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Sample records for glucagon expressing cells

  1. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Timper, Katharina; Seboek, Dalma; Eberhardt, Michael; Linscheid, Philippe; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Keller, Ulrich; Mueller, Beat; Zulewski, Henryk . E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

    2006-03-24

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

  2. Characterization of glucagon-expressing neurons in the chicken retina

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andy J.; Skorupa, Dana; Schonberg, David L.; Walton, Nathaniel A.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently identified large glucagon-expressing neurons that densely ramify neurites in the peripheral edge of the retina and regulate the proliferation of progenitors in the circumferential marginal zone (CMZ) of the postnatal chicken eye (Fischer et al., 2005). However, nothing is known about the transmitters and proteins that are expressed by the glucagon-expressing neurons in the avian retina. We used antibodies to cell-distinguishing markers to better characterize the different types of glucagon-expressing neurons. We found that the large glucagon-expressing neurons were immunoreactive for substance P, neurofilament, Pax6, AP2α, HuD, calretinin, trkB and trkC. Colocalization of glucagon and substance P in the large glucagon-expressing neurons indicates that these cells are the “bullwhip cells” that have been briefly described by Ehrlich, Keyser and Karten (1987). Similar to the bullwhip cells, the conventional glucagon-expressing amacrine cells were immunoreactive for calretinin, HuD, Pax6, and AP2α. Unlike bullwhip cells, the conventional glucagon-expressing amacrine cells were immunoreactive for GABA. While glucagon-immunoreactive amacrine cells were negative for substance P in central regions of the retina, a subset of this type of amacrine cell was immunoreactive for substance P in far peripheral regions of the retina. An additional type of glucagon/substance P-expressing neuron, resembling the bullwhip cells, was found in far peripheral and dorsal regions of the retina. Based on morphology, distribution within the retina, and histological markers, we conclude that there may be 4 different types of glucagon-expressing neurons in the avian retina. PMID:16572462

  3. Glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Linford; Salehi, Albert; Vergari, Elisa; Zhang, Quan; Rorsman, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes involves a ménage à trois of impaired glucose regulation of pancreatic hormone release: in addition to impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, the release of the hyperglycaemic hormone glucagon becomes dysregulated; these last-mentioned defects exacerbate the metabolic consequences of hypoinsulinaemia and are compounded further by hypersecretion of somatostatin (which inhibits both insulin and glucagon secretion). Glucagon secretion has been proposed to be regulated by either intrinsic or paracrine mechanisms, but their relative significance and the conditions under which they operate are debated. Importantly, the paracrine and intrinsic modes of regulation are not mutually exclusive; they could operate in parallel to control glucagon secretion. Here we have applied mathematical modelling of α-cell electrical activity as a novel means of dissecting the processes that underlie metabolic regulation of glucagon secretion. Our analyses indicate that basal hypersecretion of somatostatin and/or increased activity of somatostatin receptors may explain the loss of adequate counter-regulation under hypoglycaemic conditions, as well as the physiologically inappropriate stimulation of glucagon secretion during hyperglycaemia seen in diabetic patients. We therefore advocate studying the interaction of the paracrine and intrinsic mechanisms; unifying these processes may give a more complete picture of the regulation of glucagon secretion from α-cells than studying the individual parts. PMID:27044683

  4. Oleic acid and glucose regulate glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor expression in a rat pancreatic ductal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Leshuai W.; McMahon Tobin, Grainne A.; Rouse, Rodney L.

    2012-10-15

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and has become an important target for a growing class of drugs designed to treat type 2 diabetes. In vitro studies were designed to investigate the effect of the GLP1R agonist, exenatide (Ex4), in “on-target” RIN-5mF (islet) cells as well as in “off-target” AR42J (acinar) and DSL-6A/C1 (ductal) cells in a diabetic environment. Ex4 increased islet cell proliferation but did not affect acinar cells or ductal cells at relevant concentrations. A high caloric, high fat diet is a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type-2 diabetes. An in vitro Oleic acid (OA) model was used to investigate the effect of Ex4 in a high calorie, high fat environment. At 0.1 and 0.4 mM, OA mildly decreased the proliferation of all pancreatic cell types. Ex4 did not potentiate the inhibitory effect of OA on cell proliferation. Akt phosphorylation in response to Ex4 was diminished in OA-treated ductal cells. GLP1R protein detected by western blot was time and concentration dependently decreased after glucose stimulation in OA-treated ductal cells. In ductal cells, OA treatment altered the intracellular localization of GLP1R and its co-localization with early endosome and recycling endosomes. Chloroquine (lysosomal inhibitor), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger) and wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor), fully or partially, rescued GLP1R protein in OA-pretreated, glucose-stimulated ductal cells. The impact of altered regulation on phenotype/function is presently unknown. However, these data suggest that GLP1R regulation in ductal cells can be altered by a high fat, high calorie environment. -- Highlights: ► Exenatide did not inhibit islet, acinar or ductal cell proliferation. ► GLP1R protein decreased after glucose stimulation in oleic acid-treated ductal cells. ► Oleic acid treatment altered localization of GLP1R with early and recycling

  5. The Melanocortin-4 Receptor is Expressed in Enteroendocrine L Cells and Regulates the Release of Peptide YY and Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Panaro, Brandon L.; Tough, Iain R.; Engelstoft, Maja Storm; Matthews, Robert T.; Digby, Gregory J.; Møller, Cathrine Laustrup; Svendsen, Berit; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Holst, Jens J.; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.; Cox, Helen M.; Cone, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is expressed in the brainstem and vagal afferent nerves, and regulates a number of aspects of gastrointestinal function. Here we show that the receptor is also diffusely expressed in cells of the gastrointestinal system, from stomach to descending colon. Furthermore, MC4R is the second most highly expressed GPCR in peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide one (GLP-1) expressing enteroendocrine L cells. When vectorial ion transport is measured across mouse or human intestinal mucosa, administration of α-MSH induces a MC4R-specific PYY-dependent anti-secretory response consistent with a role for the MC4R in paracrine inhibition of electrolyte secretion. Finally, MC4R-dependent acute PYY and GLP-1 release from L cells can be stimulated in vivo by intraperitoneal administration of melanocortin peptides to mice. This suggests physiological significance for MC4R in L cells, and indicates a previously unrecognized peripheral role for the MC4R, complementing vagal and central receptor functions. PMID:25453189

  6. Expression of cholecystokinin2-receptor in rat and human L cells and the stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion by gastrin treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Cao, Xun; Liu, Xiao-Min

    2015-03-01

    Gastrin is a gastrointestinal hormone secreted by G cells. Hypergastrinemia can improve blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. These positive effects are primarily due to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells. In recent years, many receptors that regulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) have been identified in enteroendocrine L cell lines. This led us to hypothesize that, in addition to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells, L cells also express cholecystokinin2-receptor (CCK2R), which may regulate GLP-1 secretion and have synergistic effects on glucose homeostasis. Our research provides a preliminary analysis of CCK2R expression and the stimulating effect of gastrin treatment on GLP-1 secretion in a human endocrine L cell line, using RT-PCR, Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and ELISA analyses. The expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3, which regulate GLP-1 biosynthesis, were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Double immunofluorescence labeling was utilized to assess the intracellular localization of CCK2R and GLP-1 in L cells harvested from rat colon tissue. Our results showed that CCK2R was expressed in both the human L cell line and the rat L cells. We also showed that treatment with gastrin, a CCK2R agonist, stimulated the secretion of GLP-1, and that this effect was likely due to increased expression of proglucagon and PCSK1 (also known as prohormone convertase 3 (PC3 gene)). These results not only provide a basis for the role gastrin may play in intestinal L cells, and may also provide the basis for the development of a method of gastrin-mediated glycemic regulation.

  7. glucagon is essential for alpha cell transdifferentiation and beta cell neogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lihua; Robertson, Morgan A.; Hesselson, Daniel; Stainier, Didier Y. R.; Anderson, Ryan M.

    2015-01-01

    The interconversion of cell lineages via transdifferentiation is an adaptive mode of tissue regeneration and an appealing therapeutic target. However, its clinical exploitation is contingent upon the discovery of contextual regulators of cell fate acquisition and maintenance. In murine models of diabetes, glucagon-secreting alpha cells transdifferentiate into insulin-secreting beta cells following targeted beta cell depletion, regenerating the form and function of the pancreatic islet. However, the molecular triggers of this mode of regeneration are unknown. Here, using lineage-tracing assays in a transgenic zebrafish model of beta cell ablation, we demonstrate conserved plasticity of alpha cells during islet regeneration. In addition, we show that glucagon expression is upregulated after injury. Through gene knockdown and rescue approaches, we also find that peptides derived from the glucagon gene are necessary for alpha-to-beta cell fate switching. Importantly, whereas beta cell neogenesis was stimulated by glucose, alpha-to-beta cell conversion was not, suggesting that transdifferentiation is not mediated by glucagon/GLP-1 control of hepatic glucose production. Overall, this study supports the hypothesis that alpha cells are an endogenous reservoir of potential new beta cells. It further reveals that glucagon plays an important role in maintaining endocrine cell homeostasis through feedback mechanisms that govern cell fate stability. PMID:25852199

  8. Signal transduction mechanism for glucagon-induced leptin gene expression in goldfish liver

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ai-fen; Chen, Ting; Chen, Shuang; Tang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Xiao; Huang, Wen; Ren, Chun-hua; Hu, Chao-qun

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a peripheral satiety hormone that also plays important roles in energy homeostasis in vertebrates ranging from fish to mammals. In teleost fish, however, the regulatory mechanism for leptin gene expression still remains unclear. In this study, we found that glucagon, a key hormone in glucose homeostasis, was effective at elevating the leptin-AI and leptin-AII transcript levels in goldfish liver via both in vivo intraperitoneal injection and in vitro cells incubation approaches. The responses of leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA to glucagon treatment were highly comparable. In contrast, blockade of local glucagon action could reduce the basal and induced leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA expression. The stimulation of leptin levels by glucagon was caused by the activation of adenylate cyclase (AC)/cyclic-AMP (cAMP)/ protein kinase A (PKA), and probably cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) cascades. Our study described the effect and signal transduction mechanism of glucagon on leptin gene expression in goldfish liver, and may also provide new insight into leptin as a mediator in the regulatory network of energy metabolism in the fish model. PMID:27994518

  9. Signal transduction mechanism for glucagon-induced leptin gene expression in goldfish liver.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ai-Fen; Chen, Ting; Chen, Shuang; Tang, Dong-Sheng; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Xiao; Huang, Wen; Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a peripheral satiety hormone that also plays important roles in energy homeostasis in vertebrates ranging from fish to mammals. In teleost fish, however, the regulatory mechanism for leptin gene expression still remains unclear. In this study, we found that glucagon, a key hormone in glucose homeostasis, was effective at elevating the leptin-AI and leptin-AII transcript levels in goldfish liver via both in vivo intraperitoneal injection and in vitro cells incubation approaches. The responses of leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA to glucagon treatment were highly comparable. In contrast, blockade of local glucagon action could reduce the basal and induced leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA expression. The stimulation of leptin levels by glucagon was caused by the activation of adenylate cyclase (AC)/cyclic-AMP (cAMP)/ protein kinase A (PKA), and probably cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) cascades. Our study described the effect and signal transduction mechanism of glucagon on leptin gene expression in goldfish liver, and may also provide new insight into leptin as a mediator in the regulatory network of energy metabolism in the fish model.

  10. Inhibition of the glucose transporter SGLT2 with dapagliflozin in pancreatic alpha cells triggers glucagon secretion.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Caroline; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Gmyr, Valéry; Queniat, Gurvan; Moerman, Ericka; Thévenet, Julien; Beaucamps, Cédric; Delalleau, Nathalie; Popescu, Iuliana; Malaisse, Willy J; Sener, Abdullah; Deprez, Benoit; Abderrahmani, Amar; Staels, Bart; Pattou, François

    2015-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia resulting from a deficiency in insulin signaling, because of insulin resistance and/or defects in insulin secretion; it is also associated with increases in glucagon and endogenous glucose production (EGP). Gliflozins, including dapagliflozin, are a new class of approved oral antidiabetic agents that specifically inhibit sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) function in the kidney, thus preventing renal glucose reabsorption and increasing glycosuria in diabetic individuals while reducing hyperglycemia. However, gliflozin treatment in subjects with T2D increases both plasma glucagon and EGP by unknown mechanisms. In spite of the rise in EGP, T2D patients treated with gliflozin have lower blood glucose levels than those receiving placebo, possibly because of increased glycosuria; however, the resulting increase in plasma glucagon levels represents a possible concerning side effect, especially in a patient population already affected by hyperglucagonemia. Here we demonstrate that SGLT2 is expressed in glucagon-secreting alpha cells of the pancreatic islets. We further found that expression of SLC5A2 (which encodes SGLT2) was lower and glucagon (GCG) gene expression was higher in islets from T2D individuals and in normal islets exposed to chronic hyperglycemia than in islets from non-diabetics. Moreover, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-α (HNF4A) is specifically expressed in human alpha cells, in which it controls SLC5A2 expression, and its expression is downregulated by hyperglycemia. In addition, inhibition of either SLC5A2 via siRNA-induced gene silencing or SGLT2 via dapagliflozin treatment in human islets triggered glucagon secretion through KATP channel activation. Finally, we found that dapagliflozin treatment further promotes glucagon secretion and hepatic gluconeogenesis in healthy mice, thereby limiting the decrease of plasma glucose induced by fasting. Collectively, these results identify a

  11. Role of histamine H3 receptor in glucagon-secreting αTC1.6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tadaho; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Naganuma, Fumito; Mohsen, Attayeb; Iida, Tomomitsu; Miura, Yamato; Sugawara, Akira; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic α-cells secrete glucagon to maintain energy homeostasis. Although histamine has an important role in energy homeostasis, the expression and function of histamine receptors in pancreatic α-cells remains unknown. We found that the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) was expressed in mouse pancreatic α-cells and αTC1.6 cells, a mouse pancreatic α-cell line. H3R inhibited glucagon secretion from αTC1.6 cells by inhibiting an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. We also found that immepip, a selective H3R agonist, decreased serum glucagon concentration in rats. These results suggest that H3R modulates glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells. PMID:25685663

  12. Role of histamine H3 receptor in glucagon-secreting αTC1.6 cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tadaho; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Naganuma, Fumito; Mohsen, Attayeb; Iida, Tomomitsu; Miura, Yamato; Sugawara, Akira; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic α-cells secrete glucagon to maintain energy homeostasis. Although histamine has an important role in energy homeostasis, the expression and function of histamine receptors in pancreatic α-cells remains unknown. We found that the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) was expressed in mouse pancreatic α-cells and αTC1.6 cells, a mouse pancreatic α-cell line. H3R inhibited glucagon secretion from αTC1.6 cells by inhibiting an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. We also found that immepip, a selective H3R agonist, decreased serum glucagon concentration in rats. These results suggest that H3R modulates glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells.

  13. Glucagon receptor inactivation leads to α-cell hyperplasia in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingyu; Dean, E Danielle; Zhao, Liyuan; Nicholson, Wendell E.; Powers, Alvin C.; Chen, Wenbiao

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon antagonism is a potential treatment for diabetes. One potential side effect is α-cell hyperplasia, which has been noted in several approaches to antagonize glucagon action. To investigate the molecular mechanism of the α-cell hyperplasia and to identify the responsible factor, we created a zebrafish model in which glucagon receptor (gcgr) signaling has been interrupted. The genetically and chemically tractable zebrafish, which provides a robust discovery platform, has two glucagon receptor genes (gcgra and gcgrb) in its genome. Sequence, phylogenetic, and synteny analyses suggest that these are co-orthologs of the human GCGR. Similar to its mammalian counterparts, gcgra and gcgrb are mainly expressed in the liver. We inactivated the zebrafish gcgra and gcgrb using TALEN (Transcription activator-like effector nuclease) first individually and then both genes, and assessed the number of α-cells using an α-cell reporter line, Tg(gcga:GFP). Compared to wild-type fish at 7 days postfertilization, there were more α-cells in gcgra−/−, gcgrb−/−, and gcgra−/−;gcgrb−/− fish and there was an increased rate of α-cell proliferation in the gcgra−/−; gcgrb−/− fish. Glucagon levels were higher but free glucose levels were lower in gcgra−/−, gcgrb−/−, and gcgra−/−;gcgrb−/− fish, similar to Gcgr−/− mice. These results indicate that the compensatory α-cell hyperplasia in response to interruption of glucagon signaling is conserved in zebrafish. The robust α-cell hyperplasia in gcgra−/−;gcgrb−/− larvae provides a platform to screen for chemical and genetic suppressors, and ultimately to identify the stimulus of α-cell hyperplasia and its signaling mechanism. PMID:26446275

  14. Colocalization of insulin and glucagon in insulinoma cells and developing pancreatic endocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zai; You, Jia; Xu, Shiqing; Hua, Zhan; Zhang, Wenjian; Deng, Tingting; Fang, Ni; Fang, Qing; Liu, Honglin; Peng, Liang; Wang, Peigang; Lou, Jinning

    2015-06-12

    A significant portion of human and rat insulinomas coexpress multiple hormones. This character termed as multihormonality is also observed in some early pancreatic endocrine cells which coexpress insulin and glucagon, suggesting an incomplete differentiation status of both cells. Here we demonstrate that insulinoma cells INS-1 and INS-1-derived single cell clone INS-1-15 coexpressed insulin and glucagon in a portion of cells. These two hormones highly colocalized in the intracellular vesicles within a cell. Due to the existence of both PC1/3 and PC2 in INS-1-derived cells, proglucagon could be processed into glucagon, GLP-1 and GLP-2. These glucagon-family peptides and insulin were secreted simultaneously corresponding to the elevating glucose concentrations. The coexpression and partial colocalization of insulin and glucagon was also observed in rat fetal pancreatic endocrine cells, but the colocalization rate was generally lower and more diverse, suggesting that in the developing pancreatic endocrine cells, insulin and glucagon may be stored in nonidentical pools of secreting vesicles and might be secreted discordantly upon stimulus.

  15. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor expression in normal and diseased human thyroid and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Waser, Beatrice; Blank, Annika; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Perren, Aurel; Reubi, Jean C

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP1) analogs may induce thyroid or pancreatic diseases in animals, raising questions about their use in diabetic patients. There is, however, controversy regarding expression of GLP1 receptors (GLP1R) in human normal and diseased thyroid and pancreas. Here, 221 human thyroid and pancreas samples were analyzed for GLP1R immunohistochemistry and compared with quantitative in vitro GLP1R autoradiography. Neither normal nor hyperplastic human thyroids containing parafollicular C cells express GLP1R with either method. Papillary thyroid cancer do not, and medullary thyroid carcinomas rarely express GLP1R. Insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells in the normal pancreas express a high density of GLP1R, whereas acinar cells express them in low amounts. Ductal epithelial cells do not express GLP1R. All benign insulinomas express high densities of GLP1R, whereas malignant insulinomas rarely express them. All ductal pancreatic carcinomas are GLP1R negative, whereas 6/20 PanIN 1/2 and 0/12 PanIN 3 express GLP1R. Therefore, normal thyroid, including normal and hyperplastic C cells, or papillary thyroid cancer are not targets for GLP1 analogs in humans. Conversely, all pancreatic insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells are physiological GLP1 targets, as well as most acini. As normal ductal epithelial cells or PanIN 3 or ductal pancreatic carcinomas do not express GLP1R, it seems unlikely that GLP1R is related to neoplastic transformation in pancreas. GLP1R-positive medullary thyroid carcinomas and all benign insulinomas are candidates for in vivo GLP1R targeting.

