Science.gov

Sample records for glovebox experiment enclosed

  1. USML-1 Glovebox experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the development of and results from three experiments that were flown in the Materials Science Glovebox on USML-1: Marangoni convection in Closed Containers (MCCC), Double Float Zone (DFZ), and Fiber Pulling in Microgravity (FPM). The Glovebox provided a convenient, low cost method for doing simple 'try and see' experiments that could test new concepts or elucidate microgravity phenomena. Since the Glovebox provided essentially one (or possibly two levels of confinement, many of the stringent verification and test requirements on the experiment apparatus could be relaxed and a streamlined test and verification plan for flight qualification could be implemented. Furthermore, the experiments were contained in their own carrying cases whose external configurations could be identified early in the integration sequence for stowage considerations while delivery of the actual experiment apparatus could be postponed until only a few months before flight. This minimized the time fluids must be contained and reduced the possibility of corrosive reactions that could ruin the experiment. In many respects, this exercise was as much about developing a simpler, cheaper way of doing crew-assisted science as it was about the actual scientific accomplishments of the individual experiments. The Marangoni Convection in Closed Containers experiment was designed to study the effects of a void space in a simulated Bridgman crystal growth configuration and to determine if surface tension driven convective flows that may result from thermal gradients along any free surfaces could affect the solidification process. The Fiber Pulling in Microgravity experiment sought to separate the role of gravity drainage from capillarity effects in the break-up of slender cylindrical liquid columns. The Stability of a Double Float Zone experiment explored the feasibility of a quasi-containerless process in which a solidifying material is suspended by two liquid bridges of its own melt.

  2. Concepts for microgravity experiments utilizing gloveboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L.; Reiss, Donald A.; Facemire, Barbara

    1989-01-01

    The need for glovebox facilities on spacecraft in which microgravity materials processing experiments are performed is discussed. At present such facilities are being designed, and some of their capabilities are briefly described. A list of experiment concepts which would require or benefit from such facilities is presented.

  3. The USML-1 wire insulation flammability glovebox experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.; Kashiwagi, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    Flame spreading tests have been conducted using thin fuels in microgravity where buoyant convection is suppressed. In spacecraft experiments flames were ignited in quiescent atmospheres with an elevated oxygen content, demonstrating that diffusional mechanisms can be sufficient alone to sustain flame spreading. In ground-based facilities (i.e. drop towers and parabolic aircraft) low-speed convection sustains flames at much lower concentrations of atmospheric oxygen than in quiescent microgravity. Ground-based experiments are limited to very thin fuels (e.g., tissue paper); practical fuels, which are thicker, require more test time than is available. The Glovebox Facility provided for the USML 1 mission provided an opportunity to obtain flame spreading data for thicker fuel Herein we report the results from the Wire Insulation Flammability (WIF) Experiment performed in the Glovebox Facility. This experiment explored the heating, ignition and burning of 0.65 mm thick polyethylene wire insulation in low-speed flows in a reduced gravity environment. Four tests were conducted, two each in concurrent flow (WIF A and C) and opposed flow (WIF B and D), providing the first demonstration of flame spreading in controlled forced convection conducted in space.

  4. The Virtual Glovebox (VGX): An Immersive Simulation System for Training Astronauts to Perform Glovebox Experiments in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey D.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The era of the International Space Station (ISS) has finally arrived, providing researchers on Earth a unique opportunity to study long-term effects of weightlessness and the space environment on structures, materials and living systems. Many of the physical, biological and material science experiments planned for ISS will require significant input and expertise from astronauts who must conduct the research, follow complicated assay procedures and collect data and samples in space. Containment is essential for Much of this work, both to protect astronauts from potentially harmful biological, chemical or material elements in the experiments as well as to protect the experiments from contamination by air-born particles In the Space Station environment. When astronauts must open the hardware containing such experiments, glovebox facilities provide the necessary barrier between astronaut and experiment. On Earth, astronauts are laced with the demanding task of preparing for the many glovebox experiments they will perform in space. Only a short time can be devoted to training for each experimental task and gl ovebox research only accounts for a small portion of overall training and mission objectives on any particular ISS mission. The quality of the research also must remain very high, requiring very detailed experience and knowledge of instrumentation, anatomy and specific scientific objectives for those who will conduct the research. This unique set of needs faced by NASA has stemmed the development of a new computer simulation tool, the Virtual Glovebox (VGB), which is designed to provide astronaut crews and support personnel with a means to quickly and accurately prepare and train for glovebox experiments in space.

  5. Design/build/mockup of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Knight, C.J.; Michelbacher, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    A glovebox was designed, fabricated, and mocked-up for the WIPP Gas Generation Experiments (GGE) being conducted at ANL-W. GGE will determine the gas generation rates from materials in contact handled transuranic waste at likely long term repository temperature and pressure conditions. Since the customer`s schedule did not permit time for performing R&D of the support systems, designing the glovebox, and fabricating the glovebox in a serial fashion, a parallel approach was undertaken. As R&D of the sampling system and other support systems was initiated, a specification was written concurrently for contracting a manufacturer to design and build the glovebox and support equipment. The contractor understood that the R&D being performed at ANL-W would add additional functional requirements to the glovebox design. Initially, the contractor had sufficient information to design the glovebox shell. Once the shell design was approved, ANL-W built a full scale mockup of the shell out of plywood and metal framing; support systems were mocked up and resultant information was forwarded to the glovebox contractor to incorporate into the design. This approach resulted in a glovebox being delivered to ANL-W on schedule and within budget.

  6. Support and control system of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, W.W.; Knight, C.J.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Rosenberg, K.E.

    1997-09-01

    A glovebox was designed and fabricated to house test containers loaded with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. The test containers were designed to simulate the environmental characteristics of the caverns at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The support and control systems used to operate and maintain the Gas Generation Experiment (GGE) include the following: glovebox atmosphere and pressure control, test container support, glovebox operation support, and gas supply and exhaust systems. The glovebox atmosphere and pressure control systems consist of various components used to control both the pressure and quality of the argon atmosphere inside the glovebox. The glovebox pressure is maintained by three separate pressure control systems. The primary pressure control system is designed to maintain the glovebox at a negative pressure with the other two control systems serving as redundant safety backups. The quality of the argon atmosphere is controlled using a purifying bed system that removes oxygen and moisture. Glovebox atmosphere contaminants that are monitored on a continuous or periodic basis include moisture, oxygen, and nitrogen. The gas generation experiment requires the test containers to be filled with brine, leak tested, maintained at a constant temperature, and the gas head space of the test container sampled on a periodic basis. Test container support systems consisting of a brine addition system, leak test system, heating system, and gas sampling system were designed and implemented. A rupture disk system was constructed to provide pressure relief to the test containers. Operational requirements stipulated that test container temperature and pressure be monitored and collected on a continuous basis. A data acquisition system (DAS) was specifically designed to meet these requirements.

  7. NASA Virtual Glovebox: An Immersive Virtual Desktop Environment for Training Astronauts in Life Science Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twombly, I. Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey; Bruyns, Cynthia; Montgomery, Kevin; Boyle, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station will soon provide an unparalleled research facility for studying the near- and longer-term effects of microgravity on living systems. Using the Space Station Glovebox Facility - a compact, fully contained reach-in environment - astronauts will conduct technically challenging life sciences experiments. Virtual environment technologies are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to help realize the scientific potential of this unique resource by facilitating the experimental hardware and protocol designs and by assisting the astronauts in training. The Virtual GloveboX (VGX) integrates high-fidelity graphics, force-feedback devices and real- time computer simulation engines to achieve an immersive training environment. Here, we describe the prototype VGX system, the distributed processing architecture used in the simulation environment, and modifications to the visualization pipeline required to accommodate the display configuration.

  8. MSG: Microgravity Science Glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Baugher, C.R.; Ramachandran, N.; Roark, W.

    1996-12-31

    The capabilities of the Space Station glovebox facility is described. Tentatively scheduled to be launched in 1999, this facility called the Microgravity Sciences Glovebox (MSG), will provide a robust and sophisticated platform for doing microgravity experiments on the Space Station. It will provide an environment not only for testing and evaluating experiment concepts, but also serve as a platform for doing fairly comprehensive science investigations. Its design has evolved substantially from the middeck glovebox, now flown on Space Shuttle missions, not only in increased experiment volume but also in significant capability enhancements. The system concept, functionality and architecture are discussed along with technical information that will benefit potential science investigators.

  9. Test container design/fabrication/function for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, C.J.; Russell, N.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Michelbacher, J.A.

    1997-09-01

    The gas generation experiments (GGE) are being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL0W) with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The purpose of the GGE is to determine the different quantities and types of gases that would be produced and the gas-generation rates that would develop if brine were introduced to CH-TRU waste under post-closure WIPP disposal room conditions. The experiment requires that a prescribed matrix of CH-TRU waste be placed in a 7.5 liter test container. After loaded with the CH-TRU waste, brine and inoculum mixtures (consisting of salt and microbes indigenous to the Carlsbad, New Mexico region) are added to the waste. The test will run for an anticipated time period of three to five years. The test container itself is an ASME rated pressure vessel constructed from Hastelloy C276 to eliminate corrosion that might contaminate the experimental results. The test container is required to maintain a maximum 10% head space with a maximum working pressure of 17.25 MPa (2,500 psia). The test container is designed to provide a gas sample of the head space without the removal of brine. Assembly of the test container lid and process valves is performed inside an inert atmosphere glovebox. Glovebox mockup activities were utilized from the beginning of the design phase to ensure the test container and associated process valves were designed for remote handling. In addition, test container processes (including brine addition, sparging, leak detection, and test container pressurization) are conducted inside the glovebox.

  10. Material handling systems for use in glovebox lines: A survey of Department of Energy facility experience

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.; Randall, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Complex Reconfiguration Study has recommended that a new manufacturing facility be constructed to replace the Rocky Flats Plant. In the new facility, use of an automated material handling system for movement of components would reduce both the cost and radiation exposure associated with production and maintenance operations. Contamination control would be improved between process steps through the use of airlocks and portals. Part damage associated with improper transport would be reduced, and accountability would be increased. In-process workpieces could be stored in a secure vault, awaiting a request for parts at a production station. However, all of these desirable features rely on the proper implementation of an automated material handling system. The Department of Energy Weapons Production Complex has experience with a variety of methods for transporting discrete parts in glovebox lines. The authors visited several sites to evaluate the existing technologies for their suitability for the application of plutonium manufacturing. Technologies reviewed were Linear motors, belt conveyors, roller conveyors, accumulating roller conveyors, pneumatic transport, and cart systems. The sites visited were The Idaho National Engineering laboratory, the Hanford Site, and the Rocky Flats Plant. Linear motors appear to be the most promising technology observed for the movement of discrete parts, and further investigation is recommended.

  11. Material handling systems for use in glovebox lines: A survey of Department of Energy facility experience

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.; Randall, W.J.

    1992-12-31

    The Nuclear Weapons Complex Reconfiguration Study has recommended that a new manufacturing facility be constructed to replace the Rocky Flats Plant. In the new facility, use of an automated material handling system for movement of components would reduce both the cost and radiation exposure associated with production and maintenance operations. Contamination control would be improved between process steps through the use of airlocks and portals. Part damage associated with improper transport would be reduced, and accountability would be increased. In-process workpieces could be stored in a secure vault, awaiting a request for parts at a production station. However, all of these desirable features rely on the proper implementation of an automated material handling system. The Department of Energy Weapons Production Complex has experience with a variety of methods for transporting discrete parts in glovebox lines. The authors visited several sites to evaluate the existing technologies for their suitability for the application of plutonium manufacturing. Technologies reviewed were Linear motors, belt conveyors, roller conveyors, accumulating roller conveyors, pneumatic transport, and cart systems. The sites visited were The Idaho National Engineering laboratory, the Hanford Site, and the Rocky Flats Plant. Linear motors appear to be the most promising technology observed for the movement of discrete parts, and further investigation is recommended.

  12. Reproducible Crystal Growth Experiments in Microgravity Science Glovebox at the International Space Station (SUBSA Investigation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrogorsky, A.; Marin, C.; Volz, M. P.; Bonner, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) is the first investigation conducted in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility at the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha. 8 single crystals of InSb, doped with Te and Zn, were directionally solidified in microgravity. The experiments were conducted in a furnace with a transparent gradient section, and a video camera, sending images to the earth. The real time images (i) helped seeding, (ii) allowed a direct measurement of the solidification rate. The post-flight characterization of the crystals includes: computed x-ray tomography, Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS), Hall measurements, Atomic Absorption (AA), and 4 point probe analysis. For the first time in microgravity, several crystals having nearly identical initial transients were grown. Reproducible initial transients were obtained with Te-doped InSb. Furthermore, the diffusion controlled end-transient was demonstrated experimentally (SUBSA 02). From the initial transients, the diffusivity of Te and Zn in InSb was determined.

  13. Catastrophic Collapse of Particulate Clouds: Implications From Aggregation Experiments in the USML-1 and USML-2 Glovebox. Experiment 35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John; Freund, Friedemann; Sauke, Todd; Freund, Minoru

    1998-01-01

    Experiments with electrostatic aggregation of well-dispersed (nominally, mono-dispersed), freely suspended particles in the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML) Glovebox have determined that filamentary aggregates are a universal product of grain interactions in relatively dense particulate clouds. Aggregate growth from the experimental particle clouds primarily involves dipole-dipole interactions for nonconducting materials; dipole interactions account for both attraction between grains as well as the cohesive force that maintains the integrity of the filamentary structures. When a cloud undergoes a turbulent-to-quiescent transition after damping of fluid and ballistic grain motions, aggregation occurs almost instantaneously and the cloud is transformed into a population of "heavier" clusters of material with organized electrical structures. This abrupt transformation could initiate catastrophic gravitational collapse of certain regions of particulate clouds, thus controlling the longevity and fate of cloud systems as diverse as protoplanetary dust disks and volcanic eruption plumes.

  14. NASA Virtual Glovebox (VBX): Emerging Simulation Technology for Space Station Experiment Design, Development, Training and Troubleshooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey D.; Twombly, I. Alexander; Maese, A. Christopher; Cagle, Yvonne; Boyle, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station demonstrates the greatest capabilities of human ingenuity, international cooperation and technology development. The complexity of this space structure is unprecedented; and training astronaut crews to maintain all its systems, as well as perform a multitude of research experiments, requires the most advanced training tools and techniques. Computer simulation and virtual environments are currently used by astronauts to train for robotic arm manipulations and extravehicular activities; but now, with the latest computer technologies and recent successes in areas of medical simulation, the capability exists to train astronauts for more hands-on research tasks using immersive virtual environments. We have developed a new technology, the Virtual Glovebox (VGX), for simulation of experimental tasks that astronauts will perform aboard the Space Station. The VGX may also be used by crew support teams for design of experiments, testing equipment integration capability and optimizing the procedures astronauts will use. This is done through the 3D, desk-top sized, reach-in virtual environment that can simulate the microgravity environment in space. Additional features of the VGX allow for networking multiple users over the internet and operation of tele-robotic devices through an intuitive user interface. Although the system was developed for astronaut training and assisting support crews, Earth-bound applications, many emphasizing homeland security, have also been identified. Examples include training experts to handle hazardous biological and/or chemical agents in a safe simulation, operation of tele-robotic systems for assessing and diffusing threats such as bombs, and providing remote medical assistance to field personnel through a collaborative virtual environment. Thus, the emerging VGX simulation technology, while developed for space- based applications, can serve a dual use facilitating homeland security here on Earth.

  15. NASA's Student Glovebox: An Inquiry-Based Technology Educator's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Carla B.; Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    2000-01-01

    A glovebox is a sealed container with built-in gloves. Astronauts perform small experiments and test hardware inside of them. Gloveboxes have flown on NASA's space shuttles and on the Russian space station Mir. The International Space Station (ISS) will have a permanent glovebox on the U.S. laboratory, Destiny. This document contains cursory technical information on gloveboxes and glovebox experiments and is intended for use by middle school educators and students. Information is provided on constructing a model glovebox as well as realistic cut-outs to be pasted on the model.

  16. Cooperation between NASA and ESA for the first microgravity materials science glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chassay, Roger P.

    1992-01-01

    Two major space organizations have collaborated to develop the first microgravity materials science glovebox and 16 materials science experiments. The glovebox and its experiments will fly initially on USML-1, currently scheduled for launch in mid-1992.

  17. Low Stretch PMMA Burning in Microgravity: Status of the Ground-Based Program and New ISS Glovebox Experiment SALSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; T'ien, J. S.; Armstrong, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this ground-based program is to study low stretch diffusion flames burning PMMA as the solid fuel to determine the relationship between buoyant low stretch burning in normal gravity and forced flow low stretch burning in microgravity. The low stretch is generated in normal gravity by using the buoyant convection induced by burning the bottom of a large radius of curvature sample. Low stretch is also generated using the Combustion Tunnel drop tower rig (2.2 and 5.2 second facilities), which provides a forced convective low velocity flow past smaller radius of curvature samples. Lastly, an ISS glovebox investigation is being developed to study low stretch burning of PMMA spheres to obtain long duration testing needed to accurately assess the flammability and burning characteristics of the material in microgravity. A comparison of microgravity experiment results with normal gravity test results allows us to establish a direct link between a material's burning characteristics in normal gravity (easily measured) with its burning characteristics in extraterrestrial environments, including microgravity forced convective environments. Theoretical predictions and recent experimental results indicate that it should be possible to understand a material's burning characteristics in the low stretch environment of spacecraft (non-buoyant air movement induced by fans and crew disturbances) by understanding its burning characteristics in an equivalent Earth-based low stretch environment (induced by normal gravity buoyancy). Similarly, Earth-based stretch environments can be made equivalent to those in Lunar- and Martian-surface stretch environments (which would induce partial-gravity buoyancy).

  18. DAF Glovebox Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.W.; Higgs, R.L.

    2000-11-14

    This document defines how the glovebox project will be managed and executed. It provides a path forward for establishing a glovebox capability in Building 341 of the DAF in time to meet JASPER programmatic requirements as the first user. Note that some elements of the glovebox project have been under way for some time and are more mature than others; other elements are being worked concurrently. This plan serves the following purposes: Assign organizational and individual responsibilities for bringing the glovebox capability online; Coordinate activities between organizations; Facilitate communication between project members and management; and Identify the mechanisms used to manage and control the project. The scope of this plan includes all activities conducted to achieve project objectives, culminating in DOE/NV approval to operate. This plan does not address the issues associated with the steady-state operation of the glovebox.

  19. Overview of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Mary Etta

    1999-01-01

    MSG is a third generation glovebox for Microgravity Science investigations: SpaceLab Glovebox (GBX); Middeck/MIR Gloveboxes (M/MGBX); and GBX and M/MGBX developed by Bradford Engineering (NL). Previous flights have demonstrated utility of glovebox facilities: Contained environment enables broader range of science experiments; Affords better control of video and photographic imaging (a prime data source); Provides better environmental control than cabin atmosphere; and Useful for contingency operations. MSG developed in response to demands for increased work volume, increased capabilities and additional resources. MSG is multi-user facility to support a wide range of small science and technology investigations: Fluid physics; Combustion science; Material science; Biotechnology (cell culturing and protein crystal growth); Space processing; Fundamental physics; and Technology demonstrations. Topics included in this viewgraph are: MSG capabilities; MSG hardware items; MSG, GSE, and OSE items; MSG development approach; and Science utilization.

  20. Article removal device for glovebox

    DOEpatents

    Guyer, R.H.; Leebl, R.G.

    1973-12-01

    An article removal device for a glovebox is described comprising a conduit extending through a glovebox wall which may be closed by a plug within the glovebox, and a fire-resistant container closing the outer end of the conduit and housing a removable container for receiving pyrophoric or otherwise hazardous material without disturbing the interior environment of the glovebox or adversely affecting the environment outside of the glovebox. (Official Gazette)

  1. Glovebox decontamination technology comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.

    1999-09-26

    Reconfiguration of the CMR Building and TA-55 Plutonium Facility for mission requirements will require the disposal or recycle of 200--300 gloveboxes or open front hoods. These gloveboxes and open front hoods must be decontaminated to meet discharge limits for Low Level Waste. Gloveboxes and open front hoods at CMR have been painted. One of the deliverables on this project is to identify the best method for stripping the paint from large numbers of gloveboxes. Four methods being considered are the following: conventional paint stripping, dry ice pellets, strippable coatings, and high pressure water technology. The advantages of each technology will be discussed. Last, cost comparisons between the technologies will be presented.

  2. The Centrifuge Facility Life Sciences Glovebox configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Sidney C.; Goulart, Carla V.

    1992-01-01

    Crew operations associated with nonhuman life sciences research on Space Station Freedom will be conducted in the Life Sciences Glovebox, whose enclosed work volume must accommodate numerous life science procedures. Two candidate Glovebox work volume concepts have been developed: one in which two operators work side-by-side, and another that conforms to the reach envelope of a single operator. Six test volunteers tested the concepts according to preestablished operational criteria. The wrap-around, single-operator concept has been judged the superior system.

  3. Puck Handling Glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscus, J.B.

    2001-01-03

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium in a solid ceramic form. The plutonium, in oxide powder form, will be mixed with uranium oxide powder, ceramic precursors and binders. The combined powder mixture will be milled and possibly granulated; this processed powder will then be dispensed to a (dual action) cold press where it will be formed into green (unsintered) compacts. The compact will have the shape of a puck measuring approximately 3 1/2'' in diameter and 1 3/8'' thick. The green puck, once ejected from the press die, will be picked up by a robot and transferred into the Puck Handling Glovebox. Here the green puck will be inspected and then palletized onto furnace trays. The loaded furnace trays will be stacked/assembled and transported to the furnace where sintering operations will be performed. Finally the sintered pucks will be off loaded, inspected and transferred onto Transfer Trays which will carry the pucks from the Puck Handling Glovebox downstream to subsequent Bagless Transfer Can (BTC) operations. Due to contamination potential and high radiation rates, all Puck Handling Glovebox operations will be performed remotely using robots and specialized automation.

  4. Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Space Science's Past, Present, and Future on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie A.; Spearing, Scott F.; Jordan, Lee P.; McDaniel S. Greg

    2012-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility designed for microgravity investigation handling aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The unique design of the facility allows it to accommodate science and technology investigations in a "workbench" type environment. MSG facility provides an enclosed working area for investigation manipulation and observation in the ISS. Provides two levels of containment via physical barrier, negative pressure, and air filtration. The MSG team and facilities provide quick access to space for exploratory and National Lab type investigations to gain an understanding of the role of gravity in the physics associated research areas. The MSG is a very versatile and capable research facility on the ISS. The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been used for a large body or research in material science, heat transfer, crystal growth, life sciences, smoke detection, combustion, plant growth, human health, and technology demonstration. MSG is an ideal platform for gravity-dependent phenomena related research. Moreover, the MSG provides engineers and scientists a platform for research in an environment similar to the one that spacecraft and crew members will actually experience during space travel and exploration. The MSG facility is ideally suited to provide quick, relatively inexpensive access to space for National Lab type investigations.

  5. Barrier isolator/glovebox glove dexterity study.

    PubMed

    Park, Young H; Pines, E; Cournoyer, M E

    2010-01-01

    In response to new, stricter safety requirements set out by the federal government, compounding pharmacists are investigating applications and processes appropriate for their facilities. One application, currently used by many industries, was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratories in the early days of defense work. A barrier isolator or "glovebox" is a containment device that allows work within a sealed space while providing protection for people and the environment. The operations at Plutonium Facility (TA-55) in Los Alamos National Laboratories involve various amounts of plutonium. Gloveboxes are used to handle plutonium, and glovebox gloves are the weakest part of this engineering control. Currently a lead-loaded glove made from Hypalon is used. The lead-loaded gloves are compared to unleaded gloves with respect to dexterity and its effect on the outcome of any task performance. Experiments have been conducted on two models of unleaded gloves (15-mil thick Hypalon gloves and 30-mil thick Hypalon gloves), as well as 30-mil thick lead-loaded gloves. The objective of this research is to study the effect of lead-loaded gloves versus unleaded gloves on task performance. We use inferential statistical analysis of this data to support scientific judgment of the probability that the observed difference between tested gloves is dependable or that any difference noted might have happened by chance.

  6. Students build glovebox at Space Science Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Students in the Young Astronaut Program at the Coca-Cola Space Science Center in Columbus, GA, constructed gloveboxes using the new NASA Student Glovebox Education Guide. The young astronauts used cardboard copier paper boxes as the heart of the glovebox. The paper boxes transformed into gloveboxes when the students pasted poster-pictures of an actual NASA microgravity science glovebox inside and outside of the paper boxes. The young astronauts then added holes for gloves and removable transparent top covers, which completed the construction of the gloveboxes. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  7. Reproducible Te-doped InSb experiments in Microgravity Science Glovebox at the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrogorsky, A. G.; Marin, C.; Churilov, A.; Volz, M. P.; Bonner, W. A.; Duffar, T.

    2008-01-01

    Four Te-doped InSb crystals were directionally solidified under microgravity conditions at the International Space Station (ISS). Three Te-doped InSb crystals were grown at R=5 mm/h. One crystal was grown at R=3.33 mm/h. The distribution of Te was measured using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The initial transients in Te concentration were found to be consistent, yielding a diffusivity of Te in InSb melts of D=1×10 -5 cm 2/s. One experiment revealed a diffusion controlled final transient. In all experiments, the charge was pressurized by a piston and spring device, to prevent de-wetting.

  8. Operational considerations for the Space Station Life Science Glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Daryl N.; Bosley, John J.; Vogelsong, Kristofer; Schnepp, Tery A.; Phillips, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Laboratory (USL) module on Space Station will house a biological research facility for multidisciplinary research using living plant and animal specimens. Environmentally closed chambers isolate the specimen habitats, but specimens must be removed from these chambers during research procedures as well as while the chambers are being cleaned. An enclosed, sealed Life Science Glovebox (LSG) is the only locale in the USL where specimens can be accessed by crew members. This paper discusses the key science, engineering and operational considerations and constraints involving the LSG, such as bioisolation, accessibility, and functional versatility.

  9. Redefining design criteria for Pu-238 gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, S.V.

    1998-12-31

    Enclosures for confinement of special nuclear materials (SNM) have evolved into the design of gloveboxes. During the early stages of glovebox technology, established practices and process operation requirements defined design criteria. Proven boxes that performed and met or exceeded process requirements in one group or area, often could not be duplicated in other areas or processes, and till achieve the same success. Changes in materials, fabrication and installation methods often only met immediate design criteria. Standardization of design criteria took a big step during creation of ``Special-Nuclear Materials R and D Laboratory Project, Glovebox standards``. The standards defined design criteria for every type of process equipment in its most general form. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) then and now has had great success with Pu-238 processing. However with ever changing Environment Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements and Ta-55 Facility Configuration Management, current design criteria are forced to explore alternative methods of glovebox design fabrication and installation. Pu-238 fuel processing operations in the Power Source Technologies Group have pushed the limitations of current design criteria. More than half of Pu-238 gloveboxes are being retrofitted or replaced to perform the specific fuel process operations. Pu-238 glovebox design criteria are headed toward process designed single use glovebox and supporting line gloveboxes. Gloveboxes that will house equipment and processes will support TA-55 Pu-238 fuel processing needs into the next century and extend glovebox expected design life.

  10. Design concepts for the Centrifuge Facility Life Sciences Glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Sidney C.; Horkachuck, Michael J.; Mckeown, Kellie A.

    1989-01-01

    The Life Sciences Glovebox will provide the bioisolated environment to support on-orbit operations involving non-human live specimens and samples for human life sceinces experiments. It will be part of the Centrifuge Facility, in which animal and plant specimens are housed in bioisolated Habitat modules and transported to the Glovebox as part of the experiment protocols supported by the crew. At the Glovebox, up to two crew members and two habitat modules must be accommodated to provide flexibility and support optimal operations. This paper will present several innovative design concepts that attempt to satisfy the basic Glovebox requirements. These concepts were evaluated for ergonomics and ease of operations using computer modeling and full-scale mockups. The more promising ideas were presented to scientists and astronauts for their evaluation. Their comments, and the results from other evaluations are presented. Based on the evaluations, the authors recommend designs and features that will help optimize crew performance and facilitate science accommodations, and specify problem areas that require further study.

  11. Tritium stripping in a nitrogen glovebox using SAES St 198

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.; Wermer, J.R.

    1994-08-31

    SAES metal getter material St 198 was chosen for glovebox stripper tests to evaluate its effectiveness of removing tritium from a nitrogen atmosphere. The St 198 material is unique from a number of other metal hydride-based getter materials in that it is relatively inert to nitrogen and can thus be used in nitrogen glovebox atmospheres. Six tritium stripper experiments which mock-up the use of a SAES St 198 stripper bed for a full-scale (10,500 liter) nitrogen glovebox have been completed. Experiments consisted of a release of small quantity of protium/deuterium spiked with tritium which were scaled to simulate tritium releases of 0.1 g., 1.0 g., and 10 g. into the glovebox. The tritium spike allows detection using tritium ion chambers. The St 198 stripper system produced a reduction in tritium activity of approximately two orders of magnitude in 24 hours (6--8 atmosphere turn-overs) of stripper operation.

  12. Waste handling activities in glovebox dismantling facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Akihiro; Okada, Takashi; Kashiro, Kashio; Yoshino, Masanori; Hirano, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    The Glovebox Dismantling Facility is a facility to decontaminate and size-reduce after-service gloveboxes in the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The wastes generated from these dismantling activities are simultaneously handled and packaged into drums in a bag-out manner. For future waste treatment and disposal, these wastes are separated into material categories. In this paper, we present the basic steps and analyzed data for the waste handling activities. The data were collected from dismantling activities for three gloveboxes (Grinding Pellet Glovebox, Visual Inspection Glovebox, Outer-diameter Screening Glovebox) conducted from 2001-2004. We also describe both current and near-future improvements. (authors)

  13. GLOVEBOX DISMANTLEMENT AND EQUIPMENT PROTECTION IN CONTAMINATED ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Akihiro; Stallings, Ellen; Wilburn, Dianne W.

    2003-02-27

    It has been revealed from the experiences of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities that even a small improvement in performance can result in significant risk reduction and cost savings. For example, Race Scan Ear Mic System, which was originally developed for communications between racecar drivers and crews in loud environments, has been successfully applied to D&D work and proved to enhance worker safety and communications. Glovebox dismantlement is an important and costly process in D&D activities of nuclear facilities. Adequate decontamination and size reduction of the gloveboxes are especially important in this activity because they have the potential to reduce risks and costs significantly. This paper presents some simple approaches to support D&D tasks and discusses their potential advantages. Examples discussed include: Repeated shear wiping of large pipes and ducts; Application of thin layers on radiological counters for uninterrupted use; and Partial use of robotics for glovebox dismantling. The paper also discusses schematics for protecting equipment interiors and/or glovebox inner surfaces from contamination, which may result in significant savings and waste minimization upon future dismantlement. Examples discussed include: Smart coating for contamination prevention; and Protecting equipment by geometrically simple cover.

  14. THERMOGRAVIMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2012-02-29

    An experimental project was initiated to characterize mass loss when heating different polymer glovebox glove material samples to three elevated temperatures, 90, 120, and 150 C. Samples from ten different polymeric gloves that are being considered for use in the tritium gloveboxes were tested. The intent of the study was to determine the amount of material lost. These data will be used in a subsequent study to characterize the composition of the material lost. One goal of the study was to determine which glove composition would least affect the glovebox atmosphere stripper system. Samples lost most of the mass in the initial 60 minutes of thermal exposure and as expected increasing the temperature increased the mass loss and shortened the time to achieve a steady state loss. The most mass loss was experienced by Jung butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} at 146 C with 12.9% mass loss followed by Piercan Hypalon{reg_sign} at 144 C with 11.4 % mass loss and Jung butyl-Viton{reg_sign} at 140 C with 5.2% mass loss. The least mass loss was experienced by the Jung Viton{reg_sign} and the Piercan polyurethane. Unlike the permeation testing (1) the vendor and fabrication route influences the amount of gaseous species that is evolved. Additional testing to characterize these products is recommended. Savannah River Site (SRS) has many gloveboxes deployed in the Tritium Facility. These gloveboxes are used to protect the workers and to ensure a suitable environment in which to handle tritium gas products. The gas atmosphere in the gloveboxes is purified using a stripper system. The process gas strippers collect molecules that may have hydrogen or its isotopes attached, e.g., waters of hydration, acids, etc. Recently, sulfur containing compounds were detected in the stripper system and the presence of these compounds accelerates the stripper system's aging process. This accelerated aging requires the strippers to be replaced more often which can impact the facility's schedule and

  15. Tritium glovebox stripper system seismic design evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Grinnell, J. J.; Klein, J. E.

    2015-09-01

    The use of glovebox confinement at US Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities has been discussed in numerous publications. Glovebox confinement protects the workers from radioactive material (especially tritium oxide), provides an inert atmosphere for prevention of flammable gas mixtures and deflagrations, and allows recovery of tritium released from the process into the glovebox when a glovebox stripper system (GBSS) is part of the design. Tritium recovery from the glovebox atmosphere reduces emissions from the facility and the radiological dose to the public. Location of US DOE defense programs facilities away from public boundaries also aids in reducing radiological doses to the public. This is a study based upon design concepts to identify issues and considerations for design of a Seismic GBSS. Safety requirements and analysis should be considered preliminary. Safety requirements for design of GBSS should be developed and finalized as a part of the final design process.

  16. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL`s Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused.

  17. Minimizing Glovebox Glove Breaches: PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Andrade, R.M.; Taylor, D. J.; Stimmel, J. J.; Zaelke, R. L.; Balkey, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    As a matter of good business practices, a team of glovebox experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been assembled to proactively investigate processes and procedures that minimize unplanned breaches in the glovebox, e.g., glove failures. A major part of this effort involves the review of glovebox glove failures that have occurred at the Plutonium Facility and at the Chemical and Metallurgy Research Facility. Information dating back to 1993 has been compiled from formal records. This data has been combined with information obtained from a baseline inventory of about 9,000 glovebox gloves. The key attributes tracked include those related to location, the glovebox glove, type and location of breaches, the worker, and the consequences resulting from breaches. This glovebox glove failure analysis yielded results in the areas of the ease of collecting this type of data, the causes of most glove failures that have occurred, the effectiveness of current controls, and recommendations to improve hazard control systems. As expected, a significant number of breaches involve high-risk operations such as grinding, hammering, using sharps (especially screwdrivers), and assembling equipment. Surprisingly, tasks such as the movement of equipment and material between gloveboxes and the opening of cans are also major contributions of breaches. Almost half the gloves fail within a year of their install date. The greatest consequence for over 90% of glovebox glove failures is alpha contamination of protective clothing. Personnel self-monitoring at the gloveboxes continues to be the most effective way of detecting glovebox glove failures. Glove failures from these tasks can be reduced through changes in procedures and the design of remote-handling apparatus. The Nuclear Materials Technology Division management uses this information to improve hazard control systems to reduce the number of unplanned breaches in the glovebox further. As a result, excursions of contaminants

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    A task was undertaken to compare various properties of different glovebox gloves, having various compositions, for use in gloveboxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One aspect of this project was to determine the tensile strength (TS) of the gloves. Longitudinal tensile samples were cut from 15 different gloves and tensile tested. The stress, load, and elongation at failure were determined. All of the gloves that are approved for glovebox use and listed in the glovebox procurement specification met the tensile and elongation requirements. The Viton{reg_sign} compound gloves are not listed in the specification, but exhibited lower tensile strengths than permissible based on the Butyl rubber requirements. Piercan Polyurethane gloves were the thinnest samples and exhibited the highest tensile strength of the materials tested.

  19. Mechanistic Analysis of Glovebox Fire Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, M.T.; McClure, P.R.

    1999-06-13

    Propagation of a fire that originates in a single glovebox to other locations in the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is conceivable only if transport of hot combustion gases to other locations causes ignition of combustible materials elsewhere in the system (i.e., flashover). This paper describes a model developed, using the MELCOR computer code, to calculate the generation and transport of combustion gas mass and energy during postulated glovebox fire accident scenarios. The accident scenarios involved a wide spectrum of glovebox operating and potential fire conditions to determine whether flashover conditions could occur at locations outside the burning glovebox: o A variety of combustible material characteristics was considered (e.g., type, quantity, and combustion properties of combustible material). o A spectrum of safety system operating conditions was considered (e.g., glovebox ventilation system operating normally vs an inoperative exhaust fan; drop-box fir e damper closure vs failure to close). o A range of analytical modeling assumptions was considered (e.g., the extent to which heat transfer between hot combustion gases and the glovebox walls is represented in the model). Example results of these calculations are presented to illustrate the benefits obtained and lessons learned by using a computational tool like MELCOR for this analysis.

  20. Automation of the LANL ARIES lathe glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Pittman, P. C.; Staab, T. A.; Nelson, D. C.; Santistevan, W. W.; Brown, W. G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an automation system required for material handling within a glovebox. The Advanced Recovery and Integration Extraction System (ARIES) located at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) enables workers to dismantle nuclear weapons, separating the plutonium from other weapon components. The ARIES line consists of several gloveboxes that allow the 'pit' or trigger of a nuclear weapon to be dismantled and the plutonium stored in a safe form. The Lathe glovebox is the first step in the ARIES line and is used to cut the pit open to be dismantled. There are several methods for doing this, however there are advantages to using the lathe over other methods for this process. In general, this system will give the ARIES line the capability to handle a wider range of pit types. The system consists of a lathe, a 4 Degree of Freedom (DOF) robot, a glovebox that houses them, and a universal controller that resides outside the glovebox and controls all equipment. This paper will present the design and possible implementation of this lathe automation system. It will cover the system requirements, the mechanical hardware used within the glovebox, the control system and software, and operation procedures for various tasks.

  1. Microgravity Science in Space Flight Gloveboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugher, Charles; Bennett, Nancy; Cockrell, David; Jex, David; Musick, Barry; Poe, James; Roark, Walter

    1998-01-01

    Microgravity science studies the influences of gravity on phenomena in fluids, materials processes, combustion, and human cell growth in the low acceleration environment of space flight. During the last decade, the accomplishment of the flight research in the field has evolved into an effective cooperation between the flight crew in the Shuttle and the ground-based investigator using real-time communication via voice and video links. This team structure has led to interactive operations in which the crew performs the experimentation while guided, as necessary, by the science investigator who formulated the investigation and who will subsequently interpret and analyze the data. One of the primary challenges to implementing this interactive research has been the necessity of structuring a means of handling fluids, gases, and hazardous materials in a manned laboratory that exhibits the novelty of weightlessness. Developing clever means of designing experiments in closed vessels is part of the solution- but the space flight requirement for one and two failure-tolerant containment systems leads to serious complications in the physical handling of sample materials. In response to the conflict between the clear advantage of human operation and judgment, versus the necessity to isolate the experiment from the crewmember and the spacecraft environment, the Microgravity Research Program has initiated a series of Gloveboxes in the various manned experiment carriers. These units provide a sealed containment vessel whose interior is under a negative pressure with respect to the ambient environment but is accessible to a crewmember through the glove ports.

  2. Institutional glovebox safety committee (IGSC) annual report FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E; Roybal, Richard F; Lee, Roy J

    2011-01-04

    The Institutional Glovebox Safety Committee (IGSC) was chartered to minimize and/or prevent glovebox operational events. Highlights of the IGSC's third year are discussed. The focus of this working committee is to address glovebox operational and safety issues and to share Lessons Learned, best practices, training improvements, and glovebox glove breach and failure data. Highlights of the IGSC's third year are discussed. The results presented in this annual report are pivotal to the ultimate focus of the glovebox safety program, which is to minimize work-related injuries and illnesses. This effort contributes to the LANL Continuous Improvement Program by providing information that can be used to improve glovebox operational safety.

  3. Synthesis and Migratory-Insertion Reactivity of CpMo(CO)[subscript3](CH[subscript3]): Small-Scale Organometallic Preparations Utilizing Modern Glovebox Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whited, Matthew T.; Hofmeister, Gretchen E.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments are described for the reliable small-scale glovebox preparation of CpMo(CO)[subscript 3](CH[subscript 3]) and acetyl derivatives thereof through phosphine-induced migratory insertion. The robust syntheses introduce students to a variety of organometallic reaction mechanisms and glovebox techniques, and they are easily carried out…

  4. Automated, High Temperature Furnace for Glovebox Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Neikirk, K.

    2001-01-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of a two track approach for the disposition of weapons usable plutonium. As such, the Department of Energy is funding a development and testing effort for the PIP. This effort is being performed jointly by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The Plutonium Immobilization process involves the disposition of excess plutonium by incorporation into ceramic pucks. As part of the immobilization process, furnaces are needed for sintering the ceramic pucks. The furnace being developed for puck sintering is an automated, bottom loaded furnace with insulting package and resistance heating elements located within a nuclear glovebox. Other furnaces considered for the application include retort furnaces and pusher furnaces. This paper, in part, will discuss the furnace technologies considered and furnace technology selected to support reliable puck sintering in a glovebox environment. Due to the radiation levels and contamination associated with the plutonium material, the sintering process will be fully automated and contained within nuclear material gloveboxes. As such, the furnace currently under development incorporates water and air cooling to minimize heat load to the glovebox. This paper will describe the furnace equipment and systems needed to employ a fully automated puck sintering process within nuclear gloveboxes as part of the Plutonium Immobilization Plant.

  5. Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Space Sciences's Past, Present, and Future on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie A.; Jordan, Lee P.

    2012-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility designed for microgravity investigation handling aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The unique design of the facility allows it to accommodate science and technology investigations in a "workbench" type environment. MSG facility provides an enclosed working area for investigation manipulation and observation in the ISS. Provides two levels of containment via physical barrier, negative pressure, and air filtration. The MSG team and facilities provide quick access to space for exploratory and National Lab type investigations to gain an understanding of the role of gravity in the physics associated research areas.

  6. 2014 AFCI Glovebox Event Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Joseph Lenard

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary INL missions is to support development of advanced fuels with the goal of creating reactor fuels that produce less waste and are easier to store. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Glovebox in the Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF) is used for several fuel fabrication steps that involve transuranic elements, including americium. The AFCI glove box contains equipment used for fuel fabrication, including an arc melter – a small, laboratory-scale version of an electric arc furnace used to make new metal alloys for research – and an americium distillation apparatus. This overview summarizes key findings related to the investigation into the releases of airborne radioactivity that occurred in the AFCI glovebox room in late August and early September 2014. The full report (AFCI Glovebox Radiological Release – Evaluation, Corrective Actions and Testing, INL/INL-15-36996) provides details of the identified issues, corrective actions taken as well as lessons learned

  7. Robotic system for glovebox size reduction

    SciTech Connect

    KWOK,KWAN S.; MCDONALD,MICHAEL J.

    2000-03-02

    The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing technologies for glovebox size reduction in the DOE nuclear complex. A study was performed for Kaiser-Hill (KH) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) on the available technologies for size reducing the glovebox lines that require size reduction in place. Currently, the baseline approach to these glovebox lines is manual operations using conventional mechanical cutting methods. The study has been completed and resulted in a concept of the robotic system for in-situ size reduction. The concept makes use of commercially available robots that are used in the automotive industry. The commercially available industrial robots provide high reliability and availability that are required for environmental remediation in the DOE complex. Additionally, the costs of commercial robots are about one-fourth that of the custom made robots for environmental remediation. The reason for the lower costs and the higher reliability is that there are thousands of commercial robots made annually, whereas there are only a few custom robots made for environmental remediation every year. This paper will describe the engineering analysis approach used in the design of the robotic system for glovebox size reduction.

  8. STS-42 Payload Specialist Bondar works with oak seedlings in IML-1 glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar works with oak seedlings using the glovebox located in International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) Rack 5. The five young plants are part of the Gravitational Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) experiment. IML-1 is located in Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB) and is connected to the crew compartment with a tunnel.

  9. Instability of enclosed horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Bernard S.

    2015-03-01

    We point out that there are solutions to the scalar wave equation on dimensional Minkowski space with finite energy tails which, if they reflect off a uniformly accelerated mirror due to (say) Dirichlet boundary conditions on it, develop an infinite stress-energy tensor on the mirror's Rindler horizon. We also show that, in the presence of an image mirror in the opposite Rindler wedge, suitable compactly supported arbitrarily small initial data on a suitable initial surface will develop an arbitrarily large stress-energy scalar near where the two horizons cross. Also, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state for the quantum theory between these two mirrors, there are coherent states built on it for which there are similar singularities in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in other situations with analogous enclosed horizons such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a (stationary spherical) box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be similar stress-energy singularities and almost-singularities—leading to instability of the horizons when gravity is switched on and matter and gravity perturbations are allowed for. All this suggests it is incorrect to picture a black hole in equilibrium in a box or a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as extending beyond the past and future horizons of a single Schwarzschild (/Schwarzschild-AdS) wedge. It would thus provide new evidence for 't Hooft's brick wall model while seeming to invalidate the picture in Maldacena's ` Eternal black holes in AdS'. It would thereby also support the validity of the author's matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis and of the paper ` Brick walls and AdS/CFT' by the author and Ortíz.

  10. A MCNP model of gloveboxes in a plutonium processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, D.E.; Kornreich, D.E.

    1998-12-31

    A room in the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been slated for installation of a glovebox for storing plutonium metal in various shapes during processing. This storage glovebox will be located in a room containing other gloveboxes used daily by workers processing plutonium parts. A MCNP model of the room and gloveboxes has been constructed to estimate the neutron flux at various locations in the room for two different locations of the storage glovebox and to determine the effect of placing polyethylene shielding around the storage glovebox. A neutron dose survey of the room with sources dispersed as during normal production operations was used as a benchmark to compare the neutron dose equivalent rates calculated by the MCNP model.

  11. Automated, High Temperature Furnace for Glovebox Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Neikirk, K.

    2001-01-03

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP), to be located at the Savannah River Site SRS, is a combined development and testing effort by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and the Australian National Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). The Plutonium Immobilization process involves the disposition of excess plutonium by incorporation into ceramic pucks. As part of the immobilization process, furnaces are needed for sintering the ceramic pucks. The furnace being developed for puck sintering is an automated, bottom loaded furnace with insulating package and resistance heating elements located within a nuclear glovebox. Other furnaces types considered for the application include retort furnaces and pusher furnaces. This paper, in part, will discuss the furnace technologies considered and furnace technology selected to support reliable puck sintering in a glovebox environment.

  12. Unique features in the ARIES glovebox line

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H.E.; Brown, W.G.; Flamm, B.; James, C.A.; Laskie, R.; Nelson, T.O.; Wedman, D.E.

    1998-12-31

    A series of unique features have been incorporated into the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, TA-55 Plutonium Facility. The features enhance the material handling in the process of the dismantlement of nuclear weapon primaries in the glovebox line. Incorporated into these features are the various plutonium process module`s different ventilation zone requirements that the material handling systems must meet. These features include a conveyor system that consists of a remotely controlled cart that transverses the length of the conveyor glovebox, can be operated from a remote location and can deliver process components to the entrance of any selected module glovebox. Within the modules there exists linear motion material handling systems with lifting hoist, which are controlled via an Allen Bradley control panel or local control panels. To remove the packaged products from the hot process line, the package is processed through an air lock/electrolytic decontamination process that removes the radioactive contamination from the outside of the package container and allows the package to be removed from the process line.

  13. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report

    SciTech Connect

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-02-19

    The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution`s (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

  14. DISMANTLING OF GLOVEBOXES FOR MOX FUEL FABRICATION BY A GLOVEBOX DISMANTLING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Uematsu, S.; Kashiro, K.; Tobita, N.

    2002-02-25

    The Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) installed a glovebox dismantling facility (GBDF) in the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) of the Tokai works. The purpose of GBDF is to dismantle after-service gloveboxes for the MOX pellet fabrication process in PFPF (GBMPs) for safely storing and recovering the hold-up MOX powder from GBMPs. GBDF has a function of a glovebox for preventing scattering radioactive nuclides and is used for dismantling after-service gloveboxes repeatedly for decreasing the quantity of secondary wastes. Remote-controlled devices such as an arm-type robot, and plasma arc cutting systems are installed in it for the purposes of decreasing irradiation dose and increasing work efficiency respectively. Following items are considered as merits for the application of remote-controlled devices to the dismantling works in comparison with the ordinary dismantling method: improving working conditions, no capability of injury and inhalation contamination area; decreasing irradiation dose of workers; decreasing generation of secondary wastes; and decreasing personal cost.

  15. NASA's Student Glovebox: An Inquiry-Based Technology Educator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Carla B.; Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    This inquiry-based activity discusses the development of a glovebox like those used on the International Space Station and Space Shuttle. A glovebox is a box used for experimentation in which the user inserts hands into gloved access holes in order to work in the box. Activities concerning the study of liquid droplets are included to give students…

  16. Note: Efficient, low-cost cooling system for gloveboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, A.; Marioneck, T.; Dronskowski, R.

    2016-10-01

    Cooling within gloveboxes is often restricted to expensive refrigerated bath circulators or small temperature differences. Here, we present a sturdy, inexpensive cooling system which matches various glovebox types and can be readily fabricated by a mechanical workshop in a few days. The system is suitable for cold plates of areas up to 150 cm2 and temperatures as low as -100 °C.

  17. Institutional Glovebox Safety Committee (IGSC) Annual Report FY 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Peabody, Marilyn C

    2008-01-01

    Chemical and metallurgical operations involving plutonium, beryllium, and other materials in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapons program account for most activities performed in gloveboxes at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the month of January 2007, two workers were injured in separate glovebox operations in which a break in a glovebox glove resulted in plutonium penetration into the skin. As a corrective action, the Institutional Glovebox Safety Committee (IGSC) was created under the authority of the Institutional Worker Safety and Security Team (IWSST) with membership made up of those workers and/or managers representing glovebox operations across the Lab. Since then, the IGSC has made numerous inroads in the areas of glovebox operational issues, 'Lessons Learned', 'best practice', training, and unplanned glove openings. Communication of these topics improves the safety configuration of the glovebox system and contributes to the Lab's scientific and technological excellence by increasing its operational safety. In this report, highlights of the IGSC's first year, and assessment of its effectiveness, and recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  18. Minimizing glovebox glove breaches, Part 4: control charts

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M.E.; Lee, M.B.; Schreiber, S.

    2007-07-01

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility, plutonium isotopes and other actinides are handled in a glovebox environment. The spread of radiological contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the worker's breathing zone, are minimized and/or prevented through the use of glovebox technology. Evaluating the glovebox configuration, the glovebox gloves are the most vulnerable part of this engineering control. Recognizing this vulnerability, the Glovebox Glove Integrity Program was developed to minimize and/or prevent unplanned openings in the glovebox environment, e.g., glove failures and breaches. In addition, LANL implement the 'Lean Six Sigma (LSS)' program that incorporates the practices of Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma technologies and tools to effectively improve administrative and engineering controls and work processes. One tool used in LSS is the use of control charts, which is an effective way to characterize data collected from unplanned openings in the glovebox environment. The benefit management receives from using this tool is two-fold. First, control charts signal the absence or presence of systematic variations that result in process instability, in relation to glovebox glove breaches and failures. Second, these graphical representations of process variation determine whether an improved process is under control. Further, control charts are used to identify statistically significant variations (trends) that can be used in decision making to improve processes. This paper discusses performance indicators assessed by the use control charts, provides examples of control charts, and shows how managers use the results to make decisions. This effort contributes to LANL Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations. (authors)

  19. Glovebox for GeoLab Subsystem in HDU1-PEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia; Calaway, Michael J.; Bell, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The GeoLab glovebox was designed to enable the preliminary examination, by astronauts, of geological samples collected from the surface of another planetary body. The collected information would then aid scientists in making decisions about sample curation and prioritization for return to Earth for study. This innovation was designed around a positive- pressure-enriched nitrogen environment glovebox to reduce sample handling contamination. The structure was custom-designed to fit in section H of NASA s Habitat Demonstration Unit 1 Pressurized Excursion Module (HDU1- PEM). In addition, the glovebox was designed to host analytical instruments in a way that prevents sample contamination.

  20. Glovebox pressure relief and check valve

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K.L.

    1986-03-17

    This device is a combined pressure relief valve and check valve providing overpressure protection and preventing back flow into an inert atmosphere enclosure. The pressure relief is embodied by a submerged vent line in a mercury reservior, the releif pressure being a function of the submerged depth. The pressure relief can be vented into an exhaust system and the relieving pressure is only slightly influenced by the varying pressure in the exhaust system. The check valve is embodied by a ball which floats on the mercury column and contacts a seat whenever vacuum exists within the glovebox enclosure. Alternatively, the check valve is embodied by a vertical column of mercury, the maximum back pressure being a function of the height of the column of mercury.

  1. Low impact plutonium glovebox D&D

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    A dilemma often encountered in decontamination and decommissioning operations is the lack of choice as to the location where the work is to be performed. Facility siting, laboratory location, and adjacent support areas were often determined based on criteria, which while appropriate at the time, are not always the most conducive to a D&D project. One must learn to adapt and cope with as found conditions. High priority research activities, which cannot be interrupted, may be occurring in adjacent non-radiological facilities in the immediate vicinity where highly contaminated materials must be handled in the course of a D&D operation. The execution of a project within such an environment involves a high level of coordination, cooperation, professionalism and flexibility among the project, the work force and the surrounding occupants. Simply moving occupants from the potentially affected area is not always an option and much consideration must be given in the selection of the D&D methodology to be employed and the processes to be implemented. Determining project boundaries and the ensuring that adjacent occupants are included in the planning/scheduling of specific operations which impact their work area are important in the development of the safety envelope. Such was the case in the recent D&D of 61 gloveboxes contaminated with plutonium and other transuranic nuclides at the Argonne National Laboratory-East site. The gloveboxes, which were used in Department of Energy research and development program activities over the past 30 years, were decontaminated to below transuranic waste criteria, size reduced, packaged and removed from Building 212 by Argonne National Laboratory personnel in conjunction with Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. with essentially no impact to adjacent occupants.

  2. W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-03-11

    On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  3. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  4. Issues for reuse of gloveboxes at LANL TA-55

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Pinson, P.A.; Miller, C.F.

    1998-08-01

    This report is a summary of issues that face plutonium glovebox designers and users at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 55 (TA-55). Characterizing the issues is a step in the task of enhancing the next generation glovebox design to minimize waste streams while providing the other design functions. This report gives an initial assessment of eight important design and operation issues that can benefit from waste minimization.

  5. MINIMIZING GLOVEBOX GLOVE BREACHES, PART IV: CONTROL CHARTS

    SciTech Connect

    COURNOYER, MICHAEL E.; LEE, MICHELLE B.; SCHREIBER, STEPHEN B.

    2007-02-05

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility, plutonium. isotopes and other actinides are handled in a glovebox environment. The spread of radiological contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the worker's breathing zone, are minimized and/or prevented through the use of glovebox technology. Evaluating the glovebox configuration, the glovebo gloves are the most vulnerable part of this engineering control. Recognizing this vulnerability, the Glovebox Glove Integrity Program (GGIP) was developed to minimize and/or prevent unplanned openings in the glovebox environment, i.e., glove failures and breaches. In addition, LANL implement the 'Lean Six Sigma (LSS)' program that incorporates the practices of Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma technologies and tools to effectively improve administrative and engineering controls and work processes. One tool used in LSS is the use of control charts, which is an effective way to characterize data collected from unplanned openings in the glovebox environment. The benefit management receives from using this tool is two-fold. First, control charts signal the absence or presence of systematic variations that result in process instability, in relation to glovebox glove breaches and failures. Second, these graphical representations of process variation detennine whether an improved process is under control. Further, control charts are used to identify statistically significant variations (trends) that can be used in decision making to improve processes. This paper discusses performance indicators assessed by the use control charts, provides examples of control charts, and shows how managers use the results to make decisions. This effort contributes to LANL Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations.

  6. Retrofit of an Engineered Glove-port to a Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility Glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Rael, P.E.D.; Cournoyer, M.E.Ph.D.; Chunglo, S.D.; Vigil, T.J.; Schreiber, P.E.S.

    2008-07-01

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility (TA-55), various isotopes of plutonium along with other actinides are routinely handled such that the spread of radiological contamination and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox coupled with adequate negativity providing primary confinement). The current technique for changing glovebox gloves are the weakest part of this engineering control. 1300 pairs of gloves are replaced each year at TA-55, generating approximately 500 m{sup 3}/yr of transuranic (TRU) waste and Low Level Waste (LLW) waste that represents an annual disposal cost of about 4 million dollars. By retrofitting the LANL 8'' glove-port ring, a modern 'Push-Through' technology is utilized. This 'Push-Through' technology allows relatively fast glove changes to be done by operators with much less training and experience and without breaching containment. A dramatic reduction in waste is realized; exposure of the worker to residual contamination reduced, and the number of breaches due to installation issues is eliminated. In the following presentation, the evolution of the 'Push- Through' technology, the features of the glove-port retrofit, and waste savings are discussed. (author)

  7. 46 CFR 69.59 - Enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Enclosed spaces. 69.59 Section 69.59 Shipping COAST... OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.59 Enclosed spaces. Enclosed space means a space which..., in a deck or in a covering of a space, or in the partitions or bulkheads of a space, nor the...

  8. 46 CFR 69.59 - Enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Enclosed spaces. 69.59 Section 69.59 Shipping COAST... OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.59 Enclosed spaces. Enclosed space means a space which..., in a deck or in a covering of a space, or in the partitions or bulkheads of a space, nor the...

  9. 46 CFR 69.59 - Enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Enclosed spaces. 69.59 Section 69.59 Shipping COAST... OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.59 Enclosed spaces. Enclosed space means a space which..., in a deck or in a covering of a space, or in the partitions or bulkheads of a space, nor the...

  10. 46 CFR 69.59 - Enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Enclosed spaces. 69.59 Section 69.59 Shipping COAST... OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.59 Enclosed spaces. Enclosed space means a space which..., in a deck or in a covering of a space, or in the partitions or bulkheads of a space, nor the...

