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Sample records for globulus labill cuttings

  1. Interaction between environmental factors affects the accumulation of root proteins in hydroponically grown Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.).

    PubMed

    Bedon, Frank; Majada, Juan; Feito, Isabel; Chaumeil, Philippe; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Barre, Aurélien; Gion, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) is used for pulp and paper production worldwide. In this report we studied changes in protein expression in one osmotically stressed elite clone widely used in industrial plantations in Spain. High molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as an osmoticum in the growing medium. Roots of rooted cuttings were sampled after 3 and 36 h of treatment. Water potential and abscissic acid content were measured in shoot and root apices to characterize the physiological states of the plants. Total soluble proteins from roots were extracted and separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Gels were stained with Coomassie brillant blue for quantitative analysis of protein accumulation. From a total of 406 reproducible spots, 34 were found to be differentially expressed depending on treatment (osmotic versus control condition) and/or stress duration (3 h versus 36 h), and were further characterized by tandem mass spectrometry. Several proteins were reliably identified including adenosine kinase, actin, stress-related proteins as well as proteins associated to cellular processes, among which some residents of the endoplasmic reticulum. This study constitutes the first investigation of the root proteome in this important forest tree genus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Early Ovule Development Following Self‐ and Cross‐pollinations in Eucalyptus globulus Labill. ssp. globulus

    PubMed Central

    POUND, L. M.; WALLWORK, M. A. B.; POTTS, B. M.; SEDGLEY, M.

    2002-01-01

    The study was conducted to identify the self‐incompatibility mechanism in Eucalyptus globulus ssp. globulus. Controlled self‐ and cross‐pollinations were conducted on individual flowers from three mature trees that had self‐incompatibility levels of 76, 99·6 and 100 %. Flowers were harvested at 4, 6 and 8 weeks after pollination. Embryology was investigated by bright field microscopy on material harvested at 4 and 6 weeks after pollination. Fertilization had taken place at 4 weeks after pollination with zygotes and free nuclear endosperm visible. There was a greater proportion of healthy, fertilized ovules in the cross‐ compared with the self‐pollination treatment, and approx. half the ovules examined from both pollen treatments were not fertilized or were degenerating. By 6 weeks after pollination a few zygotes were starting to divide. The number of healthy, fertilized ovules was still greater in the cross‐pollination treatment, but the number of healthy fertilized ovules was lower in both treatments compared with 4 weeks after pollination, and many ovules were degenerating. Fertilized ovules were significantly larger than non‐fertilized or degenerating ovules and this difference was detectable by eye at 6 and 8 weeks after pollination. The mechanism of self‐incompatibility appears to have both late pre‐ and post‐zygotic components. PMID:12099536

  3. Characterization of an acetylated heteroxylan from Eucalyptus globulus Labill.

    PubMed

    Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Tomás, Jorge L; Silva, Artur M S; Neto, Carlos Pascoal

    2003-03-28

    A heteroxylan was isolated from Eucalyptus globulus wood by extraction of peracetic acid delignified holocellulose with dimethyl sulfoxide. Besides (1-->4)-linked beta-D-xylopyranosyl units of the backbone and short side chains of terminal (1-->2)-linked 4-O-methyl-alpha-D-glucuronosyl residues (MeGlcA) in a 1:10 molar ratio, this hemicellulose contained galactosyl and glucosyl units attached at O-2 of MeGlcA originating from rhamnoarabinogalactan and glucan backbones, respectively. About 30% of MeGlcA units were branched at O-2. The O-acetyl-(4-O-methylglucurono)xylan showed an acetylation degree of 0.61, as determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy, and a weight-average molecular weight (M(w)) of about 36 kDa (P=1.05) as revealed from size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis. About half of the beta-D-xylopyranosyl units of the backbone were found as acetylated moieties at O-3 (34 mol%), O-2 (15 mol%) or O-2,3 (6 mol%). Practically, all beta-D-xylopyranosyl units linked at O-2 with MeGlcA residues were 3-O-acetylated (10 mol%).

  4. Antimicrobial activity of globulol isolated from the fruits of Eucalyptus globulus Labill.

    PubMed

    Tan, Manliang; Zhou, Ligang; Huang, Yongfu; Wang, Ye; Hao, Xiaojiang; Wang, Jingguo

    2008-05-10

    An antimicrobial sesquiterpene was separated by bioassay-guided isolation from the petroleum ether fraction of the ethanol crude extract of Eucalyptus globulus Labill (Myrtaceae) fruits, and was identified as globulol by physicochemical properties and spectroscopic analysis. Mycelial growth method revealed that the median effective inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of globulol on Alternaria solani, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. niverum, F. graminearum, Rhizoctonia solani and Venturia pirina were 47.1 microg mL(-1), 114.3 microg mL(-1), 53.4 microg mL(-1), 56.9 microg mL(-1), 32.1 microg mL(-1) and 21.8 microg mL(-1), respectively. MTT-colorimetric assay revealed that IC50 values of globulol on Xanthomonas vesicatoria and Bacillus subtilis were 158.0 microg mL(-1) and 737.2 microg mL(-1), respectively. The results indicated that globulol could be a main antimicrobial compound in the ethanol crude extract of E. globulus fruits.

  5. Chemical Composition, Antibacterial, Antibiofilm and Synergistic Properties of Essential Oils from Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Seven Mediterranean Aromatic Plants.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Maria; Bessa, Lucinda J; Martins, M Rosário; Arantes, Sílvia; Teixeira, António P S; Mendes, Ângelo; Martins da Costa, Paulo; Belo, Anabela D F

    2017-03-09

    Essential oils (EOs) from Eucalyptus globulus Labill. ssp. globulus and from Mediterranean autochthonous aromatic plants - Thymus mastichina L., Mentha pulegium L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi ssp. nepeta, Cistus ladanifer L., Foeniculum vulgare L., Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter ssp. viscosa - were extracted by hydrodistillation and characterized by GC-FID and NMR spectroscopy. EOs were evaluated for antimicrobial properties against several bacterial strains, using diverse methods, namely, the agar disc-diffusion method, the microdilution method, the crystal violet assay and the Live/Dead staining for assessment of biofilm formation. Potential synergy was assessed by a checkerboard method. EOs of R. officinalis and C. ladanifer showed a predominance in monoterpene hydrocarbons (>60%); EOs of C. nepeta, M. pulegium, T. mastichina, E. globulus and F. vulgare were rich in oxygenated monoterpenes (62-96%) whereas EO of D. viscosa was mainly composed of oxygenated sesquiterpenes (54%). All EOs showed antimicrobial activity; M. pulegium and E. globulus generally had the strongest antimicrobial activity. EO of C. nepeta was the most promising in hampering the biofilm formation. The combinations D. viscosa/C. nepeta and E. globulus/T. mastichina were synergistic against Staphylococcus aureus. These results support the notion that EOs from the aromatic plants herein reported should be further explored as potential pharmaceuticals and/or food preservatives. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex. Roem. & Schult.) DC. and Eucalyptus globulus Labill. interactions when administered with diazepam.

    PubMed

    Quílez, A M; Saenz, M T; García, M D

    2012-03-01

    The safety of natural drugs is defined by their side effects and toxicity as well as any interactions that may occur if taken together with other drugs. In particular, it is essential to identify synergies, antagonisms and other types of interference with other drugs so that the correct choice can be made from the range of phytomedicines available. The aim of this work was to investigate changes in the pharmacological effect of diazepam (2 mg/kg) on the CNS when administered together with a medicinal plant: Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (eucalyptus 6 mg/kg and 3.25 mg/kg) or Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex Roem. & Schult). DC. (cat's claw, 7.14 mg/kg and 3.54 mg/kg). Various different psychopharmacological effects were evaluated through assessing exploratory behavior, muscle relaxation and spontaneous motor activity. Both phytodrugs interacted with the benzodiazepine. Eucalyptus had an inhibitory effect at both doses and could be useful at the highest dose in cases where the desired effect of the depressant is moderate anxiolytic activity without marked muscle relaxation. Cat's claw, at both doses, enhanced the action of diazepam on spontaneous motor activity and, at the lowest dose, exploratory ability. These herbal drugs could be useful for their antiinflammatory activity in musculoskeletal pathologies treated with benzodiazepines. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Relations of sugar composition and delta 13C in phloem sap to growth and physiological performance of Eucalyptus globulus (Labill).

    PubMed

    Merchant, Andrew; Tausz, Michael; Keitel, Claudia; Adams, Mark A

    2010-08-01

    We characterized differences in carbon isotopic content (delta(13)C) and sugar concentrations in phloem exudates from Eucalyptus globulus (Labill) plantations across a rainfall gradient in south-western Australia. Phloem sap delta(13)C and sugar concentrations varied with season and annual rainfall. Annual bole growth was negatively related to phloem sap delta(13)C during summer, suggesting a water limitation, yet was positively related in winter. We conclude that when water is abundant, variations in carboxylation rates become significant to overall growth. Concentrations of sucrose in phloem sap varied across sites by up to 600 mm, and raffinose by 300 mm. These compounds play significant roles in maintaining osmotic balance and facilitating carbon movement into the phloem, and their relative abundances contribute strongly to overall delta(13)C of phloem sap. Taken together, the delta(13)C and concentrations of specific sugars in phloem sap provide significant insights to functions supporting growth at the tree, site and landscape scale.

  8. CO2 efflux, CO2 concentration and photosynthetic refixation in stems of Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.).

    PubMed

    Cerasoli, S; McGuire, M A; Faria, J; Mourato, M; Schmidt, M; Pereira, J S; Chaves, M M; Teskey, R O

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the importance of respiration in forest carbon budgets, the mechanisms by which physiological factors control stem respiration are unclear. An experiment was set up in a Eucalyptus globulus plantation in central Portugal with monoculture stands of 5-year-old and 10-year-old trees. CO(2) efflux from stems under shaded and unshaded conditions, as well as the concentration of CO(2) dissolved in sap [CO(2)(*)], stem temperature, and sap flow were measured with the objective of improving our understanding of the factors controlling CO(2) release from stems of E. globulus. CO(2) efflux was consistently higher in 5-year-old, compared with 10-year-old, stems, averaging 3.4 versus 1.3 mumol m(-2) s(-1), respectively. Temperature and [CO(2)(*)] both had important, and similar, influences on the rate of CO(2) efflux from the stems, but neither explained the difference in the magnitude of CO(2) efflux between trees of different age and size. No relationship was found between efflux and sap flow, and efflux was independent of tree volume, suggesting the presence of substantial barriers to the diffusion of CO(2) from the xylem to the atmosphere in this species. The rate of corticular photosynthesis was the same in trees of both ages and only reduced CO(2) efflux by 7%, probably due to the low irradiance at the stem surface below the canopy. The younger trees were growing at a much faster rate than the older trees. The difference between CO(2) efflux from the younger and older stems appears to have resulted from a difference in growth respiration rather than a difference in the rate of diffusion of xylem-transported CO(2).

  9. Interactive effects of water supply and defoliation on photosynthesis, plant water status and growth of Eucalyptus globulus Labill.

    PubMed

    Quentin, A G; O'Grady, A P; Beadle, C L; Mohammed, C; Pinkard, E A

    2012-08-01

    Increased climatic variability, including extended periods of drought stress, may compromise on the health of forest ecosystems. The effects of defoliating pests on plantations may also impact on forest productivity. Interactions between climate signals and pest activity are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the combined effects of reduced water availability and defoliation on maximum photosynthetic rate (A(sat)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), plant water status and growth of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. Field-grown plants were subjected to two water-availability regimes, rain-fed (W-) and irrigated (W+). In the summer of the second year of growth, leaves from 75% of crown length removed from trees in both watering treatments and physiological responses within the canopies were examined. We hypothesized that defoliation would result in improved plant water status providing a mechanistic insight into leaf- and canopy-scale gas-exchange responses. Defoliated trees in the W+ treatment exhibited higher A(sat) and g(s) compared with non-defoliated trees, but these responses were not observed in the W- treatment. In contrast, at the whole-plant scale, maximum rates of transpiration (E(max)) and canopy conductance (G(Cmax)) and soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance (K(P)) increased in both treatments following defoliation. As a result, plant water status was unaffected by defoliation and trees in the defoliated treatments exhibited homeostasis in this respect. Whole-plant soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance was strongly correlated with leaf scale g(s) and A(sat) following the defoliation, providing a mechanistic insight into compensatory up-regulation of photosynthesis. Above-ground height and diameter growth were unaffected by defoliation in both water availability treatments, suggesting that plants use a range of responses to compensate for the impacts of defoliation.

  10. Concerted transcription of auxin and carbohydrate homeostasis-related genes underlies improved adventitious rooting of microcuttings derived from far-red treated Eucalyptus globulus Labill mother plants.

    PubMed

    Ruedell, Carolina Michels; de Almeida, Márcia Rodrigues; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano

    2015-12-01

    Economically important plant species, such as Eucalyptus globulus, are often rooting recalcitrant. We have previously shown that far-red light enrichment applied to E. globulus donor-plants improved microcutting rooting competence and increased rooting zone/shoot carbohydrate ratio. To better understand this developmental response, the relative expression profiles of genes involved in auxin signaling (ARF6, ARF8, AGO1), biosynthesis (YUC3) and transport (AUX1, PIN1, PIN2); sucrose cleavage (SUS1, CWINV1), transport (SUC5), hexose phosphorylation (HXK1, FLN1) and starch biosynthesis (SS3) were quantified during adventitious rooting of E. globulus microcuttings derived from donor plants exposed to far-red or white light. Expression of auxin transport-related genes increased in the first days of root induction. Far-red enrichment of donor plants induced ARF6, ARF8 and AGO1 in microcuttings. The first two gene products could activate GH3 and other rooting related genes, whereas AGO1 deregulation of the repressor ARF17 may relief rooting inhibition. Increased sink strength at the basal stem with sucrose unloading in root tissue mediated by SUC and subsequent hydrolysis by SUS1 were also supported by gene expression profile. Fructose phosphorylation and starch biosynthesis could also contribute to proper carbon allocation at the site of rooting, as evidenced by increased expression of related genes. These data are in good agreement with increased contents of hexoses and starch at the cutting base severed from far-red exposed donor plants. To sum up, pathways integrating auxin and carbohydrate metabolism were activated in microcuttings derived from donor plants exposed to far red light enrichment, thereby improving rooting response in E. globulus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Reference gene selection for quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction normalization during in vitro adventitious rooting in Eucalyptus globulus Labill

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Eucalyptus globulus and its hybrids are very important for the cellulose and paper industry mainly due to their low lignin content and frost resistance. However, rooting of cuttings of this species is recalcitrant and exogenous auxin application is often necessary for good root development. To date one of the most accurate methods available for gene expression analysis is quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR); however, reliable use of this technique requires reference genes for normalization. There is no single reference gene that can be regarded as universal for all experiments and biological materials. Thus, the identification of reliable reference genes must be done for every species and experimental approach. The present study aimed at identifying suitable control genes for normalization of gene expression associated with adventitious rooting in E. globulus microcuttings. Results By the use of two distinct algorithms, geNorm and NormFinder, we have assessed gene expression stability of eleven candidate reference genes in E. globulus: 18S, ACT2, EF2, EUC12, H2B, IDH, SAND, TIP41, TUA, UBI and 33380. The candidate reference genes were evaluated in microccuttings rooted in vitro, in presence or absence of auxin, along six time-points spanning the process of adventitious rooting. Overall, the stability profiles of these genes determined with each one of the algorithms were very similar. Slight differences were observed in the most stable pair of genes indicated by each program: IDH and SAND for geNorm, and H2B and TUA for NormFinder. Both programs indentified UBI and 18S as the most variable genes. To validate these results and select the most suitable reference genes, the expression profile of the ARGONAUTE1 gene was evaluated in relation to the most stable candidate genes indicated by each algorithm. Conclusion Our study showed that expression stability varied between putative reference genes tested in E. globulus. Based

  12. Production of phytohormones, siderophores and population fluctuation of two root-promoting rhizobacteria in Eucalyptus globulus cuttings.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Katy Díaz; Araya, Támara; Valenzuela, Sofía; Sossa, Katherine; Martínez, Miguel; Peña-Cortés, Hugo; Sanfuentes, Eugenio

    2012-05-01

    Vegetative propagation by stem cuttings and mini-cuttings has been used worldwide for growing Eucalyptus plants. However, clones and hybrids of this plant present a great variability in their rooting capacity, apart from a gradual decrease in the rooting potential due to the ontogenetic age of the mother plant. Several studies have demonstrated that some bacteria promote plant growth and rooting through the action of direct and indirect mechanisms that are not still completely clear. Considering this, the objective of this study was to assess the production of auxins, abscisic acid and siderophores in Bacillus subtilis and Stenotrophomona maltophilia, which in previous studies increased rooting of E. globulus cuttings. Additionally, the population of these bacteria in the rhizosphere, superficial tissues of the stem-base and callus of the mini-cuttings was identified, and quantified by real-time PCR. Only S. maltophilia produced IAA in the presence of tryptophan; none of the bacterial strains produced ABA, but both produced siderophores. A comparative analysis of the separation profiles showed that there is a diverse microbial community in the rhizosphere, and only S. maltophilia was capable of keeping its population at a density of 2.03 × 10(7) cells/mg in different tissues of the mini-cuttings. The results would indicate that the rooting stimulus in E. globulus could be related to the action of one or several mechanisms such as the production of auxins and siderophores, and it could also be associated with the ability of bacteria to stay in the rhizosphere or in plant callus tissues.

  13. Differential Methylation of Genomic Regions Associated with Heteroblasty Detected by M&M Algorithm in the Nonmodel Species Eucalyptus globulus Labill.

    PubMed Central

    Hasbún, Rodrigo; Iturra, Carolina; Bravo, Soraya; Rebolledo-Jaramillo, Boris; Valledor, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation plays important biological roles in plants, including timing of flowering and endosperm development. Little is known about the mechanisms controlling heterochrony (the change in the timing or rate of developmental events during ontogeny) in Eucalyptus globulus. DNA methylation has been proposed as a potential heterochrony regulatory mechanism in model species, but its role during the vegetative phase in E. globulus has not been explored. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms governing heterochrony in E. globulus, we have developed a workflow aimed at generating high-resolution hypermethylome and hypomethylome maps that have been tested in two stages of vegetative growth phase: juvenile (6-month leaves) and adult (30-month leaves). We used the M&M algorithm, a computational approach that integrates MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq data, to identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Thousands of DMRs between juvenile and adult leaves of E. globulus were found. Although further investigations are required to define the loci associated with heterochrony/heteroblasty that are regulated by DNA methylation, these results suggest that locus-specific methylation could be major regulators of vegetative phase change. This information can support future conservation programs, for example, selecting the best methylomes for a determinate environment in a restoration project. PMID:27123440

  14. Microsatellite analysis of population structure in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Vaillancourt, René E; Steane, Dorothy A; Jones, Rebecca C; Marques, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Eucalyptus globulus subsp. globulus Labill. (Tasmanian Blue Gum), native to southeast Australia, is a benchmark species for the pulp and paper industry. We genotyped 397 trees from 16 populations of E. globulus representing the native diversity in Australia using 24 microsatellite loci. Eight genetically distinct groups were detected, consistent with genetic groupings detected in previous quantitative and molecular studies. A sample of 29 Portuguese individuals was added to help clarify the origin of the Portuguese landrace. The results suggest a southern and eastern Tasmania origin for the Portuguese landrace. This genetic framework will enable researchers to investigate the provenance of individuals of unknown pedigree and assess the levels of representation of E. globulus natural variation in the Portuguese landrace.

  15. Biomass and nutrient mass of Acacia dealbata and Eucalyptus globulus bioenergy plantations

    Treesearch

    Timothy J. Albaugh; Rafael A. Rubilar; Chris A. Maier; Eduardo A. Acuña; Rachel L. Cook

    2017-01-01

    We quantified biomass and nutrient accumulation of Acacia dealbata Link and Eucalyptus globulus Labill. planted at stem densities of 5000 and 15000 ha-1 in a bioenergy plantation in Chile. We tested the hypotheses that species and stocking will not affect biomass or nutrient accumulation. Species and...

  16. Influence of light availability on leaf structure and growth of two Eucalyptus globulus ssp. globulus provenances.

    PubMed

    James, S A; Bell, D T

    2000-09-01

    Light availability strongly affects leaf structure of the distinctive ontogenetic leaf forms of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. ssp. globulus. Late-maturing plants from St. Marys, Tasmania and early maturing plants from Wilsons Promontory, Victoria (hereafter referred to as Wilsons Prom.) were grown for 9 months in 100, 50 or 10% sunlight. Growth, biomass and leaf area were significantly reduced when plants were grown in 10% sunlight. Provenance differences were minimal despite retention of the juvenile leaf form by the Tasmanian plants throughout the study. The time taken for initiation of vegetative phase change by the Wilsons Prom. saplings increased with decreasing light availability, but the nodal position of change on the main stem remained the same. Both juvenile and adult leaves remained horizontal in low light conditions, but became vertical with high irradiance. Leaf dimensions changed with ontogenetic development, but were unaffected by light availability. Juvenile leaves retained a dorsiventral anatomy and adult Wilsons Prom. leaves retained an isobilateral structure despite a tenfold difference in light availability. Stomatal density and distribution showed ontogenetic and treatment differences. At all irradiances, juvenile leaves produced the smallest stomata and adult leaves the largest stomata. Amphistomy decreased with decreasing irradiance. Detrended, correspondence analysis ordination highlighted the structural changes influenced by ontogenetic development and light availability. Adult leaves had characteristics similar to the xeromorphic, sun-leaf type found in arid, high-light conditions. Although juvenile leaves had characteristics typical of mesomorphic leaves, several structural features suggest that these leaves are more sun-adapted than adult leaves.

  17. Foliar nutrient retranslocation in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Saur, E; Nambiar, E K; Fife, D N

    2000-10-01

    We measured patterns of change in concentrations and contents of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and calcium in fully expanded leaves of young Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) trees growing in a plantation in southeastern Australia, over a 12-month period beginning at the onset of spring. There was significant net retranslocation of mobile nutrients on a seasonal basis from green leaves, coinciding with continued growth and production of foliage. There was a close positive relationship between initial nutrient content (N, P and K) of the leaf and amount retranslocated, and a tight coupling between N and P retranslocated from leaves. Net retranslocation was significantly correlated with basal area growth increments. Artificial shading of leaves resulted in senescence and reduction in leaf mass. It also induced retranslocation of N, P and K from leaves of different ages and from different position in the canopy. Although the mechanisms underlying the effects of shading intensity on these changes were not elucidated, shading provided an experimental tool for studying retranslocation. Comparison of the results with published data for Pinus radiata (D. Don) grown in the same environment indicated a similarity between the species in patterns of change in foliar nutrient contents and in factors governing foliar nutrient retranslocation, giving rise to unifying principles.

  18. Growth and yield in Eucalyptus globulus

    Treesearch

    James A. Rinehart; Richard B. Standiford

    1983-01-01

    A study of the major Eucalyptus globulus stands throughout California conducted by Woodbridge Metcalf in 1924 provides a complete and accurate data set for generating variable site-density yield models. Two models were developed using linear regression techniques. Model I depicts a linear relationship between age and yield best used for stands between five and fifteen...

  19. Genetic Control of Heterochrony in Eucalyptus globulus

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Corey J.; Freeman, Jules S.; Jones, Rebecca C.; Potts, Brad M.; Wong, Melissa M. L.; Weller, James L.; Hecht, Valérie F. G.; Poethig, R. Scott; Vaillancourt, René E.

    2014-01-01

    A change in the timing or rate of developmental events throughout ontogeny is referred to as heterochrony, and it is a major evolutionary process in plants and animals. We investigated the genetic basis for natural variation in the timing of vegetative phase change in the tree Eucalyptus globulus, which undergoes a dramatic change in vegetative morphology during the juvenile-to-adult transition. Quantitative trait loci analysis in an outcross F2 family derived from crosses between individuals from a coastal population of E. globulus with precocious vegetative phase change and individuals from populations in which vegetative phase change occurs several years later implicated the microRNA EglMIR156.5 as a potential contributor to this heterochronic difference. Additional evidence for the involvement of EglMIR156.5 was provided by its differential expression in trees with early and late phase change. Our findings suggest that changes in the expression of miR156 underlie natural variation in vegetative phase change in E. globulus, and may also explain interspecific differences in the timing of this developmental transition. PMID:24950963

  20. Water Relations Link Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Discrimination to Phloem Sap Sugar Concentration in Eucalyptus globulus

    PubMed Central

    Cernusak, Lucas A.; Arthur, David J.; Pate, John S.; Farquhar, Graham D.

    2003-01-01

    A strong correlation was previously observed between carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C) of phloem sap sugars and phloem sap sugar concentration in the phloem-bleeding tree Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (J. Pate, E. Shedley, D. Arthur, M. Adams [1998] Oecologia 117: 312–322). We hypothesized that correspondence between these two parameters results from covarying responses to plant water potential. We expected Δ13C to decrease with decreasing plant water potential and phloem sap sugar concentration to increase, thereby maintaining turgor within sieve tubes. The hypothesis was tested with analyses of E. globulus trees growing on opposite ends of a rainfall gradient in southwestern Australia. The Δ13C of phloem sap sugars was closely related to phloem sap sugar concentration (r = −0.90, P < 0.0001, n = 40). As predicted, daytime shoot water potential was positively related to Δ13C (r = 0.70, P < 0.0001, n = 40) and negatively related to phloem sap sugar concentration (r = −0.86, P < 0.0001, n = 40). Additional measurements showed a strong correspondence between predawn shoot water potential and phloem sap sugar concentration measured at midday (r = −0.87, P < 0.0001, n = 30). The Δ13C of phloem sap sugars collected from the stem agreed well with that predicted from instantaneous measurements of the ratio of intercellular to ambient carbon dioxide concentrations on subtending donor leaves. In accordance, instantaneous ratio of intercellular to ambient carbon dioxide concentrations correlated negatively with phloem sap sugar concentration (r = −0.91, P < 0.0001, n = 27). Oxygen isotope enrichment (Δ18O) in phloem sap sugars also varied with phloem sap sugar concentration (r = 0.91, P < 0.0001, n = 39), consistent with predictions from a theoretical model of Δ18O. We conclude that drought induces correlated variation in the concentration of phloem sap sugars and their isotopic composition in E. globulus. PMID:12692314

  1. Physiological and biochemical responses to severe drought stress of nine Eucalyptus globulus clones: a multivariate approach.

    PubMed

    Granda, Víctor; Delatorre, Carolina; Cuesta, Candela; Centeno, María L; Fernández, Belén; Rodríguez, Ana; Feito, Isabel

    2014-07-01

    Seasonal drought, typical of temperate and Mediterranean environments, creates problems in establishing plantations and affects development and yield, and it has been widely studied in numerous species. Forestry fast-growing species such as Eucalyptus spp. are an important resource in such environments, selected clones being generally used for production purposes in plantations in these areas. However, use of mono-specific plantations increases risk of plant loss due to abiotic stresses, making it essential to understand differences in an individual clone's physiological responses to drought stress. In order to study clonal differences in drought responses, nine Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) clones (C14, C46, C97, C120, C222, C371, C405, C491 and C601) were gradually subjected to severe drought stress (<14% of field capacity). A total of 31 parameters, physiological (e.g., photosynthesis, gas exchange), biochemical (e.g., chlorophyll content) and hormonal (abscisic acid [ABA] content), were analysed by classic and multivariate techniques. Relationships between parameters were established, allowing related measurements to be grouped into functional units (pigment, growth, water and ABA). Differences in these units showed that there were two distinct groups of E. globulus clones on the basis of their different strategies when faced with drought stress. The C14 group (C14, C120, C405, C491 and C601) clones behave as water savers, maintaining high water content and showing high stomatal adjustment, and reducing their aerial growth to a great extent. The C46 group (C46, C97, C222 and C371) clones behave as water spenders, reducing their water content drastically and presenting osmotic adjustment. The latter maintains the highest growth rate under the conditions tested. The method presented here can be used to identify appropriate E. globulus clones for drought environments, facilitating the selection of material for production and repopulation environments. © The

  2. Physiology and anatomy of lenticel-like structures on leaves of Eucalyptus nitens and Eucalyptus globulus seedlings.

    PubMed

    Pinkard, Elizabeth; Gill, Warwick; Mohammed, Caroline

    2006-08-01

    Intumescences or abnormal, non-pathogenic, blister-like protuberant growths, form on Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and, to a much lesser extent, Eucalyptus nitens (Deane and Maiden) Maiden leaves when plants are grown in a high relative humidity environment. We examined the histology of intumescences and their effects on leaf photosynthetic processes. Intumescences were induced by placing E. globulus and E. nitens seedlings in a relative humidity of 80% in a greenhouse for 5 days. Symptomatic and asymptomatic leaves of plants with intumescence development were compared with leaves of control plants. Light-saturated carbon dioxide (CO(2)) assimilation (A(max)) and responses of CO(2) assimilation (A) to varying intercellular CO(2) partial pressure (C(i)) were measured. Symptomatic and asymptomatic leaf samples were fixed and sectioned and cellular structure was examined. Intumescences greatly reduced the photosynthetic capacity of E. globulus leaves and were associated with reduced electron transport rate and ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration capacity. Tissue necrotization and cellular collapse of the palisade mesophyll and deposition of phenolic compounds in the affected areas, probably reduced light penetration to photosynthesizing cells as well as reducing the amount of photosynthesizing tissue. Photosynthetic capacity of E. nitens was unaffected. The intumescences resembled simple lenticels, both morphologically and developmentally. To our knowledge, this is the first time that lenticel-like structures developed in response to environmental conditions have been described on leaves.

  3. Metabolic responses to water deficit in two Eucalyptus globulus clones with contrasting drought sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shvaleva, A L; Costa E Silva, F; Breia, E; Jouve, J; Hausman, J F; Almeida, M H; Maroco, J P; Rodrigues, M L; Pereira, J S; Chaves, M M

    2006-02-01

    We compared the metabolic responses of leaves and roots of two Eucalyptus globulus Labill. clones differing in drought sensitivity to a slowly imposed water deficit. Responses measured included changes in concentrations of soluble and insoluble sugars, proline, total protein and several antioxidant enzymes. In addition to the general decrease in growth caused by water deficit, we observed a decrease in osmotic potential when drought stress became severe. In both clones, the decrease was greater in roots than in leaves, consistent with the observed increases in concentrations of soluble sugars and proline in these organs. In roots of both clones, glutathione reductase activity increased significantly in response to water deficit, suggesting that this enzyme plays a protective role in roots during drought stress by catalyzing the catabolism of reactive oxygen species. Clone CN5 has stress avoidance mechanisms that account for its lower sensitivity to drought compared with Clone ST51.

  4. Photosynthesis of temperate Eucalyptus globulus trees outside their native range has limited adjustment to elevated CO2 and climate warming.

    PubMed

    Crous, Kristine Y; Quentin, Audrey G; Lin, Yan-Shih; Medlyn, Belinda E; Williams, David G; Barton, Craig V M; Ellsworth, David S

    2013-12-01

    Eucalyptus species are grown widely outside of their native ranges in plantations on all vegetated continents of the world. We predicted that such a plantation species would show high potential for acclimation of photosynthetic traits across a wide range of growth conditions, including elevated [CO2] and climate warming. To test this prediction, we planted temperate Eucalyptus globulus Labill. seedlings in climate-controlled chambers in the field located >700 km closer to the equator than the nearest natural occurrence of this species. Trees were grown in a complete factorial combination of elevated CO2 concentration (eC; ambient [CO2] +240 ppm) and air warming treatments (eT; ambient +3 °C) for 15 months until they reached ca. 10 m height. There was little acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to eC and hence the CO2-induced photosynthetic enhancement was large (ca. 50%) in this treatment during summer. The warming treatment significantly increased rates of both carboxylation capacity (V(cmax)) and electron transport (Jmax) (measured at a common temperature of 25 °C) during winter, but decreased them significantly by 20-30% in summer. The photosynthetic CO2 compensation point in the absence of dark respiration (Γ*) was relatively less sensitive to temperature in this temperate eucalypt species than for warm-season tobacco. The temperature optima for photosynthesis and Jmax significantly changed by about 6 °C between winter and summer, but without further adjustment from early to late summer. These results suggest that there is an upper limit for the photosynthetic capacity of E. globulus ssp. globulus outside its native range to acclimate to growth temperatures above 25 °C. Limitations to temperature acclimation of photosynthesis in summer may be one factor that defines climate zones where E. globulus plantation productivity can be sustained under anticipated global environmental change. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A NEW SPECIES OF INVASIVE GALL WASP (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE: TETRASTICHINAE) ON BLUE GUM (EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS) IN CALIFORNIA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The blue gum gall wasp, Selitrichodes globulus La Salle & Gates (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), is described as an invasive gall inducer on blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae), in California....

  6. Ontogenetic differences in mesophyll structure and chlorophyll distribution in Eucalyptus globulus ssp. globulus.

    PubMed

    James, S A; Smith, W K; Vogelmann, T C

    1999-02-01

    Mesophyll structure has been associated with the photosynthetic performance of leaves via the regulation of internal light and CO(2) profiles. Differences in mesophyll structure and chlorophyll distribution within three ontogenetically different leaf types of Eucalyptus globulus ssp. globulus were investigated. Juvenile leaves are blue-grey in color, dorsiventral (adaxial palisade layer only), hypostomatous, and approximately horizontal in orientation. In contrast, adult leaves are dark green in color, isobilateral (adaxial and abaxial palisade), amphistomatous, and nearly vertical in orientation. The transitional leaf type has structural features that appear intermediate between the juvenile and adult leaves. The ratio of mesophyll cell surface area per unit leaf surface area (A(mes)/A) of juvenile leaves was maximum at the base of a single, adaxial palisade layer and declined through the spongy mesophyll. Chlorophyll a + b content showed a coincident pattern, while the chlorophyll a:b ratio declined linearly from the adaxial to abaxial epidermis. In comparison, the mesophyll of adult leaves had a bimodal distribution of A(mes)/A, with maxima occurring beneath both the adaxial and abaxial surfaces within the first layer of multiple palisade layers. The distribution of chlorophyll a + b content had a similar pattern, although the maximum ratio of chlorophyll a:b occurred immediately beneath the adaxial and abaxial epidermis. The matching distributions of A(mes)/A and chlorophyll provide further evidence that mesophyll structure may act to influence photosynthetic performance. These changes in internal leaf structure at different life stages of E. globulus may be an adaptation for increased xeromorphy under increasing light exposure experienced from the seedling to adult tree, similar to the characteristics reported for different species according to sunlight exposure and water availability within their native habitats.

  7. Within-canopy nitrogen and photosynthetic gradients are unaffected by soil fertility in field-grown Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Tarryn L; Kelly, Natalie; Adams, Mark A; Warren, Charles R

    2007-11-01

    A significant and well-supported hypothesis is that increased growth following nitrogen (N) fertilization is a function of the relationships among photosynthesis, tissue N content and the light environment-specifically, the within-canopy allocation of N among leaves and the within-leaf allocation of N between Rubisco and chlorophyll. We tested this hypothesis in a field trial that included annual applications of N,P,K fertilizer (from planting) to a Eucalyptus globulus Labill. plantation growing on uniform leached sands. Growth of 4-year-old E. globulus increased significantly in response to fertilization. Leaf N and phosphorus concentrations were 0.1-0.5 g m(-2) and 0.4-0.5 g m(-2) higher in fertilized trees compared to unfertilized trees, respectively. Stomatal conductance (g(s)) at the maximum photosynthetic rate (A(max)) was between 0.2 and 0.4 mol m(-2) s(-1) higher in fertilized trees, but A(max) and the concentration of Rubisco (Rub(a)) were unaffected by fertilization. This seeming paradox, where there was no response of A(max) to fertilization despite increases in g(s) and leaf N concentration, was explained by reduced in vivo specific activity of Rubisco in fertilized trees. Acclimation to light, measured by redistribution of N between Rubisco and chlorophyll, was unaffected by fertilization. Distribution of leaf N followed irradiance gradients, but A(max) did not. Maximum photosynthetic rate was correlated with leaf N concentration only in unfertilized trees. These findings indicate that the relationships among photosynthesis, N and the light environment in E. globulus are affected by N,P,K fertilization.

  8. In-vitro anti-inflammatory effect of Eucalyptus globulus and Thymus vulgaris: nitric oxide inhibition in J774A.1 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vigo, E; Cepeda, A; Gualillo, O; Perez-Fernandez, R

    2004-02-01

    It is well known that nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Thymus vulgaris L. have been used in traditional medicine in the treatment of bronchitis, asthma and other respiratory diseases. The present study focuses on the effects of these two extracts on NO production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1. In addition, cell viability, scavenging activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression were evaluated. E. globulus and T. vulgaris extracts significantly inhibited the enhanced production of NO induced by LPS and IFN-gamma in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with these two extracts did not reduce cell viability at any dose used. Both plant extracts showed significant scavenging of NO radicals released by an NO donor, PAPA-NONOate. Results also show that pre-treatment with E. globulus and T. vulgaris extracts significantly inhibits iNOS mRNA expression. This study thus suggests that the inhibition of net NO production by these two extracts may be due to their NO scavenging activity and/or their inhibitory effects on iNOS gene expression.

  9. Responses to water stress in two Eucalyptus globulus clones differing in drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Costa E Silva, F; Shvaleva, A; Maroco, J P; Almeida, M H; Chaves, M M; Pereira, J S

    2004-10-01

    We evaluated drought resistance mechanisms in a drought-tolerant clone (CN5) and a drought-sensitive clone (ST51) of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. based on the responses to drought of some physiological, biophysical and morphological characteristics of container-grown plants, with particular emphasis on root growth and hydraulic properties. Water loss in excess of that supplied to the containers led to a general decrease in growth and significant reductions in leaf area ratio, specific leaf area and leaf-to-root area ratio. Root hydraulic conductance and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance decreased as water stress became more severe. During the experiment, the drought-resistant CN5 clone maintained higher leaf water status (higher predawn and midday leaf water potentials), sustained a higher growth rate (new leaf area expansion and root growth) and displayed greater carbon allocation to the root system and lower leaf-to-root area ratio than the drought-sensitive ST51 clone. Clone CN5 possessed higher stomatal conductances at moderate stress as well as higher hydraulic conductances than Clone ST51. Differences in the response to drought in root biomass, coupled with changes in hydraulic properties, accounted for the clonal differences in drought tolerance, allowing Clone CN5 to balance transpiration and water absorption during drought treatment and thereby prolong the period of active carbon assimilation.

  10. Defoliation and nitrogen effects on photosynthesis and growth of Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Battaglia, Michael; Mohammed, Caroline L

    2007-07-01

    Plant responses to defoliation are complex. We established a field experiment in a nine-month-old Eucalyptus globulus Labill. plantation to examine the effects of pattern (upper crown versus lower crown removal), frequency (single, double or triple defoliation within a 12-month period) and severity (25 versus 38% of leaf area removed) of defoliation and the effect of soil nitrogen (N) on photosynthetic processes and stem growth. The photosynthetic responses observed following defoliation could be attributed to changes in source:sink ratios. Light-saturated CO(2) uptake (A(max)) increased with increasing severity and frequency of defoliation irrespective of defoliation pattern. Seedlings defoliated in autumn did not exhibit increases in A(max) until the following spring, whereas there was no such delay in photosynthetic responses associated with spring defoliation. Application of N before defoliation allowed trees to compensate for the effect of defoliation on stem diameter growth, which could not be explained simply in terms of increases in A(max). The observed increases in stem diameter increment following N fertilization of defoliated trees suggested increases in leaf area development, and there were changes in the leaf area:leaf dry mass ratio that may have increased light absorption by the crown. Nitrogen fertilization also increased partitioning of dry mass to branches at the expense of main stems, suggesting that N supply was important in rebuilding crowns following a defoliation event.

  11. Highly labile elements. [in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipschutz, Michael E.; Woolum, Dorothy S.

    1988-01-01

    Certain elements of high lability are very responsive to thermal processes, being either highly volatile during primary nebular condensation or highly mobile by postaccretionary metamorphic or shock heating. Data for highly labile elements indicate that different thermal processes were important in the genesis of each of the chondritic groups and a discussion of each is given. Contents of highly labile elements in a given group of contemporary falls differ from those of the same group that fell in Antarctica more than 0.1 Myr ago. This difference is due either to a time-dependent change in meteorite sources or, less likely, orbital variation of the meteorite flux to Earth.

  12. Highly labile elements. [in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipschutz, Michael E.; Woolum, Dorothy S.

    1988-01-01

    Certain elements of high lability are very responsive to thermal processes, being either highly volatile during primary nebular condensation or highly mobile by postaccretionary metamorphic or shock heating. Data for highly labile elements indicate that different thermal processes were important in the genesis of each of the chondritic groups and a discussion of each is given. Contents of highly labile elements in a given group of contemporary falls differ from those of the same group that fell in Antarctica more than 0.1 Myr ago. This difference is due either to a time-dependent change in meteorite sources or, less likely, orbital variation of the meteorite flux to Earth.

  13. Observed and modelled leaf area index in Eucalyptus globulus plantations: tests of optimality and equilibrium hypotheses.

    PubMed

    White, Donald A; Battaglia, Micheal; Mendham, Daniel S; Crombie, D Stuart; Kinal, Joe; McGrath, John F

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports on variation in leaf area index (L) in five Eucalyptus globulus Labill. plantations in response to application of nitrogen, thinning at age 2 years and variation in climate wetness index (the ratio of rainfall to potential evaporation). Observed L is compared with: (i) L predicted to optimize net primary productivity for a given average annual temperature, annual water use and potential evaporation (L(opt)) and (ii) L calculated as a linear function of climate wetness index (L(eq)). L peaked in fertilized plots at between 4 and 5 years of age or immediately after canopy closure. The value of L from canopy closure to age 8 years was not strongly related to annual rainfall or climate wetness index. At two sites with total soil nitrogen <1.2 mg g(-)(1), L in fertilized plots was about two units greater than in unfertilized plots. This difference persisted until measurements ended in 2004 when the trees were 8 years old. The L of plots thinned to 300 and 600 stems ha(-)(1) at age 2 years recovered quickly and was not significantly different from L in unthinned plots when the trees were 8 years old. L(opt) was a good predictor of the leaf area index of 8-year-old plots of E. globulus when nitrogen and phosphorus were non-limiting (model efficiency (EF) was 0.5). For the same plots, L(eq) underestimated observed L by an average of two units, and the model efficiency was low (-3.25). Data from two nitrogen-limited sites demonstrated that for fertilized plots L(opt) (EF = 0.6) was a much better predictor of L than L(eq) (EF = -3.36). At the same sites, L(eq) (EF = 0.42) was a better model for predicting L of unfertilized plots than L(opt) (-3.59). These results provide evidence that comparing observed L with L(opt) can identify stands limited by factors other than growing climate.

  14. Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria in Eucalyptus globulus Plantations

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Marliane de Cássia Soares; Paula, Thiago de Almeida; Moreira, Bruno Coutinho; Carolino, Manuela; Cruz, Cristina; Bazzolli, Denise Mara Soares; Silva, Cynthia Canedo; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi

    2014-01-01

    Eucalypt cultivation is an important economic activity worldwide. In Portugal, Eucalyptus globulus plantations account for one-third of the total forested area. The nutritional requirements of this crop have been well studied, and nitrogen (N) is one of the most important elements required for vegetal growth. N dynamics in soils are influenced by microorganisms, such as diazotrophic bacteria (DB) that are responsible for biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), so the aim of this study was to evaluate and identity the main groups of DB in E. globulus plantations. Samples of soil and root systems were collected in winter and summer from three different Portuguese regions (Penafiel, Gavião and Odemira). We observed that DB communities were affected by season, N fertilization and moisture. Furthermore Bradyrhizobium and Burkholderia were the most prevalent genera in these three regions. This is the first study describing the dynamic of these bacteria in E. globulus plantations, and these data will likely contribute to a better understanding of the nutritional requirements of eucalypt cultivation and associated organic matter turnover. PMID:25340502

  15. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria in Eucalyptus globulus plantations.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marliane de Cássia Soares; Paula, Thiago de Almeida; Moreira, Bruno Coutinho; Carolino, Manuela; Cruz, Cristina; Bazzolli, Denise Mara Soares; Silva, Cynthia Canedo; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi

    2014-01-01

    Eucalypt cultivation is an important economic activity worldwide. In Portugal, Eucalyptus globulus plantations account for one-third of the total forested area. The nutritional requirements of this crop have been well studied, and nitrogen (N) is one of the most important elements required for vegetal growth. N dynamics in soils are influenced by microorganisms, such as diazotrophic bacteria (DB) that are responsible for biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), so the aim of this study was to evaluate and identity the main groups of DB in E. globulus plantations. Samples of soil and root systems were collected in winter and summer from three different Portuguese regions (Penafiel, Gavião and Odemira). We observed that DB communities were affected by season, N fertilization and moisture. Furthermore Bradyrhizobium and Burkholderia were the most prevalent genera in these three regions. This is the first study describing the dynamic of these bacteria in E. globulus plantations, and these data will likely contribute to a better understanding of the nutritional requirements of eucalypt cultivation and associated organic matter turnover.

  16. Photosynthesis of Eucalyptus globulus with Mycosphaerella leaf disease.

    PubMed

    Pinkard, E A; Mohammed, C L

    2006-01-01

    Mycosphaerella leaf disease (MLD) is a major cause of foliage damage in Eucalyptus globulus plantations. Our study is the first to describe the physiological effects of MLD on E. globulus leaves. It involved measurements on both field and potted plants. Changes in photosynthetic parameters in response to MLD were quantified in a study using gas exchange techniques. There was a negative linear relationship between light-saturated photosynthesis (A(max)) and leaf-level damage from MLD. Reductions in A(max) were proportionally greater than might be expected from the reduction in green leaf area as a result of the disease, indicating that asymptomatic tissue also was affected by MLD. The reductions in A(max) were not related to increases in stomatal resistance, but were a result of reduced activity of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) and changes in the capacity for ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration. Changes in mesophyll resistance to CO2 were also implicated. The effect of MLD was similar at different sites and irrespective of tree-level infection, suggesting a general leaf-level response of E. globulus to MLD.

  17. Improvement of growth of Eucalyptus globulus and soil biological parameters by amendment with sewage sludge and inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal and saprobe fungi.

    PubMed

    Arriagada, C; Sampedro, I; Garcia-Romera, I; Ocampo, J

    2009-08-15

    Sewage sludge is widely used as an organic soil amendment to improve soil fertility. We investigated the effects of sewage sludge (SS) application on certain biological parameters of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. The plant was either uninoculated or inoculated with saprobe fungi (Coriolopsis rigida and Trichoderma harzianum) or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Glomus deserticola and Gigaspora rosea). Sewage sludge was applied to the surface of experimental plots at rates of 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 g 100 g(-1) of soil. Inoculation with both AM and saprobe fungi in the presence of SS was essential for the promotion of plant growth. The AM, saprobe fungi and SS significantly increased dry shoot weight. The AM fungi induced a significant increase in Fluorescein diacetate (FDA) activity but did not increase beta-glucosidase activity. Addition of SS to AM-inoculated soil did not affect either FDA or alpha-glucosidase activities in plants from soil that was either uninoculated or inoculated with the saprobe fungi. SS increased beta-glucosidase activity when it was applied at 4 g 100 g(-1). SS negatively affected AM colonization as well as the mycelium SDH activity for both mycorrhizal fungi. SS increased Eucalyptus shoot biomass and enhanced its nutrient status. Inoculation of the soil with G. deserticola stimulated significant E. globulus growth and increases in shoot tissue content of N, P, K, Ca, Mg and Fe. Dual inoculation with G. deserticola and either of the saprobe fungi had positive effects on K, Ca, Mg and Fe contents. The application of 8 g 100 g(-1) of SS had no positive effects on plant nutrition. The experimental setup provided a suitable tool for evaluating SS in combination with saprobe and AM fungi as a biological fertiliser for its beneficial effects on E. globulus plant growth.

  18. Beneficial effect of saprobe and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on growth of Eucalyptus globulus co-cultured with Glycine max in soil contaminated with heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Arriagada, Cesar A; Herrera, Miguel A; Ocampo, Juan A

    2007-07-01

    The effects of saprobe and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on growth, chlorophyll and N, P and K content of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. growing in soil contaminated by heavy metals in the presence or absence of Glycine max were investigated. Glomus mosseae and Glomus deserticola increased dry weight, shoot length, total N, P and K concentration and the quantity of chlorophyll in E. globulus shoots. The protection of Eucalyptus by AM fungi against the action of the heavy metals was more evident when this plant grew as an intercrop with soybean than as a monoculture. The presence of the saprobe fungi Fusarium concolor and Trichoderma koningii further enhanced shoot dry weight, N, P and K content of AM Eucalyptus. The co-inoculation of Eucalyptus with Glomus deserticola and T. koningii was more effective for Cd uptake. In addition, Glomus deserticola enhanced the amount of Pb absorbed by Eucalyptus plants. We showed that it is important to select the most efficient AM and saprobe fungi to stimulate plant growth in heavy-metal-contaminated soil and that the combination of both plays an important role in metal tolerance of Eucalyptus plants.

  19. Role of corticular photosynthesis following defoliation in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; O'Grady, Anthony P; Worledge, Dale; Warren, Charles R

    2009-08-01

    Defoliation can reduce net fixation of atmospheric CO(2) by the canopy, but increase the intensity and duration of photosynthetically active radiation on stems. Stem CO(2) flux and leaf gas exchange in young Eucalyptus globulus seedlings were measured to assess the impact of defoliation on these processes and to determine the potential contribution of re-fixation by photosynthetic inner bark in offsetting the effects of defoliation in a woody species. Pot and field trials examined how artificial defoliation of the canopy affected the photosynthetic characteristics of main stems of young Eucalyptus globulus seedlings. Defoliated potted seedlings were characterized by transient increases in foliar photosynthetic rates and concomitant decreases in stem CO(2) fluxes (both in the dark and light). Defoliated field-grown seedlings showed similar stem CO(2) flux responses, but of reduced magnitude. Despite demonstrating increased re-fixation capability, defoliated potted-seedlings had slowed stem growth. The green stem of seedlings exhibited largely shade-adapted characteristics. Defoliation reduced stem chlorophyll a/b ratio and increased carotenoid concentration. An increased capacity to re-fix internally respired CO(2) (up to 96%) suggested that stem re-fixation represents a previously unexplored mechanism to minimize the impact of foliar loss by maximizing the contribution of all photosynthetic tissues, particularly for young seedlings.

  20. Shifts in biomass and resource allocation patterns following defoliation in Eucalyptus globulus growing with varying water and nutrient supplies.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Mohammed, Caroline

    2009-06-01

    In woody species, potential mechanisms to compensate for tissue loss to herbivory and diseases have been related to post-event shifts in growth, biomass and internal resource allocation patterns, as modulated by external resource limitations. We examined the interactive effects of belowground resource limitations by varying nutrient and water availability, and aboveground carbon limitation imposed by a single defoliation event (40% leaf removal) on stem growth, whole-tree and within-tree resource allocation patterns (total non-structural carbohydrate and nitrogen) and below- and aboveground biomass allocation patterns in 8-month-old, field-grown Eucalyptus globulus Labill. saplings. Two months after treatments were imposed, the direction of the stem growth response to defoliation depended on the abiotic treatment. Five months after defoliation, however, we found little evidence that resource availability constrained the expression of tolerance to defoliation. With the exception of the combined low-nutrient and low-water supply treatment, saplings grown with (1) adequate water and nutrient supplies and even with (2) low-water supply or (3) low-nutrient supply were able to compensate for the 40% foliage loss. The observed compensatory responses were attributed to the activation of several short- and longer-term physiological mechanisms including reduced biomass allocation to coarse roots, mobilization of carbohydrate reserves, robust internal N dynamics and increased ratio of foliage to wood dry mass.

  1. Stumps of Eucalyptus globulus as a source of antioxidant and antimicrobial polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Luís, Ângelo; Neiva, Duarte; Pereira, Helena; Gominho, Jorge; Domingues, Fernanda; Duarte, Ana Paula

    2014-10-13

    These past years have seen an enormous development of the area of natural antioxidants and antimicrobials. Eucalyptus globulus is widely cultivated in subtropical and Mediterranean regions in intensive short rotation coppice plantations. In the Portuguese context, E. globulus is the third species in terms of forest area. The stump is the basal part of the tree, including the near-the-ground stem portion and the woody roots that remain after stem felling. The purpose of this work was to study the phytochemical profile and to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of several crude stump wood and stump bark extracts of E. globulus, comparing it with similar extracts of E. globulus wood (industrial chips). The results showed the presence of high concentrations of total phenolic compounds (>200 mg GAE/g extract) and flavonoids (>10 mg QE/g extract) in E. globulus stump extracts. Generally the stump wood extracts stands out from the other ones, presenting the highest percentages of inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation. It was also possible to conclude that the extracts were more active against Gram-positive bacteria, presenting low MIC values. This study thus provides information supporting the economic valorization of E. globulus stump wood.

  2. Experimental infections of waterfowl with Sphaeridiotrema globulus (Digenea).

    PubMed

    Huffman, J E; Roscoe, D E

    1989-01-01

    Sphaeridiotrema globulus in experimentally infected mute swans (Cygnus olor), mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) and Canada geese (Branta canadensis) induced ulcerative hemorrhagic enteritis. Sites of infection include the jejunum and ileum. The digeneans ulcerated the intestine. The inflammatory response was primarily lymphocytic with some eosinophils. Severe hemorrhage from damaged submucosal capillaries provided a blood meal for the parasite and caused anemia in the host. Extra-medullary hematopoiesis occurred in the liver, and an erythroid hyperplasia occurred in the bone marrow of infected birds. Infected birds exhibited muscular weakness and died from shock associated with severe blood loss. Mallards and Canada geese were less susceptible to fatal infection than the mute swan as evidenced by survivors in the higher dose groups.

  3. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of lipids from Eucalyptus globulus wood.

    PubMed

    González-Vila, F J; Bautista, J M; Gutiérrez, A; Del Rio, J C; González, A G

    2000-07-05

    Various typical lipid components of wood extractives have been isolated from Eucalyptus globulus wood by supercritical carbon dioxide modified with methanol. The influence of various extraction parameters on the yield and qualitative composition of the extracts have been studied. The extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared with those obtained by Soxhlet extraction with acetone, the standard method for the determination of wood extractives. The qualitative and quantitative results obtained by both methods were in good agreement. The experimental planning to asses the influence of pressure, temperature and percentage of methanol and their interactions on the extraction efficiency was carried out with a factorial design, followed by multiple linear regression algorithm.

  4. HEAT LABILE OPSONINS TO PNEUMOCOCCUS

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mary Ruth; Wood, W. Barry

    1969-01-01

    Heat labile opsonins (HLO) in normal rat serum to both encapsulated and unencapsulated pneumococci (a) have the same heat lability as complement (C); (b) are active at 37°C but not at 0°C; (c) are inactivated proportionately to hemolytic C by the addition of immune aggregates to the serum; (d) are adsorbed from serum nonspecifically by bacteria at 37°C but not at 0°C; (e) are Ca++- and/or Mg++-dependent in their action; and (f) are inactivated by zymosan and a purified cobra venom factor, and in the case of encapsulated pneumococci, at least, by NH4OH. Like other opsonins, HLO to pneumococci act primarily on the bacteria rather than on the phagocytes. Their combined properties indicate that they involve multiple components of the hemolytic C system. Since HLO are immunologically polyspecific, they presumably play a broad protective role in the early (preantibody) phase of acute bacterial infections. PMID:4390899

  5. Photosynthetic enhancement by elevated CO₂ depends on seasonal temperatures for warmed and non-warmed Eucalyptus globulus trees.

    PubMed

    Quentin, A G; Crous, K Y; Barton, C V M; Ellsworth, D S

    2015-11-01

    Arguments based on the biochemistry of photosynthesis predict a positive interaction between elevated atmospheric [CO2] and temperature on photosynthesis as well as growth. In contrast, few long-term studies on trees find greater stimulation of photosynthesis in response to elevated [CO2] at warmer compared with cooler temperatures. To test for CO2 × temperature interactions on leaf photosynthesis and whole-plant growth, we planted Eucalyptus globulus Labill. in climate-controlled chambers in the field at the Hawkesbury Forest Experiment research site, and investigated how photosynthetic enhancement changed across a range of seasonal temperatures. Trees were grown in a complete two-way factorial design with two CO2 concentrations (ambient and ambient + 240 ppm) and two temperatures (ambient and ambient + 3 °C) for 15 months until they reached ∼10 m height, after which they were harvested for biomass. There was significant enhancement of photosynthesis and growth with elevated [CO2], with the photosynthetic stimulation varying with season, but there was no significant effect of warming. Photosynthetic enhancement was higher in summer (+46% at 28 °C) than in winter (+14% at 20 °C). Photosynthetic enhancement as a function of leaf temperature was consistent with theoretical expectations, but was strongly mediated by the intercellular [CO2]/ambient [CO2] (Ci/Ca) ratio across seasons. Total tree biomass after 15 months was 66% larger in elevated CO2 (P = 0.017) with no significant warming effect detected. The fraction of biomass in coarse roots was reduced in warmed trees compared with ambient temperature controls, but there was no evidence of changed biomass allocation patterns in elevated CO2. We conclude that there are strong and consistent elevated CO2 effects on photosynthesis and biomass of E. globulus. It is crucial to consider stomatal conductance under a range of conditions to appraise the interactive effect of [CO2] and temperature on

  6. Root distribution of Pinus pinaster, P. radiata, Eucalyptus globulus and E. kochii and associated soil chemistry in agricultural land adjacent to tree lines.

    PubMed

    Sudmeyer, R A; Speijers, J; Nicholas, B D

    2004-12-01

    We quantified the extent and distribution of roots of four commonly planted tree species (Eucalyptus globulus Labill., Pinus radiata D. Don, P. pinaster Aiton and E. kochii Maiden & Blakely subsp. plenissima C.A. Gardner) in agricultural land adjacent to tree lines, and examined the effect of soil type and root pruning on root morphology. Root distribution in soil adjacent to tree lines was mapped by a trench profile method at 13 sites on the south coast of Western Australia. Soil samples were collected to determine water content and fertility. The lateral extent of tree roots ranged from 10 m for E. kochii to 44 m for P. pinaster. This equated to between 1.5 and 2.5 times tree height (H) for E. globulus and Pinus spp. to 4H for E. kochii. Root density declined logarithmically with distance from the trees and was greatest for P. pinaster and least for E. globulus (P < 0.001). The rate of decrease in root density with distance from the trees was greatest for the Pinus spp. and least for E. kochii (P < 0.05). Root density was generally greatest in the top 0.5 m of the soil profile and decreased with increasing depth. This decrease was relatively gradual in the deep sands, but abrupt in clay subsoil. Root dry mass in the sandy top soil beyond 0.5H ranged between 1.0 and 55.5 Mg km(treeline) (-1) for 6-year-old E. kochii and 50-year-old P. pinaster, respectively. Soil water content generally increased with distance from the trees (P < 0.001). There was no evidence of reduced soil fertility in the top 1.4 m of the soil profile adjacent to the trees. Two to four years after trees had been root pruned, both the lateral extent and vertical distribution of roots were similar for pruned and unpruned trees. The density of roots < 2 mm in diameter was greater for root-pruned trees than for unpruned trees (P < 0.05). We conclude that the study species can compete with agricultural crops based on the lateral extent of their roots and the occurrence of greatest root density

  7. Phytoremediation efficiency OF CD by Eucalyptus globulus transplanted from polluted and unpolluted sites.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Qi, Shihua; Peng, Li; Wang, Jinji

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of plants to uptake heavy metals from contaminated soils has shown great phytoremediation potential. The development, resistibility and Cd extraction of Eucalyptus globulus individuals from metalliferous and clean sites in different years were analyzed under a specific environment. Eucalyptus globulus planted in Guiyu for phytoremediation or cultivated in an uncontaminated, natural environment for economic purposes were transplanted to Yuecheng town, which, in recent years, has been involved in the e-waste dismantling and recycling business, to compare the phytoremediation efficiency of Eucalyptus globulus trees grown in different environments. Trees cultivated in polluted areas can remove far more Cd and Hg from the contaminated soil than the individuals from clean soils because metalliferous Eucalyptus globulus can produce more biomass and uptake more heavy metals than nonmetalliferous plants per year. As polluted environments negatively affect the growth of plants, we speculated that the phytoremediation efficiency of metalliferous Eucalyptus globulus should decrease over time and that nonmetalliferous trees should adapt to the local environment.

  8. Genetic Variation in the Chemical Components of Eucalyptus globulus Wood

    PubMed Central

    Stackpole, Desmond J.; Vaillancourt, René E.; Alves, Ana; Rodrigues, José; Potts, Brad M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of lignin and other wood chemical components, there are few studies of the natural genetic variation that exists within plant species and its adaptive significance. We used models developed from near infra-red spectroscopy to study natural genetic variation in lignin content and monomer composition (syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio [S/G]) as well as cellulose and extractives content, using a 16-year-old field trial of an Australian tree species, Eucalyptus globulus. We sampled 2163 progenies of 467 native trees from throughout the native geographic range of the species. The narrow-sense heritability of wood chemical traits (0.25–0.44) was higher than that of growth (0.15), but less than wood density (0.51). All wood chemical traits exhibited significant broad-scale genetic differentiation (QST = 0.34–0.43) across the species range. This differentiation exceeded that detected with putatively neutral microsatellite markers (FST = 0.09), arguing that diversifying selection has shaped population differentiation in wood chemistry. There were significant genetic correlations among these wood chemical traits at the population and additive genetic levels. However, population differentiation in the S/G ratio of lignin in particular was positively correlated with latitude (R2 = 76%), which may be driven by either adaptation to climate or associated biotic factors. PMID:22384327

  9. Kinetic modeling of kraft delignification of Eucalyptus globulus

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A.; Rodriguez, F.; Gilarranz, M.A.; Moreno, D.; Garcia-Ochoa, F.