  16. In situ electrophysiological examination of pancreatic α cells in the streptozotocin-induced diabetes model, revealing the cellular basis of glucagon hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Chi; Rupnik, Marjan S; Karimian, Negar; Herrera, Pedro L; Gilon, Patrick; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2013-02-01

    Early-stage type 1 diabetes (T1D) exhibits hyperglucagonemia by undefined cellular mechanisms. Here we characterized α-cell voltage-gated ion channels in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes model that lead to increased glucagon secretion mimicking T1D. GYY mice expressing enhanced yellow fluorescence protein in α cells were used to identify α cells within pancreas slices. Mice treated with low-dose STZ exhibited hyperglucagonemia, hyperglycemia, and glucose intolerance, with 71% reduction of β-cell mass. Although α-cell mass of STZ-treated mice remained unchanged, total pancreatic glucagon content was elevated, coinciding with increase in size of glucagon granules. Pancreas tissue slices enabled in situ examination of α-cell electrophysiology. α cells of STZ-treated mice exhibited the following: 1) increased exocytosis (serial depolarization-induced capacitance), 2) enhanced voltage-gated Na(+) current density, 3) reduced voltage-gated K(+) current density, and 4) increased action potential (AP) amplitude and firing frequency. Hyperglucagonemia in STZ-induced diabetes is thus likely due to increased glucagon content arising from enlarged glucagon granules and increased AP firing frequency and amplitude coinciding with enhanced Na(+) and reduced K(+) currents. These alterations may prime α cells in STZ-treated mice for more glucagon release per cell in response to low glucose stimulation. Thus, our study provides the first insight that STZ treatment sensitizes release mechanisms of α cells.

  17. Involvement of the clock gene Rev-erb alpha in the regulation of glucagon secretion in pancreatic alpha-cells.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Elaine; Marroquí, Laura; Figueroa, Ana Lucia C; Merino, Beatriz; Fernandez-Ruiz, Rebeca; Nadal, Angel; Burris, Thomas P; Gomis, Ramon; Quesada, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of pancreatic clock genes impairs pancreatic beta-cell function, leading to the onset of diabetes. Despite the importance of pancreatic alpha-cells in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and in diabetes pathophysiology, nothing is known about the role of clock genes in these cells. Here, we identify the clock gene Rev-erb alpha as a new intracellular regulator of glucagon secretion. Rev-erb alpha down-regulation by siRNA (60-70% inhibition) in alphaTC1-9 cells inhibited low-glucose induced glucagon secretion (p<0.05) and led to a decrease in key genes of the exocytotic machinery. The Rev-erb alpha agonist GSK4112 increased glucagon secretion (1.6 fold) and intracellular calcium signals in alphaTC1-9 cells and mouse primary alpha-cells, whereas the Rev-erb alpha antagonist SR8278 produced the opposite effect. At 0.5 mM glucose, alphaTC1-9 cells exhibited intrinsic circadian Rev-erb alpha expression oscillations that were inhibited by 11 mM glucose. In mouse primary alpha-cells, glucose induced similar effects (p<0.001). High glucose inhibited key genes controlled by AMPK such as Nampt, Sirt1 and PGC-1 alpha in alphaTC1-9 cells (p<0.05). AMPK activation by metformin completely reversed the inhibitory effect of glucose on Nampt-Sirt1-PGC-1 alpha and Rev-erb alpha. Nampt inhibition decreased Sirt1, PGC-1 alpha and Rev-erb alpha mRNA expression (p<0.01) and glucagon release (p<0.05). These findings identify Rev-erb alpha as a new intracellular regulator of glucagon secretion via AMPK/Nampt/Sirt1 pathway.

  18. Dapagliflozin stimulates glucagon secretion at high glucose: experiments and mathematical simulations of human A-cells

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Ahlstedt, Ingela; El Hachmane, Mickaël F.; Göpel, Sven O.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon is one of the main regulators of blood glucose levels and dysfunctional stimulus secretion coupling in pancreatic A-cells is believed to be an important factor during development of diabetes. However, regulation of glucagon secretion is poorly understood. Recently it has been shown that Na+/glucose co-transporter (SGLT) inhibitors used for the treatment of diabetes increase glucagon levels in man. Here, we show experimentally that the SGLT2 inhibitor dapagliflozin increases glucagon secretion at high glucose levels both in human and mouse islets, but has little effect at low glucose concentrations. Because glucagon secretion is regulated by electrical activity we developed a mathematical model of A-cell electrical activity based on published data from human A-cells. With operating SGLT2, simulated glucose application leads to cell depolarization and inactivation of the voltage-gated ion channels carrying the action potential, and hence to reduce action potential height. According to our model, inhibition of SGLT2 reduces glucose-induced depolarization via electrical mechanisms. We suggest that blocking SGLTs partly relieves glucose suppression of glucagon secretion by allowing full-scale action potentials to develop. Based on our simulations we propose that SGLT2 is a glucose sensor and actively contributes to regulation of glucagon levels in humans which has clinical implications. PMID:27535321

  19. Dapagliflozin stimulates glucagon secretion at high glucose: experiments and mathematical simulations of human A-cells.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Ahlstedt, Ingela; El Hachmane, Mickaël F; Göpel, Sven O

    2016-08-18

    Glucagon is one of the main regulators of blood glucose levels and dysfunctional stimulus secretion coupling in pancreatic A-cells is believed to be an important factor during development of diabetes. However, regulation of glucagon secretion is poorly understood. Recently it has been shown that Na(+)/glucose co-transporter (SGLT) inhibitors used for the treatment of diabetes increase glucagon levels in man. Here, we show experimentally that the SGLT2 inhibitor dapagliflozin increases glucagon secretion at high glucose levels both in human and mouse islets, but has little effect at low glucose concentrations. Because glucagon secretion is regulated by electrical activity we developed a mathematical model of A-cell electrical activity based on published data from human A-cells. With operating SGLT2, simulated glucose application leads to cell depolarization and inactivation of the voltage-gated ion channels carrying the action potential, and hence to reduce action potential height. According to our model, inhibition of SGLT2 reduces glucose-induced depolarization via electrical mechanisms. We suggest that blocking SGLTs partly relieves glucose suppression of glucagon secretion by allowing full-scale action potentials to develop. Based on our simulations we propose that SGLT2 is a glucose sensor and actively contributes to regulation of glucagon levels in humans which has clinical implications.

  20. Visualization of glucagon secretion from pancreatic α cells by bioluminescence video microscopy: Identification of secretion sites in the intercellular contact regions.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Satoru; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inouye, Satoshi; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Kanamori, Takao; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide

    2017-04-15

    We have firstly visualized glucagon secretion using a method of video-rate bioluminescence imaging. The fusion protein of proglucagon and Gaussia luciferase (PGCG-GLase) was used as a reporter to detect glucagon secretion and was efficiently expressed in mouse pancreatic α cells (αTC1.6) using a preferred human codon-optimized gene. In the culture medium of the cells expressing PGCG-GLase, luminescence activity determined with a luminometer was increased with low glucose stimulation and KCl-induced depolarization, as observed for glucagon secretion. From immunochemical analyses, PGCG-GLase stably expressed in clonal αTC1.6 cells was correctly processed and released by secretory granules. Luminescence signals of the secreted PGCG-GLase from the stable cells were visualized by video-rate bioluminescence microscopy. The video images showed an increase in glucagon secretion from clustered cells in response to stimulation by KCl. The secretory events were observed frequently at the intercellular contact regions. Thus, the localization and frequency of glucagon secretion might be regulated by cell-cell adhesion.

  1. Identification of glucagon-producing cells (A cells) in dog gastric mucosa

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    An immunocytochemical technique using specific antiglucagon serum reveals the presence of glucagon-containing cells situated exclusively in the oxyntic glandular mucosa of the dog stomach. Electron microscope examination of the mucosa demonstrated endocrine cells containing secretory granules with a round dense core surrounded by a clear halo, indistinguishable from secretory granules of pancreatic A cells. Like the alpha granules of pancreatic A cells, the granules of these gastric endocrine cells exhibited a peripheral distribution of silver grains after Grimelius silver staining. Moreover, the granules of these cells were found to be specifically labeled with reaction product, using the peroxidase immunocytochemical technique at the ultrastructural level. Accordingly, these cells were named gastric A cells. These data suggest that the gastric oxyntic mucosa contains cells indistinguishable cytologically, cytochemically, and immunocytochemically from pancreatic A cells. It is believed that gastric A cells are responsible for the secretion of the gastric glucagon. PMID:770482

  2. Glucagon and glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Holst, Jens Juul

    2010-01-01

    The glucagon gene is expressed not only in the alpha cells of the pancreatic islets but also in the endocrine cells of the intestinal epithelium (so-called L-cells), and in certain neurons of the brain stem. Whereas in the pancreas, glucagon, the hyperglycaemic hormone, is cleaved out of the 160 amino acid precursor, proglucagon, leaving behind proglucagon fragments (PG 1-30 and PG 72-158, the so-called major proglucagon fragment (MPGF)) that are probably inactive, the intestinal processing leads to the formation of glicentin (PG 1-69; action uncertain) and glucagon-like peptides 1 (PG 78-107amide, a potent incretin homone, regulating insulin secretion, glucagon secretion, gastrointestinal motility and appetite) and 2 (PG 126-158, a regulator of gut mucosal growth and integrity). The two prohormone convertases PC2 and PC1/3, respectively, are responsible for the differential processing. After their release, the hormones are eliminated mainly in the kidneys, but both GLP-2 and in particular GLP-1, but not glucagon, are metabolized both locally and in the circulation and liver by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) which inactivates the peptides, suggesting that GLP-1 acts locally rather than in an endocrine manner. A number of transcription factors have been identified that can at least partly explain the differential cellular expression of the glucagon gene as well as the differential tissue-specific processing of the precursor.

  3. Cell signalling and the hormonal stimulation of the hepatic glycine cleavage enzyme system by glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, G M; Jois, M; Brosnan, J T

    1998-01-01

    The glycine cleavage enzyme system (GCS) is found in mitochondria. In liver it is activated by glucagon and other hormones but it is not known how the hormonal signal is transmitted to the mitochondria. We found that the cell-permeant protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid stimulated flux through GCS and could induce a significant increase in the sensitivity of GCS and of glycogenolysis to glucagon. Half-maximal stimulation of GCS by glucagon occurred at 3.2+/-0.6 nM, whereas it was fully activated at 0.3 nM in the presence of 1 microM okadaic acid. The protein kinase A agonist adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Sp isomer (10 microM) stimulated the GCS flux by approx. 100%. This stimulation was inhibited by the protein kinase A antagonist 8-bromoadenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp isomer (Rp-8-Br-cAMPS). Although Rp-8-Br-cAMPS significantly inhibited glucagon-stimulated glycogenolysis it had no effect on the glucagon-stimulated GCS flux. These results indicate that a cytoplasmic phosphorylated protein is involved in transmitting glucagon's effect to the mitochondria. However, protein kinase A does not have a necessary role in transmitting glucagon's signal. We also examined the role of protein kinase C because angiotensin II also stimulated flux through GCS. However, the phorbol ester PMA had no effect on either GCS or on glycogenolysis. PMID:9480887

  4. Glucagon-, glicentin-, and pancreatic polypeptide-like immunoreativities in rectal carcinoids and related colorectal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fiocca, R.; Capella, C.; Buffa, R.; Fontana, R.; Solcia, E.; Hage, E.; Chance, R. E.; Moody, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Three nonargentaffin rectal carcinoids have been investigated immunohistochemically. In one case most tumor cells reacted with antiglucagon sera as well as with antiglicentin, antibovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP), and antihuman pancreatic polypeptide (HPP) sera; they were identified ultrastructurally as L cells. Another case showed glucagon-, glicentin-, and BPP-immunoreactive cells but lacked HPP immunoreactivity. In the third case glucagon- and glicentin-immunoreactive cells were well represented, while PP immunoreactivities were scarce. Parallel investigations of human rectal and sigmoid mucosa showed numerous cells reacting with glucagon, glicentin, and BPP antisera, most of which lacked HPP immunoreactivity. Cells reacting with glucagon and glicentin antisera, while lacking PP immunoreactivities, were also found. Thus, both tumor and nontumor cells produce glucagonlike immunoreactive (GLI) peptides--one of which may be glicentin or a related molecule--as well as PP-related sequences, although differing histochemically and ultrastructurally from glucagon or PP cells of the human pancreas. It is concluded that nonargentaffin rectal carcinoids are histogenetically linked to nonargentaffin endocrine cells of the human rectum. Images p[92]-a Figures 1-3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7395969

  5. β-Cell Uncoupling Protein 2 Regulates Reactive Oxygen Species Production, Which Influences Both Insulin and Glucagon Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Robson-Doucette, Christine A.; Sultan, Sobia; Allister, Emma M.; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Koshkin, Vasilij; Bhatacharjee, Alpana; Prentice, Kacey J.; Sereda, Samuel B.; Shirihai, Orian S.; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The role of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) in pancreatic β-cells is highly debated, partly because of the broad tissue distribution of UCP2 and thus limitations of whole-body UCP2 knockout mouse models. To investigate the function of UCP2 in the β-cell, β-cell–specific UCP2 knockout mice (UCP2BKO) were generated and characterized. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS UCP2BKO mice were generated by crossing loxUCP2 mice with mice expressing rat insulin promoter-driven Cre recombinase. Several in vitro and in vivo parameters were measured, including respiration rate, mitochondrial membrane potential, islet ATP content, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), glucagon secretion, glucose and insulin tolerance, and plasma hormone levels. RESULTS UCP2BKO β-cells displayed mildly increased glucose-induced mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization but unchanged rates of uncoupled respiration and islet ATP content. UCP2BKO islets had elevated intracellular ROS levels that associated with enhanced GSIS. Surprisingly, UCP2BKO mice were glucose-intolerant, showing greater α-cell area, higher islet glucagon content, and aberrant ROS-dependent glucagon secretion under high glucose conditions. CONCLUSIONS Using a novel β-cell–specific UCP2KO mouse model, we have shed light on UCP2 function in primary β-cells. UCP2 does not behave as a classical metabolic uncoupler in the β-cell, but has a more prominent role in the regulation of intracellular ROS levels that contribute to GSIS amplification. In addition, β-cell UCP2 contributes to the regulation of intraislet ROS signals that mediate changes in α-cell morphology and glucagon secretion. PMID:21984579

  6. Nutrient regulation of glucagon secretion: involvement in metabolism and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Marroquí, Laura; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Merino, Beatriz; Fuentes, Esther; Nadal, Angel; Quesada, Ivan

    2014-06-01

    Glucose homeostasis is precisely regulated by glucagon and insulin, which are released by pancreatic α- and β-cells, respectively. While β-cells have been the focus of intense research, less is known about α-cell function and the actions of glucagon. In recent years, the study of this endocrine cell type has experienced a renewed drive. The present review contains a summary of established concepts as well as new information about the regulation of α-cells by glucose, amino acids, fatty acids and other nutrients, focusing especially on glucagon release, glucagon synthesis and α-cell survival. We have also discussed the role of glucagon in glucose homeostasis and in energy and lipid metabolism as well as its potential as a modulator of food intake and body weight. In addition to the well-established action on the liver, we discuss the effects of glucagon in other organs, where the glucagon receptor is expressed. These tissues include the heart, kidneys, adipose tissue, brain, small intestine and the gustatory epithelium. Alterations in α-cell function and abnormal glucagon concentrations are present in diabetes and are thought to aggravate the hyperglycaemic state of diabetic patients. In this respect, several experimental approaches in diabetic models have shown important beneficial results in improving hyperglycaemia after the modulation of glucagon secretion or action. Moreover, glucagon receptor agonism has also been used as a therapeutic strategy to treat obesity.

  7. Farnesoid X receptor inhibits glucagon-like peptide-1 production by enteroendocrine L cells.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Mohamed-Sami; Daoudi, Mehdi; Prawitt, Janne; Ducastel, Sarah; Touche, Véronique; Sayin, Sama I; Perino, Alessia; Brighton, Cheryl A; Sebti, Yasmine; Kluza, Jérôme; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Hélène; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Dorchies, Emilie; Baud, Grégory; Spinelli, Valeria; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Caron, Sandrine; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Caiazzo, Robert; Reimann, Frank; Marchetti, Philippe; Lefebvre, Philippe; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Gribble, Fiona M; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pattou, François; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Lestavel, Sophie

    2015-07-02

    Bile acids are signalling molecules, which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex bile acids in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here, we show that FXR activation in L cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycaemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes.

  8. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Production by Enteroendocrine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    TRABELSI, Mohamed-Sami; DAOUDI, Mehdi; PRAWITT, Janne; DUCASTEL, Sarah; TOUCHE, Véronique; SAYIN, Sama I.; PERINO, Alessia; BRIGHTON, Cheryl A.; SEBTI, Yasmine; KLUZA, Jérôme; BRIAND, Olivier; DEHONDT, Hélène; VALLEZ, Emmanuelle; DORCHIES, Emilie; BAUD, Grégory; SPINELLI, Valeria; HENNUYER, Nathalie; CARON, Sandrine; BANTUBUNGI, Kadiombo; CAIAZZO, Robert; REIMANN, Frank; MARCHETTI, Philippe; LEFEBVRE, Philippe; BÄCKHED, Fredrik; GRIBBLE, Fiona M.; SCHOONJANS, Kristina; PATTOU, François; TAILLEUX, Anne; STAELS, Bart; LESTAVEL, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) are signalling molecules which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex BA in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L-cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L-cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here we show that FXR activation in L-cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR-deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes. PMID:26134028

  9. High fat diet impairs the function of glucagon-like peptide-1 producing L-cells

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Paul; Pais, Ramona; Habib, Abdella M.; Brighton, Cheryl A.; Yeo, Giles S.H.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) acts as a satiety signal and enhances insulin release. This study examined how GLP-1 production from intestinal L-cells is modified by dietary changes. Methods Transgenic mouse models were utilized in which L-cells could be purified by cell specific expression of a yellow fluorescent protein, Venus. Mice were fed on chow or 60% high fat diet (HFD) for 2 or 16 weeks. L-cells were purified by flow cytometry and analysed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Enteroendocrine cell populations were examined by FACS analysis, and GLP-1 secretion was assessed in primary intestinal cultures. Results Two weeks HFD reduced the numbers of GLP-1 positive cells in the colon, and of GIP positive cells in the small intestine. Purified small intestinal L-cells showed major shifts in their gene expression profiles. In mice on HFD for 16 weeks, significant reductions were observed in the expression of L-cell specific genes, including those encoding gut hormones (Gip, Cck, Sct, Nts), prohormone processing enzymes (Pcsk1, Cpe), granins (Chgb, Scg2), nutrient sensing machinery (Slc5a1, Slc15a1, Abcc8, Gpr120) and enteroendocrine-specific transcription factors (Etv1, Isl1, Mlxipl, Nkx2.2 and Rfx6). A corresponding reduction in the GLP-1 secretory responsiveness to nutrient stimuli was observed in primary small intestinal cultures. Conclusion Mice fed on HFD exhibited reduced expression in L-cells of many L-cell specific genes, suggesting an impairment of enteroendocrine cell function. Our results suggest that a western style diet may detrimentally affect the secretion of gut hormones and normal post-prandial signaling, which could impact on insulin secretion and satiety. PMID:26145551

  10. Effect of glucagon on digestive enzyme synthesis, transport and secretion in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M

