteins during human atherogenesis. The expression pattern of both OPG and OPGL during atherogenesis might suggest a regulatory role of these proteins not only in osteoclastogenesis but also in atherosclerotic calcification. PMID:11742876

  12. Systematic identification of transcriptional regulatory modules from protein–protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Diego; Hutchins, Andrew Paul; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) combine with co-factors to form transcriptional regulatory modules (TRMs) that regulate gene expression programs with spatiotemporal specificity. Here we present a novel and generic method (rTRM) for the reconstruction of TRMs that integrates genomic information from TF binding, cell type-specific gene expression and protein–protein interactions. rTRM was applied to reconstruct the TRMs specific for embryonic stem cells (ESC) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), neural progenitor cells, trophoblast stem cells and distinct types of terminally differentiated CD4+ T cells. The ESC and HSC TRM predictions were highly precise, yielding 77 and 96 proteins, of which ∼75% have been independently shown to be involved in the regulation of these cell types. Furthermore, rTRM successfully identified a large number of bridging proteins with known roles in ESCs and HSCs, which could not have been identified using genomic approaches alone, as they lack the ability to bind specific DNA sequences. This highlights the advantage of rTRM over other methods that ignore PPI information, as proteins need to interact with other proteins to form complexes and perform specific functions. The prediction and experimental validation of the co-factors that endow master regulatory TFs with the capacity to select specific genomic sites, modulate the local epigenetic profile and integrate multiple signals will provide important mechanistic insights not only into how such TFs operate, but also into abnormal transcriptional states leading to disease. PMID:24137002

  13. Binding of cellular repressor protein or the IE2 protein to a cis-acting negative regulatory element upstream of a human cytomegalovirus early promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L; Stinski, M F

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that the human cytomegalovirus early UL4 promoter has upstream negative and positive cis-acting regulatory elements. In the absence of the upstream negative regulatory region, the positive element confers strong transcriptional activity. The positive element contains a CCAAT box dyad symmetry and binds the cellular transcription factor NF-Y. The effect of the negative regulatory element is negated by the viral IE2 protein (L. Huang, C.L. Malone, and M.F. Stinski, J. Virol. 68:2108, 1994). We investigated the binding of cellular or viral IE2 protein to the negative regulatory region. The major cis-acting negative regulatory element was located between -168 and -134 bp relative to the transcription start site. This element could be transferred to a heterologous promoter, and it functioned in either orientation. Mutational analysis demonstrated that a core DNA sequence in the cis-acting negative regulatory element, 5'-GTTTGGAATCGTT-3', was required for the binding of either a cellular repressor protein(s) or the viral IE2 protein. The cellular DNA binding activity was present in both nonpermissive HeLa and permissive human fibroblast cells but more abundant in HeLa cells. Binding of the cellular repressor protein to the upstream cis-acting negative regulatory element correlates with repression of transcription from the early UL4 promoter. Binding of the viral IE2 protein correlates with negation of the repressive effect. PMID:7494269

  14. The Emerging Role of Protein Phosphorylation as a Critical Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Cellulose Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Danielle M; Murray, Christian M; Ketelaar, KassaDee J; Thomas, Joseph J; Villalobos, Jose A; Wallace, Ian S

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls are extracellular matrices that surround plant cells and critically influence basic cellular processes, such as cell division and expansion. Cellulose is a major constituent of plant cell walls, and this paracrystalline polysaccharide is synthesized at the plasma membrane by a large protein complex known as the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). Recent efforts have identified numerous protein components of the CSC, but relatively little is known about regulation of cellulose biosynthesis. Numerous phosphoproteomic surveys have identified phosphorylation events in CSC associated proteins, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may represent an important regulatory control of CSC activity. In this review, we discuss the composition and dynamics of the CSC in vivo, the catalog of CSC phosphorylation sites that have been identified, the function of experimentally examined phosphorylation events, and potential kinases responsible for these phosphorylation events. Additionally, we discuss future directions in cellulose synthase kinase identification and functional analyses of CSC phosphorylation sites. PMID:27252710

  15. The Emerging Role of Protein Phosphorylation as a Critical Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Cellulose Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Danielle M.; Murray, Christian M.; Ketelaar, KassaDee J.; Thomas, Joseph J.; Villalobos, Jose A.; Wallace, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls are extracellular matrices that surround plant cells and critically influence basic cellular processes, such as cell division and expansion. Cellulose is a major constituent of plant cell walls, and this paracrystalline polysaccharide is synthesized at the plasma membrane by a large protein complex known as the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). Recent efforts have identified numerous protein components of the CSC, but relatively little is known about regulation of cellulose biosynthesis. Numerous phosphoproteomic surveys have identified phosphorylation events in CSC associated proteins, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may represent an important regulatory control of CSC activity. In this review, we discuss the composition and dynamics of the CSC in vivo, the catalog of CSC phosphorylation sites that have been identified, the function of experimentally examined phosphorylation events, and potential kinases responsible for these phosphorylation events. Additionally, we discuss future directions in cellulose synthase kinase identification and functional analyses of CSC phosphorylation sites. PMID:27252710

  16. Global Low Frequency Protein Motions in Long-Range Allosteric Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeish, Tom; Rogers, Thomas; Townsend, Philip; Burnell, David; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark; Cann, Martin; Richards, Shane; Jones, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    We present a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low frequency dynamics without a change in protein structure. Elastic inhomogeneities allow entropic ``signalling at a distance.'' Remarkably, many globular proteins display just this class of elastic structure, in particular those that support allosteric binding of substrates (long-range co-operative effects between the binding sites of small molecules). Through multi-scale modelling of global normal modes we demonstrate negative co-operativity between the two cAMP ligands without change to the mean structure. Crucially, the value of the co-operativity is itself controlled by the interactions around a set of third allosteric ``control sites.'' The theory makes key experimental predictions, validated by analysis of variant proteins by a combination of structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. A quantitative description of allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein ``design space'' that identified the key inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, by analyzing naturally occurring CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. The methodology establishes the means to engineer allosteric mechanisms that are driven by low frequency dynamics.

  17. Modulation of activity of Bacillus subtilis regulatory proteins GltC and TnrA by glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Belitsky, Boris R; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2004-06-01

    The Bacillus subtilis gltAB operon, encoding glutamate synthase, requires a specific positive regulator, GltC, for its expression and is repressed by the global regulatory protein TnrA. The factor that controls TnrA activity, a complex of glutamine synthetase and a feedback inhibitor, such as glutamine, is known, but the signal for modulation of GltC activity has remained elusive. GltC-dependent gltAB expression was drastically reduced when cells were grown in media containing arginine or ornithine or proline, all of which are inducers and substrates of the Roc catabolic pathway. Analysis of gltAB expression in mutants with various defects in the Roc pathway indicated that rocG-encoded glutamate dehydrogenase was required for such repression, suggesting that the substrates or products of this enzyme are the real effectors of GltC. Given that RocG is an enzyme of glutamate catabolism, the main regulatory role of GltC may be prevention of a futile cycle of glutamate synthesis and degradation in the presence of arginine-related amino acids or proline. In addition, high activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was incompatible with activity of TnrA.

  18. Using the global proteome machine for protein identification.

    PubMed

    Beavis, Ronald C

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of an open-source, freely available informatics system for the identification of proteins using tandem mass spectra of peptides derived from an enzymatic digest of a mixture of mature proteins. The chapter describes the use of features of the Global Proteome Machine (GPM) interface that assist in making comprehensive assignments between spectra and sequences, including the detection of point mutations, posttranslational modifications, and experimental artifacts. The use of this interface to validate results using the GPM Database is also described. This data repository allows analysts to compare their own results to those obtained by other scientists to determine the degree to which their data are consistent with previous measurements.

  19. Protein-energy malnutrition impairs functional outcome in global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bobyn, P Joan; Corbett, Dale; Saucier, Deborah M; Noyan-Ashraf, M Hossein; Juurlink, Bernhard H J; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2005-12-01

    We investigated whether protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) exacerbates brain injury in global ischemia. It was hypothesized that PEM would increase secondary brain damage by worsening ischemia-induced depletion of glutathione (GSH) and increasing oxidative stress. Adult male gerbils were fed an adequate protein (12.5%; C) or low protein (2%; PEM) diet for 4 weeks and subjected to 5 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (Ischemia) or sham surgery (Sham). At 12 h post-ischemia, GSH and markers of oxidative stress were measured in hippocampus and neocortex. The remaining gerbils were tested in the open field on days 3, 7, and 10, with viable hippocampal CA1 neurons assessed on day 10. Although the habituation of C-Ischemia gerbils in the open field was normal by day 7, PEM-Ischemia gerbils failed to habituate even by day 10 and spent greater time in the outer zone (P < 0.05). Mean (+/-SEM) total number of viable CA1 neurons at 10 days post-ischemia were C-Sham = 713 (13), C-Ischemia = 264 (48), PEM-Sham = 716 (12), and PEM-Ischemia = 286 (66). Although PEM did not increase CA1 neuron loss caused by ischemia, a subset (4/12) of PEM-Ischemia gerbils showed dramatic reactive gliosis accompanied by extensive neuronal loss. Hippocampal protein thiols were decreased by PEM and ischemia. Although the mechanism is yet to be established, the finding that PEM worsens functional outcome following global ischemia is clinically relevant since 16% of elderly are nutritionally compromised at the time of admission for stroke.

  20. Disruption of a global regulatory gene to enhance central carbon flux into phenylalanine biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tatarko, M; Romeo, T

    2001-07-01

    Genetic engineering of microbes for commercial metabolite production traditionally has sought to alter the levels and/or intrinsic activities of key enzymes in relevant biosynthetic pathway(s). Microorganisms exploit similar strategies for flux control, but also coordinate flux through sets of related pathways by using global regulatory circuits. We have engineered a global regulatory system of Escherichia coli, Csr (carbon storage regulator), to increase precursor for aromatic amino acid biosynthesis. Disruption of csrA increases gluconeogenesis, decreases glycolysis, and thus elevates phosphoenolpyruvate, a limiting precursor of aromatics. A strain in which the aromatic (shikimate) pathway had been optimized produced twofold more phenylalanine when csrA was disrupted. Overexpression of tktA (transketolase) to increase the other precursor, erythrose-4-phosphate, yielded approximately 1.4-fold enhancement, while both changes were additive. These effects of csrA were not mediated by increasing the regulatory enzymes of phenylalanine biosynthesis. This study introduces the concept of "global metabolic engineering" for second-generation strain improvement. PMID:11375660

  1. A comprehensive study on regulatory requirements for development and filing of generic drugs globally

    PubMed Central

    Handoo, Shweta; Arora, Vandana; Khera, Deepak; Nandi, Prafulla Kumar; Sahu, Susanta Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The regulatory requirements of various countries of the world vary from each other. Therefore, it is challenging for the companies to develop a single drug which can be simultaneously submitted in all the countries for approval. The regulatory strategy for product development is essentially to be established before commencement of developmental work in order to avoid major surprises after submission of the application. The role of the regulatory authorities is to ensure the quality, safety, and efficacy of all medicines in circulation in their country. It not only includes the process of regulating and monitoring the drugs but also the process of manufacturing, distribution, and promotion of it. One of the primary challenges for regulatory authority is to ensure that the pharmaceutical products are developed as per the regulatory requirement of that country. This process involves the assessment of critical parameters during product development. PMID:23373001

  2. A comprehensive study on regulatory requirements for development and filing of generic drugs globally.

    PubMed

    Handoo, Shweta; Arora, Vandana; Khera, Deepak; Nandi, Prafulla Kumar; Sahu, Susanta Kumar

    2012-07-01

    The regulatory requirements of various countries of the world vary from each other. Therefore, it is challenging for the companies to develop a single drug which can be simultaneously submitted in all the countries for approval. The regulatory strategy for product development is essentially to be established before commencement of developmental work in order to avoid major surprises after submission of the application. The role of the regulatory authorities is to ensure the quality, safety, and efficacy of all medicines in circulation in their country. It not only includes the process of regulating and monitoring the drugs but also the process of manufacturing, distribution, and promotion of it. One of the primary challenges for regulatory authority is to ensure that the pharmaceutical products are developed as per the regulatory requirement of that country. This process involves the assessment of critical parameters during product development.

  3. RNA regulatory networks diversified through curvature of the PUF protein scaffold

    DOE PAGES

    Wilinski, Daniel; Qiu, Chen; Lapointe, Christopher P.; Nevil, Markus; Campbell, Zachary T.; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-09-14

    Proteins bind and control mRNAs, directing their localization, translation and stability. Members of the PUF family of RNA-binding proteins control multiple mRNAs in a single cell, and play key roles in development, stem cell maintenance and memory formation. Here we identified the mRNA targets of a S. cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf5p, by ultraviolet-crosslinking-affinity purification and high-throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP). The binding sites recognized by Puf5p are diverse, with variable spacer lengths between two specific sequences. Each length of site correlates with a distinct biological function. Crystal structures of Puf5p–RNA complexes reveal that the protein scaffold presents an exceptionally flat and extendedmore » interaction surface relative to other PUF proteins. In complexes with RNAs of different lengths, the protein is unchanged. A single PUF protein repeat is sufficient to induce broadening of specificity. Changes in protein architecture, such as alterations in curvature, may lead to evolution of mRNA regulatory networks.« less

  4. RNA regulatory networks diversified through curvature of the PUF protein scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Wilinski, Daniel; Qiu, Chen; Lapointe, Christopher P.; Nevil, Markus; Campbell, Zachary T.; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-09-14

    Proteins bind and control mRNAs, directing their localization, translation and stability. Members of the PUF family of RNA-binding proteins control multiple mRNAs in a single cell, and play key roles in development, stem cell maintenance and memory formation. Here we identified the mRNA targets of a S. cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf5p, by ultraviolet-crosslinking-affinity purification and high-throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP). The binding sites recognized by Puf5p are diverse, with variable spacer lengths between two specific sequences. Each length of site correlates with a distinct biological function. Crystal structures of Puf5p–RNA complexes reveal that the protein scaffold presents an exceptionally flat and extended interaction surface relative to other PUF proteins. In complexes with RNAs of different lengths, the protein is unchanged. A single PUF protein repeat is sufficient to induce broadening of specificity. Changes in protein architecture, such as alterations in curvature, may lead to evolution of mRNA regulatory networks.

  5. RNA regulatory networks diversified through curvature of the PUF protein scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wilinski, Daniel; Qiu, Chen; Lapointe, Christopher P.; Nevil, Markus; Campbell, Zachary T.; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Proteins bind and control mRNAs, directing their localization, translation and stability. Members of the PUF family of RNA-binding proteins control multiple mRNAs in a single cell, and play key roles in development, stem cell maintenance and memory formation. Here we identified the mRNA targets of a S. cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf5p, by ultraviolet-crosslinking-affinity purification and high-throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP). The binding sites recognized by Puf5p are diverse, with variable spacer lengths between two specific sequences. Each length of site correlates with a distinct biological function. Crystal structures of Puf5p–RNA complexes reveal that the protein scaffold presents an exceptionally flat and extended interaction surface relative to other PUF proteins. In complexes with RNAs of different lengths, the protein is unchanged. A single PUF protein repeat is sufficient to induce broadening of specificity. Changes in protein architecture, such as alterations in curvature, may lead to evolution of mRNA regulatory networks. PMID:26364903

  6. Effects of regulatory subunits on the kinetics of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Price, N E; Mumby, M C

    2000-09-19

    Both the scaffold (A) and the regulatory (R) subunits of protein phosphatase 2A regulate enzyme activity and specificity. Heterotrimeric enzymes containing different R-subunits differ in their specific activities for substrates. Kinetic parameters for the dephosphorylation of a phosphopeptide by different oligomeric forms of PP2A were determined to begin to elucidate the molecular basis of regulatory subunit effects on phosphatase activity. Using steady state kinetics and the pH dependence of kinetic parameters, we have explored the effect of the A- and R-subunits on the kinetic and chemical mechanism of PP2A. The regulatory subunits affected a broad range of kinetic parameters. The C-subunit and AC dimer were qualitatively similar with respect to the product inhibition patterns and the pH dependence of kinetic parameters. However, a 22-fold decrease in rate and a 4.7-fold decrease in K(m) can be attributed to the presence of the A-subunit. The presence of the R2alpha (Balpha or PR55alpha) subunit caused an additional decrease in K(m) and changed the kinetic mechanism of peptide dephosphorylation. The R2alpha-subunit also caused significant changes in the pH dependence of kinetic parameters as compared to the free C subunit or AC heterodimer. The data support an important role for the regulatory subunits in determining both the affinity of PP2A heterotrimers for peptide substrates and the mechanism by which they are dephosphorylated.

  7. Cytoplasmic dynein and its regulatory proteins in Golgi pathology in nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Dick; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2015-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is a dynamic organelle involved in processing and sorting of lipids and proteins. In neurons, the Golgi apparatus is important for the development of axons and dendrites and maintenance of their highly complex polarized morphology. The motor protein complex cytoplasmic dynein has an important role in Golgi apparatus positioning and function. Together, with dynactin and other regulatory factors it drives microtubule minus-end directed motility of Golgi membranes. Inhibition of dynein results in fragmentation and dispersion of the Golgi ribbon in the neuronal cell body, resembling the Golgi abnormalities observed in some neurodegenerative disorders, in particular motor neuron diseases. Mutations in dynein and its regulatory factors, including the dynactin subunit p150Glued, BICD2 and Lis-1, are associated with several human nervous system disorders, including cortical malformation and motor neuropathy. Here we review the role of dynein and its regulatory factors in Golgi function and positioning, and the potential role of dynein malfunction in causing Golgi apparatus abnormalities in nervous system disorders. PMID:26578860

  8. Mys protein regulates protein kinase A activity by interacting with regulatory type Ialpha subunit during vertebrate development.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Tomoya; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Kawakami, Koichi; Yamashita, Masakane

    2010-02-12

    During embryonic development, protein kinase A (PKA) plays a key role in cell fate specification by antagonizing the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. However, the mechanism by which PKA activity is regulated remains unknown. Here we show that the Misty somites (Mys) protein regulates the level of PKA activity during embryonic development in zebrafish. We isolate PKA regulatory type Ialpha subunit (Prkar1a) as a protein interacting with Mys by pulldown assay in HEK293 cells followed by mass spectrometry analysis. We show an interaction between endogenous Mys and Prkar1a in the zebrafish embryo. Mys binds to Prkar1a in its C terminus region, termed PRB domain, and activates PKA in vitro. Conversely, knockdown of Mys in zebrafish embryos results in reduction in PKA activity. We also show that knockdown of Mys induces ectopic activation of Hh target genes in the eyes, neural tube, and somites downstream of Smoothened, a protein essential for transduction of Hh signaling activity. The altered patterning of gene expression is rescued by activation of PKA. Together, our results reveal a molecular mechanism of regulation of PKA activity that is dependent on a protein-protein interaction and demonstrate that PKA activity regulated by Mys is indispensable for negative regulation of the Hh signaling pathway in Hh-responsive cells. PMID:20018846

  9. Polymorphisms of 20 regulatory proteins between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Bigi, María M; Blanco, Federico Carlos; Araújo, Flabio R; Thacker, Tyler C; Zumárraga, Martín J; Cataldi, Angel A; Soria, Marcelo A; Bigi, Fabiana

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis are responsible for tuberculosis in humans and animals, respectively. Both species are closely related and belong to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. tuberculosis is the most ancient species from which M. bovis and other members of the MTC evolved. The genome of M. bovis is over >99.95% identical to that of M. tuberculosis but with seven deletions ranging in size from 1 to 12.7 kb. In addition, 1200 single nucleotide mutations in coding regions distinguish M. bovis from M. tuberculosis. In the present study, we assessed 75 M. tuberculosis genomes and 23 M. bovis genomes to identify non-synonymous mutations in 202 coding sequences of regulatory genes between both species. We identified species-specific variants in 20 regulatory proteins and confirmed differential expression of hypoxia-related genes between M. bovis and M. tuberculosis.

  10. Structure of the Na,K-ATPase regulatory protein FXYD1 in micelles†

    PubMed Central

    Teriete, Peter; Franzin, Carla M.; Choi, Jungyuen; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2008-01-01

    FXYD1 is a major regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, and the principal substrate of hormone-regulated phosphorylation by c-AMP dependent protein kinases A and C in heart and skeletal muscle sarcolemma. It is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of membrane proteins that regulate the function of the enzyme complex in a tissue-specific and physiological-state-specific manner. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of FXYD1 determined in micelles by NMR spectroscopy. Structure determination was made possible by measuring residual dipolar couplings in weakly oriented micelle samples of the protein. This allowed us to obtain the relative orientations of the helical segments of the protein, and also provided information about the protein dynamics. The structural analysis was further facilitated by the inclusion of distance restraints, obtained from paramagnetic spin label relaxation enhancements, and by refinement with a micelle depth restraint, derived from paramagnetic Mn line broadening effects. The structure of FXYD1 provides the foundation for understanding its intra-membrane association with the Na,K-ATPase α subunit, and suggests a mechanism whereby the phosphorylation of conserved Ser residues, by protein kinases A and C, could induce a conformational change in the cytoplasmic domain of the protein, to modulate its interaction with the α subunit. PMID:17511473

  11. Differential recruitment of co-regulatory proteins to the human estrogen receptor 1 in response to xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Smith, L Cody; Clark, Jessica C; Bisesi, Joseph H; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2016-09-01

    The diverse biological effects of xenoestrogens may be explained by their ability to differentially recruit co-regulatory proteins to the estrogen receptor (ER). We employed high-throughput receptor affinity binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment screening assays based on fluorescence polarization and time resolved florescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), respectively, to assess xenoestrogen-specific binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment to the ER. Then we used a functional proteomic assay based on co-immunoprecipitation of ER-bound proteins to isolate and identify intact co-regulatory proteins recruited to a ligand-activated ER. Through these approaches, we revealed differential binding affinity of bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein (GEN) to the human ERα (ESR1) and ligand-dependent recruitment of SRC-1 and SRC-3 peptides. Recruitment profiles were variable for each ligand and in some cases were distinct compared to 17β-estradiol (E2). For example, E2 and GEN recruited both SRC-1 and -3 peptides whereas BPA recruited only SRC-1 peptides. Results of the functional proteomic assay showed differential recruitment between ligands where E2 recruited the greatest number of proteins followed by BPA then GEN. A number of proteins share previously identified relationships with ESR1 as determined by STRING analysis. Although there was limited overlap in proteins identified between treatments, all ligands recruited proteins involved in cell growth as determined by subnetwork enrichment analysis (p<0.05). A comparative, in silico analysis revealed that fewer interactions exist between zebrafish (Danio rerio) esr1 and zebrafish orthologs of proteins identified in our functional proteomic analysis. Taken together these results identify recruitment of known and previously unknown co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 and highlight new methods to assay recruitment of low abundant and intact, endogenous co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 or other nuclear receptors, in

  12. Dosage compensation regulatory proteins and the evolution of sex chromosomes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bone, J R; Kuroda, M I

    1996-10-01

    In the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, the four male specific lethal (msl) genes are required to achieve dosage compensation of the male X chromosome. The MSL proteins are thought to interact with cis-acting sites that confer dosage compensation to nearby genes, as they are detected at hundreds of discrete sites along the length of the polytene X chromosome in males but not in females. The histone H4 acetylated isoform, H4Ac16, colocalizes with the MSL proteins at a majority of sites on the D. melanogaster X chromosome. Using polytene chromosome immunostaining of other species from the genus Drosophila, we found that X chromosome association of MSL proteins and H4Ac16 is conserved despite differences in the sex chromosome karyotype between species. Our results support a model in which cis-acting regulatory sites for dosage compensation evolve on a neo-X chromosome arm in response to the degeneration of its former homologue.

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of regulatory subunits of protein kinase A in cardiac cell fractions of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Popova, I.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling in heart tissue of rats flown on Cosmos 2044 was used to measure the regulatory (R) subunits of adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. A significant decrease of RII subunits in the particulate cell fraction extract (S2; P less than 0.05 in all cases) was observed when extracts of tissue samples from vivarium controls were compared with those from flight animals. Photoaffinity labeling of the soluble fraction (S1) was observed to be unaffected by spaceflight or any of the simulation conditions. Proteins of the S2 fraction constitute a minor (less than 10 percent) component of the total, whereas the S1 fraction contained most of the cell proteins. Changes in a relatively minor aspect of adenosine monophosphate-mediated reactions are considered to be representative of a metabolic effect.

  14. Structure of dual function iron regulatory protein 1 complexed with ferritin IRE-RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, William E.; Selezneva, Anna I.; Dupuy, Jérôme; Volbeda, Anne; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Volz1, Karl

    2011-07-27

    Iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) binds iron-responsive elements (IREs) in messenger RNAs (mRNAs), to repress translation or degradation, or binds an iron-sulfur cluster, to become a cytosolic aconitase enzyme. The 2.8 angstrom resolution crystal structure of the IRP1:ferritin H IRE complex shows an open protein conformation compared with that of cytosolic aconitase. The extended, L-shaped IRP1 molecule embraces the IRE stem-loop through interactions at two sites separated by {approx}30 angstroms, each involving about a dozen protein:RNA bonds. Extensive conformational changes related to binding the IRE or an iron-sulfur cluster explain the alternate functions of IRP1 as an mRNA regulator or enzyme.

  15. Promoter analysis reveals globally differential regulation of human long non-coding RNA and protein-coding genes

    DOE PAGES

    Alam, Tanvir; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Jia, Hui; Brown, James B.; Lipovich, Leonard; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Mantovani, Roberto

    2014-10-02

    Transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes is increasingly well-understood on a global scale, yet no comparable information exists for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes, which were recently recognized to be as numerous as protein-coding genes in mammalian genomes. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of the promoters of human lncRNA and protein-coding genes, finding global differences in specific genetic and epigenetic features relevant to transcriptional regulation. These two groups of genes are hence subject to separate transcriptional regulatory programs, including distinct transcription factor (TF) proteins that significantly favor lncRNA, rather than coding-gene, promoters. We report a specific signature of promoter-proximal transcriptionalmore » regulation of lncRNA genes, including several distinct transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Experimental DNase I hypersensitive site profiles are consistent with active configurations of these lncRNA TFBS sets in diverse human cell types. TFBS ChIP-seq datasets confirm the binding events that we predicted using computational approaches for a subset of factors. For several TFs known to be directly regulated by lncRNAs, we find that their putative TFBSs are enriched at lncRNA promoters, suggesting that the TFs and the lncRNAs may participate in a bidirectional feedback loop regulatory network. Accordingly, cells may be able to modulate lncRNA expression levels independently of mRNA levels via distinct regulatory pathways. Our results also raise the possibility that, given the historical reliance on protein-coding gene catalogs to define the chromatin states of active promoters, a revision of these chromatin signature profiles to incorporate expressed lncRNA genes is warranted in the future.« less

  16. Promoter analysis reveals globally differential regulation of human long non-coding RNA and protein-coding genes

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Tanvir; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Jia, Hui; Brown, James B.; Lipovich, Leonard; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Mantovani, Roberto

    2014-10-02

    Transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes is increasingly well-understood on a global scale, yet no comparable information exists for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes, which were recently recognized to be as numerous as protein-coding genes in mammalian genomes. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of the promoters of human lncRNA and protein-coding genes, finding global differences in specific genetic and epigenetic features relevant to transcriptional regulation. These two groups of genes are hence subject to separate transcriptional regulatory programs, including distinct transcription factor (TF) proteins that significantly favor lncRNA, rather than coding-gene, promoters. We report a specific signature of promoter-proximal transcriptional regulation of lncRNA genes, including several distinct transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Experimental DNase I hypersensitive site profiles are consistent with active configurations of these lncRNA TFBS sets in diverse human cell types. TFBS ChIP-seq datasets confirm the binding events that we predicted using computational approaches for a subset of factors. For several TFs known to be directly regulated by lncRNAs, we find that their putative TFBSs are enriched at lncRNA promoters, suggesting that the TFs and the lncRNAs may participate in a bidirectional feedback loop regulatory network. Accordingly, cells may be able to modulate lncRNA expression levels independently of mRNA levels via distinct regulatory pathways. Our results also raise the possibility that, given the historical reliance on protein-coding gene catalogs to define the chromatin states of active promoters, a revision of these chromatin signature profiles to incorporate expressed lncRNA genes is warranted in the future.

  17. Role of Complement and Complement Regulatory Proteins in the Complications of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Pamela; Sahoo, Rupam; Vaidya, Anand; Chorev, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the organ damage that complicates human diabetes is caused by prolonged hyperglycemia, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which high levels of glucose cause tissue damage in humans are still not fully understood. The prevalent hypothesis explaining the mechanisms that may underlie the pathogenesis of diabetes complications includes overproduction of reactive oxygen species, increased flux through the polyol pathway, overactivity of the hexosamine pathway causing intracellular formation of advanced glycation end products, and activation of protein kinase C isoforms. In addition, experimental and clinical evidence reported in past decades supports a strong link between the complement system, complement regulatory proteins, and the pathogenesis of diabetes complications. In this article, we summarize the body of evidence that supports a role for the complement system and complement regulatory proteins in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, with specific emphasis on the role of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and of CD59, an extracellular cell membrane-anchored inhibitor of MAC formation that is inactivated by nonenzymatic glycation. We discuss a pathogenic model of human diabetic complications in which a combination of CD59 inactivation by glycation and hyperglycemia-induced complement activation increases MAC deposition, activates pathways of intracellular signaling, and induces the release of proinflammatory, prothrombotic cytokines and growth factors. Combined, complement-dependent and complement-independent mechanisms induced by high glucose promote inflammation, proliferation, and thrombosis as characteristically seen in the target organs of diabetes complications. PMID:25859860

  18. Role of complement and complement regulatory proteins in the complications of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pamela; Sahoo, Rupam; Vaidya, Anand; Chorev, Michael; Halperin, Jose A

    2015-06-01

    It is well established that the organ damage that complicates human diabetes is caused by prolonged hyperglycemia, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which high levels of glucose cause tissue damage in humans are still not fully understood. The prevalent hypothesis explaining the mechanisms that may underlie the pathogenesis of diabetes complications includes overproduction of reactive oxygen species, increased flux through the polyol pathway, overactivity of the hexosamine pathway causing intracellular formation of advanced glycation end products, and activation of protein kinase C isoforms. In addition, experimental and clinical evidence reported in past decades supports a strong link between the complement system, complement regulatory proteins, and the pathogenesis of diabetes complications. In this article, we summarize the body of evidence that supports a role for the complement system and complement regulatory proteins in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, with specific emphasis on the role of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and of CD59, an extracellular cell membrane-anchored inhibitor of MAC formation that is inactivated by nonenzymatic glycation. We discuss a pathogenic model of human diabetic complications in which a combination of CD59 inactivation by glycation and hyperglycemia-induced complement activation increases MAC deposition, activates pathways of intracellular signaling, and induces the release of proinflammatory, prothrombotic cytokines and growth factors. Combined, complement-dependent and complement-independent mechanisms induced by high glucose promote inflammation, proliferation, and thrombosis as characteristically seen in the target organs of diabetes complications.

  19. Spatial proximity statistics suggest a regulatory role of protein phosphorylation on compound binding.

    PubMed

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that regulates protein function by the attachment of negatively charged phosphate groups to phosphorylatable amino acid residues. As a mode of action, an influence of phosphorylation on the binding of compounds to proteins has been discussed and described for a number of proteins in the literature. However, a systematic statistical survey probing for enriched phosphorylation sites close to compound binding sites in support of this notion and with properly chosen random reference distributions has not been presented yet. Using high-resolution protein structures from the Protein Data Bank including their co-crystallized non-covalently bound compounds and experimentally determined phosphorylation sites, we analyzed the pairwise distance distributions of phosphorylation and compound binding sites on protein surfaces. We found that phosphorylation sites are indeed located at significantly closer distances to compounds than expected by chance holding true specifically also for the subset of compound binding sites serving as catalytic sites of metabolic reactions. This tendency was particularly evident when treating phosphorylation sites as collective sets supporting the relevance of phosphorylation hotspots. Interestingly, phosphorylation sites were found to be closer to negatively charged than to positively charged compounds suggesting a stronger modulation of the binding of negatively charged compounds in dependence on phosphorylation status than on positively charged compounds. The enrichment of phosphorylation sites near compound binding sites confirms a regulatory role of phosphorylation in compound binding and provides a solid statistical basis for the literature-reported selected events.

  20. The protein kinase A regulatory subunit R1A (Prkar1a) plays critical roles in peripheral nerve development.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Lee, Audrey A; Rizvi, Tilat A; Ratner, Nancy; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2013-11-13

    Signaling through cAMP has been implicated in Schwann cell (SC) proliferation and myelination, but the signaling pathway components downstream of cAMP required for SC function remain unknown. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a potential downstream effector of cAMP. Here, we induced loss of Prkar1a, the gene encoding the type 1A regulatory subunit of PKA, in SC to study its role in nerve development; loss of Prkar1a is predicted to elevate PKA activity. Conditional Prkar1a knock-out in mouse SC (Prkar1a-SCKO) resulted in a dramatic and persistent axonal sorting defect, and unexpectedly decreased SC proliferation in Prkar1a-SCKO nerves in vivo. Effects were cell autonomous as they were recapitulated in vitro in Prkar1a-SCKO SC, which showed elevated PKA activity. In the few SCs sorted into 1:1 relationships with axons in vivo, SC myelination was premature in Prkar1a-SCKO nerves, correlating with global increase in the cAMP-regulated transcription factor Oct-6 and expression of myelin basic protein. These data reveal a previously unknown role of PKA in axon sorting, an unexpected inhibitory role of PKA on SC cell proliferation in vivo and define the importance of Prkar1a in peripheral nerve development. PMID:24227708

  1. Structural basis for regulation of rhizobial nodulation and symbiosis gene expression by the regulatory protein NolR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Goo; Krishnan, Hari B; Jez, Joseph M

    2014-04-29

    The symbiosis between rhizobial microbes and host plants involves the coordinated expression of multiple genes, which leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. As part of the transcriptional machinery for nodulation and symbiosis across a range of Rhizobium, NolR serves as a global regulatory protein. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structures of NolR in the unliganded form and complexed with two different 22-base pair (bp) double-stranded operator sequences (oligos AT and AA). Structural and biochemical analysis of NolR reveals protein-DNA interactions with an asymmetric operator site and defines a mechanism for conformational switching of a key residue (Gln56) to accommodate variation in target DNA sequences from diverse rhizobial genes for nodulation and symbiosis. This conformational switching alters the energetic contributions to DNA binding without changes in affinity for the target sequence. Two possible models for the role of NolR in the regulation of different nodulation and symbiosis genes are proposed. To our knowledge, these studies provide the first structural insight on the regulation of genes involved in the agriculturally and ecologically important symbiosis of microbes and plants that leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation.

  2. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Betty L.; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition. PMID:26675164

  3. Cell cycle regulatory protein p27KIP1 is a substrate and interacts with the protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Julio C; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M; Sayed, Muhammed; Allende, Catherine C; Allende, Jorge E

    2004-04-01

    The protein kinase CK2 is constituted by two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two regulatory (beta) subunits. CK2 phosphorylates more than 300 proteins with important functions in the cell cycle. This study has looked at the relation between CK2 and p27(KIP1), which is a regulator of the cell cycle and a known inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk). We demonstrated that in vitro recombinant Xenopus laevis CK2 can phosphorylate recombinant human p27(KIP1), but this phosphorylation occurs only in the presence of the regulatory beta subunit. The principal site of phosphorylation is serine-83. Analysis using pull down and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) techniques showed that p27(KIP1) interacts with the beta subunit through two domains present in the amino and carboxyl ends, while CD spectra showed that p27(KIP1) phosphorylation by CK2 affects its secondary structure. Altogether, these results suggest that p27(KIP1) phosphorylation by CK2 probably involves a docking event mediated by the CK2beta subunit. The phosphorylation of p27(KIP1) by CK2 may affect its biological activity.

  4. Definition of regulatory sequence elements in the promoter region and the first intron of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, C J; Sabourin, L A; Waring, J D; Korneluk, R G

    1998-04-10

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common inherited adult neuromuscular disorder with a global frequency of 1/8000. The genetic defect is an expanding CTG trinucleotide repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene. We present the in vitro characterization of cis regulatory elements controlling transcription of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene in myoblasts and fibroblasts. The region 5' to the initiating ATG contains no consensus TATA or CCAAT box. We have mapped two transcriptional start sites by primer extension. Deletion constructs from this region fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene revealed only subtle muscle specific cis elements. The strongest promoter activity mapped to a 189-base pair fragment. This sequence contains a conserved GC box to which the transcription factor Sp1 binds. Reporter gene constructs containing a 2-kilobase pair first intron fragment of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene enhances reporter activity up to 6-fold in the human rhabdomyosarcoma myoblast cell line TE32 but not in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Co-transfection of a MyoD expression vector with reporter constructs containing the first intron into 10 T1/2 fibroblasts resulted in a 10-20-fold enhancement of expression. Deletion analysis of four E-box elements within the first intron reveal that these elements contribute to enhancer activity similarly in TE32 myoblasts and 10 T1/2 fibroblasts. These data suggest that E-boxes within the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase first intron mediate interactions with upstream promoter elements to up-regulate transcription of this gene in myoblasts.

  5. Identification and Analysis of Regulatory Elements in Porcine Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Gene Promoter.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qianhui; Wang, Yaxian; Wang, Huayan

    2015-10-27

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) is secreted by the mammalian oocytes and is indispensable for ovarian follicular development, ovulation, and fertility. To determine the regulation mechanism of BMP15 gene, the regulatory sequence of porcine BMP15 was investigated in this study. The cloned BMP15 promoter retains the cell-type specificity, and is activated in cells derived from ovarian tissue. The luciferase assays in combination with a series of deletion of BMP15 promoter sequence show that the -427 to -376 bp region of BMP15 promoter is the primary regulatory element, in which there are a number of transcription factor binding sites, including LIM homeobox 8 (LHX8), newborn ovary homeobox gene (NOBOX), and paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1). Determination of tissue-specific expression reveals that LHX8, but not PITX1 and NOBOX, is exclusively expressed in pig ovary tissue and is translocated into the cell nuclei. Overexpression of LHX8 in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells could significantly promote BMP15 promoter activation. This study confirms a key regulatory element that is located in the proximal region of BMP15 promoter and is regulated by the LHX8 factor.

  6. Identification and Analysis of Regulatory Elements in Porcine Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qianhui; Wang, Yaxian; Wang, Huayan

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) is secreted by the mammalian oocytes and is indispensable for ovarian follicular development, ovulation, and fertility. To determine the regulation mechanism of BMP15 gene, the regulatory sequence of porcine BMP15 was investigated in this study. The cloned BMP15 promoter retains the cell-type specificity, and is activated in cells derived from ovarian tissue. The luciferase assays in combination with a series of deletion of BMP15 promoter sequence show that the −427 to −376 bp region of BMP15 promoter is the primary regulatory element, in which there are a number of transcription factor binding sites, including LIM homeobox 8 (LHX8), newborn ovary homeobox gene (NOBOX), and paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1). Determination of tissue-specific expression reveals that LHX8, but not PITX1 and NOBOX, is exclusively expressed in pig ovary tissue and is translocated into the cell nuclei. Overexpression of LHX8 in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells could significantly promote BMP15 promoter activation. This study confirms a key regulatory element that is located in the proximal region of BMP15 promoter and is regulated by the LHX8 factor. PMID:26516845

  7. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover

    PubMed Central

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  8. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover.

    PubMed

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca(2+)-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  9. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover

    PubMed Central

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  10. ClpB N-terminal domain plays a regulatory role in protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Rina; Farber, Patrick; Velyvis, Algirdas; Rennella, Enrico; Latham, Michael P.; Kay, Lewis E.

    2015-01-01

    ClpB/Hsp100 is an ATP-dependent disaggregase that solubilizes and reactivates protein aggregates in cooperation with the DnaK/Hsp70 chaperone system. The ClpB–substrate interaction is mediated by conserved tyrosine residues located in flexible loops in nucleotide-binding domain-1 that extend into the ClpB central pore. In addition to the tyrosines, the ClpB N-terminal domain (NTD) was suggested to provide a second substrate-binding site; however, the manner in which the NTD recognizes and binds substrate proteins has remained elusive. Herein, we present an NMR spectroscopy study to structurally characterize the NTD–substrate interaction. We show that the NTD includes a substrate-binding groove that specifically recognizes exposed hydrophobic stretches in unfolded or aggregated client proteins. Using an optimized segmental labeling technique in combination with methyl-transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) NMR, the interaction of client proteins with both the NTD and the pore-loop tyrosines in the 580-kDa ClpB hexamer has been characterized. Unlike contacts with the tyrosines, the NTD–substrate interaction is independent of the ClpB nucleotide state and protein conformational changes that result from ATP hydrolysis. The NTD interaction destabilizes client proteins, priming them for subsequent unfolding and translocation. Mutations in the NTD substrate-binding groove are shown to have a dramatic effect on protein translocation through the ClpB central pore, suggesting that, before their interaction with substrates, the NTDs block the translocation channel. Together, our findings provide both a detailed characterization of the NTD–substrate complex and insight into the functional regulatory role of the ClpB NTD in protein disaggregation. PMID:26621746

  11. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart.

  12. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Little, Sean C.; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A.; Kline, Crystal F.; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M.; Carnes, Cynthia A.; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H.; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α+/− myocytes resulted in reduced Ca2+ waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca2+ regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart. PMID:26198358

  13. Mitochondrial Fusion and ERK Activity Regulate Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Localization in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Podestá, Ernesto J.; Poderoso, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, known as the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is facilitated by StAR, the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein. We have described that mitochondrial ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR and that mitochondrial fusion, through the up-regulation of a fusion protein Mitofusin 2, is essential during steroidogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial StAR together with mitochondrial active ERK and PKA are necessary for maximal steroid production. Phosphorylation of StAR by ERK is required for the maintenance of this protein in mitochondria, observed by means of over-expression of a StAR variant lacking the ERK phosphorylation residue. Mitochondrial fusion regulates StAR levels in mitochondria after hormone stimulation. In this study, Mitofusin 2 knockdown and mitochondrial fusion inhibition in MA-10 Leydig cells diminished StAR mRNA levels and concomitantly mitochondrial StAR protein. Together our results unveil the requirement of mitochondrial fusion in the regulation of the localization and mRNA abundance of StAR. We here establish the relevance of mitochondrial phosphorylation events in the correct localization of this key protein to exert its action in specialized cells. These discoveries highlight the importance of mitochondrial fusion and ERK phosphorylation in cholesterol transport by means of directing StAR to the outer mitochondrial membrane to achieve a large number of steroid molecules per unit of StAR. PMID:24945345

  14. Somite subdomains, muscle cell origins, and the four muscle regulatory factor proteins

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We show by immunohistology that distinct expression patterns of the four muscle regulatory factor (MRF) proteins identify subdomains of mouse somites. Myf-5 and MyoD are, at specific stages, each expressed in both myotome and dermatome cells. Myf-5 expression is initially restricted to dorsal cells in all somites, as is MyoD expression in neck somites. In trunk somites, however, MyoD is initially expressed in ventral cells. Myogenin and MRF4 are restricted to myotome cells, though the MRF4-expressing cells are initially less widely distributed than the myogenin-expressing cells, which are at all stages found throughout the myotome. All somitic myocytes express one or more MRFs. The transiently distinct expression patterns of the four MRF proteins identify dorsal and ventral subdomains of somites, and suggest that skeletal muscle cells in somites originate at multiple sites and via multiple molecular pathways. PMID:7929574

  15. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Y. Murakawa, T. Shimamura, K. Oishi, M. Ohyama, T. Kurita, N.

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  16. Global protein profiling studies of chikungunya virus infection identify different proteins but common biological processes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Duncan R

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya fever (CHIKF) caused by the mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV) swept into international prominence from late 2005 as an epidemic of CHIKF spread around countries surrounding the Indian Ocean. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the pathobiology of CHIKF, numerous questions still remain. In the absence of commercially available specific drugs to treat the disease, or a vaccine to prevent the diseases, the questions have particular significance. A number of studies have used global proteome analysis to increase our understanding of the process of CHIKV infection using a number of different experimental techniques and experimental systems. In all, over 700 proteins have been identified in nine different analyses by five different groups as being differentially regulated. Remarkably, only a single protein, eukaryotic elongation factor 2, has been identified by more than two different groups as being differentially regulated during CHIKV infection. This review provides a critical overview of the studies that have used global protein profiling to understand CHIKV infection and shows that while a broad consensus is emerging on which biological processes are altered during CHIKV infection, this consensus is poorly supported in terms of consistent identification of any key proteins mediating those biological processes.

  17. Evolution of context dependent regulation by expansion of feast/famine regulatory proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Plaisier, Christopher L.; Lo, Fang -Yin; Ashworth, Justin; Brooks, Aaron N.; Beer, Karlyn D.; Kaur, Amardeep; Pan, Min; Reiss, David J.; Facciotti, Marc T.; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2014-11-14

    Expansion of transcription factors is believed to have played a crucial role in evolution of all organisms by enabling them to deal with dynamic environments and colonize new environments. We investigated how the expansion of the Feast/Famine Regulatory Protein (FFRP) or Lrp-like proteins into an eight-member family in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 has aided in niche-adaptation of this archaeon to a complex and dynamically changing hypersaline environment. We mapped genome-wide binding locations for all eight FFRPs, investigated their preference for binding different effector molecules, and identified the contexts in which they act by analyzing transcriptional responses across 35 growth conditions that mimic different environmental and nutritional conditions this organism is likely to encounter in the wild. Integrative analysis of these data constructed an FFRP regulatory network with conditionally active states that reveal how interrelated variations in DNA-binding domains, effector-molecule preferences, and binding sites in target gene promoters have tuned the functions of each FFRP to the environments in which they act. We demonstrate how conditional regulation of similar genes by two FFRPs, AsnC (an activator) and VNG1237C (a repressor), have striking environment-specific fitness consequences for oxidative stress management and growth, respectively. This study provides a systems perspective into the evolutionary process by which gene duplication within a transcription factor family contributes to environment-specific adaptation of an organism.