  11. 46 CFR 69.59 - Enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Enclosed spaces. 69.59 Section 69.59 Shipping COAST... OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.59 Enclosed spaces. Enclosed space means a space which..., in a deck or in a covering of a space, or in the partitions or bulkheads of a space, nor the...

  12. Determining the Radiation Damage Effect on Glovebox Glove Material.

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Balkey, J. J.; Andrade, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    The Nuclear Material Technology (NMT) Division has the largest inventory of glove box gloves at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The minimization of unplanned breaches in the glovebox, e.g., glove failures, is a primary concern in the daily operations in NMT Division facilities, including the Plutonium Facility (PF-4) at TA-55 and Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility. Glovebox gloves in these facilities are exposed to elevated temperatures and exceptionally aggressive radiation environments (particulate {sup 239}Pu and {sup 238}Pu). Predictive models are needed to estimate glovebox glove service lifetimes, i.e. change-out intervals. Towards this aim aging studies have been initiated that correlate changes in mechanical (physical) properties with degradation chemistry. This present work derives glovebox glove change intervals based on previously reported mechanical data of thermally aged hypalon glove samples. Specifications for 30 mil tri-layered hypalon/lead glovebox gloves (TLH) and 15 mil hypalon gloves (HYP) have already been established. The relevant mechanical properties are shown on Table 1. Tensile strength is defined as the maximum load applied in breaking a tensile test piece divided by the original cross-sectional area of the test piece (Also termed maximum stress and ultimate tensile stress). Ultimate elongation is the elongation at time of rupture (Also termed maximum strain). The specification for the tensile test and ultimate elongation are the minimum acceptable values. In addition, the ultimate elongation must not vary 20% from the original value. In order to establish a service lifetimes for glovebox gloves in a thermal environment, the mechanical properties of glovebox glove materials were studied.

  13. Computer modeling for optimal placement of gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Hench, K.W.; Olivas, J.D.; Finch, P.R.

    1997-08-01

    Reduction of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the general downsizing of the nuclear weapons complex has presented challenges for Los Alamos. One is to design an optimized fabrication facility to manufacture nuclear weapon primary components (pits) in an environment of intense regulation and shrinking budgets. Historically, the location of gloveboxes in a processing area has been determined without benefit of industrial engineering studies to ascertain the optimal arrangement. The opportunity exists for substantial cost savings and increased process efficiency through careful study and optimization of the proposed layout by constructing a computer model of the fabrication process. This paper presents an integrative two- stage approach to modeling the casting operation for pit fabrication. The first stage uses a mathematical technique for the formulation of the facility layout problem; the solution procedure uses an evolutionary heuristic technique. The best solutions to the layout problem are used as input to the second stage - a computer simulation model that assesses the impact of competing layouts on operational performance. The focus of the simulation model is to determine the layout that minimizes personnel radiation exposures and nuclear material movement, and maximizes the utilization of capacity for finished units.

  14. DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYSIS CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2012-02-29

    As part of the characterization of various glovebox glove material from four vendors, the permeability of gas through each type as a function of temperature was determined and a discontinuity in the permeability with temperature was revealed. A series of tests to determine the viscoelastic properties of the glove materials as a function of temperature using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was initiated. The glass transition temperature and the elastic and viscoelastic properties as a function of temperature up to maximum use temperature were determined for each glove material. The glass transition temperatures of the gloves were -60 C for butyl, -30 C for polyurethane, -16 C Hypalon{reg_sign}, - 16 C for Viton{reg_sign}, and -24 C for polyurethane-Hypalon{reg_sign}. The glass transition was too complex for the butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} and butyl-Viton{reg_sign} composite gloves to be characterized by a single glass transition temperature. All of the glass transition temperatures exceed the vendor projected use temperatures.

  15. Minimizing Glovebox Glove Breaches, Part III: Deriving Service Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M.E.; Wilson, K.V.; Maestas, M.M.; Schreiber, S.

    2006-07-01

    At the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility, various isotopes of plutonium along with other actinides are handled in a glove box environment. Weapons-grade plutonium consists mainly in Pu-239. Pu-238 is another isotope used for heat sources. The Pu-238 is more aggressive regarding gloves due to its higher alpha-emitting characteristic ({approx}300 times more active than Pu-239), which modifies the change-out intervals for gloves. Optimization of the change-out intervals for gloves is fundamental since Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division generates approximately 4 m{sup 3}/yr of TRU waste from the disposal of glovebox gloves. To reduce the number of glovebox glove failures, the NMT Division pro-actively investigates processes and procedures that minimize glove failures. Aging studies have been conducted that correlate changes in mechanical (physical) properties with degradation chemistry. This present work derives glovebox glove change intervals based on mechanical data of thermally aged Hypalon{sup R}, and Butasol{sup R} glove samples. Information from this study represent an important baseline in gauging the acceptable standards for polymeric gloves used in a laboratory glovebox environment and will be used later to account for possible presence of dose-rate or synergistic effects in 'combined-environment'. In addition, excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone and excess exposure to the radiological sources associated with unplanned breaches in the glovebox are reduced. (authors)

  16. Comparison of deliverable and exhaustible pressurized air flow rates in laboratory gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    Calculations were performed to estimate the maximum credible flow rates of pressurized air into Plutonium Process Support Laboratories gloveboxes. Classical equations for compressible fluids were used to estimate the flow rates. The calculated maxima were compared to another`s estimates of glovebox exhaust flow rates and corresponding glovebox internal pressures. No credible pressurized air flow rate will pressurize a glovebox beyond normal operating limits. Unrestricted use of the pressurized air supply is recommended.

  17. Enclosed rotary disc air pulser

    DOEpatents

    Olson, A. L.; Batcheller, Tom A.; Rindfleisch, J. A.; Morgan, John M.

    1989-01-01

    An enclosed rotary disc air pulser for use with a solvent extraction pulse olumn includes a housing having inlet, exhaust and pulse leg ports, a shaft mounted in the housing and adapted for axial rotation therein, first and second disc members secured to the shaft within the housing in spaced relation to each other to define a chamber therebetween, the chamber being in communication with the pulse leg port, the first disc member located adjacent the inlet port, the second disc member being located adjacent the exhaust port, each disc member having a milled out portion, the disc members positioned on the shaft so that as the shaft rotates, the milled out portions permit alternative cyclical communication between the inlet port and the chamber and the exhaust port and the chamber.

  18. Organic Contamination Baseline Study on NASA JSC Astromaterial Curation Gloveboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Allton, J. H.; Allen, C. C.; Burkett, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Future planned sample return missions to carbon-rich asteroids and Mars in the next two decades will require strict handling and curation protocols as well as new procedures for reducing organic contamination. After the Apollo program, astromaterial collections have mainly been concerned with inorganic contamination [1-4]. However, future isolation containment systems for astromaterials, possibly nitrogen enriched gloveboxes, must be able to reduce organic and inorganic cross-contamination. In 2012, a baseline study was orchestrated to establish the current state of organic cleanliness in gloveboxes used by NASA JSC astromaterials curation labs that could be used as a benchmark for future mission designs.

  19. Glovebox stripper system tritium capture efficiency-literature review

    SciTech Connect

    James, D. W.; Poore, A. S.

    2015-09-28

    Glovebox Stripper Systems (GBSS) are intended to minimize tritium emissions from glovebox confinement systems in Tritium facilities. A question was raised to determine if an assumed 99% stripping (decontamination) efficiency in the design of a GBBS was appropriate. A literature review showed the stated 99% tritium capture efficiency used for design of the GBSS is reasonable. Four scenarios were indicated for GBSSs. These include release with a single or dual stage setup which utilizes either single-pass or recirculation for stripping purposes. Examples of single-pass as well as recirculation stripper systems are presented and reviewed in this document.

  20. 30. VIEW OF A GLOVEBOX LINE USED IN PLUTONIUM OPERATIONS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF A GLOVEBOX LINE USED IN PLUTONIUM OPERATIONS. SAFETY AND HEALTH CONCERNS WERE OF MAJOR IMPORTANCE AT THE PLANT, BECAUSE OF THE RADIOACTIVE NATURE OF THE MATERIALS USED. PLUTONIUM GIVES OFF ALPHA AND BETA PARTICLES, GAMMA PROTONS, NEUTRONS, AND IS ALSO PYROPHORIC. AS A RESULT, PLUTONIUM OPERATIONS ARE PERFORMED UNDER CONTROLLED CONDITIONS THAT INCLUDE CONTAINMENT, FILTERING, SHIELDING, AND CREATING AN INERT ATMOSPHERE. PLUTONIUM WAS HANDLED WITHIN GLOVEBOXES THAT WERE INTERCONNECTED AND RAN SEVERAL HUNDRED FEET IN LENGTH (5/5/70). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  1. Glovebox characterization and barrier integrity testing using fluorescent powder

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlquist, D.R.

    1996-07-01

    This paper presents a method for characterizing the spread of contamination and testing the barrier integrity of a new glovebox during material transfer operations and glove change-outs using fluorescent powder. Argonne National Laboratory-West has performed this test on several new gloveboxes prior to putting them into service. The test is performed after the glovebox has been leak tested and all systems have been verified to be operational. The purpose of the test is to show that bag-in/bag-out operations and glove change-outs can be accomplished without spreading the actual contaminated material to non-contaminated areas. The characterization test also provides information as to where contamination might be expected to build-up during actual operations. The fluorescent powder is used because it is easily detectable using an ultra-violet light and disperses in a similar fashion to radioactive material. The characterization and barrier integrity test of a glovebox using fluorescent powder provides a visual method of determining areas of potential contamination accumulation and helps evaluate the ability to perform clean transfer operations and glove change-outs.

  2. Preparation of a glovebox for casting enriched plutonium.

    SciTech Connect

    Ronquillo, R. D.; Trujillo, C. M.; Trujillo, C. C.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Prepare existing glovebox for casting, heat treating and storing enriched plutonium, Upgrade seismic systems to reduce dispersion hazard, Upgrade atmospheric systems to reduce oxidation of plutonium, Upgrade vacuum system to prevent oxidation, InstalI/upgrade induction heating systems to melt plutonium and heat mold

  3. Chloride-catalyzed corrosion of plutonium in glovebox atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, M.; Haschke, J.M.; Allen, T.H.; Morales, L.A.; Jarboe, D.M.; Puglisi, C.V.

    1998-04-01

    Characterization of glovebox atmospheres and the black reaction product formed on plutonium surfaces shows that the abnormally rapid corrosion of components in the fabrication line is consistent with a complex salt-catalyzed reaction involving gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl) and water. Analytical data verify that chlorocarbon and HCl vapors are presented in stagnant glovebox atmospheres. Hydrogen chloride concentrations approach 7 ppm at some locations in the glovebox line. The black corrosion product is identified as plutonium monoxide monohydride (PuOH), a product formed by hydrolysis of plutonium in liquid water and salt solutions at room temperature. Plutonium trichloride (PuCl{sub 3}) produced by reaction of HCl at the metal surface is deliquescent and apparently forms a highly concentrated salt solution by absorbing moisture from the glovebox atmosphere. Rapid corrosion is attributed to the ensuing salt-catalyzed reaction between plutonium and water. Experimental results are discussed, possible involvement of hydrogen fluoride (HF) is examined, and methods of corrective action are presented in this report.

  4. DISPOSITION PATHS FOR ROCKY FLATS GLOVEBOXES: EVALUATING OPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lobdell, D.; Geimer, R.; Larsen, P.; Loveland, K.

    2003-02-27

    The Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC has the responsibility for closure activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). One of the challenges faced for closure is the disposition of radiologically contaminated gloveboxes. Evaluation of the disposition options for gloveboxes included a detailed analysis of available treatment capabilities, disposal facilities, and lifecycle costs. The Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC followed several processes in determining how the gloveboxes would be managed for disposition. Currently, multiple disposition paths have been chosen to accommodate the needs of the varying styles and conditions of the gloveboxes, meet the needs of the decommissioning team, and to best manage lifecycle costs. Several challenges associated with developing a disposition path that addresses both the radiological and RCRA concerns as well as offering the most cost-effective solution were encountered. These challenges included meeting the radiological waste acceptance criteria of available disposal facilities, making a RCRA determination, evaluating treatment options and costs, addressing void requirements associated with disposal, and identifying packaging and transportation options. The varying disposal facility requirements affected disposition choices. Facility conditions that impacted decisions included radiological and chemical waste acceptance criteria, physical requirements, and measurement for payment options. The facility requirements also impacted onsite activities including management strategies, decontamination activities, and life-cycle cost.

  5. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. 116.600 Section 116.600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... shut down from the pilot house. (c) An enclosed passenger or crew accommodation space and any...

  6. 46 CFR 177.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. 177.600 Section 177.600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... be capable of being shut down from the pilot house. (c) An enclosed passenger or crew...

  7. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. 116.600 Section 116.600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... shut down from the pilot house. (c) An enclosed passenger or crew accommodation space and any...

  8. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. 116.600 Section 116.600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... shut down from the pilot house. (c) An enclosed passenger or crew accommodation space and any...

  9. 46 CFR 177.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. 177.600 Section 177.600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... be capable of being shut down from the pilot house. (c) An enclosed passenger or crew...

  10. 46 CFR 177.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. 177.600 Section 177.600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... be capable of being shut down from the pilot house. (c) An enclosed passenger or crew...

  11. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. 116.600 Section 116.600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... shut down from the pilot house. (c) An enclosed passenger or crew accommodation space and any...

  12. 46 CFR 177.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. 177.600 Section 177.600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... be capable of being shut down from the pilot house. (c) An enclosed passenger or crew...

  13. Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), Space Science's Past, Present and Future Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie; Spearing, Scott; Jordan, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS), which accommodates science and technology investigations in a "workbench' type environment. The MSG has been operating on the ISS since July 2002 and is currently located in the US Laboratory Module. In fact, the MSG has been used for over 10,000 hours of scientific payload operations and plans to continue for the life of ISS. The facility has an enclosed working volume that is held at a negative pressure with respect to the crew living area. This allows the facility to provide two levels of containment for small parts, particulates, fluids, and gases. This containment approach protects the crew from possible hazardous operations that take place inside the MSG work volume and allows researchers a controlled pristine environment for their needs. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter enclosed work space, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, + 12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. These capabilities make the MSG one of the most utilized facilities on ISS. MSG investigations have involved research in cryogenic fluid management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, and plant growth technologies. Modifications to the MSG facility are currently under way to expand the capabilities and provide for investigations involving Life Science and Biological research. In addition, the MSG video system is being replaced with a state-of-the-art, digital video system with high definition/high speed capabilities, and with near real-time downlink capabilities. This paper will provide an overview of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG, and an

  14. Dexterity test data contribute to proper glovebox over-glove use

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E; Lawton, Cindy M; Castro, Amanda M; Costigan, Stephen A; Apel, D M; Neal, G E; Castro, J M; Michelotti, R A

    2010-01-21

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). The glovebox gloves are the weakest part of this engineering control. The Glovebox Glove Integrity Program, which controls glovebox gloves from procurement to disposal at TA-55, manages this vulnerability. A key element of this program is to consider measures that lower the overall risk of glovebox operations. Proper selection of over-gloves is one of these measures. Line management owning glovebox processes have the responsibility to approve the appropriate personal protective equipment/glovebox glove/over-glove combination. As low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) considerations to prevent unplanned glovebox glove openings must be balanced with glove durability and worker dexterity, both of which affect the final overall risk to the worker. In this study, the causes of unplanned glovebox glove openings, the benefits of over-glove features, the effect of over-gloves on task performance using standard dexterity tests, the pollution prevention benefits, and the recommended over-gloves for a task are presented.

  15. Glovebox Integrated Microgravity Isolation Technology (g-LIMIT): A Linearized State-Space Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. David; Calhoun, Philip C.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2001-01-01

    Vibration acceleration levels on large space platforms exceed the requirements of many space experiments. The Glovebox Integrated Microgravity Isolation Technology (g-LIMIT) is being built by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to attenuate these disturbances to acceptable levels. G-LIMIT uses Lorentz (voice-coil) magnetic actuators to levitate and isolate payloads at the individual experiment/sub-experiment (versus rack) level. Payload acceleration, relative position, and relative orientation measurements are fed to a state-space controller. The controller, in turn, determines the actuator Currents needed for effective experiment isolation. This paper presents the development of an algebraic, state-space model of g-LIMIT, in a form suitable for optimal controller design. The equations are first derived using Newton's Second Law directly, then simplified to a linear form for the purpose of controller design.

  16. Device removes hydrogen gas from enclosed spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, W. N.

    1966-01-01

    Hydrogen-oxidant galvanic cell removes small amounts of hydrogen gas continually released from equipment, such as vented silver-zinc batteries, in enclosed compartments where air venting is not feasible. These cells are used in satellite compartments.

  17. Equipping a glovebox for waste form testing and characterization of plutonium bearing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, M.; Johnson, S.G.; Musick, C.A.; Moschetti, T.L.

    1997-09-01

    The recent decision by the Department of Energy to pursue a hybrid option for the disposition of weapons plutonium has created the need for additional facilities that can examine and characterize waste forms that contain Pu. This hybrid option consists of the placement of plutonium into stable waste forms and also into mixed oxide fuel for commercial reactors. Glass and glass-ceramic waste forms have a long history of being effective hosts for containing radionuclides, including plutonium. The types of tests necessary to characterize the performance of candidate waste forms include: static leaching experiments on both monolithic and crushed waste forms, microscopic examination, and density determination. Frequently, the respective candidate waste forms must first be produced using elevated temperatures and/or high pressures. The desired operations in the glovebox include, but are not limited to the following: (1) production of vitrified/sintered samples, (2) sampling of glass from crucibles or other vessels, (3) preparing samples for microscopic inspection and monolithic and crushed static leach tests, and (4) performing and analyzing leach tests in situ. This paper will describe the essential equipment and modifications that are necessary to successfully accomplish the goal of outfitting a glovebox for these functions.

  18. Peak pressures from hydrogen deflagrations in the PFP thermal stabilization glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1998-08-11

    This document describes the calculations of the peak pressures due to hydrogen deflagrations in the glovebox used for thermal stabilization (glovebox HC-21A) in PFP. Two calculations were performed. The first considered the burning of hydrogen released from a 7 inch Pu can in the Inert Atmosphere Confinement (IAC) section of the glovebox. The peak pressure increase was 12400 Pa (1.8 psi). The second calculation considered burning of the hydrogen from 25 g of plutonium hydride in the airlock leading to the main portion of the glovebox. Since the glovebox door exposes most of the airlock when open, the deflagration was assumed to pressurize the entire glovebox. The peak pressure increase was 3860 Pa (0.56 psi).

  19. Transient heat transfer program for glovebox process vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Preuss, D.E.; Frigo, A.A.; Bailey, J.L.

    1997-09-01

    A software program has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to aid in designing process vessels to be used in gloveboxes. The Transient Heat Transfer Program for Glovebox Process Vessels provides engineers with a method of analyzing the heat transfer characteristics of vessels during heating and cooling of metals, salts, and other materials. The user need only provide information on the components and geometry of the vessel and a few operating conditions. The program approximates the changes in the internal vessel temperature over a number of time steps. This temperature information can then be used to estimate parameters that are needed in the vessel design. These parameters include insulation thickness, amount of heat shielding, and heater size. This software has been designed for ease of use. A background in the thermal sciences is not necessary to use it.

  20. FLEXIBLE NEUTRON SHIELDING FOR A GLOVEBOX WITHIN THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie Walsh

    2007-07-01

    Neutron shielding was desired to reduce worker exposure during handling of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) in a glovebox at the Idaho National Laboratory. Due to the unusual shape of the glovebox, standard methods of neutron shielding were impractical and would have interfered with glovebox operations. A silicon-based, boron-impregnated material was chosen due to its flexibility. This paper discusses the material, the installation, and the results from neutron source testing.

  1. Survey of Technologies to Support Reuse of Gloveboxes at LANL TA-55

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; P. A. Pinson

    1998-11-01

    This report is a summary of ideas and technologies available to support reuse of plutonium gloveboxes at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 55 (TA-55). This work is the second of two deliverables in the task to enhance glovebox design for longevity and reusability at TA-55. The report presents several design change suggestions to be evaulated for their feasibility by LANL glovebox designers. The report also describes some techniques to be evaluated by LANL for their usefulness in reducing glovebox waste.

  2. HB-Line Dissolution of Glovebox Floor Sweepings

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.

    1998-02-01

    Two candidate flowsheets for dissolving glovebox floor sweepings in the HB-Line Phase I geometrically favorable dissolver have been developed.Dissolving conditions tested and modified during the laboratory program were based on the current processing scheme for dissolving high-fired Pu-238 oxide in HB-Line. Subsequent adjustments made to the HB-Line flowsheet reflected differences in the dissolution behavior between high-fired Pu-238 oxide and the MgO sand/PuF{sub 4}/PuO{sub 2} mixture in glovebox floor sweepings. Although both candidate flowsheets involved two separate dissolving steps and resulted incomplete dissolution of all solids, the one selected for use in HB-Line will require fewer processing operations and resembles the initial flowsheet proposed for dissolving sand, slag, and crucible material in F-Canyon dissolvers. Complete dissolution of glovebox floor sweepings was accomplished in the laboratory by initially dissolving between 55 and 65{degree} in a 14 molar nitric acid solution. Under these conditions, partial dissolution of PuF{sub 4} and complete dissolution of PuO{sub 2} and MgO sand were achieved in less than one hour. The presence of free fluoride in solution,uncomplexed by aluminum, was necessary for complete dissolution of the PuO{sub 2}.The remaining PuF{sub 4} dissolved following addition of aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN) to complex the fluoride and heating between 75 and 85{degree}C for an additional hour. Precipitation of magnesium and/or aluminum nitrates could occur before, during, and after transfer of product solutions. Both dilution and/or product solution temperature controls may be necessary to prevent precipitation of these salts. Corrosion of the dissolver should not be an issue during these dissolving operations. Corrosion is minimized when dissolving at 55-65{degree}C for one to three hours at a maximum uncomplexed free fluoride concentration of 0.07 molar and by dissolving at 75-85{degree}C at a one to one aluminum to

  3. Controlling particulates, temperature, and tritium in an inert glovebox for a weapons program

    SciTech Connect

    Purson, J.D.; Powers, D.; Walthers, C.; Navarro, C.; Newman, E.; Romero, J.; Jenkins, R.

    1996-07-01

    A glovebox is described in which several environmental parameters are controlled and monitored. Included in these are particulate, tritium, water vapor, oxygen and temperature. The paper details the design rationale and process and describes the glovebox, presently in use for neutron generator production.

  4. Pollution prevention benefits of non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves - 11000

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E; Dodge, Robert L

    2011-01-11

    Radiation shielding is commonly used to protect the glovebox worker from unintentional direct and secondary radiation exposure, while working with plutonium-238 and plutonium-239. Shielding glovebox gloves are traditionally composed of lead-based materials, i.e., hazardous waste. This has prompted the development of new, non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. No studies, however, have investigated the pollution prevention benefits of these new glovebox gloves. We examined both leaded and non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. The nonhazardous substitutes are higher in cost, but this is offset by eliminating the costs associated with onsite waste handling of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) items. In the end, replacing lead with non-hazardous substitutes eliminates waste generation and future liability.

  5. Pyrochemical Glovebox Line Replacement and Modernization Effort at Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, D. K.; McNeese, James A.; Cantrell, W. S.; Garcia, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), as part of the stockpile stewardship mission, is developing the capability to manufacture replacement pits for the United States nuclear weapon stockpile. Part of this effort requires that the various manufacturing activities formerly performed at the Rocky Flats be reconstructed at LANL, modernized to improve operation, and re-certified for pit production. Part of this effort requires that new pyrochemical metal production facilities be installed in TA-55 to replace existing outdated equipment. The purpose of this effort is design, build/procure, assemble, cold test, and support installation activities for ten pyrochemical processing gloveboxes and processing support equipment for insertion into a selected PF-4 laboratory. Eight of the gloveboxes will be connected to a common trolley tunnel with a state-of-the-art automated transport system that can access each glovebox. Five of those gloveboxes will be designed to accommodate standard water-cooled pyrochemical processing furnaces with appropriate lift mechanisms for handling the furnace products and processing hardware. Another glovebox will be designed to accommodate an improved breaking press that will be designed/procured to break alpha metal up to a thickness of l-inch, eliminate introduction of hydraulic oil to the glovebox environment, provide appropriate shielding for prevention of glovebox damage due to shrapnel projectiles, and use interchangeable impact tools in order to be able to process both contaminated and clean metals with the same machine. In addition, a storage glovebox and a distillation glovebox (already developed) will be attached to the transport system. Two other gloveboxes, one accommodating two casting furnaces and another storage glovebox, will be installed in the laboratory independent of the transport system. A transfer system (trolley) will be incorporated to handle material flow between the pyrochemical furnace gloveboxes, the press glovebox

  6. USML-1 microgravity glovebox experiment no. 1 Passive Accelerometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1995-01-01

    The passive accelerometer system (PAS) is a simple moving ball accelerometer capable of measuring the small magnitude steady relative acceleration that occurs in a low earth orbit spacecraft due to atmospheric drag and the earth's gravity gradient. The accelerometer can be used when the spacecraft continuously rotates during the orbit such that some line of reference in the craft always points along the vector connecting the earth's mass center with the spacecraft mass center. PAS was used successfully on the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1).

  7. TRANSIENT ACCIDENT ANALYSIS OF THE GLOVEBOX SYSTEM IN A LARGE PROCESS ROOM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S

    2008-01-11

    Local transient hydrogen concentrations were evaluated inside a large process room when the hydrogen gas was released by three postulated accident scenarios associated with the process tank leakage and fire leading to a loss of gas confinement. The three cases considered in this work were fire in a room, loss of confinement from a process tank, and loss of confinement coupled with fire event. Based on these accident scenarios in a large and unventilated process room, the modeling calculations of the hydrogen migration were performed to estimate local transient concentrations of hydrogen due to the sudden leakage and release from a glovebox system associated with the process tank. The modeling domain represented the major features of the process room including the principal release or leakage source of gas storage system. The model was benchmarked against the literature results for key phenomena such as natural convection, turbulent behavior, gas mixing due to jet entrainment, and radiation cooling because these phenomena are closely related to the gas driving mechanisms within a large air space of the process room. The modeling results showed that at the corner of the process room, the gas concentrations migrated by the Case 2 and Case 3 scenarios reached the set-point value of high activity alarm in about 13 seconds, while the Case 1 scenario takes about 90 seconds to reach the concentration. The modeling results were used to estimate transient radioactive gas migrations in an enclosed process room installed with high activity alarm monitor when the postulated leakage scenarios are initiated without room ventilation.

  8. EVALUATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES FOR EFFECTIVE PERMEATION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2012-02-29

    A research and development task was undertaken to determine the permeabilities of hydrogen and dry air through different polymeric glove materials that are used to maintain the integrity of glovebox secondary containment. Fifteen different glove samples were obtained from four different manufacturers and samples cut from these gloves were tested. The gloves included baseline butyl rubber, Viton{reg_sign}, Dupont{reg_sign} Hypalon{reg_sign}, polyurethane, as well as composite gloves. The testing indicated that all of the vendor's butyl rubber gloves and the Jung Viton{reg_sign} gloves performed comparably in both gases.

  9. Virtual Glovebox (VGX) Aids Astronauts in Pre-Flight Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Virtual Glovebox (VGX) was developed to allow astronauts on Earth to train for complex biology research tasks in space. The astronauts may reach into the virtual environment, naturally manipulating specimens, tools, equipment, and accessories in a simulated microgravity environment as they would do in space. Such virtual reality technology also provides engineers and space operations staff with rapid prototyping, planning, and human performance modeling capabilities. Other Earth based applications being explored for this technology include biomedical procedural training and training for disarming bio-terrorism weapons.

  10. PUNCTURE TEST CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    An experiment was conducted to determine the puncture resistance of 15 gloves that are used or proposed for use in the Tritium Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). These data will serve as a baseline for characterization and may be incorporated into the glove procurement specification. The testing was conducted in agreement with ASTM D120 and all of the gloves met or exceeded the minimum requirements. Butyl gloves exhibited puncture resistance nearly 2.5 times the minimum requirements at SRS while Polyurethane was nearly 7.5x the minimum.

  11. Requalification of the 235-F Metallograph Facility gloveboxes for use in the 773-A plutonium immobilization demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hinds, S.S; Hidlay, J.

    1997-10-16

    A concern has been identified regarding the viability of redesigning and requalifying existing glovebox lines for use as glovebox lines integral to future mission activities in the 773-A laboratory building at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Bechtel Savannah River Inc. (BSRI) design engineering team has been requested to perform an evaluation which would investigate the reuse of these existing gloveboxes versus the procurement of completely new glovebox systems. The existing glovebox lines were manufactured for the Plutonium (Pu) Metallograph Facility, Project 3253, located in building 235-F at SRS. These gloveboxes were designed as independent, fully functional Pu `metal` and Pu `oxide` processing glovebox systems for this facility. These gloveboxes, although fully installed, have never processed radioactive material. The proposed use for these gloveboxes are: (1) to utilize the Pu `metal` glovebox system for the primary containment associated with the Pre-Processing/Re-Processing Laboratory for obtaining radioactive glass compound viscometer analysis and (2) to utilize the Pu `oxide` glovebox system for primary containment associated with the Pu `Can in Can` Demonstration for proof of principle testing specific to long term Pu immobilization and storage technology. This report presents objective evidence that supports the engineering judgment indicating the existing gloveboxes can be requalified for the proposed uses indicated above. SRS has the ability to duplicate the test parameters, with site forces, that will meet or exceed the identical acceptance criteria established to qualify the existing gloveboxes. The qualification effort will be a documented procedure using the leak test criteria characteristic of the original glovebox purchase. Two equivalent tests will be performed, one for post modification leak test acceptance and one for post installation leak test acceptance. (Abstract Truncated).

  12. Dexterity tests data contribute to reduction in leaded glovebox gloves use

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E; Lawton, Cindy M; Castro, Amanda M

    2008-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alphaemitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces and airborne contamination and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes. Through an integrated approach, controls have been developed and implemented through an efficient Glovebox Glove Integrity Program (GGJP). A key element of this program is to consider measures that lower the overall risk of glovebox operations. Line management owning glovebox processes through this program make decisions on which type of glovebox gloves (the weakest component of this safety significant system) would perform in these aggressive environments. As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) considerations must be balanced with glove durability and worker dexterity, both of which affect the final overall risk of the operation. In the past, lead-loaded (leaded) glovebox gloves made from Hypalon(reg.) had been the workhorse of programmatic operations at TA-55. Replacing leaded gloves with unleaded gloves for certain operations would lower the overall risk as well as reduced the amount of mixed TRU waste. This effort contributes to Los Alamos National Laboratory Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations. In the following report, the pros and cons of wearing leaded glovebox gloves, the effect of leaded gloves versus unleaded gloves on task performance using standard dexterity tests, the justification for switching from leaded to unleaded gloves, and pollution prevention benefits of this dramatic change in the glovebox system are presented.

  13. First Post-Flight Status Report for the Microgravity Science Glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugher, Charles R., III

    2003-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) this year on the second Utilization Flight (UF2). After successful on-orbit activation, the facility began supporting an active microgravity research program. The inaugural NASA experiments operated in the unit were the Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA, A. Ostrogorski, PI), and the Pore Formation and Mobility (PFMI, R. Grugel, PI) experiments. Both of these materials science investigations demonstrated the versatility of the facility through extensive use of telescience. The facility afforded the investigators with the capability of monitoring and operating the experiments in real-time and provided several instances in which the unique combination of scientists and flight crew were able to salvage situations which would have otherwise led to the loss of a science experiment in an unmanned, or automated, environment. The European Space Agency (ESA) also made use of the facility to perform a series of four experiments that were carried to the ISS via a Russian Soyuz and subsequently operated by a Belgium astronaut during a ten day Station visit. This imaginative approach demonstrated the ability of the MSG integration team to handle a rapid integration schedule (approximately seven months) and an intensive operations interval. Interestingly, and thanks to aggressive attention from the crew, the primary limitation to experiment thru-put in these early operational phases is proving to be the restrictions on the up-mass to the Station, rather than the availability of science operations.

  14. The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), a Resource for Gravity-Dependent Phenomena Research on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie A.; Jeter, Linda B.; Vonk, Chris

    2007-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS) designed for gravity-dependent phenomena investigation handling. The MSG has been operating in the ISS US Laboratory Module since July 2002. The MSG facility provides an enclosed working area for investigation manipulation and observation in the ISS. The MSG's unique design provides two levels of containment to protect the ISS crew from hazardous operations. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter work volume, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120,28, plus or minus 12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust' and Vacuum Resource 'Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. With these capabilities, the MSG is an ideal platform for research required to advance the technology readiness levels (TRL) needed for the Crew Exploration Vehicle and the Exploration Initiative. Areas of research that will benefit from investigations in the MSG include thermal management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion and reacting control systems, in situ fabrication and repair, and advanced life support technologies. This paper will provide a detailed explanation of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG, an overview of investigations planning to operate in the MSG, and possible augmentations that can be added to-the MSG facility to further enhance the resources provided to investigations.

  15. The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), a Resource for Gravity-Dependent Phenomena Research on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie A.; Jeter, Linda B.; Vonk, Chris

    2007-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS) designed for gravity-dependent phenomena investigation handling. The MSG has been operating in the ISS US Laboratory Module since July 2002. The MSG facility provides an enclosed working area for investigation manipulation and observation in the ISS. The MSG s unique design provides two levels of containment to protect the ISS crew from hazardous operations. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter work volume, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120,28, +/-12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. With these capabilities, the MSG is an ideal platform for research required to advance the technology readiness levels (TRL) needed for the Crew Exploration Vehicle and the Exploration Initiative. Areas of research that will benefit from investigations in the MSG include thermal management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion and reacting control systems, in situ fabrication and repair, and advanced life support technologies. This paper will provide a detailed explanation of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG, an overview of investigations planning to operate in the MSG, and possible augmentations that can be added to the MSG facility to further enhance the resources provided to investigations.

  16. 46 CFR 127.250 - Ventilation for enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed spaces. 127.250 Section 127.250... ARRANGEMENTS Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.250 Ventilation for enclosed spaces. (a) Each enclosed space within the vessel must be properly vented or ventilated. Means must be provided for...

  17. 46 CFR 108.181 - Ventilation for enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed spaces. 108.181 Section 108.181... AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Ventilation § 108.181 Ventilation for enclosed spaces. (a) Each enclosed space must be vented or ventilated. (b) There must be a means to close each vent...

  18. 46 CFR 127.250 - Ventilation for enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed spaces. 127.250 Section 127.250... ARRANGEMENTS Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.250 Ventilation for enclosed spaces. (a) Each enclosed space within the vessel must be properly vented or ventilated. Means must be provided for...

  19. 46 CFR 127.250 - Ventilation for enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed spaces. 127.250 Section 127.250... ARRANGEMENTS Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.250 Ventilation for enclosed spaces. (a) Each enclosed space within the vessel must be properly vented or ventilated. Means must be provided for...

  20. 46 CFR 108.181 - Ventilation for enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed spaces. 108.181 Section 108.181... AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Ventilation § 108.181 Ventilation for enclosed spaces. (a) Each enclosed space must be vented or ventilated. (b) There must be a means to close each vent...

  1. 46 CFR 127.250 - Ventilation for enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed spaces. 127.250 Section 127.250... ARRANGEMENTS Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.250 Ventilation for enclosed spaces. (a) Each enclosed space within the vessel must be properly vented or ventilated. Means must be provided for...

  2. 46 CFR 127.250 - Ventilation for enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed spaces. 127.250 Section 127.250... ARRANGEMENTS Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.250 Ventilation for enclosed spaces. (a) Each enclosed space within the vessel must be properly vented or ventilated. Means must be provided for...

  3. 46 CFR 108.181 - Ventilation for enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed spaces. 108.181 Section 108.181... AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Ventilation § 108.181 Ventilation for enclosed spaces. (a) Each enclosed space must be vented or ventilated. (b) There must be a means to close each vent...

  4. 46 CFR 108.181 - Ventilation for enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed spaces. 108.181 Section 108.181... AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Ventilation § 108.181 Ventilation for enclosed spaces. (a) Each enclosed space must be vented or ventilated. (b) There must be a means to close each vent...

  5. GLOVEBOX WINDOWS, FIRE PROTECTION AND VOICES FROM THE PAST

    SciTech Connect

    Till, W

    2009-04-15

    'Study the past--what is past is prologue'. These words appear as the motto on a pair of statues at the National Archives Building in Washington DC. They are also the opening sentence in the preface of a document written in August of 1956 entitled 'A Summary of Accidents and Incidents Involving Radiation in Atomic Energy Activities--June 1945 thru December 1955'. This document, one of several written by D.F. Hayes of the Safety and Fire Protection Branch, Division of Organization and Personnel, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in Washington DC, and many others are often forgotten even though they contain valuable glovebox fire protection lessons for us today.

  6. Microinjection of follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Laurinda A.; Norris, Rachael P.; Freudzon, Marina; Ratzan, William J.; Mehlmann, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The mammalian oocyte develops within a complex of somatic cells known as a follicle, within which signals from the somatic cells regulate the oocyte, and signals from the oocyte regulate the somatic cells. Because isolation of the oocyte from the follicle disrupts these communication pathways, oocyte physiology is best studied within an intact follicle. Here we describe methods for quantitative microinjection of follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes, thus allowing the introduction of signaling molecules as well as optical probes into the oocyte within its physiological environment. PMID:19085139

  7. Microinjection of Follicle-Enclosed Mouse Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Laurinda A.; Norris, Rachael P.; Freudzon, Marina; Ratzan, William J.; Mehlmann, Lisa M.

    The mammalian oocyte develops within a complex of somatic cells known as a follicle, within which signals from the somatic cells regulate the oocyte, and signals from the oocyte regulate the somatic cells. Because isolation of the oocyte from the follicle disrupts these communication pathways, oocyte physiology is best studied within an intact follicle. Here we describe methods for quantitative microinjection of follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes, thus allowing the introduction of signaling molecules as well as optical probes into the oocyte within its physiological environment.

  8. Carbon fiber behavior in an enclosed volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate the behavior of single carbon fibers existing in an enclosed space such as a room of a building. Three general phenomena were explored: the concentration decay rate of a fiber-charged room, the degree of uniform mixing of fibers within a room, and the effects of fibers being redisseminated off deposition surfaces within a room. The results were required in understanding the ratio of total indoor fiber exposure to total outdoor fiber exposure, a quantity essential to risk analysis. Results indicate that decay rate is predictable within acceptable limits and that homogeneous mixing can always be assumed. Some factors of redissemination are identified and effects discussed.

  9. Expert System Control of Plant Growth in an Enclosed Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, George; Lanoue, Mark; Bathel, Matthew; Ryan, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    The Expert System is an enclosed, controlled environment for growing plants, which incorporates a computerized, knowledge-based software program that is designed to capture the knowledge, experience, and problem-solving skills of one or more human experts in a particular discipline. The Expert System is trained to analyze crop/plant status, to monitor the condition of the plants and the environment, and to adjust operational parameters to optimize the plant-growth process. This system is intended to provide a way to remotely control plant growth with little or no human intervention. More specifically, the term control implies an autonomous method for detecting plant states such as health (biomass) or stress and then for recommending and implementing cultivation and/or remediation to optimize plant growth and to minimize consumption of energy and nutrients. Because of difficulties associated with delivering energy and nutrients remotely, a key feature of this Expert System is its ability to minimize this effort and to achieve optimum growth while taking into account the diverse range of environmental considerations that exist in an enclosed environment. The plant-growth environment for the Expert System could be made from a variety of structures, including a greenhouse, an underground cavern, or another enclosed chamber. Imaging equipment positioned within or around the chamber provides spatially distributed crop/plant-growth information. Sensors mounted in the chamber provide data and information pertaining to environmental conditions that could affect plant development. Lamps in the growth environment structure supply illumination, and other additional equipment in the chamber supplies essential nutrients and chemicals.

  10. Enhancements in Glovebox Design Resulting from Laboratory-Conducted FIre Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Wunderlich, Gregory M.; Mcentire, James R.; Richmond, William G.

    2013-06-14

    The primary mission of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Project was to disassemble nuclear weapons pits and convert the resulting special nuclear materials to a form suitable for further disposition. Because of the nature of materials involved, the fundamental system which allowed PDCF to perform its mission was a series of integrated and interconnected gloveboxes which provided confinement and containment of the radioactive materials being processed. The high throughput planned for PDCF and the relatively high neutron and gamma radiation levels of the pits required that gloveboxes be shielded to meet worker dose limits. The glovebox shielding material was required to contain high hydrogen concentrations which typically result in these materials being combustible. High combustible loadings created design challenges for the facility fire suppression and ventilation system design. Combustible loading estimates for the PDCF Plutonium (Pu) Processing Building increased significantly due to these shielding requirements. As a result, the estimates of combustible loading substantially exceeded values used to support fire and facility safety analyses. To ensure a valid basis for combustible loading contributed by the glovebox system, the PDCF Project funded a series of fire tests conducted by the Southwest Research Institute on door panels and a representative glovebox containing Water Extended Polyester (WEP) radiological shielding to observe their behavior during a fire event. Improvements to PDCF glovebox designs were implemented based on lessons learned during the fire test. In particular, methods were developed to provide high levels of neutron shielding while maintaining combustible loading in the glovebox shells at low levels. Additionally, the fire test results led to design modifications to mitigate pressure increases observed during the fire test in order to maintain the integrity of the WEP cladding. These changes resulted in significantly

  11. Ultra Pure Water Cleaning Baseline Study on NASA JSC Astromaterial Curation Gloveboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Burkett, P. J.; Allton, J. H.; Allen, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Future sample return missions will require strict protocols and procedures for reducing inorganic and organic contamination in isolation containment systems. In 2012, a baseline study was orchestrated to establish the current state of organic cleanliness in gloveboxes used by NASA JSC astromaterials curation labs [1, 2]. As part of this in-depth organic study, the current curatorial technical support procedure (TSP) 23 was used for cleaning the gloveboxes with ultra pure water (UPW) [3-5]. Particle counts and identification were obtained that could be used as a benchmark for future mission designs that require glovebox decontamination. The UPW baseline study demonstrates that TSP 23 works well for gloveboxes that have been thoroughly degreased. However, TSP 23 could be augmented to provide even better glovebox decontamination. JSC 03243 could be used as a starting point for further investigating optimal cleaning techniques and procedures. DuPont Vertrel XF or other chemical substitutes to replace Freon- 113, mechanical scrubbing, and newer technology could be used to enhance glovebox cleanliness in addition to high purity UPW final rinsing. Future sample return missions will significantly benefit from further cleaning studies to reduce inorganic and organic contamination.

  12. Numerical Simulation of an Enclosed Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame in Microgravity Environment: Comparison with ELF Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Kezhong; Venuturumilli, Rajasekhar; Ryan, Brandon J.; Chen, Lea-Der

    2001-01-01

    been some research on the stability of laminar flames, but most studies have focused on turbulent flames. It is also well known that the airflow around the fuel jet can significantly alter the lift off, reattachment and blow out of the jet diffusion flame. Buoyant convection is sufficiently strong in 1-g flames that it can dominate the flow-field, even at the burner rim. In normal-gravity testing, it is very difficult to delineate the effects of the forced airflow from those of the buoyancy-induced flow. Comparison of normal-gravity and microgravity flames provides clear indication of the influence of forced and buoyant flows on the flame stability. The overall goal of the Enclosed Laminar Flames (ELF) investigation (STS-87/USMP-4 Space Shuttle mission, November to December 1997) is to improve our understanding of the effects of buoyant convection on the structure and stability of co-flow diffusion flame, e.g., see http://zeta.lerc.nasa.gov/expr/elf.htm. The ELF hardware meets the experiment hardware limit of the 35-liter interior volume of the glovebox working area, and the 180x220-mm dimensions of the main door. The ELF experiment module is a miniature, fan-driven wind tunnel, equipped with a gas supply system. A 1.5-mm diameter nozzle is located on the duct's flow axis. The cross section of the duct is nominally a 76-mm square with rounded corners. The forced air velocity can be varied from about 0.2 to 0.9 m/s. The fuel flow can be set as high as 3 std. cubic centimeter (cc) per second, which corresponds to a nozzle exit velocity of up to 1.70 m/s. The ELF hardware and experimental procedure are discussed in detail in Brooker et al. The 1-g test results are repeated in several experiments following the STS-87 Mission. The ELF study is also relevant to practical systems because the momentum-dominated behavior of turbulent flames can be achieved in laminar flames in microgravity. The specific objectives of this paper are to evaluate the use reduced model for

  13. 46 CFR 177.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... be capable of being shut down from the pilot house. (c) An enclosed passenger or crew accommodation space and any other space occupied by a crew member on a regular basis must be ventilated by a power.... (d) An exhaust duct over a frying vat or a grill must be of at least 11 U.S. Standard Gauge steel....

  14. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... shut down from the pilot house. (c) An enclosed passenger or crew accommodation space and any other space occupied by a crew member on a regular basis must be ventilated by a power ventilation system... duct over a frying vat or a grill must be at least 11 U.S. Standard Gauge (USSG) steel....

  15. Proposal for secondary enclosure setup for experiments to expose plasma facing materials to tritiated plasma in VISIONI

    SciTech Connect

    Broeckx, W.E.K.; Dylst, K.; Bornea, A.; Zamfirache, M.

    2015-03-15

    VISIONI is an equipment at SCK-CEN that allows the exposure of candidate plasma facing materials to tritium - deuterium plasmas at ITER first wall conditions. VISIONI itself, being a vacuum setup, acts as primary confinement. To protect operators against exposure to a tritiated atmosphere VISIONI must be placed in a secondary confinement. The current Tritium lab at SCK-CEN has a walk-in process cell which can be used to enclose the plasma chamber and diagnostics of the VISIONI setup, which have a limited tritium inventory. This allows easy accessibility to the setup in a well-ventilated environment. Routine operations should be conducted from outside the process cell and maintenance operations can be conducted from within the process cell with proper protections. The tritium storage and supply can be enclosed in a glove box with a dedicated air detritiation system which is activated during an experiment or in case of an incident. The detritiation system will oxidize tritium and capture it on molecular sieves. By using this confinement approach it is possible to expose materials to a tritiated plasma while maintaining good accessibility of the VISIONI setup. This paper describes the proposed confinement system and compares it to the most common approach where the entire system is enclosed into one large glovebox.

  16. Enclosed, off-axis solar concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Benitez, Pablo; Grip, Robert E; Minano, Juan C; Narayanan, Authi A; Plesniak, Adam; Schwartz, Joel A

    2013-11-26

    A solar concentrator including a housing having receiving wall, a reflecting wall and at least two end walls, the receiving, reflecting and end walls defining a three-dimensional volume having an inlet, wherein a vertical axis of the housing is generally perpendicular to the inlet, a receiver mounted on the receiving wall of the housing, the receiver including at least one photovoltaic cell, wherein a vertical axis of the receiver is disposed at a non-zero angle relative to the vertical axis of the housing, at least one clip disposed on the reflecting wall an optical element received within the three-dimensional volume, the optical element including at least one tab, the tab being engaged by the clip to align the optical element with the receiver, and a window received over the inlet to enclose the housing.

  17. Dexterity test data contribute to reduction in leaded glovebox gloves use

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E; Lawton, Cindy M; Castro, Amanda M; Costigan, Stephen A; Schreiber, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (T A-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes. Using an integrated approach, controls have been developed and implemented through an efficient Glovebox Glove Integrity Program. A key element of this program is to consider measures that lower the overall risk of glovebox operations. Line management who own glovebox processes through this program make decisions on which type of glovebox gloves (hereafter referred to as gloves), the weakest component of this safety-significant system, would perform best in these aggressive environments. As Low as Reasonably Achievable considerations must be balanced with glove durability and worker dexterity, both of which affect the final overall risk of the operation. In the past, lead-loaded (leaded) gloves made from Hypalon(reg.) were the primary glove for programmatic operations at TA55. Replacing leaded gloves with unleaded gloves for certain operations would lower the overall risk as well as reduce the amount of mixed transuranic waste. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations. In this report, the pros and cons of wearing leaded gloves, the effect of leaded gloves versus unleaded gloves on task performance using standard dexterity tests, the justification for switching from leaded to unleaded gloves, and the pollution prevention benefits of this dramatic change in the glovebox system are presented.

  18. Device Assembly Facility (DAF) Glovebox Radioactive Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Dominick, J L

    2001-12-18

    The Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) provides programmatic support to the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility in the form of target assembly. The target assembly activities are performed in a glovebox at DAF and include Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Currently, only activities with transuranic SNM are anticipated. Preliminary discussions with facility personnel indicate that primarily two distributions of SNM will be used: Weapons Grade Plutonium (WG-Pu), and Pu-238 enhanced WG-Pu. Nominal radionuclide distributions for the two material types are included in attachment 1. Wastes generated inside glove boxes is expected to be Transuranic (TRU) Waste which will eventually be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Wastes generated in the Radioactive Material Area (RMA), outside of the glove box is presumed to be low level waste (LLW) which is destined for disposal at the NTS. The process knowledge quantification methods identified herein may be applied to waste generated anywhere within or around the DAF and possibly JASPER as long as the fundamental waste stream boundaries are adhered to as outlined below. The method is suitable for quantification of waste which can be directly surveyed with the Blue Alpha meter or swiped. An additional quantification methodology which requires the use of a high resolution gamma spectroscopy unit is also included and relies on the predetermined radionuclide distribution and utilizes scaling to measured nuclides for quantification.

  19. Striving for safety excellence in chemical and glovebox environments

    SciTech Connect

    Montalvo, M. L.; Vigil, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    Within Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division provides the foundation for maintaining the nuclear materials mission in support of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. Plutonium research and production competencies reside in a suitably skilled and well-trained work force. Due to the unique chemical and physical properties of the actinide elements, specialized training, expert knowledge, and unique safety procedures are essential to the execution of NMT's mission. To ensure the highest degree of safety, NMT Division employs a behavior-based solution (ATOMICS) for assuring operations safety excellence. The subsequent mitigation efforts of the ATOMICS Process to enhance the safety culture of the NMT workforce in chemical and glovebox environments are the primary focus of this paper. The NMT ATOMICS Process demonstrates the application of LANLs first guiding principal of the Integrated Safety Management Program 'management commitment and worker involvement' as an integral element of the process. The vision of ATOMICS is to be the Department of Energy's (DOE) model of excellence in the application of safety performance.

  20. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, 1966, INTERIOR, DETAIL, ENCLOSED STAIRCASE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, 1966, INTERIOR, DETAIL, ENCLOSED STAIRCASE AND TIN SHEETING. - Sig Sautelle Circus Training House, South Main Street (State Route 11), Homer, Cortland County, NY

  1. WRAP low level waste restricted waste management (LLW RWM) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1997-11-24

    On April 22, 1997, the Low Level Waste Restricted Waste Management (LLW RWM) glovebox was tested using acceptance test procedure 13027A-87. Mr. Robert L. Warmenhoven served as test director, Mr. Kendrick Leist acted as test operator and test witness, and Michael Lane provided miscellaneous software support. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine glovebox control system interlocks, operator Interface Unit (OIU) menus, alarms, and messages. Basic drum port and lift table control sequences were demonstrated. OIU menus, messages, and alarm sequences were examined, with few exceptions noted. Barcode testing was bypassed, due to the lack of installed equipment as well as the switch from basic reliance on fixed bar code readers to the enhanced use of portable bar code readers. Bar code testing was completed during performance of the LLW RWM OTP. Mechanical and control deficiencies were documented as Test Exceptions during performance of this Acceptance Test. These items are attached as Appendix A to this report.

  2. Alternative approach for fire suppression of class A, B and C fires in gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberger, Mark S; Tsiagkouris, James A

    2011-02-10

    Department of Energy (DOE) Orders and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards require fire suppression in gloveboxes. Several potential solutions have been and are currently being considered at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective is to provide reliable, minimally invasive, and seismically robust fire suppression capable of extinguishing Class A, B, and C fires; achieve compliance with DOE and NFPA requirements; and provide value-added improvements to fire safety in gloveboxes. This report provides a brief summary of current approaches and also documents the successful fire tests conducted to prove that one approach, specifically Fire Foe{trademark} tubes, is capable of achieving the requirement to provide reliable fire protection in gloveboxes in a cost-effective manner.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2013-01-24

    A task was undertaken to characterize glovebox gloves that are currently used in the facilities at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as some experimental and advanced compound gloves that have been proposed for use. Gloves from four manufacturers were tested for permeation in hydrogen and air, thermal stability, tensile properties, puncture resistance and dynamic mechanical response. The gloves were compared to each other within the type and also to the butyl rubber glove that is widely used at the SRS. The permeation testing demonstrated that the butyl compounds from three of the vendors behaved similarly and exhibited hydrogen permeabilities of .52‐.84 x10{sup ‐7} cc H{sub 2}*cm / (cm{sup 2}*atm). The Viton glove performed at the lower edge of this bound, while the more advanced composite gloves exhibited permeabilities greater than a factor of two compared to butyl. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the amount of material lost under slightly aggressive conditions. Glove losses are important since they can affect the life of glovebox stripper systems. During testing at 90, 120, and 150°C, the samples lost most of the mass in the initial 60 minutes of thermal exposure and as expected increasing the temperature increased the mass loss and shortened the time to achieve a steady state loss. The ranking from worst to best was Jung butyl‐Hypalon with 12.9 %, Piercan Hypalon with 11.4 %, and Jung butyl‐Viton with 5.2% mass loss all at approximately 140°C. The smallest mass losses were experienced by the Jung Viton and the Piercan polyurethane. Tensile properties were measured using a standard dog bone style test. The butyl rubber exhibited tensile strengths of 11‐15 MPa and elongations or 660‐843%. Gloves made from other compounds exhibited lower tensile strengths (5 MPa Viton) to much higher tensile strengths (49 MPa Urethane) with a comparable range of elongation. The puncture resistance of the gloves was measured

  4. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan - Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment Unit Glovebox HA-20MB

    SciTech Connect

    PRIGNANO, A.L.

    2003-06-25

    This closure plan describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) glovebox HA-20MB that housed an interim status ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) of 1976 treatment unit. This closure plan is certified and submitted to Ecology for incorporation into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (HF RCRA Permit) in accordance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement; TPA) Milestone M-83-30 requiring submittal of a certified closure plan for ''glovebox HA-20MB'' by July 31, 2003. Glovebox HA-20MB is located within the 231-5Z Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Currently glovebox HA-20MB is being used for non-RCRA analytical purposes. The schedule of closure activities under this plan supports completion of TPA Milestone M-83-44 to deactivate and prepare for dismantlement the above grade portions of the 234-5Z and ZA, 243-Z, and 291-Z and 291-Z-1 stack buildings by September 30, 2015. Under this closure plan, glovebox HA-20MB will undergo clean closure to the performance standards of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 with respect to all dangerous waste contamination from glovebox HA-20MB RCRA operations. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP treatment unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. Any information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. Clearance form only sent to

  5. Lunar Processing Cabinet 2.0: Retrofitting Gloveboxes into the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Apollo 16 Lunar Processing Glovebox (cabinet 38) in the Lunar Curation Laboratory at NASA JSC received an upgrade including new technology interfaces. A Jacobs - Technology Innovation Project provided the primary resources to retrofit this glovebox into the 21st century. NASA Astromaterials Acquisition & Curation Office continues the over 40 year heritage of preserving lunar materials for future scientific studies in state-of-the-art facilities. This enhancement has not only modernized the contamination controls, but provides new innovative tools for processing and characterizing lunar samples as well as supports real-time exchange of sample images and information with the scientific community throughout the world.

  6. W-026, transuranic waste restricted waste management (TRU RWM) glovebox operational test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-18

    The TRU Waste/Restricted Waste Management (LLW/PWNP) Glovebox 401 is designed to accept and process waste from the Transuranic Process Glovebox 302. Waste is transferred to the glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagless Transfer Port (DO-07401) on a transfer stand. The stand is removed with a hoist and the operator inspects the waste (with the aid of the Sampling and Treatment Director) to determine a course of action for each item. The waste is separated into compliant and non compliant. One Trip Port DO-07402A is designated as ``Compliant``and One Trip Port DO-07402B is designated as ``Non Compliant``. As the processing (inspection, bar coding, sampling and treatment) of the transferred items takes place, residue is placed in the appropriate One Trip port. The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved for sampling or storage or it`s state altered by treatment, the Operator will track an items location using a portable barcode reader and entry any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolutions (described here) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

  7. HOLDUP MEASUREMENTS FOR VISUAL EXAMINATION GLOVEBOXES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, R

    2006-05-03

    Visual Examination (VE) gloveboxes are used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to remediate transuranic waste (TRU) drums. Noncompliant items are removed before the drums undergo further characterization in preparation for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Maintaining the flow of drums through the remediation process is critical to the program's seven-days-per-week operation. Conservative assumptions are used to ensure that glovebox contamination from this continual operation is below acceptable limits. Holdup measurements are performed in order to confirm that these assumptions are conservative. High Cs-137 backgrounds in the VE glovebox areas preclude the use of a sodium iodide spectrometer, so a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, having superior resolution, is used. Plutonium-239 is usually the nuclide of interest; however, Pu-241, Np-237 (including its daughter Pa-233) and Pu-238 (if detected) are typically assayed. Cs-137 and Co-60 may also be detected but are not reported since they do not contribute to the Pu-239 Fissile Gram Equivalent or Pu-239 Equivalent Curies. HEPA filters, drums and waste boxes are also assayed by the same methodology. If--for example--the HEPA is contained in a stainless steel housing, attenuation corrections must be applied for both the filter and the housing. Dimensions, detector locations, materials and densities are provided as inputs to Ortec's ISOTOPIC software to estimate attenuation and geometry corrections for the measurement positions. This paper discusses the methodology, results and limitations of these measurements for different VE glovebox configurations.