    1997-10-01

    A kinetic model for the kraft pulping delignification of Eucalyptus globulus is proposed. This model is discriminated among some kinetic expressions often used in the literature, and the kinetic parameters are determined by fitting of experimental results. A total of 25 isothermal experiments at liquor-to-wood ratios of 50 and 5 L/kg have been carried out. Initial, bulk, and residual delignification stages have been observed during the lignin removal, the transitions being, referring to the lignin initial content, about 82 and 3%. Carbohydrate removal and effective alkali-metal and hydrosulfide consumption have been related with the lignin removal by means of effective stoichiometric coefficients for each stage, coefficients also being calculated by fitting of the experimental data. The kinetic model chosen has been used to simulate typical kraft pulping experiments carried out at nonisothermal conditions, using a temperature ramp. The model yields simulated values close to those obtained experimentally for the wood studied and also ably reproduces the trends of the literature data.

  10. Managing for water-use efficient wood production in Eucalyptus globulus plantations

    Treesearch

    Donald A. White; John F. McGrath; Michael G. Ryan; Michael Battaglia; Daniel S. Mendham; Joe Kinal; Geoffrey M. Downes; D. Stuart Crombie; Mark E. Hunt

    2014-01-01

    This paper tests the hypothesis that thinning and nitrogen fertiliser can increase the mass of wood produced per volume of water used (evapotranspiration) by plantations of Eucalyptus globulus. We have called this plantation water productivity (PWPWOOD) and argue that, for a given genotype, this term integrates the effects of management, site and climate on both...

  11. Sources of variation in self-incompatibility in the Australian forest tree, Eucalyptus globulus

    PubMed Central

    McGowen, Marian H.; Vaillancourt, René E.; Pilbeam, David J.; Potts, Brad M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims One of the major factors affecting the outcrossing rate in Eucalyptus globulus is thought to be the inherent self-incompatibility (SI) level of the female tree. SI in this species is mainly due to late-acting pre- and post-zygotic mechanisms operating in the ovary, and not S alleles. This study aimed to assess the phenotypic variation in SI levels within E. globulus and determine its genetic control and stability across pollination techniques, sites and seasons. Methods SI levels were estimated for 105 genotypes originating from across the geographical range of E. globulus over multiple years of crossing. Separate grafted trees of some genotypes growing at the same and different sites allowed the genetic basis of the variation in SI to be tested and its stability across sites and seasons to be determined. The SI level of a tree was measured as the relative reduction in seeds obtained per flower pollinated following selfing compared with outcross pollinations. Thus, if seed set is the same, SI is 0 %, and if no self seed is set, SI is 100 %. Key Results The average SI in E. globulus was 91 % and genotypes ranged from 8 to 100 % SI. Most genotypes (>75 %) had SI levels >90 %. There were highly significant differences between genotypes and the within-site broad-sense heritability of percentage SI was high (H2 = 0·80 ± 0·13). However, there was evidence that growing site, and to a lesser extent season, can affect the expression of SI levels. Trees with low reproductive loads produced relatively more seed from selfed flowers. Conclusions There is a strong genetic basis to the phenotypic variation in SI in E. globulus within a site. However, the level of SI was affected, but to a lesser extent, by the environment, which in part may reflect the higher probability of selfed zygotes surviving on sites or in seasons where competition for resources is less. PMID:20228085

  12. Compositional analysis and insecticidal activity of Eucalyptus globulus (family: Myrtaceae) essential oil against housefly (Musca domestica).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Peeyush; Mishra, Sapna; Malik, Anushree; Satya, Santosh

    2012-05-01

    The essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtales: Myrtaceae) was evaluated for its chemical composition and insecticidal activity against the housefly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae). Chemical composition of E. globulus oil revealed 1,8-cineole (33.6%), α-pinene (14.2%) and d-limonene (10.1%) as major constituents, while vapour profile of E. globulus oil determined through solid phase microextraction (SPME) analysis showed 1,8-cineole (56.5%), α-pinene (16.9%), d-limonene (5.5%) and linalool acetate (3.4%) as principal components. Vapour phase of the oil showed increase in the contents of oxygenated monoterpenes. Insecticidal activity of E. globulus oil was assessed against larvae and pupae of housefly, through two different bioassays: contact toxicity and fumigation. Contact toxicity assay with larva showed lethal concentration, LC(50), between 2.73 and 0.60μl/cm(2) for different observation days while lethal time, LT(50), varied between 6.0 and 1.7 days. In fumigant assay for housefly larvae, LC(50) values of 66.1 and 50.1μl/l were obtained in 24h and 48h, respectively. Oil treated larvae showed surface shrinkage, spinous cells proliferation and bleb formation in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. Pupicidal effectivity was measured in terms of percentage inhibition rate (PIR) which was 36.0-93.0% for contact toxicity and 67.9-100% for fumigation toxicity assay. Considerable activity of E. globulus oil against larvae and pupae of housefly demonstrates its potentiality as a viable option for the development of eco-friendly product for housefly control.

  13. Ectomycorrhizal Pisolithus albus inoculation of Acacia spirorbis and Eucalyptus globulus grown in ultramafic topsoil enhances plant growth and mineral nutrition while limits metal uptake.

    PubMed

    Jourand, Philippe; Hannibal, Laure; Majorel, Clarisse; Mengant, Stéphane; Ducousso, Marc; Lebrun, Michel

    2014-01-15

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM) isolates of Pisolithus albus (Cooke and Massee) from nickel-rich ultramafic topsoils in New Caledonia were inoculated onto Acacia spirorbis Labill. (an endemic Fabaceae) and Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (used as a Myrtaceae plant host model). The aim of the study was to analyze the growth of symbiotic ECM plants growing on the ultramafic substrate that is characterized by high and toxic metal concentrations i.e. Co, Cr, Fe, Mn and Ni, deficient concentrations of plant essential nutrients such as N, P, K, and that presents an unbalanced Ca/Mg ratio (1/19). ECM inoculation was successful with a plant level of root mycorrhization up to 6.7%. ECM symbiosis enhanced plant growth as indicated by significant increases in shoot and root biomass. Presence of ECM enhanced uptake of major elements that are deficient in ultramafic substrates; in particular P, K and Ca. On the contrary, the ECM symbioses strongly reduced transfer to plants of element in excess in soils; in particular all metals. ECM-inoculated plants released metal complexing molecules as free thiols and oxalic acid mostly at lower concentrations than in controls. Data showed that ECM symbiosis helped plant growth by supplying uptake of deficient elements while acting as a protective barrier to toxic metals, in particular for plants growing on ultramafic substrate with extreme soil conditions. Isolation of indigenous and stress-adapted beneficial ECM fungi could serve as a potential tool for inoculation of ECM endemic plants for the successful restoration of ultramafic ecosystems degraded by mining activities.

  14. Genetics of postzygotic isolation in Eucalyptus: whole-genome analysis of barriers to introgression in a wide interspecific cross of Eucalyptus grandis and E. globulus.

    PubMed Central

    Myburg, Alexander A; Vogl, Claus; Griffin, A Rod; Sederoff, Ronald R; Whetten, Ross W

    2004-01-01

    The genetic architecture of hybrid fitness characters can provide valuable insights into the nature and evolution of postzygotic reproductive barriers in diverged species. We determined the genome-wide distribution of barriers to introgression in an F(1) hybrid of two Eucalyptus tree species, Eucalyptus grandis (W. Hill ex Maiden.) and E. globulus (Labill.). Two interspecific backcross families (N = 186) were used to construct comparative, single-tree, genetic linkage maps of an F(1) hybrid individual and two backcross parents. A total of 1354 testcross AFLP marker loci were evaluated in the three parental maps and a substantial proportion (27.7% average) exhibited transmission ratio distortion (alpha = 0.05). The distorted markers were located in distinct regions of the parental maps and marker alleles within each region were all biased toward either of the two parental species. We used a Bayesian approach to estimate the position and effect of transmission ratio distorting loci (TRDLs) in the distorted regions of each parental linkage map. The relative viability of TRDL alleles ranged from 0.20 to 0.72. Contrary to expectation, heterospecific (donor) alleles of TRDLs were favored as often as recurrent alleles in both backcrosses, suggesting that positive and negative heterospecific interactions affect introgression rates in this wide interspecific pedigree. PMID:15082559

  15. Quercetin as a shuttle for labile iron.

    PubMed

    Baccan, Mayara Marinovic; Chiarelli-Neto, Orlando; Pereira, Regina Mara Silva; Espósito, Breno Pannia

    2012-02-01

    The antioxidant activity of flavonoids may involve their ability to complex body iron in non-redox-active forms. In this study, it was found that the catechol flavonoids rutin and quercetin are able to suppress redox-active labile plasma iron (LPI) in both buffered solution and in iron-overloaded sera. Both flavonoids are effective in loading the metal into the iron-transport protein transferrin. Iron derivatives of quercetin and rutin are able to permeate cell membranes, however, only free quercetin is able to gain access to the cytosol and decrease intracellular labile iron pools. These results suggest that the antioxidant activity of quercetin may be dependent on its ability to shuttle labile iron from cell compartments followed by its transfer to transferrin.

  16. Labile sulfide and sulfite in phytochelatin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Eannetta, N.T.; Steffens, J.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium induce tomato cell cultures to synthesize the metal binding polypeptides ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 3} and ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 4}-Gly (phytochelatins). Tomato cells selected for growth on normally lethal concentrations of CdCl{sub 2} synthesize higher quantities of these polypeptides. Cd{sup r} cells are not cross-resistant to other heavy metals, and recent work suggests that metal detoxification by these peptides may be Cd-specific. The occurrence of labile sulfur as a component of the metal complex raises questions concerning possible functions of phytochelatins besides that of Cd binding. The presence of acid-labile sulfide ion in phytochelatin complexes has been reported by several groups. We report the additional finding that labile sulfite is also present in these complexes and in higher amounts than sulfide. Sulfide and sulfite are both released from the metal binding complex by acidification or by treatment with EDTA.

  17. Antibacterial activity of the essential oils from the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bachir, Raho G; Benali, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of essential oil of the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus (E. globulus). Methods The essential oils of this plant were obtained by the hydrodistillation method. The inhibitory effects of this essential oil were tested against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) by using agar disc diffusion and dilution broth methods. Results The results obtained showed that essential oil of the leaves of E. globulus has antimicrobial activity against gram negative bacteria (E. coli) as well as gram positive bacteria (S. aureus). Conclusion The encouraging results indicate the essential oil of E. globulus leaves might be exploited as natural antibiotic for the treatment of several infectious diseases caused by these two germs, and could be useful in understanding the relations between traditional cures and current medicines. PMID:23570005

  18. Antibacterial activity of the essential oils from the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Raho G; Benali, M

    2012-09-01

    To examine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of essential oil of the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus (E. globulus). The essential oils of this plant were obtained by the hydrodistillation method. The inhibitory effects of this essential oil were tested against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) by using agar disc diffusion and dilution broth methods. The results obtained showed that essential oil of the leaves of E. globulus has antimicrobial activity against gram negative bacteria (E. coli) as well as gram positive bacteria (S. aureus). The encouraging results indicate the essential oil of E. globulus leaves might be exploited as natural antibiotic for the treatment of several infectious diseases caused by these two germs, and could be useful in understanding the relations between traditional cures and current medicines.

  19. Lability of Humic-Bound Phosphorus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phosphorus (P) has long been known to be present in humic substances from various sources. However, information on the lability of humic-bound P is very limited although such information is critical for understanding the role of humic substances in P cycling and nutrition. In this presentation, we d...

  20. Leaf respiration rates are increased by warm season as well as by elevated temperature treatment in Eucalyptus globulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekenstam, Angelica af; Wallin, Göran; Ellsworth, David; Uddling Fredin, Johan; Crous, Kristine

    2014-05-01

    Plant leaf respiration is one of the major CO2 fluxes between terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere, and its responses to elevated CO2 and temperature thus have important implications for the carbon cycle and rate on ongoing climate change. Non-photorespiratory leaf respiration is reduced in light, Rlight, compared with the rate in the dark, Rdark. It is therefore important to consider both Rlight and Rdark when estimating the exchange of CO2 between the biosphere and the atmosphere, during current and future climates. This study was conducted at the Hawkesbury Forest Experiment, HFE, in Richmond, NSW, Australia. Trees of Tasmanian Blue Gum (Eucalyptus globulus Labill.) were exposed in whole tree chambers (WTC) to a complete factorial combination of ambient and elevated temperature and CO2 (+3 °C and +240 ppm CO2, respectively). The measurements of Rlight and Rdark were made in 2011 after 9 - 15 months exposure in the WTCs. The measurements were made in March (after the year's hottest months) and October (after the coldest period). Rlight was determined at four temperatures ranging between 20 and 40 °C on attached leaves using a portable gas exchange system (LI-6400XT). Rdark was measured at 20-40 °C in October and at 25 °C in March. Rdark was measured after dark acclimation for at least 30 min and Rlight was determined from the intersection of the photosynthetic CO2 responses measured at three different light intensities using the Laisk metod. Trees grown in elevated temperature had a considerably higher Rdark (+53% across all measurement temperatures in October). However, Rlight did not respond significantly to either CO2 or temperature. In October, the Rlight to Rdark ratio indicated an overall light inhibition of respiration of 31% across all temperatures and in March the light inhibition was 22 % at 25 °C. The seasonal comparisons showed that both Rlight and Rdark were considerably higher after the warm compared to cold season, especially when measured

  1. Leaf Barriers to Fungal Colonization and Shredders (Tipula lateralis) Consumption of Decomposing Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Canhoto; Graça

    1999-04-01

    > Abstract Herein we assess the importance of leaf cuticle, polyphenolic, and essential oils contents of Eucalyptus globulus leaves to hyphomycete colonization and shredder consumption. Optical and electron microscopy revealed that, at least during the first 5 weeks of conditioning, the cuticle remains virtually intact. Stomata provide the main access for hyphae to internal leaf tissues and, eventually, for spore release. We suggest that in E. globulus leaves, fungal decomposition progresses predominantly in and from the eucalyptus leaf mesophyll to the outside. Malt extract agar media supplemented with either eucalyptus essential oils or tannic acid completely inhibited (Articulospora tetracladia, Lemonniera aquatica, and Tricladium gracile) or depressed (Heliscus lugdunensis, Lunulospora curvula, and Tricladium angulatum) aquatic hyphomycetes growth. The transference of both secondary compounds to alder leaves induced similar and significant reduction in Tipula lateralis larval consumption. Results consistently indicate that eucalyptus oils are stronger deterrents than polyphenols. The waxy cuticle of E. globulus appears to be a key physical factor delaying fungal colonization during decomposition. We hypothesize that the relative influence of leaf phenols and essential oils to aquatic hyphomycetes and shredders may be related to three main factors: (a) initial distribution of such compounds in the leaves; (b) possibility of their decrease through decomposition; and (c) consumption strategies of detritivores.

  2. Evaluation of Stability and In Vitro Security of Nanoemulsions Containing Eucalyptus globulus Oil

    PubMed Central

    Quatrin, Priscilla Maciel; Sagrillo, Michele Rorato; Nascimento, Kátia

    2017-01-01

    Essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus presents several pharmacological properties. However, their therapeutic efficacy may be affected by limitations due to several conditions, rendering it difficult to obtain stable and effective pharmaceutical formulations. The use of nanotechnology is an alternative to improve their characteristics aiming to ensure their stability and effectiveness. Furthermore, studies about the possible toxic effects of nanostructures are necessary to evaluate safety when the formulation comes into contact with human cells. Hence, in this paper, we evaluate for the first time the stability and in vitro cytogenotoxicity of nanoemulsions containing Eucalyptus globulus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As a result, the stability study found that the best condition for storage up to 90 days was refrigeration (4°C); it was the condition that best preserved the nanometric features. The content of the major compounds of oil was maintained after nanoencapsulation and preserved over time. In tests to evaluate the safety of this formulation, we can conclude that, at a low concentration (approximately 0.1%), Eucalyptus globulus nanoemulsion did not cause toxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and also showed a protective effect in cells against possible damage when compared to oil in free form. PMID:28691021

  3. Evaluation of Stability and In Vitro Security of Nanoemulsions Containing Eucalyptus globulus Oil.

    PubMed

    de Godoi, Samantha Nunes; Quatrin, Priscilla Maciel; Sagrillo, Michele Rorato; Nascimento, Kátia; Wagner, Roger; Klein, Bruna; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; Ourique, Aline Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus presents several pharmacological properties. However, their therapeutic efficacy may be affected by limitations due to several conditions, rendering it difficult to obtain stable and effective pharmaceutical formulations. The use of nanotechnology is an alternative to improve their characteristics aiming to ensure their stability and effectiveness. Furthermore, studies about the possible toxic effects of nanostructures are necessary to evaluate safety when the formulation comes into contact with human cells. Hence, in this paper, we evaluate for the first time the stability and in vitro cytogenotoxicity of nanoemulsions containing Eucalyptus globulus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As a result, the stability study found that the best condition for storage up to 90 days was refrigeration (4°C); it was the condition that best preserved the nanometric features. The content of the major compounds of oil was maintained after nanoencapsulation and preserved over time. In tests to evaluate the safety of this formulation, we can conclude that, at a low concentration (approximately 0.1%), Eucalyptus globulus nanoemulsion did not cause toxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and also showed a protective effect in cells against possible damage when compared to oil in free form.

  4. Consequences of resource limitation for recovery from repeated defoliation in Eucalyptus globulus Labilladière.

    PubMed

    Barry, Karen M; Quentin, Audrey; Eyles, Alieta; Pinkard, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Recovery following defoliation can be modified by co-occurring site resource limitations. The growth response of young Eucalyptus globulus saplings to two defoliation events was examined in an experimental plantation with combinations of low (-) or high (+) water (W) and nitrogen (N) resources. Artificial defoliation was applied at 3 and 9 months of age to remove ~40 and 55% of leaf area in the upper crown, respectively. At 18 months of age, height, stem diameter and leaf area were not significantly different between control and defoliated saplings, across all resource treatments. However, stem volume, bark volume and branch number were significantly increased in defoliated saplings, including a significant interaction with resource treatment. Total above-ground biomass of saplings in response to defoliation was significantly higher (almost double) than controls for the low water (N + W-) treatment only. Significantly increased foliar starch content (and a trend for increased soluble sugars) in the upper crown zone was found in the defoliated saplings of the N + W- treatment compared with the upper zone of control saplings. Foliar total non-structural carbohydrates were significantly correlated to stem biomass regardless of resource treatment or defoliation, and we suggest that foliar resources are most important for stem growth in E. globulus rather than stored carbon (C) from other tissues. After repeated defoliation and several months recovery, E. globulus saplings were generally not C limited in this study.

  5. Linking photosynthesis and leaf N allocation under future elevated CO2 and climate warming in Eucalyptus globulus

    PubMed Central

    Sharwood, Robert E.; Crous, Kristine Y.; Whitney, Spencer M.; Ellsworth, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Leaf-level photosynthetic processes and their environmental dependencies are critical for estimating CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. These estimates use biochemical-based models of photosynthesis that require accurate Rubisco kinetics. We investigated the effects of canopy position, elevated atmospheric CO2 [eC; ambient CO2 (aC)+240 ppm] and elevated air temperature (eT; ambient temperature (aT)+3 °C) on Rubisco content and activity together with the relationship between leaf N and Vcmax (maximal Rubisco carboxylation rate) of 7 m tall, soil-grown Eucalyptus globulus trees. The kinetics of E. globulus and tobacco Rubisco at 25 °C were similar. In vitro estimates of Vcmax derived from measures of E. globulus Rubisco content and kinetics were consistent, although slightly lower, than the in vivo rates extrapolated from gas exchange. In E. globulus, the fraction of N invested in Rubisco was substantially lower than for crop species and varied with treatments. Photosynthetic acclimation of E. globulus leaves to eC was underpinned by reduced leaf N and Rubisco contents; the opposite occurred in response to eT coinciding with growth resumption in spring. Our findings highlight the adaptive capacity of this key forest species to allocate leaf N flexibly to Rubisco and other photosynthetic proteins across differing canopy positions in response to future, warmer and elevated [CO2] climates. PMID:28064178

  6. Linking photosynthesis and leaf N allocation under future elevated CO2 and climate warming in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Sharwood, Robert E; Crous, Kristine Y; Whitney, Spencer M; Ellsworth, David S; Ghannoum, Oula

    2017-02-01

    Leaf-level photosynthetic processes and their environmental dependencies are critical for estimating CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. These estimates use biochemical-based models of photosynthesis that require accurate Rubisco kinetics. We investigated the effects of canopy position, elevated atmospheric CO2 [eC; ambient CO2 (aC)+240 ppm] and elevated air temperature (eT; ambient temperature (aT)+3 °C) on Rubisco content and activity together with the relationship between leaf N and Vcmax (maximal Rubisco carboxylation rate) of 7 m tall, soil-grown Eucalyptus globulus trees. The kinetics of E. globulus and tobacco Rubisco at 25 °C were similar. In vitro estimates of Vcmax derived from measures of E. globulus Rubisco content and kinetics were consistent, although slightly lower, than the in vivo rates extrapolated from gas exchange. In E. globulus, the fraction of N invested in Rubisco was substantially lower than for crop species and varied with treatments. Photosynthetic acclimation of E. globulus leaves to eC was underpinned by reduced leaf N and Rubisco contents; the opposite occurred in response to eT coinciding with growth resumption in spring. Our findings highlight the adaptive capacity of this key forest species to allocate leaf N flexibly to Rubisco and other photosynthetic proteins across differing canopy positions in response to future, warmer and elevated [CO2] climates. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  7. Acclimation of light and dark respiration to experimental and seasonal warming are mediated by changes in leaf nitrogen in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Crous, K Y; Wallin, G; Atkin, O K; Uddling, J; Af Ekenstam, A

    2017-08-01

    Quantifying the adjustments of leaf respiration in response to seasonal temperature variation and climate warming is crucial because carbon loss from vegetation is a large but uncertain part of the global carbon cycle. We grew fast-growing Eucalyptus globulus Labill. trees exposed to +3 °C warming and elevated CO2 in 10-m tall whole-tree chambers and measured the temperature responses of leaf mitochondrial respiration, both in light (RLight) and in darkness (RDark), over a 20-40 °C temperature range and during two different seasons. RLight was assessed using the Laisk method. Respiration rates measured at a standard temperature (25 °C - R25) were higher in warm-grown trees and in the warm season, related to higher total leaf nitrogen (N) investment with higher temperatures (both experimental and seasonal), indicating that leaf N concentrations modulated the respiratory capacity to changes in temperature. Once differences in leaf N were accounted for, there were no differences in R25 but the Q10 (i.e., short-term temperature sensitivity) was higher in late summer compared with early spring. The variation in RLight between experimental treatments and seasons was positively correlated with carboxylation capacity and photorespiration. RLight was less responsive to short-term changes in temperature than RDark, as shown by a lower Q10 in RLight compared with RDark. The overall light inhibition of R was ∼40%. Our results highlight the dynamic nature of leaf respiration to temperature variation and that the responses of RLight do not simply mirror those of RDark. Therefore, it is important not to assume that RLight is the same as RDark in ecosystem models, as doing so may lead to large errors in predicting plant CO2 release and productivity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Growth efficiency increases as relative growth rate increases in shoots and roots of Eucalyptus globulus deprived of nitrogen or treated with salt.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Craig; Hansen, Lee D; Edwards, Justine; White, Donald A; Adams, Mark A

    2005-05-01

    We used calorimetry to test whether there is a single general relationship between growth and respiration in shoots and roots of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. seedlings when stressed, irrespective of the type or severity of stress. We found that nitrogen (N) deprivation and salt treatment had no effect on the relationship between growth and respiration and little effect on absolute rates of respiration. Carbon-conversion efficiency (epsilonC) ranged from 0.7 to 0.9 for specific growth rates (R(SG)) greater than 0.3 day(-1). Above an R(SG) of 0.1 day(-1), epsilonC decreased gradually with decreasing R(SG) and between an R(SG) of 0- 0.1 day(-1), epsilonC decreased rapidly. We conclude that the relationship between epsilonC and R(SG) is not greatly affected by salt or N-deprivation stresses. Relationships between gross productivity and epsilonC may be generally applicable, in which case they could improve on the "flat-tax" approach to modeling net primary productivity from gross productivity while avoiding the complexity of more explicit models of plant respiration. However, the relationship between gross productivity and epsilonC was sensitive to temperature and the effect of temperature on epsilonC thus requires further investigation. Nitrogen deprivation caused large decreases in leaf area and shoot to root ratio, and mature leaves of N-deprived plants had lower intrinsic water-use efficiencies than leaves of plants well supplied with nutrients. Nitrogen deprivation increased apical dominance and most of the reduction in leaf area was the result of fewer secondary branches, although leaf size was also reduced. Our results suggest that N deprivation reduces productivity primarily by reducing sink size, rather than sink activity, and that apical dominance may be an important mechanism for maintaining adequate epsilonC in resource-limited conditions.

  9. Laser Cutting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    lasers that are optically modified to produce high beam quality at reduced power levels for precision drilling and trepanning. * Nd:YAG lasers with...a smooth, dross-free cut face while the marking consists of a series of precisely placed shallow pits where surface finish and dross are not usually...neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) pulsed cutting data because the technique is considered vital in meeting the detailed precision cutting

  10. Ecophysiological responses of a young blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) plantation to weed control.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Worledge, Dale; Sands, Peter; Ottenschlaeger, Maria L; Paterson, Steve C; Mendham, Daniel; O'Grady, Anthony P

    2012-08-01

    Early weed control may improve the growth of forest plantations by influencing soil water and nutrient availability. To understand eucalypt growth responses to weed control, we examined the temporal responses of leaf gas-exchange, leaf nitrogen concentration (N) and water status of 7-month-old Eucalyptus globulus L. trees in a paired-plot field trial. In addition, we monitored the growth, leaf N and water status of the competing vegetation in the weed treatment. By the end of the 11-month experiment, complete weed control (WF treatment) of largely woody competitors increased the basal diameter of E. globulus by 14%. As indicated by pre-dawn water potentials of > - 0.05 MPa, interspecies competition for water resources was minimal at this site. In contrast, competition for N appeared to be the major factor limiting growth. Estimations of total plot leaf N (g m(-2) ground) showed that competing vegetation accounted for up to 70% of the total leaf N at the start of the trial. This value fell to 15% by the end of the trial. Despite increased leaf N(area) in WF trees 5 months after imposition of weed control, the photosynthetic capacity (A(1500)) of E. globulus was unaffected by treatment suggesting that the growth gains from weed control were largely unrelated to changes in leaf-level photosynthesis. Increased nutrient availability brought about by weed control enabled trees to increase investment into leaf-area production. Estimates of whole-tree carbon budget based on direct measurements of dark respiration and A(1500) allowed us to clearly demonstrate the importance of leaf area driving greater productivity following early weed control in a nutrient-limited site.

  11. An unusual Xanthophyllomyces strain from leaves of Eucalyptus globulus in Chile.

    PubMed

    Weber, Roland W S; Becerra, José; Silva, Mario J; Davoli, Paolo

    2008-07-01

    Xanthophyllomyces sp. was isolated as an epiphytic red yeast from leaves of Eucalyptus glo-bulus in Concepción, Chile. Sexual reproduction was by basidiospores produced from one or rarely two metabasidia arising from a yeast cell without preceding paedogamy. The main carotenoid pigment was astaxanthin. This isolate did not cluster with the X. dendrorhous complex (including Phaffia rhodozyma) in ITS and 26S rDNA-based phylogenetic analyses. The phylloplane may be a further habitat for Xanthophyllomyces, in addition to the well-known spring sap-flows of deciduous trees and the recently-characterised ascostromata of Cyttaria hariotii.

  12. Lability of Secondary Organic Particulate Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Pengfei; Li, Yong Jie; Wang, Yan; Giles, Mary K.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Bertram, Allan K.; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-10-24

    Accurate simulations of the consenctrations of atmospheric organic particulate matter (PM) are needed for predicting energy flow in the Earth’s climate system. In the past, simulations of organic PM widely assume equilibrium partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between the PM and surrounding vapor. Herein, we test this assumption by measuring evaporation rates and associated vapor mass concentration of organic films representative of atmospheric PM. For films representing anthropogenic PM, evaporation rates and vapor mass concentrations increased above a threshold relative humidity (RH), indicating equilibrium partitioning above a transition RH but not below. In contrast for films representing biogenic PM, no threshold was observed, indicating equilibrium partitioning at all RHs. The results suggest that the mass lability of atmospheric organic PM can differ in consequential ways among Earth’s natural biomes, polluted regions, and regions of land-use change, and these differences need to be considered when simulating atmospheric organic PM.

  13. Insights into temperature modulation of the Eucalyptus globulus and Eucalyptus grandis antioxidant and lignification subproteomes.

    PubMed

    de Santana Costa, Marília Gabriela; Mazzafera, Paulo; Balbuena, Tiago Santana

    2017-05-01

    Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus globulus are among the most widely cultivated trees, differing in lignin composition and plantation areas, as E. grandis is mostly cultivated in tropical regions while E. globulus is preferred in temperate areas. As temperature is a key modulator in plant metabolism, a large-scale proteome analysis was carried out to investigate changes in the antioxidant system and the lignification metabolism in plantlets grown at different temperatures. Our strategy allowed the identification of 3111 stem proteins. A total of 103 antioxidant proteins were detected in the stems of both species. Hierarchical clustering revealed that alterations in the antioxidant proteins are more prominent when Eucalyptus seedlings were exposed to high temperature and that the superoxide isoforms coded by the gene Eucgr.B03930 are the most abundant antioxidant enzymes induced by thermal stimulus. Regarding the lignin biosynthesis, our proteomics approach resulted in the identification of 13 of the 17 core proteins involved in this metabolism, corroborating with gene predictions and the proposed lignin toolbox. Quantitative analyses revealed significant differences in 8 protein isoforms, including the ferulate 5-hydroxylase isoform F5H1, a key enzyme in catalyzing the synthesis of sinapyl alcohol, and the cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase isoform CAD2, the last enzyme in monolignol biosynthesis. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005743.

  14. A model system to study the lignification process in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Pedro; Cesarino, Igor; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Ferrari, Ilse Fernanda; Kiyota, Eduardo; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2014-09-01

    Recalcitrance of plant biomass is closely related to the presence of the phenolic heteropolymer lignin in secondary cell walls, which has a negative effect on forage digestibility, biomass-to-biofuels conversion and chemical pulping. The genus Eucalyptus is the main source of wood for pulp and paper industry. However, when compared to model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana and poplar, relatively little is known about lignin biosynthesis in Eucalyptus and only a few genes were functionally characterized. An efficient, fast and inexpensive in vitro system was developed to study lignification in Eucalyptus globulus and to evaluate the potential role of candidate genes in this biological process. Seedlings were grown in four different conditions, in the presence or absence of light and with or without sucrose in the growth medium, and several aspects of lignin metabolism were evaluated. Our results showed that light and, to a lesser extent, sucrose induced lignin biosynthesis, which was followed by changes in S/G ratio, lignin oligomers accumulation and gene expression. In addition, higher total peroxidase activity and differential isoperoxidase profile were observed when seedlings were grown in the presence of light and sucrose. Peptide sequencing allowed the identification of differentially expressed peroxidases, which can be considered potential candidate class III peroxidases involved in lignin polymerization in E. globulus.

  15. F1 hybrid inviability in eucalyptus: the case of E. ovata x E. globulus.

    PubMed

    Lopez, G A; Potts, B M; Tilyard, P A

    2000-09-01

    The impact of inbreeding and hybridization on fitness was compared in the two co-occurring forest tree species, Eucalyptus ovata and E. globulus, aimed at explaining the rarity of their hybrids in nature. The success of selfing, open-pollination and outcrossing of both species and interspecific hybridization was monitored from seed-set to 10-year's growth in a field trial. There was a unilateral barrier to hybridization with seed-set obtained only with E. ovata females. The F1 hybrids exhibited reduced viability compared to intraspecific cross-types at virtually all stages of the life cycle and are clearly at a selective disadvantage compared with their open-pollinated E. ovata half-sibs with which they would directly compete in nature. Eucalyptus ovata and E. globulus overlap in their flowering time but the F1 hybrids flowered later with virtually no overlap with either species. The asynchronous flowering and reduced reproductive fitness of F1 hybrids would markedly limit the opportunity for advanced generation hybridization. Inbreeding similarly had a deleterious effect on the fitness of both species, and the F1 hybrids were most competitive with the E. ovata selfs. It is argued that changes in inbreeding levels of parental populations may be a key factor affecting the relative fitness of hybrids and their potential to impact on the pure species gene pool. Reduced fitness of the pure species through inbreeding may result in hybridization having its greatest evolutionary impact in small founder or relict populations.

  16. A GC-FID validated method for the quality control of Eucalyptus globulus raw material and its pharmaceutical products, and gc-ms fingerprinting of 12 Eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    Buenoa, Paula Carolina Pires; Junior, Milton Groppo; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2014-12-01

    In this work we have validated a method to standardize and control the quality of Eucalyptus globulus raw material and phytomedicines containing either the essential oil or the fluid extract of this plant in the final formulation. Internal standardization provided a simple, fast, and reproducible GC-FID analytical method that accurately quantified 1,8-cineol in different E. globulus sub-products, such as its essential oil, dried leaves, fluid extract, and syrup. In addition, GC-MS identification of the main compounds ofE. globulus species afforded fingerprints for the qualitative analysis of different Eucalyptus species.

  17. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils of Thymus algeriensis, Eucalyptus globulus and Rosmarinus officinalis from Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ait-Ouazzou, Abdenour; Lorán, Susana; Bakkali, Mohammed; Laglaoui, Amin; Rota, Carmen; Herrera, Antonio; Pagán, Rafael; Conchello, Pilar

    2011-11-01

    The present study reports on the antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of the essential oils (EOs) of Thymus algeriensis, Eucalyptus globulus and Rosmarinus officinalis from Morocco. The composition of these species was analysed by GC-MS, and 65 components were identified. Eucalyptus globulus EO showed a great similarity with EOs from other regions, with 1,8-cineole (79.85%) the major component. Also rich in this constituent was Rosmarinus officinalis (43.99%). However, the chemical profile of Thymus algeriensis was rather different, and for the first time such a high content of borneol (23.48%) has been described in this EO. The antimicrobial activity of these species has also been studied against seven pathogenic and spoiling bacteria of significant importance. According to the results, Thymus algeriensis showed the best bacteriostatic and bactericidal effect, followed by Eucalyptus globulus and Rosmarinus officinalis. As far as we know this is the first time that minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentration values have been reported for Eucalyptus globulus EO. Our data support the possible use of this EO as well as Thymus algeriensis EO, as potential natural agents in preservatives for food and pharmaceutical products. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Bone cutting.

    PubMed

    Giraud, J Y; Villemin, S; Darmana, R; Cahuzac, J P; Autefage, A; Morucci, J P

    1991-02-01

    Bone cutting has always been a problem for surgeons because bone is a hard living material, and many osteotomes are still very crude tools. Technical improvement of these surgical tools has first been their motorization. Studies of the bone cutting process have indicated better features for conventional tools. Several non-conventional osteotomes, particularly ultrasonic osteotomes are described. Some studies on the possible use of lasers for bone cutting are also reported. Use of a pressurised water jet is also briefly examined. Despite their advantages, non-conventional tools still require improvement if they are to be used by surgeons.

  19. Cutting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Racki, Daniel J.; Swenson, Clark E.; Bencloski, William A.; Wineman, Arthur L.

    1984-01-01

    A cutting apparatus includes a support table mounted for movement toward and away from a workpiece and carrying a mirror which directs a cutting laser beam onto the workpiece. A carrier is rotatably and pivotally mounted on the support table between the mirror and workpiece and supports a conduit discharging gas toward the point of impingement of the laser beam on the workpiece. Means are provided for rotating the carrier relative to the support table to place the gas discharging conduit in the proper positions for cuts made in different directions on the workpiece.

  20. Fate and lability of silver in soils: Effect of ageing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate and lability of added soluble Ag in soils over time was examined by measurement of labile metal (E-value) by isotopic dilution using the 110mAg radioactive isotope and the solid-phase speciation of Ag by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrosco...

  1. THE ASSAY AND PROPERTIES OF LABILE FACTOR (FACTOR V)

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Armand J.

    1960-01-01

    Human oxalated plasma stored at 4° C. until the prothrombin time is increased beyond 60 sec. is a reliable medium for assaying labile factor (factor V) because its response to added labile factor corresponds quantitatively to that of plasma from patients with congenital deficiency of this factor. Such an agreement is not obtained with plasma stored at 37°C. The stability of labile factor is closely associated with ionized calcium. The addition of thrombin to fresh oxalated plasma causes an apparent hyperactivity of labile factor, but this is completely removed by adsorption with Ca3(PO)2. Oxalated plasma when adsorbed with Ca3(PO4)2 before treatment with thrombin does not develop this adventitious activity, nor does it occur in stored plasma treated with thrombin. The seemingly high labile factor activity in serum can be explained by the activation of this factor which is independent of labile factor but acts synergistically with it. The true labile factor concentration can be determined only after the accelerator is removed by adsorption with Ca3(PO4)2. A close agreement between the consumption of prothrombin and the loss of labile factor during clotting is observed. PMID:13738700

  2. Fate and lability of silver in soils: Effect of ageing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate and lability of added soluble Ag in soils over time was examined by measurement of labile metal (E-value) by isotopic dilution using the 110mAg radioactive isotope and the solid-phase speciation of Ag by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrosco...

  3. The effect of vapour pressure deficit on stomatal conductance, sap pH and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance in Eucalyptus globulus clones grown under two watering regimes

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria Jose; Montes, Fernando; Ruiz, Federico; Lopez, Gustavo; Pita, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Stomatal conductance has long been considered of key interest in the study of plant adaptation to water stress. The expected increase in extreme meteorological events under a climate change scenario may compromise survival in Eucalyptus globulus plantations established in south-western Spain. We investigated to what extent changes in stomatal conductance in response to high vapour pressure deficits and water shortage are mediated by hydraulic and chemical signals in greenhouse-grown E. globulus clones. Methods Rooted cuttings were grown in pots and submitted to two watering regimes. Stomatal conductance, shoot water potential, sap pH and hydraulic conductance were measured consecutively in each plant over 4 weeks under vapour pressure deficits ranging 0·42 to 2·25 kPa. Evapotranspiration, growth in leaf area and shoot biomass were also determined. Key Results There was a significant effect of both clone and watering regime in stomatal conductance and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance, but not in sap pH. Sap pH decreased as water potential and stomatal conductance decreased under increasing vapour pressure deficit. There was no significant relationship between stomatal conductance and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance. Stomata closure precluded shoot water potential from falling below −1·8 MPa. The percentage loss of hydraulic conductance ranged from 40 to 85 %. The highest and lowest leaf-specific hydraulic conductances were measured in clones from the same half-sib families. Water shortage reduced growth and evapotranspiration, decreases in evapotranspiration ranging from 14 to 32 % in the five clones tested. Conclusions Changes in sap pH seemed to be a response to changes in atmospheric conditions rather than soil water in the species. Stomata closed after a considerable amount of hydraulic conductance was lost, although intraspecific differences in leaf-specific hydraulic conductance suggest the possibility of selection for

  4. The effect of vapour pressure deficit on stomatal conductance, sap pH and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance in Eucalyptus globulus clones grown under two watering regimes.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Maria Jose; Montes, Fernando; Ruiz, Federico; Lopez, Gustavo; Pita, Pilar

    2016-05-01

    Stomatal conductance has long been considered of key interest in the study of plant adaptation to water stress. The expected increase in extreme meteorological events under a climate change scenario may compromise survival in Eucalyptus globulus plantations established in south-western Spain. We investigated to what extent changes in stomatal conductance in response to high vapour pressure deficits and water shortage are mediated by hydraulic and chemical signals in greenhouse-grown E. globulus clones. Rooted cuttings were grown in pots and submitted to two watering regimes. Stomatal conductance, shoot water potential, sap pH and hydraulic conductance were measured consecutively in each plant over 4 weeks under vapour pressure deficits ranging 0·42 to 2·25 kPa. Evapotranspiration, growth in leaf area and shoot biomass were also determined. There was a significant effect of both clone and watering regime in stomatal conductance and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance, but not in sap pH. Sap pH decreased as water potential and stomatal conductance decreased under increasing vapour pressure deficit. There was no significant relationship between stomatal conductance and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance. Stomata closure precluded shoot water potential from falling below -1·8 MPa. The percentage loss of hydraulic conductance ranged from 40 to 85 %. The highest and lowest leaf-specific hydraulic conductances were measured in clones from the same half-sib families. Water shortage reduced growth and evapotranspiration, decreases in evapotranspiration ranging from 14 to 32 % in the five clones tested. Changes in sap pH seemed to be a response to changes in atmospheric conditions rather than soil water in the species. Stomata closed after a considerable amount of hydraulic conductance was lost, although intraspecific differences in leaf-specific hydraulic conductance suggest the possibility of selection for improved productivity under water-limiting conditions

  5. Genetic mapping of the labile (lab) gene: a recessive locus causing irregular spikelet fertility in labile-barley (Hordeum vulgare convar. labile).

    PubMed

    Youssef, Helmy M; Koppolu, Ravi; Rutten, Twan; Korzun, Viktor; Schweizer, Patrick; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2014-05-01

    The recessive labile locus mapped on chromosome 5HL causes irregular spikelet fertility and controls floret development as well as row-type in barley. The labile-barley displays a variable number of fertile spikelets at each rachis internode (0-3 fertile spikelets/rachis internode) which is intermediate between that observed in two- or six-rowed types. Previous re-sequencing of Vrs1 in 219 labile-barley (Hordeum vulgare L. convar. labile) accessions showed that all carried a six-rowed specific allele. We therefore hypothesized that this seemingly random reduction in spikelet fertility is most likely caused by the labile (lab) locus, which we aimed to phenotypically and genetically define. Here, we report a detailed phenotypic analysis of spikelet fertility in labile-barleys in comparison to two- and six-rowed genotypes using scanning electron microscopy analysis. We found that the first visible morphological deviation occurred during the stamen primordium stage, when we regularly observed the appearance of arrested central floral primordia in labile but not in two- or six-rowed barleys. At late stamen and early awn primordium stages, lateral florets in two-rowed and only some in labile-barley showed retarded development and reduction in size compared with fully fertile lateral florets in six-rowed barley. We used two F2 mapping populations to generate whole genome genetic linkage maps and ultimately locate the lab locus as a recessive Mendelian trait to a 4.5-5.8 cM interval at approximately 80 cM on chromosome 5HL. Our results will help identifying the role of the lab gene in relation to other spikelet fertility factors in barley.

  6. Improvement Cut

    Treesearch

    J. W. Johnson

    1950-01-01

    Early, effects of partial cutting on diameter growth in bottomland hardwood forests have been measured recently near Vance, Mississippi, according to a report by J. W. Johnson of the Southern Forest Experiment Station, New Orleans, LA.

  7. Cutting Candles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranucci, Ernest R.

    1973-01-01

    Different regular-polygon-shaped candles wound with a sheet of paper are cut through obliquely. When the papers are unwound, unique patterns are revealed. Investigation of these patterns leads to the discovery of geometric concepts. (JP)

  8. Lability of secondary organic particulate matter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Li, Yong Jie; Wang, Yan; Gilles, Mary K.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2016-01-01

    The energy flows in Earth’s natural and modified climate systems are strongly influenced by the concentrations of atmospheric particulate matter (PM). For predictions of concentration, equilibrium partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between organic PM and the surrounding vapor has widely been assumed, yet recent observations show that organic PM can be semisolid or solid for some atmospheric conditions, possibly suggesting that SVOC uptake and release can be slow enough that equilibrium does not prevail on timescales relevant to atmospheric processes. Herein, in a series of laboratory experiments, the mass labilities of films of secondary organic material representative of similar atmospheric organic PM were directly determined by quartz crystal microbalance measurements of evaporation rates and vapor mass concentrations. There were strong differences between films representative of anthropogenic compared with biogenic sources. For films representing anthropogenic PM, evaporation rates and vapor mass concentrations increased above a threshold relative humidity (RH) between 20% and 30%, indicating rapid partitioning above a transition RH but not below. Below the threshold, the characteristic time for equilibration is estimated as up to 1 wk for a typically sized particle. In contrast, for films representing biogenic PM, no RH threshold was observed, suggesting equilibrium partitioning is rapidly obtained for all RHs. The effective diffusion rate Dorg for the biogenic case is at least 103 times greater than that of the anthropogenic case. These differences should be accounted for in the interpretation of laboratory data as well as in modeling of organic PM in Earth’s atmosphere. PMID:27791063

  9. Attributional lability in depression and paranoia.

    PubMed

    Bentall, Richard P; Kaney, Sue

    2005-11-01

    Attributions play an important role in depression and paranoia. However, contrary to most attributional models of psychopathology, there is evidence that attributional style is not a stable trait but is affected by recent experiences. Paranoid, depressed, and healthy participants were exposed to a mild stressor in the form of the requirement to complete an anagram task, which included insoluble items. Before and afterwards, they completed measures of attributional style for negative events and a contingency judgment task. Replicating previous findings, paranoid patients initially showed low internality scores for negative events and high judgments of control on the contingency judgment task, whereas the depressed participants showed high internality for negative events and low judgments of control. Following the anagram task, both clinical groups showed increased internality for hypothetical negative events. The paranoid participants also gave increased estimates of control on the contingency judgment task. Attributional style is more labile in paranoid and depressed patients than in healthy individuals. Implications for attributional theories of psychopathology are discussed.

  10. Micellar electrokinetic chromatography with acid labile surfactant.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Bob; Lucy, Charles A

    2012-02-24

    We present a study of a degradable surfactant, sodium 4-[(2-methyl-2-undecyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methoxy]-1-propane sulfonate that is also known as an acid-labile surfactant (ALS). The performance of ALS as a pseudostationary phase is assessed and compared with established pseudostationary phases such as sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), volatile surfactants and polymeric micelles. ALS achieves separation efficiency of 100,000-145,000 theoretical plates and relative standard deviation (RSD) of electrophoretic mobility (n=5) of less than 3%. Retention factors with ALS are strongly correlated with those with SDS. This is shown by the R2=0.79 for all eleven analytes and an R2=0.992 for specifically the non-hydrogen bonding (NHB) analytes. However, ALS displays different selectivity than SDS for hydrogen bond donor (HBD) and hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) solutes (R2 of 0.74 and 0.88, respectively). ALS is degraded to less surface active compounds in acidic solution. These less surface-active compounds are more compatible with the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). ALS has a half-life of 48 min at pH 4. ALS has the potential to couple micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) with the ESI-MS. ALS can be used as a pseudostationary phase for a high efficiency separation and later acid hydrolyzed to enable an ESI-MS analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Practical use of labile protein as an index of hair.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takafumi; Kizawa, Kenji; Ito, Mayumi; Shinkai, Masakazu; Iwamoto, Yoshimichi

    2004-01-01

    Because of small fluctuations, it is difficult to evaluate hair damage caused by bleaching using previously utilized hair damage indexes. Application of commercial bleaching products elevates partially extractable labile hair protein amounts in the range of 0.4-1.2 mg/g of hair. Within this range, the level of labile protein fluctuates greatly, depending on the extent of bleaching. In the current study, it was found that the effects of alkaline constituents and various peptides contained in bleaching lotions on hair damage could be evaluated by measuring labile protein amounts without employing harsher bleaching conditions.

  12. Use of new endophytic fungi as pretreatment to enhance enzymatic saccharification of Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sampedro, Raquel; Fillat, Úrsula; Ibarra, David; Eugenio, María E

    2015-11-01

    New endophytic fungi are assessed for the first time as pretreatment to enhance saccharification of Eucalyptus globulus wood. The fungi are all laccase-producing ascomycetes and were isolated from eucalyptus trees in Spain. After five endophytes had been assayed alone or in combination with white-rot fungus Trametes sp. I-62, three were pre-selected. To improve sugar production, an autohydrolysis pretreatment was performed before or after fungal treatment. Pretreatment increased sugar production 2.7 times compared to non-pretreated wood. When fungal and autohydrolysis pretreatments were combined, a synergistic increase in saccharification was observed in all cases. Endophytic fungi Ulocladium sp. and Hormonema sp. produced greater enhancements in saccharification than Trametes sp. I-62 (increase in sugar yields of 8.5, 8.0 and 6.0 times, respectively), demonstrating the high potential of these new endophytic fungi for saccharification enhancement.

  13. Effects of essential oils from Eucalyptus globulus leaves on soil organisms involved in leaf degradation.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carla; Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Sousa, José Paulo; Gonçalves, Maria José; Salgueiro, Lígia; Canhoto, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The replacement of native Portuguese forests by Eucalyptus globulus is often associated with deleterious effects on terrestrial and aquatic communities. Several studies have suggested that such a phenomenon is linked with the leaf essential oils released into the environment during the Eucalyptus leaf degradation process. However, to date, the way these compounds affect leaf degradation in terrestrial systems i.e. by direct toxic effects to soil invertebrates or indirectly by affecting food of soil fauna, is still unknown. In order to explore this question, the effect of essential oils extracted from E. globulus leaves on terrestrial systems was investigated. Fungal growth tests with species known as leaf colonizers (Mucor hiemalis, Alternaria alternata, Penicillium sp., Penicillium glabrum and Fusarium roseum) were performed to evaluate the antifungal effect of essential oils. In addition, a reproduction test with the collembolans Folsomia candida was done using a gradient of eucalyptus essential oils in artificial soil. The influence of essential oils on feeding behaviour of F. candida and the isopods Porcellio dilatatus was also investigated through food avoidance and consumption tests. Eucalyptus essential oils were lethal at concentrations between 2.5-20 µL/mL and inhibited growth of all fungal species between 1.25-5 µL/mL. The collembolan reproduction EC50 value was 35.0 (28.6-41.2) mg/kg and both collembola and isopods preferred leaves without oils. Results suggested that the effect of essential oils in leaf processing is related to direct toxic effects on fungi and soil fauna and to indirect effects on the quality and availability of food to soil invertebrates.

  14. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of nanoemulsions containing Eucalyptus globulus oil against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Quatrin, Priscilla Maciel; Verdi, Camila Marina; Ebling de Souza, Márcia; Nunes de Godoi, Samantha; Klein, Bruna; Gundel, Andre; Wagner, Roger; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Vianna Santos, Roberto Christ

    2017-09-29

    Candida species are the main responsible microorganisms for causing fungal infections worldwide, and Candida albicans is most frequently associated with infectious processes. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium commonly found in immunocompromised patients. The infection persistence caused by these microorganisms is often related to antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation. In this context, the objective of the present study was to prepare and characterize nanoemulsions containing Eucalyptus globulus oil and to verify its antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities against P. aeruginosa and Candida spp. The nanoemulsions had a size of approximately 76 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.22, a zeta potential of - 9,42 mV and a pH of approximately 5.0. The E. globulus oil was characterized by gas chromatography, being possible to observe its main components, such as 1-8-Cineol (75.8%), p- Cymene (7.5%), α-Pinene (7.4%) and Limonene (6.4%). The antimicrobial activity of the nanoemulsion was determined from the macrodilution tests and the cell viability curve, where the minimum fungicidal concentration of 0.7 mg/mL for C. albicans and 1.4 mg/mL for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata were obtained. However, the nanoemulsions did not present antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, since it contains only 5% of the oil, being ineffective for this microorganism. The nanoencapsulated oil action against the formed biofilm was evaluated by atomic force microscopy and calcofluor staining, and the nanoemulsion was more efficient for two of the three Candida species when compared to free oil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Paucisalibacillus globulus gen. nov., sp. nov., a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from potting soil.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Inês; Tiago, Igor; Pires, Ana Luísa; da Costa, Milton S; Veríssimo, António

    2006-08-01

    A Gram-positive bacterium, designated B22(T), was isolated from potting soil produced in Portugal. This organism is a catalase-positive, oxidase-negative, motile, spore-forming, aerobic rod that grows optimally at 37 degrees C and pH 8.0-8.5. Optimal growth occurs in media containing 1 % (w/v) NaCl, although the organism can grow in 0-8 % NaCl. The cell wall peptidoglycan is of the A4alpha type with a cross-linkage containing d-Asp. The major respiratory quinone is menaquinone 7 and the major fatty acids are anteiso-15 : 0, anteiso-17 : 0 and iso-15 : 0. The DNA G+C content is 37.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain B22(T) formed a new branch within the family Bacillaceae. The novel isolate is phylogenetically closely related to members of genera of moderately halophilic bacilli and formed a coherent cluster with species of the genera Salinibacillus, Virgibacillus, Oceanobacillus and Lentibacillus, supported by bootstrap analysis at a confidence level of 71 %. Strain B22(T) exhibited 16S rRNA gene pairwise sequence similarity values of 94.7-94.3 % with members of the genus Salinibacillus, 95.1-92.8 % with members of the genus Virgibacillus, 94.7-93.2 % with members of the genus Oceanobacillus and 93.1-92.3 % with members of the genus Lentibacillus. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and physiological and biochemical characteristics, it is proposed that strain B22(T) represents a novel species in a new genus, Paucisalibacillus globulus gen. nov., sp. nov. Strain B22(T) (=LMG 23148(T)=CIP 108857(T)) is the type strain of Paucisalibacillus globulus.

  16. Eucalyptus globulus extract protects upon acetaminophen-induced kidney damages in male rat

    PubMed Central

    Dhibi, Sabah; Mbarki, Sakhria; Elfeki, Abdelfettah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2014-01-01

    Plants have historically been used in treating many diseases. Eucalyptus globules, a rich source of bioactive compounds, and have been shown to possess antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study, carried out on male Wistar rats, was to evaluate the beneficial effects of Eucalyptus globulus extract upon acetaminophen-induced damages in kidney. Our study is realized in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax (Tunisia). 32 Wistar male rats; were divided into 4 batches: a control group (n=8), a group of rats treated with acetaminophen (goomg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection during 4 days (n=8), a group receiving Eucalyptus globulus extract (130 mg of dry leaves/kg/day) in drinking water during 42 days after 2 hours of acetaminophen administration (during 4 days) (n=8) and group received only Eucalyptus (n=8) during 42 days. After 6 weeks, animals from each group were rapidly sacrificed by decapitation. Blood serum was obtained by centrifugation. Under our experimental conditions, acetaminophen poisoning resulted in an oxidative stress evidenced by statistically significant losses in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide-dismutase (SOD), glutathione-peroxidase (GPX) activities and an increase in lipids peroxidation level in renal tissue of acetaminophen-treated group compared with the control group. Acetaminophen also caused kidney damage as evident by statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in levels of creatinine and urea and decreased levels of uric acid and proteins in blood. Histological analysis demonstrated alteration of proximal tubules, atrophy of the glomerule and dilatation of urinary space. Previous administration of plant extract is found to alleviate this acetaminophen-induced damage. PMID:24856382

  17. Effects of Essential Oils from Eucalyptus globulus Leaves on Soil Organisms Involved in Leaf Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Sousa, José Paulo; Gonçalves, Maria José; Salgueiro, Lígia; Canhoto, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The replacement of native Portuguese forests by Eucalyptus globulus is often associated with deleterious effects on terrestrial and aquatic communities. Several studies have suggested that such a phenomenon is linked with the leaf essential oils released into the environment during the Eucalyptus leaf degradation process. However, to date, the way these compounds affect leaf degradation in terrestrial systems i.e. by direct toxic effects to soil invertebrates or indirectly by affecting food of soil fauna, is still unknown. In order to explore this question, the effect of essential oils extracted from E. globulus leaves on terrestrial systems was investigated. Fungal growth tests with species known as leaf colonizers (Mucor hiemalis, Alternaria alternata, Penicillium sp., Penicillium glabrum and Fusarium roseum) were performed to evaluate the antifungal effect of essential oils. In addition, a reproduction test with the collembolans Folsomia candida was done using a gradient of eucalyptus essential oils in artificial soil. The influence of essential oils on feeding behaviour of F. candida and the isopods Porcellio dilatatus was also investigated through food avoidance and consumption tests. Eucalyptus essential oils were lethal at concentrations between 2.5–20 µL/mL and inhibited growth of all fungal species between 1.25–5 µL/mL. The collembolan reproduction EC50 value was 35.0 (28.6–41.2) mg/kg and both collembola and isopods preferred leaves without oils. Results suggested that the effect of essential oils in leaf processing is related to direct toxic effects on fungi and soil fauna and to indirect effects on the quality and availability of food to soil invertebrates. PMID:23577212

  18. Hair cut

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-10

    ISS033-E-018986 (10 Nov. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Evgeny Tarelkin, Expedition 33 flight engineer, trims the hair of Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy, flight engineer, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Tarelkin used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair. NASA astronaut Kevin Ford, flight engineer, is visible in the background.

  19. Hair cut

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-10

    ISS033-E-018991 (10 Nov. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy, Expedition 33 flight engineer, trims the hair of Russian cosmonaut Evgeny Tarelkin, flight engineer, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Novitskiy used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  20. Lability of secondary organic particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Pengfei; Li, Yong Jie; Wang, Yan; Gilles, Mary K.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Bertram, Allan K.; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-10-24

    We report the energy flows in Earth’s natural and modified climate systems are strongly influenced by the concentrations of atmospheric particulate matter (PM). For predictions of concentration, equilibrium partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between organic PM and the surrounding vapor has widely been assumed, yet recent observations show that organic PM can be semisolid or solid for some atmospheric conditions, possibly suggesting that SVOC uptake and release can be slow enough that equilibrium does not prevail on timescales relevant to atmospheric processes. Herein, in a series of laboratory experiments, the mass labilities of films of secondary organic material representative of similar atmospheric organic PM were directly determined by quartz crystal microbalance measurements of evaporation rates and vapor mass concentrations. There were strong differences between films representative of anthropogenic compared with biogenic sources. For films representing anthropogenic PM, evaporation rates and vapor mass concentrations increased above a threshold relative humidity (RH) between 20% and 30%, indicating rapid partitioning above a transition RH but not below. Below the threshold, the characteristic time for equilibration is estimated as up to 1 wk for a typically sized particle. In contrast, for films representing biogenic PM, no RH threshold was observed, suggesting equilibrium partitioning is rapidly obtained for all RHs. The effective diffusion rate Dorg for the biogenic case is at least 103 times greater than that of the anthropogenic case. In conclusion, these differences should be accounted for in the interpretation of laboratory data as well as in modeling of organic PM in Earth’s atmosphere.

  1. Lability of secondary organic particulate matter

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Pengfei; Li, Yong Jie; Wang, Yan; ...

    2016-10-24

    We report the energy flows in Earth’s natural and modified climate systems are strongly influenced by the concentrations of atmospheric particulate matter (PM). For predictions of concentration, equilibrium partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between organic PM and the surrounding vapor has widely been assumed, yet recent observations show that organic PM can be semisolid or solid for some atmospheric conditions, possibly suggesting that SVOC uptake and release can be slow enough that equilibrium does not prevail on timescales relevant to atmospheric processes. Herein, in a series of laboratory experiments, the mass labilities of films of secondary organic material representativemore » of similar atmospheric organic PM were directly determined by quartz crystal microbalance measurements of evaporation rates and vapor mass concentrations. There were strong differences between films representative of anthropogenic compared with biogenic sources. For films representing anthropogenic PM, evaporation rates and vapor mass concentrations increased above a threshold relative humidity (RH) between 20% and 30%, indicating rapid partitioning above a transition RH but not below. Below the threshold, the characteristic time for equilibration is estimated as up to 1 wk for a typically sized particle. In contrast, for films representing biogenic PM, no RH threshold was observed, suggesting equilibrium partitioning is rapidly obtained for all RHs. The effective diffusion rate Dorg for the biogenic case is at least 103 times greater than that of the anthropogenic case. In conclusion, these differences should be accounted for in the interpretation of laboratory data as well as in modeling of organic PM in Earth’s atmosphere.« less

  2. Why is firefly oxyluciferin a notoriously labile substance?

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Oleg V; Nath, Naba K; Naumov, Panče; Hintermann, Lukas

    2014-01-13

    The chemistry of firefly bioluminescence is important for numerous applications in biochemistry and analytical chemistry. The emitter of this bioluminescent system, firefly oxyluciferin, is difficult to handle. The cause of its lability was clarified while its synthesis was reinvestigated. A side product was identified and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The reason for the lability of oxyluciferin is now ascribed to autodimerization of the coexisting enol and keto forms in a Mannich-type reaction.

  3. Freshwater processing of terrestrial dissolved organic matter: What governs lability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrilli, J.; Smith, H. J.; Junker, J. R.; Scholl, E. A.; Foreman, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are linked through the transfer of energy and materials. Allochthonous organic matter (OM) is central to freshwater ecosystem function, influencing local food webs, trophic state, and nutrient availability. In order to understand the nature and fate of OM from inland headwaters to the open ocean, it is imperative to understand the links between OM lability and ecosystem function. Thus, biological, chemical, and physical factors need to be evaluated together to inform our understanding of environmental lability. We performed a laboratory processing experiment on naturally occurring OM leachates from riparian leaves, grasses, and pine needles. Measures of water chemistry, OM optical and molecular characterization, bacterial abundances, microbial assemblage composition, respiration, and C:N:P were integrated to discern the nature and fate of labile and recalcitrant OM in a freshwater stream. Peak processing of all OM sources in the stream water occurred after two days, with spikes in bacterial cell abundances, respiration rates, microbial assemblage shifts, and maximum C utilization. Respiration rates and microbial assemblages were dependent on the degree of lability of the OM molecular composition. Within the first few days, no differences in respiration rates were observed between leachate sources, however, beyond day five, the rates diverged with C processing efficiency correlated with OM lability. Originally comprised of amino acid-like, labile fluorescent species, the inoculated stream water OM became more recalcitrant after 16 days, indicating humification processing over time. Our study highlights the importance of interdisciplinary approaches for understanding the processing and fate of OM in aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Nickel-tolerant ectomycorrhizal Pisolithus albus ultramafic ecotype isolated from nickel mines in New Caledonia strongly enhance growth of the host plant Eucalyptus globulus at toxic nickel concentrations.