    1980-01-01

    1. Effect of glucagon on amylase secretion and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release from functionally intact dissociated pancreatic acinar cells and acini was studied. 2. In dissociated rat pancreatic acinar cells, the rate of amylase secretion was increased by 70% with bethanechol (maximally effective concentration, 10(-4) M) and 125% with A23187 (10(-5) M), but the response to cholecystokinin-pancreozymin (CCK-PZ) was inconsistent. In dissociated cells from mouse pancreas, the increases amounted to 78% with bethanechol (10(-4) M), 134% with A23187 (10(-5) M) and 82% with CCK-PZ (maximally effective concentration, 0 . 01 u. ml.-1). Glucagon in concentrations ranging from 10(-7) to 10(-4) M increased amylase secretion by 3, 26, 67 and 80%, whereas secretin (10(-8)--10(-5) M) increased amylase secretion by 8, 39, 88 and 138%. LDH release was increased with A23187 in concentrations greater than 10(-6) M. 3. CCK-PZ, bethanechol and A23187 used in maximal concentrations potentiated the effect of a submaximal dose of glucagon whereas secretin did not have an additive or a potentiating effect. 4. Pancreatic acini were approximately 3 times more responsive to secretagogues than cells. The dose--response curves to bethanechol, glucagon and CCK-PZ for increase in amylase secretion were similar. LDH release was not increased by these agents. Cytochalasin B (5 microgram ml.-1) which is known to disrupt the integrity of luminal membrane inhibited the amylase secretion stimulated by glucagon, bethanechol and CCK-PZ. 5. Glucagon inhibited incorporation of a mixture of fifteen 14C-labelled amino acids (algal profile, Schwarz Mann) into perchloric acid precipitable proteins in dissociated mouse pancreatic acini within 30 min. 6. In 'pulse-chase' experiments, glucagon decreased the specific activity of zymogen granules isolated by differential centrifugation, from pancreatic lobules (120 min) and increased the specific activity of radiolabelled proteins in the medium (60 and 120 min

  11. Blockade of glucagon signaling prevents or reverses diabetes onset only if residual β-cells persist

    PubMed Central

    Damond, Nicolas; Thorel, Fabrizio; Moyers, Julie S; Charron, Maureen J; Vuguin, Patricia M; Powers, Alvin C; Herrera, Pedro L

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon secretion dysregulation in diabetes fosters hyperglycemia. Recent studies report that mice lacking glucagon receptor (Gcgr-/-) do not develop diabetes following streptozotocin (STZ)-mediated ablation of insulin-producing β-cells. Here, we show that diabetes prevention in STZ-treated Gcgr-/- animals requires remnant insulin action originating from spared residual β-cells: these mice indeed became hyperglycemic after insulin receptor blockade. Accordingly, Gcgr-/- mice developed hyperglycemia after induction of a more complete, diphtheria toxin (DT)-induced β-cell loss, a situation of near-absolute insulin deficiency similar to type 1 diabetes. In addition, glucagon deficiency did not impair the natural capacity of α-cells to reprogram into insulin production after extreme β-cell loss. α-to-β-cell conversion was improved in Gcgr-/- mice as a consequence of α-cell hyperplasia. Collectively, these results indicate that glucagon antagonism could i) be a useful adjuvant therapy in diabetes only when residual insulin action persists, and ii) help devising future β-cell regeneration therapies relying upon α-cell reprogramming. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13828.001 PMID:27092792

  12. In vivo inhibition of glucagon secretion by paracrine beta cell activity in man.

    PubMed

    Asplin, C M; Paquette, T L; Palmer, J P

    1981-07-01

    The close anatomical relationships betaeen pancreatic alpha and beta cells makes possible their interaction at a local (paracrine) level. To demonstrate this in vivo, we have compared the acute glucagon response to intravenous arginine in the basal state and after beta cell suppression by infusions of insulin. The plasma glucose concentration was maintained by the glucose clamp technique. In six normal weight nondiabetics, infusion of insulin at 0.2 mU/kg per min (rate 1) raised the mean +/- SEM plasma insulin levels from 10 +/- 3 to 32 +/- 4 mU/liter and at 1 mU/kg per min (rate 2) raised plasma insulin to 84 +/- 8 mU/liter. This resulted in beta cell suppression, as shown by a diminution in the acute insulin response (incremental area under the insulin response curve, 0-10 min): basal = 283 +/- 61, 199 +/- 66 (rate 1) and 143 +/- 48 mU/liter per 10 min (rate 2) and a fall in prestimulus C-peptide from 1.05 +/- 0.17 to 0.66 +/- 0.15 and to 0.44 +/- 0.15 mM/liter (all P less than 0.01). This beta cell suppression was associated with increased glucagon responses to arginine: 573 +/- 75 (basal), 829 +/- 114 (rate 1), and 994 +/- 136 ng/liter per 10 min (rate 2) and increased peak glucagon responses 181 +/- 11 (basal), 214 +/- 16 (rate 1), and 259 +/- 29 ng/liter (rate 2) (all P less than 0.01). In all subjects, there was a proportional change between the rise in he acute glucagon response to arginine and the fall in the prearginine C-peptide level. To demonstrate that augmented glucagon response was due to betw cell suppression, and not to the metabolic effect of infused insulin, similar studies were performed in C-peptide-negative-diabetics. Their acute glucagon response to arginine was inhibited by the insulin infusion: 701 +/- 112 (basal), 427 +/- 33 (rate 1), and 293 +/- 67 ng/liter per 10 min (rate 2) as was their peak glucagon response: 268 +/- 69, 170 +/- 36, and 115 +/- 33 ng/liter (all P less than 0.01). Thus, hyperinsulinemia, within the physiological range

  13. Septal Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Expression Determines Suppression of Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harasta, Anne E; Power, John M; von Jonquieres, Georg; Karl, Tim; Drucker, Daniel J; Housley, Gary D; Schneider, Miriam; Klugmann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and its receptor GLP-1R are a key component of the satiety signaling system, and long-acting GLP-1 analogs have been approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Previous reports demonstrate that GLP-1 regulates glucose homeostasis alongside the rewarding effects of food. Both palatable food and illicit drugs activate brain reward circuitries, and pharmacological studies suggest that central nervous system GLP-1 signaling holds potential for the treatment of addiction. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1 in the attenuation of reward-oriented behavior, and the essential domains of the mesolimbic system mediating these beneficial effects, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the central regions of highest Glp-1r gene activity are essential in mediating responses to drugs of abuse. Here, we show that Glp-1r-deficient (Glp-1r−/−) mice have greatly augmented cocaine-induced locomotor responses and enhanced conditional place preference compared with wild-type (Glp-1r+/+) controls. Employing mRNA in situ hybridization we located peak Glp-1r mRNA expression in GABAergic neurons of the dorsal lateral septum, an anatomical site with a crucial function in reward perception. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of dorsal lateral septum neurons revealed that genetic Glp-1r ablation leads to increased excitability of these cells. Viral vector-mediated Glp-1r gene delivery to the dorsal lateral septum of Glp-1r−/− animals reduced cocaine-induced locomotion and conditional place preference to wild-type levels. This site-specific genetic complementation did not affect the anxiogenic phenotype observed in Glp-1r−/− controls. These data reveal a novel role of GLP-1R in dorsal lateral septum function driving behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:25669605

  14. Quantitative ultrastructural analysis of the human parietal cell during acid inhibition and increase of gastric potential difference by glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Ivey, K J; Tarnawski, A; Sherman, D; Krause, W J; Ackman, K; Burks, M; Hewett, J

    1980-01-01

    Glucagon inhibits gastric acid secretion and increases the negativity of gastric mucosal potential difference (PD) in man. To test the hypothesis that the increased negativity of PD after glucagon in man could be due to decreased parietal cell canalicular membrane area, a quantitative ultrastructural analysis was carried out. Four healthy volunteers with normal gastric mucosa were submitted to biopsy before and 20 minutes after intravenous injection of 2 mg glucagon (G). This time corresponded with the maximal change in PD and a decrease in gastric acid secretion. Canalicular and tubulovesicular membrane area of 80 parietal cells (40 cells before glucagon and 40 cells after glucagon) were quantified by the Loud morphometric method. After glucagon, the oxyntic cell canalicular membrane area was reduced by one-fourth (P less than 0.05), while tubulovesicular membrane area showed an increase (P less than 0.05) at the same time. The decrease in the area of parietal cell canalicular membrane caused by glucagon may in part be responsible for increased negativity of the gastric PD caused by this hormone. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7364316

  15. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Regulates Cholecystokinin Production in β-Cells to Protect From Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Amelia K; Neuman, Joshua C; Battiola, Therese J; Wisinski, Jaclyn A; Kimple, Michelle E; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-07-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a classic gut hormone that is also expressed in the pancreatic islet, where it is highly up-regulated with obesity. Loss of CCK results in increased β-cell apoptosis in obese mice. Similarly, islet α-cells produce increased amounts of another gut peptide, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), in response to cytokine and nutrient stimulation. GLP-1 also protects β-cells from apoptosis via cAMP-mediated mechanisms. Therefore, we hypothesized that the activation of islet-derived CCK and GLP-1 may be linked. We show here that both human and mouse islets secrete active GLP-1 as a function of body mass index/obesity. Furthermore, GLP-1 can rapidly stimulate β-cell CCK production and secretion through direct targeting by the cAMP-modulated transcription factor, cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). We find that cAMP-mediated signaling is required for Cck expression, but CCK regulation by cAMP does not require stimulatory levels of glucose or insulin secretion. We also show that CREB directly targets the Cck promoter in islets from obese (Leptin(ob/ob)) mice. Finally, we demonstrate that the ability of GLP-1 to protect β-cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis is partially dependent on CCK receptor signaling. Taken together, our work suggests that in obesity, active GLP-1 produced in the islet stimulates CCK production and secretion in a paracrine manner via cAMP and CREB. This intraislet incretin loop may be one mechanism whereby GLP-1 protects β-cells from apoptosis.

  16. Glucagon in the scintigraphic diagnosis of small-bowel hemorrhage by Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, J.W.; Juni, J.

    1984-04-01

    Twelve patients undergoing scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells (RBC) exhibited abnormal small-bowel activity and were given glucagon to assess its role in detecting bleeding from the small bowel. Six demonstrated focal accumulation of activity which was not identified prior to glucagon. Endoscopy, barium studies, angiography, and colonoscopy located the small-bowel bleeding site in 4 patients; in the other 2, studies of the colon failed to show the bleeding site and the origin was presumed to be the small bowel. The authors suggest that intravenous glucagon can be beneficial as an adjuvant to Tc-99m-RBC when diagnosing bleeding from the small bowel.

  17. Arginine is preferred to glucagon for stimulation testing of β-cell function.

    PubMed

    Robertson, R Paul; Raymond, Ralph H; Lee, Douglas S; Calle, Roberto A; Ghosh, Atalanta; Savage, Peter J; Shankar, Sudha S; Vassileva, Maria T; Weir, Gordon C; Fryburg, David A

    2014-10-15

    A key aspect of research into the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes is the availability of reproducible clinical research methodology to assess β-cell function. One commonly used method employs nonglycemic secretagogues like arginine (arg) or glucagon (glgn). This study was designed to quantify the insulin response to arg and glgn and determine test repeatability and tolerability. Obese overnight-fasted subjects with normal glucose tolerance were studied on 4 separate days: twice using arg (5 g iv) and twice with glgn (1 mg iv). Pre- and postinfusion samples for plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide were acquired. Arg and glgn challenges were repeated in the last 10 min of a 60-min glucose (900 mg/min) infusion. Insulin and C-peptide secretory responses were estimated under baseline fasting glucose conditions (AIRarg and AIRglgn) and hyperglycemic (AIRargMAX AIRglgnMAX) states. Relative repeatability was estimated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Twenty-three (12 men and 11 women) subjects were studied (age: 42.4 ± 8.3 yr; BMI: 31.4 ± 2.8 kg/m²). Geometric means (95% CI) for baseline-adjusted values AIRarg and AIRglgn were 84 (75-95) and 102 (90-115) μU/ml, respectively. After the glucose infusion, AIRargMAX and AIRglgnMAX were 395 (335-466) and 483 (355-658) μU/ml, respectively. ICC values were >0.90 for AIRarg andAIRargMAX. Glucagon ICCs were 0.83, 0.34, and 0.36, respectively, although the exclusion of one outlier increased the latter two values (to 0.84 and 0.86). Both glgn and arg induced mild adverse events that were transient. Glucagon, but not arginine, induced moderate adverse events due to nausea. Taken together, arginine is preferred to glucagon for assessment of β-cell function.

  18. Glucagon-producing cells are increased in Mas-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Felix Braga, Janaína; Ravizzoni Dartora, Daniela; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that angiotensin(1–7) (Ang(1–7)) produces several effects related to glucose homeostasis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of genetic deletion of Ang(1–7), the GPCR Mas, on the glucagon-producing cells. C57BL6/N Mas−/− mice presented a significant and marked increase in pancreatic α-cells (number of cells: 146 ± 21 vs 67 ± 8 in WT; P < 0.001) and the percentage per islet (17.9 ± 0.91 vs 12.3 ± 0.9% in WT; P < 0.0001) with subsequent reduction of β-cells percentage (82.1 ± 0.91 vs 87.7 ± 0.9% in WT; P < 0.0001). Accordingly, glucagon plasma levels were increased (516.7 ± 36.35 vs 390.8 ± 56.45 pg/mL in WT; P < 0.05) and insulin plasma levels were decreased in C57BL6/N Mas−/− mice (0.25 ± 0.01 vs 0.31 ± 56.45 pg/mL in WT; P = 0.02). In order to eliminate the possibility of a background-related phenotype, we determined the number of glucagon-producing cells in FVB/N Mas−/− mice. In keeping with the observations in C57BL6/N Mas−/− mice, the number and percentage of pancreatic α-cells were also significantly increased in these mice (number of α-cells: 260 ± 22 vs 156 ± 12 in WT, P < 0.001; percentage per islet: 16 ± 0.8 vs 10 ± 0.5% in WT, P < 0.0001). These results suggest that Mas has a previously unexpected role on the pancreatic glucagon production. PMID:27998954

  19. Do glucagonomas always produce glucagon?

    PubMed Central

    Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Challis, Benjamin G.; Damjanov, Ivan; Jens, Juul Holst

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islet α-cell tumours that overexpress proglucagon are typically associated with the glucagonoma syndrome, a rare disease entity characterised by necrolytic migratory erythema, impaired glucose tolerance, thromboembolic complications and psychiatric disturbances. Paraneoplastic phenomena associated with enteric overexpression of proglucagon-derived peptides are less well recognized and include gastrointestinal dysfunction and hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia. The diverse clinical manifestations associated with glucagon-expressing tumours can be explained, in part, by the repertoire of tumorally secreted peptides liberated through differential post-translational processing of tumour-derived proglucagon. Proglucagon-expressing tumours may be divided into two broad biochemical subtypes defined by either secretion of glucagon or GLP-1, GLP-2 and the glucagon-containing peptides, glicentin and oxyntomodulin, due to an islet α-cell or enteroendocrine L-cell pattern of proglucagon processing, respectively. In the current review we provide an updated overview of the clinical presentation of proglucagon-expressing tumours in relation to known physiological actions of proglucagon-derived peptides and suggest that detailed biochemical characterisation of the peptide repertoire secreted from these tumours may provide new opportunities for diagnosis and clinical management. PMID:26773171

  20. Co-transfection with protein kinase D confers phorbol-ester-mediated inhibition on glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation in COS cells transfected to overexpress glucagon receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, E S; Rozengurt, E; Connell, J M; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    Glucagon elicited a profound increase in the intracellular cAMP concentration of COS-7 cells which had been transiently transfected with a cDNA encoding the rat glucagon receptor and under conditions where cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was fully inhibited. This was achieved in a dose-dependent fashion with an EC50 of 1.8+/-0.4 nM glucagon. In contrast with previous observations made using hepatocytes [Heyworth, Whetton, Kinsella and Houslay (1984) FEBS Lett. 170, 38-42], treatment of transfected COS-7 cells with PMA did not inhibit the ability of glucagon to increase intracellular cAMP levels. PMA-mediated inhibition was not conferred by treatment with okadaic acid, nor by co-transfecting cells with cDNAs encoding various protein kinase C isoforms (PKC-alpha, PKC-betaII and PKC-epsilon) or with the PMA-activated G-protein-receptor kinases GRK2 and GRK3. In contrast, PMA induced the marked inhibition of glucagon-stimulated cAMP production in COS-7 cells that had been co-transfected with a cDNA encoding protein kinase D (PKD). Such inhibition was not due to an action on the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase, as forskolin-stimulated cAMP production was unchanged by PMA treatment of COS cells that had been co-transfected with both the glucagon receptor and PKD. PKD transcripts were detected in RNA isolated from hepatocytes but not from COS-7 cells. Transcripts for GRK2 were present in hepatocytes but not in COS cells, whereas transcripts for GRK3 were not found in either cell type. It is suggested that PKD may play a role in the regulation of glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase. PMID:9291130

  1. Co-culture of clonal beta cells with GLP-1 and glucagon-secreting cell line impacts on beta cell insulin secretion, proliferation and susceptibility to cytotoxins.

    PubMed

    Green, Alastair D; Vasu, Srividya; Moffett, R Charlotte; Flatt, Peter R

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the direct effects on insulin releasing MIN6 cells of chronic exposure to GLP-1, glucagon or a combination of both peptides secreted from GLUTag L-cell and αTC1.9 alpha-cell lines in co-culture. MIN6, GLUTag and αTC1.9 cell lines exhibited high cellular hormone content and release of insulin, GLP-1 and glucagon, respectively. Co-culture of MIN6 cells with GLUTag cells significantly increased cellular insulin content, beta-cell proliferation, insulin secretory responses to a range of established secretogogues and afforded protection against exposure cytotoxic concentrations of glucose, lipid, streptozotocin or cytokines. Benefits of co-culture of MIN6 cells with αTC1.9 alphacells were limited to enhanced beta-cell proliferation with marginal positive actions on both insulin secretion and cellular protection. In contrast, co-culture of MIN6 with GLUTag cells plus αTC1.9 cells, markedly enhanced both insulin secretory responses and protection against beta-cell toxins compared with co-culture with GLUTag cells alone. These data indicate important long-term effects of conjoint GLP-1 and glucagon exposure on beta-cell function. This illustrates the possible functional significance of alpha-cell GLP-1 production as well as direct beneficial effects of dual agonism at beta-cell GLP-1 and glucagon receptors.

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism.

  3. Integrative function of adrenaline receptors for glucagon-like peptide-1 exocytosis in enteroendocrine L cell line GLUTag.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2015-05-15

    Adrenaline reacts with three types of adrenergic receptors, α1, α2 and β-adrenergic receptors (ARs), inducing many physiological events including exocytosis. Although adrenaline has been shown to induce glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal L cells, the precise molecular mechanism by which adrenaline regulates GLP-1 secretion remains unknown. Here we show by live cell imaging that all types of adrenergic receptors are stimulated by adrenaline in enteroendocrine L cell line GLUTag cells and are involved in GLP-1 exocytosis. We performed RT-PCR analysis and found that α1B-, α2A-, α2B-, and β1-ARs were expressed in GLUTag cells. Application of adrenaline induced a significant increase of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP concentration ([Ca(2+)]i and [cAMP]i, respectively), and GLP-1 exocytosis in GLUTag cells. Blockade of α1-AR inhibited adrenaline-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase and exocytosis but not [cAMP]i increase, while blockade of β1-AR inhibited adrenaline-induced [cAMP]i increase and exocytosis but not [Ca(2+)]i increase. Furthermore, overexpression of α2A-AR suppressed the adrenaline-induced [cAMP]i increase and exocytosis. These results suggest that the fine-turning of GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells is established by the balance between α1-, α2-, and β-ARs activation.