  18. Evolution of context dependent regulation by expansion of feast/famine regulatory proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Plaisier, Christopher L.; Lo, Fang -Yin; Ashworth, Justin; Brooks, Aaron N.; Beer, Karlyn D.; Kaur, Amardeep; Pan, Min; Reiss, David J.; Facciotti, Marc T.; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2014-11-14

    Expansion of transcription factors is believed to have played a crucial role in evolution of all organisms by enabling them to deal with dynamic environments and colonize new environments. We investigated how the expansion of the Feast/Famine Regulatory Protein (FFRP) or Lrp-like proteins into an eight-member family in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 has aided in niche-adaptation of this archaeon to a complex and dynamically changing hypersaline environment. We mapped genome-wide binding locations for all eight FFRPs, investigated their preference for binding different effector molecules, and identified the contexts in which they act by analyzing transcriptional responses across 35 growth conditions thatmore » mimic different environmental and nutritional conditions this organism is likely to encounter in the wild. Integrative analysis of these data constructed an FFRP regulatory network with conditionally active states that reveal how interrelated variations in DNA-binding domains, effector-molecule preferences, and binding sites in target gene promoters have tuned the functions of each FFRP to the environments in which they act. We demonstrate how conditional regulation of similar genes by two FFRPs, AsnC (an activator) and VNG1237C (a repressor), have striking environment-specific fitness consequences for oxidative stress management and growth, respectively. This study provides a systems perspective into the evolutionary process by which gene duplication within a transcription factor family contributes to environment-specific adaptation of an organism.« less

  19. Theoretical investigations on the interactions of glucokinase regulatory protein with fructose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Ling, Baoping; Yan, Xueyuan; Sun, Min; Bi, Siwei

    2016-02-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a critical role in maintaining glucose homeostasis in the human liver and pancreas. In the liver, the activity of GK is modulated by the glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP) which functions as a competitive inhibitor of glucose to bind to GK. Moreover, the inhibitory intensity of GKRP-GK is suppressed by fructose 1-phosphate (F1P), and reinforced by fructose 6-phosphate (F6P). Here, we employed a series of computational techniques to explore the interactions of fructose phosphates with GKRP. Calculation results reveal that F1P and F6P can bind to the same active site of GKRP with different binding modes, and electrostatic interaction provides a major driving force for the ligand binding. The presence of fructose phosphate severely influences the motions of protein and the conformational space, and the structural change of sugar phosphate influences its interactions with GKRP, leading to a large conformational rearrangement of loop2 in the SIS2 domain. In particular, the binding of F6P to GKRP facilitates the protruding loop2 contacting with GK to form the stable GK-GKRP complex. The conserved residues 179-184 of GKRP play a major role in the binding of phosphate group and maintaining the stability of GKRP. These results may provide deep insight into the regulatory mechanism of GKRP to the activity of GK. PMID:26629747

  20. Regulatory function of Arabidopsis lipid transfer protein 1 (LTP1) in ethylene response and signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Honglin; Sun, Yue; Chang, Jianhong; Zheng, Fangfang; Pei, Haixia; Yi, Yanjun; Chang, Caren; Dong, Chun-Hai

    2016-07-01

    Ethylene as a gaseous plant hormone is directly involved in various processes during plant growth and development. Much is known regarding the ethylene receptors and regulatory factors in the ethylene signal transduction pathway. In Arabidopsis thaliana, REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1) can interact with and positively regulates the ethylene receptor ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (ETR1). In this study we report the identification and characterization of an RTE1-interacting protein, a putative Arabidopsis lipid transfer protein 1 (LTP1) of unknown function. Through bimolecular fluorescence complementation, a direct molecular interaction between LTP1 and RTE1 was verified in planta. Analysis of an LTP1-GFP fusion in transgenic plants and plasmolysis experiments revealed that LTP1 is localized to the cytoplasm. Analysis of ethylene responses showed that the ltp1 knockout is hypersensitive to 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACC), while LTP1 overexpression confers insensitivity. Analysis of double mutants etr1-2 ltp1 and rte1-3 ltp1 demonstrates a regulatory function of LTP1 in ethylene receptor signaling through the molecular association with RTE1. This study uncovers a novel function of Arabidopsis LTP1 in the regulation of ethylene response and signaling. PMID:27097903

  1. The life cycle of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein: from transcription through proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Granot, Zvi; Silverman, Eran; Friedlander, Ruth; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Eimerl, Sarah; Timberg, Rina; Hales, Karen H; Hales, Dale B; Stocco, Douglas M; Orly, Joseph

    2002-11-01

    The Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory (StAR) protein is a mitochondrial protein required for the transport of cholesterol substrate to the P450scc enzyme located in the inner mitochondrial membranes of steroid producing cells. This study suggests that the acute regulation of the rodent StAR gene in the ovary is mediated by two factors, C/EBPbeta and GATA-4. Once translated, the StAR precursor protein is either imported into the mitochondria, or it is rapidly degraded in the cytosol. We predicted that in order to perpetuate StAR activity cycles, imported StAR should turn over rapidly to avoid a potentially harmful accumulation of the protein in sub-mitochondrial compartments. Pulse-chase experiments in metabolically labeled cells showed that: (a) the turnover rate of mature mitochondrial StAR protein (30 kDa) is much faster (t(1/2) = 4-5 h) than that of other mitochondrial proteins; (b) dissipation of the inner membrane potential (-delta psi) by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (mCCCP) accelerates the mitochondrial degradation of StAR; (c) unexpectedly, the mitochondrial degradation of StAR is inhibited by MG132 and lactacystin, but not by epoxomicin. Furthermore, StAR degradation becomes inhibitor-resistant two hours after import. Therefore, these studies suggest a bi-phasic route of StAR turnover in the mitochondria. Shortly after import, StAR is degraded by inhibitor-sensitive protease(s) (phase I), whereas at later times, StAR turnover proceeds to completion through an MG132-resistant proteolytic activity (phase II). Collectively, this study defines StAR as a unique protein that can authentically be used to probe multiple proteolytic activities in mammalian mitochondria.

  2. The life cycle of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein: from transcription through proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Granot, Zvi; Silverman, Eran; Friedlander, Ruth; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Eimerl, Sarah; Timberg, Rina; Hales, Karen H; Hales, Dale B; Stocco, Douglas M; Orly, Joseph

    2002-11-01

    The Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory (StAR) protein is a mitochondrial protein required for the transport of cholesterol substrate to the P450scc enzyme located in the inner mitochondrial membranes of steroid producing cells. This study suggests that the acute regulation of the rodent StAR gene in the ovary is mediated by two factors, C/EBPbeta and GATA-4. Once translated, the StAR precursor protein is either imported into the mitochondria, or it is rapidly degraded in the cytosol. We predicted that in order to perpetuate StAR activity cycles, imported StAR should turn over rapidly to avoid a potentially harmful accumulation of the protein in sub-mitochondrial compartments. Pulse-chase experiments in metabolically labeled cells showed that: (a) the turnover rate of mature mitochondrial StAR protein (30 kDa) is much faster (t(1/2) = 4-5 h) than that of other mitochondrial proteins; (b) dissipation of the inner membrane potential (-delta psi) by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (mCCCP) accelerates the mitochondrial degradation of StAR; (c) unexpectedly, the mitochondrial degradation of StAR is inhibited by MG132 and lactacystin, but not by epoxomicin. Furthermore, StAR degradation becomes inhibitor-resistant two hours after import. Therefore, these studies suggest a bi-phasic route of StAR turnover in the mitochondria. Shortly after import, StAR is degraded by inhibitor-sensitive protease(s) (phase I), whereas at later times, StAR turnover proceeds to completion through an MG132-resistant proteolytic activity (phase II). Collectively, this study defines StAR as a unique protein that can authentically be used to probe multiple proteolytic activities in mammalian mitochondria. PMID:12530639

  3. Assembly of the cysteine synthase complex and the regulatory role of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Kumaran, Sangaralingam; Yi, Hankuil; Krishnan, Hari B; Jez, Joseph M

    2009-04-10

    Macromolecular assemblies play critical roles in regulating cellular functions. The cysteine synthase complex (CSC), which is formed by association of serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), acts as a sensor and modulator of thiol metabolism by responding to changes in nutrient conditions. Here we examine the oligomerization and energetics of formation of the soybean CSC. Biophysical examination of the CSC by size exclusion chromatography and sedimentation ultracentrifugation indicates that this assembly (complex M(r) approximately 330,000) consists of a single SAT trimer (trimer M(r) approximately 110,000) and three OASS dimers (dimer M(r) approximately 70,000). Analysis of the SAT-OASS interaction by isothermal titration calorimetry reveals negative cooperativity with three distinct binding events during CSC formation with K(d) values of 0.3, 7.5, and 78 nm. The three binding events are also observed using surface plasmon resonance with comparable affinities. The stability of the CSC derives from rapid association and extremely slow dissociation of OASS with SAT and requires the C terminus of SAT for the interaction. Steady-state kinetic analysis shows that CSC formation enhances SAT activity and releases SAT from substrate inhibition and feedback inhibition by cysteine, the final product of the biosynthesis pathway. Cysteine inhibits SAT and the CSC with K(i) values of 2 and 70 microm, respectively. These results suggest a new model for the architecture of this regulatory complex and additional control mechanisms for biochemically controlling plant cysteine biosynthesis. Based on previous work and our results, we suggest that OASS acts as an enzyme chaperone of SAT in the CSC. PMID:19213732

  4. Structural basis for specific recognition of multiple mRNA targets by a PUF regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yeming; Opperman, Laura; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.

    2011-11-02

    Caenorhabditis elegans fem-3 binding factor (FBF) is a founding member of the PUMILIO/FBF (PUF) family of mRNA regulatory proteins. It regulates multiple mRNAs critical for stem cell maintenance and germline development. Here, we report crystal structures of FBF in complex with 6 different 9-nt RNA sequences, including elements from 4 natural mRNAs. These structures reveal that FBF binds to conserved bases at positions 1-3 and 7-8. The key specificity determinant of FBF vs. other PUF proteins lies in positions 4-6. In FBF/RNA complexes, these bases stack directly with one another and turn away from the RNA-binding surface. A short region of FBF is sufficient to impart its unique specificity and lies directly opposite the flipped bases. We suggest that this region imposes a flattened curvature on the protein; hence, the requirement for the additional nucleotide. The principles of FBF/RNA recognition suggest a general mechanism by which PUF proteins recognize distinct families of RNAs yet exploit very nearly identical atomic contacts in doing so.

  5. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5′-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5′-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  6. Oxidant-induced apoptosis is mediated by oxidation of the actin-regulatory protein cofilin

    PubMed Central

    Klamt, Fábio; Zdanov, Stéphanie; Levine, Rodney L.; Pariser, Ashley; Zhang, Yaqin; Zhang, Baolin; Yu, Li-Rong; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Shacter, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Physiological oxidants that are generated by activated phagocytes comprise the main source of oxidative stress during inflammation1,2. Oxidants such as taurine chloramine (TnCl) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can damage proteins and induce apoptosis, but the role of specific protein oxidation in this process has not been defined. We found that the actin-binding protein cofilin is a key target of oxidation. When oxidation of this single regulatory protein is prevented, oxidant-induced apoptosis is inhibited. Oxidation of cofilin causes it to lose its affinity for actin and to translocate to the mitochondria, where it induces swelling and cytochrome c release by mediating opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP). This occurs independently of Bax activation and requires both oxidation of cofilin Cys residues and dephosphorylation at Ser 3. Knockdown of endogenous cofilin using targeted siRNA inhibits oxidant-induced apoptosis, which is restored by re-expression of wild-type cofilin but not by cofilin containing Cys to Ala mutations. Exposure of cofilin to TnCl results in intramolecular disulphide bonding and oxidation of Met residues to Met sulphoxide, but only Cys oxidation causes cofilin to induce mitochondrial damage. PMID:19734890

  7. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5'-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5'-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  8. Crystal structures of the apo and ATP bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis nitrogen regulatory PII protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, Nishant D.; Reddy, Manchi C.M.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Owen, Joshua L.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2010-10-11

    PII constitutes a family of signal transduction proteins that act as nitrogen sensors in microorganisms and plants. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has a single homologue of PII whose precise role has as yet not been explored. We have solved the crystal structures of the Mtb PII protein in its apo and ATP bound forms to 1.4 and 2.4 {angstrom} resolutions, respectively. The protein forms a trimeric assembly in the crystal lattice and folds similarly to the other PII family proteins. The Mtb PII:ATP binary complex structure reveals three ATP molecules per trimer, each bound between the base of the T-loop of one subunit and the C-loop of the neighboring subunit. In contrast to the apo structure, at least one subunit of the binary complex structure contains a completely ordered T-loop indicating that ATP binding plays a role in orienting this loop region towards target proteins like the ammonium transporter, AmtB. Arg38 of the T-loop makes direct contact with the {gamma}-phosphate of the ATP molecule replacing the Mg{sup 2+} position seen in the Methanococcus jannaschii GlnK1 structure. The C-loop of a neighboring subunit encloses the other side of the ATP molecule, placing the GlnK specific C-terminal 3{sub 10} helix in the vicinity. Homology modeling studies with the E. coli GlnK:AmtB complex reveal that Mtb PII could form a complex similar to the complex in E. coli. The structural conservation and operon organization suggests that the Mtb PII gene encodes for a GlnK protein and might play a key role in the nitrogen regulatory pathway.

  9. Expression of complement regulatory proteins on human natural killer cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Halliday, Deborah; Johnson, Peter M; Christmas, Stephen E

    2007-10-15

    The cell surface complement regulatory (CReg) proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 are widely distributed on human leucocytes and protect against complement-mediated damage. To investigate heterogeneity in CReg protein expression by human natural killer (NK) cells, levels were assessed on resting and activated NK cell subsets identified phenotypically on the basis of expression of CD56 and CD158 markers. Levels of all three CReg proteins on CD56+ cells were lower than on T cells (p<0.05). Freshly isolated CD56(bright) cells expressed higher levels of CD55 than CD56dim cells (p<0.05). CD158a+ cells expressed significantly lower levels of both CD46 and CD59, and CD158e+ cells expressed significantly lower levels of CD46, than CD158a(-) CD158e(-) cells, respectively (both p<0.05). Stimulation with PHA did not significantly alter NK cell surface CReg protein levels whereas, following culture with IL-2, CD46 and CD59 were decreased on both CD56bright and CD56dim subsets (p<0.05). In the case of CD59, this was independent of T cells. Only CD46 was significantly downregulated on CD158b+ (GL183+) and CD158e (NKB1+) subsets (p<0.05). However, culture in IL-15 significantly increased levels of all three CReg proteins. These observations that CReg proteins are downregulated on certain NK cell subsets following activation with IL-2 are opposite to previous findings for other leucocyte subpopulations. Activated NK cells may instead use other strategies for protection against complement-mediated damage in a local inflammatory response.

  10. Experimental detection of short regulatory motifs in eukaryotic proteins: tips for good practice as well as for bad.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Toby J; Dinkel, Holger; Van Roey, Kim; Diella, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    It has become clear in outline though not yet in detail how cellular regulatory and signalling systems are constructed. The essential machines are protein complexes that effect regulatory decisions by undergoing internal changes of state. Subcomponents of these cellular complexes are assembled into molecular switches. Many of these switches employ one or more short peptide motifs as toggles that can move between one or more sites within the switch system, the simplest being on-off switches. Paradoxically, these motif modules (termed short linear motifs or SLiMs) are both hugely abundant but difficult to research. So despite the many successes in identifying short regulatory protein motifs, it is thought that only the "tip of the iceberg" has been exposed. Experimental and bioinformatic motif discovery remain challenging and error prone. The advice presented in this article is aimed at helping researchers to uncover genuine protein motifs, whilst avoiding the pitfalls that lead to reports of false discovery. PMID:26581338

  11. Structural basis for regulation of rhizobial nodulation and symbiosis gene expression by the regulatory protein NolR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Goo; Krishnan, Hari B.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The symbiosis between rhizobial microbes and host plants involves the coordinated expression of multiple genes, which leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. As part of the transcriptional machinery for nodulation and symbiosis across a range of Rhizobium, NolR serves as a global regulatory protein. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structures of NolR in the unliganded form and complexed with two different 22-base pair (bp) double-stranded operator sequences (oligos AT and AA). Structural and biochemical analysis of NolR reveals protein–DNA interactions with an asymmetric operator site and defines a mechanism for conformational switching of a key residue (Gln56) to accommodate variation in target DNA sequences from diverse rhizobial genes for nodulation and symbiosis. This conformational switching alters the energetic contributions to DNA binding without changes in affinity for the target sequence. Two possible models for the role of NolR in the regulation of different nodulation and symbiosis genes are proposed. To our knowledge, these studies provide the first structural insight on the regulation of genes involved in the agriculturally and ecologically important symbiosis of microbes and plants that leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. PMID:24733893

  12. The potential function of steroid sulphatase activity in steroid production and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Teruo; Fujimoto, Seiichiro

    2004-01-01

    The first step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones is conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone. StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory) protein plays a crucial role in the intra-mitochondrial movement of cholesterol. STS (steroid sulphatase), which is present ubiquitously in mammalian tissues, including the placenta, adrenal gland, testis and ovary, desulphates a number of 3beta-hydroxysteroid sulphates, including cholesterol sulphate. The present study was designed to examine the effect of STS on StAR protein synthesis and steroidogenesis in cells. Steroidogenic activities of COS-1 cells that had been co-transfected with a vector for the cholesterol P450scc (cytochrome P450 side-chain-cleavage enzyme) system, named F2, a StAR expression vector (pStAR), and an STS expression vector (pSTS) were assayed. Whole-cell extracts were subjected to SDS/PAGE and then to Western blot analysis. pSTS co-expressed in COS-1 cells with F2 and pStAR increased pregnenolone synthesis 2-fold compared with that of co-expression with F2 and pStAR. Western blot analysis using COS-1 cells that had been co-transfected with pSTS, F2 and pStAR revealed that StAR protein levels increased, whereas STS and P450scc protein levels did not change. The amount of StAR protein translation products increased when pSTS was added to an in vitro transcription-translation reaction mixture. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the 37 kDa StAR pre-protein disappeared significantly ( P <0.01) more slowly in COS-1 cells that had been transfected with pSTS than in COS-1 cells that had not been transfected with pSTS. The increase in StAR protein level is not a result of an increase in StAR gene expression, but is a result of both an increase in translation and a longer half-life of the 37 kDa pre-StAR protein. In conclusion, STS increases StAR protein expression level and stimulates steroid production. PMID:14969586

  13. Different expression of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits in normal and neoplastic thyroid tissues.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Stefano; Vaira, Valentina; Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Vicentini, Leonardo; Bosari, Silvano; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Mantovani, Giovanna; Spada, Anna; Lania, Andrea G

    2015-04-01

    The four regulatory subunits (R1A, R1B, R2A, R2B) of protein kinase A (PKA) are differentially expressed in several cancer cell lines and exert distinct roles in both cell growth and cell differentiation control. Mutations of the PRKAR1A gene have been found in patients with Carney complex and in a minority of sporadic anaplastic thyroid carcinomas. The aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the expression of different PKA regulatory subunits in benign and non benign human thyroid tumours and to correlate their expression with clinical phenotype. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a significant increase in PRKAR2B expression in both differentiated and undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid tumors in comparison with normal thyroid tissues. Conversely, a significant increase in PRKAR1A expression was only demonstrated in undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas in comparison with normal thyroid tissue and differentiated thyroid tumors. In thyroid cancers without lymph nodal metastases PRKAR1A expression was higher in tumours of more than 2 cm in size (T2 and T3) compared to smaller ones (T1). In conclusion, our data shows that an increased PRKAR1A expression is associated with aggressive and undifferentiated thyroid tumors. PMID:25393625

  14. Arthritis protective regulatory potential of self–heat shock protein cross-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, Willem; Wendling, Uwe; Paul, Liesbeth; Prakken, Berent; van Kooten, Peter; van der Zee, Ruurd

    2000-01-01

    Immunization with heat shock proteins has protective effects in models of induced arthritis. Analysis has shown a reduced synovial inflammation in such protected animals. Adoptive transfer and immunization with selected T cell epitopes (synthetic peptides) have indicated the protection to be mediated by T cells directed to conserved hsp epitopes. This was shown first for mycobacterial hsp60 and later for mycobacterial hsp70. Fine specificity analysis showed that such T cells were cross-reactive with the homologous self hsp. Therefore protection by microbial hsp reactive T cells can be by cross-recognition of self hsp overexpressed in the inflamed tissue. Preimmunization with hsp leads to a relative expansion of such self hsp cross-responsive T cells. The regulatory nature of such T cells may originate from mucosal tolerance maintained by commensal flora derived hsp or from partial activation through recognition of self hsp as a partial agonist (Altered Peptide Ligand) or in the absence of proper costimulation. Recently, we reported the selective upregulation of B7.2 on microbial hsp60 specific T cells in response to self hsp60. Through a preferred interaction with CTLA-4 on proinflammatory T cells this may constitute an effector mechanism of regulation. Also, regulatory T cells produced IL10. PMID:11189451

  15. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  16. Insights on regulation and function of the iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Guohua; Filebeen, Carine; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2008-01-01

    Iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) controls the translation or stability of several mRNAs by binding to iron responsive elements (IREs) within their untranslated regions. Its activity is regulated by an unusual iron-sulfur cluster (ICS) switch. Thus, in iron-replete cells, IRP1 assembles a cubane [4Fe-4S] cluster that prevents RNA-binding activity and renders the protein to cytosolic aconitase. We show that wild type or mutant forms of IRP1 that fail to assemble a [4Fe-4S] cluster are sensitized for iron-dependent degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The regulation of IRP1 abundance poses an alternative mechanism to prevent accumulation of inappropriately high IRE-binding activity when the ICS assembly pathway is impaired. To study functional aspects of IRP1, we overexpressed wild type or mutant forms of the protein in human H1299 lung cancer cells in a tetracycline-inducible fashion, and analyzed how this affects cell growth. While the induction of IRP1 did not affect cell proliferation in culture, it dramatically reduced the capacity of the cells to form solid tumor xenografts in nude mice. These data provide a first link between IRP1 and cancer.

  17. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  18. Leishmania donovani engages in regulatory interference by targeting macrophage protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1.

    PubMed

    Nandan, Devki; Reiner, Neil E

    2005-03-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus leishmania are obligate intracellular parasites of monocytes and macrophages. These pathogens have evolved to invade the mammalian immune system and typically survive for long periods of time. Leishmania have developed a variety of remarkable strategies to prevent their elimination by both innate and acquired immune effector mechanisms. One particular strategy of interest involves manipulation of host cell regulatory pathways so as to prevent macrophage activation required for efficient microbicidal activity. These interference mechanisms are the main focus of this review. Several lines of evidence have been developed to show that the Src homology-2 domain containing tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) becomes activated in leishmania-infected cells and that this contributes to disease pathogenesis. Recent studies aimed at understanding the mechanism responsible for the change in activation state of SHP-1 led to the identification of leishmania EF-1alpha as an SHP-1 binding protein and SHP-1 activator. This was a surprising finding given that this ubiquitous and highly conserved protein plays an essential role in protein translation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The role of leishmania EF-1alpha as an SHP-1 activator and its contribution to pathogenesis are reviewed with particular attention to the properties that distinguish it from host EF-1alpha. PMID:15721837

  19. Paired receptor specificity explained by structures of signal regulatory proteins alone and complexed with CD47.

    PubMed

    Hatherley, Deborah; Graham, Stephen C; Turner, Jessie; Harlos, Karl; Stuart, David I; Barclay, A Neil

    2008-07-25

    CD47 is a widely distributed cell-surface protein that acts a marker of self through interactions of myeloid and neural cells. We describe the high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures of the immunoglobulin superfamily domain of CD47 alone and in complex with the N-terminal ligand-binding domain of signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPalpha). The unusual and convoluted interacting face of CD47, comprising the N terminus and loops at the end of the domain, intercalates with the corresponding regions in SIRPalpha. We have also determined structures of the N-terminal domains of SIRPbeta, SIRPbeta(2), and SIRPgamma; proteins that are closely related to SIRPalpha but bind CD47 with negligible or reduced affinity. These results explain the specificity of CD47 for the SIRP family of paired receptors in atomic detail. Analysis of SIRPalpha polymorphisms suggests that these, as well as the activating SIRPs, may have evolved to counteract pathogen binding to the inhibitory SIRPalpha receptor.

  20. Structure of the Yeast Polarity Protein Sro7 Reveals a SNARE Regulatory Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Hattendorf, D.A.; Andreeva, A.; Gangar, A.; Brennwald, P.J.; Weis, W.I.; /Stanford U., Med. School /North Carolina U.

    2007-07-09

    Polarized exocytosis requires coordination between the actin cytoskeleton and the exocytic machinery responsible for fusion of secretory vesicles at specific sites on the plasma membrane. Fusion requires formation of a complex between a vesicle-bound R-SNARE and plasma membrane Qa, Qb and Qc SNARE proteins. Proteins in the lethal giant larvae protein family, including lethal giant larvae and tomosyn in metazoans and Sro7 in yeast, interact with Q-SNAREs and are emerging as key regulators of polarized exocytosis. The crystal structure of Sro7 reveals two seven-bladed WD40 {beta}-propellers followed by a 60-residue-long 'tail', which is bound to the surface of the amino-terminal propeller. Deletion of the Sro7 tail enables binding to the Qbc SNARE region of Sec9 and this interaction inhibits SNARE complex assembly. The N-terminal domain of Sec9 provides a second, high-affinity Sro7 interaction that is unaffected by the tail. The results suggest that Sro7 acts as an allosteric regulator of exocytosis through interactions with factors that control the tail. Sequence alignments indicate that lethal giant larvae and tomosyn have a two-{beta}-propeller fold similar to that of Sro7, but only tomosyn appears to retain the regulatory tail.

  1. Ca2+-regulatory muscle proteins in the alcohol-fed rat.

    PubMed

    Ohlendieck, Kay; Harmon, Shona; Koll, Michael; Paice, Alistair G; Preedy, Victor R

    2003-09-01

    Alcoholic myopathy is characterized by muscle weakness and difficulties in gait and locomotion. It is one of the most prevalent skeletal muscle disorders in the Western hemisphere, affecting between 40% and 60% of all chronic alcohol misusers. However, the pathogenic mechanisms are unknown, although recent studies have suggested that membrane defects occur as a consequence of chronic alcohol exposure. It was our hypothesis that alcohol ingestion perturbs membrane-located proteins associated with intracellular signalling and contractility, in particular those relating to calcium homeostasis. To test this, we fed male Wistar rats nutritionally complete liquid diets containing ethanol as 35% of total dietary energy. Controls were pair-fed identical amounts of the same diet in which ethanol was replaced by isocaloric glucose. At the end of 6 weeks, rats were killed and skeletal muscles dissected. These were used to determine important ion-regulatory skeletal muscle proteins including sarcalumenin (SAR), sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) (SERCA1), the junctional face protein of 90 kd (90-JFP), alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-dihydropyridine receptor (alpha(1)-DHPR and alpha(2)-DHPR), and calsequestrin (CSQ) by immunoblotting. The relative abundance of microsomal proteins was determined by immunoblotting using the enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL) technique. The data showed that alcohol-feeding significantly reduced gastrocnemius and hind limb muscle weights (P <.05 in both instances). Concomitant changes included increases in the relative amounts of SERCA1 (P <.05) and Ca(2+)-ATPase activity (P <.025). However, there were no statistically significant changes in either SAR, 90-JFP, alpha(1)-DHPR or alpha(2)-DHPR (P >.2 in all instances). Reductions in CSQ were of marginal significance (P =.0950). We conclude that upregulation of SERCA1 protein and Ca(2+)-ATPase activity may be an adaptive mechanism and/or a contributory process in the

  2. The selective phosphorylation of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor-activated signal transduction pathways regulate the responsiveness of cells to external stimuli. These transduction pathways themselves are subject to regulation, most commonly by phosphorylation. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G Proteins), as requisite signal transducing elements for many plasma membrane receptors, are considered likely targets for regulation by phosphorylation. Protein kinase C (PKC) has been shown to phosphorylate the {alpha} subunit of G{sub i} and other G proteins in solution. However, the occurrence of the phosphorylation of G{sub 1} within intact cells in response to activation of PKC has not been rigorously demonstrated. In this thesis, the extent to which the {alpha} subunits of G{sub i} undergo phosphorylation within human platelets in response to activation of PKC was examined by means of radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation. Incubation of platelets with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a potent activator of PKC, promoted the phosphorylation of several proteins within saponin-permeabilized and intact platelets incubated with ({gamma}{sup 32}P)ATP and ({sup 32}P)H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, respectively. None of the phosphoproteins, however, were precipitated by either of two antisera containing antibodies differing in specificities for epitopes within G{sub i{alpha}}-despite precipitation of a substantial fraction of the subunit itself. In contrast, other antisera, containing antibodies specific for the recently describe G{sub z{alpha}}, or antibodies for both G{sub z{alpha}} and G{sub i{alpha}}, precipitated a 40-kDa phosphoprotein.

  3. Protein kinase CK2 enables regulatory T cells to suppress excessive TH2 responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ulges, Alexander; Klein, Matthias; Reuter, Sebastian; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Hoffmann, Markus; Grebe, Nadine; Staudt, Valérie; Stergiou, Natascha; Bohn, Toszka; Brühl, Till-Julius; Muth, Sabine; Yurugi, Hajime; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Bellinghausen, Iris; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Hahn, Susanne; Reißig, Sonja; Haben, Irma; Zipp, Frauke; Waisman, Ari; Probst, Hans-Christian; Beilhack, Andreas; Buchou, Thierry; Filhol-Cochet, Odile; Boldyreff, Brigitte; Breloer, Minka; Jonuleit, Helmut; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Bopp, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    The quality of the adaptive immune response depends on the differentiation of distinct CD4(+) helper T cell subsets, and the magnitude of an immune response is controlled by CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells). However, how a tissue- and cell type-specific suppressor program of Treg cells is mechanistically orchestrated has remained largely unexplored. Through the use of Treg cell-specific gene targeting, we found that the suppression of allergic immune responses in the lungs mediated by T helper type 2 (TH2) cells was dependent on the activity of the protein kinase CK2. Genetic ablation of the β-subunit of CK2 specifically in Treg cells resulted in the proliferation of a hitherto-unexplored ILT3(+) Treg cell subpopulation that was unable to control the maturation of IRF4(+)PD-L2(+) dendritic cells required for the development of TH2 responses in vivo.

  4. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) as regulatory factors of hepatic apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kewei; Lin, Bingliang

    2013-10-01

    IAPs are a group of regulatory proteins that are structurally related. Their conserved homologues have been identified in various organisms. In human, eight IAP members have been recognized based on baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR) domains. IAPs are key regulators of apoptosis, cytokinesis and signal transduction. The antiapoptotic property of IAPs depends on their professional role for caspases. IAPs are functionally non-equivalent and regulate effector caspases through distinct mechanisms. IAPs impede apoptotic process via membrane receptor-dependent (extrinsic) cascade and mitochondrial dependent (intrinsic) pathway. IAP-mediated apoptosis affects the progression of liver diseases. Therapeutic options of liver diseases may depend on the understanding toward mechanisms of the IAP-mediated apoptosis.

  5. Properties of Sequence Conservation in Upstream Regulatory and Protein Coding Sequences among Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Dale N.; Wiehe, Thomas

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) has catalyzed the formation of new species, genes with novel functions, altered expression patterns, complexified signaling pathways and has provided organisms a level of genetic robustness. We studied the long-term evolution and interrelationships of 5’ upstream regulatory sequences (URSs), protein coding sequences (CDSs) and expression correlations (EC) of duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis. Three distinct methods revealed significant evolutionary conservation between paralogous URSs and were highly correlated with microarray-based expression correlation of the respective gene pairs. Positional information on exact matches between sequences unveiled the contribution of micro-chromosomal rearrangements on expression divergence. A three-way rank analysis of URS similarity, CDS divergence and EC uncovered specific gene functional biases. Transcription factor activity was associated with gene pairs exhibiting conserved URSs and divergent CDSs, whereas a broad array of metabolic enzymes was found to be associated with gene pairs showing diverged URSs but conserved CDSs.

  6. Protein phosphatase 2A is requisite for the function of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Apostolidis, Sokratis A.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Noé; Suárez-Fueyo, Abel; Dioufa, Nikolina; Ozcan, Esra; Crispín, José C.; Tsokos, Maria G.; Tsokos, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Immune homeostasis depends on the proper function of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Compromised Treg cell suppressive activity leads to autoimmune disease, graft rejection and promotes anti-tumor immunity. Here we report the previously unrecognized requirement of the serine/threonine phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) for the function of Treg cells. Treg cells exhibited high PP2A activity and Treg cell-specific ablation of the PP2A complex resulted in a severe, multi-organ, lymphoproliferative autoimmune disorder. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that PP2A associates with components of the mTOR pathway and suppresses mTORC1 activity. In the absence of PP2A, Treg cells altered their metabolic and cytokine profile and were unable to suppress effector immune responses. Therefore, PP2A is requisite for the function of Treg cells and the prevention of autoimmunity. PMID:26974206

  7. The reduced soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 and regulatory T cells in acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Li, Ting; Huang, Shiyuan; Long, Rui; You, Ya; Liu, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2, sfgl2, is the new effector of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cell (Treg) and exerts immunosuppressive activity. We design this study to investigate the possible role of sfgl2 in atherosclerosis. A total of 58 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, together with 22 stable angina (SA) patients and 31 normal coronary artery (NCA) people were enrolled in our study. Serum level of sfgl2 and plasma level of Treg were respectively measured. In line with the change of Treg, serum level of sfgl2 in ACS (8.70 ng/mL) was significantly decreased (P = 0.003), compared with that in SA (11.86 ng/mL) and NCA (17.55 ng/mL). Both sfgl2 and Treg level were obviously decreased in ACS; Sfgl2 may play a protective role in atherosclerosis. PMID:26515143

  8. Evolutionary Adaptation of an AraC-Like Regulatory Protein in Citrobacter rodentium and Escherichia Species

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Aimee; Petty, Nicola K.; Hocking, Dianna; Bennett-Wood, Vicki; Wakefield, Matthew; Praszkier, Judyta; Tauschek, Marija; Yang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of pathogenic bacteria is a multifaceted and complex process, which is strongly influenced by the horizontal acquisition of genetic elements and their subsequent expression in their new hosts. A well-studied example is the RegA regulon of the enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. The RegA regulatory protein is a member of the AraC/XylS superfamily, which coordinates the expression of a gene repertoire that is necessary for full pathogenicity of this murine pathogen. Upon stimulation by an exogenous, gut-associated signal, namely, bicarbonate ions, RegA activates the expression of a series of genes, including virulence factors, such as autotransporters, fimbriae, a dispersin-like protein, and the grlRA operon on the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island. Interestingly, the genes encoding RegA homologues are distributed across the genus Escherichia, encompassing pathogenic and nonpathogenic subtypes. In this study, we carried out a series of bioinformatic, transcriptional, and functional analyses of the RegA regulons of these bacteria. Our results demonstrated that regA has been horizontally transferred to Escherichia spp. and C. rodentium. Comparative studies of two RegA homologues, namely, those from C. rodentium and E. coli SMS-3-5, a multiresistant environmental strain of E. coli, showed that the two regulators acted similarly in vitro but differed in terms of their abilities to activate the virulence of C. rodentium in vivo, which evidently was due to their differential activation of grlRA. Our data indicate that RegA from C. rodentium has strain-specific adaptations that facilitate infection of its murine host. These findings shed new light on the development of virulence by C. rodentium and on the evolution of virulence-regulatory genes of bacterial pathogens in general. PMID:25624355

  9. Evolutionary adaptation of an AraC-like regulatory protein in Citrobacter rodentium and Escherichia species.

    PubMed

    Tan, Aimee; Petty, Nicola K; Hocking, Dianna; Bennett-Wood, Vicki; Wakefield, Matthew; Praszkier, Judyta; Tauschek, Marija; Yang, Ji; Robins-Browne, Roy

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of pathogenic bacteria is a multifaceted and complex process, which is strongly influenced by the horizontal acquisition of genetic elements and their subsequent expression in their new hosts. A well-studied example is the RegA regulon of the enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. The RegA regulatory protein is a member of the AraC/XylS superfamily, which coordinates the expression of a gene repertoire that is necessary for full pathogenicity of this murine pathogen. Upon stimulation by an exogenous, gut-associated signal, namely, bicarbonate ions, RegA activates the expression of a series of genes, including virulence factors, such as autotransporters, fimbriae, a dispersin-like protein, and the grlRA operon on the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island. Interestingly, the genes encoding RegA homologues are distributed across the genus Escherichia, encompassing pathogenic and nonpathogenic subtypes. In this study, we carried out a series of bioinformatic, transcriptional, and functional analyses of the RegA regulons of these bacteria. Our results demonstrated that regA has been horizontally transferred to Escherichia spp. and C. rodentium. Comparative studies of two RegA homologues, namely, those from C. rodentium and E. coli SMS-3-5, a multiresistant environmental strain of E. coli, showed that the two regulators acted similarly in vitro but differed in terms of their abilities to activate the virulence of C. rodentium in vivo, which evidently was due to their differential activation of grlRA. Our data indicate that RegA from C. rodentium has strain-specific adaptations that facilitate infection of its murine host. These findings shed new light on the development of virulence by C. rodentium and on the evolution of virulence-regulatory genes of bacterial pathogens in general.

  10. Biosafety, biosecurity and internationally mandated regulatory regimes: compliance mechanisms for education and global health security

    PubMed Central

    Sture, Judi; Whitby, Simon; Perkins, Dana

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights the biosafety and biosecurity training obligations that three international regulatory regimes place upon states parties. The duty to report upon the existence of such provisions as evidence of compliance is discussed in relation to each regime. We argue that such mechanisms can be regarded as building blocks for the development and delivery of complementary biosafety and biosecurity teaching and training materials. We show that such building blocks represent foundations upon which life and associated scientists – through greater awareness of biosecurity concerns – can better fulfil their responsibilities to guard their work from misuse in the future. PMID:24494580

  11. Global Risk Assessment of Aflatoxins in Maize and Peanuts: Are Regulatory Standards Adequately Protective?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America. PMID:23761295

  12. Global risk assessment of aflatoxins in maize and peanuts: are regulatory standards adequately protective?

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Stacy, Shaina L; Kensler, Thomas W

    2013-09-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America.

  13. Regulatory mechanisms that modulate signalling by G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, S K; Grady, E F; Bunnett, N W

    1997-01-01

    The large and functionally diverse group of G-protein-coupled receptors includes receptors for many different signalling molecules, including peptide and non-peptide hormones and neuro-transmitters, chemokines, prostanoids and proteinases. Their principal function is to transmit information about the extracellular environment to the interior of the cell by interacting with the heterotrimeric G-proteins, and they thereby participate in many aspects of regulation. Cellular responses to agonists of these receptors are usually rapidly attenuated. Mechanisms of signal attenuation include removal of agonists from the extracellular fluid, receptor desensitization, endocytosis and down-regulation. Agonists are removed by dilution, uptake by transporters and enzymic degradation. Receptor desensitization is mediated by receptor phosphorylation by G-protein receptor kinases and second-messenger kinases, interaction of phosphorylated receptors with arrestins and receptor uncoupling from G-proteins. Agonist-induced receptor endocytosis also contributes to desensitization by depleting the cell surface of high-affinity receptors, and recycling of internalized receptors contributes to resensitization of cellular responses. Receptor down-regulation is a form of desensitization that occurs during continuous, long-term exposure of cells to receptor agonists. Down-regulation, which may occur during the development of drug tolerance, is characterized by depletion of the cellular receptor content, and is probably mediated by alterations in the rates of receptor degradation and synthesis. These regulatory mechanisms are important, as they govern the ability of cells to respond to agonists. A greater understanding of the mechanisms that modulate signalling may lead to the development of new therapies and may help to explain the mechanism of drug tolerance. PMID:9078236

  14. Global Analysis of Protein Activities Using Proteome Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Heng; Bilgin, Metin; Bangham, Rhonda; Hall, David; Casamayor, Antonio; Bertone, Paul; Lan, Ning; Jansen, Ronald; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Houfek, Thomas; Mitchell, Tom; Miller, Perry; Dean, Ralph A.; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2001-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the yeast proteome, we cloned 5800 open reading frames and overexpressed and purified their corresponding proteins. The proteins were printed onto slides at high spatial density to form a yeast proteome microarray and screened for their ability to interact with proteins and phospholipids. We identified many new calmodulin- and phospholipid-interacting proteins; a common potential binding motif was identified for many of the calmodulin-binding proteins. Thus, microarrays of an entire eukaryotic proteome can be prepared and screened for diverse biochemical activities. The microarrays can also be used to screen protein-drug interactions and to detect posttranslational modifications.

  15. Dynamic Localization of Glucokinase and Its Regulatory Protein in Hypothalamic Tanycytes

    PubMed Central

    Ordenes, Patricio; Millán, Carola; Yañez, María José; Llanos, Paula; Villagra, Marcos; Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Martínez, Fernando; Nualart, Francisco; Uribe, Elena; de los Angeles García-Robles, María

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic β cells, is also expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, which cover the ventricular walls of the basal hypothalamus and are implicated in an indirect control of neuronal activity by glucose. Previously, we demonstrated that GK was preferentially localized in tanycyte nuclei in euglycemic rats, which has been reported in hepatocytes and is suggestive of the presence of the GK regulatory protein, GKRP. In the present study, GK intracellular localization in hypothalamic and hepatic tissues of the same rats under several glycemic conditions was compared using confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In the hypothalamus, increased GK nuclear localization was observed in hyperglycemic conditions; however, it was primarily localized in the cytoplasm in hepatic tissue under the same conditions. Both GK and GKRP were next cloned from primary cultures of tanycytes. Expression of GK by Escherichia coli revealed a functional cooperative protein with a S0.5 of 10 mM. GKRP, expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inhibited GK activity in vitro with a Ki 0.2 µM. We also demonstrated increased nuclear reactivity of both GK and GKRP in response to high glucose concentrations in tanycyte cultures. These data were confirmed using Western blot analysis of nuclear extracts. Results indicate that GK undergoes short-term regulation by nuclear compartmentalization. Thus, in tanycytes, GK can act as a molecular switch to arrest cellular responses to increased glucose. PMID:24739934

  16. Retinoid regulated macrophage cholesterol efflux involves the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Pulak R.

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of excess cholesteryl esters from macrophage-derived foam cells is known to be a key process in limiting plaque stability and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux is influenced by liver X receptor (LXR) signaling in mouse macrophages (Manna, P.R. et al., 2015, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 464:312-317). The data presented in this article evaluate the importance of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in retinoid mediated macrophage cholesterol efflux. Overexpression of StAR in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages increased the effects of both all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA on cholesterol efflux, suggesting StAR enhances the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and/or retinoid X receptor (RXR) ligands. Additional data revealed that atRA enhances (Bu)2cAMP induced StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 protein levels. Treatment of macrophages transfected with an LXRE reporter plasmid (pLXREx3-Luc) was found to induce the effects of RAR and RXR analogs on LXR activity. PMID:27081671

  17. Activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 is inhibited by the influenza A virus NS1 protein.

    PubMed

    Talon, J; Horvath, C M; Polley, R; Basler, C F; Muster, T; Palese, P; García-Sastre, A

    2000-09-01

    We present a novel mechanism by which viruses may inhibit the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) cascade. The double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein NS1 of influenza virus is shown to prevent the potent antiviral interferon response by inhibiting the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), a key regulator of IFN-alpha/beta gene expression. IRF-3 activation and, as a consequence, IFN-beta mRNA induction are inhibited in wild-type (PR8) influenza virus-infected cells but not in cells infected with an isogenic virus lacking the NS1 gene (delNS1 virus). Furthermore, NS1 is shown to be a general inhibitor of the interferon signaling pathway. Inhibition of IRF-3 activation can be achieved by the expression of wild-type NS1 in trans, not only in delNS1 virus-infected cells but also in cells infected with a heterologous RNA virus (Newcastle disease virus). We propose that inhibition of IRF-3 activation by a dsRNA binding protein significantly contributes to the virulence of influenza A viruses and possibly to that of other viruses.

  18. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  19. Identification of RNA-binding surfaces in iron regulatory protein-1.

    PubMed

    Kaldy, P; Menotti, E; Moret, R; Kühn, L C

    1999-11-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA translation and stability in iron metabolism involves the interaction between the trans-acting cytoplasmic iron regulatory proteins (IRP-1 and IRP-2) and cis-acting iron-responsive elements (IREs) in mRNA 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions. IRP-1 can adopt two conformations: one with a [4Fe-4S]-cluster, unable to bind IREs, which functions as a cytoplasmic aconitase; one lacking this cluster, which accumulates in iron-deprived cells and binds mRNA firmly. We investigated which surfaces of IRP-1 interact with IREs. Surface areas were predicted on the basis of the crystallized porcine mitochondrial aconitase structure. We selected nine sequences absent or different in mitochondrial and Escherichia coli aconitases, both being devoid of RNA-binding properties. Mutations in two regions of domain 4 of IRP-1 lowered the affinity for a wild-type IRE up to 7-fold in vitro, whereas the aconitase activity, a control for structural integrity, was not affected. Scatchard plot analysis with mutant IREs indicated that domain 4 is involved in the binding specificity. This conclusion was confirmed with hybrid proteins in which IRP-1 surface loops were grafted into IRP-2. The results indicate that arginines 728 and 732 contact the IRE bulge, whereas region 685-689 is necessary for recognition of the IRE loop. PMID:10545118

  20. Global trade and assisted reproductive technologies: regulatory challenges in international surrogacy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erin

    2013-01-01

    International surrogacy is an increasingly common phenomenon and an important global health challenge. Legal rules are a key consideration for the participants in international surrogacy arrangements. In some cases the law can help to resolve the complex issues that arise in this context, but it is important to consider the role played by law in contributing to the complex conflicts that such arrangements can generate.

  1. Can the FDA improve oversight of foreign clinical trials?: Closing the information gap and moving towards a globalized regulatory scheme.

    PubMed

    Ourso, André

    2012-01-01

    Currently, pharmaceutical companies' utilization of foreign clinical trial data is a ubiquitous and indispensable aspect of gaining approval to market drugs in the United States. Cost benefits, a larger pool of ready volunteer subjects, and greater efficiency in clinical testing are some of the reasons for conducting clinical trials overseas. Despite these advantages, lack of proper oversight may have serious public health implications regarding the integrity of clinical research, ethical treatment of human subjects, and drug safety. Due to the expansive global nature of foreign clinical trials, there are concerns with the FDA's ability to monitor and regulate these trials. This article examines the FDA's oversight of foreign clinical trials and the agency's limitations regulating these trials. In addition to looking at steps the FDA is taking to address these limitations, the article examines other potential regulatory and cooperative actions that can be taken to effectively monitor foreign clinical trials and to ensure data integrity and patient safety. PMID:22606923

  2. Can the FDA improve oversight of foreign clinical trials?: Closing the information gap and moving towards a globalized regulatory scheme.

    PubMed

    Ourso, André

    2012-01-01

    Currently, pharmaceutical companies' utilization of foreign clinical trial data is a ubiquitous and indispensable aspect of gaining approval to market drugs in the United States. Cost benefits, a larger pool of ready volunteer subjects, and greater efficiency in clinical testing are some of the reasons for conducting clinical trials overseas. Despite these advantages, lack of proper oversight may have serious public health implications regarding the integrity of clinical research, ethical treatment of human subjects, and drug safety. Due to the expansive global nature of foreign clinical trials, there are concerns with the FDA's ability to monitor and regulate these trials. This article examines the FDA's oversight of foreign clinical trials and the agency's limitations regulating these trials. In addition to looking at steps the FDA is taking to address these limitations, the article examines other potential regulatory and cooperative actions that can be taken to effectively monitor foreign clinical trials and to ensure data integrity and patient safety.

  3. Phage phi 29 regulatory protein p4 stabilizes the binding of the RNA polymerase to the late promoter in a process involving direct protein-protein contacts.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1992-12-01

    Transcription from the late promoter, PA3, of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 is activated by the viral regulatory protein p4. A kinetic analysis of the activation process has revealed that the role of protein p4 is to stabilize the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter as a closed complex without significantly affecting further steps of the initiation process. Electrophoretic band-shift assays performed with a DNA fragment spanning only the protein p4 binding site showed that RNA polymerase could efficiently retard the complex formed by protein p4 bound to the DNA. Similarly, when a DNA fragment containing only the RNA polymerase-binding region of PA3 was used, p4 greatly stimulated the binding of RNA polymerase to the DNA. These results strongly suggest that p4 and RNA polymerase contact each other at the PA3 promoter. In the light of current knowledge of the p4 activation mechanism, we propose that direct contacts between the two proteins participate in the activation process.

  4. Overexpression of iron regulatory protein 1 suppresses growth of tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guohua; Fillebeen, Carine; Wang, Jian; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2007-04-01

    Iron is essential for proliferation of normal and neoplastic cells. Cellular iron uptake, utilization and storage are regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that the disruption of iron homeostasis may modulate the growth properties of cancer cells. To address this, we employed H1299 lung cancer cells engineered for tetracycline-inducible overexpression of the post-transcriptional regulator iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1). The induction of IRP1 (wild-type or the constitutive IRP1(C437S) mutant) did not affect the proliferation of the cells in culture, and only modestly reduced their efficiency to form colonies in soft agar. However, IRP1 dramatically impaired the capacity of the cells to form solid tumor xenografts in nude mice. Tumors derived from IRP1-transfectants were <20% in size compared to those from parent cells. IRP1 coordinately controls the expression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) within their mRNAs. Biochemical analysis revealed high expression of epitope-tagged IRP1 in tumor tissue, which was associated with a profound increase in IRE-binding activity. As expected, this response misregulated iron metabolism by increasing TfR1 levels. Surprisingly, IRP1 failed to suppress ferritin expression and did not affect the levels of the iron transporter ferroportin. Our results show that the overexpression of IRP1 is associated with an apparent tumor suppressor phenotype and provide a direct regulatory link between the IRE/IRP system and cancer.

  5. Nitric oxide-mediated modulation of iron regulatory proteins: implication for cellular iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangwon; Ponka, Prem

    2002-01-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) that are located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and the 5' UTR of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to IREs and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO(.), a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP1 RNA-binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels and a decrease in ferritin synthesis. We have shown that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO(+) (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA-binding of IRP2, followed by IRP2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and a dramatic increase in ferritin synthesis. Moreover, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP1 binding activity, whereas RNA-binding of IRP2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Furthermore, the decrease of IRP2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and an increase in ferritin synthesis in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that NO(+)-mediated degradation of IRP2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  6. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Regulates the Expression of Small GTPase Regulatory Proteins GEFs, GAPs, and GDI

    PubMed Central

    Laukkanen, Mikko O.; Cammarota, Francesca; Esposito, Tiziana; Salvatore, Marco; Castellone, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3), which catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide at the cell membranes, regulates the cellular growth in a dose-dependent manner. This enzyme induces primary cell proliferation and immortalization at low expression levels whereas it activates cancer barrier signaling through the p53-p21 pathway at high expression levels, causing growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. Because previous reports suggested that the SOD3–induced reduction in the rates of cellular growth and migration also occurred in the absence of functional p53 signaling, in the current study we investigated the SOD3-induced growth-suppressive mechanisms in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Based on our data, the robust over-expression of SOD3 increased the level of phosphorylation of the EGFR, ERBB2, RYK, ALK, FLT3, and EPHA10 receptor tyrosine kinases with the consequent downstream activation of the SRC, FYN, YES, HCK, and LYN kinases. However, pull-down experiments focusing on the small GTPase RAS, RAC, CDC42, and RHO revealed a reduced level of growth and migration signal transduction, such as the lack of stimulation of the mitogen pathway, in the SOD3 over-expressing cells, which was confirmed by MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 Western blotting analysis. Interestingly, the mRNA expression analyses indicated that SOD3 regulated the expression of guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (RHO GEF16, RAL GEF RGL1), GTPase-activating proteins (ARFGAP ADAP2, RAS GAP RASAL1, RGS4), and a Rho guanine nucleotide-disassociation inhibitor (RHO GDI 2) in a dose dependent manner, thus controlling signaling through the small G protein GTPases. Therefore, our current data may suggest the occurrence of dose-dependent SOD3–driven control of the GTP loading of small G proteins indicating a novel growth regulatory mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:25751262

  7. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in the human corpus luteum throughout the luteal phase.