    PubMed

    Jourand, Philippe; Ducousso, Marc; Reid, Robert; Majorel, Clarisse; Richert, Clément; Riss, Jennifer; Lebrun, Michel

    2010-10-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) Pisolithus albus (Cooke & Massee), belonging to the ultramafic ecotype isolated in nickel-rich serpentine soils from New Caledonia (a tropical hotspot of biodiversity) and showing in vitro adaptive nickel tolerance, were inoculated to Eucalyptus globulus Labill used as a Myrtaceae plant-host model to study ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. Plants were then exposed to a nickel (Ni) dose-response experiment with increased Ni treatments up to 60 mg kg( - )(1) soil as extractable Ni content in serpentine soils. Results showed that plants inoculated with ultramafic ECM P. albus were able to tolerate high and toxic concentrations of Ni (up to 60 μg g( - )(1)) while uninoculated controls were not. At the highest Ni concentration tested, root growth was more than 20-fold higher and shoot growth more than 30-fold higher in ECM plants compared with control plants. The improved growth in ECM plants was associated with a 2.4-fold reduction in root Ni concentration but a massive 60-fold reduction in transfer of Ni from root to shoots. In vitro, P. albus strains could withstand high Ni concentrations but accumulated very little Ni in its tissue. The lower Ni uptake by mycorrhizal plants could not be explained by increased release of metal-complexing chelates since these were 5- to 12-fold lower in mycorrhizal plants at high Ni concentrations. It is proposed that the fungal sheath covering the plant roots acts as an effective barrier to limit transfer of Ni from soil into the root tissue. The degree of tolerance conferred by the ultramafic P. albus isolates to growth of the host tree species is considerably greater than previously reported for other ECM. The primary mechanisms underlying this improved growth were identified as reduced Ni uptake into the roots and markedly reduced transfer from root to shoot in mycorrhizal plants. The fact that these positive responses were observed at Ni concentrations commonly observed in serpentinic soils suggests that

  5. Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Sphaeridiotrema pseudoglobulus (Digenea): Species Differentiation Based on mtDNA (Barcode) and Partial LSUrDNA Sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergmame, L.; Huffman, J.; Cole, R.; Dayanandan, S.; Tkach, V.; McLaughlin, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Flukes belonging to Sphaeridiotrema are important parasites of waterfowl, and 2 morphologically similar species Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Sphaeridiotrema pseudoglobulus, have been implicated in waterfowl mortality in North America. Cytochrome oxidase I (barcode region) and partial LSU-rDNA sequences from specimens of S. globulus and S. pseudoglobulus, obtained from naturally and experimentally infected hosts from New Jersey and Quebec, respectively, confirmed that these species were distinct. Barcode sequences of the 2 species differed at 92 of 590 nucleotide positions (15.6%) and the translated sequences differed by 13 amino acid residues. Partial LSU-rDNA sequences differed at 29 of 1,208 nucleotide positions (2.4%). Additional barcode sequences from specimens collected from waterfowl in Wisconsin and Minnesota and morphometric data obtained from specimens acquired along the north shore of Lake Superior revealed the presence of S. pseudoglobulus in these areas. Although morphometric data suggested the presence of S. globulus in the Lake Superior sample, it was not found among the specimens sequenced from Wisconsin or Minnesota. ?? 2011 American Society of Parasitologists.

  6. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Thymus schimperi, Matricaria chamomilla, Eucalyptus globulus, and Rosmarinus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Awol; Yitayew, Berhanu; Tesema, Alemnesh; Taddese, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the in vitro antimicrobial activities of four plant essential oils (T. schimperi, E. globulus, R. officinalis, and M. Chamomilla) were evaluated against bacteria and fungi. The studies were carried out using agar diffusion method for screening the most effective essential oils and agar dilution to determine minimum inhibitory concentration of the essential oils. Results of this study revealed that essential oils of T. schimperi, E. globulus, and R. officinalis were active against bacteria and some fungi. The antimicrobial effect of M. chamomilla was found to be weaker and did not show any antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of T. schimperi were <15.75 mg/mL for most of the bacteria and fungi used in this study. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of the other essential oils were in the range of 15.75-36.33 mg/mL against tested bacteria. This study highlighted the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of E. globulus, M. chamomilla, T. Schimperi, and R. officinalis. The results indicated that T. schimperi have shown strong antimicrobial activity which could be potential candidates for preparation of antimicrobial drug preparation.

  7. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Thymus schimperi, Matricaria chamomilla, Eucalyptus globulus, and Rosmarinus officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Mekonnen, Awol; Yitayew, Berhanu; Tesema, Alemnesh; Taddese, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the in vitro antimicrobial activities of four plant essential oils (T. schimperi, E. globulus, R. officinalis, and M. Chamomilla) were evaluated against bacteria and fungi. The studies were carried out using agar diffusion method for screening the most effective essential oils and agar dilution to determine minimum inhibitory concentration of the essential oils. Results of this study revealed that essential oils of T. schimperi, E. globulus, and R. officinalis were active against bacteria and some fungi. The antimicrobial effect of M. chamomilla was found to be weaker and did not show any antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of T. schimperi were <15.75 mg/mL for most of the bacteria and fungi used in this study. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of the other essential oils were in the range of 15.75–36.33 mg/mL against tested bacteria. This study highlighted the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of E. globulus, M. chamomilla, T. Schimperi, and R. officinalis. The results indicated that T. schimperi have shown strong antimicrobial activity which could be potential candidates for preparation of antimicrobial drug preparation. PMID:26880928

  8. Emotional Lability and Affective Synchrony in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schoenleber, Michelle; Berghoff, Christopher R.; Tull, Matthew T.; DiLillo, David; Messman-Moore, Terri; Gratz, Kim L.

    2015-01-01

    Extant research on emotional lability in borderline personality disorder (BPD) has focused almost exclusively on lability of individual emotions or emotion types, with limited research considering how different types of emotions shift together over time. Thus, this study examined the temporal dynamics of emotion in BPD at the level of both individual emotions (i.e., self-conscious emotions [SCE], anger, and anxiety) and mixed emotions (i.e., synchrony between emotions). One hundred forty-four women from the community completed a diagnostic interview and laboratory study involving five emotion induction tasks (each of which was preceded and followed by a 5-min resting period or neutral task). State ratings of SCE, anger, and anxiety were provided at 14 time points (before and after each laboratory task and resting period). Hierarchical linear modeling results indicate that women with BPD reported greater mean levels of SCE and Anxiety (but not Anger), and greater lability of Anxiety. Women with BPD also exhibited greater variability in lability of all three emotions (suggestive of within-group differences in the relevance of lability to BPD). Results also revealed synchrony (i.e., positive relations) between each possible pair of emotions, regardless of BPD status. Follow-up regression analyses suggest the importance of accounting for lability when examining the role of synchrony in BPD, as the relation of SCE-Anger synchrony to BPD symptom severity was moderated by Anger and SCE lability. Specifically, synchronous changes in SCE and Anger were associated with greater BPD symptom severity when large shifts in SCE were paired with minor shifts in Anger. PMID:27362623

  9. Parietal cortex and information granularity in labile and stable learning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuzhen; Zhong, Ning; Lu, Shengfu; Liu, Chunnian; Gu, Weiquan

    2010-01-27

    We investigated the effects of rule learning based on information granularity. Using two homogeneous Boolean arithmetic tasks, we examined parietal cortex activity during the calculation of labile and stabilized learning. The results revealed stability-related behavioral advantages in a comparison of granularity-based effects with labile learning of Boolean problems. The functional MRI results revealed that different regions within the parietal cortex exhibited increased activity while solving Boolean problems in both the conditions. The calculation of labile rule learning based on low-granularity Boolean rules was significantly correlated with activation in bilateral parietal cortex, whereas stable rule learning based on high-granularity Boolean rules was correlated with activation in the left parietal cortex.

  10. Characterization of plasma labile heme in hemolytic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Zélia; Carlos, Ana R; Yuan, Xiaojing; Aires-da-Silva, Frederico; Stocker, Roland; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Leal, Sónia S; Gomes, Cláudio M; Todorovic, Smilja; Iranzo, Olga; Ramos, Susana; Santos, Ana C; Hamza, Iqbal; Gonçalves, João; Soares, Miguel P

    2017-10-01

    Extracellular hemoglobin, a byproduct of hemolysis, can release its prosthetic heme groups upon oxidation. This produces metabolically active heme that is exchangeable between acceptor proteins, macromolecules and low molecular weight ligands, termed here labile heme. As it accumulates in plasma labile heme acts in a pro-oxidant manner and regulates cellular metabolism while exerting pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic effects that foster the pathogenesis of hemolytic diseases. Here, we developed and characterized a panel of heme-specific single domain antibodies (sdAbs) that together with a cellular-based heme reporter assay, allow for quantification and characterization of labile heme in plasma during hemolytic conditions. Using these approaches, we demonstrate that when generated during hemolytic conditions labile heme is bound to plasma molecules with an affinity higher than 10(-7) m and that 2-8% (~ 2-5 μm) of the total amount of heme detected in plasma can be internalized by bystander cells, termed here bioavailable heme. Acute, but not chronic, hemolysis is associated with transient reduction of plasma heme-binding capacity, that is, the ability of plasma molecules to bind labile heme with an affinity higher than 10(-7) m. The heme-specific sdAbs neutralize the pro-oxidant activity of soluble heme in vitro, suggesting that these maybe used to counter the pathologic effects of labile heme during hemolytic conditions. Finally, we show that heme-specific sdAbs can be used to visualize cellular heme. In conclusion, we describe a panel of heme-specific sdAbs that when used with other approaches provide novel insights to the pathophysiology of heme. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Repeated Labilization-Reconsolidation Processes Strengthen Declarative Memory in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Forcato, Cecilia; Rodríguez, María L. C.; Pedreira, María E.

    2011-01-01

    The idea that memories are immutable after consolidation has been challenged. Several reports have shown that after the presentation of a specific reminder, reactivated old memories become labile and again susceptible to amnesic agents. Such vulnerability diminishes with the progress of time and implies a re-stabilization phase, usually referred to as reconsolidation. To date, the main findings describe the mechanisms associated with the labilization-reconsolidation process, but little is known about its functionality from a biological standpoint. Indeed, two functions have been proposed. One suggests that destabilization of the original memory after the reminder allows the integration of new information into the background of the original memory (memory updating), and the other suggests that the labilization-reconsolidation process strengthens the original memory (memory strengthening). We have previously reported the reconsolidation of human declarative memories, demonstrating memory updating in the framework of reconsolidation. Here we deal with the strengthening function attributed to the reconsolidation process. We triggered labilization-reconsolidation processes successively by repeated presentations of the proper reminder. Participants learned an association between five cue-syllables and their respective response-syllables. Twenty-four hours later, the paired-associate verbal memory was labilized by exposing the subjects to one, two or four reminders. The List-memory was evaluated on Day 3 showing that the memory was improved when at least a second reminder was presented in the time window of the first labilization-reconsolidation process prompted by the earlier reminder. However, the improvement effect was revealed on Day 3, only when at least two reminders were presented on Day2 and not as a consequence of only retrieval. Therefore, we propose central concepts for the reconsolidation process, emphasizing its biological role and the parametrical constrains

  12. Combination of steam explosion and laccase-mediator treatments prior to Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulping.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sampedro, R; Eugenio, M E; Carbajo, J M; Villar, J C

    2011-07-01

    The effect of a pretreatment consisting of steam explosion (SE) followed by a laccase mediator system (LMS) stage on Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulping has been evaluated and compared with fungal pretreatments. Pretreatment with SE and LMS was more efficient than pretreatments using Pycnoporus sanguineus and Trametes sp. I-62. Steam explosion not only improved the enzyme penetration into the wood chips and shortened the pulping process by 60%, but also extracted around 50% of the hemicelluloses which could be converted into value-added products. The optimal conditions for the LMS treatment were 3h, 3UA/g and 40°C. Compared to SE, the SE/LMS treatment yielded an increase in delignification of 13.9% without affecting pulp properties, provided a similar screened kraft yield, and reduced consumption of chemical reagents Na(2)S and NaOH by 11.5% and 6.3%, respectively. Therefore, SE/LMS is a promising pretreatment for converting the pulp mill into a forest bio-refinery.

  13. Enhancement of enzymatic saccharification of Eucalyptus globulus: steam explosion versus steam treatment.

    PubMed

    Martin-Sampedro, Raquel; Revilla, Esteban; Villar, Juan C; Eugenio, Maria E

    2014-09-01

    Steam explosion and steam pre-treatment have proved capable of enhancing enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic materials. However, until now, these methods had not been compared under the same operational conditions and using the same raw material. Both pre-treatments lead to increased yields in the saccharification of Eucalyptus globulus; but results have been better with steam pre-treatments, despite the more accessible surface of exploded samples. The reason for this finding could be enzymatic inhibition: steam explosion causes a more extensive extraction of hemicelluloses and releases a greater amount of degradation products which can inhibit enzymatic action. Enzymatic inhibition is also dependent on the amount and chemical structure of lignin, which was also a contributing factor to the lower enzymatic yields obtained with the most severe pre-treatment. Thus, the highest yields (46.7% glucose and 73.4% xylose yields) were obtained after two cycle of steam treatment, of 5 and 3 min, at 183°C.

  14. Kinetics of Eucalyptus globulus delignification in a methanol-water medium

    SciTech Connect

    Gilarranz, M.A.; Rodriguez, F.; Santos, A.; Oliet, M.; Garcia-Ochoa, F.; Tijero, J.

    1999-09-01

    The kinetics of Eucalyptus Globulus delignification in methanol-water pulping has been studied. A total of 17 isothermal runs at a liquor-to-wood ratio of 50 L/kg were carried out to develop the kinetic model describing the system. In a first series of experiments, eight models were considered to study the influence of temperature on the delignification rate. The most suitable model, which was discriminated according to statistical criteria, describes delignification as the consecutive dissolution of three lignin species: initial, bulk, and residual lignin, their content in wood being 10, 69, and 21%, respectively. Initial and residual delignification were considered as irreversible reactions and bulk delignification as reversible. The influence of hydrogen ion concentration was taken into account by means of a general power-law expression. The model proposed was taken into account by means of a general power-law expression. The model proposed was validated by reproducing the experimental data from four runs carried out under nonisothermal conditions and a liquor-to-wood ratio of 7 L/kg, which are closer to industrial operating conditions.

  15. Steam torrefaction of Eucalyptus globulus for producing black pellets: A pilot-scale experience.

    PubMed

    Arteaga-Pérez, Luis E; Grandón, Héctor; Flores, Mauricio; Segura, Cristina; Kelley, Stephen S

    2017-08-01

    Steam torrefaction of Eucalyptus globulus was performed at temperatures between 245°C and 265°C in a 100kg/h pilot plant. Torrefied biomass was then pelletized in a 300kg/h unit and the pellets were subject to durability, density and combustion tests. The structural changes measured with FTIR were studied along with the combustion behavior of the materials. Compositional analysis showed that increasing the torrefaction temperature reduced both hemicellulose fraction and overall mass yield (MY). Furthermore, there was a linear relationship between the energy yield (EY) and mass yield (EY=[1.04-0.9(1-MY)]) for these samples. The ignition and comprehensive indexes confirmed that the stability of the torrefied biomass in a combustion environment was higher than for untreated biomass. Finally, pellets showed high durability (98%), and had an energy density (13-14GJ/m(3)), which is comparable to low-rank coals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Air temperatures in a power line corridor over 10 years following afforestation with Eucalyptus globulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Suárez, J. A.; Soto, B.; Perez, R.; Diaz-Fierros, F.

    2011-03-01

    Over the 10 years following the planting of Eucalyptus globulus on an area of 320 ha in 1998, air temperature was measured in the middle of a power line corridor and compared with temperatures recorded at meteorological stations located 11.2 and 35.7 km away. At these reference stations, the annual means of both daily minimum and daily maximum temperature remained approximately constant. In the power line corridor, annual mean daily minimum temperature also remained approximately constant, but annual mean daily maximum temperature fell by about 3.6°C; in particular, between years 4 and 7 the cooling rate was on average about 0.7°C per year. The resulting sigmoid time course of annual mean daily temperature range may partly reflect the evolution of evapotranspiration from the plantation, but seems to be mainly attributable to the shading of the power line corridor by the growing trees, being closely correlated with solar irradiance at the center of the corridor as estimated from tree growth data using sun charts and standard formulae for clear-sky solar irradiance.

  17. The molecular basis of quantitative variation in foliar secondary metabolites in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Külheim, Carsten; Yeoh, Suat Hui; Wallis, Ian R; Laffan, Shawn; Moran, Gavin F; Foley, William J

    2011-09-01

    Eucalyptus is characterized by high foliar concentrations of plant secondary metabolites with marked qualitative and quantitative variation within a single species. Secondary metabolites in eucalypts are important mediators of a diverse community of herbivores. We used a candidate gene approach to investigate genetic associations between 195 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 24 candidate genes and 33 traits related to secondary metabolites in the Tasmanian Blue Gum (Eucalyptus globulus). We discovered 37 significant associations (false discovery rate (FDR) Q < 0.05) across 11 candidate genes and 19 traits. The effects of SNPs on phenotypic variation were within the expected range (0.018 < r(2) < 0.061) for forest trees. Whereas most marker effects were nonadditive, two alleles from two consecutive genes in the methylerythritol phosphate pathway (MEP) showed additive effects. This study successfully links allelic variants to ecologically important phenotypes which can have a large impact on the entire community. It is one of very few studies to identify the genetic variants of a foundation tree that influences ecosystem function. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. [Ovicidal and larvicidal activity in vitro of Eucalyptus globulus essential oils on Haemonchus contortus].

    PubMed

    Macedo, Iara T F; Bevilaqua, Claudia M L; de Oliveira, Lorena M B; Camurça-Vasconcelos, Ana L F; Vieira, Luiz da S; Oliveira, Fabrício R; Queiroz-Junior, Eudson M; Portela, Bruno G; Barros, Renata S; Chagas, Ana C S

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate ovicidal and larvicidal effects of Eucalyptus globulus essential oil (EGEO) on Haemonchus contortus. The chemical composition determination of EGEO was through gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Egg hatch test (EHT) was performed in concentrations 21.75; 17.4; 8.7; 5.43 e 2.71 mg x mL(-1). In larval development test (LDT) were used the concentrations 43.5; 21.75; 10.87; 5.43 e 2.71 mg x mL(-1). Each trial was conducted by negative control with Tween 80 (3%) and positive control, 0.02 mg x mL(-1) of thiabendazole in EHT and 0.008 mg x mL(-1) of ivermectin in LDT. The maximum effectiveness of EGEO on eggs was 99.3% in concentration of 21.75 mg x mL(-1) and on larvae was 98.7% in concentration 43.5 mg x mL(-1). The concentration of EGEO that inhibits 50% of the eggs and larvae was 8.3 and 6.92 mg x mL(-1), respectively. The oil chemical analysis identified as main component the monoterpen 1,8-cineol. EGEO presented ovicidal and larvicidal activities in vitro, revealing a good potential for use in the control of sheep and goat gastrointestinal nematodes.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus against fish pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon-Woo; Wendt, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of the essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus (EOEG) was determined against 7 fish pathogenic bacteria (Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, S. parauberis, Lactococcus garviae, Vibrio harveyi, V. ichthyoenteri and Photobacterium damselae) obtained from farmed olive flounder. The inhibitory activity was evaluated by three methods: Disc diffusion method, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). According to the disc diffusion test, as the concentration of EOEG (5-40 µg) rises, the inhibitory zone increases in size. Compared with amoxicillin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol, EOEG showed similar antibacterial activity. The MIC of EOEG ranged from 7.8 to 125 mg/mL and MBC values ranged from 62 to 250 mg/mL. These results show that EOEG has antimicrobial activity against all seven bacteria, but there was no marked difference between each genus. From these results, it is suggested that EOEG can be used as an antimicrobial agent against fish bacterial diseases in the fish industry. PMID:27382376

  20. Supercritical fluid extraction of Eucalyptus globulus bark-A promising approach for triterpenoid production.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Rui M A; Oliveira, Eduardo L G; Freire, Carmen S R; Couto, Ricardo M; Simões, Pedro C; Neto, Carlos P; Silvestre, Armando J D; Silva, Carlos M

    2012-01-01

    Eucalyptus bark contains significant amounts of triterpenoids with demonstrated bioactivity, namely triterpenic acids and their acetyl derivatives (ursolic, betulinic, oleanolic, betulonic, 3-acetylursolic, and 3-acetyloleanolic acids). In this work, the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of Eucalyptus globulus deciduous bark was carried out with pure and modified carbon dioxide to recover this fraction, and the results were compared with those obtained by Soxhlet extraction with dichloromethane. The effects of pressure (100-200 bar), co-solvent (ethanol) content (0, 5 and 8% wt), and multistep operation were studied in order to evaluate the applicability of SFE for their selective and efficient production. The individual extraction curves of the main families of compounds were measured, and the extracts analyzed by GC-MS. Results pointed out the influence of pressure and the important role played by the co-solvent. Ethanol can be used with advantage, since its effect is more important than increasing pressure by several tens of bar. At 160 bar and 40 °C, the introduction of 8% (wt) of ethanol greatly improves the yield of triterpenoids more than threefold.

  1. Eucalyptus globulus (Eucalyptus) Treatment of Candidiasis in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bokaeian, Mohammad; Nakhaee, Alireza; Moodi, Bita; Ali Khazaei, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Background: The leaves of Eucalyptus globulus (eucalyptus) are used for treatment of diabetes mellitus in traditional medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of eucalyptus in treatment of established systemic infection with Candida albicans in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Methods: Sixty normoglycemic male Wistar rats, weighing 200-250 g, were selected and randomly divided into six groups (n= 10): normal control, control + C. albicans, control + eucalyptus + C. albicans, diabetic control, diabetic + C. albicans, diabetic + eucalyptus + C. albicans. Diabetes was induced after a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight) and eucalyptus was added to the diet (62.5 g/kg) and drinking water (2.5 g/L) of treated animals for 4 weeks. The concerned groups were inoculated with C. albicans 15 days after diabetes induction. At the end of one month experiment, fasted rats were killed by cervical decapitation. Blood was collected from neck vein for estimation of glucose. C. albicans concentrations were estimated in liver and kidneys using serial dilution culture of tissue homogenates. Results: Eucalyptus administration significantly improved the hyperglycemia, polydipsia, polyphagia, and it also compensated weight loss of diabetic rats (P<0.05). Moreover, eucalyptus caused a significant reduction in C. albicans concentration in liver and kidney homogenates (P<0.01). Conclusion: The results revealed that eucalyptus improves Candidia infection in normal and diabetic rats that in some ways validates the traditional use of this plant in treatment of diabetic patients. PMID:21079663

  2. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Eucalyptus globulus Bark—A Promising Approach for Triterpenoid Production

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Rui M. A.; Oliveira, Eduardo L. G.; Freire, Carmen S. R.; Couto, Ricardo M.; Simões, Pedro C.; Neto, Carlos P.; Silvestre, Armando J. D.; Silva, Carlos M.

    2012-01-01

    Eucalyptus bark contains significant amounts of triterpenoids with demonstrated bioactivity, namely triterpenic acids and their acetyl derivatives (ursolic, betulinic, oleanolic, betulonic, 3-acetylursolic, and 3-acetyloleanolic acids). In this work, the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of Eucalyptus globulus deciduous bark was carried out with pure and modified carbon dioxide to recover this fraction, and the results were compared with those obtained by Soxhlet extraction with dichloromethane. The effects of pressure (100–200 bar), co-solvent (ethanol) content (0, 5 and 8% wt), and multistep operation were studied in order to evaluate the applicability of SFE for their selective and efficient production. The individual extraction curves of the main families of compounds were measured, and the extracts analyzed by GC-MS. Results pointed out the influence of pressure and the important role played by the co-solvent. Ethanol can be used with advantage, since its effect is more important than increasing pressure by several tens of bar. At 160 bar and 40 °C, the introduction of 8% (wt) of ethanol greatly improves the yield of triterpenoids more than threefold. PMID:22837719

  3. Woody clockworks: circadian regulation of night-time water use in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Resco de Dios, Víctor; Díaz-Sierra, Rubén; Goulden, Michael L; Barton, Craig V M; Boer, Matthias M; Gessler, Arthur; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Pfautsch, Sebastian; Tissue, David T

    2013-11-01

    The role of the circadian clock in controlling the metabolism of entire trees has seldom been considered. We tested whether the clock influences nocturnal whole-tree water use. Whole-tree chambers allowed the control of environmental variables (temperature, relative humidity). Night-time stomatal conductance (gs ) and sap flow (Q) were monitored in 6- to 8-m-tall Eucalyptus globulus trees during nights when environmental variables were kept constant, and also when conditions varied with time. Artificial neural networks were used to quantify the relative importance of circadian regulation of gs and Q. Under a constant environment, gs and Q declined from 0 to 6 h after dusk, but increased from 6 to 12 h after dusk. While the initial decline could be attributed to multiple processes, the subsequent increase is most consistent with circadian regulation of gs and Q. We conclude that endogenous regulation of gs is an important driver of night-time Q under natural environmental variability. The proportion of nocturnal Q variation associated with circadian regulation (23-56%) was comparable to that attributed to vapor pressure deficit variation (25-58%). This study contributes to our understanding of the linkages between molecular and cellular processes related to circadian regulation, and whole-tree processes related to ecosystem gas exchange in the field. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. First Cut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Lockheed Martin and a Northrop Grumman/Boeing team expect the Crew Exploration Vehicle proposals they submitted last week to change, given the new top-down push at NASA to close the gap between space shuttle retirement and launch of the new crew carrier. Still, delivery of the proposals gives a first glimpse of at least one of the concepts for a space shuttle replacement. Instead of the ballistic capsule approach put forward in some early CEV concept work, Lockheed Martin proposed a lifting body shape with a two-stage thermal protection system, coupled with a cylindrical mission module to give crews of four to six extra room on trips to the Moon, and a trans-Earth injection module (TEIM) for the return powered-at least in the first cut-by a couple of Pratt & Whitney RL10 rocket engines.

  5. Labile trace elements in carbonaceous chondrites - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, Xiaoyue; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    Data are presented on 14 trace elements, including Co, Au, Ga, Rb, Sb, Ag, Se, Cs, Te, Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl, and In (nearly all of which are moderately or highly labile in meteorites), obtained by radiochemical neutron activation analyses of 42 C2-C6 chondrites, all but three from Antarctica. The data indicate that carbonaceous chondrites of petrographic types 2-6 define compositional continua. It is suggested that carbonaceous C2-C6 chondrites may reflect a mixture of material that formed at low temperatures and that contained cosmic levels of highly labile elements, with material that was devoid of them.

  6. Labile trace elements in carbonaceous chondrites - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, Xiaoyue; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    Data are presented on 14 trace elements, including Co, Au, Ga, Rb, Sb, Ag, Se, Cs, Te, Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl, and In (nearly all of which are moderately or highly labile in meteorites), obtained by radiochemical neutron activation analyses of 42 C2-C6 chondrites, all but three from Antarctica. The data indicate that carbonaceous chondrites of petrographic types 2-6 define compositional continua. It is suggested that carbonaceous C2-C6 chondrites may reflect a mixture of material that formed at low temperatures and that contained cosmic levels of highly labile elements, with material that was devoid of them.

  7. Neuropsychological Correlates of Emotional Lability in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Brandeis, Daniel; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Kuntsi, Jonna; Poustka, Luise; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Albrecht, Bjorn; Chen, Wai; Uebel, Henrik; Schlotz, Wolff; van der Meere, Jaap J.; Gill, Michael; Manor, Iris; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Asherson, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Background: Emotional lability (EL) is commonly seen in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The reasons for this association remain currently unknown. To address this question, we examined the relationship between ADHD and EL symptoms, and performance on a range of neuropsychological tasks to clarify whether EL symptoms…

  8. Neuropsychological Correlates of Emotional Lability in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Brandeis, Daniel; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Kuntsi, Jonna; Poustka, Luise; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Albrecht, Bjorn; Chen, Wai; Uebel, Henrik; Schlotz, Wolff; van der Meere, Jaap J.; Gill, Michael; Manor, Iris; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Asherson, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Background: Emotional lability (EL) is commonly seen in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The reasons for this association remain currently unknown. To address this question, we examined the relationship between ADHD and EL symptoms, and performance on a range of neuropsychological tasks to clarify whether EL symptoms…

  9. Labile dissolved organic carbon supply limits hyporheic denitrification

    Treesearch

    Jay P. Zarnetske; Roy Haggerty; Steven M. Wondzell; Michelle A. Baker

    2012-01-01

    We used an in situ steady state 15N-labeled nitrate and acetate well-to-wells injection experiment to determine how the availability of labile dissolved organic carbon as acetate influences microbial denitrification in the hyporheic zone of an upland (third-order) agricultural stream.

  10. Mechanism of Stabilization of Labile Compounds by Silk Fibroin Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-05

    to stability of labile molecules. In addition , we plan to complete efforts initiated to refine our understanding of electrogelation mechanisms of...paper approaches. Additional processing can remediate interactions with conformational structures of the silk protein to further enhance blood... additional benefits such as preventing exposure to enzymatic and UV stresses. Long-term temperature stability of dried silk formats such as films or

  11. The Extended Community-Level Effects of Genetic Variation in Foliar Wax Chemistry in the Forest Tree Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Gosney, Benjamin; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne; Forster, Lynne; Whiteley, Carmen; Potts, Brad

    2017-05-01

    Genetic variation in foundation trees can influence dependent communities, but little is known about the mechanisms driving these extended genetic effects. We studied the potential chemical drivers of genetic variation in the dependent foliar community of the focal tree Eucalyptus globulus. We focus on the role of cuticular waxes and compare the effects to that of the terpenes, a well-studied group of secondary compounds known to be bioactive in eucalypts. The canopy community was quantified based on the abundance of thirty-nine distinctive arthropod and fungal symptoms on foliar samples collected from canopies of 246 progeny from 13 E. globulus sub-races grown in a common garden trial. Cuticular waxes and foliar terpenes were quantified using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MC). A total of 4 of the 13 quantified waxes and 7 of the 16 quantified terpenes were significantly associated with the dependent foliar community. Variation in waxes explained 22.9% of the community variation among sub-races, which was equivalent to that explained by terpenes. In combination, waxes and terpenes explained 35% of the genetic variation among sub-races. Only a small proportion of wax and terpene compounds showing statistically significant differences among sub-races were implicated in community level effects. The few significant waxes have previously shown evidence of divergent selection in E. globulus, which signals that adaptive variation in phenotypic traits may have extended effects. While highlighting the role of the understudied cuticular waxes, this study demonstrates the complexity of factors likely to lead to community genetic effects in foundation trees.

  12. Acaricidal effect of Pelargonium roseum and Eucalyptus globulus essential oils against adult stage of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pirali-Kheirabadi, Khodadad; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi; Halajian, Ali

    2009-06-10

    In a laboratory trial, in west-central Iran, the acaricidal effects of the essential oils (EOs) prepared from two medicinal plants, i.e. Pelargonium roseum and Eucalyptus globulus on the adult stage of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus were evaluated. For this purpose, the engorged females of R. (B) annulatus were exposed to two-fold serial dilutions of oils (0.31-5.0%) using a "dipping method" in vitro. The engorged ticks were immersed in different plant dilutions (eight per dilution) for 1min then each replicate was incubated in separate petri dishes at 26 degrees C and 80% relative humidity. The mortality rate for adult ticks exposed to different dilutions of P. roseum and E. globulus EO's showed a dose-dependent decrease. It was however significant only for the 2.5% and 5.0% dilutions of P. roseum EO, when compared to the non-treated control (P<0.05). The mass of produced eggs in adult female ticks exposed to both P. roseum and E. globulus EOs had decreased dose-dependently. It was significant for only 2.5% and 5.0% dilutions of P. roseum EO, comparing the non-treated control (P<0.05). The highest decrease in egg laying was reported for ticks treated with 5% dilutions of P. roseum (87.5%) and E. globosus (25%) (P<0.05). This is the first report that details the acaricidal activity of EO's obtained from P. roseum and E. globosus against R. (B) annulatus. The results show that both plants, particularly P. Roseum can be considered as potential candidates for biocontrol of R. (B) annulatus in the field.

  13. Oligo-carrageenans enhance growth and contents of cellulose, essential oils and polyphenolic compounds in Eucalyptus globulus trees.

    PubMed

    González, Alberto; Contreras, Rodrigo A; Moenne, Alejandra

    2013-07-24

    Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae) originated in Australia and has been introduced in countries with temperate weather in order to obtain wood for cellulose extraction and building purposes. In this work, we analyzed the potential stimulation of growth in height and trunk diameter as well as the content of holo-cellulose, α-cellulose (long cellulose chains), essential oils and polyphenolic compounds (PPCs) in E. globulus trees treated with oligo-carrageenans (OCs) kappa, lambda and iota, at 1 mg mL⁻¹, once a week, four times in total and then cultivated for three additional years without further treatment. Eucalyptus treated with OCs kappa, lambda and iota showed an increase in height, mainly with OCs kappa and iota by 58% and 47%, respectively, and in trunk diameter by 44% and 40%, respectively. In addition, OCs induced an increase in the contents of holo-cellulose and α-cellulose, mainly OCs kappa and iota which increased holo-cellulose by 8% and 5%, respectively, and α-cellulose by 16 and 13%, respectively. Moreover, OCs increased the content of essential oils, mainly OCs kappa and iota by 67% and 39%, respectively. Furthermore, OCs decreased the concentration of total phenolic compounds but differentially changed the concentration of several PPCs such as genistein, rutin, ellagic acid, morin, luteolin and quercetin with potential antimicrobial activities. Thus, marine algae OCs kappa, lambda and iota stimulate growth of E. globulus trees by enhancing height and trunk diameter as well as the content of α-cellulose, total essential oils, and some PPCs with potential antimicrobial activities.

  14. A water availability gradient reveals the deficit level required to affect traits in potted juvenile Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Adam B; Potts, Brad M; Hovenden, Mark J; Brodribb, Timothy J; Davies, Noel W; Rodemann, Thomas; McAdam, Scott A M; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M

    2017-04-01

    Drought leading to soil water deficit can have severe impacts on plants. Water deficit may lead to plant water stress and affect growth and chemical traits. Plant secondary metabolite (PSM) responses to water deficit vary between compounds and studies, with inconsistent reports of changes to PSM concentrations even within a single species. This disparity may result from experimental water deficit variation among studies, and so multiple water deficit treatments are used to fully assess PSM responses in a single species. Juvenile Eucalyptus globulus were grown for 8 weeks at one of ten water deficit levels based on evapotranspiration from control plants (100 %). Treatments ranged from 90 % of control evapotranspiration (mild water deficit) to 0 % of control evapotranspiration (severe water deficit) in 10 % steps. Plant biomass, foliar abscisic acid (ABA) levels, Ψ leaf , leaf C/N, selected terpenes and phenolics were quantified to assess responses to each level of water deficit relative to a control. Withholding ≥30 % water resulted in higher foliar ABA levels and withholding ≥40 % water reduced leaf water content. Ψ leaf became more negative when ≥60 % water was withheld. Plant biomass was lower when ≥80 % water was withheld, and no water for 8 weeks (0 % water) resulted in plant death. The total oil concentration was lower and C/N was higher in dead and desiccated juvenile E. globulus leaves (0 % water). Concentrations of individual phenolic and terpene compounds, along with condensed tannin and total phenolic concentrations, remained stable regardless of water deficit or plant stress level. These juvenile E. globulus became stressed with a moderate reduction in available water, and yet the persistent concentrations of most PSMs in highly stressed or dead plants suggests no PSM re-metabolization and continued ecological roles of foliar PSMs during drought.

  15. Mid-infrared spectroscopy for rapid assessment of soil properties after land use change from pastures to Eucalyptus globulus plantations.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Dinesh B; Kitching, Matt; Mendham, Daniel S; Weston, Christopher J; Baker, Thomas G

    2016-06-15

    There is an increasing demand for rapid and cost effective techniques to accurately measure the effects of land use change on soil properties. This study evaluated the ability of mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIRS) coupled with partial least squares regression (PLSR) to rapidly predict soil properties affected by land use change from agriculture (mainly pasture) to Eucalyptus globulus plantations in south-western Australia. We measured total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (Total N), TOC/Total N (C/N ratio), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), and total phosphorus (Total P). The PLSR calibration models were developed using mid-infrared (MIR) spectra (4000 to 450 cm(-1)) and square root transformed measured soil data (n = 180) from 23 paired pasture and E. globulus plantation sites representing the soils and climate of E. globulus plantation estates in south-western Australia. The calibration models for TOC, Total N, C/N ratio and Total P showed excellent correlations between measured and predicted data with coefficient of determination (R(2)) exceeding 0.91 and minimum root-mean-square error (RMSE) of calibration [TOC (R(2) = 0.95, RMSE = 0.36), Total N (R(2) = 0.96, RMSE = 0.10), C/N ratio (R(2) = 0.92, RMSE = 0.14) and Total P (R(2) = 0.91, RMSE = 0.06)]. The calibration models had reasonable predictions for MBC (R(2) = 0.66, RMSE = 0.07) and MBN (R(2) = 0.63, RMSE = 0.06). The calibrated models were validated using soils from 8 independent paired pasture and E. globulus sites (n = 64). The validated predictions were excellent for TOC (R(2) = 0.92, RMSE = 0.40) and Total N (R(2) = 0.91, RMSE = 0.12), but less so for C/N ratio (R(2) = 0.80, RMSE = 0.35), MBC (R(2) = 0.70, RMSE = 0.08) and Total P (R(2) = 0.75, RMSE = 0.12). The results demonstrate the potential of MIRS-PLSR to rapidly, accurately and simultaneously determine several properties in land use change affected soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative pathologic features and development of Sphaeridiotrema globulus (Trematoda) infections in the mute swan and domestic chicken and chicken chorioallantois.

    PubMed

    Huffman, J E; Fried, B; Roscoe, D E; Cali, A

    1984-02-01

    The natural infection of Sphaeridiotrema globulus in the mute swan and the experimental infection in the chicken resulted in an ulcerative hemorrhagic enteritis. Swans and chickens died from the resultant blood loss. Culturing of the parasite on the chorioallantoic membrane of the chicken egg resulted in hemorrhage and a cellular response of the chorioallantois to the trematode. Experimental infections in the domestic chicken and chicken embryo can be of use for the study of ulcerative hemorrhagic enteritis produced by the trematode, pathologic features, identification of the metacercaria to the adult, and developmental aspects of the parasite.

  17. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that biosolids Ag concentrations have decreased significantly over recent decades. XANES revealed the importance of reduced-sulfur binding environments for Ag speciation in materials ranging from freshly produced sludge to biosolids weathered under ambient environmental conditions for more than 50 years. Isotopic dilution with 110mAg showed that Ag was predominantly non-labile in both fresh and aged biosolids (13.7% mean lability), with E-values ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg and 5 mM CaNO3 extractable Ag from 1.2 to 609 µg/kg (0.002 - 3.4% of the total Ag). This study indicates that at the time of soil application, biosolids Ag will be predominantly Ag-sulfides and characterised by low isotopic lability. This paper presents an overview of biosolids Ag chemistry in historic and contemporary biosolids sourced from the UK, USA and Australia from the 1950s until today by drawing on a unique collection of archived, stockpiled and contemporary biosolids samples. Characteristics of biosolids Ag chemistry determined in this study included total Ag measurement by neutron activation analysis (NAA); the assessment of Ag lability by 110mAg isotopic dilution (E-values); and Ag speciation by X-ray Absorp

  18. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that biosolids Ag concentrations have decreased significantly over recent decades. XANES revealed the importance of reduced-sulfur binding environments for Ag speciation in materials ranging from freshly produced sludge to biosolids weathered under ambient environmental conditions for more than 50 years. Isotopic dilution with 110mAg showed that Ag was predominantly non-labile in both fresh and aged biosolids (13.7% mean lability), with E-values ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg and 5 mM CaNO3 extractable Ag from 1.2 to 609 µg/kg (0.002 - 3.4% of the total Ag). This study indicates that at the time of soil application, biosolids Ag will be predominantly Ag-sulfides and characterised by low isotopic lability. This paper presents an overview of biosolids Ag chemistry in historic and contemporary biosolids sourced from the UK, USA and Australia from the 1950s until today by drawing on a unique collection of archived, stockpiled and contemporary biosolids samples. Characteristics of biosolids Ag chemistry determined in this study included total Ag measurement by neutron activation analysis (NAA); the assessment of Ag lability by 110mAg isotopic dilution (E-values); and Ag speciation by X-ray Absorp

  19. Life cycle impacts of topsoil erosion on aquatic ecosystems: case study on Eucalyptus globulus forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinteiro, Paula; Van de Broek, Marijn; Cláudia Dias, Ana; Ridoutt, Bradley; Arroja, Luís

    2016-04-01

    High concentrations of suspended solids (SS), particularly in the clay and silt size fractions, reaching lotic environments and remaining in suspension can be a significant stressors to the biodiversity of these aquatic systems, degrading the water quality and directly affecting the aquatic biota, namely macroinvertebrates, algae and macrophytes. This damage is presently not considered in Life Cycle Assessment studies. This study is devoted to the effects of SS into freshwater systems due to topsoil erosion by water (environmental mechanism), translated into damage to aquatic ecosystem diversity (endpoint impact category), namely to macroinvertebrates, algae and macrophytes. For this, we have developed a framework to conduct an erosion inventory using the WaTEM/SEDEM model and linked this with, a method to derive regional characterisation for endpoint damage on aquatic ecosystem diversity. A case study was performed for Eucalyptus globulus stands in Portugal, with a functional unit of one hectare of land under production forestry management. To demonstrate how this newly SS ecosystem method can help to improve the environmental assessment in forestry, results were compared with the earlier commonly used impact categories from ReCiPe method. The relevance of the impact from SS delivery to freshwater streams is shown, providing a more comprehensive assessment of the SS impact from land use systems on aquatic environments. The SS impacts ranged from 15.5 to 1234.9 PDF.m3.yr.ha-1.revolution-1 for macroinvertebrates, and from 5.2 to 411.9 PDF.m3.yr.ha-1.revolution-1 for algae and macrophytes. For some stands, SS potential impacts on macroinvertebrates have the same order of magnitude than freshwater eutrophication, freshwater ecotoxicity, terrestrial ecotoxicity and terrestrial acidification impacts. For algae and macrophytes, most of the stands present SS impacts of the same order of magnitude as terrestrial ecotoxicity, one order of magnitude higher than freshwater

  20. Hydrological implications of soil water-repellency in Eucalyptus globulus forests, north-central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A. J. D.; Coelho, C. O. A.; Walsh, R. P. D.; Shakesby, R. A.; Ceballos, A.; Doerr, S. H.

    2000-05-01

    Soil water-repellency (hydrophobicity) is a widespread property of Eucalyptus globulus and Pinus pinaster forest soils in central and north littoral Portugal and is particularly severe during the summer dry conditions. This paper attempts to assess the impact of water repellency on overland flow and runoff generation at plot and catchment scales for two types of terrain with differing land management and degree of soil hydrophobicity: (i) highly hydrophobic land with regenerating eucalyptus forest following fire; and (ii) largely hydrophilic land on which deep-ploughing prior to planting eucalyptus seedlings had eliminated hydrophobicity. Overland flow responses were monitored over a 40-month period for two 8 m×2 m plots and streamflow was recorded continuously at gauging stations for two small catchments of predominantly regrowth eucalyptus and ploughed/planted eucalyptus, respectively. Soil hydrophobicity was assessed using the Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) test. Seasonal variations in the factors influencing plot overland flow response were assessed for each land management type using multivariate analysis. For the regrowth eucalyptus plot, overland flow generation was found to be negatively correlated with antecedent soil moisture in summer (suggesting that hydrophobicity-linked Hortonian overland flow is then dominant), but positively related to throughflow in winter (suggesting that saturation overland flow generation in a hydrophilic-phase soil was at that time the dominant mechanism). In the ploughed/planted areas, negative correlations with soil moisture were found neither in summer nor winter. Rainfall amount (and in winter also antecedent precipitation) were found to be the variables most strongly and positively related to overland flow volume. The plot results are compared with streamflow responses for the small catchments.

  1. Lignin Composition and Structure in Young versus Adult Eucalyptus globulus Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Nieto, Lidia; Jiménez-Barbero, J.; Faulds, Craig B.; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Martínez, Ángel T.; del Río, José C.

    2011-01-01

    Lignin changes during plant growth were investigated in a selected Eucalyptus globulus clone. The lignin composition and structure were studied in situ by a new procedure enabling the acquisition of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) spectra on wood gels formed in the NMR tube as well as by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, milled-wood lignins were isolated and analyzed by 2D-NMR, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and thioacidolysis. The data indicated that p-hydroxyphenyl and guaiacyl units are deposited at the earlier stages, whereas the woods are enriched in syringyl (S) lignin during late lignification. Wood 2D-NMR showed that β-O-4′ and resinol linkages were predominant in the eucalypt lignin, whereas other substructures were present in much lower amounts. Interestingly, open β-1′ structures could be detected in the isolated lignins. Phenylcoumarans and cinnamyl end groups were depleted with age, spirodienone abundance increased, and the main substructures (β-O-4′ and resinols) were scarcely modified. Thioacidolysis revealed a higher predominance of S units in the ether-linked lignin than in the total lignin and, in agreement with NMR, also indicated that resinols are the most important nonether linkages. Dimer analysis showed that most of the resinol-type structures comprised two S units (syringaresinol), the crossed guaiacyl-S resinol appearing as a minor substructure and pinoresinol being totally absent. Changes in hemicelluloses were also shown by the 2D-NMR spectra of the wood gels without polysaccharide isolation. These include decreases of methyl galacturonosyl, arabinosyl, and galactosyl (anomeric) signals, assigned to pectin and related neutral polysaccharides, and increases of xylosyl (which are approximately 50% acetylated) and 4-O-methylglucuronosyl signals. PMID:21098672

  2. Emission of Isoprene from Salt-Stressed Eucalyptus globulus Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Loreto, Francesco; Delfine, Sebastiano

    2000-01-01

    Eucalyptus spp. are among the highest isoprene emitting plants. In the Mediterranean area these plants are often cultivated along the seashore and cope with recurrent salt stress. Transient salinity may severely but reversibly reduce photosynthesis and stomatal conductance of Eucalyptus globulus leaves but the effect on isoprene emission is not significant. When the stress is relieved, a burst of isoprene emission occurs, simultaneously with the recovery of photosynthetic performance. Later on, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and isoprene emission decay, probably because of the onset of leaf senescence. Isoprene emission is not remarkably affected by the stress at different light intensities, CO2 concentrations, and leaf temperatures. When CO2 was removed and O2 was lowered to inhibit both photosynthesis and photorespiration, we found that the residual emission is actually higher in salt-stressed leaves than in controls. This stimulation is particularly evident at high-light intensities and high temperatures. The maximum emission occurs at 40°C in both salt-stressed and control leaves sampled in ambient air and in control leaves sampled in CO2-free and low-O2 air. However, the maximum emission occurs at 45°C in salt-stressed leaves sampled in CO2-free and low-O2 air. Our results suggest the activation of alternative non-photosynthetic pathways of isoprene synthesis in salt-stressed leaves and perhaps in general in leaves exposed to stress conditions. The temperature dependence indicates that this alternative synthesis is also under enzymatic control. If this alternative synthesis still occurs in the chloroplasts, it may involve a thylakoid-bound isoprene synthase. PMID:10938376

  3. Water stress and recovery in the performance of two Eucalyptus globulus clones: physiological and biochemical profiles.

    PubMed

    Correia, Barbara; Pintó-Marijuan, Marta; Neves, Lucinda; Brossa, Ricard; Dias, Maria Celeste; Costa, Armando; Castro, Bruno B; Araújo, Clara; Santos, Conceição; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Pinto, Glória

    2014-04-01

    Eucalyptus plantations are among the most productive forest stands in Portugal and Spain, being mostly used for pulp production and, more recently, as an energy crop. However, the region's Mediterranean climate, with characteristic severe summer drought, negatively affects eucalypt growth and increases mortality. Although the physiological response to water shortage is well characterized for this species, evidence about the plants' recovery ability remains scarce. In order to assess the physiological and biochemical response of Eucalyptus globulus during the recovery phase, two genotypes (AL-18 and AL-10) were submitted to a 3-week water stress period at two different intensities (18 and 25% of field capacity), followed by 1 week of rewatering. Recovery was assessed 1 day and 1 week after rehydration. Drought reduced height, biomass, water potential, NPQ and gas exchange in both genotypes. Contrarily, the levels of pigments, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (F(v) /F(m) and (φPSII)), MDA and ABA increased. During recovery, the physiological and biochemical profile of stressed plants showed a similar trend: they experienced reversion of altered traits (MDA, ABA, E, g(s), pigments), while other parameters did not recover ((φPSII), NPQ). Furthermore, an overcompensation of CO(2) assimilation was achieved 1 week after rehydration, which was accompanied by greater growth and re-establishment of oxidative balance. Both genotypes were tolerant to the tested conditions, although clonal differences were found. AL-10 was more productive and showed a more rapid and dynamic response to rehydration (namely in carotenoid content, (φPSII) and NPQ) compared to clone AL-18. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  4. Quantification of Labile Soil Mercury by Stable Isotope Dilution Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetaya, Waleed; Huang, Jen-How; Osterwalder, Stefan; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that can cause severe health problems to humans. Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources and can be transported over long distances before it is deposited to aquatic and terrestrial environments. Aside from accumulation in soil solid phases, Hg deposited in soils may migrate to surface- and ground-water or enter the food chain, depending on its lability. There are many operationally-defined extraction methods proposed to quantify soil labile metals. However, these methods are by definition prone to inaccuracies such as non-selectivity, underestimation or overestimation of the labile metal pool. The isotopic dilution technique (ID) is currently the most promising method for discrimination between labile and non-labile metal fractions in soil with a minimum disturbance to soil-solid phases. ID assesses the reactive metal pool in soil by defining the fraction of metal both in solid and solution phases that is isotopically-exchangeable known as the 'E-value'. The 'E-value' represents the metal fraction in a dynamic equilibrium with the solution phase and is potentially accessible to plants. This is carried out by addition of an enriched metal isotope to soil suspensions and quantifying the fraction of metal that is able to freely exchange with the added isotope by measuring the equilibrium isotopic ratio by ICP-MS. E-value (mg kg-1) is then calculated as follows: E-Value = (Msoil/ W) (CspikeVspike/ Mspike) (Iso1IAspike -Iso2IAspikeRss / Iso2IAsoil Rss - Iso1IAsoil) where M is the average atomic mass of the metal in the soil or the spike, W is the mass of soil (kg), Cspike is the concentration of the metal in the spike (mg L-1), Vspike is the volume of spike (L), IA is isotopic abundance, and Rss is the equilibrium ratio of isotopic abundances (Iso1:Iso2). Isotopic dilution has been successfully applied to determine E-values for several elements. However, to our knowledge, this method has not yet

  5. Anti-Helicobacter Pylori Activities of Shoya Powder and Essential Oils of Thymus Vulgaris and Eucalyptus Globulus

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, D; Mobarez, A Mohabati; Tohidpour, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori, an infective agent of more than 50% of the world population is prominent to be the main causative factor in the etiologies of chronic, active or type B gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tumors. A high prevalence of this bacterium in dental plaque is always reported. Pharmacological treatment of H. pylori infections includes administration of 3-fold therapeutic regimens which are typically used to suppress H. pylori activity. However, antibiotic resistance frequently develops as a consequence of such treatment. Thus, searching for alternative therapies for H. pylori infections is of special interest. Materials and Methods: In this study, anti H. pylori activities of a traditional antimicrobial drug so-called Shoya and also essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Eucalyptus globulus were investigated using antimicrobial analysis and serological screening methods. Results: The agar dilution method results revealed the Shoya with the highest inhibitory effect against H. pylori. Also serological screening on tested mice showed a significant effect of this drug in lowering the sera amount of anti H. pylori specific IgA and IgG titers. Both of the essential oils showed different degrees of antibacterial effect against H. pylori. Conclusion: The obtained results showed the antibacterial effect of Shoya powder and Essential oils from Thymus vulgaris and Eucalyptus globulus and purposes new therapeutical alternatives to control the H. pylori infection. Additional studies and clinical trials are necessary to approve the use of these data in health care and pharmacopeia systems. PMID:22927892

  6. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbins, A.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC), defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzene polycarboxylic acid oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance) were determined over the course of a 28 d irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM C to 55 ± 15 nM C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 yr. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Photo-degradation is therefore posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their inherent inertness but by the rate at which they are cycled through the surface ocean's photic zone.

  7. Labile disulfide bonds are common at the leucocyte cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Cresswell, Peter; Ciaccia, Laura; Thomas, Benjamin; Barclay, A. Neil

    2011-01-01

    Redox conditions change in events such as immune and platelet activation, and during viral infection, but the biochemical consequences are not well characterized. There is evidence that some disulfide bonds in membrane proteins are labile while others that are probably structurally important are not exposed at the protein surface. We have developed a proteomic/mass spectrometry method to screen for and identify non-structural, redox-labile disulfide bonds in leucocyte cell-surface proteins. These labile disulfide bonds are common, with several classes of proteins being identified and around 30 membrane proteins regularly identified under different reducing conditions including using enzymes such as thioredoxin. The proteins identified include integrins, receptors, transporters and cell–cell recognition proteins. In many cases, at least one cysteine residue was identified by mass spectrometry as being modified by the reduction process. In some cases, functional changes are predicted (e.g. in integrins and cytokine receptors) but the scale of molecular changes in membrane proteins observed suggests that widespread effects are likely on many different types of proteins including enzymes, adhesion proteins and transporters. The results imply that membrane protein activity is being modulated by a ‘redox regulator’ mechanism. PMID:22645650

  8. Ovicidal and adulticidal activity of Eucalyptus globulus leaf oil terpenoids against Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Young-Cheol; Choi, Han-Young; Choi, Won-Sil; Clark, J M; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2004-05-05

    The toxic effects of Eucalyptus globulus leaf oil-derived monoterpenoids [1,8-cineole, l-phellandrene, (-)-alpha-pinene, 2-beta-pinene, trans-pinocarveol, gamma-terpinene, and 1-alpha-terpineol] and the known Eucalyptusleaf oil terpenoids (beta-eudesmol and geranyl acetate) on eggs and females of the human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis, were examined using direct contact and fumigation bioassays and compared with the lethal activity of delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum, two commonly used pediculicides. In a filter paper contact bioassay with female P. h. capitis, the pediculicidal activity was more pronounced with Eucalyptus leaf oil than with either delta-phenothrin or pyrethrum on the basis of LT(50) values (0.125 vs 0.25 mg/cm(2)). 1,8-Cineole was 2.2- and 2.3-fold more toxic than either delta-phenothrin or pyrethrum, respectively. The pediculicidal activities of (-)-alpha-pinene, 2-beta-pinene, and (E)-pinocarveol were comparable to those of delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum. l-Phellandrene, gamma-terpinene, and 1-alpha-terpineol were relatively less active than delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum. beta-Eudesmol and geranyl acetate were ineffective. 1-alpha-Terpineol and (E)-pinocaveol were highly effective at 0.5 and 1.0 mg/cm(2), respectively, against P. h. capitis eggs. At 1.0 mg/cm(2), (-)-alpha-pinene, 2-beta-pinene, and gamma-terpinene exhibited moderate ovicidal activity, whereas little or no ovicidal activity was observed with the other terpenoids and with delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum. In fumigation tests with female P. h. capitis at 0.25 mg/cm(2), 1,8-cineole, (-)-alpha-pinene, (E)-pinocarveol, and 1-alpha-terpineol were more effective in closed cups than in open ones, indicating that the effect of the monoterpenoids was largely due to action in the vapor phase. Neither delta-phenothrin nor pyrethrum exhibited fumigant toxicity. Eucalyptus leaf oil, particularly 1,8-cineole, 1-alpha-terpineol, and (E)-pinocaveol, merits further study as potential

  9. Portable cutting apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, R.F.

    1984-07-17

    A remotely operable, portable cutting apparatus detachably secured to the workpiece by laterally spaced clamp assemblies engagable with the workpiece on opposite sides of the intended line of cut. A reciprocal cutter head is mounted between the clamp assemblies and is provided with a traveling abrasive cutting wire adapted to sever the workpiece normal to the longitudinal axis thereof. Dust and debris are withdrawn from the cutting area by a vacuum force through a nozzle mounted on the cutting head.

  10. Portable cutting apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Richard F.

    1986-01-01

    A remotely operable, portable cutting apparatus detachably secured to the workpiece by laterally spaced clamp assemblies engageable with the workpiece on opposite sides of the intended line of cut. A reciprocal cutter head is mounted between the clamp assemblies and is provided with a traveling abrasive cutting wire adapted to sever the workpiece normal to the longitudinal axis thereof. Dust and debris are withdrawn from the cutting area by a vacuum force through a nozzle mounted on the cutting head.

  11. Portable cutting apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Richard F.

    1986-04-01

    A remotely operable, portable cutting apparatus detachably secured to the workpiece by laterally spaced clamp assemblies engageable with the workpiece on opposite sides of the intended line of cut. A reciprocal cutter head is mounted between the clamp assemblies and is provided with a traveling abrasive cutting wire adapted to sever the workpiece normal to the longitudinal axis thereof. Dust and debris are withdrawn from the cutting area by a vacuum force through a nozzle mounted on the cutting head.

  12. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of extracts of leaves of Eucalyptus globulus on ovine gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Kanojiya, Dharmendra; Shanker, Daya; Sudan, Vikrant; Jaiswal, Amit Kumar; Parashar, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of anthelminthic resistance has limited the success of traditional control programmes in several countries, thereby forcing the researchers to search for alternatives. In vitro anthelmintic activities of crude aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus were investigated against the egg and larvae of naturally infected sheep. In the phytochemical analyses, tannins and flavonoids were the main metabolites identified in the extract. The aqueous extract of E. globulus was also investigated for in vivo anthelmintic activity in naturally infected sheep. The various blood parameters, coupled with effects on marker enzymes and antioxidant status, were evaluated during the trial period. Methanolic extract showed better ED50 (3.756 mg/ml) and ED99 (33.809 mg/ml) values in comparison with aqueous extract (ED50 = 1.502 and ED99 = 7.10 mg/ml) in the egg hatch assay. Inverse was true in larval development and larval paralysis tests. The aqueous extract's ED50 = 19.994 and ED99 = 108.931 mg/ml values in the larval development test and ED50 = 19.994 and ED99 = 108.931 mg/ml in the larval paralysis test were more potent than those of its methanolic counterpart with ED50 = 15.595 and ED99 = 94.493 mg/ml and ED50 = 15.595 and ED99 = 94.493 mg/ml, respectively. A significant amount of 66% faecal egg count reduction was observed in in vivo trail using the aqueous extract on day 21 post treatment, although in initial stages it showed 58.0 and 80% effectiveness on days 7 and 14 post treatment. Though the FCER reduction was somewhat lower in terms of comparison with albendazole, nevertheless, significant and prolong reduction was noticed. No deleterious ill effect was found in any of the haematological and biochemical parameters suggesting that the plant could be safer for use in sheep. Though significant changes were observed in SGPT, RBCs, Hb and RDWc levels, other parameters showed nonsignificant variations within the

  13. Cutting state identification

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, B.S.; Minis, I.; Rokni, M.

    1997-12-31

    Cutting states associated with the orthogonal cutting of stiff cylinders are identified through an analysis of the singular values of a Toeplitz matrix of third order cumulants of acceleration measurements. The ratio of the two pairs of largest singular values is shown to differentiate between light cutting, medium cutting, pre-chatter and chatter states. Sequences of cutting experiments were performed in which either depth of cut or turning frequency was varied. Two sequences of experiments with variable turning frequency and five with variable depth of cut, 42 cutting experiments in all, provided a database for the calculation of third order cumulants. Ratios of singular values of cumulant matrices find application in the analysis of control of orthogonal cutting.

  14. Labile complexes facilitate cadmium uptake by Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, L; Degryse, F; Niewold, T; Smolders, E

    2012-06-01

    The Free Ion Activity Model (FIAM) predicts that metal uptake in biota is related to the free ion activity in the external solution and that metal complexes do not contribute. However, studies with plants have shown that labile metal complexes enhance metal bioavailability when the uptake is rate-limited by transport of the free ion in solution to the uptake site. Here, the role of labile complexes of Cd on metal bioavailability was assessed using Caco-2 cells, the cell model for intestinal absorption. At low Cd(2+) concentration (1 nM), the CdCl(n)(2-n) complexes contributed to the uptake almost to the same extent as the free ion. At large Cd(2+) concentration (10 μM), the contribution of the complexes was much smaller. At constant Cd(2+) concentration, Cd intake in the cells from solutions containing synthetic ligands such as EDTA increased as the dissociation rate of the cadmium complexes increased, and correlated well with the Cd diffusion flux in solution measured with the Diffusive Gradient in Thin Films technique (DGT). The Cd intake fluxes in the cells were well predicted assuming that the specific uptake is limited by diffusion of the free Cd(2+) ion to the cell surface. Our results underline that speciation of Cd has a major effect on its uptake by intestinal cells, but the availability is not simply related to the free ion concentration. Labile complexes of Cd enhance metal bioavailability in these cells, likely by alleviating diffusive limitations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Do Vermont's Floodplains Constitute an Important Source of Labile Carbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdrial, J. N.; Dolan, A.; Kemsley, M.