  8. Modular glovebox connector and associated good practices for control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials.

    PubMed

    Hoover, M D; Mewhinney, C J; Newton, G J

    1999-01-01

    Design and associated good practices are described for a modular glovebox connector to improve control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials. The connector consists of an anodized aluminum circular port with a mating spacer, gaskets, and retaining rings for joining two parallel ends of commercially available or custom-manufactured glovebox enclosures. Use of the connector allows multiple gloveboxes to be quickly assembled or reconfigured in functional units. Connector dimensions can be scaled to meet operational requirements for access between gloveboxes. Options for construction materials are discussed, along with recommendations for installation of the connector in new or retrofitted systems. Associated good practices include application of surface coatings and caulking, use of disposable glovebags, and proper selection and protection of gasket and glove materials. Use of the connector at an inhalation toxicology research facility has reduced the time and expense required to reconfigure equipment for changing operational requirements, the dispersion of contamination during reconfigurations, and the need for decommissioning and disposal of contaminated enclosures.

  9. CSER 96-022: mass limit for 2-inch vacuum line in glovebox HC-18M

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.G.

    1996-10-30

    This Criticality Safety Evaluation Report analyzes the criticality safety of transporting and sectioning a 2.5 meter (8 foot) section of 5.08 cm (2-inch) vacuum tubing with approximately 3.8 kg of PuO2 via the HC- 1 conveyor and HC- I 8M glovebox in the 234-5Z building.

  10. Vapor containment tests of the rapid response system glovebox. Final report, December 1995-April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Arca, V.J.; Blewett, W.K.; Kinne, W.E.

    1996-10-01

    The Rapid Response System (RRS) is a trailer-mounted facility for demilitarizing Chemical Agent Identification Sets (CAIS), obsolete training kits containing ampules and/or bottles of chemical warfare agents (mustard and lewisite), or other industrial chemical compounds. The main component of the RRS is a glovebox divided into three areas - an airlock station, unpack station, and neutralization station, and the CAIS items are processed through each station by use of 11 glove ports. The glovebox is maintained at negative pressure differential by a gas-particulate filter-blower unit. To measure the performance of the glovebox in containing chemical vapors/gases, a series of tests was conducted on 811 April 1996 at Tooele Army Depot, UT, with methyl salicylate, a simulant for mustard. This testing addressed performance in steady state operation, airlock cycling, waste barrel changeout, and glove changeout. Two trials were also conducted in a simulated power-failure condition to determine the rate of leakage if system airflow is interrupted. The glovebox and its engineering controls provided a very high level of protection. Some procedural changes were recommended to increase the protection factor in glove and barrel changeout operations.

  11. INTERIOR VIEW OF TYPICAL COVERED ENCLOSED WALKWAY; NOTE HEATING UNITS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF TYPICAL COVERED ENCLOSED WALKWAY; NOTE HEATING UNITS MOUNTED BELOW WINDOWS AND HEATING SYSTEM PIPES ABOVE - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-10600, 4 Quadrants, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  12. 7. Mispillion Lighthouse, First Floor, Enclosed Stairway Mispillion Lighthouse, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Mispillion Lighthouse, First Floor, Enclosed Stairway - Mispillion Lighthouse, South bank of Mispillion River at its confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  13. 5. EXTERIOR OF NORTH SIDE SHOWING ENCLOSED FRONT PORCH AREA, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EXTERIOR OF NORTH SIDE SHOWING ENCLOSED FRONT PORCH AREA, ALUMINUM SLIDING GLASS WINDOW GLAZING REPLACEMENTS, AND RAILING FOR STAIRS TO BASEMENT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  14. 5. SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST ELEVATIONS, SOUTH PORTAL, SHOWING BOX ENCLOSING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST ELEVATIONS, SOUTH PORTAL, SHOWING BOX ENCLOSING VALVES. VIEW TO NORTH. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  15. 12. ENCLOSED SLEEPING PORCH INTERIOR DETAIL SHOWING PULLDOWN STAIRCASE TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. ENCLOSED SLEEPING PORCH INTERIOR DETAIL SHOWING PULL-DOWN STAIRCASE TO ATTIC. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Big Creek Hydroelectric System, Big Creek Town, Operator House, Orchard Avenue south of Huntington Lake Road, Big Creek, Fresno County, CA

  16. 12. INTERIOR OF NORTH END ENCLOSED SCREEN PORCH. DOUBLE FRENCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR OF NORTH END ENCLOSED SCREEN PORCH. DOUBLE FRENCH DOORS LEAD TO BEDROOM #3. VIEW TO EAST. - Big Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse 8, Operator Cottage, Big Creek, Big Creek, Fresno County, CA

  17. Interior of exercise room created by enclosing former dance floor. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of exercise room created by enclosing former dance floor. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bloch Recreation Center & Arena, Between Center Drive & North Road near Nimitz Gate, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. 17. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM ELEVATOR TO 18-FOOT LOCK, LOOKING EAST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  19. 18. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM 50-FOOT LOCK TO ELEVATOR, LOOKING WEST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  20. 6. VIEW OF UTILITY TUNNEL, DRYDOCK NO., 4 (CAGE ENCLOSES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF UTILITY TUNNEL, DRYDOCK NO., 4 (CAGE ENCLOSES ACCESS TO SEWAGE PIT) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Dry Dock No. 4, West of State Route 92, West of Nimitz Gate, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. Kitchen, view to northnortheast. Window looks out on enclosed east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Kitchen, view to north-northeast. Window looks out on enclosed east porch. Door at left leads to mud room, with laundry beyond that. - Drew-Sherwood Farm, House, 7927 Elk Grove Boulevard, Elk Grove, Sacramento County, CA

  2. Facility No. 201, view of enclosed loggia (now a study) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. 201, view of enclosed loggia (now a study) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Marine Corps Officers' Quarters, Russell Avenue, between Central Avenue and Salvor Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. An Overview of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility and the Research Performed in the MSG on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie; Flores, Ginger N.

    2009-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS) designed for investigation handling. The MSG has been operating on the ISS since July 2002 and is currently located in the Columbus Laboratory Module. The unique design of the facility allows it to accommodate science and technology investigations in a workbench type environment. The facility has an enclosed working volume that is held at a negative pressure with respect to the crew living area. This allows the facility to provide two levels of containment for small parts, particulates, fluids, and gases. This containment approach protects the crew from possible hazardous operations that take place inside the MSG work volume. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter enclosed work space, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, +/- 12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. These capabilities make the MSG one of the most utilized facilities on ISS. In fact, the MSG has been used for over 5000 hours of scientific payload operations. MSG investigations involve research in cryogenic fluid management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, plant growth, and life support technologies. MSG is an ideal platform for science investigations and research required to advance the technology readiness levels (TRLs) applicable to the Constellation Program. This paper will provide an overview of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG, an overview of future investigations currently planned for operation in the MSG, and potential applications of MSG investigations that can provide useful data to the Constellation Program. In addition, this paper will address

  4. An Overview of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility, and the Gravity-Dependent Phenomena Research Performed in the MSG on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie A.; Sheredy, William A.; Flores, Ginger

    2008-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS) designed for gravity-dependent phenomena investigation handling. The MSG has been operating in the ISS US Laboratory Module since July 2002. The MSG facility provides an enclosed working area for investigation manipulation and observation, The MSG's unique design provides two levels of containment to protect the ISS crew from hazardous operations. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter work volume, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, +/-12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. With these capabilities, the MSG is an ideal platform for research required to advance the technology readiness levels (TRL) needed for the Crew Exploration Vehicle and the Exploration Initiative. Areas of research that will benefit from investigations in the MSG include thermal management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, reaction control systems, in situ fabrication and repair, and advanced life support technologies. This paper will provide a detailed explanation of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG and an overview of investigations planning to operate in the MSG. In addition, this paper will address possible changes to the MSG utilization process that will be brought about by the transition to ISS as a National Laboratory.

  5. Requalification of the 235-F Metallograph Facility gloveboxes for use in the 773-A Pre-Processing/Re-Processing Laboratory and plutonium ``Can in Can`` demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hinds, S.; Hidlay, J.

    1997-04-16

    The proposed use for these gloveboxes are: (1) to utilize the Pu metal glovebox system for the primary containment associated with the Pre-Processing/Re-Processing Laboratory for obtaining radioactive glass compound viscometer analysis, and (2) to utilize the Pu oxide glovebox system for primary containment associated with the Pu Can in Can Demonstration for proof of principle testing specific to long term Pu immobilization and storage technology. This report presents objective evidence that supports the engineering judgment indicating the existing gloveboxes can be requalified for the proposed uses indicated above. SRS has the ability to duplicate the test parameters, with site forces, that will meet or exceed the identical acceptance criteria established to qualify the existing gloveboxes. The qualification effort will be a documented procedure using the leak test criteria characteristic of the original glovebox purchase. Two equivalent tests will be performed, one for post modification leak test acceptance and one for post installation leak test acceptance. Assurance of this approach is substantiated by thorough reviews of glovebox, leak test and weld standard guidance documents, as well as review of historical Project 3253 design and vendor information specific to the existing gloveboxes. Reuse of these gloveboxes will eliminate the need for competitive procurement of new gloveboxes.

  6. CSER 96-023: CSER for PFP glovebox HC-21A with 4.4 kilogram plutonium cans

    SciTech Connect

    Wittekind, W.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-17

    This criticality safety evaluation report addresses the criticality impact of increasing plutonium oxide content from 2.5 kg oxide storage cans to 5.0 kg oxide Pu storage cans. Glovebox HC-21A is used to move plutonium metal buttons from cans into furnace boats prior to transferring them to the muffle furnace gloveboxes. Glovebox HC-21A supports muffle furnace operations where plutonium buttons are burned to form paw, (H/Pu < 2). The paw, is returned to glovebox HC-21A and sieved and packed into the 4.,f kg Pu cans. The plutonium mass limit is set at 7.5 kg plutonium when plutonium metal is present. The plutonium mass limit is set at 15. kg plutonium when no plutonium metal is present. Additionally, there are other requirements to assure criticality safety during this operation.

  7. CSER 98-003: criticality safety evaluation report for PFP glovebox HC-21A with button can opening

    SciTech Connect

    ERICKSON, D.G.

    1999-02-25

    Glovebox HC-21A is an enclosure where cans containing plutonium metal buttons or other plutonium bearing materials are prepared for thermal stabilization in the muffle furnaces. The Inert Atmosphere Confinement (IAC), a new feature added to Glovebox HC-21 A, allows the opening of containers suspected of containing hydrided plutonium metal. The argon atmosphere in the IAC prevents an adverse reaction between oxygen and the hydride. The hydride is then stabilized in a controlled manner to prevent glovebox over pressurization. After removal from the containers, the plutonium metal buttons or plutonium bearing materials will be placed into muffle furnace boats and then be sent to one of the muffle furnace gloveboxes for stabilization. The materials allowed to be brought into Glovebox HC-21A are limited to those with a hydrogen to fissile atom ratio (H/X) {le} 20. Glovebox HC-21A is classified as a DRY glovebox, meaning it has no internal liquid lines, and no free liquids or solutions are allowed to be introduced. The double contingency principle states that designs shall incorporate sufficient factors of safety to require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent changes in process conditions before a criticality accident is possible. This criticality safety evaluation report (CSER) shows that the operations to be performed in this glovebox are safe from a criticality standpoint. No single identified event that causes criticality controls to be lost exceeded the criticality safety limit of k{sub eff} = 0.95 (including uncertainties). Therefore, this CSER meets the requirements for a criticality analysis contained in the Hanford Site Nuclear Criticality Safety Manual, HNF-PRO-334, and meets the double contingency principle.

  8. CSER 98-003: Criticality safety evaluation report for PFP glovebox HC-21A with button can opening

    SciTech Connect

    ERICKSON, D.G.

    1999-02-23

    Glovebox HC-21A is an enclosure where cans containing plutonium metal buttons or other plutonium bearing materials are prepared for thermal stabilization in the muffle furnaces. The Inert Atmosphere Confinement (IAC), a new feature added to Glovebox HC-21A, allows the opening of containers suspected of containing hydrided plutonium metal. The argon atmosphere in the IAC prevents an adverse reaction between oxygen and the hydride. The hydride is then stabilized in a controlled manner to prevent glovebox over pressurization. After removal from the containers, the plutonium metal buttons or plutonium bearing materials will be placed into muffle furnace boats and then be sent to one of the muffle furnace gloveboxes for stabilization. The materials allowed to be brought into GloveboxHC-21 A are limited to those with a hydrogen to fissile atom ratio (H/X) {le} 20. Glovebox HC-21A is classified as a DRY glovebox, meaning it has no internal liquid lines, and no free liquids or solutions are allowed to be introduced. The double contingency principle states that designs shall incorporate sufficient factors of safety to require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent changes in process conditions before a criticality accident is possible. This criticality safety evaluation report (CSER) shows that the operations to be performed in this glovebox are safe from a criticality standpoint. No single identified event that causes criticality controls to be lost exceeded the criticality safety limit of k{sub eff} = 0.95. Therefore, this CSER meets the requirements for a criticality analysis contained in the Hanford Site Nuclear Criticality Safety Manual, HNF-PRO-334, and meets the double contingency principle.

  9. Superfluid Couette flow in an enclosed annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Karen L.; Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2004-11-01

    The Couette configuration of a fluid contained between two rotating concentric cylinders has proved useful to test and validate the HVBK equations which govern the motion of superfluid helium II. We critically review the current understanding of the superfluid Couette problem and compare theory and experiment, distinguishing between the results obtained with infinitely long cylinders and those obtained at small aspect ratio. After discussing some issues which are still unsolved, we point to what should be fruitful directions of further investigation which can be pursued in the Couette configuration.

  10. Hygrometer for Detecting Water in Partially Enclosed Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Surma, Jan; Parks, Steve

    2005-01-01

    A portable hygrometer has been devised to implement a pre-existing technique for detecting water trapped in partially enclosed volumes that may be difficult to reach and cannot be examined directly. The technique is based on the fact that eventually the air in such a volume becomes saturated or nearly so. The technique is straightforward: One measures the relative humidity and temperature of both the ambient air and a sample of air from the enclosed volume. If the relative humidity of the sample is significantly greater than that of the ambient air and/or if the sample is at or close to the dew point, then it can be concluded that water is trapped in the volume. Of course, the success of this technique depends on the existence of an access hole through which one can withdraw some air from the enclosed volume.

  11. A new glove-box system for a high-pressure tritium pump

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, S.W.; Borree, R.J.; Chambers, D.I.; Chang, Y.; Merrill, J.T.; Souers, P.C.; Wiggins, R.K.

    1988-05-26

    A new glove-box system that was designed around a high-pressure tritium pump is described. The system incorporates new containment ideas such as ''burpler'' passive pressure controls, valves that can be turned from outside the box, inflatable door seals, ferro-fluidic motor-shaft seals, and rapid box-to-hood conversion during cryostaging. Currently under construction, the system will contain nine separate sections with automatic pressure-balancing and venting systems. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Field evaluation of ventilation system performance in enclosed parking garages

    SciTech Connect

    Ayari, A.M.; Grot, D.A.; Krarti, M.

    2000-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a field study to determine the ventilation requirements and the contaminant levels in existing enclosed parking garages. The testing was conducted in seven parking garages with different sizes, traffic flow patterns, vehicle types, and locations. In particular, the study compares the actual ventilation rates measured using the tracer gas technique with the ventilation requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62-1989. In addition, the field test evaluated the effectiveness of the existing ventilation systems in maintaining acceptable contaminant levels within enclosed parking garages.

  13. Pressure exerted on stationary enclosing structures by expansive soil

    SciTech Connect

    Sorochan, E.A.; Kim, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The influence exerted by expansive soil on a rigid stationary enclosing structure is addressed. Using numerical modeling, it is established that the wetting of a portion of the soil mass adjacent to the enclosing structure manifests itself unfavorably on the latter`s performance. Two cases of wetting should be examined as computational cases: uniform wetting from above and from a point source alongside the enclosure. The possibility of the swelling of that part of the soil mass not immediately adjacent to the structure should also be brought to attention.

  14. Comparison of enclosed space detection system with conventional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.; Baylor, V.M.; Labaj, L.E.

    1997-09-01

    Enclosed Space Detection System (ESDS) is a fast, inexpensive, and reliable device for detecting human occupants hidden in vehicles. Operation requires less than two minutes. ESDS is used to foil attempts at smuggling illegal aliens, terrorists, and escaping prisoners. It is being tested at nuclear weapons facilities and has been operated at several prisons and international border crossings. ESDS is the first practical electronic alternative to physical searches of vehicles for hidden passengers. At critical checkpoints, a thorough physical search of a single fully loaded truck requires a team of from two to six people, and may take as long as eight hours. Despite this level of security, experience has shown that the search can occasionally be foiled. Due to the enormous time and expense of thorough physical searches of vehicles, they are seldom conducted at any but the most critical of locations, simply leaving many sites vulnerable to crime and terrorism. Prior to the development of the ESDS, the only other effective alternative to physical search was the use of specially-trained canines, which can be vastly superior to the physical search in both time and accuracy. However, as discussed in this paper, canine inspection is not really a competitive substitute for ESDS because canine reliability (80% at most) is not as high as that of the ESDS (99%+), while the costs, training requirements, and operator skill needed are significantly higher with canines than with the ESDS. In addition, the ESDS has straightforward self-diagnostic tests to ensure the system is operating correctly; such tests are not currently available with either canine or human inspectors. ESDS offers an attractive supplement or alternative to meet current security requirements for vehicle searches at portals at government, nuclear, industrial, and other facilities where concealed persons may pose a threat either by entering or leaving.

  15. Improving Efficiency with 3-D Imaging: Technology Essential in Removing Plutonium Processing Equipment from Plutonium Finishing Plant Gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, Stephen H.; Kyle, Richard N.; Minette, Michael J.

    2008-09-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant at Hanford, Washington began operations in 1949 to process plutonium and plutonium products. Its primary mission was to produce plutonium metal, fabricate weapons parts, and stabilize reactive materials. These operations, and subsequent activities, were performed in remote production lines, consisting primarily of hundreds of gloveboxes. Over the years these gloveboxes and processes have been continuously modified. The plant is currently inactive and Fluor Hanford has been tasked to clean out contaminated equipment and gloveboxes from the facility so it can be demolished in the near future. Approximately 100 gloveboxes at PFP have been cleaned out in the past four years and about 90 gloveboxes remain to be cleaned out. Because specific commitment dates for this work have been established with the State of Washington and other entities, it is important to adopt work practices that increase the safety and speed of this effort. The most recent work practice to be adopted by Fluor Hanford D&D workers is the use of 3-D models to improve the efficiency of cleaning out radioactive gloveboxes at the plant. The use of 3-D models has significantly improved the work planning process by providing workers with a clear image of glovebox construction and composition, which is then used to determine cleanout methods and work sequences. The 3-D visual products enhance safety by enabling workers to more easily identify hazards and implement controls. In addition, the ability to identify and target the removal of radiological materials early in the D&D process provides substantial dose reduction for the workers.

  16. Replacement of lead-loaded glovebox glove with attenuation medium that are not RCRA-hazardous metals

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E; George, Gerald L; Dodge, Robert L; Chunglo, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Radiation shielding is commonly used to protect the glovebox worker from unintentional direct and secondary radiation exposure, while working with plutonium-238 and plutonium-239. In these environments, low-energy photons, i.e., those less than 250 keY, are encountered. Shielding glove box gloves are traditionally composed of lead-based materials, but these are now considered hazardous waste. This has prompted the development of new, nonhazardous- shielding gJovebox gloves. No studies, however, have investigated the effectiveness of these new glovebox gloves. We examined both leaded and nonhazardous- shielding glovebox gloves and compared their attenuation effectiveness over the energy range of interest at TA-55. All measurements are referenced to lead sheets, allowing direct comparisons to the common industry standard of 0.1 mm lead equivalent material. The attenuation properties of both types of glovebox gloves vary with energy, making it difficult for manufacturers to claim lead equivalency across the entire energy range used at TA-55. The positions of materials' photon energy absorption edges, which are particularly important to improved attenuation performance, depending upon the choice of radiation energy range, are discussed. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations.

  17. USING 3-D MODELING TO IMPROVE THE EFFICIENCY FOR REMOVING PLUTONIUM PROCESSING EQUIMENT FROM GLOVEBOXES AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHANG PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    CROW SH; KYLE RN; MINETTE MJ

    2008-07-15

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State began operations in 1949 to process plutonium and plutonium products. Its primary mission was to produce plutonium metal, fabricate weapons parts, and stabilize reactive materials. These operations, and subsequent activities, were performed in production lines, consisting primarily of hundreds of gloveboxes. Over the years, these gloveboxes and attendant processes have been continuously modified. The plant is currently inactive and Fluor Hanford has been tasked with cleaning out contaminated equipment and gloveboxes from the facility so it can be demolished in the near future. Approximately 100 gloveboxes at PFP have been cleaned out in the past four years and about 90 gloveboxes remain to be cleaned out. Because specific commitment dates for this work have been established with the State of Washington and other entities, it is important to adopt work practices that increase the safety and speed of this effort. The most recent work practice to be adopted by Fluor Hanford D and D workers is the use of 3-D models to make the process of cleaning out the radioactive gloveboxes more efficient. The use of 3-D models has significantly improved the work-planning process by giving workers a clear image of glovebox construction and composition, which in turn is used to determine cleanout methods and work sequences. The 3-D visual products also enhance safety by enabling workers to more easily identify hazards and implement controls. Further, the ability to identify and target the removal of radiological material early in the D and D process provides substantial dose reduction for the workers.

  18. 15. VIEW NORTHNORTHEAST OF TOW TANK No. 2, DEWATERED. ENCLOSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW NORTH-NORTHEAST OF TOW TANK No. 2, DEWATERED. ENCLOSED AREAS AT BACK OF TUNNEL IS A HOUSING FOR CONDUCTING PERFORMANCE TESTING ON AIRCRAFT MODELS IN A VORTEX. - NASA Langley Research Center, Seaplane Towing Channel, 108 Andrews Street, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  19. 126. AERIAL FORWARD VIEW OF ENCLOSED HURRICANE BOW WITH FLIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. AERIAL FORWARD VIEW OF ENCLOSED HURRICANE BOW WITH FLIGHT DECK GUN MOUNTS REMOVED AND ANGLED FLIGHT DECK. 1 OCTOBER 1956. (NATIONAL ARCHIVES NO. 80-G-1001445) - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  20. NORTH FRONT AND WEST SIDE, HIGH ENCLOSED METAL OBSERVATION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH FRONT AND WEST SIDE, HIGH ENCLOSED METAL OBSERVATION TOWER LOCATED APPROXIMATELY 1800 FEET SOUTH OF TRACK. Looking southeast - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Observation Tower, South of west end of Sled Track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 7. HOUSE SOUTH SIDE EXTERIOR SHOWING ENCLOSED SLEEPING PORCH AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. HOUSE SOUTH SIDE EXTERIOR SHOWING ENCLOSED SLEEPING PORCH AND CASEMENT WINDOW INTO ATTIC AT PEAK OF GABLE. VIEW TO NORTH. - Big Creek Hydroelectric System, Big Creek Town, Operator House, Orchard Avenue south of Huntington Lake Road, Big Creek, Fresno County, CA

  2. 46 CFR 108.181 - Ventilation for enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed spaces. 108.181 Section 108.181 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN... ventilating system. (c) Each fan in a ventilating system must have remote controls installed in...

  3. 11. INTERIOR OF WEST SIDE ENCLOSED SCREEN PORCH IN OPPOSITE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR OF WEST SIDE ENCLOSED SCREEN PORCH IN OPPOSITE VIEW FROM CA-167-A-8. DOUBLE FRENCH DOORS LEAD TO BEDROOM #2. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Big Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse 8, Operator Cottage, Big Creek, Big Creek, Fresno County, CA

  4. 3. VIEW OF CHAINVEYOR. AN ENCLOSED CHAIN CONVEYOR CONNECTED GLOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF CHAINVEYOR. AN ENCLOSED CHAIN CONVEYOR CONNECTED GLOVE BOXES WITHIN AND BETWEEN MODULAR WORK AREAS. LEADED GLOVES WERE AFFIXED TO PORTS ALONG THE CHAINVEYOR PATHWAY TO ALLOW OPERATOR ACCESS. (1/25/93) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Manufacturing Facility, North-central section of Plant, just south of Building 776/777, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  5. 9. EXTERIOR OF ENCLOSED PORTION OF SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. EXTERIOR OF ENCLOSED PORTION OF SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT ENTRYWAY SHOWING STAIR LANDING AND OPEN FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY PAIRED 4-LIGHT OVER 4-LIGHT DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAME WINDOWS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  6. DETAIL OF THE PARTIAL HEIGHT GRAPESTAKE FENCING WHICH ENCLOSES THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE PARTIAL HEIGHT GRAPESTAKE FENCING WHICH ENCLOSES THE LAUNDRY AREA IN THE CARPORT. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 2, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. ENCLOSING WALL NORTH OF MAIN GATE, WITH (LEFT TO RIGHT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ENCLOSING WALL NORTH OF MAIN GATE, WITH (LEFT TO RIGHT) BIVOUAC OF THE DEAD PLAQUE, FLORAL REGULATIONS SIGN, GENERAL ORDER 80 PLAQUE AND CEMETERY ACT PLAQUE IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO EAST. - Culpeper National Cemetery, 305 U.S. Avenue, Culpeper, Culpeper County, VA

  8. DETAILED VIEW OF PARTIALLY ENCLOSED LANAI AT THE FRONT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAILED VIEW OF PARTIALLY ENCLOSED LANAI AT THE FRONT OF THE HOUSE - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Three-Bedroom Single-Family Type 7, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Kitchen, view to south. Door at left enters from enclosed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Kitchen, view to south. Door at left enters from enclosed east porch. Dining room visible through open door at center, with door to living room visible in background. Kitchen is highly altered. - Drew-Sherwood Farm, House, 7927 Elk Grove Boulevard, Elk Grove, Sacramento County, CA

  10. Interior view of the enclosed area, note the twolightover singlepanel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of the enclosed area, note the two-light-over single-panel door to the main warehouse area, view facing northeast - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Interior view of the window wall of the enclosed office ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of the window wall of the enclosed office area taken from the main warehouse area showing the metal sash windows, view facing west - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  12. PARTIAL VIEW OF NORTH SIDE, SHOWING ENCLOSED CONVEYOR AND ABANDONED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PARTIAL VIEW OF NORTH SIDE, SHOWING ENCLOSED CONVEYOR AND ABANDONED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE TO THE FORMER THIRD FLOOR. VIEW FACING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Aviation Storehouse, Vincennes Avenue at Simms Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF ENCLOSED CONVEYOR TO CARRY FINE ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF ENCLOSED CONVEYOR TO CARRY FINE ORE UP TO BIN IN THE TALLEST BUILDING. THE MULTI-WINDOWED PORTION OF BUILDING WITH "MILL TOUR" SIGN HOUSES THE MAINTENANCE SHOP. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  14. Case histories of building material problems caused by condensation at an enclosed swimming pool and an enclosed ice rink

    SciTech Connect

    VanGeem, M.G.; Farahmandpour, K.; Gajda, J.

    1999-07-01

    Enclosed swimming pools and ice rinks in winter climates have the potential for high indoor relative humidities and cold building materials. These elements can contribute to condensation and premature deterioration of building materials. Case histories are provided for an enclosed swimming pool and an enclosed ice rink with condensation problems. An evaluation was performed after roof leaks were reported at a recently constructed indoor swimming pool in a Chicago suburb. After a preliminary inspection, it was evident that the reported leaks were related to building moisture problems rather than a roof leak. Exterior brick masonry exhibited heavy efflorescence in the area of the swimming pools, and water streaks were visible on the exterior walls below the eaves. The evaluation included laboratory testing, a visual inspection, field tests and measurements, and analyses for condensation potential. Results of the evaluation indicated the presence of condensed moisture as a direct cause of the observed water stains, and masonry efflorescence. Recommended corrective actions developed. A 54-year-old enclosed ice rink in New England was under investigation to determine the cause of a deteriorated wood deck roof. The building did not have dehumidification or air handling systems, and was heated only when occupied. The evaluation included visual inspection and analyses for condensation potential. Results of the evaluation indicated condensation within the wood decking and insulation during winter months, and high relative humidities that prohibited drying during the spring, summer, and fall. These conditions, over an extended number of years, resulted in decay of the wood decking.

  15. Effective strategies of collective evacuation from an enclosed space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Yan-Yan

    2015-06-01

    On the basis of fundamental principles of the Vicsek model and the leader-follower model, we develop an extended evacuation model of self-propelled particles system considering movable exits, and then propose effective strategies of self-organization evacuating from an enclosed space. It is found that placing exits in the corner is an effective strategy for evacuation via simulations. Furthermore, increasing the intensity of exit sign takes only effect in some extent. In addition, multi exits will make the evacuation more slowly. In general, one corner exit is the best choice for collective evacuation. Our results provide new insights into designing a safe passage in some enclosed places, such as the cinema and conference halls.

  16. CSER 00-003 Criticality Safety Evaluation report for PFP Magnesium Hydroxide Precipitation Process for Plutonium Stabilization Glovebox 3

    SciTech Connect

    LAN, J.S.

    2000-07-13

    This Criticality Safety Evaluation Report analyzes the stabilization of plutonium/uranium solutions in Glovebox 3 using the magnesium hydroxide precipitation process at PFP. The process covered are the receipt of diluted plutonium solutions into three precipitation tanks, the precipitation of plutonium from the solution, the filtering of the plutonium precipitate from the solution, the scraping of the precipitate from the filter into boats, and the initial drying of the precipitated slurry on a hot plate. A batch (up to 2.5 kg) is brought into the glovebox as plutonium nitrate, processed, and is then removed in boats for further processing. This CSER establishes limits for the magnesium hydroxide precipitation process in Glovebox 3 to maintain criticality safety while handling fissionable material.

  17. 63. VIEW OF AUTOTRANSFERS. THE ACTUAL AUTOTRANSFERS ARE ENCLOSED IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW OF AUTOTRANSFERS. THE ACTUAL AUTOTRANSFERS ARE ENCLOSED IN THE OIL FILLED CYLINDERS ON THE RIGHT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THESE ELECTRICAL DEVICES BOOSTED THE GENERATOR OUTPUT OF 11,000 VOLTS TO 22,000 VOLTS PRIOR TO TRANSMISSION OUT TO THE MAIN FEEDER LINES. A SPARE INNER UNIT IS CONTAINED IN THE METAL BOX AT THE LEFT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  18. 46 CFR 42.30-30 - Enclosed seas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Enclosed seas. 42.30-30 Section 42.30-30 Shipping COAST...: December 16 to March 15. Summer: March 16 to December 15. (d) Sea of Japan. This sea south of the parallel... at latitude 38° N. to the west coast of Hokkaido, Japan, at latitude 43°12′ N., is a Winter...

  19. Acoustic firearm discharge detection and classification in an enclosed environment.

    PubMed

    Luzi, Lorenzo; Gonzalez, Eric; Bruillard, Paul; Prowant, Matthew; Skorpik, James; Hughes, Michael; Child, Scott; Kist, Duane; McCarthy, John E

    2016-05-01

    Two different signal processing algorithms are described for detection and classification of acoustic signals generated by firearm discharges in small enclosed spaces. The first is based on the logarithm of the signal energy. The second is a joint entropy. The current study indicates that a system using both signal energy and joint entropy would be able to both detect weapon discharges and classify weapon type, in small spaces, with high statistical certainty. PMID:27250165

  20. Glovebox design requirements for molten salt oxidation processing of transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.B.; Acosta, S.V.; Wernly, K.D.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of potential technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated combustible waste. Molten salt oxidation (MSO) provides a method for removing greater than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible waste. Implementation of MSO processing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility will eliminate the combustible matrix from {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste and consequently reduce the cost of TRU waste disposal operations at LANL. The glovebox design requirements for unit operations including size reduction and MSO processing will be presented.

  1. HOLDUP MEASUREMENTS FOR THREE VISUAL EXAMINATION AND TRU REMEDIATION GLOVEBOX FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R; Donald Pak, D

    2007-05-04

    Visual Examination (VE) gloveboxes are used to remediate transuranic waste (TRU) drums at three separate facilities at the Savannah River Site. Noncompliant items are removed before the drums undergo further characterization in preparation for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Maintaining the flow of drums through the remediation process is critical to the program's seven-days-per-week operation. Conservative assumptions are used to ensure that glovebox contamination from this continual operation is below acceptable limits. Holdup measurements using cooled HPGe spectrometers are performed in order to confirm that these assumptions are conservative. {sup 239}Pu is the main nuclide of interest; however, {sup 241}Pu, equilibrium {sup 237}Np/{sup 233}Pa and {sup 238}Pu (if detected) are typically assayed. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) facility {sup 243,244,245}Cm are also generally observed and are always reported at either finite levels or at limits of detection. A complete assay at each of the three facilities includes a measure of TRU content in the gloveboxes and HEPA filters in the glovebox exhaust. This paper includes a description of the {gamma}-PHA acquisitions, of the modeling, and of the calculations of nuclide content. Because each of the remediation facilities is unique and ergonomically unfavorable to {gamma}-ray acquisitions, we have constructed custom detector support devices specific to each set of acquisitions. This paper includes a description and photographs of these custom devices. The description of modeling and calculations include determination and application of container and matrix photon energy dependent absorption factors and also determination and application of geometry factors relative to our detector calibration geometry. The paper also includes a discussion of our measurements accuracy using off-line assays of two SRNL HEPA filters. The comparison includes assay of the filters inside of 55-gallon

  2. In-Situ Leak Testing And Replacement Of Glovebox Isolator, Or Containment Unit Gloves

    DOEpatents

    Castro, Julio M.; Macdonald, John M.; Steckle, Jr., Warren P.

    2004-11-02

    A test plug for in-situ testing a glove installed in a glovebox is provided that uses a top plate and a base plate, and a diametrically expandable sealing mechanism fitting between the two plates. The sealing mechanism engages the base plate to diametrically expand when the variable distance between the top plate and the bottom plate is reduced. An inlet valve included on the top plate is used to introducing a pressurized gas to the interior of the glove, and a pressure gauge located on the top plate is used to monitor the interior glove pressure.

  3. An Overview of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility and the Research Performed in the MSG on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Lee P.

    2013-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS) designed for investigation handling. The MSG was built by the European Space Agency (ESA) which also provides sustaining engineering support for the facility. The MSG has been operating on the ISS since July 2002 and is currently located in the US Laboratory Module. The unique design of the facility allows it to accommodate science and technology investigations in a "workbench" type environment. The facility has an enclosed working volume that is held at a negative pressure with respect to the crew living area. This allows the facility to provide two levels of containment for small parts, particulates, fluids, and gases. This containment approach protects the crew from possible hazardous operations that take place inside the MSG work volume. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter enclosed work space, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, +/- 12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. These capabilities make the MSG one of the most utilized facilities on ISS. The MSG has been used for over 14500 hours of scientific payload operations. MSG investigations involve research in cryogenic fluid management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, plant growth, and life support technology. The MSG facility is operated by the Payloads Operations Integration Center at Marshall Space flight Center. Payloads may also operate remotely from different telescience centers located in the United States and Europe. The investigative Payload Integration Manager (iPIM) is the focal to assist organizations that have payloads operating in the MSG facility. NASA provides an MSG engineering unit for payload developers

  4. Summary of stationary and personal air sampling measurements made during a plutonium glovebox decommissioning project.

    SciTech Connect

    Munyon, W. J.; Lee, M. B.

    2002-02-01

    Workplace air sampling was performed during the decommissioning of a previously active plutonium glovebox facility located at Argonne National Laboratory. Personal air samplers (PAS) were used to measure breathing zone activity concentrations of workers engaged in size-reducing contaminated gloveboxes. Stationary air samplers (SAS) were used to measure the work area activity concentrations and test their application in providing representative sampling of breathing zone activity concentrations. The relative response of these samplers (PAS:SAS) was tracked during the course of the decommissioning work, with results yielding favorable agreement to within a factor of {+-}5. A cascade impactor was used to determine the particle size distribution of workplace aerosols. The average activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was estimated to be 3.0 {mu}m, with a corresponding geometric standard deviation of 2.4. A gas-flow proportional counter was utilized to measure the gross alpha activity collected on both the SAS glass fiber and the PAS cellulose fiber filters. A subset of this filter group was subsequently analyzed using an alpha spectrometer post radiochemical processing and isotopic separation. The quantity of alpha activity measured on the SAS filters was generally within {+-}30% of the alpha spectrometry measurements. However, measurements made of the activity present on the PAS cellulose fiber filters were consistently underestimated using a gas-flow proportional counter, suggesting a small correction factor of 15-20% to account for the absorption of alpha particle emissions.

  5. A two-dimensional point-kernel model for dose calculations in a glovebox array

    SciTech Connect

    Kornreich, D.E.; Dooley, D.E.

    1999-06-01

    An associated paper details a model of a room containing gloveboxes using the industry standard dose equivalent (dose) estimation tool MCNP. Such tools provide an excellent means for obtaining relatively reliable estimates of radiation transport in a complicated geometric structure. However, creating the input deck that models the complicated geometry is equally complicated. Therefore, an alternative tool is desirable that provides reasonable accurate dose estimates in complicated geometries for use in engineering-scale dose analyses. In the past, several tools that use the point-kernel model for estimating doses equivalent have been constructed (those referenced are only a small sample of similar tools). This new tool, the Photon and Neutron Dose Equivalent Model Of Nuclear materials Integrated with an Uncomplicated geometry Model (PANDEMONIUM), combines point-kernel and diffusion theory calculation routines with a simple geometry construction tool. PANDEMONIUM uses Visio{trademark} to draw a glovebox array in the room, including hydrogenous shields, sources and detectors. This simplification in geometric rendering limits the tool to two-dimensional geometries (and one-dimensional particle transport calculations).

  6. Design and fabrication of a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process radioactive bench-scale system

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlquist, D.R.

    1996-07-01

    This paper presents some of the design considerations and fabrication techniques for building a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) radioactive bench-scale system. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system uses a plasma torch to process a variety of radioactive materials into a final vitrified waste form. The processed waste will contain plutonium and trace amounts of other radioactive materials. The glovebox used in this system is located directly below the plasma chamber and is called the Hearth Handling Enclosure (HHE). The HHE is designed to maintain a confinement boundary between the processed waste and the operator. Operations that take place inside the HHE include raising and lowering the hearth using a hydraulic lift table, transporting the hearth within the HHE using an overhead monorail and hoist system, sampling and disassembly of the processed waste and hearth, weighing the hearth, rebuilding a hearth, and sampling HEPA filters. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system is located at the TREAT facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  7. Robotic Sample Manipulator for Handling Astromaterials Inside the Geolab Microgravity Glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Mary S.; Calaway, M. J.; Evans, C. A.; Li,Z.; Tong, S.; Zhong, Y.; Dahiwala, R.; Wang, L.; Porter, F.

    2013-01-01

    Future human and robotic sample return missions will require isolation containment systems with strict protocols and procedures for reducing inorganic and organic contamination. Robotic handling and manipulation of astromaterials may be required for preliminary examination inside such an isolation containment system. In addition, examination of astromaterials in microgravity will require constant contact to secure samples during manipulation. The National Space Grant Foundation exploration habitat (XHab) academic innovative challenge 2012 administered through the NASA advanced exploration systems (AES) deep space habitat (DSH) project awarded funding to the University of Bridgeport team to develop an engineering design for tools to facilitate holding and handling geological samples for analysis in a microgravity glovebox environment. The Bridgeport XHab team developed a robotic arm system with a three-finger gripper that could manipulate geologic samples within the existing GeoLab glovebox integrated into NASA's DSH called the GeoLab Robotic Sample Manipulator (see fig. 1 and 2). This hardware was deployed and tested during the 2012 DSH mission operations tests [1].

  8. Summary of stationary and personal air sampling measurements made during a plutonium glovebox decommissioning project.

    PubMed

    Munyon, W J; Lee, M B

    2002-02-01

    Workplace air sampling was performed during the decommissioning of a previously active plutonium glovebox facility located at Argonne National Laboratory. Personal air samplers (PAS) were used to measure breathing zone activity concentrations of workers engaged in size-reducing contaminated gloveboxes. Stationary air samplers (SAS) were used to measure the work area activity concentrations and test their application in providing representative sampling of breathing zone activity concentrations. The relative response of these samplers (PAS:SAS) was tracked during the course of the decommissioning work, with results yielding favorable agreement to within a factor of +/-5. A cascade impactor was used to determine the particle size distribution of workplace aerosols. The average activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was estimated to be 3.0 microm, with a corresponding geometric standard deviation of 2.4. A gas-flow proportional counter was utilized to measure the gross alpha activity collected on both the SAS glass fiber and the PAS cellulose fiber filters. A subset of this filter group was subsequently analyzed using an alpha spectrometer post radiochemical processing and isotopic separation. The quantity of alpha activity measured on the SAS filters was generally within +/-30% of the alpha spectrometry measurements. However, measurements made of the activity present on the PAS cellulose fiber filters were consistently underestimated using a gas-flow proportional counter, suggesting a small correction factor of 15-20% to account for the absorption of alpha particle emissions.

  9. Seismic structural analysis of a glovebox by the equivalent static method

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, B.J.

    1994-06-01

    Seismic strength evaluation of equipment requires efficient and accurate methods. Such an evaluation generally calls for dynamic analysis requiring detailed accelerations and advanced mathematical modeling. The analysis may be tedious, but in theory works for any structure with any boundary conditions. Many equipment do not justify such expansive and expensive evaluation; hence, efficient and inexpensive, but may be more conservative, methods of analysis are used instead. The equivalent static method (ESM) is such a method. Being a static method, the ESM can not be directly applied to equipment that are not simply anchored to or only rest on the ground. In this paper, we show how a glovebox with ambiguous anchorage conditions is analyzed by the ESM when subjected to the seismic load. Also outlined are the retrofits to increase its seismic resistance. The recommendations include fixing the legs to the floor and using inclined braces. The use of braces is effective in resisting the lateral seismic. It redistributes the seismic-generated moment and force in a more benign way. It also significantly stiffens the glovobox`s supporting table structure, thus raising the vibration frequency of the table away from the high-energy range of the seismic load and drastically reduces the displacement of the glovebox.

  10. Strategy for decommissioning of the glove-boxes in the Belgonucleaire Dessel MOX fuel fabrication plant

    SciTech Connect

    Vandergheynst, Alain; Cuchet, Jean-Marie

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: BELGONUCLEAIRE has been operating the Dessel plant from the mid-80's at industrial scale. In this period, over 35 metric tons of plutonium (HM) was processed into almost 100 reloads of MOX fuel for commercial West-European Light Water Reactors. In late 2005, the decision was made to stop the production because of the shortage of MOX fuel market remaining accessible to BELGONUCLEAIRE after the successive capacity increases of the MELOX plant (France) and the commissioning of the SMP plant (UK). As a significant part of the decommissioning project of this Dessel plant, about 170 medium-sized glove-boxes are planned for dismantling. In this paper, after having reviewed the different specifications of {+-}-contaminated waste in Belgium, the authors introduce the different options considered for cleaning, size reduction and packaging of the glove-boxes, and the main decision criteria (process, {alpha}-containment, mechanization and radiation protection, safety aspects, generation of secondary waste, etc) are analyzed. The selected strategy consists in using cold cutting techniques and manual operation in shielded disposable glove-tents, and packaging {alpha}-waste in 200-liter drums for off-site conditioning and intermediate disposal. (authors)

  11. 46 CFR 153.217 - Access to enclosed spaces and dedicated ballast tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to enclosed spaces and dedicated ballast tanks... and Equipment General Vessel Requirements § 153.217 Access to enclosed spaces and dedicated ballast tanks. An access opening to an enclosed space or a dedicated ballast tank must meet the requirements...

  12. 46 CFR 153.217 - Access to enclosed spaces and dedicated ballast tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Access to enclosed spaces and dedicated ballast tanks... and Equipment General Vessel Requirements § 153.217 Access to enclosed spaces and dedicated ballast tanks. An access opening to an enclosed space or a dedicated ballast tank must meet the requirements...

  13. Thermal Stability Studies of Candidate Decontamination Agents for Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant Plutonium-Contaminated Gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, Randall D.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Jones, Susan A.; Ewalt, John R.; Compton, James A.; Trent, Donald S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2005-09-29

    This report provides the results of PNNL's and Fluor's studies of the thermal stabilities of potential wastes arising from decontamination of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant's plutonium contaminated gloveboxes. The candidate wastes arising from the decontamination technologies ceric nitrate/nitric acid, RadPro, Glygel, and Aspigel.

  14. CSER 00-008 use of PFP Glovebox HC-18BS for Storage and Transport of Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    ERICKSON, D.G.

    2000-06-01

    This CSER addresses the feasibility of increasing the allowed number of open containers and permitting the transfer and storage of fissionable material in Glovebox HC-18BS without regard to form or density (metal, oxide having an H/X {le} 20, material having unrestricted moderation and plutonium hydroxide having a plutonium density of 0.2 g/cm{sup 3}).

  15. Behavior in normal and reduced gravity of an enclosed liquid/gas system with nonuniform heating from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. D.; Schiller, D. N.; Disimile, P.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The temperature and velocity fields have been investigated for a single-phase gas system and a two-layer gas-and-liquid system enclosed in a circular cylinder being heated suddenly and nonuniformly from above. The transient response of the gas, liquid, and container walls was modelled numerically in normal and reduced gravity (10 to the -5 g). Verification of the model was accomplished via flow visualization experiments in 10 cm high by 10 cm diameter plexiglass cylinders.

  16. A human factors approach towards the design of a new glovebox glove for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Jude M.

    2012-08-06

    Present day glovebox gloves at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are underdeveloped and ergonomically inaccurate. This problem results in numerous sprain and strain injuries every year for employees who perform glovebox work. In addition to injuries, using the current glovebox glove design also contributes to breaches and contamination. The current glove used today at LANL has several problems: (1) The length of the fingers is incorrect, (2) the web spacing between the fingers is nonexistent, (3) the angles between each digit on the finger are incorrect, (4) the thumb is placed inaccurately, and (5) the length of the hand is incorrect. These problems present a need to correct the current glove design to decrease the risk of injuries, breaches, and contamination. Anthropometrics were researched to help find the best range of hand measurements to fix the current glove design. Anthropometrics is the measure of the human physical variation. Anthropometrics for this study were gathered from the American National Survey (ANSUR) data that was conducted by the U.S Army in 1988. The current glovebox glove uses anthropometrics from the 95th to 105th percentile range which is too large so the new gloves are going to implement data from a smaller range of percentile groups. The 105th percentile range represents measurements that exceed the human population but are needed to fit certain circumstance such as wearing several under gloves within the glovebox gloves. Anthropometrics used in this study include: 105th percentile measurements for joint circumference which was unchanged because the room for under gloves plus ease of hand insertion and extraction is needed, 80th percentile measurements for crotch length to allow workers to reach the web spacing in the glove, 20th percentile measurements for finger length to allow workers to reach the end of the glove, standard 10.5cm hand breadth to allow more room to accommodate under gloves, 45 degrees abduction angle for the

  17. An experimental and numerical investigation of velocity in an enclosed residential complex parking area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Khosro; Motlagh, Majid Shafie Pour; Mousavi, Monireh Sadat; Niksokhan, Mohhamad hosein; Vosoughifar, Hamid Reza

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present research is analysis of velocity vector and magnitude in an enclosed residential complex parking in Tehran. Velocity parameters are key factor and can be helpful in proposing solutions to improve indoor air quality. Since The flow pattern determines that how and where the pollutants propagate. In this research at first, the proportion of vehicular exhaust emissions is estimated and then experimental and numerical analyses are performed. In experimental analysis, a full-scale experiment of parking area has been used; velocity is measured by calibrated measuring devices. Samples were performed in several times. In order to perform numerical calculation, a 3-dimensional model was created by Fluent software that solves flow equations with finite volume method. In this research, the flow condition is assumed to be incompressible and turbulent. Standard k-ɛ scheme was selected as turbulence modeling. In the Computational Fluid Dynamics technique the geometry of parking area is generated in ICEM-CFD software and hexahedral mesh type is used. Velocity vectors and magnitudes in an enclosed residential complex parking in Tehran are estimated. The findings obtained from numerical simulation are in complete accord with experimental results.

  18. Impact of dangerous microclimate conditions within an enclosed vehicle on pediatric thermoregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Duzinski, Sarah; Null, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric vehicular hyperthermia (PVH) persists as the leading cause of non-crash, vehicle-related deaths among US children with an average of 37 children dying after being left unattended in motor vehicles each year. Our study aims to demonstrate the microclimate conditions within an enclosed vehicle that lead infants and small children to reach key physiological heat thresholds: uncompensable heating (>37 °C) and heatstroke (>40 °C) under "worst case" conditions. A modified version of the Man-Environment Heat Exchange Model was used to compute the length of time for an infant to reach these thresholds. Several different scenarios were modeled using different initial cabin air temperatures. Assuming full sun exposure and maximum heating rates, an infant may reach uncompensable heating within 5 min and experience hyperthermia anywhere from 15 to 55 min depending on the starting cabin air temperature. The rapid approach of these heat-related thresholds occurs as enclosed vehicles maximize heating and minimize cooling mechanisms, leading to net heating and increase in core body temperatures. Health experts can use this information to support public health messaging on the topic of PVH by explaining why it is important to never leave a child alone in a car and increase the public perception of severity and susceptibility to this ongoing public health issue.

  19. Combustion Research Aboard the ISS Utilizing the Combustion Integrated Rack and Microgravity Science Glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.; Otero, Angel M.; Urban, David L.

    2002-01-01

    The Physical Sciences Research Program of NASA sponsors a broad suite of peer-reviewed research investigating fundamental combustion phenomena and applied combustion research topics. This research is performed through both ground-based and on-orbit research capabilities. The International Space Station (ISS) and two facilities, the Combustion Integrated Rack and the Microgravity Science Glovebox, are key elements in the execution of microgravity combustion flight research planned for the foreseeable future. This paper reviews the Microgravity Combustion Science research planned for the International Space Station implemented from 2003 through 2012. Examples of selected research topics, expected outcomes, and potential benefits will be provided. This paper also summarizes a multi-user hardware development approach, recapping the progress made in preparing these research hardware systems. Within the description of this approach, an operational strategy is presented that illustrates how utilization of constrained ISS resources may be maximized dynamically to increase science through design decisions made during hardware development.

  20. Prediction of dose and field mapping around a shielded plutonium fuel fabrication glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Strode, J.N.; Soldat, K.L.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1984-04-25

    Westinghouse Hanford Company, as the Department of Energy's (DOE) prime contractor for the operation of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), is responsible for the development of the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) Line which is to be installed in the recently constructed Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The SAF Line will fabricate mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel pins for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at an annual throughput rate of six (6) metric tons (MT) of MOX. The SAF Line will also demonstrate the automated manufacture of fuel pins on a production-scale. This paper describes some of the techniques used to reduce personnel exposure on the SAF Line, as well as the prediction and field mapping of doses from a shielded fuel fabrication glovebox. Tables are also presented from which exposure rate estimates can be made for plutonium recovered from fuels having different isotopic compositions as a result of varied burnup.

  1. Permanent-magnet-less machine having an enclosed air gap

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2013-03-05

    A permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by an alternating current. An uncluttered rotor disposed within the magnetic rotating field is spaced apart from the stator to form an air gap relative to an axis of rotation. A stationary excitation core spaced apart from the uncluttered rotor by an axial air gap and a radial air gap substantially encloses the stationary excitation core. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include stator core gaps to reduce axial flux flow. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include an uncluttered rotor coupled to outer laminations. The quadrature-axis inductance may be increased in some synchronous systems. Some synchronous systems convert energy such as mechanical energy into electrical energy (e.g., a generator); other synchronous systems may convert any form of energy into mechanical energy (e.g., a motor).

  2. Permanent-magnet-less machine having an enclosed air gap

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2012-02-07

    A permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by an alternating current. An uncluttered rotor disposed within the magnetic rotating field is spaced apart from the stator to form an air gap relative to an axis of rotation. A stationary excitation core spaced apart from the uncluttered rotor by an axial air gap and a radial air gap substantially encloses the stationary excitation core. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include stator core gaps to reduce axial flux flow. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include an uncluttered rotor coupled to outer laminations. The quadrature-axis inductance may be increased in some synchronous systems. Some synchronous systems convert energy such as mechanical energy into electrical energy (e.g., a generator); other synchronous systems may convert any form of energy into mechanical energy (e.g., a motor).

  3. Quantum transport in coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum transport properties are instrumental to understanding quantum coherent transport processes. Potential applications of quantum transport are widespread, in areas ranging from quantum information science to quantum engineering, and not restricted to quantum state transfer, control and manipulation. Here, we study light transport in a ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The ring configuration, with an arbitrary number of resonators embedded, forms a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer. The influence of magnetic flux on light transport is investigated. Tuning the magnetic flux can lead to resonant transmission, while half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to completely destructive interference and transmission zeros in an interferometer with two equal arms.

  4. Calculation note for Consequences of a fire in the sorting and repackaging glovebox in room 636 of bldg 2736-ZB Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, L.E.

    1999-08-31

    This Calculation Note provides a conservative estimate of the grams of plutonium released from Building 2736-ZB of the Plutonium Finishing Plant as a result of a fire within Glovebox 636, without consideration of mitigation.

  5. D&D of a reactor, hot cells and gloveboxes - an integrated experience

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, T.J.; Fellhauer, C.R.; Rose, R.W.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.

    1997-08-01

    Performing Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations at a multi-use laboratory containing small sites which run the gamut of nuclear facility types within the DOE Complex provides engaging challenges, as well as many unique opportunities. While the relatively small scale of the D&D work performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL-E) does not present the significant environmental, safety and health risks which might be encountered at large production sites, the types of issues are representative of the most significant problems. Being a small site with relatively low risks and an exceptional rapport with local stakeholders provides for the development and demonstration of technologies and methodologies which could be utilized at the larger sites.

  6. Spicules and the Effect of Rigid Rods on Enclosing Membrane Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, D. R.; Turner, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    Membrane tubes (spicules) arise in cells, or artificial membranes, in the nonlinear deformation regime due to, e.g., the growth of microtubules, actin filaments, or sickle hemoglobin fibers towards a membrane. We calculate the axial force f exerted by the tube, and its average radius, taking into account steric interactions between the fluctuating membrane and the enclosed rod. We find a smooth crossover of the axial force between ftilde σ and ftilde σ as the membrane tension σ increases and the tube radius shrinks. This crossover occurs around the most physiologically relevant membrane tensions. Our work may be important in (i) interpreting experiments in which axial force is related to the tube radius or membrane tension, and (ii) constructing dynamical theories for biopolymer growth in narrow tubes where these fluctuation effects control the tube radius.

  7. Numerical Simulation And Experimental Investigation Of The Lift-Off And Blowout Of Enclosed Laminar Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venuturmilli, Rajasekhar; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Lea-Der

    2003-01-01

    Enclosed flames are found in many industrial applications such as power plants, gas-turbine combustors and jet engine afterburners. A better understanding of the burner stability limits can lead to development of combustion systems that extend the lean and rich limits of combustor operations. This paper reports a fundamental study of the stability limits of co-flow laminar jet diffusion flames. A numerical study was conducted that used an adaptive mesh refinement scheme in the calculation. Experiments were conducted in two test rigs with two different fuels and diluted with three inert species. The numerical stability limits were compared with microgravity experimental data. Additional normal-gravity experimental results were also presented.

  8. Integrated Positioning for Coal Mining Machinery in Enclosed Underground Mine Based on SINS/WSN

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Jing; Wu, Lei; Yan, Wenxu; Zhou, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    To realize dynamic positioning of the shearer, a new method based on SINS/WSN is studied in this paper. Firstly, the shearer movement model is built and running regularity of the shearer in coal mining face has been mastered. Secondly, as external calibration of SINS using GPS is infeasible in enclosed underground mine, WSN positioning strategy is proposed to eliminate accumulative error produced by SINS; then the corresponding coupling model is established. Finally, positioning performance is analyzed by simulation and experiment. Results show that attitude angle and position of the shearer can be real-timely tracked by integrated positioning strategy based on SINS/WSN, and positioning precision meet the demand of actual working condition. PMID:24574891

  9. Integrated positioning for coal mining machinery in enclosed underground mine based on SINS/WSN.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qigao; Li, Wei; Hui, Jing; Wu, Lei; Yu, Zhenzhong; Yan, Wenxu; Zhou, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    To realize dynamic positioning of the shearer, a new method based on SINS/WSN is studied in this paper. Firstly, the shearer movement model is built and running regularity of the shearer in coal mining face has been mastered. Secondly, as external calibration of SINS using GPS is infeasible in enclosed underground mine, WSN positioning strategy is proposed to eliminate accumulative error produced by SINS; then the corresponding coupling model is established. Finally, positioning performance is analyzed by simulation and experiment. Results show that attitude angle and position of the shearer can be real-timely tracked by integrated positioning strategy based on SINS/WSN, and positioning precision meet the demand of actual working condition.

  10. Implementation of a spark plasma sintering facility in a hermetic glovebox for compaction of toxic, radiotoxic, and air sensitive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tyrpekl, V. E-mail: vaclav.tyrpekl@gmail.com; Berkmann, C.; Holzhäuser, M.; Köpp, F.; Cologna, M.; Somers, J.; Wangle, T.