  4. Role of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase isozymes in murine colonic glucagon-like peptide 1 secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Ronn S; Moss, Catherine E; Mace, Jessica; Parker, Helen E; Tolhurst, Gwen; Habib, Abdella M; Wachten, Sebastian; Cooper, Dermot M; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells after food intake. Increasing GLP-1 signalling either through inhibition of the GLP-1 degrading enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase IV or injection of GLP-1-mimetics has recently been successfully introduced for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Boosting secretion from the L-cell has so far not been exploited, due to our incomplete understanding of L-cell physiology. Elevation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to be a strong stimulus for GLP-1 secretion and here we investigate the activities of adenylate cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes likely to shape cAMP responses in L-cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression of AC and PDE isoforms was quantified by RT-PCR. Single cell responses to stimulation or inhibition of AC and PDE isoforms were monitored with real-time cAMP probes. GLP-1 secretion was assessed by elisa. KEY RESULTS Quantitative PCR identified expression of protein kinase C- and Ca2+-activated ACs, corresponding with phorbolester and cytosolic Ca2+-stimulated cAMP elevation. Inhibition of PDE2, 3 and 4 were found to stimulate GLP-1 secretion from murine L-cells in primary culture. This corresponded with cAMP elevations monitored with a plasma membrane targeted cAMP probe. Inhibition of PDE3 but not PDE2 was further shown to prevent GLP-1 secretion in response to guanylin, a peptide secreted into the gut lumen, which had not previously been implicated in L-cell secretion. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results reveal several mechanisms shaping cAMP responses in GLP-1 secreting cells, with some of the molecular components specifically expressed in L-cells when compared with their epithelial neighbours, thus opening new strategies for targeting these cells therapeutically. PMID:21054345

  5. Characterization of pancreatic glucagon-producing tumors and pituitary gland tumors in transgenic mice overexpressing MYCN in hGFAP-positive cells.

    PubMed

    Fielitz, Kathrin; Althoff, Kristina; De Preter, Katleen; Nonnekens, Julie; Ohli, Jasmin; Elges, Sandra; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Klöppel, Günter; Knösel, Thomas; Schulte, Marc; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Beisser, Daniela; Reis, Henning; Eyking, Annette; Cario, Elke; Schulte, Johannes H; Schramm, Alexander; Schüller, Ulrich

    2016-11-15

    Amplification or overexpression of MYCN is involved in development and maintenance of multiple malignancies. A subset of these tumors originates from neural precursors, including the most aggressive forms of the childhood tumors, neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. In order to model the spectrum of MYCN-driven neoplasms in mice, we transgenically overexpressed MYCN under the control of the human GFAP-promoter that, among other targets, drives expression in neural progenitor cells. However, LSL-MYCN;hGFAP-Cre double transgenic mice did neither develop neural crest tumors nor tumors of the central nervous system, but presented with neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and, less frequently, the pituitary gland. Pituitary tumors expressed chromogranin A and closely resembled human pituitary adenomas. Pancreatic tumors strongly produced and secreted glucagon, suggesting that they derived from glucagon- and GFAP-positive islet cells. Interestingly, 3 out of 9 human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors expressed MYCN, supporting the similarity of the mouse tumors to the human system. Serial transplantations of mouse tumor cells into immunocompromised mice confirmed their fully transformed phenotype. MYCN-directed treatment by AuroraA- or Brd4-inhibitors resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation in vitro and reduced tumor growth in vivo. In summary, we provide a novel mouse model for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and pituitary gland that is dependent on MYCN expression and that may help to evaluate MYCN-directed therapies.

  6. Characterization of pancreatic glucagon-producing tumors and pituitary gland tumors in transgenic mice overexpressing MYCN in hGFAP-positive cells

    PubMed Central

    Fielitz, Kathrin; Althoff, Kristina; De Preter, Katleen; Nonnekens, Julie; Ohli, Jasmin; Elges, Sandra; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Klöppel, Günter; Knösel, Thomas; Schulte, Marc; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Beisser, Daniela; Reis, Henning; Eyking, Annette; Cario, Elke; Schulte, Johannes H.

    2016-01-01

    Amplification or overexpression of MYCN is involved in development and maintenance of multiple malignancies. A subset of these tumors originates from neural precursors, including the most aggressive forms of the childhood tumors, neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. In order to model the spectrum of MYCN-driven neoplasms in mice, we transgenically overexpressed MYCN under the control of the human GFAP-promoter that, among other targets, drives expression in neural progenitor cells. However, LSL-MYCN;hGFAP-Cre double transgenic mice did neither develop neural crest tumors nor tumors of the central nervous system, but presented with neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and, less frequently, the pituitary gland. Pituitary tumors expressed chromogranin A and closely resembled human pituitary adenomas. Pancreatic tumors strongly produced and secreted glucagon, suggesting that they derived from glucagon- and GFAP-positive islet cells. Interestingly, 3 out of 9 human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors expressed MYCN, supporting the similarity of the mouse tumors to the human system. Serial transplantations of mouse tumor cells into immunocompromised mice confirmed their fully transformed phenotype. MYCN-directed treatment by AuroraA- or Brd4-inhibitors resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation in vitro and reduced tumor growth in vivo. In summary, we provide a novel mouse model for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and pituitary gland that is dependent on MYCN expression and that may help to evaluate MYCN-directed therapies. PMID:27769070

  7. Self-inducible secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) that allows MIN6 cells to maintain insulin secretion and insure cell survival.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Koji; Shimoda, Masashi; Hamamoto, Sumiko; Tatsumi, Fuminori; Hirukawa, Hidenori; Tawaramoto, Kazuhito; Kanda, Yukiko; Kaku, Kohei

    2012-02-26

    Based on the hypothesis that MIN6 cells could produce glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) to maintain cell survival, we analyzed the effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4 (Ex4), and antagonist, exendin-(9-39) (Ex9) on cell function and cell differentiation. MIN6 cells expressed proglucagon mRNAs and produced GLP-1, which was accelerated by Ex4 and suppressed by Ex9. Moreover, Ex4 further enhanced glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion, suggesting autocrine loop-contributed amplification of the GLP-1 signal. Ex4 up-regulated cell differentiation- and cell function-related CREBBP, Pdx-1, Pax6, proglucagon, and PC1/3 gene expressions. The confocal laser scanning images revealed that GLP-1 positive cells were dominant in the early stage of cells, but positive for insulin were more prominent in the mature stage of cells. Ex4 accelerated cell viability, while Ex9 and anti-GLP-1 receptor antibody enhanced cell apoptosis. MIN6 cells possess a mechanism of GLP-1 signal amplification in an autocrine fashion, by which the cells maintained insulin production and cell survival.

  8. Aberrant expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands of a patient with Cushing's syndrome and ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Valeria; Redal, María Ana; Viale, María Lorena; Kahan, Mariano; Glerean, Mariela; Beskow, Axel; Fainstein Day, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) is a rare cause of Cushing's syndrome, characterized by bilateral adrenal lesions and excess cortisol production despite ACTH suppression. Cortisol synthesis is produced in response to abnormal activation of G-protein-coupled receptors, such as gastric inhibitory peptide, vasopressin, beta adrenergic agonists, LH/hCG and serotonin receptors. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands from an AIMAH patient. A patient with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome and bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia was screened for altered activation of adrenal receptors by physiological (mixed meal) and pharmacological (gonadotrophin releasing hormone, ACTH and glucagon) tests. The results showed abnormally high levels of serum cortisol after stimulation with glucagon. Hypercortisolism was successfully managed with ketoconazole treatment. Interestingly, a 4-month treatment with a somatostatin analogue (octreotide) was also able to reduce cortisol secretion. Finally, Cushing's syndrome was cured after bilateral adrenalectomy. Abnormal mRNA expression for glucagon receptor in the patient's adrenal glands was observed by Real-Time PCR procedure. These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of AIMAH causing Cushing's syndrome in this case involves the illicit activation of adrenal glucagon receptors. This is the first case reported of AIMAH associated with ectopic glucagon receptors.

  9. A strategy for fusion expression and preparation of functional glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue by introducing an enterokinase cleavage site.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Ren, Limei; Ge, Lingmiao; Cui, Qingxin; Cao, Xiaofang; Hou, Yuanyuan; Bai, Fang; Bai, Gang

    2014-08-01

    KGLP-1, a 31-amino acid glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, has a great therapeutic potential for anti-diabetes. In this work, a strategy for expression and purification of functional KGLP-1 peptide has been established. KGLP-1 cDNA was fused with glutathione S-transferase (GST), with an enterokinase cleavage site in the fusion junction. The recombinant fusion protein GST-KGLP-1 was affinity purified via the GST-tag, and then digested with enterokinase. The resulting GST part as well as the enzymes were eliminated by ultra-filtration followed by size exclusion chromatograph. The yield of purified KGLP-1 was approximately 12.1 mg/L, with purity of 96.18 %. The recombinant KGLP-1 was shown to have similar bioactivity as native GLP-1 when evaluated in a Chinese hamster ovary cell line expressing a GLP-1 receptor-egfp reporter gene.

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1 improves beta-cell antioxidant capacity via extracellular regulated kinases pathway and Nrf2 translocation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Millán, E; Martín, M A; Goya, L; Lizárraga-Mollinedo, E; Escrivá, F; Ramos, S; Álvarez, C

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance, two major pathophysiological abnormalities of type 2 diabetes. Expression levels of antioxidant enzymes in beta cells are very low, rendering them more susceptible to damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although the antioxidant effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its analogs have been previously reported, the exact mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that GLP-1 was able to effectively inhibit oxidative stress and cell death of INS-1E beta cells induced by the pro-oxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tert-BOOH). Incubation with GLP-1 enhanced cellular levels of glutathione and the activity of its related enzymes, glutathione-peroxidase (GPx) and -reductase (GR) in beta cells. However, inhibition of ERK, but not of the PI3K/AKT pathway abolished, at least in part, the antioxidant effect of GLP-1. Moreover, ERK activation seems to be protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent because inhibition of PKA with H-89 was sufficient to block the GLP-1-derived protective effect on beta cells. GLP-1 likewise increased the synthesis of GR and favored the translocation of the nuclear transcription factor erythroid 2p45-related factor (Nrf2), a transcription factor implicated in the expression of several antioxidant/detoxificant enzymes. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was also preserved in beta-cells challenged with tert-BOOH but pre-treated with GLP-1, probably through the down-regulation of the mitochondrial uncoupling-protein2 (UCP2). Thus, our results provide additional mechanisms of action of GLP-1 to prevent oxidative damage in beta cells through the modulation of signaling pathways involved in antioxidant enzyme regulation.

  11. Glucagon receptor activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 via cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Youwei; Cypess, Aaron M.; Muse, Evan D.; Wu, Cui-Rong; Unson, Cecilia G.; Merrifield, R. B.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2001-01-01

    We prepared a stable cell line expressing the glucagon receptor to characterize the effect of Gs-coupled receptor stimulation on extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity. Glucagon treatment of the cell line caused a dose-dependent increase in cAMP concentration, activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and transient release of intracellular calcium. Glucagon treatment also caused rapid dose-dependent phosphorylation and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK kinase (MEK1/2) and ERK1/2. Inhibition of either PKA or MEK1/2 blocked ERK1/2 activation by glucagon. However, no significant activation of several upstream activators of MEK, including Ras, Rap1, and Raf, was observed in response to glucagon treatment. In addition, chelation of intracellular calcium reduced glucagon-mediated ERK1/2 activation. In transient transfection experiments, glucagon receptor mutants that bound glucagon but failed to increase intracellular cAMP and calcium concentrations showed no glucagon-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We conclude that glucagon-induced MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation is mediated by PKA and that an increase in intracellular calcium concentration is required for maximal ERK activation. PMID:11517300

  12. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 improves proliferation and differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells via upregulating VEGF generation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiao-Yun; Mo, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Ke; He, Hong-Hui; Xie, Yan-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1), released from enteroendocrine cells of the intestine, exerted cardiovascular protective effect. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in maintaining endothelial integrity regulating neovascularization and reendothelialization after endothelial injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important cytokine in the process of EPCs vascular differentiation and proliferation. Material/Methods This study was designed to investigate the association between VEGF changes and the proliferation/differentiation function of EPCs in the presence of GLP-1. Results We demonstrated that GLP-1 markedly enhanced the EPCs proliferation and expression of EC-specific markers, and simultaneously upregulated VEGF secretion in EPCs. Exogenous VEGF augmented EPCs proliferation/differentiation abilities in a dose-dependent manner. However, all of the beneficial effects of GLP-1 were suppressed by anti-VEGFmAb or the KDR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor SU1498. Conclusions These findings suggest that GLP-1 improves VEGF generation, which contributed to improvement of EPCs biological function, partly by tyrosine kinase KDR. VEGF is a necessary intermediate, mediating the effects of GLP-1 on EPCs. These changes offer a novel explanation that upregulation EPCs bioactivities may be one of the mechanisms of GLP-1 cardiovascular protective effect. PMID:21278683

  13. Phentolamine inhibits exocytosis of glucagon by Gi2 protein-dependent activation of calcineurin in rat pancreatic alpha -cells.

    PubMed

    Høy, M; Bokvist, K; Xiao-Gang, W; Hansen, J; Juhl, K; Berggren, P O; Buschard, K; Gromada, J

    2001-01-12

    Capacitance measurements were used to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which imidazoline compounds inhibit glucagon release in rat pancreatic alpha-cells. The imidazoline compound phentolamine reversibly decreased depolarization-evoked exocytosis >80% without affecting the whole-cell Ca(2+) current. During intracellular application through the recording pipette, phentolamine produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the rate of exocytosis (IC(50) = 9.7 microm). Another imidazoline compound, RX871024, exhibited similar effects on exocytosis (IC(50) = 13 microm). These actions were dependent on activation of pertussis toxin-sensitive G(i2) proteins but were not associated with stimulation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels or adenylate cyclase activity. The inhibitory effect of phentolamine on exocytosis resulted from activation of the protein phosphatase calcineurin and was abolished by cyclosporin A and deltamethrin. Exocytosis was not affected by intracellular application of specific alpha(2), I(1), and I(2) ligands. Phentolamine reduced glucagon release (IC(50) = 1.2 microm) from intact islets by 40%, an effect abolished by pertussis toxin, cyclosporin A, and deltamethrin. These data suggest that imidazoline compounds inhibit glucagon secretion via G(i2)-dependent activation of calcineurin in the pancreatic alpha-cell. The imidazoline binding site is likely to be localized intracellularly and probably closely associated with the secretory granules.

  14. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (1–37) converts intestinal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 1 is produced through posttranslational processing of proglucagon and acts as a regulator of various homeostatic events. Among its analogs, however, the function of GLP-1-(1–37), synthesized in small amounts in the pancreas, has been unclear. Here, we find that GLP-1-(1–37) induces insulin production in developing and, to a lesser extent, adult intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo, a process mediated by up-regulation of the Notch-related gene ngn3 and its downstream targets, which are involved in pancreatic endocrine differentiation. These cells became responsive to glucose challenge in vitro and reverse insulin-dependent diabetes after implantation into diabetic mice. Our findings suggest that efficient induction of insulin production in intestinal epithelial cells by GLP-1-(1–37) could represent a new therapeutic approach to diabetes mellitus. PMID:12702762

  15. [Protective effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on beta-cells: preclinical and clinical data].

    PubMed

    Consoli, Agostino; Di Biagio, Rosamaria

    2011-12-01

    Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Scienze dell'Invecchiamento, Università degli Studi "G. d'Annunzio", Chieti Continuing b-cell mass and function loss represents the key mechanism for the pathogenesis and the progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Drugs capable of arresting b-cell loss and eventually able to bring b-cell function close to be back to normal would then be a formidable help in type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists exenatide and liraglutide can stimulate in vitro neogenesis and prevent apoptosis in b-cell-like cell lines. Consistently, treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonists ameliorates glucose metabolism, preserves b-cell mass and improves b-cell function in several animal models of diabetes. For instance, in the db/db mice, liraglutide protects the b-cell from oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress-related damage. Data in humans, in vivo, are less definitive and often based on scarcely reliable indexes of b-cell function. However, short-term treatment (14 weeks) with liraglutide increased b-cell maximal response capacity in a dose-response fashion. A longer (1 year) exenatide treatment also was able to increase b-cell maximal response capacity, but the effect was no longer there after a 4-week washout period. However, a marginal, although significant as compared to glargine treatment, improvement in another b-cell function index (disposition index) was observed after a 4-week washout period following 3-year exenatide treatment. Finally, although no clinical trials with a long enough follow-up period are presently available, durable glucose control has been obtained during 2 years of liraglutide treatment in monotherapy. Since the durability of good control is strictly dependent upon a lack of further b-cell function deterioration, these clinical data may foster hope that GLP-1 receptor antagonist treatment might help preserving b-cell function also in individuals affected by type 2

  16. Glucagon and cAMP inhibit cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) gene expression in human hepatocytes: discordant regulation of bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang-Hoon; Chiang, John Y L

    2006-01-01

    The gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is tightly regulated to control bile acid synthesis and maintain lipid homeostasis. Recent studies in mice suggest that bile acid synthesis is regulated by the fasted-to-fed cycle, and fasting induces CYP7A1 gene expression in parallel to the induction of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). How glucagon regulates CYP7A1 gene expression in the human liver is not clear. Here we show that glucagon and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) strongly repressed CYP7A1 mRNA expression in human primary hepatocytes. Reporter assays confirmed that cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibited human CYP7A1 gene transcription, in contrast to their stimulation of the PEPCK gene. Mutagenesis analysis identified a PKA-responsive region located within the previously identified HNF4alpha binding site in the human CYP7A1 promoter. Glucagon and cAMP increased HNF4alpha phosphorylation and reduced the amount of HNF4alpha present in CYP7A1 chromatin. Our findings suggest that glucagon inhibited CYP7A1 gene expression via PKA phosphorylation of HNF4alpha, which lost its ability to bind the CYP7A1 gene and resulted in inhibition of human CYP7A1 gene transcription. In conclusion, this study unveils a species difference in nutrient regulation of the human and mouse CYP7A1 gene and suggests a discordant regulation of bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis by glucagon in human livers during fasting.

  17. Factors controlling gastric-glucagon release.

    PubMed Central

    Lefèbvre, P J; Luyckx, A S

    1977-01-01

    A system consisting of an isolated dog stomach perfused with whole blood has been designed to study gastric glucagon secretion. Under basal conditions, gastric glucagon release was 0.0-3.1 ng glucagon/100g of stomach per min. Arginine, at an arterial plasma concentration averaging 10 mM, elicited a rapid glucagon release. This gastric glucagon release was almost completely abolished by somatostatin (100 ng/ml). The release of gastric glucagon was not affected by hyperglycemia alone but was reduced by about 40% when hyperglycemia was concomitant with an hyperinsulinemia within the physiological range. These observations support the concept that adequate concentrations of insulin are necessary in order for hyperglycemia to inhibit gastric glucagon secretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that the isolated perfused dog stomach might provide a unique tool permitting investigation of alpha-cell function in the absence of endogenously released insulin. PMID:845258

  18. Glucagon blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... type I - glucagon test; Hypoglycemia - glucagon test; Low blood sugar - glucagon test ... A blood sample is needed . ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel ... Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This ...