    2014-12-01

    Floodplains are extremely heterogeneous landscapes with respect to soil and sediment composition and can present an important source of carbon (C) during floods. For example, stream bank soils and sediments are zones of active erosion and deposition of sediment associated C. Due to the presence of plants, riparian soils contain high amounts of C that is exchanged between stream waters and banks. Abandoned channels and meander wetlands that remain hydrologically connected to the main channel contain high amounts of organic matter that can be flushed into the stream during high discharge. This heterogeneity, result of floodplain geomorphology, land cover and use, can profoundly impact the amount and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) introduced into streams. In order to assess DOM characteristics leached from heterogeneous floodplain soils, aqueous soil extracts were performed on soil samples representative of different land covers (n=20) at four depths. Extracts were analyzed for dissolved organic C and total dissolved nitrogen with a Shimadzu C analyzer. Colored dissolved organic matter characteristics was measured with the Aqualog Fluorescence Spectrometer and quantified with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Preliminary data from three floodplains in Vermont (Connecticut, Missisquoi and Mad River) show a 3D variability of longitudinal, lateral, and vertical extents on water-extractable, mobile C. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations in meander swamp samples were found up to 9 times higher than in those of soils from agricultural field indicative of an important C source. Although C concentrations in adjacent fields were low, high abundance of labile C (indicated by tryptophan-like fluorescence) in water extracts from fields indicates recent biological production of C. This labile C is easily processed by microbes and transformed to the greenhouse gas CO2. These results provide important information on the contribution and lability of different floodplain

  16. A field study on phytoremediation of a lead-contaminated soil by Eucalyptus globulus in an abandoned mine site - Alagoa, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardo, R.; Kikuchi, R.

    2009-04-01

    Current engineering-based technologies used to clean up soils are very costly and need lots of work. Phytoremediation is the use of plants to remove pollutants (i.e. heavy metals) from the environment or render them harmless. In the phytoremediation process several plant species can be used to reduce the concentrations of heavy metals in contaminated soils to environmentally acceptable levels. The idea of using rare plants which hyperaccumulate metals to selectively remove and recycle excessive soil metals has increasingly been examined as a potential practical and more cost effective technology than soil replacement, solidification, or washing strategies presently used. However, most hyperaccumulator species are not suitable for phytoremediation application in the field due to their small biomass and slow growth. Cultivation of woody plants in contaminated soils has showed potential for use in phytoremediation but also it provides aesthetic improvement in the field. In this study we studied the possibility of using the approach of phytoremediation of lead by Eucalyptus globulus in a lead-contaminated soil from an abandoned mine. Although Eucalytpus globulus prefer good ecological conditions in humid temperate climates, there are few studies that have showed their great potential in contaminated areas and important biomonitors of environmental quality. A test field was set up in an abandoned mine site (Alagoa, Portugal) in order to investigate the feasibility of phytoremediation of lead by Eucalyptus globulus. The field soil was characterized as follows: humus - 2.56-7.08%, pH in the soil water - 4.50-5.10, silte - 18-15% and total Pb - 67-239 mg/kg. The soils in some areas exceed the critical value (150 mg/kg) according with Portuguese law. Eucalytus globulus growing on the abandoned mine, contaminated with lead was studied. The results of shoots sample analysis (n = 15) show the total Pb levels of 0.170-0.093 mg/kg in the stem and 2.94-5.14 mg/kg in the leaves

  17. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbins, A.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-05-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC), defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA) oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance) were determined over the course of a 28 day irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM-C to 55 ± 15 nM-C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. The concentration of DBC correlated with CDOM absorbance and the quality of DBC indicated by the ratios of different BPCAs correlated with CDOM absorbance spectral slope, suggesting the optical properties of CDOM may provide a proxy for both DBC concentrations and quality in natural waters. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 years. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Consequently, photo-degradation is posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the apparent survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their inherent inertness but

  18. Antihyperglycemic actions of Eucalyptus globulus (Eucalyptus) are associated with pancreatic and extra-pancreatic effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Gray, A M; Flatt, P R

    1998-12-01

    Eucalyptus globulus (eucalyptus) is used as a traditional treatment for diabetes. In this study, incorporation of eucalyptus in the diet (62.5 g/kg) and drinking water (2.5 g/L) reduced the hyperglycemia and associated weight loss of streptozotocin-treated mice. An aqueous extract of eucalyptus (AEE) (0.5 g/L) enhanced 2-deoxy-glucose transport by 50%, glucose oxidation by 60% and incorporation of glucose into glycogen by 90% in mouse abdominal muscle. In acute, 20 min incubations, 0.25-0.5 g AEE/L evoked a stepwise 70-160% enhancement of insulin secretion from the clonal pancreatic beta-cell line (BRIN-BD11). The stimulatory effect of 0.5 g/L AEE was unaltered by the presence of 400 micromol diazoxide/L and prior exposure to AEE did not alter subsequent insulin secretory response to L-alanine, thereby negating adetrimental effect on cell viability. The effect of AEE was not potentiated by glucose or demonstrable in cells exposed to a depolarizing concentration of KCl. Further study of the insulin-releasing effects of AEE revealed the activity to be heat stable, acetone insoluble, stable to acid, but abolished by exposure to alkali. Sequential extraction with solvents revealed activity in both methanol and water fractions, indicating the presence of more than one biologically active extract constituent. These data indicate that Eucalyptus globulus represents an effective antihyperglycemic dietary adjunct for the treatment of diabetes and a potential source for discovery of new orally active agent(s) for future therapy.

  19. Simulation of Laser Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Wolfgang; Nießen, Markus; Eppelt, Urs; Kowalick, Kerstin

    Laser cutting is a thermal separation process widely used in shaping and contour cutting applications. There are, however, gaps in understanding the dynamics of the process, especially issues related to cut quality. This work describes the advances in fundamental physical modelling and process monitoring of laser cutting, as well as time varying processes such as contour cutting. Diagnosis of ripple and dross formation is advanced to observe the melt flow and its separation simultaneously as well as the spatial shape of the cut kerf.

  20. Bronchial lability and skin reactivity in siblings of asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Verity, C M; Vanheule, B; Carswell, F; Hughes, A O

    1984-09-01

    Seventy five children with asthma (42 boys and 33 girls; age range 4 years 2 months to 15 years) and 75 of their siblings (37 boys and 38 girls; age range 4 years 3 months to 17 years 8 months) were studied to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the increased prevalence of asthma in boys, a prevalence that tends to disappear after puberty. Immediate cutaneous hypersensitivity to five allergens and maximum fall in peak expiratory flow rate after six minutes of treadmill running (bronchial lability) were determined in patients and siblings. There was no significant difference between boys and girls in skin test reactivity to single or multiple allergens in the sibling group. The percentage fall in peak expiratory flow rate after exercise was significantly greater in male than in female siblings and when a positive test was defined as a fall after exercise of either 10% or 15% of the rate before exercise the number of positive tests was significantly greater in boys. The results suggest that more boys than girls in this age group have asthma because their bronchial lability is greater, and not because more boys are atopic.

  1. The Labile Side of Iron Supplementation in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Cabantchik, Zvi Ioav

    2015-01-01

    The practice of intravenous iron supplementation has grown as nephrologists have gradually moved away from the liberal use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents as the main treatment for the anemia of CKD. This approach, together with the introduction of large-dose iron preparations, raises the future specter of inadvertent iatrogenic iron toxicity. Concerns have been raised in original studies and reviews about cardiac complications and severe infections that result from long-term intravenous iron supplementation. Regarding the iron preparations specifically, even though all the currently available preparations appear to be relatively safe in the short term, little is known regarding their long-term safety. In this review we summarize current knowledge of iron metabolism with an emphasis on the sources and potentially harmful effects of labile iron, highlight the approaches to identifying labile iron in pharmaceutical preparations and body fluids and its potential toxic role as a pathogenic factor in the complications of CKD, and propose methods for its early detection in at-risk patients. PMID:25999405

  2. Labile neurotoxin in serum of calves with "nervous" coccidiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Isler, C M; Bellamy, J E; Wobeser, G A

    1987-01-01

    Mouse inoculation was used to test for the presence of a toxin in the serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and intestinal contents collected from cases of bovine enteric coccidiosis, with and without neurological signs, and from control calves. Intravenous inoculation of mice with 10 mL/kg of serum from calves showing nervous signs caused effects significantly different from those caused by the inoculation of serum from calves not showing nervous signs and from control calves. The effect was particularly evident in female mice. At this dosage severe neurological signs such as loss of righting reflex, seizures and death occurred only with serum from calves with "nervous coccidiosis". The results suggest that serum from the calves with neurological signs contains a neurotoxin. This toxin appears to be highly labile. It was not present in the cerebrospinal fluid at levels comparable to those in the serum. The significance of this labile neurotoxin with respect to the pathogenesis of the neurological signs associated with bovine enteric coccidiosis is unknown. PMID:2955865

  3. Non-labile Soil 15Nitrogen Retention beneath Three Tree Species in a Tropical Plantation

    Treesearch

    Jason P. Kaye; Dan Binkley; Xiaoming Zou; John A. Parrotta

    2002-01-01

    Soil organic matter is the largest sink for N additions to forests.Species composition may affect soilNretention by altering the amount or proportion of added N stored in non-labile organic pools. We measured 15N tracer retention in labile and non-labile pools of surface (0–20 cm) mineral soils, 7 yr after the tracer was applied to a 9 yr-old Puerto Rican tree...

  4. An ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry index to estimate natural organic matter lability

    PubMed Central

    D'Andrilli, Juliana; Cooper, William T; Foreman, Christine M; Marshall, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Determining the chemical constituents of natural organic matter (NOM) by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICRMS) remains the ultimate measure for probing its source material, evolution, and transport; however, lability and the fate of organic matter (OM) in the environment remain controversial. FTICRMS-derived elemental compositions are presented in this study to validate a new interpretative method to determine the extent of NOM lability from various environments. Methods FTICRMS data collected over the last decade from the same 9.4 tesla instrument using negative electrospray ionization at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, Florida, was used to validate the application of a NOM lability index. Solid-phase extraction cartridges were used to isolate the NOM prior to FTICRMS; mass spectral peaks were calibrated internally by commonly identified NOM homologous series, and molecular formulae were determined for NOM composition and lability analysis. Results A molecular lability boundary (MLB) was developed from the FTICRMS molecular data, visualized from van Krevelen diagrams, dividing the data into more and less labile constituents. NOM constituents above the MLB at H/C ≥1.5 correspond to more labile material, whereas NOM constituents below the MLB, H/C <1.5, exhibit less labile, more recalcitrant character. Of all marine, freshwater, and glacial environments considered for this study, glacial ecosystems were calculated to contain the most labile OM. Conclusions The MLB extends our interpretation of FTICRMS NOM molecular data to include a metric of lability, and generally ranked the OM environments from most to least labile as glacial > marine > freshwater. Applying the MLB is useful not only for individual NOM FTICRMS studies, but also provides a lability threshold to compare and contrast molecular data with other FTICRMS instruments that survey NOM from around the world. Copyright © 2015

  5. [Universal implementation of pathogen inactivation in labile blood products is a major step towards transfusion safety].

    PubMed

    Cazenave, Jean-Pierre

    2010-12-01

    Transfusion of labile blood products (red cell concentrates, platelet concentrates and plasma) is vital in the absence of alternatives. Patients and doctors have always feared infections transmitted by blood, blood components and blood-derived drugs. It is potentially dangerous to delay implementation of pathogen inactivation in labile blood products pending a perfect process. Universal implementation of pathogen inactivation in labile blood products is a major step towards transfusion safety.

  6. Non-labile Soil Nitrogen Retention beneath Three Tree Species in a Tropical Plantation

    Treesearch

    Jason P. Kaye; Dan Binkley; Xiaoming Zou; John A. Parrotta

    2002-01-01

    Soil organic matter is the largest sink for N additions to forests. Species composition may affect soilNretention by altering the amount or proportion of added N stored in non-labile organic pools. We measured 15N tracer retention in labile and non-labile pools of surface (0–20 cm) mineral soils, 7 yr after the tracer was applied to a 9 yr-old Puerto Rican tree...

  7. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography diode array detection mass spectrometry of phenolic compounds in fruit of Eucalyptus globulus cultivated in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Boulekbache-Makhlouf, Lila; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Chibane, Mohamed; Mazauric, Jean-Paul; Slimani, Sakina; Henry, Max; Cheynier, Veronique; Madani, Khodir

    2010-12-22

    A method based on high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS) following fractionation by chromatography on a Sephadex LH-20 column has been developed to determine the phenolic composition of fruit of Eucalyptus globulus growing in Algeria. The presence of 18 gallotannins, 26 ellagitannins, and 2 flavonols was established. Tentative identification is provided for these compounds on the basis of UV-visible spectra and mass spectrometry data. Most compounds described in this study have not previously detected in fruit of E. globulus. Moreover, this is the first report of methyl digalloyl diglucose, 3,3'-O-dimethylellagic acid 4-O-β-glucopyranoside, ellagic acid hexose, methyl ellagic acid pentose, methyltetragalloylglucose, and valoneic acid isomers (sanguisorbic, flavogallic acid dilactone) in the genus Eucalyptus. Quantitatively, ellagic acid and its derivatives, including ellagitannins, are largely predominant.

  8. Pharmacological ascorbate and ionizing radiation (IR) increase labile iron in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Moser, Justin C; Rawal, Malvika; Wagner, Brett A; Du, Juan; Cullen, Joseph J; Buettner, Garry R

    2013-01-01

    Labile iron, i.e. iron that is weakly bound and is relatively unrestricted in its redox activity, has been implicated in both the pathogenesis as well as treatment of cancer. Two cancer treatments where labile iron may contribute to their mechanism of action are pharmacological ascorbate and ionizing radiation (IR). Pharmacological ascorbate has been shown to have tumor-specific toxic effects due to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. By catalyzing the oxidation of ascorbate, labile iron can enhance the rate of formation of hydrogen peroxide; labile iron can also react with hydrogen peroxide. Here we have investigated the magnitude of the labile iron pool in tumor and normal tissue. We also examined the ability of pharmacological ascorbate and IR to change the size of the labile iron pool. Although a significant amount of labile iron was seen in tumors (MIA PaCa-2 cells in athymic nude mice), higher levels were seen in murine tissues that were not susceptible to pharmacological ascorbate. Pharmacological ascorbate and irradiation were shown to increase the labile iron in tumor homogenates from this murine model of pancreatic cancer. As both IR and pharmacological ascorbate may rely on labile iron for their effects on tumor tissues, our data suggest that pharmacological ascorbate could be used as a radio-sensitizing agent for some radio-resistant tumors.

  9. Affective lability in patients with bipolar disorders is associated with high levels of childhood trauma.

    PubMed

    Aas, Monica; Aminoff, Sofie R; Vik Lagerberg, Trine; Etain, Bruno; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid

    2014-08-15

    This study aimed to investigate associations between a history of childhood trauma and levels of affective lability in bipolar patients compared to controls. Forty-two patients and 14 controls were assessed using the Affective Lability Scale (ALS) and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Affective Lability Score was significantly associated with scores on the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. A multivariate regression model indicated a relationship between childhood trauma scores and differences in affective lability between patients and controls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Potent HGF/c-Met axis inhibitors from Eucalyptus globulus: the coupling of phloroglucinol and sesquiterpenoid is essential for the activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Ai, Jing; Gan, Li-She; Xu, Jin-Biao; Wang, Ying; Su, Zu-Shang; Wang, Lu; Ding, Jian; Geng, Mei-Yu; Yue, Jian-Min

    2012-09-27

    Eucalyptin A (1), together with two known compounds 2 and 3 exhibiting potent inhibition on HGF/c-Met axis, was discovered from the fruits of Eucalyptus globulus. 1 possessed an unprecedented carbon framework of phloroglucinol-coupled sesquiterpenoid, and its structure was elucidated by spectroscopic method and ECD calculation. A brief structure-activity relationship discussion indicated that the coupling of a phloroglucinol and a sesquiterpenoid is essential for the activity.

  11. Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Sphaeridiotrema pseudoglobulus (Digenea): Species differentiation based on mtDNA (Barcode) and partial LSU-rDNA sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergmame, Laura; Huffman, Jane; Cole, Rebecca; Dayanandan, Selvadurai; Tkach, Vasyl; McLaughlin, J. Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Flukes belonging to Sphaeridiotrema are important parasites of waterfowl, and 2 morphologically similar species Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Sphaeridiotrema pseudoglobulus, have been implicated in waterfowl mortality in North America. Cytochrome oxidase I (barcode region) and partial LSU-rDNA sequences from specimens of S. globulus and S. pseudoglobulus, obtained from naturally and experimentally infected hosts from New Jersey and Quebec, respectively, confirmed that these species were distinct. Barcode sequences of the 2 species differed at 92 of 590 nucleotide positions (15.6%) and the translated sequences differed by 13 amino acid residues. Partial LSU-rDNA sequences differed at 29 of 1,208 nucleotide positions (2.4%). Additional barcode sequences from specimens collected from waterfowl in Wisconsin and Minnesota and morphometric data obtained from specimens acquired along the north shore of Lake Superior revealed the presence of S. pseudoglobulus in these areas. Although morphometric data suggested the presence of S. globulus in the Lake Superior sample, it was not found among the specimens sequenced from Wisconsin or Minnesota.

  12. Device for cutting protrusions

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M [Knoxville, TN

    2011-07-05

    An apparatus for clipping a protrusion of material is provided. The protrusion may, for example, be a bolt head, a nut, a rivet, a weld bead, or a temporary assembly alignment tab protruding from a substrate surface of assembled components. The apparatus typically includes a cleaver having a cleaving edge and a cutting blade having a cutting edge. Generally, a mounting structure configured to confine the cleaver and the cutting blade and permit a range of relative movement between the cleaving edge and the cutting edge is provided. Also typically included is a power device coupled to the cutting blade. The power device is configured to move the cutting edge toward the cleaving edge. In some embodiments the power device is activated by a momentary switch. A retraction device is also generally provided, where the retraction device is configured to move the cutting edge away from the cleaving edge.

  13. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrani, Alon; Zhang, Tongwei; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Tang, Yongchun

    2008-06-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S°, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 °C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (∼6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (∼0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  14. Chemical leaching methods and measurements of marine labile particulate Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revels, B. N.; John, S.

    2012-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential nutrient for life. Yet its low solubility and concentration in the ocean limits marine phytoplankton productivity in many regions of the world. Dissolved phase Fe (<0.4μm) has traditionally been considered the most biologically accessible form, however, the particulate phase (>0.4μm) may contain an important, labile reservoir of Fe that may also be available to phytoplankton. However, concentration data alone cannot elucidate the sources of particulate Fe to the ocean and to what extent particulate iron may support phytoplankton growth. Isotopic analysis of natural particles may help to elucidate the biogeochemical cycling of Fe, though it is important to find a leaching method which accesses bioavailable Fe. Thirty-three different chemical leaches were performed on a marine sediment reference material, MESS-3. The combinations included four different acids (25% acetic acid, 0.01M HCl, 0.5M HCl, 0.1M H2SO4 at pH2), various redox conditions (0.02M hydroxylamine hydrochloride or 0.02M H2O2), three temperatures (25°C, 60°C, 90°C), and three time points (10 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours). Leached Fe concentrations varied from 1mg/g to 35mg/g, with longer treatment times, stronger acids, and hotter temperatures generally associated with an increase in leached Fe. δ56Fe in these leaches varied from -1.0‰ to +0.2‰. Interestingly, regardless of leaching method used, there was a very similar relationship between the amount of Fe leached from the particles and the δ56Fe of this iron. Isotopically lighter δ56Fe values were associated with smaller amounts of leached Fe whereas isotopically heavier δ56Fe values were associated with larger amounts of leached Fe. Two alternate hypotheses could explain these data. Either, the particles may contain pools of isotopically light Fe that are easily accessed early in dissolution, or isotopically light Fe may be preferentially leached from the particle due to a kinetic isotope effect during dissolution

  15. [Labile iron pool formation in rat's blood under rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Shandrenko, S H

    2012-01-01

    The labile nonheme iron pool formation in blood under glycerol induced rhabdomyolysis in rats has been investigated. This iron is not included in transferrin, thereby it is redox-active. Rhabdomyolysis was caused by intramuscular injection of 50% glycerol in a dose of 10 ml/kg. In the first day it has been registered that the blood plasma free heme content increased 10 times and the liver heme-oxigenase activity increased 6 times. Plasma redox-active iron pool formation has been registered by EPR method. Such iron was absent in the control group. This iron pool content in the interval from the 1st to the 6st day was more than 2 mg/l and significantly higher than the transferrin iron level. The plasma iron pool unshielded by transferrin may be one of oxidative stress causes.

  16. Lability of renal papillary tissue composition in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, J C

    1978-01-01

    1. The acute effects of (a) a minor operative procedure using ether as the anaesthetic, and (b) the administration of 0.9% saline as a single I.V. injection in the conscious rat, on renal tissue composition were studied in hydropenic and normally hydrated rats. 2. The operative procedure and anaesthesia induced a rapid and transient decrease in papillary osmolality in both hydropenic and normally hydrated animals, the important contributing factor being a significant decrease in urea content. 3. Administration of a small volume of saline caused a rapid decrease in urea content, and an increase in water content. 4. It is concluded that papillary composition is extremely labile, large changes being produced by relatively minor experimental procedures. PMID:624997

  17. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amrani, A.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S??, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 ??C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (???6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (???0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  18. Effects of labile carbon addition on a headwater stream food web

    Treesearch

    Heidi S. Wilcox; J. Bruce Wallace; Judy L. Meyer; Jonathan P. Benstead

    2005-01-01

    We added dextrose for two 8-week periods (summer and autumn) to a highly heterotrophic headwater stream in North Carolina, U.S.A., to examine the responses of its benthic food web to increased labile carbon. We hypothesized that addition of labile carbon would elevate microbial abundance and activity, resulting in greater resource availability and higher...

  19. Phaeochromocytoma presenting with labile blood pressures following coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Roy, James; Akhunji, Zakir; Kushwaha, Virag; Mackie, James; Jepson, Nigel

    2016-12-01

    Pheochromocytomas have been reported prior to and during coronary artery bypass surgery. We present a patient with an undiagnosed pheochromocytoma who presented with labile hypertension following coronary artery bypass surgery. This case calls attention to the inclusion of an undiagnosed pheochromocytoma in the differential diagnosis for all patients who develop labile hypertension in the postoperative period following cardiac surgery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Elemental composition and functional groups in soil labile organic matter fractions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Labile organic matter fractions are major components involved in nutrient cycle in soil. In this chapter, we examine three labile organic matter fraction: light fraction (LF), humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (HA) in Alabama cotton soils (ultisol) amended with chemical fertilizer (NH4NO3) and poult...

  1. Lability criteria for successive metal complexes in steady-state planar diffusion.

    PubMed

    Salvador, José; Puy, Jaume; Galceran, Josep; Cecília, Joan; Town, Raewyn M; van Leeuwen, Herman P

    2006-01-19

    The lability of sequential metal complexes, ML, ML2, ML3, ... , up to a general 1:n metal/ligand stoichiometric ratio is considered for the case of metal ions (M) being accumulated at a surface (analytical sensor or organism). The analytical solution for the steady-state diffusion of M within a sequential complexation scheme allows quantification of the contribution from the dissociation of all of the complex species to the metal flux through the so-called lability degree, xi. A lability degree for each sequential complexation step is also defined which, due to the sequential character of the complexation scheme, depends not only on the proper kinetic constants of the given complexation step but also on the kinetics of the previous ones. When all contributions from the complexes are diffusion limited, the system is fully labile and xi=1. To provide simple lability criteria, the reaction layer approximation is extended to specifically deal with this sequential complexation scheme, so that a reaction layer thickness is defined when the existence of one particular rate-limiting step is assumed. Expressions for the classical lability parameter, L, are formulated using the reaction layer approximation. The change of the lability of the system as the diffusion layer thickness is modified is analyzed in detail. The contribution of the complex flux reflects the evolution of the system from labile to inert as the thickness of the sensor is appropriately decreased.

  2. Estimating soil labile organic carbon and potential turnover rates using a sequential fumigation–incubation procedure.

    Treesearch

    X.M. Zoua; H.H. Ruanc; Y. Fua; X.D. Yanga; L.Q. Sha

    2005-01-01

    Labile carbon is the fraction of soil organic carbon with most rapid turnover times and its oxidation drives the flux of CO2 between soils and atmosphere. Available chemical and physical fractionation methods for estimating soil labile organic carbon are indirect and lack a clear biological definition. We have modified the well-established Jenkinson and Powlson’s...

  3. Knowledge lability: Within-person changes in parental knowledge and their associations with adolescent problem behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lippold, Melissa A.; Fosco, Gregory; Ram, Nilam; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Higher levels of parental knowledge about youth activities has been associated with lower levels of youth risky behavior. Yet little is known about how parental knowledge fluctuates during early adolescence and how those fluctuations are associated with the development of problem behavior. We use the term lability to describe within-person fluctuations in knowledge over time with higher lability indicating greater fluctuations in knowledge from year-to-year. This longitudinal study of rural adolescents (N = 840) investigated if change in parental knowledge across four waves of data from Grades 6 to 8 is characterized by lability, and if greater lability is associated with higher youth substance use, delinquency, and internalizing problems in Grade 9. Our models indicated that only some of the variance in parental knowledge was accounted for by developmental trends. The remaining residual variance reflects within-person fluctuations around these trends, lability, plus measurement and occasion-specific error. Even controlling for level and developmental trends in knowledge, higher knowledge lability (i.e., more fluctuation) was associated with increased risk for later alcohol and tobacco use, and for girls, higher delinquency and internalizing problems. Our findings suggest that lability in parental knowledge has unique implications for adolescent outcomes. The discussion focuses on mechanisms that may link knowledge lability to substance use. Interventions may be most effective if they teach parents to consistently and predictably decrease knowledge across early adolescence. PMID:26381431

  4. Labile proteins accumulated in damaged hair upon permanent waving and bleaching treatments.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takafumi; Ito, Mayumi; Kizawa, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    We previously found that certain hair proteins were soluble by means of a partial extraction method. In this study, we demonstrate that the amount of soluble proteins internally formed in permed and bleached hair, labile proteins, is a useful index for hair damage assessment. Compared to tensile property changes, this index rose in widely dynamic ranges as the time of either permanent waving or bleaching treatments increased. The amount of labile proteins was much larger than that of proteins eluted into perming and bleaching lotions. However, the labile proteins showed electrophoretic profiles similar to those of the eluted proteins. These results suggest that a portion of the stable proteins in normal hair was transformed into labile proteins upon permanent waving and bleaching treatments. Consequently, permed and bleached hair tends to release the resultant labile proteins.

  5. Laser cutting plastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  6. Ultrasonic Cutting of Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Yvonne; Zahn, Susann; Rohm, Harald

    In the field of food engineering, cutting is usually classified as a mechanical unit operation dealing with size reduction by applying external forces on a bulk product. Ultrasonic cutting is realized by superpositioning the macroscopic feed motion of the cutting device or of the product with a microscopic vibration of the cutting tool. The excited tool interacts with the product and generates a number of effects. Primary energy concentration in the separation zone and the modification of contact friction along the tool flanks arise from the cyclic loading and are responsible for benefits such as reduced cutting force, smooth cut surface, and reduced product deformation. Secondary effects such as absorption and cavitation originate from the propagation of the sound field in the product and are closely related to chemical and physical properties of the material to be cut. This chapter analyzes interactions between food products and ultrasonic cutting tools and relates these interactions with physical and chemical product properties as well as with processing parameters like cutting velocity, ultrasonic amplitude and frequency, and tool design.

  7. Few Mendelian Genes Underlie the Quantitative Response of a Forest Tree, Eucalyptus globulus, to a Natural Fungal Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jules S.; Potts, Brad M.; Vaillancourt, René E.

    2008-01-01

    Foliar fungal pathogens from the genus Mycosphaerella affect eucalypts in natural forests and plantations worldwide. QTL analysis was conducted to dissect the genetic control of resistance in Eucalyptus globulus to a natural infection by Mycosphaerella leaf disease, using a clonally replicated outbred F2 family (112 genotypes) planted in a field trial. Two major QTL, with high LOD support (20.2 and 10.9) and high genomewide significance, explained a large proportion (52%) of the phenotypic variance in the severity of damage by Mycosphaerella cryptica, which may be indicative of oligogenic control. Both QTL were validated in a second F2 family and one was validated in a third F2 family. The mean values of different genotype classes at both major QTL argue for Mendelian inheritance with resistance dominant over susceptibility. There were strong correlations between the levels of Mycosphaerella damage in related genetic material planted in three widely separated locations in Tasmania. These findings together provide evidence that the genes controlling resistance to Mycosphaerella damage are stable in different genetic backgrounds and across different environments. PMID:18202395

  8. Chemical and structural analysis of Eucalyptus globulus and E. camaldulensis leaf cuticles: a lipidized cell wall region

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Paula; Fernández, Victoria; Graça, José; Cabral, Vanessa; Kayali, Nour; Khayet, Mohamed; Gil, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The plant cuticle has traditionally been conceived as an independent hydrophobic layer that covers the external epidermal cell wall. Due to its complexity, the existing relationship between cuticle chemical composition and ultra-structure remains unclear to date. This study aimed to examine the link between chemical composition and structure of isolated, adaxial leaf cuticles of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus by the gradual extraction and identification of lipid constituents (cutin and soluble lipids), coupled to spectroscopic and microscopic analyses. The soluble compounds and cutin monomers identified could not be assigned to a concrete internal cuticle ultra-structure. After cutin depolymerization, a cellulose network resembling the cell wall was observed, with different structural patterns in the regions ascribed to the cuticle proper and cuticular layer, respectively. Our results suggest that the current cuticle model should be revised, stressing the presence and major role of cell wall polysaccharides. It is concluded that the cuticle may be interpreted as a modified cell wall region which contains additional lipids. The major heterogeneity of the plant cuticle makes it difficult to establish a direct link between cuticle chemistry and structure with the existing methodologies. PMID:25278953

  9. The influence of operating parameters on the biodelignification of Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulps in a laccase--violuric acid system.

    PubMed

    Oudia, Atika; Queiroz, João; Simões, Rogério

    2008-04-01

    The potential of a laccase mediator system on the delignification of Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulp was investigated under diverse operating conditions. A series of enzymatic treatments were performed to determine how biodelignification is influenced by pulp consistency, oxygen pressure, reaction time, dose of laccase, and dose of mediator. The mediator used was violuric acid. The results revealed that the extent of biodelignification remains practically constant between 1% and 2.5% of pulp consistency then decreases. However, its effect is less pronounced than the mediator or laccase charge. In fact, an increase in the mediator charge from 1% to 4% leads to an increase in the extent of delignification (fixed laccase charge = 20 IU/g and reaction time 120 min) from 28.4% to 52.2%. On the other hand, at a mediator charge of 4%, the increase of laccase charge from 10 to 40 IU/g has a similar impact on delignification. As for oxygen pressure, the extent of delignification increases with oxygen pressure, from 38.9% to 48.6%, when air and pure oxygen at 4 bar gauge are used. From the standpoint of reaction time, delignification is characterized by a very fast phase followed by a much slower one, leading to a plateau.

  10. Novel detection of formylated phloroglucinol compounds (FPCs) in the wound wood of Eucalyptus globulus and E. nitens.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Davies, Noel W; Mohammed, Caroline

    2003-04-01

    This study characterized the chemical responses of Eucalyptus globulus and Eucalyptus nitens to artificial inoculation with a basidiomycete decay fungus. Nine-year-old trees responded to mechanical wounding or inoculation with the decay fungus by producing new wound wood characterized by the presence of dark extractives 17 months after wounding. Analysis of crude wound wood extracts by HPLC coupled to negative ion electrospray mass spectrometry revealed the presence of a complex mixture of many unidentified formylated phlorglucinol compounds (FPCs), in addition to a diverse range of other polyphenolic compounds (hydrolyzable tannins, proanthocyanidins, flavanone glycoside, stilbene glycosides). Prior to this study, FPCs have only been reported from leaves and buds of Eucalyptus spp. Unequivocal evidence for the presence of macrocarpal A and B, and sideroxylonal A and B in the crude extracts was obtained, as well as evidence for a wide range of as yet unreported FPCs. Subsequent preliminary in vitro fungal and bacterial bioassays did not support an antimicrobial role for FPCs in host-pathogen interactions in eucalypts.

  11. Chemical and structural analysis of Eucalyptus globulus and E. camaldulensis leaf cuticles: a lipidized cell wall region.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Paula; Fernández, Victoria; Graça, José; Cabral, Vanessa; Kayali, Nour; Khayet, Mohamed; Gil, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The plant cuticle has traditionally been conceived as an independent hydrophobic layer that covers the external epidermal cell wall. Due to its complexity, the existing relationship between cuticle chemical composition and ultra-structure remains unclear to date. This study aimed to examine the link between chemical composition and structure of isolated, adaxial leaf cuticles of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus by the gradual extraction and identification of lipid constituents (cutin and soluble lipids), coupled to spectroscopic and microscopic analyses. The soluble compounds and cutin monomers identified could not be assigned to a concrete internal cuticle ultra-structure. After cutin depolymerization, a cellulose network resembling the cell wall was observed, with different structural patterns in the regions ascribed to the cuticle proper and cuticular layer, respectively. Our results suggest that the current cuticle model should be revised, stressing the presence and major role of cell wall polysaccharides. It is concluded that the cuticle may be interpreted as a modified cell wall region which contains additional lipids. The major heterogeneity of the plant cuticle makes it difficult to establish a direct link between cuticle chemistry and structure with the existing methodologies.

  12. Lability of trace metals in submerged soils: a column study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimirciag, Ramona; Ajmone-Marsan, Franco

    2013-04-01

    The reduction of Fe (III) and Mn (IV) and the decomposition of organic matter exert a great influence on the biogeochemical cycles of many trace metals and nutrients in the environment. In the particular case of intermittently submerged soils, metals associated with Fe and Mn oxides become readily available due to the reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn oxides. The effects of oxido-reductive conditions on the release of Cu and Zn from heavy metal contaminated soils and the changes in their chemical speciation were studied. Column experiments were performed, using Rhizon soil moisture samplers inserted at different heights to monitor the mobility and transport of metals in the submerged soil samples. Cu was released in solution immediately, in the first red-ox cycle, either due to the solubilization of Fe and Mn oxides, or to the oxidation of organic matter with which Cu is commonly complexed, or both. During the following reductive half-cycles, the amount of Cu extracted from the soil solution decreased. However, the concentration of Cu in the solution leached from the column, which was percolated in aerobic conditions, increased. Since in the successive red-ox cycles the Eh decreases faster and to lower values, it is possible that Cu might have been removed from pore water by sulfide precipitation during the anaerobic half-cycle and released during the aerobic half-cycle, due to the oxidation of sulfides to sulfates. The release of Zn was similar to the dissolution of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxydes, and the amount extracted by Rhizon and by leaching increased during the four red-ox cycles. The chemical fractionation of the soils was also studied and the results showed that the alternate oxidative-reductive conditions cause, in general, an increase in the lability of trace metals. While Zn speciation suffers little change, Cu showed a much higher exchangeable fraction in the submerged soils, as compared to the initial, not submerged ones. The results of this study indicate

  13. Cutting Class Harms Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lewis A., III

    2012-01-01

    An accessible business school population of undergraduate students was investigated in three independent, but related studies to determine effects on grades due to cutting class and failing to take advantage of optional reviews and study quizzes. It was hypothesized that cutting classes harms exam scores, attending preexam reviews helps exam…

  14. Starting Trees from Cuttings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a procedure for starting tree cuttings from woody plants, explaining "lag time," recommending materials, and giving step-by-step instructions for rooting and planting. Points out species which are likely candidates for cuttings and provides tips for teachers for developing a unit. (JM)

  15. When Students Cut Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malikow, Max

    2006-01-01

    Masochism, the irrational self-infliction of pain, is more easily defined than understood. Once, a teacher used the word "cutting" only reference to a student skipping class. But, in recent years, it has taken on additional meaning. Cutting, or self-injury, is a deliberate self-harming behavior but without conscious suicidal ideation. To define…

  16. When Students Cut Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malikow, Max

    2006-01-01

    Masochism, the irrational self-infliction of pain, is more easily defined than understood. Once, a teacher used the word "cutting" only reference to a student skipping class. But, in recent years, it has taken on additional meaning. Cutting, or self-injury, is a deliberate self-harming behavior but without conscious suicidal ideation. To define…

  17. Cutting Class Harms Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lewis A., III

    2012-01-01

    An accessible business school population of undergraduate students was investigated in three independent, but related studies to determine effects on grades due to cutting class and failing to take advantage of optional reviews and study quizzes. It was hypothesized that cutting classes harms exam scores, attending preexam reviews helps exam…

  18. Affect lability predicts occurrence of suicidal ideation in bipolar patients: a two-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ducasse, D; Jaussent, I; Guillaume, S; Azorin, J M; Bellivier, F; Belzeaux, R; Bougerol, T; Etain, B; Gard, S; Henry, C; Kahn, J P; Leboyer, M; Loftus, J; Passerieux, C; Olié, E; Courtet, P

    2017-05-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate, in bipolar patients, whether affect lability was associated with suicidal ideation incidence during 2-year follow-up, and which subtype of affect lability was associated with suicidal ideation. A total of 319 euthymic or mildly depressed bipolar outpatients recruited in the French FondaMental Advanced Centres of Expertise for Bipolar Disorder were divided into two subgroups according to the occurrence of suicidal ideation during a 2-year follow-up. Affect lability was assessed by the French version of the Affect Lability Scale. Bipolar patients with high affect lability were more likely to report suicidal ideation during follow-up, even after adjustment for age, study level, rapid cycling, current depression level, anxiety disorder, and lifetime history SA (OR = 2.47; 95% CI [1.15-5.30], P = 0.01). The risk of suicidal ideation increased with the level of affect lability. More specifically, the propensity to switch from neutral to elation affect, from anxious to depressive affect (or inversely), and from neutral to anger affect predicted suicidal ideation. Reducing affective lability could become a new therapeutic target of suicidal prevention in bipolar disorder. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Fundamentals of cutting

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J. G.; Patel, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The process of cutting is analysed in fracture mechanics terms with a view to quantifying the various parameters involved. The model used is that of orthogonal cutting with a wedge removing a layer of material or chip. The behaviour of the chip is governed by its thickness and for large radii of curvature the chip is elastic and smooth cutting occurs. For smaller thicknesses, there is a transition, first to plastic bending and then to plastic shear for small thicknesses and smooth chips are formed. The governing parameters are tool geometry, which is principally the wedge angle, and the material properties of elastic modulus, yield stress and fracture toughness. Friction can also be important. It is demonstrated that the cutting process may be quantified via these parameters, which could be useful in the study of cutting in biology. PMID:27274798

  20. Fundamentals of cutting.

    PubMed

    Williams, J G; Patel, Y

    2016-06-06

    The process of cutting is analysed in fracture mechanics terms with a view to quantifying the various parameters involved. The model used is that of orthogonal cutting with a wedge removing a layer of material or chip. The behaviour of the chip is governed by its thickness and for large radii of curvature the chip is elastic and smooth cutting occurs. For smaller thicknesses, there is a transition, first to plastic bending and then to plastic shear for small thicknesses and smooth chips are formed. The governing parameters are tool geometry, which is principally the wedge angle, and the material properties of elastic modulus, yield stress and fracture toughness. Friction can also be important. It is demonstrated that the cutting process may be quantified via these parameters, which could be useful in the study of cutting in biology.

  1. Labile aggregation stimulating substance, free fatty acids, and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, J M; White, J G; Krivit, W

    1976-01-01

    Labile aggregation stimulating substance (LASS), an intermediate produced during platelet biosynthesis of PGE2 and PGF2alpha, acts as a physiologic intercellular messenger to promote platelet aggregation and the release reaction. The activity is formed by intact cells after physiologic stimulation or can be generated from platelet membrane fractions after combination with arachidonate. In the present investigation, small amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids added to an incubation mixture of platelet microsomes and arachidonate were found to significantly inhibit subsequent platelet aggregation. Saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the same concentrations were without effect. However, in higher concentrations mono-unsaturated fatty acids were found to be inhibitory and stearic acid was found to enhance subsequent platelet aggregation. The inhibition caused by the polyunsaturated fatty acid, linoleate, was shown to be the result of an effect on the production of LASS through an interaction with the platelet enzyme responsible for conversion of arachidonate to LASS. In contrast, stearic acid was found to enhance platelet aggregation by acting on the platelets and not directly on LASS production. The results suggest that small changes in the fatty acid composition of platelet phospholipids could significantly influence platelet reactivity.

  2. Anticariogenic and phytochemical evaluation of Eucalyptus globules Labill.

    PubMed Central

    Ishnava, Kalpesh B.; Chauhan, Jenabhai B.; Barad, Mahesh B.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, in vitro anticariogenic potential of ethyl acetate, hexane and methanol and aqueous extracts of plant leaves of Eucalyptus globules Labill. were evaluated by using four cariogenic bacteria, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans. Agar well diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were used for this purpose. The ethyl acetate extracted fraction of plant leaves showed good inhibitory effects against all selected bacteria. In Eucalyptus globules, hexane and ethyl acetate extracts found highly effective against, Lactobacillus acidophilus with MIC value of 0.031 and 0.062 mg/mL, respectively. Qualitative phytochemical investigation of above extracts showed the presence of alkaloids, phenolic compounds, steroids, cardiac glycosides and terpenes. Based on the MIC value and bioautography, ethyl acetate of plant leaf was selected for further study. Further investigation on the structure elucidation of the bioactive compound using IR, GC-MS and NMR techniques revealed the presence of alpha-farnesene, a sesquiterpene. Eucalyptus globules plant leaf extracts have great potential as anticariogenic agents that may be useful in the treatment of oral disease. PMID:23961222

  3. Inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives. II. Physical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, B.; Wiebe, M.E.; Lippin, A.; Vandersande, J.; Stryker, M.H.

    1985-11-01

    The thermal inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives was evaluated by addition of marker viruses (VSV, Sindbis, Sendai, EMC) to anti-hemophilic factor (AHF) concentrates. The rate of virus inactivation at 60 degrees C was decreased by at least 100- to 700-fold by inclusion of 2.75 M glycine and 50 percent sucrose, or 3.0 M potassium citrate, additives which contribute to retention of protein biologic activity. Nonetheless, at least 10(4) infectious units of each virus was inactivated within 10 hours. Increasing the temperature from 60 to 70 or 80 degrees C caused a 90 percent or greater loss in AHF activity. An even greater decline in the rate of virus inactivation was observed on heating AHF in the lyophilized state, although no loss in AHF activity was observed after 72 hours of heating at 60 degrees C. Several of the proteins present in lyophilized AHF concentrates displayed an altered electrophoretic mobility as a result of exposure to 60 degrees C for 24 hours. Exposure of lyophilized AHF to irradiation from a cobalt 60 source resulted in an acceptable yield of AHF at 1.0, but not at 2.0, megarads. At 1 megarad, greater than or equal to 6.0 logs of VSV and 3.3 logs of Sindbis virus were inactivated.

  4. Microbial formation of labile organic carbon in Antarctic glacial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. J.; Foster, R. A.; McKnight, D. M.; Lisle, J. T.; Littmann, S.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Foreman, C. M.

    2017-04-01

    Roughly six petagrams of organic carbon are stored within ice worldwide. This organic carbon is thought to be of old age and highly bioavailable. Along with storage of ancient and new atmospherically deposited organic carbon, microorganisms may contribute substantially to the glacial organic carbon pool. Models of glacial microbial carbon cycling vary from net respiration to net carbon fixation. Supraglacial streams have not been considered in models although they are amongst the largest ecosystems on most glaciers and are inhabited by diverse microbial communities. Here we investigate the biogeochemical sequence of organic carbon production and uptake in an Antarctic supraglacial stream in the McMurdo Dry Valleys using nanometre-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry, fluorescence spectroscopy, stable isotope analysis and incubation experiments. We find that heterotrophic production relies on highly labile organic carbon freshly derived from photosynthetic bacteria rather than legacy organic carbon. Exudates from primary production were utilized by heterotrophs within 24 h, and supported bacterial growth demands. The tight coupling of microbially released organic carbon and rapid uptake by heterotrophs suggests a dynamic local carbon cycle. Moreover, as temperatures increase there is the potential for positive feedback between glacial melt and microbial transformations of organic carbon.

  5. Continuous flow analysis of labile iron in ice-cores.

    PubMed

    Hiscock, William T; Fischer, Hubertus; Bigler, Matthias; Gfeller, Gideon; Leuenberger, Daiana; Mini, Olivia

    2013-05-07

    The important active and passive role of mineral dust aerosol in the climate and the global carbon cycle over the last glacial/interglacial cycles has been recognized. However, little data on the most important aeolian dust-derived biological micronutrient, iron (Fe), has so far been available from ice-cores from Greenland or Antarctica. Furthermore, Fe deposition reconstructions derived from the palaeoproxies particulate dust and calcium differ significantly from the Fe flux data available. The ability to measure high temporal resolution Fe data in polar ice-cores is crucial for the study of the timing and magnitude of relationships between geochemical events and biological responses in the open ocean. This work adapts an existing flow injection analysis (FIA) methodology for low-level trace Fe determinations with an existing glaciochemical analysis system, continuous flow analysis (CFA) of ice-cores. Fe-induced oxidation of N,N'-dimethyl-p-pheylenediamine (DPD) is used to quantify the biologically more important and easily leachable Fe fraction released in a controlled digestion step at pH ~1.0. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of labile Fe in ice-core samples collected from the Antarctic Byrd ice-core and the Greenland Ice-Core Project (GRIP) ice-core.

  6. Structural Lability of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Pavel I.; Abashkin, Dmitry A.; Kalinina, Natalya O.; Arutyunyan, Alexsandr M.; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Dobrov, Eugeny N.

    2013-01-01

    Virions of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) were neglected for more than thirty years after their basic properties were determined. In this paper, the physicochemical characteristics of BSMV virions and virion-derived viral capsid protein (CP) were analyzed, namely, the absorption and intrinsic fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, differential scanning calorimetry curves, and size distributions by dynamic laser light scattering. The structural properties of BSMV virions proved to be intermediate between those of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a well-characterized virus with rigid rod-shaped virions, and flexuous filamentous plant viruses. The BSMV virions were found to be considerably more labile than expected from their rod-like morphology and a distant sequence relation of the BSMV and TMV CPs. The circular dichroism spectra of BSMV CP subunits incorporated into the virions, but not subunits of free CP, demonstrated a significant proportion of beta-structure elements, which were proposed to be localized mostly in the protein regions exposed on the virion outer surface. These beta-structure elements likely formed during virion assembly can comprise the N- and C-terminal protein regions unstructured in the non-virion CP and can mediate inter-subunit interactions. Based on computer-assisted structure modeling, a model for BSMV CP subunit structural fold compliant with the available experimental data was proposed. PMID:23613760

  7. Metabolically Labile Fumarate Esters Impart Kinetic Selectivity to Irreversible Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zaro, Balyn W; Whitby, Landon R; Lum, Kenneth M; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-12-14

    Electrophilic small molecules are an important class of chemical probes and drugs that produce biological effects by irreversibly modifying proteins. Examples of electrophilic drugs include covalent kinase inhibitors that are used to treat cancer and the multiple sclerosis drug dimethyl fumarate. Optimized covalent drugs typically inactivate their protein targets rapidly in cells, but ensuing time-dependent, off-target protein modification can erode selectivity and diminish the utility of reactive small molecules as chemical probes and therapeutics. Here, we describe an approach to confer kinetic selectivity to electrophilic drugs. We show that an analogue of the covalent Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor Ibrutinib bearing a fumarate ester electrophile is vulnerable to enzymatic metabolism on a time-scale that preserves rapid and sustained BTK inhibition, while thwarting more slowly accumulating off-target reactivity in cell and animal models. These findings demonstrate that metabolically labile electrophilic groups can endow covalent drugs with kinetic selectivity to enable perturbation of proteins and biochemical pathways with greater precision.

  8. INTERNAL CUTTING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Russell, W.H. Jr.

    1959-06-30

    A device is described for removing material from the interior of a hollow workpiece so as to form a true spherical internal surface in a workpiece, or to cut radial slots of an adjustable constant depth in an already established spherical internal surface. This is accomplished by a spring loaded cutting tool adapted to move axially wherein the entire force urging the tool against the workpiece is derived from the spring. Further features of importance involve the provision of a seal between the workpiece and the cutting device and a suction device for carrying away particles of removed material.

  9. Ecological studies on Cyathocotyle bushiensis (Digenea) and Sphaeridiotrema globulus (Digenea), possible pathogens of dabbling ducks in southern Québec.

    PubMed

    Hoeve, J; Scott, M E

    1988-07-01

    Over the past 20 yr, recurrent late-summer mortality of dabbling ducks in southern Québec has been attributed to the digenean parasite Cyathocotyle bushiensis. This study attempted to determine whether this parasite was still implicated in the epizootics, and examined aspects of the ecology of the parasite in the definitive host. Comparison of prevalence and mean intensity of infection of all species of Digenea between salvaged carcasses and hunter-shot ducks revealed that C. bushiensis and a second digenean Sphaeridiotrema globulus were both significantly more prevalent in salvaged ducks. Mean intensity of infection was consistently higher for S. globulus in the salvaged carcasses than in hunter-shot ducks. These data provide strong circumstantial support for the hypothesis that C. bushiensis continues to contribute to the annual mortality, but also strongly suggest that S. globulus may be involved. Comparison of the relative numbers of each species of duck between the salvaged carcass sample and the hunter-shot sample revealed that blue-winged teal (Anas discors) occurred significantly more frequently in the salvaged carcass sample whereas wood ducks (Aix sponsa) were common in the hunter-shot sample but were never found in the salvaged carcass sample. A comparison of susceptibility to experimental infection with C. bushiensis revealed that mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), black ducks (Anas rubripes), blue-winged teal, pintail (Anas acuta) and lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) had similar susceptibilities but that wood ducks were significantly less susceptible to infection. Experimental infections also showed that age of mallards significantly influenced the number of parasites obtained 7 days postinfection; ducklings were most heavily infected. Significant differences were detected in the gross pathology caused by C. bushiensis among duck species. Data obtained from sentinel ducks placed in the field for 24 hr revealed that transmission of both C. bushiensis and S

  10. Testing Of Choiced Ceramics Cutting Tools At Irregular Interrupted Cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyncl, Ladislav; Malotová, Šárka; Nováček, Pavel; Nicielnik, Henryk; Šoková, Dagmar; Hemžský, Pavel; Pitela, David; Holubjak, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the test of removable ceramic cutting inserts during machining irregular interrupted cut. Tests were performed on a lathe, with the preparation which simulated us the interrupted cut. By changing the number of plates mounted in a preparation it simulate us a regular or irregular interrupted cut. When with four plates it was regular interrupted cut, the remaining three variants were already irregular cut. It was examined whether it will have the irregular interrupted cutting effect on the insert and possibly how it will change life of inserts during irregular interrupted cut (variable delay between shocks).

  11. DETERMINATION OF APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD SPECTRA FOR THE FORMATION OF BIOLOGICALLY LABILE PHOTOPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantum yield spectra for the photochemical formation of biologically labile photoproducts from dissolved organic matter (DOM) have not been available previously, although they would greatly facilitate attempts to model photoproduct formation rates across latitudinal, seasonal, a...

  12. Construction of hierarchically porous metal–organic frameworks through linker labilization

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Shuai; Zou, Lanfang; Qin, Jun-Sheng; ...

    2017-05-25

    One major goal of metal–organic framework (MOF) research is the expansion of pore size and volume. Although many approaches have been attempted to increase the pore size of MOF materials, it is still a challenge to construct MOFs with precisely customized pore apertures for specific applications. W present a new method, namely linker labilization, to increase the MOF porosity and pore size, giving rise to hierarchical-pore architectures. Microporous MOFs with robust metal nodes and pro-labile linkers were initially synthesized. The mesopores were subsequently created as crystal defects through the splitting of a pro-labile-linker and the removal of the linker fragmentsmore » by acid treatment. We also demonstrate that linker labilization method can create controllable hierarchical porous structures in stable MOFs, which facilitates the diffusion and adsorption process of guest molecules to improve the performances of MOFs in adsorption and catalysis.« less

  13. DETERMINATION OF APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD SPECTRA FOR THE FORMATION OF BIOLOGICALLY LABILE PHOTOPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantum yield spectra for the photochemical formation of biologically labile photoproducts from dissolved organic matter (DOM) have not been available previously, although they would greatly facilitate attempts to model photoproduct formation rates across latitudinal, seasonal, a...

  14. Construction of hierarchically porous metal-organic frameworks through linker labilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shuai; Zou, Lanfang; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Li, Jialuo; Huang, Lan; Feng, Liang; Wang, Xuan; Bosch, Mathieu; Alsalme, Ali; Cagin, Tahir; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2017-05-01

    A major goal of metal-organic framework (MOF) research is the expansion of pore size and volume. Although many approaches have been attempted to increase the pore size of MOF materials, it is still a challenge to construct MOFs with precisely customized pore apertures for specific applications. Herein, we present a new method, namely linker labilization, to increase the MOF porosity and pore size, giving rise to hierarchical-pore architectures. Microporous MOFs with robust metal nodes and pro-labile linkers were initially synthesized. The mesopores were subsequently created as crystal defects through the splitting of a pro-labile-linker and the removal of the linker fragments by acid treatment. We demonstrate that linker labilization method can create controllable hierarchical porous structures in stable MOFs, which facilitates the diffusion and adsorption process of guest molecules to improve the performances of MOFs in adsorption and catalysis.

  15. Construction of hierarchically porous metal–organic frameworks through linker labilization

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Zou, Lanfang; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Li, Jialuo; Huang, Lan; Feng, Liang; Wang, Xuan; Bosch, Mathieu; Alsalme, Ali; Cagin, Tahir; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2017-01-01

    A major goal of metal–organic framework (MOF) research is the expansion of pore size and volume. Although many approaches have been attempted to increase the pore size of MOF materials, it is still a challenge to construct MOFs with precisely customized pore apertures for specific applications. Herein, we present a new method, namely linker labilization, to increase the MOF porosity and pore size, giving rise to hierarchical-pore architectures. Microporous MOFs with robust metal nodes and pro-labile linkers were initially synthesized. The mesopores were subsequently created as crystal defects through the splitting of a pro-labile-linker and the removal of the linker fragments by acid treatment. We demonstrate that linker labilization method can create controllable hierarchical porous structures in stable MOFs, which facilitates the diffusion and adsorption process of guest molecules to improve the performances of MOFs in adsorption and catalysis. PMID:28541301

  16. Evaluation of ascorbic acid in protecting labile folic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S D; Horne, D W

    1983-11-01

    The use of ascorbic acid as a reducing agent to protect labile, reduced derivatives of folic acid has been evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatographic separations and Lactobacillus casei microbiological assay of eluate fractions. Upon heating for 10 min at 100 degrees C, solutions of tetrahydropteroylglutamic acid (H4PteGlu) in 2% sodium ascorbate gave rise to 5,10-methylene-H4PteGlu and 5-methyl-H4PteGlu. H2PteGlu acid gave rise to 5-methyl-H4PteGlu and PteGlu. 10-Formyl-H4PteGlu gave rise to 5-formyl-H4PteGlu and 10-formyl-PteGlu. 5-Formyl-H4-PteGlu gave rise to a small amount of 10-formyl-PteGlu. 5-Methyl-H4PteGlu and PteGlu appeared stable to these conditions. These interconversions were not seen when solutions of these folate derivatives were kept at 0 degrees C in 1% ascorbate. These observations indicate that elevated temperatures are necessary for the interconversions of folates in ascorbate solutions. Assays of ascorbic acid solutions indicated the presence of formaldehyde (approximately equal to 6 mM). This was confirmed by the identification of 3,5-diacetyl-1,4-dihydrolutidine by UV, visible, and fluorescence spectroscopy and by thin-layer chromatography of chloroform extracts of the reaction mixture of ascorbic acid solutions, acetylacetone, and ammonium acetate. These results indicate that solutions of sodium ascorbate used at elevated temperatures are not suitable for extracting tissue for the subsequent assay of the individual folic acid derivatives.

  17. Evaluation of ascorbic acid in protecting labile folic acid derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S D; Horne, D W

    1983-01-01

    The use of ascorbic acid as a reducing agent to protect labile, reduced derivatives of folic acid has been evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatographic separations and Lactobacillus casei microbiological assay of eluate fractions. Upon heating for 10 min at 100 degrees C, solutions of tetrahydropteroylglutamic acid (H4PteGlu) in 2% sodium ascorbate gave rise to 5,10-methylene-H4PteGlu and 5-methyl-H4PteGlu. H2PteGlu acid gave rise to 5-methyl-H4PteGlu and PteGlu. 10-Formyl-H4PteGlu gave rise to 5-formyl-H4PteGlu and 10-formyl-PteGlu. 5-Formyl-H4-PteGlu gave rise to a small amount of 10-formyl-PteGlu. 5-Methyl-H4PteGlu and PteGlu appeared stable to these conditions. These interconversions were not seen when solutions of these folate derivatives were kept at 0 degrees C in 1% ascorbate. These observations indicate that elevated temperatures are necessary for the interconversions of folates in ascorbate solutions. Assays of ascorbic acid solutions indicated the presence of formaldehyde (approximately equal to 6 mM). This was confirmed by the identification of 3,5-diacetyl-1,4-dihydrolutidine by UV, visible, and fluorescence spectroscopy and by thin-layer chromatography of chloroform extracts of the reaction mixture of ascorbic acid solutions, acetylacetone, and ammonium acetate. These results indicate that solutions of sodium ascorbate used at elevated temperatures are not suitable for extracting tissue for the subsequent assay of the individual folic acid derivatives. PMID:6415653

  18. Neuropsychological correlates of emotional lability in children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Brandeis, Daniel; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Kuntsi, Jonna; Poustka, Luise; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Albrecht, Björn; Chen, Wai; Uebel, Henrik; Schlotz, Wolff; van der Meere, Jaap J.; Gill, Michael; Manor, Iris; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Asherson, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Background Emotional lability (EL) is commonly seen in patients with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The reasons for this association are currently unknown. To address this question we examined the relationship between ADHD and EL symptoms, and performance on a range of neuropsychological tasks to clarify whether EL symptoms are predicted by particular cognitive and/or motivational dysfunctions and whether these associations are mediated by the presence of ADHD symptoms. Methods A large multi-site sample of 424 carefully diagnosed ADHD cases and 564 unaffected siblings and controls aged 6 to 18 years performed a broad neuropsychological test battery, including a Go/No-Go Task, a warned 4-choice Reaction Time task, the Maudsley Index of Childhood Delay Aversion, and Digit span backwards. Neuropsychological variables were aggregated as indices of processing speed, response variability, executive functions, choice impulsivity and the influence of energetic and/or motivational factors. EL and ADHD symptoms were regressed on each neuropsychological variable in separate analyses controlling for age, gender and IQ, and, in subsequent regression analyses, for ADHD and EL symptoms respectively. Results Neuropsychological variables significantly predicted ADHD and EL symptoms with moderate to low regression coefficients. However, the association between neuropsychological parameters on EL disappeared entirely when the effect of ADHD symptoms was taken into account, revealing that the association between the neuropsychological performance measures and EL is completely mediated statistically by variations in ADHD symptoms. Conversely, neuropsychological effects on ADHD symptoms remained after EL symptom severity was taken into account. Conclusions The neuropsychological parameters examined here predict ADHD more strongly than EL. They cannot explain EL symptoms beyond what is already accounted for by ADHD symptom severity. The association between EL and ADHD

  19. Cuts and puncture wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... severely, call your local emergency number such as 911. Minor cuts and puncture wounds can be treated ... arrives. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call 911 or your local emergency number if: The bleeding ...

  20. INFINITY ribbon-cutting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-11

    'Astronaut' Patrick Johnston, 8, is interviewed by Heath Allen, a reporter with WDSU-TV in New Orleans, about his experience at the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center facility during ribbon-cutting activities April 11, 2012.

  1. Laser cutting system

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, Thomas J

    2015-03-03

    A workpiece cutting apparatus includes a laser source, a first suction system, and a first finger configured to guide a workpiece as it moves past the laser source. The first finger includes a first end provided adjacent a point where a laser from the laser source cuts the workpiece, and the first end of the first finger includes an aperture in fluid communication with the first suction system.