    2015-02-15

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is a rapidly developing method for densification of powders into compacts. It belongs to the so-called “field assisted sintering techniques” that enable rapid sintering at much lower temperatures than the classical approaches of pressureless sintering of green pellets or hot isostatic pressing. In this paper, we report the successful integration of a SPS device into a hermetic glovebox for the handling of highly radioactive material containing radioisotopes of U, Th, Pu, Np, and Am. The glovebox implantation has been facilitated by the replacement of the hydraulic system to apply pressure with a compact electromechanical unit. The facility has been successfully tested using UO{sub 2} powder. Pellets with 97% of the theoretical density were obtained at 1000 °C for 5 min, significantly lower than the ∼1600 °C for 5-10 h used in conventional pellet sintering.

  11. Implementation of a spark plasma sintering facility in a hermetic glovebox for compaction of toxic, radiotoxic, and air sensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrpekl, V.; Berkmann, C.; Holzhäuser, M.; Köpp, F.; Cologna, M.; Wangle, T.; Somers, J.

    2015-02-01

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is a rapidly developing method for densification of powders into compacts. It belongs to the so-called "field assisted sintering techniques" that enable rapid sintering at much lower temperatures than the classical approaches of pressureless sintering of green pellets or hot isostatic pressing. In this paper, we report the successful integration of a SPS device into a hermetic glovebox for the handling of highly radioactive material containing radioisotopes of U, Th, Pu, Np, and Am. The glovebox implantation has been facilitated by the replacement of the hydraulic system to apply pressure with a compact electromechanical unit. The facility has been successfully tested using UO2 powder. Pellets with 97% of the theoretical density were obtained at 1000 °C for 5 min, significantly lower than the ˜1600 °C for 5-10 h used in conventional pellet sintering.

  12. Automation of Command and Data Entry in a Glovebox Work Volume: An Evaluation of Data Entry Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Marianne K.; Nakamura, Gail; Havens, Cindy; LeMay, Moira

    1996-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the human-computer interface for data entry while performing experimental procedures within a glovebox work volume in order to make a recommendation to the Space Station Biological Research Project for a data entry system to be used within the Life Sciences Glovebox. Test subjects entered data using either a manual keypad, similar to a standard computer numerical keypad located within the glovebox work volume, or a voice input system using a speech recognition program with a microphone headset. Numerical input and commands were programmed in an identical manner between the two systems. With both electronic systems, a small trackball was available within the work volume for cursor control. Data, such as sample vial identification numbers, sample tissue weights, and health check parameters of the specimen, were entered directly into procedures that were electronically displayed on a video monitor within the glovebox. A pen and paper system with a 'flip-chart' format for procedure display, similar to that currently in use on the Space Shuttle, was used as a baseline data entry condition. Procedures were performed by a single operator; eight test subjects were used in the study. The electronic systems were tested under both a 'nominal' or 'anomalous' condition. The anomalous condition was introduced into the experimental procedure to increase the probability of finding limitations or problems with human interactions with the electronic systems. Each subject performed five test runs during a test day: two procedures each with voice and keypad, one with and one without anomalies, and one pen and paper procedure. The data collected were both quantitative (times, errors) and qualitative (subjective ratings of the subjects).

  13. Numerical study of conjugate transient solidification in an enclosed region

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanath, R.; Jaluria, Y.

    1995-05-01

    Solidification in an enclosed space is investigated, considering conduction in the mold wall. This gives rise to a conjugate, transient problem, with the flow in the liquid driven by thermal buoyancy. An enthalpy formulation is used for the energy equation, with a porous medium approximation for the region undergoing phase change. The governing equations are solved using primitive variables in the physical space. The control volume approach is employed to discretize the equations. The numerical simulation of the phase change process is discussed in detail. The mold is subjected to different thermal conditions at the outer surface, and the effect of these on the shape of the solid-liquid interface, rate of solid formation, and rate of heat transfer quantified. Streamlines, isotherms, and velocity profiles are also obtained. The conditions under which natural convection in the melt can be neglected are investigated. The effects of important design parameters such as the mold material and width, aspect ratio of the cavity, and heat removal rate from the mold are considered in detail. A comparison is made of the important characteristics between the conjugate and nonconjugate cases. The differences in the numerical simulation of these two cases are investigated. Of particular interest are the temperature distributions that arise in the liquid, solid, and mold. It is shown that conjugate transport must be included for a realistic simulation of practical problems.

  14. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.

    2014-11-20

    A protostellar jet and outflow are calculated for ∼270 yr following the protostar formation using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation, in which both the protostar and its parent cloud are spatially resolved. A high-velocity (∼100 km s{sup –1}) jet with good collimation is driven near the disk's inner edge, while a low-velocity (≲ 10 km s{sup –1}) outflow with a wide opening angle appears in the outer-disk region. The high-velocity jet propagates into the low-velocity outflow, forming a nested velocity structure in which a narrow high-velocity flow is enclosed by a wide low-velocity flow. The low-velocity outflow is in a nearly steady state, while the high-velocity jet appears intermittently. The time-variability of the jet is related to the episodic accretion from the disk onto the protostar, which is caused by gravitational instability and magnetic effects such as magnetic braking and magnetorotational instability. Although the high-velocity jet has a large kinetic energy, the mass and momentum of the jet are much smaller than those of the low-velocity outflow. A large fraction of the infalling gas is ejected by the low-velocity outflow. Thus, the low-velocity outflow actually has a more significant effect than the high-velocity jet in the very early phase of the star formation.

  15. A Glove Box Enclosed Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding System

    SciTech Connect

    Reevr, E, M; Robino, C.V.

    1999-07-01

    This report describes an inert atmosphere enclosed gas-tungsten arc welding system which has been assembled in support of the MC2730, MC2730A and MC 3500 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Enhanced Surveillance Program. One goal of this program is to fabricate welds with microstructures and impurity levels which are similar to production heat source welds previously produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mound Facility. These welds will subsequently be used for high temperature creep testing as part of the overall component lifetime assessment. In order to maximize the utility of the welding system, means for local control of the arc atmosphere have been incorporated and a wide range of welding environments can easily be evaluated. The gas-tungsten arc welding system used in the assembly is computer controlled, includes two-axis and rotary motion, and can be operated in either continuous or pulsed modes. The system can therefore be used for detailed research studies of welding impurity effects, development of prototype weld schedules, or to mimic a significant range of production-like welding conditions. Fixturing for fabrication of high temperature creep test samples have been designed and constructed, and weld schedules for grip-tab and test welds have been developed. The microstructure of these welds have been evaluated and are consistent with those used during RTG production.

  16. Soft tissue decomposition of submerged, dismembered pig limbs enclosed in plastic bags.

    PubMed

    Pakosh, Caitlin M; Rogers, Tracy L

    2009-11-01

    This study examines underwater soft tissue decomposition of dismembered pig limbs deposited in polyethylene plastic bags. The research evaluates the level of influence that disposal method has on underwater decomposition processes and details observations specific to this scenario. To our knowledge, no other study has yet investigated decomposing, dismembered, and enclosed remains in water environments. The total sample size consisted of 120 dismembered pig limbs, divided into a subsample of 30 pig limbs per recovery period (34 and 71 days) for each treatment. The two treatments simulated non-enclosed and plastic enclosed disposal methods in a water context. The remains were completely submerged in Lake Ontario for 34 and 71 days. In both recovery periods, the non-enclosed samples lost soft tissue to a significantly greater extent than their plastic enclosed counterparts. Disposal of remains in plastic bags therefore results in preservation, most likely caused by bacterial inhibition and reduced oxygen levels.

  17. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhilin; Chang, Ruiming; Mu, Long; Song, Guoyang; Wang, Heyi; Wu, Guanyin; Wei, Xiye

    2010-07-01

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of beta particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7x10(5) Bq/m(3).

  18. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Chang, Ruiming; Mu, Long; Song, Guoyang; Wang, Heyi; Wu, Guanyin; Wei, Xiye

    2010-07-01

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of β particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7×105 Bq/m3.

  19. Evaluation of Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) and Multi-Purpose Crew Restraint Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban

    2005-01-01

    Within the scope of the Multi-purpose Crew Restraints for Long Duration Spaceflights project, funded by Code U, it was proposed to conduct a series of evaluations on the ground and on the KC-135 to investigate the human factors issues concerning confined/unique workstations, such as the design of crew restraints. The usability of multiple crew restraints was evaluated for use with the Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) and for performing general purpose tasks. The purpose of the KC-135 microgravity evaluation was to: (1) to investigate the usability and effectiveness of the concepts developed, (2) to gather recommendations for further development of the concepts, and (3) to verify the validity of the existing requirements. Some designs had already been tested during a March KC-135 evaluation, and testing revealed the need for modifications/enhancements. This flight was designed to test the new iterations, as well as some new concepts. This flight also involved higher fidelity tasks in the LSG, and the addition of load cells on the gloveports.

  20. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhilin; Chang Ruiming; Mu Long; Song Guoyang; Wang Heyi; Wu Guanyin; Wei Xiye

    2010-07-15

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of {beta} particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7x10{sup 5} Bq/m{sup 3}.

  1. Comparison of photovoltaic cell temperatures in modules operating with exposed and enclosed back surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.; Simon, F. F.

    1981-01-01

    Four different photovoltaic module designs were tested to determine the cell temperature of each design. The cell temperatures were compared to those obtained on identical design, using the same nominal operating cell temperature (NOCT) concept. The results showed that the NOCT procedure does not apply to the enclosed configurations due to continuous transient conditions. The enclosed modules had higher cell temperatures than the open modules, and insulated modules higher than the uninsulated. The severest performance loss - when translated from cell temperatures - 17.5 % for one enclosed, insulated module as a compared to that module mounted openly.

  2. Target-enclosing control for second-order multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y. J.; Li, R.; Wei, T. T.

    2015-09-01

    This paper poses the enclosing control problem with identical geometry for a group of targets which are either stationary or moving and offers consensus-based distributed control protocols. An estimator is first introduced to estimate the central position of the targets. We then propose a target-enclosing control law with velocity information based on the centre estimating algorithm and consensus theory. A target-enclosing control law without the velocity information is further designed. The Lyapunov theory and Lasalle's invariance principle are applied to show the convergence of the proposed control algorithms. Finally, numerical simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed strategy.

  3. Crewmember working on the spacelab Zeolite Crystal Growth experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    View showing Payload Specialists Bonnie Dunbar and Larry DeLucas in the aft section of the U. S. Microgravity Laboratory-1. Dunbar is preparing to load a sample in the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) Integrated Furnace Experiment Assembly (IFEA) in rack 9 of the Microgravity Laboratory. DeLucas is checking out the multi-purpose Glovebox Facility.

  4. Utilization of polymer enclosed intermediate class arresters to improve the performance of modern power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sakich, J.D.; Lenk, D.W. ); Koepfinger, J.L. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper introduces the first commercially available polymer enclosed intermediate class metal oxide surge arrester. It describes the unique construction of the design, including reduced size, increased flexibility, a collared seal on the polymer housing and an open webbed fiberglass-epoxy module which houses the metal oxide disc elements. Performance advantages are discussed. These include improved short term contamination performance of the insulator-like polymer design when compared to multi-unit porcelain housed designs. Data will show that polymer housed open-webbed fiberglass module construction extends the pressure relief capability beyond that of typical porcelain enclosed designs. The capability of the polymer enclosed design to withstand repeated pressure relief tests, simulating system reclose on a failed arrester, is also discussed. This paper discusses the circumstances at one utility which has considered utilizing polymer enclosed intermediate class arresters to effectively upgrade their system protection capabilities.

  5. 40 CFR 65.118 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.118... control device. Process units that are enclosed in such a manner that all emissions from equipment...

  6. 40 CFR 65.118 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.118... control device. Process units that are enclosed in such a manner that all emissions from equipment...

  7. 40 CFR 65.118 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.118... control device. Process units that are enclosed in such a manner that all emissions from equipment...

  8. 40 CFR 65.118 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.118... control device. Process units that are enclosed in such a manner that all emissions from equipment...

  9. 40 CFR 65.118 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.118... control device. Process units that are enclosed in such a manner that all emissions from equipment...

  10. PIV measurement of high-Reynolds-number homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in an enclosed flow apparatus with fan agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Pecenak, Zachary K.; Cao, Lujie; Woodward, Scott H.; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Enclosed flow apparatuses with negligible mean flow are emerging as alternatives to wind tunnels for laboratory studies of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (HIT) with or without aerosol particles, especially in experimental validation of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). It is desired that these flow apparatuses generate HIT at high Taylor-microscale Reynolds numbers ({{R}λ} ) and enable accurate measurement of turbulence parameters including kinetic energy dissipation rate and thereby {{R}λ} . We have designed an enclosed, fan-driven, highly symmetric truncated-icosahedron ‘soccer ball’ airflow apparatus that enables particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and other whole-field flow measurement techniques. To minimize gravity effect on inertial particles and improve isotropy, we chose fans instead of synthetic jets as flow actuators. We developed explicit relations between {{R}λ} and physical as well as operational parameters of enclosed HIT chambers. To experimentally characterize turbulence in this near-zero-mean flow chamber, we devised a new two-scale PIV approach utilizing two independent PIV systems to obtain both high resolution and large field of view. Velocity measurement results show that turbulence in the apparatus achieved high homogeneity and isotropy in a large central region (48 mm diameter) of the chamber. From PIV-measured velocity fields, we obtained turbulence dissipation rates and thereby {{R}λ} by using the second-order velocity structure function. A maximum {{R}λ} of 384 was achieved. Furthermore, experiments confirmed that the root mean square (RMS) velocity increases linearly with fan speed, and {{R}λ} increases with the square root of fan speed. Characterizing turbulence in such apparatus paves the way for further investigation of particle dynamics in particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence.

  11. Coupling of bio-PRB and enclosed in-well aeration system for remediation of nitrobenzene and aniline in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Ding, Feng; Wang, Liu; Liu, Peng; Yu, Xiaolong; Ye, Kang

    2016-05-01

    A laboratory-scale bio-permeable reactive barrier (bio-PRB) was constructed and combined with enclosed in-well aeration system to treat nitrobenzene (NB) and aniline (AN) in groundwater. Batch-style experiments were first conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of NB and AN degradation, using suspension (free cells) of degrading consortium and immobilized consortium by a mixture of perlite and peat. The NB and AN were completely degraded in <3 days using immobilized consortium, while 3-5 days were required using free cells. The O2 supply efficiency of an enclosed in-well aeration system was assessed in a box filled with perlite and peat. Dissolved O2 (DO) concentrations increased to 8-12 mg L(-1) in 12 h for sampling ports within 12 cm of the aeration well. A diffusion coefficient as 33.5 cm(2) s(-1) was obtained. The DO concentration was >4 mg L(-1) when the aeration system was applied into the bio-PRB system. The NB and AN were effectively removed when the aeration system was functional in the bio-PRB. The removal efficiency decreased when the aeration system malfunctioned for 20 days, thus indicating that DO was an important factor for the degradation of NB and AN. The regain of NB and AN removal after the malfunction indicates the robustness of degradation consortium. No original organics and new formed by-products were observed in the effluent. The results indicate that NB and AN in groundwater can be completely mineralized in a bio-PRB equipped with enclosed in-well aeration system and filled with perlite and peat attached with degrading consortium.

  12. Scalable learning method for feedforward neural networks using minimal-enclosing-ball approximation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Deng, Zhaohong; Luo, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Yizhang; Wang, Shitong

    2016-06-01

    Training feedforward neural networks (FNNs) is one of the most critical issues in FNNs studies. However, most FNNs training methods cannot be directly applied for very large datasets because they have high computational and space complexity. In order to tackle this problem, the CCMEB (Center-Constrained Minimum Enclosing Ball) problem in hidden feature space of FNN is discussed and a novel learning algorithm called HFSR-GCVM (hidden-feature-space regression using generalized core vector machine) is developed accordingly. In HFSR-GCVM, a novel learning criterion using L2-norm penalty-based ε-insensitive function is formulated and the parameters in the hidden nodes are generated randomly independent of the training sets. Moreover, the learning of parameters in its output layer is proved equivalent to a special CCMEB problem in FNN hidden feature space. As most CCMEB approximation based machine learning algorithms, the proposed HFSR-GCVM training algorithm has the following merits: The maximal training time of the HFSR-GCVM training is linear with the size of training datasets and the maximal space consumption is independent of the size of training datasets. The experiments on regression tasks confirm the above conclusions. PMID:27049545

  13. Pallet insertion glovebox/hood control ladder diagram. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Issaian, V.

    1995-12-01

    The pallet insertion glovebox/hood (G/H) is a special confinement space that will be designed to allow for insertion of pallets into the Stacker/Retriever (S/R) area. The S/R a large vault that is kept at negative 1 inches w.c. relative to the atmosphere and is used for the safe storage of special nuclear material. The S/R system uses a vehicle to move the special nuclear material that are placed on the pallets from the storage bins to input/output (I/O) stations and vice versa. As the name suggest the I/O stations are used to place the material into the S/R vault or to remove material from the S/R vault. The pallets are specially designed structures that will hold certain numbers of the material containers in a safe configuration. To store additional material containers, there is a need to insert additional pallets in the SIR vault. Due to the presence of radioactive contamination and the fact that the vault must be kept at a negative pressure at all times, one of the several I/O stations will be modified so that pallets could be inserted into the S/R vault. The ventilation system for the S/R area is a dedicated system that recirculates nitrogen with less than 5% oxygen by volume throughout the area while exhausting small option of the nitrogen to keep the S/R at negative 1 inches w.c. relative to the atmosphere. The rooms surrounding the G/H and the S/R area are maintained at negative of 0.3 inches w.c. relative to the outside atmosphere. Both the G/H and the control system for the G/H will be designed such that the confinement requirements of the S/R and the G/H system will not be jeopardized. A ladder diagram will be developed to illustrate the control system.

  14. CSER 99-002: CSER for unrestricted moderation of sludge material with two-boat operations in gloveboxes HC-21A and HC21-C

    SciTech Connect

    LAN, J.S.

    1999-04-29

    This Criticality Safety Evaluation Report was prepared by Fluor Daniel Northwest under contract to BWHC. This document establishes the criticality safety parameters for unrestricted moderation of Sludge material with two-boat operations in gloveboxes HC-21A and HC-21C.

  15. Decontamination and decommissioning of 61 plutonium gloveboxes in D-Wing, Building 212 Argonne National Laboratory-East: Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Cheever, C.L.; Rose, R.W.

    1996-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is a government-owned, contractor operated, multipurpose research facility located 25 miles southwest of downtown Chicago on 689 hectares (1,700 acres) in DuPage County, Illinois, as shown in Figure 1.1. Building 212 is located in the central area of ANL-E, as shown in Figure 1.2. The purpose of this project was to eliminate the risk of radioactive material release from the contaminated glovebox systems and to make the laboratories available for unrestricted use. The following work objectives were established: (1) Identify and remove radioactive materials for return to ANL-E Special Materials control. (2) Remove and package the radioactively contaminated materials and equipment from the gloveboxes. (3) Decontaminate the gloveboxes to nontransuranic (non-TRU) levels. (4) Size-reduce and package the gloveboxes and support systems. (5) Document and dispose of the radioactive and mixed waste. (6) Decontaminate, survey, and release the nine laboratories and corridor areas for unrestricted use.

  16. Computing the volume enclosed by a periodic surface and its variation to model a follower pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Mohammad; Zhang, Kuan; Arroyo, Marino

    2015-03-01

    In modeling and numerically implementing a follower pressure in a geometrically nonlinear setting, one needs to compute the volume enclosed by a surface and its variation. For closed surfaces, the volume can be expressed as a surface integral invoking the divergence theorem. For periodic systems, widely used in computational physics and materials science, the enclosed volume calculation and its variation is more delicate and has not been examined before. Here, we develop simple expressions involving integrals on the surface, on its boundary lines, and point contributions. We consider two specific situations, a periodic tubular surface and a doubly periodic surface enclosing a volume with a nearby planar substrate, which are useful to model systems such as pressurized carbon nanotubes, supported lipid bilayers or graphene. We provide a set of numerical examples, which show that the familiar surface integral term alone leads to an incorrect volume evaluation and spurious forces at the periodic boundaries.

  17. Cooperative enclosing control for multiple moving targets by a group of agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y. J.; Li, R.; Teo, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the enclosing control problem of second-order multi-agent systems is considered, where the targets can be either stationary or moving. The objective is to achieve an equidistant circular formation for a group of agents to enclose a team of targets. In order to do so, we first introduce a formal definition explaining certain basic properties of the exploring relation between the agents and the targets. We then construct the estimator of the centre of the targets, which is used to build the control protocol to achieve equidistant circular enclosing. Using a Lyapunov function and Lasalle's Invariance Principle, the convergency of the estimator and control protocol are, respectively, established. We then construct a smooth function to approximate the discontinuous term in the estimator. Finally, the simulations for stationary targets and moving targets are given to verify the validity of the results obtained.

  18. Radial stability and configuration transition of carbon nanotubes regulated by enclosed cores

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yonggang; He, Haitang; Ye, Hongfei

    2015-05-15

    The radial stability and configuration transition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with enclosed cores have been studied in this paper by using atomistic simulations. We found that an abnormal transition of CNTs from open to collapse can be regulated by enclosing deformable and rigid cores. The energy barrier for the configuration transition can be reduced by nearly one order of magnitude due to the presence of these cores, i.e., from ∼0.3 eV/Å to ∼0.03 eV/Å. These findings may provide guidance for the design of controllable CNT-based carrier systems for the delivery of drug, gene and fluid.

  19. Enclosed Electronic System for Force Measurements in Knee Implants

    PubMed Central

    Forchelet, David; Simoncini, Matteo; Arami, Arash; Bertsch, Arnaud; Meurville, Eric; Aminian, Kamiar; Ryser, Peter; Renaud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a widely performed surgical technique. Soft tissue force balancing during the operation relies strongly on the experience of the surgeon in equilibrating tension in the collateral ligaments. Little information on the forces in the implanted prosthesis is available during surgery and post-operative treatment. This paper presents the design, fabrication and testing of an instrumented insert performing force measurements in a knee prosthesis. The insert contains a closed structure composed of printed circuit boards and incorporates a microfabricated polyimide thin-film piezoresistive strain sensor for each condylar compartment. The sensor is tested in a mechanical knee simulator that mimics in-vivo conditions. For characterization purposes, static and dynamic load patterns are applied to the instrumented insert. Results show that the sensors are able to measure forces up to 1.5 times body weight with a sensitivity fitting the requirements for the proposed use. Dynamic testing of the insert shows a good tracking of slow and fast changing forces in the knee prosthesis by the sensors. PMID:25196007

  20. In situ remediation of plutonium from glovebox exhaust ducts at the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Dugdale, J.S.; Humiston, T.J.; Omer, G.E.

    1993-10-01

    Plutonium and other miscellaneous hold-up materials have been accumulating in the glovebox exhaust ducts at the Rocky Flats Plant over the 40 years of weapons production at the site. The Duct Remediation Project was undertaken to assess the safety impacts of this material, and to remove it from the ductwork. The project necessitated the development of specialized tools, equipment and methods to remediate the material from continuously operating ventilation systems. Special engineered access locations were also required to provide access to the ductwork, and to ensure that safety and system operability were not degraded as a result of the remediation efforts. Operations personnel underwent significant training and development, and became an important asset to the success of the project. In total, the project succeeded in removing over 40 kilograms of plutonium-bearing material from one of the major weapons production buildings at the plant.

  1. Use of simulation to examine operational scenarios in a lathe glovebox for the processing of nuclear materials.

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, M.; Ashok, P.; Cox, D. J.; Pittman, P. C.; Turner, C. J.; Hollen, R. M.

    2001-06-01

    In the process of dispositioning nuclear materials into storage, the use of a robot eliminates the safety risks to humans and increases productivity. The current process of processing typically uses humans to handle the hazardous material using gloves through glove-ports. This process is not only dangerous, but also costly, because humans can only be subjected to limited exposure to nuclear materials due to the actual Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) and thus have a fixed amount of dedicated workload per unit time. Use of robotics reduces ORE to humans and increases productivity. The Robotics Research Group at the University of Texas at Austin has created a simulation model of a conceptual application that uses a robot inside the glovebox to handle hazardous materials for lathe machining process operations in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL). The actions of the robot include preparing the parts for entry into the box, weighing the parts, positioning the parts into the headstock chuck of the lathe, handling the subsequent processed parts, changing and replacing the lathe tools and chuck assemblies are necessary to process the material. The full three-dimensional geometric model of the simulation demonstrates the normal expected operation from beginning to end and verifies the path plans for the robot. The emphasis of this paper is to report additional findings from the simulation model, which is currently being expanded to include failure mode analysis, error recovery, and other what-if scenarios involved in unexpected, or unplanned, operation of the robot and lathe process inside of the glovebox.

  2. Measuring evapotranspiration: comparison of eddy covariance, scintillometers and enclosed chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Mei Sun; Beringer, Jason; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Daly, Edoardo; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Rüdiger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the combination of evaporation from the soil surface and transpiration from plants. It is an important component of the hydrological cycle, particularly in arid and semi-arid areas where most of the precipitation is returned to the atmosphere via ET. It also drives the land-surface energy balance, largely affecting soil temperature and the heat exchange between the land and atmosphere. Therefore, the ability to quantify ET is important for accurate climate and weather predictions, as well as improving the management of water resources. Various methods for measuring ET are available, including gas chambers, lysimeters, Bowen-ratio energy balance stations, eddy-covariance systems, scintillometers, and space-borne sensors. These methods differ in spatial scales (from leaf to basin scale), time scales (seconds to days), principles (water-balance, mass-transfer, eddy-correlation, energy balance) and have their own strengths and limitations. For instance, point scale measurements, such as those obtained using lysimeters, assume that the sample is representative of a larger area, whereas measurements at a basin scale assume that the spatial average of all the other components in the water or energy balance equations can be measured accurately. The purpose of this study is to compare different techniques to measure ET across their respective scales and to identify causes of discrepancies between measurements. The final aim is to identify a technique or a combination of techniques to be used for verification of remote sensing evapotranspiration products. The study area is located in the Yanco Study Area (34.561°S, 35.170°S, 145.826°E, 146.439°E), situated within the western plains of the Murrumbidgee River catchment, in New South Wales, Australia. This area has been extensively monitored and a series of field experiments have been performed in the past to contribute to the pre- and post-launch algorithm development of earth observing

  3. 10. INTERIOR OF SOUTH SIDE ENCLOSED SCREEN PORCH SHOWING 1/2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR OF SOUTH SIDE ENCLOSED SCREEN PORCH SHOWING 1/2 SCREEN DOOR TO EXTERIOR AND DOUBLE FRENCH DOORS TO DINING ROOM. HOLE AT BOTTOM LEFT OF 1/2 SCREEN DOOR WAS A CAT DOOR. VIEW TO EAST. - Big Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse 8, Operator Cottage, Big Creek, Big Creek, Fresno County, CA

  4. 46 CFR 28.340 - Ventilation of enclosed engine and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... The fan motor must comply with 46 CFR 111.105-23. (c) Alternative standards. A vessel less than 65... ABYC H-2 and 33 CFR part 183, subpart K, will be considered as meeting the requirements of this section. ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed engine and fuel tank spaces....

  5. 46 CFR 28.340 - Ventilation of enclosed engine and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... The fan motor must comply with 46 CFR 111.105-23. (c) Alternative standards. A vessel less than 65... ABYC H-2 and 33 CFR part 183, subpart K, will be considered as meeting the requirements of this section. ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed engine and fuel tank spaces....

  6. 40 CFR 63.1016 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... vent system and control device. Process units of affected facilities or portions of process units of affected facilities enclosed in such a manner that all emissions from equipment leaks are routed to a....1006 through 63.1014. The enclosure shall be maintained under a negative pressure at all times...

  7. A method for determining the parameters of blast load on the enclosing medium and surrounding objects

    SciTech Connect

    Shuifer, M. I.

    2006-01-15

    A model for computing the impact of blast energy irradiated into the three-dimensional space of the enclosing medium is suggested, which makes it possible to predict the parameters of the action of an arbitrary blast source on an arbitrarily located watched object. As a consequence, it becomes possible to optimize safe conditions of the building process under virtually any conditions of blasting.

  8. Temporal and spatial distributions of aerial contaminants in an enclosed pig building in winter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Y; Ko, Han J; Lee, Kyung J; Park, Jae B; Kim, Chi N

    2005-10-01

    Optimal management of indoor air quality in an enclosed swine house, especially in winter, is indispensable for preventing the transmission of infectious respiratory disease to workers and animals. Studies are needed to elucidate the correlation of aerial contaminants and climate factors. It was observed that indoor air contamination in an enclosed pig building was the highest at 2:00--5:00 PM, followed by 8:00--11:00 PM and 8:00--11:00 AM. It was assumed that this was attributed to the increase of swine activities in the afternoon. In general, the concentration of total dust and total airborne bacteria in an enclosed pig building was found to have a significant correlation with temperature and relative humidity (P<0.05). There were significant correlations between total dust and total airborne bacteria, between total dust and ammonia, and between total dust and odor at the 95% confidence level. In conclusion, temperature and total dust concentration correlated significantly with all parameters except hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S). This could have been due to the drying of swine feces due to the increase in interior temperature and the resuspension of feed deposited on the floor of the pig building by the swines' activity, resulting in a high generation of dust that adsorbed and carried the airborne bacteria and odorous compounds in the enclosed pig building. It was proved that an adsorptive capacity of dust for ammonia was higher than for hydrogen sulfide.

  9. 40 CFR 63.1016 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternative means of emission... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1 § 63.1016 Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units. (a) Use of...

  10. Creating a parameterized model of a CMOS transistor with a gate of enclosed layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, S. M.; Atkin, E. V.; Ivanov, P. Y.

    2016-02-01

    The method of creating a parameterized spice model of an N-channel transistor with a gate of enclosed layout is considered. Formulas and examples of engineering calculations for use of models in the computer-aided Design environment of Cadence Vitruoso are presented. Calculations are made for the CMOS technology with 180 nm design rules of the UMC.

  11. Community Space and Cultural Transmission: Formation and Schooling in English Enclosed Convents in the Seventeenth Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    In the first seventy five years of the seventeenth century twenty two enclosed convents for English women were founded in exile where more than 1950 women were professed. In order to lead the strict religious life following the requirements of the Council of Trent for enclosure for women religious, these foundations required specialised buildings…

  12. Effects of waves on water dispersion in a semi-enclosed estuarine bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpey, M. T.; Ardhuin, F.; Otheguy, P.

    2012-04-01

    The bay of Saint Jean de Luz - Ciboure is a touristic destination located in the south west of France on the Basque coast. This small bay is 1.5km wide for 1km long. It is semi-enclosed by breakwaters, so that the area is mostly protected from waves except in its eastern part, where wave breaking is regularly observed over a shallow rock shelf. In the rest of the area the currents are generally weak. The bay receives fresh water inflows from two rivers. During intense raining events, the rivers can introduce pollutants in the bay. The input of pollutants combined with the low level dynamic of the area can affect the water quality for several days. To study such a phenomenon, mechanisms of water dispersion in the bay are investigated. The present paper focuses on the effects of waves on bay dynamics. Several field experiments were conducted in the area, combining wave and current measurements from a set of ADCP and ADV, lagrangian difter experiments in the surfzone, salinity and temperature profile measurements. An analysis of this set of various data is provided. It reveals that the bay combines remarkable density stratification due to fresh water inflows and occasionally intense wave-induced currents in the surfzone. These currents have a strong influence on river plume dynamics when the sea state is energetic. Moreover, modifications of hydrodynamics in the bay passes are found to be remarkably correlated with sea state evolutions. This result suggests a significant impact of waves on the bay flushing. To further analyse these phenomena, a three dimensional numerical model of bay hydrodynamics is developed. The model aims at reproducing fresh water inflows combined with wind-, tide- and wave-induced currents and mixing. The model of the bay is implemented using the code MOHID , which has been modified to allow the three dimensional representation of wave-current interactions proposed by Ardhuin et al. [2008b] . The circulation is forced by the wave field modelled

  13. A simplified real time method to forecast semi-enclosed basins storm surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquali, D.; Di Risio, M.; De Girolamo, P.

    2015-11-01

    Semi-enclosed basins are often prone to storm surge events. Indeed, their meteorological exposition, the presence of large continental shelf and their shape can lead to strong sea level set-up. A real time system aimed at forecasting storm surge may be of great help to protect human activities (i.e. to forecast flooding due to storm surge events), to manage ports and to safeguard coasts safety. This paper aims at illustrating a simple method able to forecast storm surge events in semi-enclosed basins in real time. The method is based on a mixed approach in which the results obtained by means of a simplified physics based model with low computational costs are corrected by means of statistical techniques. The proposed method is applied to a point of interest located in the Northern part of the Adriatic Sea. The comparison of forecasted levels against observed values shows the satisfactory reliability of the forecasts.

  14. Metal contamination in water, sediment and biota from a semi-enclosed coastal area.

    PubMed

    Aly, Walid; Williams, Ian D; Hudson, Malcolm D

    2013-05-01

    This study identifies and quantifies the spatial variations of metal contamination in water, sediment and biota: the common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and the Mermaid's glove sponge (Haliclona oculata), within a heavily anthropogenically impacted semi-enclosed estuarine-coastal area with a low ability to disperse and flush contaminants (Poole Harbour, UK). The results showed that metal contamination was detected in all environmental compartments. Water was polluted with As, and Hg sediment metals were mostly within "the possible effect range" in which adverse effects occasionally occurs. Cockles had considerable concentrations of Ni, Ag and Hg in areas close to pollution sources, and sponges accumulate Cu and Zn with very high magnitude. A systematic monitoring approach that includes biological monitoring techniques, which covers all embayments, is needed, and an integrated management of the semi-enclosed coastal zones should be based on the overall hydrological characteristics of these sensitive areas and their ability to self-restore which is different than open coastal zones.

  15. Isolation and characterization of the membrane envelope enclosing the bacteroids in soybean root nodules

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The membrane envelope enclosing the bacteroids in soybean root nodules is shown by ultrastructural and biochemical studies to be derived from, and to retain the characteristics of, the host cell plasma membrane. During the early stages of the infection process, which occurs through an invagination, Rhizobium becomes surrounded by the host cell wall and plasma membrane, forming the infection thread. The cell wall of the infection thread is degraded by cellulolytic enzyme(s), leaving behind the enclosed plasma membrane, the membrane envelope. Cellulase activity in young nodules increases two- to threefold as compared to uninfected roots, and this activity is localized in the cell wall matrix of the infection threads. Membrane envelopes were isolated by first preparing bacteroids enclosed in the envelopes on a discontinuous sucrose gradient followed by passage through a hypodermic needle, which released the bacteroids from the membranes. This membrane then sedimented at the interface of 34--45% sucrose (mean density of 1.14 g/cm3). Membranes were characterized by phosphotungstic acid (PTA)- chromic acid staining. ATPase activity, and localization, sensitivity to nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. These analyses revealed a close similarity between plasma membrane and the membrane envelope. Incorporation of radioactive amino acids into the membrane envelope proteins was sensitive to cycloheximide, suggesting that the biosynthesis of these proteins is primarily under host-cell control. No immunoreactive material to leghemoglobin antibodies was found inside or associated with the isolated bacteroids enclosed in the membrane envelope, and its location is confined to the host cell cytoplasmic matrix. PMID:151688

  16. An identification method for enclosed voids restriction in manufacturability design for additive manufacturing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shutian; Li, Quhao; Chen, Wenjiong; Tong, Liyong; Cheng, Gengdong

    2015-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, such as selective laser sintering (SLS) and fused deposition modeling (FDM), have become the powerful tools for direct manufacturing of complex parts. This breakthrough in manufacturing technology makes the fabrication of new geometrical features and multiple materials possible. Past researches on designs and design methods often focused on how to obtain desired functional performance of the structures or parts, specific manufacturing capabilities as well as manufacturing constraints of AM were neglected. However, the inherent constraints in AM processes should be taken into account in design process. In this paper, the enclosed voids, one type of manufacturing constraints of AM, are investigated. In mathematics, enclosed voids restriction expressed as the solid structure is simplyconnected. We propose an equivalent description of simply-connected constraint for avoiding enclosed voids in structures, named as virtual temperature method (VTM). In this method, suppose that the voids in structure are filled with a virtual heating material with high heat conductivity and solid areas are filled with another virtual material with low heat conductivity. Once the enclosed voids exist in structure, the maximum temperature value of structure will be very high. Based upon this method, the simplyconnected constraint is equivalent to maximum temperature constraint. And this method can be easily used to formulate the simply-connected constraint in topology optimization. The effectiveness of this description method is illustrated by several examples. Based upon topology optimization, an example of 3D cantilever beam is used to illustrate the trade-off between manufacturability and functionality. Moreover, the three optimized structures are fabricated by FDM technology to indicate further the necessity of considering the simply-connected constraint in design phase for AM.

  17. Pressure Loads by Gas in an Enclosed Chamber in DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J; Badders, D C

    2002-08-08

    New algorithms that efficiently calculate the volume of a closed chamber are presented in this paper. The current pressure in the enclosed chamber can then be computed, based on the user-specified gas law, from the updated volume and the initial volume and pressure of the chamber. This pressure load function is very useful in modeling common features, such as air pocket, airbag, piston, and gun barrel, in structural analyses.

  18. Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements and Non-Coding RNAs in the Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sabrina B.; Spencer-Smith, Russell; Shah, Mahwish; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Cook, Richard T.; Snyder, Lori A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is capable of causing gonorrhoea and more complex diseases in the human host. Neisseria meningitidis is a closely related pathogen that shares many of the same genomic features and virulence factors, but causes the life threatening diseases meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia. The importance of non-coding RNAs in gene regulation has become increasingly evident having been demonstrated to be involved in regulons responsible for iron acquisition, antigenic variation, and virulence. Neisseria spp. contain an IS-like element, the Correia Repeat Enclosed Element, which has been predicted to be mobile within the genomes or to have been in the past. This repeat, present in over 100 copies in the genome, has the ability to alter gene expression and regulation in several ways. We reveal here that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements tend to be near non-coding RNAs in the Neisseria spp., especially N. gonorrhoeae. These results suggest that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements may have disrupted ancestral regulatory networks not just through their influence on regulatory proteins but also for non-coding RNAs. PMID:27681925

  19. Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements and Non-Coding RNAs in the Neisseria Species.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sabrina B; Spencer-Smith, Russell; Shah, Mahwish; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Cook, Richard T; Snyder, Lori A S

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is capable of causing gonorrhoea and more complex diseases in the human host. Neisseria meningitidis is a closely related pathogen that shares many of the same genomic features and virulence factors, but causes the life threatening diseases meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia. The importance of non-coding RNAs in gene regulation has become increasingly evident having been demonstrated to be involved in regulons responsible for iron acquisition, antigenic variation, and virulence. Neisseria spp. contain an IS-like element, the Correia Repeat Enclosed Element, which has been predicted to be mobile within the genomes or to have been in the past. This repeat, present in over 100 copies in the genome, has the ability to alter gene expression and regulation in several ways. We reveal here that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements tend to be near non-coding RNAs in the Neisseria spp., especially N. gonorrhoeae. These results suggest that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements may have disrupted ancestral regulatory networks not just through their influence on regulatory proteins but also for non-coding RNAs. PMID:27681925

  20. Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements and Non-Coding RNAs in the Neisseria Species.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sabrina B; Spencer-Smith, Russell; Shah, Mahwish; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Cook, Richard T; Snyder, Lori A S

    2016-08-25

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is capable of causing gonorrhoea and more complex diseases in the human host. Neisseria meningitidis is a closely related pathogen that shares many of the same genomic features and virulence factors, but causes the life threatening diseases meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia. The importance of non-coding RNAs in gene regulation has become increasingly evident having been demonstrated to be involved in regulons responsible for iron acquisition, antigenic variation, and virulence. Neisseria spp. contain an IS-like element, the Correia Repeat Enclosed Element, which has been predicted to be mobile within the genomes or to have been in the past. This repeat, present in over 100 copies in the genome, has the ability to alter gene expression and regulation in several ways. We reveal here that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements tend to be near non-coding RNAs in the Neisseria spp., especially N. gonorrhoeae. These results suggest that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements may have disrupted ancestral regulatory networks not just through their influence on regulatory proteins but also for non-coding RNAs.

  1. Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements and Non-Coding RNAs in the Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sabrina B.; Spencer-Smith, Russell; Shah, Mahwish; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Cook, Richard T.; Snyder, Lori A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is capable of causing gonorrhoea and more complex diseases in the human host. Neisseria meningitidis is a closely related pathogen that shares many of the same genomic features and virulence factors, but causes the life threatening diseases meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia. The importance of non-coding RNAs in gene regulation has become increasingly evident having been demonstrated to be involved in regulons responsible for iron acquisition, antigenic variation, and virulence. Neisseria spp. contain an IS-like element, the Correia Repeat Enclosed Element, which has been predicted to be mobile within the genomes or to have been in the past. This repeat, present in over 100 copies in the genome, has the ability to alter gene expression and regulation in several ways. We reveal here that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements tend to be near non-coding RNAs in the Neisseria spp., especially N. gonorrhoeae. These results suggest that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements may have disrupted ancestral regulatory networks not just through their influence on regulatory proteins but also for non-coding RNAs.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of the performance of an industrial benchtop enclosing hood.

    PubMed

    He, Xinjian Kevin; Guffey, Steven E

    2013-01-01

    Plain benchtop enclosing hoods are assumed to be highly effective in protecting workers from airborne contaminants, but there is little research published to support or rebut that assumption. The purpose of this research was to investigate the performance of a 36 in. wide, 30 in. high, and 40 in. deep benchtop enclosing hood. The study consisted of two parts: (1) investigating the effects of hood face velocity (five levels: 111, 140, 170, 200, and 229 ft/min) and wind tunnel cross-draft velocity (five levels: 14, 26, 36, 46, and 57 ft/min) on a plain benchtop enclosing hood, and (2) studying the effects of specific interventions (no-intervention, collar flange, bottom flange, cowling, and sash) added onto the same enclosing hood. A tracer gas method was used to study the hood's performance inside a 9 ft high, 12 ft wide, and 40 ft long wind tunnel. Freon-134a concentrations were measured at the mouth and nose of an anthropometrically scaled, heated, breathing manikin holding a source between its hands while standing at the enclosing hood's face. Roughly 3 L/min of pure Freon-134a mixed with 9 L/min of helium was released from the source during all tests. Results showed that hood face velocity, wind tunnel cross-draft velocity, and interventions had statistically significant effects (p < 0.05) on the concentrations measured at the manikin's breathing zone. Lower exposures were associated with higher face velocities and higher cross-draft velocities. The highest exposures occurred when the face velocity was at the lowest test value (111 ft/min), and the cross-draft velocity was at its lowest test value (14 ft/min). For the effects of interventions to the hood face, the results showed that flanges and the cowling failed to consistently reduce exposures and often exacerbated them. However, the customized sash reduced exposures to less than the detection limit of 0.1 ppm, so a similar sash should be considered when feasible. The hood face velocity should be at least 150

  3. A numerical study of vegetation impact on reducing storm surge by wetlands in a semi-enclosed estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelin, Hu; Qin, Chen; Wang, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    Coastal wetlands play a unique role in extreme hurricane events. The impact of wetlands on storm surge depends on multiple factors including vegetation, landscape, and storm characteristics. The Delft3D model, in which vegetation effects on flow and turbulence are explicitly incorporated, was applied to the semi-enclosed Breton Sound (BS) estuary in coastal Louisiana to investigate the wetland impact. Guided by extensive field observations, a series of numerical experiments were conducted based on variations of actual vegetation properties and storm parameters from Hurricane Isaac in 2012. Both the vegetation-induced maximum surge reduction (MSR) and maximum surge reduction rate (MSRR) increased with stem height and stem density, and were more sensitive to stem height. The MSR and MSRR decreased significantly with increasing wind intensity. The MSRR was the highest with a fast-moving weak storm. It was also found that the MSRR varied proportionally to the expression involving the maximum bulk velocity and surge over the area of interest, and was more dependent on the maximum bulk surge. Both MSR and MSRR appeared to increase when the area of interest decreased from the whole BS estuary to the upper estuary. Within the range of the numerical experiments, the maximum simulated MSR and MSRR over the upper estuary were 0.7 m and 37%, respectively.

  4. Pore Formation and Mobility (PFMI): An International Space Station Glovebox Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Anilkumar, A.; Jeter, L.; Luz, P.; Volz, M. P.; Spivey, R.; Smith, G.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Porosity in the form of "bubbles and pipes" can occur during controlled directional solidification processing of metal alloys. It is detrimental to material properties and precludes obtaining meaningful scientific results. On Earth, density differences allow an initiated bubble can rise through the liquid and "pop" at the surface resulting in a sound casting. This is not likely to occur in a microgravity environment and, unfortunately, a number of experiments conducted in microgravity have suffered from porosity effects. The current investigation is a systematic effort towards understanding porosity formation and mobility during controlled directional solidification in a microgravity environment. This will be investigated by utilizing a transparent material, succinonitrile (SCN), in conjunction with a translating temperature gradient stage so that direct observation and recording of pore generation and mobility can be made. The talk will cover the porosity problem, the details of the proposed experiments and the experimental hardware, and the expectations from the microgravity experiments.

  5. Determining the Carbon Transport Rate of an Enclosed Tropical Rainforest Ecosystem in Biosphere 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Y. A.; Van Haren, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Determining how carbon moves through a tropical rainforest ecosystem is an important step towards understanding its role as a carbon sink system in the global carbon cycle. The paths by which carbon moves through forest ecosystems are reasonably well known. However, very little is known about how quickly this happens. We will present data from experiments where we isotopically pulse label the atmospheric carbon dioxide within the Biosphere 2 tropical rainforest biome with natural gas derived CO2 (∂13C ~ -40‰ vs. ~ -8.5‰ for ambient air). We are continually monitoring the CO2 concentration and isotope composition of the ambient air along a vertical profile to measure ecosystem gas exchange, and that of six branch-bag and five soil-chamber locations within the Biosphere 2 tropical rainforest, with an Aerodyne Quantum Cascade Laser to trace the labeled carbon (precision for ∂13C = 0.02‰ and CO2 = 0.07ppm, calibrated to NOAA air standards). Environmental parameters such as light, relative humidity, soil moisture, and temperature are monitored at fifteen-minute intervals. We have selected one vine species and three different tree species for branch bag enclosures at two canopy heights that we expect represent the bulk photosynthetic biomass of the rainforest. The soil chambers are distributed randomly. By treating the Biosphere 2 tropical rainforest biome, a glass enclosed ecosystem with 1900m2 of ground, 26700m3 of air, and 92 different plant species, as a model ecosystem, we anticipate to determine carbon transport rates that would otherwise be practically impossible to determine in the real world due to the difficulty of isotopically labeling and monitoring entire canopies or even individual trees, which can reach heights over 60m. The data we have collected thus far will provide a baseline comparison for the labeling data. Comparing the branch bag data with the ecosystem data has helped us determine how well small branches represent the canopy and whole

  6. Demonstration of an Area-Enclosing Guided-Atom Interferometer for Rotation Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Saijun; Su, Edward; Prentiss, Mara

    2007-10-26

    We demonstrate area-enclosing atom interferometry based on a moving guide. Light pulses along the free-propagation direction of a magnetic guide are applied to split and recombine the confined atomic matter-wave, while the atoms are translated back and forth along a second direction in 50 ms. The interferometer is estimated to resolve 10 times the earth rotation rate per interferometry cycle. We demonstrate a ''folded figure 8'' interfering configuration for creating a compact, large-area atom gyroscope with multiple-turn interfering paths.

  7. Polymer film-based optical access to enclosed gas: demonstration of H2O absorption tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze; Anderson, Mark H.; Sanders, Scott T.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the use of a film to enable optical access to enclosed gases. We use absorption tomography to image H2O in a 101.6-mm-diameter duct with 2-mm spatial resolution. Considering the central 94 mm, the standard deviation of the image is 1.6 %, and the average mole fraction error is -0.008 %. A polybenzimidazole film is identified to be a candidate for extending the technique to enable NH3 imaging in a diesel aftertreatment system.

  8. Masquerading as self? Endoparasitic Strepsiptera (Insecta) enclose themselves in host-derived epidermal bag.

    PubMed

    Kathirithamby, Jeyaraney; Ross, Larry D; Johnston, J Spencer

    2003-06-24

    We report here the case of a metazoan parasite, a strepsipteran, that manipulates host epidermal tissue and wraps itself within it; which probably camouflages the endoparasite and is recognized as "self" by the host. This mechanism is one of immune avoidance among parasitoid insects. The host-derived epidermal "bag" might have enabled Strepsiptera to radiate to disparate hosts compared with the relatively few taxa (596 species) described so far. They have been recorded as parasitizing 34 families belonging to seven orders of Insecta. We also report a mechanism of insect ecdysis between the first- and second-instar larva, while enclosed in the bag. PMID:12788973

  9. Behavioral study of ultradian activity periods of mice enclosed in experimental cages of different dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, A.

    1982-01-01

    Male mice are enclosed in cages of different dimensions (cage A - 23x8x8 cm., cage B - 36x27x17 cm.), in an alternating light/dark regimen, at an ambient temperature of 22 to 23 C. The successions of the behavioral sequences of ultradian activity periods are noticed by direct observation during 11 consecutive hours in light. The experimental situation modifies the mean duration time and the behavioral organization of each activity period. However, the comparison of the overall activity time lengths and the comparison of the overall behavioral frequencies suggest that the energy spent per mouse is constant.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flows around a fin-tube heat exchanger enclosed by a compartment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Changkeun; Song, Simon; Lee, Jeesoo; Kang, Seongwon

    2014-11-01

    The main objective of the present study is to analyze heat transfer and flow characteristics of a heat exchanger in an industrial application using high-fidelity simulation techniques. Large-eddy simulations (LES) were performed to investigate the turbulent flows around a fin-tube heat exchanger enclosed by a compartment. The complex geometry of the compartment poses a difficulty in a simulation as the local Re number is about two orders of different magnitude, and generates various scales of the 3-D vortices and complex flow patterns. Careful tests with both grid resolution and turbulent inflow boundary condition were performed in order to compare our results to the measured data from a MRV experiment as well as the results from RANS simulations. From interaction of the flow structures such as the 3-D vortices, a few interesting flow phenomena were observed which are different from a plain fin-tube heat exchanger, such as helical flows and a jet stream observed behind the fin-tube region. Also, performance of the heat exchanger was analyzed using the data from plain fin-tube heat exchangers. Based on this analysis, a numerical technique for heat exchanger was devised and tested to show a possibility of reducing the computational cost significantly, using a porous media model.

  11. Evaluation of a New Thermal Fog Machine for Control of Adult Aedes albopictus in a Large Enclosed Space.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Jennifer; Smith, Michael L; Xue, Rui-De; Ren, Dong-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Testing of the PSO BASDKA-AC1200 multifunction ultrafine particle atomization machine, a thermal fog machine, with Aqualuer 20-20(®) (permethrin 20.6%, piperonyl butoxide 20.6%) was conducted against Aedes albopictus. The machine was set at a 40 sec maximum burst interval dispersing 36 ml of chemical with an average droplet volume of 50%. Female adult Ae. albopictus were placed into cylindrical paper cages and adhered to poles at 5, 8, 10, 15, and 25 m from the center point of the machine. Control cages consisted of 1 cage placed at 5, 10, and 25 m. Control and treatment groups were left in the experiment area for 15 min. Initial knockdown after 15 min and 24 h mortality were documented. At 15 min post-treatment, Ae. albopictus displayed less than 50% knockdown. After 24 h, all treatment cages displayed greater than 90% mortality. Further bottle bioassays were conducted to determine the lowest chemical dose possible to achieve a lethal dose of 90%. A 1% dilution (10 ml Aqualuer 20-20 to 1,000 ml of polyether) of Aqualuer showed high mortality in the laboratory. However, after running 3 repetitions of a 1% dilution, there was no significant difference between the mortality of the mosquitoes at any of the distances 24 h post-treatment. This study indicates that the test machine would be an applicable and suitable machine for control of Ae. albopictus in enclosed spaces.

  12. Phytoplankton along the coastal shelf of an oligotrophic hypersaline environment in a semi-enclosed marginal sea: Qatar (Arabian Gulf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigg, Antonietta; Al-Ansi, Mohsin; Al Din, Nehad Nour; Wei, Chih-Lin; Nunnally, Clifton C.; Al-Ansari, Ibrahim S.; Rowe, Gilbert T.; Soliman, Yousria; Al-Maslamani, Ibrahim; Mahmoud, Ismail; Youssef, Nabiha; Abdel-Moati, Mohamed A.

    2013-06-01

    Phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a concentration), primary production, abundance, species diversity and species groupings were measured in the coastal waters surrounding Qatar (Arabian Gulf) at 13 stations in February 2010, July 2010, February 2011 and May 2011. In addition, a broad suite of physico-chemical characteristics were measured: temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and nutrients (dissolved and particulate). Waters surrounding the Qatari peninsula were found to be highly diverse (125 species of diatoms, dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria were identified) but were low in both biomass (0.18-2.19 μg Chl a l-1) and productivity (0.14-0.97 mg C m-2 day-1). Phytoplankton physiology (Fv/Fm, σPSII, τQa, p) revealed acclimation strategies consistent with phytoplankton populations receiving ample light but insufficient nutrients. The finding of low primary production is consistent with water column nutrient ratios (DIN:P and DIN:Si ratios<1) and nutrient enrichment experiments in which the addition of nitrate or the addition of near-bottom waters stimulated biomass production of phytoplankton. This study in an oligotrophic, hypersaline semi-enclosed marginal sea is intended to contribute to the growing body of ecological information on this ecosystem functions.

  13. Evaluation of a New Thermal Fog Machine for Control of Adult Aedes albopictus in a Large Enclosed Space.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Jennifer; Smith, Michael L; Xue, Rui-De; Ren, Dong-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Testing of the PSO BASDKA-AC1200 multifunction ultrafine particle atomization machine, a thermal fog machine, with Aqualuer 20-20(®) (permethrin 20.6%, piperonyl butoxide 20.6%) was conducted against Aedes albopictus. The machine was set at a 40 sec maximum burst interval dispersing 36 ml of chemical with an average droplet volume of 50%. Female adult Ae. albopictus were placed into cylindrical paper cages and adhered to poles at 5, 8, 10, 15, and 25 m from the center point of the machine. Control cages consisted of 1 cage placed at 5, 10, and 25 m. Control and treatment groups were left in the experiment area for 15 min. Initial knockdown after 15 min and 24 h mortality were documented. At 15 min post-treatment, Ae. albopictus displayed less than 50% knockdown. After 24 h, all treatment cages displayed greater than 90% mortality. Further bottle bioassays were conducted to determine the lowest chemical dose possible to achieve a lethal dose of 90%. A 1% dilution (10 ml Aqualuer 20-20 to 1,000 ml of polyether) of Aqualuer showed high mortality in the laboratory. However, after running 3 repetitions of a 1% dilution, there was no significant difference between the mortality of the mosquitoes at any of the distances 24 h post-treatment. This study indicates that the test machine would be an applicable and suitable machine for control of Ae. albopictus in enclosed spaces. PMID:27280358

  14. SUBSA and PFMI Transparent Furnace Systems Currently in use in the International Space Station Microgravity Science Glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie A.; Gilley, Scott; Ostrogorsky, Aleksander; Grugel, Richard; Smith, Guy; Luz, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) and Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) furnaces were developed for operation in the International Space Station (ISS) Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). Both furnaces were launched to the ISS on STS-111, June 4, 2002, and are currently in use on orbit. The SUBSA furnace provides a maximum temperature of 850 C and can accommodate a metal sample as large as 30 cm long and 12mm in diameter. SUBSA utilizes a gradient freeze process with a minimum cooldown rate of 0.5C per min, and a stability of +/- 0.15C. An 8 cm long transparent gradient zone coupled with a Cohu 3812 camera and quartz ampoule allows for observation and video recording of the solidification process. PFMI is a Bridgman type furnace that operates at a maximum temperature of 130C and can accommodate a sample 23cm long and 10mm in diameter. Two Cohu 3812 cameras mounted 90 deg apart move on a separate translation system which allows for viewing of the sample in the transparent hot zone and gradient zone independent of the furnace translation rate and direction. Translation rates for both the cameras and furnace can be specified from 0.5micrometers/sec to 100 micrometers/sec with a stability of +/-5%. The two furnaces share a Process Control Module (PCM) which controls the furnace hardware, a Data Acquisition Pad (DaqPad) which provides signal condition of thermal couple data, and two Cohu 3812 cameras. The hardware and software allow for real time monitoring and commanding of critical process control parameters. This paper will provide a detailed explanation of the SUBSA and PFMI systems along with performance data and some preliminary results from completed on-orbit processing runs.

  15. CSER 90-006, addendum 1: Criticality safety control for source term reduction project in the scrubber glovebox of Building 232-Z. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, A.L.

    1995-03-10

    This Criticality Safety Evaluation Report addendum extends the coverage of the original CSER (90-006) about dismantling the ductwork in 232-Z to include cleanout of the Scrubber Glovebox, with an estimated residual Pu holdup of less than 200 grams. For conservatism and containment considerations, the provisions about waste packaging and water exclusion from the original work are retained, even though it is not credible for the Scrubber Pu content to be made critical with water added (NDA gives about 1/3 a minimum critical mass).

  16. The behavior of enclosed-type connection of drill pipes during percussive drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadrina, A.; Saruev, L.

    2015-11-01

    Percussion drilling is the efficient method to drill small holes (≥ 70 mm) in medium- hard and harder rocks. The existing types of drill strings for geological explorations are not intended for strain wave energy transfer. The description of the improved design of the drill string having enclosed-type nipple connections is given in this paper presents. This nipple connection is designed to be used in drilling small exploration wells with formation sampling. Experimental findings prove the effectiveness of the enclosed nipple connection in relation to the load distribution in operation. The paper presents research results of the connection behavior under quasistatic loading (compression-tension). Loop diagrams are constructed and analyzed in force-displacement coordinates. Research results are obtained for shear stresses occurred in the nipple connection. A mechanism of shear stress distribution is described for the wave strain propagation over the connecting element. It is shown that in the course of operation the drill pipe tightening reduces the shear stress three times.