    PubMed

    Devoto, L; Kohen, P; Gonzalez, R R; Castro, O; Retamales, I; Vega, M; Carvallo, P; Christenson, L K; Strauss, J F

    2001-11-01

    The expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in the human corpus luteum (CL) was examined throughout the luteal phase. The primary 1.6-kb StAR transcript was in greater abundance in early (3.1-fold) and mid (2.2-fold) luteal phase CL compared with late luteal phase CL. The larger StAR transcript (4.4 kb) was found in early and midluteal phase CL, but was not detected in late luteal phase specimens. Mature StAR protein (30 kDa) was present in lower amounts within late CL compared with early and midluteal phase CL. The StAR preprotein (37 kDa) was also detected in greater abundance in early and midluteal CL. Immunohistochemistry revealed that StAR staining was most prominent in thecal-lutein cells throughout the luteal phase. The intensity of the signal for StAR exhibited significant changes throughout the luteal phase, being most intense during the midluteal phase and least during the late luteal phase. Plasma progesterone concentrations were highly correlated (r = 0.73 and r = 0.79) with luteal expression of the preprotein and mature StAR isoforms, respectively, throughout the luteal phase. To examine the LH dependency of StAR expression, the GnRH antagonist, Cetrorelix, was administered during the midluteal phase. Cetrorelix caused a decline in serum LH levels within 2 h, which, in turn, caused a pronounced decline in plasma progesterone within 6 h. The StAR 4.4-kb transcript was not detectable, and the 1.6-kb transcript was reduced by approximately 50% within 24 h of Cetrorelix treatment. The mature 30-kDa StAR protein level declined approximately 30% after Cetrorelix treatment. We conclude that 1) StAR mRNA and protein are highly expressed in early and midluteal phase CL; 2) StAR protein is present in both thecal-lutein and granulosa-lutein cells throughout the luteal phase; 3) StAR protein levels in the CL are highly correlated with plasma progesterone levels; 4) declining StAR mRNA and protein levels are characteristic of late luteal

  8. A Common Missense Variant in the Glucokinase Regulatory Protein Gene (GCKR) Is Associated with Increased Plasma Triglyceride and C-Reactive Protein but Lower Fasting Glucose Concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE-Using the genome-wide-association approach, we recently identified the glucokinase regulatory protein gene (GCKR, rs780094) region as a novel quantitative trait locus for plasma triglyceride concentration in Europeans. Here, we sought to study the association of GCKR variants with metaboli...

  9. In Bacillus subtilis LutR is part of the global complex regulatory network governing the adaptation to the transition from exponential growth to stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Irigül-Sönmez, Öykü; Köroğlu, Türkan E; Öztürk, Büşra; Kovács, Ákos T; Kuipers, Oscar P; Yazgan-Karataş, Ayten

    2014-02-01

    The lutR gene, encoding a product resembling a GntR-family transcriptional regulator, has previously been identified as a gene required for the production of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin in Bacillus subtilis. To understand the broader regulatory roles of LutR in B. subtilis, we studied the genome-wide effects of a lutR null mutation by combining transcriptional profiling studies using DNA microarrays, reverse transcription quantitative PCR, lacZ fusion analyses and gel mobility shift assays. We report that 65 transcriptional units corresponding to 23 mono-cistronic units and 42 operons show altered expression levels in lutR mutant cells, as compared with lutR(+) wild-type cells in early stationary phase. Among these, 11 single genes and 25 operons are likely to be under direct control of LutR. The products of these genes are involved in a variety of physiological processes associated with the onset of stationary phase in B. subtilis, including degradative enzyme production, antibiotic production and resistance, carbohydrate utilization and transport, nitrogen metabolism, phosphate uptake, fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, protein synthesis and translocation, cell-wall metabolism, energy production, transfer of mobile genetic elements, induction of phage-related genes, sporulation, delay of sporulation and cannibalism, and biofilm formation. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay performed in the presence of both SinR and LutR revealed a close overlap between the LutR and SinR targets. Our data also revealed a significant overlap with the AbrB regulon. Together, these findings reveal that LutR is part of the global complex, interconnected regulatory systems governing adaptation of bacteria to the transition from exponential growth to stationary phase. PMID:24196425

  10. Global Analysis of Palmitoylated Proteins in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Foe, Ian T; Child, Matthew A; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Krishnamurthy, Shruthi; van der Linden, Wouter A; Ward, Gary E; Martin, Brent R; Bogyo, Matthew

    2015-10-14

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as palmitoylation are critical for the lytic cycle of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. While palmitoylation is involved in invasion, motility, and cell morphology, the proteins that utilize this PTM remain largely unknown. Using a chemical proteomic approach, we report a comprehensive analysis of palmitoylated proteins in T. gondii, identifying a total of 282 proteins, including cytosolic, membrane-associated, and transmembrane proteins. From this large set of palmitoylated targets, we validate palmitoylation of proteins involved in motility (myosin light chain 1, myosin A), cell morphology (PhIL1), and host cell invasion (apical membrane antigen 1, AMA1). Further studies reveal that blocking AMA1 palmitoylation enhances the release of AMA1 and other invasion-related proteins from apical secretory organelles, suggesting a previously unrecognized role for AMA1. These findings suggest that palmitoylation is ubiquitous throughout the T. gondii proteome and reveal insights into the biology of this important human pathogen.

  11. Global identification of the genetic networks and cis-regulatory elements of the cold response in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Mingli; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Jinfeng; Niu, Hongbo; Liu, Yimeng; Wu, Zhichao; Han, Bingshe; Zhai, Wanying; Shen, Yu; Chen, Liangbiao

    2015-10-30

    The transcriptional programs of ectothermic teleosts are directly influenced by water temperature. However, the cis- and trans-factors governing cold responses are not well characterized. We profiled transcriptional changes in eight zebrafish tissues exposed to mildly and severely cold temperatures using RNA-Seq. A total of 1943 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, from which 34 clusters representing distinct tissue and temperature response expression patterns were derived using the k-means fuzzy clustering algorithm. The promoter regions of the clustered DEGs that demonstrated strong co-regulation were analysed for enriched cis-regulatory elements with a motif discovery program, DREME. Seventeen motifs, ten known and seven novel, were identified, which covered 23% of the DEGs. Two motifs predicted to be the binding sites for the transcription factors Bcl6 and Jun, respectively, were chosen for experimental verification, and they demonstrated the expected cold-induced and cold-repressed patterns of gene regulation. Protein interaction modeling of the network components followed by experimental validation suggested that Jun physically interacts with Bcl6 and might be a hub factor that orchestrates the cold response in zebrafish. Thus, the methodology used and the regulatory networks uncovered in this study provide a foundation for exploring the mechanisms of cold adaptation in teleosts.

  12. The US regulatory and pharmacopeia response to the global heparin contamination crisis.

    PubMed

    Szajek, Anita Y; Chess, Edward; Johansen, Kristian; Gratzl, Gyöngyi; Gray, Elaine; Keire, David; Linhardt, Robert J; Liu, Jian; Morris, Tina; Mulloy, Barbara; Nasr, Moheb; Shriver, Zachary; Torralba, Pearle; Viskov, Christian; Williams, Roger; Woodcock, Janet; Workman, Wesley; Al-Hakim, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The contamination of the widely used lifesaving anticoagulant drug heparin in 2007 has drawn renewed attention to the challenges that are associated with the characterization, quality control and standardization of complex biological medicines from natural sources. Heparin is a linear, highly sulfated polysaccharide consisting of alternating glucosamine and uronic acid monosaccharide residues. Heparin has been used successfully as an injectable antithrombotic medicine since the 1930s, and its isolation from animal sources (primarily porcine intestine) as well as its manufacturing processes have not changed substantially since its introduction. The 2007 heparin contamination crisis resulted in several deaths in the United States and hundreds of adverse reactions worldwide, revealing the vulnerability of a complex global supply chain to sophisticated adulteration. This Perspective discusses how the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the United States Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) and international stakeholders collaborated to redefine quality expectations for heparin, thus making an important natural product better controlled and less susceptible to economically motivated adulteration. PMID:27281424

  13. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins are transcriptional regulators of the thyroglobulin gene in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gaiping; Eder, Klaus; Ringseis, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The genes encoding sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO), both of which are essential for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, were shown to be regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP)-1c and -2. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that transcription of a further gene essential for TH synthesis, the thyroglobulin (TG) gene, is under the control of SREBP. To test this hypothesis, we studied the influence of inhibition of SREBP maturation and SREBP knockdown on TG expression in FRTL-5 thyrocytes and explored transcriptional regulation of the TG promoter by reporter gene experiments in FRTL-5 and HepG2 cells, gel shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of SREBP maturation by 25-hydroxycholesterol and siRNA-mediated knockdown of either SREBP-1c or SREBP-2 decreased mRNA and protein levels of TG in FRTL-5 thyrocytes. Reporter gene assays with wild-type and mutated TG promoter reporter truncation constructs revealed that the rat TG promoter is transcriptionally activated by nSREBP-1c and nSREBP-2. DNA-binding assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that both nSREBP-1c and nSREBP-2 bind to a SREBP binding motif with characteristics of an E-box SRE at position -63 in the rat TG promoter. In connection with recent findings that NIS and TPO are regulated by SREBP in thyrocytes the present findings support the view that SREBP are regulators of essential steps of TH synthesis in the thyroid gland such as iodide uptake, iodide oxidation and iodination of tyrosyl residues of TG. This moreover suggests that SREBP may be molecular targets for pharmacological modulation of TH synthesis. PMID:27321819

  14. REGULATORY AUTOPHOSPHORYLATION SITES ON PROTEIN KINASE C-δ AT Thr141 AND Thr295

    PubMed Central

    Rybin, Vitalyi O.; Guo, Jianfen; Harleton, Erin; Feinmark, Steven J.; Steinberg, Susan F.

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) is a Ser/Thr kinase that regulates a wide range of cellular responses. This study identifies novel in vitro PKCδ autophosphorylation sites at Thr141 adjacent to the pseudosubstrate domain, Thr218 in the C1A–C1B interdomain, Ser295, Ser302, and Ser304 in the hinge region, and Ser503 adjacent to Thr505 in the activation loop. Cell-based studies show that Thr141 and Thr295 also are phosphorylated in vivo and that Thr141 phosphorylation regulates the kinetics of PKCδ downregulation in COS7 cells. In vitro studies implicate Thr141 and Thr295 autophosphorylation as modifications that regulate PKCδ activity. A T141D substitution markedly increases basal lipid-independent PKCδ activity; the PKCδ-T141D mutant is only slightly further stimulated in vitro by PMA treatment, suggesting that Thr141 phosphorylation relieves autoinhibitory constraints that limit PKCδ activity. Mutagenesis studies also indicate that a phosphorylation at Thr295 contributes to the control of PKCδ substrate specificity. We previously demonstrated that PKCδ phosphorylates the myofilament protein cardiac troponin I (cTnI) at Ser23/Ser24 when it is allosterically activated by lipid cofactors and that the Thr505/Tyr311-phosphorylated form of PKCδ (that is present in assays with Src) acquires as additional activity toward cTnI-Thr144. Studies reported herein show that a T505A substitution reduces PKCδ-Thr295 autophosphorylation and that a T295A substitution leads to a defect in Src-dependent PKCδ-Tyr311 phosphorylation and PKCδ-dependent cTnI-Thr144 phosphorylation. These results implicate PKCδ-Thr295 autophosphorylation as a lipid-dependent modification that links PKCδ-Thr505 phosphorylation to Src-dependent regulation of PKCδ catalytic function. Collectively, these studies identify novel regulatory autophosphorylations on PKCδ that serve as markers and regulators of PKCδ activity. PMID:19366211

  15. Comprehensive analysis of hydrogen bonds in regulatory protein DNA-complexes: in search of common principles.

    PubMed

    Mandel-Gutfreund, Y; Schueler, O; Margalit, H

    1995-10-20

    A systematic analysis of hydrogen bonds between regulatory proteins and their DNA targets is presented, based on 28 crystallographically solved complexes. All possible hydrogen bonds were screened and classified into different types: those that involve the amino acid side-chains and DNA base edges and those that involve the backbone atoms of the molecules. For each interaction type, all bonds were characterized and a statistical analysis was performed to reveal significant amino acid-base interdependence. The interactions between the amino acid side-chains and DNA backbone constitute about half of the interactions, but did not show any amino acid-base correlation. Interactions via the protein backbone were also observed, predominantly with the DNA backbone. As expected, the most significant pairing preference was demonstrated for interactions between the amino acid side-chains and the DNA base edges. The statistically significant relationships could mostly be explained by the chemical nature of the participants. However, correlations that could not be trivially predicted from the hydrogen bonding potential of the residues were also identified, like the preference of lysine for guanine over adenine, or the preference of glutamic acid for cystosine over adenine. While Lys x G interactions were very frequent and spread over various families, the Glu x C interactions were found mainly in the basic helix-loop-helix family. Further examination of the side-chain-base edge contacts at the atomic level revealed a trend of the amino acids to contact the DNA by their donor atoms, preferably at position W2 in the major groove. In most cases it seems that the interactions are not guided simply by the presence of a required atom in a specific position in the groove, but that the identity of the base possessing this atom is crucial. This may have important implications in molecular design experiments.

  16. Cleavage of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) by CPP32 during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Zelenski, N G; Yang, J; Sakai, J; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol homeostasis is controlled by sterol-regulated proteolysis of membrane-bound transcription factors called sterol-regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs). CPP32, a cysteine protease, was shown previously to cleave SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 in vitro at an aspartic acid between the basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper domain and the first trans-membrane domain, liberating a transcriptionally active fragment. Here, we show that CPP32 exists in an inactive 32 kDa form in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. When apoptosis was induced with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, CPP32 was cleaved to subunits of 20 and 10 kDa to form the active protease. Under these conditions membrane-bound SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 were both cleaved, and the transcriptionally active N-terminal fragments were found in nuclear extracts. Similar results were obtained in human U937 cells induced to undergo apoptosis by anti-Fas and etoposide. The apoptosis-induced cleavage of SREBPs was not suppressed by sterols, indicating that apoptosis-induced cleavage and sterol-regulated cleavage are mediated by different proteases. CHO cells expressing a mutant SREBP-2 with an Asp--> Ala mutation at the CPP32 cleavage site showed sterol-regulated cleavage but no apoptosis-induced cleavage. These data are consistent with the emerging concept that CPP32 is a central mediator in apoptosis. They also indicate that SREBPs, like poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, are cleaved by CPP32 during programmed cell death. Images PMID:8605870

  17. Insights into the inhibitory mechanisms of the regulatory protein IIA(Glc) on melibiose permease activity.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Parameswaran; Guan, Lan

    2014-11-21

    The phosphotransfer protein IIA(Glc) of the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system plays a key role in the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism. Melibiose permease (MelB) is one among several permeases subject to IIA(Glc) regulation. The regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood; in addition, thermodynamic features of IIA(Glc) binding to other proteins are also unknown. Applying isothermal titration calorimetry and amine-specific cross-linking, we show that IIA(Glc) directly binds to MelB of Salmonella typhimurium (MelB(St)) and Escherichia coli MelB (MelB(Ec)) at a stoichiometry of unity in the absence or presence of melibiose. The dissociation constant values are 3-10 μM for MelB(St) and 25 μM for MelB(Ec). All of the binding is solely driven by favorable enthalpy forces. IIA(Glc) binding to MelB(St) in the absence or presence of melibiose yields a large negative heat capacity change; in addition, the conformational entropy is constrained upon the binding. We further found that the IIA(Glc)-bound MelB(St) exhibits a decreased binding affinity for melibiose or nitrophenyl-α-galactoside. It is believed that sugar binding to the permease is involved in an induced fit mechanism, and the transport process requires conformational cycling between different states. Thus, the thermodynamic data are consistent with the interpretation that IIA(Glc) inhibits the induced fit process and restricts the conformational dynamics of MelB(St). PMID:25296751

  18. Regulatory roles of RNA binding proteins in the nervous system of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sharifnia, Panid; Jin, Yishi

    2015-01-01

    Neurons have evolved to employ many factors involved in the regulation of RNA processing due to their complex cellular compartments. RNA binding proteins (RBPs) are key regulators in transcription, translation, and RNA degradation. Increasing studies have shown that regulatory RNA processing is critical for the establishment, functionality, and maintenance of neural circuits. Recent advances in high-throughput transcriptomics have rapidly expanded our knowledge of the landscape of RNA regulation, but also raised the challenge for mechanistic dissection of the specific roles of RBPs in complex tissues such as the nervous system. The C. elegans genome encodes many RBPs conserved throughout evolution. The rich analytic tools in molecular genetics and simple neural anatomy of C. elegans offer advantages to define functions of genes in vivo at the level of a single cell. Notably, the discovery of microRNAs has had transformative effects to the understanding of neuronal development, circuit plasticity, and neurological diseases. Here we review recent studies unraveling diverse roles of RBPs in the development, function, and plasticity of C. elegans nervous system. We first summarize the general technologies for studying RBPs in C. elegans. We then focus on the roles of several RBPs that control gene- and cell-type specific production of neuronal transcripts. PMID:25628531

  19. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Dobrinic, Paula; Macek, Boris; Franjevic, Damjan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Francoise; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD, and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells. PMID:25278935

  20. Regulatory mechanism of protein metabolic pathway during the differentiation process of chicken male germ cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Zuo, Qisheng; Lian, Chao; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Qingqing; Zhang, Zhentao; Wang, Yingjie; Ahmed, Mahmoud F; Tang, Beibei; Xiao, Tianrong; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2015-08-01

    We explored the regulatory mechanism of protein metabolism during the differentiation process of chicken male germ cells and provide a basis for improving the induction system of embryonic stem cell differentiation to male germ cells in vitro. We sequenced the transcriptome of embryonic stem cells, primordial germ cells, and spermatogonial stem cells with RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), bioinformatics analysis methods, and detection of the key genes by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Finally, we found 16 amino acid metabolic pathways enriched in the biological metabolism during the differentiation process of embryonic stem cells to primordial germ cells and 15 amino acid metabolic pathways enriched in the differentiation stage of primordial germ cells to spermatogonial stem cells. We found three pathways, arginine-proline metabolic pathway, tyrosine metabolic pathway, and tryptophan metabolic pathway, significantly enriched in the whole differentiation process of embryonic stem cells to spermatogonial stem cells. Moreover, for these three pathways, we screened key genes such as NOS2, ADC, FAH, and IDO. qRT-PCR results showed that the expression trend of these genes were the same to RNA-Seq. Our findings showed that the three pathways and these key genes play an important role in the differentiation process of embryonic stem cells to male germ cells. These results provide basic information for improving the induction system of embryonic stem cell differentiation to male germ cells in vitro.

  1. Generation of novel bacterial regulatory proteins that detect priority pollutant phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, A.A.; Kuske, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    The genetic systems of bacteria that have the ability to use organic pollutants as carbon and energy sources can be adapted to create bacterial biosensors for the detection of industrial pollution. The creation of bacterial biosensors is hampered by a lack of information about the genetic systems that control production of bacterial enzymes that metabolize pollutants. The authors have attempted to overcome this problem through modification of DmpR, a regulatory protein for the phenol degradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain CF600. The phenol detection capacity of DmpR was altered by using mutagenic PCR targeted to the DmpR sensor domain. DmpR mutants were identified that both increased sensitivity to the phenolic effectors of wild-type DmpR and increased the range of molecules detected. The phenol detection characteristics of seven DmpR mutants were demonstrated through their ability to activate transcription of a lacZ reporter gene. Effectors of the DmpR derivatives included phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2-nitrophenol, and 4-nitrophenol.

  2. Acetylation of glucokinase regulatory protein decreases glucose metabolism by suppressing glucokinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo-Man; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Jo, Seong-Ho; Kim, Mi-Young; Ahn, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), mainly expressed in the liver and pancreatic β-cells, is critical for maintaining glucose homeostasis. GK expression and kinase activity, respectively, are both modulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Post-translationally, GK is regulated by binding the glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP), resulting in GK retention in the nucleus and its inability to participate in cytosolic glycolysis. Although hepatic GKRP is known to be regulated by allosteric mechanisms, the precise details of modulation of GKRP activity, by post-translational modification, are not well known. Here, we demonstrate that GKRP is acetylated at Lys5 by the acetyltransferase p300. Acetylated GKRP is resistant to degradation by the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway, suggesting that acetylation increases GKRP stability and binding to GK, further inhibiting GK nuclear export. Deacetylation of GKRP is effected by the NAD+-dependent, class III histone deacetylase SIRT2, which is inhibited by nicotinamide. Moreover, the livers of db/db obese, diabetic mice also show elevated GKRP acetylation, suggesting a broader, critical role in regulating blood glucose. Given that acetylated GKRP may affiliate with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), understanding the mechanism of GKRP acetylation in the liver could reveal novel targets within the GK-GKRP pathway, for treating T2DM and other metabolic pathologies. PMID:26620281

  3. Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein regulation of competitive antagonism: a problem of interpretation.

    PubMed

    Maclean, David M; Bowie, Derek

    2011-11-15

    Synaptic AMPA receptors are greatly influenced by a family of transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) which control trafficking, channel gating and pharmacology. The prototypical TARP, stargazin (or γ2), shifts the blocking ability of several AMPAR-selective compounds including the commonly used quinoxalinedione antagonists, CNQX and NBQX. Stargazin's effect on CNQX is particularly intriguing as it not only apparently lowers the potency of block, as with NBQX, but also renders it a partial agonist. Given this, agonist behaviour by CNQX has been speculated to account for its weaker blocking effect on AMPAR-TARP complexes. Here we show that this is not the case. The apparent effect of stargazin on CNQX antagonism can be almost entirely explained by an increase in the apparent affinity for l-glutamate (l-Glu), a full agonist and neurotransmitter at AMPAR synapses. Partial agonism at best plays a minor role but not through channel gating per se but rather because CNQX elicits AMPAR desensitization. Our study reveals that CNQX is best thought of as a non-competitive antagonist at glutamatergic synapses due to the predominance of non-equilibrium conditions. Consequently, CNQX primarily reports the proportion of AMPARs available for activation but may also impose additional block by receptor desensitization.

  4. Fas/CD95 regulatory protein Faim2 is neuroprotective after transient brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Reich, Arno; Spering, Christopher; Gertz, Karen; Harms, Christoph; Gerhardt, Ellen; Kronenberg, Golo; Nave, Klaus A; Schwab, Markus; Tauber, Simone C; Drinkut, Anja; Harms, Kristian; Beier, Chrstioph P; Voigt, Aaron; Göbbels, Sandra; Endres, Matthias; Schulz, Jörg B

    2011-01-01

    Death receptor (DR) signaling has a major impact on the outcome of numerous neurological diseases, including ischemic stroke. DRs mediate not only cell death signals, but also proinflammatory responses and cell proliferation. Identification of regulatory proteins that control the switch between apoptotic and alternative DR signaling opens new therapeutic opportunities. Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (Faim2) is an evolutionary conserved, neuron-specific inhibitor of Fas/CD95-mediated apoptosis. To investigate its role during development and in disease models, we generated Faim2-deficient mice. The ubiquitous null mutation displayed a viable and fertile phenotype without overt deficiencies. However, lack of Faim2 caused an increase in susceptibility to combined oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons in vitro as well as in caspase-associated cell death, stroke volume, and neurological impairment after cerebral ischemia in vivo. These processes were rescued by lentiviral Faim2 gene transfer. In summary, we provide evidence that Faim2 is a novel neuroprotective molecule in the context of cerebral ischemia.

  5. Endotoxin regulates the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 through the induction of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Diomede, L; Albani, D; Bianchi, M; Salmona, M

    2001-01-01

    Endotoxin (LPS), by raising the levels of cytokines, markedly influences lipid metabolism. To clarify the molecular mechanism of this effect, we examined the action of endotoxin in vitro and in vivo on the regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). In HepG2 cells stimulated with LPS, a dose-dependent increase in the level of the mature form of SREBP-1 was observed. For in vivo studies, endotoxin was administered intraperitoneally to CD1 mice fed with a standard or a cholesterol-enriched diet to increase the basal levels of circulating and liver cholesterol. Endotoxin raised cholesterol levels and stimulated the maturation of hepatic SREBP-1 in both normal and cholesterol-fed mice, indicating that the lipogenic effect of LPS was independent of endogenous sterol levels. To assess whether the lipogenic effect of endotoxin was linked to cytokine production, we administered LPS to C57Bl/6J endotoxin-sensitive and to C3H/HeJ endotoxin-resistant mice, which do not produce tumor necrosis factor in response to LPS. Significant induction of cholesterol levels and SREBP-1 activation was observed only in C57Bl/6J mice, indicating that cytokine production is crucial for the regulation of SREBP-1, and that the transcriptional activation of cholesterol biosynthesis may be part of the acute-phase response.

  6. Regulatory effect of porcine plasma protein hydrolysates on pasting and gelatinization action of corn starch.

    PubMed

    Kong, Baohua; Niu, Haili; Sun, Fangda; Han, Jianchun; Liu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the regulatory effect of porcine plasma protein hydrolysates (PPPH) on the physicochemical, pasting, and gelatinization properties of corn starch (CS). The results showed that the solubility of CS markedly increased, whereas swelling power and gel penetration force decreased with increased PPPH concentration (P<0.05). Compared with native CS, PPPH significantly lowered peak viscosity, minimum viscosity, final viscosity, and total setback, whereas it increased breakdown and pasting temperature in rapid visco analyzer (RVA) measurement (P<0.05) and obviously enhanced the gelatinization temperature as determined in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) (P<0.05). Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that PPPH surrounded the starch granules at room temperature (25°C) and then formed a network with swollen starch granules during gelatinization. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images indicated that the blocklet sizes of gelatinized CS-PPPH mixtures were smaller and more uniform than native CS. The results proved that pasting and gelatinization abilities of CS can be effectively influenced by adding PPPH.

  7. BTat, a trans-acting regulatory protein, contributes to bovine immunodeficiency virus-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Chenghao; Qiao, Wentao; Li, Jian; Peng, Guoyuan; Liu, Min; Chen, Qimin; Zhou, Jun; Geng, Yunqi

    2008-01-01

    Bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) is a member of the lentivirus subfamily of retroviruses highly related to human immunodeficiency virus in morphologic, antigenic and genomic features. BIV is known to induce chronic pathological changes in infected hosts, which are often associated with the development of immune-mediated lesions. However, the molecular events underlying the cytopathic effect of BIV remain poorly understood. In this study, BIV was found to induce apoptotic cell death, and a small trans-acting regulatory protein encoded by BIV, BTat, was found to participate in the pro-apoptotic action of BIV. Introduction of exogenous BTat to cells triggered apoptosis dramatically, as revealed by assays such as terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling, nuclear morphology analysis, flow cytometry, and cleavages of caspases and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effect of BTat was found to be mediated through its interaction with cellular microtubules and its interference with microtubule dynamics. These results provide the first evidence that induction of apoptosis may contribute to the cytopathic effect of BIV. In addition, these results uncover a novel role for BTat in regulating microtubule dynamics in addition to its conventional role in regulating gene transcription.

  8. Global small RNA chaperone Hfq and regulatory small RNAs are important virulence regulators in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Quan; McNally, R Ryan; Sundin, George W

    2013-04-01

    Hfq is a global small RNA (sRNA) chaperone that interacts with Hfq-regulated sRNAs and functions in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this work, we identified Hfq to be a virulence regulator in the Gram-negative fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Deletion of hfq in E. amylovora Ea1189 significantly reduced bacterial virulence in both immature pear fruits and apple shoots. Analysis of virulence determinants in strain Ea1189Δhfq showed that Hfq exerts pleiotropic regulation of amylovoran exopolysaccharide production, biofilm formation, motility, and the type III secretion system (T3SS). Further characterization of biofilm regulation by Hfq demonstrated that Hfq limits bacterial attachment to solid surfaces while promoting biofilm maturation. Characterization of T3SS regulation by Hfq revealed that Hfq positively regulates the translocation and secretion of the major type III effector DspE and negatively controls the secretion of the putative translocator HrpK and the type III effector Eop1. Lastly, 10 Hfq-regulated sRNAs were identified using a computational method, and two of these sRNAs, RprA and RyhA, were found to be required for the full virulence of E. amylovora.

  9. Signalling by the global regulatory molecule ppGpp in bacteria and chloroplasts of land plants.

    PubMed

    Tozawa, Y; Nomura, Y

    2011-09-01

    The hyperphosphorylated guanine ribonucleotide ppGpp mediates the stringent response in bacteria. Biochemical and genetic studies of this response in Escherichia coli have shown that the biosynthesis of ppGpp is catalysed by two homologous enzymes, RelA and SpoT. RelA is activated in response to amino acid starvation, and SpoT responds to abiotic physical stress beside nutritional stress. All free-living bacteria, including Gram-positive firmicutes, contain RelA-SpoT homologues (RSH). Further, novel ppGpp biosynthetic enzymes, designated small alarmone synthetases (SASs), were recently identified in a subset of bacteria, including the Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis, and were shown to consist only of a ppGpp synthetase domain. Studies suggest that these SAS proteins contribute to ppGpp signalling in response to stressful conditions in a manner distinct from that of RelA-SpoT enzymes. SAS proteins currently appear to always occur in addition to RSH enzymes in various combinations but never alone. RSHs have also been identified in chloroplasts, organelles of photosynthetic eukaryotes that originated from endosymbiotic photosynthetic bacteria. These chloroplast RSHs are exclusively encoded in nuclear DNA and targeted into chloroplasts. The findings suggest that ppGpp may regulate chloroplast functions similar to those regulated in bacteria, including transcription and translation. In addition, a novel ppGpp synthetase that is regulated by Ca²⁺ as a result of the presence of two EF-hand motifs at its COOH terminus was recently identified in chloroplasts of land plants. This finding indicates the existence of a direct connection between eukaryotic Ca²⁺ signalling and prokaryotic ppGpp signalling in chloroplasts. The new observations with regard to ppGpp signalling in land plants suggest that such signalling contributes to the regulation of a wider range of cellular functions than previously anticipated.

  10. The Staphylococcus aureus Global Regulator MgrA Modulates Clumping and Virulence by Controlling Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Heidi A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Merriman, Joseph A.; King, Jessica M.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen that causes devastating infections in a wide range of locations within the body. One of the defining characteristics of S. aureus is its ability to form clumps in the presence of soluble fibrinogen, which likely has a protective benefit and facilitates adhesion to host tissue. We have previously shown that the ArlRS two-component regulatory system controls clumping, in part by repressing production of the large surface protein Ebh. In this work we show that ArlRS does not directly regulate Ebh, but instead ArlRS activates expression of the global regulator MgrA. Strains lacking mgrA fail to clump in the presence of fibrinogen, and clumping can be restored to an arlRS mutant by overexpressing either arlRS or mgrA, indicating that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory pathway. We used RNA-seq to show that MgrA represses ebh, as well as seven cell wall-associated proteins (SraP, Spa, FnbB, SasG, SasC, FmtB, and SdrD). EMSA analysis showed that MgrA directly represses expression of ebh and sraP. Clumping can be restored to an mgrA mutant by deleting the genes for Ebh, SraP and SasG, suggesting that increased expression of these proteins blocks clumping by steric hindrance. We show that mgrA mutants are less virulent in a rabbit model of endocarditis, and virulence can be partially restored by deleting the genes for the surface proteins ebh, sraP, and sasG. While mgrA mutants are unable to clump, they are known to have enhanced biofilm capacity. We demonstrate that this increase in biofilm formation is partially due to up-regulation of SasG, a surface protein known to promote intercellular interactions. These results confirm that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory cascade, and that they control expression of a number of genes important for virulence, including those for eight large surface proteins. PMID:27144398

  11. Bayesian Proteoform Modeling Improves Protein Quantification of Global Proteomic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Datta, Susmita; Payne, Samuel H.; Kang, Jiyun; Bramer, Lisa M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Tardiff, Mark F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2014-12-01

    As the capability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has matured, tens of thousands of peptides can be measured simultaneously, which has the benefit of offering a systems view of protein expression. However, a major challenge is that with an increase in throughput, protein quantification estimation from the native measured peptides has become a computational task. A limitation to existing computationally-driven protein quantification methods is that most ignore protein variation, such as alternate splicing of the RNA transcript and post-translational modifications or other possible proteoforms, which will affect a significant fraction of the proteome. The consequence of this assumption is that statistical inference at the protein level, and consequently downstream analyses, such as network and pathway modeling, have only limited power for biomarker discovery. Here, we describe a Bayesian model (BP-Quant) that uses statistically derived peptides signatures to identify peptides that are outside the dominant pattern, or the existence of multiple over-expressed patterns to improve relative protein abundance estimates. It is a research-driven approach that utilizes the objectives of the experiment, defined in the context of a standard statistical hypothesis, to identify a set of peptides exhibiting similar statistical behavior relating to a protein. This approach infers that changes in relative protein abundance can be used as a surrogate for changes in function, without necessarily taking into account the effect of differential post-translational modifications, processing, or splicing in altering protein function. We verify the approach using a dilution study from mouse plasma samples and demonstrate that BP-Quant achieves similar accuracy as the current state-of-the-art methods at proteoform identification with significantly better specificity. BP-Quant is available as a MatLab ® and R packages at https://github.com/PNNL-Comp-Mass-Spec/BP-Quant.

  12. Nickel decreases cellular iron level and converts cytosolic aconitase to iron-regulatory protein 1 in A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Haobin; Davidson, Todd; Singleton, Steven; Garrick, Michael D.; Costa, Max . E-mail: costam@env.med.nyu.edu

    2005-08-15

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are well-established carcinogens and are known to initiate a hypoxic response in cells via the stabilization and transactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1{alpha}). This change may be the consequence of nickel's interference with the function of several Fe(II)-dependent enzymes. In this study, the effects of soluble nickel exposure on cellular iron homeostasis were investigated. Nickel treatment decreased both mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase (c-aconitase) activity in A549 cells. Cytosolic aconitase was converted to iron-regulatory protein 1, a form critical for the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. The increased activity of iron-regulatory protein 1 after nickel exposure stabilized and increased transferrin receptor (Tfr) mRNA and antagonized the iron-induced ferritin light chain protein synthesis. The decrease of aconitase activity after nickel treatment reflected neither direct interference with aconitase function nor obstruction of [4Fe-4S] cluster reconstitution by nickel. Exposure of A549 cells to soluble nickel decreased total cellular iron by about 40%, a decrease that likely caused the observed decrease in aconitase activity and the increase of iron-regulatory protein 1 activity. Iron treatment reversed the effect of nickel on cytosolic aconitase and iron-regulatory protein 1. To assess the mechanism for the observed effects, human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells over expressing divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) were compared to A549 cells expressing only endogenous transporters for inhibition of iron uptake by nickel. The inhibition data suggest that nickel can enter via DMT1 and compete with iron for entry into the cell. This disturbance of cellular iron homeostasis by nickel may have a great impact on the ability of the cell to regulate a variety of cell functions, as well as create a state of hypoxia in cells under normal oxygen tension. These effects may be very important in how nickel exerts phenotypic

  13. A global regulatory mechanism for activating an exon network required for neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Raj, Bushra; Irimia, Manuel; Braunschweig, Ulrich; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; O'Hanlon, Dave; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Chen, Ginny I; Easton, Laura E; Ule, Jernej; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Eyras, Eduardo; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2014-10-01

    The vertebrate and neural-specific Ser/Arg (SR)-related protein nSR100/SRRM4 regulates an extensive program of alternative splicing with critical roles in nervous system development. However, the mechanism by which nSR100 controls its target exons is poorly understood. We demonstrate that nSR100-dependent neural exons are associated with a unique configuration of intronic cis-elements that promote rapid switch-like regulation during neurogenesis. A key feature of this configuration is the insertion of specialized intronic enhancers between polypyrimidine tracts and acceptor sites that bind nSR100 to potently activate exon inclusion in neural cells while weakening 3' splice site recognition and contributing to exon skipping in nonneural cells. nSR100 further operates by forming multiple interactions with early spliceosome components bound proximal to 3' splice sites. These multifaceted interactions achieve dominance over neural exon silencing mediated by the splicing regulator PTBP1. The results thus illuminate a widespread mechanism by which a critical neural exon network is activated during neurogenesis. PMID:25219497

  14. A fast approach to global alignment of protein-protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    edges in the alignment graph, the percentage of enriched components, and the total number of covered Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Conclusions We have demonstrated significant reductions in global network alignment computation times by coupling heuristic bipartite matching methods with the similarity scoring step of the IsoRank procedure. Our heuristic matching techniques maintain comparable – if not better – quality in resulting alignments. A consequence of our work is that network-alignment based orthologies can be computed within minutes (as compared to hours) on typical protein interaction networks, enabling a more comprehensive tuning of alignment parameters for refined orthologies. PMID:23363457

  15. Global Membrane Protein Interactome Analysis using In vivo Crosslinking and Mass Spectrometry-based Protein Correlation Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Kirkwood, Kathryn J.; Tinti, Michele; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Ferguson, Michael A. J.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2016-01-01

    We present a methodology using in vivo crosslinking combined with HPLC-MS for the global analysis of endogenous protein complexes by protein correlation profiling. Formaldehyde crosslinked protein complexes were extracted with high yield using denaturing buffers that maintained complex solubility during chromatographic separation. We show this efficiently detects both integral membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes,in addition to soluble complexes, allowing identification and analysis of complexes not accessible in native extracts. We compare the protein complexes detected by HPLC-MS protein correlation profiling in both native and formaldehyde crosslinked U2OS cell extracts. These proteome-wide data sets of both in vivo crosslinked and native protein complexes from U2OS cells are freely available via a searchable online database (www.peptracker.com/epd). Raw data are also available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD003754). PMID:27114452

  16. Global Membrane Protein Interactome Analysis using In vivo Crosslinking and Mass Spectrometry-based Protein Correlation Profiling.

    PubMed

    Larance, Mark; Kirkwood, Kathryn J; Tinti, Michele; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Ferguson, Michael A J; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-07-01

    We present a methodology using in vivo crosslinking combined with HPLC-MS for the global analysis of endogenous protein complexes by protein correlation profiling. Formaldehyde crosslinked protein complexes were extracted with high yield using denaturing buffers that maintained complex solubility during chromatographic separation. We show this efficiently detects both integral membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes,in addition to soluble complexes, allowing identification and analysis of complexes not accessible in native extracts. We compare the protein complexes detected by HPLC-MS protein correlation profiling in both native and formaldehyde crosslinked U2OS cell extracts. These proteome-wide data sets of both in vivo crosslinked and native protein complexes from U2OS cells are freely available via a searchable online database (www.peptracker.com/epd). Raw data are also available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD003754).

  17. Toward a global analysis of metabolites in regulatory mutants of yeast

    PubMed Central

    Humston, Elizabeth M.; Dombek, Kenneth M.; Tu, Benjamin P.; Young, Elton T.

    2013-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase in yeast, Snf1, coordinates expression and activity of numerous intracellular signaling and developmental pathways, including those regulating cellular differentiation, response to stress, meiosis, autophagy, and the diauxic transition. Snf1 phosphorylates metabolic enzymes and transcription factors to change cellular physiology and metabolism. Adr1 and Cat8, transcription factors that activate gene expression after the diauxic transition, are regulated by Snf1; Cat8 through direct phosphorylation and Adr1 by dephosphorylation in a Snf1-dependent manner. Adr1 and Cat8 coordinately regulate numerous genes encoding enzymes of gluconeogenesis, the glyoxylate cycle, β-oxidation of fatty acids, and the utilization of alternative fermentable sugars and nonfermentable substrates. To determine the roles of Adr1, Cat8, and Snf1 in metabolism, two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify metabolites whose levels change after the diauxic transition in wild-type-, ADR1-, CAT8-, and SNF1-deficient yeast. A discovery-based approach to data analysis utilized chemometric algorithms to identify, quantify, and compare 63 unique metabolites between wild type, adr1Δ, cat8Δ, adr1Δcat8Δ, and snf1Δ strains. The primary metabolites found to differ were those of gluconeogenesis, the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid cycles, and amino acid metabolism. In general, good agreement was observed between the levels of metabolites derived from these pathways and the levels of transcripts from the same strains, suggesting that transcriptional control plays a major role in regulating the levels of metabolites after the diauxic transition. PMID:21416166

  18. Genome-wide Annotation, Identification, and Global Transcriptomic Analysis of Regulatory or Small RNA Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Andy; Broach, William H.; Wiemels, Richard E.; Mogen, Austin B.; Rice, Kelly C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Staphylococcus aureus, hundreds of small regulatory or small RNAs (sRNAs) have been identified, yet this class of molecule remains poorly understood and severely understudied. sRNA genes are typically absent from genome annotation files, and as a consequence, their existence is often overlooked, particularly in global transcriptomic studies. To facilitate improved detection and analysis of sRNAs in S. aureus, we generated updated GenBank files for three commonly used S. aureus strains (MRSA252, NCTC 8325, and USA300), in which we added annotations for >260 previously identified sRNAs. These files, the first to include genome-wide annotation of sRNAs in S. aureus, were then used as a foundation to identify novel sRNAs in the community-associated methicillin-resistant strain USA300. This analysis led to the discovery of 39 previously unidentified sRNAs. Investigating the genomic loci of the newly identified sRNAs revealed a surprising degree of inconsistency in genome annotation in S. aureus, which may be hindering the analysis and functional exploration of these elements. Finally, using our newly created annotation files as a reference, we perform a global analysis of sRNA gene expression in S. aureus and demonstrate that the newly identified tsr25 is the most highly upregulated sRNA in human serum. This study provides an invaluable resource to the S. aureus research community in the form of our newly generated annotation files, while at the same time presenting the first examination of differential sRNA expression in pathophysiologically relevant conditions. PMID:26861020

  19. Global multiple protein-protein interaction network alignment by combining pairwise network alignments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background A wealth of protein interaction data has become available in recent years, creating an urgent need for powerful analysis techniques. In this context, the problem of finding biologically meaningful correspondences between different protein-protein interaction networks (PPIN) is of particular interest. The PPIN of a species can be compared with that of other species through the process of PPIN alignment. Such an alignment can provide insight into basic problems like species evolution and network component function determination, as well as translational problems such as target identification and elucidation of mechanisms of disease spread. Furthermore, multiple PPINs can be aligned simultaneously, expanding the analytical implications of the result. While there are several pairwise network alignment algorithms, few methods are capable of multiple network alignment. Results We propose SMAL, a MNA algorithm based on the philosophy of scaffold-based alignment. SMAL is capable of converting results from any global pairwise alignment algorithms into a MNA in linear time. Using this method, we have built multiple network alignments based on combining pairwise alignments from a number of publicly available (pairwise) network aligners. We tested SMAL using PPINs of eight species derived from the IntAct repository and employed a number of measures to evaluate performance. Additionally, as part of our experimental investigations, we compared the effectiveness of SMAL while aligning up to eight input PPINs, and examined the effect of scaffold network choice on the alignments. Conclusions A key advantage of SMAL lies in its ability to create MNAs through the use of pairwise network aligners for which native MNA implementations do not exist. Experiments indicate that the performance of SMAL was comparable to that of the native MNA implementation of established methods such as IsoRankN and SMETANA. However, in terms of computational time, SMAL was significantly faster

  20. The complement regulatory protein CD59: insights into attenuation of choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Schnabolk, Gloriane; Tomlinson, Stephen; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Complement activation is associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), with the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) being one of the main target tissues. In AMD, disease severity is correlated with the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), the terminal step in the complement cascade, as well as diminished RPE expression of CD59, a membrane-bound regulatory protein of MAC formation. This has prompted the search for therapeutic strategies based on MAC inhibition, and soluble forms of CD59 (sCD59) have been investigated in mouse laser-induced choroidal neovascularization, a model for "wet" AMD. Unlike membrane-bound CD59, sCD59 provides relatively poor cell protection from complement, and different strategies to increase sCD59 activity at the cell membrane level have been investigated. These include increasing the circulatory half-life of sCD59 by the addition of an Fc moiety; increasing the half-life of sCD59 in target tissues by modifying CD59 with a (non-specific) membrane-targeting domain; and by locally overexpressing sCD59 via adenoviral vectors. Finally, a different strategy currently under investigation employs complement receptor (CR)2-mediated targeting of CD59 exclusively to membranes under complement attack. CR2 recognizes long-lasting membrane-bound breakdown activation fragments of complement C3. CR2-CD59 may have greater therapeutic potential than other complement inhibitory approaches, since it can be administered either systemically or locally, it will bind specifically to membranes containing activated complement activation fragments, and dosing can be regulated. Hence, this strategy might offer opportunities for site-specific inhibition of complement in diseases with restricted sites of inflammation such as AMD.

  1. A large family of anti‐activators accompanying XylS/AraC family regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Michael B.; Tran, Minh; Wright, Nathan; Luzader, Deborah H.; Kendall, Melissa M.; Ruiz‐Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary AraC Negative Regulators (ANR) suppress virulence genes by directly down‐regulating AraC/XylS members in Gram‐negative bacteria. In this study, we sought to investigate the distribution and molecular mechanisms of regulatory function for ANRs among different bacterial pathogens. We identified more than 200 ANRs distributed in diverse clinically important gram negative pathogens, including Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Citrobacter spp., enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and members of the Pasteurellaceae. By employing a bacterial two hybrid system, pull down assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we demonstrate that Aar (AggR‐activated regulator), a prototype member of the ANR family in EAEC, binds with high affinity to the central linker domain of AraC‐like member AggR. ANR‐AggR binding disrupted AggR dimerization and prevented AggR‐DNA binding. ANR homologs of Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and ETEC were capable of complementing Aar activity by repressing aggR expression in EAEC strain 042. ANR homologs of ETEC and Vibrio cholerae bound to AggR as well as to other members of the AraC family, including Rns and ToxT. The predicted proteins of all ANR members exhibit three highly conserved predicted α‐helices. Site‐directed mutagenesis studies suggest that at least predicted α‐helices 2 and 3 are required for Aar activity. In sum, our data strongly suggest that members of the novel ANR family act by directly binding to their cognate AraC partners. PMID:27038276

  2. Emotional regulatory function of receptor interacting protein 140 revealed in the ventromedial hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Flaisher-Grinberg, S; Tsai, H C; Feng, X; Wei, L N

    2014-08-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP140) is a transcription co-regulator highly expressed in macrophages to regulate inflammatory and metabolic processes. However, its implication in neurological, cognitive and emotional conditions, and the cellular systems relevant to its biological activity within the central nervous system are currently less clear. A transgenic mouse line with macrophage-specific knockdown of RIP140 was generated (MΦRIPKD mice) and brain-region specific RIP140 knockdown efficiency evaluated. Mice were subjected to a battery of tests, designed to evaluate multiple behavioral domains at naïve or following site-specific RIP140 re-expression. Gene expression analysis assessed TNF-α, IL-1β, TGF-1β, IL1-RA and neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, and in vitro studies examined the effects of macrophage's RIP140 on astrocytes' NPY production. We found that RIP140 expression was dramatically reduced in macrophages within the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and the cingulate cortex of MΦRIPKD mice. These animals exhibited increased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. VMH-targeted RIP140 re-expression in MΦRIPKD mice reversed its depressive- but not its anxiety-like phenotype. Analysis of specific neurochemical changes revealed reduced astrocytic-NPY expression within the hypothalamus of MΦRIPKD mice, and in vitro analysis confirmed that conditioned medium of RIP140-silnenced macrophage culture could no longer stimulate NPY production from astrocytes. The current study revealed an emotional regulatory function of macrophage-derived RIP140 in the VMH, and secondary dysregulation of NPY within hypothalamic astrocyte population, which might be associated with the observed behavioral phenotype of MΦRIPKD mice. This study highlights RIP140 as a novel target for the development of potential therapeutic and intervention strategies for emotional regulation disorders.