  2. Inhibition of growth and biofilm formation of clinical bacterial isolates by NiO nanoparticles synthesized from Eucalyptus globulus plants.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Samia; Ahmed, Bilal; Khan, Mohammad Saghir; Al-Shaeri, Majed; Musarrat, Javed

    2017-09-12

    Nanotechnology based therapeutics has emerged as a promising approach for augmenting the activity of existing antimicrobials due to the unique physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles (NPs). Nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) have been suggested as prospective antibacterial and antitumor agent. In this study, NiO-NPs have been synthesized by a green approach using Eucalyptus globulus leaf extract and assessed for their bactericidal activity. The morphology and purity of synthesized NiO-NPs determined through various spectroscopic techniques like UV-Visible, FT-IR, XRD, EDX and electron microscopy differed considerably. The synthesized NiO-NPs were pleomorphic varying in size between 10 and 20 nm. The XRD analysis revealed the average size of NiO-NPs as 19 nm. The UV-Vis spectroscopic data showed a strong SPR of NiO-NPs with a characteristic spectral peak at 396 nm. The FTIR data revealed various functional moieties like C=C, C-N, C-H and O-H which elucidate the role of leaf biomolecules in capping and dispersal of NiO-NPs. The bioactivity assay revealed the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of NiO-NPs against ESβL (+) E. coli, P. aeruginosa, methicillin sensitive and resistant S. aureus. Growth inhibition assay demonstrated time and NiO-NPs concentration dependent decrease in the viability of treated cells. NiO-NPs induced biofilm inhibition was revealed by a sharp increase in characteristic red fluorescence of PI, while SEM images of NiO-NPs treated cells were irregular shrink and distorted with obvious depressions/indentations. The results suggested significant antibacterial and antibiofilm activity of NiO-NPs which may play an important role in the management of infectious diseases affecting human health. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Whole-plant versus leaf-level regulation of photosynthetic responses after partial defoliation in Eucalyptus globulus saplings

    PubMed Central

    Eyles, Alieta

    2013-01-01

    Increases in photosynthetic capacity (A1500) after defoliation have been attributed to changes in leaf-level biochemistry, water, and/or nutrient status. The hypothesis that transient photosynthetic responses to partial defoliation are regulated by whole-plant (e.g. source–sink relationships or changes in hydraulic conductance) rather than leaf-level mechanisms is tested here. Temporal variation in leaf-level gas exchange, chemistry, whole-plant soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance (KP), and aboveground biomass partitioning were determined to evaluate mechanisms responsible for increases in A1500 of Eucalyptus globulus L. potted saplings. A1500 increased in response to debudding (B), partial defoliation (D), and combined B&D treatments by up to 36% at 5 weeks after treatment. Changes in leaf-level factors partly explained increases in A1500 of B and B&D treatments but not for D treatment. By week 5, saplings in B, B&D, and D treatments had similar leaf-specific KP to control trees by maintaining lower midday water potentials and higher transpiration rate per leaf area. Whole-plant source:sink ratios correlated strongly with A1500. Further, unlike KP, temporal changes in source:sink ratios tracked well with those observed for A1500. The results indicate that increases in A1500 after partial defoliation treatments were largely driven by an increased demand for assimilate by developing sinks rather than improvements in whole-plant water relations and changes in leaf-level factors. Three carbohydrates, galactional, stachyose, and, to a lesser extent, raffinose, correlated strongly with photosynthetic capacity, indicating that these sugars may function as signalling molecules in the regulation of longer term defoliation-induced gas exchange responses. PMID:23382548

  4. Whole-plant versus leaf-level regulation of photosynthetic responses after partial defoliation in Eucalyptus globulus saplings.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Davies, Noel W; Corkrey, Ross; Churchill, Keith; O'Grady, Anthony P; Sands, Peter; Mohammed, Caroline

    2013-04-01

    Increases in photosynthetic capacity (A1500) after defoliation have been attributed to changes in leaf-level biochemistry, water, and/or nutrient status. The hypothesis that transient photosynthetic responses to partial defoliation are regulated by whole-plant (e.g. source-sink relationships or changes in hydraulic conductance) rather than leaf-level mechanisms is tested here. Temporal variation in leaf-level gas exchange, chemistry, whole-plant soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance (KP), and aboveground biomass partitioning were determined to evaluate mechanisms responsible for increases in A1500 of Eucalyptus globulus L. potted saplings. A1500 increased in response to debudding (B), partial defoliation (D), and combined B&D treatments by up to 36% at 5 weeks after treatment. Changes in leaf-level factors partly explained increases in A1500 of B and B&D treatments but not for D treatment. By week 5, saplings in B, B&D, and D treatments had similar leaf-specific KP to control trees by maintaining lower midday water potentials and higher transpiration rate per leaf area. Whole-plant source:sink ratios correlated strongly with A1500. Further, unlike KP, temporal changes in source:sink ratios tracked well with those observed for A1500. The results indicate that increases in A1500 after partial defoliation treatments were largely driven by an increased demand for assimilate by developing sinks rather than improvements in whole-plant water relations and changes in leaf-level factors. Three carbohydrates, galactional, stachyose, and, to a lesser extent, raffinose, correlated strongly with photosynthetic capacity, indicating that these sugars may function as signalling molecules in the regulation of longer term defoliation-induced gas exchange responses.

  5. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  6. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Oct 1, 2001 and Dec. 31, 2001. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Collection System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  7. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Lei Zhou

    2000-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between Oct 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 2: Addition of a foam generation and breaker system), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (h) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members. The tasks Completed During This Quarter are Task 7 and Task 8.

  8. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-04-30

    This is the third quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Jan. 1, 2002 and Mar. 31, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop, progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); and (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  9. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-07-30

    This is the fourth quarterly progress report for Year-3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between April 1, 2002 and June 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)''; (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions''; (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''; (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  10. Transient acidosis while retrieving a fear-related memory enhances its lability

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianyang; Price, Margaret P; Taugher, Rebecca J; Grigsby, Daniel; Ash, Jamison J; Stark, Austin C; Hossain Saad, Md Zubayer; Singh, Kritika; Mandal, Juthika; Wemmie, John A; Welsh, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Attenuating the strength of fearful memories could benefit people disabled by memories of past trauma. Pavlovian conditioning experiments indicate that a retrieval cue can return a conditioned aversive memory to a labile state. However, means to enhance retrieval and render a memory more labile are unknown. We hypothesized that augmenting synaptic signaling during retrieval would increase memory lability. To enhance synaptic transmission, mice inhaled CO2 to induce an acidosis and activate acid sensing ion channels. Transient acidification increased the retrieval-induced lability of an aversive memory. The labile memory could then be weakened by an extinction protocol or strengthened by reconditioning. Coupling CO2 inhalation to retrieval increased activation of amygdala neurons bearing the memory trace and increased the synaptic exchange from Ca2+-impermeable to Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors. The results suggest that transient acidosis during retrieval renders the memory of an aversive event more labile and suggest a strategy to modify debilitating memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22564.001 PMID:28650315

  11. PAH repartitioning in field-contaminated sediment following removal of the labile chemical fraction.

    PubMed

    Birdwell, Justin E; Thibodeaux, Louis J

    2009-11-01

    The effect of removing the labile chemical fraction associated with sediment particles followed by internal chemical redistribution was examined in a field-contaminated sediment. Using data from desorption equilibrium (organic carbon-water partition coefficients, K(OC)) and kinetic (rate of release) experiments, estimates of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon biphasic partitioning and desorption rates for both the labile and nonlabile chemical fractions or organic matter compartments were obtained. Sediment K(OC) values increased between 50 and 150% after removal of the labile chemical fraction. Following depletion of the labile chemical fraction during desorption experiments, sediment was stored 30 and 90 days to allow for chemical redistribution between the labile and nonlabile compartments. The subsequent desorption data indicated repartitioning had occurred with the nonlabile chemical fraction recharging the labile compartment. The results provide evidence that chemical transfer between organic matter compartments, either through interparticle porewater or via direct intraparticle compartmental exchange, is a real phenomenon that occurs over relatively short times (weeks to months). This calls into question the idea that hydrophobic organic pollutants in the nonlabile chemical fraction are sequestered or less bioavailable over the long-term and has implications for water quality impacts during contaminated sediment resuspension events, risk assessment of polluted sites, and selection of sediment remediation strategies.

  12. Maternal emotion socialization differentially predicts third-grade children's emotion regulation and lability.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Megan L; Halberstadt, Amy G; Castro, Vanessa L; MacCormack, Jennifer K; Garrett-Peters, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    Numerous parental emotion socialization factors have been implicated as direct and indirect contributors to the development of children's emotional competence. To date, however, no study has combined parents' emotion-related beliefs, behaviors, and regulation strategies in one model to assess their cumulative-as well as unique-contributions to children's emotion regulation. We considered the 2 components that have recently been distinguished: emotion regulation and emotional lability. We predicted that mothers' beliefs about the value of and contempt for children's emotions, mothers' supportive and nonsupportive reactions to their children's emotions, as well as mothers' use of cognitive reappraisal and suppression of their own emotions would each contribute unique variance to their children's emotion regulation and lability, as assessed by children's teachers. The study sample consisted of an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse group of 165 mothers and their third-grade children. Different patterns emerged for regulation and lability: Controlling for family income, child gender, and ethnicity, only mothers' lack of suppression as a regulatory strategy predicted greater emotion regulation in children, whereas mothers' valuing of children's emotions, mothers' lack of contempt for children's emotions, mothers' use of cognitive reappraisal to reinterpret events, and mothers' lack of emotional suppression predicted less lability in children. These findings support the divergence of emotion regulation and lability as constructs and indicate that, during middle childhood, children's lability may be substantially and uniquely affected by multiple forms of parental socialization.

  13. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

    2003-09-30

    The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

  14. Exploring the effect of different plant lignin content and composition on ionic liquid pretreatment efficiency and enzymatic saccharification of Eucalyptus globulus L. mutants.

    PubMed

    Papa, G; Varanasi, P; Sun, L; Cheng, G; Stavila, V; Holmes, B; Simmons, B A; Adani, F; Singh, S

    2012-08-01

    There are several approaches being investigated to improve the efficiency of biomass conversion into fermentable sugars, including those that engineer the feedstocks to enhance digestibility. In this study it was evaluated the impact of genotype modifications of three mutants of Eucalyptus globulus L., and of the corresponding wild type on cellulose hydrolyzability before and after ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment. Both untreated and IL-treated samples were chemically characterized and tested for cellulose hydrolizability. Results obtained indicate that genetic modifications altered wood lignin-S/G ratio. This alteration resulted in a different hydrolyzability of cellulose for untreated samples, i.e. high lignin-S/G ratio produced low glucose yield (r=-0.97; P<0.03; n=4), but did not affect glucose yield after IL pretreatment. IL pretreated samples had increased glucose yields compared to that of untreated samples due to the modification of microcrystalline cellulose I to mixtures of more hydrolysable cellulose II and amorphous cellulose, and to the partial removal of the steric impediment, or removal of the lignin "sheath" protecting cellulose, to enzymes. The efficiency of the IL pretreatment used in this study does not appear to be affected by the S/G content of the E. globulus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. DOC Lability Across Aquatic Ecosystems and its Link to in Situ Bacterial Carbon Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Giorgio, P. A.; Pace, M. L.

    2004-05-01

    The biological reactivity or lability of organic matter is a key aspect of the carbon cycling in all aquatic ecosystems. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) lability is an operational term that defines the proportion of the dissolved C pool that can be utilized by aquatic microbes within a given period of time. Lability is generally determined using bioassays that follow the changes in DOC concentration with time, typically days to weeks, in the absence of light and of any new sources of DOC or nutrients. This in vitro DOC consumption thus represents the minimum level of microbial metabolism that can be supported by the ambient DOC pool. In the past, comparisons of DOC lability reported by different studies have been hampered by differences in approaches, so it is unclear how the amount of labile DOC varies among aquatic ecosystems. Here we compare DOC lability measurements from estuaries and salt marshes, rivers and lakes, determined with similar protocols, and we compare these data with the actual in situ bacterial carbon metabolism. We show that in most freshwater systems surveyed, the in vitro rates of DOC consumption rates are low and fall within a relatively narrow range, in spite of large variations in total DOC, chlorophyll, and nutrient concentrations among systems. In most freshwater ecosystems, the proportion of labile DOC is below 3%, and this labile pool generally represents a small fraction of the measured in situ rate of bacterial respiration, suggesting that these freshwater lability bioassays only capture a remnant pool of organic matter and not the pool that fuels most of the heterotrophic microbial metabolism. The proportion of labile DOC is on average much higher in estuarine and marsh ecosystems, and also represents a larger proportion of the total in situ microbial metabolism. These results point to fundamental differences in the patterns of DOC sources and cycling between brackish and estuarine systems on the one hand, and lakes and rivers on the

  16. Transfer Rates of 238U and 232Th for E. globulus, A. mearnsii, H. filipendula and Hazardous Effects of the Usage of Medicinal Plants From Around Gold Mine Dump Environs

    PubMed Central

    Tshivhase, Victor M.; Njinga, Raymond L.; Mathuthu, Manny; Dlamini, Thulani C.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plant consumption can be a source of human exposure to radioactive elements such as 238U and 232Th, which can lead to internal radiation doses. The uptake of 238U and 232Th from soils to the leaf samples of three different medicinal plant species (Eucalyptus globulus, Acacia mearnsii and Hyparrhenia filipendula) from the purlieu of the Princess gold mine dump, an abandoned contaminated tailings storage site (TSS), located at longitude 27°55′00″E and latitude 26°09′30″S in Davidsonville (Roodepoort, west of Johannesburg, South Africa) was measured. This was done using ICP-MS spectrometry and substantial differences were observed in the soil-plant transfer factor (TF) values between these radionuclides. The plant species E. globulus exhibited the highest uptake of 238U, with an average TF of 3.97, while that of H. filipendula was 0.01 and the lowest TF of 0.15 × 10−2 was measured for A. mearnsii. However, in the case of 232Th, the highest average TF was observed for A. mearnsii (0.29), followed by E. globulus (0.10) and lowest was measured for H. filipendula (0.27 × 10−2). The ratio of TF average value i.e., 238U to 232Th in the soil-plant leaves was 38.05 for E. globulus, 0.01 for A. mearnsii and 4.38 for H. filipendula. PMID:26690462

  17. Transfer Rates of ²³⁸U and ²³²Th for E. globulus, A. mearnsii, H. filipendula and Hazardous Effects of the Usage of Medicinal Plants From Around Gold Mine Dump Environs.

    PubMed

    Tshivhase, Victor M; Njinga, Raymond L; Mathuthu, Manny; Dlamini, Thulani C

    2015-12-10

    Medicinal plant consumption can be a source of human exposure to radioactive elements such as (238)U and (232)Th, which can lead to internal radiation doses. The uptake of (238)U and (232)Th from soils to the leaf samples of three different medicinal plant species (Eucalyptus globulus, Acacia mearnsii and Hyparrhenia filipendula) from the purlieu of the Princess gold mine dump, an abandoned contaminated tailings storage site (TSS), located at longitude 27°55'00″E and latitude 26°09'30″S in Davidsonville (Roodepoort, west of Johannesburg, South Africa) was measured. This was done using ICP-MS spectrometry and substantial differences were observed in the soil-plant transfer factor (TF) values between these radionuclides. The plant species E. globulus exhibited the highest uptake of (238)U, with an average TF of 3.97, while that of H. filipendula was 0.01 and the lowest TF of 0.15 × 10(-2) was measured for A. mearnsii. However, in the case of (232)Th, the highest average TF was observed for A. mearnsii (0.29), followed by E. globulus (0.10) and lowest was measured for H. filipendula (0.27 × 10(-2)). The ratio of TF average value i.e., (238)U to (232)Th in the soil-plant leaves was 38.05 for E. globulus, 0.01 for A. mearnsii and 4.38 for H. filipendula.

  18. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

    2000-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  19. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk, Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2002-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between July 1, 2002 and Sept. 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System, (b) New Research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings (Task 12), Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  20. Lability of drinking water treatment residuals (WTR) immobilized phosphorus: aging and pH effects.

    PubMed

    Agyin-Birikorang, Sampson; O'Connor, George A

    2007-01-01

    Time constraints associated with conducting long-term (>20 yr) field experiments to test the stability of drinking water treatment residuals (WTR) sorbed phosphorus (P) inhibit improved understanding of the fate of sorbed P in soils when important soil properties (e.g., pH) change. We used artificially aged samples to evaluate aging and pH effects on lability of WTR-immobilized P. Artificial aging was achieved through incubation at elevated temperatures (46 or 70 degrees C) for 4.5 yr, and through repeated wetting and drying for 2 yr. Using a modified isotopic ((32)P) dilution technique, coupled with a stepwise acidification procedure, we monitored changes in labile P concentrations over time. This technique enabled evaluation of the effect of pH on the lability of WTR-immobilized P. Within the pH range of 4 to 7, WTR amendment, coupled with artificial aging, ultimately reduced labile P concentrations by > or = 75% relative to the control (no-WTR) samples. Soil samples with different physicochemical properties from two 7.5-yr-old, one-time WTR-amended field sites were utilized to validate the trends observed with the artificially aged samples. Despite the differences in physicochemical properties among the three (two field-aged and one artificially aged) soil samples, similar trends of aging and pH effects on lability of WTR-immobilized P were observed. Labile P concentrations of the WTR-amended field-aged samples of the two sites decreased 6 mo after WTR amendment and the reduction persisted for 7.5 yr, ultimately resulting in > or = 70% reduction, compared to the control plots. We conclude that WTR application is capable of reducing labile P concentration in P-impacted soils, doing so for a long time, and that within the commonly encountered range of pH values for agricultural soils WTR-immobilized P should be stable.

  1. In Situ, High-Resolution Profiles of Labile Metals in Sediments of Lake Taihu

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Gong, Mengdan; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Lv; Wang, Yan; Jing, Rui; Ding, Shiming; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing labile metal distribution and biogeochemical behavior in sediments is crucial for understanding their contamination characteristics in lakes, for which in situ, high-resolution data is scare. The diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique was used in-situ at five sites across Lake Taihu in the Yangtze River delta in China to characterize the distribution and mobility of eight labile metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Co and Cd) in sediments at a 3 mm spatial resolution. The results showed a great spatial heterogeneity in the distributions of redox-sensitive labile Fe, Mn and Co in sediments, while other metals had much less marked structure, except for downward decreases of labile Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu in the surface sediment layers. Similar distributions were found between labile Mn and Co and among labile Ni, Cu and Zn, reflecting a close link between their geochemical behaviors. The relative mobility, defined as the ratio of metals accumulated by DGT to the total contents in a volume of sediments with a thickness of 10 mm close to the surface of DGT probe, was the greatest for Mn and Cd, followed by Zn, Ni, Cu and Co, while Pb and Fe had the lowest mobility; this order generally agreed with that defined by the modified BCR approach. Further analyses showed that the downward increases of pH values in surface sediment layer may decrease the lability of Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu as detected by DGT, while the remobilization of redox-insensitive metals in deep sediment layer may relate to Mn cycling through sulphide coprecipitation, reflected by several corresponding minima between these metals and Mn. These in situ data provided the possibility for a deep insight into the mechanisms involved in the remobilization of metals in freshwater sediments. PMID:27608033

  2. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Evren Ozbayoglu; Barkim Demirdal; Paco Vieira; Affonso Lourenco

    1999-10-15

    This report includes a review of the progress made in ACTF Flow Loop development and research during 90 days pre-award period (May 15-July 14, 1999) and the following three months after the project approval date (July15-October 15, 1999) The report presents information on the following specific subjects; (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development, (b) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Progress report on the instrumentation tasks (Tasks 11 and 12) (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with oil and service company members.

  3. Radial cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.C.

    1997-01-08

    The project`s aim is to complete development of the Radial Cutting Torch, a pyrotechnic cutter, for use in all downhole tubular cutting operations in the petroleum industry. Project objectives are to redesign and pressure test nozzle seals to increase product quality, reliability, and manufacturability; improve the mechanical anchor to increase its temperature tolerance and its ability to function in a wider variety of wellbore fluids; and redesign and pressure test the RCT nozzle for operation at pressures from 10 to 20 ksi. The proposal work statement is included in the statement of work for the grant via this reference.

  4. Cutting assembly. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Treuhaft, M.B.; Oser, M.S.

    1981-06-25

    A mining auger comprises a cutting head carried at one end of a tubular shaft and a plurality of wall segments which in a first position thereof are disposed side by side around said shaft and in a second position thereof are disposed oblique to said shaft. A vane projects outwardly from each wall segment. When the wall segments are in their first position, the vanes together form a substantially continuous helical wall. A cutter is mounted on the peripheral edge of each of the vanes. When the wall segments are in their second position, the cutters on the vanes are disposed radially outward from the perimeter of the cutting head.

  5. Cryogenic ribbon-cutting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-30

    NASA cut the ribbon on a new cryogenics control center at John C. Stennis Space Center on March 30. The new facility is part of a project to strengthen Stennis facilities to withstand the impacts of future storms like hurricane Katrina in 2005. Participants in the ribbon-cutting included (l to r): Jason Zuckerman, director of project management for The McDonnel Group; Keith Brock, director of the NASA Project Directorate at Stennis; Stennis Deputy Director Rick Gilbrech; Steve Jackson of Jacobs Technology; and Troy Frisbie, Cryo Control Center Construction project manager for NASA Center Operations at Stennis.

  6. Cryogenic ribbon-cutting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-30

    NASA cut the ribbon on a new cryogenics control center at John C. Stennis Space Center on March 30. The new facility is part of a project to strengthen Stennis facilities to withstand the impacts of future storms like hurricane Katrina in 2005. Participants in the ribbon-cutting included (l to r): Jason Zuckerman, director of project management for The McDonnel Group; Keith Brock, director of the NASA Project Directorate at Stennis; Stennis Deputy Director Rick Gilbrech; Steve Jackson, outgoing program manager of the Jacobs Technology NASA Test Operations Group; and Troy Frisbie, Cryo Control Center Construction project manager for NASA Center Operations at Stennis.

  7. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a

  8. Application of an enthalpy balance model of the relation between growth and respiration to temperature acclimation of Eucalyptus globulus seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Craig; Adams, Mark A; Hansen, Lee D

    2002-01-01

    The enthalpy balance model of growth uses measurements of the rates of heat and CO(2) production to quantify rates of decarboxylation, oxidative phosphorylation and net anabolism. Enthalpy conversion efficiency (eta(H)) and the net rate of conservation of enthalpy in reduced biosynthetic products (R(SG)DeltaH(B)) can be calculated from metabolic heat rate (q) and CO(2) rate (R(CO2)). eta(H) is closely related to carbon conversion efficiency and the efficiency of conservation of available electrons in biosynthetic products. R(SG)DeltaH(B) and eta(H) can be used, together with biomass composition, to describe the rate and efficiency of growth of plant tissues. q is directly related to the rate of O(2) consumption and the ratio q:R(CO2) is inversely related to the respiratory quotient. We grew seedlings of Eucalyptus globulus at 16 and 28 degrees C for four to six weeks, then measured q and R(CO2) using isothermal calorimetry. Respiratory rate at a given temperature was increased by a lower growth temperature but eta(H) was unaffected. Enthalpy conversion efficiency - and, therefore, carbon conversion efficiency - decreased with increasing temperature from 15 to 35 degrees C. The ratio of oxidative phosphorylation to oxygen consumption (P/O ratio) was inferred in vivo from eta(H) and by assuming a constant ratio of growth to maintenance respiration with changing temperature. The P/O ratio decreased from 2.1 at 10-15 degrees C to less than 0.3 at 35 degrees C, suggesting that decreased efficiency was not only due to activity of the alternative oxidase pathway. In agreement with predictions from non-equilibrium thermodynamics, growth rate was maximal near 25 degrees C, where the calculated P/O ratio was about half maximum. We propose that less efficient pathways, such as the alternative oxidase pathway, are necessary to satisfy the condition of conductance matching whilst maintaining a near constant phosphorylation potential. These conditions minimize entropy production

  9. Characterization of juvenile and adult leaves of Eucalyptus globulus showing distinct heteroblastic development: photosynthesis and volatile isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Velikova, V; Loreto, F; Brilli, F; Stefanov, D; Yordanov, I

    2008-01-01

    Heteroblastic Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus L.) leaves were characterized for their functional diversity examining photosynthesis and photosynthesis limitations, transpiration, and the emission of isoprene and monoterpenes. In vivo and combined analyses of gas-exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and light absorbance at 830 nm were made on the adaxial and abaxial sides of juvenile and adult leaves. When adult leaves were reversed to illuminate the abaxial side, photosynthesis and isoprene emission were significantly lower than when the adaxial side was illuminated. Monoterpene emission, however, was independent on the side illuminated and similarly partitioned between the two leaf sides. The abaxial side of adult leaves showed less diffusive resistance to CO(2) acquisition by chloroplasts, but also lower ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activity, than the adaxial leaf side. In juvenile leaves, photosynthesis, isoprene, and monoterpene emissions were similar when the adaxial or abaxial side was directly illuminated. In the abaxial side of juvenile leaves, photosynthesis did not match the rates attained by the other leaf types when exposed to elevated CO(2), which suggests the occurrence of a limitation of photosynthesis by ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration. Accordingly, a reduced efficiency of both photosystems and a high non-radiative dissipation of energy was observed in the abaxial side of juvenile leaves. During light induction, the adaxial side of juvenile leaves also showed a reduced efficiency of photosystem II and a large non-radiative energy dissipation. Our report reveals distinct functional properties in Eucalyptus leaves. Juvenile leaves invest more carbon in isoprene, but not in monoterpenes, and have a lower water use efficiency than adult leaves. Under steady-state conditions, in adult leaves the isobilateral anatomy does not correspond to an equal functionality of the two sides, while in juvenile leaves the

  10. Application of an enthalpy balance model of the relation between growth and respiration to temperature acclimation of Eucalyptus globulus seedlings.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Craig; Adams, Mark A; Hansen, Lee D

    2002-07-22

    The enthalpy balance model of growth uses measurements of the rates of heat and CO(2) production to quantify rates of decarboxylation, oxidative phosphorylation and net anabolism. Enthalpy conversion efficiency (eta(H)) and the net rate of conservation of enthalpy in reduced biosynthetic products (R(SG)DeltaH(B)) can be calculated from metabolic heat rate (q) and CO(2) rate (R(CO2)). eta(H) is closely related to carbon conversion efficiency and the efficiency of conservation of available electrons in biosynthetic products. R(SG)DeltaH(B) and eta(H) can be used, together with biomass composition, to describe the rate and efficiency of growth of plant tissues. q is directly related to the rate of O(2) consumption and the ratio q:R(CO2) is inversely related to the respiratory quotient. We grew seedlings of Eucalyptus globulus at 16 and 28 degrees C for four to six weeks, then measured q and R(CO2) using isothermal calorimetry. Respiratory rate at a given temperature was increased by a lower growth temperature but eta(H) was unaffected. Enthalpy conversion efficiency - and, therefore, carbon conversion efficiency - decreased with increasing temperature from 15 to 35 degrees C. The ratio of oxidative phosphorylation to oxygen consumption (P/O ratio) was inferred in vivo from eta(H) and by assuming a constant ratio of growth to maintenance respiration with changing temperature. The P/O ratio decreased from 2.1 at 10-15 degrees C to less than 0.3 at 35 degrees C, suggesting that decreased efficiency was not only due to activity of the alternative oxidase pathway. In agreement with predictions from non-equilibrium thermodynamics, growth rate was maximal near 25 degrees C, where the calculated P/O ratio was about half maximum. We propose that less efficient pathways, such as the alternative oxidase pathway, are necessary to satisfy the condition of conductance matching whilst maintaining a near constant phosphorylation potential. These conditions minimize entropy production

  11. Hard exercise, affect lability, and personality among individuals with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Brownstone, Lisa M; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Joiner, Thomas E; Le Grange, Daniel; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Crosby, Ross D; Klein, Marjorie H; Bardone-Cone, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    The current study explores the personality traits of compulsivity (e.g., sense of orderliness and duty to perform tasks completely) and restricted expression (e.g., emotion expression difficulties) as potential moderators of the relation between affect lability and frequency of hard exercise episodes in a sample of individuals with bulimic pathology. Participants were 204 adult females recruited in five Midwestern cities who met criteria for threshold or subthreshold bulimia nervosa (BN). Compulsivity was found to significantly moderate the relation between affect lability and number of hard exercise episodes over the past 28 days, such that among those with high compulsivity, level of affect lability was associated with the number of hard exercise episodes; whereas, among those with low compulsivity, affect lability was not associated with the number of hard exercise episodes. The same pattern of findings emerged for restricted expression; however, this finding approached, but did not reach statistical significance. As such, it appears that affect lability is differentially related to hard exercise among individuals with BN depending upon the level of compulsivity and, to a more limited extent, restricted expression. These results suggest that, for individuals with BN with either compulsivity or restricted expression, focusing treatment on increasing flexibility and/or verbal expression of emotions may help in the context of intense, fluctuating affect.

  12. Effects of carbon substrate lability on carbon mineralization dynamics of tropical peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhiainen, Jyrki; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Könönen, Mari; Limin, Suwido; Vasander, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Extensive draining at tropical ombrotrophic peatlands in Southeast Asia has made them global 'hot spots' for greenhouse gas emissions. Management practises and fires have led to changed substrate status, which affects microbial processes. Here, we present the first data on how management practises affect carbon (C) mineralization processes at these soils. We compared the carbon mineralization potentials of pristine forest soils to those of drained fire affected soils at various depths, with and without additional labile substrates (glucose, glutamate and NO3-N) and in oxic and anoxic conditions by dedicated ex situ experiments. Carbon mineralization (CO2 and CH4 production) rates were higher in the pristine site peat, which contains more labile carbon due to higher input via vegetation. Production rates decreased with depth together with decreasing availability of labile carbon. Consequently, the increase in production rates after labile substrate addition was relatively modest from pristine site as compared to the managed site and from the top layers as compared to deeper layers. Methanogenesis had little importance in total carbon mineralization. Adding labile C and N enhanced heterotrophic CO2 production more than the sole addition of N. Surprisingly, oxygen availability was not an ultimate requirement for substantial CO2 production rates, but anoxic respiration yielded comparable rates, especially at the pristine soils. Flooding of these sites will therefore reduce, but not completely cease, peat carbon loss. Reintroduced substantial vegetation and fertilization in degraded peatlands can enrich recalcitrant peat with simple C and N compounds and thus increase microbiological activity.

  13. Quantification of labile heme in live malaria parasites using a genetically encoded biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Abshire, James R.; Rowlands, Christopher J.; Ganesan, Suresh M.; So, Peter T. C.; Niles, Jacquin C.

    2017-01-01

    Heme is ubiquitous, yet relatively little is known about the maintenance of labile pools of this cofactor, which likely ensures its timely bioavailability for proper cellular function. Quantitative analysis of labile heme is of fundamental importance to understanding how nature preserves access to the diverse chemistry heme enables, while minimizing cellular damage caused by its redox activity. Here, we have developed and characterized a protein-based sensor that undergoes fluorescence quenching upon heme binding. By genetically encoding this sensor in the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, we have quantified cytosolic labile heme levels in intact, blood-stage parasites. Our findings indicate that a labile heme pool (∼1.6 µM) is stably maintained throughout parasite development within red blood cells, even during a period coincident with extensive hemoglobin degradation by the parasite. We also find that the heme-binding antimalarial drug chloroquine specifically increases labile cytosolic heme, indicative of dysregulation of this homeostatic pool that may be a relevant component of the antimalarial activity of this compound class. We propose that use of this technology under various environmental perturbations in P. falciparum can yield quantitative insights into fundamental heme biology. PMID:28242687

  14. Hard Exercise, Affect Lability, and Personality Among Individuals with Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Brownstone, Lisa M.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Joiner, Thomas E.; Le Grange, Daniel; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.; Crosby, Ross D.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Bardone-Cone, Anna M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study explores the personality traits of compulsivity (e.g., sense of orderliness and duty to perform tasks completely) and restricted expression (e.g., emotion expression difficulties) as potential moderators of the relation between affect lability and frequency of hard exercise episodes in a sample of individuals with bulimic pathology. Participants were 204 adult females recruited in five Midwestern cities who met criteria for threshold or subthreshold bulimia nervosa (BN). Compulsivity was found to significantly moderate the relation between affect lability and number of hard exercise episodes over the past 28 days, such that among those with high compulsivity, level of affect lability was associated with the number of hard exercise episodes; whereas, among those with low compulsivity, affect lability was not associated with the number of hard exercise episodes. The same pattern of findings emerged for restricted expression; however, this finding approached, but did not reach statistical significance. As such, it appears that affect lability is differentially related to hard exercise among individuals with BN depending upon the level of compulsivity and, to a more limited extent, restricted expression. These results suggest that, for individuals with BN with either compulsivity or restricted expression, focusing treatment on increasing flexibility and/or verbal expression of emotions may help them in the context of intense, fluctuating affect. PMID:24183126

  15. Soil Microbial and Enzymatic Responses to Complex and Labile Nutrient Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, S. D.; Vitousek, P. M.

    2003-12-01

    Microbial extracellular enzymes are essential for converting complex organic compounds into smaller molecules that are available for plant and microbial uptake. However, enzyme production represents a substantial resource cost for microbes, and microbes may be under selection to produce enzymes only when benefits exceed costs. We predicted that soil enzyme activities would be highest when complex substrates were abundant, but available nutrients were scarce (large potential benefit from enzyme production). We also predicted that rates of nutrient and carbon mineralization would correspond to observed shifts in enzyme activities. To test these predictions, we added insoluble and available carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus substrates to soil incubations and measured enzyme activities, CO2 respiration, microbial biomass, and nutrient mineralization. Labile carbon additions increased respiration rates and microbial biomass, while labile nutrient additions were taken up by microbes but did not increase respiration rates. Labile carbon + nitrogen additions increased acid phosphatase activity, while labile nitrogen additions suppressed aminopeptidase activity. Insoluble nutrients caused major increases in enzyme and microbial activities only when added in combination with complementary labile nutrients (e.g. insoluble carbon + available nitrogen and phosphorus). These results indicate that microbes respond to soil nutrient status by changing patterns of extracellular enzyme production. Such changes can allow microbes to access nutrients in complex molecules, but may be limited by the availability of resources to build enzymes.

  16. Mzm1 Influences a Labile Pool of Mitochondrial Zinc Important for Respiratory Function*

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Aaron; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Smith, Pamela; Sabic, Hana; Eide, David; Winge, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc is essential for function of mitochondria as a cofactor for several matrix zinc metalloproteins. We demonstrate that a labile cationic zinc component of low molecular mass exists in the yeast mitochondrial matrix. This zinc pool is homeostatically regulated in response to the cellular zinc status. This pool of zinc is functionally important because matrix targeting of a cytosolic zinc-binding protein reduces the level of labile zinc and interferes with mitochondrial respiratory function. We identified a series of proteins that modulate the matrix zinc pool, one of which is a novel conserved mitochondrial protein designated Mzm1. Mutant mzm1Δ cells have reduced total and labile mitochondrial zinc, and these cells are hypersensitive to perturbations of the labile pool. In addition, mzm1Δ cells have a destabilized cytochrome c reductase (Complex III) without any effects on Complexes IV or V. Thus, we have established that a link exists between Complex III integrity and the labile mitochondrial zinc pool. PMID:20404342

  17. Think before You Cut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettifor, Ann

    2010-01-01

    With the main political parties set on reducing public spending, one might be forgiven for supposing that "savage" cuts are the only way forward. However, the author believes there are alternatives, and that is why public education about the financial system is so important. Today, UK is trying to clear up a mess--a mess made by the…

  18. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Neelima Godugu; Sri Suresh Kumar Thiroveedhula

    2000-04-30

    ACTS flow loop is now operational under elevated pressure and temperature. Currently, experiments with water under pressure and temperature are being conducted. Based on the analysis of Fann 70 data, empirical correlations defining the shear stress as a function of temperature, pressure and the shear rate have been developed for Petrobras synthetic drilling fluids. PVT equipment has been modified for testing Synthetic drilling fluids. Initial calibration tests have been conducted by using water. Currently, the base oil of the Petrobras synthetic drilling fluid is being tested. Foam flow experiments have been conducted. Currently, more experiments are being conducted while data are being analyzed to characterize the rheology of the foam. Cuttings transport experiments have been conducted using air, water and cuttings. Preliminary results have shown that it may not be possible to avoid cuttings bed deposition under any practical combination of air and water flow rates. Foam stability analyses have been conducted. Effects of salt and oil concentration on the foam stability have been investigated. A software for controlling the data sampling and data storage during cuttings monitoring process have been developed.

  19. Cutting Cakes Carefully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Theodore P.; Morrison, Kent E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper surveys the fascinating mathematics of fair division, and provides a suite of examples using basic ideas from algebra, calculus, and probability which can be used to examine and test new and sometimes complex mathematical theories and claims involving fair division. Conversely, the classical cut-and-choose and moving-knife algorithms…

  20. Think before You Cut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettifor, Ann

    2010-01-01

    With the main political parties set on reducing public spending, one might be forgiven for supposing that "savage" cuts are the only way forward. However, the author believes there are alternatives, and that is why public education about the financial system is so important. Today, UK is trying to clear up a mess--a mess made by the…

  1. A Cut below

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2010-01-01

    Today, thousands of California students worry about vanishing college affordability and access, especially for historically under-represented and marginalized populations. The author reports on how students and faculty throughout California are grappling with the effects of draconian state cuts to postsecondary education that have topped more than…

  2. INFINITY ribbon-cutting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-11

    Clare Johnston, 10, and Eden Landis, 3, stare in wonder at the moon rock on display at the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center visitor center and museum. The children toured INFINITY exhibits during ribbon-cutting activities for the facility April 11, 2012.

  3. Classroom Cut Ups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Stacy

    2011-01-01

    Discovering identity can be a lifelong challenge for some people, while others seem to figure it out right away. During the middle school years, finding one's identity can be a daunting task. Most students will spend a considerable amount of time during these middle years looking for it. This lesson on cut-paper self-portraits lets students delve…

  4. Cutting Cakes Carefully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Theodore P.; Morrison, Kent E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper surveys the fascinating mathematics of fair division, and provides a suite of examples using basic ideas from algebra, calculus, and probability which can be used to examine and test new and sometimes complex mathematical theories and claims involving fair division. Conversely, the classical cut-and-choose and moving-knife algorithms…

  5. Kids Who Cut.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Doris Rhea; Simpson, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Regardless of whether it is cutting, burning or some other form of self-harm, self-injury is a serious problem requiring serious solutions. This article reviews the various types of self-harm, descriptions of self-mutilators, common myths about self-mutilation, and effective treatment methods. (GCP)

  6. Collaborating To Cut Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strosnider, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Private colleges across the country are collaborating to cut costs, streamline services, and increase efficiency. An ambitious Ohio project, involving 35 colleges, to redesign business operations hopes to save $20-25 million. Other efforts include joint classes using interactive television, shared library resources, cross-registration, jointly…

  7. Electron beam cutting

    DOEpatents

    Mochel, Margaret E.; Humphreys, Colin J.

    1985-04-02

    A method for the cutting of holes 20 Angstroms in diameter, or lines 20 Angstroms wide in a material having positive ionic conduction by the use of a focused electron probe is described. The holes and lines are stable under ambient conditions.

  8. Electron beam cutting

    DOEpatents

    Mochel, M.E.; Humphreys, C.J.

    1985-04-02

    A method for the cutting of holes 20 Angstroms in diameter, or lines 20 Angstroms wide in a material having positive ionic conduction by the use of a focused electron probe is described. The holes and lines are stable under ambient conditions. 2 figs.

  9. Kids Who Cut.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Doris Rhea; Simpson, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Regardless of whether it is cutting, burning or some other form of self-harm, self-injury is a serious problem requiring serious solutions. This article reviews the various types of self-harm, descriptions of self-mutilators, common myths about self-mutilation, and effective treatment methods. (GCP)

  10. Cutting thread at flexible endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Gong, F; Swain, P; Kadirkamanathan, S; Hepworth, C; Laufer, J; Shelton, J; Mills, T

    1996-12-01

    New thread-cutting techniques were developed for use at flexible endoscopy. A guillotine was designed to follow and cut thread at the endoscope tip. A new method was developed for guiding suture cutters. Efficacy of Nd: YAG laser cutting of threads was studied. Experimental and clinical experience with thread-cutting methods is presented. A 2.4 mm diameter flexible thread-cutting guillotine was constructed featuring two lateral holes with sharp edges through which sutures to be cut are passed. Standard suture cutters were guided by backloading thread through the cutters extracorporeally. A snare cutter was constructed to retrieve objects sewn to tissue. Efficacy and speed of Nd: YAG laser in cutting twelve different threads were studied. The guillotine cut thread faster (p < 0.05) than standard suture cutters. Backloading thread shortened time taken to cut thread (p < 0.001) compared with free-hand cutting. Nd: YAG laser was ineffective in cutting uncolored threads and slower than mechanical cutters. Results of thread cutting in clinical studies using sewing machine (n = 77 cutting episodes in 21 patients), in-vivo experiments (n = 156), and postsurgical cases (n = 15 over 15 years) are presented. New thread-cutting methods are described and their efficacy demonstrated in experimental and clinical studies.

  11. A reactivity-based probe of the intracellular labile ferrous iron pool

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Benjamin; Morgan, Charles W.; Fontaine, Shaun D.; Vander Wal, Mark N.; Chang, Christopher J.; Wells, James A.; Renslo, Adam R.

    2016-01-01

    Improved methods for studying intracellular reactive iron(II) are of significant interest for studies of iron metabolism and disease relevant changes in iron homeostasis. Here we describe a highly-selective reactivity-based probe in which Fenton-type reaction with intracellular labile iron(II) leads to unmasking of the aminonucleoside puromycin. Puromycin leaves a permanent and dose-dependent mark on treated cells that can be detected with high sensitivity and precision using the high-content, plate-based immunofluorescence assay described. Using this new probe and screening approach, we detected alteration of cellular labile iron(II) in response extracellular iron conditioning, overexpression of iron storage and/or export proteins, and post-translational regulation of iron export. Finally, we utilized this new tool to demonstrate the presence of augmented labile iron(II) pools in cancer cells as compared to non-tumorigenic cells. PMID:27376690

  12. Comparison of metal lability in air-dried and fresh dewatered drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng; Zhao, Yaqian

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the labilities of Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in air-dried (for 60 days) and fresh dewatered WTRs were compared using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), fractionation, in vitro digestion and a plant enrichment test. The results showed that the air-dried and fresh dewatered WTRs had different properties, e.g., organic matter composition and available nutrients. The air-dried and fresh dewatered WTRs were non-haf zardous according to the TCLP assessment method used in the United States; however, the metals in the two types of WTRs had different lability. Compared with the metals in the fresh dewatered WTRs, those in the air-dried WTRs tended to be in more stable fractions and also exhibited lower bioaccessibility and bioavailability. Therefore, air-drying can decrease the metal lability and thereby reduce the potential metal pollution risk of WTRs.

  13. The Interactive Effects of Affect Lability, Negative Urgency, and Sensation Seeking on Young Adult Problematic Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Karyadi, Kenny; Coskunpinar, Ayca; Dir, Allyson L.; Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested that affect lability might reduce the risk for problematic drinking among sensation seekers by compensating for their deficiencies in emotional reactivity and among individuals high on negative urgency by disrupting stable negative emotions. Due to the high prevalence of college drinking, this study examined whether affect lability interacted with sensation seeking and negative urgency to influence college student problematic drinking. 414 college drinkers (mean age: 20, 77% female, and 74% Caucasian) from a US Midwestern University completed self-administered questionnaires online. Consistent with our hypotheses, our results indicated that the effects of sensation seeking and negative urgency on problematic drinking weakened at higher levels of affect lability. These findings emphasize the importance of considering specific emotional contexts in understanding how negative urgency and sensation seeking create risk for problematic drinking among college students. These findings might also help us better understand how to reduce problematic drinking among sensation seekers and individuals high on negative urgency. PMID:24826366

  14. Adaptation of the staphylococcal coagglutination technique for detection of heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Brill, B M; Wasilauskas, B L; Richardson, S H

    1979-01-01

    Protein A-containing staphylococci coated with specific antiserum were tested for heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli. The immunological cross-reactivity of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin with Vibrio cholerae toxin (choleragen) was the basis for sensitizing stabilized suspensions of the Cowan I strain of Staphylococcus aureus with anticholeragen. Unconcentrated culture supernatant fluid containing E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin produced macroscopic agglutination when mixed with sensitized staphylococci in capillary tubes. A total of 15 toxigenic and 61 nontoxigenic isolates were tested by the staphylococcal coagglutination technique in a coded fashion and found to be in agreement with previous results of the Chinese hamster ovary cell assay and the passive immune hemolysis test. The staphylococcal coagglutination technique is simple, relatively inexpensive to perform, and requires the immunoglobulin fraction of anticholeragen as the only specific reagent. The staphylococcal coagglutination technique appears to have potential for routine use in diagnostic microbiology laboratories. Images PMID:372214

  15. Radiation-induced heat-labile sites that convert into DNA double-strand breaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The yield of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in SV40 DNA irradiated in aqueous solution was found to increase by more than a factor of two as a result of postirradiation incubation of the DNA at 50 degrees C and pH 8.0 for 24 h. This is in agreement with data from studies performed at 37 degrees C that were published previously. Importantly, similar results were also obtained from irradiation of mammalian DNA in agarose plugs. These results suggest that heat-labile sites within locally multiply damaged sites are produced by radiation and are subsequently transformed into DSBs. Since incubation at 50 degrees C is typically employed for lysis of cells in commonly used pulsed-field gel assays for detection of DSBs in mammalian cells, the possibility that heat-labile sites are present in irradiated cells was also studied. An increase in the apparent number of DSBs as a function of lysis time at 50 degrees C was found with kinetics that was similar to that for irradiated DNA, although the magnitude of the increase was smaller. This suggests that heat-labile sites are also formed in the cell. If this is the case, a proportion of DSBs measured by the pulsed-field gel assays may occur during the lysis step and may not be present in the cell as breaks but as heat-labile sites. It is suggested that such sites consist mainly of heat-labile sugar lesions within locally multiply damaged sites. Comparing rejoining of DSBs measured with short and long lysis procedure indicates that the heat-labile sites are repaired with fast kinetics in comparison with repair of the bulk of DSBs.

  16. Biotic and abiotic controls on diurnal fluctuations in labile soil phosphorus of a wet tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Vandecar, Karen L; Lawrence, Deborah; Wood, Tana; Oberbauer, Steven F; Das, Rishiraj; Tully, Katherine; Schwendenmann, Luitgard

    2009-09-01

    The productivity of many tropical wet forests is generally limited by bioavailable phosphorus (P). Microbial activity is a key regulator of P availability in that it determines both the supply of P through organic matter decomposition and the depletion of bioavailable P through microbial uptake. Both microbial uptake and mineralization occur rapidly, and their net effect on P availability varies with soil moisture, temperature, and soil organic matter quantity and quality. Exploring the mechanisms driving P availability at fine temporal scales can provide insight into the coupling of carbon, water, and nutrient cycles, and ultimately, the response of tropical forests to climate change. Despite the recognized importance of P cycling to the dynamics of wet tropical forests and their potential sensitivity to short-term fluctuations in bioavailable P, the diurnal pattern of P remains poorly understood. This study quantifies diurnal fluctuations in labile soil P and evaluates the importance of biotic and abiotic factors in driving these patterns. To this end, measurements of labile P were made every other hour in a Costa Rican wet tropical forest oxisol. Spatial and temporal variation in Bray-extractable P were investigated in relation to ecosystem carbon flux, soil CO2 efflux, soil moisture, soil temperature, solar radiation, and sap-flow velocity. Spatially averaged bi-hourly (every two hours) labile P ranged from 0.88 to 2.48 microg/g across days. The amplitude in labile P throughout the day was 0.61-0.82 microg/g (41-54% of mean P concentrations) and was characterized by a bimodal pattern with a decrease at midday. Labile P increased with soil CO2 efflux and soil temperature and declined with increasing sap flow and solar radiation. Together, soil CO2 efflux, soil temperature, and sap flow explained 86% of variation in labile P.

  17. Mood lability among offspring of parents with bipolar disorder and community controls.

    PubMed

    Birmaher, Boris; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Axelson, David A; Monk, Kelly; Hickey, Mary Beth; Fan, Jieyu; Iyengar, Satish; Ha, Wonho; Diler, Rasim S; Goldstein, Tina; Brent, David; Ladouceur, Cecile D; Sakolsky, Dara; Kupfer, David J

    2013-05-01

    Early identification of bipolar disorder (BP) symptomatology is crucial for improving the prognosis of this illness. Increased mood lability has been reported in BP. However, mood lability is ubiquitous across psychiatric disorders and may be a marker of severe psychopathology and not specific to BP. To clarify this issue, this study examined the prevalence of mood lability and its components in offspring of BP parents and offspring of community control parents recruited through the Pittsburgh Bipolar Offspring Study. Forty-one school-age BP offspring of 38 BP parents, 257 healthy or non-BP offspring of 174 BP parents, and 192 offspring of 117 control parents completed a scale that was developed to evaluate mood lability in youth, i.e., the Children's Affective Lability Scale (CALS). A factor analysis of the parental CALS, and in part the child CALS, revealed Irritability, Mania, and Anxiety/Depression factors, with most of the variance explained by the Irritability factor. After adjusting for confounding factors (e.g., parental and offspring non-BP psychopathology), BP offspring of BP parents showed the highest parental and child total and factor scores, followed by the non-BP offspring of BP parents, and then the offspring of the controls. Mood lability overall and mania-like, anxious/depressed, and particularly irritability symptoms may be a prodromal phenotype of BP among offspring of parents with BP. Prospective studies are warranted to clarify whether these symptoms will predict the development of BP and/or other psychopathology. If confirmed, these symptoms may become a target of treatment and biological studies before BP develops. © 2013 John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Radiation-induced heat-labile sites that convert into DNA double-strand breaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The yield of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in SV40 DNA irradiated in aqueous solution was found to increase by more than a factor of two as a result of postirradiation incubation of the DNA at 50 degrees C and pH 8.0 for 24 h. This is in agreement with data from studies performed at 37 degrees C that were published previously. Importantly, similar results were also obtained from irradiation of mammalian DNA in agarose plugs. These results suggest that heat-labile sites within locally multiply damaged sites are produced by radiation and are subsequently transformed into DSBs. Since incubation at 50 degrees C is typically employed for lysis of cells in commonly used pulsed-field gel assays for detection of DSBs in mammalian cells, the possibility that heat-labile sites are present in irradiated cells was also studied. An increase in the apparent number of DSBs as a function of lysis time at 50 degrees C was found with kinetics that was similar to that for irradiated DNA, although the magnitude of the increase was smaller. This suggests that heat-labile sites are also formed in the cell. If this is the case, a proportion of DSBs measured by the pulsed-field gel assays may occur during the lysis step and may not be present in the cell as breaks but as heat-labile sites. It is suggested that such sites consist mainly of heat-labile sugar lesions within locally multiply damaged sites. Comparing rejoining of DSBs measured with short and long lysis procedure indicates that the heat-labile sites are repaired with fast kinetics in comparison with repair of the bulk of DSBs.

  19. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-04-30

    Experiments on the flow loop are continuing. Improvements to the software for data acquisition are being made as additional experience with three-phase flow is gained. Modifications are being made to the Cuttings Injection System in order to improve control and the precision of cuttings injection. The design details for a drill-pipe Rotation System have been completed. A US Patent was filed on October 28, 2002 for a new design for an instrument that can generate a variety of foams under elevated pressures and temperatures and then transfer the test foam to a viscometer for measurements of viscosity. Theoretical analyses of cuttings transport phenomena based on a layered model is under development. Calibrations of two nuclear densitometers have been completed. Baseline tests have been run to determine wall roughness in the 4 different tests sections (i.e. 2-in, 3-in, 4-in pipes and 5.76-in by 3.5-in annulus) of the flow loop. Tests have also been conducted with aerated fluids at EPET conditions. Preliminary experiments on the two candidate aqueous foam formulations were conducted which included rheological tests of the base fluid and foam stability reports. These were conducted after acceptance of the proposal on the Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature Conditions. Preparation of a test matrix for cuttings-transport experiments with foam in the ACTF is also under way. A controller for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration and distribution has been designed that can control four transceivers at a time. A prototype of the control circuit board was built and tested. Tests showed that there was a problem with radiated noise. AN improved circuit board was designed and sent to an external expert to verify the new design. The new board is being fabricated and will first be tested with static water and gravel in an annulus at elevated temperatures. A series of viscometer tests to measure foam properties have

  20. Labile carbon concentrations are strongly linked to plant production in Arctic tussock tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrouzet-Nardi, A.; Weintraub, M. N.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Steltzer, H.; Sullivan, P.

    2013-12-01

    The exchange of carbon and nutrients between plants and microbes is a key determinant of carbon balance in Arctic soils. Microbes rely on labile plant carbon for the energy they need to produce enzymes that can release nutrients and less energetically favorable carbon from soil organic matter. One of the main mechanisms of carbon transfer is rhizodeposition, the exudation of labile plant carbon such as sugars from roots into the rhizosphere. Despite the importance of this flow of energy and materials from plants to microbes, there have been few attempts to quantify labile carbon pools or fluxes in Arctic soils. To improve our knowledge of labile carbon dynamics in Arctic soils, we address two basic questions: (1) What are the seasonal patterns of labile carbon concentrations? and (2) How do seasonal patterns in labile carbon correlate with plant production, microbial biomass, and soil nutrients? We measured concentrations of total reducing sugars (TRS) in the soil solution of moist acidic tussock tundra on 28 dates during the 2012 growing season in 20 plots of an early snowmelt × warming experiment. We evaluated these total reducing sugar concentrations in the context of eddy flux carbon exchange data, plant NDVI, total dissolved carbon in soils, microbial biomass, and soil nutrients. Though we did not see treatment effects of the snowmelt × warming experiment, we did observe a clear seasonal pattern in TRS concentrations in which they started low at the time of thaw, then built to a maximum value around the time of peak plant physiology in July, followed by a decline as plants senesced. We observed a clear correlation between TRS and gross primary production (GPP). NDVI values also increased with TRS concentrations during the first half of the season and then leveled off as TRS began its decline. These relationships were in contrast to labile N concentrations, which remained at low concentrations all season. Our data suggest that rhizodeposition of labile carbon

  1. Laser cutting nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Ramos, Terry J.

    1984-01-01

    A laser cutting nozzle for use with a laser cutting apparatus directing a focused beam to a spot on a work piece. The nozzle has a cylindrical body with a conical tip which together have a conically shaped hollow interior with the apex at a small aperture through the tip. The conical hollow interior is shaped to match the profile of the laser beam, at full beamwidth, which passes through the nozzle to the work piece. A plurality of gas inlet holes extend through the body to the hollow interior and are oriented to produce a swirling flow of gas coaxially through the nozzle and out the aperture, aligned with the laser beam, to the work piece. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

  2. Laser cutting nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Ramos, T.J.

    1982-09-30

    A laser cutting nozzle for use with a laser cutting apparatus directing a focused beam to a spot on a work piece. The nozzle has a cylindrical body with a conical tip which together have a conically shaped hollow interior with the apex at a small aperture through the tip. The conical hollow interior is shaped to match the profile of the laser beam, at full beamwidth, which passes through the nozzle to the work piece. A plurality of gas inlet holes extend through the body to the hollow interior and are oriented to produce a swirling flow of gas coaxially through the nozzle and out the aperture, aligned with the laser beam, to the work piece.

  3. Cutting Through Multiyear Ice

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    ICESCAPE scientists watched from the deck of the Healy as it cut a path through thick multiyear ice on July 6, 2011. Cutting the path is key for getting researchers to remote research sites amid the sea ice. Credit: NASA/Kathryn Hansen The ICESCAPE mission, or "Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment," is a NASA shipborne investigation to study how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the ocean's chemistry and ecosystems. The bulk of the research took place in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas in summer 2010 and 2011. Credit: NASA/Kathryn Hansen NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  4. Rooting of carnation cuttings

    PubMed Central

    Oliveros-Valenzuela, M Rocío; Nicolás, Carlos; Sánchez-Bravo, José

    2009-01-01

    The rooting of stem cuttings is a common vegetative propagation practice in many ornamental species. Among other signals, auxin polarly transported through the stem plays a key role in the formation and growth of adventitious roots. Unlike in other plant species, auxin from mature leaves plays a decisive role in the rooting of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus. L) cuttings. The gene DcAUX1, which codifies an auxin influx carrier involved in polar auxin transport, has now been cloned and characterized in carnation. The expression pattern of this gene was seen to depend on the organ, the cultivar and the time of cold storage. The variations observed in its expression could be related with the rooting ability of different carnation cultivars. PMID:19721760

  5. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Neelima Godugu

    2000-07-30

    ACTS flow loop is now operational under elevated pressure and temperature. Currently, experiments with synthetic based drilling fluids under pressure and temperature are being conducted. Based on the analysis of Fann 70 data, empirical correlations defining the shear stress as a function of temperature, pressure and the shear rate have been developed for Petrobras synthetic drilling fluids. PVT equipment has been modified for testing Synthetic oil base drilling fluids. PVT tests with Petrobras Synthetic base mud have been conducted and results are being analyzed Foam flow experiments have been conducted and the analysis of the data has been carried out to characterize the rheology of the foam. Comparison of pressure loss prediction from the available foam hydraulic models and the test results has been made. Cuttings transport experiments in horizontal annulus section have been conducted using air, water and cuttings. Currently, cuttings transport tests in inclined test section are being conducted. Foam PVT analysis tests have been conducted. Foam stability experiments have also been conducted. Effects of salt and oil concentration on the foam stability have been investigated. Design of ACTS flow loop modification for foam and aerated mud flow has been completed. A flow loop operation procedure for conducting foam flow experiments under EPET conditions has been prepared Design of the lab-scale flow loop for dynamic foam characterization and cuttings monitoring instrumentation tests has been completed. The construction of the test loop is underway. As part of the technology transport efforts, Advisory Board Meeting with ACTS-JIP industry members has been organized on May 13, 2000.

  6. Manual bamboo cutting tool.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Mariana Pereira; Correia, Walter Franklin Marques; da Costa Campos, Fabio Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the development of a cutting tool guide, specifically for the harvest of bamboo. The development was made based on precepts of eco-design and ergonomics, for prioritizing the physical health of the operator and the maintenance of the environment, as well as meet specific requirements of bamboo. The main goal is to spread the use of bamboo as construction material, handicrafts, among others, from a handy, easy assembly and material available tool.

  7. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-07-30

    This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.

  8. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Koshelev, Alexei E.; Glatz, Andreas; Welp, Ulrich; Kwok, Wai-K.

    2015-03-01

    Unlike illusive magnetic field lines in vacuum, magnetic vortices in superconductors are real physical strings, which interact with the sample surface, crystal structure defects, and with each other. We address the complex and poorly understood process of vortex cutting via a comprehensive set of magneto-optic experiments which allow us to visualize vortex patterns at magnetization of a nearly twin-free YBCO crystal by crossing magnetic fields of different orientations. We observe a pronounced anisotropy in the flux dynamics under crossing fields and the filamentation of induced supercurrents associated with the staircase vortex structure expected in layered cuprates, flux cutting effects, and angular vortex instabilities predicted for anisotropic superconductors. At some field angles, we find formation of the vortex domains following a type-I phase transition in the vortex state accompanied by an abrupt change in the vortex orientation. To clarify the vortex cutting scenario we performed time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations, which confirmed formation of sharp vortex fronts observed in the experiment and revealed a left-handed helical instability responsible for the rotation of vortices. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  9. Reagan Administration Prepares Budget Cuts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Colin

    1981-01-01

    Describes tentative federal budget cuts affecting science education in the National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, and the specific areas these budget cuts will affect. (DS)

  10. Dealing with Cuts (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Cellulitis First Aid: Cuts Staph Infections Bites and Scratches ... Animal Bites Blood Childproofing and Preventing Household Accidents Cellulitis Stitches Scars Cuts, Scratches, and Abrasions What's a ...

  11. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy for estimation of non-structural carbohydrates in foliar samples of Eucalyptus globulus Labilladière.

    PubMed

    Quentin, A G; Rodemann, T; Doutreleau, M-F; Moreau, M; Davies, N W; Millard, Peter

    2017-01-31

    Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) is frequently used for the assessment of key nutrients of forage or crops but remains underused in ecological and physiological studies, especially to quantify non-structural carbohydrates. The aim of this study was to develop calibration models to assess the content in soluble sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose) and starch in foliar material of Eucalyptus globulus. A partial least squares (PLS) regression was used on the sample spectral data and was compared to the contents measured using standard wet chemistry methods. The calibration models were validated using a completely independent set of samples. We used key indicators such as the ratio of prediction to deviation (RPD) and the range error ratio to give an assessment of the performance of the calibration models. Accurate calibration models were obtained for fructose and sucrose content (R2 > 0.85, root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.95%–1.26% in the validation models), followed by sucrose and total soluble sugar content (R2 ~ 0.70 and RMSEP > 2.3%). In comparison to the others, calibration of the starch model performed very poorly with RPD = 1.70. This study establishes the ability of the NIRS calibration model to infer soluble sugar content in foliar samples of E. globulus in a rapid and cost-effective way. We suggest a complete redevelopment of the starch analysis using more specific quantification such as an HPLC-based technique to reach higher performance in the starch model. Overall, NIRS could serve as a high-throughput phenotyping tool to study plant response to stress factors.

  12. ALPS yield optimization cutting program

    Treesearch

    P. Klinkhachorn; J.P. Franklin; Charles W. McMillin; H.A. Huber

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports ongoing work on a series of computer programs developed to automate hardwood lumber processing in a furniture roughmill. The program computes the placement of cuttings on lumber, based on a description of each board in terms of shape and defect location, and a cutting bill. These results are suitable for use with a high-power laser to cut the parts...

  13. CUTTING AND WEDGING JACKET REMOVER

    DOEpatents

    Freedman, M.; Raynor, S.

    1959-04-01

    A tool is presented for stripping cladded jackets from fissionable fuel elements. The tool is a tube which fits closely around the jacket and which has two cutting edges at opposite sides of one end. These cutting edges are adjusted to penetrate only the jacket so that by moving the edges downward the jacket is cut into two pieces.