  17. Application of RADTRAN to estimation of doses to persons in enclosed spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    The RADTRAN computer code for transportation risk analysis can be used to estimate doses to persons in enclosed volumes. This application was developed in response to a need to examine consequences of a hypothetical container leak during accident-free transportation by cargo air. The original problem addressed tritium containers, but the method can be applied to any gaseous or suspended particulate material potentially released in an airplane or other enclosed area (e.g., warehouse) under accident-free conditions. Such leakage can occur during shipment of any radioactive gas or material with a gaseous phase. Atmospheric dispersion is normally modeled in RADTRAN as a series of downwind isopleths each of which is assigned a dilution factor (also known as time-integrated concentration or X/Q value). These values are located in look-up tables in RADTRAN and are normally taken from externally performed Gaussian dispersion calculations. The dilution factors are used to estimate inhalation dose to persons in the specified downwind areas.

  18. Metal contamination in water, sediment and biota from a semi-enclosed coastal area.

    PubMed

    Aly, Walid; Williams, Ian D; Hudson, Malcolm D

    2013-05-01

    This study identifies and quantifies the spatial variations of metal contamination in water, sediment and biota: the common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and the Mermaid's glove sponge (Haliclona oculata), within a heavily anthropogenically impacted semi-enclosed estuarine-coastal area with a low ability to disperse and flush contaminants (Poole Harbour, UK). The results showed that metal contamination was detected in all environmental compartments. Water was polluted with As, and Hg sediment metals were mostly within "the possible effect range" in which adverse effects occasionally occurs. Cockles had considerable concentrations of Ni, Ag and Hg in areas close to pollution sources, and sponges accumulate Cu and Zn with very high magnitude. A systematic monitoring approach that includes biological monitoring techniques, which covers all embayments, is needed, and an integrated management of the semi-enclosed coastal zones should be based on the overall hydrological characteristics of these sensitive areas and their ability to self-restore which is different than open coastal zones. PMID:23014922

  19. Location representation in enclosed spaces: what types of information afford young children an advantage?

    PubMed

    Lourenco, Stella F; Addy, Dede; Huttenlocher, Janellen

    2009-11-01

    It has been suggested that young children can only reorient, locating a target object, when the geometry of an enclosed space provides distinctive shape information [e.g., Hermer, L., & Spelke, E. (1994). A geometric process for spatial reorientation in young children. Nature, 370, 57-59]. Recently, however, young children were shown to specify location in a square-shaped space, where geometry is uninformative, so long as scale-like information was available on the walls of the space [Huttenlocher, J., & Lourenco, S. F. (2007a). Coding location in enclosed spaces: Is geometry the principle? Developmental Science, 10, 741-746]. Here we build on this work by examining more closely what types of cues afford 18- to 24-month-olds an advantage in locating a target object following disorientation. Their performance was assessed when linear scale-like information was presented either in isolation or in composite form. It was found that, even in isolation, young children searched at the appropriate locations, with added benefit when presented as a composite. We suggest that linear scale-like dimensions, especially when available in composite form, play a critical role in supporting location representation in young children.

  20. Coastal upwelling and downwelling forcing of circulation in a semi-enclosed bay: Ria de Vigo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, E. D.; Largier, J. L.; Torres, R.; Sheridan, M.; Trasviña, A.; Souza, A.; Pazos, Y.; Valle-Levinson, A.

    2015-05-01

    Semi-enclosed bays in upwelling regions are exposed to forcing related to winds, currents and buoyancy over the shelf. The influence of this external forcing is moderated by factors such as connectivity to the open ocean, shelter by surrounding topography, dimensions of the bay, and freshwater outflows. Such bays, preferred locations for ports, mariculture, marine industry, recreational activities and coastal settlement, present a range of characteristics, understanding of which is necessary to their rational management. Observations in such a semi-enclosed bay, the Ria de Vigo in Spain, are used to characterize the influence of upwelling and downwelling pulses on its circulation. In this location, near the northern limit of the Iberian upwelling system, upwelling events dominate during a short summer season and downwelling events the rest of the year. The ria response to the external forcing is central to nutrient supply and resultant plankton productivity that supports its high level of cultured mussel production. Intensive field studies in September 2006 and June 2007 captured a downwelling event and an upwelling event, respectively. Data from eight current profiler moorings and boat-based MiniBat/ADCP surveys provided an unprecedented quasi-synoptic view of the distribution of water masses and circulation patterns in any ria. In the outer ria, circulation was dominated by the introduction of wind-driven alongshore flow from the external continental shelf through the ria entrances and its interaction with the topography. In the middle ria, circulation was primarily related to the upwelling/downwelling cycle, with a cool, salty and dense lower layer penetrating to the inner ria during upwelling over the shelf. A warmer, lower salinity and less dense surface layer of coastal waters flowed inward during downwelling. Without external forcing, the inner ria responded primarily to tides and buoyancy changes related to land runoff. Under both upwelling and downwelling

  1. Application of macrobenthos functional groups to estimate the ecosystem health in a semi-enclosed bay.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shitao; Zhou, Ran; Qin, Xuebo; Shi, Honghua; Ding, Dewen

    2013-09-15

    In this study, the functional group concept was first applied to evaluate the ecosystem health of Bohai Bay. Macrobenthos functional groups were defined according to feeding types and divided into five groups: a carnivorous group (CA), omnivorous group (OM), planktivorous group (PL), herbivorous group (HE), and detritivorous group (DE). Groups CA, DE, OM, and PL were identified, but the HE group was absent from Bohai Bay. Group DE was dominant during the study periods. The ecosystem health was assessed using a functional group evenness index. The functional group evenness values of most sampling stations were less than 0.40, indicating that the ecosystem health was deteriorated in Bohai Bay. Such deterioration could be attributed to land reclamation, industrial and sewage effluents, oil pollution, and hypersaline water discharge. This study demonstrates that the functional group concept can be applied to ecosystem health assessment in a semi-enclosed bay.

  2. Geomorphology evolution of semi-enclosed embayment in response to human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aijun; Zheng, Binxin; Ye, Xiang; Fang, Jianyong; Wang, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Coastal embayments, as an important type of coastal system, are undergoing a heavy influence by strong human activities. Tongan Bay is a typical semi-enclosed embayment adjacent to Xiamen Island, southeast China. Due to construction of the Gaoji Seawall, the Tongan Bay have occurred a heavy accretion from 1950s', and the hydrodynamic processes were changed obviously, and the fine fraction of the sediment increased. Since 2000, the Tongan Bay was experienced a series of complicated rearrangement, and hydrodynamic processes were changed again, and associated suspended sediment and bedload transport patterns were also altered, and then the new sediment distribution pattern and geomorphology structure were established correspondingly. The evolution of geomorphology in Tongan Bay is experiencing the adjustment from naturally developed pattern to artificial geomorphology types. After the complicated rearrangement, it will be fashioned into a set of new geomorphology pattern which is the net effects of physical hydrodynamic processes and human activities.

  3. Calculation of fire extinguishment time with water mist in an enclosed room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lijun; Zhao, Jianbo; Xu, Zhenyu

    2010-12-01

    The fire extinguishment time is a major factor to evaluate the efficiency of fire extinguishment with water mist. In this paper the fire extinguishment time with water mist in an enclosed room is calculated. Before adding water mist, the chemical kinetics plays the role in combustion, where a dimensionless math model is established by using the Semenov theory. After adding water mist, the diffusion plays the role instead. Then another math model containing water mist and dominated by oxygen concentration is established. The fire temperature is integrated from Tm to extinguishment temperature TB and the extinguishment time can be obtained. The calculated values are compared with the experimental data under different conditions. The results show that this model can predict the fire extinguishment time accurately. Besides, this model also can be used to determine the critical water mist flux and evaluate which fire extinguishment mechanisms dominate the extinguishment.

  4. Seeing through Walls at the Nanoscale: Microwave Microscopy of Enclosed Objects and Processes in Liquids.

    PubMed

    Tselev, Alexander; Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Ievlev, Anton V; Kalinin, Sergei V; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2016-03-22

    Noninvasive in situ nanoscale imaging in liquid environments is a current imperative in the analysis of delicate biomedical objects and electrochemical processes at reactive liquid-solid interfaces. Microwaves of a few gigahertz frequencies offer photons with energies of ≈10 μeV, which can affect neither electronic states nor chemical bonds in condensed matter. Here, we describe an implementation of scanning near-field microwave microscopy for imaging in liquids using ultrathin molecular impermeable membranes separating scanning probes from samples enclosed in environmental cells. We imaged a model electroplating reaction as well as individual live cells. Through a side-by-side comparison of the microwave imaging with scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate the advantage of microwaves for artifact-free imaging. PMID:26866377

  5. Seasickness in totally-enclosed motor-propelled survival craft: remedial measures.

    PubMed

    Landolt, J P; Monaco, C

    1992-03-01

    Totally-enclosed motor-propelled survival craft (TEMPSC) are used to evacuate the crews of mobile offshore drilling units in emergencies. The small size and flat bottom of the TEMPSC predispose most occupants to seasickness, even in relatively calm waters. This paper discusses efforts required to improve the well-being of occupants in terms of reducing seasickness, dehydration, hypothermia, anxiety, and the other factors that contribute to loss of comfort and the will to survive. Specific recommendations include the provision of climatic control to regulate temperature, remove odors and provide fresh air; potable water, electrolytes, and survival rations; and an ample supply of motion sickness bags. Overcrowding should be avoided. Anti-motion-sickness drug therapy to control vomiting should be administered in two ways: initial injection of intramuscular scopolamine for fast action followed by a transdermal ear patch for long-term protection. Leadership and seasickness management should be requisite survival training for all oil rig workers. PMID:1567325

  6. Seeing through walls at the nanoscale: Microwave microscopy of enclosed objects and processes in liquids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Kolmakov, Andrei; Tselev, Alexander; Ievlev, Anton V.

    2016-02-11

    Here, noninvasive in situ nanoscale imaging in liquid environments is a current imperative in the analysis of delicate biomedical objects and electrochemical processes at reactive liquid–solid interfaces. Microwaves of a few gigahertz frequencies offer photons with energies of ≈10 μeV, which can affect neither electronic states nor chemical bonds in condensed matter. Here, we describe an implementation of scanning near-field microwave microscopy for imaging in liquids using ultrathin molecular impermeable membranes separating scanning probes from samples enclosed in environmental cells. We imaged a model electroplating reaction as well as individual live cells. Through a side-by-side comparison of the microwave imagingmore » with scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate the advantage of microwaves for artifact-free imaging.« less

  7. Gyroscope relativity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decher, R.

    1971-01-01

    A gyroscope test of general relativity theory is proposed. The basic ideas and hardware concepts conceived by the investigators to implement the experiment are discussed. The goal is to measure the extremely small relativistic precession of gyroscopes in an earth-orbiting satellite. The experiment hardware (cryogenic gyroscopes, a telescope and superconducting circuits) is enclosed in a liquid helium dewar. The experiment will operate in orbit for about one year.

  8. RF Exposure Analysis for Multiple Wi-Fi Devices In Enclosed Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Rhodes, Bryan A.; deSilva, B. Kanishka; Sham, Catherine C.; Keiser, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Wi-Fi devices operated inside a metallic enclosure have been investigation in the recent years. A motivation for this study is to investigate wave propagation inside an enclosed environment such as elevator, car, aircraft, and spacecraft. There are performances and safety concerned that when the RF transmitters are used in the metallic enclosed environments. In this paper, the field distributions inside a confined room were investigated with multiple portable Wi-Fi devices. Computer simulations were performed using the rigorous computational electromagnetics (CEM). The method of moments (MoM) was used to model the mutual coupling among antennas. The geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) was applied for the multiple reflections off the ground and walls. The prediction of the field distribution inside such environment is useful for the planning and deployment of a wireless radio and sensor system. Factors that affect the field strengths and distributions of radio waves in confined space were analyzed. The results could be used to evaluate the RF exposure safety in confined environment. By comparing the field distributions for various scenarios, it was observed that the Wi-Fi device counts, spacing and relative locations in the room are important factors in such environments. The RF Keep Out Zone (KOZ), where the electric field strengths exceed the permissible RF exposure limit, could be used to assess the RF human exposure compliance. As shown in this study, it s possible to maximize or minimize field intensity in specific area by arranging the Wi-Fi devices as a function of the relative location and spacing in a calculated manner.

  9. Facile bench-top fabrication of enclosed circular microchannels provides 3D confined structure for growth of prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dolega, Monika E; Wagh, Jayesh; Gerbaud, Sophie; Kermarrec, Frederique; Alcaraz, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Donald K; Gidrol, Xavier; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple bench-top method to fabricate enclosed circular channels for biological experiments. Fabricating the channels takes less than 2 hours by using glass capillaries of various diameters (from 100 µm up to 400 µm) as a mould in PDMS. The inner surface of microchannels prepared in this way was coated with a thin membrane of either Matrigel or a layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte to control cellular adhesion. The microchannels were then used as scaffolds for 3D-confined epithelial cell culture. To show that our device can be used with several epithelial cell types from exocrine glandular tissues, we performed our biological studies on adherent epithelial prostate cells (non-malignant RWPE-1 and invasive PC3) and also on breast (non-malignant MCF10A) cells We observed that in static conditions cells adhere and proliferate to form a confluent layer in channels of 150 µm in diameter and larger, whereas cellular viability decreases with decreasing diameter of the channel. Matrigel and PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulphonate)) promote cell adhesion, whereas the cell proliferation rate was reduced on the PAH (poly (allylamine hydrochloride))-terminated surface. Moreover infusing channels with a continuous flow did not induce any cellular detachment. Our system is designed to simply grow cells in a microchannel structure and could be easily fabricated in any biological laboratory. It offers opportunities to grow epithelial cells that support the formation of a light. This system could be eventually used, for example, to collect cellular secretions, or study cell responses to graduated hypoxia conditions, to chemicals (drugs, siRNA, …) and/or physiological shear stress.

  10. A glass-coated tungsten microelectrode enclosing optical fibers for optogenetic exploration in primate deep brain structures.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Keita; Ohashi, Yohei; Tsubota, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Daigo; Hirabayashi, Toshiyuki; Yaguchi, Masae; Matsuyama, Makoto; Sekine, Takeru; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2012-10-15

    The optogenetic approach to primate brain circuitry has unparalleled potential for uncovering genetically and temporally resolved neuronal mechanisms of higher brain functions. In order to optogenetically investigate the large and complex primate brain, an optical-/electrical probe, or "optrode", must be inserted deeply, which requires the optrode to be not only long and stiff, but also sharp and smooth to reduce possible tissue damage. This study presents a tungsten microelectrode-based optrode that encloses optical fibers within its insulation glass. Optical fibers and a tungsten wire were tightly bound to each other and integrally coated with a smooth, thin layer of glass. This design satisfied the structural requirements for use in deep brain structures. The performance of the optrode was then examined in the thalamus of the rat and macaque monkeys which were injected with lentiviral vectors carrying the channelrhodopsin-2-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (ChR2-EYFP) transgene. With fluorescence measurements via the optical fiber, ChR2-EYFP expression was detected clearly in vivo, which was confirmed by histological analysis in the rat. With photostimulation and extracellular recording, photo-responsive single-unit activities were isolated in the monkeys. The depth distribution of these units and the peak of the EYFP fluorescence profile overlapped consistently with each other. Thus, by developing a new probe, optogenetic methodology was successfully applied to a primate subcortical structure. This smooth glass-coated optrode is a promising tool for chronic in vivo experiments with various research targets including deep brain structures in behaving monkeys. PMID:22971353

  11. Facile Bench-Top Fabrication of Enclosed Circular Microchannels Provides 3D Confined Structure for Growth of Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dolega, Monika E.; Wagh, Jayesh; Gerbaud, Sophie; Kermarrec, Frederique; Alcaraz, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Donald K.; Gidrol, Xavier; Picollet-D’hahan, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple bench-top method to fabricate enclosed circular channels for biological experiments. Fabricating the channels takes less than 2 hours by using glass capillaries of various diameters (from 100 µm up to 400 µm) as a mould in PDMS. The inner surface of microchannels prepared in this way was coated with a thin membrane of either Matrigel or a layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte to control cellular adhesion. The microchannels were then used as scaffolds for 3D-confined epithelial cell culture. To show that our device can be used with several epithelial cell types from exocrine glandular tissues, we performed our biological studies on adherent epithelial prostate cells (non-malignant RWPE-1 and invasive PC3) and also on breast (non-malignant MCF10A) cells We observed that in static conditions cells adhere and proliferate to form a confluent layer in channels of 150 µm in diameter and larger, whereas cellular viability decreases with decreasing diameter of the channel. Matrigel and PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulphonate)) promote cell adhesion, whereas the cell proliferation rate was reduced on the PAH (poly (allylamine hydrochloride))-terminated surface. Moreover infusing channels with a continuous flow did not induce any cellular detachment. Our system is designed to simply grow cells in a microchannel structure and could be easily fabricated in any biological laboratory. It offers opportunities to grow epithelial cells that support the formation of a light. This system could be eventually used, for example, to collect cellular secretions, or study cell responses to graduated hypoxia conditions, to chemicals (drugs, siRNA, …) and/or physiological shear stress. PMID:24945245

  12. Coarsening Experiment Being Prepared for Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, J. Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures-2 (CSLM-2) experiment is a materials science space flight experiment whose purpose is to investigate the kinetics of competitive particle growth within a liquid matrix. During coarsening, small particles shrink by losing atoms to larger particles, causing the larger particles to grow. In this experiment, solid particles of tin will grow (coarsen) within a liquid lead-tin eutectic matrix. The preceding figures show the coarsening of tin particles in a lead-tin eutectic as a function of time. By conducting this experiment in a microgravity environment, we can study a greater range of solid volume fractions, and the effects of sedimentation present in terrestrial experiments will be negligible. The CSLM-2 experiment is slated to fly onboard the International Space Station. The experiment will be run in the Microgravity Science Glovebox installed in the U.S. Laboratory module.

  13. Reef fish dynamic response to climatic variability in a warm eastern Mediterranean semi-enclosed basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agiadi, K.; Koskeridou, E.; Giamali, Ch.; Karakitsios, V.

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies on the effects of global warming on fish populations reveal that the resulting hypoxia-based habitat compression due to the expansion of the oxygen minimum zone may lead to the restriction of fish depth distributions to the oxygenated near-surface layer1. Here we postulate that similar phenomena may have affected the fish distribution in the early Pliocene Heraklion semi-enclosed sea (Crete, eastern Mediterranean). Fish otoliths from Voutes section are systematically identified and the data is examined from a palaeoecologic perspective in response to the Pliocene climatic variability. Bregmaceros and Diaphus taaningi otoliths' relative abundances are used as reliable palaeoclimatic indicators2. The Voutes section sediments contain a very rich fish fauna. Diaphus spp., Bregmaceros sp., Sardinella maderensis, Phosichthyidae and Sternoptychyidae form the pelagic component. Mesopelagic taxa belong mostly to Myctophids. The benthopelagic and benthic component of the fish fauna is very well diversified and is comprised of Gobiids, such as Gobius cf. niger, Callogobius sp., Lesueurigobius aff. sanzoi, and Aphya sp., as well as Gadiculus labiatus, Laemonema sp., Oblada melanura, Parascombrus mutinensis, Barbourisia rufa, Blennius sp., Ammodytes sp., Solea aff. solea. The presence of Oligopus sp., Spratelloides sp., and Brotula cf. mutlibarbata in the middle part of the section indicate the development of a reef in the study area. The palaeoecologic analysis of the surface, intermediate and deep water faunal groups indicate that the pelagic fish populations in the semi-enclosed early Pliocene Heraklion basin directly reflect the climatic variability. However, the intermediate and deep water fish did not respond to climate change in the same manner. Indeed, two dysoxic events are recorded in this section, where the pelagic component of the fauna is almost exclusively comprised of Bregmaceros sp., few Myctophids are present, and the benthic and benthopelagic

  14. GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2012-05-14

    A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for each characterization technique used. This report contains the summary of the results.

  15. 46 CFR 108.437 - Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment. 108.437 Section 108.437 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide...

  16. One-pot fabrication of novel cuboctahedral Cu2O crystals enclosed by anisotropic surfaces with enhancing catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaodong; Zhang, Hongjia; Tang, LinLi; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Yang, Zhimao

    2014-10-14

    For the first time, one-pot solution-phase selective-etching to create cuboctahedral Cu2O crystals enclosed by both stepped {111} surfaces and smooth {100} surfaces has been demonstrated. Investigation of photocatalytic performances indicates that the stepped cuboctahedral Cu2O crystals have higher photocatalytic activities than those of the common smooth ones.

  17. STS 31 PAYLOAD HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ENCLOSED IN AN AIR-TIGHT PLASTIC BAG FOR PROTECTION IN VERTICA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Preparations are made to enclose the Hubble Space Telescope [HST] inside an air-tight plastic bag in the VPF. Processing of the 94- inch primary mirror telescope for launch on the Discovery in March 1990, involves working within strict controls to prevent contamination.

  18. FUGITIVE EMISSION REDUCTIONS DUE TO THE USE OF ENCLOSED DOCTOR BLADE SYSTEMS IN THE FLEXOGRAPHIC AND ROTOGRAVURE PRINTING INDUSTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a quantification of the level of fugitive emission reductions resulting from the use of enclosed doctor blade (EDB) systems in place of traditional ink feed systems at flexographic and rotogravure printing operations. An EDB system is an innovative ink...

  19. 40 CFR 63.1037 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units or affected facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... negative pressure at all times while the process unit or affected facility is in operation to ensure that... limitation: Enclosed-vented process units or affected facilities. 63.1037 Section 63.1037 Protection of...-vented process units or affected facilities. (a) Use of closed vent system and control device....

  20. Small drains, big problems: the impact of dry weather runoff on shoreline water quality at enclosed beaches.

    PubMed

    Rippy, Megan A; Stein, Robert; Sanders, Brett F; Davis, Kristen; McLaughlin, Karen; Skinner, John F; Kappeler, John; Grant, Stanley B

    2014-12-16

    Enclosed beaches along urban coastlines are frequent hot spots of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) pollution. In this paper we present field measurements and modeling studies aimed at evaluating the impact of small storm drains on FIB pollution at enclosed beaches in Newport Bay, the second largest tidal embayment in Southern California. Our results suggest that small drains have a disproportionate impact on enclosed beach water quality for five reasons: (1) dry weather surface flows (primarily from overirrigation of lawns and ornamental plants) harbor FIB at concentrations exceeding recreational water quality criteria; (2) small drains can trap dry weather runoff during high tide, and then release it in a bolus during the falling tide when drainpipe outlets are exposed; (3) nearshore turbulence is low (turbulent diffusivities approximately 10(-3) m(2) s(-1)), limiting dilution of FIB and other runoff-associated pollutants once they enter the bay; (4) once in the bay, runoff can form buoyant plumes that further limit vertical mixing and dilution; and (5) local winds can force buoyant runoff plumes back against the shoreline, where water depth is minimal and human contact likely. Outdoor water conservation and urban retrofits that minimize the volume of dry and wet weather runoff entering the local storm drain system may be the best option for improving beach water quality in Newport Bay and other urban-impacted enclosed beaches.

  1. 46 CFR 108.437 - Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment. 108.437 Section 108.437 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.12 - Precautions and the order of testing before entering confined and enclosed spaces and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... exposure limit, are located in subpart Z of 29 CFR part 1915, and § 1915.12(c). (c) Toxic, corrosive... confined and enclosed spaces and other dangerous atmospheres. 1915.12 Section 1915.12 Labor Regulations... Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.12 Precautions and the order of testing before...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.12 - Precautions and the order of testing before entering confined and enclosed spaces and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... exposure limit, are located in subpart Z of 29 CFR part 1915, and § 1915.12(c). (c) Toxic, corrosive... confined and enclosed spaces and other dangerous atmospheres. 1915.12 Section 1915.12 Labor Regulations... Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.12 Precautions and the order of testing before...

  4. 46 CFR 108.437 - Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment. 108.437 Section 108.437 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide...

  5. 29 CFR 1915.12 - Precautions and the order of testing before entering confined and enclosed spaces and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... exposure limit, are located in subpart Z of 29 CFR part 1915, and § 1915.12(c). (c) Toxic, corrosive... confined and enclosed spaces and other dangerous atmospheres. 1915.12 Section 1915.12 Labor Regulations... Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.12 Precautions and the order of testing before...

  6. Trapping of fine sediment in a semi-enclosed bay, Palau, Micronesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbuu, Yimnang; Victor, Steven; Wolanski, Eric; Richmond, Robert H.

    2003-08-01

    Airai Bay, Palau, is a small (3 km 2), semi-enclosed, mangrove-fringed, meso-tidal, coral lagoon on the southeast coast of Palau. It drains a small catchment area (26 km 2) of highly erodible soils in an area with high annual rainfall (3.7 m). River floods are short-lived and the sediment load is very large, with suspended fine sediment concentration exceeding 1500 mg l -1. The resulting river plume is about 2 m thick. The brackish water residence time is about 7 days; during this period the plume remains a distinct surface feature even after river runoff has ceased. About 98% of the riverine fine sediment settles in Airai Bay, of which about 15-30% is deposited in the mangroves during river floods. This mud remains trapped in Airai Bay because the bay is protected from ocean swells and the tidal currents and locally generated wind waves are too small to resuspend the mud in quantity. The mud is smothering coral reefs, creating a phase shift from coral to fleshy algae dominance, and is even changing habitats by creating mud banks. The persistence of Airai Bay marine resources may not be possible without improved soil erosion control in the river catchment.

  7. Field assessment of enclosed cab filtration system performance using particle counting measurements.

    PubMed

    Organiscak, John A; Cecala, Andrew B; Noll, James D

    2013-01-01

    Enclosed cab filtration systems are typically used on mobile mining equipment to reduce miners' exposure to airborne dust generated during mining operations. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Office of Mine Safety and Health Research (OMSHR) has recently worked with a mining equipment manufacturer to examine a new cab filtration system design for underground industrial minerals equipment. This cab filtration system uses a combination of three particulate filters to reduce equipment operators' exposure to dust and diesel particulates present in underground industrial mineral mines. NIOSH initially examined this cab filtration system using a two-instrument particle counting method at the equipment company's manufacturing shop facility to assess several alternative filters. This cab filtration system design was further studied on several pieces of equipment during a two- to seven-month period at two underground limestone mines. The two-instrument particle counting method was used outside the underground mine at the end of the production shifts to regularly test the cabs' long-term protection factor performance with particulates present in the ambient air. This particle counting method showed that three of the four cabs achieved protection factors greater than 1,000 during the field studies. The fourth cab did not perform at this level because it had a damaged filter in the system. The particle counting measurements of submicron particles present in the ambient air were shown to be a timely and useful quantification method in assessing cab performance during these field studies.

  8. Pollution of PM10 in an underground enclosed loading dock in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abualqumboz, M. S.; Mohammed, N. I.; Malakahmad, A.; Nazif, A. N.; Albattniji, A. T.

    2016-06-01

    The enclosed nature of underground loading docks results in accumulation of motor vehicles emissions. Thus, concentration of numerous harmful air pollutants including PM10 particles can increase and reach dangerous levels. This paper aims to study short-term and long-term exposure of PM10 particles inside an underground loading dock located in Malaysia. In addition, the correlation with indoor temperature, relative humidity and vehicles flow will be measured. The concentrations of PM10 were measured for three consecutive weeks using the real-time air quality monitoring instrument AQM60. Series of statistical tests and multiple linear regression analysis were applied on the data using SPSS software and MATLAB R2013a. The results illustrated that PM10 daily average concentration was in compliance with the Malaysian guideline of 150 µg/m3. Actually, 95% of instantaneous PM10 concentration readings were below 75 μg/m3. In addition, significant correlation were found between PM10 concentration and indoor temperature, relative humidity and the previous concentration. The multiple R and R2 were 0.91 and 0.83, respectively. PM10 concentration was also correlated with motor vehicles flow. In conclusion, health effects of long-term exposure to small repetitive doses of air pollutant inside underground facilities should be studied and appropriate control measures need to be implemented.

  9. Through-Metal-Wall Power Delivery and Data Transmission for Enclosed Sensors: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ding-Xin; Hu, Zheng; Zhao, Hong; Hu, Hai-Feng; Sun, Yun-Zhe; Hou, Bao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the current viable technologies for wireless power delivery and data transmission through metal barriers. Using such technologies sensors enclosed in hermetical metal containers can be powered and communicate through exterior power sources without penetration of the metal wall for wire feed-throughs. In this review, we first discuss the significant and essential requirements for through-metal-wall power delivery and data transmission and then we: (1) describe three electromagnetic coupling based techniques reported in the literature, which include inductive coupling, capacitive coupling, and magnetic resonance coupling; (2) present a detailed review of wireless ultrasonic through-metal-wall power delivery and/or data transmission methods; (3) compare various ultrasonic through-metal-wall systems in modeling, transducer configuration and communication mode with sensors; (4) summarize the characteristics of electromagnetic-based and ultrasound-based systems, evaluate the challenges and development trends. We conclude that electromagnetic coupling methods are suitable for through thin non-ferromagnetic metal wall power delivery and data transmission at a relatively low data rate; piezoelectric transducer-based ultrasonic systems are particularly advantageous in achieving high power transfer efficiency and high data rates; the combination of more than one single technique may provide a more practical and reliable solution for long term operation. PMID:26694392

  10. Casimir potential of a compact object enclosed by a spherical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, Saad; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-11-15

    We study the electromagnetic Casimir interaction of a compact object contained inside a closed cavity of another compact object. We express the interaction energy in terms of the objects' scattering matrices and translation matrices that relate the coordinate systems appropriate to each object. When the enclosing object is an otherwise empty metallic spherical shell, much larger than the internal object, and the two are sufficiently separated, the Casimir force can be expressed in terms of the static electric and magnetic multipole polarizabilities of the internal object, which is analogous to the Casimir-Polder result. Although it is not a simple power law, the dependence of the force on the separation of the object from the containing sphere is a universal function of its displacement from the center of the sphere, independent of other details of the object's electromagnetic response. Furthermore, we compute the exact Casimir force between two metallic spheres contained one inside the other at arbitrary separations. Finally, we combine our results with earlier work on the Casimir force between two spheres to obtain data on the leading-order correction to the proximity force approximation for two metallic spheres both outside and within one another.

  11. Field Assessment of Enclosed Cab Filtration System Performance Using Particle Counting Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Organiscak, John A.; Cecala, Andrew B.; Noll, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Enclosed cab filtration systems are typically used on mobile mining equipment to reduce miners’ exposure to airborne dust generated during mining operations. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Office of Mine Safety and Health Research (OMSHR) has recently worked with a mining equipment manufacturer to examine a new cab filtration system design for underground industrial minerals equipment. This cab filtration system uses a combination of three particulate filters to reduce equipment operators’ exposure to dust and diesel particulates present in underground industrial mineral mines. NIOSH initially examined this cab filtration system using a two-instrument particle counting method at the equipment company’s manufacturing shop facility to assess several alternative filters. This cab filtration system design was further studied on several pieces of equipment during a two- to seven-month period at two underground limestone mines. The two-instrument particle counting method was used outside the underground mine at the end of the production shifts to regularly test the cabs’ long-term protection factor performance with particulates present in the ambient air. This particle counting method showed that three of the four cabs achieved protection factors greater than 1,000 during the field studies. The fourth cab did not perform at this level because it had a damaged filter in the system. The particle counting measurements of submicron particles present in the ambient air were shown to be a timely and useful quantification method in assessing cab performance during these field studies. PMID:23915268

  12. An outbreak of Sarcocystis calchasi encephalitis in multiple psittacine species within an enclosed zoological aviary.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Guillermo; Speer, Brian; Wellehan, James F X; Bradway, Daniel S; Wright, Lewis; Reavill, Drury; Barr, Bradd C; Childress, April; Shivaprasad, H L; Chin, Richard P

    2013-11-01

    A total of 5 psittacine birds in an enclosed zoological exhibit, including 2 princess parrots and 3 cockatoos of 2 different species, developed severe central nervous system clinical signs over a 2-3-month period and died or were euthanized. Histologically, all birds had a lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic encephalitis with intralesional protozoa consistent with a Sarcocystis species in addition to intramuscular tissue sarcocysts. By immunohistochemical staining, merozoites in brain and tissue cysts in muscle did not react with polyclonal antisera against Sarcocystis falcatula, Sarcocystis neurona, Toxoplasma gondii, and Neospora caninum, or with a monoclonal antibody to S. neurona. Transmission electron microscopy on sarcocyst tissue cyst walls from 2 birds was morphologically consistent with Sarcocystis calchasi. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of partial 18S ribosomal RNA from muscle tissue cysts and brain schizonts from 3 birds was consistent with a clade containing S. calchasi and Sarcocystis columbae but could not distinguish these closely related Sarcocystis species. However, PCR amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer 1 RNA segment in the brain from 2 birds and muscle from 2 birds specifically identified the isolates as S. calchasi. The current report documents that multiple psittacine species are susceptible intermediate hosts of S. calchasi, and that infection can cause encephalitis resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in psittacine aviaries.

  13. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry of flowable enclosed materials

    DOEpatents

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1993-03-02

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a flowable material enclosed in a transport system having an infrared transparent wall portion. A temperature differential is transiently generated between a thin surface layer portion of the material and a lower or deeper portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material, and the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is detected through the infrared transparent portion of the transport system while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower or deeper portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. By such detection, the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the material.

  14. Microbiological and clinical effects of chlorhexidine enclosed in fixtures of 3I-Titamed implants.

    PubMed

    Groenendijk, Edith; Dominicus, Jan J K; Moorer, Wilfred R; Aartman, Irene H A; van Waas, Marinus A J

    2004-04-01

    This double-blind study used a split-mouth design to investigate the microbiological and clinical effects of 0.2% chlorhexidine enclosed in fixtures. Twelve patients had 46 fixtures implanted. At second-stage surgery, a microbiological sample (baseline sample) of the inner parts of the fixtures was taken. Then, a 0.2% chlorhexidine solution was applied into the inner space of 23 fixtures (test group), and in 23 fixtures saline was applied (control group). Abutments were installed and gingival index, plaque index and crevicular fluid flow were monitored weekly. After 6 weeks, a second microbiological sample of the inner part of the fixtures was taken. At baseline, viable bacteria were detected within 46% of the fixtures. After weeks, bacteria were found in 87% of the fixtures. The numbers of bacteria in the control group were significantly higher than those in the test group. The results indicate that, after first-stage surgery, contamination of the inner spaces of the fixtures is commonplace. Application of a 0.2% chlorhexidine solution at second-stage surgery inhibits growth or acquisition of bacteria in the fixtures. In both test and control groups, the crevicular fluid flow as well as the gingival index decreased during the experimental period. At 4, 5, and 6 weeks after chlorhexidine application, these values in the test group appeared lower, but did not attain statistical significance.

  15. Non-linear dynamics of annular creeping flow enclosed by an elastic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaz, Shai; Gat, Amir

    2015-11-01

    This study deals with the fluid-structure-interaction problem of longitudinal annular flow about a varying cross-section centre-body enclosed by an elastic membrane. The gap between the centre-body and membrane wall may be initially filled with a thin fluid layer or devoid of it. We employ elastic shell theory and the lubrication approximation and obtain a forced nonlinear diffusion equation governing the problem. In the case of an advancing liquid front in an initially unpenetrated interface (viscous peeling) the governing equation degenerates into a forced porous medium equation, for which several closed-form solutions can be obtained. Based on self-similarity we define propagation laws for the fluid-elastic interaction which in turn provide the basis for numerical investigation of compound solutions such as pulse trains and other waveforms. The presented interaction between viscosity and elasticity may be applied to fields such as soft-robotics and micro-scale or larger swimmers by allowing for the time-dependent control of a compliant boundary.

  16. Through-Metal-Wall Power Delivery and Data Transmission for Enclosed Sensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ding-Xin; Hu, Zheng; Zhao, Hong; Hu, Hai-Feng; Sun, Yun-Zhe; Hou, Bao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the current viable technologies for wireless power delivery and data transmission through metal barriers. Using such technologies sensors enclosed in hermetical metal containers can be powered and communicate through exterior power sources without penetration of the metal wall for wire feed-throughs. In this review, we first discuss the significant and essential requirements for through-metal-wall power delivery and data transmission and then we: (1) describe three electromagnetic coupling based techniques reported in the literature, which include inductive coupling, capacitive coupling, and magnetic resonance coupling; (2) present a detailed review of wireless ultrasonic through-metal-wall power delivery and/or data transmission methods; (3) compare various ultrasonic through-metal-wall systems in modeling, transducer configuration and communication mode with sensors; (4) summarize the characteristics of electromagnetic-based and ultrasound-based systems, evaluate the challenges and development trends. We conclude that electromagnetic coupling methods are suitable for through thin non-ferromagnetic metal wall power delivery and data transmission at a relatively low data rate; piezoelectric transducer-based ultrasonic systems are particularly advantageous in achieving high power transfer efficiency and high data rates; the combination of more than one single technique may provide a more practical and reliable solution for long term operation. PMID:26694392

  17. Seasickness in totally-enclosed motor-propelled survival craft: five offshore oil rig disasters.

    PubMed

    Landolt, J P; Light, I M; Greenen, M G; Monaco, C

    1992-02-01

    Five mobile offshore drilling unit disasters--Alexander L. Kielland, Ocean Ranger, Vinland, Ocean Odyssey, and Rowan Gorilla I--were studied to assess the degree to which seasickness occurs and endangers the lives of occupants of totally-enclosed motor-propelled survival craft (TEMPSC). Thousands of other peacetime marine incidents were reviewed and a literature search was conducted to assess the same seasickness problem. The one reported death in the Vinland abandonment appears to be the only one that could be associated, even remotely, with seasickness. It cannot be established whether or not seasickness contributed to the cause of death in the case of the Ocean Ranger victims, but it did occur in 75% or more of TEMPSC occupants in the other four rig disasters. It has occurred both in relatively calm waters of 1-m wave height and in severe seas of 15-m heights. Evacuees in an intact TEMPSC are able to survive many hours of severe seas; consequently, they should not be rescued until the weather and sea conditions improve. Moreover, practical survival training and good leadership is a principal cornerstone in the amelioration of seasickness.

  18. Influence of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on Primary Productivity in the Semi-Enclosed Bay in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, R.; Nishi, S.; Taniguchi, M.; Tominaga, O.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have shown that submarine groundwater discharge is an alternative nutrient pathway and can drive primary production in coastal seas. However, very little is known about an exact relationship between input of groundwater and response of primary production. To clarify the relationship, we conducted the field survey in the semi-enclosed coastal bay in Japan (Obama Bay). There are abundant amounts of groundwater resources in the basin. Firstly, we conducted 222Rn continuous measurement along the coast in March 2013 to obtain the spatial difference of groundwater impact. As a result, 222Rn activity clearly showed that groundwater discharge concentrates in the western part of the bay head. We thus conducted in-situ measurements of primary productivity using stable 13C tracer method and environmental parameters (ex. 222Rn activity, light intensity, temperature and nutrient concentrations) at 6 stations within the western bay head in July and August 2013. Primary productivity within the western bay head changed from 11.0 to 49.5 μg C L-1 hr-1 in July and from 9.3 to 32.4 μg C L-1 hr-1 in August. Moreover, there was significant relationship between primary productivity and 222Rn concentration in both months. Although light intensity and water temperature were different in each station and month, concentrations of nutrients limited primary productivity. These results showed that nutrient supply from SGD would affect crucial impact on primary productivity in Obama Bay.

  19. Seasickness in totally-enclosed motor-propelled survival craft: five offshore oil rig disasters.

    PubMed

    Landolt, J P; Light, I M; Greenen, M G; Monaco, C

    1992-02-01

    Five mobile offshore drilling unit disasters--Alexander L. Kielland, Ocean Ranger, Vinland, Ocean Odyssey, and Rowan Gorilla I--were studied to assess the degree to which seasickness occurs and endangers the lives of occupants of totally-enclosed motor-propelled survival craft (TEMPSC). Thousands of other peacetime marine incidents were reviewed and a literature search was conducted to assess the same seasickness problem. The one reported death in the Vinland abandonment appears to be the only one that could be associated, even remotely, with seasickness. It cannot be established whether or not seasickness contributed to the cause of death in the case of the Ocean Ranger victims, but it did occur in 75% or more of TEMPSC occupants in the other four rig disasters. It has occurred both in relatively calm waters of 1-m wave height and in severe seas of 15-m heights. Evacuees in an intact TEMPSC are able to survive many hours of severe seas; consequently, they should not be rescued until the weather and sea conditions improve. Moreover, practical survival training and good leadership is a principal cornerstone in the amelioration of seasickness. PMID:1546944

  20. Comparison of glass vessels and plastic bags for enclosing living plant parts for headspace analysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Jones, Alex; Poppy, Guy M

    2006-04-01

    Plants release volatile chemicals into their surrounding air space that can affect the physiology of neighboring plants and influence the behavior of insects. In studying these interactions, it is desirable to collect volatiles from plants that have not been excised and are growing under as natural conditions as possible. We compared a vessel of borosilicate glass and Nylon-6 or polyester [poly(ethyleneterephthalate) or PET] cooking bags for enclosing plants during collection of volatiles. A push-pull airflow system was used, and volatiles were trapped on Tenax TA and analyzed by gas chromatography after thermal desorption. Low levels of impurities were found for the glass vessel and polyester bags. Nylon bags contained higher levels and more impurities. Recoveries of standards of 10 plant volatiles were measured in static and dynamic systems. In a static air system, there was good recovery only from the glass vessel. In a dynamic system, there was generally good recovery from both the glass vessel and polyester bags. Recoveries of alpha-pinene and (Z)-jasmone were poor throughout. The former was shown to have a very low breakthrough volume on the Tenax TA adsorbent, and the latter may be strongly adsorbed on glass. All three materials were essentially transparent in the IR and visible (photosynthetic) range but with significantly different absorptions in the UV range. In a simulated dynamic entrainment in full sunlight, internal vessel temperatures were higher than ambient by up to 9.5 degrees C in the glass vessel and 7.5 degrees C in the polyester bag. Lower increases in temperature relative to ambient (<1 degrees C) were recorded when entrainments were conducted in the shade. In a field trial, the profiles of volatiles collected from an apple tree infested with rosy apple aphid using a glass vessel and a polyester bag were similar. Polyester bags are recommended as more convenient than glass vessels for the enclosure of plants during the collection of volatiles.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of the behavior of nitromethanes enclosed inside carbon nanotube containers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Se Won; Cho, Soo Gyeong

    2016-07-01

    We utilized molecular dynamics (MD) to investigate the behavior of nitromethane molecules (NMs) enclosed inside carbon nanotube (CNT) containers sealed with buckybowl caps. Two different sizes of CNT containers, i.e., (10,10) and (20,20), were employed to contain the energetic NMs. After loading the NMs into these containers, MD simulations were carried out at different loading densities. The loading density was changed from 0.4 to 2.0 g/cc. At low loading densities, NMs preferentially resided near the surface of the CNT wall (orienting themselves in the cylindrical direction) and near the buckybowl caps (orienting themselves in the principal-axis direction). This behavior suggests the buckybowl caps and the CNT wall have attractive interactions with the NMs. The distribution of the NMs inside the containers did not change upon increasing the temperature from ambient to 100 °C. However, the positional preference of the NMs found at ambient temperature to 100 °C was not the same as that observed at 1000 °C due to the increased thermal motions of the NMs. The size of the CNT container had a significant effect on the fluidity of the NMs. From 25 to 100 °C, the NMs inside the (10,10) CNT container were only mobile at low loading densities. On the other hand, in the (20,20) CNT container, the NMs showed good mobility up to a loading density of 1.6 g/cc. Graphical Abstract Attractive interactions between the nitromethanes and the buckybowl caps as well as the carbon nanotube wall.

  2. Preliminary Findings from the SHERE ISS Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Nancy R.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Erni, Philipp; Soulages, Johannes; Magee, Kevin S.

    2009-01-01

    The Shear History Extensional Rheology Experiment (SHERE) is an International Space Station (ISS) glovebox experiment designed to study the effect of preshear on the transient evolution of the microstructure and viscoelastic tensile stresses for monodisperse dilute polymer solutions. The SHERE experiment hardware was launched on Shuttle Mission STS-120 (ISS Flight 10A) on October 22, 2007, and 20 fluid samples were launched on Shuttle Mission STS-123 (ISS Flight 10/A) on March 11, 2008. Astronaut Gregory Chamitoff performed experiments during Increment 17 on the ISS between June and September 2008. A summary of the ten year history of the hardware development, the experiment's science objectives, and Increment 17's flight operations are discussed in the paper. A brief summary of the preliminary science results is also discussed.

  3. Assessment of the Particulate Food Supply Available for Mussel ( Mytilus spp.) Farming in a Semi-enclosed, Northern Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, R. W.; McKenzie, C. H.; Mills, T. J.

    2001-07-01

    Temporal variability in the quantity, organic content, and phytoplankton composition of the particulate food supply available to a cultured mussel population was assessed for a 3-year period in a small inlet of Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland, Canada. The study site had a restricted flushing rate estimated at 1-2·75 times wk -1for a complete water exchange. The quantity of both total (TPM) and organic (POM) seston varied temporally from 0·7-23·7 mg l -1and 0·05-1·97 mg l -1respectively during the 3-year sampling period. TPM typically remained relatively high (>10 mg l -1) through the winter and spring period. Most of the seasonal variation in total seston was due to seasonal variability in the PIM component. Both PIM and POM concentrations were seasonally lowest during summer. The organic fraction of the seston (POM/TPM ratio) was seasonally low in winter and increased steadily through spring and summer to reach its maximum in the autumn. The living phytoplankton component of the seston was typically dominated, both numerically and in biomass, by a variety of diatom and autotrophic nanoflagellate species in the 2- 20-μm diameter size range. Discrete diatom population blooms occurred in the autumn of all three years and largely consisted of a single species, Skeletonema costatum. Phytoplankton:detritus ratios were significantly lower during winter. Total phytoplankton biomass levels were seasonally low during winter and summer and were associated with seasonal variation in diatom biomass. We conducted modelling simulations of relationships among seston organic food levels, their temporal variability, tidal flushing rates, cultured mussel biomass and production indices, and estimates of mussel maintenance ration requirements to predict the adequacy of northern inlets to sustain commercial-scale mussel farm development. We conclude from these simulations that small, semi-enclosed, northern inlets likely frequently experience periods when naturally occurring organic

  4. How Patients and Nurses Experience an Open Versus an Enclosed Nursing Station on an Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    PubMed

    Shattell, Mona; Bartlett, Robin; Beres, Kyle; Southard, Kelly; Bell, Claire; Judge, Christine A; Duke, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The inpatient environment is a critical space for nurses and patients in psychiatric settings. In this article, we describe nurses' and patients' perceptions of the inpatient environment both before the removal of a Plexiglas enclosure around a nurses' station and after its removal. Nurses had mixed feelings about the enclosure, reporting that it provided for confidentiality and a concentrated work space but also acknowledged the challenge of the barrier for communication with their patients. Patients unanimously preferred the nurses' station without the barrier, reporting increased feelings of freedom, safety, and connection with the nurses after its removal. It is important to consider the implications of environmental decisions in inpatient settings in order to promote a healthy workplace and healing environment for all community members.

  5. How Patients and Nurses Experience an Open Versus an Enclosed Nursing Station on an Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    PubMed

    Shattell, Mona; Bartlett, Robin; Beres, Kyle; Southard, Kelly; Bell, Claire; Judge, Christine A; Duke, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The inpatient environment is a critical space for nurses and patients in psychiatric settings. In this article, we describe nurses' and patients' perceptions of the inpatient environment both before the removal of a Plexiglas enclosure around a nurses' station and after its removal. Nurses had mixed feelings about the enclosure, reporting that it provided for confidentiality and a concentrated work space but also acknowledged the challenge of the barrier for communication with their patients. Patients unanimously preferred the nurses' station without the barrier, reporting increased feelings of freedom, safety, and connection with the nurses after its removal. It is important to consider the implications of environmental decisions in inpatient settings in order to promote a healthy workplace and healing environment for all community members. PMID:26597907

  6. Quantitative Microwave Imaging of Realistic Numerical Breast Phantoms Using an Enclosed Array of Multiband, Miniaturized Patch Antennas.

    PubMed

    Burfeindt, Matthew J; Behdad, Nader; Van Veen, Barry D; Hagness, Susan C

    2012-01-01

    We present a 3-D microwave breast imaging study in which we reconstruct the dielectric profiles of MRI-derived numerical breast phantoms from simulated array measurements using an enclosed array of multiband, miniaturized patch antennas. The array is designed to overcome challenges relating to the ill-posed nature of the inverse scattering system. We use a multifrequency formulation of the distorted Born iterative method to image four normal-tissue breast phantoms, each corresponding to a different density class. The reconstructed fibroglandular distributions are very faithful to the true distributions in location and basic shape. These results establish the feasibility of using an enclosed array of miniaturized, multiband patch antennas for quantitative microwave breast imaging.

  7. 3D modelling of the transport and fate of riverine fine sediment exported to a semi-enclosed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delandmeter, Philippe; Lambrechts, Jonathan; Lewis, Stephen; Legat, Vincent; Deleersnijder, Eric; Wolanski, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the transport and fate of suspended sediment exported by rivers is crucial for the management of sensitive marine ecosystems. Sediment transport and fate can vary considerably depending on the geophysical characteristics of the offshore environment (i.e. open, semi-enclosed and enclosed systems and the nature of the continental shelf). In this presentation, we focus on a semi-enclosed setting in the Great Barrier Reef, NE Australia. In this system, the large tropical Burdekin River discharges to a long and narrow continental shelf containing numerous headlands and embayments. Using a new 3D sediment model we developed and SLIM 3D, a Finite Element 3D model for coastal flows, we highlight the key processes of sediment transport for such a system. We validate the model with available measured data from the region. Wind direction and speed during the high river flows are showed to largely control the dynamics and final fate of the sediments. Most (71%) of the sediment load delivered by the river is deposited and retained near the river mouth. The remaining sediment is transported further afield in riverine freshwater plumes. The suspended sediment transported longer distances in the freshwater plumes can reach sensitive marine ecosystems. These results are compared to previous studies on the Burdekin River sediment fate and differences are analysed. The model suggests that wind-driven resuspension events will redistribute sediments within an embayment but have little influence on transporting sediments from bay to bay.

  8. Predicting transient particle transport in enclosed environments with the combined computational fluid dynamics and Markov chain method.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Lin, C-H; Long, Z; Chen, Q

    2014-02-01

    To quickly obtain information about airborne infectious disease transmission in enclosed environments is critical in reducing the infection risk to the occupants. This study developed a combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and Markov chain method for quickly predicting transient particle transport in enclosed environments. The method first calculated a transition probability matrix using CFD simulations. Next, the Markov chain technique was applied to calculate the transient particle concentration distributions. This investigation used three cases, particle transport in an isothermal clean room, an office with an underfloor air distribution system, and the first-class cabin of an MD-82 airliner, to validate the combined CFD and Markov chain method. The general trends of the particle concentrations vs. time predicted by the Markov chain method agreed with the CFD simulations for these cases. The proposed Markov chain method can provide faster-than-real-time information about particle transport in enclosed environments. Furthermore, for a fixed airflow field, when the source location is changed, the Markov chain method can be used to avoid recalculation of the particle transport equation and thus reduce computing costs. PMID:23789964

  9. In situ experimental study of carbon monoxide generation by gasoline-powered electric generator in an enclosed space.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liangzhu; Emmerich, Steven J; Persily, Andrew K

    2010-12-01

    On the basis of currently available data, approximately 97% of generator-related carbon monoxide (CO) fatalities are caused by operating currently marketed, carbureted spark-ignited gasoline-powered generators (not equipped with emission controls) in enclosed spaces. To better understand and to reduce the occurrence of these fatalities, research is needed to quantify CO generation rates, develop and test CO emission control devices, and evaluate CO transport and exposure when operating a generator in an enclosed space. As a first step in these efforts, this paper presents measured CO generation rates from a generator without any emission control devices operating in an enclosed space under real weather conditions. This study expands on previously published information from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Thirteen separate tests were conducted under different weather conditions at half and full generator load settings. It was found that the CO level in the shed reached a maximum value of 29,300 +/- 580 mg/m3, whereas the oxygen (O2) was depleted to a minimum level of 16.2 +/- 0.02% by volume. For the test conditions of real weather and generator operation, the CO generation and the O2 consumption could be expressed as time-averaged generation/consumption rates. It was also found that the CO generation and O2 consumption rates can be correlated to the O2 levels in the space and the actual load output from the generator. These correlations are shown to agree well with the measurements.

  10. The impact of Ontario smoke-free legislation on secondhand smoke in enclosed public places.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Bondy, Susan J; Chiavetta, Jo Anne; Selby, Peter; Ferrence, Roberta

    2010-03-01

    Many studies have evaluated the impact of indoor smoking bans on secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure. No studies have assessed the impact of a smoking ban on SHS in enclosed areas outside separately ventilated, designated smoking rooms (DSRs). This study evaluated the overall impact of the Smoke-Free Ontario Act implemented May 31, 2006, on SHS in bars and coffee shops and the impact of banning DSRs on SHS outside DSRs. Air particulate matter (PM) and carcinogenic particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAH) were measured in May 2006 before the ban inside and outside DSRs in Toronto venues (13 coffee shops and 14 bars) that allowed smoking only in DSRs, and in Windsor venues (10 coffee shops and 10 bars) where smoking was allowed in shared spaces. Measurements were repeated 2 months post-ban. Air quality index values (AQIs) were calculated. Mixed model analysis was applied, taking into account measurement errors for repeated measures. Post ban, mean PM and PPAH levels were reduced by 87% (from 494 to 67 mm(2)/m(3)) and 94% (from 196 to 11 ng/m(3)), respectively, inside Toronto DSRs. Mean PM and PPAH levels were reduced by 10% (from 124 to 111 mm(2)/m(3)) and 46% (from 45 to 24 ng/m(3)), respectively, outside Toronto DSRs. In all Windsor venues, mean PM and PPAH levels were reduced by 83% (from 488 to 81 mm(2)/m(3)) and 90% (from 107 to 10 ng/m(3)), respectively. All reductions were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). In Toronto venues, the AQI was reduced from the "very unhealthy" range inside DSRs and the "moderate" range outside Toronto DSRs to the "good" range, and in Windsor venues from the "unhealthy for sensitive groups" range to the "good" range post-ban. Pre-ban PPAH levels including those outside Toronto DSRs may be associated with cardiovascular injury. DSRs did not provide adequate protection from SHS. The Smoke-Free Ontario Act produced a significant and firm reduction in SHS exposure in venues both with and without DSRs. PMID:20017055

  11. Assessment of current effect on waves in a semi-enclosed basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetazzo, A.; Carniel, S.; Sclavo, M.; Bergamasco, A.

    2012-04-01

    The wave-current interaction process in the semi-enclosed Adriatic Sea is studied using the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system, which is used to exchange data fields between the ocean model ROMS (Regional Ocean Modeling System) and the wave model SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore). The 2-way data transfer between circulation and wave models is synchronous with ROMS providing current fields, free surface elevation, and bathymetry to SWAN. In particular, the 3-D current profiles are averaged using a formulation that integrates the near-surface velocity over a depth controlled by the spectral mean wave number. This coupling procedure is carried out up to coastal areas by means of an offline grid nesting. The parent grid covers the whole Adriatic Sea and has a horizontal resolution of 2.0 km, whereas the child grid resolution increases to 0.5 km but it is limited to the northern Adriatic Sea (Gulf of Venice), where the current effect on waves is investigated. The most frequent winds blowing on the Adriatic Sea are the so-called Bora and Sirocco which cause high waves in the Adriatic Sea, although Bora waves are generally fetch-limited. In fact, Bora winds blow orthogonal to the main basin axis (approximately aligned with the NW-SE direction), while Sirocco has large spatial scale being a southeasterly wind. For the numerical simulations, the meteorological forcings are provided by the operational meteorological model COSMO-I7, which is the Italian version of the COSMO Model, a mesoscale model developed in the framework of the COSMO Consortium. During the analysis period, the simulated wind, current and wave are compared with observations at the ISMAR oceanographic tower located off the Venice littoral. Wave heights and sea surface winds are also compared with satellite-derived data. To account for the variability of sea states during a storm, the expected maximum individual wave height in a sea storm with a given history is also

  12. Wave-current interaction: Effect on the wave field in a semi-enclosed basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetazzo, A.; Carniel, S.; Sclavo, M.; Bergamasco, A.