  19. Intestinotrophic Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 (GLP-2) Activates Intestinal Gene Expression and Growth Factor-Dependent Pathways Independent of the Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Gene in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yusta, Bernardo; Holland, Dianne; Waschek, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The enteroendocrine and enteric nervous systems convey signals through an overlapping network of regulatory peptides that act either as circulating hormones or as localized neurotransmitters within the gastrointestinal tract. Because recent studies invoke an important role for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) as a downstream mediator of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) action in the gut, we examined the importance of the VIP-GLP-2 interaction through analysis of Vip−/− mice. Unexpectedly, we detected abnormal villous architecture, expansion of the crypt compartment, increased crypt cell proliferation, enhanced Igf1 and Kgf gene expression, and reduced expression of Paneth cell products in the Vip−/− small bowel. These abnormalities were not reproduced by antagonizing VIP action in wild-type mice, and VIP administration did not reverse the intestinal phenotype of Vip−/− mice. Exogenous administration of GLP-2 induced the expression of ErbB ligands and immediate-early genes to similar levels in Vip+/+ vs. Vip−/− mice. Moreover, GLP-2 significantly increased crypt cell proliferation and small bowel growth to comparable levels in Vip+/+ vs. Vip−/− mice. Unexpectedly, exogenous GLP-2 administration had no therapeutic effect in mice with dextran sulfate-induced colitis; the severity of colonic injury and weight loss was modestly reduced in female but not male Vip−/− mice. Taken together, these findings extend our understanding of the complex intestinal phenotype arising from loss of the Vip gene. Furthermore, although VIP action may be important for the antiinflammatory actions of GLP-2, the Vip gene is not required for induction of a gene expression program linked to small bowel growth after enhancement of GLP-2 receptor signaling. PMID:22535770

  20. New Potential Targets of Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonists in Pancreatic β-Cells and Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that both insulin resistance and decreased insulin secretory capacity are important factors in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition to genetic factors, obesity and lipotoxicity can increase the risk of T2DM. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are novel antidiabetic drugs with multiple effects. They can stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibit postprandial glucagon release, delay gastric emptying, and induce pancreatic β-cell proliferation. They can also reduce the weight of patients with T2DM and relieve lipotoxicity at the cellular level. Many intracellular targets of GLP-1 have been found, but more remain to be identified. Elucidating these targets could be a basis for developing new potential drugs. My colleagues and I have investigated new targets of GLP-1, with a particular focus on pancreatic β-cell lines and hepatic cell lines. Herein, I summarize the recent work from my laboratory, with profound gratitude for receiving the prestigious 2016 Namgok Award. PMID:28181428

  1. Increased Glucose-induced Secretion of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Mice Lacking the Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 2 (CEACAM2)*

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Simona S.; Heinrich, Garrett; Lester, Sumona G.; Pfeiffer, Verena; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Patel, Payal R.; DeAngelis, Anthony M.; Dai, Tong; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K.; Smiley, Zachary N.; Jung, Dae Y.; Lee, Yongjin; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Ergun, Suleyman; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Kim, Jason K.; Giovannucci, David R.; Najjar, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 2 (CEACAM2) regulates food intake as demonstrated by hyperphagia in mice with the Ceacam2 null mutation (Cc2−/−). This study investigated whether CEACAM2 also regulates insulin secretion. Ceacam2 deletion caused an increase in β-cell secretory function, as assessed by hyperglycemic clamp analysis, without affecting insulin response. Although CEACAM2 is expressed in pancreatic islets predominantly in non-β-cells, basal plasma levels of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin, islet areas, and glucose-induced insulin secretion in pooled Cc2−/− islets were all normal. Consistent with immunofluorescence analysis showing CEACAM2 expression in distal intestinal villi, Cc2−/− mice exhibited a higher release of oral glucose-mediated GLP-1, an incretin that potentiates insulin secretion in response to glucose. Compared with wild type, Cc2−/− mice also showed a higher insulin excursion during the oral glucose tolerance test. Pretreating with exendin(9–39), a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, suppressed the effect of Ceacam2 deletion on glucose-induced insulin secretion. Moreover, GLP-1 release into the medium of GLUTag enteroendocrine cells was increased with siRNA-mediated Ceacam2 down-regulation in parallel to an increase in Ca2+ entry through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Thus, CEACAM2 regulates insulin secretion, at least in part, by a GLP-1-mediated mechanism, independent of confounding metabolic factors. PMID:26586918

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 counteracts the detrimental effects of Advanced Glycation End-Products in the pancreatic beta cell line HIT-T 15

    SciTech Connect

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Durante, A.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced cell death. {yields} GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced oxidative stress. {yields} GLP-1 ameliorated AGEs-induced cell dysfunction. {yields} GLP-1 attenuates AGEs-induced RAGE increment. {yields} GLP-1 counteracts AGEs-induced pancreatic cell death and dysfunction. -- Abstract: Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs), a group of compounds resulting from the non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with the free amino group of proteins, are implicated in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T 15 to high concentrations of AGEs significantly decreases cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and affects transcription factors regulating insulin gene transcription. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that increases proinsulin biosynthesis, stimulates insulin secretion, and improves pancreatic beta-cell viability. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of GLP-1 on the function and viability of HIT-T 15 cells cultured with AGEs. HIT-T 15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs alone, or supplemented with 10 nmol/l GLP-1. Cell viability, insulin secretion, redox balance, and expression of the AGEs receptor (RAGE) were then determined. The results showed that GLP-1 protected beta cell against AGEs-induced cell death preventing both apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, addition of GLP-1 to the AGEs culture medium restored the redox balance, improved the responsiveness to glucose, and attenuated AGEs-induced RAGE expression. These findings provide evidence that GLP-1 protects beta cells from the dangerous effects of AGEs.

  3. The pivotal role of high glucose-induced overexpression of PKCβ in the appearance of glucagon-like peptide-1 resistance in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, Gemma; De Nigris, Valeria; La Sala, Lucia; Testa, Roberto; Genovese, Stefano; Ceriello, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has a protective effect on endothelial cells. Our hypothesis is that this GLP-1 protective effect is partly lost when the cells are exposed to sustained high glucose concentrations. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured for 21 days in normal glucose (5 mmol/L, NG) or high glucose (25 mmol/L glucose, HG). GLP-1 (7-37) and Ruboxistaurin were added at 50 and 500 nM, respectively, alone or in combination, 1 h before cell harvesting. Analysis of GLP-1 receptor protein levels, as well as of the gene expression of different ER stress-related genes, proliferation markers, antioxidant cell response-related genes, and PKA subunits, was performed. ROS production was also measured in HUVECs exposed to mentioned treatments. GLP-1 receptor expression was reduced in HUVECs exposed to chronic high glucose concentrations but was partially restored by a chemical PKCβ-specific inhibitor. GLP-1, added as an acute treatment in endothelial cells, had the capacity to induce the expression of Nrf2-detoxifying enzyme targets, to increase transcription levels of scavenger genes, to attenuate the expression of high glucose-induced PKA subunits, ER stress and also the apoptotic phenotype of HUVECs; these effects occured only when high glucose-induced PKCβ overexpression was reduced by Ruboxistaurin. In a similar manner, ROS production induced by high glucose was reduced by GLP-1 in the presence of PKCβ inhibitor. This study suggests that an increase in PKCβ, induced by high glucose, could have a role in endothelial GLP-1 resistance, reducing GLP-1 receptor levels and disrupting the GLP-1 canonical pathway.

  4. A novel neurotrophic property of glucagon-like peptide 1: a promoter of nerve growth factor-mediated differentiation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Perry, TracyAnn; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Chen, Demao; Zhou, Jie; Shaw, Karen T Y; Egan, Josephine M; Greig, Nigel H

    2002-03-01

    The insulinotropic hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)-amide (GLP-1) has potent effects on glucose-dependent insulin secretion, insulin gene expression, and pancreatic islet cell formation and is presently in clinical trials as a therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We report on the effects of GLP-1 and two of its long-acting analogs, exendin-4 and exendin-4 WOT, on neuronal proliferation and differentiation, and on the metabolism of two neuronal proteins in the rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell line, which has been shown to express the GLP-1 receptor. We observed that GLP-1 and exendin-4 induced neurite outgrowth in a manner similar to nerve growth factor (NGF), which was reversed by coincubation with the selective GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39). Furthermore, exendin-4 could promote NGF-initiated differentiation and may rescue degenerating cells after NGF-mediated withdrawal. These effects were induced in the absence of cellular dysfunction and toxicity as quantitatively measured by 3-(4,5-cimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays, respectively. Our findings suggest that such peptides may be used in reversing or halting the neurodegenerative process observed in neurodegenerative diseases, such as the peripheral neuropathy associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Due to its novel twin action, GLP-1 and exendin-4 have therapeutic potential for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and these central nervous system disorders.

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-1: The missing link in the metabolic clock?

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Patricia L; Gil-Lozano, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Circadian expression of clock genes in peripheral tissues is critical to the coordinated regulation of intestinal digestive and absorptive functions, insulin secretion, and peripheral tissue nutrient deposition during periods of nutrient ingestion, thereby preventing metabolic dysregulation. As glucagon-like peptide-1 is a key incretin hormone that regulates glucose-dependent insulin secretion, we hypothesized that this intestinal hormone is a player in the peripheral metabolic clock, linking nutrient ingestion to insulin secretion. We have now established that secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 from the intestinal L cell shows a rhythmic pattern in rats and humans in vivo that is altered by circadian disruptors, such as constant light exposure, consumption of a Western diet and feeding at inappropriate times (i.e., during the light period in rodents). Interestingly, the alterations in the rhythm of the glucagon-like peptide-1 secretory responses were found to parallel the changes in the pattern of insulin responses in association with significant impairments in glucose tolerance. Furthermore, we have detected circadian clock gene expression, and showed circadian secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 from both the murine and human L cell in vitro. These findings demonstrate that glucagon-like peptide-1 is a functional component of the peripheral metabolic clock, and suggest that altered release of glucagon-like peptide-1 might play a role in the metabolic perturbations that result from circadian disruption.

  6. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Expression on Intracellular Granule Movement in Pancreatic α Cells.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Satoru; Furuno, Tadahide; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirashima, Naohide

    2016-09-01

    Although glucagon secreted from pancreatic α cells plays a role in increasing glucose concentrations in serum, the mechanism regulating glucagon secretion from α cells remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), identified as an adhesion molecule in α cells, has been reported not only to communicate among α cells and between nerve fibers, but also to prevent excessive glucagon secretion from α cells. Here, we investigated the effect of CADM1 expression on the movement of intracellular secretory granules in α cells because the granule transport is an important step in secretion. Spinning disk microscopic analysis showed that granules moved at a mean velocity of 0.236 ± 0.010 μm/s in the mouse α cell line αTC6 that expressed CADM1 endogenously. The mean velocity was significantly decreased in CADM1-knockdown (KD) cells (mean velocity: 0.190 ± 0.016 μm/s). The velocity of granule movement decreased greatly in αTC6 cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing reagent nocodazole, but not in αTC6 cells treated with the actin-depolymerizing reagent cytochalasin D. No difference in the mean velocity was observed between αTC6 and CADM1-KD cells treated with nocodazole. These results suggest that intracellular granules in pancreatic α cells move along the microtubule network, and that CADM1 influences their velocity.

  7. Insulin and Glucagon Secretion In Vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, Arun S.

    1998-01-01

    Long-duration space flight is associated with many physiological abnormalities in astronauts. In particular, altered regulation of the hormones insulin and glucagon may contribute to metabolic disturbances such as increased blood sugar levels, which if persistently elevated result in toxic effects. These changes are also observed in the highly prevalent disease diabetes, which affects 16 million Americans and consumes over $100 billion in annual healthcare costs. By mimicking the microgravity environment of space in the research laboratory using a NASA-developed bioreactor, one can study the physiology of insulin and glucagon secretion and determine if there are alterations in these cellular processes. The original specific objectives of the project included: (1) growing ('cell culture') of pancreatic islet beta and alpha cells that secrete insulin and glucagon respectively, in the NASA bioreactor; (2) examination of the effects of microgravity on insulin and glucagon secretion; and (3) study of molecular mechanisms of insulin and glucagon secretion if altered by microgravity.

  8. Opioid blockade effect on insulin beta-cells secretory patterns in polycystic ovary syndrome. Oral glucose load versus intravenous glucagon bolus.

    PubMed

    Ciampelli, M; Fulghesu, A M; Guido, M; Murgia, F; Muzj, G; Belosi, C; Fortini, A; Cento, R; Lanzone, A

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate the involvement of endogenous opiates in the insulin disorders of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOs) a total of 25 PCOs women and 11 normo-ovulatory controls were studied by comparing the effect of a chronic opioid blockade on beta-cells responsiveness to oral glucose load and to intravenous glucagon bolus. Each patient, studied on follicular phase, underwent to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and, 2 days later, to a glucagon intravenous bolus (1 mg); these tests were then repeated after 6 weeks of naltrexone treatment (50 mg orally). Naltrexone treatment did not modify the insulin secretory patterns of control subjects, whereas the same therapy significantly reduced, in hyperinsulinemic PCOs women, the beta-cell hyperresponsiveness both to oral glucose load and to intravenous glucagon (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively), even if with different mean percent decrease (32% OGTT vs. 45% glucagon, p < 0.05). Moreover, normoinsulinemic PCOs patients showed a slight, but not significantly increase in the beta-cells response to OGTT after opioid blockade, whereas, in the same situation, the insulin release after glucagon bolus was significantly reduced (p < 0.01). Chronic opioid blockade did not modify gonadotropins, steroids and SHBG levels in either group. Our data show that naltrexone treatment is able to reduce the beta-cell response to a direct intravenous secretagogue stimulus in all PCOs patients, while only in hyperinsulinemic PCOs subjects the same treatment is effective in reducing the exaggerated insulin secretion after oral glucose load. The reason for such a discrepancy could be ascribed to a different effect of opioids on first- and second-phase insulin secretion, or, alternatively, to an involvement of other secretagogue factors, such as glucoincretins.

  9. Isosteviol Has Beneficial Effects on Palmitate-Induced α-Cell Dysfunction and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoping; Hermansen, Kjeld; Xiao, Jianzhong; Bystrup, Sara Kjaergaard; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Jeppesen, Per Bendix

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term exposure to high levels of fatty acids impairs insulin secretion and exaggerates glucagon secretion. The aim of this study was to explore if the antihyperglycemic agent, Isosteviol (ISV), is able to counteract palmitate-induced α-cell dysfunction and to influence α-cell gene expression. Methodology/Principal Findings Long-term incubation studies with clonal α-TC1–6 cells were performed in the presence of 0.5 mM palmitate with or without ISV. We investigated effects on glucagon secretion, glucagon content, cellular triglyceride (TG) content, cell proliferation, and expression of genes involved in controlling glucagon synthesis, fatty acid metabolism, and insulin signal transduction. Furthermore, we studied effects of ISV on palmitate-induced glucagon secretion from isolated mouse islets. Culturing α-cells for 72-h with 0.5 mM palmitate in the presence of 18 mM glucose resulted in a 56% (p<0.01) increase in glucagon secretion. Concomitantly, the TG content of α-cells increased by 78% (p<0.01) and cell proliferation decreased by 19% (p<0.05). At 18 mM glucose, ISV (10−8 and 10−6 M) reduced palmitate-stimulated glucagon release by 27% (p<0.05) and 27% (p<0.05), respectively. ISV (10−6 M) also counteracted the palmitate-induced hypersecretion of glucagon in mouse islets. ISV (10−6 M) reduced α-TC1–6 cell proliferation rate by 25% (p<0.05), but ISV (10−8 and 10−6 M) had no effect on TG content in the presence of palmitate. Palmitate (0.5 mM) increased Pcsk2 (p<0.001), Irs2 (p<0.001), Fasn (p<0.001), Srebf2 (p<0.001), Acaca (p<0.01), Pax6 (p<0.05) and Gcg mRNA expression (p<0.05). ISV significantly (p<0.05) up-regulated Insr, Irs1, Irs2, Pik3r1 and Akt1 gene expression in the presence of palmitate. Conclusions/Significance ISV counteracts α-cell hypersecretion and apparently contributes to changes in expression of key genes resulting from long-term exposure to palmitate. ISV apparently acts as a glucagonostatic drug with

  10. Activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells in a cAMP-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hejun; Wei, Rui; Wang, Liang; Tian, Qing; Tao, Ming; Ke, Jing; Liu, Ye; Hou, Wenfang; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Jin; Hong, Tianpei

    2014-06-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) promotes pancreatic β-cell regeneration through GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation. However, whether it promotes exocrine pancreas growth and thereby increases the risk of pancreatic cancer has been a topic of debate in recent years. Clinical data and animal studies published so far have been controversial. In the present study, we report that GLP-1R activation with liraglutide inhibited growth and promoted apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro and attenuated pancreatic tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model in vivo. These effects of liraglutide were mediated through activation of cAMP production and consequent inhibition of Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in a GLP-1R-dependent manner. Moreover, we examined GLP-1R expression in human pancreatic cancer tissues and found that 43.3% of tumor tissues were GLP-1R-null. In the GLP-1R-positive tumor tissues (56.7%), the level of GLP-1R was lower compared with that in tumor-adjacent normal pancreatic tissues. Furthermore, the GLP-1R-positive tumors were significantly smaller than the GLP-1R-null tumors. Our study shows for the first time that GLP-1R activation has a cytoreductive effect on human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which may help address safety concerns of GLP-1-based therapies in the context of human pancreatic cancer.

  11. Glucagon effects on the human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, G K; Whalen, G E; Soergel, K H; Wu, W C; Meade, R C

    1979-07-01

    In healthy volunteers, the effects of intravenously administered glucagon on small intestinal function was investigated. Bolus doses resulting in plasma glucagon concentrations of greater than 800 pg/ml (5 min after injection) abolished jejunal contractions for 4.4 +/- 0.4 (SEM) min after a latency period of 49 +/- 4 sec. During continuous intravenous glucagon infusion, jejunal dilatation and increase in mean transit time (MTT) occurred at plasma levels greater than 720 pg/ml, while inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption was observed only with plasma glucagon concentrations of 1760 +/- 114 pg/ml. Under these conditions, the propulsion of fasting intestinal contents was slowed without change in flow rate. The observed effects cannot be attributed to the simultaneously occurring rise in plasma insulin and glucose concentrations. Short-term increases in circulating glucagon concentration inhibit intestinal tone, contractions, and propulsion with only a minor effect on water and electrolyte absorption limited to a narrow concentration range of plasma glucagon. Neither effect occurs at glucagon levels likely to occur under physiologic concentrations. The latency period preceding the abolition of jejunal contractions suggests that glucagon does not act directly on intestinal smooth muscle cells.

  12. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta-cells from Death by Increasing Autophagic Flux and Restoring Lysosomal Function.

    PubMed

    Zummo, Francesco P; Cullen, Kirsty S; Honkanen-Scott, Minna; Shaw, James Am; Lovat, Penny E; Arden, Catherine

    2017-02-23

    Studies in animal models of type 2 diabetes have shown that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists prevent β-cell loss. Whether GLP-1 mediates β-cell survival via the key lysosomal-mediated process of autophagy is unknown.Here we report that treatment of INS-1E β-cells and primary islets with glucolipotoxicity (0.5mmol/l palmitate, 25mmol/l glucose) increases LC3 II, a marker of autophagy. Further analysis indicates a blockage in autophagic flux associated with lysosomal dysfunction. Accumulation of defective lysosomes leads to lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP) and release of Cathepsin D, which contributes to cell death. Our data further demonstrated defects in autophagic flux and lysosomal staining in human samples of type 2 diabetes. Co-treatment with the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 reversed the lysosomal dysfunction, relieving the impairment in autophagic flux and further stimulated autophagy. siRNA knockdown showed the restoration of autophagic flux is also essential for the protective effects of exendin-4.Collectively, our data highlights lysosomal dysfunction as a critical mediator of β-cell loss and shows that exendin-4 improves cell survival via restoration of lysosomal function and autophagic flux. Modulation of autophagy / lysosomal homeostasis may thus define a novel therapeutic strategy for type 2 diabetes, with the GLP-1 signalling pathway as a potential focus.