  14. Labile compounds in plant litter reduce the sensitivity of decomposition to warming and altered precipitation.

    PubMed

    Suseela, Vidya; Tharayil, Nishanth; Xing, Baoshan; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2013-10-01

    Together, climate and litter quality strongly regulate decomposition rates. Although these two factors and their interaction have been studied across species in continent-scale experiments, few researchers have studied how labile and recalcitrant compounds interact to influence decomposition, or the climate sensitivity of decomposition, within a litter type. Over a period of 3 yr, we studied the effects of warming and altered precipitation on mass loss and compound-specific decomposition using two litter types that possessed similar heteropolymer chemistry, but different proportions of labile and recalcitrant compounds. Climate treatments immediately affected the mass loss of the more recalcitrant litter, but affected the more labile litter only after 2 yr. After 3 yr, although both litter types had lost similar amounts of mass, warming (c. 4°C) and supplemental precipitation (150% of ambient) together accelerated the degradation of alkyl-carbon and lignin only in the more recalcitrant litter, highlighting the role of initial litter quality in determining whether the chemistry of litter residues converges or diverges under different climates. Our finding that labile compounds in litter reduce the climate sensitivity of mass loss and the decomposition of recalcitrant matrix is novel. Our results highlight the potential for litter quality to regulate the effect of climatic changes on the sequestration of litter-derived carbon. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that...

  16. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that...

  17. Occurrence and abundance of carbohydrates and amino compounds in sequentially extracted labile soil organic matter fractions.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study aimed to investigate the content of carbohydrates and amino compounds in three labile fraction of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil samples were collected from two agricultural fields in southern Italy and the light fraction (LF), the 500–53-µm particulate organic matter (POM) and the mobil...

  18. Enzymatically- and Ultraviolet-labile Phosphorus in Humic Acid Fractions From Rice Soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Humic acid is an important soil component which can improve nutrient availability and impact other important chemical, biological, and physical properties of soils. We investigated the lability of phosphorus (P) in the mobile humic acid (MHA) and calcium humate (CaHA) fractions of four rice soils as...

  19. Forms and Lability of Phosphorus in Humic Acid Fractions of Hord Silt Loam Soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phosphorus (P) has long been known to be present in soil humic fractions, but little is known about specific P forms in humic fractions, or their lability. We extracted the mobile humic acid (MHA) and recalcitrant calcium humate (CaHA) fractions from a Nebraska Hord silt loam soil under continuous c...

  20. Glaciers as a source of ancient and labile organic matter to the marine environment.

    Treesearch

    Eran Hood; Jason Fellman; Robert G.M. Spencer; Peter J. Hernes; Rick Edwards; David D' Amore; Durelle Scott

    2009-01-01

    Riverine organic matter supports of the order of one-fifth of estuarine metabolism. Coastal ecosystems are therefore sensitive to alteration of both the quantity and lability of terrigenous dissolved organic matter (DOM) delivered by rivers. Here we characterize streamwater DOM from 11 coastal watersheds on the Gulf of Alaska that vary widely in glacier coverage. In...

  1. Endocrine correlates of personality traits: a comparison between emotionally stable and emotionally labile healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Adler, L; Wedekind, D; Pilz, J; Weniger, G; Huether, G

    1997-01-01

    An initial sample of 120 healthy young men was screened by a personality questionnaire and 15 subjects each with highest and lowest scores respectively on emotionality (emotionally labile, EL subjects and emotionally stable, ES subjects) were recruited for a study on the relationship between the degree of emotionality and the basal secretion of stress-sensitive hormones during night-time. The nocturnal urinary excretion of cortisol, testosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline and melatonin was measured over a period of 5 consecutive nights. The average amounts of each hormone excreted per night were not different between the two extreme groups. The variability of the excretion during the 5 nights of cortisol and testosterone, but not of adrenaline, noradrenaline and melatonin, was significantly higher in EL compared to ES subjects. The larger fluctuations in the nocturnal secretion of these two (and no other) hormones in EL subjects indicate that emotional lability is associated with a more labile regulation of cortisol and testosterone secretion. The observed intraindividual variability of basal stress hormone secretion may contribute to the vast interindividual variability noticed in psychoneuroendocrine stress research, especially in emotionally labile subjects.

  2. Stand-scale correspondence in empirical and simulated labile carbohydrates in loblolly pine

    Treesearch

    David A. Sampson; Kurt H. Johnsen; Kim H. Ludovici; Timothy J. Albaugh; Chris A. Maier

    2001-01-01

    As investment into intensive forestry increases, the potential trade-offs between productivity and sustainability should be scrutinized. Because of their important role in internal carbon (C) budgets, labile C pools may provide a measure of the potential ability of trees and stands to respond to stress. We modified the process model BIOMASS to...

  3. Maximal cuts in arbitrary dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosma, Jorrit; Sogaard, Mads; Zhang, Yang

    2017-08-01

    We develop a systematic procedure for computing maximal unitarity cuts of multiloop Feynman integrals in arbitrary dimension. Our approach is based on the Baikov representation in which the structure of the cuts is particularly simple. We examine several planar and nonplanar integral topologies and demonstrate that the maximal cut inherits IBPs and dimension shift identities satisfied by the uncut integral. Furthermore, for the examples we calculated, we find that the maximal cut functions from different allowed regions, form the Wronskian matrix of the differential equations on the maximal cut.

  4. Drilling cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Capuano, L.E. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation by Louis E. Capuano, Jr., President, ThermaSource, Inc., discusses cost-cutting in the drilling phase of geothermal energy exploration and production. All aspects of a geothermal project including the drilling must be streamlined to make it viable and commercial. If production could be maximized from each well, there would be a reduction in drilling costs. This could be achieved in several ways, including big hole and multi-hole completion, directional drilling, better knowledge of the resource and where to penetrate, etc.

  5. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi

    2004-07-31

    We have tested the loop elevation system. We raised the mast to approximately 25 to 30 degrees from horizontal. All went well. However, while lowering the mast, it moved laterally a couple of degrees. Upon visual inspection, severe spalling of the concrete on the face of the support pillar, and deformation of the steel support structure was observed. At this time, the facility is ready for testing in the horizontal position. A new air compressor has been received and set in place for the ACTS test loop. A new laboratory has been built near the ACTS test loop Roughened cups and rotors for the viscometer (RS300) were obtained. Rheologies of aqueous foams were measured using three different cup-rotor assemblies that have different surface roughness. The relationship between surface roughness and foam rheology was investigated. Re-calibration of nuclear densitometers has been finished. The re-calibration was also performed with 1% surfactant foam. A new cuttings injection system was installed at the bottom of the injection tower. It replaced the previous injection auger. A mechanistic model for cuttings transport with aerated mud has been developed. Cuttings transport mechanisms with aerated water at various conditions were experimentally investigated. A total of 39 tests were performed. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental measurements show a satisfactory agreement. Results from the ultrasonic monitoring system indicated that we could distinguish between different sand levels. We also have devised ways to achieve consistency of performance by securing the sensors in the caps in exactly the same manner as long as the sensors are not removed from the caps. A preliminary test was conducted on the main flow loop at 100 gpm flow rate and 20 lb/min cuttings injection rate. The measured bed thickness using the ultrasonic method showed a satisfactory agreement with nuclear densitometer readings. Thirty different data points were collected after the test

  6. INFINITY ribbon-cutting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-11

    Ceremony participants prepare to cut the ribbon on the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center facility April 11, 2012. Participating in the ceremony were (l to r): Gulfport Mayor and INFINITY Science Center Inc. Chairman George Schloegel; U.S. Rep. Steven Palazzo, R-Miss.; U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss.; Roy S. Estess granddaughter Lauren McKay; Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant; Leo Seal Jr. grandson Leo Seal IV; Stennis Director Patrick Scheuermann; U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran, R-Miss.; NASA Chief of Staff David Radzanowski; and Apollo 13 astronaut and INFINITY Science Center Inc. Vice Chairman Fred Haise.

  7. Photochemical cutting of fabrics

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus for the cutting of garment patterns from one or more layers of fabric. A laser capable of producing laser light at an ultraviolet wavelength is utilized to shine light through a pattern, such as a holographic phase filter, and through a lens onto the one or more layers of fabric. The ultraviolet laser light causes rapid photochemical decomposition of the one or more layers of fabric, but only along the pattern. The balance of the fabric of the one or more layers of fabric is undamaged.

  8. Cutting the Cord-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  9. Cutting the Cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  10. Cross-Cutting Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows cross-cutting fault scarps among graben features in northern Tempe Terra. Graben form in regions where the crust of the planet has been extended; such features are common in the regions surrounding the vast 'Tharsis Bulge' on Mars.

    Location near: 43.7oN, 90.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  11. Cutting the Cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  12. Cross-Cutting Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows cross-cutting fault scarps among graben features in northern Tempe Terra. Graben form in regions where the crust of the planet has been extended; such features are common in the regions surrounding the vast 'Tharsis Bulge' on Mars.

    Location near: 43.7oN, 90.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  13. Cutting the Cord-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  14. Using isotopic dilution to assess chemical extraction of labile Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in soils.

    PubMed

    Garforth, J M; Bailey, E H; Tye, A M; Young, S D; Lofts, S

    2016-07-01

    Chemical extractants used to measure labile soil metal must ideally select for and solubilise the labile fraction, with minimal solubilisation of non-labile metal. We assessed four extractants (0.43 M HNO3, 0.43 M CH3COOH, 0.05 M Na2H2EDTA and 1 M CaCl2) against these requirements. For soils contaminated by contrasting sources, we compared isotopically exchangeable Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb (EValue, mg kg(-1)), with the concentrations of metal solubilised by the chemical extractants (MExt, mg kg(-1)). Crucially, we also determined isotopically exchangeable metal in the soil-extractant systems (EExt, mg kg(-1)). Thus 'EExt - EValue' quantifies the concentration of mobilised non-labile metal, while 'EExt - MExt' represents adsorbed labile metal in the presence of the extractant. Extraction with CaCl2 consistently underestimated EValue for Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb, while providing a reasonable estimate of EValue for Cd. In contrast, extraction with HNO3 both consistently mobilised non-labile metal and overestimated the EValue. Extraction with CH3COOH appeared to provide a good estimate of EValue for Cd; however, this was the net outcome of incomplete solubilisation of labile metal, and concurrent mobilisation of non-labile metal by the extractant (MExtEValue). The Na2H2EDTA extractant mobilised some non-labile metal in three of the four soils, but consistently solubilised the entire labile fraction for all soil-metal combinations (MExt ≈ EExt). Comparison of EValue, MExt and EExt provides a rigorous means of assessing the underlying action of soil chemical extraction methods and could be used to refine long-standing soil extraction methodologies.

  15. Primary production contributes to non-labile organic matter generation in the estuarine and coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z.; Zhang, J.; Wu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Oceanic generation of refractory organic matter is an important pathway for safe and long time scale safe carbon sequestration. Since refractory/non-labile organic matter generation is highly related with microorganism, estuaries and coastal zones with high primary production should be important regions for such generation process. We investigated the particulate organic matter in the estuarine and adjacent coastal zone of the Changjiang (Yangtze River). Peptidoglycan estimated on the basis of D-form of amino acids enantiomers showed a large variation in the estuary but generally lower than the lower reaches (XLJ). Peptidoglycan quickly decreased from the river to the sea, when DI increased from negative to < 0.5. The decrease can be due to dilution by fresh organic matter and seawater. But when DI > 0.5, the peptidoglycan concentration began to positively relate with organic matter freshness and normalized peptidoglycan was comparable to or even higher than that in terrestrial organic matter. This indicates that estuarine and coastal zones make a significant contribution to non-labile organic matter production. Further analysis suggests that heterotrophic bacteria and Synechococcus are notable contributors. For large river's estuary and adjacent coastal zone, terrestrial inputs promote high in situ production. The generated fresh organic matter in the estuary further promotes heterotrophic bacteria. Since the generation of non-labile organic matter process is both contributed by autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms, primary production is indirectly generating refractory/non-labile organic matter. And the refractory/non labile organic matter production occurs routinely during every productive season. On another aspect, considering the shallow water depth (usually < 100 m) and high sedimentation rate (e.g., 0-5 cm/year for the Changjiang Estuary), the organic matter can be buried in sediment much more easily than it is in the open ocean.

  16. Effects of wetland recovery on soil labile carbon and nitrogen in the Sanjiang Plain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingyu; Song, Changchun; Nkrumah, Philip Nti

    2013-07-01

    Soil management significantly affects the soil labile organic factors. Understanding carbon and nitrogen dynamics is extremely helpful in conducting research on active carbon and nitrogen components for different kinds of soil management. In this paper, we examined the changes in microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) to assess the effect and mechanisms of land types, organic input, soil respiration, microbial species, and vegetation recovery under Deyeuxia angustifolia freshwater marshes (DAMs) and recovered freshwater marsh (RFM) in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China. Identifying the relationship among the dynamics of labile carbon, nitrogen, and soil qualification mechanism using different land management practices is therefore important. Cultivation and land use affect intensely the DOC, DON, MBC, and MBN in the soil. After DAM soil tillage, the DOC, DON, MBC, and MBN at the surface of the agricultural soil layer declined significantly. In contrast, their recovery was significant in the RFM surface soil. A long time was needed for the concentration of cultivated soil total organic carbon and total nitrogen to be restored to the wetland level. The labile carbon and nitrogen fractions can reach a level similar to that of the wetland within a short time. Typical wetland ecosystem signs, such as vegetation, microbes, and animals, can be recovered by soil labile carbon and nitrogen fraction restoration. In this paper, the D. angustifolia biomass attained natural wetland level after 8 years, indicating that wetland soil labile fractions can support wetland eco-function in a short period of time (4 to 8 years) for reconstructed wetland under suitable environmental conditions.

  17. Glaciers as a source of ancient and labile organic matter to the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Hood, Eran; Fellman, Jason; Spencer, Robert G M; Hernes, Peter J; Edwards, Rick; D'Amore, David; Scott, Durelle

    2009-12-24

    Riverine organic matter supports of the order of one-fifth of estuarine metabolism. Coastal ecosystems are therefore sensitive to alteration of both the quantity and lability of terrigenous dissolved organic matter (DOM) delivered by rivers. The lability of DOM is thought to vary with age, with younger, relatively unaltered organic matter being more easily metabolized by aquatic heterotrophs than older, heavily modified material. This view is developed exclusively from work in watersheds where terrestrial plant and soil sources dominate streamwater DOM. Here we characterize streamwater DOM from 11 coastal watersheds on the Gulf of Alaska that vary widely in glacier coverage (0-64 per cent). In contrast to non-glacial rivers, we find that the bioavailability of DOM to marine microorganisms is significantly correlated with increasing (14)C age. Moreover, the most heavily glaciated watersheds are the source of the oldest ( approximately 4 kyr (14)C age) and most labile (66 per cent bioavailable) DOM. These glacial watersheds have extreme runoff rates, in part because they are subject to some of the highest rates of glacier volume loss on Earth. We estimate the cumulative flux of dissolved organic carbon derived from glaciers contributing runoff to the Gulf of Alaska at 0.13 +/- 0.01 Tg yr(-1) (1 Tg = 10(12) g), of which approximately 0.10 Tg is highly labile. This indicates that glacial runoff is a quantitatively important source of labile reduced carbon to marine ecosystems. Moreover, because glaciers and ice sheets represent the second largest reservoir of water in the global hydrologic system, our findings indicate that climatically driven changes in glacier volume could alter the age, quantity and reactivity of DOM entering coastal oceans.

  18. Determination of various types of labile atmospheric iron over remote oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Siefert, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of iron (Fe) is a major source of the micronutrient to the remote ocean. Most studies have focused on the total atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans while fewer studies have focused on the chemistry and chemical speciation of atmospheric Fe. This speciation of Fe in the atmosphere is critical to understanding the fraction of Fe that will be labile in surface waters after deposition and consequently has implications for the bioavailability of this atmospherically derived Fe. In this study, 24-hour aerosol samples were collected using a high-volume dichotomous virtual impactor (HVDVI) that collected coarse (Dp > 2.5 μm) and fine (Dp< 2.5 μm) aerosol fractions on two 90-mm Teflon membrane filters, over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. A sequential aqueous extraction procedure using a pH 4.5 buffer solution and a chemical reductant (hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HA)) was used to measure various labile Fe fractions. The extraction procedure was performed immediately after aerosol sample collection and used time series measurements of Fe(II) using long path length absorbance spectroscopy (LPAS) for analysis of Fe(II). The method measured both the quantities of labile Fe and also the dissolution and reduction kinetics of the labile Fe. Comparisons of HA-reducible Fe and photoreducible Fe concentrations were conducted on board and showed that both reduction processes had similar reduction kinetics and final Fe(II) concentrations during the initial 90 min. The average pseudo-first-order rate constants for the increase in Fe(II) were 0.020 and 0.0076 min-1 for the photoreducible Fe extraction and HA-reduction extraction, respectively. This HA-reducible Fe amount could potentially be used to determine the maximum amount of labile atmospheric Fe that is deposited into the ocean.

  19. Vibrator improves spark erosion cutting process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrall, L. R.

    1966-01-01

    Variable frequency mechanical vibrator improves spark erosion cutting process. The vibration of the cutting tip permits continual flushing away of residue around the cut area with nondestructive electric transformer oil during the cutting process.

  20. Upregulation of transferrin receptor-1 induces cholangiocarcinoma progression via induction of labile iron pool.

    PubMed

    Jamnongkan, Wassana; Thanan, Raynoo; Techasen, Anchalee; Namwat, Nisana; Loilome, Watcharin; Intarawichian, Piyapharom; Titapun, Attapol; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2017-07-01

    Labile iron pool is a cellular source of ions available for Fenton reactions resulting in oxidative stress. Living organisms avoid an excess of free irons by a tight control of iron homeostasis. We investigated the altered expression of iron regulatory proteins and iron discrimination in the development of liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinoma. Additionally, the levels of labile iron pool and the functions of transferrin receptor-1 on cholangiocarcinoma development were also identified. Iron deposition was determined using the Prussian blue staining method in human cholangiocarcinoma tissues. We investigated the alteration of iron regulatory proteins including transferrin, transferrin receptor-1, ferritin, ferroportin, hepcidin, and divalent metal transporter-1 in cholangiocarcinoma tissues using immunohistochemistry. The clinicopathological data of cholangiocarcinoma patients and the expressions of proteins were analyzed. Moreover, the level of intracellular labile iron pool in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines was identified by the RhoNox-1 staining method. We further demonstrated transferrin receptor-1 functions on cell proliferation and migration upon small interfering RNA for human transferrin receptor 1 transfection. Results show that Iron was strongly stained in tumor tissues, whereas negative staining was observed in normal bile ducts of healthy donors. Interestingly, high iron accumulation was significantly correlated with poor prognosis of cholangiocarcinoma patients. The expressions of iron regulatory proteins in human cholangiocarcinoma tissues and normal liver from cadaveric donors revealed that transferrin receptor-1 expression was increased in the cancer cells of cholangiocarcinoma tissues when compared with the adjacent normal bile ducts and was significantly correlated with cholangiocarcinoma metastasis. Labile iron pool level and transferrin receptor-1 expression were significantly increased in KKU-214 and KKU-213 when compared with cholangiocyte

  1. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-01

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  2. Cut By Troughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    1 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an impact crater cut by troughs which formed after the crater formed. The crater and troughs have large windblown ripples on their floors. The ripples, troughs, craters, and other surfaces in this scene have all been mantled by dust. Dark streaks on slopes indicate areas where avalanches of dry dust have occurred. These features are located on Sacra Mena, a large mesa in the Kasei Valles region.

    Location near: 25.4oN, 66.8oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  3. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi

    2004-01-31

    Final design of the mast was completed (Task 5). The mast is consisting of two welded plate girders, set next to each other, and spaced 14-inches apart. Fabrication of the boom will be completed in two parts solely for ease of transportation. The end pivot connection will be made through a single 2-inch diameter x 4 feet-8 inch long 316 SS bar. During installation, hard piping make-ups using Chiksan joints will connect the annular section and 4-inch return line to allow full movement of the mast from horizontal to vertical. Additionally, flexible hoses and piping will be installed to isolate both towers from piping loads and allow recycling operations respectively. Calibration of the prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed and experiments are now being conducted. We were able to generate up to 95% quality foam. Work is currently underway to attach the Thermo-Haake RS300 viscometer and install a view port with a microscope to measure foam bubble size and bubble size distribution. Foam rheology tests (Task 13) were carried out to evaluate the rheological properties of the proposed foam formulation. After successful completion of the first foam test, two sets of rheological tests were conducted at different foam flow rates while keeping other parameters constant (100 psig, 70F, 80% quality). The results from these tests are generally in agreement with the previous foam tests done previously during Task 9. However, an unanticipated observation during these tests was that in both cases, the frictional pressure drop in 2 inch pipe was lower than that in the 3 inch and 4 inch pipes. We also conducted the first foam cuttings transport test during this quarter. Experiments on aerated fluids without cuttings have been completed in ACTF (Task 10). Gas and liquid were injected at different flow rates. Two different sets of experiments were carried out, where the only difference was the temperature. Another set of tests was performed, which covered a wide range of

  4. Making the cut

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Chris

    2013-01-01

    ‘Deliberate self-harm’, ‘self-mutilation’ and ‘self-injury’ are just some of the terms used to describe one of the most prominent issues in British mental health policy in recent years. This article demonstrates that contemporary literature on ‘self-harm’ produces this phenomenon (to varying extents) around two key characteristics. First, this behaviour is predominantly performed by those identified as female. Second, this behaviour primarily involves cutting the skin. These constitutive characteristics are traced back to a corpus of literature produced in the 1960s and 1970s in North American psychiatric inpatient institutions; analysis shows how pre-1960 works were substantially different. Finally, these gendered and behavioural assertions are shown to be the result of historically specific processes of exclusion and emphasis. PMID:23741086

  5. Cutting ice: nanowire regelation.

    PubMed

    Hynninen, Teemu; Heinonen, Vili; Dias, Cristiano L; Karttunen, Mikko; Foster, Adam S; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2010-08-20

    Even below its normal melting temperature, ice melts when subjected to high pressure and refreezes once the pressure is lifted. A classic demonstration of this regelation phenomenon is the passing of a thin wire through a block of ice when sufficient force is exerted. Here we present a molecular-dynamics study of a nanowire cutting through ice to unravel the molecular level mechanisms responsible for regelation. In particular, we show that the transition from a stationary to a moving wire due to increased driving force changes from symmetric and continuous to asymmetric and discontinuous as a hydrophilic wire is replaced by a hydrophobic one. This is explained at the molecular level in terms of the wetting properties of the wire.

  6. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-09

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, in this paper, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Finally, our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  7. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; ...

    2016-08-09

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, in this paper, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details ofmore » the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Finally, our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.« less

  8. Eating from the same plate? Revisiting the role of labile carbon inputs in the soil food web.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Franciska T; Caruso, Tancredi

    2016-11-01

    An increasing number of empirical studies are challenging the central fundamentals on which the classical soil food web model is built. This model assumes that bacteria consume labile substrates twice as fast as fungi, and that mycorrhizal fungi do not decompose organic matter. Here, we build on emerging evidence that points to significant consumption of labile C by fungi, and to the ability of ectomycorrhizal fungi to decompose organic matter, to show that labile C constitutes a major and presently underrated source of C for the soil food web. We use a simple model describing the dynamics of a recalcitrant and a labile C pool and their consumption by fungi and bacteria to show that fungal and bacterial populations can coexist in a stable state with large inputs into the labile C pool and a high fungal use of labile C. We propose a new conceptual model for the bottom trophic level of the soil food web, with organic C consisting of a continuous pool rather than two or three distinct pools, and saprotrophic fungi using substantial amounts of labile C. Incorporation of these concepts will increase our understanding of soil food web dynamics and functioning under changing conditions.

  9. Cross-Cutting Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 25 August 2003

    The several linear cross-cutting grabens and collapse features observed in this THEMIS image illustrate the relative timing of a series of complex geologic processes as more recent events produce features that overlap and intersect older ones. Some impact craters are observed to be cut grabens, suggesting an older impact event compared to impact craters that appear fresh and unmodified.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 14.1, Longitude 236.3 East (123.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Cross-Cutting Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 25 August 2003

    The several linear cross-cutting grabens and collapse features observed in this THEMIS image illustrate the relative timing of a series of complex geologic processes as more recent events produce features that overlap and intersect older ones. Some impact craters are observed to be cut grabens, suggesting an older impact event compared to impact craters that appear fresh and unmodified.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 14.1, Longitude 236.3 East (123.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Chemical composition and antimicrobial effects of essential oils of Eucalyptus globulus, Myrtus communis and Satureja hortensis against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus in minced beef.

    PubMed

    Djenane, D; Yangüela, J; Amrouche, T; Boubrit, S; Boussad, N; Roncalés, P

    2011-12-01

    Essential oils (EOs) extracted by hydrodistillation from leaf parts of Algerian Eucalyptus globulus, Myrtus communis and Satureja hortensis were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The main components of EOs obtained were γ-terpinene (94.48%), 1,8-cineole (46.98%) and carvacrol (46.10%), respectively, for E. globulus, M. communis and S. hortensis. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the EOs was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus CECT 4459 and Escherichia coli O157:H7 CECT 4267 using the agar diffusion technique. Results revealed that E. globulus and S. hortensis EOs had more antibacterial effects than that from M. communis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) showed a range of 0.05-0.22% (volume by volume [v/v]). Sensitivity of gram-positive S. aureus was much higher than that of gram-negative E. coli. Plant EOs were added to minced beef (two-fold MIC value) at 0.10-0.44%, experimentally inoculated with the same pathogens at a level of 5 × 10(5) colony forming units (cfu)/g and stored at 5 ± 2 °C. Results showed that the EOs of E. globulus and S. hortensis had remarkable antibacterial properties, higher than that of M. communis, against S. aureus and E. coli. Indeed, a reduction of 5.8 log cfu/g (70.74% of reduction) was recorded after 7 days of storage for S. hortensis against E. coli. However, regarding S. aureus, both S. hortensis and E. globulus caused a highly significant (p < 0.05) decrease of microbial counts, most evident after 5 days of storage; S. aureus numbers were 3.50 and 2.50 cfu/g, respectively, corresponding to a reduction of 2.20 and 3.20 log cfu/g (38.60 and 56.14% of reduction) after 1 week of storage. Sensory evaluation revealed that the aroma of minced beef meat treated with EOs was acceptable by panelists at the levels used.

  12. Mechanically cut mitotic spindles: clean cuts and stable microtubules.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, R B; Lee, G M; Rieder, C L; Rupp, G

    1989-11-01

    We have discovered an easy way to cut through the mitotic spindle at any desired place. Spindles of demembranated cricket or grasshopper spermatocytes were severed with a microneedle between the chromosomes and one pole, and the cut-off polar piece was swept away. Spindle structure and microtubule dynamics in cut spindles were studied by anti-tubulin immunostaining and electron microscopy. The cut is clean: all microtubules are severed and only a few extend beyond the others. This provides the basis for a clear test of whether traction fibers pull chromosomes to the pole in anaphase, because the putative traction fiber is cleanly severed. Cutting creates new plus ends on microtubules in the cut-off polar piece and new minus ends on microtubules in the main spindle body. The microtubules with new plus ends are unstable, as expected from the dynamic instability of microtubules. However, the microtubules with new minus ends are as stable as uncut microtubules in the same spindle. Our mechanical method of cutting microtubules very likely creates native, reactive ends, and therefore the surprising stability of new minus ends is genuinely interesting, not an artifact of cutting.

  13. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron.

    PubMed

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-04-06

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters.

  14. [Pathogen inactivation in labile blood products: transfusion safety and economic impact].

    PubMed

    Cazenave, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The safety of labile blood products (red blood cell concentrates, platelet concentrates and plasma) is currently ensured by medical and biological donor selection measures. Nonetheless, in addition to the residual risk of bacterial injection of platelet concentrates and parasitic infection of red cell concentrates, there is the emerging danger associated with new viruses. Pathogen inactivation based on chemical or photochemical genomic modifications is a broad-spectrum approach. These techniques are already used to inactivate plasma, and are being developed or application to platelet and erythrocyte concentrates. Universal inactivation of all labile blood products should be possible in a few years' time, but clinical and hemovigilance studies must first show that the biological properties and therapeutic efficacy of these products are not markedly affected, and that the methods used do not lead to long-term toxicity.

  15. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    PubMed Central

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-01-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters. PMID:27050673

  16. Relationship between the lability of sediment-bound Cd and its bioaccumulation in edible oyster.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Ramteke, Darwin; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Chennuri, Kartheek; Bardhan, Pratirupa

    2015-11-15

    A linkage between Cd speciation in sediments and its bioaccumulation in edible oyster (Crassostrea sp.) from a tropical estuarine system was established. Bioaccumulation of Cd in edible oyster increased with the increasing lability and dissociation rate constants of Cd-sediment complexes in the bottom sediments. Total Cd concentration in sediment was not a good indicator of Cd-bioavailability. Increasing trace metal competition in sediments increased lability and bioavailability of Cd in the tropical estuarine sediment. Low thermodynamic stability and high bioavailability of Cd in the estuarine sediment were responsible for high bioaccumulation of Cd in edible oysters (3.2-12.2mgkg(-1)) even though the total concentration of Cd in the bottom sediment was low (0.17-0.49mgkg(-1)).

  17. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-04-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters.

  18. A Solvent-Free Thermosponge Nanoparticle Platform for Efficient Delivery of Labile Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein therapeutics have gained attention recently for treatment of a myriad of human diseases due to their high potency and unique mechanisms of action. We present the development of a novel polymeric thermosponge nanoparticle for efficient delivery of labile proteins using a solvent-free polymer thermo-expansion mechanism with clinical potential, capable of effectively delivering a range of therapeutic proteins in a sustained manner with no loss of bioactivity, with improved biological half-lives and efficacy in vivo. PMID:25333768

  19. Protein degradation by ubiquitin–proteasome system in formation and labilization of contextual conditioning memory

    PubMed Central

    Sol Fustiñana, María; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this case, the inhibition of the UPS during consolidation impairs memory. Similar results were reported for memory reconsolidation. However, in other cases, the inhibition of UPS had no effect on memory consolidation and reconsolidation but impedes the amnesic action of protein synthesis inhibition after retrieval. The last finding suggests a specific action of the UPS inhibitor on memory labilization. However, another interpretation is possible in terms of the synthesis/degradation balance of positive and negative elements in neural plasticity, as was found in the case of long-term potentiation. To evaluate these alternative interpretations, other reconsolidation-interfering drugs than translation inhibitors should be tested. Here we analyzed initially the UPS inhibitor effect in contextual conditioning in crabs. We found that UPS inhibition during consolidation impaired long-term memory. In contrast, UPS inhibition did not affect memory reconsolidation after contextual retrieval but, in fact, impeded memory labilization, blocking the action of drugs that does not affect directly the protein synthesis. To extend these finding to vertebrates, we performed similar experiments in contextual fear memory in mice. We found that the UPS inhibitor in hippocampus affected memory consolidation and blocked memory labilization after retrieval. These findings exclude alternative interpretations to the requirement of UPS in memory labilization and give evidence of this mechanism in both vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:25135196

  20. Protein degradation by ubiquitin-proteasome system in formation and labilization of contextual conditioning memory.

    PubMed

    Sol Fustiñana, María; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Romano, Arturo

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this case, the inhibition of the UPS during consolidation impairs memory. Similar results were reported for memory reconsolidation. However, in other cases, the inhibition of UPS had no effect on memory consolidation and reconsolidation but impedes the amnesic action of protein synthesis inhibition after retrieval. The last finding suggests a specific action of the UPS inhibitor on memory labilization. However, another interpretation is possible in terms of the synthesis/degradation balance of positive and negative elements in neural plasticity, as was found in the case of long-term potentiation. To evaluate these alternative interpretations, other reconsolidation-interfering drugs than translation inhibitors should be tested. Here we analyzed initially the UPS inhibitor effect in contextual conditioning in crabs. We found that UPS inhibition during consolidation impaired long-term memory. In contrast, UPS inhibition did not affect memory reconsolidation after contextual retrieval but, in fact, impeded memory labilization, blocking the action of drugs that does not affect directly the protein synthesis. To extend these finding to vertebrates, we performed similar experiments in contextual fear memory in mice. We found that the UPS inhibitor in hippocampus affected memory consolidation and blocked memory labilization after retrieval. These findings exclude alternative interpretations to the requirement of UPS in memory labilization and give evidence of this mechanism in both vertebrates and invertebrates.

  1. Labile iron potentiates ascorbate-dependent reduction and mobilization of ferritin iron.

    PubMed

    Badu-Boateng, Charles; Pardalaki, Sofia; Wolf, Claude; Lajnef, Sonia; Peyrot, Fabienne; Naftalin, Richard J

    2017-03-21

    Ascorbate mobilizes iron from equine spleen ferritin by two separate processes. Ascorbate alone mobilizes ferritin iron with an apparent Km (ascorbate) ≈1.5mM. Labile iron >2μM, complexed with citrate (10mM), synergises ascorbate-dependent iron mobilization by decreasing the apparent Km (ascorbate) to ≈270μM and raising maximal mobilization rate by ≈5-fold. Catalase reduces the apparent Km(ascorbate) for both ascorbate and ascorbate+iron dependent mobilization by ≈80%. Iron mobilization by ascorbate alone has a higher activation energy (Ea=45.0±5.5kJ/mole) than when mediated by ascorbate with labile iron (10μM) (Ea=13.7±2.2kJ/mole); also mobilization by iron-ascorbate has a three-fold higher pH sensitivity (pH range 6.0-8.0) than with ascorbate alone. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits ascorbate's iron mobilizing action. EPR and autochemiluminescence studies show that ascorbate and labile iron within ferritin enhances radical formation, whereas ascorbate alone produces negligible radicals. These findings suggest that iron catalysed single electron transfer reactions from ascorbate, involving ascorbate or superoxide and possibly ferroxidase tyrosine radicals, accelerate iron mobilization from the ferroxidase centre more than EPR silent, bi-dentate two-electron transfers. These differing modes of electron transference from ascorbate mirror the known mono and bidentate oxidation reactions of dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide with di-ferrous iron at the ferroxidase centre. This study implies that labile iron, at physiological pH, complexed with citrate, synergises iron mobilization from ferritin by ascorbate (50-4000μM). This autocatalytic process can exacerbate oxidative stress in ferritin-containing inflamed tissue.

  2. Mechanism-based design of labile precursors for chromium(I) chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Akturk, Eser S.; Yap, Glenn P. A.; Theopold, Klaus H.

    2015-08-27

    Here, we report that dinitrogen complexes of the type TpR,RCr–N2–CrTpR,R are not the most labile precursors for Cr(I) chemistry, as they are sterically protected from obligatory associative ligand substitution. A mononuclear alkyne complex – TptBu,MeCr(η2-C2(SiMe3)2) – proved to be much more reactive.

  3. Labile and stabilised fractions of soil organic carbon in some intensively cultivated alluvial soils.

    PubMed

    Verma, B C; Datta, S P; Rattan, R K; Singh, A K

    2013-11-01

    The present investigation was undertaken in view of the limited information on the relative proportion of labile and stabilized fractions of soil organic carbon (SOC) in intensively cultivated lands, particularly under tropics. The specific objectives were i) to study the comparative recovery of SOC by different methods of labile carbon estimation under intensively cultivated lands and ii) to evaluate the impact of agricultural practices on carbon management index. For this purpose, in all, 105 surface soil samples were collected from intensively cultivated tube well and sewage irrigated agricultural lands. These samples were analysed for total as well as labile pools of SOC. Results indicated that Walkley and Black, KMnO4-oxidizable and microbial biomass carbon constituted the total SOC to the extent of 10.2 to 47.4, 1.66 to 23.2 and 0.30 to 5.49%, respectively with the corresponding mean values of 26.2, 9.16 and 2.15%. Lability of SOC was considerably higher in sewage irrigated soils than tube well irrigated soils under intensive cropping. Under soybean-wheat, the higher values of carbon management index (CMI) (279 and 286) were associated with the treatments where entire amount of nitrogen was supplied through FYM. Similar results were obtained under rice-wheat, whereas in case of maize-wheat the highest value of CMI was recorded under treatment receiving NPK through chemical fertilizer along with green manure. There was also a significant improvement in CMI under integrated (chemical fertilizer + organics) and chemical fertilizer-treated plots. The values of CMI ranged from 220 to 272 under cultivated lands receiving irrigation through sewage and industrial effluents.

  4. Immunological Interrelationships of Coliform Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Enterotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    FA, Engert RF: Immunological interrelationships between cholera toxin and the heat -labile and hoat-stable enterotoxins of coliform bacteria . Infec...When Date Enterd) -3- SUMMARY These investigations (a) established the fact that species of coliform bacteria other than ETEC strains of E. coZi...elaborate enterotoxins which alter gastrointestinal physiology, and (b) showed that immunization with either E. coli (ETEC) LT or ST toxin arouses an

  5. Immunologic Interrelationships of Coliform Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Enterotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-15

    immunization program to prevent diarrheal disease due to Intestinal contamination by enterotoxigenic straing of coliform bacteria . We have found that...pnotobiotic rats are challenged by intestinal contamination with strains of E. coli which produce the heat-labile toxin , FOB W 13 -niouos wI, soov esis...extended protection against challenge with either this toxin or viable strains of LT-producing E. coZi. Current investigations are addressed at

  6. Mayolenes: labile defensive lipids from the glandular hairs of a caterpillar (Pieris rapae).

    PubMed

    Smedley, Scott R; Schroeder, Frank C; Weibel, Douglas B; Meinwald, Jerrold; Lafleur, Katie A; Renwick, J Alan; Rutowski, Ronald; Eisner, Thomas

    2002-05-14

    Larvae of the European cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae (Pieridae), are beset with glandular hairs, bearing droplets of a clear oily secretion at their tip. The fluid consists primarily of a series of chemically labile, unsaturated lipids, the mayolenes, which are derived from 11-hydroxylinolenic acid. In bioassays with the ant Crematogaster lineolata, the secretion was shown to be potently deterrent, indicating that the fluid plays a defensive role in nature.

  7. Efficient catalysis of Nazarov cyclization using a cationic iridium complex possessing adjacent labile coordination sites.

    PubMed

    Janka, Mesfin; He, Wei; Frontier, Alison J; Eisenberg, Richard

    2004-06-09

    The dicationic Ir(III) complex [IrMe(CO)(dppe)(DIB)](BARF)2 having adjacent labile sites has been found to be a very effective catalyst for promoting the Nazarov cyclization of aryl vinyl and divinyl ketones. Spectroscopic evidence for a substate-catalyst complex before cyclization is presented. The efficiency of the cyclization is attributed to the electrophilicity of the Ir(III) complex and substrate activation via chelation.

  8. Electrodermal lability as an indicator for subjective sleepiness during total sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Michael, Lars; Passmann, Sven; Becker, Ruth

    2012-08-01

    The present study addresses the suitability of electrodermal lability as an indicator of individual vulnerability to the effects of total sleep deprivation. During two complete circadian cycles, the effects of 48h of total sleep deprivation on physiological measures (electrodermal activity and body temperature), subjective sleepiness (measured by visual analogue scale and tiredness symptom scale) and task performance (reaction time and errors in a go/no go task) were investigated. Analyses of variance with repeated measures revealed substantial decreases of the number of skin conductance responses, body temperature, and increases for subjective sleepiness, reaction time and error rates. For all changes, strong circadian oscillations could be observed as well. The electrodermal more labile subgroup reported higher subjective sleepiness compared with electrodermal more stable participants, but showed no differences in the time courses of body temperature and task performance. Therefore, electrodermal lability seems to be a specific indicator for the changes in subjective sleepiness due to total sleep deprivation and circadian oscillations, but not a suitable indicator for vulnerability to the effects of sleep deprivation per se.

  9. Substrate lability and plant activity controls greenhouse gas release from Neotropical peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogersten, Sofie; Hoyos, Jorge; Lomax, Barry; Turner, Ben; Wright, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Almost one third of global CO2 emissions resulting from land use change and substantial CH4 emissions originate from tropical peatlands. However, our understanding of the controls of CO2 and CH4 release from tropical peatlands are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peat lability and the activity of the vegetation on gas release using a combination of field and laboratory experiments. We demonstrated that peat lability constrained CH4 production to the surface peat under anaerobic conditions. The presence of plants shifted the C balance from a C source to a C sink with respect to CO2 while the activity of the root system strongly influenced CH4 emissions through its impact on soil O2 inputs. Both field and laboratory data suggest a coupling between the photosynthetic activity of the vegetation and the release of both CO2 and CH4 following the circadian rhythm of the dominant plant functional types. Forest clearance for agriculture resulted in elevated CH4 release, which we attribute in part to the cessation of root O2 inputs to the peat. We conclude that high emissions of CO2 and CH4 from forested tropical peatlands are likely driven by labile C inputs from the vegetation but that root O2 release may limit CH4 emissions.

  10. Memory labilization in reconsolidation and extinction--evidence for a common plasticity system?

    PubMed

    Almeida-Corrêa, Suellen; Amaral, Olavo B

    2014-01-01

    Reconsolidation and extinction are two processes occurring upon memory retrieval that have received great attention in memory research over the last decade, partly due to their purported potential in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Due to their opposite behavioral effects, the two phenomena have usually been considered as separate entities, with few attempts to build a unified view of how both could be produced by similar mechanisms. Based on computational modeling, we have previously proposed that reconsolidation and extinction are behavioral outcomes of the same set of plasticity systems, albeit working at different synapses. One of these systems seems to be pharmacologically similar to the one involved in initial memory consolidation, and likely involves traditional Hebbian plasticity, while the second seems to be more involved with the labilization of existing memories and/or synaptic changes. In this article, we review the evidence for the existence of a plasticity system specifically involved in memory labilization, as well as its possible molecular requirements, anatomical substrates, synaptic mechanisms and physiological roles. Based on these data, we propose that the field of memory updating might ultimately benefit from a paradigm shift in which reconsolidation and extinction are viewed not as separate processes but as different instantiations of plasticity systems responsible for reinforcement and labilization of synaptic changes.

  11. Evolution of phenotypic plasticity and environmental tolerance of a labile quantitative character in a fluctuating environment.

    PubMed

    Lande, R

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative genetic models of evolution of phenotypic plasticity are used to derive environmental tolerance curves for a population in a changing environment, providing a theoretical foundation for integrating physiological and community ecology with evolutionary genetics of plasticity and norms of reaction. Plasticity is modelled for a labile quantitative character undergoing continuous reversible development and selection in a fluctuating environment. If there is no cost of plasticity, a labile character evolves expected plasticity equalling the slope of the optimal phenotype as a function of the environment. This contrasts with previous theory for plasticity influenced by the environment at a critical stage of early development determining a constant adult phenotype on which selection acts, for which the expected plasticity is reduced by the environmental predictability over the discrete time lag between development and selection. With a cost of plasticity in a labile character, the expected plasticity depends on the cost and on the environmental variance and predictability averaged over the continuous developmental time lag. Environmental tolerance curves derived from this model confirm traditional assumptions in physiological ecology and provide new insights. Tolerance curve width increases with larger environmental variance, but can only evolve within a limited range. The strength of the trade-off between tolerance curve height and width depends on the cost of plasticity. Asymmetric tolerance curves caused by male sterility at high temperature are illustrated. A simple condition is given for a large transient increase in plasticity and tolerance curve width following a sudden change in average environment.

  12. Labile soil carbon inputs mediate the soil microbial community composition and plant residue decomposition rates

    SciTech Connect

    De Graaff, Marie-Anne; Classen, Aimee T; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2010-01-01

    Root carbon (C) inputs may regulate decomposition rates in soil, and in this study we ask: how do labile C inputs regulate decomposition of plant residues, and soil microbial communities? In a 14 d laboratory incubation, we added C compounds often found in root exudates in seven different concentrations (0, 0.7, 1.4, 3.6, 7.2, 14.4 and 21.7 mg C g{sup -1} soil) to soils amended with and without {sup 13}C-labeled plant residue. We measured CO{sub 2} respiration and shifts in relative fungal and bacterial rRNA gene copy numbers using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Increased labile C input enhanced total C respiration, but only addition of C at low concentrations (0.7 mg C g{sup -1}) stimulated plant residue decomposition (+2%). Intermediate concentrations (1.4, 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) had no impact on plant residue decomposition, while greater concentrations of C (> 7.2 mg C g{sup -1}) reduced decomposition (-50%). Concurrently, high exudate concentrations (> 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) increased fungal and bacterial gene copy numbers, whereas low exudate concentrations (< 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) increased metabolic activity rather than gene copy numbers. These results underscore that labile soil C inputs can regulate decomposition of more recalcitrant soil C by controlling the activity and relative abundance of fungi and bacteria.

  13. The effect of acidification on the bioavailability and electrochemical lability of zinc in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ja-Myung; Baars, Oliver; Morel, François M. M.

    2016-11-01

    A poorly studied but potentially important consequence of the CO2-induced acidification of the surface ocean is a possible change in the bioavailability of trace metals, which play a critical role in the productivity and population dynamics of marine ecosystems. We report laboratory and field experiments designed to compare quantitatively the effects of acidification on the bioavailability of Zn, a metal essential to the growth of phytoplankton and on the extent of its complexation by model and natural ligands. We observed a good correspondence between the effects of pH on the rate of Zn uptake by a model diatom and the chemical lability of Zn measured by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). In model laboratory systems, the chemical lability and the bioavailability of Zn could either increase or decrease at low pH depending on the mix of complexing ligands. In a sample of coastal surface water, we observed similar increases in the ASV-labile and bioavailable Zn concentrations upon acidification, a result contrary to previous observations. These results, which can likely be generalized to other bioactive trace metals, mutatis mutandis, demonstrate the intricacy of the effects of ocean acidification on the chemistry and the ecology of surface seawater. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  14. Labile synthetic cadmium complexes are not bioavailable to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata in resin buffered solutions.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, L; Merckx, R; Smolders, E

    2012-11-15

    The Free Ion Activity Model (FIAM) predicts that cadmium (Cd) uptake by organisms is identical for solutions with the same free Cd(2+) concentration and inorganic composition. Clear exceptions to the FIAM have been shown for Cd uptake by plant roots, periphyton and human cells where labile Cd complexes increase bioavailability and which has been attributed to their role in enhancing Cd diffusion towards the uptake cells. Here, we assessed the role of labile Cd complexes on Cd uptake by algae, for which diffusion limitations should be less pronounced due to their smaller size. Long-term (3 days) Cd uptake by the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata was measured in resin buffered solutions with or without synthetic ligands and at three Cd(2+) ion activities (pCd 8.2-5.7). The free Cd(2+) activity was maintained during the test using a metal-selective resin located in the algal bottles. Total dissolved Cd increased up to 35-fold by adding the synthetic ligands at constant Cd(2+) activity. In contrast, Cd uptake by algae increased maximally 2.8 fold with increasing concentration of the synthetic ligands and the availability of the complexes were maximally 5.2% relative to Cd(2+) for NTA and CDTA complexes. It is concluded that labile Cd complexes do not greatly enhance Cd bioavailability to the unicellular algae and calculations suggest that Cd transport from solution to these small cells is not rate limiting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Lability of heavy metal species in aquatic humic substances characterized by ion exchange with cellulose phosphate.

    PubMed

    Rocha, J C; Toscano, I A; Burba, P

    1997-01-01

    Labile metal species in aquatic humic substances (HSs) were characterized by ion exchange on cellulose phosphate (CellPhos) by applying an optimized batch procedure. The HSs investigated were pre-extracted from humic-rich waters by ultrafiltration and a resin XAD 8 procedure. The HS-metal species studied were formed by complexation with Cd(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Mn(II) and Pb(II) as a function of time and the ratio ions to HSs. The kinetics and reaction order of this exchange process were studied. At the beginning (<3 min), the labile metal fractions are separated relatively quickly. After 3 min, the separation of the metal ions proceeds with uniform half-lives of about 12-14 min, revealing rather slow first-order kinetics. The metal exchange between HSs and CellPhos exhibited the following order of metal lability with the studied HSs: Cu > Pb > Mn > Ni > Cd. The required metal determinations were carried out by atomic absorption spectrometry.

  16. Improvement Cutting in Bottomland Hardwoods

    Treesearch

    J. W. Johnson

    1951-01-01

    Do bottomland hardwood forests respond to improvement cuts? Do growth rate and stand quality increase enough to make up for the extra effort and, sometimes, outright expense of improvement cutting? Ten years of growth on some plots on the Delta Experimental Forest near Stoneville, Mississippi, indicates that the answer to both questions is "yes".

  17. Composite structure for cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Radd, F.J.; Haden, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    A cutting tool comprises a compact bundle of elongated, substantially cylindrical fibers or rods formed from a cemented metal carbide material. The bundle of fibers is shrink-fitted within a metal collar to form a long-wearing cutting tool.

  18. Corner-cutting mining assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, John A.

    1983-01-01

    A mining assembly includes a primary rotary cutter mounted on one end of a support shaft and four secondary rotary cutters carried on the same support shaft and positioned behind the primary cutters for cutting corners in the hole cut by the latter.

  19. How to Cut Publications Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Virginia L., Ed.; Alberger, Patricia A., Ed.

    This handbook on how to cut costs in college publications contains the following articles: "Stretching Your Publications Dollar: The Basics," by Kelvin J. Arden and William J. Whalen; "How to Print Cheaper," by M. Frederic Volkmann; "How Your Colleagues Cut Costs," by Robert S. Topor; "Printing Specifications: Writing Them Right," by M. Frederic…

  20. Minimum Cuts and Related Problems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The paper is concerned with an integer programming characterization of a cut in a network. This characterization provides a fundamental equivalence...between directed pseudosummetric networks and undirected networks. It also identifies a class of problems which can be solved as minimum cut problems on a network. (Author)

  1. Cutting Head for Ultrasonic Lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, Earl D. (Inventor); Goodfriend, Roger (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup-shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduces breakage thereof.

  2. Cutting and Self-Harm

    MedlinePlus

    ... sad Cutting and self-harm Cutting and self-harm Self-harm, sometimes called self-injury, is when a person ... about how one girl helps herself not self-harm. What are signs of self-injury in others? ...

  3. Dominus for cut flower production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fumigation with methyl bromide was the principal method of soilborne pest control in cut flower production. Many cut flower growers in Florida have ceased production, but those that remain are restricted in the fumigants that they are able to utilize due to proximity to potable water sources and oc...

  4. How to Cut Publications Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Virginia L., Ed.; Alberger, Patricia A., Ed.

    This handbook on how to cut costs in college publications contains the following articles: "Stretching Your Publications Dollar: The Basics," by Kelvin J. Arden and William J. Whalen; "How to Print Cheaper," by M. Frederic Volkmann; "How Your Colleagues Cut Costs," by Robert S. Topor; "Printing Specifications: Writing Them Right," by M. Frederic…

  5. Detection of heat-labile enterotoxin-like activity in stools of patients with cholera and Escherichia coli diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Echeverria, P; Verheart, L; Ulyanco, C V; Santiago, L T

    1978-01-01

    The Y1 adrenal cell tissue culture assay was used to detect heat-labile enterotoxin-like activity in the stools of 14 of 74 patients with diarrhea. A positive effect of the stool on the adrenal cells was heat-labile and neutralized by cholera antitoxin. Enterotoxin-like activity was detected in the stools of 10 of 30 patients with cholera and in those of 2 of 4 from whom heat-labile Escherichia coli were isolated. None of the stools from nine individuals with Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Salmonella, or Shigella infections were positive. Two of 31 individuals from whom no pathogens were isolated had detectable toxin-like activity in their stools. The Y1 adrenal cell assay provides a rapid method of diagnosing heat-labile enterotoxigenic diarrhea and could be an adjunct in epidemiological studies of gastroenteritis. PMID:342414

  6. Assessing the Selectivity of Extractant Solutions for Recovering Labile Arsenic Associated with Iron (Hydr)oxides and Sulfides in Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential extractions can provide analytical constraints on the identification of mineral phases that control arsenic speciation in sediments. Model solids were used in this study to evaluate different solutions designed to extract arsenic from relatively labile solid phases. ...

  7. Assessing the Selectivity of Extractant Solutions for Recovering Labile Arsenic Associated with Iron (Hydr)oxides and Sulfides in Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential extractions can provide analytical constraints on the identification of mineral phases that control arsenic speciation in sediments. Model solids were used in this study to evaluate different solutions designed to extract arsenic from relatively labile solid phases. ...

  8. Tubing and cable cutting tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsmith, D. D.; Richardson, J. I. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hand held hydraulic cutting tool was developed which is particularly useful in deactivating ejection seats in military aircraft rescue operations. The tool consists primarily of a hydraulic system composed of a fluid reservoir, a pumping piston, and an actuator piston. Mechanical cutting jaws are attached to the actuator piston rod. The hydraulic system is controlled by a pump handle. As the pump handle is operated the actuator piston rod is forced outward and thus the cutting jaws are forced together. The frame of the device is a flexible metal tubing which permits easy positioning of the tool cutting jaws in remote and normally inaccessible locations. Bifurcated cutting edges ensure removal of a section of the tubing or cable to thereby reduce the possibility of accidental reactivation of the tubing or cable being severed.

  9. The evolution of labile traits in sex- and age-structured populations.

    PubMed

    Childs, Dylan Z; Sheldon, Ben C; Rees, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Many quantitative traits are labile (e.g. somatic growth rate, reproductive timing and investment), varying over the life cycle as a result of behavioural adaptation, developmental processes and plastic responses to the environment. At the population level, selection can alter the distribution of such traits across age classes and among generations. Despite a growing body of theoretical research exploring the evolutionary dynamics of labile traits, a data-driven framework for incorporating such traits into demographic models has not yet been developed. Integral projection models (IPMs) are increasingly being used to understand the interplay between changes in labile characters, life histories and population dynamics. One limitation of the IPM approach is that it relies on phenotypic associations between parents and offspring traits to capture inheritance. However, it is well-established that many different processes may drive these associations, and currently, no clear consensus has emerged on how to model micro-evolutionary dynamics in an IPM framework. We show how to embed quantitative genetic models of inheritance of labile traits into age-structured, two-sex models that resemble standard IPMs. Commonly used statistical tools such as GLMs and their mixed model counterparts can then be used for model parameterization. We illustrate the methodology through development of a simple model of egg-laying date evolution, parameterized using data from a population of Great tits (Parus major). We demonstrate how our framework can be used to project the joint dynamics of species' traits and population density. We then develop a simple extension of the age-structured Price equation (ASPE) for two-sex populations, and apply this to examine the age-specific contributions of different processes to change in the mean phenotype and breeding value. The data-driven framework we outline here has the potential to facilitate greater insight into the nature of selection and its

  10. Molecular insights into the microbial formation of marine dissolved organic matter: recalcitrant or labile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, B. P.; Kattner, G.; Witt, M.; Passow, U.

    2014-08-01

    The degradation of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important control variable in the global carbon cycle. For our understanding of the kinetics of organic matter cycling in the ocean, it is crucial to achieve a mechanistic and molecular understanding of its transformation processes. A long-term microbial experiment was performed to follow the production of non-labile DOM by marine bacteria. Two different glucose concentrations and dissolved algal exudates were used as substrates. We monitored the bacterial abundance, concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), nutrients, amino acids and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) for 2 years. The molecular characterization of extracted DOM was performed by ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) after 70 days and after ∼2 years of incubation. Although glucose quickly degraded, a non-labile DOC background (5-9% of the initial DOC) was generated in the glucose incubations. Only 20% of the organic carbon from the algal exudate degraded within the 2 years of incubation. The degradation rates for the non-labile DOC background in the different treatments varied between 1 and 11 μmol DOC L-1 year-1. Transparent exopolymer particles, which are released by microorganisms, were produced during glucose degradation but decreased back to half of the maximum concentration within less than 3 weeks (degradation rate: 25 μg xanthan gum equivalents L-1 d-1) and were below detection in all treatments after 2 years. Additional glucose was added after 2 years to test whether labile substrate can promote the degradation of background DOC (co-metabolism; priming effect). A priming effect was not observed but the glucose addition led to a slight increase of background DOC. The molecular analysis demonstrated that DOM generated during glucose degradation differed appreciably from DOM transformed during the degradation of the algal exudates. Our

  11. Soil-specific response functions of organic matter mineralization to the availability of labile carbon.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Eric; Sim, Allan

    2013-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization processes are central to the functioning of soils in relation to feedbacks with atmospheric CO2 concentration, to sustainable nutrient supply, to structural stability and in supporting biodiversity. Recognition that labile C-inputs to soil (e.g. plant-derived) can significantly affect mineralization of SOM ('priming effects') complicates prediction of environmental and land-use change effects on SOM dynamics and soil C-balance. The aim of this study is to construct response functions for SOM priming to labile C (glucose) addition rates, for four contrasting soils. Six rates of glucose (3 atm% (13) C) addition (in the range 0-1 mg glucose g(-1) soil day(-1) ) were applied for 8 days. Soil CO2 efflux was partitioned into SOM- and glucose-derived components by isotopic mass balance, allowing quantification of SOM priming over time for each soil type. Priming effects resulting from pool substitution effects in the microbial biomass ('apparent priming') were accounted for by determining treatment effects on microbial biomass size and isotopic composition. In general, SOM priming increased with glucose addition rate, approaching maximum rates specific for each soil (up to 200%). Where glucose additions saturated microbial utilization capacity (>0.5 mg glucose g(-1) soil), priming was a soil-specific function of glucose mineralization rate. At low to intermediate glucose addition rates, the magnitude (and direction) of priming effects was more variable. These results are consistent with the view that SOM priming is supported by the availability of labile C, that priming is not a ubiquitous function of all components of microbial communities and that soils differ in the extent to which labile C stimulates priming. That priming effects can be represented as response functions to labile C addition rates may be a means of their explicit representation in soil C-models. However, these response functions are soil-specific and may be

  12. Cutting forces in orthogonal cutting of unidirectional GFRP composites

    SciTech Connect

    Caprino, G.; Nele, L.

    1996-07-01

    The results of orthogonal cutting tests carried out on unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic composites, using HSS tools, are presented and discussed. During the tests, performed on a milling machine at very low cutting speed to avoid thermal effects, the cutting speed was held constant and parallel to the fiber direction. Three parameters, namely the tool rake angle {alpha}, the tool relief angle {gamma}, and the depth of cut t, were varied. According to the experimental results, the horizontal force per unit width, F{sub hu}, undergoes a dramatic decrease, never verified for metals, with increasing {alpha}. Besides, F{sub hu} is only negligibly affected by the relief angle, and linearly increases with t. Similarly to metals, an effect of the depth of cut on the specific energy (size effect) is found also for composites. However, the presented results indicate that the size effect can be analytically modeled in a simple way in the case of composites. The vertical force per unit width, F{sub vu}, exhibits a marked reduction when the relief angle is increased. F{sub vu} is also very sensitive to the rake angle: the lower {alpha}, the higher is F{sub vu}. It is shown that this behavior probably reflects a strong influence of the rake angle on the forces developing at the flank. A linear dependence of the vertical force on the depth of cut is also demonstrated. Finally, the experimental data are utilized to obtain empirical formulae, allowing an approximate evaluation of cutting forces.

  13. Reduced contribution of thermally-labile sugar lesions to DNA double-strand break formation after exposure to neutrons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra K; Wu, Wenqi; Stuschke, Martin; Bockisch, Andreas; Iliakis, George

    2012-12-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response apparatus. However, DSBs also form by delayed chemical conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions (TLSL) to breaks. We recently reported that conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions to breaks occurs in cells maintained at physiological temperatures. Here, we investigate the influence of radiation quality on the formation of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs. We show that, although the yields of total DSBs are very similar after exposure to neutrons and X rays, the yields of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs from neutrons are decreased in comparison to that from X rays. Thus, the yields of prompt DSBs for neutrons are greater than for X rays. Notably, after neutron irradiation the decreased yield of thermally-labile sugar lesion dependent DSBs is strongly cell line dependent, likely reflecting subtle differences in DNA organization. We propose that the higher ionization density of neutrons generates with higher probability prompt DSBs within ionization clusters and renders the ensuing chemical evolution of thermally-labile sugar lesions inconsequential to DNA integrity. Modification of thermally-labile sugar lesion evolution may define novel radiation protection strategies aiming at decreasing DSB formation by chemically preserving thermally-labile sugar lesions until other DSB contributing lesions within the clustered damage site are removed by non-DSB repair pathways.

  14. Novel mannose-sequestration technique reveals variation in subcellular orthophosphate pools do not explain the effects of phosphorus nutrition on photosynthesis in Eucalyptus globulus seedlings.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Tarryn L; Warren, Charles R; Adams, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Although only a small proportion of plant phosphorus (P) is used for photosynthesis, the relationships between P and photosynthesis can be strong. It was hypothesized, in this study, that variation in the allocation of orthophosphate (Pi) between active (cytoplasmic) and nonactive (vacuolar) pools would underpin differences in rates of photosynthesis in 4-month-old Eucalyptus globulus seedlings grown with a varying P supply. Photosynthetic biochemistry was assessed by the response of net photosynthesis to increasing intercellular [CO2]. Cytoplasmic Pi was sequestered as mannose 6-phosphate. Total P and the proportion of P as Pi were positively related to P supply. The ratios of active : stored Pi (10-24%) varied little over the range of treatments. Active Pi was positively related to P supply, as was photosynthesis (7 micromol CO2 m(-2) s(-1) with 0 mM P vs. 16 micromol CO2 m(-2) s(-1) with 0.32 mM P). Positive relationships between P supply and photosynthesis were explained best by leaf P content, not by active pools of Pi. The distribution of Pi between the vacuole and the cytoplasm had little impact on the photosynthetic phosphorus-use efficiency (PPUE), and reductions in cytoplasmic Pi had little effect on photosynthesis. Hence, PPUE is an unsuitable guide for assessing plant responses to increasingly unavailable P in the environment.