    2013-10-01

    The effect on waves of the Wave-Current Interaction (WCI) process in the semi-enclosed Gulf of Venice (northern region of the Adriatic Sea) was investigated using the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system. COAWST relies on the ocean model ROMS (Regional Ocean Modeling System), the wave model SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore), and the CSTMS (Community Sediment Transport Modeling System) routines. The two-way data transfer between circulation and wave models was synchronous via MCT (Model Coupling Toolkit), with ROMS providing: current field, free surface elevation, and bathymetry to SWAN. For coupling, the 3-D current profiles were averaged using a formulation which integrated the near-surface velocity over a depth controlled by the spectral mean wavenumber. COAWST system was implemented on a parent grid (with horizontal resolution of 2.0 km) covering the whole Adriatic Sea with one-way nesting to a child grid resolving the northern area (Gulf of Venice) at a resolution of 0.5 km. The meteorological forcings provided by the operational meteorological model COSMO-I7 (a mesoscale model developed in the framework of the COSMO Consortium) were used to drive the modeling system in the period bracketing September 2010-August 2011. The adopted winds and the simulated waves were compared with observations at the CNR-ISMAR Acqua Alta oceanographic tower, located off the Venice littoral. Wave heights and sea surface winds were also compared with satellite-derived data. The analysis of WCI was performed on the child grid over the winter season (January-March 2011) with particular focus on the waves generated by prevailing and dominant winds blowing on the Adriatic Sea: Bora and Sirocco. Due to the variable wind direction with respect to the ocean current direction different effects on WCI were depicted, showing that within the northern Adriatic Sea the ocean-wave interactions are strongly dependent on the wind forcing direction. Further

  13. Radon progeny size distributions and enhanced deposition effects from high radon concentrations in an enclosed chamber.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Bobby E

    2004-01-01

    Prior work studying radon progeny in a small enclosed chamber found that at high (222)Rn concentrations an enhanced surface deposition was observed. Subsequent measurements for unfiltered air showed minimal charged particle mobility influence. Progeny particle size measurements reported here, performed at the US Department of Energy Environmental Measurement Laboratory (now with Home Security Department), using the EML graded screen array (GSA) system show in unfiltered air that the high (222)Rn levels causes a reduction in the attached (218)Po progeny airborne particulates and formation of additional normal sized unattached ( approximately 0.80 nm) and also even smaller (218)Po below 0.50 nm. At a (222)Rn level of 51 kBq m(-3), 73% of all (218)Po are of a mean particle diameter of about 0.40 +/- 0.02 nm. At this (222)Rn level, the ratio of (218)Po to (222)Rn airborne concentrations is reduced significantly from the concentration ratio at low (222)Rn levels. Similar reductions and size reformations were observed for the (214)Pb and (214)Bi/Po progeny. The particle size changes are further confirmed using the plateout rates and corresponding deposition velocities. The Crump and Seinfeld deposition theory provides the corresponding particle diffusion coefficients. With the diffusion coefficient to ultrafine clustered particle diameter correlation of Ramamurthi and Hopke, good agreement is obtained between EML GSA and deposition velocity data down to 0.40 nm. Strong evidence is presented that the progeny size reduction is due to, as a result of air ionization, the increased neutralization rate (primarily from electron scavenging of OH molecules) of the initially charged progeny. This is shown to increase with the (1/2) power of (222)Rn concentration and relative humidity as well as increased air change rate in the chamber. These results imply that at (222)Rn levels above 50 kBq m(-3), at relative humidity of 52%, a considerable reduction in lung dose could occur from

  14. Sampling Line Heating Improves Frequency Response of Enclosed Eddy Covariance Gas Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. G.; Fratini, G.; Metzger, S.; Kathilankal, J. C.; Trutna, D.; Luo, H.; Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P.

    2015-12-01

    One of the challenges when measuring eddy-covariance fluxes with closed gas analyzers is high frequency attenuation due to the passage of the sampled air through a gas sampling system (GSS). The problem is particularly relevant for gases that undergo strong sorption processes, such as H2O. Recent "enclosed" analyzer designs (e.g. LI-7200, LI-COR Biosciences Inc.) mitigate the problem by allowing a reduced length of the intake tube (<1 m). Further improvements can come from carefully designed filtering and heating systems that reduce hygroscopic particulates and H2O adsorption on GSS surfaces. Because the sorption processes of H2O increase exponentially with air relative humidity (RH), low-pass filtering effects can be reduced by reducing RH inside the GSS, for example by increasing air temperature via heating. In this work, we evaluate the effects of several heating strategies with the aim of optimizing the LI-7200 performance while limiting the implied increase in power consumption. From field tests we found that 4 W of heating applied uniformly to a rain cap-integrated 2 µm particulate filter (FW-series, Swagelok) and a 700 mm stainless steel tube with 4.8 mm inner diameter reduces the occurrence of problematic RH levels (>60%) in the LI-7200 by ≈50%. As a result, the system half-power frequency increased by ≈1 Hz, and the remaining cospectral correction did not exceed 3%, even at very high ambient RH (95%). While little further improvement was found for increased heating powers, it is possible to optimize the sequence of GSS components and their heating: we found that positioning the particulate filter ≈20 cm downstream of the rain cap and concentrating 2/3 of the heat in this first 20 cm, and 1/3 in the remainder of the tube, provides optimal performances. Using model cospectra and a range of realistic measurement and environmental conditions, we estimated H2O spectral corrections to reduce by ≈50-70%, getting very close to those of CO2 in most

  15. Microheater Array Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    By conducting pool boiling tests in microgravity, the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and the relative magnitude of other phenomena can be assessed. Data from KC-135 and sounding rocket experiments indicate little effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble, surrounded by smaller satellite bubbles, moved over the surface, occasionally causing nucleation. Once formed, the primary bubble size remained constant for a given superheat, indicating evaporation at the bubble base is balanced with condensation on the bubble cap. The primary bubble's size increased with wall superheat. Most heaters under the primary bubble had low heat transfer rates, suggesting liquid dryout. Strong Marangoni convection developed in microgravity, forming a 'jet' into the bulk liquid that forced the bubble onto the heater. An experiment is being designed for the. Microgravity Science Glovebox. This experiment uses two 96 element microheater arrays, 2.7 and 7.0 mm in size. These heaters are individually controlled to operate at a constant temperature, measuring local heat fluxes as a function of time and space. Most boiling experiments operate at constant wall heat flux with larger heaters, allowing only time and space-averaged measurements. Each heater is about the bubble departure size in normal gravity, but significantly smaller than the bubble departure size in reduced gravity.

  16. One-pot glovebox-free synthesis, characterization, and self-assembly of novel amphiphilic poly(sarcosine-b-caprolactone) diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Saide; Wang, Xin; Li, Zhenjiang; Zhang, Qiguo; Wu, Wenzhuo; Liu, Jingjing; Wu, Hao; Chen, Cheng; Guo, Kai

    2014-11-01

    Novel amphiphilic polypeptoid-polyester diblock copolymers based on poly(sarcosine) (PSar) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) are synthesized by a one-pot glovebox-free approach. In this method, sarcosine N-carboxy anhydride (Sar-NCA) is firstly polymerized in the presence of benzylamine under N(2) flow, then the resulting poly(sarcosine) is used in situ as the macro-initiator for the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of ε-caprolactone using tin(II) octanoate as a catalyst. The degree of poly-merization of each block is controlled by various feed ratios of monomer/initiator. The diblock copolymers with controlled molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distributions (Đ(M) < 1.2) are characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and size-exclusion chromatography. The self-assembly behavior of PSar-b-PCL in water is investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy. DLS results reveal that the diblock copolymers associate into nanoparticles with average hydrodynamic diameters (D(H)) around 100 nm in water, which may be used as drug delivery carriers.

  17. One-pot glovebox-free synthesis, characterization, and self-assembly of novel amphiphilic poly(sarcosine-b-caprolactone) diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Saide; Wang, Xin; Li, Zhenjiang; Zhang, Qiguo; Wu, Wenzhuo; Liu, Jingjing; Wu, Hao; Chen, Cheng; Guo, Kai

    2014-11-01

    Novel amphiphilic polypeptoid-polyester diblock copolymers based on poly(sarcosine) (PSar) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) are synthesized by a one-pot glovebox-free approach. In this method, sarcosine N-carboxy anhydride (Sar-NCA) is firstly polymerized in the presence of benzylamine under N(2) flow, then the resulting poly(sarcosine) is used in situ as the macro-initiator for the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of ε-caprolactone using tin(II) octanoate as a catalyst. The degree of poly-merization of each block is controlled by various feed ratios of monomer/initiator. The diblock copolymers with controlled molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distributions (Đ(M) < 1.2) are characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and size-exclusion chromatography. The self-assembly behavior of PSar-b-PCL in water is investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy. DLS results reveal that the diblock copolymers associate into nanoparticles with average hydrodynamic diameters (D(H)) around 100 nm in water, which may be used as drug delivery carriers. PMID:25283643

  18. Repeated batch production of theanine by coupled fermentation with energy transfer using membrane-enclosed gamma-glutamylmethylamide synthetase and dried yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Sachiko; Morihara, Yosuke; Wakayama, Mamoru; Tachiki, Takashi

    2009-12-01

    Gamma-glutamylmethylamide synthetase and dried baker's yeast cells were enclosed together in a dialysis membrane tube to produce theanine repeatedly by coupled fermentation with energy transfer. The membrane-enclosed enzyme preparation (M-EEP) formed approximately 600 mM theanine from glutamic acid and ethylamine at a 100% conversion rate. M-EEP maintained its productivity of theanine during six consecutive reactions in a mixture containing NAD(+).

  19. Well-posedness of a model for structural acoustic coupling in a cavity enclosed by a thin cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    A fully coupled mathematical model describing the interactions between a vibrating thin cylindrical shell and enclosed acoustic field is presented. Because the model will ultimately be used in control applications involving piezoceramic actuators, the loads and material contributions resulting from piezoceramic patches bonded to the shell are included in the discussion. Theoretical and computational issues lead to the consideration of a weak form of the modeling set of partial differential equations (PDE's) and through the use of a semigroup formulation, well-posedness results for the system model are obtained.

  20. A 29.3-GHz cavity-enclosed aperture-coupled circular-patch antenna for microwave circuit integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Julio A.; Chang, Kai; Tolleson, Joseph; Sanzgiri, Shashi; Lee, R. Q.

    1991-01-01

    A circular patch antenna fed by an aperture-coupled microstrip line has been demonstrated at 29.3 GHz. The patch was enclosed by a cavity to reduce surface-wave interactions in an array environment and to improve heat dissipation when using active devices. The antenna exhibited a 2:1 input VSWR (voltage standing wave ratio) over a bandwidth of 12 percent from 27.52 to 30.95 GHz. The antenna should have applications in conformal phased arrays at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  1. Removal of Radioactive Nuclides by Multi-Functional Microcapsules Enclosing Inorganic Ion-Exchangers and Organic Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Mimura, H.; Akiba, K.; Onodera, Y.

    2002-02-26

    The microcapsules enclosing two kinds of functional materials, inorganic ion-exchangers and organic extractants, were prepared by taking advantage of the high immobilization ability of alginate gel polymer. The fine powders of inorganic ion-exchanger and oil drops of extractant were kneaded with sodium alginate (NaALG) solution and the kneaded sol readily gelled in a salt solution of CaCl2, BaCl2 or HCl to form spherical gel particles. The uptake properties of various nuclides, 137Cs, 85Sr, 60Co, 88Y, 152Eu and 241Am, for thirty-four specimens of microcapsules in the presence of 10-1-10-4 M HNO3 were evaluated by the batch method. The distribution coefficient (Kd) of Cs+ above 103 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules enclosing CuFC or AMP. The Kd of Sr2+ around 102 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules containing clinoptilolite, antimonic acid, zeolite A, zeolite X or titanic acid. The microcapsules enclosing DEHPA exhibited relatively large Kd values of trivalent metal ions above 103 cm3/g; for example, the Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for a favorable microcapsule (CuFC/clinoptilolite/DEHPA/CaALG) were 1.1x104, 7.5x10, 1.1x10, 1.0x104, 1.4x104, 3.4x103 cm3/g, respectively. The uptake rates of Cs+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for this microcapsule were rather fast; the uptake percentage above 90% was obtained after 19 h-shaking and the uptake equilibrium was attained within 1 d. The AMP/CaALG exhibited high uptake ability for Cs+ even after irradiation of 188 kGy, and DEHPA/CaALG microcapsule had similar Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ ions before and after irradiation. The microcapsules with various shapes such as spherical, columnar, fibrous and filmy forms were easily prepared by changing the way of dipping kneaded sol into gelling salt solution. The microcapsules enclosing inorganic ion-exchangers and extractants have a potential possibility for the simultaneous removal of various radioactive nuclides from waste solutions.

  2. Theoretical study on the top- and enclosed-contacted single-layer MoS2 piezotronic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhou, Yongli; Zhang, Aihua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the piezotronic effect has been observed in two-dimensional single-layer MoS2 materials, which have potential applications in force and pressure triggered or controlled electronic devices, sensors, and human-machine interfaces. However, classical theory faces the difficulty in explaining the mechanism of the piezotronic effect for the top- and enclosed-contacted MoS2 transistors, since the piezoelectric charges are assumed to exist only at the edge of the MoS2 flake that is far from the electronic transport pathway. In the present study, we identify the piezoelectric charges at the MoS2/metal-MoS2 interface by employing both the density functional theory and finite element method simulations. This interface is on the transport pathway of both top- and enclosed-contacted MoS2 transistors, thus it is capable of controlling their transport properties. This study deepens the understanding of piezotronic effect and provides guidance for the design of two-dimensional piezotronic devices.

  3. Wave energy balance in wave models (SWAN) for semi-enclosed domains-Application to the Catalan coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallares, Elena; Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; Espino, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    This study has been motivated by the limited accuracy of wave models under short-duration, fetch-limited conditions. This applies particularly to the wave period, in semi-enclosed domains with highly variable wind patterns as along the Catalan coast. The wave model SWAN version 40.91A is used here in three nested grids covering all the North-western Mediterranean Sea with a grid resolution from 9 to 1 km, forced with high resolution wind patterns from BSC (Barcelona Supercomputing Center) for two study periods, the winter 2010 and the spring 2011. The results are validated in eight locations with different types of instrumentations. In order to improve the results, a modification of the whitecapping term parameters is performed. Also the appropriate frequency integral range used to calculate the integral wave parameters is tested to be sure to compare the simulation results and the measurements for the same frequency interval. The results obtained show a clear improvement of the mean wave period and the peak period for the study area, decreasing considerably the negative bias observed previously, while almost no change is observed in wave height due to the proposed modifications. These results can be generalized to the Spanish Mediterranean coast and may be applicable to study areas with similar characteristics as the ones presented here: semi-enclosed domains with fetch-limited conditions and young sea waves.

  4. Coarsening Experiment Prepared for Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, J. Mark

    2003-01-01

    The Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures-2 (CSLM-2) experiment is a materials science spaceflight experiment whose purpose is to investigate the kinetics of competitive particle growth within a liquid matrix. During coarsening, small particles shrink by losing atoms to larger particles, causing the larger particles to grow. In this experiment, solid particles of tin will grow (coarsen) within a liquid lead-tin eutectic matrix. The following figures show the coarsening of tin particles in a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) eutectic as a function of time. By conducting this experiment in a microgravity environment, we can study a greater range of solid volume fractions, and the effects of sedimentation present in terrestrial experiments will be negligible. The CSLM-2 experiment flew November 2002 on space shuttle flight STS-113 for operation on the International Space Station, but it could not be run because of problems with the Microgravity Science Glovebox in the U.S. Laboratory module. Additional samples will be sent to ISS on subsequent shuttle flights.

  5. Enclosed chambers for humidity control and sample containment in fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Kendall, A.; Tanaka, M.; Weissman, J.S.; Stubbs, G.

    2008-11-03

    A chamber and stretch frame for making fibers for diffraction is described. The chamber is made from a simple plastic cuvette with silicon nitride windows. It is suitable for maintaining constant humidity during fiber drying and data collection, and allows stretching of the fiber and exposure to magnetic fields during sample preparation. If necessary, it provides primary containment for toxic and infectious biological materials. The chamber has been used in fiber diffraction experiments with filamentous plant viruses and a yeast prion protein, and is shown to produce excellent orientation and to maintain hydration and order at the molecular level.

  6. Enclosed Chambers for Humidity Control And Sample Containment in Fiber Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Kendall, A.; Tanaka, M.; Weissman, J.S.; Stubbs, G.

    2009-05-26

    A chamber and stretch frame for making fibers for diffraction is described. The chamber is made from a simple plastic cuvette with silicon nitride windows. It is suitable for maintaining constant humidity during fiber drying and data collection, and allows stretching of the fiber and exposure to magnetic fields during sample preparation. If necessary, it provides primary containment for toxic and infectious biological materials. The chamber has been used in fiber diffraction experiments with filamentous plant viruses and a yeast prion protein, and is shown to produce excellent orientation and to maintain hydration and order at the molecular level.

  7. Orbit-averaged quantities, the classical Hellmann-Feynman theorem, and the magnetic flux enclosed by gyro-motion

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J. Bellan, P. M.

    2015-02-15

    Action integrals are often used to average a system over fast oscillations and obtain reduced dynamics. It is not surprising, then, that action integrals play a central role in the Hellmann-Feynman theorem of classical mechanics, which furnishes the values of certain quantities averaged over one period of rapid oscillation. This paper revisits the classical Hellmann-Feynman theorem, rederiving it in connection to an analogous theorem involving the time-averaged evolution of canonical coordinates. We then apply a modified version of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem to obtain a new result: the magnetic flux enclosed by one period of gyro-motion of a charged particle in a non-uniform magnetic field. These results further demonstrate the utility of the action integral in regards to obtaining orbit-averaged quantities and the usefulness of this formalism in characterizing charged particle motion.

  8. Assessment of contaminant impacts in a semi-enclosed estuary (Amvrakikos Gulf, NW Greece): bioenergetics and biochemical biomarkers in mussels.

    PubMed

    Tsangaris, Catherine; Cotou, Efthimia; Papathanassiou, Enangelos; Nicolaidou, Artemis

    2010-02-01

    A combination of bioenergetics and biochemical biomarkers in mussels was applied to assess possible pollution impacts in a protected semi-enclosed estuary (Amvrakikos Gulf, NW Greece) that receives pesticide discharges through riverine transport. Scope for growth, a physiological condition index representing the energy budget of the organism, was applied to detect general stress effects on the health status of mussels. The low energy budgets of mussels revealed stress conditions and provided early warning signals of possible consequences at higher levels of biological organization. Biochemical markers of exposure confirmed a risk of pesticide contamination. Decreased acetylcholinesterase activities indicated exposure to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Responses of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase suggested the presence of contaminants capable of reactive oxygen species production that could be related to organochlorine pesticide contamination in the area. On the other hand, metallothionein levels implied low metal contamination.

  9. Diagnostic model construction and example analysis of habitat degradation in enclosed bay: III. Sansha Bay habitat restoration strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; Yu, Ge; Chen, Zhaozhang; Hu, Jianyu; Liu, Guangxing; Xu, Donghui

    2014-09-01

    Unbalanced inputs and outputs of material are the root cause of habitat degradation in Sansha Bay, Fujian Province, China. However, the cumulative pollution varies in different geographic locations and natural conditions in the enclosed bay. In this study, hydrodynamic conditions, sediment characteristics, and aquaculture methods were recognized as the underlying causes of spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of nitrogen and phosphorous pollutants, the two major controlling factors of habitat degradation in the bay area. In order to achieve the goal of balancing nutrient inputs and outputs in Sansha Bay, we developed a feasible and practical zone restoration strategy for reasonable adjustment and arrangement of aquaculture species and production scale in accordance with varying hydrodynamic conditions and sediment characteristics in six sub-bay areas (sub-systems). The proposed zone restoration strategy lays a solid foundation for habitat restoration and management in Sansha Bay.

  10. Diagnostic model construction and example analysis of habitat degradation in enclosed bay: III. Sansha Bay habitat restoration strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; Yu, Ge; Chen, Zhaozhang; Hu, Jianyu; Liu, Guangxing; Xu, Donghui

    2015-03-01

    Unbalanced inputs and outputs of material are the root cause of habitat degradation in Sansha Bay, Fujian Province, China. However, the cumulative pollution varies in different geographic locations and natural conditions in the enclosed bay. In this study, hydrodynamic conditions, sediment characteristics, and aquaculture methods were recognized as the underlying causes of spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of nitrogen and phosphorous pollutants, the two major controlling factors of habitat degradation in the bay area. In order to achieve the goal of balancing nutrient inputs and outputs in Sansha Bay, we developed a feasible and practical zone restoration strategy for reasonable adjustment and arrangement of aquaculture species and production scale in accordance with varying hydrodynamic conditions and sediment characteristics in six sub-bay areas (sub-systems). The proposed zone restoration strategy lays a solid foundation for habitat restoration and management in Sansha Bay.

  11. A curve shortening flow rule for closed embedded plane curves with a prescribed rate of change in enclosed area

    PubMed Central

    Dallaston, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by a problem from fluid mechanics, we consider a generalization of the standard curve shortening flow problem for a closed embedded plane curve such that the area enclosed by the curve is forced to decrease at a prescribed rate. Using formal asymptotic and numerical techniques, we derive possible extinction shapes as the curve contracts to a point, dependent on the rate of decreasing area; we find there is a wider class of extinction shapes than for standard curve shortening, for which initially simple closed curves are always asymptotically circular. We also provide numerical evidence that self-intersection is possible for non-convex initial conditions, distinguishing between pinch-off and coalescence of the curve interior. PMID:26997898

  12. Effects of oil and oil dispersant on an enclosed marine ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Lindin, O.; Rosemarin, A.; Lindskog, A.; Hoeglund, C.; Johansson, S.

    1987-04-01

    The effects of a North Sea oil with and without the addition of an oil spill dispersant were studied in a model of the littoral ecosystem of the Baltic Sea. Measured ecosystem parameters included abundance of heterotrophic bacteria, periphyton and phytoplankton photosynthesis, growth of bladderwrack, zooplankton abundance and diversity, physiological responses of certain crustaceans and molluscs, and growth of blue mussels. In addition, net photosynthesis and respiration of the ecosystem were studied. Concentrations of oil in water and blue mussels were monitored. The results of the experiments showed that almost all the measured parameters were affected, although several of the results indicated a stronger response to oil alone than to oil plus dispersant. On the basis of the results of this experiment, it may be concluded that the use of oil dispersants on diverse shallow water communities may produce greater acute effects than if a dispersant is not used. The long-term effects, however, may prove to be less severe than the dispersion of oil by natural processes. 40 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Atomic structure of interphase boundary enclosing bcc precipitate formed in fcc matrix in a Ni-Cr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Furuhara, T.; Wada, K.; Maki, T.

    1995-08-01

    The atomic structure of the interphase boundary enclosing body-centered cubic (bcc) lath-shape precipitates formed in the face-centered cubic (fcc) matrix of a Ni-45 mass pct Cr alloy was examined by means of conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Growth ledges were observed on the broad faces of the laths. The growth ledge terrace (with the macroscopic habit plane {approximately}(112){sub fcc}//(23{bar 1}){sub bcc}) contains a regular array of structural ledges whose terrace is formed by the (111){sub fcc}//(110){sub bcc} planes. A structural ledge has an effective Burgers vector corresponding to an a/12[1{bar 2}1]{sub fcc} transformation dislocation in the fcc {yields} bcc transformation. The side facet (and presumably the growth ledge riser) of the bcc lath contains two distinct types of lattice dislocation accommodating transformation strains. One type is glissile dislocations, which exist on every six layers of parallel close-packed planes. These perfectly accommodate the shear strain caused by the stacking sequence change from fcc to bcc. The second set is sessile misfit dislocations ({approximately}10 nm apart) whose Burgers vector is a/3[111]{sub fcc} = a/2[110]{sub bcc}. These perfectly accommodate the dilatational strain along the direction normal to the parallel close-packed planes. These results demonstrate that the interphase boundaries enclosing the laths are all semicoherent. Nucleation and migration of growth ledges, which are controlled by diffusion of substitutional solute atoms, result in the virtual displacement of transformation dislocations accompanying the climb of sessile misfit dislocations and the glide of glissile dislocations simultaneously. Such a growth mode assures the retention of atomic site correspondence across the growing interface.

  14. Water age, exposure time, and local flushing time in semi-enclosed, tidal basins with negligible freshwater inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Daniele Pietro; Defina, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of tidally flushed, semi-enclosed basins with negligible freshwater inflow, and under steady periodic flow conditions, three frequently used local transport time scales to quantify the efficiency of water renewal, namely water age, exposure time, and local flushing time are studied and compared to each other. In these environments, water renewal is strongly controlled by diffusion, and it is significantly affected by the return flow (i.e., the fraction of effluent water that returns into the basin on each flood tide). The definition of water age is here modified to account for the return flow, in analogy with exposure time and local flushing time. We consider approximate time scales, whose accuracy is analyzed, in order to overcome problems related to the size of the computational domain and to reduce the computational effort. A new approximate procedure is introduced to estimate water age, which is based on the water aging rate. Also, the concept of local flushing time as a relevant time scale is introduced. Under steady periodic conditions, we demonstrate that the local flushing time quantitatively corresponds to water age, and well approximates exposure time when the flow is dominated by diffusion. Since the effort required to compute water age and exposure time is greater than that required to compute the local flushing time, the present results can also have a practical interest in the assessment of water renewal efficiency of semi-enclosed water basins. The results of a modeling study, in which the lagoon of Venice is used as a benchmark, confirm the substantial quantitative equivalence between these three transport time scales in highly diffusive environments.

  15. [Dispersion and analysis of odor pollution in landfill area under the enclosed operation condition].

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng; Wu, Shi-Xing; Dai, Zhi-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Su, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Xiao-Fei; Dai, Zhan-Guo; Lu, Xu-Fei; Zheng, Bin; Shen, Kai; Wei, Pan-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Odor pollution of landfill site is a serious problem accompanied with the urbanization process that influences city life. Generally, odor emission points in landfill boundary are detected by experience, but the pollution intensity, distribution and variation in the scope of landfill boundary are difficulty to describe. In this research, odor emission points were disclosed with equal odor concentration curves that were delineated using electric nose and GPS instrument. The leakage of landfill gas and exhaust emission from biogas incineration torch was the main cause of the odor pollution in landfill area. Gas production evaluation suggested that the improvement of landfill gas consumption is the key point to control the odor pollution at the landfill site.

  16. The optimum shape for a rigid rotating shell enclosing an isotropic spherical planetary mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covington, Tatiana

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the Dyson Sphere, an extremely advanced civilization's hypothetical construct entirely surrounding a star, shows that new stress inward to the star increases to maxima at the poles if the sphere is rotating. This is because the centrifugal force in the rotating frame of reference vanishes at zero rotational radius, which occurs at the poles. There is less of the centrifugal force at high latitudes than low to offset the star's gravity. A form is derived for a thin, rigid, rotating shell, surrounding a large pointlike mass and/or charge, which will experience the least possible net stress at every point upon it - a shape on which every point not on the shell's equator is as near as possible to being in orbit. In orbit, whose plane passes through the primary body's center of mass or of charge, F(grav), or Fg, is exactly opposite in direction to F(centrif), or Fc, and is equal in amount. At all points not on the equator, Fc will not entirely offset Fg, because of Fg's vector decomposition. However, both forces are always constrained to be equal in absolute amount everywhere on the shell, equator included. The derived shape, given by the figure of revolution around the x-axis of x = square root (y-1-72), will prove useful in large-scale space construction. Also, various engineering problems are discussed.

  17. Three dimensional analysis of turbulent steam jets in enclosed structures : a CFD approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; NguyenLe, Q.

    1999-04-20

    This paper compares the three-dimensional numerical simulation with the experimental data of a steam blowdown event in a light water reactor containment building. The temperature and pressure data of a steam blowdown event was measured at the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integrated Test Assembly (PUMA), a scaled model of the General Electric simplified Boiling Water Reactor. A three step approach was used to analyze the steam jet behavior. First, a 1-Dimensional, system level RELAP5/Mod3.2 model of the steam blowdown event was created and the results used to set the initial conditions for the PUMA blowdown experiments. Second, 2-Dimensional CFD models of the discharged steam jets were computed using PHOENICS, a commercially available CFD package. Finally, 3-Dimensional model of the PUMA drywell was created with the boundary conditions based on experimental measurements. The results of the 1-D and 2-D models were reported in the previous meeting. This paper discusses in detail the formulation and the results of the 3-Dimensional PHOENICS model of the PUMA drywell. It is found that the 3-D CFD solutions compared extremely well with the measured data.

  18. Effect of a simulated oil spill on natural assemblages of marine phytoplankton enclosed in microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J.; Figueiras, F. G.; Aranguren-Gassis, M.; Crespo, B. G.; Fernández, E.; Morán, X. A. G.; Nieto-Cid, M.

    2009-07-01

    Two microcosm experiments were carried out to simulate the effect of sporadic oil spills derived from tanker accidents on oceanic and coastal marine phytoplankton assemblages. Treatments were designed to reproduce the spill from the Prestige, which took place in Galician coastal waters (NW Iberia) in November 2002. Two different concentrations of the water soluble fraction of oil were used: low (8.6 ± 0.7 μg l -1 of chrysene equivalents) and high (23 ± 5 μg l -1 of chrysene equivalents l -1). Photosynthetic activity and chlorophyll a concentration decreased in both assemblages after 24-72 h of exposure to the two oil concentrations, even though the effect was more severe on the oceanic assemblage. These variables progressively recovered up to values close or higher than those in the controls, but the short-term negative effect of oil, which was generally stronger at the high concentration, also induced changes in the structure of the plankton community. While the biomass of nanoflagellates increased in both assemblages, oceanic picophytoplankton was drastically reduced by the addition of oil. Effects on diatoms were also observed, particularly in the coastal assemblage. The response of coastal diatoms to oil addition showed a clear dependence on size. Small diatoms (<20 μm) were apparently stimulated by oil, whereas diatoms >20 μm were only negatively affected by the high oil concentration. These differences, which could be partially due to indirect trophic interactions, might also be related to different sensitivity of species to PAHs. These results, in agreement with previous observations, additionally show that the negative effect of the water soluble fraction of oil on oceanic phytoplankton was stronger than on coastal phytoplankton.

  19. Tsunami Induced Resonance in Enclosed Basins; Case Study of Haydarpasa Port In Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kian, Rozita; Cevdet Yalciner, Ahmet; Zaytsev, Andrey; Aytore, Betul

    2015-04-01

    Coincidence of the frequency of forcing mechanisms and the natural frequency of free oscillations in the harbors or basins leads to formation of resonance oscillations and additional amplifications in the basins. This phenomenon becomes much more critical when it is caused by a tsunamis. In the cases of tsunami induced basin resonances, the wave amplifications may occur with more and unexpected damages. The harbor resilience against the marine hazards is important for the performance and success of recovery operations. Classifying the tsunami effects on the ports and harbors and on their functions is the main concern of this study. There are two types of impacts; direct impacts including structural damages due to strong currents, high water elevation and indirect ones because of basin resonance expose to seiche oscillations. The sea of Marmara has experienced numerous (more than 30) tsunamis in history where a highly populated metropolitan city Istanbul is located at North coast of Maramara sea. There are numerous ports and harbors located at Istanbul Coast. Haydarpasa port (41.0033 N, 29.0139 E) in Istanbul coast near Marmara sea, as a case study is selected to test its resilience under tsunami attack by numerical experiments. There are two breakwaters in Haydarpasa port with total length of three kilometers and the shape of basins are regular. Applying numerical model (NAMI DANCE) which solves nonlinear form of shallow water equations, the resonance oscillations in Haydarpasa Port is investigated by following the method given in Yalciner and Pelinovsky, (2006). In the applications, high resolution bathymetry and topography are used and an initial impulse is inputted to the study domain in the simulations. The computed time histories of water surface fluctuations at different locations inside the harbor are analyzed by using Fast Fourier Transform technique. The frequencies where the peaks of spectrum curves indicates the amplification of waves in the respective

  20. Shear History Extensional Rheology Experiment: A Proposed ISS Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Nancy R.; Logsdon, Kirk A.; Magee, Kevin S.

    2007-01-01

    The Shear History Extensional Rheology Experiment (SHERE) is a proposed International Space Station (ISS) glovebox experiment designed to study the effect of preshear on the transient evolution of the microstructure and viscoelastic tensile stresses for monodisperse dilute polymer solutions. Collectively referred to as Boger fluids, these polymer solutions have become a popular choice for rheological studies of non-Newtonian fluids and are the non-Newtonian fluid used in this experiment. The SHERE hardware consists of the Rheometer, Camera Arm, Interface Box, Cabling, Keyboard, Tool Box, Fluid Modules, and Stowage Tray. Each component will be described in detail in this paper. In the area of space exploration, the development of in-situ fabrication and repair technology represents a critical element in evolution of autonomous exploration capability. SHERE has the capability to provide data for engineering design tools needed for polymer parts manufacturing systems to ensure their rheological properties have not been impacted in the variable gravity environment and this will be briefly addressed.

  1. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: PILOT STUDY OF ENCLOSED THERMAL SOIL AERATION FOR REMOVAL OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CONTAMINATION AT THE MCKIN SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reports on the results of a pilot study that treated vadose zone soil contaminated with VOCs in an enclosed thermal aeration system. The McKin site, an NPL site in Grey, Maine, was the location of the pilot study. The pilot study was chosen to demonstrate the viabili...

  2. Culturing Human Pluripotent and Neural Stem Cells in an Enclosed Cell Culture System for Basic and Preclinical Research.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alexander E; Herculian, Siranush; Banuelos, Maria G; Navarro, Samantha L; Jenkins, Michael P; Schwartz, Philip H

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how to use a custom manufactured, commercially available enclosed cell culture system for basic and preclinical research. Biosafety cabinets (BSCs) and incubators have long been the standard for culturing and expanding cell lines for basic and preclinical research. However, as the focus of many stem cell laboratories shifts from basic research to clinical translation, additional requirements are needed of the cell culturing system. All processes must be well documented and have exceptional requirements for sterility and reproducibility. In traditional incubators, gas concentrations and temperatures widely fluctuate anytime the cells are removed for feeding, passaging, or other manipulations. Such interruptions contribute to an environment that is not the standard for cGMP and GLP guidelines. These interruptions must be minimized especially when cells are utilized for therapeutic purposes. The motivation to move from the standard BSC and incubator system to a closed system is that such interruptions can be made negligible. Closed systems provide a work space to feed and manipulate cell cultures and maintain them in a controlled environment where temperature and gas concentrations are consistent. This way, pluripotent and multipotent stem cells can be maintained at optimum health from the moment of their derivation all the way to their eventual use in therapy. PMID:27341536

  3. Culturing Human Pluripotent and Neural Stem Cells in an Enclosed Cell Culture System for Basic and Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Alexander E.; Herculian, Siranush; Banuelos, Maria G.; Navarro, Samantha L.; Jenkins, Michael P.; Schwartz, Philip H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how to use a custom manufactured, commercially available enclosed cell culture system for basic and preclinical research. Biosafety cabinets (BSCs) and incubators have long been the standard for culturing and expanding cell lines for basic and preclinical research. However, as the focus of many stem cell laboratories shifts from basic research to clinical translation, additional requirements are needed of the cell culturing system. All processes must be well documented and have exceptional requirements for sterility and reproducibility. In traditional incubators, gas concentrations and temperatures widely fluctuate anytime the cells are removed for feeding, passaging, or other manipulations. Such interruptions contribute to an environment that is not the standard for cGMP and GLP guidelines. These interruptions must be minimized especially when cells are utilized for therapeutic purposes. The motivation to move from the standard BSC and incubator system to a closed system is that such interruptions can be made negligible. Closed systems provide a work space to feed and manipulate cell cultures and maintain them in a controlled environment where temperature and gas concentrations are consistent. This way, pluripotent and multipotent stem cells can be maintained at optimum health from the moment of their derivation all the way to their eventual use in therapy. PMID:27341536

  4. Multi-hollow polymer microspheres with enclosed surfaces and compartmentalized voids prepared by seeded swelling polymerization method.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiong; Yu, Demei; Zhu, Kaiming; Hu, Guohe; Zhang, Lifeng; Liu, Yuhang

    2016-07-01

    Multi-hollow particles have drawn extensive research interest due to their high specific areas and abundant inner voids, whereas their convenient synthesis still remains challenging. In this paper, we report a simple and convenient method based on seeded swelling polymerization to prepare the multi-hollow microspheres with enclosed surfaces and compartmentalized voids using monodisperse poly (styrene-co-sodium 4-vinylbenzenesulfonate) microspheres as seed particles. A formation mechanism of the multi-hollow structure was proposed involving the processes of water absorption, coalescence and stabilization of water domains, immobilization of multi-hollow structure, and coverage of surface dimples. The influencing parameters on the morphology of the microspheres, including weight ratio of sodium 4-vinylbenzenesulfonate to styrene in the seed particles, dosage of the swelling monomer and the crosslinking agent were systematically investigated. The internal structure of the resultant microspheres could be tuned from solid to multi-hollow by controlling over these parameters. Multi-hollow microspheres with compartmentalized chambers, smooth surfaces and narrow size distributions were obtained as a result.

  5. The effect of different open plan and enclosed classroom acoustic conditions on speech perception in Kindergarten children.

    PubMed

    Mealings, Kiri T; Demuth, Katherine; Buchholz, Jörg M; Dillon, Harvey

    2015-10-01

    Open plan classrooms, where several classes are in the same room, have recently re-emerged in Australian primary schools. This paper explores how the acoustics of four Kindergarten classrooms [an enclosed classroom (25 children), double classroom (44 children), fully open plan triple classroom (91 children), and a semi-open plan K-6 "21st century learning space" (205 children)] affect speech perception. Twenty-two to 23 5-6-year-old children in each classroom participated in an online four-picture choice speech perception test while adjacent classes engaged in quiet versus noisy activities. The noise levels recorded during the test were higher the larger the classroom, except in the noisy condition for the K-6 classroom, possibly due to acoustic treatments. Linear mixed effects models revealed children's performance accuracy and speed decreased as noise level increased. Additionally, children's speech perception abilities decreased the further away they were seated from the loudspeaker in noise levels above 50 dBA. These results suggest that fully open plan classrooms are not appropriate learning environments for critical listening activities with young children due to their high intrusive noise levels which negatively affect speech perception. If open plan classrooms are desired, they need to be acoustically designed to be appropriate for critical listening activities.

  6. Epiboly generates the epidermal basal monolayer and spreads the nascent mammalian skin to enclose the embryonic body

    PubMed Central

    Panousopoulou, Eleni; Hobbs, Carl; Mason, Ivor; Green, Jeremy B. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epiboly is a morphogenetic process that is employed in the surface ectoderm of anamniotes during gastrulation to cover the entire embryo. We propose here that mammals also utilise this process to expand the epidermis and enclose the body cavity and spinal cord with a protective surface covering. Our data supports a model whereby epidermal spreading is driven by the primary establishment of the epidermal basal progenitor monolayer through radial cell intercalation of a multi-layered epithelium towards the basal lamina. By using a suspension organotypic culture strategy, we find that this process is fibronectin-dependent and autonomous to the skin. The radial cell rearrangements that drive epidermal spreading also require ROCK activity but are driven by cell protrusions and not myosin II contractility. Epidermal progenitor monolayer formation and epidermal spreading are delayed in Crash mice, which possess a dominant mutation in Celsr1, an orthologue of the core planar cell polarity (PCP) Drosophila protein Flamingo (also known as Stan). We observe a failure of ventral enclosure in Crash mutants suggesting that defective epidermal spreading might underlie some ventral wall birth defects. PMID:26989131

  7. FSH supplementation to culture medium is beneficial for activation and survival of preantral follicles enclosed in equine ovarian tissue.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, F L N; Lunardi, F O; Lima, L F; Rocha, R M P; Bruno, J B; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Cibin, F W S; Nunes-Pinheiro, D C S; Gastal, M O; Rodrigues, A P R; Apgar, G A; Gastal, E L; Figueiredo, J R

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of adding different concentrations of bovine recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone on the IVC of equine preantral follicles enclosed in ovarian tissue fragments. Randomized ovarian fragments were fixed immediately (fresh noncultured control) or cultured for 1 or 7 days in α-MEM(+) supplemented with 0, 10, 50, and 100 ng/mL FSH and subsequently analyzed by classical histology. Culture media collected on Day 1 or Day 7 and were analyzed for steroids (estradiol and progesterone) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). After Day 1 and Day 7 of culture, 50-ng/mL FSH treatment had a greater (P < 0.05) percentage of morphologically normal follicles when compared to the other groups, except the 10-ng/mL FSH treatment at Day 1 of culture. The percentage of developing follicles (transition, primary, and secondary), and follicular and oocyte diameters were higher (P < 0.05) in the 50-ng/mL FSH treatment compared to the other groups after Day 7 of culture. Furthermore, estradiol secretion and ROS production were maintained (P > 0.05) throughout the culture in the 50-ng/mL FSH treatment. In conclusion, the addition of 50 ng/mL of FSH promoted activation of primordial follicles to developing follicles, improved survival of preantral follicles, and maintained estradiol and ROS production of equine ovarian tissue after 7 days of culture.

  8. Multi-hollow polymer microspheres with enclosed surfaces and compartmentalized voids prepared by seeded swelling polymerization method.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiong; Yu, Demei; Zhu, Kaiming; Hu, Guohe; Zhang, Lifeng; Liu, Yuhang

    2016-07-01

    Multi-hollow particles have drawn extensive research interest due to their high specific areas and abundant inner voids, whereas their convenient synthesis still remains challenging. In this paper, we report a simple and convenient method based on seeded swelling polymerization to prepare the multi-hollow microspheres with enclosed surfaces and compartmentalized voids using monodisperse poly (styrene-co-sodium 4-vinylbenzenesulfonate) microspheres as seed particles. A formation mechanism of the multi-hollow structure was proposed involving the processes of water absorption, coalescence and stabilization of water domains, immobilization of multi-hollow structure, and coverage of surface dimples. The influencing parameters on the morphology of the microspheres, including weight ratio of sodium 4-vinylbenzenesulfonate to styrene in the seed particles, dosage of the swelling monomer and the crosslinking agent were systematically investigated. The internal structure of the resultant microspheres could be tuned from solid to multi-hollow by controlling over these parameters. Multi-hollow microspheres with compartmentalized chambers, smooth surfaces and narrow size distributions were obtained as a result. PMID:27046772

  9. Development of a Novel Self-Enclosed Sample Preparation Device for DNA/RNA Isolation in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Mehta, Satish K.; Pensinger, Stuart J.; Pickering, Karen D.

    2011-01-01

    Modern biology techniques present potentials for a wide range of molecular, cellular, and biochemistry applications in space, including detection of infectious pathogens and environmental contaminations, monitoring of drug-resistant microbial and dangerous mutations, identification of new phenotypes of microbial and new life species. However, one of the major technological blockades in enabling these technologies in space is a lack of devices for sample preparation in the space environment. To overcome such an obstacle, we constructed a prototype of a DNA/RNA isolation device based on our novel designs documented in the NASA New Technology Reporting System (MSC-24811-1/3-1). This device is self-enclosed and pipette free, purposely designed for use in the absence of gravity. Our design can also be modified easily for preparing samples in space for other applications, such as flowcytometry, immunostaining, cell separation, sample purification and separation according to its size and charges, sample chemical labeling, and sample purification. The prototype of our DNA/RNA isolation device was tested for efficiencies of DNA and RNA isolation from various cell types for PCR analysis. The purity and integrity of purified DNA and RNA were determined as well. Results showed that our developed DNA/RNA isolation device offers similar efficiency and quality in comparison to the samples prepared using the standard protocol in the laboratory.

  10. Epiboly generates the epidermal basal monolayer and spreads the nascent mammalian skin to enclose the embryonic body.

    PubMed

    Panousopoulou, Eleni; Hobbs, Carl; Mason, Ivor; Green, Jeremy B A; Formstone, Caroline J

    2016-05-01

    Epiboly is a morphogenetic process that is employed in the surface ectoderm of anamniotes during gastrulation to cover the entire embryo. We propose here that mammals also utilise this process to expand the epidermis and enclose the body cavity and spinal cord with a protective surface covering. Our data supports a model whereby epidermal spreading is driven by the primary establishment of the epidermal basal progenitor monolayer through radial cell intercalation of a multi-layered epithelium towards the basal lamina. By using a suspension organotypic culture strategy, we find that this process is fibronectin-dependent and autonomous to the skin. The radial cell rearrangements that drive epidermal spreading also require ROCK activity but are driven by cell protrusions and not myosin II contractility. Epidermal progenitor monolayer formation and epidermal spreading are delayed in Crash mice, which possess a dominant mutation in Celsr1, an orthologue of the core planar cell polarity (PCP) Drosophila protein Flamingo (also known as Stan). We observe a failure of ventral enclosure in Crash mutants suggesting that defective epidermal spreading might underlie some ventral wall birth defects. PMID:26989131

  11. Engineering tissues with a perfusable vessel-like network using endothelialized alginate hydrogel fiber and spheroid-enclosing microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Sakai, Shinji; Taya, Masahito

    2016-02-01

    Development of the technique for constructing an internal perfusable vascular network is a challenging issue in fabrication of dense three-dimensional tissues in vitro. Here, we report a method for realizing it. We assembled small tissue (about 200 μm in diameter)-enclosing hydrogel microcapsules and a single hydrogel fiber, both covered with human vascular endothelial cells in a collagen gel. The microcapsules and fiber were made from alginate and gelatin derivatives, and had cell adhesive surfaces. The endothelial cells on the hydrogel constructs sprouted and spontaneously formed a network connecting the hydrogel constructs with each other in the collagen gel. Perfusable vascular network-like structure formation after degrading the alginate-based hydrogel constructs by alginate lyase was confirmed by introducing solution containing tracer particles of about 3 μm in diameter into the lumen templated by the alginate hydrogel fiber. The introduced solution flowed into the spontaneously formed capillary branches and passed around the individual spherical tissues.

  12. Practical Use of Eddy Covariance in Non-Ideal Landscapes: Pilot Study on a Small, Enclosed Turfgrass Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, A. L.; Kurc, S. A.; Huxman, T.

    2008-12-01

    Land-use change has been identified as a critical process affecting carbon and energy balance. Conversion from undeveloped to developed environments has a profound effect on the partitioning of energy, moisture availability for plant communities, and the presence and accumulation of toxins. Efforts to characterize the effects of urban environments, however, often have been limited by physical constraints. In this study, carbon and energy fluxes from a small (approximately 1ha) lawn at Biosphere 2, in Oracle, AZ, were measured using an eddy covariance (EC) system. This lawn provides a simple proxy for complex urban landscapes due to the complexity of the surrounding environment, being almost entirely enclosed by the structure of the Biosphere 2 and a 50m berm. With reasonable attention to limitations, we argue that the data collected demonstrate that EC measurements may be applicable to similarly small and confined spaces, allowing for more precise, high-resolution measurements of fluxes in constrained urban landscapes. Furthermore, the results here indicate a baseline of carbon flux for irrigated lawns in semi-arid regions, which may be used for comparison to future field studies as well as applied in a model framework as indicative of this land use type.

  13. Neisserial Correia repeat-enclosed elements do not influence the transcription of pil genes in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Hsun; Ryan, Catherine S; Davies, John K

    2011-10-01

    Two human-specific neisserial pathogens, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis, require the expression of type IV pili (tfp) for initial attachment to the host during infection. However, the mechanisms controlling the assembly and functionality of tfp are poorly understood. It is known that the gonococcal pilE gene, encoding the major subunit, is positively regulated by IHF, a multifunctional DNA binding protein. A neisserial specific repetitive DNA sequence, termed the Correia repeat-enclosed element (CREE) is situated upstream of three pil loci: pilHIJKX (pilH-X), pilGD, and pilF. CREEs have been shown to contain strong promoters, and some CREE variants contain a functional IHF binding site. CREEs might therefore be involved in the regulation of tfp biogenesis in pathogenic Neisseria. Site-directed and deletion mutagenesis on promoter::cat reporter constructs demonstrated that transcription of pilH-X and pilGD is from a σ(70) promoter and is independent of the CREE. The insertion of a CREE in the pilF promoter region in N. meningitidis generated a functional σ(70) promoter. However, there is also a functional promoter at this position in N. gonorrhoeae, where there is no CREE. These results suggest CREE insertion in these three pil loci does not influence transcription and that IHF does not coordinately regulate tfp biogenesis.

  14. Results From the USML-2 Interface Configuration Experiment. Experiment 30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert; Weislogel, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. For studying such shifts, container shapes are described that were flown on board the Space Shuttle USML-2 mission as part of the Glovebox Interface Configuration Experiment. These containers are in the form of a circular cylinder with two diametrically opposed "canonical proboscis" protrusions. The containers were designed with the goal of having two desirable properties -that sufficient liquid would participate in the shift to permit easy observation, and that the change would be abrupt enough to allow accurate determination of critical contact angle. The observed behavior for these vessels is depicted, along with behavior for a movable wedge vessel, which also formed part of the experiment. The experimental results support the validity of the concept of macroscopic contact angle, basic to the theory, and thereby its use in predicting fluid behavior under reduced gravity. The results indicate, as well, the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation to equilibrium.

  15. ERUPTING FILAMENTS WITH LARGE ENCLOSING FLUX TUBES AS SOURCES OF HIGH-MASS THREE-PART CMEs, AND ERUPTING FILAMENTS IN THE ABSENCE OF ENCLOSING FLUX TUBES AS SOURCES OF LOW-MASS UNSTRUCTURED CMEs

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, Joe; Morgan, Huw

    2015-11-01

    The 3-part appearance of many coronal mass ejections (CMEs) arising from erupting filaments emerges from a large magnetic flux tube structure, consistent with the form of the erupting filament system. Other CMEs arising from erupting filaments lack a clear 3-part structure and reasons for this have not been researched in detail. This paper aims to further establish the link between CME structure and the structure of the erupting filament system and to investigate whether CMEs which lack a 3-part structure have different eruption characteristics. A survey is made of 221 near-limb filament eruptions observed from 2013 May 03 to 2014 June 30 by Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) imagers and coronagraphs. Ninety-two filament eruptions are associated with 3-part structured CMEs, 41 eruptions are associated with unstructured CMEs. The remaining 88 are categorized as failed eruptions. For 34% of the 3-part CMEs, processing applied to EUV images reveals the erupting front edge is a pre-existing loop structure surrounding the filament, which subsequently erupts with the filament to form the leading bright front edge of the CME. This connection is confirmed by a flux-rope density model. Furthermore, the unstructured CMEs have a narrower distribution of mass compared to structured CMEs, with total mass comparable to the mass of 3-part CME cores. This study supports the interpretation of 3-part CME leading fronts as the outer boundaries of a large pre-existing flux tube. Unstructured (non 3-part) CMEs are a different family to structured CMEs, arising from the eruption of filaments which are compact flux tubes in the absence of a large system of enclosing closed field.

  16. Instrumented Sheath Insulator Experiment (IFAC-SI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Celia; Miskolczy, Gabor; Lieb, David P.; Witt, Tony

    The Instrumented Fast-Reactor Accelerated Component-Sheath Insulator test (IFAC-SI) is a key experiment of the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program designed to allow continuous monitoring of sheath insulator specimens with an applied voltage during the in-reactor test. This paper describes the IFAC-SI experiment test setting, including shear insulator samples, heat pipes, fins, and enclosing container, and discusses the thermal models and their effects on the experimental design.

  17. Trophic resource use by macrozoobenthic primary consumers within a semi-enclosed coastal ecosystem: Stable isotope and fatty acid assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Sophie; Blanchet, Hugues; Garcia, Aurélie; Massé, Marjorie; Galois, Robert; Grémare, Antoine; Charlier, Karine; Guillou, Gaël; Richard, Pierre; Savoye, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    The diet of different macrozoobenthic trophic groups was investigated in the Arcachon Bay-a semi-enclosed macrotidal ecosystem that shelters the largest Zostera noltei seagrass meadow in Europe-in early spring and late summer 2009, using stable isotopes and fatty acids. Fatty acid profiles and literature information about the biology and physiology of benthic consumers were combined to identify the main organic matter sources for the benthic primary consumers. An isotope mixing model was then run to evaluate the contribution of each organic matter source to each identified trophic group (suspension feeders, sub-surface deposit feeders, micro-and macrograzers, suspension-oriented interface feeders and deposit-oriented interface feeders). Variations in organism' diets with respect to both habitats (intertidal seagrass meadows, intertidal bare sediments and subtidal bare sediments) and study periods were also investigated. At the scale of this study, it appeared that the diet of macrozoobenthos primary consumers was based exclusively on autochthonous material (no use of terrestrial organic matter): mainly microphytobenthos, seagrasses and their epiphytes, and phytoplankton. In addition, the different trophic groups relied on different organic matter pools: for instance, suspension feeders mainly fed on microphytobenthos and phytoplankton, whereas subsurface deposit feeders fed on microphytobenthos, decayed seagrasses and bacteria, and grazers mainly fed on microphytobenthos, and seagrasses and their epiphytes. The same pattern was observed in both early spring and late summer, indicating a stability of the benthic system at a six-month time scale. Finally our results showed that, in Arcachon Bay, the seagrass meadow directly or indirectly (through detritus) plays a significant role in the diet of most benthic consumers.

  18. Phosphorus mass balance in a highly eutrophic semi-enclosed inlet near a big metropolis: a small inlet can contribute towards particulate organic matter production.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tamiji

    2011-01-01

    Terrigenous loading into enclosed water bodies has been blamed for eutrophic conditions marked by massive algal growth and subsequent hypoxia due to decomposition of dead algal cells. This study aims to describe the eutrophication and hypoxia processes in a semi-enclosed water body lying near a big metropolis. Phosphorus mass balance in a small inlet, Ohko Inlet, located at the head of Hiroshima Bay, Japan, was quantified using a numerical model. Dissolved inorganic phosphorous inflow from Kaita Bay next to the inlet was five times higher than that from terrigenous load, which may cause an enhancement of primary production. Therefore, it was concluded that not only the reduction of material load from the land and the suppression of benthic flux are needed, but also reducing the inflow of high phosphorus and oxygen depleted water from Kaita Bay will form a collective alternative measure to remediate the environmental condition of the inlet. PMID:21402392

  19. The effects of video compression on acceptability of images for monitoring life sciences' experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Chuang, Sherry L.

    1993-01-01

    Current plans indicate that there will be a large number of life science experiments carried out during the thirty year-long mission of the Biological Flight Research Laboratory (BFRL) on board Space Station Freedom (SSF). Non-human life science experiments will be performed in the BFRL. Two distinct types of activities have already been identified for this facility: (1) collect, store, distribute, analyze and manage engineering and science data from the Habitats, Glovebox and Centrifuge, (2) perform a broad range of remote science activities in the Glovebox and Habitat chambers in conjunction with the remotely located principal investigator (PI). These activities require extensive video coverage, viewing and/or recording and distribution to video displays on board SSF and to the ground. This paper concentrates mainly on the second type of activity. Each of the two BFRL habitat racks are designed to be configurable for either six rodent habitats per rack, four plant habitats per rack, or a combination of the above. Two video cameras will be installed in each habitat with a spare attachment for a third camera when needed. Therefore, a video system that can accommodate up to 12-18 camera inputs per habitat rack must be considered.

  20. Exobiological implications of dust aggregation in planetary atmospheres: An experiment for the gas-grain simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, J. L.; Schwartz, D. E.; Marshall, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) will provide a microgravity environment where undesirable environmental effects are reduced, and thus, experiments involving interactions between small particles and grains can be more suitably performed. Slated for flight aboard the Shuttle in 1992, the ESA glovebox will serve as a scientific and technological testbed for GGSF exobiology experiments as well as generating some basic scientific data. Initial glovebox experiments will test a method of generating a stable, mono-dispersed cloud of fine particles using a vibrating sprinkler system. In the absence of gravity and atmospheric turbulence, it will be possible to determine the influence of interparticle forces in controlling the rate and mode of aggregation. The experimental chamber can be purged of suspended matter to enable multiple repetitions of the experiments. Of particular interest will be the number of particles per unit volume of the chamber, because it is suspected that aggregation will occur extremely rapidly if the number exceeds a critical value. All aggregation events will be recorded on high-resolution video film. Changes in the experimental procedure as a result of surprise events will be accompanied by real-time interaction with the mission specialist during the Shuttle flight.

  1. Improving the Energy Performance of Multi-Unit Residential Buildings Using Air-Source Heat Pumps and Enclosed Balconies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touchie, Marianne

    Existing multi-unit residential buildings (MURBs) are important assets for urban regions such as Toronto, Canada. These buildings provide high-density housing and allow for the efficient provision of public services and utilities. However, MURB energy-use imposes a significant environmental burden. A preliminary part of the study presented here found that the median energy intensity of MURBs in Toronto is 300ekWh/m2 and that this energy-use accounts for 17% of residential greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the City. To reduce this environmental burden, this work explores a novel energy retrofit strategy involving a suite-based air-source heat pump (ASHP) operating in an enclosed balcony space which serves as a thermal buffer zone (TBZ) to improve the cold-weather ASHP performance in a heating-dominated climate. More broadly, a methodology for assessing the impact of an energy retrofit measure is developed. First, energy-use and interior condition data were collected from a 1960s MURB over the course of one year. The subject building was found to have a higher-than-average energy intensity of 374ekWh/m2 and other operational issues including overheating of suites. These data were then used to calibrate an energy model so that the proposed retrofit strategy could be modeled. Next, the proposed retrofit strategy was tested in a mock apartment unit constructed in a climate-controlled chamber. The testing showed that the coefficient of performance of the ASHP could be improved by operating it in a TBZ with access to heat from solar gains. This finding was used to modify the subject building energy model which showed that applying the proposed retrofit could reduce the annual energy intensity and GHG emissions of the building by 39% and 45%, respectively. An estimate of the impact of applying this retrofit strategy to Toronto MURBs with energy intensities greater than the median results in a median sector energy intensity of 236ekWh/m 2.