  3. The complement regulatory protein CD59: insights into attenuation of choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Schnabolk, Gloriane; Tomlinson, Stephen; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Complement activation is associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), with the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) being one of the main target tissues. In AMD, disease severity is correlated with the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), the terminal step in the complement cascade, as well as diminished RPE expression of CD59, a membrane-bound regulatory protein of MAC formation. This has prompted the search for therapeutic strategies based on MAC inhibition, and soluble forms of CD59 (sCD59) have been investigated in mouse laser-induced choroidal neovascularization, a model for "wet" AMD. Unlike membrane-bound CD59, sCD59 provides relatively poor cell protection from complement, and different strategies to increase sCD59 activity at the cell membrane level have been investigated. These include increasing the circulatory half-life of sCD59 by the addition of an Fc moiety; increasing the half-life of sCD59 in target tissues by modifying CD59 with a (non-specific) membrane-targeting domain; and by locally overexpressing sCD59 via adenoviral vectors. Finally, a different strategy currently under investigation employs complement receptor (CR)2-mediated targeting of CD59 exclusively to membranes under complement attack. CR2 recognizes long-lasting membrane-bound breakdown activation fragments of complement C3. CR2-CD59 may have greater therapeutic potential than other complement inhibitory approaches, since it can be administered either systemically or locally, it will bind specifically to membranes containing activated complement activation fragments, and dosing can be regulated. Hence, this strategy might offer opportunities for site-specific inhibition of complement in diseases with restricted sites of inflammation such as AMD. PMID:24664728

  4. SIRT3 regulates cellular iron metabolism and cancer growth by repressing iron regulatory protein 1.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S M; Lee, J; Finley, L W S; Schmidt, P J; Fleming, M D; Haigis, M C

    2015-04-16

    Iron metabolism is essential for many cellular processes, including oxygen transport, respiration and DNA synthesis, and many cancer cells exhibit dysregulation in iron metabolism. Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs), which control the expression of iron-related genes by binding iron-responsive elements (IREs) of target mRNAs. Here, we report that mitochondrial SIRT3 regulates cellular iron metabolism by modulating IRP1 activity. SIRT3 loss increases reactive oxygen species production, leading to elevated IRP1 binding to IREs. As a consequence, IRP1 target genes, such as the transferrin receptor (TfR1), a membrane-associated glycoprotein critical for iron uptake and cell proliferation, are controlled by SIRT3. Importantly, SIRT3 deficiency results in a defect in cellular iron homeostasis. SIRT3 null cells contain high levels of iron and lose iron-dependent TfR1 regulation. Moreover, SIRT3 null mice exhibit higher levels of iron and TfR1 expression in the pancreas. We found that the regulation of iron uptake and TfR1 expression contribute to the tumor-suppressive activity of SIRT3. Indeed, SIRT3 expression is negatively correlated with TfR1 expression in human pancreatic cancers. SIRT3 overexpression decreases TfR1 expression by inhibiting IRP1 and represses proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells. Our data uncover a novel role of SIRT3 in cellular iron metabolism through IRP1 regulation and suggest that SIRT3 functions as a tumor suppressor, in part, by modulating cellular iron metabolism. PMID:24909164

  5. Identification of a regulatory loop for the synthesis of neurosteroids: a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-dependent mechanism involving hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis receptors.

    PubMed

    Meethal, Sivan Vadakkadath; Liu, Tianbing; Chan, Hsien W; Ginsburg, Erika; Wilson, Andrea C; Gray, Danielle N; Bowen, Richard L; Vonderhaar, Barbara K; Atwood, Craig S

    2009-08-01

    Brain sex steroids are derived from both peripheral (primarily gonadal) and local (neurosteroids) sources and are crucial for neurogenesis, neural differentiation and neural function. The mechanism(s) regulating the production of neurosteroids is not understood. To determine whether hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis components previously detected in the extra-hypothalamic brain comprise a feedback loop to regulate neuro-sex steroid (NSS) production, we assessed dynamic changes in expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, a key regulator of steroidogenesis, and key hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine receptors, by modulating peripheral sex hormone levels in female mice. Ovariectomy (OVX; high serum gonadotropins, low serum sex steroids) had a differential effect on StAR protein levels in the extrahypothalamic brain; increasing the 30- and 32-kDa variants but decreasing the 37-kDa variant and is indicative of cholesterol transport into mitochondria for steroidogenesis. Treatment of OVX animals with E(2), P(4), or E(2) + P(4) for 3 days, which decreases OVX-induced increases in GnRH/gonadotropin production, reversed this pattern. Suppression of gonadotropin levels in OVX mice using the GnRH agonist leuprolide acetate inhibited the processing of the 37-kDa StAR protein into the 30-kDa StAR protein, confirming that the differential processing of brain StAR protein is regulated by gonadotropins. OVX dramatically suppressed extra-hypothalamic brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 receptor expression, and was further suppressed in E(2)- or P(4)-treated OVX mice. Together, these data indicate the existence of endocrine and autocrine/paracrine feedback loops that regulate NSS synthesis. Further delineation of these feedback loops that regulate NSS production will aid in developing therapies to maintain brain sex steroid levels and cognition.

  6. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5′- or 3′-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5′-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  7. Optimization and Corroboration of the Regulatory Pathway of p42.3 Protein in the Pathogenesis of Gastric Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yibin; Fan, Tianli; Nan, Kejun

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To optimize and verify the regulatory pathway of p42.3 in the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma (GC) by intelligent algorithm. Methods. Bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the features of structural domain in p42.3 protein. Proteins with the same domains and similar functions to p42.3 were screened out for reference. The possible regulatory pathway of p42.3 was established by integrating the acting pathways of these proteins. Then, the similarity between the reference proteins and p42.3 protein was figured out by multiparameter weighted summation method. The calculation result was taken as the prior probability of the initial node in Bayesian network. Besides, the probability of occurrence in different pathways was calculated by conditional probability formula, and the one with the maximum probability was regarded as the most possible pathway of p42.3. Finally, molecular biological experiments were conducted to prove it. Results. In Bayesian network of p42.3, probability of the acting pathway “S100A11→RAGE→P38→MAPK→Microtubule-associated protein→Spindle protein→Centromere protein→Cell proliferation” was the biggest, and it was also validated by biological experiments. Conclusions. The possibly important role of p42.3 in the occurrence of gastric carcinoma was verified by theoretical analysis and preliminary test, helping in studying the relationship between p42.3 and gastric carcinoma. PMID:26106439

  8. Global absolute quantification reveals tight regulation of protein expression in single Xenopus eggs

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Arne H.; Lindeboom, Rik G.H.; Perino, Matteo; van Heeringen, Simon J.; Veenstra, Gert Jan C.; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    While recent developments in genomic sequencing technology have enabled comprehensive transcriptome analyses of single cells, single cell proteomics has thus far been restricted to targeted studies. Here, we perform global absolute protein quantification of fertilized Xenopus laevis eggs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, quantifying over 5800 proteins in the largest single cell proteome characterized to date. Absolute protein amounts in single eggs are highly consistent, thus indicating a tight regulation of global protein abundance. Protein copy numbers in single eggs range from tens of thousands to ten trillion copies per cell. Comparison between the single-cell proteome and transcriptome reveal poor expression correlation. Finally, we identify 439 proteins that significantly change in abundance during early embryogenesis. Downregulated proteins include ribosomal proteins and upregulated proteins include basal transcription factors, among others. Many of these proteins do not show regulation at the transcript level. Altogether, our data reveal that the transcriptome is a poor indicator of the proteome and that protein levels are tightly controlled in X. laevis eggs. PMID:25056316

  9. Staphylococcus aureus SarA is a Regulatory Protein Responsive to Redox and pH that can Support Bacteriophage Lambda Integrase-Mediated Excision/Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, David F.; Higginbotham, Robin H.; Maleki, Soheila J.; Segall1, Anca M.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Hurlburt, Barry K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Staphylococcus aureus produces a wide array of virulence factors and causes a correspondingly diverse array of infections. Production of these virulence factors is under the control of a complex network of global regulatory elements, one of which is sarA. sarA encodes a DNA-binding protein that is considered to function as a transcription factor capable of acting as either a repressor or an activator. Using competitive ELISA assays, we demonstrate that SarA is present at approximately 50,000 copies per cell, which is not characteristic of classical transcription factors. We also demonstrate that SarA is present at all stages of growth in vitro and is capable of binding DNA with high affinity but that its binding affinity and pattern of shifted complexes in electrophoretic mobility shift assays is responsive to the redox state. We also show that SarA binds to the bacteriophage lambda (λ) attachment site, attL, producing SarA-DNA complexes similar to intasomes, which consist of bacteriophage lambda integrase, E. coli integration host factor and attL DNA. In addition, SarA stimulates intramolecular excision recombination in the absence of λ excisionase, a DNA-binding accessory protein. Taken together, these data suggest that SarA may function as an architectural accessory protein. PMID:19919677

  10. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of the N-terminal region of the calcium regulatory domain from soybean calcium-dependent protein kinase alpha.

    PubMed

    Weljie, Aalim M; Gagné, Stéphane M; Vogel, Hans J

    2004-12-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are vital Ca(2+)-signaling proteins in plants and protists which have both a kinase domain and a self-contained calcium regulatory calmodulin-like domain (CLD). Despite being very similar to CaM (>40% identity) and sharing the same fold, recent biochemical and structural evidence suggests that the behavior of CLD is distinct from its namesake, calmodulin. In this study, NMR spectroscopy is employed to examine the structure and backbone dynamics of a 168 amino acid Ca(2+)-saturated construct of the CLD (NtH-CLD) in which almost the entire C-terminal domain is exchange broadened and not visible in the NMR spectra. Structural characterization of the N-terminal domain indicates that the first Ca(2+)-binding loop is significantly more open than in a recently reported structure of the CLD complexed with a putative intramolecular binding region (JD) in the CDPK. Backbone dynamics suggest that parts of the third helix exhibit unusually high mobility, and significant exchange, consistent with previous findings that this helix interacts with the C-terminal domain. Dynamics data also show that the "tether" region, consisting of the first 11 amino acids of CLD, is highly mobile and these residues exhibit distinctive beta-type secondary structure, which may help to position the JD and CLD. Finally, the unusual global dynamic behavior of the protein is rationalized on the basis of possible interdomain rearrangements and the highly variable environments of the C- and N-terminal domains.

  11. SACE_5599, a putative regulatory protein, is involved in morphological differentiation and erythromycin production in Saccharopolyspora erythraea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Erythromycin is a medically important antibiotic, biosynthesized by the actinomycete Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Genes encoding erythromycin biosynthesis are organized in a gene cluster, spanning over 60 kbp of DNA. Most often, gene clusters encoding biosynthesis of secondary metabolites contain regulatory genes. In contrast, the erythromycin gene cluster does not contain regulatory genes and regulation of its biosynthesis has therefore remained poorly understood, which has for a long time limited genetic engineering approaches for erythromycin yield improvement. Results We used a comparative proteomic approach to screen for potential regulatory proteins involved in erythromycin biosynthesis. We have identified a putative regulatory protein SACE_5599 which shows significantly higher levels of expression in an erythromycin high-producing strain, compared to the wild type S. erythraea strain. SACE_5599 is a member of an uncharacterized family of putative regulatory genes, located in several actinomycete biosynthetic gene clusters. Importantly, increased expression of SACE_5599 was observed in the complex fermentation medium and at controlled bioprocess conditions, simulating a high-yield industrial fermentation process in the bioreactor. Inactivation of SACE_5599 in the high-producing strain significantly reduced erythromycin yield, in addition to drastically decreasing sporulation intensity of the SACE_5599-inactivated strains when cultivated on ABSM4 agar medium. In contrast, constitutive overexpression of SACE_5599 in the wild type NRRL23338 strain resulted in an increase of erythromycin yield by 32%. Similar yield increase was also observed when we overexpressed the bldD gene, a previously identified regulator of erythromycin biosynthesis, thereby for the first time revealing its potential for improving erythromycin biosynthesis. Conclusions SACE_5599 is the second putative regulatory gene to be identified in S. erythraea which has positive influence

  12. Trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shao-Min; Wu, Guang

    2009-12-01

    The global warming is an important factor affecting the biological evolution, and the influenza is an important disease that threatens humans with possible epidemics or pandemics. In this study, we attempted to analyze the trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus, because this protein is a target of anti-flu drug, and its mutation would have significant effect on the resistance to anti-flu drugs. The evolution of matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus from 1959 to 2008 was defined using the unpredictable portion of amino-acid pair predictability. Then the trend in this evolution was compared with the trend in the global temperature, the temperature in north and south hemispheres, and the temperature in influenza A virus sampling site, and species carrying influenza A virus. The results showed the similar trends in global warming and in evolution of M2 proteins although we could not correlate them at this stage of study. The study suggested the potential impact of global warming on the evolution of proteins from influenza A virus.

  13. Protein kinase CK2 phosphorylation regulates the interaction of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus regulatory protein ORF57 with its multifunctional partner hnRNP K

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Poonam; Clements, J. Barklie

    2004-01-01

    ORF57 protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus has a counterpart in all herpesvirus of mammals and birds and regulates gene expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. ORF57 was capable of self-interaction and bound a rapidly migrating form of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), a multifunctional cellular protein involved in gene expression. In virus infected cell extracts, ORF57 was present in a complex with hnRNP K that had protein kinase CK2 activity, and was phosphorylated by CK2. Different regions of ORF57 bound both catalytic α/α′ and regulatory β subunits of CK2. CK2 modification enhanced the ORF57–hnRNP K interaction, and may regulate the presence and activities of components in the complex. We suggest that ORF57 and hnRNP K interaction may modulate ORF57-mediated regulation of viral gene expression. Herpesviral ORF57 (Rhadinovirus) and ICP27 (Simplexvirus) proteins both interact with hnRNP K and CK2 implying that adaptation of the ancestral hnRNP K and CK2 to associate with viral regulatory ancestor protein likely pre-dates divergence of these Herpesviridae genera that occurred 200 million years ago. PMID:15486205

  14. Identification of regulatory pathways controlling gene expression of stress-responsive mitochondrial proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Lois H M; Giraud, Estelle; Uggalla, Vindya; Lister, Ryan; Clifton, Rachel; Glen, Angela; Thirkettle-Watts, Dave; Van Aken, Olivier; Whelan, James

    2008-08-01

    In this study we analyzed transcript abundance and promoters of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins to identify signaling pathways that regulate stress-induced gene expression. We used Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) alternative oxidase AOX1a, external NADP H-dehydrogenase NDB2, and two additional highly stress-responsive genes, At2g21640 and BCS1. As a starting point, the promoter region of AOX1a was analyzed and functional analysis identified 10 cis-acting regulatory elements (CAREs), which played a role in response to treatment with H(2)O(2), rotenone, or both. Six of these elements were also functional in the NDB2 promoter. The promoter region of At2g21640, previously defined as a hallmark of oxidative stress, shared two functional CAREs with AOX1a and was responsive to treatment with H(2)O(2) but not rotenone. Microarray analysis further supported that signaling pathways induced by H(2)O(2) and rotenone are not identical. The promoter of BCS1 was not responsive to H(2)O(2) or rotenone, but highly responsive to salicylic acid (SA), whereas the promoters of AOX1a and NDB2 were unresponsive to SA. Analysis of transcript abundance of these genes in a variety of defense signaling mutants confirmed that BCS1 expression is regulated in a different manner compared to AOX1a, NDB2, and At2g21640. These mutants also revealed a pathway associated with programmed cell death that regulated AOX1a in a manner distinct from the other genes. Thus, at least three distinctive pathways regulate mitochondrial stress response at a transcriptional level, an SA-dependent pathway represented by BCS1, a second pathway that represents a convergence point for signals generated by H(2)O(2) and rotenone on multiple CAREs, some of which are shared between responsive genes, and a third pathway that acts via EDS1 and PAD4 regulating only AOX1a. Furthermore, posttranscriptional regulation accounts for changes in transcript abundance by SA treatment for some genes.

  15. Global protein synthesis in human trophoblast is resistant to inhibition by hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S.F.; Fik, E.; Zamudio, S.; Illsley, N.P.

    2012-01-01

    Placental growth and function depend on syncytial cell processes which require the continuing synthesis of cellular proteins. The substantial energy demands of protein synthesis are met primarily from oxidative metabolism. Although the responses of individual proteins produced by the syncytiotrophoblast to oxygen deprivation have been investigated previously, there is no information available on global protein synthesis in syncytiotrophoblast under conditions of hypoxia. These studies were designed to test the hypothesis that syncytial protein synthesis is decreased in a dose-dependent manner by hypoxia. Experiments were performed to measure amino acid incorporation into proteins in primary syncytiotrophoblast cells exposed to oxygen concentrations ranging from 0 to 10%. Compared to cells exposed to normoxia (10% O2), no changes were observed following exposure to 5% or 3% O2, but after exposure to 1% O2, protein synthesis after 24 and 48 h decreased by 24% and 23% and with exposure to 0% O2, by 65% and 50%. As a consequence of these results, we hypothesized that global protein synthesis in conditions of severe hypoxia was being supported by glucose metabolism. Additional experiments were performed therefore to examine the role of glucose in supporting protein synthesis. These demonstrated that at each oxygen concentration there was a significant, decreasing linear trend in protein synthesis as glucose concentration was reduced. Under conditions of near-anoxia and in the absence of glucose, protein synthesis was reduced by >85%. Even under normoxic conditions (defined as 10% O2) and in the presence of oxidative substrates, reductions in glucose were accompanied by decreases in protein synthesis. These experiments demonstrate that syncytiotrophoblast cells are resistant to reductions in protein synthesis at O2 concentrations greater than 1%. This could be explained by our finding that a significant fraction of protein synthesis in the syncytiotrophoblast is

  16. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    PubMed

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics. PMID:9148788

  17. Protein Structure and Evolution: Are They Constrained Globally by a Principle Derived from Information Theory?

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, Leslie; Warr, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    That the physicochemical properties of amino acids constrain the structure, function and evolution of proteins is not in doubt. However, principles derived from information theory may also set bounds on the structure (and thus also the evolution) of proteins. Here we analyze the global properties of the full set of proteins in release 13-11 of the SwissProt database, showing by experimental test of predictions from information theory that their collective structure exhibits properties that are consistent with their being guided by a conservation principle. This principle (Conservation of Information) defines the global properties of systems composed of discrete components each of which is in turn assembled from discrete smaller pieces. In the system of proteins, each protein is a component, and each protein is assembled from amino acids. Central to this principle is the inter-relationship of the unique amino acid count and total length of a protein and its implications for both average protein length and occurrence of proteins with specific unique amino acid counts. The unique amino acid count is simply the number of distinct amino acids (including those that are post-translationally modified) that occur in a protein, and is independent of the number of times that the particular amino acid occurs in the sequence. Conservation of Information does not operate at the local level (it is independent of the physicochemical properties of the amino acids) where the influences of natural selection are manifest in the variety of protein structure and function that is well understood. Rather, this analysis implies that Conservation of Information would define the global bounds within which the whole system of proteins is constrained; thus it appears to be acting to constrain evolution at a level different from natural selection, a conclusion that appears counter-intuitive but is supported by the studies described herein. PMID:25970335

  18. Protein structure and evolution: are they constrained globally by a principle derived from information theory?

    PubMed

    Hatton, Leslie; Warr, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    That the physicochemical properties of amino acids constrain the structure, function and evolution of proteins is not in doubt. However, principles derived from information theory may also set bounds on the structure (and thus also the evolution) of proteins. Here we analyze the global properties of the full set of proteins in release 13-11 of the SwissProt database, showing by experimental test of predictions from information theory that their collective structure exhibits properties that are consistent with their being guided by a conservation principle. This principle (Conservation of Information) defines the global properties of systems composed of discrete components each of which is in turn assembled from discrete smaller pieces. In the system of proteins, each protein is a component, and each protein is assembled from amino acids. Central to this principle is the inter-relationship of the unique amino acid count and total length of a protein and its implications for both average protein length and occurrence of proteins with specific unique amino acid counts. The unique amino acid count is simply the number of distinct amino acids (including those that are post-translationally modified) that occur in a protein, and is independent of the number of times that the particular amino acid occurs in the sequence. Conservation of Information does not operate at the local level (it is independent of the physicochemical properties of the amino acids) where the influences of natural selection are manifest in the variety of protein structure and function that is well understood. Rather, this analysis implies that Conservation of Information would define the global bounds within which the whole system of proteins is constrained; thus it appears to be acting to constrain evolution at a level different from natural selection, a conclusion that appears counter-intuitive but is supported by the studies described herein.

  19. Acetyl-Phosphate Is Not a Global Regulatory Bridge between Virulence and Central Metabolism in Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Crystal L.; Lawrence, Kevin A.; Su, Hua; Yang, Youyun; Yang, X. Frank; Dulebohn, Daniel P.; Gherardini, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    In B. burgdorferi, the Rrp2-RpoN-RpoS signaling cascade is a distinctive system that coordinates the expression of virulence factors required for successful transition between its arthropod vector and mammalian hosts. Rrp2 (BB0763), an RpoN specific response regulator, is essential to activate this regulatory pathway. Previous investigations have attempted to identify the phosphate donor of Rrp2, including the cognate histidine kinase, Hk2 (BB0764), non-cognate histidine kinases such as Hk1, CheA1, and CheA2, and small molecular weight P-donors such as carbamoyl-phosphate and acetyl-phosphate (AcP). In a report by Xu et al., exogenous sodium acetate led to increased expression of RpoS and OspC and it was hypothesized this effect was due to increased levels of AcP via the enzyme AckA (BB0622). Genome analyses identified only one pathway that could generate AcP in B. burgdorferi: the acetate/mevalonate pathway that synthesizes the lipid, undecaprenyl phosphate (C55-P, lipid I), which is essential for cell wall biogenesis. To assess the role of AcP in Rrp2–dependent regulation of RpoS and OspC, we used a unique selection strategy to generate mutants that lacked ackA (bb0622: acetate to AcP) or pta (bb0589: AcP to acetyl-CoA). These mutants have an absolute requirement for mevalonate and demonstrate that ackA and pta are required for cell viability. When the ΔackA or Δpta mutant was exposed to conditions (i.e., increased temperature or cell density) that up-regulate the expression of RpoS and OspC, normal induction of those proteins was observed. In addition, adding 20mM acetate or 20mM benzoate to the growth media of B. burgdorferi strain B31 ΔackA induced the expression of RpoS and OspC. These data suggest that AcP (generated by AckA) is not directly involved in modulating the Rrp2-RpoN-RpoS regulatory pathway and that exogenous acetate or benzoate are triggering an acid stress response in B. burgdorferi. PMID:26681317

  20. UbiNet: an online resource for exploring the functional associations and regulatory networks of protein ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van-Nui; Huang, Kai-Yao; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya; Lai, K Robert; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitylation catalyzed by E3 ubiquitin ligases are crucial in the regulation of many cellular processes. Owing to the high throughput of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, a number of methods have been developed for the experimental determination of ubiquitylation sites, leading to a large collection of ubiquitylation data. However, there exist no resources for the exploration of E3-ligase-associated regulatory networks of for ubiquitylated proteins in humans. Therefore, the UbiNet database was developed to provide a full investigation of protein ubiquitylation networks by incorporating experimentally verified E3 ligases, ubiquitylated substrates and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). To date, UbiNet has accumulated 43 948 experimentally verified ubiquitylation sites from 14 692 ubiquitylated proteins of humans. Additionally, we have manually curated 499 E3 ligases as well as two E1 activating and 46 E2 conjugating enzymes. To delineate the regulatory networks among E3 ligases and ubiquitylated proteins, a total of 430 530 PPIs were integrated into UbiNet for the exploration of ubiquitylation networks with an interactive network viewer. A case study demonstrated that UbiNet was able to decipher a scheme for the ubiquitylation of tumor proteins p63 and p73 that is consistent with their functions. Although the essential role of Mdm2 in p53 regulation is well studied, UbiNet revealed that Mdm2 and additional E3 ligases might be implicated in the regulation of other tumor proteins by protein ubiquitylation. Moreover, UbiNet could identify potential substrates for a specific E3 ligase based on PPIs and substrate motifs. With limited knowledge about the mechanisms through which ubiquitylated proteins are regulated by E3 ligases, UbiNet offers users an effective means for conducting preliminary analyses of protein ubiquitylation. The UbiNet database is now freely accessible via http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/UbiNet/ The content is regularly updated with the

  1. Regulatory role of the 90-kDa-heat-shock protein (Hsp90) and associated factors on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Erlejman, Alejandra G; Lagadari, Mariana; Toneatto, Judith; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Galigniana, Mario D

    2014-02-01

    The term molecular chaperone was first used to describe the ability of nucleoplasmin to prevent the aggregation of histones with DNA during the assembly of nucleosomes. Subsequently, the name was extended to proteins that mediate the post-translational assembly of oligomeric complexes protecting them from denaturation and/or aggregation. Hsp90 is a 90-kDa molecular chaperone that represents the major soluble protein of the cell. In contrast to most conventional chaperones, Hsp90 functions as a refined sensor of protein function and its principal role in the cell is to facilitate biological activity to properly folded client proteins that already have a preserved tertiary structure. Consequently, Hsp90 is related to basic cell functions such as cytoplasmic transport of soluble proteins, translocation of client proteins to organelles, and regulation of the biological activity of key signaling factors such as protein kinases, ubiquitin ligases, steroid receptors, cell cycle regulators, and transcription factors. A growing amount of evidence links the protective action of this molecular chaperone to mechanisms related to posttranslational modifications of soluble nuclear factors as well as histones. In this article, we discuss some aspects of the regulatory action of Hsp90 on transcriptional regulation and how this effect could have impacted genetic assimilation mechanism in some organisms.

  2. Regulatory role of the 90-kDa-heat-shock protein (Hsp90) and associated factors on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Erlejman, Alejandra G; Lagadari, Mariana; Toneatto, Judith; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Galigniana, Mario D

    2014-02-01

    The term molecular chaperone was first used to describe the ability of nucleoplasmin to prevent the aggregation of histones with DNA during the assembly of nucleosomes. Subsequently, the name was extended to proteins that mediate the post-translational assembly of oligomeric complexes protecting them from denaturation and/or aggregation. Hsp90 is a 90-kDa molecular chaperone that represents the major soluble protein of the cell. In contrast to most conventional chaperones, Hsp90 functions as a refined sensor of protein function and its principal role in the cell is to facilitate biological activity to properly folded client proteins that already have a preserved tertiary structure. Consequently, Hsp90 is related to basic cell functions such as cytoplasmic transport of soluble proteins, translocation of client proteins to organelles, and regulation of the biological activity of key signaling factors such as protein kinases, ubiquitin ligases, steroid receptors, cell cycle regulators, and transcription factors. A growing amount of evidence links the protective action of this molecular chaperone to mechanisms related to posttranslational modifications of soluble nuclear factors as well as histones. In this article, we discuss some aspects of the regulatory action of Hsp90 on transcriptional regulation and how this effect could have impacted genetic assimilation mechanism in some organisms. PMID:24389346

  3. Preservation of Gene Duplication Increases the Regulatory Spectrum of Ribosomal Protein Genes and Enhances Growth under Stress.

    PubMed

    Parenteau, Julie; Lavoie, Mathieu; Catala, Mathieu; Malik-Ghulam, Mustafa; Gagnon, Jules; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2015-12-22

    In baker's yeast, the majority of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are duplicated, and it was recently proposed that such duplications are preserved via the functional specialization of the duplicated genes. However, the origin and nature of duplicated RPGs' (dRPGs) functional specificity remain unclear. In this study, we show that differences in dRPG functions are generated by variations in the modality of gene expression and, to a lesser extent, by protein sequence. Analysis of the sequence and expression patterns of non-intron-containing RPGs indicates that each dRPG is controlled by specific regulatory sequences modulating its expression levels in response to changing growth conditions. Homogenization of dRPG sequences reduces cell tolerance to growth under stress without changing the number of expressed genes. Together, the data reveal a model where duplicated genes provide a means for modulating the expression of ribosomal proteins in response to stress. PMID:26686636

  4. Conformation-selective ATP-competitive inhibitors control regulatory interactions and noncatalytic functions of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Hari, Sanjay B; Merritt, Ethan A; Maly, Dustin J

    2014-05-22

    Most potent protein kinase inhibitors act by competing with ATP to block the phosphotransferase activity of their targets. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that ATP-competitive inhibitors can affect kinase interactions and functions in ways beyond blocking catalytic activity. Here, we show that stabilizing alternative ATP-binding site conformations of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38α and Erk2 with ATP-competitive inhibitors differentially, and in some cases divergently, modulates the abilities of these kinases to interact with upstream activators and deactivating phosphatases. Conformation-selective ligands are also able to modulate Erk2's ability to allosterically activate the MAPK phosphatase DUSP6, highlighting how ATP-competitive ligands can control noncatalytic kinase functions. Overall, these studies underscore the relationship between the ATP-binding and regulatory sites of MAPKs and provide insight into how ATP-competitive ligands can be designed to confer graded control over protein kinase function.

  5. Human cervical cancer cells use Ca2+ signalling, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase in regulatory volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Shen, M R; Chou, C Y; Browning, J A; Wilkins, R J; Ellory, J C

    2001-12-01

    1. This study was aimed at identifying the signalling pathways involved in the activation of volume-regulatory mechanisms of human cervical cancer cells. 2. Osmotic swelling of human cervical cancer cells induced a substantial increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) by the activation of Ca2+ entry across the cell membrane, as well as Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This Ca2+ signalling was critical for the normal regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response. 3. The activation of swelling-activated ion and taurine transport was significantly inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin AG 1478) and potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na3VO4. However, the Src family of tyrosine kinases was not involved in regulation of the swelling-activated Cl- channel. 4. Cell swelling triggered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades leading to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/ERK2) and p38 kinase. The volume-responsive ERK1/ERK2 signalling pathway linked with the activation of K+ and Cl- channels, and taurine transport. However, the volume-regulatory mechanism was independent of the activation of p38 MAP kinase. 5. The phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 expression following a hypotonic shock was up-regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and down-regulated by PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The response of ERK activation to hypotonicity also required Ca2+ entry and depended on tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated/ERK-activating kinase (MEK) activity. 6. Considering the results overall, osmotic swelling promotes the activation of tyrosine kinase and ERK1/ERK2 and raises intracellular Ca2+, all of which play a crucial role in the volume-regulatory mechanism of human cervical cancer cells. PMID:11731569

  6. Leucine-responsive regulatory protein Lrp and PapI homologues influence phase variation of CS31A fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Graveline, Richard; Garneau, Philippe; Martin, Christine; Mourez, Michaël; Hancock, Mark A; Lavoie, Rémi; Harel, Josée

    2014-08-15

    CS31A, a K88-related surface antigen specified by the clp operon, is a member of the type P family of adhesive factors and plays a key role in the establishment of disease caused by septicemic and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains. Its expression is under the control of methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation, for which the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is essential. CS31A is preferentially in the OFF state and exhibits distinct regulatory features compared to the regulation of other P family members. In the present study, surface plasmon resonance and DNase I protection assays showed that Lrp binds to the distal moiety of the clp regulatory region with low micromolar affinity compared to its binding to the proximal moiety, which exhibits stronger, nanomolar affinity. The complex formation was also influenced by the addition of PapI or FooI, which increased the affinity of Lrp for the clp distal and proximal regions and was required to induce phase variation. The influence of PapI or FooI, however, was predominantly associated with a more complete shutdown of clp expression, in contrast to what has previously been observed with AfaF (a PapI ortholog). Taken together, these results suggest that the preferential OFF state observed in CS31A cells is mainly due to the weak interaction of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein with the clp distal region and that the PapI homolog favors the OFF phase. Within the large repertoire of fimbrial variants in the P family, our study illustrates that having a fimbrial operon that lacks its own PapI ortholog allows it to be more flexibly regulated by other orthologs in the cell. PMID:24914179

  7. UbiNet: an online resource for exploring the functional associations and regulatory networks of protein ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van-Nui; Huang, Kai-Yao; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya; Lai, K. Robert; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitylation catalyzed by E3 ubiquitin ligases are crucial in the regulation of many cellular processes. Owing to the high throughput of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, a number of methods have been developed for the experimental determination of ubiquitylation sites, leading to a large collection of ubiquitylation data. However, there exist no resources for the exploration of E3-ligase-associated regulatory networks of for ubiquitylated proteins in humans. Therefore, the UbiNet database was developed to provide a full investigation of protein ubiquitylation networks by incorporating experimentally verified E3 ligases, ubiquitylated substrates and protein–protein interactions (PPIs). To date, UbiNet has accumulated 43 948 experimentally verified ubiquitylation sites from 14 692 ubiquitylated proteins of humans. Additionally, we have manually curated 499 E3 ligases as well as two E1 activating and 46 E2 conjugating enzymes. To delineate the regulatory networks among E3 ligases and ubiquitylated proteins, a total of 430 530 PPIs were integrated into UbiNet for the exploration of ubiquitylation networks with an interactive network viewer. A case study demonstrated that UbiNet was able to decipher a scheme for the ubiquitylation of tumor proteins p63 and p73 that is consistent with their functions. Although the essential role of Mdm2 in p53 regulation is well studied, UbiNet revealed that Mdm2 and additional E3 ligases might be implicated in the regulation of other tumor proteins by protein ubiquitylation. Moreover, UbiNet could identify potential substrates for a specific E3 ligase based on PPIs and substrate motifs. With limited knowledge about the mechanisms through which ubiquitylated proteins are regulated by E3 ligases, UbiNet offers users an effective means for conducting preliminary analyses of protein ubiquitylation. The UbiNet database is now freely accessible via http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/UbiNet/. The content is regularly updated with the

  8. Local-global alignment for finding 3D similarities in protein structures

    DOEpatents

    Zemla, Adam T.

    2011-09-20

    A method of finding 3D similarities in protein structures of a first molecule and a second molecule. The method comprises providing preselected information regarding the first molecule and the second molecule. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Longest Continuous Segments (LCS) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Global Distance Test (GDT) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Local Global Alignment Scoring function (LGA_S) analysis. Verifying constructed alignment and repeating the steps to find the regions of 3D similarities in protein structures.

  9. Nickel decreases cellular iron level and converts cytosolic aconitase to iron-regulatory protein 1 in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haobin; Davidson, Todd; Singleton, Steven; Garrick, Michael D; Costa, Max

    2005-08-15

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are well-established carcinogens and are known to initiate a hypoxic response in cells via the stabilization and transactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha). This change may be the consequence of nickel's interference with the function of several Fe(II)-dependent enzymes. In this study, the effects of soluble nickel exposure on cellular iron homeostasis were investigated. Nickel treatment decreased both mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase (c-aconitase) activity in A549 cells. Cytosolic aconitase was converted to iron-regulatory protein 1, a form critical for the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. The increased activity of iron-regulatory protein 1 after nickel exposure stabilized and increased transferrin receptor (Tfr) mRNA and antagonized the iron-induced ferritin light chain protein synthesis. The decrease of aconitase activity after nickel treatment reflected neither direct interference with aconitase function nor obstruction of [4Fe-4S] cluster reconstitution by nickel. Exposure of A549 cells to soluble nickel decreased total cellular iron by about 40%, a decrease that likely caused the observed decrease in aconitase activity and the increase of iron-regulatory protein 1 activity. Iron treatment reversed the effect of nickel on cytosolic aconitase and iron-regulatory protein 1. To assess the mechanism for the observed effects, human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells over expressing divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) were compared to A549 cells expressing only endogenous transporters for inhibition of iron uptake by nickel. The inhibition data suggest that nickel can enter via DMT1 and compete with iron for entry into the cell. This disturbance of cellular iron homeostasis by nickel may have a great impact on the ability of the cell to regulate a variety of cell functions, as well as create a state of hypoxia in cells under normal oxygen tension. These effects may be very important in how nickel exerts phenotypic

  10. A Proteomic Strategy for Global Analysis of Plant Protein Complexes[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Uma K.; Xiong, Yi; McBride, Zachary; Kihara, Daisuke; Xie, Jun; Hall, Mark C.; Szymanski, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Global analyses of protein complex assembly, composition, and location are needed to fully understand how cells coordinate diverse metabolic, mechanical, and developmental activities. The most common methods for proteome-wide analysis of protein complexes rely on affinity purification-mass spectrometry or yeast two-hybrid approaches. These methods are time consuming and are not suitable for many plant species that are refractory to transformation or genome-wide cloning of open reading frames. Here, we describe the proof of concept for a method allowing simultaneous global analysis of endogenous protein complexes that begins with intact leaves and combines chromatographic separation of extracts from subcellular fractions with quantitative label-free protein abundance profiling by liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry. Applying this approach to the crude cytosolic fraction of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves using size exclusion chromatography, we identified hundreds of cytosolic proteins that appeared to exist as components of stable protein complexes. The reliability of the method was validated by protein immunoblot analysis and comparisons with published size exclusion chromatography data and the masses of known complexes. The method can be implemented with appropriate instrumentation, is applicable to any biological system, and has the potential to be further developed to characterize the composition of protein complexes and measure the dynamics of protein complex localization and assembly under different conditions. PMID:25293756

  11. Alanine and proline content modulate global sensitivity to discrete perturbations in disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Perez, Romel B; Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew; Whitten, Steven T

    2014-12-01

    Molecular transduction of biological signals is understood primarily in terms of the cooperative structural transitions of protein macromolecules, providing a mechanism through which discrete local structure perturbations affect global macromolecular properties. The recognition that proteins lacking tertiary stability, commonly referred to as intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), mediate key signaling pathways suggests that protein structures without cooperative intramolecular interactions may also have the ability to couple local and global structure changes. Presented here are results from experiments that measured and tested the ability of disordered proteins to couple local changes in structure to global changes in structure. Using the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein as an experimental model, a set of proline (PRO) and alanine (ALA) to glycine (GLY) substitution variants were designed to modulate backbone conformational propensities without introducing non-native intramolecular interactions. The hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) was used to monitor changes in global structure. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the GLY substitutions decreased polyproline II (PP(II)) propensities relative to the wild type, as expected, and fluorescence methods indicated that substitution-induced changes in R(h) were not associated with folding. The experiments showed that changes in local PP(II) structure cause changes in R(h) that are variable and that depend on the intrinsic chain propensities of PRO and ALA residues, demonstrating a mechanism for coupling local and global structure changes. Molecular simulations that model our results were used to extend the analysis to other proteins and illustrate the generality of the observed PRO and alanine effects on the structures of IDPs.

  12. Evaluation of affinity-tagged protein expression strategies using local and global isotope ratio measurements.

    PubMed

    Hervey, W Judson; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai; Lankford, Patricia K; Owens, Elizabeth T; McKeown, Catherine K; Lu, Tse-Yuan; Foote, Linda J; Asano, Keiji G; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; McDonald, W Hayes; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory B

    2009-07-01

    Elucidation of protein-protein interactions can provide new knowledge on protein function. Enrichments of affinity-tagged (or "bait") proteins with interaction partners generally include background, nonspecific protein artifacts. Furthermore, in vivo bait expression may introduce additional artifacts arising from altered physiology or metabolism. In this study, we compared these effects for chromosome and plasmid encoding strategies for bait proteins in two microbes: Escherichia coli and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Differential metabolic labeling of strains expressing bait protein relative to the wild-type strain in each species allowed comparison by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). At the local level of the protein complex, authentic interacting proteins of RNA polymerase (RNAP) were successfully discerned from artifactual proteins by the isotopic differentiation of interactions as random or targeted (I-DIRT, Tackett, A. J.; et al. J. Proteome Res. 2005, 4, 1752-1756). To investigate global effects of bait protein production, we compared proteomes from strains harboring a plasmid encoding an affinity-tagged subunit (RpoA) of RNAP with the corresponding wild-type strains. The RpoA abundance ratios of 0.8 for R. palustris and 1.7 for E. coli in plasmid strains versus wild-type indicated only slightly altered expression. While most other proteins also showed no appreciable difference in abundance, several that did show altered levels were involved in amino acid metabolism. Measurements at both local and global levels proved useful for evaluating in vitro and in vivo artifacts of plasmid-encoding strategies for bait protein expression.

  13. The alternate AP-1 adaptor subunit Apm2 interacts with the Mil1 regulatory protein and confers differential cargo sorting

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Shawn T.; Burston, Helen E.; Bean, Björn D. M.; Raghuram, Nandini; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Davey, Michael; Wendland, Beverly; Conibear, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Heterotetrameric adaptor protein complexes are important mediators of cargo protein sorting in clathrin-coated vesicles. The cell type–specific expression of alternate μ chains creates distinct forms of AP-1 with altered cargo sorting, but how these subunits confer differential function is unclear. Whereas some studies suggest the μ subunits specify localization to different cellular compartments, others find that the two forms of AP-1 are present in the same vesicle but recognize different cargo. Yeast have two forms of AP-1, which differ only in the μ chain. Here we show that the variant μ chain Apm2 confers distinct cargo-sorting functions. Loss of Apm2, but not of Apm1, increases cell surface levels of the v-SNARE Snc1. However, Apm2 is unable to replace Apm1 in sorting Chs3, which requires a dileucine motif recognized by the γ/σ subunits common to both complexes. Apm2 and Apm1 colocalize at Golgi/early endosomes, suggesting that they do not associate with distinct compartments. We identified a novel, conserved regulatory protein that is required for Apm2-dependent sorting events. Mil1 is a predicted lipase that binds Apm2 but not Apm1 and contributes to its membrane recruitment. Interactions with specific regulatory factors may provide a general mechanism to diversify the functional repertoire of clathrin adaptor complexes. PMID:26658609

  14. Drug-drug interactions related to altered absorption and plasma protein binding: theoretical and regulatory considerations, and an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Jerome; Tang, Cuyue; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant

    2015-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) related to altered drug absorption and plasma protein binding have received much less attention from regulatory agencies relative to DDIs mediated via drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. In this review, a number of theoretical bases and regulatory framework are presented for these DDI aspects. Also presented is an industry perspective on how to approach these issues in support of drug development. Overall, with the exception of highly permeable and highly soluble (BCS 1) drugs, DDIs related to drug-induced changes in gastrointestinal (GI) physiology can be substantial, thus warranting more attentions. For a better understanding of absorption-associated DDI potential in a clinical setting, mechanistic studies should be conducted based on holistic integration of the pharmaceutical profiles (e.g., pH-dependent solubility) and pharmacological properties (e.g., GI physiology and therapeutic margin) of drug candidates. Although majority of DDI events related to altered plasma protein binding are not expected to be of clinical significance, exceptions exist for a subset of compounds with certain pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties. Knowledge of the identity of binding proteins and the binding extent in various clinical setting (including disease states) can be valuable in aiding clinical DDI data interpretations, and ensuring safe and effective use of new drugs.

  15. Rethinking gene regulatory networks in light of alternative splicing, intrinsically disordered protein domains, and post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Karl J.; Bondos, Sarah E.; Dunker, A. Keith; Newman, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Models for genetic regulation and cell fate specification characteristically assume that gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are essentially deterministic and exhibit multiple stable states specifying alternative, but pre-figured cell fates. Mounting evidence shows, however, that most eukaryotic precursor RNAs undergo alternative splicing (AS) and that the majority of transcription factors contain intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) domains whose functionalities are context dependent as well as subject to post-translational modification (PTM). Consequently, many transcription factors do not have fixed cis-acting regulatory targets, and developmental determination by GRNs alone is untenable. Modeling these phenomena requires a multi-scale approach to explain how GRNs operationally interact with the intra- and intercellular environments. Evidence shows that AS, IDP, and PTM complicate gene expression and act synergistically to facilitate and promote time- and cell-specific protein modifications involved in cell signaling and cell fate specification and thereby disrupt a strict deterministic GRN-phenotype mapping. The combined effects of AS, IDP, and PTM give proteomes physiological plasticity, adaptive responsiveness, and developmental versatility without inefficiently expanding genome size. They also help us understand how protein functionalities can undergo major evolutionary changes by buffering mutational consequences. PMID:25767796

  16. Stress-induced Start Codon Fidelity Regulates Arsenite-inducible Regulatory Particle-associated Protein (AIRAP) Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Lolita; Braunstein, Ilana; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Initial steps in protein synthesis are highly regulated processes as they define the reading frame of the translation machinery. Eukaryotic translation initiation is a process facilitated by numerous factors (eIFs), aimed to form a “scanning” mechanism toward the initiation codon. Translation initiation of the main open reading frame (ORF) in an mRNA transcript has been reported to be regulated by upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in a manner of re-initiation. This mode of regulation is governed by the phosphorylation status of eIF2α and controlled by cellular stresses. Another mode of translational initiation regulation is leaky scanning, and this regulatory process has not been extensively studied. We have identified arsenite-inducible regulatory particle-associated protein (AIRAP) transcript to be translationally induced during arsenite stress conditions. AIRAP transcript contains a single uORF in a poor-kozak context. AIRAP translation induction is governed by means of leaky scanning and not re-initiation. This induction of AIRAP is solely dependent on eIF1 and the uORF kozak context. We show that eIF1 is phosphorylated under specific conditions that induce protein misfolding and have biochemically characterized this site of phosphorylation. Our data indicate that leaky scanning like re-initiation is responsive to stress conditions and that leaky scanning can induce ORF translation by bypassing poor kozak context of a single uORF transcript. PMID:24898249

  17. Protein kinase A type II-α regulatory subunit regulates the response of prostate cancer cells to taxane treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zynda, Evan R; Matveev, Vitaliy; Makhanov, Michael; Chenchik, Alexander; Kandel, Eugene S

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade taxane-based therapy has emerged as a standard of care for hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Nevertheless, a significant fraction of tumors show no appreciable response to the treatment, while the others develop resistance and recur. Despite years of intense research, the mechanisms of taxane resistance in prostate cancer and other malignancies are poorly understood and remain a topic of intense investigation. We have used improved mutagenesis via random insertion of a strong promoter to search for events, which enable survival of prostate cancer cells after Taxol exposure. High-throughput mapping of the integration sites pointed to the PRKAR2A gene, which codes for a type II-α regulatory subunit of protein kinase A, as a candidate modulator of drug response. Both full-length and N-terminally truncated forms of the PRKAR2A gene product markedly increased survival of prostate cancer cells lines treated with Taxol and Taxotere. Suppression of protein kinase A enzymatic activity is the likely mechanism of action of the overexpressed proteins. Accordingly, protein kinase A inhibitor PKI (6–22) amide reduced toxicity of Taxol to prostate cancer cells. Our findings support the role of protein kinase A and its constituent proteins in cell response to chemotherapy. PMID:25485509

  18. Protein-energy malnutrition alters hippocampal plasticity-associated protein expression following global ischemia in the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Prosser-Loose, Erin J; Verge, Valerie M K; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2010-11-01

    Previously it has been demonstrated that protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) impairs habituation in the open field test following global ischemia. The present study examined the hypothesis that PEM exerts some of its deleterious effects on functional outcome by altering the post-ischemic expression of the plasticity-associated genes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB), and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Male, Mongolian gerbils (11-12 wk) were randomized to either control diet (12.5% protein) or PEM (2% protein) for 4 wk, and then underwent 5 min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion or sham surgery. Tympanic temperature was maintained at 36.5 ± 0.5°C during surgery. Brains collected at 1, 3 and 7 d post-surgery were processed by in-situ hybridization or immunofluorescence. BDNF and trkB mRNA expression was increased in hippocampal CA1 neurons after ischemia at all time points and was not significantly influenced by diet. However, increased trkB protein expression after ischemia was exacerbated by PEM at 7 d in the CA1 region. Post-ischemic GAP-43 protein increased at 3 and 7 d in the CA1 region, and PEM intensified this response and extended it to the CA3 and hilar regions. PEM exerted these effects without exacerbating CA1 neuron loss caused by global ischemia. The findings suggest that PEM increases the stress response and/or hyper-excitability in the hippocampus after global ischemia. Nutritional care appears to have robust effects on plasticity mechanisms important to recovery after brain ischemia.

  19. Identification of Regulatory and Cargo Proteins of Endosomal and Secretory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana by Proteomic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Heard, William; Sklenář, Jan; Tomé, Daniel F A; Robatzek, Silke; Jones, Alexandra M E

    2015-07-01

    The cell's endomembranes comprise an intricate, highly dynamic and well-organized system. In plants, the proteins that regulate function of the various endomembrane compartments and their cargo remain largely unknown. Our aim was to dissect subcellular trafficking routes by enriching for partially overlapping subpopulations of endosomal proteomes associated with endomembrane markers. We selected RABD2a/ARA5, RABF2b/ARA7, RABF1/ARA6, and RABG3f as markers for combinations of the Golgi, trans-Golgi network (TGN), early endosomes (EE), secretory vesicles, late endosomes (LE), multivesicular bodies (MVB), and the tonoplast. As comparisons we used Golgi transport 1 (GOT1), which localizes to the Golgi, clathrin light chain 2 (CLC2) labeling clathrin-coated vesicles and pits and the vesicle-associated membrane protein 711 (VAMP711) present at the tonoplast. We developed an easy-to-use method by refining published protocols based on affinity purification of fluorescent fusion constructs to these seven subcellular marker proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We present a total of 433 proteins, only five of which were shared among all enrichments, while many proteins were common between endomembrane compartments of the same trafficking route. Approximately half, 251 proteins, were assigned to one enrichment only. Our dataset contains known regulators of endosome functions including small GTPases, SNAREs, and tethering complexes. We identify known cargo proteins such as PIN3, PEN3, CESA, and the recently defined TPLATE complex. The subcellular localization of two GTPase regulators predicted from our enrichments was validated using live-cell imaging. This is the first proteomic dataset to discriminate between such highly overlapping endomembrane compartments in plants and can be used as a general proteomic resource to predict the localization of proteins and identify the components of regulatory complexes and provides a useful tool for the identification of new protein

  20. Identification of Regulatory and Cargo Proteins of Endosomal and Secretory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana by Proteomic Dissection*

    PubMed Central

    Heard, William; Sklenář, Jan; Tomé, Daniel F. A.; Robatzek, Silke; Jones, Alexandra M. E.