  15. Reactivity of syringyl and guaiacyl lignin units and delignification kinetics in the kraft pulping of Eucalyptus globulus wood using Py-GC-MS/FID.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Ana; Gominho, Jorge; Marques, António Velez; Pereira, Helena

    2012-11-01

    Eucalyptus globulus sapwood and heartwood showed no differences in lignin content (23.0% vs. 23.7%) and composition: syringyl-lignin (17.9% vs. 18.0%) and guaiacyl-lignin (4.8% vs. 5.2%). Delignification kinetics of S- and G-units in heartwood and sapwood was investigated by Py-GC-MS/FID at 130, 150 and 170°C and modeled as double first-order reactions. Reactivity differences between S and G-units were small during the main pulping phase and the higher reactivity of S over G units was better expressed in the later pulping stage. The residual lignin composition in pulps was different from wood or from samples in the initial delignification stages, with more G and H-units. S/G ratio ranged from 3 to 4.5 when pulp residual lignin was higher than 10%, decreasing rapidly to less than 1. The S/H was initially around 20 (until 15% residual lignin), decreasing to 4 when residual lignin was about 3%.

  16. Site-specific responses to short-term environmental variation are reflected in leaf and phloem-sap carbon isotopic abundance of field grown Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas N; Pfautsch, Sebastian; Turnbull, Tarryn L; Samsa, Glen A; Adams, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ(13) C) of plant material has been used extensively as an indirect measure of carbon fixation per volume of water used. More recently, the δ(13) C of phloem sap (δ(13) C(phl) ) has been used as a surrogate measure of short-term, canopy scale δ(13) C. Using a combination of δ(13) C physiological, structural and chemical indices from leaves and phloem sap of Eucalyptus globulus at sites of contrasting water availability, we sought to identify short-term, canopy scale resource limitations. Results illustrate that δ(13) C(phl) offers valid reflections of short-term, canopy scale values of leaf δ(13) C and tree water status. Under conditions limited by water, leaf and phloem sap photoassimilates differ in (13) C abundance of a magnitude large enough to significantly influence predictions of water use efficiency. This pattern was not detected among trees with adequate water supply indicating fractionation into heterotrophic tissues that may be sensitive to plant water status. Trees employed a range of physiological, biochemical and structural adaptations to acclimate to resource limitation that differed among sites providing a useful context upon which to interpret patterns in δ(13) C. Our results highlight that such easily characterized properties are ideal for use as minimally invasive tools to monitor growth and resilience of plants to variations in resource availability. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  17. Doubly Rotated Cut SAW Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    A O-AIIO 663 NOTO AOI.A INC SCOTTS A LEJ AZ S0V RNmF.NT ELECTRONICS DV F/S WI1 DOUBLY ROTATED CUT SAV DEVICES.(U) JAN 82 D F WIL.IANMS F T CHO DAK20...quartz substrates for the purpose of locating promising angular ranges with properties superior to the singly rotated cuts now in existence More...detailed calculations follow to refine the angular coordinates in order to specify cuts for experimental erification in Task I1. In Task II, sets of

  18. Doubly Rotated Cut SAW Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    AD-AO 545 MOTOROLA INC SCOTTSDALE AZ GOVERNMENT ELECTRONICS DIV F/O 20/2 DOUBLY ROTATED CUT SAW DEVICES.( U) APR 81 0 F WILLIAMS, F Y CHO DAAK2O 79...f we Ma. he0 _TL ft . *VM or seu3f? 6 090100 cove mis interim Report.~arch 198 ’ Doubly Rotated Cut SAW Devices .r etme 9 9. SInFY T ON 6MNY mUUUUf L...exploratory development of doubly rotated cuts of quartz possessing superior Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) properties for applications involving

  19. Doubly Rotated Cut SAW Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    A0-AI03 -728 MOTOROLA INC SCOTTSDALE AZ GOVERNMENT ELECTRONICS DIV FIG 20/2 DOUBLY ROTATED CUT SAW DEVICES. U P AUG 81 0 F WILLIAMS, F Y CHO OAAK20...79-C-0275 UNCLASSIFIED DELET-TR-79-0275-3 ML wIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII illlllllllllr: K8 MMR UNCLASSIFIED / JZ R-79-0273 Doubly Rotated Cut SAW Devices...towme. e *#* tooeeeimp md fallp p, uh9lbme The objective of this program is the exploratory development of doubly rotated cuts of quartz possessing

  20. Cutting Head for Ultrasonic Lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, E. D.; Goodfriend, R.

    1987-01-01

    Kidney stones lodged in urinary tract disintegrated with increased safety and efficiency by cutting head attached to end of vibrated wire probe. Aligns probe with stone and enables probe to vibrate long enough to disintegrate stone. Design of cutting head reduces risk of metal-fatigue-induced breakage of probe tip leaving metal fragments in urinary tract. Teeth of cutting head both seat and fragment kidney stone, while extension of collar into catheter lessens mechanical strain in probe wire, increasing probe life and lessening danger of in situ probe breakage.

  1. How Can I Stop Cutting?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Help You Express the Pain and Deep Emotion Some people cut because the emotions that ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for ...

  2. Dealing with Cuts (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Cellulitis First Aid: Cuts Staph Infections Bites and Scratches ... Animal Bites Blood Childproofing and Preventing Household Accidents Cellulitis How Stitches Help Kids Heal The Story on ...

  3. Laser cutting of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, T.; Muenchausen, R.; Sanchez, J.

    1998-12-01

    The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of safely and efficiently cutting and drilling metal cases containing a variety of high explosives (HE) using a Nd:YAG laser. Spectral analysis of the optical emission, occurring during the laser-induced ablation process, is used to identify the removed material. By monitoring changes in the optical emission during the cutting process, the metal-He interface can be observed in real time and the cutting parameters adjusted accordingly. For cutting the HE material itself, the authors have demonstrated that this can be safely and efficiently accomplished by means of a ultraviolet (UV) laser beam obtained from the same Nd:YAG laser using the third or fourth harmonics. They are currently applying this technology to UXO identification and ordnance demilitarization.

  4. Cutting thin sections of bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    Medical equipment for obtaining repetitive planoparallel sections of bone to study healing of bone structure under high gravity stress is described. Device consists of modified saw with diamond cutting edges. Construction of device and manner of use are explained.

  5. How Can I Stop Cutting?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Help You Express the Pain and Deep Emotion Some people cut because the emotions that ... Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for ...

  6. Refrigerated cutting tools improve machining of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    Freon-12 applied to tool cutting edge evaporates quickly, leaves no residue, and permits higher cutting rate than with conventional coolants. This technique increases cutting rate on Rene-41 threefold and improves finish of machined surface.

  7. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOEpatents

    Lindroth, David P.; Morrell, Roger J.; Blair, James R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  8. Interactive cutting path analysis programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, J. M.; Williams, D. S.; Colley, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The operation of numerically controlled machine tools is interactively simulated. Four programs were developed to graphically display the cutting paths for a Monarch lathe, Cintimatic mill, Strippit sheet metal punch, and the wiring path for a Standard wire wrap machine. These programs are run on a IMLAC PDS-ID graphic display system under the DOS-3 disk operating system. The cutting path analysis programs accept input via both paper tape and disk file.

  9. Underwater welding, cutting and inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.L. . Ohio Underwater Welding Center)

    1995-02-01

    Underwater welding, cutting and inspection of offshore, inland waterway and port facilities are becoming a requirement for both military and industrial communities, as maintenance and repair costs continue to escalate, and as many of the facilities are in operation well beyond their intended design life. In nuclear applications, underwater welding, cutting and inspection for repair and modification of irradiated nuclear power plant components are also a requirement. This article summarizes recent developments in this emerging underwater technology.

  10. Cutting head for ultrasonic lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anguluo, E. D.; Goodfriend, R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument is described. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduce breakage thereof.

  11. Effect of temperature on the decomposition of labile and recalcitrant organic matter in Chernozem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larioinova, Alla; Kvitkina, Anna; Bykhovets, Sergey; Stulin, Alexandr; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2017-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the recalcitrant pool of soil organic matter (SOM) is more temperature sensitive to decomposition than the labile one. The hypothesis was verified for Chernozem soil sampled from the control (unfertilized) and fertilized with NPK experimental plots of the 50 year field experiment with maize monoculture in Voronezh Region, Russia (51o41'N, 39o15'E). The labile and recalcitrant SOM pools at 2, 12, and 22°C in a long-term (430 d) incubation experiment were traced using the method of 13C natural abundance by C3-C4 transition. Based on decomposition rate constants, the SOM pools followed the order plant residues < new (C4) SOM < old (C3) SOM, with plant residues as the most labile C pool. The hypothesis was valid only for the temperature interval of 12-22°C, where Q10 values increased in the recalcitrance order from 1.2 (plant residues) to 4.3 (C3 SOM). At low temperatures (2-12°C), the values of Q10 varied in the narrow range of 2.2-2.8 irrespective of a SOM pool. In the soil under maize monoculture fertilized with NPK, the increased decomposition of C3 SOM was observed compared to the unfertilized control. The input of new C4 carbon decreased the rate of CO2 emission during the decomposition of the old C3 SOM, i.e. induced negative priming effect (PE). To the contrast, the fertilization increased the positive PE for the C3 SOM. Along with the SOM decomposition rate constants, the magnitude of PE was also temperature dependent. The maximal negative PE in control treatment was found at the lowest temperature of 2oC, while the highest positive PE in NPK fertilized soil was observed at the highest temperature of 22oC.

  12. Lability of High Molecular Weight Dissolved Organic Matter Polysaccharides Increases with Mild Acid or Base Treatment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedler Sherwood, B.; Sosa, O.; Nelson, C. E.; Repeta, D.; DeLong, E.

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 662 Pg of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has accumulated in the global ocean, yet the biological and chemical constraints on DOC turnover remain poorly understood. High molecular weight dissolved organic matter (HMWDOM) is largely comprised of semi-labile polysaccharides. These polysaccharides resist degradation even in the presence of nutrient amendments, suggesting unknown factors of polysaccharide composition affect microbial degradation. In a series of microcosm incubations conducted at station ALOHA in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, we tested the affect of mild base (KOH-DOM) and acid (HCl-DOM) treatments on polysaccharide lability. KOH-DOM, HCl-DOM, and untreated HMWDOM was added to seawater from the deep chlorophyll maximum and 200m. Microcosms amended with KOH-DOM and HCl-DOM yielded higher bacterial abundance and greater carbon drawdown relative to untreated HMWDOM and unamended controls. Microcosms amended with KOH-DOM and HCl-DOM also showed significant production of fluorescent DOM (fDOM), whereas untreated HMWDOM and unamended controls showed a net decrease in fDOM as measured by parallel factor analysis of DOM excitation-emission spectra. Metagenomic analyses revealed that microcosms amended with untreated HMWDOM and controls became dominated by Alteromonas genera ( 60% total sequence reads). In contrast, KOH-DOM and HCl-DOM amended microcosms yielded greater bacterial diversity; Alteromonas genera comprised 25% of sequence reads, with differences primarily accounted for by proportional increases in vibrio, roseobacter, rugeria and marinomonas clades. Transcriptomic analyses identified differential gene expression during growth on each DOM fraction. This study provides new insight into specific chemical moieties that may limit the bacterial degradation rate of semi-labile HMWDOM in the ocean.

  13. Labile Low-Molecular-Mass Metal Complexes in Mitochondria: Trials and Tribulations of a Burgeoning Field.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Paul A; Moore, Michael J

    2016-08-02

    Iron, copper, zinc, manganese, cobalt, and molybdenum play important roles in mitochondrial biochemistry, serving to help catalyze reactions in numerous metalloenzymes. These metals are also found in labile "pools" within mitochondria. Although the composition and cellular function of these pools are largely unknown, they are thought to be comprised of nonproteinaceous low-molecular-mass (LMM) metal complexes. Many problems must be solved before these pools can be fully defined, especially problems stemming from the lability of such complexes. This lability arises from inherently weak coordinate bonds between ligands and metals. This is an advantage for catalysis and trafficking, but it makes characterization difficult. The most popular strategy for investigating such pools is to detect them using chelator probes with fluorescent properties that change upon metal coordination. Characterization is limited because of the inevitable destruction of the complexes during their detection. Moreover, probes likely react with more than one type of metal complex, confusing analyses. An alternative approach is to use liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). With help from a previous lab member, the authors recently developed an LC-ICP-MS approach to analyze LMM extracts from yeast and mammalian mitochondria. They detected several metal complexes, including Fe580, Fe1100, Fe1500, Cu5000, Zn1200, Zn1500, Mn1100, Mn2000, Co1200, Co1500, and Mo780 (numbers refer to approximate masses in daltons). Many of these may be used to metalate apo-metalloproteins as they fold inside the organelle. The LC-based approach also has challenges, e.g., in distinguishing artifactual metal complexes from endogenous ones, due to the fact that cells must be disrupted to form extracts before they are passed through chromatography columns prior to analysis. Ultimately, both approaches will be needed to characterize these intriguing complexes and to

  14. Interactions between recalcitrant and labile organic carbon in streams - Can stream biofilms mediate a priming effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, M. M.; Wagner, K.; Herberg, E. R.; Burns, N. R.; Wanek, W.; Battin, T. J.

    2012-04-01

    Inland waters - such as streams, rivers and lakes - are increasingly recognized as important components in the global carbon cycle. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in these systems is diverse in structure, origin and reactivity, and a fraction of it is regarded as recalcitrant to microbial degradation. In soils, degradation of recalcitrant carbon is often controlled by the availability of labile carbon sources. This is linked to the priming effect (PE). Mounting evidence suggests that PE is also important in aquatic ecosystems but there are so far very few studies addressing this topic. Biofilms are vital components of aquatic ecosystems. In stream biofilms, heterotrophic bacteria and algae coexist in close proximity, exposing the bacteria to both recalcitrant DOC of terrestrial origin and labile organic carbon from the algae. We hypothesize that this makes stream biofilms hotspots for PE. We used plug-flow bioreactors inoculated with natural stream biofilm bacterial communities to test the potential of a priming effect in aquatic ecosystems. The bioreactors were amended with an isotope-labeled plant extract serving as a model of recalcitrant DOC in streams. Labile carbon sources, in the form of glucose and an algal extract were added to induce PE. Nitrate and phosphate were also added to assess the role of these inorganic nutrients on carbon uptake. Microbial uptake of the different carbon sources was monitored by measuring the concentrations and isotopic ratios of respired CO2, biomass and DOC. Our results suggest that the priming effect plays a role in stream carbon cycling and that it is potentially an important process in other aquatic ecosystems.

  15. Total and Labile Phosphorus Concentrations as Influenced by Riparian Buffer Soil Properties.

    PubMed

    Young, Eric O; Ross, Donald S

    2016-01-01

    Riparian buffers can act as a phosphorus (P) source under active stream bank erosion. Using soil and landscape variables (soil series, drainage class, organic matter, and pH) to index P concentrations could improve P loss risk tools for buffers. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine if soil properties could predict total and labile P concentrations within a 10-ha riparian buffer and (ii) to quantify the degree of spatial dependence of P and related properties. Soil samples were taken in 15-cm increments to a depth of 60 cm using a grid ( = 71) from an established riparian buffer along the Rock River in Vermont. Total soil P (TP), plant-available P determined by Modified Morgan extraction (MM-P), pH, soil organic matter (SOM), soil texture, and select cations were measured. We found that TP (152-1536 mg P kg) and MM-P (0.4-14.6 mg kg) ranged widely, with distinct differences between soil series. Mean TP and MM-P were greater in alluvial and glaciolacustrine soils compared with glacial till. Across all samples, MM-P was weakly related to soil properties; however, total labile P (orthophosphate + organic P measured by ICP) and unreactive labile P (ICP-P - colorimetric-P) could both be predicted by SOM ( = 0.59 and 0.73, respectively). Strong spatial dependence was found for P and related properties as revealed by geospatial analyses. Results show that P availability in the buffer was strongly related to soil genesis and support site-specific approaches for P loss risk evaluation in buffers. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. Biosolids application affects the competitive sorption and lability of cadmium, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc in fluvial and calcareous soils.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Antoniadis, Vasileios; Kwon, Eilhann E; Biswas, Jayanta K; Wang, Hailong; Ok, Yong Sik; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2017-03-03

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of biosolids on the competitive sorption and lability of the sorbed Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in fluvial and calcareous soils. Competitive sorption isotherms were developed, and the lability of these metals was estimated by DTPA extraction following their sorption. Sorption of all metals was higher in the fluvial than in the calcareous soil. Sorption of Cu and Pb was stronger than that of Cd, Ni, and Zn in all soils. Biosolids application (2.5%) reduced the sorption of all metals especially Cu and Pb (28-43%) in both soils (especially the calcareous soil) at the lower added metal concentrations (50 and 100 mg L(-1)). However, it increased the sorption of all metals especially Pb and Cu in both soils (especially the calcareous soil; 15.5-fold for Cu) at the higher added concentrations (250 and 300 mg L(-1)). Nickel showed the highest lability followed by Cd, Zn, and Pb in both soils. Biosolids increased the lability of the sorbed Ni in the fluvial soils at all added concentrations and the lability of Cd, Pb, and Zn at 50 mg L(-1), but decreased the lability of Cd, Pb, and Zn at 250 and 300 mg L(-1) in both soils. We conclude that at low loading rate (e.g., 50 mg L(-1)) biosolids treatment might increase the lability and environmental risk of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. However, at high loading rate (e.g., 300 mg L(-1)) biosolids may be used as an immobilizing agent for Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn and mobilizing agent for Ni.

  17. Labile Compounds in Plant Litter Reduce the Sensitivity of Decomposition to Warming and Altered Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suseela, V.; Tharayil, N.; Xing, B.; Dukes, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Together, climate and litter quality strongly regulate decomposition rates. While these two factors and their interaction have been studied across species in continent-scale experiments, few researchers have studied how labile and recalcitrant compounds interact to influence decomposition, or the climate sensitivity of decomposition, within a litter type. Over a period of three years, we studied the effects climate change on mass loss and compound-specific decomposition using two litter types that differed in the relative proportions of labile and recalcitrant compounds, but that had heteropolymers with similar molecular structure. We examined how warming and altered precipitation affected the decomposition of two types of Polygonum cuspidatum (Japanese knotweed) litter (stem litter that was either newly senesced or one year old), at the Boston-Area Climate Experiment (BACE), in Massachusetts, USA. We placed litter bags in an old-field ecosystem exposed to four levels of warming (up to 4oC) and three levels of precipitation (ambient, drought (-50%) and wet (+50%) treatments. The compound-specific degradation of litter was assessed using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Climate treatments immediately affected mass loss of the more recalcitrant litter, but affected the more labile litter only after two years. After three years, although both litter types had lost similar amounts of mass, warming (~4oC) and supplemental precipitation (150% of ambient) together accelerated degradation of alkyl-carbon and lignin only in the more recalcitrant litter, highlighting the role of initial litter quality in determining whether the chemistry of litter residues converges or diverges under different climates. The results from this study indicate that the effect of climate on litter decomposition depends on the quality of litter; litter with a greater initial proportion of labile compounds was less

  18. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  19. Experimental Observation of the Nature of Weak Chemical Bonds in Labile Compounds.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Daisuke

    2017-02-15

    Accurate single-crystal X-ray diffraction data afford a total electron density distribution for crystalline materials by employing an aspherical atomic model with comparable accuracy to that of theoretical calculations. Chemical bonds and intermolecular interactions in the crystalline state are characterized based on the electron density distribution of valence electrons, as well as structural parameters. Herein, the bonding nature of weak chemical bonds in labile compounds, such as hypervalent bonds and delocalized π-bonds, is explored on the basis of electronic structures derived from experimental electron density distribution analyses. In addition, the visualization of a radicalic orbital distribution on an sp(2) -hydridized carbon atom is demonstrated.

  20. Essential oil composition of the fruits of Periploca laevigata Aiton subsp. angustifolia (Labill.) Markgraf (Apocynaceae - Periplocoideae).

    PubMed

    Zito, Pietro; Sajeva, Maurizio; Bruno, Maurizio; Maggio, Antonella; Rosselli, Sergio; Senatore, Felice; Formisano, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    The essential oil of the fruits of Periploca laevigata Aiton subsp. angustifolia (Labill.) Markgraf (Apocynaceae) from Lampedusa Island was obtained by hydrodistillation and its composition was analysed. The analyses allowed the identification and quantification of 64 volatile compounds belonging to different classes. The most abundant compounds were nonacosane, heptacosane, hentriacontane and δ-cadinene. Among the volatile compounds identified in the fruits of P. laevigata subsp. angustifolia, 31 are present in other taxa of Apocynaceae, 19 have antimicrobial activity and four are pheromones for the butterfly Danaus chrysippus. The possible ecological role of the volatile compounds found is briefly discussed.

  1. Organic chemistry of basal ice - presence of labile, low molecular weight compounds available for microbial metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, Grzegorz P.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Lawson, Emily; Stibal, Marek; Telling, Jon

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies show that subglacial environments previously thought to be devoid of life contain a host of active microbial organisms. Presence of liquid water due to overburden pressure, the release of nutrients from chemical erosion of bedrock, and the potential carbon sources in overridden sediments facilitate life in this extreme environment. However, little is still known of concentrations and diversity of labile organic compounds essential for sustaining microbial metabolism in subglacial environments. Three subglacial ecosystems that considerably differ in range and amount of available organic compounds were selected for this study 1-Engabreen, northern Norway, overlying high-grade metamorphic rocks with low organic carbon content; 2-Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, overriding ancient black shales with a relatively high carbon content yet recalcitrant to microbiological consumption; and 3-Russell Glacier in western Greenland with recently overridden quaternary organic rich paleosols. Basal and pressure ridge ice samples were collected and subsequently analysed for low molecular weight organic compounds, with the emphasis on volatile fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. The highest concentration of labile organic compounds in Greenland basal ice suggest that recently overridden paleosols have the greatest potential for sustaining microbial populations present within and underneath basal ice. The high concentration of "ancient" organic carbon in basal ice from Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, doesn't correlate with the presence of labile organic compounds. This indicates the inability of microbes to digest recalcitrant kerogen carbon in cold temperatures. In all three investigated environments, concentrations of labile organic compounds are elevated in basal ice with a high debris content. Until recently, most models of the global carbon cycle tend to neglect the pool of subglacial organic carbon as little is known about the range and concentrations of

  2. Nature of chiral-induced equilibrium shifts in racemic labile lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shuguang; Hilmes, G.L.; Riehl, J.P. )

    1989-03-23

    An analysis of the chiral-induced equilibrium shift of racemic D{sub 3} tris-terdendate complexes of lanthanides with 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylate is presented in terms of the associated/dissociated models of Schipper. Results are presented which indicate that the so-called Pfeiffer effect in these lanthanide complexes is best described by the dissociated model, as was determined for similar labile transition-metal complexes. The nature of the chiral discriminatory interaction is shown to be largely electrostatic by measurements in mixed solvents of varying dielectric constant.

  3. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-10-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  4. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  5. Comparison of preservation methods for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli producing heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Yoh, M; Narita, I; Honda, T; Miwatani, T; Nishibuchi, M

    1991-01-01

    Ten strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli producing heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) were preserved under 12 different conditions. After 1 month, 9 months, and 3 years of preservation, the cultures were recovered and examined for LT production. Preservation of the cultures on Dorset Egg Medium at 4 degrees C and preservation by freezing the cell suspensions in tryptic soy broth with 20% glycerol were found to be suitable preservation methods; all strains were alive for 3 years and had a minimum loss of LT production. PMID:1939590

  6. Mechanism-based design of labile precursors for chromium(I) chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Akturk, Eser S.; Yap, Glenn P. A.; Theopold, Klaus H.

    2015-08-27

    Here, we report that dinitrogen complexes of the type TpR,RCr–N2–CrTpR,R are not the most labile precursors for Cr(I) chemistry, as they are sterically protected from obligatory associative ligand substitution. A mononuclear alkyne complex – TptBu,MeCr(η2-C2(SiMe3)2) – proved to be much more reactive.

  7. Optimization of labile esters for esterase–assisted accumulation of nitroxides into cells: A model for in vivo EPR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Scott R.; Ni, Jiahong; Muralidharan, Sukumaran; Coop, Andrew; Kao, Joseph P.Y.; Rosen, Gerald M.

    2009-01-01

    Nitroxide–based electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging agents are useful quantitative probes of O2 concentration in vivo in real time. Lipophilic, labile alkanoyloxymethyl esters of nitroxides can cross the blood-brain barrier, and after hydrolysis, the corresponding anionic nitroxide is intracellularly entrapped at levels sufficient to permit O2 measurements. The utility of nitroxides as EPR imaging agents depends critically on their ability to accumulate in the brain to high levels. In this study, we systematically investigated the relationship between the structure of the alkanoyl moiety and the ability of the corresponding labile ester to deliver nitroxide intracellularly. We demonstrate, in a cultured cell model, that for nitroxide labile esters with unbranched alkanoyl chains, increasing the chain length improves intracellular loading. Moreover, by studying an isomeric series of labile esters, we conclude that branching of the alkanoyl chain drastically reduces intracellular loading. These structural insights improve our general ability to use labile esters to deliver carboxylates intracellularly, and suggest a strategy for how to enhance delivery of nitroxide imaging agents across the blood-brain barrier in a living animal. PMID:18783260

  8. Simultaneous quantification of soil phosphorus labile pool and desorption kinetics using DGTs and 3D-DIFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Sun, Jiahui; Lehto, Niklas; Zhang, Hao; Stutter, Marc; Giles, Courtney D.; Darch, Tegan; George, Timothy S.; Shand, Charles; Lumsdon, David; Blackwell, Martin; Wearing, Catherine; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Haygarth, Philip M.

    2017-04-01

    The phosphorus (P) labile pool and desorption kinetics were simultaneously evaluated in ten representative UK soils using the technique of Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT). The DGT-induced fluxes in soil and sediments model (DIFS) was fitted to the time series of DGT deployment (1h to 240h). The desorbable P concentration (labile P) was obtained by multiplying the fitted Kd by the soil solution P concentration obtained using Diffusive Equilibration in Thin Films (DET) devices. The labile P was then compared to several soil P extracts including Olsen P, Resin P, FeO-P and water extractable P, in order to assess if these analytical procedures can be used to represent the labile P across different soils. The Olsen P, commonly used as a representation of the soil labile P pool, overestimated the desorbable P concentration by a seven fold factor. The use of this approach for the quantification of soil P desorption kinetics parameters was somewhat unprecise, showing a wide range of equally valid solutions for the response of the system P equilibration time (Tc). Additionally, the performance of different DIFS model versions (1D, 2D and 3D) was compared. Although these models had a good fit to experimental DGT time series data, the fitted parameters showed a poor agreement between different model versions. The limitations of the DIFS model family are associated with the assumptions taken in the modelling approach and the 3D version is here considered to be the most precise among them.

  9. Cut Front Geometry Characterization in Cutting Applications of Brass with Abrasive Water Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkurt, Adnan

    2010-06-01

    Abrasive water jet (AWJ) cutting is an advanced manufacturing process for machining hard to cut materials. In this study, brass-353 samples of different thicknesses were cut by AWJ using different feed rates to identify the relationships between depth of cut (material thickness), feed rate, and deflection of cutting edge geometry. The effects of material thickness on the AWJ cut surface roughness were investigated and discussed. Deflection of cutting edge geometry in AWJ cutting process was assessed. Cutting edge geometry was characterized by analyzing the surface properties of cut samples.

  10. Impacts of Population Structure and Analytical Models in Genome-Wide Association Studies of Complex Traits in Forest Trees: A Case Study in Eucalyptus globulus

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Martín N.; Acuña, Cintia; Borralho, Nuno M. G.; Grattapaglia, Dario; Marcucci Poltri, Susana N.

    2013-01-01

    The promise of association genetics to identify genes or genomic regions controlling complex traits has generated a flurry of interest. Such phenotype-genotype associations could be useful to accelerate tree breeding cycles, increase precision and selection intensity for late expressing, low heritability traits. However, the prospects of association genetics in highly heterozygous undomesticated forest trees can be severely impacted by the presence of cryptic population and pedigree structure. To investigate how to better account for this, we compared the GLM and five combinations of the Unified Mixed Model (UMM) on data of a low-density genome-wide association study for growth and wood property traits carried out in a Eucalyptus globulus population (n = 303) with 7,680 Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers. Model comparisons were based on the degree of deviation from the uniform distribution and estimates of the mean square differences between the observed and expected p-values of all significant marker-trait associations detected. Our analysis revealed the presence of population and family structure. There was not a single best model for all traits. Striking differences in detection power and accuracy were observed among the different models especially when population structure was not accounted for. The UMM method was the best and produced superior results when compared to GLM for all traits. Following stringent correction for false discoveries, 18 marker-trait associations were detected, 16 for tree diameter growth and two for lignin monomer composition (S∶G ratio), a key wood property trait. The two DArT markers associated with S∶G ratio on chromosome 10, physically map within 1 Mbp of the ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H) gene, providing a putative independent validation of this marker-trait association. This study details the merit of collectively integrate population structure and relatedness in association analyses in undomesticated, highly

  11. Drought increases heat tolerance of leaf respiration in Eucalyptus globulus saplings grown under both ambient and elevated atmospheric [CO2] and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Paul P. G.; Crous, Kristine Y.; Ayub, Gohar; Duan, Honglang; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K.; Ellsworth, David S.; Tjoelker, Mark G.; Evans, John R.; Tissue, David T.; Atkin, Owen K.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is resulting in increasing atmospheric [CO2], rising growth temperature (T), and greater frequency/severity of drought, with each factor having the potential to alter the respiratory metabolism of leaves. Here, the effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2], sustained warming, and drought on leaf dark respiration (R dark), and the short-term T response of R dark were examined in Eucalyptus globulus. Comparisons were made using seedlings grown under different [CO2], T, and drought treatments. Using high resolution T–response curves of R dark measured over the 15–65 °C range, it was found that elevated [CO2], elevated growth T, and drought had little effect on rates of R dark measured at T <35 °C and that there was no interactive effect of [CO2], growth T, and drought on T response of R dark. However, drought increased R dark at high leaf T typical of heatwave events (35–45 °C), and increased the measuring T at which maximal rates of R dark occurred (T max) by 8 °C (from 52 °C in well-watered plants to 60 °C in drought-treated plants). Leaf starch and soluble sugars decreased under drought and elevated growth T, respectively, but no effect was found under elevated [CO2]. Elevated [CO2] increased the Q 10 of R dark (i.e. proportional rise in R dark per 10 °C) over the 15–35 °C range, while drought increased Q 10 values between 35 °C and 45 °C. Collectively, the study highlights the dynamic nature of the T dependence of R dark in plants experiencing future climate change scenarios, particularly with respect to drought and elevated [CO2]. PMID:25205579

  12. Drought increases heat tolerance of leaf respiration in Eucalyptus globulus saplings grown under both ambient and elevated atmospheric [CO2] and temperature.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Paul P G; Crous, Kristine Y; Ayub, Gohar; Duan, Honglang; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Ellsworth, David S; Tjoelker, Mark G; Evans, John R; Tissue, David T; Atkin, Owen K

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is resulting in increasing atmospheric [CO2], rising growth temperature (T), and greater frequency/severity of drought, with each factor having the potential to alter the respiratory metabolism of leaves. Here, the effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2], sustained warming, and drought on leaf dark respiration (R(dark)), and the short-term T response of R(dark) were examined in Eucalyptus globulus. Comparisons were made using seedlings grown under different [CO2], T, and drought treatments. Using high resolution T-response curves of R(dark) measured over the 15-65 °C range, it was found that elevated [CO2], elevated growth T, and drought had little effect on rates of R(dark) measured at T <35 °C and that there was no interactive effect of [CO2], growth T, and drought on T response of R(dark). However, drought increased R(dark) at high leaf T typical of heatwave events (35-45 °C), and increased the measuring T at which maximal rates of R(dark) occurred (Tmax) by 8 °C (from 52 °C in well-watered plants to 60 °C in drought-treated plants). Leaf starch and soluble sugars decreased under drought and elevated growth T, respectively, but no effect was found under elevated [CO2]. Elevated [CO2] increased the Q 10 of R(dark) (i.e. proportional rise in R(dark) per 10 °C) over the 15-35 °C range, while drought increased Q 10 values between 35 °C and 45 °C. Collectively, the study highlights the dynamic nature of the T dependence of R dark in plants experiencing future climate change scenarios, particularly with respect to drought and elevated [CO2].

  13. Comparative Effects of Some Medicinal Plants: Anacardium occidentale, Eucalyptus globulus, Psidium guajava, and Xylopia aethiopica Extracts in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Male Wistar Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Okpashi, Victor Eshu; Bayim, Bayim Peter-Robins; Obi-Abang, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Insulin therapy and oral antidiabetic agents/drugs used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus have not sufficiently proven to control hyperlipidemia, which is commonly associated with the diabetes mellitus. Again the hopes that traditional medicine and natural plants seem to trigger researchers in this area is yet to be discovered. This research was designed to compare the biochemical effects of some medicinal plants in alloxan-induced diabetic male Wistar rats using named plants that are best at lowering blood glucose and hyperlipidemia and ameliorating other complications of diabetes mellitus by methods of combined therapy. The results obtained showed 82% decrease in blood glucose concentration after the 10th hour to the fortieth hour. There was significant increase P < 0.05 in the superoxide dismutase activity of the test group administered 100 mg/kg of A. Occidentale. There was no significant difference P > 0.05 recorded in the glutathione peroxidase activity of E. globulus (100 mg/kg) when compared to the test groups of P. guajava (250 mg/kg) and X. aethiopica (250 mg/kg). Catalase activity showed significant increase P < 0.05 in the catalase activity, compared to test groups. While at P > 0.05, there was no significant difference seen between test group and treated groups. Meanwhile, degree of significance was observed in other parameters analysed. The biochemical analysis conducted in this study showed positive result, attesting to facts from previous works. Though these individual plants extracts exhibited significant increase in amelorating diabetes complication and blood glucose control compared to glibenclamide, a synthetic antidiabetic drug. Greater performance was observed in the synergy groups. Therefore, a poly/combined formulation of these plants extracts yielded significant result as well as resolving some other complications associated with diabetics. PMID:25525518

  14. Effects of lability of metal complex on free ion measurement using DMT.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liping; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H; Temminghoff, Erwin J M

    2010-04-01

    Very low concentrations of free metal ion in natural samples can be measured using the Donnan membrane technique (DMT) based on ion transport kinetics. In this paper, the possible effects of slow dissociation of metal complexes on the interpretation of kinetic DMT are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The expressions of the lability parameter, Lgrangian , were derived for DMT. Analysis of new experimental studies using synthetic solution containing NTA as the ligand and Cu(2+) ions shows that when the ionic strength is low (labile species measured using other dynamic sensors (DGT, GIME) in several freshwaters, it is concluded that in most waters ion transport in DMT is controlled by diffusion in the membrane. Only in very soft waters (<0.7 mM Ca+Mg), the dissociation rate of natural metal complex may influence ion transport in DMT. In this case, neglecting this effect may lead to an underestimation of the free metal ion concentration measured.

  15. Protective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide on labile protein interactions during electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Landreh, Michael; Alvelius, Gunvor; Johansson, Jan; Jörnvall, Hans

    2014-05-06

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is a valuable tool to probe noncovalent interactions. However, the integrity of the interactions in the gas-phase is heavily influenced by the ionization process. Investigating oligomerization and ligand binding of transthyretin (TTR) and the chaperone domain from prosurfactant protein C, we found that dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) can improve the stability of the noncovalent interactions during the electrospray process, both regarding ligand binding and the protein quaternary structure. Low amounts of DMSO can reduce in-source dissociation of native protein oligomers and their interactions with hydrophobic ligands, even under destabilizing conditions. We interpret the effects of DMSO as being derived from its enrichment in the electrospray droplets during evaporation. Protection of labile interactions can arise from the decrease in ion charges to reduce the contributions from Coulomb repulsions, as well as from the cooling effect of adduct dissociation. The protective effects of DMSO on labile protein interactions are an important property given its widespread use in protein analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

  16. Rhizosphere Environment and Labile Phosphorus Release from Organic Waste-Amended Soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Thanh H.

    2015-04-01

    Crop residues and biofertilizers are primary sources of nutrients for organic crop production. However, soils treated with large amounts of nutrient-enriched manure have elevated phosphorus (P) levels in regions of intensive animal agriculture. Surpluses occurred in these amended soils, resulting in large pools of exchangeable inorganic P (Pi) and enzyme-labile organic P (Po) that averaging 30.9 and 68.2 mg kg-1, respectively. Organic acids produced during crop residue decomposition can promote the complexation of counter-ions and decouple and release unbound Pi from metal and alkali metal phosphates. Animal manure and cover crop residues also contain large amounts of soluble organic matter, and likely generate similar ligands. However, a high degree of heterogeneity in P spatial distribution in such amended fields, arising from variances in substrate physical forms ranging from slurries to dried solids, composition, and diverse application methods and equipment. Distinct clusters of Pi and Po were observed, where accumulation of the latter forms was associated with high soil microbial biomass C and reduced phosphomonoesterases' activity. Accurate estimates of plant requirements and lability of soil P pools, and real-time plant and soil P sensing systems are critical considerations to optimally manage manure-derived nutrients in crop production systems. An in situ X-ray fluorescence-based approach to sensing canopy and soil XRFS-P was developed to improve the yield-soil P relationship for optimal nutrient recommendations in addition to allowing in-the-field verification of foliar P status.

  17. Light microscopic localization of labile calcium in hypertrophied chondrocytes of long bone with alizarin red S.

    PubMed

    Kashiwa, H K; Park, H Z

    1976-05-01

    A method which localizes labile 5% ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-amino-ethyl ether)N-N'-tetraacetic acid-removable calcium in spherules within hypertrophied chondrocytes and in pericellular matrix using alizarin red S (ARS) is described. Fresh blocks of epiphyseal cartilage approximately 1 mm thick were immersed into 0.5-2% ARS solution containing 7% mounted on glass slides in 7% sucrose or in glycerol-gelatin. The stained tissue blocks were also dehydrated in acetone, cleared in xylene and mounted in Preservaslide. The ARS precipitated ionic calcium as red Ca-ARS salt which was birefringent in polarizing microscope, stable in water at pH 4-9 and in nonpolar organic solvent but soluble in polar solvents, especially in dimethyl sulfoxide. In contrast, ARS-stained insoluble calcium phosphate was stable even in dimethyl sulfoxide. Calcium in the hypertrophied chondrocytes, therefore, was thought to be present in a readily ionizable state instead of as insoluble calcium phosphate. Since addition of 7% sucrose retained as well as improved ARS localization of cellular calcium, the calcium was believed to be present in an osmotically sensitive, membrane-bound cytoplasmic compartment. The ARS-positive labile calcium in spherules which develop in the hypertrophied chondrocytes as well as in the pericellular matrix at the zone of provisional calcification suggested a preparatory stage in the process of cartilage calcification.

  18. Two clusters of GABAergic ellipsoid body neurons modulate olfactory labile memory in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiping; Li, Xiaoting; Guo, Jing; Li, Yan; Guo, Aike

    2013-03-20

    In Drosophila, aversive olfactory memory is believed to be stored in a prominent brain structure, the mushroom body (MB), and two pairs of MB intrinsic neurons, the dorsal paired medial (DPM) and the anterior paired lateral (APL) neurons, are found to regulate the consolidation of middle-term memory (MTM). Here we report that another prominent brain structure, the ellipsoid body (EB), is also involved in the modulation of olfactory MTM. Activating EB R2/R4m neurons does not affect the learning index, but specifically eliminates anesthesia-sensitive memory (ASM), the labile component of olfactory MTM. We further demonstrate that approximately two-thirds of these EB neurons are GABAergic and are responsible for the suppression of ASM. Using GRASP (GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners), we reveal potential synaptic connections between the EB and MB in regions covering both the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of EB neurons, suggesting the presence of bidirectional connections between these two important brain structures. These findings suggest the existence of direct connections between the MB and EB, and provide new insights into the neural circuit basis for olfactory labile memory in Drosophila.

  19. Constrained lability in floral evolution: counting convergent origins of hummingbird pollination in Penstemon and Keckiella.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Paul; Wolfe, Andrea D; Armbruster, W Scott; Thomson, James D

    2007-01-01

    In the clade of Penstemon and segregate genera, pollination syndromes are well defined among the 284 species. Most display combinations of floral characters associated with pollination by Hymenoptera, the ancestral mode of pollination for this clade. Forty-one species present characters associated with hummingbird pollination, although some of these ornithophiles are also visited by insects. The ornithophiles are scattered throughout the traditional taxonomy and across phylogenies estimated from nuclear (internal transcribed spacer (ITS)) and chloroplast DNA (trnCD/TL) sequence data. Here, the number of separate origins of ornithophily is estimated, using bootstrap phylogenies and constrained parsimony searches. Analyses suggest 21 separate origins, with overwhelming support for 10 of these. Because species sampling was incomplete, this is probably an underestimate. Penstemons therefore show great evolutionary lability with respect to acquiring hummingbird pollination; this syndrome acts as an attractor to which species with large sympetalous nectar-rich flowers have frequently been drawn. By contrast, penstemons have not undergone evolutionary shifts backwards or to other pollination syndromes. Thus, they are an example of both striking evolutionary lability and constrained evolution.

  20. Constraints on Transport and Emplacement Mechanisms of Labile Fractions in Lunar Cold Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, D.; Gertsch, L.

    2014-01-01

    Sustaining the scientific exploration of the Solar System will require a significant proportion of the necessary fuels and propellants, as well as other bulk commodities, to be produced from local raw materials [1]. The viability of mineral production depends on the ability to locate and characterize mineable deposits of the necessary feedstocks. This requires, among other things, a workable understanding of the mechanisms by which such deposits form, which is the subject of Economic Geology. Multiple deposition scenarios are possible for labile materials on the Moon. This paper suggests labile fractions moved diffusely through space; deposits may grow richer with depth until low porosity rock; lateral transport is likely to have occurred with the regolith, at least for short distances; crystalline ice may not exist; the constituent phases could be extremely complex. At present we can constrain the sources only mildly; once on the Moon, the transport mechanisms inherently mix and therefore obscure the origins. However, the importance of expanding our understanding of ore-forming processes on the Moon behooves us to make the attempt. Thus begins a time of new inquiry for Economic Geology.

  1. Structure and function of cholera toxin and the related Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, B D

    1992-01-01

    Cholera and the related Escherichia coli-associated diarrheal disease are important problems confronting Third World nations and any area where water supplies can become contaminated. The disease is extremely debilitating and may be fatal in the absence of treatment. Symptoms are caused by the action of cholera toxin, secreted by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or by a closely related heat-labile enterotoxin, produced by Escherichia coli, that causes a milder, more common traveler's diarrhea. Both toxins bind receptors in intestinal epithelial cells and insert an enzymatic subunit that modifies a G protein associated with the adenylate cyclase complex. The consequent stimulated production of cyclic AMP, or other factors such as increased synthesis of prostaglandins by intoxicated cells, initiates a metabolic cascade that results in the excessive secretion of fluid and electrolytes characteristic of the disease. The toxins have a very high degree of structural and functional homology and may be evolutionarily related. Several effective new vaccine formulations have been developed and tested, and a growing family of endogenous cofactors is being discovered in eukaryotic cells. The recent elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of the heat-labile enterotoxin has provided an opportunity to examine and compare the correlations between structure and function of the two toxins. This information may improve our understanding of the disease process itself, as well as illuminate the role of the toxin in studies of signal transduction and G-protein function. Images PMID:1480112

  2. [Effects of land use change on soil labile organic carbon in Central Jiangxi of China].

    PubMed

    Du, Man-Yi; Fan, Shao-Hui; Liu, Guang-Lu; Qi, Liang-Hua; Guo, Bao-Hu; Tang, Xiao-Lu; Xiao, Fu-Ming

    2013-10-01

    Selecting the 15-year abandoned land (AL) and three forest lands [Phyllostachys edulis plantation (PE), Schima superba secondary forest (SS), and Cunninghamia Lanceolata plantation (CL)] in Anfu County of Jiangxi Province as test objects, this paper studied the effects of land use change on the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool and soil labile organic carbon (SLOC) contents. The soil organic carbon (SOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), hot- water extractable carbon (HWC), and readily oxidizable carbon (ROC) contents in the test lands were all in the order of PE>CL>SS>AL. As compared with those in AL, the SOC content, soil carbon stock, and soil labile organic carbon (SLOC) contents in the three forest lands all decreased with increasing soil depth, and had an obvious accumulation in surface soil. The proportions of different kinds of SLOC to soil total organic carbon differed markedly, among which, ROC had the highest proportion, while MBC had the smallest one. There existed significant relationships between SOC, MBC, HWC, and ROC. The MBC, HWC, and ROC contained higher content of active carbon, and were more sensitive to the land use change, being able to be used as the indicators for evaluating the soil quality and fertility in central Jiangxi Province.

  3. Localization of alkali-labile sites in donkey (Equus asinus) and stallion (Equus caballus) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; López-Fernández, Carmen; Fernández, José Luis; Crespo, Francisco; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2014-01-15

    The presence of constitutive alkali-labile sites (ALS) has been investigated using a protocol of DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization and comet assay in spermatozoa of donkey (Equus asinus) and stallion (Equus caballus). These results were compared with those obtained using a similar experimental approach using somatic cells. The relative abundance of ALS was of the order of four times more in spermatozoa than in somatic cells. Alkali-labile sites showed a tendency to cluster localized at the equatorial-distal regions of the sperm. The amount of hybridized signal in the ALS in the sperm of donkey (Equus asinus) was 1.3 times greater than in stallion (Equus caballus), and the length of the comet tail obtained in donkey sperm was 1.6 times longer than that observed in stallion (P < 0.05); however, these differences were not appreciated in somatic cells. In conclusion, ALS localization in sperm is not a randomized event and a different pattern of ALS distribution occurs for each species. These results suggest that ALS represents a species-specific issue related to chromatin organization in sperm and somatic cells in mammalian species, and they might diverge even with very short phylogenetic distances.

  4. Novel diffusive gradients in thin films technique to assess labile sulfate in soil.

    PubMed

    Hanousek, Ondrej; Mason, Sean; Santner, Jakob; Chowdhury, Md Mobaroqul Ahsan; Berger, Torsten W; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A novel diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique for sampling labile soil sulfate was developed, based on a strong basic anion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400) for sulfate immobilization on the binding gel. For reducing the sulfate background on the resin gels, photopolymerization was applied instead of ammonium persulfate-induced polymerization. Agarose cross-linked polyacrylamide (APA) hydrogels were used as diffusive layer. The sulfate diffusion coefficient in APA gel was determined as 9.83 × 10(-6) ± 0.35 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) at 25 °C. The accumulated sulfate was eluted in 1 mol L(-1) HNO3 with a recovery of 90.9 ± 1.6 %. The developed method was tested against two standard extraction methods for soil sulfate measurement. The obtained low correlation coefficients indicate that DGT and conventional soil test methods assess differential soil sulfate pools, rendering DGT a potentially important tool for measuring labile soil sulfate.

  5. Microbially driven export of labile organic carbon from the Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musilova, Michaela; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma; Telling, Jon; Tedstone, Andrew; Anesio, Alexandre M.

    2017-04-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets are significant sources of dissolved organic carbon and nutrients to downstream subglacial and marine ecosystems. Climatically driven increases in glacial runoff are expected to intensify the impact of exported nutrients on local and regional downstream environments. However, the origin and bioreactivity of dissolved organic carbon from glacier surfaces are not fully understood. Here, we present simultaneous measurements of gross primary production, community respiration, dissolved organic carbon composition and export from different surface habitats of the Greenland ice sheet, throughout the ablation season. We found that microbial production was significantly correlated with the concentration of labile dissolved organic species in glacier surface meltwater. Further, we determined that freely available organic compounds made up 62% of the dissolved organic carbon exported from the glacier surface through streams. We therefore conclude that microbial communities are the primary driver for labile dissolved organic carbon production and recycling on glacier surfaces, and that glacier dissolved organic carbon export is dependent on active microbial processes during the melt season.

  6. Acid-Labile Amphiphilic PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO Copolymers: Degradable Poloxamer Analogs.

    PubMed

    Worm, Matthias; Kang, Biao; Dingels, Carsten; Wurm, Frederik R; Frey, Holger

    2016-05-01

    Poly ((ethylene oxide)-b-(propylene oxide)-b-(ethylene oxide)) triblock copolymers commonly known as poloxamers or Pluronics constitute an important class of nonionic, biocompatible surfactants. Here, a method is reported to incorporate two acid-labile acetal moieties in the backbone of poloxamers to generate acid-cleavable nonionic surfactants. Poly(propylene oxide) is functionalized by means of an acetate-protected vinyl ether to introduce acetal units. Three cleavable PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers (Mn,total = 6600, 8000, 9150 g·mol(-1) ; Mn,PEO = 2200, 3600, 4750 g·mol(-1) ) have been synthesized using anionic ring-opening polymerization. The amphiphilic copolymers exhibit narrow molecular weight distributions (Ð = 1.06-1.08). Surface tension measurements reveal surface-active behavior in aqueous solution comparable to established noncleavable poloxamers. Complete hydrolysis of the labile junctions after acidic treatment is verified by size exclusion chromatography. The block copolymers have been employed as surfactants in a miniemulsion polymerization to generate polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles with mean diameters of ≈200 nm and narrow size distribution, as determined by dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy. Acid-triggered precipitation facilitates removal of surfactant fragments from the nanoparticles, which simplifies purification and enables nanoparticle precipitation "on demand."

  7. Towards powerful experimental and statistical approaches to study intraindividual variability in labile traits

    PubMed Central

    Fanson, Benjamin G.; Beckmann, Christa; Biro, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a long-standing interest in behavioural ecology, exploring the causes and correlates of consistent individual differences in mean behavioural traits (‘personality’) and the response to the environment (‘plasticity’). Recently, it has been observed that individuals also consistently differ in their residual intraindividual variability (rIIV). This variation will probably have broad biological and methodological implications to the study of trait variation in labile traits, such as behaviour and physiology, though we currently need studies to quantify variation in rIIV, using more standardized and powerful methodology. Focusing on activity rates in guppies (Poecilia reticulata), we provide a model example, from sampling design to data analysis, in how to quantify rIIV in labile traits. Building on the doubly hierarchical generalized linear model recently used to quantify individual differences in rIIV, we extend the model to evaluate the covariance between individual mean values and their rIIV. After accounting for time-related change in behaviour, our guppies substantially differed in rIIV, and it was the active individuals that tended to be more consistent (lower rIIV). We provide annotated data analysis code to implement these complex models, and discuss how to further generalize the model to evaluate covariances with other aspects of phenotypic variation. PMID:27853550

  8. Heat-Labile Enterotoxin IIa, a Platform To Deliver Heterologous Proteins into Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Przedpelski, Amanda; Tepp, William H.; Pellett, Sabine; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cholera toxin (CT) and the related heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) of Escherichia coli have been implicated as adjuvants in human therapies, but reactivity upon intranasal delivery dampened efforts to develop other clinical applications. However, each CT family member variant has unique biological properties that may warrant development as therapeutic platforms. In the current study, a nontoxic variant of the heat-labile enterotoxin IIa (LTIIa) was engineered to deliver heterologous, functional proteins into the cytosol of neurons. As proof of principle, the LTIIa variant delivered two cargos into neurons. LTIIa delivered β-lactamase efficiently into cells containing complex gangliosides, such as GD1b, as host receptors. LTIIa delivery of β-lactamase was sensitive to brefeldin A, an inhibitor that collapses the Golgi compartment into the endoplasmic reticulum, but not sensitive to treatment with botulinum neurotoxin D (BoNT/D), an inhibitor of synaptic vesicle cycling. LTIIa delivered a single-chain, anti-BoNT/A camelid antibody that inhibited SNAP25 cleavage during post-BoNT/A exposure of neurons. Delivery of functional, heterologous protein cargos into neurons demonstrates the potential of LTII variants as platforms to deliver therapies to inactivate toxins and microbial infections and to reverse the pathology of human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26265718

  9. [Effects of stand structure regulation on soil labile organic carbon in Pinus elliottii plantation].

    PubMed

    Tan, Gui-Xia; Liu, Yuan-Qiu; Li, Lian-Lian; Liu, Wu; Zan, Yu-Ting; Huo, Bing-Nan; He, Mu-Jiao

    2014-05-01

    Taking 21-year-old Pinus elliottii pure plantation as the control, effects of enrichment planting with broadleaf trees (Liquidambar fornosana) after thinning the conifer trees (P. elliottii) on soil labile organic carbon of different plantations, including 3-year-old, 6-year-old, 9-year-old P. elliottii and 21-year-old P. elliottii-L. fornosana mixed plantations, were investigated. The results showed that the contents of soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), readily oxidizable organic carbon (ROC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) significantly increased in the 6-year-old and 9-year-old plantations compared with those in the 21-year-old P. elliottii pure plantation. Soil labile organic carbon contents in the 21-year-old P. elliottii-L. fornosana mixed plantation increased significantly than those in 3-year-old, 6-year-old, 9-year-old stands, and the DOC, ROC and MBC contents increased by 113.1%, 53.3% and 54.6%, respectively, compared with those in the 21-year-old P. elliottii pure plantation. The results suggested that replanting with broadleaf trees are an effective measure to improve the soil ecological function in pure P. elliottii plantation.

  10. Analysis of remineralisation, lability, temperature sensitivity and structural composition of organic matter from the upper ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendtsen, Jørgen; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Hansen, Jørgen L. S.; Richardson, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC) synthesised by plankton is exported out of the surface layer as particulate (POC) and dissolved (DOC) organic carbon. This 'biological pump' constitutes a major pathway in the global marine carbon cycle, each year exporting about 10 Pg C into the ocean interior, where it is subsequently remineralised via biological decomposition. Remineralised inorganic nutrients and carbon are, ultimately, again brought to the surface by advection and turbulent mixing which closes the OC-cycle in the upper ocean. Thus, remineralisation rates of OC are a critical component of the biological pump. These rates are regulated by the lability of the material and the environmental conditions in the ambient water. Temperature is particularly important in regulating the rate of microbial respiration and, thus, remineralisation rates. A significant temperature dependence of the microbial metabolic activity in the ocean interior is expected, as this is a feature observed elsewhere in the biosphere. Such temperature dependence of microbial remineralisation of POC and DOC will alter the amount of material available for transport by the biological pump to the deep ocean. Very few studies on the lability of OC and temperature sensitivity of microbial degradation processes in the mesopelagic zone (∼100-1000 m) have, to date, been carried out. Here, we present a comprehensive new experimental data set from all major ocean basins and quantify remineralisation rates of OC and their temperature sensitivity in long-term incubations of water from the upper 350 m. Microbial respiration was measured by non-invasive oxygen optodes and oxygen consumption was used as a constraint for determining the remineralisation rates and temperature sensitivity by two complementary methods. First, we analysed the oxygen consumption from a multi-component OC-model where the concentration, remineralisation rates and temperature sensitivity of two bio-available (labile) pools of organic carbon were

  11. Metal contents of phytoplankton and labile particulate material in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twining, Benjamin S.; Rauschenberg, Sara; Morton, Peter L.; Vogt, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Phytoplankton contribute significantly to global C cycling and serve as the base of ocean food webs. Phytoplankton require trace metals for growth and also mediate the vertical distributions of many metals in the ocean. We collected bulk particulate material and individual phytoplankton cells from the upper water column (<150 m) of the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the US GEOTRACES North Atlantic Zonal Transect cruise (GEOTRACES GA03). Particulate material was first leached to extract biogenic and potentially-bioavailable elements, and the remaining refractory material was digested in strong acids. The cruise track spanned several ocean biomes and geochemical regions. Particulate concentrations of metals associated primarily with lithogenic phases (Fe, Al, Ti) were elevated in surface waters nearest North America, Africa and Europe, and elements associated primarily with biogenic material (P, Cd, Zn, Ni) were also found at higher concentrations near the coasts. However metal/P ratios of labile particulate material were also elevated in the middle of the transect for Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, and V. P-normalized cellular metal quotas measured with synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) were generally comparable to ratios in bulk labile particles but did not show mid-basin increases. Manganese and Fe ratios and cell quotas were higher in the western part of the section, nearest North America, and both elements were more enriched in bulk particles, relative to P, than in cells, suggesting the presence of labile oxyhydroxide particulate phases. Cellular Fe quotas thus did not increase in step with aeolian dust inputs, which are highest near Africa; these data suggest that the dust inputs have low bioavailability. Copper and Ni cell quotas were notably higher nearest the continental margins. Overall mean cellular metal quotas were similar to those measured in the Pacific and Southern Oceans except for Fe, which was approximately 3-fold higher in North Atlantic cells. Cellular Fe

  12. Doubly Rotated Cut SAW Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    A D A O S G 7 3 A M T O R A I N C S C O T T S A L E A R I Z G V E R N M E N T E L C T R O N I C S I V F / B 2 0 / 2 DOUBLY ROTATED CUT SAW DEVICES...IEEEEI-/ II//E///III I jjj 5.1 -I I II II II F~ ~ 2, I UUGLASSIF1 U100TVw CLAMOGmeIawor OU I lulP&g EWhm oe ae & oubly Rotated Cut SAW Devices& . r...doubly rotated cuts of quartz possessing speri r Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) properties for applications involving environmentally hardened devices. The

  13. AK-cut Crystal Resonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    AK- cut C r y s t a l Resonators A l f r e d Kahan and Ferdinand K. Eu le r S o l i d S t a t e Sciences D i v i s i o n Rome A i r b v e l...l e s s s e n s i t i v e t o angu la r mis- o r i e n t a t i o n than comparable AT- o r BT- cuts . We have a r b i t r a r i - l y...designated these c r y s t a l s as t h e AK- cut . We r e p o r t exper- imenta l da ta f o r seven o r i e n t a t i o n s , +-angle v a r i a t i

  14. The Nichols Wing Cutting Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, James B

    1923-01-01

    Described here is wing cutting equipment for the economical production of metal wings for wind tunnel models. The machine will make any size of constant-section wing or strut up to one-sixth inch chord by 36-inch span and up to a thickness of one and one-quarter inches. It cuts a smooth, true model that is accurate to within two-thousandths of an inch on any ordinate. The holding jaws are so designed as to leave the model free of chip marks, and the only hand finishing necessary after the cutting is a rub with amunite to remove burrs. The actual change on ordinate in this finishing rub is less than .0002 inches.

  15. Comparison of Y1 mouse adrenal cell and coagglutination assays for detection of Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, P A; Daly, C M

    1989-01-01

    A commercial coagglutination assay (COA; Phadebact LT-ETEC) was compared with a Y1 mouse adrenal cell assay for detecting the heat labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli. Of four different media evaluated for use with the COA, only one (modified blood agar) gave a positive result with all strains known to produce heat labile enterotoxin. With modified blood agar, the COA detected 74 (85%) of 87 such strains. Eighty six strains negative by cell culture assay were also negative by COA, and one strain positive by COA could not be confirmed by cell culture. The Phadebact LT-ETEC kit provides a simple, sensitive, and economical method for detecting E coli heat labile enterotoxin. PMID:2668342

  16. Stresses in ultrasonically assisted bone cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, K.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Bäker, M.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2009-08-01

    Bone cutting is a frequently used procedure in the orthopaedic surgery. Modern cutting techniques, such as ultrasonic assisted drilling, enable surgeons to perform precision operations in facial and spinal surgeries. Advanced understanding of the mechanics of bone cutting assisted by ultrasonic vibration is required to minimise bone fractures and to optimise the technique performance. The paper presents results of finite element simulations on ultrasonic and conventional bone cutting analysing the effects of ultrasonic vibration on cutting forces and stress distribution. The developed model is used to study the effects of cutting and vibration parameters (e.g. amplitude and frequency) on the stress distributions in the cutting region.

  17. Microbiopsy/precision cutting devices

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-07-27

    Devices are disclosed for performing tissue biopsy on a small scale (microbiopsy). By reducing the size of the biopsy tool and removing only a small amount of tissue or other material in a minimally invasive manner, the risks, costs, injury and patient discomfort associated with traditional biopsy procedures can be reduced. By using micromachining and precision machining capabilities, it is possible to fabricate small biopsy/cutting devices from silicon. These devices can be used in one of four ways (1) intravascularly, (2) extravascularly, (3) by vessel puncture, and (4) externally. Additionally, the devices may be used in precision surgical cutting. 6 figs.

  18. Female genital cutting: nursing implications.

    PubMed

    Goldenstein, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    Female genital cutting (FGC) is a practice that affects millions of girls and women worldwide. This deeply rooted practice has cultural, religious, and psychosexual meaning to its practitioners, but it also carries long-term physical and mental complications. Decried as a human rights violation, nonetheless this practice is still carried out today. Nurses are in a unique position to contact and educate women who have been cut or are at risk for mutilation. To advocate for these women, a thorough understanding of the practice of FGC, its cultural overtones, religious implications, and psychosexual effects is needed.

  19. Document segmentation via oblique cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, Jeremy; Branzan-Albu, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel solution for the layout segmentation of graphical elements in Business Intelligence documents. We propose a generalization of the recursive X-Y cut algorithm, which allows for cutting along arbitrary oblique directions. An intermediate processing step consisting of line and solid region removal is also necessary due to presence of decorative elements. The output of the proposed segmentation is a hierarchical structure which allows for the identification of primitives in pie and bar charts. The algorithm was tested on a database composed of charts from business documents. Results are very promising.