  2. THE EFFECTS OF THYMUS AND OTHER LYMPHOID ORGANS ENCLOSED IN MILLIPORE DIFFUSION CHAMBERS ON NEONATALLY THYMECTOMIZED MICE

    PubMed Central

    Osoba, David

    1965-01-01

    When neonatally thymectomized CBA mice were implanted at 9 to 12 days of age with Millipore diffusion chambers (pore size, 0.1 µ) containing either syngeneic or allogeneic neonatal thymus, they were subsequently found to have the capacity to reject skin homografts and to form antibodies to sheep erythrocytes. In spite of displaying restored immune reactivity, thymectomized mice bearing thymus-filled diffusion chambers still had a lymphopenia and diminished numbers of small lymphocytes in their spleens, lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. Comparison of the lymphoid organs of these mice with those of the thymectomized control mice did not reveal any appreciable difference in the numbers of primary follicles or small lymphocytes. It is postulated that the thymus humoral factor induced immunological competence in lymphoid cells which had left the thymus prior to neonatal thymectomy. The paucity of circulating and tissue small lymphocytes in thymectomized animals, the immune reactivity of which was restored by thymus tissue in diffusion chambers, argues against the theory that the thymus humoral factor has a lymphocytosis-stimulating effect. There was no restoration of immune reactivity in those neonatally thymectomized mice which had been implanted with diffusion chambers containing neonatal or adult spleens, or adult lymph nodes. Thus, the competence-inducing factor is elaborated by the thymus but not by the spleen or lymph nodes. Allogeneic (C57Bl) neonatal thymus tissue, enclosed within diffusion chambers, had the capacity to restore the immune reactivity of totally thymectomized CBA mice, not only to skin homografts of a totally unrelated strain (Ak), but also to grafts isogeneic with the donor of the allogeneic thymus. Therefore, there is no strain barrier to the action of thymus humoral factor. To explain the apparent lack of full participation of thymus lymphocytes in immune reactions it is postulated that thymus lymphocytes are functionally immature in situ, and

  3. Spatial patterns of phytoplanktonic pigments and primary production in a semi-enclosed periantarctic ecosystem: the Strait of Magellan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggiomo, V.; Goffart, A.; Carrada, G. C.; Hecq, J. H.

    1994-07-01

    The spatial patterns of nitrate, phytoplankton size-fractionated chlorophyll a, photosynthetic pigments detected by HPLC and primary production were studied at the end of the austral summer (February-March 1991), in the Strait of Magellan to provide insight into the mechanisms governing this seemi-enclosed periantartic ecosystem. Climatological peculiarities, hydrodynamic constraints, runoff and land forcing were considered. The most important features identified for this area were the confinement of the microphytoplankton fraction to the external parts of the Strait and the rather uniform dimensional structure of the phytoplankton communities (< 5 μm) within the internal sectors. In particular, the nanoplanktonic fraction (10-2 μm) comprised 33%, while the picoplanktonic one (2-0.5 μm) represented 62% of the total. The concentration of active Chl. a and plant pigments detected by HPLC, nitrate and primary production showed an uneven but similar distribution, allowing for the characterization of different sectors within the Strait, according to different types and intensities of forcing factors. The different ecological sectors identified along the Strait were associated with distinct hydrographic typologies: an oligotrophic, wind-mixed coastal area, adjacent to the Pacific opening; a high runoff fjord and a divergence zone in the Andean sectors; a stratified inland sea in the basin-like part of the channel (Paso Ancho) and a shallow, tidally mixed system in the Patagonian sectors. Areas of relatively low and high phytoplankton biomass and primary production alternate along the Strait, according to the hydrographic structures of the different sectors. Phytoplankton biomass, in terms of active Chl. a (spectrofluorometric determination) ranged between 10 and 51 mg m -2 and primary production between 275 and 1170 mg C m -2 d -1. The assemblage of plant pigments detected by HPLC indicated that the high levels of phytoplankton pigments and production were most likely

  4. Sea level rise of semi-enclosed basins: deviation of Adriatic and Baltic sea level from the mean global value.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarascia, Luca; Lionello, Piero

    2015-04-01

    Future sea level rise (SL), which represents today one of the major threats that are caused by climate change, will not be uniform. Regional differences are crucial for 40% of the world population, which is located in the coastal zone. To explore the mechanisms linking regional SL to climate variables is very important in order to provide reliable future projections. This study focuses on two semi-enclosed basins, the Adriatic and Baltic Sea and investigates the deviation of their SL from the mean global value. In fact, past deviations of the SL of these two basins from the global value have been observed and can be attributed to large scale factors (such as teleconnections) and regional factors, such as the inverse barometric effect, the wind stress, the thermosteric and halosteric effects. The final goal of this work is to assess to which extent the Adriatic and Baltic SL will depart from the mean global value in the next decades and at the end of 21st century. This is achieved by analyzing deviations of the mean SL of the Baltic and Adriatic Sea from the global mean SL during the 20th century and investigating which factors can explain such deviations. A multivariate linear regression model is built and used to describe the link between three large scale climate variables which are used as predictors (mean sea level pressure, surface air temperature and precipitation), and the regional SL deviation (the predictand), computed as the difference between the regional and the global SL. At monthly scale this linear regression model provides a good reconstruction of the past variability in the cold season during which it explains 60%-70% of the variance. Summer reconstruction is substantially less successful and it represents presently the main limit of the model skill. This linear regression model, forced by predictors extracted from CMIP5 multi-model simulations, is used to provide projections of SL in the Adriatic and Baltic Sea. On the basis of the projections

  5. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Stefan; Burba, George; Burns, Sean P.; Blanken, Peter D.; Li, Jiahong; Luo, Hongyan; Zulueta, Rommel C.

    2016-03-01

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) are set to provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across ecoclimatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analyzers are widely employed for eddy covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation varies with site properties and gas sampling systems, and requires correction. Here, we show that components of the gas sampling system can substantially contribute to such high-frequency attenuation, but their effects can be significantly reduced by careful system design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5-16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4-14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3-21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4-19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyzer cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor-capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was developed on this

  6. Observed and modeled patterns of circulation in a semi-enclosed bay: Ria de Vigo (NW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilczynski, Krzysztof; Dubert, Jesus; Nolasco, Rita; Barton, Des; Souto Torres, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The Ría de Vigo, as a semi-enclosed bay, belonging to the area so-called Rias Baixas, located at the northern tip of the Iberian coastal upwelling system. The circulation of the Ria de Vigo, being one of the major areas of mussels production, has become the subject of intensive research. The Ria de Vigo behaves as a partially-mixed estuary with a two-layered residual circulation, and is influenced by water exchange with the surrounding ocean. During northerly (upwelling favorable) winds, water enters into the Ria through the northern mouth and leaves through the surface layer of the southern mouth, in a double layer circulation at this mouth. Nearly opposed situation occours during downwelling favourable wind periods. Numerical models have become useful tools to study the hydrology and circulation of the Ria de Vigo. In this research we used the ROMS - AGRIF model. The implementation of several nested domains to increase the spatial resolution (up to 150m resolution) allowed solving the interactions between Ria de Vigo and surrounding coastal ocean in a realistic way. We have obtained a detailed description of the circulation with good agreement between observational data (ADCP moorings at both mouths, and weekly hydrological cruises) and predicted currents, salinity and temperature fields. Two new patterns of circulation in the Ria are revealed by our research: -In particular conditions associated with northerly wind relaxation, there are two-layer circulation occurs in both mouths of the Ria, consisting of outflow and inflow though the surface and bottom layers. This situation happens in the absence of stratification during winter. -Also during winter, one-layer circulation in the southern mouth of the Ria (typically there are two layers) can occur during long periods of persistent and strong upwelling-favourable wind. Our research has provided a detailed study of the circulation and hydrology of the Ria de Vigo, explaining specifically different mechanisms of

  7. The elementary steps of the photodissociation and recombination reactions of iodine molecules enclosed in cages and channels of zeolite crystals: A femtosecond time-resolved study of the geometry effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flachenecker, G.; Materny, A.

    2004-03-01

    We present femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments on iodine molecules enclosed into well-defined cages and channels of different crystalline SiO2 modifications of zeolites. The new experimental results obtained from iodine in TON (Silica-ZSM-22), FER (Silica-Ferrierit), and MFI (Silicalit-1) porosils are compared with data published earlier on the iodine/DDR (Decadodecasil 3R) porosil system [Flachenecker et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 5, 865 (2003)]. A summary of all findings is given. The processes analyzed by means of the ultrafast spectroscopy are the vibrational relaxation as well as the dissociation and recombination reactions, which are caused by the interaction of the photo-excited iodine molecules with the cavity walls of the porosils. A clear dependence of the observed dynamics on the geometry of the surrounding lattice structure can be seen. These measurements are supported by temperature-dependent experiments. Making use of a theoretical model which is based on the classical Langevin equation, an analysis of the geometry-reaction relation is performed. The Brownian dynamics simulations show that in contrast to the vibrational relaxation the predissociation dynamics are independent of the frequency of collisions with the surroundings. From the results obtained in the different surroundings, we conclude that mainly local fields are responsible for the crossing from the bound B state to the repulsive a/a' states of the iodine molecules.

  8. Flow visualization of acoustic levitation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baroth, ED

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic levitation experiments for space applications were performed. Holographic interferometry is being used to study the heat transfer rates on a heated rod enclosed in a 6 cu in chamber. Acoustic waves at levels up to 150 db increased the heating rates to the rod by factors of three to four. High speed real time holographic interferometry was used to measure the boundary layer on the heated rod. Data reduction and digitization of the interferograms are being implemented.

  9. A Technology Demonstration Experiment for Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Seidel, D. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Maleki, L.; Gibble, K.

    2000-01-01

    We have been developing a laser-cooling apparatus for flight on the International Space Station (ISS), with the intention of demonstrating linewidths on the cesium clock transition narrower than can be realized on the ground. GLACE (the Glovebox Laser- cooled Atomic Clock Experiment) is scheduled for launch on Utilization Flight 3 (UF3) in 2002, and will be mounted in one of the ISS Glovebox platforms for an anticipated 2-3 week run. Separate flight definition projects funded at NIST and Yale by the Micro- gravity Research Division of NASA as a part of its Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program will follow GLACE. Core technologies for these and other LCAP missions are being developed at JPL, with the current emphasis on developing components such as the laser and optics subsystem, and non-magnetic vacuum-compatible mechanical shutters. Significant technical challenges in developing a space qualifiable laser cooling apparatus include reducing the volume, mass, and power requirements, while increasing the ruggedness and reliability in order to both withstand typical launch conditions and achieve several months of unattended operation. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Surface energetic and bonding characteristics of tetrahexahedral platinum nanocrystals enclosed by high-index facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Zi-Zhong; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2009-11-01

    This paper uses a molecular static approach with a many-body potential to investigate the surface energetic and bonding characteristics of tetrahexahedral platinum nanocrystals enclosed by high-index facets such as {210}, {310}, {410}, {520} and {730}. It mainly focuses on the effect of crystal size and surface Miller index on these characteristics. The results show that the surface energy and dangling bond density increase with decreasing diameter of tetrahexahedral nanocrystals and generally show an order of {210} > {730} > {520} > {310} > {410}. However, this order is not valid at crystal sizes below 7 nm or so. The results of corresponding surfaces are also presented for comparison.

  11. Estimates of effects of residual acceleration on USML-1 experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study effort was to develop analytical models to describe the effects of residual accelerations on the experiments to be carried on the first U.S. Microgravity Lab mission (USML-1) and to test the accuracy of these models by comparing the pre-flight predicted effects with the post-flight measured effects. After surveying the experiments to be performed on USML-1, it became evident that the anticipated residual accelerations during the USML-1 mission were well below the threshold for most of the primary experiments and all of the secondary (Glovebox) experiments and that the only set of experiments that could provide quantifiable effects, and thus provide a definitive test of the analytical models, were the three melt growth experiments using the Bridgman-Stockbarger type Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF). This class of experiments is by far the most sensitive to low level quasi-steady accelerations that are unavoidable on space craft operating in low earth orbit. Because of this, they have been the drivers for the acceleration requirements imposed on the Space Station. Therefore, it is appropriate that the models on which these requirements are based are tested experimentally. Also, since solidification proceeds directionally over a long period of time, the solidified ingot provides a more or less continuous record of the effects from acceleration disturbances.

  12. Subtle effects of the water soluble fraction of oil spills on natural phytoplankton assemblages enclosed in mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J.; Fernández, E.; Figueiras, F. G.; Varela, M.

    2013-06-01

    Four mesocosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of episodic oil spills on coastal marine phytoplankton assemblages. The experimental design was selected to simulate the Prestige oil spill, which occurred in Galician coastal waters (NW Iberia) in November 2002. The empirical results indicate that no significant direct effects of the water soluble fraction of oil (20-60 μg l-1 of chrysene equivalents) on phytoplankton biomass and production were observed immediately after oil additions. Despite this, subtle negative effects on primary production were detected using a modelling approach, being the impact lower on phytoplankton communities dominated by diatoms. Consistent with the reduced direct effect of oil additions on phytoplankton biomass and photosynthesis-related variables, no indirect trophic cascading effects, previously reported in microcosm experiments, were detected. This shows that the effect of punctual inputs of the water accommodated fraction of oil on natural phytoplankton communities was very subtle, undetectable on some occasions, and of much lower magnitude than the effects recorded in microcosm experiments. This suggests that the initial composition of the phytoplankton community determines the degree of response and that the experimental approach adopted could explain the different, and sometimes contradictory, reported responses of the planktonic community to the input of oil into the marine environment.

  13. Results of first field tests of the improved open-path and enclosed models of CO2 and H2O flux measurements systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begashaw, Israel; Fratini, Gerardo; Griessbaum, Frank; Kathilankal, James; Xu, Liukang; Franz, Daniela; Joseph, Everett; Larmanou, Eric; Miller, Scott; Papale, Dario; Sabbatini, Simone; Sachs, Torsten; Sakai, Ricardo; McDermitt, Dayle; Burba, George

    2016-04-01

    In 2014-2015, improved open-path and enclosed-path flux measurement systems were developed, based on established LI-7500A and LI-7200 gas analyzer models, with the focus on improving stability in the presence of contamination, refining temperature control and compensation, and providing more accurate gas concentration measurements. In addition to optical and electronic redesign, both systems incorporate automated on-site flux calculations using EddyPro® software run by a weatherized remotely-accessible microcomputer, SmartFlux 2, with fully digital inputs. The ultimate goal of such development was to reduce errors in CO2 and H2O hourly fluxes and in long-term carbon and water budgets. Field tests of both systems were conducted over six periods, each 5-14 months long, at 6 sites with diverse environments, setups, and types of contamination, using 26 gas analyzers. The open-path LI-7500RS system performed significantly better than the original LI-7500A model in terms of contamination-related drifts in mean concentrations. Improvements in CO2 drifts were strong, with RS models often drifting few-to-tens of times less than the original. Improvements in H2O contamination-related drifts were particularly significant, with modified models often drifting many tens of times less than the original. The enclosed-path LI-7200RS system performed substantially better than the original LI-7200 in terms of the drifts in H2O, sometimes drifting few-to-tens of times less than the original. Improvements in CO2 contamination-related drifts were modest, being similar or just a bit better than the original. Results from field tests suggest that both RS systems can help improve flux data coverage and potentially reduce site maintenance: (i) Frequency of cleaning and site visits for service and maintenance should decrease, especially for the open-path design (ii) Amount of highest quality data with smallest error bars on fluxes is expected to increase for both open-path and enclosed

  14. Temporal population dynamics of dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum in a semi-enclosed mariculture pond and its relationship to environmental factors and protozoan grazers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Henglong; Min, Gi-Sik; Choi, Joong-Ki; Zhu, Mingzhuang; Jiang, Yong; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.

    2010-01-01

    The ecological processes and interrelationships between protists, either autotrophic or heterotrophic, and environmental factors in mariculture ponds are largely unknown. This study investigated the temporal dynamics of potentially harmful dinoflagellate, Prorocentrum minimum (Pavillard) Schiller, and its relationship to physico-chemical factors and protozoan grazers over a complete cycle in a semi-enclosed shrimp-farming pond near Qingdao, Northern China. P. minimum occurred frequently in low numbers from June to August, followed by a sharp increase from the middle of August, reaching a single maximum peak value of 2.2×105 cells L-1 in October. Temporal variation in abundance was positively correlated with dissolved nitrogen, but showed a significant inverse relationship to abundance of the dominant ciliates, Tintinnopsis lohmanni and Askenasia stellaris. The results provide statistical evidence that the number of P. minimum increased with increasing nitrogen, and the suppression or shortening of algal bloom may be associated with protozoan grazers, such as Tintinnopsis lohmanni, in mariculture ponds.

  15. A novel on-chip three-dimensional micromachined calorimeter with fully enclosed and suspended thin-film chamber for thermal characterization of liquid samples

    PubMed Central

    Davaji, Benyamin; Jeong Bak, Hye; Chang, Woo-Jin; Hoon Lee, Chung

    2014-01-01

    A microfabricated calorimeter (μ-calorimeter) with an enclosed reaction chamber is presented. The 3D micromachined reaction chamber is capable of analyzing liquid samples with volume of 200 nl. The thin film low-stress silicon nitride membrane is used to reduce thermal mass of the calorimeter and increase the sensitivity of system. The μ-calorimeter has been designed to perform DC and AC calorimetry, thermal wave analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry. The μ-calorimeter fabricated with an integrated heater and a temperature sensor on opposite sides of the reaction chamber allows to perform thermal diffusivity and specific heat measurements on liquid samples with same device. Measurement results for diffusivity and heat capacitance using time delay method and thermal wave analysis are presented. PMID:24926386

  16. Land Surface Modeling of an Enclosed Ecosystem: Vegetation Response to Short-Term Perturbations Inside Biosphere 2 Tropical Rainforest Biome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolem, R.; Zeng, X.; Shuttleworth, W. J.; Saleska, S. R.; Huxman, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    Biosphere 2 (B2) is a large-scale Earth science facility near Tucson (Arizona) that encompasses about 3.15 acres of land and houses five natural biomes. Sealed off to the outside world, B2 allows scientists to exert precise climate and mass balance control at large scales. The tropical rainforest (TRF) mesocosm area is about 1900 sq. meters and contains plant species from different tropical regions. B2 provides a unique controlled laboratory for carrying out experiments to investigate rainforest biome behavior in response to imposed environmental stresses at plot-scales (e.g., temperature, rainfall, humidity, and CO2 levels), providing the missing link between the laboratory scale and the real world. However, lack of repetitions (the facility contains only a single mesocosm for each biome) poses limitations to the analysis of the results. A well-established land surface parameterization scheme (LSP) may overcome this lack of repetitions by providing a reliable assessment of the biome under a variety of conditions. Modeling approaches can also facilitate and improve future experimental designs in B2. Here we challenge a LSP, the Simple Biosphere 3 (SiB3) model, to simulate the main aspects of the biosphere-atmosphere exchanges inside B2-TRF biome. Model simulations include B2-TRF under normal (i.e., operational) conditions, and during short-term perturbations, such as drought conditions and different treatments of CO2 concentration. A hypothetical simulation which combines both drought and high CO2 levels is performed with SiB3 and analyzed on the basis of future predictions of tropical rainforest under climate change. The main objectives of this study is to determine whether or not SiB3 is capable of representing B2-TRF at a wide range of conditions, and if we can use the combination of past field experiments and modeling to improve our understanding on how tropical rainforests may respond to these changes. Results show that our modified version of SiB3 is capable

  17. Geomorphological evolution of Mediterranean enclosed depressions in the Late glacial and Holocene: The example of Canohès (Roussillon, SE France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carozza, Jean-Michel; Llubes, Muriel; Danu, Mihaela; Faure, Elodie; Carozza, Laurent; David, Mélodie; Manen, Claire

    2016-11-01

    The origin and evolution of the enclosed depressions (pans) of southern France during the period from the Late Glacial to the Holocene are discussed on the basis of new stratigraphical, geophysical and chronological (14C) data from the Canohès depression (Roussillon, Southern of France) and its nearby environment. The Canohès depression is non-karstic, excavated from Pliocene arkosic sands that were shaped by eolian erosion during cold stages of the Middle and Upper Pleistocene. The timing and controlling factors of eolian carving of the depression are discussed on the basis of geomorphological data, surrounding alluvial terrace chronology, preserved ledge within the depression and alluvial infill of the depression. Formation of the depression was controlled, locally, by climate variability and its consequences on vegetation and water table position and, regionally, by the sea base level. The enclosed depression probably started to form during MIS 6, reaching its maximum depth during MIS 2. Climate variability in the region is recorded in the depression's infill. The basal deposits are of fluvial origin and record the increase of moisture and temperature during the Early Late-Glacial. The first lacustrine deposits are observed during the Bölling/GI-1e stage, while continental sedimentation and drying occurred during the Alleröd and Younger Dryas stages. During the Early and Middle Holocene, lacustrine conditions prevailed, except during short periods of drying. The specific evolution of the Canohès depression as regards other such formations is discussed in light of regional deglaciation and climate chronology. A regional synthesis of eolian erosion is proposed.

  18. Comparison of a direct-reading device to gravimetric methods for evaluating organic dust aerosols in an enclosed swine production environment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C D; Reynolds, S J

    2001-01-01

    The production of livestock in enclosed facilities has become an accepted practice, driven by the need for increased efficiency. Exposure to organic dusts, containing various bioactive components, has been identified an important risk factor for the high rate of lung disease found among workers in these environments. Assessment of organic dust exposure requires technical skills and instrumentation not readily available to most agricultural enterprises. Development of a simple, cost-effective method for measuring organic dust levels would be useful in evaluating and controlling exposures in these environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the direct reading MIE PDM-3 Miniram for estimating organic dust concentrations in enclosed swine production facilities. Responses from the MIE PDM-3 Miniram were compared to gravimetric methods for total and inhalable dust. Total dust determinations were conducted in accordance with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method 0500. Inhalable particulate mass (IPM) sampling was conducted using SKC brand IOM (Institute of Occupational Medicine) sampling cassettes, which meet the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists ACGIH criteria for inhalable dust sampling. This study design also allowed for the comparison of traditional total dust method to the IPM method, in collecting organic dusts in an agricultural setting. Fifteen sets of side-by-side samples (Miniram, total dust, and IPM) were collected over a period of six months in a swine confinement building. There were statistically significant differences in the results provided by the three sampling methods. Measurements for inhalable dust exceeded those for total dust in eleven of fifteen samples. The Miniram time-weighted average (TWA) response to the organic dust was always the lower of the three methods. A high degree of correlation was found among all three methods. The Miniram performed well under

  19. Benchmark of CFD Simulations Using Temperatures Measured Within an Enclosed Array of Heater Rods Oriented Vertically and Horizontally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalasani, Narayana Rao

    Experiments and computational fluid dynamics/radiation heat transfer simulations of an 8x8 array of heated rods within an aluminum enclosure are performed. This configuration represents a region inside the channel of a spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assembly between two consecutive spacer plates. The heater rods can be oriented horizontally or vertically to represent transport or storage conditions, respectively. The measured and simulated rod-to-wall temperature differences are compared for various heater rod power levels (100, 200, 300, 400 and 500W), gases (Helium and Nitrogen), enclosure wall temperatures, pressures (1, 2 and 3 atm) and orientations (Horizontal and Vertical) to assess the accuracy of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. For analysis of spent nuclear fuel casks, it is crucial to predict the temperature of the hottest rods in an assembly to ensure that none of the fuel cladding exceeds its temperature limit. The measured temperatures are compared to those determined using CFD code to assess the adequacy of the computer code. Simulations show that temperature gradients are much steeper near the enclosure walls than they are near the center of the heater rod array. The measured maximum heater rod temperatures are above the center of heater rod array for nitrogen experiments in both horizontal and vertical orientations, whereas for helium the maximum temperatures are at the center of heater rod array irrespective of the orientation due to the high thermal conductivity of the helium gas. The measured temperatures of rods at symmetric locations are not identical, and the difference is larger for rods close to the enclosure wall than for those far from it. Small but uncontrolled deviations of the rod positions away from the design locations may cause these differences. For 2-inch insulated nitrogen experiment in vertical orientation with 1 atm pressure and a total heater rod power of 500 W, the maximum measured heater rod and enclosure

  20. Boiling Experiment Facility for Heat Transfer Studies in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; McQuillen, John; Chao, David

    2008-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. By conducting tests in microgravity, it is possible to assess the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and assess the relative magnitude of effects with regards to other "forces" and phenomena such as Marangoni forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The Boiling eXperiment Facility is now being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox that will use normal perfluorohexane as a test fluid to extend the range of test conditions to include longer test durations and less liquid subcooling. Two experiments, the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment and the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment will use the Boiling eXperiment Facility. The objectives of these studies are to determine the differences in local boiling heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity and normal gravity from nucleate boiling, through critical heat flux and into the transition boiling regime and to examine the bubble nucleation, growth, departure and coalescence processes. Custom-designed heaters will be utilized to achieve these objectives.

  1. Bubble Formation and Transport during Microgravity Materials Processing: Model Experiments on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Anilkumar, A. V.; Lee, C. P.

    2003-01-01

    Flow Visualization experiments on the controlled melting and solidification of succinonitrile were conducted in the glovebox facility of the International Space Station (ISS). The experimental samples were prepared on ground by filling glass tubes, 1 cm ID and approximately 30 cm in length, with pure succinonitrile (SCN) under 450 millibar of nitrogen. Porosity in the samples arose from natural shrinkage, and in some cases by direct insertion of nitrogen bubbles, during solidification of the liquid SCN. The samples were processed in the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) apparatus that is placed in the glovebox facility (GBX) aboard the ISS. Experimental processing parameters of temperature gradient and translation speed, as well as camera settings, were remotely monitored and manipulated from the ground Telescience Center (TSC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. During the experiments, the sample is first subjected to a unidirectional melt back, generally at 10 microns per second, with a constant temperature gradient ahead of the melting interface. The temperatures in the sample are monitored by six in situ thermocouples. Real time visualization of the controlled directional melt back shows bubbles of different sizes initiating at the melt interface and, upon dislodging from the melting solid, migrating at different speeds into the temperature field ahead of them, before coming to rest. The thermocapillary flow field set up in the melt, ahead of the interface, is dramatic in the context of the large bubbles, and plays a major role in dislodging the bubble. A preliminary analysis of the observed bubble formation and mobility during melt back and its implication to future microgravity experiments is presented and discussed.

  2. Bubble Formation and Transport during Microgravity Materials Processing: Model Experiments on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Anilkumar, A. V.; Lee, C. P.

    2003-01-01

    Flow Visualization experiments on the controlled melting and solidification of succinonitrile were conducted in the glovebox facility of the International Space Station (ISS). The experimental samples were prepared on ground by filling glass tubes, 1 cm ID and approximately 30 cm in length, with pure succinonitrile (SCN) under 450 millibar of nitrogen. Porosity in the samples arose from natural shrinkage, and in some cases by direct insertion of nitrogen bubbles, during solidification of the liquid SCN. The samples were processed in the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) apparatus that is placed in the glovebox facility (GBX) aboard the ISS. Experimental processing parameters of temperature gradient and translation speed, as well as camera settings, were remotely monitored and manipulated from the ground Telescience Center (TSC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. During the experiments, the sample is first subjected to a unidirectional melt back, generally at 10 microns per second, with a constant temperature gradient ahead of the melting interface. The temperatures in the sample are monitored by six in situ thermocouples. Real time visualization of the controlled directional melt back shows bubbles of different sizes initiating at the melt interface and, upon dislodging from the melting solid, migrating at different speeds into the temperature field ahead of them, before coming to rest. The thermocapillary flow field set up in the melt, ahead of the interface, is dramatic in the context of the large bubbles, and plays a major role in dislodging the bubble. A preliminary analysis of the observed bubble formation and mobility during melt back and its implication to future microgravity experiments is presented and discussed.

  3. Burning a Candle in a Vessel, a Simple Experiment with a Long History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Nunez, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The experiment in which a candle is burned inside an inverted vessel partially immersed in water has a history of more than 2,200 years, but even nowadays it is common that students and teachers relate the change in volume of the enclosed air to its oxygen content. Contrary to what many people think, Lavoisier concluded that any change in volume…

  4. Identifying Enclosed Chemical Reaction and Dynamics at the Molecular Level Using Shell-Isolated Miniaturized Plasmonic Liquid Marble.

    PubMed

    Han, Xuemei; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Lee, Yih Hong; Hao, Wei; Liu, Yejing; Phang, In Yee; Li, Shuzhou; Ling, Xing Yi

    2016-04-21

    Current microscale tracking of chemical kinetics is limited to destructive ex situ methods. Here we utilize Ag nanocube-based plasmonic liquid marble (PLM) microreactor for in situ molecular-level identification of reaction dynamics. We exploit the ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) capability imparted by the plasmonic shell to unravel the mechanism and kinetics of aryl-diazonium surface grafting reaction in situ, using just a 2-μL reaction droplet. This reaction is a robust approach to generate covalently functionalized metallic surfaces, yet its kinetics remain unknown to date. Experiments and simulations jointly uncover a two-step sequential grafting process. An initial Langmuir chemisorption of sulfonicbenzene diazonium (dSB) salt onto Ag surfaces forms an intermediate sulfonicbenzene monolayer (Ag-SB), followed by subsequent autocatalytic multilayer growth of Ag-SB3. Kinetic rate constants reveal 19-fold faster chemisorption than multilayer growth. Our ability to precisely decipher molecular-level reaction dynamics creates opportunities to develop more efficient processes in synthetic chemistry and nanotechnology.

  5. Features of motivation of the crewmembers in an enclosed space at atmospheric pressure changes during breathing inert gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarevcev, Sergey

    Since the 1960s, our psychologists are working on experimenting with small groups in isolation .It was associated with the beginning of spaceflight and necessity to study of human behaviors in ways different from the natural habitat of man .Those, who study human behavior especially in isolation, know- that the behavior in isolation markedly different from that in the natural situаtions. It associated with the development of new, more adaptive behaviors (1) What are the differences ? First of all , isolation is achieved by the fact ,that the group is in a closed space. How experiments show - the crew members have changed the basic personality traits, such as motivation Statement of the problem and methods. In our experimentation we were interested in changing the features of human motivation (strength, stability and direction of motivation) in terms of a closed group in the modified atmosphere pressure and breathing inert gases. Also, we were interested in particular external and internal motivation of the individual in the circumstances. To conduct experimentation , we used an experimental barocomplex GVK -250 , which placed a group of six mаns. A task was to spend fifteen days in isolation on barokomplex when breathing oxigen - xenon mixture of fifteen days in isolation on the same complex when breathing oxygen- helium mixture and fifteen days of isolation on the same complex when breathing normal air All this time, the subjects were isolated under conditions of atmospheric pressure changes , closer to what you normally deal divers. We assumed that breathing inert mixtures can change the strength and stability , and with it , the direction and stability of motivation. To check our results, we planned on using the battery of psychological techniques : 1. Schwartz technique that measures personal values and behavior in society, DORS procedure ( measurement of fatigue , monotony , satiety and stress ) and riffs that give the test once a week. Our assumption is

  6. Experience gained with the Synroc demonstration plant at ANSTO and its relevance to plutonium immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Jostsons, A.; Ridal, A.; Mercer, D.J.; Vance, E.R.L.

    1996-05-01

    The Synroc Demonstration Plant (SDP) was designed and constructed at Lucas Heights to demonstrate the feasibility of Synroc production on a commercial scale (10 kg/hr) with simulated Purex liquid HLW. Since commissioning of the SDP in 1987, over 6000 kg of Synroc has been fabricated with a range of feeds and waste loadings. The SDP utilises uniaxial hot-pressing to consolidate Synroc. Pressureless sintering and hot-isostatic pressing have also been studied at smaller scales. The results of this extensive process development have been incorporated in a conceptual design for a radioactive plant to condition HLW from a reprocessing plant with a capacity to treat 800 tpa of spent LWR fuel. Synroic containing TRU, including Pu, and fission products has been fabricated and characterised in a glove-box facility and hot cells, respectively. The extensive experience in processing of Synroc over the past 15 years is summarised and its relevance to immobilization of surplus plutonium is discussed.

  7. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hendrix, M. K.; Fox, J. C.; Thomas, D. J.; Nicholson, J.

    The hardware and software of NASA's proposed Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) are described. The OARE is to provide aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's principal axis in the free-molecular flow-flight regime at orbital attitude and in the transition regime during reentry. Models considering the effects of electromagnetic effects, solar radiation pressure, orbiter mass attraction, gravity gradient, orbital centripetal acceleration, out-of-orbital-plane effects, orbiter angular velocity, structural noise, mass expulsion signal sources, crew motion, and bias on acceleration are examined. The experiment contains an electrostatically balanced cylindrical proofmass accelerometer sensor with three orthogonal sensing axis outputs. The components and functions of the experimental calibration system and signal processor and control subsystem are analyzed. The development of the OARE software is discussed. The experimental equipment will be enclosed in a cover assembly that will be mounted in the Orbiter close to the center of gravity.

  8. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hendrix, M. K.; Fox, J. C.; Thomas, D. J.; Nicholson, J.

    1986-01-01

    The hardware and software of NASA's proposed Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) are described. The OARE is to provide aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's principal axis in the free-molecular flow-flight regime at orbital attitude and in the transition regime during reentry. Models considering the effects of electromagnetic effects, solar radiation pressure, orbiter mass attraction, gravity gradient, orbital centripetal acceleration, out-of-orbital-plane effects, orbiter angular velocity, structural noise, mass expulsion signal sources, crew motion, and bias on acceleration are examined. The experiment contains an electrostatically balanced cylindrical proofmass accelerometer sensor with three orthogonal sensing axis outputs. The components and functions of the experimental calibration system and signal processor and control subsystem are analyzed. The development of the OARE software is discussed. The experimental equipment will be enclosed in a cover assembly that will be mounted in the Orbiter close to the center of gravity.

  9. Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion Experiment on STS-94

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A fuel droplet burns in the Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC) Experiment on STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:02/19:20 (approximate). This experiment, performed in the Middeck Glovebox, allows us to study the burning of fuels such as n-heptane, n-decane, methanol, ethanol, methanol/water mixtures, and heptane/hexadecane mixtures in droplets as large as 6 mm (nearly 1/4 inch). In this sequence, you see the burn of a 5mm droplet of n-heptane, in a 30% O2/He environment at 1 atmosphere pressure. The droplet (looking bright pink because of reflected light) hangs suspended from the supporting fiber. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station.(467KB, 18-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300174.html.

  10. Droplet Burns in the Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A fuel droplet burns in the Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC) Experiment on STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:02/19:20 (approximate). This experiment, performed in the Middeck Glovebox, allows us to study the burning of fuels such as n-heptane, n-decane, methanol, ethanol, methanol/water mixtures, and heptane/hexadecane mixtures in droplets as large as 6 mm (nearly 1/4 inch). In this sequence, you see the burn of a 5mm droplet of n-heptane, in a 30% O2/He environment at 1 atmosphere pressure. The droplet (looking bright pink because of reflected light) hangs suspended from the supporting fiber. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (279KB JPEG, 1350 x 2026 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300175.html.

  11. Influence of bottom topography on dynamics of river plumes in semi-enclosed domains: Case study in Taiwan Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavialov, Peter; Korotenko, Konstantin; Osadchiev, Alexander; Kao, Ruei-Chi; Ding, Chung-Feng

    2014-05-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a Russian-Taiwan research project focused on the role of continental discharges into the Taiwan Strait, an important channel in the western Pacific Ocean transporting water between the South China Sea and the East China Sea. Another critically important hydrographic feature in the area is the discharge of freshwater from multiple rivers of the western coast of Taiwan. With its long-term average discharge rate of 210 m3/s, the Zhuoshui River is the biggest of the rivers bringing a large amount of pollutants and nutrients into the Strait. The northern extremity of Zhuoshui River's plume often merges with that of the Wu River (also known as Dudu River) whose average discharge rate is about 120 m3/s. Oceanic waters in the area experience significant anthropogenic pressures, traceable to the distance of a few km offshore and tens of km along the shore. This is manifested, in particular, in strongly elevated concentrations of copper, iron, and other trace metals. The corresponding quantitative estimates are obtained. The newly obtained in situ data from a field campaign were also used to implement 2 numerical models aimed at simulating the pathways of the continental waters in the study region. One of them, based on the Princeton Ocean Model, was coupled with a regional barotropic tidal model for the Taiwan Strait. The other one, a fully Lagrangian model STRiPE is based on applying a complete set of momentum equations to individual "particles" of river water released into the ocean. Both models demonstrated reasonable good agreement with the in situ data and each other. The bathymetry, tides and winds significantly affect the dynamics of the Wu and Zhuoshui river plumes, acting together in a complex interactive manner. The Zhuoshui River plume stretches in a narrow alongshore belt both to the south and north from the river mouth while the larger, round-shaped Wu River's plume elongates mostly north of its mouth. The difference is

  12. Petrological evolution of subducted rodingite from seafloor metamorphism to dehydration of enclosing antigorite-serpentinite (Cerro del Almirez massif, southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborda-López, Casto; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Marchesi, Claudio; Gómez-Pugnaire, María Teresa; Garrido, Carlos J.; Jabaloy-Sánchez, Antonio; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Rodingites are common rocks associated with serpentinites in exhumed terrains that experienced subduction and high pressure metamorphism. However, the response of these rocks to devolatilization and redox reactions in subduction settings is not well constrained. In the Cerro del Almirez ultramafic massif (southern Spain) rodingites constitute about 1-2% of the total volume of exposed rocks. Metarodingites are enclosed in antigorite-serpentinite and chlorite-harzburgite separated by a transitional zone that represents the front of prograde serpentinite-dehydration in a paleo-subduction setting (Padrón-Navarta et al., 2011). Metarodingites occur as boudin lenses, 1 to 20 m in length and 30 cm to 2 m in thickness. During serpentinization of peridotite host rocks, dolerites and basalts precursor of rodingites underwent intense seafloor metasomatism, causing the enrichment in Ca and remobilization of Na and K. Subsequent metamorphism during subduction transformed the original igneous and seafloor metamorphic mineralogy into an assemblage of garnet (Ti-rich hydrogrossular), diopside, chlorite, and epidote. During prograde metamorphism, garnet composition changed towards higher andradite contents. High-pressure transformation of enclosing antigorite-serpentinite to chlorite-harzburgite released fluids which induced breakdown of garnet to epidote in metarodingites. Ti liberation by this latter reaction produced abundant titanite. Released fluids also triggered the formation of amphibole by alkalis addition. Highly recrystallized metarodingites in chlorite-harzburgite present a new generation of idiomorphic garnet with composition equal to 10-30% pyrope, 30-40% grossular and 35-55% almandine + spessartine. This garnet has titanite inclusions in the core and rutile inclusions in the rim. The contact between metarodingites and ultramafic rocks consists of a metasomatic zone (blackwall) with variable thickness (7 to 40 cm) constituted by chlorite, diopside, and titanite

  13. STS-95 Day 02 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this second day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, are seen preparing a glovebox device in the middeck area of Discovery, an enclosed research facility that will support numerous science investigations throughout the mission. Payload Specialist John Glenn, activates the Microgravity Encapsulation Process experiment (MEPS). This experiment will study the formation of capsules containing two kinds of anti-tumor drugs that could be delivered directly to solid tumors with applications for future chemotherapy treatments and the pharmaceutical industry.

  14. Optical-to-optical interface device. [consisting of two transparent electrodes on glass substrates that enclose thin film photoconductor and thin layer of nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, A. D.

    1973-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the performance of a photoactivated dc liquid crystal light valve. The dc light valve is a thin film device that consists of two transparent electrodes, deposited on glass substrates, that enclose a thin film photoconductor (cadmium sulfide) and a thin layer of a nematic liquid crystal that operates in the dynamic scattering mode. The work was directed toward application of the light valve to high resolution non-coherent light to coherent light image conversion. The goal of these studies was to improve the performance and quality of the already existing dc light valve device and to evaluate quantitatively the properties and performance of the device as they relate to the coherent optical data processing application. As a result of these efforts, device sensitivity was improved by a factor of ten, device resolution was improved by a factor of three, device lifetime was improved by two-orders of magnitude, undesirable secondary liquid crystal scattering effects were eliminated, the scattering characteristics of the liquid crystal were thoroughly documented, the cosmetic quality of the devices was dramatically improved, and the performance of the device was fully documented.

  15. Refugium for surface life on Snowball Earth in a nearly enclosed sea? A numerical solution for sea-glacier invasion through a narrow strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Adam J.; Waddington, Edwin D.; Warren, Stephen G.

    2014-04-01

    Where photosynthetic eukaryotic organisms survived during the Snowball Earth events of the Neoproterozoic remains unclear. Our previous research tested whether a narrow arm of the ocean, similar to the modern Red Sea, could have been a refugium for photosynthetic eukaryotes during the Snowball Earth. Using an analytical ice-flow model, we demonstrated that a limited range of climate conditions could restrict sea-glacier flow sufficiently to allow an arm of the sea to remain partially free from sea-glacier penetration, a necessary condition for it to act as a refugium. Here we expand on the previous study, using a numerical ice-flow model, with the ability to capture additional physics, to calculate sea-glacier penetration, and to explore the effect of a channel with a narrow entrance. The climatic conditions are made self-consistent by linking sublimation rate to surface temperature. As expected, the narrow entrance allows parts of the nearly enclosed sea to remain safe from sea-glacier penetration for a wider range of climate conditions.

  16. Metal-Intermetallic Laminate Ti-Al3Ti Composites Produced by Spark Plasma Sintering of Titanium and Aluminum Foils Enclosed in Titanium Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazurenko, Daria V.; Mali, Vyacheslav I.; Bataev, Ivan A.; Thoemmes, Alexander; Bataev, Anatoly A.; Popelukh, Albert I.; Anisimov, Alexander G.; Belousova, Natalia S.

    2015-09-01

    Metal-intermetallic laminate composites are considered as promising materials for application in the aerospace industry. In this study, Ti-Al3Ti composites enclosed in titanium cases were produced by reactive spark plasma sintering. Sintering was carried out at 1103 K and 1323 K (830 °C and 1050 °C) for 10 minutes. In both cases, high-quality Ti-Al3Ti composites containing thin transition layers at the interfaces were obtained. Al2Ti, AlTi, and AlTi3 intermetallic phases and a solid solution of aluminum in titanium were observed in the transition layers by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The material sintered at 1323 K (1050 °C) had higher strength in comparison with the composite obtained at 1103 K (830 °C). However, the hardness of the intermetallic component in the sample sintered at higher temperature decreased due to the grain growth. The impact toughness values of both materials were approximately identical.

  17. A fully enclosed, compact standard lightning impulse generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class gas-insulated switchgears with high capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Tao; Zhang, Qiaogen; Zhang, Lingli; Zhao, Junping; Liu, Xuandong; Li, Xiaoang; Guo, Can; You, Haoyang; Chen, Weijiang; Yin, Yu; Shi, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    At present, conducting standard lightning impulse (LI) tests in the field for gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) equipment is difficult because of the high capacitance of the test equipment and large circuit inductance of traditional impulse devices, which leads to a wavefront time Tf ≥ 2.5 μs. A novel fully enclosed, compact standard LI generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class GIS equipment with high capacitance is presented to solve the problem of Tf exceeding the standard during LI voltage tests for actual large-sized equipment. The impulse generator is installed in a metal vessel filled with SF6 or SF6/N2 gas mixture at a pressure of 0.3-0.5 MPa, providing a more compact structure and a lower series inductance. A newly developed conical voltage sensor is used to accurately measure the output voltage waveform. Two test modes (via bushing docking and direct docking) for the GIS test based on the impulse generator are introduced. Calculation results show that the impulse generator can generate an LI test waveform following the present IEC standard for the test of equipment with capacitance >10 000 pF.

  18. Influence of co-culture with denuded oocytes during in vitro maturation on fertilization and developmental competence of cumulus-enclosed porcine oocytes in a defined system.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, Ruth; Somfai, Tamás; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Maes, Dominiek; Van Soom, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Co-culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) with denuded oocytes (DOs) during in vitro maturation (IVM) was reported to improve the developmental competence of oocytes via oocyte-secreted factors in cattle. The aim of the present study was to investigate if addition of DOs during IVM can improve in vitro fertilization (IVF) and in vitro culture (IVC) results for oocytes in a defined in vitro production system in pigs. The maturation medium was porcine oocyte medium supplemented with gonadotropins, dbcAMP and β-mercaptoethanol. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were matured without DOs or with DOs in different ratios (9 COC, 9 COC+16 DO and 9 COC+36 DO). Consequently; oocytes were subjected to IVF as intact COCs or after denudation to examine if DO addition during IVM would affect cumulus or oocyte properties. After fertilization, penetration and normal fertilization rates of zygotes were not different between all tested groups irrespective of denudation before IVF. When zygotes were cultured for 6 days, no difference could be observed between all treatment groups in cleavage rate, blastocyst rate and cell number per blastocyst. In conclusion, irrespective of the ratio, co-culture with DOs during IVM did not improve fertilization parameters and embryo development of cumulus-enclosed porcine oocytes in a defined system.

  19. Study on O2 generation and CO2 absorption capability of four co-cultured salad plants in an enclosed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuangsheng; Ai, Weidang; Tang, Yongkang; Cheng, Quanyong; Shen, Yunze; Qin, Lifeng; Ma, Jialu; Zhu, Jingtao; Ren, Jin

    2014-06-01

    The ability to generate O2 and absorb CO2 of several co-cultured vegetable plants in an enclosed system was studied to provide theoretical reference for the future man-plant integrated tests. Four kinds of salad plants (Lactuca sativa L. var. Dasusheng, Lactuca sativa L. var. Youmaicai, Gynura bicolor and Cichorium endivia L.) were grown in the CELSS Integration Test Platform (CITP). The environmental factors including O2 and CO2 concentration were continuously monitored on-line and the plant biomass was measured at the end of the test. The changing rules of O2 and CO2 concentration in the system were basically understood and it was found that the O2 generated by the plants could satisfy the respiratory needs of 1.75 persons by calculation. It was also found that the plants could absorb the CO2 breathed out by 2 persons when the light intensity was raised to 550 mmol m-2 s-1 PPF. The results showed that the co-cultured plants hold good compatibility and excellent O2-generating and CO2-absorbing capability. They could also supply some fresh edible vegetable for a 2-person crew.

  20. Reconstruction of a meteotsunami in Lake Erie on 27 May 2012: Roles of atmospheric conditions on hydrodynamic response in enclosed basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eric J.; Bechle, Adam J.; Wu, Chin H.; Schwab, David J.; Mann, Greg E.; Lombardy, Kirk A.

    2015-12-01

    On 27 May 2012, atmospheric conditions gave rise to two convective systems that generated a series of waves in the meteotsunami band on Lake Erie. The resulting waves swept three swimmers a 0.5 mi offshore, inundated a marina, and may have led to a capsized boat along the southern shoreline. Analysis of radial velocities from a nearby radar tower in combination with coastal meteorological observation indicates that the convective systems produced a series of outflow bands that were the likely atmospheric cause of the meteotsunami. In order to explain the processes that led to meteotsunami generation, we model the hydrodynamic response to three meteorological forcing scenarios: (i) the reconstructed atmospheric disturbance from radar analysis, (ii) simulated conditions from a high-resolution weather model, and (iii) interpolated meteorological conditions from the NOAA Great Lakes Coastal Forecasting System. The results reveal that the convective systems generated a series of waves incident to the southern shore of the lake that reflected toward the northern shoreline and reflected again to the southern shore, resulting in spatial wave focusing and edge wave formation that combined to impact recreational users near Cleveland, OH. This study illustrates the effects of meteotsunami development in an enclosed basin, including wave reflection, focusing, and edge wave formation as well as temporal lags between the causative atmospheric conditions and arrival of dangerous wave conditions. As a result, the ability to detect these extreme storms and predict the hydrodynamic response is crucial to reducing risk and building resilient coastal communities.

  1. A fully enclosed, compact standard lightning impulse generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class gas-insulated switchgears with high capacitance.

    PubMed

    Wen, Tao; Zhang, Qiaogen; Zhang, Lingli; Zhao, Junping; Liu, Xuandong; Li, Xiaoang; Guo, Can; You, Haoyang; Chen, Weijiang; Yin, Yu; Shi, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    At present, conducting standard lightning impulse (LI) tests in the field for gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) equipment is difficult because of the high capacitance of the test equipment and large circuit inductance of traditional impulse devices, which leads to a wavefront time T(f) ≥ 2.5 μs. A novel fully enclosed, compact standard LI generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class GIS equipment with high capacitance is presented to solve the problem of T(f) exceeding the standard during LI voltage tests for actual large-sized equipment. The impulse generator is installed in a metal vessel filled with SF6 or SF6/N2 gas mixture at a pressure of 0.3-0.5 MPa, providing a more compact structure and a lower series inductance. A newly developed conical voltage sensor is used to accurately measure the output voltage waveform. Two test modes (via bushing docking and direct docking) for the GIS test based on the impulse generator are introduced. Calculation results show that the impulse generator can generate an LI test waveform following the present IEC standard for the test of equipment with capacitance >10,000 pF. PMID:27036815

  2. Gold-silver-graphene hybrid nanosheets-based sensors for sensitive amperometric immunoassay of alpha-fetoprotein using nanogold-enclosed titania nanoparticles as labels.

    PubMed

    Su, Biling; Tang, Dianping; Li, Qunfang; Tang, Juan; Chen, Guonan

    2011-04-29

    A new sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor with enhanced sensitivity was developed for detection of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, as a model analyte) in biological fluids by using nanogold-enclosed titania nanoparticle (AuTi)-labeled secondary antibody on a gold-silver-graphene hybrid nanosheet (AuAgGP)-functionalized glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The presence of the AuAgGP nanosheets not only enhanced the immobilized amount of biomolecules, but also improved the electrochemical properties of the immunosensor. With the aid of AuTi nanolabels, the electrochemical signal was greatly amplified in comparison with pure nanogold or titania-based labels. Under optimal conditions, the sensitivity and dynamic range of the immunosensor were evaluated by using the labeled horseradish peroxidase on the AuTi as trace and H(2)O(2) as enzyme substrate, and exhibited a wide dynamic range of 0.001-200 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit (LOD) of 0.5 pg mL(-1) AFP (at 3σ). Both the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were less than 10%. The current of the immunosensor at 13th day was as much as 90% of the initial current. In addition, the methodology was evaluated for 8 positive serum specimens obtained from hepatocarcinoma patients and 19 negative sera, and validated with the commercially available Roche 2010 Electrochemiluminescent (ECL) Automatic Analyzer. No significant differences at the 95% confidence level were encountered between two methods.

  3. Resilience and adjustments of surface sediment bacterial communities in an enclosed shallow coastal lagoon, Magdalen Islands, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada.

    PubMed

    Mohit, Vani; Archambault, Philippe; Lovejoy, Connie

    2015-05-01

    Bacteria regulate global biogeochemical cycles and much of this activity occurs in shallow coastal sediments; however, little is known of the seasonality or how changes in environmental conditions influence the active sediment bacterial communities. Havre-aux-Maisons (Magdalen Islands, Canada), a relatively pristine enclosed shallow coastal lagoon, is of particular biological interest since it has no inflowing rivers and provides an opportunity to investigate non-estuarine shallow marine sediments. Potentially active taxa in surface sediments were identified over a 15-month period using high-throughput rRNA amplicon sequencing. Sediment bacterial communities were diverse at the species level, with high Beta diversity. Throughout most of the sampling period, communities consisted of taxa that were closely related to each other, suggesting that specific environmental conditions at a given time point favored taxa with similar ecological traits. However, bacterial phyla and proteobacterial classes were remarkably similar over time with a predominantly sulfur cycling community composed of sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria persisting over much of the sampling period, despite the oxygenated water column. This community was disrupted after a storm and less common phyla became relatively more abundant. Following this disruption, a high proportion of benthic Cyanobacteria colonized the sediment before the reestablishment of the sulfur-cycle-dominated community.

  4. Subtidal benthic megafauna in a productive and highly urbanised semi-enclosed bay (Ría de Vigo, NW Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneiros, Fernando; Rubal, Marcos; Troncoso, Jesús S.; Bañón, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    The Ría de Vigo is a semi-enclosed bay with high primary productivity due to the influence of coastal upwelling-downwelling dynamics. The area is heavily populated and affected by numerous human activities, which lead to sediment modification. Epibenthic megafauna from the non-estuarine zones of this bay has been studied in order to describe its spatial distribution, testing possible differences between inner and outer areas. With that purpose, 75 sites have been sampled by means of a towing dredge. Megafauna was identified to the lowest taxonomic level possible, and each taxon counted and weighted. 113 different taxa were identified and a high spatial heterogeneity was observed in terms of abundance, biomass, taxa richness, diversity and evenness. Suspension-feeding molluscs dominated the innermost part of the studied area, and were substituted by echinoderms towards the external zones; this spatial pattern was also reflected in the results of multivariate analyses. These shifts in taxonomic and trophic guild composition of the assemblages have been tentatively related to differences in pollution levels and primary productivity along the main axis of the bay.

  5. Trophic transfer of trace elements in an isotopically constructed food chain from a semi-enclosed marine coastal area (Stagnone di Marsala, Sicily, Mediterranean).

    PubMed

    Vizzini, Salvatrice; Costa, Valentina; Tramati, Cecilia; Gianguzza, Paola; Mazzola, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Trace element accumulation is particularly important in coastal and transitional environments, which act as contaminant buffers between the continental and marine systems. We compared trace element transfer to the biota in two locations with different open-sea exposures in a semi-enclosed marine coastal area (Stagnone di Marsala, Sicily, Italy) using isotopically reconstructed food chains. Samples of sediment, macroalgae, seagrasses, invertebrates, fish, and bird feathers were sampled in July 2006 and analysed for stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes (δ(13)C, δ(15)N) and trace elements (arsenic [As], cadmium [Cd], total mercury [THg], and lead [Pb]). Trophic magnification factors were calculated through the relationships between trace elements and δ(15)N in consumers. As and Pb were greater in organic matter sources (sediments and primary producers), whereas Cd and THg were greater in bird feathers. At the food chain level, an insignificant trophic transfer was found for all elements, suggesting biodilution rather than biomagnification. Sediments were more contaminated in the location with lower open-sea exposure. Macroalgae and seagrasses overall mirrored the spatial pattern highlighted in sediments, whereas differences between the two locations became further decreased moving toward higher trophic levels, indicating that trophic transfer of sediment and macrophyte-bound trace elements to the coastal lagoon food chain may be of relatively minor importance.

  6. A fully enclosed, compact standard lightning impulse generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class gas-insulated switchgears with high capacitance.

    PubMed

    Wen, Tao; Zhang, Qiaogen; Zhang, Lingli; Zhao, Junping; Liu, Xuandong; Li, Xiaoang; Guo, Can; You, Haoyang; Chen, Weijiang; Yin, Yu; Shi, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    At present, conducting standard lightning impulse (LI) tests in the field for gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) equipment is difficult because of the high capacitance of the test equipment and large circuit inductance of traditional impulse devices, which leads to a wavefront time T(f) ≥ 2.5 μs. A novel fully enclosed, compact standard LI generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class GIS equipment with high capacitance is presented to solve the problem of T(f) exceeding the standard during LI voltage tests for actual large-sized equipment. The impulse generator is installed in a metal vessel filled with SF6 or SF6/N2 gas mixture at a pressure of 0.3-0.5 MPa, providing a more compact structure and a lower series inductance. A newly developed conical voltage sensor is used to accurately measure the output voltage waveform. Two test modes (via bushing docking and direct docking) for the GIS test based on the impulse generator are introduced. Calculation results show that the impulse generator can generate an LI test waveform following the present IEC standard for the test of equipment with capacitance >10,000 pF.

  7. The Single-Stranded DNA Genome of Novel Archaeal Virus Halorubrum Pleomorphic Virus 1 Is Enclosed in the Envelope Decorated with Glycoprotein Spikes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pietilä, Maija K.; Laurinavičius, Simonas; Sund, Jukka; Roine, Elina; Bamford, Dennis H.

    2010-01-01

    Only a few archaeal viruses have been subjected to detailed structural analyses. Major obstacles have been the extreme conditions such as high salinity or temperature needed for the propagation of these viruses. In addition, unusual morphotypes of many archaeal viruses have made it difficult to obtain further information on virion architectures. We used controlled virion dissociation to reveal the structural organization of Halorubrum pleomorphic virus 1 (HRPV-1) infecting an extremely halophilic archaeal host. The single-stranded DNA genome is enclosed in a pleomorphic membrane vesicle without detected nucleoproteins. VP4, the larger major structural protein of HRPV-1, forms glycosylated spikes on the virion surface and VP3, the smaller major structural protein, resides on the inner surface of the membrane vesicle. Together, these proteins organize the structure of the membrane vesicle. Quantitative lipid comparison of HRPV-1 and its host Halorubrum sp. revealed that HRPV-1 acquires lipids nonselectively from the host cell membrane, which is typical of pleomorphic enveloped viruses. PMID:19864380

  8. Enrichment of hexabromocyclododecanes in coastal sediments near aquaculture areas and a wastewater treatment plant in a semi-enclosed bay in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Al-Odaini, Najat Ahmed; Shim, Won Joon; Han, Gi Myung; Jang, Mi; Hong, Sang Hee

    2015-02-01

    The contamination status and potential sources of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in the coastal environment were investigated using sediment samples from a semi-enclosed bay in South Korea. HBCDs displayed a very different distribution profile compared to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and nonylphenol, indicating different emission sources inside the bay. A strong enrichment of HBCDs was found near aquaculture areas that used expanded polystyrene (EPS) buoys, which were confirmed to be the main source of HBCDs following an analysis of buoys collected from a market and the coast. EPS buoys contained large amounts of HBCDs, with lower levels in the outside layer than inside, implying the leaching of HBCDs from the surface throughout their lifetime. This was reflected in the high levels of HBCDs measured in coastal sediments near aquaculture farms. A wastewater treatment plant was found to be an additional source of HBCDs. A dated core sample revealed an increase in HBCD concentrations over time. The isomeric profiles for most of the surface and core sediment samples were dominated by the γ-diastereoisomer.