    2015-01-01

    The cell's endomembranes comprise an intricate, highly dynamic and well-organized system. In plants, the proteins that regulate function of the various endomembrane compartments and their cargo remain largely unknown. Our aim was to dissect subcellular trafficking routes by enriching for partially overlapping subpopulations of endosomal proteomes associated with endomembrane markers. We selected RABD2a/ARA5, RABF2b/ARA7, RABF1/ARA6, and RABG3f as markers for combinations of the Golgi, trans-Golgi network (TGN), early endosomes (EE), secretory vesicles, late endosomes (LE), multivesicular bodies (MVB), and the tonoplast. As comparisons we used Golgi transport 1 (GOT1), which localizes to the Golgi, clathrin light chain 2 (CLC2) labeling clathrin-coated vesicles and pits and the vesicle-associated membrane protein 711 (VAMP711) present at the tonoplast. We developed an easy-to-use method by refining published protocols based on affinity purification of fluorescent fusion constructs to these seven subcellular marker proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We present a total of 433 proteins, only five of which were shared among all enrichments, while many proteins were common between endomembrane compartments of the same trafficking route. Approximately half, 251 proteins, were assigned to one enrichment only. Our dataset contains known regulators of endosome functions including small GTPases, SNAREs, and tethering complexes. We identify known cargo proteins such as PIN3, PEN3, CESA, and the recently defined TPLATE complex. The subcellular localization of two GTPase regulators predicted from our enrichments was validated using live-cell imaging. This is the first proteomic dataset to discriminate between such highly overlapping endomembrane compartments in plants and can be used as a general proteomic resource to predict the localization of proteins and identify the components of regulatory complexes and provides a useful tool for the identification of new protein

  1. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 is Expressed inOsteoblasts and Regulated by PTH

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sonali; Mahalingam, Chandrika D.; Das, Varsha; Levi, Edi; Rishi, Arun K.; Datta, Nabanita S.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •CARP-1 is identified for the first time in bone cells. •PTH downregulates CARP-1 expression in differentiated osteoblasts. •PTH displaces CARP-1 from nucleus to the cytoplasm in differentiated osteoblasts. •Downregulation of CARP-1 by PTH involves PKA, PKC and P-p38 MAPK pathways. -- Abstract: Bone mass is dependent on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and life-span of osteoblasts. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) controls osteoblast cell cycle regulatory proteins and suppresses mature osteoblasts apoptosis. Intermittent administration of PTH increases bone mass but the mechanism of action are complex and incompletely understood. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 (aka CCAR1) is a novel transducer of signaling by diverse agents including cell growth and differentiation factors. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanism, we investigated involvement of CARP-1 in PTH signaling in osteoblasts. Immunostaining studies revealed presence of CARP-1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes, while a minimal to absent levels were noted in the chondrocytes of femora from 10 to 12-week old mice. Treatment of 7-day differentiated MC3T3-E1 clone-4 (MC-4) mouse osteoblastic cells and primary calvarial osteoblasts with PTH for 30 min to 5 h followed by Western blot analysis showed 2- to 3-fold down-regulation of CARP-1 protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner compared to the respective vehicle treated control cells. H-89, a Protein Kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, suppressed PTH action on CARP-1 protein expression indicating PKA-dependent mechanism. PMA, a Protein Kinase C (PKC) agonist, mimicked PTH action, and the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, partially blocked PTH-dependent downregulation of CARP-1, implying involvement of PKC. U0126, a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Kinase (MEK) inhibitor, failed to interfere with CARP-1 suppression by PTH. In contrast, SB203580, p38 inhibitor, attenuated PTH down-regulation of CARP-1

  2. Expression of protein kinase A regulatory subunits in benign and malignant human thyroid tissues: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Peverelli, Erika; Treppiedi, Donatella; Lania, Andrea; Mantovani, Giovanna; Ferrero, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms and prognostic implications of the protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway in human tumors, with special emphasis on the malignant thyroid. The PKA signaling pathway is differentially activated by the expression of regulatory subunits 1 (R1) and 2 (R2), whose levels change during development, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation. Following the identification of gene mutations within the PKA regulatory subunit R1A (PRKAR1A) that cause Carney complex-associated neoplasms, several investigators have studied PRKAR1A expression in sporadic thyroid tumors. The PKA regulatory subunit R2B (PRKAR2B) is highly expressed in benign, as well as in malignant differentiated and undifferentiated lesions. PRKAR1A is highly expressed in follicular adenomas and malignant lesions with a statistically significant gradient between benign and malignant tumors; however, it is not expressed in hyperplastic nodules. Although the importance of PKA in human malignancy outcomes is not completely understood, PRKAR1A expression correlates with tumor dimension in malignant lesions. Additional studies are needed to determine whether a relationship exists between PKA subunit expression and clinical outcomes, particularly in undifferentiated tumors. In conclusion, the R1A subunit might be a good molecular candidate for the targeted treatment of malignant thyroid tumors. PMID:27321957

  3. Unique N-terminal Arm of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP Protein Plays an Unusual Role in Its Regulatory Function*

    PubMed Central

    Das, Arijit Kumar; Kumar, Vijjamarri Anil; Sevalkar, Ritesh Rajesh; Bansal, Roohi; Sarkar, Dibyendu

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP, a master regulator involved in complex lipid biosynthesis and expression of unknown virulence determinants, is composed of an N-terminal receiver domain and a C-terminal effector domain. The two experimentally characterized PhoP orthologs, from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, display vastly different regulatory capabilities. Here, we demonstrate that the 20-residue-long N-terminal arm unique to M. tuberculosis PhoP plays an essential role in the expanded regulatory capabilities of this important regulator. Although the arm is not required for overall structural stability and/or phosphorylation of the PhoP N-domain, strikingly it is essential for phosphorylation-coupled transcription regulation of target genes. Consistent with this view, arm truncation of PhoP is accompanied by a conformational change of the effector domain, presenting a block in activation subsequent to phosphorylation. These results suggest that presence of the arm, unique to this regulator that shares an otherwise highly conserved domain structure with members of the protein family, contributes to the mechanism of inter-domain interactions. Thus, we propose that the N-terminal arm is an adaptable structural feature of M. tuberculosis PhoP, which evolved to fine-tune regulatory capabilities of the transcription factor in response to the changing physiology of the bacilli within its host. PMID:23963455

  4. Regulation of sterol regulatory-element binding protein 1 gene expression in liver: role of insulin and protein kinase B/cAkt.

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, M; Iynedjian, P B

    2000-01-01

    Insulin stimulates the transcription of the sterol regulatory- element binding protein (SREBP) 1/ADD1 gene in liver. Hepatocytes in primary culture were used to delineate the insulin signalling pathway for induction of SREBP1 gene expression. The inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), wortmannin and LY 294002, abolished the insulin-dependent increase in SREBP1 mRNA, whereas the inhibitor of the mitogen- activated protein kinase cascade, PD 98059, was without effect. To investigate the role of protein kinase B (PKB)/cAkt downstream of PI 3-kinase, hepatocytes were transduced with an adenovirus encoding a PKB--oestrogen receptor fusion protein. The PKB activity of this recombinant protein was rapidly activated in hepatocytes challenged with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT), as was endogenous PKB in hepatocytes challenged with insulin. The addition of OHT to transduced hepatocytes resulted in accumulation of SREBP1 mRNA, with a time-course and magnitude similar to the effect of insulin in non-transduced cells. The level of SREBP1 mRNA was not increased by OHT in hepatocytes expressing a mutant form of the recombinant protein whose PKB activity was not activated by OHT. Thus acute activation of PKB is sufficient to induce SREBP1 mRNA accumulation in primary hepatocytes, and might be the major signalling event by which insulin induces SREBP1 gene expression in the liver. PMID:10861205

  5. Construction of hormonally responsive intact cell hybrids by cell fusion: transfer of. beta. -adrenergic receptor and nucleotide regulatory protein(s) in normal and desensitized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schulster, D.; Salmon, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Fusion of normal, untreated human erythrocytes with desensitized turkey erythrocytes increases isoproterenol stimulation of cyclic (/sup 3/H)AMP accumulation over basal rates. Moreover, pretreatment of the human erythrocytes with cholera toxin before they are fused with desensitized turkey erthythrocytes leads to a large stimulation with isoproterenol. This is even greater and far more rapid than the response obtained if turkey erythrocytes are treated directly with cholera toxin. It is concluded that the stimulation in the fused system is due to the transfer of an ADP-ribosylated subunit of nucleotide regulatory protein.

  6. Inhibition of protein synthesis by TOR inactivation revealed a conserved regulatory mechanism of the BiP chaperone in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Troya, Sandra; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Pérez-Martín, Marta; Moes, Suzette; Jeno, Paul; Florencio, Francisco J; Crespo, José L

    2011-10-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase integrates nutritional and stress signals to coordinately control cell growth in all eukaryotes. TOR associates with highly conserved proteins to constitute two distinct signaling complexes termed TORC1 and TORC2. Inactivation of TORC1 by rapamycin negatively regulates protein synthesis in most eukaryotes. Here, we report that down-regulation of TOR signaling by rapamycin in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in pronounced phosphorylation of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone BiP. Our results indicated that Chlamydomonas TOR regulates BiP phosphorylation through the control of protein synthesis, since rapamycin and cycloheximide have similar effects on BiP modification and protein synthesis inhibition. Modification of BiP by phosphorylation was suppressed under conditions that require the chaperone activity of BiP, such as heat shock stress or tunicamycin treatment, which inhibits N-linked glycosylation of nascent proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. A phosphopeptide localized in the substrate-binding domain of BiP was identified in Chlamydomonas cells treated with rapamycin. This peptide contains a highly conserved threonine residue that might regulate BiP function, as demonstrated by yeast functional assays. Thus, our study has revealed a regulatory mechanism of BiP in Chlamydomonas by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events and assigns a role to the TOR pathway in the control of BiP modification.

  7. Expression and purification of the cynR regulatory gene product: CynR is a DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lamblin, A F; Fuchs, J A

    1993-01-01

    The CynR protein, a member of the LysR family, positively regulates the Escherichia coli cyn operon and negatively autoregulates its own transcription. By S1 mapping analysis, the in vivo cynR transcription start site was located 63 bp upstream of the cynTSX operon transcription start site. Topologically, the cynR and cynTSX promoters overlap and direct transcription in opposite directions. The CynR translation initiation codon was identified by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, and the CynR coding sequence was cloned under the control of a T7 phage promoter. The CynR protein was stably expressed at a high level with a T7 RNA polymerase-T7 phage promoter system. Purification by ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography, and ammonium sulfate fractionation yielded pure CynR protein. Gel shift assays confirmed that CynR is a DNA-binding protein like the other members of the LysR family. The CynR regulatory protein binds specifically to a 136-bp DNA fragment encompassing both the cynR and the cynTSX promoters. Images PMID:8253686

  8. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  9. Using BAC transgenesis in zebrafish to identify regulatory sequences of the amyloid precursor protein gene in humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-coding DNA in and around the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) gene that is central to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) shares little sequence similarity with that of appb in zebrafish. Identifying DNA domains regulating expression of the gene in such situations becomes a challenge. Taking advantage of the zebrafish system that allows rapid functional analyses of gene regulatory sequences, we previously showed that two discontinuous DNA domains in zebrafish appb are important for expression of the gene in neurons: an enhancer in intron 1 and sequences 28–31 kb upstream of the gene. Here we identify the putative transcription factor binding sites responsible for this distal cis-acting regulation, and use that information to identify a regulatory region of the human APP gene. Results Functional analyses of intron 1 enhancer mutations in enhancer-trap BACs expressed as transgenes in zebrafish identified putative binding sites of two known transcription factor proteins, E4BP4/ NFIL3 and Forkhead, to be required for expression of appb. A cluster of three E4BP4 sites at −31 kb is also shown to be essential for neuron-specific expression, suggesting that the dependence of expression on upstream sequences is mediated by these E4BP4 sites. E4BP4/ NFIL3 and XFD1 sites in the intron enhancer and E4BP4/ NFIL3 sites at −31 kb specifically and efficiently bind the corresponding zebrafish proteins in vitro. These sites are statistically over-represented in both the zebrafish appb and the human APP genes, although their locations are different. Remarkably, a cluster of four E4BP4 sites in intron 4 of human APP exists in actively transcribing chromatin in a human neuroblastoma cell-line, SHSY5Y, expressing APP as shown using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments. Thus although the two genes share little sequence conservation, they appear to share the same regulatory logic and are regulated by a similar set of transcription factors. Conclusion The

  10. Regulatory evolution in proteins by turnover and lineage-specific changes of cyclin-dependent kinase consensus sites

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Alan M.; Liku, Muluye E.; Li, Joachim J.; Durbin, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary change in gene regulation is a key mechanism underlying the genetic component of organismal diversity. Here, we study evolution of regulation at the posttranslational level by examining the evolution of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus phosphorylation sites in the protein subunits of the pre-replicative complex (RC). The pre-RC, an assembly of proteins formed during an early stage of DNA replication, is believed to be regulated by CDKs throughout the animals and fungi. Interestingly, although orthologous pre-RC components often contain clusters of CDK consensus sites, the positions and numbers of sites do not seem conserved. By analyzing protein sequences from both distantly and closely related species, we confirm that consensus sites can turn over rapidly even when the local cluster of sites is preserved, consistent with the notion that precise positioning of phosphorylation events is not required for regulation. We also identify evolutionary changes in the clusters of sites and further examine one replication protein, Mcm3, where a cluster of consensus sites near a nucleocytoplasmic transport signal is confined to a specific lineage. We show that the presence or absence of the cluster of sites in different species is associated with differential regulation of the transport signal. These findings suggest that the CDK regulation of MCM nuclear localization was acquired in the lineage leading to Saccharomyces cerevisiae after the divergence with Candida albicans. Our results begin to explore the dynamics of regulatory evolution at the posttranslational level and show interesting similarities to recent observations of regulatory evolution at the level of transcription. PMID:17978194

  11. Pim-2 Kinase Influences Regulatory T Cell Function and Stability by Mediating Foxp3 Protein N-terminal Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guoping; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhiyuan; Dai, Shujia; Ohtani, Takuya; Banham, Alison; Li, Bin; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Hancock, Wayne; Samanta, Arabinda; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I

    2015-08-14

    Regulation of the extent of immune responses is a requirement to maintain self-tolerance and limit inflammatory processes. CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a role in regulation. The Foxp3 transcription factor is considered a dominant regulator for Treg cell development and function. Foxp3 function itself is directly regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications that occur in response to various external stimuli. The Foxp3 protein is a component of several dynamic macromolecular regulatory complexes. The complexes change constituents over time and through different signals to regulate the development and function of regulatory T cells. Here we identified a mechanism regulating Foxp3 level and activity that operates through discrete phosphorylation. The Pim-2 kinase can phosphorylate Foxp3, leading to decreased suppressive functions of Treg cells. The amino-terminal domain of Foxp3 is modified at several sites by Pim-2 kinase. This modification leads to altered expression of proteins related to Treg cell functions and increased Treg cell lineage stability. Treg cell suppressive function can be up-regulated by either pharmacologically inhibiting Pim-2 kinase activity or by genetically knocking out Pim-2 in rodent Treg cells. Deficiency of Pim-2 activity increases murine host resistance to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis in vivo, and a Pim-2 small molecule kinase inhibitor also modified Treg cell functions. Our studies define a pathway for limiting the regulation of Foxp3 function because the Pim-2 kinase represents a potential therapeutic target for modulating the Treg cell suppressive activities in controlling immune responses. PMID:25987564

  12. Proximal tubular epithelial cells possess a novel 42-kilodalton guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, J; Sims, C; Chang, C H; Berti-Mattera, L; Hopfer, U; Douglas, J

    1990-01-01

    The proximal tubule of the kidney represents an important location where adenylate cyclase regulates salt and water transport; yet a detailed characterization of the distribution and classification of guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) and adenylate cyclase is lacking. We used purified brush border (20-fold) and basolateral membranes (14-fold) to characterize parathyroid hormone- and G protein-regulated adenylate cyclase and G-protein distribution. Adenylate cyclase was predominantly localized to basolateral membranes, while the 46-kDa alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gs) was 2-fold higher in brush border membranes than in basolateral membranes. The alpha subunit of the inhibitory G protein (Gi; 41 kDa) was equally distributed on immunoblotting but was 2-fold higher in brush border membranes than in basolateral membranes on radiolabeling with pertussis toxin. A 42-kDa cholera toxin substrate that cross-reacted with antisera to the common alpha subunit of G proteins and to Gs on immunoblotting and that was not immunoprecipitated with two Gi antisera was the most abundant alpha subunit and comprised approximately 1% of the total membrane proteins. These observations suggest that G proteins are important regulators of proximal tubular transport independent of adenylate cyclase. Images PMID:2120702

  13. Evidence for the existence of an Ns-type regulatory protein in Trypanosoma cruzi membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C D; Paladini, A A; Molina y Vedia, L; Torres, H N; Flawiá, M M

    1986-01-01

    The existence of a GTP-binding protein of the Ns type in Trypanosoma cruzi was explored. Epimastigote membranes were labelled by cholera toxin in the presence of [adenine-14C]NAD+. After SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of extracted membrane proteins, a single labelled polypeptide band of apparent Mr approx. 45,000 was detected. Epimastigote cells were treated with N-ethylmaleimide and electrofused to lymphoma S49 cells lacking the Ns protein. Evidence indicates that in such electrofusion-generated cell hybrids a heterologous adenylate cyclase system was reconstituted with the Ns protein provided by T. cruzi epimastigotes. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3099761

  14. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (Srb1) Is Required for Hypoxic Adaptation and Virulence in the Dimorphic Fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Juwen C.; Smulian, A. George

    2016-01-01

    The Histoplasma capsulatum sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), Srb1 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), leucine zipper DNA binding protein family of transcription factors that possess a unique tyrosine (Y) residue instead of an arginine (R) residue in the bHLH region. We have determined that Srb1 message levels increase in a time dependent manner during growth under oxygen deprivation (hypoxia). To further understand the role of Srb1 during infection and hypoxia, we silenced the gene encoding Srb1 using RNA interference (RNAi); characterized the resulting phenotype, determined its response to hypoxia, and its ability to cause disease within an infected host. Silencing of Srb1 resulted in a strain of H. capsulatum that is incapable of surviving in vitro hypoxia. We found that without complete Srb1 expression, H. capsulatum is killed by murine macrophages and avirulent in mice given a lethal dose of yeasts. Additionally, silencing Srb1 inhibited the hypoxic upregulation of other known H. capsulatum hypoxia-responsive genes (HRG), and genes that encode ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes. Consistent with these regulatory functions, Srb1 silenced H. capsulatum cells were hypersensitive to the antifungal azole drug itraconazole. These data support the theory that the H. capsulatum SREBP is critical for hypoxic adaptation and is required for H. capsulatum virulence. PMID:27711233

  15. A novel processing system of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c regulated by polyunsaturated fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Nakakuki, Masanori; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Tatsuto; Imada, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Kiyoshi; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    The proteolytic cascade is the key step in transactivation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), a transcriptional factor of lipid synthesis. Proteolysis of SREBP-2 is strictly regulated by sterols, but that of SREBP-1c was not strongly sterol-regulated, but inhibited by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In this study, the proteolytic processing of SREBP-1 and -2 was examined by transfection studies of cDNA-encoding mutants in which all the known cleavage sites were disrupted. In cultured cells, sterol-regulated SREBP-2 processing was completely eliminated by mutation of cleavage sites. In contrast, the corresponding SREBP-1c mutants as well as wild type exhibited large amounts of cleaved products in the nuclear extracts from culture cells and murine liver in vivo. The nuclear form of the mutant SREBP-1c was induced by delipidated condition and suppressed by eicosapentaenoic acid, an n-3 PUFA, but not by sterols. This novel processing mechanism was affected by neither SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) nor insulin-induced gene (Insig)-1, unlike SREBP-2, but abolished by a serine protease inhibitor. Through analysis of deletion mutant, a site-2 protease recognition sequence (DRSR) was identified to be involved in this novel processing. These findings suggest that SREBP-1c cleavage could be subjected to a novel PUFA-regulated cleavage system in addition to the sterol-regulatory SCAP/Insig system.

  16. Epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus regulatory proteins tat, nef, and rev are expressed in normal human tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Parmentier, H. K.; van Wichen, D. F.; Meyling, F. H.; Goudsmit, J.; Schuurman, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of regulatory proteins tat, rev, and nef of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and tat of HIV-2 was studied in frozen sections of lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected individuals, and various tissues from uninfected persons. In HIV-1-positive lymph nodes, monoclonal antibodies to HIV-1-tat stained solitary cells in the germinal centers and interfollicular zones, and vascular endothelium. Staining by an anti-nef monoclonal antibody was restricted to follicular dendritic cells, whereas anti-rev antibody bound to fibriohistiocytes and high endothelial venules. The antibodies used labeled several cell types in tissues from uninfected individuals. Anti-HIV-1-tat antibodies labeled blood vessels and Hassall's corpuscles in skin and thymus; goblet cells in intestinal tissue and trachea; neural cells in brain and spinal cord; and zymogen-producing cells in pancreas. Anti-rev antibody stained high endothelial venules, Hassall's corpuscles and histiocytes. One anti-nef antibody solely stained follicular dendritic cells in spleen, tonsil, lymph node and Peyer's patches, whereas two other anti-nef antibodies bound to astrocytes, solitary cells in the interfollicular zones of lymph nodes, and skin cells. The current results hamper the immunohistochemical study for pathogenetic and diagnostic use of HIV regulatory protein expression in infected tissue specimens or cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1279980

  17. [Seasonal changes in phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chains and C-protein in myocardium of hibernating ground squirrel Citellus undulatus].

    PubMed

    Malyshev, S L; Osipova, D A; Vikhliantsev, I M; Podlubnaia, Z A

    2006-01-01

    A comparative study concerning the extent of phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chains and C-protein from the left ventricle of hibernating ground squirrel Citellus undulatus during the periods of hibernation and activity was carried out. During hibernation, regulatory light chains of ground squirrel were found to be completely dephosphorylated. In active animals, the share of phosphorylated light chains averages 40-45% of their total amount. The extent of phosphorylation of the cardiac C-protein during hibernation is about two times higher than that in the active state. Seasonal differences in phosphorylation of the two proteins of ground squirrel myocardium are discussed in the context of adaptation to hibernation.

  18. Inhibition of protein kinase C catalytic activity by additional regions within the human protein kinase Calpha-regulatory domain lying outside of the pseudosubstrate sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Kirwan, Angie F; Bibby, Ashley C; Mvilongo, Thierry; Riedel, Heimo; Burke, Thomas; Millis, Sherri Z; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2003-01-01

    The N-terminal pseudosubstrate site within the protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha)-regulatory domain has long been regarded as the major determinant for autoinhibition of catalytic domain activity. Previously, we observed that the PKC-inhibitory capacity of the human PKCalpha-regulatory domain was only reduced partially on removal of the pseudosubstrate sequence [Parissenti, Kirwan, Kim, Colantonio and Schimmer (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 8940-8945]. This finding suggested that one or more additional region(s) contributes to the inhibition of catalytic domain activity. To assess this hypothesis, we first examined the PKC-inhibitory capacity of a smaller fragment of the PKCalpha-regulatory domain consisting of the C1a, C1b and V2 regions [GST-Ralpha(39-177): this protein contained the full regulatory domain of human PKCalpha fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), but lacked amino acids 1-38 (including the pseudosubstrate sequence) and amino acids 178-270 (including the C2 region)]. GST-Ralpha(39-177) significantly inhibited PKC in a phorbol-independent manner and could not bind the peptide substrate used in our assays. These results suggested that a region within C1/V2 directly inhibits catalytic domain activity. Providing further in vivo support for this hypothesis, we found that expression of N-terminally truncated pseudosubstrate-less bovine PKCalpha holoenzymes in yeast was capable of inhibiting cell growth in a phorbol-dependent manner. This suggested that additional autoinhibitory force(s) remained within the truncated holoenzymes that could be relieved by phorbol ester. Using tandem PCR-mediated mutagenesis, we observed that mutation of amino acids 33-86 within GST-Ralpha(39-177) dramatically reduced its PKC-inhibitory capacity when protamine was used as substrate. Mutagenesis of a broad range of sequences within C2 (amino acids 159-242) also significantly reduced PKC-inhibitory capacity. Taken together, these observations support strongly the existence of

  19. Prolactin Regulatory Element Binding Protein Is Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Interaction with NS4B

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingbao; Fujimoto, Akira; Nakamura, Mariko; Aoyagi, Haruyo; Matsuda, Mami; Watashi, Koichi; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Arita, Minetaro; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B protein triggers the membranous HCV replication compartment, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we screened for NS4B-associated membrane proteins by tandem affinity purification and proteome analysis and identified 202 host proteins. Subsequent screening of replicon cells with small interfering RNA identified prolactin regulatory element binding (PREB) to be a novel HCV host cofactor. The interaction between PREB and NS4B was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and proximity ligation assays. PREB colocalized with double-stranded RNA and the newly synthesized HCV RNA labeled with bromouridine triphosphate in HCV replicon cells. Furthermore, PREB shifted to detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), where HCV replication complexes reside, in the presence of NS4B expression in Huh7 cells. However, a PREB mutant lacking the NS4B-binding region (PREBd3) could not colocalize with double-stranded RNA and did not shift to the DRM in the presence of NS4B. These results indicate that PREB locates at the HCV replication complex by interacting with NS4B. PREB silencing inhibited the formation of the membranous HCV replication compartment and increased the protease and nuclease sensitivity of HCV replicase proteins and RNA in DRMs, respectively. Collectively, these data indicate that PREB promotes HCV RNA replication by participating in the formation of the membranous replication compartment and by maintaining its proper structure by interacting with NS4B. Furthermore, PREB was induced by HCV infection in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into HCV host cofactors. IMPORTANCE The hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein NS4B can induce alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum and the formation of a membranous web structure, which provides a platform for the HCV replication complex. The molecular mechanism by which NS4B induces the membranous HCV replication

  20. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles

    PubMed Central

    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  1. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles.

    PubMed

    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  2. Serum and Antibodies of Glaucoma Patients Lead to Changes in the Proteome, Especially Cell Regulatory Proteins, in Retinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Katharina; Funke, Sebastian; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies show significantly specifically changed autoantibody reactions against retinal antigens in the serum of glaucoma and ocular hypertension (OHT) patients in comparison to healthy people. As pathogenesis of glaucoma still is unknown the aim of this study was to analyze if the serum and antibodies of glaucoma patients interact with neuroretinal cells. Methods R28 cells were incubated with serum of patients suffering from primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), normal tension glaucoma (NTG) or OHT, POAG serum after antibody removal and serum from healthy people for 48 h under a normal or an elevated pressure of 15000 Pa (112 mmHg). RGC5 cells were additionally incubated with POAG antibodies under a normal pressure. Protein profiles of the R28 cells were measured with Seldi-Tof-MS, protein identification was performed with Maldi-TofTof-MS. Protein analysis of the RGC5 cells was performed with ESI-Orbitrap MS. Statistical analysis including multivariate statistics, variance component analysis as well as calculating Mahalanobis distances was performed. Results Highly significant changes of the complex protein profiles after incubation with glaucoma and OHT serum in comparison to healthy serum were detected, showing specific changes in the cells (e.g. Protein at 9192 Da (p<0.001)). The variance component analysis showed an effect of the serum of 59% on the cells. The pressure had an effect of 11% on the cells. Antibody removal led to significantly changed cell reactions (p<0.03). Furthermore, the incubation with POAG serum and its antibodies led to pro-apoptotic changes of proteins in the cells. Conclusions These studies show that the serum and the antibodies of glaucoma patients significantly change protein expressions involved in cell regulatory processes in neuroretinal cells. These could lead to a higher vulnerability of retinal cells towards stress factors such as an elevated IOP and eventually could lead to an increased apoptosis of the cells as

  3. Drug Transporters and Na+/H+ Exchange Regulatory Factor PSD-95/Drosophila Discs Large/ZO-1 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Dustin R.; Nolin, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Drug transporters govern the absorption, distribution, and elimination of pharmacologically active compounds. Members of the solute carrier and ATP binding-cassette drug transporter family mediate cellular drug uptake and efflux processes, thereby coordinating the vectorial movement of drugs across epithelial barriers. To exert their physiologic and pharmacological function in polarized epithelia, drug transporters must be targeted and stabilized to appropriate regions of the cell membrane (i.e., apical versus basolateral). Despite the critical importance of drug transporter membrane targeting, the mechanisms that underlie these processes are largely unknown. Several clinically significant drug transporters possess a recognition sequence that binds to PSD-95/Drosophila discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) proteins. PDZ proteins, such as the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF) family, act to stabilize and organize membrane targeting of multiple transmembrane proteins, including many clinically relevant drug transporters. These PDZ proteins are normally abundant at apical membranes, where they tether membrane-delimited transporters. NHERF expression is particularly high at the apical membrane in polarized tissue such as intestinal, hepatic, and renal epithelia, tissues important to drug disposition. Several recent studies have highlighted NHERF proteins as determinants of drug transporter function secondary to their role in controlling membrane abundance and localization. Mounting evidence strongly suggests that NHERF proteins may have clinically significant roles in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of several pharmacologically active compounds and may affect drug action in cancer and chronic kidney disease. For these reasons, NHERF proteins represent a novel class of post-translational mediators of drug transport and novel targets for new drug development. PMID:26092975

  4. The Role of Metal Regulatory Proteins in Brain Oxidative Stress: A Tutorial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The proteins that regulate the metabolism of a metal must also play a role in regulating the redox activity of the metal. Metals are intrinsic to a substantial number of biological processes and the proteins that regulate those activities are also considerable in number. The role these proteins play in a wide range of physiological processes involves them directly and indirectly in a variety of disease processes. Similarly, it may be therapeutically advantageous to pharmacologically alter the activity of these metal containing proteins to influence disease processes. This paper will introduce the reader to a number of important proteins in both metal metabolism and oxidative stress, with an emphasis on the brain. Potential pharmacological targets will be considered. PMID:23304261

  5. The retinoblastoma family of proteins and their regulatory functions in the mammalian cell division cycle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins are found in organisms as distantly related as humans, plants, and insects. These proteins play a key role in regulating advancement of the cell division cycle from the G1 to S-phases. This is achieved through negative regulation of two important positive regulators of cell cycle entry, E2F transcription factors and cyclin dependent kinases. In growth arrested cells transcriptional activity by E2Fs is repressed by RB proteins. Stimulation of cell cycle entry by growth factor signaling leads to activation of cyclin dependent kinases. They in turn phosphorylate and inactivate the RB family proteins, leading to E2F activation and additional cyclin dependent kinase activity. This propels the cell cycle irreversibly forward leading to DNA synthesis. This review will focus on the basic biochemistry and cell biology governing the regulation and activity of mammalian RB family proteins in cell cycle control. PMID:22417103

  6. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    SciTech Connect

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  7. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.

    PubMed

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig

    2007-03-01

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  8. The RNA-binding protein Gemin5 binds directly to the ribosome and regulates global translation

    PubMed Central

    Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnación

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial roles in all organisms. The protein Gemin5 harbors two functional domains. The N-terminal domain binds to snRNAs targeting them for snRNPs assembly, while the C-terminal domain binds to IRES elements through a non-canonical RNA-binding site. Here we report a comprehensive view of the Gemin5 interactome; most partners copurified with the N-terminal domain via RNA bridges. Notably, Gemin5 sediments with the subcellular ribosome fraction, and His-Gemin5 binds to ribosome particles via its N-terminal domain. The interaction with the ribosome was lost in F381A and Y474A Gemin5 mutants, but not in W14A and Y15A. Moreover, the ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 bind directly with Gemin5, and conversely, Gemin5 mutants impairing the binding to the ribosome are defective in the interaction with L3 and L4. The overall polysome profile was affected by Gemin5 depletion or overexpression, concomitant to an increase or a decrease, respectively, of global protein synthesis. Gemin5, and G5-Nter as well, were detected on the polysome fractions. These results reveal the ribosome-binding capacity of the N-ter moiety, enabling Gemin5 to control global protein synthesis. Our study uncovers a crosstalk between this protein and the ribosome, and provides support for the view that Gemin5 may control translation elongation. PMID:27507887

  9. Evidence for the interaction of the regulatory protein Ki-1/57 with p53 and its interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nery, Flavia C.; Rui, Edmilson; Kuniyoshi, Tais M.; Kobarg, Joerg . E-mail: jkobarg@lnls.br

    2006-03-17

    Ki-1/57 is a cytoplasmic and nuclear phospho-protein of 57 kDa and interacts with the adaptor protein RACK1, the transcription factor MEF2C, and the chromatin remodeling factor CHD3, suggesting that it might be involved in the regulation of transcription. Here, we describe yeast two-hybrid studies that identified a total of 11 proteins interacting with Ki-1/57, all of which interact or are functionally associated with p53 or other members of the p53 family of proteins. We further found that Ki-1/57 is able to interact with p53 itself in the yeast two-hybrid system when the interaction was tested directly. This interaction could be confirmed by pull down assays with purified proteins in vitro and by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation assays from the human Hodgkin analogous lymphoma cell line L540. Furthermore, we found that the phosphorylation of p53 by PKC abolishes its interaction with Ki-1/57 in vitro.

  10. Structural Dynamics and Conformational Equilibria of SERCA Regulatory Proteins in Membranes by Solid-State NMR Restrained Simulations

    PubMed Central

    De Simone, Alfonso; Mote, Kaustubh R.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is emerging as a powerful approach to determine structure, topology, and conformational dynamics of membrane proteins at the atomic level. Conformational dynamics are often inferred and quantified from the motional averaging of the NMR parameters. However, the nature of these motions is difficult to envision based only on spectroscopic data. Here, we utilized restrained molecular dynamics simulations to probe the structural dynamics, topology and conformational transitions of regulatory membrane proteins of the calcium ATPase SERCA, namely sarcolipin and phospholamban, in explicit lipid bilayers. Specifically, we employed oriented solid-state NMR data, such as dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropy measured in lipid bicelles, to refine the conformational ensemble of these proteins in lipid membranes. The samplings accurately reproduced the orientations of transmembrane helices and showed a significant degree of convergence with all of the NMR parameters. Unlike the unrestrained simulations, the resulting sarcolipin structures are in agreement with distances and angles for hydrogen bonds in ideal helices. In the case of phospholamban, the restrained ensemble sampled the conformational interconversion between T (helical) and R (unfolded) states for the cytoplasmic region that could not be observed using standard structural refinements with the same experimental data set. This study underscores the importance of implementing NMR data in molecular dynamics protocols to better describe the conformational landscapes of membrane proteins embedded in realistic lipid membranes. PMID:24940774

  11. Drosophila Valosin-Containing Protein is required for dendrite pruning through a regulatory role in mRNA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Sebastian; Bagley, Joshua A.; Thompson-Peer, Katherine L.; Zhu, Sijun; Gorczyca, David; Beckstead, Robert B.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2014-01-01

    The dendritic arbors of the larval Drosophila peripheral class IV dendritic arborization neurons degenerate during metamorphosis in an ecdysone-dependent manner. This process—also known as dendrite pruning—depends on the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), but the specific processes regulated by the UPS during pruning have been largely elusive. Here, we show that mutation or inhibition of Valosin-Containing Protein (VCP), a ubiquitin-dependent ATPase whose human homolog is linked to neurodegenerative disease, leads to specific defects in mRNA metabolism and that this role of VCP is linked to dendrite pruning. Specifically, we find that VCP inhibition causes an altered splicing pattern of the large pruning gene molecule interacting with CasL and mislocalization of the Drosophila homolog of the human RNA-binding protein TAR–DNA-binding protein of 43 kilo-Dalton (TDP-43). Our data suggest that VCP inactivation might lead to specific gain-of-function of TDP-43 and other RNA-binding proteins. A similar combination of defects is also seen in a mutant in the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme ubcD1 and a mutant in the 19S regulatory particle of the proteasome, but not in a 20S proteasome mutant. Thus, our results highlight a proteolysis-independent function of the UPS during class IV dendritic arborization neuron dendrite pruning and link the UPS to the control of mRNA metabolism. PMID:24799714

  12. The zinc fingers of HIV nucleocapsid protein NCp7 direct interactions with the viral regulatory protein Vpr.

    PubMed

    de Rocquigny, H; Petitjean, P; Tanchou, V; Decimo, D; Drouot, L; Delaunay, T; Darlix, J L; Roques, B P

    1997-12-01

    The 96-amino acid protein Vpr functions as a regulator of cellular processes involved in human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) life cycle, in particular by interrupting cells division in the G2 phase. Incorporation of Vpr in the virion was reported to be mediated by the C-terminal domain of the Pr55(Gag) polyprotein precursor, which includes NCp7, a protein involved in the genomic RNA encapsidation and p6, a protein required for particle budding. To precisely define the Gag and Vpr sequences involved in this protein-protein interaction, NCp7, p6, and Vpr as well as a series of derived peptides were synthesized using Fmoc (N-(9-fluorenyl)methoxycarbonyl) chemistry. Binding assays were carried out by Far Western experiments and by competition studies using (52-96)Vpr immobilized onto agarose beads. The results show that interaction between NCp7 and Vpr occurs in vitro by a recognition mechanism requiring the zinc fingers of NCp7 and the last 16 amino acids of Vpr. Moreover, NCp10, the equivalent of NCp7 in Moloney murine leukemia virus but not polysine inhibits Vpr-NCp7 complexation. Interestingly enough, Vpr was found to interact with Gag, NCp15, and NCp7 but not with mature p6 in vitro. In vivo mutations in NCp7 zinc fingers in an HIV-1 molecular clone led to viruses with important defects in Vpr encapsidation. Together, these results suggest that NCp7 cooperates with p6 to induce Vpr encapsidation in HIV-1 mature particles. The NCp7-Vpr complex could also be important for interaction of Vpr with cellular proteins involved in cell division.

  13. The mitochondrial PPR protein LOVASTATIN INSENSITIVE 1 plays regulatory roles in cytosolic and plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis through RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianwei; Kobayashi, Keiko; Suzuki, Masashi; Matsumoto, Shogo; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2010-02-01

    Unlike animals, plants synthesize isoprenoids via two pathways, the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastidial 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Little information is known about the mechanisms that regulate these complex biosynthetic networks over multiple organelles. To understand such regulatory mechanisms of the biosynthesis of isoprenoids in plants, we previously characterized the Arabidopsis mutant, lovastatin insensitive 1 (loi1), which is resistant to lovastatin and clomazone, specific inhibitors of the MVA and MEP pathways, respectively. LOI1 encodes a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein localized in mitochondria that is thought to have RNA binding ability and function in post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial gene expression. LOI1 belongs to the DYW subclass of PPR proteins, which is hypothesized to be correlated with RNA editing. As a result of analysis of RNA editing of mitochondrial genes in loi1, a defect in RNA editing of three genes, nad4, ccb203 and cox3, was identified in loi1. These genes are related to the respiratory chain. Wild type (WT) treated with some respiration inhibitors mimicked the loi1 phenotype. Interestingly, HMG-CoA reductase activity of WT treated with lovastatin combined with antimycin A, an inhibitor of complex III in the respiratory chain, was higher than that of WT treated with only lovastatin, despite the lack of alteration of transcript or protein levels of HMGR. These results suggest that HMGR enzyme activity is regulated through the respiratory cytochrome pathway. Although various mechanisms exist for isoprenoid biosynthesis, our studies demonstrate the novel possibility that mitochondrial respiration plays potentially regulatory roles in isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  14. Reversible oxidation of vicinal-thiols motif in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium regulatory proteins is involved in muscle fatigue mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Pável; Tirado-Cortés, Aldo; Álvarez, Rocío; Ronjat, Michel; Amaya, Araceli; Ortega, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    The mechanism underlying fatigue in skeletal muscle (SM) related to the redox-potential hypothesis, ranges from a direct effect of oxygen reactive species, to a number of other free radical intermediates targeting specific amino acids in the Ca(2+)-regulatory proteins of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In the present study, we investigate the selective oxidation/reduction of the protein motif Cys-(Xn=2-6)-Cys, known as a vicinal thiol group (VTG), present in the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) and in the Ca(2+)-channel ryanodine receptor (RyR) which are modified during muscle fatigue in SM. Selective oxidation of VTG with phenyl arsine oxide (PAO) increases fatigue in rat isolated SM and fatigue is prevented when muscle is previously incubated with a VTG selective reducing agent, 2,3-dimercaptopropanol (British anti-Lewisite (BAL)). In isolated SR membranes, PAO [<0.1mM] modifies SERCA conformation and inhibits ATPase activity but does not affect Ca(2+)-release. However, PAO at [>0.1mM] inhibits SERCA and RyR activities in a reversible manner by selectively reducing them. Interestingly, as observed by differential scanning calorimetry, the conformation of SERCA from fatigued muscle changed in a similar manner as when SERCA VTG where oxidized. The addition of BAL to fatigued muscle restored the structural conformation and activity of SERCA with full recovery of muscle force production after fatigue. We conclude that VTG reversible oxidation of SR Ca(2+) regulatory proteins are involved in muscle contraction/relaxation and are a molecular mechanism to be considered for muscle fatigue.

  15. Evaluation of Affinity-Tagged Protein Expression Strategies using Local and Global Isotope Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hervey, IV, William Judson; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Lankford, Patricia K; Owens, Elizabeth T; McKeown, Catherine K; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Foote, Linda J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; McDonald, W Hayes; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B

    2009-01-01

    Protein enrichments of engineered, affinity-tagged (or bait ) fusion proteins with interaction partners are often laden with background, non-specific proteins, due to interactions that occur in vitro as an artifact of the technique. Furthermore, the in vivo expression of the bait protein may itself affect physiology or metabolism. In this study, intrinsic affinity purification challenges were investigated in a model protein complex, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), encompassing chromosome- and plasmid-encoding strategies for bait proteins in two different microbial species: Escherichia coli and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Isotope ratio measurements of bait protein expression strains relative to native, wild-type strains were performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to assess bait protein expression strategies in each species. Authentic interacting proteins of RNAP were successfully discerned from artifactual co-isolating proteins by the isotopic differentiation of interactions as random or targeted (I-DIRT) method (A. J. Tackett et al. J. Proteome Res. 2005, 4 (5), 1752-1756). To investigate broader effects of bait protein production in the bacteria, we compared proteomes from strains harboring a plasmid that encodes an affinity-tagged subunit (RpoA) of the RNAP complex with the corresponding wild-type strains using stable isotope metabolic labeling. The ratio of RpoA abundance in plasmid strains versus wild type was 0.8 for R. palustris and 1.7 for E. coli. While most other proteins showed no appreciable difference, proteins significantly increased in abundance in plasmid-encoded bait-expressing strains of both species included the plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance protein, GenR and proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis. Together, these local, complex-specific and more global, whole proteome isotopic abundance ratio measurements provided a tool for evaluating both in vivo and in vitro effects of plasmid

  16. Known Turnover and Translation Regulatory RNA-Binding Proteins Interact with the 3’ UTR of SECIS-Binding Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Bubenik, Jodi; Ladd, Andrea; Gerber, Carri A.; Budiman, Michael; Driscoll, Donna

    2008-01-01

    The human selenoproteome is composed of ~25 selenoproteins, which cotranslationally incorporate selenocysteine, the 21st amino acid. Selenoprotein expression requires an unusual translation mechanism, as selenocysteine is encoded by the UGA stop codon. SECIS-binding protein 2 (SBP2) is an essential component of the selenocysteine insertion machinery. SBP2 is also the only factor known to differentiate among selenoprotein mRNAs, thereby modulating the relative expression of the individual selenoproteins. Here, we show that expression of SBP2 protein varies widely across tissues and cell types examined, despite previous observations of only modest variation in SBP2 mRNA levels. This discrepancy between SBP2 mRNA and protein levels implies translational regulation, which is often mediated via untranslated regions (UTRs) in regulated transcripts. We have identified multiple sequences in the SBP2 3’ UTR that are highly conserved. The proximal short conserved region is GU rich and was subsequently shown to be a binding site for CUG-BP1. The distal half of the 3’ UTR is largely conserved, and multiple proteins interact with this region. One of these proteins was identified as HuR. Both CUG-BP1 and HuR are members of the Turnover and Translation Regulatory RNA-Binding Protein family (TTR-RBP). Members of this protein family are linked by the common ability to rapidly effect gene expression through alterations in the stability and translatability of target mRNAs. The identification of CUG-BP1 and HuR as factors that bind to the SBP2 3’ UTR suggests that TTR-RBPs play a role in the regulation of SBP2, which then dictates the expression of the selenoproteome. PMID:19106619

  17. Temperature inducible β-sheet structure in the transactivation domains of retroviral regulatory proteins of the Rev family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumb, Werner; Graf, Christine; Parslow, Tristram; Schneider, Rainer; Auer, Manfred

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory protein Rev with cellular cofactors is crucial for the viral life cycle. The HIV-1 Rev transactivation domain is functionally interchangeable with analog regions of Rev proteins of other retroviruses suggesting common folding patterns. In order to obtain experimental evidence for similar structural features mediating protein-protein contacts we investigated activation domain peptides from HIV-1, HIV-2, VISNA virus, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by CD spectroscopy, secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis. Although different in polarity and hydrophobicity, all peptides showed a similar behavior with respect to solution conformation, concentration dependence and variations in ionic strength and pH. Temperature studies revealed an unusual induction of β-structure with rising temperatures in all activation domain peptides. The high stability of β-structure in this region was demonstrated in three different peptides of the activation domain of HIV-1 Rev in solutions containing 40% hexafluoropropanol, a reagent usually known to induce α-helix into amino acid sequences. Sequence alignments revealed similarities between the polar effector domains from FIV and EIAV and the leucine rich (hydrophobic) effector domains found in HIV-1, HIV-2 and VISNA. Studies on activation domain peptides of two dominant negative HIV-1 Rev mutants, M10 and M32, pointed towards different reasons for the biological behavior. Whereas the peptide containing the M10 mutation (L 78E 79→D 78L 79) showed wild-type structure, the M32 mutant peptide (L 78L 81L 83→A 78A 81A 83) revealed a different protein fold to be the reason for the disturbed binding to cellular cofactors. From our data, we conclude, that the activation domain of Rev proteins from different viral origins adopt a similar fold and that a β-structural element is involved in binding to a

  18. Selection on Coding and Regulatory Variation Maintains Individuality in Major Urinary Protein Scent Marks in Wild Mice.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Michael J; Lee, Victoria; Corbett-Detig, Russell; Bi, Ke; Beynon, Robert J; Hurst, Jane L; Nachman, Michael W

    2016-03-01

    Recognition of individuals by scent is widespread across animal taxa. Though animals can often discriminate chemical blends based on many compounds, recent work shows that specific protein pheromones are necessary and sufficient for individual recognition via scent marks in mice. The genetic nature of individuality in scent marks (e.g. coding versus regulatory variation) and the evolutionary processes that maintain diversity are poorly understood. The individual signatures in scent marks of house mice are the protein products of a group of highly similar paralogs in the major urinary protein (Mup) gene family. Using the offspring of wild-caught mice, we examine individuality in the major urinary protein (MUP) scent marks at the DNA, RNA and protein levels. We show that individuality arises through a combination of variation at amino acid coding sites and differential transcription of central Mup genes across individuals, and we identify eSNPs in promoters. There is no evidence of post-transcriptional processes influencing phenotypic diversity as transcripts accurately predict the relative abundance of proteins in urine samples. The match between transcripts and urine samples taken six months earlier also emphasizes that the proportional relationships across central MUP isoforms in urine is stable. Balancing selection maintains coding variants at moderate frequencies, though pheromone diversity appears limited by interactions with vomeronasal receptors. We find that differential transcription of the central Mup paralogs within and between individuals significantly increases the individuality of pheromone blends. Balancing selection on gene regulation allows for increased individuality via combinatorial diversity in a limited number of pheromones.