  13. Differentiating effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue exendin-4 in a human neuronal cell model.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Paola; Deledda, Cristiana; Benvenuti, Susanna; Cellai, Ilaria; Squecco, Roberta; Monici, Monica; Cialdai, Francesca; Luciani, Giorgia; Danza, Giovanna; Di Stefano, Chiara; Francini, Fabio; Peri, Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an insulinotropic peptide with neurotrophic properties, as assessed in animal cell models. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 analogue, has been recently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to morphologically, structurally, and functionally characterize the differentiating actions of exendin-4 using a human neuronal cell model (i.e., SH-SY5Y cells). We found that exendin-4 increased the number of neurites paralleled by dramatic changes in intracellular actin and tubulin distribution. Electrophysiological analyses showed an increase in cell membrane surface and in stretch-activated-channels sensitivity, an increased conductance of Na(+) channels and amplitude of Ca(++) currents (T- and L-type), typical of a more mature neuronal phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that exendin-4 promotes neuronal differentiation in human cells. Noteworthy, our data support the claimed favorable role of exendin-4 against diabetic neuropathy as well as against different neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist enhances intrinsic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Onuma, Hirohisa; Inukai, Kouichi Kitahara, Atsuko; Moriya, Rie; Nishida, Susumu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Katsuta, Hidenori; Takahashi, Kazuto; Sumitani, Yoshikazu; Hosaka, Toshio; Ishida, Hitoshi

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • PPARγ activation was involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action. • Exendin-4 enhanced endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity in HUVECs. • H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement. • The anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 may be explained by PPARγ activation. - Abstract: Recent studies have suggested glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) signaling to exert anti-inflammatory effects on endothelial cells, although the precise underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether PPARγ activation is involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action on endothelial cells. When we treated HUVEC cells with 0.2 ng/ml exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity was significantly elevated, by approximately 20%, as compared with control cells. The maximum PPARγ activity enhancing effect of exendin-4 was observed 12 h after the initiation of incubation with exendin-4. As H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement, the signaling downstream from GLP-1 cross-talk must have been involved in PPARγ activation. In conclusion, our results suggest that GLP-1 has the potential to induce PPARγ activity, partially explaining the anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 on endothelial cells. Cross-talk between GLP-1 signaling and PPARγ activation would have major impacts on treatments for patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

  15. Spergularia marina Induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in NCI-H716 Cells Through Bile Acid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong; Lee, Yu Mi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spergularia marina Griseb. (SM) is a halophyte that grows in mud flats. The aerial portions of SM have been eaten as vegetables and traditionally used to prevent chronic diseases in Korea. However, there has been no scientific report that demonstrates the pharmacological effects of SM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is important for the maintenance of glucose and energy homeostasis through acting as a signal in peripheral and neural systems. To discover a functional food for regulating glucose and energy homeostasis, we evaluated the effect of an aqueous ethanolic extract (AEE) of SM on GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. In addition, we explored the Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) agonist activity of AEE-SM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells transiently transfected with human TGR5. As a result, treatment of NCI-H716 cells with AEE-SM increased GLP-1 secretion and intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of NCI-H716 cells with TGR5-specific small interference RNA inhibited AEE-SM-induced GLP-1 secretion and the increase in Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Moreover, AEE-SM showed that the TGR5 agonist activity in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with TGR5. The results suggest that AEE-SM might be a candidate for a functional food to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:25260089

  16. Real architecture For 3D Tissue (RAFT™) culture system improves viability and maintains insulin and glucagon production of mouse pancreatic islet cells.

    PubMed

    Szebeni, Gabor J; Tancos, Zsuzsanna; Feher, Liliana Z; Alfoldi, Robert; Kobolak, Julianna; Dinnyes, Andras; Puskas, Laszlo G

    2017-04-01

    There is an unmet medical need for the improvement of pancreatic islet maintenance in culture. Due to restricted donor availability it is essential to ameliorate islet viability and graft engraftment. The aim of this study was to compare the standard tissue culture techniques with the advanced Real Architecture For 3D Tissue (RAFT™) culture system in terms of viability and hormone production. Here, we first report that islets embedded in RAFT™ collagen type I advanced tissue culture system maintain their tissue integrity better than in monolayer and suspension cultures. The Calcein violet assay and Annexin V/propidium-iodide staining show higher cell viability in the RAFT™ culture system. Quantitative real-time PCR data showed that RAFT™ increases insulin expression after 18 days in culture compared to traditional methods. Enhanced insulin and glucagon production was further verified by immunofluorescent staining in a time-course manner. These results indicate that RAFT™ tissue culture platform can be a promising tool to maintain pancreatic islet spheroid integrity and culture islets for downstream high throughput pharmacological studies ex vivo.

  17. Exaggerated glucagon-like peptide 1 response is important for improved β-cell function and glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Jacobsen, Siv H; Worm, Dorte; Hansen, Dorte L; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Naver, Lars; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens J

    2013-09-01

    β-Cell function improves in patients with type 2 diabetes in response to an oral glucose stimulus after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. This has been linked to the exaggerated secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), but causality has not been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of GLP-1 in improving β-cell function and glucose tolerance and regulating glucagon release after RYGB using exendin(9-39) (Ex-9), a GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R)-specific antagonist. Nine patients with type 2 diabetes were examined before and 1 week and 3 months after surgery. Each visit consisted of two experimental days, allowing a meal test with randomized infusion of saline or Ex-9. After RYGB, glucose tolerance improved, β-cell glucose sensitivity (β-GS) doubled, the GLP-1 response greatly increased, and glucagon secretion was augmented. GLP-1R blockade did not affect β-cell function or meal-induced glucagon release before the operation but did impair glucose tolerance. After RYGB, β-GS decreased to preoperative levels, glucagon secretion increased, and glucose tolerance was impaired by Ex-9 infusion. Thus, the exaggerated effect of GLP-1 after RYGB is of major importance for the improvement in β-cell function, control of glucagon release, and glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  18. β-Cell Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Contributes to Improved Glucose Tolerance After Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Garibay, Darline; McGavigan, Anne K; Lee, Seon A; Ficorilli, James V; Cox, Amy L; Michael, M Dodson; Sloop, Kyle W; Cummings, Bethany P

    2016-09-01

    Vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) produces high rates of type 2 diabetes remission; however, the mechanisms responsible for this remain incompletely defined. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut hormone that contributes to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and is elevated after VSG. VSG-induced increases in postprandial GLP-1 secretion have been proposed to contribute to the glucoregulatory benefits of VSG; however, previous work has been equivocal. In order to test the contribution of enhanced β-cell GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling we used a β-cell-specific tamoxifen-inducible GLP-1R knockout mouse model. Male β-cell-specific Glp-1r(β-cell+/+) wild type (WT) and Glp-1r(β-cell-/-) knockout (KO) littermates were placed on a high-fat diet for 6 weeks and then switched to high-fat diet supplemented with tamoxifen for the rest of the study. Mice underwent sham or VSG surgery after 2 weeks of tamoxifen diet and were fed ad libitum postoperatively. Mice underwent oral glucose tolerance testing at 3 weeks and were euthanized at 6 weeks after surgery. VSG reduced body weight and food intake independent of genotype. However, glucose tolerance was only improved in VSG WT compared with sham WT, whereas VSG KO had impaired glucose tolerance relative to VSG WT. Augmentation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during the oral glucose tolerance test was blunted in VSG KO compared with VSG WT. Therefore, our data suggest that enhanced β-cell GLP-1R signaling contributes to improved glucose regulation after VSG by promoting increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

  19. Mitochondrial GTP Insensitivity Contributes to Hypoglycemia in Hyperinsulinemia Hyperammonemia by Inhibiting Glucagon Release

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol Soo; Lee, Hui-Young; Cabrera, Over; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Zhao, Xiaojian; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Li, Changhong; Berggren, Per-Olof; Stanley, Charles; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial GTP (mtGTP)-insensitive mutations in glutamate dehydrogenase (GDHH454Y) result in fasting and amino acid–induced hypoglycemia in hyperinsulinemia hyperammonemia (HI/HA). Surprisingly, hypoglycemia may occur in this disorder despite appropriately suppressed insulin. To better understand the islet-specific contribution, transgenic mice expressing the human activating mutation in β-cells (H454Y mice) were characterized in vivo. As in the humans with HI/HA, H454Y mice had fasting hypoglycemia, but plasma insulin concentrations were similar to the controls. Paradoxically, both glucose- and glutamine-stimulated insulin secretion were severely impaired in H454Y mice. Instead, lack of a glucagon response during hypoglycemic clamps identified impaired counterregulation. Moreover, both insulin and glucagon secretion were impaired in perifused islets. Acute pharmacologic inhibition of GDH restored both insulin and glucagon secretion and normalized glucose tolerance in vivo. These studies support the presence of an mtGTP-dependent signal generated via β-cell GDH that inhibits α-cells. As such, in children with activating GDH mutations of HI/HA, this insulin-independent glucagon suppression may contribute importantly to symptomatic hypoglycemia. The identification of a human mutation causing congenital hypoglucagonemic hypoglycemia highlights a central role of the mtGTP–GDH–glucagon axis in glucose homeostasis. PMID:25024374

  20. Evidence of the receptor-mediated influence of melatonin on pancreatic glucagon secretion via the Gαq protein-coupled and PI3K signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bähr, Ina; Mühlbauer, Eckhard; Albrecht, Elke; Peschke, Elmar

    2012-11-01

    Melatonin has been shown to modulate glucose metabolism by influencing insulin secretion. Recent investigations have also indicated a regulatory function of melatonin on the pancreatic α-cells. The present in vitro and in vivo studies evaluated whether melatonin mediates its effects via melatonin receptors and which signaling cascade is involved. Incubation experiments using the glucagon-producing mouse pancreatic α-cell line αTC1 clone 9 (αTC1.9) as well as isolated pancreatic islets of rats and mice revealed that melatonin increases glucagon secretion. Preincubation of αTC1.9 cells with the melatonin receptor antagonists luzindole and 4P-PDOT abolished the glucagon-stimulatory effect of melatonin. In addition, glucagon secretion was lower in the pancreatic islets of melatonin receptor knockout mice than in the islets of the wild-type (WT) control animals. Investigations of melatonin receptor knockout mice revealed decreased plasma glucagon concentrations and elevated mRNA expression levels of the hepatic glucagon receptor when compared to WT mice. Furthermore, studies using pertussis toxin, as well as measurements of cAMP concentrations, ruled out the involvement of Gαi- and Gαs-coupled signaling cascades in mediating the glucagon increase induced by melatonin. In contrast, inhibition of phospholipase C in αTC1.9 cells prevented the melatonin-induced effect, indicating the physiological relevance of the Gαq-coupled pathway. Our data point to the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling cascade in mediating melatonin effects in pancreatic α-cells. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that the glucagon-stimulatory effect of melatonin in pancreatic α-cells is melatonin receptor mediated, thus supporting the concept of melatonin-modulated and diurnal glucagon release.

  1. Production of pancreatic hormone-expressing endocrine cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Kevin A; Bang, Anne G; Eliazer, Susan; Kelly, Olivia G; Agulnick, Alan D; Smart, Nora G; Moorman, Mark A; Kroon, Evert; Carpenter, Melissa K; Baetge, Emmanuel E

    2006-11-01

    Of paramount importance for the development of cell therapies to treat diabetes is the production of sufficient numbers of pancreatic endocrine cells that function similarly to primary islets. We have developed a differentiation process that converts human embryonic stem (hES) cells to endocrine cells capable of synthesizing the pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin. This process mimics in vivo pancreatic organogenesis by directing cells through stages resembling definitive endoderm, gut-tube endoderm, pancreatic endoderm and endocrine precursor--en route to cells that express endocrine hormones. The hES cell-derived insulin-expressing cells have an insulin content approaching that of adult islets. Similar to fetal beta-cells, they release C-peptide in response to multiple secretory stimuli, but only minimally to glucose. Production of these hES cell-derived endocrine cells may represent a critical step in the development of a renewable source of cells for diabetes cell therapy.

  2. An AlphaScreen Assay for the Discovery of Synthetic Chemical Inhibitors of Glucagon Production.

    PubMed

    Evans, Matthew R; Wei, Shuguang; Posner, Bruce A; Unger, Roger H; Roth, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Glucose homeostasis is primarily controlled by two opposing hormones, insulin and glucagon, and diabetes results when insulin fails to inhibit glucagon action. Recent efforts to control glucagon in diabetes have focused on antagonizing the glucagon receptor, which is effective in lowering blood glucose levels but leads to hyperglucogonemia in rodents. An alternative strategy would be to control glucagon production with small molecules. In pursuit of this goal, we developed a homogeneous AlphaScreen assay for measuring glucagon in cell culture media and used this in a high-throughput screen to discover synthetic compounds that inhibited glucagon secretion from an alpha cell-like cell line. Some of these compounds inhibited transcription of the glucagon gene.

  3. Characterization of glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor (GLP2R) gene in chickens: functional analysis, tissue distribution, and developmental expression profile of GLP2R in embryonic intestine.

    PubMed

    Mo, C; Zhong, Y; Wang, Y; Yan, Z; Li, J

    2014-07-01

    This study characterized the glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor (GLP2R) gene of chickens because relatively little is known about the underlying mechanism of GLP2 actions in nonmammalian species. With the use of reverse transcription PCR, we first cloned the chicken GLP2R (cGLP2R) from adult intestine, which was predicted to encode a 529-amino acid receptor precursor. With the use of a pGL3-CRE luciferase reporter system, we demonstrated that cGLP2R expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells could be potently activated by cGLP2 (half maximal effective concentration, 1.06 nM) but not by its structurally related peptides, including the newly identified glucagon-like peptide, indicating that cGLP2R is a functional receptor specific to cGLP2. Reverse transcription PCR assay revealed that cGLP2R mRNA was widely expressed in adult chicken tissues, including pancreas and various parts of the gastrointestinal tract. With the use of quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR assays, we further investigated the mRNA expression of cGLP2R and its potential downstream mediators, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands (heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, epiregulin, and amphiregulin), in the distal duodenum of developing embryos. The mRNA expression levels of GLP2R and EGFR ligands (heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor and amphiregulin) were shown to increase (P < 0.05 or 0.01) during the late embryonic stages (E16 and E20), implying a potential coordinated action of GLP2 and EGFR ligands on embryonic intestine development. Taken together, our findings not only establish a molecular basis to explore the physiological roles of GLP2 in birds, but they also provide comparative insights into the roles of GLP2R and its ligand in vertebrates, such as its roles in embryonic intestine development.

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist inhibits asymmetric dimethylarginine generation in the kidney of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by blocking advanced glycation end product-induced protein arginine methyltranferase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Ayako; Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Maeda, Sayaka; Nishino, Yuri; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Fukami, Kei; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) play a role in diabetic nephropathy. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, contributes to diabetic nephropathy. We have found that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) inhibits the AGE-induced inflammatory reactions in endothelial cells. However, effects of GLP-1 on the AGE-RAGE-ADMA axis are unknown. This study examined the effects of GLP-1 on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, gene expression of protein arginine methyltransfetase-1 (PRMT-1), an enzyme that mainly generates ADMA, and ADMA levels in human proximal tubular cells. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats received continuous i.p. infusion of 0.3 μg of vehicle or 1.5 μg of the GLP-1 analog exendin-4 per kilogram of body weight for 2 weeks. We further investigated whether and how exendin-4 treatment reduced ADMA levels and renal damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. GLP-1 inhibited the AGE-induced RAGE and PRMT-1 gene expression, ROS, and ADMA generation in tubular cells, which were blocked by small-interfering RNAs raised against GLP-1 receptor. Exendin-4 treatment decreased gene expression of Rage, Prmt-1, Icam-1, and Mcp-1 and ADMA level; reduced urinary excretions of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and albumin; and improved histopathologic changes of the kidney in diabetic rats. Our present study suggests that GLP-1 receptor agonist may inhibit the AGE-RAGE-mediated ADMA generation by suppressing PRMT-1 expression via inhibition of ROS generation, thereby protecting against the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  5. Short communication: Glucagon-like peptide-2 and coccidiosis alter tight junction gene expression in the gastrointestinal tract of dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Walker, M P; Evock-Clover, C M; Elsasser, T H; Connor, E E

    2015-05-01

    Tight junction (TJ) proteins are integral factors involved in gut barrier function, and therapy with glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) enhances gut integrity. Our aim was to assess effects of GLP-2 treatment on mRNA expression of 8 TJ complex proteins in the intestine of dairy calves not infected or infected with Eimeria bovis at 11±3d of age. Mucosal epithelium from jejunum, ileum, and cecum was collected at slaughter from Holstein bull calves assigned to 4 groups: noninfected, buffer-treated (n=5); noninfected, GLP-2 treated (n=4); E. bovis-infected, buffer-treated (n=5); and E. bovis-infected, GLP-2-treated (n=4). Infected calves were orally dosed with 100,000 to 200,000 sporulated E. bovis oocysts on d 0; GLP-2-treated calves received 50 µg of GLP-2/kg of body weight subcutaneously twice daily for 10d beginning on d 18; and buffer-treated calves received an equal injection volume of 0.01 M Na bicarbonate buffer. All calves were killed on d 28. The mRNA expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), claudins 1, 2, and 4 (CLDN1, CLDN2, and CLDN4), F11 receptor (F11R), junction adhesion molecule 2 (JAM2), occludin (OCLN), and tight junction protein ZO-1 (TJP1) was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. In jejunum and ileum, an interaction of E. bovis infection and GLP-2 treatment on gene expression was noted. In jejunum of noninfected calves, GLP-2 increased CXADR, CLDN2, OCLN, and TJP1 mRNA expression but had no effect on mRNA expression in infected calves. Treatment with GLP-2 also increased tight junction protein ZO-1 protein expression in jejunum of noninfected calves as determined by immunohistochemistry. In ileum, E. bovis decreased expression of JAM2, OCLN, and TJP1 in buffer-treated calves, and GLP-2 increased TJP1 expression in infected calves. In cecum, E. bovis infection reduced expression of CXADR, CLDN4, F11R, and OCLN, and GLP-2 therapy increased expression of CLDN4, F11R, OCLN, and TJP1. Results are consistent with studies in

  6. An AlphaScreen Assay for the Discovery of Synthetic Chemical Inhibitors of Glucagon Production

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Matthew R.; Wei, Shuguang; Posner, Bruce A.; Unger, Roger H.; Roth, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is primarily controlled by two opposing hormones, insulin and glucagon, and diabetes results when insulin fails to inhibit glucagon action. Recent efforts to control glucagon in diabetes have focused on antagonizing the glucagon receptor, which is effective in lowering blood glucose levels but leads to hyperglucogonemia in rodents. An alternative strategy would be to control glucagon production with small molecules. In pursuit of this goal, we developed a homogeneous AlphaScreen assay for measuring glucagon in cell culture media and used this in a high-throughput screen to discover synthetic compounds that inhibited glucagon secretion from an alpha cell–like cell line. Some of these compounds inhibited transcription of the glucagon gene. PMID:26676097

  7. Identification of glucagon in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, H; Rubalcava, B; Baetens, D; Blazquez, E; Srikant, C B; Orci, L; Unger, R H

    1975-01-01

    Gel filtration studies on Bio-Gel P-10 columns of a 50-fold purified porcine duodenal extract revealed a main peak of glucagon-like immunoreactivity (GLI) in the 2,900 mol wt zone and a smaller peak in the 3,500 mol wt zone, the same zone as the pancreatic glucagon marker. Like pancreatic glucagon, samples of 3,500 mol wt material gave essentially identical measurements in radioimmunoassays employing the pancreatic glucagon-specific antiserum 30K and the GLI crossreacting antiserum 78J, whereas the 2,900 mol wt peptide gave 60-fold higher readings in the 78J assay. On disk gel electrophoresis, the 3,500 mol wt fraction, like pancreatic glucagon, migrated at pH 8.3, whereas the 2,900 mol wt peptide remained at the origin; at pH 4.7, the 2,900 mol wt peptide migrated while the 3,500 mol wt immunoreactive peptide and glucagon remained at the origin. Isoelectric focusing revealed the 3,500 mol wt moiety to have an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.2, the same as pancreatic glucagon, whereas the 2,900 mol wt peptide had an pI greater than 10. The glycogenolytic activity of the 3,500 mol wt peptide in the perfused rat liver did not differ significantly from glucagon, and its adenylate cyclase stimulating activity in partially purified liver cell membranes was comparable to that of glucagon; the 2,900 mol wt peptide had less than 20% of these activities. In samples of 3,500 mol wt material subjected to isoelectric focusing, adenylate cyclase-stimulating activity was confirmed to fractions containing 30K immunoreactivity with a pI of 6.2. In samples of 2,900 mol wt material subjected to isoelectric focusing, adenylate cyclase-stimulating activity was confined to fractions containing 78J immunoreactivity with an pI greater than 10. Displacement of [125-I]glucagon from the membranes was limited to these two biologically active fractions. However, the affinity of both pancreatic glucagon and the 3,500 mol wt peptide was an order of magnitude greater than of the 2,900 mol wt peptide