  9. Results from On-Board CSA-CP and CDM Sensor Readings During the Burning and Suppression of Solids II (BASS-II) Experiment in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; Miller, Fletcher J.; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Link, Shmuel; T'ien, James S.; Wichman, Indrek

    2015-01-01

    For the first time on ISS, BASS-II utilized MSG working volume dilution with gaseous nitrogen (N2). We developed a perfectly stirred reactor model to determine the N2 flow time and flow rate to obtain the desired reduced oxygen concentration in the working volume for each test. We calibrated the model with CSA-CP oxygen readings offset using the Mass Constituents Analyzer reading of the ISS ambient atmosphere data for that day. This worked out extremely well for operations, and added a new vital variable, ambient oxygen level, to our test matrices. The main variables tested in BASS-II were ambient oxygen concentration, ventilation flow velocity, and fuel type, thickness, and geometry. BASS-II also utilized the on-board CSA-CP for oxygen and carbon monoxide readings, and the CDM for carbon dioxide readings before and after each test. Readings from these sensors allow us to evaluate the completeness of the combustion. The oxygen and carbon dioxide readings before and after each test were analyzed and compared very well to stoichiometric ratios for a one step gas-phase reaction. The CO versus CO2 followed a linear trend for some datasets, but not for all the different geometries of fuel and flow tested. Lastly, we calculated the heat release rates during each test from the oxygen consumption and burn times, using the constant 13.1 kJ of heat released per gram of oxygen consumed. The results showed that the majority of the tests had heat release rates well below 100 Watts.

  10. Enclosed ground-flare incinerator

    DOEpatents

    Wiseman, Thomas R.

    2000-01-01

    An improved ground flare is provided comprising a stack, two or more burner assemblies, and a servicing port so that some of the burner assemblies can be serviced while others remain in operation. The burner assemblies comprise a burner conduit and nozzles which are individually fitted to the stack's burner chamber and are each removably supported in the chamber. Each burner conduit is sealed to and sandwiched between a waste gas inlet port and a matching a closure port on the other side of the stack. The closure port can be opened for physically releasing the burner conduit and supplying sufficient axial movement room for extracting the conduit from the socket, thereby releasing the conduit for hand removal through a servicing port. Preferably, the lower end of the stack is formed of one or more axially displaced lower tubular shells which are concentrically spaced for forming annular inlets for admitting combustion air. An upper tubular exhaust stack, similarly formed, admits additional combustion air for increasing the efficiency of combustion, increasing the flow of exhausted for improved atmospheric dispersion and for cooling the upper stack.

  11. Limitations of metallothioneins in common cockles (Cerastoderma edule) and sponges (Haliclona oculata) as biomarkers of metal contamination in a semi-enclosed coastal area.

    PubMed

    Aly, W; Williams, I D; Hudson, M D

    2014-03-01

    Poole Harbour is typical of many heavily anthropologically impacted semi-enclosed estuarine coastal areas under pressure from metal pollution across the world. This study examined the physiological significance of metal burdens within that sensitive area, and assessed the potential use of metallothionein (MT) concentrations in two organisms: the common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and the Mermaid's glove sponge (Haliclona oculata) for mapping the spatial extent of the biological response to metal contamination. A spectrophotometric method was applied for detection of MT in the bivalve, and for the first time to detect MT in sponges. The results show that while some metal concentrations in cockle and sponge tissues and in their surrounding environment (water and sediment) could be related to sources of metal contamination, MT values in the soft tissue of cockles and whole tissue of sponges are not. No relation could be found between MT in both cockles and sponges, and any of the tested metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, Ag, Sn, Zn). Furthermore, some of the lowest MT concentrations were detected in heavily polluted areas, indicating that MT concentrations in tested organisms are not exclusively associated with metal concentrations, as other environmental factors could affect induction of this protein. Organisms probably have a high tolerance to metal contamination and chronic exposure to a high level of contamination resulted in developing a variety of detoxification mechanisms. Results indicate that further study of metal stress in this type of ecosystem may need to examine other indicator species and/or apply a different biomonitoring technique.

  12. Discerning biodegradation and adsorption of microcystin-LR in a shallow semi-enclosed bay and bacterial community shifts in response to associated process.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieming; Li, Ji; Shi, Ge; Mei, Zulin; Wang, Ruiping; Li, Dianyue

    2016-10-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) produced by cyanobacteria pose serious risks to aquatic ecosystems and human health, to understand elimination pathways and mechanisms for MCs, especially in a shallow and semi-enclosed eutrophic area, is of great significance. This study succeed in discerning biodegradation and adsorption of microcystin-LR (MCLR) mediated by water and/or sediment in northern part of Meiliang Bay in Lake Taihu, China, and among the first to reveal the shifts of indigenous bacterial community composition in response to MCLR-biodegradation in sediment by Illumina high-throughput sequencing (HTS). Results confirmed that biodegradation predominantly governed MCLR elimination as compared to adsorption in study area. Through faster biodegradation with a rate of 49.21μgL(-1)d(-1), lake water contributed more to overall MCLR removal than sediment. Sediment also played indispensable role in MCLR removal via primarily biodegradation by indigenous community (a rate of 17.27μgL(-1)d(-1)) and secondarily adsorption (<20% of initial concentration). HTS analysis showed that indigenous community composition shifted with decreased phylogenetic diversity in response to sediment-mediated MCLR-biodegradation. Proteobacteria became predominant (39.34-86.78%) in overall composition after biodegradation, which was mostly contributed by sharp proliferation of β-proteobacteria (22.76-74.80%), and might closely link to MCLR-biodegradation in sediment. Moreover, the members of several genera belonging to α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria seemed to be key degraders because of their dominance or increasing population as MCLR degraded. This study expands understanding on natural elimination mechanism for MCs, and provides guidance to reduce MCs' biological risks and guarantee ecosystem safety in aquatic habitats. PMID:27294671

  13. Insulin improves in vitro survival of equine preantral follicles enclosed in ovarian tissue and reduces reactive oxygen species production after culture.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, F L N; Lunardi, F O; Lima, L F; Rocha, R M P; Bruno, J B; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Cibin, F W S; Rodrigues, A P R; Gastal, M O; Gastal, E L; Figueiredo, J R

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of insulin concentration on the in vitro culture of equine preantral follicles enclosed in ovarian tissue. Ovarian tissue samples were immediately fixed (noncultured control) or cultured for 1 or 7 days in α-MEM(+) supplemented with 0 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, or 10 μg/mL insulin. Ovarian tissues were processed and analyzed by classical histology. Culture medium samples were collected after 1 and 7 days of culture for steroid and reactive oxygen species (ROS) analyses. The percentage of morphologically normal follicles was greater (P < 0.001) in insulin-treated groups after 1 day of culture; likewise, more (P < 0.02) normal follicles were observed after 7 days of culture in medium supplemented with 10-ng/mL insulin. Furthermore, an increase (P < 0.01) in developing (transition, primary, and secondary) follicles between Days 1 and 7 of culture was observed only with the 10-ng/mL insulin treatment. ROS production after 1 or 7 days of culture was lower (P < 0.0001) in medium with 10-ng/mL insulin than the other treatments. Ovarian tissues containing preantral follicles were able to produce estradiol and progesterone after 1 and 7 days of culture; however, treatments did not differ in steroid production. In conclusion, the use of a physiological concentration (10 ng/mL) of insulin rather than the previously reported concentration (10 μg/mL) for in vitro culture of equine preantral follicles improved follicular survival and growth and lowered oxidative stress. Results from this study shed light on new perspectives for producing an appropriate medium to improve equine preantral follicle in vitro survival and growth.

  14. Influence of gelatin matrices cross-linked with transglutaminase on the properties of an enclosed bioactive material using beta-galactosidase as model system.

    PubMed

    Fuchsbauer, H L; Gerber, U; Engelmann, J; Seeger, T; Sinks, C; Hecht, T

    1996-08-01

    Transglutaminase (protein-glutamine: amine gamma-glutamyltransferase, EC 2.3.2.13) from Streptoverticillium mobaraense has been used to stabilize immobilisates produced with beta-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23) from Aspergillus oryzae and acid-processed gelatins of different qualities as support. The isopeptide level of N epsilon-(gamma-L-glutamyl)-L-lysine bonds formed by transglutaminase was determined to estimate their influence on the kinetic properties of the enclosed beta-galactosidase. An HPLC procedure using precolumn derivatization of the gelatin hydrolysates with FMOC-chloride was chosen which permits the analysis of cross-linked lysine with satisfactory precision. Depending on the gelatin quality, the degree of cross-links necessary for the transformation of gelatin into an insoluble protein was in the range 0.3-32.3% of the available lysine residues. beta-Galactosidase was entrapped in the gelatin matrices with a yield of 8-46% of the initial activity. Long reaction times for cross-linking were due to low yields rather than to the number of isopeptide bonds. Repeated use of the immobilisates did not lead to an appreciable loss of activity. The Vmax of beta-galactosidase were diminished by immobilization caused by a tighter package of the protein chains rather than by the extent of cross-links, while the obtained Km values of the free enzyme and the immobilisates were quite similar. Also, the pH and temperature of optima of the free enzyme and the gelatin immobilisates differ only slightly. The data suggest that the immobilization procedure only moderately affects the activity of enzymes catalysing the reaction of a small compound if gelatin with high jelly strength is cross-linked in a 10% solution with transglutaminase. PMID:8853118

  15. Limitations of metallothioneins in common cockles (Cerastoderma edule) and sponges (Haliclona oculata) as biomarkers of metal contamination in a semi-enclosed coastal area.

    PubMed

    Aly, W; Williams, I D; Hudson, M D

    2014-03-01

    Poole Harbour is typical of many heavily anthropologically impacted semi-enclosed estuarine coastal areas under pressure from metal pollution across the world. This study examined the physiological significance of metal burdens within that sensitive area, and assessed the potential use of metallothionein (MT) concentrations in two organisms: the common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and the Mermaid's glove sponge (Haliclona oculata) for mapping the spatial extent of the biological response to metal contamination. A spectrophotometric method was applied for detection of MT in the bivalve, and for the first time to detect MT in sponges. The results show that while some metal concentrations in cockle and sponge tissues and in their surrounding environment (water and sediment) could be related to sources of metal contamination, MT values in the soft tissue of cockles and whole tissue of sponges are not. No relation could be found between MT in both cockles and sponges, and any of the tested metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, Ag, Sn, Zn). Furthermore, some of the lowest MT concentrations were detected in heavily polluted areas, indicating that MT concentrations in tested organisms are not exclusively associated with metal concentrations, as other environmental factors could affect induction of this protein. Organisms probably have a high tolerance to metal contamination and chronic exposure to a high level of contamination resulted in developing a variety of detoxification mechanisms. Results indicate that further study of metal stress in this type of ecosystem may need to examine other indicator species and/or apply a different biomonitoring technique. PMID:24378929

  16. Discerning biodegradation and adsorption of microcystin-LR in a shallow semi-enclosed bay and bacterial community shifts in response to associated process.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieming; Li, Ji; Shi, Ge; Mei, Zulin; Wang, Ruiping; Li, Dianyue

    2016-10-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) produced by cyanobacteria pose serious risks to aquatic ecosystems and human health, to understand elimination pathways and mechanisms for MCs, especially in a shallow and semi-enclosed eutrophic area, is of great significance. This study succeed in discerning biodegradation and adsorption of microcystin-LR (MCLR) mediated by water and/or sediment in northern part of Meiliang Bay in Lake Taihu, China, and among the first to reveal the shifts of indigenous bacterial community composition in response to MCLR-biodegradation in sediment by Illumina high-throughput sequencing (HTS). Results confirmed that biodegradation predominantly governed MCLR elimination as compared to adsorption in study area. Through faster biodegradation with a rate of 49.21μgL(-1)d(-1), lake water contributed more to overall MCLR removal than sediment. Sediment also played indispensable role in MCLR removal via primarily biodegradation by indigenous community (a rate of 17.27μgL(-1)d(-1)) and secondarily adsorption (<20% of initial concentration). HTS analysis showed that indigenous community composition shifted with decreased phylogenetic diversity in response to sediment-mediated MCLR-biodegradation. Proteobacteria became predominant (39.34-86.78%) in overall composition after biodegradation, which was mostly contributed by sharp proliferation of β-proteobacteria (22.76-74.80%), and might closely link to MCLR-biodegradation in sediment. Moreover, the members of several genera belonging to α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria seemed to be key degraders because of their dominance or increasing population as MCLR degraded. This study expands understanding on natural elimination mechanism for MCs, and provides guidance to reduce MCs' biological risks and guarantee ecosystem safety in aquatic habitats.

  17. PCDD/F, PBDE, and nonylphenol contamination in a semi-enclosed bay (Masan Bay, South Korea) and a Mediterranean lagoon (Thau, France).

    PubMed

    Hong, Sang Hee; Munschy, Catherine; Kannan, Narayanan; Tixier, Celine; Tronczynski, Jacek; Héas-Moisan, Karine; Shim, Won Joon

    2009-10-01

    Chemical contamination of the coastal marine environment by polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) was assessed along with emerging contaminants such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in an industrially well-developed country (France) and a fast-developing country (Korea). Other chemicals, i.e. nonylphenol (NP) and 5 beta(H)-cholestan-3beta-ol (coprostanol) were determined to trace industrial waste and/or domestic inputs. These compounds were analyzed in coastal sediments and mussels in two enclosed coastal water bodies: Masan Bay (South Korea) and Thau lagoon (France). The overall levels of target organic contaminants were higher in Masan Bay than in Thau lagoon. The mean concentrations of 17 PCDD/Fs, 13 PBDEs, NP and coprostanol in Masan Bay sediments were, respectively, 1.3, 11, 248 and 291 ng g(-1) dry weight (d.w.); in Thau lagoon sediments they were, respectively, 0.39, not detectable (nd), 23 and 395 ng g(-1)d.w. Mean concentrations in mussels (coprostanol and cholestanol were not measured) were 0.0093, 13, 140 ng g(-1)d.w. in Masan Bay and 0.016, 0.94, 38 ng g(-1)d.w. in Thau lagoon. Principal component analysis of the contaminants and chemical tracers indicates possible point sources of pollution for Masan Bay and Thau lagoon. This study highlights a growing pollution problem in Asia and in particular a tremendous uptrend in Korea, in comparison to more controlled discharges and releases in Western Europe.

  18. Proboscis container shapes for the USML-2 interface configuration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1995-05-01

    Small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. Such behavior suggests a means for managing fluids in microgravity and, as one specific possible application, for the accurate determination of contact angle. In connection with this application, the authors discuss certain containers designed for the forthcoming USML-2 Glovebox Interface Configuration Experiment (ICE) and depict their behavior in preliminary drop tower experiments. The containers are in the form of a circular cylinder with two diametrically opposed {open_quotes}proboscis{close_quotes} protrusions. These shapes are based on the canonical (single) proboscis containers introduced mathematically, which have the properties in the absence of gravity that (i) fluid rises arbitrarily high over the entire proboscis for contact angles less than or equal to a critical value and (ii) the size of the proboscis can be made relatively as large a portion of the container cross section as desired. These properties allow overcoming some of the practical limitations of wedge containers; for the latter too little fluid may participate in the shift at a critical contact angle to be easily observable. The authors include some background material, where computational results for the double proboscis containers are presented.

  19. Predicting Worker Exposure from a Glovebox Leak

    SciTech Connect

    H. Jordan; D. J. Gordon; J. J. Whicker; D. L. Wannigman

    2001-05-01

    It is difficult to predict immediate worker radiological consequences from a hypothetical accident. This is recognized in DOE safety analysis guidance and the reason such guidance does not call for quantitative determinations of such consequences. However, it would be useful to at least have a means of systematically and formally quantifying worker dose to be able to identify the relative risks of various processes and to provide an order-of-magnitude impression of absolute consequences. In this report, we present such a means in the form of a simple calculation model that is easily applied and generates reasonable, qualitative dose predictions. The model contains a scaling parameter whose value was deduced from extensive laboratory ventilation flow rate measurements performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) over the last several years and from recent indoor radioactive contamination dispersion measurements, also at LANL. Application of the model is illustrated with the aid of two example calculations.

  20. Fjord water circulation patterns and dysoxic/anoxic conditions in a Mediterranean semi-enclosed embayment in the Amvrakikos Gulf, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferentinos, George; Papatheodorou, George; Geraga, Maria; Iatrou, Margarita; Fakiris, Elias; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Dimitriou, Evagelos; Koutsikopoulos, Constantin

    2010-08-01

    Oceanographic research in the Amvrakikos Gulf in Western Greece, a semi-enclosed embayment isolated from the Ionian Sea by a narrow, shallow sill, has shown that it is characterised by a fjord-like oceanographic regime. The Gulf is characterised by a well-stratified two layer structure in the water column made up of a surface layer and a bottom layer that are separated by a strong pycnocline. At the entrance over the sill, there is a brackish water outflow in the surface water and a saline water inflow in the near-bed region. This morphology and water circulation pattern makes the Amvrakikos Gulf the only Mediterranean Sea fjord. The investigations have also shown that the surface layer is well oxygenated, whereas in the pycnocline, the dissolved oxygen (DO) declines sharply and finally attains a value of zero, thus dividing the water column into oxic, dysoxic and anoxic environments. At the dysoxic/anoxic interface, at a depth of approximately 35 m, a sharp redox cline develops with Eh values between 0 and 120 mV occurring above and values between 0 and -250 mV occurring below, where oxic and anoxic biochemical processes prevail, respectively. On the seafloor underneath the anoxic waters, a black silt layer and a white mat cover resembling Beggiatoa-like cells are formed. The dysoxic/anoxic conditions appeared during the last 20 to 30 years and have been caused by the excessive use of fertilisers, the increase in animal stocks, intensive fish farming and domestic effluents. The inflicted dysoxia/anoxia has resulted in habitat loss on the seafloor over an area that makes up just over 50% of the total Gulf area and approximately 28% of the total water volume. Furthermore, anoxia is also considered to have been responsible for the sudden fish mortality which occurred in aquaculture rafts in the Gulf in February 2008. Therefore, anoxic conditions can be considered to be a potential hazard to the ecosystem and to the present thriving fishing and mariculture industry in

  1. Fabrication of a SU-8-based polymer-enclosed channel with a penetrating UV/ozone-modified interior surface for electrokinetic separation of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Jung; Yang, Chung-Shi; Lan, Li-Hua; Wang, Pen-Cheng; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2010-11-01

    This paper introduces electrokinetic separation inside fully cross-linked epoxy-based polymer channels that were batch modified on the inner surfaces using a penetrating UV/ozone treatment from the outside. The treatment can employ either a 254 nm UV source in an ozone-rich environment or a stand-alone 172 nm UV source to directly generate C=O hydrophilic functional groups on the embedded polymer channel wall surfaces. Short-wavelength UV radiation was employed to break polymer surface bonds inside the channel. Ozone generated directly from air or supplied externally oxidized the reaction site on the activated polymer surface to generate the desired functional groups. An epoxy-based photoresist compound, SU-8 (MicroChem, MA), which is widely used in microfluidic systems, was employed to demonstrate the surface modification. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HRXPS) were employed to characterize the functional groups that formed after the UV/ozone surface modification and to confirm the formation of O-H functional groups from the phenol group covalently bonded to the SU-8 surface, attributed mostly to the surface hydrophilicity modification. Water contact angles on the modified surface ranged from 72° to 12° depending on the processing time, UV power and ozone concentration. These angles were retained for at least 4 weeks after the process. Finally, the inner wall surfaces of the SU-8-enclosed channels were successfully modified using this technology, and rapid water transportation and EOF pumping were visualized inside the channel after surface modification. Successful electrokinetic separation of 10 mM BSA and 10 mM anti-rabbit IgG labeled with FITC inside the channel was also carried out. The polymer channel revealed a surface charge density of 75% of the zeta potential on a microslide glass surface, indicating the potential for molecule separation using polymer channels instead of glass channels

  2. Bombs, welded spatter, rockfall and cross-cutting breccia enclosed in avalanche deposits 300 m deep in a debris-filled vent (diatreme), Hopi Buttes, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, James; Lefebvre, Nathalie; Kjarsgaard, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Diatremes are debris-filled vents that are surprisingly large relative to the small maar volcanoes that are their surface expression. Field characteristics of well-exposed diatreme deposits in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, in Arizona, USA, challenge existing diatreme models, but may provide insight into the broader behavior of magma plumbing systems feeding small basaltic volcanoes. Standing Rocks East is a volcanic "neck" rising 35 m above the adjacent land surface. It was previously identified as the deposit of a "root zone", i.e. the fragmental zone at the base of a diatreme structure, based on the depth of exposure, textural diversity of its deposits, irregular dikes that terminate within it, and its small footprint relative to a nearby diatreme remnant. Painstaking mapping in a new study reveals: (1) most of the diatreme structure at the level of the "neck" is filled by a coarse country-rock breccia, which contains blocks sourced both from as far as 200 m below exposure, and as much as 300 m above it at the paleosurface; (2) a zone of juvenile-rich heterolithic lapilli tuff, with domainal map-view variations in deposit granulometry and componentry were emplaced after the country-rock breccia but before the rocks of the neck; (3) the neck comprises an architecturally complex range of deposits in which metres-wide subvertical sheets dominated by coherent basaltic rock cut, locally with surface wrinkes and clast imprints, and locally grade outward into, subhorizontally layered domains, up to several metres in extent, of breccia and welded spatter including large isolated boulders of mixed pyroclastic and host mud/mudrock that deformed adjacent spattery deposits. From these relationships we draw these conclusions. (A) The neck is not a root zone, because it is entirely enclosed within earlier deposits in the diatreme structure - it is not at the bottom of this diatreme structure, and hence represents an intra-diatreme fragmentation zone. (B) This fragmentation

  3. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metzger, Stefan; Burba, George; Burns, Sean P.; Blanken, Peter D.; Li, Jiahong; Luo, Hongyan; Zulueta, Rommel C.

    2016-03-31

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) are set to provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across ecoclimatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analyzers are widely employed for eddy covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation variesmore » with site properties and gas sampling systems, and requires correction. Here, we show that components of the gas sampling system can substantially contribute to such high-frequency attenuation, but their effects can be significantly reduced by careful system design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5–16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4–14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3–21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4–19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyzer cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor–capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was

  4. Rapid sedimentation of iron oxyhydroxides in an active hydrothermal shallow semi-enclosed bay at Satsuma Iwo-Jima Island, Kagoshima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokawa, Shoichi; Ueshiba, Takuya

    2015-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity is common in the fishing port of Nagahama Bay, a small semi-enclosed bay located on the southwest coast of Satsuma Iwo-Jima Island (38 km south of Kyushu Island, Japan). The bay contains red-brown iron oxyhydroxides and thick deposits of sediment. In this work, the high concentration and sedimentation rates of oxyhydroxide in this bay were studied and the sedimentary history was reconstructed. Since dredging work in 1998, a thickness of ~ 1.0-1.5 m of iron oxyhydroxide-rich sediments has accumulated on the floor of the bay. To estimate the volume of iron oxyhydroxide sediments and the amount discharged from hydrothermal vents, sediment traps were operated for several years and 13 sedimentary core samples were collected to reconstruct the 10-year sedimentary history of Nagahama Bay. To confirm the timing of sedimentary events, the core data were compared with meteorological records obtained on the island, and the ages of characteristic key beds were thus identified. The sedimentation rate of iron oxyhydroxide mud was calculated, after correcting for sediment input from other sources. The sediments in the 13 cores from Nagahama Bay consist mainly of iron oxyhydroxide mud, three thick tephra beds, and a topmost thick sandy mud bed. Heavy rainfall events in 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004-2005 coincide with tephra beds, which were reworked from Iwo-Dake ash deposits to form tephra-rich sediment. Strong typhoon events with gigantic waves transported outer-ocean-floor sediments and supplied quartz, cristobalite, tridymite, and albite sands to Nagahama Bay. These materials were redeposited together with bay sediments as the sandy mud bed. Based on the results from the sediment traps and cores, it is estimated that the iron oxyhydroxide mud accumulated in the bay at the relatively rapid rate of 33.3 cm/year (from traps) and 2.8-4.9 cm/year (from cores). The pore water contents within the sediment trap and core sediments are 73%-82% and 47

  5. Production of endothelial cell-enclosing alginate-based hydrogel fibers with a cell adhesive surface through simultaneous cross-linking by horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed reaction in a hydrodynamic spinning process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Sakai, Shinji; Taya, Masahito

    2012-09-01

    We developed an alginate-based hydrogel fiber enabling to enclose endothelial cells, degradable on-demand by alginate lyase, and having a cell adhesive surface. The hydrogel fiber was obtained by extruding an aqueous solution of 4% (w/v) alginate derivative possessing phenolic hydroxyl moieties (Alg-Ph) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into a flow of aqueous solution containing 0.3 mM H(2)O(2) and gelatin derivative possessing Ph moieties (Gelatin-Ph). In the process, cross-linking of Alg-Ph resulting in a hydrogel fiber and immobilization of Gelatin-Ph on the surface of the hydrogel fiber were simultaneously accomplished by an HRP-catalyzed cross-linking reaction between Ph moieties. The diameter of the hydrogel fiber and the quantity of immobilized Gelatin-Ph on the fiber were controllable by changing the flow rates of the solutions and the concentration of HRP in the Alg-Ph-containing solution, respectively. The viability of the human endothelial cells enclosed in the hydrogel fibers obtained by 10 s of flowing in the H(2)O(2)-containing solution was 87.1%. In addition, the cells harvested from the hydrogel fibers through degradation using alginate lyase grew on tissue culture dishes in the same fashion as the cells seeded by a conventional subculture protocol. Human smooth muscle cells adhered, grew and achieved confluence on the surface of the hydrogel fibers. By degrading the hydrogel fibers using alginate lyase, a tubular cell construct was successfully obtained.

  6. Does office space occupation matter? The role of the number of persons per enclosed office space, psychosocial work characteristics, and environmental satisfaction in the physical and mental health of employees.

    PubMed

    Herbig, B; Schneider, A; Nowak, D

    2016-10-01

    The study examined the effects of office space occupation, psychosocial work characteristics, and environmental satisfaction on physical and mental health of office workers in small-sized and open-plan offices as well as possible underlying mechanisms. Office space occupation was characterized as number of persons per one enclosed office space. A total of 207 office employees with similar jobs in offices with different space occupation were surveyed regarding their work situation (psychosocial work characteristics, satisfaction with privacy, acoustics, and control) and health (psychosomatic complaints, irritation, mental well-being, and work ability). Binary logistic and linear regression analyses as well as bootstrapped mediation analyses were used to determine associations and underlying mechanisms. Employee health was significantly associated with all work characteristics. Psychosocial work stressors had the strongest relation to physical and mental health (OR range: 1.66-3.72). The effect of office space occupation on employee health was mediated by stressors and environmental satisfaction, but not by psychosocial work resources. As assumed by sociotechnical approaches, a higher number of persons per enclosed office space was associated with adverse health effects. However, the strongest associations were found with psychosocial work stressors. When revising office design, a holistic approach to work (re)design is needed.

  7. Optimization of cryoprotectant treatment for the vitrification of immature cumulus-enclosed porcine oocytes: comparison of sugars, combinations of permeating cryoprotectants and equilibration regimens

    PubMed Central

    SOMFAI, Tamás; MEN, Nguyen Thi; NOGUCHI, Junko; KANEKO, Hiroyuki; KASHIWAZAKI, Naomi; KIKUCHI, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to optimize the cryoprotectant treatment for the preservation of immature porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) by solid surface vitrification. In each experiment, the vitrification solution consisted of 50 mg/ml polyvinyl pyrrolidone, 0.3 M of the actual sugar and in total 35% (v/v) of the actual permeating cryoprotectant (pCPA) combination. After warming, the COCs were subjected to in vitro maturation, fertilization and embryo culture. In Experiment 1, trehalose and sucrose were equally effective during vitrification and warming in terms of facilitating oocyte survival and subsequent embryo development. In Experiment 2, when equilibration was performed at 38.5 C in a total of 4% (v/v) pCPA for 15 min, the combination of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol (EG + PG = 1:1) was superior to EG and dimethyl sulfoxide (EG + DMSO = 1:1) in terms of oocyte survival after vitrification and the quality of resultant blastocysts. In Experiment 3, equilibration in 4% (v/v) pCPA for 15 min before vitrification was superior to that in 15% (v/v) CPA for 5 min for achievement of high survival rates irrespective of the pCPA combination used. In Experiment 4, when equilibration was performed in 4% EG + PG for 5 min, 15 min or 25 min, there was no difference in oocyte survival and subsequent embryo development after vitrification and warming; however, the developmental competence of cleaved embryos was tendentiously reduced when equilibration was performed for 25 min. In conclusion, trehalose and sucrose were equally effective in facilitating vitrification, and the optimum pCPA treatment was 5–15 min equilibration in 4% (v/v) of EG + PG followed by vitrification in 35% (v/v) EG + PG. PMID:26411536

  8. Experiments on a hurricane windmill model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolie, V. W.

    1981-08-01

    Airflow tests of a vertical-axis wind turbine model were performed to establish accurate endpoints for the curve of trans-rotor pressure vs trans-rotor flow rate. Calibrated free-field flow tests at wind speeds up to 25 m/s, and corroborating experiments using tufted-yarn flow tracers were performed, with the latter showing smoother flows at higher wind speeds. The rotor was also replaced by a close-fitting weighted solid disk to measure maximum available trans-orifice pressure drop. Results indicate that the vertical-axis turbines are superior in terms of simplicity, TV interference, and safety enclosed rotor blades, while producing the same amount of power as conventional windmills. Economically, however, the design would not be competitive in terms of dollars/kW/yr.

  9. Three tritium systems test assembly (TSTA) off-loop experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Talcott, C.L.; Anderson, J.L.; Carlson, R.V.; Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.; Hamerdinger, D.; Binning, K.; Trujillo, R.D.; Moya, J.S.; Hayashi, T.; Okuno, K.; Yamanishi, T.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains the results from three different experiments. Experiment one was initiated to establish the possibility of using a soft elastomer in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) applications. Used in this application, the sealing material is anticipated to be in tritium at pressures in the range of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} torr for many years. Here two O-ring valve seals each of Viton-A, Buna-N, and EDPM were exposed to 1, 40, or 400 torr of tritium while being cycled open and closed approximately 11,500 times in 192 days. EDPM is the least susceptible to damage from the tritium. Both Buna-N and Viton-A showed deterioration following the first cycling at 400 torr. Using commercially available materials, the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) designed and built a Portable Water Removal (PWR) Unit to reduce tritium oxide emissions during glovebox breaches. The PWR removes 99.9% of all tritium and saves between 0.7 and 3.5 curies of tritium oxide from being stacked during each of the five tests. Finally, a series of tests are done to determine whether the presence of SF{sub 6} changes the ability of palladium and platinum to catalyze the T{sub 2}-O{sub 2} reaction to form T{sub 2}O. No deterioration of the catalytic activity is observed. This is important because the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) requires information about the effect of SF{sub 6}, an electrical insulator, on the catalytic behavior of Pt and Pd in a T{sub 2} environment. This information is necessary for the accident analysis in the Safety Analysis Report for TFTR. This study is done using an apparatus supplied to TSTA by TFTR.

  10. Effects of enhanced UV-B on pigment-based phytoplankton biomass and composition of mesocosm-enclosed natural marine communities from three latitudes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Suzanne; Mohovic, Bruna; Gianesella, Sônia M F; Schloss, Irene; Ferrario, Martha; Demers, Serge

    2006-01-01

    A series of three outdoor mesocosm experiments was undertaken in Rimouski (Canada), Ubatuba (Brazil) and Ushuaia (southern Argentina) to examine the effects of lamp-enhanced UV-B (280-320 nm) on phytoplankton communities isolated from seawater at each site. Detailed pigment composition was used to identify these communities. Each experiment compared three replicated UV-B treatments, consisting of natural sunlight conditions (NUVB), low-level UV-B enhancement corresponding to local 30% ozone depletion (LUVB) and high-level enhancement corresponding to 60% ozone depletion (HUVB). Each mesocosm (ca 2 m deep) was mixed continuously (turnover time, ca 1.3 h) and samples were obtained daily over 7-10 days. In Rimouski a large diatom bloom occurred during the first week. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA), with time as the repeated factor, showed slight but statistically significant increases in the chlorophyll (Chl) a level with the HUVB treatment, which were especially obvious over the last 3 days of the experiment. A large decrease in grazers (ciliates) that was observed concurrently with this treatment is the most likely explanation for the increase in Chl a level. The lack of negative effect on algal biomass by enhanced UV-B is attributed to the mixing inside the mesocosms and to the relatively low UV-B penetration. In Ubatuba levels of most pigments decreased over time, particularly fucoxanthin, Chl c3 and alloxanthin. The RM-ANOVA showed no effect of the UV-B treatments, except for Chl c3, which had significantly lower concentrations under natural UVB conditions, indicating that enhanced UV-B directly or indirectly favored Chl c3 algae (likely prymnesiophytes). Although particulate organic carbon concentration was significantly larger during HUVB treatment than during the other treatments, Chl a was unaffected, suggesting that enhanced UV-B favored heterotrophs. Lack of algal growth during this experiment was attributed to low nutrient concentrations

  11. High sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance probe for anvil cell pressure experiments.

    PubMed

    Haase, Jürgen; Goh, Swee K; Meissner, Thomas; Alireza, Patricia L; Rybicki, Damian

    2009-07-01

    While the highest pressures can be achieved with diamond anvil cells, limited sample size and anvil geometry have hampered their application in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments due to weak signal-to-noise. Here we report a new probe design that is based on having the resonant radio frequency coil that encloses the sample within the anvil cell inside the gasket hole. This increases the filling factor tremendously and results in greatly enhanced NMR sensitivity. The setup is described together with room temperature Na and Al NMR experiments. PMID:19655963

  12. The Infrastructure of an Integrated Virtual Reality Environment for International Space Welding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Peter Hor-Ching

    1996-01-01

    This study is a continuation of the summer research of 1995 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. This effort is to provide the infrastructure of an integrated Virtual Reality (VR) environment for the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE) Analytical Tool and Trainer and the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Analytical Tool study. Due to the unavailability of the MSG CAD files and the 3D-CAD converter, little was done to the MSG study. However, the infrastructure of the integrated VR environment for ISWE is capable of performing the MSG study when the CAD files become available. Two primary goals are established for this research. First, the essential peripheral devices for an integrated VR environment will be studied and developed for the ISWE and MSG studies. Secondly, the training of the flight crew (astronaut) in general orientation, procedures, and location, orientation, and sequencing of the welding samples and tools are built into the VR system for studying the welding process and training the astronaut.

  13. Combustion of Solids in Microgravity: Results from the BASS-II Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferkul, Paul V.; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Miller, Fletcher; Olson, Sandra L.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; T’ien, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The Burning and Suppression of Solids-II (BASS-II) experiment was performed on the International Space Station. Microgravity combustion tests burned thin and thick flat samples, acrylic slabs, spheres, and cylinders. The samples were mounted inside a small wind tunnel which could impose air flow speeds up to 53 cms. The wind tunnel was installed in the Microgravity Science Glovebox which supplied power, imaging, and a level of containment. The effects of air flow speed, fuel thickness, fuel preheating, and oxygen concentration on flame appearance, growth, spread rate, and extinction were examined in both the opposed and concurrent flow configuration. The flames are quite sensitive to air flow speed in the range 0 to 5 cms. They can be sustained at very low flow speeds of less than 1 cms, when they become dim blue and stable. In this state they are not particularly dangerous from a fire safety perspective, but they can flare up quickly with a sudden increase in air flow speed. Including earlier BASS-I results, well over one hundred tests have been conducted of the various samples in the different geometries, flow speeds, and oxygen concentrations. There are several important implications related to fundamental combustion research as well as spacecraft fire safety. This work was supported by the NASA Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division (SLPSRA).

  14. Psychology Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Ken; Tew, Mark D.; Williams, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A goal of the PsychExperiments project was to reduce the financial burden on psychology departments for hardware/software used in their laboratories. In its third year, the PsychExperiments site now hosts 39 experiments. Over 200 classrooms worldwide have signed up as official site users and there have been nearly 10,000 data sessions conducted.…

  15. A Liquid Metal Flume for Free Surface Magnetohydrodynamic Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nornberg, M.D.; Ji, H.; Peterson, J.L.; Rhoads, J.R.

    2008-08-27

    We present an experiment designed to study magnetohydrodynamic effects in free-surface channel flow. The wide aspect ratio channel (the width to height ratio is about 15) is completely enclosed in an inert atmosphere to prevent oxidization of the liquid metal. A custom-designed pump reduces entrainment of oxygen, which was found to be a problem with standard centrifugal and gear pumps. Laser Doppler Velocimetry experiments characterize velocity profiles of the flow. Various flow constraints mitigate secondary circulation and end effects on the flow. Measurements of the wave propagation characteristics in the liquid metal demonstrate the surfactant effect of surface oxides and the damping of fluctuations by a cross-channel magnetic field.

  16. Syn-collisional adakitic granodiorites formed by fractional crystallization: Insights from their enclosed mafic magmatic enclaves (MMEs) in the Qumushan pluton, North Qilian Orogen at the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo; Niu, Yaoling; Li, Jiyong; Sun, Wenli; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Yan; Shao, Fengli

    2016-04-01

    The Qumushan (QMS) syn-collisional granodiorite, which is located in the eastern section of the North Qilian Orogen at the northern margin of the Greater Tibetan Plateau, has typical adakitic characteristics and also contains abundant mafic magmatic enclaves (MMEs). This recognition offers an unprecedented insight into the petrogenesis of both the adakitic host granodiorite and the enclosed MMEs. The MMEs and their host granodiorites share many characteristics in common, including identical crystallization age (~ 430 Ma), same mineralogy, similar mineral chemistry and whole-rock isotopic compositions, indicating their genetic link. The MMEs are most consistent with being of cumulate origin formed at earlier stages of the same magmatic system that produced the QMS adakitic granodiorite. Subsequent replenishment of adakitic magmas could have disturbed the cumulate piles as "MMEs" dispersed in the adakitic granodiorite host during emplacement. The geochemical data and petrogenetic modeling of trace elements suggest that the QMS adakitic host granodiorite is most consistent with fractional crystallization dominated by the mineral assemblage of the MMEs. The parental magma for the QMS granodiorite is best explained as resulting from partial melting of the ocean crust together with recycled terrigenous sediments during continental collision, which may have also experienced interaction with mantle peridotite during ascent.

  17. The "Kluge-Lüttge Kammer": a preliminary evaluation of an enclosed, Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) Mesocosm that allows separation of synchronized and desynchronized contributions of plants to whole system gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Rascher, U; Bobich, E G; Osmond, C B

    2006-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is recognized as a photosynthetic adaptation of plants to arid habitats. This paper presents a proof-of-concept evaluation of partitioning net CO2 exchanges for soil and plants in an arid, exclusively CAM mesocosm, with soil depth and succulent plant biomass approximating that of natural Sonoran Desert ecosystems. We present the first evidence that an enclosed CAM-dominated soil and plant community exposed to a substantial day/night temperature difference (30/20 degrees C), exhibits a diel gas exchange pattern consisting of four consecutive phases with a distinct nocturnal CO2 uptake. These phases were modulated by plant assimilation and soil respiration processes. Day-time stomatal closure of the CAM cycle during phase III was used to eliminate aboveground photosynthetic assimilation and respiration and thereby to estimate belowground plant plus soil respiration. Rapid changes in temperature appeared to synchronize single plant gas exchange but individual plant gas exchange patterns were desynchronized at constant day/night temperatures (25 degrees C), masking the distinct mesocosm pattern. Overall, the mean carbon budget of this CAM model Sonoran Desert system was negative, releasing an average of 22.5 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1. The capacity for nocturnal CO2 assimilation in this exclusively CAM mesocosm was inadequate to recycle CO2 released by plant and soil respiration.

  18. Confined systems within arbitrary enclosed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, B. L.; Cohen, M.

    2016-06-01

    A new model of electronic confinement in atoms and molecules is presented. This is based on the electronic flux J which is assumed to vanish on some notional bounding surface of arbitrary shape. J is necessarily calculated using an approximate wave-function, whose parameters are chosen to satisfy the required surface conditions. This model embraces the results of all previous calculations for which the wave-functions or their derivatives vanish on conveniently shaped surfaces, but now extends the theory to more general surfaces. Examples include one-centre hydrogen-like atoms, the valence state of Li and the two centre molecular systems {{{H}}}2+ and {{HeH}}++.

  19. Estimating Noise Levels In An Enclosed Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzi, Elias

    1995-01-01

    GEGS Acoustic Analysis Program (GAAP) developed to compute composite profile of noise in Spacelab module on basis of data on noise produced by equipment, data on locations of equipment, and equipment-operating schedules. Impetus for development of GAAP provided by noise that generated in Spacelab Module during SLS-1 mission because of concurrent operation of many pieces of experimental and subsystem equipment. Although originally intended specifically to help compute noise in Spacelab, also applicable to any region with multiple sources of noise. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  20. Air control system providing healthful enclosed environment

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.A.

    1991-08-27

    This patent describes an environmentally controlled building. It comprises an outer wall defining an outer building perimeter and having at least one fenestration therethrough for passage of personnel; a roof supported by and cooperating with the outer wall to define a building exterior and interior; and an environmental control system for controlling the environment within the building interior, the environmental control system including a heating and air conditioning unit, having an air inlet, for controlling the temperature of air drawing into the air control system; a humidity control unit, having an inlet connected to the heating and air conditioning unit, for controlling the humidity of air within the air control system; an air blower for forcing air from the environmental control system into the building interior; and an air filtering system having an inlet connected to the humidity control unit and an outlet connected to the blower.

  1. Language Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugh, Marylou

    1978-01-01

    When a child uses his words and his ideas in learning to read, he also assists in the normal integration of his personality. Starting with a method of language experience developed by Sylvia Ashton-Warner, the author, a reading consultant, describes a language experience-reading program which utilizes the student's own curiosity and interests. (RK)

  2. Art Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spodek, Bernard; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents four articles that examine the role of art experiences in early childhood education: "Educationally Appropriate Art Activities for Young Children," by Bernard Spodek; "Teachers and Children Together: Constructing New Learning," by Lella Gandini; "Fostering Experiences between Young Children and Clay," by Cathy Weisman Topal; and…

  3. TRIO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

    1984-09-01

    The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

  4. Mixture Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.

    2007-12-01

    A mixture experiment involves combining two or more components in various proportions or amounts and then measuring one or more responses for the resulting end products. Other factors that affect the response(s), such as process variables and/or the total amount of the mixture, may also be studied in the experiment. A mixture experiment design specifies the combinations of mixture components and other experimental factors (if any) to be studied and the response variable(s) to be measured. Mixture experiment data analyses are then used to achieve the desired goals, which may include (i) understanding the effects of components and other factors on the response(s), (ii) identifying components and other factors with significant and nonsignificant effects on the response(s), (iii) developing models for predicting the response(s) as functions of the mixture components and any other factors, and (iv) developing end-products with desired values and uncertainties of the response(s). Given a mixture experiment problem, a practitioner must consider the possible approaches for designing the experiment and analyzing the data, and then select the approach best suited to the problem. Eight possible approaches include 1) component proportions, 2) mathematically independent variables, 3) slack variable, 4) mixture amount, 5) component amounts, 6) mixture process variable, 7) mixture of mixtures, and 8) multi-factor mixture. The article provides an overview of the mixture experiment designs, models, and data analyses for these approaches.

  5. Hydronuclear experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, R.N.; Westervelt, D.R.

    1987-02-01

    Hydronuclear experiments, a method for assessing some aspects of nuclear weapon safety, were conducted at Los Alamos during the 1958 to 1961 moratorium on nuclear testing. The experiments resulted in subcritical multiplying assemblies or a very slight degree of supercriticality and, in some cases, involved a slight, but insignificant, fission energy release. These experiments helped to identify so-called one-point safety problems associated with some of the nuclear weapons systems of that time. The need for remedial action was demonstrated, although some of the necessary design changes could not be made until after the resumption of weapons testing at the end of 1961.

  6. Simulation of organic molecule formation in solar system environments-The Miller-Urey Experiment in Space project overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, J. Michelle; Ehrenfruend, Pascale; Botta, Oliver; Blum, Jurgen; Schrapler, Rainer; van Dongen, Joost; Palmans, Anja; Sephton, Mark A.; Martins, Zita; Cleaves, Henderson J.; Ricco, Antonio

    The Miller-Urey Experiment in space (MUE) investigates the formation of potential prebiotic organic compounds in the early solar system environment. The MUE experiment will be sent to and retrieved from the International Space Station (ISS), where it will be performed inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). The goal of this space experiment is to understand prebiotic reactions in microgravity by simulating environments of the early solar nebula. The dynamic environment of the solar nebula with the simultaneous presence of gas, particles, and energetic processes, including shock waves, lightning, and radiation may trigger a rich organic chemistry leading to organic molecules. These environments will be simulated in six fabricated vials containing various gas mixtures as well as solid particles. Two gas mixture compositions will be tested and subjected to continuous spark discharges for 48, 96, and 192 hours. Silicate particles will serve as surfaces on which thin water ice mantles can accrete. The particles will move repeatedly through a high-voltage spark discharge in microgravity, enabling chemical re-actions analogous to the original Miller-Urey experiment. The experiment will be performed at low temperatures (-5 C), slowing hydrolysis and improving chances of detection of interme-diates, initial products, and their distributions. Executing the Miller-Urey experiment in the space environment (microgravity) allows us to simulate conditions that could have prevailed in the energetic early solar nebula and provides insights into the chemical pathways that may occur in forming planetary systems. Analysis will be performed post-flight using chemical analytical methods. The anticipated results will provide information about chemical reaction pathways to form organic compounds in space environment, emphasizing abiotic chemical pathways and mechanisms that could have been crucial in the formation of biologically relevant compounds such as amino acids and

  7. European Microgravity Facilities for ZEOLITE Experiments on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletser, V.; Minster, O.; Kremer, S.; Kirschhock, C.; Martens, J.; Jacobs, P.

    2002-01-01

    Synthetic zeolites are complex porous silicates. Zeolites are applied as catalysts, adsorbents and sensors. Whereas the traditional applications are situated in the petrochemical area, zeolite catalysis and related zeolite-based technologies have a growing impact on the economics and sustainability of products and processes in a growing number of industrial sectors, including environmental protection and nanotechnology. A Sounding Rocket microgravity experiment led to significant insight in the physical aggregation patterns of zeolitic nanoscopic particles and the occurrence of self-organisation phenomena when undisturbed by convection. The opportunity of performing longer microgravity duration experiments on zeolite structures was recently offered in the frame of a Taxi-Flight to the ISS in November 2002 organized by Belgium and ESA. Two facilities are currently under development for this flight. One of them will use the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in the US Lab. Destiny to achieve thermal induced self-organization of different types of Zeosil nanoslabs by heating and cooling. The other facility will be flown on the ISS Russian segment and will allow to form Zeogrids at ambient temperature. On the other hand, the European Space Agency (ESA) is studying the possibility of developing a dedicated insert for zeolite experiments to be used with the optical and diagnostic platform of the Protein Crystallisation Diagnostic Facility (PCDF), that will fly integrated in the European Drawer Rack on the Columbus Laboratory starting in 2004. This paper will present the approach followed by ESA to prepare and support zeolite investigations in microgravity and will present the design concept of these three facilities.

  8. Wire Insulation Flammability Experiment: USML-1 One Year Post Mission Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.; Kashiwagi, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    Herein we report the results from the Wire Insulation Flammability (WIF) Experiment performed in the Glovebox Facility on the USML-1 mission. This experiment explored various aspects of electrically induced fire scenarios in a reduced gravity environment. Under quiescent microgravity conditions, heat and mass transfer are dominated by diffusive and radiative transport; while in normal-gravity buoyancy induced convection often dominates. Of considerable scientific and practical interest is the intermediate situation of combustion occurring in the presence of imposed gas flows, with lower characteristic velocities than those induced by buoyancy in noma1 gravity. Two distinct cases naturally arise: flow direction opposed to, or concurrent with, the flame spread direction. Two tests of each kind were conducted in the WIF experiment, providing the first controlled demonstration of flame spreading in forced convection ever conducted in space. Four test modules were flown. The wire insulation, 1.5 mm in diameter, was polyethylene, extruded onto nichrome wire. Temperatures of the wh3 cores and insulation heated in quiescent and flowing environments were measured. Video and still-camera images of the samples, burning in air flowing at approximately 10 cm/sec, were recorded to obtain flame characteristics including spread rate, structure and temperature. Flame spread rates in concurrent flow were approximately twice those in opposed flow. In concurrent and opposed flow regimes, the spreading flames stabilized around a bead of molten insulation material, within which bubble nucleation was observed. An ignition attempt without flow mated a quiescent cloud of vaporized fuel which ignited dramatically yet failed to sustain normal flame spread. Finally, all tests produced substantial soot agglomerates, particularly the concurrent flow tests; and the collected soot has a morphology very distinct from soot formed in normal gravity flames. Several unexpected and unique microgravity

  9. Interpretive Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHaan, Frank, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interpretative experiment involving the application of symmetry and temperature-dependent proton and fluorine nmr spectroscopy to the solution of structural and kinetic problems in coordination chemistry. (MLH)

  10. The spatial distribution of dissolved and particulate heavy metals and their response to land-based inputs and tides in a semi-enclosed industrial embayment: Jiaozhou Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changyou; Liang, Shengkang; Li, Yanbin; Li, Keqiang; Wang, Xiulin

    2015-07-01

    In order to evaluate heavy metal contamination in surface waters in the Jiaozhou Bay (JZB), a typical semi-enclosed bay in the north of China, and to identify the response of heavy metal distribution to terrigenous sources and tides, the land-based discharge flux of dissolved Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd and their particulates, as well as their concentrations, were synchronously surveyed in JZB in flood season and normal season respectively. The survey results showed that the amount of dissolved Cu clearly increased from the estuaries to the offshore waters during the flood season, especially from the Dagu estuary to the mouth of JZB. The same trend was observed for Pb. The isopleths of dissolved Zn during the flood season presented a different pattern in which a clear decrease was observed from the Lianwan, Moshui and Dagu estuaries to the offshore waters. However, the particulate Cu isopleths during the flood season, which had the same pattern as those of particulate Pb, Zn and Cd, showed a clear decrease from the Dagu estuary to the mouth of JZB. The isopleths for dissolved and particulate Cu during the normal season showed a clear decrease from the northeast to the entrance of JZB, and the same trend was observed for Pb, Zn and Cd. Observations based on synchronous investigations of the fluvial fluxes of the selected metals and their average concentrations in JZB showed that these patterns were controlled by the strong external fluvial inputs, especially from the Dagu River. The diurnal change in the Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd concentrations showed a periodicity with a cycle length of approximately 12 h in JZB, which indicates the noticeable impact of the semi-diurnal tide. The weighed average concentration from freshwater inputs calculated for dissolved Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd were higher than their average concentrations in JZB. This indicated that JZB had been contaminated with these metals, whose concentrations were also higher than those found in uncontaminated waters.

  11. The Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariana Nicoara, Floare

    2016-04-01

    My name is Nicoara Floarea and I am teacher at Secondary School Calatele and I teach students from preparatory class and the second grade . They are six-eight years old. In my activity, for introducing scientific concepts to my students, I use various and active methods or traditional methods including experiments. The experiment stimulates students' curiosity, their creativity, the understanding and knowledge taught accessibility. I propose you two such experiments: The life cycle of the plants (long-term experiment, with rigorous observation time):We use beans, wheat or other; They are grown in pots and on the cotton soaked with water,keeping under students' observation protecting them ( just soak them regularly) and we waiting the plants rise. For discussions and comments of plant embryo development we use the plants which rose on the cotton soaked with water plants at the end of the first week. Last school year we had in the pot climbing beans which in May made pods. They were not too great but our experiment was a success. The students could deduce that there will develop those big beans which after drying will be planted again. The influence of light on plants (average duration experiment with the necessary observation time): We use two pots in which plants are of the same type (two geraniums), one of them is situated so as to get direct sunlight and other plant we put in a closed box. Although we wet both plants after a week we see that the plant that benefited from sunlight has turned strain in direct sunlight, developing normally in return the plant out of the box I have yellowed leaves, photosynthesis does not She has occurred . Students will understand the vital role of the Sun in plants' life, both in the classroom and in nature. The experiment is a method of teaching students extremely pleasant, with a remarkable percentage of acquiring more knowledge.

  12. Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2010-08-04

    Recent studies of neutrino oscillations have established the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, reactor antineutrinos and neutrinos produced at accelerators paint an intriguing picture that clearly requires modification of the standard model of particle physics. These results also provide clear motivation for future neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for direct neutrino mass and nuclear double-beta decay. I will discuss the program of new neutrino oscillation experiments aimed at completing our knowledge of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  13. HEGRA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The La Palma cosmic-ray observatory HEGRA (High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy) is an air shower experiment, located at the OBSERVATORIO DEL ROQUE DE LOS MUCHACHOS (2200 m above sea level, 28.75°N, 17.89°W) on the Canary island of La Palma, and is operated by institutes from Germany, Spain and Yerevan....

  14. Soil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Linton; Butler, Todd; Smith, Mike; Cline, Charles; Scruggs, Steve; Zakhia, Nadim

    1987-01-01

    An experimental procedure was devised to investigate the effects of the lunar environment on the physical properties of simulated lunar soil. The test equipment and materials used consisted of a vacuum chamber, direct shear tester, static penetrometer, and fine grained basalt as the simulant. The vacuum chamber provides a medium for applying the environmental conditions to the soil experiment with the exception of gravity. The shear strength parameters are determined by the direct shear test. Strength parameters and the resistance of soil penetration by static loading will be investigated by the use of a static cone penetrometer. In order to conduct a soil experiment without going to the moon, a suitable lunar simulant must be selected. This simulant must resemble lunar soil in both composition and particle size. The soil that most resembles actual lunar soil is basalt. The soil parameters, as determined by the testing apparatus, will be used as design criteria for lunar soil engagement equipment.

  15. XMASS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Ko

    2016-06-01

    XMASS is a single phase liquid xenon scintillator detector. The project is designed for multi purposes, dark matter, neutrinoless double beta decay and 7Be/pp solar neutrino. As the first step of project, XMASS-I detector with 832kg sensitive volume started operation from Dec. 2010. In this paper, recent obtained physics results from commissioning data, refurbishment of detector and future step of experiment are presented.

  16. Multiwell experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, A.R.; Warpinski, N.R.; Lorenz, J.C.; Hart, C.M.; Branagan, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Multiwell Experiment is a research-oriented field laboratory. Its overall objectives are to characterize lenticular, low-permeability gas reservoirs and to develop technology for their production. This field laboratory has been established at a site in the east-central Piceance basin, Colorado. Here the Mesaverde formation lies at a depth of 4000 to 8250 ft. This interval contains different, distinct reservoir types depending upon their depositional environments. These different zones serve as the focus of the various testing and stimulation programs. Field work began in late 1981 and is scheduled through mid-1988. One key to the Multiwell Experiment is three closely spaced wells. Core, log, well testing, and well-to-well seismic data are providing a far better definition of the geological setting than has been available previously. The closely spaced wells also allow interference and tracer tests to obtain in situ reservoir parameters. The vertical variation of in situ stress throughout the intervals of interest is being measured. A series of stimulation experiments is being conducted in one well and the other two wells are being used as observation wells for improved fracture diagnostics and well testing. Another key to achieving the Multiwell Experiment objectives is the synergism resulting from a broad spectrum of activities: geophysical surveys, sedimentological studies, core and log analyses, well testing, in situ stress determination, stimulation, fracture diagnostics, and reservoir analyses. The results from the various activities will define the reservoir and the hydraulic fracture. These, in turn, define the net pay stimulated: the intersection of a hydraulic fracture of known geometry with a reservoir of known morphology and properties. Accomplishments of the past year are listed. 4 refs.

  17. Experiments with Liquid Metal Walls: Status of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, Robert; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor; Timberlak, John

    2010-02-16

    Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in Ohmically-heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions. __________________________________________________

  18. Ecosystem experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mooney, H.A.; Medina, E.; Schindler, D.W.; Schulze, E.D.; Walker, B.H.

    1991-01-01

    Large scale, human-induced modifications to terrestrial and hydrological systems have been a major factor in contributing to global change. The objective of this book is to explore the potential of ecosystem experimentation as a tool to understanding and predicting more precisely the consequences of our changing biosphere. The papers in this book are the result of two SCOPE workshops to evaluated understanding of the response of ecosystems to large scale perturbations and to design ecosystem experiments to study the impace of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on ecosystem processes. The general topics addressed include the following: how changes in driving variables affect different biotic interactions within ecosystems; the human role in modifying forest structure and the resulting ecosystem processes; the role of ecosystem experiments in the study of controlling factors such as hydrological controls, temperature, and biotic controlles; analysis of ecosystem dynamics as a complex and chaotic system; role of ecosystem experiments in the study of the impact of acid deposition; role of ecosystem experimentation in the study of global change impace on the biosphere and the biospheric feedbacks to global environmental change.

  19. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  20. Plume Electrification: Laboratory and Numerical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, J. S.; Dufek, J.

    2012-12-01

    The spectacular lightning strokes observed during eruptions testify to the enormous potentials that can be generated within plumes. Related to the charging of individual ash particles, large electric fields and volcanic lightning have been observed at Eyjafjallajokull, Redoubt, and Chaiten, among other volcanoes. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for plume electrification, including triboelectric charging, charging from the brittle failure of rock, and charging due to phase change as material is carried aloft. While the overall electrification of the plume likely results from a combination of these processes, in the following work we focus on triboelectric charging—how a plume charges as particles collide with each other. To explore the role of triboelectric effects in plume charging we have conducted a number of small scale laboratory experiments similar to those designed by Forward et al (2009). Succinctly, the experiments consist of fluidizing an ash bed with nitrogen and monitoring the resulting currents induced by the moving particles. It is important to note that the reaction chamber only allows particle-particle interactions. The entire experimental setup is enclosed in a vacuum chamber, allowing us to carefully control the environment during experiments. Runs were carried out for different ash compositions, and driving pressures. We particularly focused on natural grain size distributions of ash and on quantifying not only the net charge but also the charging rate. Furthermore, we report on our progress to incorporate the collected data, namely charging rates, into a large eularian-eularian-lagrangian multiphase eruption dynamic model. Finally, to validate these results, we present our plans to deploy a large wireless sensor network of electrometers and magnetometers around active volcanoes to directly map the overhead E- and M-fields as an eruption occurs.