  19. Selection on Coding and Regulatory Variation Maintains Individuality in Major Urinary Protein Scent Marks in Wild Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Michael J.; Lee, Victoria; Corbett-Detig, Russell; Bi, Ke; Beynon, Robert J.; Hurst, Jane L.; Nachman, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of individuals by scent is widespread across animal taxa. Though animals can often discriminate chemical blends based on many compounds, recent work shows that specific protein pheromones are necessary and sufficient for individual recognition via scent marks in mice. The genetic nature of individuality in scent marks (e.g. coding versus regulatory variation) and the evolutionary processes that maintain diversity are poorly understood. The individual signatures in scent marks of house mice are the protein products of a group of highly similar paralogs in the major urinary protein (Mup) gene family. Using the offspring of wild-caught mice, we examine individuality in the major urinary protein (MUP) scent marks at the DNA, RNA and protein levels. We show that individuality arises through a combination of variation at amino acid coding sites and differential transcription of central Mup genes across individuals, and we identify eSNPs in promoters. There is no evidence of post-transcriptional processes influencing phenotypic diversity as transcripts accurately predict the relative abundance of proteins in urine samples. The match between transcripts and urine samples taken six months earlier also emphasizes that the proportional relationships across central MUP isoforms in urine is stable. Balancing selection maintains coding variants at moderate frequencies, though pheromone diversity appears limited by interactions with vomeronasal receptors. We find that differential transcription of the central Mup paralogs within and between individuals significantly increases the individuality of pheromone blends. Balancing selection on gene regulation allows for increased individuality via combinatorial diversity in a limited number of pheromones. PMID:26938775

  20. Comparative genomic analysis of two-component regulatory proteins in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Lavín, José L; Kiil, Kristoffer; Resano, Ohiana; Ussery, David W; Oguiza, José A

    2007-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas syringae is a widespread bacterial plant pathogen, and strains of P. syringae may be assigned to different pathovars based on host specificity among different plant species. The genomes of P. syringae pv. syringae (Psy) B728a, pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 and pv. phaseolicola (Pph) 1448A have been recently sequenced providing a major resource for comparative genomic analysis. A mechanism commonly found in bacteria for signal transduction is the two-component system (TCS), which typically consists of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). P. syringae requires a complex array of TCS proteins to cope with diverse plant hosts, host responses, and environmental conditions. Results Based on the genomic data, pattern searches with Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles have been used to identify putative HKs and RRs. The genomes of Psy B728a, Pto DC3000 and Pph 1448A were found to contain a large number of genes encoding TCS proteins, and a core of complete TCS proteins were shared between these genomes: 30 putative TCS clusters, 11 orphan HKs, 33 orphan RRs, and 16 hybrid HKs. A close analysis of the distribution of genes encoding TCS proteins revealed important differences in TCS proteins among the three P. syringae pathovars. Conclusion In this article we present a thorough analysis of the identification and distribution of TCS proteins among the sequenced genomes of P. syringae. We have identified differences in TCS proteins among the three P. syringae pathovars that may contribute to their diverse host ranges and association with plant hosts. The identification and analysis of the repertoire of TCS proteins in the genomes of P. syringae pathovars constitute a basis for future functional genomic studies of the signal transduction pathways in this important bacterial phytopathogen. PMID:17971244

  1. Guanine nucleotide regulatory protein co-purifies with the D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Senogles, S.E.; Caron, M.G.

    1986-05-01

    The D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor from bovine anterior pituitary was purified approx.1000 fold by affinity chromatography on CMOS-Sepharose. Reconstitution of the affinity-purified receptor into phospholipid vesicles revealed the presence of high and low affinity agonist sites as detected by N-n-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) competition experiments with /sup 3/H-spiperone. High affinity agonist binding could be converted to the low affinity form by guanine nucleotides, indicating the presence of an endogenous guanine nucleotide binding protein (N protein) in the affinity-purified D/sub 2/ receptor preparations. Furthermore, this preparation contained an agonist-sensitive GTPase activity which was stimulated 2-3 fold over basal by 10 ..mu..M NPA. /sup 35/S-GTP..gamma..S binding to these preparations revealed a stoichiometry of 0.4-0.7 mole N protein/mole receptor, suggesting the N protein may be specifically coupled with the purified D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor and not present as a contaminant. Pertussis toxin treatment of the affinity purified receptor preparations prevented high affinity agonist binding, as well as agonist stimulation of the GTPase activity, presumably by inactivating the associated N protein. Pertussis toxin lead to the ADP-ribosylation of a protein of 39-40K on SDS-PAGE. These findings indicate that an endogenous N protein, N/sub i/ or N/sub o/, co-purifies with the D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor which may reflect a precoupling of this receptor with an N protein within the membranes.

  2. From local structure to a global framework: recognition of protein folds

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; de Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding has been a major area of research for many years. Nonetheless, the mechanisms leading to the formation of an active biological fold are still not fully apprehended. The huge amount of available sequence and structural information provides hints to identify the putative fold for a given sequence. Indeed, protein structures prefer a limited number of local backbone conformations, some being characterized by preferences for certain amino acids. These preferences largely depend on the local structural environment. The prediction of local backbone conformations has become an important factor to correctly identifying the global protein fold. Here, we review the developments in the field of local structure prediction and especially their implication in protein fold recognition. PMID:24740960

  3. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E.; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Sorger, Peter K.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H. Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components—16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators—of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  4. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D; Chrisler, William B; Markillie, Lye M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D; Sorger, Peter K; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components-16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators-of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  5. Coordination of Hepatitis C Virus Assembly by Distinct Regulatory Regions in Nonstructural Protein 5A

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Margarita; Long, Gang; Madan, Vanesa; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein (NS)5A is a RNA-binding protein composed of a N-terminal membrane anchor, a structured domain I (DI) and two intrinsically disordered domains (DII and DIII) interacting with viral and cellular proteins. While DI and DII are essential for RNA replication, DIII is required for assembly. How these processes are orchestrated by NS5A is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a highly conserved basic cluster (BC) at the N-terminus of DIII that is critical for particle assembly. We generated BC mutants and compared them with mutants that are blocked at different stages of the assembly process: a NS5A serine cluster (SC) mutant blocked in NS5A-core interaction and a mutant lacking the envelope glycoproteins (ΔE1E2). We found that BC mutations did not affect core-NS5A interaction, but strongly impaired core–RNA association as well as virus particle envelopment. Moreover, BC mutations impaired RNA-NS5A interaction arguing that the BC might be required for loading of core protein with viral RNA. Interestingly, RNA-core interaction was also reduced with the ΔE1E2 mutant, suggesting that nucleocapsid formation and envelopment are coupled. These findings argue for two NS5A DIII determinants regulating assembly at distinct, but closely linked steps: (i) SC-dependent recruitment of replication complexes to core protein and (ii) BC-dependent RNA genome delivery to core protein, triggering encapsidation that is tightly coupled to particle envelopment. These results provide a striking example how a single viral protein exerts multiple functions to coordinate the steps from RNA replication to the assembly of infectious virus particles. PMID:26727512

  6. Purification and binding analysis of the nitrogen fixation regulatory NifA protein from Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Passaglia, L M; Van Soom, C; Schrank, A; Schrank, I S

    1998-11-01

    NifA protein activates transcription of nitrogen fixation operons by the alternative sigma 54 holoenzyme form of RNA polymerase. This protein binds to a well-defined upstream activator sequence (UAS) located at the -200/-100 position of nif promoters with the consensus motif TGT-N10-ACA. NifA of Azospirillum brasilense was purified in the form of a glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-NifA fusion protein and proteolytic release of GST yielded inactive and partially soluble NifA. However, the purified NifA was able to induce the production of specific anti-A. brasilense NifA-antiserum that recognized NifA from A. brasilense but not from K. pneumoniae. Both GST-NifA and NifA expressed from the E. coli tac promoter are able to activate transcription from the nifHDK promoter but only in an A. brasilense background. In order to investigate the mechanism that regulates NifA binding capacity we have used E. coli total protein extracts expressing A. brasilense nifA in mobility shift assays. DNA fragments carrying the two overlapping, wild-type or mutated UAS motifs present in the nifH promoter region revealed a retarded band of related size. These data show that the binding activity present in the C-terminal domain of A. brasilense NifA protein is still functional even in the presence of oxygen.

  7. Local and global structural drivers for the photoactivation of the orange carotenoid protein.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sayan; Guttman, Miklos; Leverenz, Ryan L; Zhumadilova, Kulyash; Pawlowski, Emily G; Petzold, Christopher J; Lee, Kelly K; Ralston, Corie Y; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2015-10-13

    Photoprotective mechanisms are of fundamental importance for the survival of photosynthetic organisms. In cyanobacteria, the orange carotenoid protein (OCP), when activated by intense blue light, binds to the light-harvesting antenna and triggers the dissipation of excess captured light energy. Using a combination of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), X-ray hydroxyl radical footprinting, circular dichroism, and H/D exchange mass spectrometry, we identified both the local and global structural changes in the OCP upon photoactivation. SAXS and H/D exchange data showed that global tertiary structural changes, including complete domain dissociation, occur upon photoactivation, but with alteration of secondary structure confined to only the N terminus of the OCP. Microsecond radiolytic labeling identified rearrangement of the H-bonding network associated with conserved residues and structural water molecules. Collectively, these data provide experimental evidence for an ensemble of local and global structural changes, upon activation of the OCP, that are essential for photoprotection.

  8. Local and global structural drivers for the photoactivation of the orange carotenoid protein

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sayan; Guttman, Miklos; Leverenz, Ryan L.; Zhumadilova, Kulyash; Pawlowski, Emily G.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Lee, Kelly K.; Ralston, Corie Y.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Photoprotective mechanisms are of fundamental importance for the survival of photosynthetic organisms. In cyanobacteria, the orange carotenoid protein (OCP), when activated by intense blue light, binds to the light-harvesting antenna and triggers the dissipation of excess captured light energy. Using a combination of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), X-ray hydroxyl radical footprinting, circular dichroism, and H/D exchange mass spectrometry, we identified both the local and global structural changes in the OCP upon photoactivation. SAXS and H/D exchange data showed that global tertiary structural changes, including complete domain dissociation, occur upon photoactivation, but with alteration of secondary structure confined to only the N terminus of the OCP. Microsecond radiolytic labeling identified rearrangement of the H-bonding network associated with conserved residues and structural water molecules. Collectively, these data provide experimental evidence for an ensemble of local and global structural changes, upon activation of the OCP, that are essential for photoprotection. PMID:26385969

  9. Regulatory subunit B'gamma of protein phosphatase 2A prevents unnecessary defense reactions under low light in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Andrea; Wrzaczek, Michael; Scharte, Judith; Tikkanen, Mikko; Konert, Grzegorz; Rahikainen, Moona; Holmström, Maija; Hiltunen, Hanna-Maija; Rips, Stephan; Sipari, Nina; Mulo, Paula; Weis, Engelbert; von Schaewen, Antje; Aro, Eva-Mari; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2011-07-01

    Light is an important environmental factor that modulates acclimation strategies and defense responses in plants. We explored the functional role of the regulatory subunit B'γ (B'γ) of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in light-dependent stress responses of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The predominant form of PP2A consists of catalytic subunit C, scaffold subunit A, and highly variable regulatory subunit B, which determines the substrate specificity of PP2A holoenzymes. Mutant leaves of knockdown pp2a-b'γ plants show disintegration of chloroplasts and premature yellowing conditionally under moderate light intensity. The cell-death phenotype is accompanied by the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide through a pathway that requires CONSTITUTIVE EXPRESSION OF PR GENES5 (CPR5). Moreover, the pp2a-b'γ cpr5 double mutant additionally displays growth suppression and malformed trichomes. Similar to cpr5, the pp2a-b'γ mutant shows constitutive activation of both salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-dependent defense pathways. In contrast to cpr5, however, pp2a-b'γ leaves do not contain increased levels of salicylic acid or jasmonic acid. Rather, the constitutive defense response associates with hypomethylation of DNA and increased levels of methionine-salvage pathway components in pp2a-b'γ leaves. We suggest that the specific B'γ subunit of PP2A is functionally connected to CPR5 and operates in the basal repression of defense responses under low irradiance.

  10. Increased protein kinase A type Iα regulatory subunit expression in parathyroid gland adenomas of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yatsuka; Kambe, Fukushi; Imai, Tsuneo; Ogawa, Kimio; Shimizu, Yoshimi; Shibata, Masahiro; Kagawa, Chikara; Mizuno, Yutaka; Ito, Asako; Iwase, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) is a major regulatory subunit that functions as an inhibitor of PKA kinase activity. We have previously demonstrated that elevated RIα expression is associated with diffuse-to-nodular transformation of hyperplasia in parathyroid glands of renal hyperparathyroidism. The aim of the current study was to determine whether or not RIα expression is increased in adenomas of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), because monoclonal proliferation has been demonstrated in both adenomas and nodular hyperplasia. Surgical specimens comprising 22 adenomas and 11 normal glands, obtained from 22 patients with PHPT, were analyzed. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were employed to evaluate RIα expression. PKA activities were determined in several adenomas highly expressing RIα. RIα expression was also separately evaluated in chief and oxyphilic cells using the "Allred score" system. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a proliferation marker, was also immunohistochemically examined. Western blot analysis revealed that 5 out of 8 adenomas highly expressed RIα, compared with normal glands. PKA activity in adenomas was significantly less than in normal glands. Immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated high expression of RIα in 20 out of 22 adenomas. In adenomas, the greater RIα expression and more PCNA positive cells were observed in both chief and oxyphilic cells. The present study suggested that high RIα expression could contribute to monoclonal proliferation of parathyroid cells by impairing the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:23197043

  11. Crystal Structures of GCN2 Protein Kinase C-terminal Domains Suggest Regulatory Differences in Yeast and Mammals*

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongzhen; Singh, Isha; Wek, Sheree A.; Dey, Souvik; Baird, Thomas D.; Wek, Ronald C.; Georgiadis, Millie M.

    2014-01-01

    In response to amino acid starvation, GCN2 phosphorylation of eIF2 leads to repression of general translation and initiation of gene reprogramming that facilitates adaptation to nutrient stress. GCN2 is a multidomain protein with key regulatory domains that directly monitor uncharged tRNAs which accumulate during nutrient limitation, leading to activation of this eIF2 kinase and translational control. A critical feature of regulation of this stress response kinase is its C-terminal domain (CTD). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of murine and yeast CTDs, which guide a functional analysis of the mammalian GCN2. Despite low sequence identity, both yeast and mammalian CTDs share a core subunit structure and an unusual interdigitated dimeric form, albeit with significant differences. Disruption of the dimeric form of murine CTD led to loss of translational control by GCN2, suggesting that dimerization is critical for function as is true for yeast GCN2. However, although both CTDs bind single- and double-stranded RNA, murine GCN2 does not appear to stably associate with the ribosome, whereas yeast GCN2 does. This finding suggests that there are key regulatory differences between yeast and mammalian CTDs, which is consistent with structural differences. PMID:24719324

  12. Evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor response by mutations in regulatory network interactions.

    PubMed

    Di Roberto, Raphaël B; Chang, Belinda; Trusina, Ala; Peisajovich, Sergio G

    2016-08-04

    All cellular functions depend on the concerted action of multiple proteins organized in complex networks. To understand how selection acts on protein networks, we used the yeast mating receptor Ste2, a pheromone-activated G protein-coupled receptor, as a model system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ste2 is a hub in a network of interactions controlling both signal transduction and signal suppression. Through laboratory evolution, we obtained 21 mutant receptors sensitive to the pheromone of a related yeast species and investigated the molecular mechanisms behind this newfound sensitivity. While some mutants show enhanced binding affinity to the foreign pheromone, others only display weakened interactions with the network's negative regulators. Importantly, the latter changes have a limited impact on overall pathway regulation, despite their considerable effect on sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that a new receptor-ligand pair can evolve through network-altering mutations independently of receptor-ligand binding, and suggest a potential role for such mutations in disease.

  13. CCN: core regulatory proteins in the microenvironment that affect the metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qingan; Dong, Qiongzhu; Qin, Lunxiu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) results from an underlying chronic liver inflammatory disease, such as chronic hepatitis B or C virus infections, and the general prognosis of patients with HCC still remains extremely dismal because of the high frequency of HCC metastases. Throughout the process of tumor metastasis, tumor cells constantly communicate with the surrounding microenvironment and improve their malignant phenotype. Therefore, there is a strong rationale for targeting the tumor microenvironment as primary treatment of HCC therapies. Recently, CCN family proteins have emerged as localized multitasking signal integrators in the inflammatory microenvironment. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of CCN family proteins in inflammation and the tumor. We also propose that the CCN family proteins may play a central role in signaling the tumor microenvironment and regulating the metastasis of HCC. PMID:26497214

  14. High-yield soluble expression, purification and characterization of human steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) fused to a cleavable Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP).

    PubMed

    Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Tugaeva, Kristina V; Faletrov, Yaroslav V; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2016-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is responsible for the rapid delivery of cholesterol to mitochondria where the lipid serves as a source for steroid hormones biosynthesis in adrenals and gonads. Despite many successful investigations, current understanding of the mechanism of StAR action is far from being completely clear. StAR was mostly obtained using denaturation/renaturation or in minor quantities in a soluble form at decreased temperatures that, presumably, limited the possibilities for its consequent detailed exploration. In our hands, existing StAR expression constructs could be bacterially expressed almost exclusively as insoluble forms, even upon decreased expression temperatures and in specific strains of Escherichia coli, and isolated protein tended to aggregate and was difficult to handle. To maximize the yield of soluble protein, optimized StAR sequence encompassing functional domain STARD1 (residues 66-285) was fused to the C-terminus of His-tagged Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP) with the possibility to cleave off the whole tag by 3C protease. The developed protocol of expression and purification comprising of a combination of subtractive immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size-exclusion chromatography allowed us to obtain up to 25 mg/1 L culture of completely soluble StAR protein, which was (i) homogenous according to SDS-PAGE, (ii) gave a single symmetrical peak on a gel-filtration, (iii) showed the characteristic CD spectrum and (iv) pH-dependent ability to bind a fluorescently-labeled cholesterol analogue. We conclude that our strategy provides fully soluble and native StAR protein which in future could be efficiently used for biotechnology and drug discovery aimed at modulation of steroids production.

  15. Iron-regulatory proteins DmdR1 and DmdR2 of Streptomyces coelicolor form two different DNA-protein complexes with iron boxes.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Francisco J; Martín, Juan F

    2004-01-01

    In high G+C Gram-positive bacteria, the control of expression of genes involved in iron metabolism is exerted by a DmdR [divalent (bivalent) metal-dependent regulatory protein] in the presence of Fe2+ or other bivalent ions. The dmdR1 and dmdR2 genes of Streptomyces coelicolor were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the DmdR1 and DmdR2 proteins were purified to homogeneity. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays showed that both DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the 19-nt tox and desA iron boxes forming two different complexes in each case. Increasing the concentrations of DmdR1 or DmdR2 protein shifted these complexes from their low-molecular-mass form to the high-molecular-mass complexes. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was prevented by the bivalent metal chelating agent 2,2'-dipyridyl and by antibodies specific against the DmdR proteins. Cross-linking with glutaraldehyde of pure DmdR1 or DmdR2 proteins showed that DmdR1 forms dimers, whereas DmdR2 is capable of forming dimers and probably tetramers. Ten different iron boxes were found in a search for iron boxes in the genome of S. coelicolor. Most of them correspond to putative genes involved in siderophore biosynthesis. Since the nucleotide sequence of these ten boxes is identical (or slightly different) with the synthetic DNA fragment containing the desA box used in the present study, it is proposed that DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the iron boxes upstream of at least ten different genes in S. coelicolor. PMID:14960152

  16. Quercetin and vitamin E attenuate Bonny Light crude oil-induced alterations in testicular apoptosis, stress proteins and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ebokaiwe, Azubuike P; Mathur, Premendu P; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2016-10-01

    Studies have shown the reproductive effects of Bonny Light crude oil (BLCO) via the mechanism of oxidative stress and testicular apoptosis. We investigated the protective role of quercetin and vitamin E on BLCO-induced testicular apoptosis. Experimental rats were divided into four groups of four each. Animals were orally administered 2 ml/kg corn oil (control: group 1), BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight + 10 mg/kg quercetin (group 2), BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight + 50 mg/kg vitamin E (group 3) and BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight only (group 4) for 7 d. Protein levels of caspase 3, FasL, NF-kB, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and stress response proteins were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunofluorescence staining was used to quantify the expression of caspase 3, FasL and NF-kB. Apoptosis was quantified by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Administration of BLCO resulted in a significant increase in the levels of stress response proteins and apoptosis-related proteins by 50% and above after 7 d following BLCO exposure and a concomitant increase in expression of caspase 3, FasL and NF-kB expression by immunofluorescence staining. Apoptosis showed a significant increase in TUNEL positive cells. Co-administration with quercetin or vitamin E reversed BLCO-induced apoptosis and levels of stress protein, relative to control. These findings suggest that quercetin and vitamin E may confer protection against BLCO-induced testicular oxidative stress-related apoptosis.

  17. Structural and dynamic characterization of eukaryotic gene regulatory protein domains in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A L

    1996-05-01

    Solution NMR was primarily used to characterize structure and dynamics in two different eukaryotic protein systems: the {delta}-Al-{var_epsilon} activation domain from c-jun and the Drosophila RNA-binding protein Sex-lethal. The second system is the Drosophila Sex-lethal (Sxl) protein, an RNA-binding protein which is the ``master switch`` in sex determination. Sxl contains two adjacent RNA-binding domains (RBDs) of the RNP consensus-type. The NMR spectrum of the second RBD (Sxl-RBD2) was assigned using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR, and an intermediate-resolution family of structures was calculated from primarily NOE distance restraints. The overall fold was determined to be similar to other RBDs: a {beta}{alpha}{beta}-{beta}{alpha}{beta} pattern of secondary structure, with the two helices packed against a 4-stranded anti-parallel {beta}-sheet. In addition {sup 15}N T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, and {sup 15}N/{sup 1}H NOE relaxation measurements were carried out to characterize the backbone dynamics of Sxl-RBD2 in solution. RNA corresponding to the polypyrimidine tract of transformer pre-mRNA was generated and titrated into 3 different Sxl-RBD protein constructs. Combining Sxl-RBD1+2 (bht RBDs) with this RNA formed a specific, high affinity protein/RNA complex that is amenable to further NMR characterization. The backbone {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonances of Sxl-RBD1+2 were assigned using a triple-resonance approach, and {sup 15}N relaxation experiments were carried out to characterize the backbone dynamics of this complex. The changes in chemical shift in Sxl-RBD1+2 upon binding RNA are observed using Sxl-RBD2 as a substitute for unbound Sxl-RBD1+2. This allowed the binding interface to be qualitatively mapped for the second domain.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction data for the aconitase form of human iron-regulatory protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, J.; Darnault, C.; Moulis, J. M.

    2005-05-01

    Two crystal forms of the aconitase version of recombinant human IRP1 are reported. Iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 are closely related molecules involved in animal iron metabolism. Both proteins can bind to specific mRNA regions called iron-responsive elements and thereby control the expression of proteins involved in the uptake, storage and utilization of iron. In iron-replete cells, IRP1, but not IRP2, binds a [4Fe–4S] cluster and functions as a cytoplasmic aconitase, with simultaneous loss of its RNA-binding ability. Whereas IRP2 is known to be involved in Fe homeostasis, the role of IRP1 is less clear; it may provide a link between citrate and iron metabolisms and be involved in oxidative stress response. Here, two crystal forms of the aconitase version of recombinant human IRP1 are reported. An X-ray fluorescence measurement performed on a gold-derivative crystal showed the unexpected presence of zinc, in addition to gold and iron. Both native and MAD X-ray data at the Au, Fe and Zn absorption edges have been collected from these crystals.

  19. Insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein during olanzapine administration: effects of the antidiabetic metformin.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; Sandia, Ignacio; Lacruz, Anny; Rangel, Nairy; de Mendoza, Soaira; Beaulieu, Serge; Contreras, Quilianio; Galeazzi, Tatiana; Vargas, Doritza

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the Authors assessed some insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein after olanzapine administration, and the effect of metformin on these variables, 37 patients with chronic schizophrenia were given olanzapine (10 mg/day for 14 weeks). Nineteen patients received metformin (850-2550 mg/day) and 18 received placebo in a randomized, double-blind protocol. The following variables were quantified before and after olanzapine: cortisol, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, glucagon, growth hormone, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein. Results were correlated with the changes in body weight and the insulin resistance index. We have reported elsewhere that metformin did not prevent olanzapine-induced weight gain, and the insulin resistance index significantly decreased after metformin and placebo; Baptista T, et al. Can J Psychiatry 2006; 51: 192-196. Cortisol, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and fibrinogen levels significantly decreased in both groups. Glucagon significantly increased after metformin (P=0.03). Leptin tended to increase after placebo (P=0.1) and displayed a small nonsignificant reduction after metformin. The C-reactive protein did not change significantly in any group. Contrarily to most published studies, olanzapine was associated with decreased insulin resistance. Decrements in cortisol, fibrinogen and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels point to an improvement in the metabolic profile. The trend for leptin to increase after placebo, but not after metformin in spite of similar weight gain suggests a beneficial effect of this antidiabetic agent. PMID:17293706

  20. Regulation of the germinal center gene program by interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 8/IFN consensus sequence-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Melchers, Mark; Wang, Hongsheng; Torrey, Ted A; Slota, Rebecca; Qi, Chen-Feng; Kim, Ji Young; Lugar, Patricia; Kong, Hee Jeong; Farrington, Lila; van der Zouwen, Boris; Zhou, Jeff X; Lougaris, Vassilios; Lipsky, Peter E; Grammer, Amrie C; Morse, Herbert C

    2006-01-23

    Interferon (IFN) consensus sequence-binding protein/IFN regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) is a transcription factor that regulates the differentiation and function of macrophages, granulocytes, and dendritic cells through activation or repression of target genes. Although IRF8 is also expressed in lymphocytes, its roles in B cell and T cell maturation or function are ill defined, and few transcriptional targets are known. Gene expression profiling of human tonsillar B cells and mouse B cell lymphomas showed that IRF8 transcripts were expressed at highest levels in centroblasts, either from secondary lymphoid tissue or transformed cells. In addition, staining for IRF8 was most intense in tonsillar germinal center (GC) dark-zone centroblasts. To discover B cell genes regulated by IRF8, we transfected purified primary tonsillar B cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged IRF8, generated small interfering RNA knockdowns of IRF8 expression in a mouse B cell lymphoma cell line, and examined the effects of a null mutation of IRF8 on B cells. Each approach identified activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AICDA) and BCL6 as targets of transcriptional activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated in vivo occupancy of 5' sequences of both genes by IRF8 protein. These results suggest previously unappreciated roles for IRF8 in the transcriptional regulation of B cell GC reactions that include direct regulation of AICDA and BCL6.

  1. Hormone-dependent expression of a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein natural antisense transcript in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5' and 3' RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis.

  2. Inducer effect on the complex formation between rat liver nuclear proteins and cytochrome P450 2B gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Duzhak, T G; Schwartz, E I; Gulyaeva, L F; Lyakhovich, V V

    2002-09-01

    DNA gel retardation assay has been applied to the investigation of complexes between rat liver nuclear proteins and Barbie box positive regulatory element of cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) genes. The intensities of B1 and B2 bands detected in the absence of an inducer increased after 30 min protein incubation with phenobarbital (PB) or triphenyldioxane (TPD), but not with 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOPOB). In addition, a new complex (B3 band) was for the first time detected under induction by PB, TPD, and TCPOPOB. Increase in the incubation time up to 2 h facilitated the formation of other new complexes (B4 and B5 bands), which were detected only in the presence of TPD. The use of [3H]TPD in hybridization experiments revealed that this inducer, capable of binding to Barbie box DNA, is also present in B4 and B5 complexes. It is probable that the investigated compounds activate the same proteins at the initial induction steps, which correlates with the formation of B1, B2, and B3 complexes. The further induction step might be inducer-specific, as indicated by the formation of B4 and B5 complexes in the presence of TPD only. Thus, the present data suggest the possibility of specific gene activation signaling pathways that are dependent on a particular inducer. PMID:12387719

  3. Complement and membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for autoimmune inflammatory disorders, RA and SLE.

    PubMed

    Das, Nibhriti

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is a major effecter system of the innate immunity that bridges with adaptive immunity. The system consists of about 40 humoral and cell surface proteins that include zymogens, receptors and regulators. The zymogens get activated in a cascade fashion by antigen-antibody complex, antigen alone or by polymannans, respectively, by the classical, alternative and mannose binding lectin (MBL) pathways. The ongoing research on complement regulators and complement receptors suggest key role of these proteins in the initiation, regulation and effecter mechanisms of the innate and adaptive immunity. Although, the complement system provides the first line of defence against the invading pathogens, its aberrant uncontrolled activation causes extensive self tissue injury. A large number of humoral and cell surface complement regulatory protein keep the system well-regulated in healthy individuals. Complement profiling had brought important information on the pathophysiology of several infectious and chronic inflammatory disorders. In view of the diversity of the clinical disorders involving abnormal complement activity or regulation, which include both acute and chronic diseases that affect a wide range of organs, diverse yet specifically tailored therapeutic approaches may be needed to shift complement back into balance. This brief review discusses on the complement system, its functions and its importance as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for autoimmune diseases with focus on SLE and RA.

  4. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome. PMID:26140926

  5. Functional analysis of membrane-bound complement regulatory protein on T-cell immune response in ginbuna crucian carp.

    PubMed

    Nur, Indriyani; Abdelkhalek, Nevien K; Motobe, Shiori; Nakamura, Ryota; Tsujikura, Masakazu; Somamoto, Tomonori; Nakao, Miki

    2016-02-01

    Complements have long been considered to be a pivotal component in innate immunity. Recent researches, however, highlight novel roles of complements in T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Membrane-bound complement regulatory protein CD46, a costimulatory protein for T cells, is a key molecule for T-cell immunomodulation. Teleost CD46-like molecule, termed Tecrem, has been newly identified in common carp and shown to function as a complement regulator. However, it remains unclear whether Tecrem is involved in T-cell immune response. We investigated Tecrem function related to T-cell responses in ginbuna crucian carp. Ginbuna Tecrem (gTecrem) proteins were detected by immunoprecipitation using anti-common carp Tecrem monoclonal antibody (mAb) and were ubiquitously expressed on blood cells including CD8α(+) and CD4(+) lymphocytes. gTecrem expression on leucocyte surface was enhanced after stimulation with the T-cell mitogen, phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Coculture with the anti-Tecrem mAb significantly inhibited the proliferative activity of PHA-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggesting that cross-linking of Tecrems on T-cells interferes with a signal transduction pathway for T-cell activation. These findings indicate that Tecrem may act as a T-cell moderator and imply that the complement system in teleost, as well as mammals, plays an important role for linking adaptive and innate immunity.

  6. Stress-evoked tyrosine phosphorylation of signal regulatory protein α regulates behavioral immobility in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Murata, Takaaki; Kusakari, Shinya; Hayashi, Yuriko; Takao, Keizo; Maruyama, Toshi; Ago, Yukio; Koda, Ken; Jin, Feng-Jie; Okawa, Katsuya; Oldenborg, Per-Arne; Okazawa, Hideki; Murata, Yoji; Furuya, Nobuhiko; Matsuda, Toshio; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Matozaki, Takashi

    2010-08-01

    Severe stress induces changes in neuronal function that are implicated in stress-related disorders such as depression. The molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the brain to stress remain primarily unknown, however. Signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPalpha) is an Ig-superfamily protein that undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation and binds the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2. Here we show that mice expressing a form of SIRPalpha that lacks most of the cytoplasmic region manifest prolonged immobility (depression-like behavior) in the forced swim (FS) test. FS stress induced marked tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPalpha in the brain of wild-type mice through activation of Src family kinases. The SIRPalpha ligand CD47 was important for such SIRPalpha phosphorylation, and CD47-deficient mice also manifested prolonged immobility in the FS test. Moreover, FS stress-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of both the NR2B subunit of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor and the K+-channel subunit Kvbeta2 was regulated by SIRPalpha. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPalpha is important for regulation of depression-like behavior in the response of the brain to stress.

  7. Isolation of the alpha subunits of GTP-binding regulatory proteins by affinity chromatography with immobilized beta gamma subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Pang, I H; Sternweis, P C

    1989-01-01

    Immobilized beta gamma subunits of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to isolate alpha subunits from solubilized membranes of bovine tissues and to separate specific alpha subunits based on their differential affinities for beta gamma subunits. The beta gamma subunits were cross-linked to omega-aminobutyl agarose. Up to 7 nmol of alpha subunit could bind to each milliliter of beta gamma-agarose and be recovered by elution with AIF4-. This affinity resin effectively separated the alpha subunits of Gi1 and Gi2 from "contaminating" alpha subunits of Go, the most abundant G protein in bovine brain, by taking advantage of the apparent lower affinity of the alpha subunits of Go for beta gamma subunits. The beta gamma-agarose was also used to isolate mixtures of alpha subunits from cholate extracts of membranes from different bovine tissues. alpha subunits of 39-41 kDa (in various ratios) as well as the alpha subunits of Gs were purified. The yields from extracts exceeded 60% for all alpha subunits examined and apparently represented the relative content of alpha subunits in the tissues. This technique can rapidly isolate and identify, from a small amount of sample, the endogenous G proteins in various tissues and cells. So far, only polypeptides in the range of 39-52 kDa have been detected with this approach. If other GTP-binding proteins interact with these beta gamma subunits, the interaction is either of low affinity or mechanistically unique from the alpha subunits isolated in this study. Images PMID:2510152

  8. Evolution of the regulatory control of vertebrate striated muscle: the roles of troponin I and myosin binding protein-C.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Justin F; Gillis, Todd E

    2010-08-01

    Troponin I (TnI) and myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C) are key regulatory proteins of contractile function in vertebrate muscle. TnI modulates the Ca(2+) activation signal, while MyBP-C regulates cross-bridge cycling kinetics. In vertebrates, each protein is distributed as tissue-specific paralogs in fast skeletal (fs), slow skeletal (ss), and cardiac (c) muscles. The purpose of this study is to characterize how TnI and MyBP-C have changed during the evolution of vertebrate striated muscle and how tissue-specific paralogs have adapted to different physiological conditions. To accomplish this we have completed phylogenetic analyses using the amino acid sequences of all known TnI and MyBP-C isoforms. This includes 99 TnI sequences (fs, ss, and c) from 51 different species and 62 MyBP-C sequences from 26 species, with representatives from each vertebrate group. Results indicate that the role of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) in regulating contractile function has changed during the evolution of vertebrate striated muscle. This is reflected in an increased number of phosphorylatable sites in cTnI and cMyBP-C in endothermic vertebrates and the loss of two PKC sites in fsTnI in a common ancestor of mammals, birds, and reptiles. In addition, we find that His(132), Val(134), and Asn(141) in human ssTnI, previously identified as enabling contractile function during cellular acidosis, are present in all vertebrate cTnI isoforms except those from monotremes, marsupials, and eutherian mammals. This suggests that the replacement of these residues with alternative residues coincides with the evolution of endothermy in the mammalian lineage.

  9. Global optimum protein threading with gapped alignment and empirical pair score functions.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, R H; Smith, T F

    1996-02-01

    We describe a branch-and-bound search algorithm for finding the exact global optimum gapped sequence-structure alignment ("threading") between a protein sequence and a protein core or structural model, using an arbitrary amino acid pair score function (e.g. contact potentials, knowledge-based potentials, potentials of mean force, etc.). The search method imposes minimal conditions on how structural environments are defined or the form of the score function, and allows arbitrary sequence-specific functions for scoring loops and active site residues. Consequently the search method can be used with many different score functions and threading methodologies; this paper illustrates five from the literature. On a desktop workstation running LISP, we have found the global optimum protein sequence-structure alignment in NP-hard search spaces as large as 9.6 x 10(31), at rates ranging as high as 6.8 x 10(28) equivalent threadings per second (most of which are pruned before they ever are examined explicitly). Continuing the procedure past the global optimum enumerates successive candidate threadings in monotonically increasing score order. We give efficient algorithms for search space size, uniform random sampling, segment placement probabilities, mean, standard deviation and partition function. The method should prove useful for structure prediction, as well as for critical evaluation of new pair score functions. PMID:8568903

  10. Using Local States To Drive the Sampling of Global Conformations in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Fornili, Arianna

    2016-03-01

    Conformational changes associated with protein function often occur beyond the time scale currently accessible to unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, so that different approaches have been developed to accelerate their sampling. Here we investigate how the knowledge of backbone conformations preferentially adopted by protein fragments, as contained in precalculated libraries known as structural alphabets (SA), can be used to explore the landscape of protein conformations in MD simulations. We find that (a) enhancing the sampling of native local states in both metadynamics and steered MD simulations allows the recovery of global folded states in small proteins; (b) folded states can still be recovered when the amount of information on the native local states is reduced by using a low-resolution version of the SA, where states are clustered into macrostates; and (c) sequences of SA states derived from collections of structural motifs can be used to sample alternative conformations of preselected protein regions. The present findings have potential impact on several applications, ranging from protein model refinement to protein folding and design. PMID:26808351

  11. CD55 is a key complement regulatory protein that counteracts complement-mediated inactivation of Newcastle Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Cotter, Christopher R; Cheng, Xing; Jin, Hong; Chen, Zhongying

    2016-08-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is being developed as an oncolytic virus for virotherapy. In this study we analysed the regulation of complement-mediated inactivation of a recombinant NDV in different host cells. NDV grown in human cells was less sensitive to complement-mediated virus inactivation than NDV grown in embryonated chicken eggs. Additionally, NDV produced from HeLa-S3 cells is more resistant to complement than NDV from 293F cells, which correlated with higher expression and incorporation of complement regulatory proteins (CD46, CD55 and CD59) into virions from HeLa-S3 cells. Further analysis of the recombinant NDVs individually expressing the three CD molecules showed that CD55 is the most potent in counteracting complement-mediated virus inactivation. The results provide important information on selecting NDV manufacture substrate to mitigate complement-mediated virus inactivation.

  12. Novel Host Proteins and Signaling Pathways in Enteropathogenic E. coli Pathogenesis Identified by Global Phosphoproteome Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Scott, Nichollas E.; Trimble, William S.; Foster, Leonard J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to directly translocate effector proteins into host cells where they play a pivotal role in subverting host cell signaling needed for disease. However, our knowledge of how EPEC affects host protein phosphorylation is limited to a few individual protein studies. We employed a quantitative proteomics approach to globally map alterations in the host phosphoproteome during EPEC infection. By characterizing host phosphorylation events at various time points throughout infection, we examined how EPEC dynamically impacts the host phosphoproteome over time. This experimental setup also enabled identification of T3SS-dependent and -independent changes in host phosphorylation. Specifically, T3SS-regulated events affected various cellular processes that are known EPEC targets, including cytoskeletal organization, immune signaling, and intracellular trafficking. However, the involvement of phosphorylation in these events has thus far been poorly studied. We confirmed the MAPK family as an established key host player, showed its central role in signal transduction during EPEC infection, and extended the repertoire of known signaling hubs with previously unrecognized proteins, including TPD52, CIN85, EPHA2, and HSP27. We identified altered phosphorylation of known EPEC targets, such as cofilin, where the involvement of phosphorylation has so far been undefined, thus providing novel mechanistic insights into the roles of these proteins in EPEC infection. An overlap of regulated proteins, especially those that are cytoskeleton-associated, was observed when compared with the phosphoproteome of Shigella-infected cells. We determined the biological relevance of the phosphorylation of a novel protein in EPEC pathogenesis, septin-9 (SEPT9). Both siRNA knockdown and a phosphorylation-impaired SEPT9 mutant decreased bacterial adherence and EPEC-mediated cell death. In contrast, a phosphorylation

  13. Different expression of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits in cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors: Relationship with cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Mantovani, G.; Lania, A.G.; Bondioni, S.; Peverelli, E.; Pedroni, C.; Ferrero, S.; Pellegrini, C.; Vicentini, L.; Arnaldi, G.; Bosari, S.; Beck-Peccoz, P.; Spada, A.

    2008-01-01

    The four regulatory subunits (R1A, R1B, R2A, R2B) of protein kinase A (PKA) are differentially expressed in several cancer cell lines and exert distinct roles in growth control. Mutations of the R1A gene have been found in patients with Carney complex and in a minority of sporadic primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of PKA regulatory subunits in non-PPNAD adrenocortical tumors causing ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome and to test the impact of differential expression of these subunits on cell growth. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a defective expression of R2B in all cortisol-secreting adenomas (n = 16) compared with the normal counterpart, while both R1A and R2A were expressed at high levels in the same tissues. Conversely, carcinomas (n = 5) showed high levels of all subunits. Sequencing of R1A and R2B genes revealed a wild type sequence in all tissues. The effect of R1/R2 ratio on proliferation was assessed in mouse adrenocortical Y-1 cells. The R2-selective cAMP analogue 8-Cl-cAMP dose-dependently inhibited Y-1 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis, while the R1-selective cAMP analogue 8-HA-cAMP stimulated cell proliferation. Finally, R2B gene silencing induced up-regulation of R1A protein, associated with an increase in cell proliferation. In conclusion, we propose that a high R1/R2 ratio favors the proliferation of well differentiated and hormone producing adrenocortical cells, while unbalanced expression of these subunits is not required for malignant transformation.

  14. Fluctuations and ultrastructural localization of oncoproteins and cell cycle regulatory proteins during growth and apoptosis of synchronized AGF cells.

    PubMed

    Gazitt, Y; Erdos, G W

    1994-02-15

    blebbing nuclei. Furthermore, we observed for the first time that CDC-2, cyclin A, and PCNA proteins were associated mostly with the plasma membrane and the cytoplasm of log phase cells. However, in cells undergoing apoptosis, these proteins were found exclusively in the nuclei of apoptotic cells. These results suggest a possible active role for c-myc, p53, and the cell cycle regulatory proteins in the process of nuclear blebbing and apoptosis.

  15. WrpA Is an Atypical Flavodoxin Family Protein under Regulatory Control of the Brucella abortus General Stress Response System

    PubMed Central

    Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M.; Willett, Jonathan W.; Kim, Hye-Sook; Chhor, Gekleng; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The general stress response (GSR) system of the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes in response to a range of stress cues. The core genetic regulatory components of the GSR are required for B. abortus survival under nonoptimal growth conditions in vitro and for maintenance of chronic infection in an in vivo mouse model. The functions of the majority of the genes in the GSR transcriptional regulon remain undefined. bab1_1070 is among the most highly regulated genes in this regulon: its transcription is activated 20- to 30-fold by the GSR system under oxidative conditions in vitro. We have solved crystal structures of Bab1_1070 and demonstrate that it forms a homotetrameric complex that resembles those of WrbA-type NADH:quinone oxidoreductases, which are members of the flavodoxin protein family. However, B. abortus WrbA-related protein (WrpA) does not bind flavin cofactors with a high affinity and does not function as an NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in vitro. Soaking crystals with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) revealed a likely low-affinity binding site adjacent to the canonical WrbA flavin binding site. Deletion of wrpA (ΔwrpA) does not compromise cell survival under acute oxidative stress in vitro or attenuate infection in cell-based or mouse models. However, a ΔwrpA strain does elicit increased splenomegaly in a mouse model, suggesting that WrpA modulates B. abortus interaction with its mammalian host. Despite high structural homology with canonical WrbA proteins, we propose that B. abortus WrpA represents a functionally distinct member of the diverse flavodoxin family. IMPORTANCE Brucella abortus is an etiological agent of brucellosis, which is among the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. The general stress response (GSR) regulatory system of B. abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a murine model; the majority of

  16. 76 FR 32364 - Collaboration in Regulatory Science and Capacity To Advance Global Access to Safe Vaccines and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... pandemic influenza vaccines). Expected outputs ] could include analyses, reports and data-driven strategy... sustainable global influenza vaccines production capacity. These financial and intellectual investments in... influenza and other vaccines, biological products and technologies. These norms and standards are based...

  17. Intratesticular delivery of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and ceramide directly abrogates steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression and Leydig cell steroidogenesis in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Morales, Victoria; Santana, Pino; Díaz, Raquel; Tabraue, Carlos; Gallardo, Germán; López Blanco, Félix; Hernández, Inmaculada; Fanjul, Luisa F; Ruiz de Galarreta, Carlos M

    2003-11-01

    Systemic or intratesticular release of TNF alpha and IL1 beta have been implicated in the reduced testosterone biosynthesis and impaired production of competent spermatozoa found in human patients suffering from sepsis or chronic inflammation. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that TNF alpha and IL1 beta intercept the hypothalamic-pituitary testis axis at different levels, the site(s) of action and relative contribution of each cytokine to the overall testicular failure associated to systemic inflammatory processes remains poorly defined. In this study we show that intratesticular delivery of TNF alpha induced a rapid (4 h) and sustained (up to 24 h) reduction in steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein expression and testosterone biosynthesis in nonstimulated or human chorionic gonadotropin-treated intact or hypophysectomized rats. Bilateral treatment with cell-permeant short-chain ceramides (C2-cer or C6-cer) reproduced the early (4 h) inhibitory action of TNFalpha on testosterone biosynthesis and testicular StAR expression. The inhibitory action of C2-cer or C6-cer was not observed in animals treated with inactive analogs (dihydroceramide), phosphorylcholine, sphingosine, or sphingosine-1P. In sharp contrast to the previously described ability of IL1 beta to prevent human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated Leydig cell steroidogenesis in vitro, serum testosterone and testicular StAR protein expression remained unchanged in animals bilaterally injected with this cytokine. These data support the concept that TNF alpha triggers different effector mechanisms to directly inhibit Leydig cell StAR expression and steroidogenesis, which ultimately contribute to the global reproductive failure associated with chronic inflammation and sepsis.

  18. Increase in cell viability by polyamines through stimulation of the synthesis of ppGpp regulatory protein and ω protein of RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Terui, Yusuke; Akiyama, Mariko; Sakamoto, Akihiko; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Igarashi, Kazuei; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2012-02-01

    It is known that polyamines increase cell growth through stimulation of the synthesis of several kinds of proteins encoded by the so-called "polyamine modulon". We recently reported that polyamines also increase cell viability at the stationary phase of cell growth through stimulation of the synthesis of ribosome modulation factor, a component of the polyamine modulon. Accordingly, we looked for other proteins involved in cell viability whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines. It was found that the synthesis of ppGpp regulatory protein (SpoT) and ω protein of RNA polymerase (RpoZ) was stimulated by polyamines at the level of translation. Stimulation of the synthesis of SpoT and RpoZ by polyamines was due to an inefficient initiation codon UUG in spoT mRNA and an unusual location of a Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence in rpoZ mRNA. Accordingly, the spoT and rpoZ genes are components of the polyamine modulon involved in cell viability. Reduced cell viability caused by polyamine deficiency was prevented by modified spoT and rpoZ genes whose synthesis was not influenced by polyamines. Under these conditions, the level of ppGpp increased in parallel with increase of SpoT protein. The results indicate that polyamine stimulation of synthesis of SpoT and RpoZ plays important roles for cell viability through stimulation of ppGpp synthesis by SpoT and modulation of RNA synthesis by ppGpp-RpoZ complex.