  8. Cardiomyocyte glucagon receptor signaling modulates outcomes in mice with experimental myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Safina; Ussher, John R.; Baggio, Laurie L.; Kabir, M. Golam; Charron, Maureen J.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Newgard, Christopher B.; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Glucagon is a hormone with metabolic actions that maintains normoglycemia during the fasting state. Strategies enabling either inhibition or activation of glucagon receptor (Gcgr) signaling are being explored for the treatment of diabetes or obesity. However, the cardiovascular consequences of manipulating glucagon action are poorly understood. Methods We assessed infarct size and the following outcomes following left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation; cardiac gene and protein expression, acylcarnitine profiles, and cardiomyocyte survival in normoglycemic non-obese wildtype mice, and in newly generated mice with selective inactivation of the cardiomyocyte Gcgr. Complementary experiments analyzed Gcgr signaling and cell survival in cardiomyocyte cultures and cell lines, in the presence or absence of exogenous glucagon. Results Exogenous glucagon administration directly impaired recovery of ventricular pressure in ischemic mouse hearts ex vivo, and increased mortality from myocardial infarction after LAD coronary artery ligation in mice in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner. In contrast, cardiomyocyte-specific reduction of glucagon action in adult GcgrCM−/− mice significantly improved survival, and reduced hypertrophy and infarct size following myocardial infarction. Metabolic profiling of hearts from GcgrCM−/− mice revealed a marked reduction in long chain acylcarnitines in both aerobic and ischemic hearts, and following high fat feeding, consistent with an essential role for Gcgr signaling in the control of cardiac fatty acid utilization. Conclusions Activation or reduction of cardiac Gcgr signaling in the ischemic heart produces substantial cardiac phenotypes, findings with implications for therapeutic strategies designed to augment or inhibit Gcgr signaling for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:25685700

  9. Imaging exocytosis of single glucagon-like peptide-1 containing granules in a murine enteroendocrine cell line with total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Kawakami, Hayato; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2009-12-04

    To analyze the exocytosis of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) granules, we imaged the motion of GLP-1 granules labeled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) fused to human growth hormone (hGH-Venus) in an enteroendocrine cell line, STC-1 cells, by total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF) microscopy. We found glucose stimulation caused biphasic GLP-1 granule exocytosis: during the first phase, fusion events occurred from two types of granules (previously docked granules and newcomers), and thereafter continuous fusion was observed mostly from newcomers during the second phase. Closely similar to the insulin granule fusion from pancreatic {beta} cells, the regulated biphasic exocytosis from two types of granules may be a common mechanism in glucose-evoked hormone release from endocrine cells.

  10. Glucagon binding and lipolytic response in isolated adipocytes from streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mayor, P; Calle, C

    1988-04-01

    Evidence for pre-receptor, receptor and post-receptor glucagon defects was investigated in adipocytes from streptozotocin-diabetic rats. For this purpose male Wistar rats were injected by cardiac puncture with streptozotocin (65 mg/Kg body-weight) or saline solution and sacrificed after 7 and 15 days of drug administration. Increased glucagon levels and increased glucagon degradation in serum together with a decrease in glucagon binding were found in both groups of diabetic rats. The decrease in glucagon binding was related to a decrease in the number of glucagon receptors/cell rather than to a change in receptor affinity. The lipolytic response of glucagon was increased. However, the ability of glucagon to increase basal or theophylline-stimulated cAMP accumulation in the incubation medium of adipocytes from diabetic rats was decreased. Such alterations could represent a counter-regulatory mechanism of the hyperglucagonemia detected in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

  11. The Effects of Glucagon-like Peptide-2 on the Tight Junction and Barrier Function in IPEC-J2 Cells through Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Protein Kinase B–Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Changsong; Jia, Gang; Deng, Qiuhong; Zhao, Hua; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Guangmang; Wang, Kangning

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is important for intestinal barrier function and regulation of tight junction (TJ) proteins, but the intracellular mechanisms of action remain undefined. The purpose of this research was to determine the protective effect of GLP-2 mediated TJ and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stressed IPEC-J2 cells and to test the hypothesis that GLP-2 regulate TJ and TER through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in IPEC-J2 cells. Wortmannin and LY294002 are specific inhibitors of PI3K. The results showed that 100 μg/mL LPS stress decreased TER and TJ proteins occludin, claudin-1 and zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) mRNA, proteins expressions (p<0.01) respectively. GLP-2 (100 nmol/L) promote TER and TJ proteins occludin, claudin-1, and zo-1 mRNA, proteins expressions in LPS stressed and normal IPEC-J2 cells (p<0.01) respectively. In normal cells, both wortmannin and LY294002, PI3K inhibitors, prevented the mRNA and protein expressions of Akt and mTOR increase induced by GLP-2 (p<0.01) following with the significant decreasing of occludin, claudin-1, ZO-1 mRNA and proteins expressions and TER (p<0.01). In conclusion, these results indicated that GLP-2 can promote TJ’s expression and TER in LPS stressed and normal IPEC-J2 cells and GLP-2 could regulate TJ and TER through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. PMID:26954146

  12. Effects of E2HSA, a Long-Acting Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist, on Glycemic Control and Beta Cell Function in Spontaneous Diabetic db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shaocong; Li, Caina; Huan, Yi; Liu, Shuainan; Liu, Quan; Sun, Sujuan; Jiang, Qian; Jia, Chunming; Shen, Zhufang

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists such as exendin-4 have been widely used but their short half-life limits their therapeutic value. The recombinant protein, E2HSA, is a novel, long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist generated by the fusion of exendin-4 with human serum albumin. In mouse pancreatic NIT-1 cells, E2HSA activated GLP-1 receptor with similar efficacy as exendin-4. After single-dose administration in ICR mice, E2HSA showed prolonged glucose lowering effects which lasted up to four days and extended inhibition on gastric emptying for at least 72 hours. Chronic E2HSA treatment in db/db mice significantly improved glucose tolerance, reduced elevated nonfasting and fasting plasma glucose levels, and also decreased HbA1c levels. E2HSA also increased insulin secretion and decreased body weight and appetite. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analysis showed that E2HSA increased β-cell area, improved islet morphology, and reduced β-cell apoptosis. In accordance with the promotion of β-cell function and survival, E2HSA upregulated genes such as Irs2, Pdx-1, Nkx6.1, and MafA and downregulated the expression levels of FoxO1 and proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. In conclusion, with prolonged glucose lowering effects and promoting β-cell function and survival, the fusion protein, E2HSA, is a promising new therapeutic for once weekly treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Hypothalamic CaMKKβ mediates glucagon anorectic effect and its diet-induced resistance

    PubMed Central

    Quiñones, Mar; Al-Massadi, Omar; Gallego, Rosalía; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Objective Glucagon receptor antagonists and humanized glucagon antibodies are currently studied as promising therapies for obesity and type II diabetes. Among its variety of actions, glucagon reduces food intake, but the molecular mechanisms mediating this effect as well as glucagon resistance are totally unknown. Methods Glucagon and adenoviral vectors were administered in specific hypothalamic nuclei of lean and diet-induced obese rats. The expression of neuropeptides controlling food intake was performed by in situ hybridization. The regulation of factors of the glucagon signaling pathway was assessed by western blot. Results The central injection of glucagon decreased feeding through a hypothalamic pathway involving protein kinase A (PKA)/Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. More specifically, the central injection of glucagon increases PKA activity and reduces protein levels of CaMKKβ and its downstream target phosphorylated AMPK in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Consistently, central glucagon significantly decreased AgRP expression. Inhibition of PKA and genetic activation of AMPK in the ARC blocked glucagon-induced anorexia in lean rats. Genetic down-regulation of glucagon receptors in the ARC stimulates fasting-induced hyperphagia. Although glucagon was unable to decrease food intake in DIO rats, glucagon sensitivity was restored after inactivation of CaMKKβ, specifically in the ARC. Thus, glucagon decreases food intake acutely via PKA/CaMKKβ/AMPK dependent pathways in the ARC, and CaMKKβ mediates its obesity-induced hypothalamic resistance. Conclusions This work reveals the molecular underpinnings by which glucagon controls feeding that may lead to a better understanding of disease states linked to anorexia and cachexia. PMID:26909312

  14. Recent Progress in the Use of Glucagon and Glucagon Receptor Antago-nists in the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lotfy, Mohamed; Kalasz, Huba; Szalai, Gyorgy; Singh, Jaipaul; Adeghate, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon is an important pancreatic hormone, released into blood circulation by alpha cells of the islet of Langerhans. Glucagon induces gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis in hepatocytes, leading to an increase in hepatic glucose production and subsequently hyperglycemia in susceptible individuals. Hyperglucagonemia is a constant feature in patients with T2DM. A number of bioactive agents that can block glucagon receptor have been identified. These glucagon receptor antagonists can reduce the hyperglycemia associated with exogenous glucagon administration in normal as well as diabetic subjects. Glucagon receptor antagonists include isoserine and beta-alanine derivatives, bicyclic 19-residue peptide BI-32169, Des-His1-[Glu9] glucagon amide and related compounds, 5-hydroxyalkyl-4-phenylpyridines, N-[3-cano-6- (1,1 dimethylpropyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1-benzothien-2-yl]-2-ethylbutamide, Skyrin and NNC 250926. The absorption, dosage, catabolism, excretion and medicinal chemistry of these agents are the subject of this review. It emphasizes the role of glucagon in glucose homeostasis and how it could be applied as a novel tool for the management of diabetes mellitus by blocking its receptors with either monoclonal antibodies, peptide and non-peptide antagonists or gene knockout techniques. PMID:25674162

  15. Insulin and Glucagon Impairments in Relation with Islet Cells Morphological Modifications Following Long Term Pancreatic Duct Ligation in the Rabbit – A Model of Non-insulin-dependent Diabete

    PubMed Central

    Daumas, M.; Chanh, A. Pham Huu; Lasserre, B.; Hollande, E

    2001-01-01

    Plasma levels of glucose, insulin and glucagon were measured at various time intervals after pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) in rabbits. Two hyperglycemic periods were observed: one between 15–90 days (peak at 30 days of 15.1 ± 1.2mmol/l, p < 0.01), and the other at 450 days (11.2 ± 0.5 mmol/l, p < 0.02). The first hyperglycemic episode was significantly correlated with both hypoinsulinemia (41.8 ± 8pmol/l, r= –0.94, p < 0.01) and hyperglucagonemia (232 ± 21ng/l, r=0.95, p < 0.01). However, the late hyperglycemic phase (450 days), which was not accompanied by hypoinsulinemia, was observed after the hyperglucagonemia (390 days) produced by abundant immunostained A-cells giving rise to a 3-fold increase in pancreatic glucagon stores. The insulin and glucagon responses to glucose loading at 180, 270 and 450 days reflected the insensitivity of B- and A-cells to glucose. The PDL rabbit model with chronic and severe glycemic disorders due to the predominant role of glucagon mimicked key features of the NIDDM syndrome secondary to exocrine disease. PMID:12369713

  16. Multiple Factors Related to the Secretion of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XingChun; Liu, Huan; Chen, Jiaqi; Li, Yan; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 is secreted by intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. It regulates the secretion and sensitivity of insulin while suppressing glucagon secretion and decreasing postprandial glucose levels. It also improves beta-cell proliferation and prevents beta-cell apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents. Additionally, glucagon-like peptide-1 delays gastric emptying and suppresses appetite. The impaired secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 has negative influence on diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance related diseases. Thus, glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) are now well accepted in the management of type 2 diabetes. The levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 are influenced by multiple factors including a variety of nutrients. The component of a meal acts as potent stimulants of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. The levels of its secretion change with the intake of different nutrients. Some drugs also have influence on GLP-1 secretion. Bariatric surgery may improve metabolism through the action on GLP-1 levels. In recent years, there has been a great interest in developing effective methods to regulate glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. This review summarizes the literature on glucagon-like peptide-1 and related factors affecting its levels. PMID:26366173

  17. Insulinotropic toxins as molecular probes for analysis of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor-mediated signal transduction in pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Holz, George G.; Leech, Colin A.; Habener, Joel F.

    2010-01-01

    Cholera toxin, pertussis toxin, mastoparan, maitotoxin, and α-latrotoxin are complex protein or polyether-based toxins of bacterial, insect, or phytoplankton origin that act with high potency at the endocrine pancreas to stimulate secretion of insulin from β-cells located in the islets of Langerhans. The remarkable insulinotropic properties of these toxins have attracted considerable attention by virtue of their use as selective molecular probes for analyses of β-cell stimulus-secretion coupling. Targets of the toxins include heptahelical cell surface receptors, GTP-binding proteins, ion channels, Ca2+ stores, and the exocytotic secretory apparatus. Here we review the value of insulinotropic toxins from the perspective of their established use in the study of signal transduction pathways activated by the blood glucose-lowering hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Our analysis of one insulinotropic toxin (α-latrotoxin) leads us to conclude that there exists a process of molecular mimicry whereby the ‘lock and key’analogy inherent to hormone-receptor interactions is reproduced by a toxin related in structure to GLP-1. PMID:11086221

  18. Onset of cell-specific gene expression in the developing mouse pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Gittes, G K; Rutter, W J

    1992-01-01

    A central question in developmental biology has been the initiation of cell-specific gene expression and its temporal relationship to morphogenesis. We have coupled embryo microdissection with the exquisite sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction to define the onset of cell-specific gene expression during pancreatic organogenesis. Using the precise assignment of gestational age by the number of somites in each embryo, we determined the onset of transcription of major genes of the endocrine and exocrine pancreas during mouse development to within 2-3 hr. Somatostatin mRNA was detected at the 10-somite stage throughout the foregut, consistent with the presence of somatostatin-producing cells throughout the adult gut. Mature mRNA for insulin and glucagon first appears surprisingly early, at the 20-somite stage in the wall of the embryonic foregut and is restricted to only the area of the duodenum from which the pancreas will arise 10-12 hr later. In contrast, exocrine gene transcription begins 24 hr after formation of the pancreatic diverticulum. Thus cell-specific gene expression in the endocrine pancreas begins in a "pre-morphogenetic phase." This early expression of insulin and glucagon could reflect the initiation of an endocrine cell lineage. Images PMID:1371010

  19. The mechanism underlying the central glucagon-induced hyperglycemia and anorexia in chicks.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi; Uemura, Taku; Yanagi, Takashi; Saito, Noboru; Kurose, Yohei; Sugahara, Kunio; Katoh, Kazuo; Hasegawa, Shin

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the mechanism underlying central glucagon-induced hyperglycemia and anorexia in chicks. Male 8-day-old chicks (Gallus gallus) were used in all experiments. Intracerebroventricular administration of glucagon in chicks induced hyperglycemia and anorexia from 30 min after administration. However, the plasma insulin level did not increase until 90 min after glucagon administration, suggesting that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells may be suppressed by central glucagon. The plasma corticosterone concentration significantly increased from 30 min to 120 min after administration, suggesting that central glucagon activates the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis in chicks. However, central administration of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), which activates the HPA axis in chicken hypothalamus, significantly reduced not only food intake but also plasma glucose concentration, suggesting that CRF and the activation of the HPA axis are related to the glucagon-induced anorexia but not hyperglycemia in chicks. Phentolamine, an α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated the glucagon-induced hyperglycemia, suggesting that glucagon induced hyperglycemia at least partly via α-adrenergic neural pathway. Co-administration of phentolamine and α-helical CRF, a CRF receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated glucagon-induced hyperglycemia and anorexia. It is therefore likely that central administration of glucagon suppresses food intake at least partly via CRF-induced anorexigenic pathway in chicks.

  20. Effects of cysteamine and antibody to somatostatin on islet cell function in vitro. Evidence that intracellular somatostatin deficiency augments insulin and glucagon secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Y.C.; Pierzchala, I.; Amherdt, M.; Orci, L.

    1985-04-01

    In this study the authors have characterized the effects of cysteamine (CHS) on the cellular content and release of immunoreactive somatostatin (S-14 LI), insulin (IRI), and glucagon (IRG) from monolayer cultures of neonatal rat islets. Incubation of cultures with 0.1-10 mM CHS for 1 h led to an apparent, dose-dependent reduction of cellular S-14 LI that was 50% of control at 0.3 mM, 87% at 1 mM, and 95% at 10 mM. IRI content was unaffected by CHS up to 1 mM, but at 10 mM 90% loss of IRI occurred. All concentrations were without effect on IRG content. The loss of S-14 LI and IRI was completely reversible with time, but with different recovery rates for the two hormones. Cultures rendered S-14 LI deficient with both CHS and anti-S-14 LI exhibited threefold and 2.3-fold potentiation of IRG and IRI secretions, respectively, greater than that expected from the separate effects of the two agents. Increasing medium glucose from 2.8 mM to 16.7 mM stimulated IRI release by 86% and suppressed IRG by 53%. These results suggest that CHS induces an apparent loss of islet S-14 LI, and at high doses, of IRI as well, but has no effect on A cells. Complete islet S-14 LI deficiency augments IRI and IRG secretion over a wide range of glucose concentrations, suggesting a physiological role of D cells on B cell and A cell regulation.

  1. Design, synthesis and crystallization of a novel glucagon analog as a therapeutic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pengyun; Rogers, Tanya; Smiley, David; DiMarchi, Richard D.; Zhang, Faming

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis and crystallization of glucagon-Cex are reported. Glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are drugs or drug candidates for the treatment of metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. The native hormones have pharmacological deficiencies such as short half-life and poor solubility. A novel glucagon receptor agonist named glucagon-Cex has been designed, synthesized and crystallized. This peptide was highly soluble under physiological conditions and crystallized readily. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.2 Å resolution and the diffraction was consistent with space group P23, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 48.20 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. The crystals were suitable for a full structural determination to reveal the conformational differences between glucagon-Cex and the native hormone.