  20. Hypervelocity cutting machine and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Reich, Morris

    1996-11-12

    A method and machine 14 are provided for cutting a workpiece 12 such as concrete. A gun barrel 16 is provided for repetitively loading projectiles 22 therein and is supplied with a pressurized propellant from a storage tank 28. A thermal storage tank 32,32A is disposed between the propellant storage tank 28 and the gun barrel 16 for repetitively receiving and heating propellant charges which are released in the gun barrel 16 for repetitively firing projectiles 22 therefrom toward the workpiece 12. In a preferred embodiment, hypervelocity of the projectiles 22 is obtained for cutting the concrete workpiece 12 by fracturing thereof.

  1. Hypervelocity cutting machine and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.

    1996-11-12

    A method and machine are provided for cutting a workpiece such as concrete. A gun barrel is provided for repetitively loading projectiles therein and is supplied with a pressurized propellant from a storage tank. A thermal storage tank is disposed between the propellant storage tank and the gun barrel for repetitively receiving and heating propellant charges which are released in the gun barrel for repetitively firing projectiles therefrom toward the workpiece. In a preferred embodiment, hypervelocity of the projectiles is obtained for cutting the concrete workpiece by fracturing thereof. 10 figs.

  2. Microbiopsy/precision cutting devices

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Devices for performing tissue biopsy on a small scale (microbiopsy). By reducing the size of the biopsy tool and removing only a small amount of tissue or other material in a minimally invasive manner, the risks, costs, injury and patient discomfort associated with traditional biopsy procedures can be reduced. By using micromachining and precision machining capabilities, it is possible to fabricate small biopsy/cutting devices from silicon. These devices can be used in one of four ways 1) intravascularly, 2) extravascularly, 3) by vessel puncture, and 4) externally. Additionally, the devices may be used in precision surgical cutting.

  3. In situ high-resolution evaluation of labile arsenic and mercury in sediment of a large shallow lake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yao, Yu; Wang, Peifang; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Yuan, Ye; Fan, Xiulei

    2016-01-15

    The precise evaluation of arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) bioavailability in sediment is crucial to controlling As and Hg contamination, but traditional ex situ measurements hamper comprehensive analysis of labile As and Hg in sediment. In this study, we characterized in situ labile As and Hg in sediment of Lake Hongze using the zirconium (Zr) oxide diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique and 3-mercaptopropyl functionalized silica gel DGT, respectively. The concentrations of DGT-labile As and Hg in the sediment profiles were found to exhibit considerable variation, ranging from 0.15 to 4.15 μg L(-1) for As and from 0.04 to 1.35 μg L(-1) for Hg. As and Hg flux values, calculated based on the concentration gradients measured from the DGT profiles for both the overlying water and sediment close to the sediment-water interface, were used to determine the contamination status of As and Hg. Flux values of As and Hg were between -0.066 and 0.067 ng cm(-2)d(-1) and between -0.0187 and 0.0181 ng cm(-2)d(-1), respectively. The GNU's Not Unix R (GNU R) programming language was used to identify outliers of As and Hg at various depths at the sampling sites. The results indicate that the sites with the most outliers were all located in the regions that were seriously affected by contaminants from the Huai River. The DGT-labile As and Hg concentrations in the 0-30 mm layer were found to be significantly correlated with concentrations of labile As and Hg, total dissolved As and Hg, and total As and Hg in the overlying water, as indicated by ex situ measurements. Results show that DGT is a reliable and high-resolution technique that can be used for in situ monitoring of the labile fractions of As and Hg in sediment in fresh water bodies.

  4. High-resolution imaging of labile phosphorus and its relationship with iron redox state in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yulu; Liang, Tao; Tian, Shuhan; Wang, Lingqing; Holm, Peter E; Bruun Hansen, Hans Christian

    2016-12-01

    A thorough understanding of the labile status and dynamics of phosphorus (P) and iron (Fe) across the sediment-water interface (SWI) is essential for managing internal P release in eutrophic lakes. Fe-coupled inactivation of P in sediments is an important factor which affects internal P release in freshwater lakes. In this study, two in-situ high-resolution diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) techniques, Zr-Oxide DGT and ZrO-Chelex DGT, were used to investigate the release characteristics of P from sediments in a large freshwater lake (Dongting Lake, China; area of 2691 km(2)) experiencing a regional summer algal bloom. Two-dimensional distributions of labile P in sediments were imaged with the Zr-Oxide DGT without destruction of the original structure of the sediment layer at four sites of the lake. The concentration of DGT-labile P in the sediments, ranging from 0.007 to 0.206 mg L(-1), was highly heterogeneous across the profiles. The values of apparent diffusion flux (Fd) and release flux (Fr) of P varied between -0.027-0.197 mg m(-2) d(-1) and 0.037-0.332 mg m(-2) d(-1), respectively. Labile P showed a high and positive correlation (p < 0.01) with labile Fe(II) in the profiles, providing high-resolution evidence for the key role of Fe-redox cycling in labile P variation in sediments.

  5. Labile trace elements in basaltic achondrites: Can they distinguish between meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and V-type asteroids?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Stephen F.; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    2009-06-01

    We report data for 14 mainly labile trace elements (Ag, Au, Bi, Cd, Cs, Ga, In, Rb, Sb, Se, Te, Tl, U, and Zn) in eight whole-rock lunar meteorites (Asuka [A-] 881757, Dar al Gani [DaG] 262, Elephant Moraine [EET] 87521, Queen Alexandra Range [QUE] 93069, QUE 94269, QUE 94281, Yamato [Y-] 793169, and Y-981031), and Martian meteorite (DaG 476) and incorporate these into a comparative study of basaltic meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and V-type asteroids. Multivariate cluster analysis of data for these elements in 14 lunar, 13 Martian, and 34 howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites demonstrate that materials from these three parents are distinguishable using these markers of late, low-temperature episodes. This distinguishability is essentially as complete as that based on markers of high-temperature igneous processes. Concentrations of these elements in 14 lunar meteorites are essentially lognormally distributed and generally more homogeneous than in Martian and HED meteorites. Mean siderophile and labile element concentrations in the 14 lunar meteorites indicate the presence of a CI-equivalent micrometeorite admixture of 2.6% When only feldspathic samples are considered, our data show a slightly higher value of 3.4% consistent with an increasing micrometeorite content in regolith samples of higher maturity. Concentrations of labile elements in the 8 feldspathic samples hint at the presence of a fractionated highly labile element component, possibly volcanic in origin, at a level comparable to the micrometeorite component. Apparently, the process(es) that contributed to establishing lunar meteorite siderophile and labile trace element contents occurred in a system open to highly labile element transport.

  6. Antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds from extracts of Eucalyptus globulus and Melaleuca styphelioides and their protective role on D-glucose-induced hyperglycemic stress and oxalate stress in NRK-49Fcells.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Divya; Al-Sayed, Eman; Albert, Abhishek; Paul, Eldho; Singab, Abdel Nasser B; Govindan Sadasivam, Selvam; Saso, Luciano

    2017-06-21

    Phytochemicals serve as potential therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of diseases. In this study, we elucidate the renoprotective activity of compounds isolated from Eucalyptus globulus and Melaleuca styphelioides extracts in glucose- and oxalate-challenged NRK-49F cell model. The antioxidant potential of isolated compounds was evaluated based on their effect on antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels. The results demonstrated that exposure of NRK-49F cells to glucose and oxalate stress augmented cell damage and attenuated antioxidant enzyme activities. The phytochemicals 2,2,8-trimethyl-6-formyl-chrom-3-ene-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, Cornusiin B and tellimagrandin I treatment restored antioxidant enzyme activity, significantly lowered lipid peroxidation levels and effectively protected cells from glucose and oxalate stress equivalent to the known antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine. Pterocarinin A significantly reversed cellular damage owing to glucose stress. In conclusion, the compounds isolated from E. globulus and M. styphelioides showed potential cytoprotective and anti-oxidative property against glucose- and oxalate-induced oxidative stress in NRK-49F cells.

  7. Pharmacologic management of anxiety and affective lability during recovery from Guillain-Barré syndrome: some preliminary observations

    PubMed Central

    Brousseau, Kristin; Arciniegas, David; Harris, Susie

    2005-01-01

    Psychiatric symptoms in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) can include anxiety and affective lability, which require treatment to improve functional outcomes. Three cases in which modest doses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), alone or in combination with anticonvulsants, reduced symptoms of anxiety and affective lability during acute rehabilitation of GBS are presented. These agents were both more effective and better tolerated than benzodiazepines and appeared to facilitate engagement in rehabilitation therapies, including psychotherapy. Further investigation of the pharmacotherapy of neuropsychiatric disturbances in this population using prospective, blinded, placebo-controlled methods is recommended. PMID:18568059

  8. Evolutionary lability of a complex life cycle in the aphid genus Brachycaudus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most aphid species complete their life cycle on the same set of host-plant species, but some (heteroecious species) alternate between different hosts, migrating from primary (woody) to secondary (herbaceous) host plants. The evolutionary processes behind the evolution of this complex life cycle have often been debated. One widely accepted scenario is that heteroecy evolved from monoecy on woody host plants. Several shifts towards monoecy on herbaceous plants have subsequently occurred and resulted in the radiation of aphids. Host alternation would have persisted in some cases due to developmental constraints preventing aphids from shifting their entire life cycle to herbaceous hosts (which are thought to be more favourable). According to this scenario, if aphids lose their primary host during evolution they should not regain it. The genus Brachycaudus includes species with all the types of life cycle (monoecy on woody plants, heteroecy, monoecy on herbs). We used this genus to test hypotheses concerning the evolution of life cycles in aphids. Results Phylogenetic investigation and character reconstruction suggest that life cycle is evolutionary labile in the genus. Though ancestral character states can be ambiguous depending on optimization methods, all analyses suggest that transitions from monoecy on herbs towards heteroecy have occurred several times. Transitions from heteroecy towards monoecy, are also likely. There have been many shifts in feeding behaviour but we found no significant correlation between life cycle changes and changes in diet. Conclusions The transitions from monoecy on herbs towards heteroecy observed in this study go against a widely accepted evolutionary scenario: aphids in the genus Brachycaudus seem to be able to recapture their supposedly ancestral woody host. This suggests that the determinants of host alternation are probably not as complicated as previously thought. Definitive proofs of the lability of life cycle in

  9. Wedge cutting of mild steel by CO 2 laser and cut-quality assessment in relation to normal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Karatas, C.; Uslan, I.; Keles, O.; Usta, Y.; Yilbas, Z.; Ahsan, M.

    2008-10-01

    In some applications, laser cutting of wedge surfaces cannot be avoided in sheet metal processing and the quality of the end product defines the applicability of the laser-cutting process in such situations. In the present study, CO 2 laser cutting of the wedge surfaces as well as normal surfaces (normal to laser beam axis) is considered and the end product quality is assessed using the international standards for thermal cutting. The cut surfaces are examined by the optical microscopy and geometric features of the cut edges such as out of flatness and dross height are measured from the micrographs. A neural network is introduced to classify the striation patterns of the cut surfaces. It is found that the dross height and out of flatness are influenced significantly by the laser output power, particularly for wedge-cutting situation. Moreover, the cut quality improves at certain value of the laser power intensity.

  10. Soil respiration, labile carbon pools, and enzyme activities as affected by tillage practices in a tropical rice-maize-cowpea cropping system.

    PubMed

    Neogi, S; Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Panda, B B; Nayak, A K; Rao, K S; Manna, M C

    2014-07-01

    In order to identify the viable option of tillage practices in rice-maize-cowpea cropping system that could cut down soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission, sustain grain yield, and maintain better soil quality in tropical low land rice ecology soil respiration in terms of CO2 emission, labile carbon (C) pools, water-stable aggregate C fractions, and enzymatic activities were investigated in a sandy clay loam soil. Soil respiration is the major pathway of gaseous C efflux from terrestrial systems and acts as an important index of ecosystem functioning. The CO2-C emissions were quantified in between plants and rows throughout the year in rice-maize-cowpea cropping sequence both under conventional tillage (CT) and minimum tillage (MT) practices along with soil moisture and temperature. The CO2-C emissions, as a whole, were 24 % higher in between plants than in rows, and were in the range of 23.4-78.1, 37.1-128.1, and 28.6-101.2 mg m(-2) h(-1) under CT and 10.7-60.3, 17.3-99.1, and 17.2-79.1 mg m(-2) h(-1) under MT in rice, maize, and cowpea, respectively. The CO2-C emission was found highest under maize (44 %) followed by rice (33 %) and cowpea (23 %) irrespective of CT and MT practices. In CT system, the CO2-C emission increased significantly by 37.1 % with respect to MT on cumulative annual basis including fallow. The CO2-C emission per unit yield was at par in rice and cowpea signifying the beneficial effect of MT in maintaining soil quality and reduction of CO2 emission. The microbial biomass C (MBC), readily mineralizable C (RMC), water-soluble C (WSC), and permanganate-oxidizable C (PMOC) were 19.4, 20.4, 39.5, and 15.1 % higher under MT than CT. The C contents in soil aggregate fraction were significantly higher in MT than CT. Soil enzymatic activities like, dehydrogenase, fluorescein diacetate, and β-glucosidase were significantly higher by 13.8, 15.4, and 27.4 % under MT compared to CT. The soil labile C pools, enzymatic activities, and

  11. The Cutting-Edge Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Share, Joani

    2005-01-01

    In a time of educational budget cuts, the arts seem to take the major brunt of the financial ax. Fine arts programs are often pitted against one another for survival. The music industry and supporting corporations, such as American Express, campaign to have instruments donated or purchased to keep educational programs alive. The visual arts do not…

  12. Automated internal pipe cutting device

    DOEpatents

    Godlewski, William J.; Haffke, Gary S.; Purvis, Dale; Bashar, Ronald W.; Jones, Stewart D.; Moretti, Jr., Henry; Pimentel, James

    2003-01-21

    The invention is a remotely controlled internal pipe cutting device primarily used for cutting pipes where the outside of the pipe is inaccessible at the line where the cut is to be made. The device includes an axial ram within a rotational cylinder which is enclosed in a housing. The housing is adapted for attachment to an open end of the pipe and for supporting the ram and cylinder in cantilever fashion within the pipe. A radially movable cutter, preferably a plasma arc torch, is attached to the distal end of the ram. A drive mechanism, containing motors and mechanical hardware for operating the ram and cylinder, is attached to the proximal end of the housing. The ram and cylinder provide for moving the cutter axially and circumferentially, and a cable assembly attached to a remote motor provide for the movement of the cutter radially, within the pipe. The control system can be adjusted and operated remotely to control the position and movement of the cutter to obtain the desired cut. The control system can also provide automatic standoff control for a plasma arc torch.

  13. Model aids cuttings transport prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Gavignet, A.A. ); Sobey, I.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Drilling of highly deviated wells can be complicated by the formation of a thick bed of cuttings at low flow rates. The model proposed in this paper shows what mechanisms control the thickness of such a bed, and the model predictions are compared with experimental results.

  14. The Cutting-Edge Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Share, Joani

    2005-01-01

    In a time of educational budget cuts, the arts seem to take the major brunt of the financial ax. Fine arts programs are often pitted against one another for survival. The music industry and supporting corporations, such as American Express, campaign to have instruments donated or purchased to keep educational programs alive. The visual arts do not…

  15. Brazilian science faces swingeing cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanissevich, Alicia

    2017-05-01

    A number of “big-science” projects in Brazil could be hit if the government pushes through a 44% cut to the R5bn (£1.28bn) budget of the Ministry of Science, Technology, Innovations and Communications (MCTIC).

  16. The lateralized processing of affect in emotionally labile extraverts and introverts: central and autonomic effects.

    PubMed

    Smith, B D; Kline, R; Lindgren, K; Ferro, M; Smith, D A; Nespor, A

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to better understand both the lateralized hemispheric processing of emotion and the differential neural processing of arousal in extraverts and introverts. We preselected right-handed male and female extraverts and introverts who were high in emotional lability. Each subject was exposed to two positive and two negative emotional stimuli under each of three counterbalanced conditions, including affective, cognitive, and neutral, while EEG and electrodermal activity (EDA) were recorded. Results showed that introverts are more aroused and that extraversion interacts with gender to produce differentiated patterns of lateralized neural activity. In addition, affective conditions produced higher levels of arousal than did cognitive or neutral conditions, particularly in the left hemisphere and under negative as opposed to positive stimuli. Finally, the hemispherically differentiated processing of positive and negative stimuli was affected by the contextual conditions under which they were experienced.

  17. Glycine as a potentially specific biomolecule of semi-labile dissolved organic matter in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, H.; Saotome, N.; Sakai, A.; Uchimiya, M.; Fukuda, H.

    2016-02-01

    Glycine is the simplest amino acid and a typical of small biomolecule. However it is known to be the most major component of amino acids in dissolved organic matter especially in deep ocean, suggesting a relatively recalcitrant to microbiological degradation and little is known about the actual turnover time of this simple compound in seawater. Thus, we conducted bacterial uptake experiments in the Pacific Ocean with 3H-labeled glycine at in situ concentration label of dissolved free amino acids (sub- nanomolar), and it was found that bacterial uptake rate of glycine was much slower (by up to 6 times) than that of leucine that is a typical of labile amino acid. And the turnover times of glycine were more than 3 days. In addition, another uptake experiment using non-labeled amino acids and high-sensitive detection by UHPLC supported this finding.

  18. Significance of Isotopically Labile Organic Hydrogen in Thermal Maturation of Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz

    2010-03-30

    Isotopically labile organic hydrogen in fossil fuels occupies chemical positions that participate in isotopic exchange and in chemical reactions during thermal maturation from kerogen to bitumen, oil and gas. Carbon-bound organic hydrogen is isotopically far less exchangeable than hydrogen bound to nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur. We explore why organic hydrogen isotope ratios express a relationship with organic nitrogen isotope ratios in kerogen at low to moderate maturity. We develop and apply new techniques to utilize organic D/H ratios in organic matter fractions and on a molecular level as tools for exploration for fossil fuels and for paleoenvironmental research. The scope of our samples includes naturally and artificially matured substrates, such as coal, shale, oil and gas.

  19. Force relaxation, labile heat and parvalbumin content of skeletal muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Lännergren, J; Elzinga, G; Stienen, G J

    1993-01-01

    1. Measurements were made of stable (hb) and labile (ha) maintenance heat rate, slowing of relaxation as a function of tetanus duration, and parvalbumin (PA) content in intact single muscle fibres of types 1 and 2 from Xenopus laevis. The majority of experiments were performed at 20 degrees C. In addition, total and myofibrillar ATPase activity was measured in skinned Xenopus fibres, also of types 1 and 2; these studies were performed at 4 degrees C. 2. In agreement with a previous study hb was significantly higher in type 1 (175 +/- 13 mW (g wet wt)-1; n = 8) than in type 2 fibres (88 +/- 9 mW (g wet wt)-1; n = 7). The value of ha was 236 +/- 22 and 117 +/- 16 mW (g wet wt)-1, respectively (mean +/- S.E.M.). ha decayed with a time constant of 0.27 +/- 0.02 (n = 8) and 0.33 +/- 0.02 s (n = 7). 3. The early relaxation rate of tetanic force, extrapolated to the onset of stimulation (yo + yb; where yo is 'extra' rate of relaxation and yb steady rate) was 85.6 +/- 4.2 s-1 for type 1 fibres (n = 8) and 62.7 +/- 7.3 s-1 for type 2 fibres (n = 7). Relaxation rate at the end of a 1.8 s tetanus (yb) was 29.4 +/- 1.6 and 33.3 +/- 1.5 s-1, respectively; thus, there was more slowing with tetanus duration in type 1 fibres. The time constant for slowing of relaxation with tetanus duration was similar to that for decay of ha. 4. Parvalbumin concentration, [PA], was 0.45 +/- 0.04 mM in type 1 (n = 7) and 0.22 +/- 0.04 mM (n = 7) in type 2 fibres. 5. For individual fibres positive correlations were found between the 'extra' rate of relaxation (yo), labile heat (ha) and [PA]. Significantly more labile heat was liberated than can be accounted for by the enthalpy change of Ca2+ binding to PA. 6. For five fibres (type 1) studied both at 20 and 10 degrees C, the magnitude of slowing of relaxation, expressed as yo/(yo + yb), was 0.58 +/- 0.03 at 20 degrees C and 0.65 +/- 0.03 at 10 degrees C. 7. Both slowing of relaxation and labile heat were depressed in the second of two closely spaced

  20. Developmental change and intraindividual variability: relating cognitive aging to cognitive plasticity, cardiovascular lability, and emotional diversity.

    PubMed

    Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis; Lindenberger, Ulman; Smith, Jacqui

    2011-06-01

    Repeated assessments obtained over years can be used to measure individuals' developmental change, whereas repeated assessments obtained over a few weeks can be used to measure individuals' dynamic characteristics. Using data from a burst of measurement embedded in the Berlin Aging Study (BASE; Baltes & Mayer, 1999), we illustrate and examine how long-term changes in cognitive ability are related to short-term changes in cognitive performance, cardiovascular function, and emotional experience. Our findings suggest that "better" cognitive aging over approximately 13 years was associated with greater cognitive plasticity, less cardiovascular lability, and less emotional diversity over approximately 2 weeks at age 90 years. The study highlights the potential benefits of multi-time scale longitudinal designs for the study of individual function and development.

  1. Bioavailability of labile and desorption-resistant phenanthrene sorbed to montmorillonite clay containing humic fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Lahlou, M.; Ortega-Calvo, J.J.

    1999-12-01

    The biodegradation of {sup 14}C-labeled phenanthrene in the presence of particles of montmorillonite and fulvic and humic acid-montmorillonite complexes was studied in a batch system. A mathematical model that takes into account the contribution to mineralization by the slowly desorbing compound was used to calculate the initial mineralization rates. Sorption of phenanthrene to the particles was determined in sorption isotherms, and desorption was measured during successive water extractions. Mineralization rates in equilibrated suspensions were higher than predicted from aqueous equilibrium concentrations, and in some cases, montmorillonite and fulvic acid-montmorillonite complexes stimulated the phenanthrene transformation rates. In contrast with the high bioavailability exhibited by phenanthrene sorbed as a labile form, biodegradation of the desorption-resistant phenanthrene occurred slowly and followed zero-order kinetics, which indicated a limitation caused by slow desorption. The results suggest that the mechanism of sorption may cause a differential bioavailability of the sorbed compound.

  2. Spinal cord injury: reversing the incorrect cortical maps by inductive lability procedure.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, R V

    2004-06-01

    Within the brain-stem and on the cerebral cortex there are locomotor control centers arranged in a ladder-form control system. These centers are somatotopic, self-organizing neural network maps capable of simultaneously learning and task execution. In spinal cord injury (SCI) these self-organized maps get erroneously re-organized and maladaptively stabilized. The extent and quality of sensory-motor recovery, if any appears, is affected by and compromised due to incorrect mapping processes. The treatment method based on inductive lability procedure (Krishnan, 2003a, 2003b, 2003c) uses botulinum toxin for the purpose. It recreates competition among synapses in a locomotor training-based corrective re-self-organization of the maps in various steps of the ladder.

  3. Developmental Change and Intraindividual Variability: Relating Cognitive Aging to Cognitive Plasticity, Cardiovascular Lability, and Emotional Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis; Lindenberger, Ulman; Smith, Jacqui

    2010-01-01

    Repeated assessments obtained over years can be used to measure individuals’ developmental change, whereas repeated assessments obtained over a few weeks can be used to measure individuals’ dynamic characteristics. Using data from a burst of measurement embedded in the Berlin Aging Study (BASE: Baltes & Mayer, 1999), we illustrate and examine how long-term changes in cognitive ability are related to short-term changes in cognitive performance, cardiovascular function, and emotional experience. Our findings suggest that “better” cognitive aging over approximately13 years was associated with greater cognitive plasticity, less cardiovascular lability, and less emotional diversity over approximately 2 weeks at age 90 years. The study highlights the potential benefits of multi-time scale longitudinal designs for the study of individual function and development. PMID:21443355

  4. Analysis of acid-labile subunit and its usefulness in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Zaidman, Verónica E

    2017-08-01

    The acid-labile subunit (ALS) is an 85 kDa glycoprotein that belongs to the leucine-rich repeat superfamily. It mainly circulates in serum bound to a high molecular weight ternary complex. The main and most widely studied function of ALS is to prolong the half-life of the binary complex formed by insulin-like growth factors type 1 and 2 and its transport proteins 3 and 5. ALS serum levels are lower in neonates, reach a peak in late puberty, and then slowly decrease throughout adulthood. ALS deficiency has consequences on growth, hydrocarbon and bone metabolism, and, in some cases, it affects pubertal development. To date, 25 patients with complete ALS deficiency due to IGFALS gene mutations have been found. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  5. Microenvironmental Control of MUC1 Aptamer-Guided Acid-Labile Nanoconjugate within Injectable Microporous Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenchen; Han, Xiu; Jiang, Yujie; Yuan, Shengxiao; Wu, Ziheng; Wu, Zhenghong; Qi, Xiaole

    2017-10-05

    Although aptamers are well-known as cell-specific membrane biomarkers for tumor-targeted therapy, it is important to avoid their degradation by nucleases in vivo. In this study, we developed a MUC1 aptamer-doxorubicin nanoconjugate (APT-DOX) through an acid-labile linkage and embedded APT-DOX into a thermosensitive hydrogel for antitumor therapy. The hydrogels exhibit a sol-gel transition upon intratumoral injection, resulting in the protection and controlled release control of APT-DOX with the shielding of the gel network. Moreover, the released APT-DOX was prone to be enriched at the tumor cells due to specific intracellular transport by the overexpressing MUC1 protein; however, APT-DOX regained the free DOX form via the rupture of the linkage under tumor cells lysosome acidic conditions and achieved increased concentration in the nucleus for antitumor treatment.

  6. Multiple peptide synthesis on acid-labile handle derivatized polyethylene supports.

    PubMed

    Valerio, R M; Bray, A M; Maeji, N J

    1994-08-01

    Using the multipin peptide synthesis approach, a range of peptides with native amide and carboxylate C-termini were generated using an acid-labile approach. Polyethylene crowns grafted with hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) polymer were functionalized with either 4-hydroxymethylphenoxyacetic acid for the generation of peptide-carboxylate or p-[(R,S)-alpha-[1-(9H-fluoren-9-yl)methoxyformamido]-2,4-dim ethoxy- benzyl]phenoxyacetic acid for peptide-amide. A range of known peptide hormone sequences and other peptides with native C-termini were assembled by sequential incorporation of N alpha-Fmoc protected amino acids. Peptides were sidechain deprotected and cleaved from crowns with TFA/scavengers within 2 mL centrifuge tubes, and isolated by a series of ether/petrol wash and centrifugation steps. In this way it was possible to avoid a cleavage and isolation botteneck, allowing rapid processing of large numbers of peptides.

  7. Labile and recalcitrant organic matter utilization by river biofilm under increasing water temperature.

    PubMed

    Ylla, Irene; Romaní, Anna M; Sabater, Sergi

    2012-10-01

    Microbial biofilms in rivers contribute to the decomposition of the available organic matter which typically shows changes in composition and bioavailability due to their origin, seasonality, and watershed characteristics. In the context of global warming, enhanced biofilm organic matter decomposition would be expected but this effect could be specific when either a labile or a recalcitrant organic matter source would be available. A laboratory experiment was performed to mimic the effect of the predicted increase in river water temperature (+4 °C above an ambient temperature) on the microbial biofilm under differential organic matter sources. The biofilm microbial community responded to higher water temperature by increasing bacterial cell number, respiratory activity (electron transport system) and microbial extracellular enzymes (extracellular enzyme activity). At higher temperature, the phenol oxidase enzyme explained a large fraction of respiratory activity variation suggesting an enhanced microbial use of degradation products from humic substances. The decomposition of hemicellulose (β-xylosidase activity) seemed to be also favored by warmer conditions. However, at ambient temperature, the enzymes highly responsible for respiration activity variation were β-glucosidase and leu-aminopeptidase, suggesting an enhanced microbial use of polysaccharides and peptides degradation products. The addition of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC; dipeptide plus cellobiose) caused a further augmentation of heterotrophic biomass and respiratory activity. The changes in the fluorescence index and the ratio Abs(250)/total DOC indicated that higher temperature accelerated the rates of DOC degradation. The experiment showed that the more bioavailable organic matter was rapidly cycled irrespective of higher temperature while degradation of recalcitrant substances was enhanced by warming. Thus, pulses of carbon at higher water temperature might have consequences for DOC

  8. In vivo lability of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in GdA- and Gdmediterranean deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, Sergio; Corash, Laurence M.; Davenport, Deatra D.; Miraglia, Janet; Amorosi, Edward L.

    1968-01-01

    A decreased level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase might result from decreased rate of synthesis, synthesis of an enzyme of lower catalytic efficiency, increased lability, or a combined mechanism. To test the hypothesis of increased lability, the rate of decline of the enzyme in vivo was measured in three groups of individuals, controls, Gd(—),A-males, and Gd(—), Mediterranean males, by the slope of decline of activity in fractions containing erythrocytes of progressively increasing mean age. These fractions were obtained by ultracentrifugation on a discontinuous density gradient of erythrocyte suspensions free of contaminating platelets and leukocytes. The rate of in vivo decline of pyruvate kinase (another age-dependent enzyme) was also measured and found very similar in the three groups. The in vivo decline of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was found to follow an exponential rate, with a half-life of 62 days for controls and 13 days for Gd(—),A- erythrocytes. The activity in normal reticulocytes was estimated at 9.7 U and in Gd(—),A- reticulocytes at 8.8 U. These estimates were confirmed by direct measurements in reticulocytes isolated from patients with extreme reticulocytosis. In Gd(—),Mediterranean erythrocytes activity could be demonstrated only in reticulocytes, which were estimated to average 1.4 U. The rate of decline is so extreme that no activity could be detected in mature erythrocytes. These data suggest that the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency of both the GdA- and the GdMediterranean variant results from different degrees of in vivo instability of the abnormal enzyme. PMID:5641629

  9. High lability of sexual system over 250 million years of evolution in morphologically conservative tadpole shrimps

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexual system is a key factor affecting the genetic diversity, population structure, genome structure and the evolutionary potential of species. The sexual system androdioecy – where males and hermaphrodites coexist in populations – is extremely rare, yet is found in three crustacean groups, barnacles, a genus of clam shrimps Eulimnadia, and in the order Notostraca, the tadpole shrimps. In the ancient crustacean order Notostraca, high morphological conservatism contrasts with a wide diversity of sexual systems, including androdioecy. An understanding of the evolution of sexual systems in this group has been hampered by poor phylogenetic resolution and confounded by the widespread occurrence of cryptic species. Here we use a multigene supermatrix for 30 taxa to produce a comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of Notostraca. Based on this phylogenetic reconstruction we use character mapping techniques to investigate the evolution of sexual systems. We also tested the hypothesis that reproductive assurance has driven the evolution of androdioecy in Notostraca. Results Character mapping analysis showed that sexual system is an extremely flexible trait within Notostraca, with repeated shifts between gonochorism and androdioecy, the latter having evolved a minimum of five times. In agreement with the reproductive assurance hypothesis androdioecious notostracans are found at significantly higher latitudes than gonochoric ones indicating that post glacial re-colonisation may have selected for the higher colonisation ability conferred by androdioecy. Conclusions In contrast to their conserved morphology, sexual system in Notostraca is highly labile and the rare reproductive mode androdioecy has evolved repeatedly within the order. Furthermore, we conclude that this lability of sexual system has been maintained for at least 250 million years and may have contributed to the long term evolutionary persistence of Notostraca. Our results further our

  10. Collagenase-labile polyurethane urea synthesis and processing into hollow fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hui-Li; Hong, Yi; Little, Steven R; Wagner, William R

    2014-08-11

    As a means to stimulate wound healing, a hollow fiber membrane system might be placed within a wound bed to provide local and externally regulated controlled delivery of regenerative factors. After sufficient healing, it would be desirable to triggerably degrade these fibers as opposed to pulling them out. Accordingly, a series of enzymatically degradable thermoplastic elastomers was developed as potential hollow fiber base material. Polyurethane ureas (PUUs) were synthesized based on 1, 4-diisocyanatobutane, polycaprolactone (PCL) diol and polyethylene glycol (PEG) at different molar fractions as soft segments, and collagenase-sensitive peptide GGGLGPAGGK-NH2 as a chain extender (defined as PUU-CLxEGy-peptide, where x and y are the respective molar percents). In these polymers, PEG in the polymer backbone decreased tensile strengths and initial moduli of solvent-cast films in the wet state, while increasing water absorption. Collagenase degradation was observed at 75% relative PEG content in the soft segment. Control PUUs with putrescine or nonsense peptide chain extenders did not degrade acutely in collagenase. Conduits electrospun from PUU-CL25EG75-peptide and PUU-CL50EG50-peptide exhibited appropriate mechanical strength and sustained release of a model protein from the tube lumen for 7 days. Collapse of PUU-CL25EG75-peptide tubes occurred after collagenase degradation for 3 days. In conclusion, through molecular design, synthesis and characterization, a collagenase-labile PUU-CL25EG75-peptide polymer was identified that exhibited the desired traits of triggerable lability, processability, and the capacity to act as a membrane to facilitate controlled protein release.

  11. Poly(ortho ester amides): Acid-labile Temperature-responsive Copolymers for Potential Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rupei; Palumbo, R. Noelle; Ji, Weihang; Wang, Chun

    2009-01-01

    A new, convenient pathway is developed to synthesize highly hydrolytically labile poly(ortho ester amide) (POEA) copolymers that overcomes some of the major weaknesses of the traditional methods of synthesizing poly(ortho esters) and their derivatives. A diamine monomer containing a built-in, stabilized ortho ester group was synthesized and was used for polycondensation with diacid esters, giving rise to a series of POEA copolymers with unique stimuli-responsive properties. The POEA undergoes temperature-responsive, reversible sol-gel phase transition in water. Phase diagrams of the POEA/H2O mixture reveal the concentration-dependent existence of different phases, including hydrogel and opaque or clear solution. Such behavior may be attributed to the temperature-dependent hydrogen-bonding involving the amide groups in the POEA backbone and hydrophobic interactions between POEA chains, and it is tunable by selecting diacid monomers with different chemical structures. The kinetics of POEA mass loss in physiological aqueous buffers and release of a model macromolecular drug, fluorescently labeled dextran, are nearly zero-order, suggesting predominantly surface-restricted polymer erosion. The rates of polymer erosion and drug release are much faster at pH 5.0 than pH 7.4. No cytotoxicity was found for the polymer extracts and the polymer degradation products at concentrations as high as 1 mg/ml. The normal morphology of fibroblasts cultured directly in contact with POEA films was not altered. These novel acid-labile temperature-responsive POEA copolymers may be potentially useful for a wide range of biomedical applications such as minimal invasive delivery of controlled-release drug formulations that respond to biological temperature and acidic-pH environments in cells and tissues. PMID:19281150

  12. Phenotypic lability and the evolution of predator-induced plasticity in tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Van Buskirk, J

    2002-02-01

    The hypothesis that predator-induced defenses in anuran larvae are maintained by divergent selection across multiple predation environments has not been fully supported by empirical results. One reason may be that traits that respond slowly to environmental variation experience a fitness cost not incorporated in the standard adaptive model, due to a time lag between detecting the state of the environment and expressing the phenotypic response. I measured the rate at which behavior and morphology of Rana temporaria tadpoles change when confronted with a switch in the predation environment at two points in development. Hatchling tadpoles that had been exposed during the egg stage to Aeshna dragonfly larvae were not phenotypically different from those exposed as eggs to predator-free conditions, and both responded similarly to post-hatching predator treatments. When 25-day-old tadpoles from treatments with and without dragonflies were subjected to a switch in the environment, their activity budgets reversed completely within 24-36 h, and their body and tail shape began changing significantly within 4 days. The behavioral response was conservative: Tadpoles switched from high-risk to predator-free treatments were slower to adjust their activity. The study confirmed that behavioral traits are relatively labile and exhibit strong plasticity, but it did not reveal such a pattern at the level of individual traits: Morphological traits that developed slowly did not show the least plasticity. Thus, I found that differences in lability of traits were useful for predicting the magnitude of plasticity only for fundamentally different kinds of characters.

  13. Poly(ortho ester amides): acid-labile temperature-responsive copolymers for potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rupei; Palumbo, R Noelle; Ji, Weihang; Wang, Chun

    2009-04-13

    A new, convenient pathway is developed to synthesize highly hydrolytically labile poly(ortho ester amide) (POEA) copolymers that overcomes some of the major weaknesses of the traditional methods of synthesizing poly(ortho esters) and their derivatives. A diamine monomer containing a built-in, stabilized ortho ester group was synthesized and was used for polycondensation with diacid esters, giving rise to a series of POEA copolymers with unique stimuli-responsive properties. The POEA undergoes temperature-responsive, reversible sol-gel phase transition in water. Phase diagrams of the POEA/H(2)O mixture reveal the concentration-dependent existence of different phases, including hydrogel and opaque or clear solution. Such behavior may be attributed to the temperature-dependent hydrogen-bonding involving the amide groups in the POEA backbone and hydrophobic interactions between POEA chains, and it is tunable by selecting diacid monomers with different chemical structures. The kinetics of POEA mass loss in physiological aqueous buffers and release of a model macromolecular drug, fluorescently labeled dextran, are nearly zero-order, suggesting predominantly surface-restricted polymer erosion. The rates of polymer erosion and drug release are much faster at pH 5.0 than pH 7.4. No cytotoxicity was found for the polymer extracts and the polymer degradation products at concentrations as high as 1 mg/mL. The normal morphology of fibroblasts cultured directly in contact with POEA films was not altered. These novel acid-labile temperature-responsive POEA copolymers may be potentially useful for a wide range of biomedical applications such as minimal invasive delivery of controlled-release drug formulations that respond to biological temperature and acidic-pH environments in cells and tissues.

  14. Oxidative stress and labile plasmatic iron in anemic patients following blood therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marília Sabo; Rissi, Tatiana Tamborena; Zuravski, Luisa; Mezzomo, Juliana; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Folmer, Vanderlei; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Manfredini, Vanusa; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Puntel, Robson Luiz

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the plasmatic iron content and evaluate the oxidative stress (OS) markers in subjects receiving blood therapy. METHODS: Thirty-nine individuals with unspecified anemia receiving blood transfusions and 15 healthy subjects were included in the study. Anemic subjects were divided into three subgrouP: (1) those that received up to five blood transfusions (n = 14); (2) those that received from five to ten transfusions (n = 11); and (3) those that received more than ten transfusions (n = 14). Blood samples were collected by venous arm puncture and stored in tubes containing heparin. The plasma and cells were separated by centrifugation and subsequently used for analyses. Statistical analyses were performed using Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance followed by Dunn’s multiple comparison tests when appropriate. RESULTS: The eletrophoretic hemoglobin profiles of the subjects included in this study indicated that no patients presented with hemoglobinopathy. Labile plasmatic iron, ferritin, protein carbonyl, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and dichlorofluorescein diacetate oxidation were significantly higher (P < 0.05), whereas total thiol levels were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in transfused subjects compared to controls. Additionally, the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were significantly lower in the transfused subjects (P < 0.05). Antioxidant enzyme activities and total thiol levels were positively correlated (P < 0.05), and negatively correlated with the levels of protein carbonyl and TBARS (P < 0.05). In contrast, protein carbonyl and TBARS were positively correlated (P < 0.05). Altogether, these data confirm the involvement of OS in patients following therapy with repeated blood transfusions. CONCLUSION: Our data reveal that changes in OS markers are correlated with levels of labile plasmatic iron and ferritin and the number of transfusions. PMID:25254188

  15. Temporal Changes in Photochemically Labile DOM and Implications for Carbon Budgets in Peatland Aquatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, A.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic systems in peatland catchments are subject to high loading of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from surrounding terrestrial environments. However the significance of photochemical transformation of DOM in peatland carbon budgets remains poorly constrained. In this study UV irradiation experiments were conducted on water samples collected over one year from two contrasting systems in Scotland: a stream draining a peatland with high levels of DOM and a reservoir draining a peat catchment with low levels of DOM. Further samples were collected from the high DOM system during two storm events. After experimental exposure, optical and chemical analyses were employed to determine photochemical lability of the DOM pool. At both sites irradiation-induced decreases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a percentage of the total carbon pool were greatest in winter, suggesting that DOM was depleted in photo-reactive molecules in summer. Seasonal variability in DOC was high at the stream site and was positively correlated with CO₂ and CO photoproduction (r2 = 0.81 and 0.83, respectively; p<0.05). Lignin phenol analyses indicate considerable contribution of peat to the DOM pool at the stream site, particularly during summer. Whilst DOC concentrations did not vary greatly during storm events, UV-Vis absorbance indicators did, signifying changing DOM source material from activation of different hydrological pathways. The most photo-reactive DOM occurred 5-10 hours after peak discharge, suggesting that storms replenish photochemically labile DOM in headwater streams. Conservative estimates using data from this study suggest that up to 7% of the DOM pool of peatland streams can be lost (primarily as CO₂ and CO) upon exposure to 8 hours of environmentally representative UV irradiation. Further investigation in field campaigns under natural UV exposure are underway to assess the importance of photodegradation of DOM as a loss pathway of carbon based gases from aquatic systems.

  16. Molecular insights into the microbial formation of marine dissolved organic matter: recalcitrant or labile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, B. P.; Kattner, G.; Witt, M.; Passow, U.

    2014-02-01

    The degradation of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important control variable in the global carbon cycle and dependent on the DOM composition. For our understanding of the kinetics of organic matter cycling in the ocean, it is therefore crucial to achieve a mechanistic and molecular understanding of its transformation processes. A long-term microbial experiment was performed to follow the production of non-labile DOM by marine bacteria. Two different glucose concentrations and dissolved algal exudates were used as substrates. We monitored the bacterial abundance, concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), nutrients, amino acids, and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) for two years. Ultrahigh resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) allowed the molecular characterization of extracted DOM after 70 days and after ∼2 years of incubation. Although glucose was quickly degraded, a DOC background was generated in glucose incubations. Only 20% of the organic carbon from algal exudate was degraded within the 2 years of incubation. TEP, which are released by micro-organisms, were produced during glucose degradation but decreased within less than three weeks back to half of the maximum concentration and were below detection in all treatments after 2 years. The molecular analysis demonstrated that DOM generated during glucose degradation differed appreciably from DOM produced during the degradation of the algal exudates. Our results led to several conclusions: (i) Higher substrate levels result in a higher level of non-labile DOC which is an important prerequisite for carbon sequestration in the ocean; (ii) TEP are generated by bacteria but are also degraded rapidly, thus limiting their potential contribution to carbon sequestration; (iii) The molecular signatures of DOM derived from algal exudates or glucose after 70 days of incubation differed strongly from refractory DOM. After 2 years

  17. [Computer assisted prescription of labile blood products: What are we expecting?

    PubMed

    Daurat, G

    2016-11-01

    Computer assisted prescription of labile blood products is just at its beginning. Current programs already allow embedding automatically such data as patient's and prescribers' identification or ward details to produce readable prescriptions, also complying with part of Good Practice guidelines. Now prescriptions can also be sent electronically to the Etablissement Francais du Sang, the French blood products services. Usually they are computer programs specialised in transfusion and interfaced with the main patient's file software. Hardly ever the main software is able to manage transfusion itself. Next step would consist in performing checks, calculations or displaying warning or help messages based on academic or local medical recommendations or even tailored to pre-defined individual requirements. But these call for direct access to patient's data such as diagnosis or tests results, that must be accurately classified and coded before use. The main software could provide such functionalities: but actually that would be infrequent and difficult to transpose from one hospital to the other, regarding to the diversity of main software and their settings. Another solution would be to enhance the very few transfusion specialised programs in order to assist prescribers. Data could be prepared and sent by the main software according to a standardised format each time a prescription is to be entered. This standardised format should be independent from software in order to ensure interoperability, whatever the main and specialised programs. The content and format of this data exchange has to be defined, but this would allow hundreds of hospitals to provide a comprehensive tool for prescription of labile blood products, regardless of their main patient's file software. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  18. The priming effect: Investigating the role of labile C quantity on subsoil C losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diochon, Amanda; Kellman, Lisa; Beltrami, Hugo

    2010-05-01

    In a study examining changes in soil organic carbon storage after clearcut harvesting, we previously reported a 50% decline in soil C stocks approximately 30 years after harvesting, with the greatest losses reported below 20 cm in the mineral soil. Physical and biological separation of organic matter indicated that the decline was greatest in the fractions of organic matter that are conceptually thought to be stable. Stable isotope analyses were consistent with increased mineralization post-harvest and we speculated that the deeper stores of C might have been primed by a flush of labile C post harvest. A recent review (Blagodatskyaya and Kuzyakov, 2008) reported that the direction (positive, negative, neutral) of the priming effect may be dependent not only upon the energy content of the added substrate, but the quantity of C added relative to microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this study we test this hypothesis using a lab-based incubation of soils collected from the surface (0-10 cm) and subsoil (35-50 cm) of an 80 year old red spruce forest. We added 10, 100 and 1000 % C (glucose) relative to MBC and measured the rate of decomposition (microbial respiration) every 5 h for the first week, every 24 h for the second week, weekly for a month and biweekly for two months. After flushing the headspace with CO2 free air, we measured the rate of microbial respiration and the δ13C of the respired C using a Multiflow prep system with a Gilson autosampler coupled to an Isoprime mass spectrometer. We used an isotope-mixing model to partition the sources of respired C and determine the direction of priming. Our findings suggest that the quantity of added C can affect the direction of priming and that the relative priming effect differs between depths, suggesting that soil organic carbon stores in the subsoil are more sensitive to labile C additions.

  19. CO2-Laser Cutting Fiber Reinforced Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R.; Nuss, Rudolf; Geiger, Manfred

    1989-10-01

    Guided by experimental investigations laser cutting of glass fiber reinforced reactive injection moulded (RRIM)-polyurethanes which are used e.g. in car industry for bumpers, spoilers, and further components is described. A Comparison with other cutting techniques as there are water jet cutting, milling, punching, sawing, cutting with conventional knife and with ultrasonic excited knife is given. Parameters which mainly influence cutting results e.g. laser power, cutting speed, gas nature and pressure will be discussed. The problematic nature in characterising micro and macro geometry of laser cut edges of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) is explained. The topography of cut edges is described and several characteristic values are introduced to specify the obtained working quality. The surface roughness of laser cut edges is measured by both, an optical and a mechanical sensor and their reliabilities are compared.

  20. X-Z-Theta cutting method

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, L.F.

    1993-01-12

    A method for machining a workpiece. The method includes the use of a rotary cutting tool mounted on the end of a movable arm. The arm is adapted to move in a plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation of the cutting tool. The cutting tool has cutting teeth to cut chips of material off of the workpiece in a predetermined size and shape to facilitate better removal of the chips from the workpiece. The teeth can be of different type and length to permit the tool to both rough cut and finish cut the workpiece during machining. The total depth of cut is divided by the number of tool teeth, so that the longest tool always performs the finishing cut.

  1. Knife and impact cutting of lamb bone.

    PubMed

    King, M J

    1999-05-01

    The forces and hence fracture energies required to cut bone are presented in this paper and the merits of cutting with a high speed blade are considered. A plain knife blade was used to cut cancellous and compact lamb bone using three different methods. A microtome was used to produce a range of cut thicknesses which enabled the fracture energy to be separated into friction, surface fracture and plastic deformation energies. A tensile test machine was used to produce thicker off-cuts so that the energy required to cut through full sections of bone could be determined. A high speed rail gun was used to cut at speeds up to 130 m/s. The energy required to cut bone did not change with blade speed. However, the energies measured during the cutting varied over a wide range. In situations in which the surface of the cut bone exhibited a very uneven surface high energy was required, whereas when the resulting cut surface was planar the cutting energy was low. A light weight blade which impacts the bone at high speed will transmit a small impulse to the carcass which may be absorbed without transmitting strain to the muscle/connective tissue. This may allow the development of a high speed knife which will cut bone without excessively damaging the meat surrounding the cut.

  2. Evaluation of the hemostatic and coagulation effects of AUTO CUT and DRY CUT using a computer-controlled cutting system.

    PubMed

    Szyrach, Mara N I; Tolba, Rene H; Voigtländer, Matthias; Neugebauer, Alexander; Enderle, Markus D

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate a newly developed computer-controlled cutting system for the generation of standardized resections and to systematically compare the hemostatic properties and tissue effect of 2 cutting modes, namely, AUTO CUT and DRY CUT used in urologic procedures. An isolated perfused kidney model was used to assess blood loss and coagulation depth after resection of tissue specimens of standardized geometry, size, and cutting velocity with a resection loop. Three different effect settings (E1, E3, and E6; 200 W) of the electrosurgical modes AUTO CUT and DRY CUT were compared. Blood loss was determined semiquantitatively by weighing a swab before and after placing it onto the resection area. The coagulation depth was estimated microscopically on cross sections. The computer-controlled cutting system creates resections of standardized geometry and size with a high reproducibility. An effect level-dependent increase in hemostasis and coagulation depth could be demonstrated with the cutting modes DRY CUT and AUTO CUT using this computer-controlled cutting system. The hemostatic effect with DRY CUT is significantly more pronounced than with AUTO CUT (E1, E3: P < .0001, E6: P = .004), and the coagulation is significantly deeper (E1, E3, E6: P < .0001). The computer-controlled cutting system creating reproducible resections in combination with the isolated perfused kidney model offers the possibility to systematically investigate bleeding rate and coagulation depth. The stronger hemostatic properties of the DRY CUT mode are more favorable for urologic interventions requiring a higher hemostatic effect than the AUTO CUT mode. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparison of retrospective self-report versus ecological momentary assessment measures of affective lability in the examination of its relationship with bulimic symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Anestis, Michael D; Selby, Edward A; Crosby, Ross D; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Engel, Scott G; Joiner, Thomas E

    2010-07-01

    Affective lability has been linked to several maladaptive behaviors (Anestis et al., 2009; Coccaro, 1991). Methodology for measuring affective lability varies and includes retrospective self-report and ecological momentary assessment (EMA). In this study, we sought to test these methodologies by examining which better predicted binge eating episodes and general eating disorder symptoms in a sample (n = 131) of women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa (BN). We hypothesized that, while the two forms of measurement would be correlated with one another and predict binge eating episodes, EMA affective lability would be the stronger predictor. Results supported several hypotheses. Specifically, both EMA affective lability and retrospective self-report affective lability significantly predicted global eating disorder symptoms, even when controlling for depression, age, body mass index, and level of education, EMA affective lability exhibited a significantly stronger correlation with binge eating episodes than did retrospective self-report affective lability, and EMA affective lability predicted number of binge eating episodes on any given day controlling for the same list of covariates. Limitations include the use of a clinical sample that may limit the generalizability of our findings. Findings highlight the importance of affect in such behavior. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurement of Cut Front Properties in Laser Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thombansen, Ulrich; Hermanns, Torsten; Molitor, Thomas; Pereira, Milton; Schulz, Wolfgang

    Cut-front properties are a key variable in laser-cutting and thus of major importance for self-optimization. Within the Cluster of Excellence at RWTH Aachen University, several achievements were made in setting up sensor-systems that provide information on the operating-point of this melt-based manufacturing process. These achievements contribute to a gradual increase in system-transparency which is seen as an enabler for self-optimization. Instead of searching for a single measurand to characterize the course of the process, an approach is being presented which establishesa surrogate criterion to allow determination of the current operating-point. In the depicted area, this is done by joining sources of information from process observation, determining boundary-conditions such as actual feed-rate and modeling of process-variables. Although process-variables like properties of the cutting-front are influenced through more than one process parameter, a concept for a sensor-system is reported showing the correlation between properties of the melt-front and the current feed-rate. The results are compared to a solution derived from process-simulation.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy as alternative to wet chemical analysis to characterize Eucalyptus globulus pulps and predict their ethanol yield for a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Rosario Del P; Baeza, Jaime; Rubilar, Joselyn; Rivera, Alvaro; Freer, Juanita

    2012-12-01

    Bioethanol can be obtained from wood by simultaneous enzymatic saccharification and fermentation step (SSF). However, for enzymatic process to be effective, a pretreatment is needed to break the wood structure and to remove lignin to expose the carbohydrates components. Evaluation of these processes requires characterization of the materials generated in the different stages. The traditional analytical methods of wood, pretreated materials (pulps), monosaccharides in the hydrolyzated pulps, and ethanol involve laborious and destructive methodologies. This, together with the high cost of enzymes and the possibility to obtain low ethanol yields from some pulps, makes it suitable to have rapid, nondestructive, less expensive, and quantitative methods to monitoring the processes to obtain ethanol from wood. In this work, infrared spectroscopy (IR) accompanied with multivariate analysis is used to characterize chemically organosolv pretreated Eucalyptus globulus pulps (glucans, lignin, and hemicellulosic sugars), as well as to predict the ethanol yield after a SSF process. Mid (4,000-400 cm(-1)) and near-infrared (12,500-4,000 cm(-1)) spectra of pulps were used in order to obtain calibration models through of partial least squares regression (PLS). The obtained multivariate models were validated by cross validation and by external validation. Mid-infrared (mid-IR)/NIR PLS models to quantify ethanol concentration were also compared with a mathematical approach to predict ethanol yield estimated from the chemical composition of the pulps determined by wet chemical methods (discrete chemical data). Results show the high ability of the infrared spectra in both regions, mid-IR and NIR, to calibrate and predict the ethanol yield and the chemical components of pulps, with low values of standard calibration and validation errors (root mean square error of calibration, root mean square error of validation (RMSEV), and root mean square error of prediction), high correlation

  6. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9–4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  7. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9-4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  8. Tillage and rotational effects on exchangeable and enzyme-labile phosphorus forms in conventional and organic cropping systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The transformations of crop residues and bio-fertilizers used as primary sources of nutrients for organic grain and forage production are influenced by soil management practices. The effects of management of the near-surface zone on labile phosphorus (P) forms were studied in soil under three organ...

  9. Rapid latex particle agglutination test for Escherichia coli strains of porcine origin producing heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, R A; Yang, Z S; Moseley, S L; Moon, H W

    1983-01-01

    A latex particle agglutination test previously shown to be suitable for the rapid identification of Escherichia coli strains of human origin producing heat-labile enterotoxin (R. A. Finkelstein and Z. Yang, J. Clin. Microbiol. 18:23-28) is equally applicable to strains of porcine origin. PMID:6361056

  10. Thermal Analysis of Labile Trace Elements in CM and CV Carbonaceous Chondrites Using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, D. S.; Klaue, B.; Blum, J. D.; Buseck, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    We developed a technique to measure the thermal release profiles of a suite of labile elements (Zn, As, Se, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Pt, Hg, Au, Tl, Pb, Bi). Conclusions are reached about the behavior of each element during parent-body alteration. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. On the Labile Memory Buffer in the Attentional Blink: Masking the T2 Representation by Onset Transients Mediates the AB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M.; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Report of a second target (T2) is impaired when presented within 500 ms of the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is known to cause a delay in T2 processing during which T2 must be stored in a labile memory buffer. We explored the buffer's characteristics using different types of masks after T2. These characteristics were inferred by…

  12. Further characterization of some heterophile agglutinins reacting with alkali-labile carbohydrate chains of human erythrocyte glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Dahr, W; Uhlenbruck, G; Bird, G W

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the receptor sites for several agglutinins is characterized by hemagglutination inhibition assays. The inhibitory activity of human erythrocytes glycoproteins, from which sialic acid, sialic acid and galactose or alkali-labile oligosaccharides have been removed, is compared to the inhibitory effect of compounds with known structure. It is shown that the lectin from Arachis hypogea and anti-T bind to alkali-labile galactosyl-residues. Agglutinins from Bauhinia purpurea and variegata (non- or N-specific), Maclura aurantiaca, Iberis amara, sempervirens, umbellata hybrida and umbellata nana (M- or nonspecific), Moluccella laevis (A- plus N-specific), Helix pomatia, Helix aspersa, Helix lucorum and Caucasotachea atrolabiata interact with alkali-labile N-acetylgalactosamine. The results obtained with the anti-A agglutinins from various snails suggest that human erythrocyte glycoproteins contain, besides the alkali-labile tetrasaccharide, a peptide-linked sialyl-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-residue. The investigations do not allow a precise definition of the receptor sites for the lectins having M- or N-specificity.

  13. Emotional Lability in Children and Adolescents with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Clinical Correlates and Familial Prevalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobanski, Esther; Banaschewski, Tobias; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Chen, Wai; Franke, Barbara; Holtmann, Martin; Krumm, Bertram; Sergeant, Joseph; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Stringaris, Argyris; Taylor, Eric; Anney, Richard; Ebstein, Richard P.; Gill, Michael; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence, severity and clinical correlates of emotional lability (EL) in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and to examine factors contributing to EL and familiality of EL in youth with ADHD. Methods: One thousand, one hundred and eighty-six children with ADHD…

  14. Forms and lability of phosphorus in algae and aquatic macrophytes characterized by solution 31P NMR coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increased information on forms and lability of phosphorus (P) in aquatic macrophytes and algae is crucial for better understanding of P biogeochemical cycling in eutrophic lakes. In this work, solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) was used ...

  15. An anaerobic incubation study of metal lability in drinking water treatment residue with implications for practical reuse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Yuan, Nannan; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-06-15

    Drinking water treatment residue (WTR) is an inevitable by-product generated during the treatment of drinking water with coagulating agents. The beneficial reuse of WTR as an amendment for environmental remediation has attracted growing interest. In this work, we investigated the lability of Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in Fe/Al hydroxide-comprised WTR based on a 180-day anaerobic incubation test using fractionation, in vitro digestion and a toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. The results indicated that most metals in the WTR were stable during anaerobic incubation and that the WTR before and after incubation could be considered non-hazardous in terms of leachable metal contents according to US EPA Method 1311. However, the lability of certain metals in the WTR after incubation increased substantially, especially Mn, which may be due to the reduction effect. Therefore, although there is no evidence presented to restrict the use of WTR in the field, the lability of metals (especially Mn) in WTR requires further assessment prior to field application. In addition, fractionation (e.g., BCR) is recommended for use to determine the potential lability of metals under various conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. On the Labile Memory Buffer in the Attentional Blink: Masking the T2 Representation by Onset Transients Mediates the AB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M.; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Report of a second target (T2) is impaired when presented within 500 ms of the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is known to cause a delay in T2 processing during which T2 must be stored in a labile memory buffer. We explored the buffer's characteristics using different types of masks after T2. These characteristics were inferred by…

  17. Analysis and modeling of heat-labile enterotoxins of Escherichia coli suggests a novel space with insights into receptor preference.

    PubMed

    Krishna Raja, M; Ghosh, Asit Ranjan; Vino, S; Sajitha Lulu, S

    2015-01-01

    Features of heat-labile enterotoxins of Escherichia coli which make them fit to use as novel receptors for antidiarrheals are not completely explored. Data-set of 14 different serovars of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli producing heat-labile toxins were taken from NCBI Genbank database and used in the study. Sequence analysis showed mutations in different subunits and also at their interface residues. As these toxins lack crystallography structures, homology modeling using Modeller 9.11 led to the structural approximation for the E. coli producing heat-labile toxins. Interaction of modeled toxin subunits with proanthocyanidin, an antidiarrheal showed several strong hydrogen bonding interactions at the cost of minimized energy. The hits were subsequently characterized by molecular dynamics simulation studies to monitor their binding stabilities. This study looks into novel space where the ligand can choose the receptor preference not as a whole but as an individual subunit. Mutation at interface residues and interaction among subunits along with the binding of ligand to individual subunits would help to design a non-toxic labile toxin and also to improve the therapeutics.

  18. Size-optimized galactose-capped gold nanoparticles for the colorimetric detection of heat-labile enterotoxin at nanomolar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Poonthiyil, Vivek; Golovko, Vladimir B; Fairbanks, Antony J

    2015-05-14

    The development of a galactose-capped gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric sensor for the detection of the lectin heat-labile enterotoxin is reported. Heat-labile enterotoxin is one of the pathogenic agents responsible for the intestinal disease called 'traveller's diarrhoea'. By means of specific interaction between galactose moieties attached to the surface of gold nanoparticles and receptors on the B-subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin (LTB), the gold nanoparticles reported here act as an efficient colorimetric sensor, which can detect the toxin at nanomolar concentrations. The effect of gold nanoparticle size on the detection sensitivity was investigated in detail. Amongst the various sizes of gold nanoparticles studied (2, 7, 12, and 20 nm), the 12 nm sized gold nanoparticles were found to be the most efficient, with a minimum heat-labile enterotoxin detection concentration of 100 nM. The red to purple colour change of the gold nanoparticle solution occurred within two minutes, indicating rapid toxin sensing.

  19. Thermal Analysis of Labile Trace Elements in CM and CV Carbonaceous Chondrites Using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, D. S.; Klaue, B.; Blum, J. D.; Buseck, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    We developed a technique to measure the thermal release profiles of a suite of labile elements (Zn, As, Se, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Pt, Hg, Au, Tl, Pb, Bi). Conclusions are reached about the behavior of each element during parent-body alteration. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Emotional Lability in Children and Adolescents with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Clinical Correlates and Familial Prevalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobanski, Esther; Banaschewski, Tobias; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Chen, Wai; Franke, Barbara; Holtmann, Martin; Krumm, Bertram; Sergeant, Joseph; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Stringaris, Argyris; Taylor, Eric; Anney, Richard; Ebstein, Richard P.; Gill, Michael; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence, severity and clinical correlates of emotional lability (EL) in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and to examine factors contributing to EL and familiality of EL in youth with ADHD. Methods: One thousand, one hundred and eighty-six children with ADHD…