  19. Probing the energetics of proteins through structural perturbation: sites of regulatory energy in human hemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Pettigrew, D W; Romeo, P H; Tsapis, A; Thillet, J; Smith, M L; Turner, B W; Ackers, G K

    1982-01-01

    The sites of energy transduction within the human hemoglobin molecule for the regulation of oxygen affinity have been determined by an extensive study of the molecule's energetic response to structural alteration at individual amino acid residues. For 22 mutant and chemically modified hemoglobins we have determined the total free energy used by the tetrameric molecule for alteration of oxygen affinity at the four binding steps. The results imply that the regulation of oxygen binding affinity is due to energy changes which are mostly localized at the alpha 1 beta 2 interface. They also indicate a high degree of "internal cooperativity" within this contact region--i.e., the structural perturbations at individual residue sites are energetically coupled. Cooperativity in ligand binding is thus a reflection of cooperativity at a deeper level--that of the protein-protein interactions within the alpha 1 beta 2 interfacial domain. Images PMID:6952235

  20. Immune Protection of Retroviral Vectors Upon Molecular Painting with the Complement Regulatory Protein CD59.

    PubMed

    Heider, Susanne; Kleinberger, Sandra; Kochan, Feliks; Dangerfield, John A; Metzner, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchoring is a type of post-translational modification that allows proteins to be presented on the exterior side of the cell membrane. Purified glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein can spontaneously re-insert into lipid bilayer membranes in a process termed Molecular Painting. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of inserting purified, recombinant CD59 into virus particles produced from a murine retroviral producer cell line. CD59 is a regulator of the complement system that helps protect healthy cells from the lytic activity of the complement cascade. In this study, we could show that Molecular Painting confers protection from complement activity upon murine retroviral vector particles. Indeed, increased infectivity of CD59-modified virus particles was observed upon challenge with human serum, indicating that Molecular Painting is suitable for modulating the immune system in gene therapy or vaccination applications. PMID:27170144

  1. A predicted protein interactome identifies conserved global networks and disease resistance subnetworks in maize

    PubMed Central

    Musungu, Bryan; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Brown, Robert L.; Fakhoury, Ahmad M.; Geisler, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Interactomes are genome-wide roadmaps of protein-protein interactions. They have been produced for humans, yeast, the fruit fly, and Arabidopsis thaliana and have become invaluable tools for generating and testing hypotheses. A predicted interactome for Zea mays (PiZeaM) is presented here as an aid to the research community for this valuable crop species. PiZeaM was built using a proven method of interologs (interacting orthologs) that were identified using both one-to-one and many-to-many orthology between genomes of maize and reference species. Where both maize orthologs occurred for an experimentally determined interaction in the reference species, we predicted a likely interaction in maize. A total of 49,026 unique interactions for 6004 maize proteins were predicted. These interactions are enriched for processes that are evolutionarily conserved, but include many otherwise poorly annotated proteins in maize. The predicted maize interactions were further analyzed by comparing annotation of interacting proteins, including different layers of ontology. A map of pairwise gene co-expression was also generated and compared to predicted interactions. Two global subnetworks were constructed for highly conserved interactions. These subnetworks showed clear clustering of proteins by function. Another subnetwork was created for disease response using a bait and prey strategy to capture interacting partners for proteins that respond to other organisms. Closer examination of this subnetwork revealed the connectivity between biotic and abiotic hormone stress pathways. We believe PiZeaM will provide a useful tool for the prediction of protein function and analysis of pathways for Z. mays researchers and is presented in this paper as a reference tool for the exploration of protein interactions in maize. PMID:26089837

  2. Dentin sialophosphoprotein: a regulatory protein for dental pulp stem cell identity and fate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shiliang; Lim, Dandrich; Dong, Zhihong; Saunders, Thomas L; Ma, Peter X; Marcelo, Cynthia L; Ritchie, Helena H

    2014-12-01

    The dentin sialophosphoprotein (dspp) transcript is expressed during tooth development as a DSPP precursor protein, which then undergoes cleavage to form mature dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and phosphophoryn (PP) proteins. Previous studies using DSPP-knockout (KO) mice have reported that these animals have hypomineralized teeth, thin dentin, and a large dental pulp chamber, similar to those from patients with dentinogenesis imperfecta III. However, there is no information about factors that regulate dental pulp stem cell lineage fate, a critical early event in the odontoblast-dentin mineralization scheme. To reveal the role of DSPP in odontoblast lineage differentiation during tooth development, we systematically examined teeth from wild-type (wt) and DSPP-KO C57BL/6 mice between the ages of postnatal day 1 and 3 months. We found developmental abnormalities not previously reported, such as circular dentin formation within dental pulp cells and altered odontoblast differentiation in DSPP-KO mice, even as early as 1 day after birth. Surprisingly, we also identified chondrocyte-like cells in the dental pulp from KO-mice teeth. Thus, these studies that compare wt and DSPP-KO mice suggest that the expression of DSPP precursor protein is required for normal odontoblast lineage differentiation and that the absence of DSPP allows dental pulp cells to differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells, which could negatively impact pulpal wound healing and tissue regeneration.

  3. Evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor response by mutations in regulatory network interactions.

    PubMed

    Di Roberto, Raphaël B; Chang, Belinda; Trusina, Ala; Peisajovich, Sergio G

    2016-01-01

    All cellular functions depend on the concerted action of multiple proteins organized in complex networks. To understand how selection acts on protein networks, we used the yeast mating receptor Ste2, a pheromone-activated G protein-coupled receptor, as a model system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ste2 is a hub in a network of interactions controlling both signal transduction and signal suppression. Through laboratory evolution, we obtained 21 mutant receptors sensitive to the pheromone of a related yeast species and investigated the molecular mechanisms behind this newfound sensitivity. While some mutants show enhanced binding affinity to the foreign pheromone, others only display weakened interactions with the network's negative regulators. Importantly, the latter changes have a limited impact on overall pathway regulation, despite their considerable effect on sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that a new receptor-ligand pair can evolve through network-altering mutations independently of receptor-ligand binding, and suggest a potential role for such mutations in disease. PMID:27487915

  4. Recycling of a regulatory protein by degradation of the RNA to which it binds.

    PubMed

    Deikus, Gintaras; Babitzke, Paul; Bechhofer, David H

    2004-03-01

    When Bacillus subtilis is grown in the presence of excess tryptophan, transcription of the trp operon is regulated by binding of tryptophan-activated TRAP to trp leader RNA, which promotes transcription termination in the trp leader region. Transcriptome analysis of a B. subtilis strain lacking polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease) revealed a striking overexpression of trp operon structural genes when the strain was grown in the presence of abundant tryptophan. Analysis of trp leader RNA in the PNPase(-) strain showed accumulation of a stable, TRAP-protected fragment of trp leader RNA. Loss of trp operon transcriptional regulation in the PNPase(-) strain was due to the inability of ribonucleases other than PNPase to degrade TRAP-bound leader RNA, resulting in the sequestration of limiting TRAP. Thus, in the case of the B. subtilis trp operon, specific ribonuclease degradation of RNA in an RNA-protein complex is required for recycling of an RNA-binding protein. Such a mechanism may be relevant to other systems in which limiting concentrations of an RNA-binding protein must keep pace with ongoing transcription. PMID:14976255

  5. Evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor response by mutations in regulatory network interactions

    PubMed Central

    Di Roberto, Raphaël B.; Chang, Belinda; Trusina, Ala; Peisajovich, Sergio G.

    2016-01-01

    All cellular functions depend on the concerted action of multiple proteins organized in complex networks. To understand how selection acts on protein networks, we used the yeast mating receptor Ste2, a pheromone-activated G protein-coupled receptor, as a model system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ste2 is a hub in a network of interactions controlling both signal transduction and signal suppression. Through laboratory evolution, we obtained 21 mutant receptors sensitive to the pheromone of a related yeast species and investigated the molecular mechanisms behind this newfound sensitivity. While some mutants show enhanced binding affinity to the foreign pheromone, others only display weakened interactions with the network's negative regulators. Importantly, the latter changes have a limited impact on overall pathway regulation, despite their considerable effect on sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that a new receptor–ligand pair can evolve through network-altering mutations independently of receptor–ligand binding, and suggest a potential role for such mutations in disease. PMID:27487915

  6. Stimulatory effects of propylthiouracil on pregnenolone production through upregulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression in rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Chih; Wang, Shyi-Wu; Kan, Shu-Fen; Tsai, Shiow-Chwen; Wu, Yu-Ching; Wang, Paulus S

    2010-12-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) is a common and effective clinical medicine for the treatment of hyperthyroidism. Our previous study demonstrated that short-term treatment with PTU inhibits progesterone production in rat granulosa cells. However, our present results indicate that a 16-h treatment with PTU was able to stimulate pregnenolone production in rat granulosa cells, although progesterone production was diminished by PTU through inhibition of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Notably, we found that PTU treatment enhanced the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone, whereas the protein level of the cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc, which is the enzyme responding to this conversion) was not affected. Interestingly, the levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in both total cell lysate and the mitochondrial fraction were significantly increased by PTU treatment. Furthermore, the binding of steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) to the StAR promoter region was also enhanced by PTU treatment, which suggests that PTU could upregulate StAR gene expression. In addition to SF-1 regulation, we found that mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase activation is an important regulator of PTU-stimulated StAR protein expression, based on the effects of the MEK inhibitor PD98059. In conclusion, these results indicate that PTU plays opposite roles in the production of progesterone and its precursor, pregnenolone. The regulation of negative feedback on speeding the cholesterol transportation and pregnenolone conversion after a 16-h PTU treatment may be the mechanism explaining PTU's inhibition of progesterone production in rat granulosa cells.

  7. Cell-penetrable mouse forkhead box protein 3 alleviates experimental arthritis in mice by up-regulating regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Ji, Baoju; Sun, Mengyi; Wu, Weijiang; Huang, Lili; Sun, Aihua; Zong, Yangyong; Xia, Sheng; Shi, Liyun; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong; Shao, Qixiang

    2015-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(regs)) have potential applications in clinical disease therapy, such as autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection. However, their numbers are limited. Forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) is a key transcription factor that controls T(reg) development and function. Here, we generated a cell-permeable fusion protein, protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated mouse FoxP3 protein (PTD-mFoxP3), and evaluated whether PTD-mFoxp3 can alleviate rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. As expected, PTD-mFoxP3 was transduced into cells effectively, and inhibited T cell activation and attenuated the cell proliferation. It decreased interleukin (IL) 2 and interferon (IFN)-γ expression, and increased IL-10 expression in activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. PTD-mFoxP3-transduced CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells attenuated proliferation of activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. In addition, PTD-mFoxP3 blocked the Th17 differentiation programme in vitro and down-regulated IL-17 production from T cells by modulating induction and levels of retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt). Intra-articular delivery of PTD-mFoxP3 delayed disease incidence remarkably and alleviated autoimmune symptoms of CIA mice. Moreover, protective effects of PTD-mFoxP3 were associated with regulating the balance of T helper type 17 (Th17) and T(regs). These results suggest that PTD-mFoxP3 may be a candidate for RA therapy. PMID:25809415

  8. Cell-penetrable mouse forkhead box protein 3 alleviates experimental arthritis in mice by up-regulating regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Ji, Baoju; Sun, Mengyi; Wu, Weijiang; Huang, Lili; Sun, Aihua; Zong, Yangyong; Xia, Sheng; Shi, Liyun; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong; Shao, Qixiang

    2015-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(regs)) have potential applications in clinical disease therapy, such as autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection. However, their numbers are limited. Forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) is a key transcription factor that controls T(reg) development and function. Here, we generated a cell-permeable fusion protein, protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated mouse FoxP3 protein (PTD-mFoxP3), and evaluated whether PTD-mFoxp3 can alleviate rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. As expected, PTD-mFoxP3 was transduced into cells effectively, and inhibited T cell activation and attenuated the cell proliferation. It decreased interleukin (IL) 2 and interferon (IFN)-γ expression, and increased IL-10 expression in activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. PTD-mFoxP3-transduced CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells attenuated proliferation of activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. In addition, PTD-mFoxP3 blocked the Th17 differentiation programme in vitro and down-regulated IL-17 production from T cells by modulating induction and levels of retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt). Intra-articular delivery of PTD-mFoxP3 delayed disease incidence remarkably and alleviated autoimmune symptoms of CIA mice. Moreover, protective effects of PTD-mFoxP3 were associated with regulating the balance of T helper type 17 (Th17) and T(regs). These results suggest that PTD-mFoxP3 may be a candidate for RA therapy.

  9. Turnover of mitochondrial steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein by Lon protease: the unexpected effect of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Granot, Zvi; Kobiler, Oren; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Eimerl, Sarah; Bahat, Assaf; Lu, Bin; Braun, Sergei; Maurizi, Michael R; Suzuki, Carolyn K; Oppenheim, Amos B; Orly, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is a vital mitochondrial protein promoting transfer of cholesterol into steroid making mitochondria in specialized cells of the adrenal cortex and gonads. Our previous work has demonstrated that StAR is rapidly degraded upon import into the mitochondrial matrix. To identify the protease(s) responsible for this rapid turnover, murine StAR was expressed in wild-type Escherichia coli or in mutant strains lacking one of the four ATP-dependent proteolytic systems, three of which are conserved in mammalian mitochondria-ClpP, FtsH, and Lon. StAR was rapidly degraded in wild-type bacteria and stabilized only in lon (-)mutants; in such cells, StAR turnover was fully restored upon coexpression of human mitochondrial Lon. In mammalian cells, the rate of StAR turnover was proportional to the cell content of Lon protease after expression of a Lon-targeted small interfering RNA, or overexpression of the protein. In vitro assays using purified proteins showed that Lon-mediated degradation of StAR was ATP-dependent and blocked by the proteasome inhibitors MG132 (IC(50) = 20 microm) and clasto-lactacystin beta-lactone (cLbetaL, IC(50) = 3 microm); by contrast, epoxomicin, representing a different class of proteasome inhibitors, had no effect. Such inhibition is consistent with results in cultured rat ovarian granulosa cells demonstrating that degradation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix is blocked by MG132 and cLbetaL but not by epoxomicin. Both inhibitors also blocked Lon-mediated cleavage of the model substrate fluorescein isothiocyanate-casein. Taken together, our former studies and the present results suggest that Lon is the primary ATP-dependent protease responsible for StAR turnover in mitochondria of steroidogenic cells.

  10. Protein structure prediction and potential energy landscape analysis using continuous global minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, K.A.; Phillips, A.T.; Rosen, J.B.

    1997-12-01

    Proteins require specific three-dimensional conformations to function properly. These {open_quotes}native{close_quotes} conformations result primarily from intramolecular interactions between the atoms in the macromolecule, and also intermolecular interactions between the macromolecule and the surrounding solvent. Although the folding process can be quite complex, the instructions guiding this process are specified by the one-dimensional primary sequence of the protein or nucleic acid: external factors, such as helper (chaperone) proteins, present at the time of folding have no effect on the final state of the protein. Many denatured proteins spontaneously refold into functional conformations once denaturing conditions are removed. Indeed, the existence of a unique native conformation, in which residues distant in sequence but close in proximity exhibit a densely packed hydrophobic core, suggests that this three-dimensional structure is largely encoded within the sequential arrangement of these specific amino acids. In any case, the native structure is often the conformation at the global minimum energy. In addition to the unique native (minimum energy) structure, other less stable structures exist as well, each with a corresponding potential energy. These structures, in conjunction with the native structure, make up an energy landscape that can be used to characterize various aspects of the protein structure. 22 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Quantitative Proteomics of Sleep-Deprived Mouse Brains Reveals Global Changes in Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tie-Mei; Zhang, Ju-en; Lin, Rui; Chen, She; Luo, Minmin; Dong, Meng-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a ubiquitous, tightly regulated, and evolutionarily conserved behavior observed in almost all animals. Prolonged sleep deprivation can be fatal, indicating that sleep is a physiological necessity. However, little is known about its core function. To gain insight into this mystery, we used advanced quantitative proteomics technology to survey the global changes in brain protein abundance. Aiming to gain a comprehensive profile, our proteomics workflow included filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), which increased the coverage of membrane proteins; tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, for relative quantitation; and high resolution, high mass accuracy, high throughput mass spectrometry (MS). In total, we obtained the relative abundance ratios of 9888 proteins encoded by 6070 genes. Interestingly, we observed significant enrichment for mitochondrial proteins among the differentially expressed proteins. This finding suggests that sleep deprivation strongly affects signaling pathways that govern either energy metabolism or responses to mitochondrial stress. Additionally, the differentially-expressed proteins are enriched in pathways implicated in age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and Alzheimer’s, hinting at possible connections between sleep loss, mitochondrial stress, and neurodegeneration. PMID:27684481

  12. Global analysis of the Brucella melitensis proteome: Identification of proteins expressed in laboratory-grown culture.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mary Ann; Eschenbrenner, Michel; Horn, Troy A; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Mujer, Cesar V; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2002-08-01

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes brucellosis, a zoonotic disease primarily infecting sheep and goats, characterized by undulant fever, arthritic pain and other neurological disorders in humans. A comprehensive proteomic study of strain 16M was conducted to identify and characterize the proteins expressed in laboratory-grown culture. Using overlapping narrow range immobilized pH gradient strips for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, 883 protein spots were detected between pH 3.5 and 11. The average isoelectric point and molecular weight values of the detected spots were 5.22 and 46.5 kDa, respectively. Of the 883 observed protein spots, 440 have been identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry. These proteins represent 187 discrete open reading frames (ORFs) or 6% of the predicted 3197 ORFs contained in the genome. The corresponding ORFs of the identified proteins are distributed evenly between each of the two circular B. melitensis chromosomes, indicating that both replicons are functionally active. The presented proteome map lists those protein spots identified to date in this study. This map may serve as a baseline reference for future proteomic studies aimed at the definition of biochemical pathways associated with stress responses, host specificity, pathogenicity and virulence. It will also assist in characterization of global proteomic effects in gene-knockout mutants. Ultimately, it may aid in our overall understanding of the cell biology of B. melitensis, an important bacterial pathogen.

  13. Trm9-Catalyzed tRNA Modifications Regulate Global Protein Expression by Codon-Biased Translation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wenjun; Babu, I. Ramesh; Su, Dan; Yin, Shanye; Begley, Thomas J.; Dedon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modifications of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have long been recognized to play crucial roles in regulating the rate and fidelity of translation. However, the extent to which they determine global protein production remains poorly understood. Here we use quantitative proteomics to show a direct link between wobble uridine 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5) and 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio (mcm5s2) modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9) in tRNAArg(UCU) and tRNAGlu(UUC) and selective translation of proteins from genes enriched with their cognate codons. Controlling for bias in protein expression and alternations in mRNA expression, we find that loss of Trm9 selectively impairs expression of proteins from genes enriched with AGA and GAA codons under both normal and stress conditions. Moreover, we show that AGA and GAA codons occur with high frequency in clusters along the transcripts, which may play a role in modulating translation. Consistent with these results, proteins subject to enhanced ribosome pausing in yeast lacking mcm5U and mcm5s2U are more likely to be down-regulated and contain a larger number of AGA/GAA clusters. Together, these results suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications play a significant role in regulating protein expression within the cell. PMID:26670883

  14. Opposing Growth Regulatory Roles of Protein Kinase D Isoforms in Human Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ryvkin, Vladislav; Rashel, Mohammad; Gaddapara, Trivikram; Ghazizadeh, Soosan

    2015-01-01

    PKD is a family of three serine/threonine kinases (PKD-1, -2, and -3) involved in the regulation of diverse biological processes including proliferation, migration, secretion, and cell survival. We have previously shown that despite expression of all three isoforms in mouse epidermis, PKD1 plays a unique and critical role in wound healing, phorbol ester-induced hyperplasia, and tumor development. In translating our findings to the human, we discovered that PKD1 is not expressed in human keratinocytes (KCs) and there is a divergence in the expression and function of other PKD isoforms. Contrary to mouse KCs, treatment of cultured human KCs with pharmacological inhibitors of PKDs resulted in growth arrest. We found that PKD2 and PKD3 are expressed differentially in proliferating and differentiating human KCs, with the former uniformly present in both compartments whereas the latter is predominantly expressed in the proliferating compartment. Knockdown of individual PKD isoforms in human KCs revealed contrasting growth regulatory roles for PKD2 and PKD3. Loss of PKD2 enhanced KC proliferative potential while loss of PKD3 resulted in a progressive proliferation defect, loss of clonogenicity and diminished tissue regenerative ability. This proliferation defect was correlated with up-regulation of CDK4/6 inhibitor p15INK4B and induction of a p53-independent G1 cell cycle arrest. Simultaneous silencing of PKD isoforms resulted in a more pronounced proliferation defect consistent with a predominant role for PKD3 in proliferating KCs. These data underline the importance and complexity of PKD signaling in human epidermis and suggest a central role for PKD3 signaling in maintaining human epidermal homeostasis. PMID:25802335

  15. Environmental toxicants perturb human Sertoli cell adhesive function via changes in F-actin organization mediated by actin regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Wong, Chris K.C.; Lee, Will M.; John, Constance M.; Turek, Paul J.; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro and that have formed an epithelium be used as a model to monitor toxicant-induced junction disruption and to better understand the mechanism(s) by which toxicants disrupt cell adhesion at the Sertoli cell blood–testis barrier (BTB)? SUMMARY ANSWER Our findings illustrate that human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro serve as a reliable system to monitor the impact of environmental toxicants on the BTB function. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Suspicions of a declining trend in semen quality and a concomitant increase in exposures to environmental toxicants over the past decades reveal the need of an in vitro system that efficiently and reliably monitors the impact of toxicants on male reproductive function. Furthermore, studies in rodents have confirmed that environmental toxicants impede Sertoli cell BTB function in vitro and in vivo. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION We examined the effects of two environmental toxicants: cadmium chloride (0.5–20 µM) and bisphenol A (0.4–200 µM) on human Sertoli cell function. Cultured Sertoli cells from three men were used in this study, which spanned an 18-month period. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Human Sertoli cells from three subjects were cultured in F12/DMEM containing 5% fetal bovine serum. Changes in protein expression were monitored by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence analyses were used to assess changes in the distribution of adhesion proteins, F-actin and actin regulatory proteins following exposure to two toxicants: cadmium chloride and bisphenol A (BPA). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Human Sertoli cells were sensitive to cadmium and BPA toxicity. Changes in the localization of cell adhesion proteins were mediated by an alteration of the actin-based cytoskeleton. This alteration of F-actin network in Sertoli cells as manifested by truncation and depolymerization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli cell BTB was caused by

  16. Lovastatin insensitive 1, a Novel pentatricopeptide repeat protein, is a potential regulatory factor of isoprenoid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Suzuki, Masashi; Tang, Jianwei; Nagata, Noriko; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Seki, Hikaru; Kiuchi, Reiko; Kaneko, Yasuko; Nakazawa, Miki; Matsui, Minami; Matsumoto, Shogo; Yoshida, Shigeo; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2007-02-01

    Higher plants have two metabolic pathways for isoprenoid biosynthesis: the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastidal non-mevalonate (MEP) pathway. Despite the compartmentalization of these two pathways, metabolic flow occurs between them. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the two pathways and the metabolic cross-talk. To identify such regulatory mechanisms, we isolated and characterized the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant lovastatin insensitive 1 (loi1), which is resistant to lovastatin and clomazone, inhibitors of the MVA and MEP pathways, respectively. The accumulation of the major products of these pathways, i.e. sterols and chlorophyll, was less affected by lovastatin and clomazone, respectively, in loi1 than in the wild type. Furthermore, the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) activity analysis showed higher activity of HMGR in loi1-1 treated with lovastatin than that in the WT. We consider that the lovastatin-resistant phenotype of loi1-1 was derived from this post-transcriptional up-regulation of HMGR. The LOI1 gene encodes a novel pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein. PPR proteins are thought to regulate the expression of genes encoded in organelle genomes by post-transcriptional regulation in mitochondria or plastids. Our results demonstrate that LOI1 is predicted to localize in mitochondria and has the ability to bind single-stranded nucleic acids. Our investigation revealed that the post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial RNA may be involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis in both the MVA and MEP pathways.

  17. Structural modeling of the catalytic subunit-regulatory subunit dimeric complex of the camp-dependent protein kinase.

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, C-S; Gallagher, S. C.; Walsh, D. A.; Trewhella, J.

    2001-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is a multifunctional kinase that serves as a prototype for understanding second messenger signaling and protein phosphorylation. In the absence of a cAMP signal, PKA exists as a dimer of dimers, consisting of two regulatory (R) and two catalystic (C) subunits. Based on experimentally derived data (i.e., crystal structures of the R and C subunits, mutagenesis data identifying points of subunit-subunit contacts), the neutron scattering derived model for the heterodimer (Zhao et al., 1998) and using a set of computational approaches (homology modeling, Monte Carlo simulation), they have developed a high-resolution model of the RII{alpha}-C{alpha} dimer. The nature of the subunit-subunit interface was studied. The model reveals an averaged size dimer interface (2100 Angstrom{sup 2}) that is distant from the pseudo-substrate binding site on the C subunit. The additional contacts made by the pseudosubstrate increases the stability of the dimeric complex. Based on a set of R-C dimer structures derived using a simulated annealing approach, specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between the two subunits and were identified.

  18. Testosterone induction of microsomal acyl-CoA reductase and a cytosolic regulatory protein in mouse preputial glands.

    PubMed

    Lee, T C; Kirk, P; Snyder, F

    1986-01-01

    Alkyl and alk-1-enyl (plasmalogens) ether-linked glycerolipids are prominent components of many mammalian cells; moreover, an acetylated form of an alkyl phospholipid was recently found to possess potent hypotensive, inflammatory and allergic properties. In our studies, preputial glands of mice were selected as a model to investigate the regulation of factors involved in the biosynthesis of ether-linked lipids, since these glands contain high concentrations of ether-linked neutral lipids that are under the influence of hormonal control. We found that a key enzyme in the ether-lipid metabolic pathway, microsomal acyl-CoA reductase that catalyzes the formation of long-chain fatty alcohols (precursor of the O-alkyl chain), was increased 16-fold after injecting testosterone into male, castrated mice. This induction was highly specific, since testosterone did not affect another microsomal enzyme, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase. Based on kinetics of enzyme activity changes, the half-life of acyl-CoA reductase was calculated to be 61-70 h. In addition, the activity of a cytosolic stimulatory protein for the acyl-CoA reductase (but not for a different cytosolic protein, lactate dehydrogenase) was also enhanced in the testosterone-treated, male, castrated mice. These findings indicate that acyl-CoA reductase is an important regulatory enzyme in the reactions that lead to the formation of the ether bond in glycerolipids and that it is modulated through hormonal control. PMID:3940533

  19. Regulation of the germinal center gene program by interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 8/IFN consensus sequence-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Melchers, Mark; Wang, Hongsheng; Torrey, Ted A.; Slota, Rebecca; Qi, Chen-Feng; Kim, Ji Young; Lugar, Patricia; Kong, Hee Jeong; Farrington, Lila; van der Zouwen, Boris; Zhou, Jeff X.; Lougaris, Vassilios; Lipsky, Peter E.; Grammer, Amrie C.; Morse, Herbert C.

    2006-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) consensus sequence-binding protein/IFN regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) is a transcription factor that regulates the differentiation and function of macrophages, granulocytes, and dendritic cells through activation or repression of target genes. Although IRF8 is also expressed in lymphocytes, its roles in B cell and T cell maturation or function are ill defined, and few transcriptional targets are known. Gene expression profiling of human tonsillar B cells and mouse B cell lymphomas showed that IRF8 transcripts were expressed at highest levels in centroblasts, either from secondary lymphoid tissue or transformed cells. In addition, staining for IRF8 was most intense in tonsillar germinal center (GC) dark-zone centroblasts. To discover B cell genes regulated by IRF8, we transfected purified primary tonsillar B cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein–tagged IRF8, generated small interfering RNA knockdowns of IRF8 expression in a mouse B cell lymphoma cell line, and examined the effects of a null mutation of IRF8 on B cells. Each approach identified activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AICDA) and BCL6 as targets of transcriptional activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated in vivo occupancy of 5′ sequences of both genes by IRF8 protein. These results suggest previously unappreciated roles for IRF8 in the transcriptional regulation of B cell GC reactions that include direct regulation of AICDA and BCL6. PMID:16380510

  20. Application of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis regulatory protein PhaR as a bio-surfactant and bactericidal agent.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong-Kun; Liu, Ming-Ming; Li, Shi-Yan; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jin-Chun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2013-06-20

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), a family of diverse bio-polyesters, are produced by many bacteria as an energy and carbon storage material. PHA synthesis regulatory protein PhaR was reported to attach on the surface of intracellular PHA granules for convenience of synthesis regulation. PhaR was found to have an amphiphilic property. However, no study was conducted to exploit this property for applications as bio-surfactant and bactericide agent. Purified PhaR showed a higher emulsification ability than that of the widely used chemical surfactants including SDS, Tween 20, sodium oleate, and liquefied detergent (LD). PhaR also showed a higher emulsification ability than bio-surfactants rhamnose and PHA granules associated protein termed phasin or PhaP. Non-purified PhaR, namely, the native inclusion bodies and cell lysates, also demonstrated to be an excellent surfactant. PhaR was found highly stable even at 95 °C. In addition, PhaR was revealed to be a promising bactericidal agent against Gram positive and negative bacteria. PhaR can be conveniently produced by recombinant Escherichia coli. It has shown to be a bio-surfactant with excellent emulsification ability and strong bactericidal capacity at elevated temperature as high as 95 °C. Therefore, PhaR could be used in areas including food, beverage, pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries.

  1. Transcriptional profiling analysis of the global regulator NorG, a GntR-like protein of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Truong-Bolduc, Q C; Dunman, P M; Eidem, T; Hooper, D C

    2011-11-01

    The GntR-like protein NorG has been shown to affect Staphylococcus aureus genes involved in resistance to quinolones and β-lactams, such as those encoding the NorB and AbcA transporters. To identify the target genes regulated by NorG, we carried out transcriptional-profiling assays using S. aureus RN6390 and its isogenic norG::cat mutant. Our data showed that NorG positively affected the transcription of global regulators mgrA, arlS, and sarZ. The three putative drug efflux pump genes most positively affected by NorG were the NorB efflux pump (5.1-fold), the MmpL-like protein SACOL2566 (5.2-fold), and the BcrA-like drug transporter SACOL2525 (5.7-fold) genes. The S. aureus predicted MmpL protein showed 53% homology with the MmpL lipid transporter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the putative SACOL2525 protein showed 87% homology with the bacitracin drug transporter BcrA of Staphylococcus hominis. Two pump genes most negatively affected by NorG were the NorC (4-fold) and AbcA (6-fold) genes. Other categories of genes, such as those participating in amino acid, inorganic ion, or nucleotide transporters and metabolism, were also affected by NorG. Real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays for mgrA, arlS, sarZ, norB, norC, abcA, mmpL, and bcrA-like were carried out to verify microarray data and showed the same level of up- or downregulation by NorG. The norG mutant showed a 2-fold increase in resistance to norfloxacin and rhodamine, both substrates of the NorC transporter, which is consistent with the resistance phenotype conferred by overexpression of norC on a plasmid. These data indicate that NorG has broad regulatory function in S. aureus.

  2. Social dominance-related major urinary proteins and the regulatory mechanism in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huifen; Fang, Qi; Huo, Ying; Zhang, Yaohua; Zhang, Jianxu

    2015-11-01

    Major urinary proteins (MUPs) have been proven to be non-volatile male pheromones in mice. Here, we aimed to elucidate the relationship between MUPs and dominance hierarchy, and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Dominance-submission relationship was established by chronic dyadic encountering. We found that at the urinary protein level and hepatic mRNA level, the expression of major MUPs, including Mup20, was enhanced in dominant males compared with subordinate males, indicating that MUPs might signal the social status of male mice. Meanwhile, the mRNA level of hepatic corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) was higher in subordinate male mice than in dominant male mice. Castration also enhanced the expression of CRHR2, but suppressed that of MUPs. CRHR2 agonist treatment reduced the expression of MUPs in liver. However, male social status failed to exert significant influence on serum testosterone and corticosterone as well as the mRNA expression of their receptors. These findings reveal that some MUPs, especially Mup20, might constitute potential dominance pheromones and could be downregulated by hepatic CRHR2, which is possibly independent of androgen or corticosterone systems.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of conformation changes of HIV-1 regulatory protein on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; He, Daohang; Zhou, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV genes through channel formation in which it adopts a leucine-zipper-like alpha-helical conformation. A recent experimental study reported that helical Vpr13-33 would transform to β-sheet or random coil structures and aggregate on the surface of graphene or graphene oxide through hydrophobic interactions. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a considerable lack of understanding on the adsorption dynamics at the early stage of the conformational transition at water-graphene interface and the underlying driving force at molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformation transition phenomena. Vpr13-33 kept α-helical structure in solution, but changed to β-sheet structure when strongly adsorbed onto graphene. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The cluster analysis identified the most significant populated conformation and the early stage of structure conversion from α-helical to β-sheet was found, but the full β-sheet propagation was not observed. Free energy landscape analysis further complemented the transformation analysis of peptide conformations. These findings are consistent with experimental results, and give a molecular level interpretation for the reduced cytotoxicity of Vpr13-33 to some extent upon graphene exposure. Meanwhile, this study provides some significant insights into the detailed mechanism of graphene-induced protein conformation transition.

  4. Novel functions for the endocytic regulatory proteins MICAL-L1 and EHD1 in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, James B; Katafiasz, Dawn; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    During interphase, recycling endosomes mediate the transport of internalized cargo back to the plasma membrane. However, in mitotic cells, recycling endosomes are essential for the completion of cytokinesis, the last phase of mitosis that promotes the physical separation the two daughter cells. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular determinants that regulate recycling endosome dynamics during cytokinesis remains incomplete. We have previously demonstrated that Molecule Interacting with CasL Like-1 (MICAL-L1) and C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain protein 1 (EHD1) coordinately regulate receptor transport from tubular recycling endosomes during interphase. However, their potential roles in controlling cytokinesis had not been addressed. In this study, we show that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 regulate mitosis. Depletion of either protein resulted in increased numbers of bi-nucleated cells. We provide evidence that bi-nucleation in MICAL-L1- and EHD1-depleted cells is a consequence of impaired recycling endosome transport during late cytokinesis. However, depletion of MICAL-L1, but not EHD1, resulted in aberrant chromosome alignment and lagging chromosomes, suggesting an EHD1-independent function for MICAL-L1 earlier in mitosis. Moreover, we provide evidence that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 differentially influence microtubule dynamics during early and late mitosis. Collectively, our new data suggest several unanticipated roles for MICAL-L1 and EHD1 during the cell cycle.

  5. Association between glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) and apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) gene polymorphisms and triacylglycerol concentrations in fasting, postprandial, and fenofibrate-treated states

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Hypertriglyceridemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Variation in the apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) and glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) genes has been associated with fasting plasma triacylglycerol. Objective: We investigated the combined effects of the GCKR rs780094C-->T,...

  6. Oxytocin receptor gene sequences in owl monkeys and other primates show remarkable interspecific regulatory and protein coding variation.

    PubMed

    Babb, Paul L; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Schurr, Theodore G

    2015-10-01

    The oxytocin (OT) hormone pathway is involved in numerous physiological processes, and one of its receptor genes (OXTR) has been implicated in pair bonding behavior in mammalian lineages. This observation is important for understanding social monogamy in primates, which occurs in only a small subset of taxa, including Azara's owl monkey (Aotus azarae). To examine the potential relationship between social monogamy and OXTR variation, we sequenced its 5' regulatory (4936bp) and coding (1167bp) regions in 25 owl monkeys from the Argentinean Gran Chaco, and examined OXTR sequences from 1092 humans from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also assessed interspecific variation of OXTR in 25 primate and rodent species that represent a set of phylogenetically and behaviorally disparate taxa. Our analysis revealed substantial variation in the putative 5' regulatory region of OXTR, with marked structural differences across primate taxa, particularly for humans and chimpanzees, which exhibited unique patterns of large motifs of dinucleotide A+T repeats upstream of the OXTR 5' UTR. In addition, we observed a large number of amino acid substitutions in the OXTR CDS region among New World primate taxa that distinguish them from Old World primates. Furthermore, primate taxa traditionally defined as socially monogamous (e.g., gibbons, owl monkeys, titi monkeys, and saki monkeys) all exhibited different amino acid motifs for their respective OXTR protein coding sequences. These findings support the notion that monogamy has evolved independently in Old World and New World primates, and that it has done so through different molecular mechanisms, not exclusively through the oxytocin pathway. PMID:26025428

  7. Oxytocin receptor gene sequences in owl monkeys and other primates show remarkable interspecific regulatory and protein coding variation.

    PubMed

    Babb, Paul L; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Schurr, Theodore G

    2015-10-01

    The oxytocin (OT) hormone pathway is involved in numerous physiological processes, and one of its receptor genes (OXTR) has been implicated in pair bonding behavior in mammalian lineages. This observation is important for understanding social monogamy in primates, which occurs in only a small subset of taxa, including Azara's owl monkey (Aotus azarae). To examine the potential relationship between social monogamy and OXTR variation, we sequenced its 5' regulatory (4936bp) and coding (1167bp) regions in 25 owl monkeys from the Argentinean Gran Chaco, and examined OXTR sequences from 1092 humans from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also assessed interspecific variation of OXTR in 25 primate and rodent species that represent a set of phylogenetically and behaviorally disparate taxa. Our analysis revealed substantial variation in the putative 5' regulatory region of OXTR, with marked structural differences across primate taxa, particularly for humans and chimpanzees, which exhibited unique patterns of large motifs of dinucleotide A+T repeats upstream of the OXTR 5' UTR. In addition, we observed a large number of amino acid substitutions in the OXTR CDS region among New World primate taxa that distinguish them from Old World primates. Furthermore, primate taxa traditionally defined as socially monogamous (e.g., gibbons, owl monkeys, titi monkeys, and saki monkeys) all exhibited different amino acid motifs for their respective OXTR protein coding sequences. These findings support the notion that monogamy has evolved independently in Old World and New World primates, and that it has done so through different molecular mechanisms, not exclusively through the oxytocin pathway.

  8. Calorie restriction and SIRT3 trigger global reprogramming of the mitochondrial protein acetylome

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Alexander S.; Dittenhafer-Reed, Kristin E.; Yu, Wei; Bailey, Derek J.; Selen, Ebru Selin; Boersma, Melissa D.; Carson, Joshua J.; Tonelli, Marco; Balloon, Allison; Higbee, Alan J.; Westphall, Michael S.; Pagliarini, David J.; Prolla, Tomas A.; Assadi-Porter, Fariba; Roy, Sushmita; Denu, John M.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan in diverse species. Mitochondria play a key role in CR adaptation, however, the molecular details remain elusive. We developed and applied a quantitative mass spectrometry method to probe the liver mitochondrial acetyl-proteome during CR vs. control diet in mice that were wild-type or lacked the protein deacetylase SIRT3. Quantification of 3,285 acetylation sites −2,193 from mitochondrial proteins rendered a comprehensive atlas of the acetyl-proteome and enabled global site-specific, relative acetyl occupancy measurements between all four experimental conditions. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses provided additional support for the effects of specific acetylation on mitochondrial protein function. Our results (1) reveal widespread reprogramming of mitochondrial protein acetylation in response to CR and SIRT3, (2) identify three biochemically distinct classes of acetylation sites, and (3) provide evidence that SIRT3 is a prominent regulator in CR adaptation by coordinately deacetylating proteins involved in diverse pathways of metabolism and mitochondrial maintenance. PMID:23201123

  9. Global Profiling of Protein Lysine Malonylation in Escherichia coli Reveals Its Role in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Nie, Litong; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Jun; Zhai, Linhui; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Tan, Minjia

    2016-06-01

    Protein lysine malonylation is a recently identified post-translational modification (PTM), which is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to mammals. Although analysis of lysine malonylome in mammalians suggested that this modification was related to energy metabolism, the substrates and biological roles of malonylation in prokaryotes are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses to globally identify lysine malonylation substrates in Escherichia coli. We identified 1745 malonylation sites in 594 proteins in E. coli, representing the first and largest malonylome data set in prokaryotes up to date. Bioinformatic analyses showed that lysine malonylation was significantly enriched in protein translation, energy metabolism pathways and fatty acid biosynthesis, implying the potential roles of protein malonylation in bacterial physiology. Quantitative proteomics by fatty acid synthase inhibition in both auxotrophic and prototrophic E. coli strains revealed that lysine malonylation is closely associated with E. coli fatty acid metabolism. Protein structural analysis and mutagenesis experiment suggested malonylation could impact enzymatic activity of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in citric acid (TCA) cycle. Further comparative analysis among lysine malonylome, succinylome and acetylome data showed that these three modifications could participate in some similar enriched metabolism pathways, but they could also possibly play distinct roles such as in fatty acid synthesis. These data expanded our knowledge of lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, providing a resource for functional study of lysine malonylation in bacteria. PMID:27183143

  10. Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (TPPP1): A DNA-damage induced microtubule regulatory gene.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Alice; Bernard, Ora

    2013-11-01

    The eukaryotic cell cycle relies heavily on the mechanical forces vested by the dynamic rearrangement of the microtubule (MT) network. Tubulin Polymerization promoting Protein 1 (TPPP1) alters MT dynamics by driving MT polymerization as well as stabilization, via increasing MT acetylation. It increases MT rigidity, which results in reduced cell proliferation through downregulation of G1/S-phase and mitosis to G1-phase cell cycle transitioning. In this communication, we provide further evidence that TPPP1 may be an important regulator of genomic homeostasis. Our preliminary data show that long-term TPPP1 overexpression reduces cell viability via induction of apoptotic cell death pathways. Moreover, induction of DNA-damage results in increased TPPP1 expression, which is inhibited in the absence of expression of the tumor suppressor p53.

  11. Infantile 4-tert-octylphenol exposure transiently inhibits rat ovarian steroidogenesis and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression

    SciTech Connect

    Myllymaeki, S.A. . E-mail: saanmy@utu.fi; Karjalainen, M.; Haavisto, T.E.; Toppari, J.; Paranko, J.

    2005-08-22

    Phenolic compounds, such as 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), have been shown to interfere with rat ovarian steroidogenesis. However, little is known about steroidogenic effects of infantile OP exposure on immature ovary. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of infantile OP exposure on plasma FSH, LH, estradiol, and progesterone levels in 14-day-old female rats. The effect on ovarian steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and FSH receptor (FSHr) expression was analyzed by Western blotting. Ex vivo analysis was carried out for follicular estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and cAMP production. Sprague-Dawley rats were given OP (0, 10, 50, or 100 mg/kg) subcutaneously on postnatal days 6, 8, 10, and 12. On postnatal day 14, plasma FSH was decreased and progesterone increased significantly at a dose of 100 mg OP/kg. In addition, the highest OP dose advanced the time of vaginal opening in puberty. OP had no effect on infantile LH and estradiol levels or ovarian FSHr content. Ovarian StAR protein content and ex vivo hormone and cAMP production were decreased at all OP doses compared to controls. However, hormone levels recovered independent on FSH and even increased above the control level during a prolonged culture. On postnatal day 35, no statistically significant differences were seen between control and OP-exposed animals in plasma FSH, LH, estradiol, and progesterone levels, or in ovarian StAR protein content. The results indicate that the effect of OP on the infantile ovary is reversible, while more permanent effects in the hypothalamus and pituitary, as described earlier, are involved in the reduction of circulating FSH levels and premature vaginal opening.

  12. Transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein γ-2 is required for the modulation of GABA release by presynaptic AMPARs.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G; Farrant, Mark

    2015-03-11

    Presynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) play important roles in the control of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter release, yet their regulation is poorly understood. In particular, the contribution of transmembrane auxiliary proteins, which profoundly shape the trafficking and gating of somatodendritic iGluRs, is unknown. Here we examined the influence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) on presynaptic AMPARs in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a partial agonist at TARP-associated AMPARs, enhanced spontaneous GABA release in wild-type mice but not in stargazer mice that lack the prototypical TARP stargazin (γ-2). These findings were replicated in mechanically dissociated Purkinje cells with functional adherent synaptic boutons, demonstrating the presynaptic locus of modulation. In dissociated Purkinje cells from stargazer mice, AMPA was able to enhance mIPSC frequency, but only in the presence of the positive allosteric modulator cyclothiazide. Thus, ordinarily, presynaptic AMPARs are unable to enhance spontaneous release without γ-2, which is required predominantly for its effects on channel gating. Presynaptic AMPARs are known to reduce action potential-driven GABA release from MLIs. Although a G-protein-dependent non-ionotropic mechanism has been suggested to underlie this inhibition, paradoxically we found that γ-2, and thus AMPAR gating, was required. Following glutamate spillover from climbing fibers or application of CNQX, evoked GABA release was reduced; in stargazer mice such effects were markedly attenuated in acute slices and abolished in the dissociated Purkinje cell-nerve bouton preparation. We suggest that γ-2 association, by increasing charge transfer, allows presynaptic AMPARs to depolarize the bouton membrane sufficiently to modulate both phasic and spontaneous release. PMID:25762667

  13. Transmembrane AMPAR Regulatory Protein γ-2 Is Required for the Modulation of GABA Release by Presynaptic AMPARs

    PubMed Central

    Cull-Candy, Stuart G.

    2015-01-01

    Presynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) play important roles in the control of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter release, yet their regulation is poorly understood. In particular, the contribution of transmembrane auxiliary proteins, which profoundly shape the trafficking and gating of somatodendritic iGluRs, is unknown. Here we examined the influence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) on presynaptic AMPARs in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a partial agonist at TARP-associated AMPARs, enhanced spontaneous GABA release in wild-type mice but not in stargazer mice that lack the prototypical TARP stargazin (γ-2). These findings were replicated in mechanically dissociated Purkinje cells with functional adherent synaptic boutons, demonstrating the presynaptic locus of modulation. In dissociated Purkinje cells from stargazer mice, AMPA was able to enhance mIPSC frequency, but only in the presence of the positive allosteric modulator cyclothiazide. Thus, ordinarily, presynaptic AMPARs are unable to enhance spontaneous release without γ-2, which is required predominantly for its effects on channel gating. Presynaptic AMPARs are known to reduce action potential-driven GABA release from MLIs. Although a G-protein-dependent non-ionotropic mechanism has been suggested to underlie this inhibition, paradoxically we found that γ-2, and thus AMPAR gating, was required. Following glutamate spillover from climbing fibers or application of CNQX, evoked GABA release was reduced; in stargazer mice such effects were markedly attenuated in acute slices and abolished in the dissociated Purkinje cell-nerve bouton preparation. We suggest that γ-2 association, by increasing charge transfer, allows presynaptic AMPARs to depolarize the bouton membrane sufficiently to modulate both phasic and spontaneous release. PMID:25762667

  14. The function of the RNA-binding protein TEL1 in moss reveals ancient regulatory mechanisms of shoot development.

    PubMed

    Vivancos, Julien; Spinner, Lara; Mazubert, Christelle; Charlot, Florence; Paquet, Nicolas; Thareau, Vincent; Dron, Michel; Nogué, Fabien; Charon, Céline

    2012-03-01

    The shoot represents the basic body plan in land plants. It consists of a repeated structure composed of stems and leaves. Whereas vascular plants generate a shoot in their diploid phase, non-vascular plants such as mosses form a shoot (called the gametophore) in their haploid generation. The evolution of regulatory mechanisms or genetic networks used in the development of these two kinds of shoots is unclear. TERMINAL EAR1-like genes have been involved in diploid shoot development in vascular plants. Here, we show that disruption of PpTEL1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens, causes reduced protonema growth and gametophore initiation, as well as defects in gametophore development. Leafy shoots formed on ΔTEL1 mutants exhibit shorter stems with more leaves per shoot, suggesting an accelerated leaf initiation (shortened plastochron), a phenotype shared with the Poaceae vascular plants TE1 and PLA2/LHD2 mutants. Moreover, the positive correlation between plastochron length and leaf size observed in ΔTEL1 mutants suggests a conserved compensatory mechanism correlating leaf growth and leaf initiation rate that would minimize overall changes in plant biomass. The RNA-binding protein encoded by PpTEL1 contains two N-terminus RNA-recognition motifs, and a third C-terminus non-canonical RRM, specific to TEL proteins. Removal of the PpTEL1 C-terminus (including this third RRM) or only 16-18 amino acids within it seriously impairs PpTEL1 function, suggesting a critical role for this third RRM. These results show a conserved function of the RNA-binding PpTEL1 protein in the regulation of shoot development, from early ancestors to vascular plants, that depends on the third TEL-specific RRM.

  15. Transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein γ-2 is required for the modulation of GABA release by presynaptic AMPARs.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G; Farrant, Mark

    2015-03-11

    Presynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) play important roles in the control of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter release, yet their regulation is poorly understood. In particular, the contribution of transmembrane auxiliary proteins, which profoundly shape the trafficking and gating of somatodendritic iGluRs, is unknown. Here we examined the influence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) on presynaptic AMPARs in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a partial agonist at TARP-associated AMPARs, enhanced spontaneous GABA release in wild-type mice but not in stargazer mice that lack the prototypical TARP stargazin (γ-2). These findings were replicated in mechanically dissociated Purkinje cells with functional adherent synaptic boutons, demonstrating the presynaptic locus of modulation. In dissociated Purkinje cells from stargazer mice, AMPA was able to enhance mIPSC frequency, but only in the presence of the positive allosteric modulator cyclothiazide. Thus, ordinarily, presynaptic AMPARs are unable to enhance spontaneous release without γ-2, which is required predominantly for its effects on channel gating. Presynaptic AMPARs are known to reduce action potential-driven GABA release from MLIs. Although a G-protein-dependent non-ionotropic mechanism has been suggested to underlie this inhibition, paradoxically we found that γ-2, and thus AMPAR gating, was required. Following glutamate spillover from climbing fibers or application of CNQX, evoked GABA release was reduced; in stargazer mice such effects were markedly attenuated in acute slices and abolished in the dissociated Purkinje cell-nerve bouton preparation. We suggest that γ-2 association, by increasing charge transfer, allows presynaptic AMPARs to depolarize the bouton membrane sufficiently to modulate both phasic and spontaneous release.

  16. Control of synapse development and plasticity by Rho GTPase regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tolias, Kimberley F.; Duman, Joseph G.; Um, Kyongmi

    2011-01-01

    Synapses are specialized cell-cell contacts that mediate communication between neurons. Most excitatory synapses in the brain are housed on dendritic spines, small actin-rich protrusions extending from dendrites. During development and in response to environmental stimuli, spines undergo marked changes in shape and number thought to underlie processes like learning and memory. Improper spine development, in contrast, likely impedes information processing in the brain, since spine abnormalities are associated with numerous brain disorders. Elucidating the mechanisms that regulate the formation and plasticity of spines and their resident synapses is therefore crucial to our understanding of cognition and disease. Rho-family GTPases, key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, play essential roles in orchestrating the development and remodeling of spines and synapses. Precise spatio-temporal regulation of Rho GTPase activity is critical for their function, since aberrant Rho GTPase signaling can cause spine and synapse defects as well as cognitive impairments. Rho GTPases are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and inhibited by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). We propose that Rho-family GEFs and GAPs provide the spatiotemporal regulation and signaling specificity necessary for proper Rho GTPase function based on the following features they possess: (i) existence of multiple GEFs and GAPs per Rho GTPase, (ii) developmentally regulated expression, (iii) discrete localization, (iv) ability to bind to and organize specific signaling networks, and (v) tightly regulated activity, perhaps involving GEF/GAP interactions. Recent studies describe several Rho-family GEFs and GAPs that uniquely contribute to spinogenesis and synaptogenesis. Here, we highlight several of these proteins and discuss how they occupy distinct biochemical niches critical for synaptic development. PMID:21530608

  17. Identification of a Novel Transcript and Regulatory Mechanism for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Brown, Judy J.; Swift, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. Previous studies in our laboratory identified a novel splice variant of MTP in mice that we named MTP-B. MTP-B has a unique first exon (1B) located 2.7 kB upstream of the first exon (1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A). The two mature isoforms, though nearly identical in sequence and function, have different tissue expression patterns. In this study we report the identification of a second MTP splice variant (MTP-C), which contains both exons 1B and 1A. MTP-C is expressed in all the tissues we tested. In cells transfected with MTP-C, protein expression was less than 15% of that found when the cells were transfected with MTP-A or MTP-B. In silico analysis of the 5’-UTR of MTP-C revealed seven ATGs upstream of the start site for MTP-A, which is the only viable start site in frame with the main coding sequence. One of those ATGs was located in the 5’-UTR for MTP-A. We generated reporter constructs in which the 5’-UTRs of MTP-A or MTP-C were inserted between an SV40 promoter and the coding sequence of the luciferase gene and transfected these constructs into HEK 293 cells. Luciferase activity was significantly reduced by the MTP-C 5’-UTR, but not by the MTP-A 5’-UTR. We conclude that alternative splicing plays a key role in regulating MTP expression by introducing unique 5’-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP levels and activity. PMID:26771188

  18. Deregulation of a Hox Protein Regulatory Network Spanning Prostate Cancer Initiation and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, James L.; Li, Jianrong; Kiriluk, Kyle J.; Rosen, Alex M.; Paner, Gladell P.; Antic, Tatjana; Lussier, Yves A.; Vander Griend, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aberrant activity of developmental pathways in prostate cancer may provide significant insight into predicting tumor initiation and progression, as well as identifying novel therapeutic targets. To this end, despite shared androgen-dependence and functional similarities to the prostate gland, seminal vesicle cancer is exceptionally rare. Experimental Design We conducted genomic pathway analyses comparing patient-matched normal prostate and seminal vesicle epithelial cells to identify novel pathways for tumor initiation and progression. Derived gene expression profiles were grouped into cancer biomodules using a protein–protein network algorithm to analyze their relationship to known oncogenes. Each resultant biomodule was assayed for its prognostic ability against publically available prostate cancer patient gene array datasets. Results Analyses show that the embryonic developmental biomodule containing four homeobox gene family members (Meis1, Meis2, Pbx1, and HoxA9) detects a survival difference in a set of watchful-waiting patients (n = 172, P = 0.05), identify men who are more likely to recur biochemically postprostatectomy (n = 78, P = 0.02), correlate with Gleason score (r = 0.98, P = 0.02), and distinguish between normal prostate, primary tumor, and metastatic disease. In contrast to other cancer types, Meis1, Meis2, and Pbx1 expression is decreased in poor-prognosis tumors, implying that they function as tumor suppressor genes for prostate cancer. Immunohistochemical staining documents nuclear basal-epithelial and stromal Meis2 staining, with loss of Meis2 expression in prostate tumors. Conclusion These data implicate deregulation of the Hox protein cofactors Meis1, Meis2, and Pbx1 as serving a critical function to suppress prostate cancer initiation and progression. PMID:22723371

  19. Identification of a Novel Transcript and Regulatory Mechanism for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Brown, Judy J; Swift, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. Previous studies in our laboratory identified a novel splice variant of MTP in mice that we named MTP-B. MTP-B has a unique first exon (1B) located 2.7 kB upstream of the first exon (1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A). The two mature isoforms, though nearly identical in sequence and function, have different tissue expression patterns. In this study we report the identification of a second MTP splice variant (MTP-C), which contains both exons 1B and 1A. MTP-C is expressed in all the tissues we tested. In cells transfected with MTP-C, protein expression was less than 15% of that found when the cells were transfected with MTP-A or MTP-B. In silico analysis of the 5'-UTR of MTP-C revealed seven ATGs upstream of the start site for MTP-A, which is the only viable start site in frame with the main coding sequence. One of those ATGs was located in the 5'-UTR for MTP-A. We generated reporter constructs in which the 5'-UTRs of MTP-A or MTP-C were inserted between an SV40 promoter and the coding sequence of the luciferase gene and transfected these constructs into HEK 293 cells. Luciferase activity was significantly reduced by the MTP-C 5'-UTR, but not by the MTP-A 5'-UTR. We conclude that alternative splicing plays a key role in regulating MTP expression by introducing unique 5'-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP levels and activity. PMID:26771188

  20. The identification of complete domains within protein sequences using accurate E-values for semi-global alignment

    PubMed Central

    Kann, Maricel G.; Sheetlin, Sergey L.; Park, Yonil; Bryant, Stephen H.; Spouge, John L.

    2007-01-01

    The sequencing of complete genomes has created a pressing need for automated annotation of gene function. Because domains are the basic units of protein function and evolution, a gene can be annotated from a domain database by aligning domains to the corresponding protein sequence. Ideally, complete domains are aligned to protein subsequences, in a ‘semi-global alignment’. Local alignment, which aligns pieces of domains to subsequences, is common in high-throughput annotation applications, however. It is a mature technique, with the heuristics and accurate E-values required for screening large databases and evaluating the screening results. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) provide an alternative theoretical framework for semi-global alignment, but their use is limited because they lack heuristic acceleration and accurate E-values. Our new tool, GLOBAL, overcomes some limitations of previous semi-global HMMs: it has accurate E-values and the possibility of the heuristic acceleration required for high-throughput applications. Moreover, according to a standard of truth based on protein structure, two semi-global HMM alignment tools (GLOBAL and HMMer) had comparable performance in identifying complete domains, but distinctly outperformed two tools based on local alignment. When searching for complete protein domains, therefore, GLOBAL avoids disadvantages commonly associated with HMMs, yet maintains their superior retrieval performance. PMID:17596268

  1. Global Regulation of Gene Expression by the MafR Protein of Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cruz, Sofía; Espinosa, Manuel; Goldmann, Oliver; Bravo, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a natural inhabitant of the human gastrointestinal tract. However, as an opportunistic pathogen, it is able to colonize other host niches and cause life-threatening infections. Its adaptation to new environments involves global changes in gene expression. The EF3013 gene (here named mafR) of E. faecalis strain V583 encodes a protein (MafR, 482 residues) that has sequence similarity to global response regulators of the Mga/AtxA family. The enterococcal OG1RF genome also encodes the MafR protein (gene OG1RF_12293). In this work, we have identified the promoter of the mafR gene using several in vivo approaches. Moreover, we show that MafR influences positively the transcription of many genes on a genome-wide scale. The most significant target genes encode components of PTS-type membrane transporters, components of ABC-type membrane transporters, and proteins involved in the metabolism of carbon sources. Some of these genes were previously reported to be up-regulated during the growth of E. faecalis in blood and/or in human urine. Furthermore, we show that a mafR deletion mutant strain induces a significant lower degree of inflammation in the peritoneal cavity of mice, suggesting that enterococcal cells deficient in MafR are less virulent. Our work indicates that MafR is a global transcriptional regulator. It might facilitate the adaptation of E. faecalis to particular host niches and, therefore, contribute to its potential virulence. PMID:26793169

  2. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-dependent regulation of lipid synthesis supports cell survival and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of lipid metabolism via activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) has emerged as an important function of the Akt/mTORC1 signaling axis. Although the contribution of dysregulated Akt/mTORC1 signaling to cancer has been investigated extensively and altered lipid metabolism is observed in many tumors, the exact role of SREBPs in the control of biosynthetic processes required for Akt-dependent cell growth and their contribution to tumorigenesis remains unclear. Results We first investigated the effects of loss of SREBP function in non-transformed cells. Combined ablation of SREBP1 and SREBP2 by siRNA-mediated gene silencing or chemical inhibition of SREBP activation induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and engaged the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, specifically under lipoprotein-deplete conditions in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Induction of ER-stress led to inhibition of protein synthesis through increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. This demonstrates for the first time the importance of SREBP in the coordination of lipid and protein biosynthesis, two processes that are essential for cell growth and proliferation. SREBP ablation caused major changes in lipid composition characterized by a loss of mono- and poly-unsaturated lipids and induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Alterations in lipid composition and increased ROS levels, rather than overall changes to lipid synthesis rate, were required for ER-stress induction. Next, we analyzed the effect of SREBP ablation in a panel of cancer cell lines. Importantly, induction of apoptosis following SREBP depletion was restricted to lipoprotein-deplete conditions. U87 glioblastoma cells were highly susceptible to silencing of either SREBP isoform, and apoptosis induced by SREBP1 depletion in these cells was rescued by antioxidants or by restoring the levels of mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, silencing of SREBP1

  3. Heat shock protein 27 and its regulatory molecules express differentially in SLE patients with distinct autoantibody profiles.

    PubMed

    Rai, Richa; Chauhan, Sudhir Kumar; Singh, Vikas Vikram; Rai, Madhukar; Rai, Geeta

    2015-03-01

    Generation of autoantigens of nuclear origin, like dsDNA and extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) have largely been associated with dysregulated apoptosis and defective clearance of apoptotic debris in SLE. Heat shock protein (HSP) 27 has been reported to have anti-apoptotic properties hence it was of interest to study the expression of HSP27 and its regulatory molecule Brn3a and hsa-miR-939 in SLE patients with distinct autoantibodies specificities. SLE patients were categorized into three subsets based on their distinct sero-positivity for either anti-dsDNA antibody alone (anti-dsDNA(+) group) or anti-ENA antibody alone (anti-ENA(+) group) or both (anti-dsDNA(+) ENA(+) group). We investigated the mRNA and protein expression of HSP27 and Brn3a in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blotting. Expression of apoptosis markers caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was determined by Western blotting. Hsa-miR-939 expression was determined using TaqMan(®) miRNA assay. In this study, we report significant downregulation of HSP27 in anti-ENA(+) patients and increased expression of caspase 3 and PARP in both anti-ENA(+) and anti-dsDNA(+) SLE subsets. A negative correlation was observed between the expression of HSP27 and apoptosis markers caspase 3 and PARP. Decreased Brn3a expression was observed in anti-ENA(+) SLE patients, which correlated positively with HSP27 expression. Expression of hsa-miR-939, which has a potential target site for Brn3a 3' UTR, was also elevated specifically in anti-ENA(+) patients. The decreased expressions of HSP27, Brn3a along with elevated levels of hsa-miR-939 are selectively associated with anti-ENA(+) patients and HSP27 was observed to be inversely associated with apoptosis. These findings are suggestive of distinct regulatory processes operative in SLE patient subsets with different autoantibody specificities.

  4. Regulatory roles of tumor-suppressor proteins and noncoding RNA in cancer and normal cell functions.

    PubMed

    Garen, Alan; Song, Xu

    2008-04-15

    We describe a mechanism for reversible regulation of gene transcription, mediated by a family of tumor-suppressor proteins (TSP) containing a DNA-binding domain (DBD) that binds to a gene and represses transcription, and RNA-binding domains (RBDs) that bind RNA, usually a noncoding RNA (ncRNA), forming a TSP/RNA complex that releases the TSP from a gene and reverses repression. This mechanism appears to be involved in the regulation of embryogenesis, oncogenesis, and steroidogenesis. Embryonic cells express high levels of RNA that bind to a TSP and prevent repression of proto-oncogenes that drive cell proliferation. The level of the RNA subsequently decreases in most differentiating cells, enabling a TSP to repress proto-oncogenes and stop cell proliferation. Oncogenesis can result when the level of the RNA fails to decrease in a proliferating cell or increases in a differentiated cell. This mechanism also regulates transcription of P450scc, the first gene in the steroidogenic pathway.

  5. Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing Shows Selection on Leptospira Regulatory Proteins During in vitro Culture Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jason S; Corey, Victoria C; Ricaldi, Jessica N; Vinetz, Joseph M; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Matthias, Michael A

    2016-02-01

    Leptospirosis is the most common zoonotic disease worldwide with an estimated 500,000 severe cases reported annually, and case fatality rates of 12-25%, due primarily to acute kidney and lung injuries. Despite its prevalence, the molecular mechanisms underlying leptospirosis pathogenesis remain poorly understood. To identify virulence-related genes in Leptospira interrogans, we delineated cumulative genome changes that occurred during serial in vitro passage of a highly virulent strain of L. interrogans serovar Lai into a nearly avirulent isogenic derivative. Comparison of protein coding and computationally predicted noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes between these two polyclonal strains identified 15 nonsynonymous single nucleotide variant (nsSNV) alleles that increased in frequency and 19 that decreased, whereas no changes in allelic frequency were observed among the ncRNA genes. Some of the nsSNV alleles were in six genes shown previously to be transcriptionally upregulated during exposure to in vivo-like conditions. Five of these nsSNVs were in evolutionarily conserved positions in genes related to signal transduction and metabolism. Frequency changes of minor nsSNV alleles identified in this study likely contributed to the loss of virulence during serial in vitro culture. The identification of new virulence-associated genes should spur additional experimental inquiry into their potential role in Leptospira pathogenesis.

  6. Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing Shows Selection on Leptospira Regulatory Proteins during in vitro Culture Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Jason S.; Corey, Victoria C.; Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Matthias, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is the most common zoonotic disease worldwide with an estimated 500,000 severe cases reported annually, and case fatality rates of 12–25%, due primarily to acute kidney and lung injuries. Despite its prevalence, the molecular mechanisms underlying leptospirosis pathogenesis remain poorly understood. To identify virulence-related genes in Leptospira interrogans, we delineated cumulative genome changes that occurred during serial in vitro passage of a highly virulent strain of L. interrogans serovar Lai into a nearly avirulent isogenic derivative. Comparison of protein coding and computationally predicted noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes between these two polyclonal strains identified 15 nonsynonymous single nucleotide variant (nsSNV) alleles that increased in frequency and 19 that decreased, whereas no changes in allelic frequency were observed among the ncRNA genes. Some of the nsSNV alleles were in six genes shown previously to be transcriptionally upregulated during exposure to in vivo-like conditions. Five of these nsSNVs were in evolutionarily conserved positions in genes related to signal transduction and metabolism. Frequency changes of minor nsSNV alleles identified in this study likely contributed to the loss of virulence during serial in vitro culture. The identification of new virulence-associated genes should spur additional experimental inquiry into their potential role in Leptospira pathogenesis. PMID:26711524

  7. Attenuating Listeria monocytogenes Virulence by Targeting the Regulatory Protein PrfA

    PubMed Central

    Good, James A.D.; Andersson, Christopher; Hansen, Sabine; Wall, Jessica; Krishnan, K. Syam; Begum, Afshan; Grundström, Christin; Niemiec, Moritz S.; Vaitkevicius, Karolis; Chorell, Erik; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Sauer, Uwe H.; Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth; Almqvist, Fredrik; Johansson, Jörgen

    2016-01-01

    Summary The transcriptional activator PrfA, a member of the Crp/Fnr family, controls the expression of some key virulence factors necessary for infection by the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Phenotypic screening identified ring-fused 2-pyridone molecules that at low micromolar concentrations attenuate L. monocytogenes cellular uptake by reducing the expression of virulence genes. These inhibitors bind the transcriptional regulator PrfA and decrease its affinity for the consensus DNA-binding site. Structural characterization of this interaction revealed that one of the ring-fused 2-pyridones, compound 1, binds at two separate sites on the protein: one within a hydrophobic pocket or tunnel, located between the C- and N-terminal domains of PrfA, and the second in the vicinity of the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix motif. At both sites the compound interacts with residues important for PrfA activation and helix-turn-helix formation. Ring-fused 2-pyridones represent a new class of chemical probes for studying virulence in L. monocytogenes. PMID:26991105

  8. Crystal Structure of the Vibrio Cholerae Quorum-Sensing Regulatory Protein HapR

    SciTech Connect

    DeSilva,R.; Kovacikova, G.; Lin, W.; Taylor, R.; Skorupski, K.; Kull, F.

    2007-01-01

    Quorum sensing in Vibrio cholerae involves signaling between two-component sensor protein kinases and the response regulator LuxO to control the expression of the master regulator HapR. HapR, in turn, plays a central role in regulating a number of important processes, such as virulence gene expression and biofilm formation. We have determined the crystal structure of HapR to 2.2- Angstroms resolution. Its structure reveals a dimeric, two-domain molecule with an all-helical structure that is strongly conserved with members of the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. The N-terminal DNA-binding domain contains a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif and alteration of certain residues in this domain completely abolishes the ability of HapR to bind to DNA, alleviating repression of both virulence gene expression and biofilm formation. The C-terminal dimerization domain contains a unique solvent accessible tunnel connected to an amphipathic cavity, which by analogy with other TetR regulators, may serve as a binding pocket for an as-yet-unidentified ligand.

  9. Epithelial and endothelial expression of the green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of bovine prion protein (PrP) gene regulatory sequences in transgenic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire-Vieille, Catherine; Schulze, Tobias; Podevin-Dimster, Valérie; Follet, Jérome; Bailly, Yannick; Blanquet-Grossard, Françoise; Decavel, Jean-Pierre; Heinen, Ernst; Cesbron, Jean-Yves

    2000-05-01

    The expression of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrPc) gene is required for prion replication and neuroinvasion in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The identification of the cell types expressing PrPc is necessary to understanding how the agent replicates and spreads from peripheral sites to the central nervous system. To determine the nature of the cell types expressing PrPc, a green fluorescent protein reporter gene was expressed in transgenic mice under the control of 6.9 kb of the bovine PrP gene regulatory sequences. It was shown that the bovine PrP gene is expressed as two populations of mRNA differing by alternative splicing of one 115-bp 5' untranslated exon in 17 different bovine tissues. The analysis of transgenic mice showed reporter gene expression in some cells that have been identified as expressing PrP, such as cerebellar Purkinje cells, lymphocytes, and keratinocytes. In addition, expression of green fluorescent protein was observed in the plexus of the enteric nervous system and in a restricted subset of cells not yet clearly identified as expressing PrP: the epithelial cells of the thymic medullary and the endothelial cells of both the mucosal capillaries of the intestine and the renal capillaries. These data provide valuable information on the distribution of PrPc at the cellular level and argue for roles of the epithelial and endothelial cells in the spread of infection from the periphery to the brain. Moreover, the transgenic mice described in this paper provide a model that will allow for the study of the transcriptional activity of the PrP gene promoter in response to scrapie infection.

  10. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Liu, Qiang

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. {yields} Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. {yields} Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  11. Characterization of novel mechanisms for steatosis from global protein hyperacetylation in ethanol-induced mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Ju; Kwon, Oh Kwang; Ki, Sung Hwan; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Sangkyu

    2015-08-01

    Steatosis is the earliest and most common disease of the liver due to chronic ethanol consumption, and stems from alterations in the function of transcription factors related to lipid metabolism. Protein acetylation at the lysine residue (Kac) is known to have diverse functions in cell metabolism. Recent studies showed that ethanol exposure induces global protein hyperacetylation by reducing the deacetylase activities of SIRT1 and SIRT3. Although global acetylome analyses have revealed the involvement of a variety of lysine acetylation sites, the exact sites directly regulated by ethanol exposure are unknown. In this study, to elucidate the exact hyperacetylation sites that contribute to SIRT1 and SIRT3 downregulation, we identified and quantified a total of 1285 Kac sites and 686 Kac proteins in AML-12 cells after ethanol treatment (100 mM) for 3 days. All quantified Kac sites were divided into four quantiles: Q1 (0-15%), Q2 (15-50%), Q3 (50-85%), and Q4 (85-100%). Q4 had 192 Kac sites indicating ethanol-induced hyperacetylation. Using the Motif-x program, the [LXKL], [KH], and [KW] motifs were included in the Q4 category, where [KW] was a specific residue for SIRT3. We also performed gene ontology term and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses. Hyperacetylation sites were significantly enriched in biosynthetic processes and ATPase activities within the biological process and molecular function categories, respectively. In conclusion, ethanol regulates the acetylation of proteins in a variety of metabolic pathways mediated by SIRT1 and SIRT3. As a result, ethanol stimulates increased de novo fatty acid synthesis in hepatocytes.

  12. A direct link between the global regulator PhoP and the Csr regulon in Y. pseudotuberculosis through the small regulatory RNA CsrC.

    PubMed

    Nuss, Aaron M; Schuster, Franziska; Kathrin Heroven, Ann; Heine, Wiebke; Pisano, Fabio; Dersch, Petra

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the influence of the global response regulator PhoP on the complex regulatory cascade controlling expression of early stage virulence genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis via the virulence regulator RovA. Our analysis revealed the following novel features: (1) PhoP activates expression of the CsrC RNA in Y. pseudotuberculosis, leading to activation of RovA synthesis through the CsrABC-RovM cascade, (2) activation of csrC transcription is direct and PhoP is shown to bind to two separate PhoP box-like sites, (3) PhoP-mediated activation results in transcription from two different promoters closely downstream of the PhoP binding sites, leading to two distinct CsrC RNAs, and (4) the stability of the CsrC RNAs differs significantly between the Y. pseudotuberculosis strains YPIII and IP32953 due to a 20 nucleotides insertion in CsrC(IP32953), which renders the transcript more susceptible to degradation. In summary, our study showed that PhoP-mediated influence on the regulatory cascade controlling the Csr system and RovA in Y. pseudotuberculosis varies within the species, suggesting that the Csr system is a focal point to readjust and adapt the genus to different hosts and reservoirs.

  13. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin; Bopanna, Ramanamurthy; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-08-21

    T{sub reg} cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T{sub reg} cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T{sub reg} phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T{sub reg} cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T{sub reg} cells in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T{sub reg} cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T{sub reg} physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T{sub reg} cells. • SMAR1{sup −/−} T{sub reg} cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T{sub reg} phenotype that controls colitis.

  14. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Plays No Regulatory Role in Skeletal Muscle Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Brian; Govindan, Suresh; Lee, Kyounghwan; Zhao, Piming; Han, Renzhi; Runte, K. Elisabeth; Craig, Roger; Palmer, Bradley M.; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2013-01-01

    Myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C) exists in three major isoforms: slow skeletal, fast skeletal, and cardiac. While cardiac MyBP-C (cMyBP-C) expression is restricted to the heart in the adult, it is transiently expressed in neonatal stages of some skeletal muscles. However, it is unclear whether this expression is necessary for the proper development and function of skeletal muscle. Our aim was to determine whether the absence of cMyBP-C alters the structure, function, or MyBP-C isoform expression in adult skeletal muscle using a cMyBP-C null mouse model (cMyBP-C(t/t)). Slow MyBP-C was expressed in both slow and fast skeletal muscles, whereas fast MyBP-C was mostly restricted to fast skeletal muscles. Expression of these isoforms was unaffected in skeletal muscle from cMyBP-C(t/t) mice. Slow and fast skeletal muscles in cMyBP-C(t/t) mice showed no histological or ultrastructural changes in comparison to the wild-type control. In addition, slow muscle twitch, tetanus tension, and susceptibility to injury were all similar to the wild-type controls. Interestingly, fMyBP-C expression was significantly increased in the cMyBP-C(t/t) hearts undergoing severe dilated cardiomyopathy, though this does not seem to prevent dysfunction. Additionally, expression of both slow and fast isoforms was increased in myopathic skeletal muscles. Our data demonstrate that i) MyBP-C isoforms are differentially regulated in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, ii) cMyBP-C is dispensable for the development of skeletal muscle with no functional or structural consequences in the adult myocyte, and iii) skeletal isoforms can transcomplement in the heart in the absence of cMyBP-C. PMID:23936073

  15. Structural hierarchy of regulatory elements in the folding and transport of an intestinal multidomain protein.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Marc; Polaina, Julio; Naim, Hassan Y

    2010-02-01

    Human intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, LPH, encompasses four homologous domains, which presumably have evolved from two subsequent duplications of one ancestral gene. The profragment, LPHalpha, comprises homologous domains I and II and functions as an intramolecular chaperone in the context of the brush-border LPHbeta region of LPH. Here, we analyze the inter-relationship between homologous domains III and IV of LPHbeta and their implication in the overall structure, function, and trafficking of LPH. In silico analyses revealed potential domain boundaries for these domains as a basis for loop-out mutagenesis and construction of deletion or individual domain forms of LPH. Removal of domain IV, which contains lactase, results in a diminished phlorizin hydrolase activity, lack of dimerization in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but accelerated transport kinetics from the ER to the Golgi apparatus. By contrast, deletion of domain III, which harbors phlorizin hydrolase, generates a malfolded protein that is blocked in the ER. Interestingly, homologous domain III is transport-competent per se and sorted to the apical membrane in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Nevertheless, it neither dimerizes nor acquires complete phlorizin hydrolase activity. Our data present a hierarchical model of LPH in which the homologous domain III constitutes (i) a fully autonomous core domain within LPH and (ii) another intramolecular chaperone besides the profragment LPHalpha. Nevertheless, the regulation of the trafficking kinetics and activity of domain III and entire LPH including elevation of the enzymatic activities require the correct dimerization of LPH in the ER, an event that is accomplished by the non-autonomous domain IV.

  16. Loss of N-terminal Acetylation Suppresses A Prion Phenotype By Modulating Global Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, William M.; Mannakee, Brian K.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Serio, Tricia R.

    2014-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation is among the most ubiquitous of protein modifications in eukaryotes. While loss of N-terminal acetylation is associated with many abnormalities, the molecular basis of these effects is known for only a few cases, where acetylation of single factors has been linked to binding avidity or metabolic stability. In contrast, the impact of N-terminal acetylation for the majority of the proteome, and its combinatorial contributions to phenotypes, are unknown. Here, by studying the yeast prion [PSI+], an amyloid of the Sup35 protein, we show that loss of N-terminal acetylation promotes general protein misfolding, a redeployment of chaperones to these substrates, and a corresponding stress response. These proteostasis changes, combined with the decreased stability of unacetylated Sup35 amyloid, reduce the size of prion aggregates and reverse their phenotypic consequences. Thus, loss of N-terminal acetylation, and its previously unanticipated role in protein biogenesis, globally resculpts the proteome to create a unique phenotype. PMID:25023910

  17. Global proteomic analysis of protein acetylation affecting metabolic regulation in Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kwang; Sim, Juhee; Kim, Sun Ju; Oh, Hye Ryeung; Nam, Doo Hyun; Lee, Sangkyu

    2016-02-01

    Daphnia (Daphnia pulex) is a small planktonic crustacean and a key constituent of aquatic ecosystems. It is generally used as a model organism to study environmental toxic problems. In the past decade, genomic and proteomic datasets of Daphnia have been developed. The proteomic dataset allows for the investigation of toxicological effects in the context of "Daphnia proteomics," resulting in greater insights for toxicological research. To exploit Daphnia for ecotoxicological research, information on the post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is necessary, as this is a critical regulator of biological processes. Acetylation of lysine (Kac) is a reversible and highly regulated PTM that is associated with diverse biological functions. However, a comprehensive description of Kac in Daphnia is not yet available. To understand the cellular distribution of lysine acetylation in Daphnia, we identified 98 acetylation sites in 65 proteins by immunoprecipitation using an anti-acetyllysine antibody and a liquid chromatography system supported by mass spectroscopy. We identified 28 acetylated sites related to metabolic proteins and six acetylated enzymes associated with the TCA cycle in Daphnia. From GO and KEGG enrichment analyses, we showed that Kac in D. pulex is highly enriched in proteins associated with metabolic processes. Our data provide the first global analysis of Kac in D. pulex and is an important resource for the functional analysis of Kac in this organism. PMID:26700148

  18. Proteomics Analyses for the Global Proteins in the Brain Tissues of Different Human Prion Diseases*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qi; Chen, Li-Na; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Xiao, Kang; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Cao; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Tian, Chan; Gao, Chen; Wang, Jing; Han, Jun; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics changes of brain tissues have been described in different neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the brain proteomics of human prion disease remains less understood. In the study, the proteomics patterns of cortex and cerebellum of brain tissues of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD were analyzed with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation combined with multidimensional liquid chromatography and MS analysis, with the brains from three normal individuals as controls. Global protein profiling, significant pathway, and functional categories were analyzed. In total, 2287 proteins were identified with quantitative information both in cortex and cerebellum regions. Cerebellum tissues appeared to contain more up- and down-regulated proteins (727 proteins) than cortex regions (312 proteins) of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD. Viral myocarditis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, lysosome, oxidative phosphorylation, protein export, and drug metabolism-cytochrome P450 were the most commonly affected pathways of the three kinds of diseases. Almost coincident biological functions were identified in the brain tissues of the three diseases. In all, data here demonstrate that the brain tissues of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD have obvious proteomics changes at their terminal stages, which show the similarities not only among human prion diseases but also with other neurodegeneration diseases. This is the first study to provide a reference proteome map for human prion diseases and will be helpful for future studies focused on potential biomarkers for the diagnosis and therapy of human prion diseases. PMID:25616867

  19. Genetic variant coding for iron regulatory protein HFE contributes to hypertension, the TAMRISK study.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Kirsi M; Nikkari, Seppo T; Kunnas, Tarja A

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for body homeostasis, but iron overload may lead to metabolic abnormalities and thus increase the risk for atherosclerosis and many other diseases. Major histocompatibility complex class I-like transmembrane protein (HFE) is involved in body iron metabolism. The gene coding for HFE has 3 well-known polymorphic sites of which H63D (rs1799945, C > G) has recently been associated with hypertension in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) study. In the present study, we wanted to clarify whether the genetic variant associates with hypertension in a Finnish cohort consisting of 50-year-old men and women. The study included 399 hypertensive cases and 751 controls from the Tampere adult population cardiovascular risk study (TAMRISK) cohort. Genotyping of polymorphisms was done by polymerase chain reaction using DNAs extracted from buccal swabs. We found that individuals with the mutated form of the H63D polymorphic site (G-allele) had a 1.4-fold risk (P = 0.037, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.89) for hypertension at the age of 50 years compared with the CC genotype carriers. When obese subjects (body mass index > 30 kg/m²) were analyzed in their own group, the risk for hypertension was even stronger (odds ratio 4.15, P < 0.001, 95% CI 1.98-8.68). We also noticed that the blood pressure (BP) readings were higher in those with the minor G-allele when compared to ones having a normal genotype already at the age of 35 years. Means of systolic/diastolic BPs were 127/81 mm Hg for CC and 131/83 mm Hg for CG + GG groups (P < 0.001 for systolic and P = 0.005 for diastolic pressure). In conclusion, HFE genetic variant H63D was associated with essential hypertension in Finnish subjects from the TAMRISK cohort confirming a previous GWAS study. The effect of this SNP on BP was also confirmed from a longitudinal study. PMID:25634189

  20. Ref2, a regulatory subunit of the yeast protein phosphatase 1, is a novel component of cation homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Dalmau, Jofre; González, Asier; Platara, Maria; Navarrete, Clara; Martínez, José L; Barreto, Lina; Ramos, José; Ariño, Joaquín; Casamayor, Antonio

    2010-02-24

    Maintenance of cation homoeostasis is a key process for any living organism. Specific mutations in Glc7, the essential catalytic subunit of yeast protein phosphatase 1, result in salt and alkaline pH sensitivity, suggesting a role for this protein in cation homoeostasis. We screened a collection of Glc7 regulatory subunit mutants for altered tolerance to diverse cations (sodium, lithium and calcium) and alkaline pH. Among 18 candidates, only deletion of REF2 (RNA end formation 2) yielded increased sensitivity to these conditions, as well as to diverse organic toxic cations. The Ref2F374A mutation, which renders it unable to bind Glc7, did not rescue the salt-related phenotypes of the ref2 strain, suggesting that Ref2 function in cation homoeostasis is mediated by Glc7. The ref2 deletion mutant displays a marked decrease in lithium efflux, which can be explained by the inability of these cells to fully induce the Na+-ATPase ENA1 gene. The effect of lack of Ref2 is additive to that of blockage of the calcineurin pathway and might disrupt multiple mechanisms controlling ENA1 expression. ref2 cells display a striking defect in vacuolar morphogenesis, which probably accounts for the increased calcium levels observed under standard growth conditions and the strong calcium sensitivity of this mutant. Remarkably, the evidence collected indicates that the role of Ref2 in cation homoeostasis may be unrelated to its previously identified function in the formation of mRNA via the APT (for associated with Pta1) complex.

  1. Hepatic PCSK9 expression is regulated by nutritional status via insulin and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c.

    PubMed

    Costet, Philippe; Cariou, Bertrand; Lambert, Gilles; Lalanne, Florent; Lardeux, Bernard; Jarnoux, Anne-Laure; Grefhorst, Aldo; Staels, Bart; Krempf, Michel

    2006-03-10

    Familial autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia is associated with high risk for cardiovascular accidents and is related to mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor or its ligand apolipoprotein B (apoB). Mutations in a third gene, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9), were recently associated to this disease. PCSK9 acts as a natural inhibitor of the low density lipoprotein receptor pathway, and both genes are regulated by depletion of cholesterol cell content and statins, via sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Here we investigated the regulation of PCSK9 gene expression during nutritional changes. We showed that PCSK9 mRNA quantity is decreased by 73% in mice after 24 h of fasting, leading to a 2-fold decrease in protein level. In contrast PCSK9 expression was restored upon high carbohydrate refeeding. PCSK9 mRNA increased by 4-5-fold in presence of insulin in rodent primary hepatocytes, whereas glucose had no effect. Moreover, insulin up-regulated hepatic PCSK9 expression in vivo during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in mice. Adenoviral mediated overexpression of a dominant or negative form of SREBP-1c confirmed the implication of this transcription factor in insulin-mediated stimulation of PCSK9 expression. Liver X receptor agonist T0901317 also regulated PCSK9 expression via this same pathway (a 2-fold increase in PCSK9 mRNA of primary hepatocytes cultured for 24 h in presence of 1 microm T0901317). As our last investigation, we isolated PCSK9 proximal promoter and verified the functionality of a SREBP-1c responsive element located from 335 bp to 355 bp upstream of the ATG. Together, these results show that PCSK9 expression is regulated by nutritional status and insulinemia. PMID:16407292

  2. A phosphomimetic mutation at Ser-138 renders iron regulatory protein 1 sensitive to iron-dependent degradation.

    PubMed

    Fillebeen, Carine; Chahine, Danielle; Caltagirone, Annie; Segal, Phillip; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2003-10-01

    Iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) binds to mRNA iron-responsive elements (IREs) and thereby controls the expression of IRE-containing mRNAs. In iron-replete cells, assembly of a cubane [4Fe-4S] cluster inhibits IRE-binding activity and converts IRP1 to a cytosolic aconitase. Earlier experiments with Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggested that phosphomimetic mutations of Ser-138 negatively affect the stability of the cluster (N. M. Brown, S. A. Anderson, D. W. Steffen, T. B. Carpenter, M. C. Kennedy, W. E. Walden, and R. S. Eisenstein, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:15235-15240, 1998). Along these lines, we show here that a highly purified preparation of recombinant human IRP1 bearing a phosphomimetic S138E substitution (IRP1(S138E)) lacks aconitase activity, which is a hallmark of [4Fe-4S] cluster integrity. Similarly, IRP1(S138E) expressed in mammalian cells fails to function as aconitase. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the impairment of [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly in mammalian cells sensitizes IRP1(S138E) to iron-dependent degradation. This effect can be completely blocked by the iron chelator desferrioxamine or by the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin. As expected, the stability of wild-type or phosphorylation-deficient IRP1(S138A) is not affected by iron manipulations. Ser-138 and flanking sequences appear to be highly conserved in the IRP1s of vertebrates, whereas insect IRP1 orthologues and nonvertebrate IRP1-like molecules contain an S138A substitution. Our data suggest that phosphorylation of Ser-138 may provide a basis for an additional mechanism for the control of vertebrate IRP1 activity at the level of protein stability.

  3. Control of transferrin receptor expression via nitric oxide-mediated modulation of iron-regulatory protein 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Ponka, P

    1999-11-12

    Cellular iron storage and uptake are coordinately regulated post-transcriptionally by cytoplasmic factors, iron-regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP-1 and IRP-2). When iron in the intracellular transit pool is scarce, IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) in the 5'-untranslated region of the ferritin mRNA and 3'-untranslated region of the transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA. Such binding inhibits translation of ferritin mRNA and stabilizes the mRNA for TfR, whereas the opposite scenario develops when iron in the transit pool is plentiful. However, we (Richardson, D. R., Neumannova, V., Nagy, E., and Ponka, P. (1995) Blood 86, 3211-3219) and others reported that the binding of IRPs to IREs can also be modulated by nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we showed that a short exposure of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) to the NO(+) donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), caused a significant decrease in IRP-2 binding to the IREs followed by IRP-2 degradation and that these changes occurred without affecting IRP-1 binding. The SNP-mediated degradation of IRP-2 in RAW 264.7 cells could be prevented by MG-132 or lactacystin, known inhibitors of proteasome-dependent protein degradation. A SNP-mediated decrease in IRP-2 binding and levels was associated with a dramatic decrease in TfR mRNA levels and an increase in ferritin synthesis. Importantly, the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 prevented the SNP-mediated decrease in TfR mRNA levels. These observations suggest that IRP-2 can play an important role in controlling transferrin receptor expression.

  4. Chrysin, a natural flavonoid enhances steroidogenesis and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene expression in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Jana, Kuladip; Yin, Xiangling; Schiffer, Randolph B; Chen, Jau-Jiin; Pandey, Akhilesh K; Stocco, Douglas M; Grammas, Paula; Wang, Xingjia

    2008-05-01

    During the aging process of males, testosterone biosynthesis declines in testicular Leydig cells resulting in decreases in various physiological functions. To explore the possibility of delaying the decline using food supplements, we have studied steroidogenic effects of a natural flavonoid, chrysin, in mouse Leydig cells. Chrysin dramatically increased cyclic AMP (cAMP)-induced steroidogenesis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. This result was confirmed using Leydig cells isolated from mouse testes. The steroidogenic effect of chrysin is not associated with an increase in expression of the P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme, required for the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone. In addition, when 22(R)hydroxylcholesterol was used as a substrate, chrysin induced a non-significant increase in steroid hormone, suggesting that the majority of the observed increase in steroidogenesis was due to the increased supply of substrate cholesterol. These observations were corroborated by showing that chrysin induced a marked increase in the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, the factor that controls mitochondrial cholesterol transfer. Also, chrysin significantly increased StAR promoter activity and StAR mRNA level. Further studies indicated that this compound depressed expression of DAX-1, a repressor in StAR gene transcription. In the absence of cAMP, chrysin did not increase steroidogenesis. However, when a sub-threshold level of cAMP was used, StAR protein and steroid hormone were increased by chrysin to the levels seen with maximal stimulation of cAMP. These results suggest that while chrysin itself is unable to induce StAR gene expression and steroidogenesis, it appears to function by increasing the sensitivity of Leydig cells to cAMP stimulation. PMID:18434361

  5. Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit Isoforms Regulate Growth and Differentiation in Mucor circinelloides: Essential Role of PKAR4

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, J.; McCormack, B.; Navarro, E.; Moreno, S.; Garre, V.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway plays a role in regulating growth and differentiation in the dimorphic fungus Mucor circinelloides. PKA holoenzyme is comprised of two catalytic (C) and two regulatory (R) subunits. In M. circinelloides, four genes encode the PKAR1, PKAR2, PKAR3, and PKAR4 isoforms of R subunits. We have constructed null mutants and demonstrate that each isoform has a different role in growth and differentiation. The most striking finding is that pkaR4 is an essential gene, because only heterokaryons were obtained in knockout experiments. Heterokaryons with low levels of wild-type nuclei showed an impediment in the emission of the germ tube, suggesting a pivotal role of this gene in germ tube emergence. The remaining null strains showed different alterations in germ tube emergence, sporulation, and volume of the mother cell. The pkaR2 null mutant showed an accelerated germ tube emission and was the only mutant that germinated under anaerobic conditions when glycine was used as a nitrogen source, suggesting that pkaR2 participates in germ tube emergence by repressing it. From the measurement of the mRNA and protein levels of each isoform in the wild-type and knockout strains, it can be concluded that the expression of each subunit has its own mechanism of differential regulation. The PKAR1 and PKAR2 isoforms are posttranslationally modified by ubiquitylation, suggesting another regulation point in the specificity of the signal transduction. The results indicate that each R isoform has a different role in M. circinelloides physiology, controlling the dimorphism and contributing to the specificity of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway. PMID:22635921

  6. The first global screening of protein substrates bearing protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine in E. coli and human mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangkyu; Chen, Yue; Luo, Hao; Wu, Andrew A.; Wilde, Michael; Schumacker, Paul T.; Zhao, Yingming

    2010-01-01

    Protein hydroxylation at proline and lysine residues is known to have important effects on cellular functions, such as the response to hypoxia. However, for protein hydroxylation at tyrosine residues (called protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (PB-DOPA) has not been carefully examined. Here we report the first proteomics screening of the PB-DOPA protein substrates and their sites in E. coli and human mitochondria by nano-LC/MS/MS and protein sequence alignment using the PTMap algorithm. Our study identified 67 novel PB-DOPA sites in 43 E. coli proteins, and 9 novel PB-DOPA sites in 7 proteins from HeLa mitochondria. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that the structured region is more favored than the unstructured regions of proteins for the PB-DOPA modification. The PB-DOPA substrates in E. coli were dominantly enriched in proteins associated with carbohydrate metabolism. Our study showed that PB-DOPA may be involved in regulation of the specific activity of certain evolutionarily conserved proteins such as superoxide dismutase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, suggesting the conserved nature of the modification among distant biological species. The substrate proteins identified in this study offer a rich source for hunting their regulatory enzymes, and for further characterization of the possible contributions of this modification to cellular physiology and human diseases. PMID:20818827

  7. Molecular analysis of selected cell cycle regulatory proteins during aerobic and hypoxic maintenance of human ovarian carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Krtolica, A; Krucher, N A; Ludlow, J W

    1999-01-01

    We have previously reported on the development of an in vitro model system for studying the effect of hypoxia on ovarian carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion (Krtolica and Ludlow, 1996). These data indicate that the cell division cycle is reversibly arrested during the G1 phase. Here, we have continued this study to include the proliferation properties of both aerobic and hypoxic human ovarian carcinoma cells at the molecular level. The growth suppressor product of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene, pRB, appears to be functional in these cells as determined by SV40 T-antigen binding studies. Additional G1-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclins D and E, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) 4 and 2, and cdk inhibitors p27 and p18, also appear to be intact based on their apparent molecular weights and cell cycle stage-specific abundance. During hypoxia, there is a decrease in abundance of cyclins D and E, with an increase in p27 abundance. cdk4 activity towards pRB and cdk2 activity towards histone H1 are also decreased. Co-precipitation studies revealed an increased amount of p27 complexing with cyclin E-cdk2 during hypoxia than during aerobic cell growth. In addition, pRB-directed phosphatase activity was found to be greater in hypoxic than aerobic cells. Taken together, a model is suggested to explain hypoxia-induced cell cycle arrest in SKA human ovarian carcinoma cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471034

  8. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein Regulates the Expression and Metabolic Functions of Wild-Type and Oncogenic IDH1.

    PubMed

    Ricoult, Stéphane J H; Dibble, Christian C; Asara, John M; Manning, Brendan D

    2016-09-15

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) is a major transcriptional regulator of the enzymes underlying de novo lipid synthesis. However, little is known about the SREBP-mediated control of processes that indirectly support lipogenesis, for instance, by supplying reducing power in the form of NAPDH or directing carbon flux into lipid precursors. Here, we characterize isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) as a transcriptional target of SREBP across a spectrum of cancer cell lines and human cancers. IDH1 promotes the synthesis of lipids specifically from glutamine-derived carbons. Neomorphic mutations in IDH1 occur frequently in certain cancers, leading to the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). We found that SREBP induces the expression of oncogenic IDH1 and influences 2-HG production from glucose. Treatment of cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol or statins, which respectively inhibit or activate SREBP, further supports SREBP-mediated regulation of IDH1 and, in cells with oncogenic IDH1, carbon flux into 2-HG. PMID:27354064

  9. Downregulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene expression by cyclic AMP in cultured Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Benmessahel, Yasmina; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Cadepond, Françoise; Guennoun, Rachida; Hales, Dale Buchanan; Schumacher, Michael; Groyer, Ghislaine

    2004-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) plays a key role in the availability of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the first step of steroidogenesis, its conversion to pregnenolone, takes place. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the StAR gene is also expressed in the rat sciatic nerve and in cultured Schwann cells. The addition to the culture medium of the cAMP-elevating agent forskolin or of the cAMP analogue 8Br-cAMP produced a time-course extinction of StAR gene expression. An inverse relationship was demonstrated between StAR gene expression and the intracellular cAMP content. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of the activities of Schwann cell adenylyl cyclase or of phosphodiesterase IV resulted in modifications of StAR gene expression. Since StAR gene expression is stimulated by cAMP in classical steroidogenic cells, our work is the first demonstration of a negative regulation of StAR gene by cAMP.

  10. Interaction of the CCAAT displacement protein with shared regulatory elements required for transcription of paired histone genes.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hodiri, H M; Perry, M

    1995-01-01

    The H2A and H2B genes of the Xenopus xlh3 histone gene cluster are transcribed in opposite directions from initiation points located approximately 235 bp apart. The close proximity of these genes to one another suggests that their expression may be controlled by either a single bidirectional promoter or by separate promoters. Our analysis of the transcription of histone gene pairs containing deletions and site-specific mutations of intergenic DNA revealed that both promoters are distinct but that they overlap physically and share multiple regulatory elements, providing a possible basis for the coordinate regulation of their in vivo activities. Using the intergenic DNA fragment as a probe and extracts from mammalian and amphibian cells, we observed the formation of a specific complex containing the CCAAT displacement protein (CDP). The formation of the CDP-containing complex was not strictly dependent on any single element in the intergenic region but instead required the presence of at least two of the three CCAAT motifs. Interestingly, similar CDP-containing complexes were formed on the promoters from the three other histone genes. The binding of CDP to histone gene promoters may contribute to the coordination of their activities during the cell cycle and early development. PMID:7791766

  11. Overexpression of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 feedback regulatory protein is protective in a murine model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Starr, Anna; Sand, Claire A; Heikal, Lamia; Kelly, Peter D; Spina, Domenico; Crabtree, Mark; Channon, Keith M; Leiper, James M; Nandi, Manasi

    2014-11-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase contributes toward refractory hypotension, impaired microvascular perfusion, and end-organ damage in septic shock patients. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential NOS cofactor. GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for BH4 biosynthesis. Under inflammatory conditions, GCH1 activity and hence BH4 levels are increased, supporting pathological NOS activity. GCH1 activity can be controlled through allosteric interactions with GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We investigated whether overexpression of GFRP can regulate BH4 and NO production and attenuate cardiovascular dysfunction in sepsis. Sepsis was induced in mice conditionally overexpressing GFRP and wild-type littermates by cecal ligation and puncture. Blood pressure was monitored by radiotelemetry, and mesenteric blood flow was quantified by laser speckle contrast imaging. Blood biochemistry data were obtained using an iSTAT analyzer, and BH4 levels were measured in plasma and tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography. Increased BH4 and NO production and hypotension were observed in all mice, but the extents of these pathophysiological changes were attenuated in GFRP OE mice. Perturbations in blood biochemistry were similarly attenuated in GFRP OE compared with wild-type controls. These results suggest that GFRP overexpression regulates GCH1 activity during septic shock, which in turn limits BH4 bioavailability for iNOS. We conclude that the GCH1-GFRP axis is a critical regulator of BH4 and NO production and the cardiovascular derangements that occur in septic shock.

  12. Effect of fetal hemoglobin-stimulating medicines on the interaction of DNA and protein of important erythroid regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xin-Jun; Liu, De-pei; Xu, Dong-Dong; Li, Lei; Liang, Chih-chuan

    2003-08-01

    Beta-Thalassemia is the most common single gene disorder in the world, which is caused by the imbalance between alpha-globin chain and beta-globin chain synthesis. Several medicines, such as 5-azacytidine, hydroxyurea, cytarab