  2. Biochemical Stabilization of Glucagon at Alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Melanie A.; Castle, Jessica R.; El Youssef, Joseph; Bakhtiani, Parkash A.; Bergstrom, Colin P.; Carroll, Julie M.; Breen, Matthew E.; Leonard, Gerald L.; David, Larry L.; Roberts, Charles T.; Ward, W. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: For patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, a bihormonal artificial endocrine pancreas system utilizing glucagon and insulin has been found to stabilize glycemic control. However, commercially available formulations of glucagon cannot currently be used in such systems because of physical instability characterized by aggregation and chemical degradation. Storing glucagon at pH 10 blocks protein aggregation but results in chemical degradation. Reductions in pH minimize chemical degradation, but even small reductions increase protein aggregation. We hypothesized that common pharmaceutical excipients accompanied by a new excipient would inhibit glucagon aggregation at an alkaline pH. Methods and Results: As measured by tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence shift and optical density at 630 nm, protein aggregation was indeed minimized when glucagon was formulated with curcumin and albumin. This formulation also reduced chemical degradation, measured by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Biological activity was retained after aging for 7 days in an in vitro cell-based bioassay and also in Yorkshire swine. Conclusions: Based on these findings, a formulation of glucagon stabilized with curcumin, polysorbate-80, l-methionine, and albumin at alkaline pH in glycine buffer may be suitable for extended use in a portable pump in the setting of a bihormonal artificial endocrine pancreas. PMID:24968220

  3. Mechanisms underlying glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M

    2016-04-01

    The incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and glucagon-like peptide-1, are secreted from intestinal K- and L cells, respectively, with the former being most abundant in the proximal small intestine, whereas the latter increase in number towards the distal gut. Although an overlap between K- and L cells can be observed immunohistochemically or in murine models expressing fluorescent markers under the control of the two hormone promoters, the majority (>80%) of labeled cells seems to produce only one of these hormones. Transcriptomic analysis showed a close relationship between small intestinal K- and L cells, and glucose sensing mechanisms appear similar in both cell types with a predominant role of electrogenic glucose uptake through sodium-coupled glucose transporter 1. Similarly, both cell types produce the long-chain fatty acid sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, FFAR1 (GPR40) and FFAR4 (GPR120), but differ in the expression/functionality of other lipid sensing receptors. GPR119 and FFAR2/3, for example, have clearly documented roles in glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion, whereas agonists for the endocannabinoid receptor type 1 have been found to show largely selective inhibition of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide secretion. In conclusion, although K- and L cell populations overlap and share key molecular nutrient-sensing mechanisms, subtle differences between the responsiveness of the different cell types might be exploited to differentially modulate glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide or glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion.

  4. The role of glucagon-like peptide-2 on apoptosis, cell proliferation, and oxidant-antioxidant system at a mouse model of intestinal injury induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha/actinomycin D.

    PubMed

    Arda-Pirincci, Pelin; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2011-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a multifunctional cytokine, which has the ability to produce cytotoxicity via induction of cell death and cell cycle arrest. Blocking the synthesis of protective proteins through a transcriptional inhibitor such as actinomycin D (Act D) sensitizes many cell types to TNF-α toxicity. Teduglutide, h[Gly(2)]GLP-2, is a protease-resistant synthetic analog of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) which is an intestinotrophic peptide. In this study, we evaluated this potential of GLP-2 on apoptosis, cell proliferation, and oxidant-antioxidant system on a mouse model of intestinal injury induced by TNF-α/Act D. The intestinal injury was induced by intraperitoneal administration of 15 μg/kg TNF-α and 800 μg/kg Act D per mouse. Animals were injected subcutaneously 200 μg/kg h[Gly(2)]GLP-2 every 12 h for 10 consecutive days prior to the administration of TNF-α and Act D. The model of intestinal injury induced by TNF-α/Act D, which is the new animal model for the intestinal disorders, was characterized by the degeneration of intestinal mucosa, an increase in apoptotic index, expression of active caspase-3, lipid peroxidation and glutathione (GSH) levels, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities; a decrease in cell proliferation and catalase (CAT) activity. h[Gly(2)]GLP-2 pretreatment prevented the TNF-α/Act D-induced oxidative injury by a significant reduction in the intestinal injury, apoptotic index, expression of active caspase-3, lipid peroxidation and GSH levels, GPx and SOD activities; a markedly increase in cell proliferation, and CAT activity. These results demonstrate that GLP-2 has a protective, antiapoptotic, proliferative, and antioxidant effects against to TNF-α/Act D-induced intestinal injury. It is suggested that GLP-2 may potentially be useful as a therapeutic agent in TNF-α-mediated intestinal disorders.

  5. Glucagon in the Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of glucagon, in conjunction with insulin, in a dual chamber pump (artificial pancreas, AP) is a working goal for multiple companies and researchers. However, capital investment to create, operate, and maintain facilities with sufficient scale to produce enough glucagon to treat millions of patients, at a level of profit that makes it feasible, will be substantial. It can be assumed that the marketplace will expect the daily cost of glucagon (to the consumer) to be similar to the daily cost of insulin. After one subtracts wholesaler and pharmacy markup, there may be very few dollars remaining for the drug company to cover profit, capital expenditures, marketing, burden, and other costs. Without the potential for adequate margins, manufacturers may not be willing to take the risk. Assuming that the projections discussed in this article are in the right ballpark, advance planning for the supply for glucagon needs to start today and not wait for the AP to come to market. PMID:25139825

  6. Desensitization of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors in insulin-secreting beta TC3 cells: role of PKA-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Gromada, J.; Dissing, S.; Rorsman, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. The cellular processes involved in the desensitization of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors were investigated by measurements of the glucagon-like peptide 1(7-36)amide (GLP-1(7-36)amide)-induced increases in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in insulin-secreting beta TC3 cells. 2. In the presence of 11.2 mM glucose, stimulation with GLP-1(7-36)amide led to a small membrane depolarization (< 10 mV), induction of electrical activity and a rapid increase in [Ca2+]i. The increase in [Ca2+]i was not observed in the presence of the L-type Ca(2+)-channel antagonist nifedipine. However, nifedipine was ineffective when applied after addition of GLP-1(7-36)amide. 3. The increase in [Ca2+]i evoked by GLP-1-(7-36)amide was transient and even in the continued presence of the agonist, [Ca2+]i returned to the basal value within 4-5 min. The latter process was slowed, but not prevented, by inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) by staurosporine and Ro31-8220. 4. Short pretreatment of the cells with the phorbol ester, 4-beta-phorbol-12-beta-myristate-13-alpha-acetate (PMA), an activator of PKC, reduced the GLP-1(7-36)amide-evoked increase in [Ca2+]i by 75%. This effect of PMA was fully reversed by staurosporine and Ro31-8220. 5. The ability of GLP-1(7-36)amide to increase [Ca2+]i disappeared upon pre-exposure of the cells to the hormone (desensitization). This process was maximal within 5 min of exposure to the agonist. Following removal of the agonist from the medium, the ability to respond to subsequent stimulation by GLP-1(7-36)amide recovered gradually with time; half and complete recovery requiring > 20 min and 60 min, respectively. The desensitizing action of GLP-1(7-36)amide persisted in the presence of either staurosporine or forskolin and did not require an elevation of [Ca2+]i. 6. Our data suggest that the GLP-1(7-36)amide-evoked increase in [Ca2+]i is initiated by Ca(2+)-influx though voltage-dependent and nifedipine-sensitive L-type Ca2+ channels but

  7. Minireview: Glucagon in the Pathogenesis of Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic islet α-cell glucagon secretion is critically dependent on pancreatic islet β-cell insulin secretion. Normally, a decrease in the plasma glucose concentration causes a decrease in β-cell insulin secretion that signals an increase in α-cell glucagon secretion during hypoglycemia. In contrast, an increase in the plasma glucose concentration, among other stimuli, causes an increase in β-cell insulin secretion that signals a decrease, or at least no change, in α-cell glucagon secretion after a meal. In absolute endogenous insulin deficiency (i.e. in type 1 diabetes and in advanced type 2 diabetes), however, β-cell failure results in no decrease in β-cell insulin secretion and thus no increase in α-cell glucagon secretion during hypoglycemia and no increase in β-cell insulin secretion and thus an increase in α-cell glucagon secretion after a meal. In type 1 diabetes and advanced type 2 diabetes, the absence of an increment in glucagon secretion, in the setting of an absent decrement in insulin secretion and an attenuated increment in sympathoadrenal activity, in response to falling plasma glucose concentrations plays a key role in the pathogenesis of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. In addition, there is increasing evidence that, in the aggregate, suggests that relative hyperglucagonemia, in the setting of deficient insulin secretion, plays a role in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia in diabetes. If so, abnormal glucagon secretion is involved in the pathogenesis of both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in diabetes. PMID:22166985

  8. Effects of the glucagon-like polypeptide-1 analogue (Val8)GLP-1 on learning, progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the C57B/16 mouse brain.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Stephen F J; Hunter, Kerry; Hölscher, Christian

    2012-09-14

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has been identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Here, we tested the properties of the glucagon-like polypetide-1 (GLP-1) analogue (Val8)GLP-1, a drug originally developed as a treatment for T2DM at a range of doses (2.5 nmol; 25 nmol; 100 nmol; or 250 nmol/kg bw ip.) in an acute memory study in wild type C57B/l6 mice. We also tested (Val8)GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39) in a chronic study (3 weeks at 25 nmol/kg bw ip. once-daily). We found that (Val8)GLP-1 crossed the blood brain barrier readily and that peripheral injection increased levels in the brain 30 min post-injection ip. but not 2h post-injection in rats. In the acute study, the low dose of 2.5 nmol/kg ip. enhanced motor activity in the open field task, while total distance travelled, exploratory behaviour and anxiety was not affected at any dose. Learning an object recognition task was not affected either. In the chronic study, no effect was observed in the open field assessment. The antagonist exendin (9-39) impaired object recognition learning and spatial learning in a water maze task, demonstrating the importance of GLP-1 signalling in memory formation. Locomotor activity was also affected in some cases. Blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity was not affected in chronically treated mice. Neuronal stem cells and neurogenesis was enhanced by (Val8)GLP-1 in the dentate gyrus of wild type mice. The results demonstrate that (Val8)GLP-1 is safe in a range of doses, crosses the BBB and has potentially beneficial effects in the CNS by enhancing neurogenesis.

  9. In vitro reprogramming of pancreatic alpha cells towards a beta cell phenotype following ectopic HNF4α expression.

    PubMed

    Sangan, Caroline B; Jover, Ramiro; Heimberg, Harry; Tosh, David

    2015-01-05

    There is currently a shortage of organ donors available for pancreatic beta cell transplantation into diabetic patients. An alternative source of beta cells is pre-existing pancreatic cells. While we know that beta cells can arise directly from alpha cells during pancreatic regeneration we do not understand the molecular basis for the switch in phenotype. The aim of the present study was to investigate if hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α), a transcription factor essential for a normal beta cell phenotype, could induce the reprogramming of alpha cells towards potential beta cells. We utilised an in vitro model of pancreatic alpha cells, the murine αTC1-9 cell line. We initially characterised the αTC1-9 cell line before and following adenovirus-mediated ectopic expression of HNF4α. We analysed the phenotype at transcript and protein level and assessed its glucose-responsiveness. Ectopic HNF4α expression in the αTC1-9 cell line induced a change in morphology (1.7-fold increase in size), suppressed glucagon expression, induced key beta cell-specific markers (insulin, C-peptide, glucokinase, GLUT2 and Pax4) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and enabled the cells to secrete insulin in a glucose-regulated manner. In conclusion, HNF4α reprograms alpha cells to beta-like cells.

  10. Gliclazide directly inhibits arginine-induced glucagon release.

    PubMed

    Cejvan, Kenan; Coy, David H; Holst, Jens Juul; Cerasi, Erol; Efendic, Suad

    2002-12-01

    Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect of gliclazide or was secondary to the paracrine effect of released somatostatin. To eliminate the paracrine effects of somatostatin, we first perfused isolated rat pancreata with a medium supplemented with 23% of the standard calcium content. Second, we perifused isolated rat islets with a novel and highly specific antagonist of type 2 somatostatin receptor, DC-41-33 (2 micro mol/l), which fully antagonizes the suppressive somatostatin effect on rat A cells. Gliclazide (30 micro mol/l) inhibited glucagon release by 54% in the perfusion experiments, whereas the somatostatin response was nearly abolished. In islet perifusions with DC-41-33, arginine-induced glucagon release was inhibited by 66%. We therefore concluded that gliclazide inhibits glucagon release by a direct action on the pancreatic A cell.

  11. Glucagon Release Induced by Pancreatic Nerve Stimulation in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Marliss, Errol B.; Girardier, Lucien; Seydoux, Josiane; Wollheim, Claes B.; Kanazawa, Yasunori; Orci, Lelio; Renold, Albert E.; Porte, Daniel

    1973-01-01

    A direct neural role in the regulation of immunoreactive glucagon (IRG) secretion has been investigated during stimulation of mixed autonomic nerves to the pancreas in anesthetized dogs. The responses were evaluated by measurement of blood flow and hormone concentration in the venous effluent from the stimulated region of pancreas. Electrical stimulation of the distal end of the discrete bundles of nerve fibers isolated along the superior pancreaticoduodenal artery was invariably followed by an increase in IRG output. With 10-min periods of nerve stimulation, the integrated response showed that the higher the control glucagon output, the greater was the increment. Atropinization did not influence the response to stimulation. That the preparation behaved in physiologic fashion was confirmed by a fall in IRG output, and a rise in immunoreactive insulin (IRI) output, during hyperglycemia induced by intravenous glucose (0.1 g/kg). The kinetics of this glucose effect on IRG showed characteristics opposite to those of nerve stimulation: the lower the control output, the less the decrement. Furthermore, during the control steady state, blood glucose concentration was tightly correlated with the IRI/IRG molar output ratio, the function relating the two parameters being markedly nonlinear. Injection or primed infusion of glucose diminished the IRG response to simultaneous nerve stimulation. Measurement of IRG was inferred to reflect response of pancreatic glucagon secretion on the basis of the site of sample collection (the superior pancreaticoduodenal vein), the absence of changes in arterial IRG, and similar responses being obtained using an antibody specific for pancreatic glucagon. These studies support a role for the autonomic nervous system in the control of glucagon secretion: direct nerve stimulation induces glucagon release. Such sympathetic activation may be interpreted as capable of shifting the sensitivity of the A cell to glucose in the direction of higher

  12. REVIEW: Role of cyclic AMP signaling in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cells express the proglucagon gene (gcg) and thereby produce the peptide hormone glucagon, which stimulates hepatic glucose production and thereby increases blood glucose levels. The same gcg gene is also expressed in the intestinal endocrine L cells and certain neural cells in the brain. In the gut, gcg expression leads to the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). This incretin hormone stimulates insulin secretion when blood glucose level is high. In addition, GLP-1 stimulates pancreatic cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. Today, a long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist has been developed as a drug in treating diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. Extensive investigations have shown that the expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP signaling, and the crosstalk between PKA and Wnt signaling pathway, are also involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg expression and GLP-1 production. Furthermore, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic cells are mainly mediated by cAMP-PKA, cAMP-Epac and Wnt signaling pathways as well.

  13. Effects of cysteamine and antibody to somatostatin on islet cell function in vitro. Evidence that intracellular somatostatin deficiency augments insulin and glucagon secretion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Pierzchala, I; Amherdt, M; Orci, L

    1985-04-01

    In this study we have characterized the effects of cysteamine (CHS) on the cellular content and release of immunoreactive somatostatin (S-14 LI), insulin (IRI), and glucagon (IRG) from monolayer cultures of neonatal rat islets. Incubation of cultures with 0.1-10 mM CHS for 1 h led to an apparent, dose-dependent reduction of cellular S-14 LI that was 50% of control at 0.3 mM, 87% at 1 mM, and 95% at 10 mM. IRI content was unaffected by CHS up to 1 mM, but at 10 mM 90% loss of IRI occurred. All concentrations were without effect on IRG content. The loss of S-14 LI and IRI was completely reversible with time, but with different recovery rates for the two hormones (48 h for S-14 LI, and 72 h for IRI). Released S-14 LI rose progressively with increasing doses of CHS from 21 +/- 2.5 pg/ml per hour to 41 +/- 1.4 pg/ml per hour at CHS concentrations of 5 mM and 10 mM. IRI and IRG secretion were both also significantly enhanced (by 55% and 88%, respectively), despite the elevated medium S-14 LI. Since CHS reduced cellular S-14 LI but augmented medium S-14 LI, the relative effects of CHS (1 mM) and immunoneutralization with antibody to S-14 LI on IRI and IRG secretion were tested. Anti S-14 LI alone stimulated basal IRG (67%) but not IRI. Cultures rendered S-14 LI deficient with both CHS and anti-S-14 LI exhibited threefold and 2.3-fold potentiation of IRG and IRI secretions, respectively, greater than that expected from the separate effects of the two agents. Increasing medium glucose from 2.8 mM to 16.7 mM stimulated IRI release by 86% and suppressed IRG by 53%. CHS (1 mM) and anti-S-14 LI further augmented stimulated IRI release, by 30%; although 16.7 mM glucose suppression of IRG was still maintained under these conditions, the quantitative IRG response was significantly greater. These results suggest that CHS induces an apparent loss of islet S-14 LI, and at high doses, of IRI as well, but has no effect on A cells. Complete islet S-14 LI deficiency augments IRI and IRG

  14. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, reduces intimal thickening after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Hiromasa; Nomiyama, Takashi; Mita, Tomoya; Yasunari, Eisuke; Azuma, Kosuke; Komiya, Koji; Arakawa, Masayuki; Jin, Wen Long; Kanazawa, Akio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Hirose, Takahisa; Watada, Hirotaka

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Exendin-4 reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury in a mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 dose not alter metabolic parameters in non-diabetic, non-obese mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 reduces PDGF-induced cell proliferation in cultured SMCs. {yields} Exendin-4 may reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury at least in part through its direct action on SMCs. -- Abstract: Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a hormone secreted by L cells of the small intestine and stimulates glucose-dependent insulin response. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists such as exendin-4 are currently used in type 2 diabetes, and considered to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. To further elucidate the effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular diseases, we investigated the effects of exendin-4 on intimal thickening after endothelial injury. Under continuous infusion of exendin-4 at 24 nmol/kg/day, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to endothelial denudation injury of the femoral artery. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 reduced neointimal formation at 4 weeks after arterial injury without altering body weight or various metabolic parameters. In addition, in vitro studies of isolated murine, rat and human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells showed the expression of GLP-1 receptor. The addition of 10 nM exendin-4 to cultured smooth muscle cells significantly reduced their proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor. Our results suggested that exendin-4 reduced intimal thickening after vascular injury at least in part by the suppression of platelet-derived growth factor-induced smooth muscle cells proliferation.

  15. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist prevents mTBI-induced changes in hippocampus gene expression and memory deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tweedie, D.; Rachmany, L.; Rubovitch, V.; Lehrmann, E.; Zhang, Y.; Becker, K.G.; Perez, E.; Miller, J.; Hoffer, B.J.; Greig, N.H.; Pick, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a global problem reaching near epidemic numbers that manifests clinically with cognitive problems that decades later may result in dementias like Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Presently, little can be done to prevent ensuing neurological dysfunctions by pharmacological means. Recently, it has become apparent that several CNS diseases share common terminal features of neuronal cell death. The effects of exendin-4 (Ex-4), a neuroprotective agent delivered via a subcutaneous micro-osmotic pump, were examined in the setting of mild TBI (mTBI). Utilizing a model of mTBI, where cognitive disturbances occur over time, animals were subjected to four treatments: sham; Ex-4; mTBI and Ex-4/mTBI. mTBI mice displayed deficits in novel object recognition, while Ex-4/mTBI mice performed similar to sham. Hippocampal gene expression, assessed by gene array methods, showed significant differences with little overlap in co-regulated genes between groups. Importantly, changes in gene expression induced by mTBI, including genes associated with AD were largely prevented by Ex-4. These data suggest a strong beneficial action of Ex-4 in managing secondary events induced by a traumatic brain injury. PMID:23059457

  16. Exendin-4 promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation via inhibiting the expression of Wnt5a.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinger; Liang, Weiwei; Guan, Hongyu; Liu, Juan; Liu, Liehua; Li, Hai; He, Xiaoying; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Jie; Cao, Xiaopei; Li, Yanbing

    2017-02-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, is currently regarded as an effective therapeutic strategy for type-2 diabetes. Previous studies indicated that exendin-4 promoted β cell proliferation. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Recently it was reported that exendin-4 promoted pancreatic β cell proliferation by regulating the expression level of Wnt4. The present study was designed to investigate whether other Wnt isoforms take part in accommodation of β-cell proliferation. We found that exendin-4 promotes the proliferation and suppresses the expression of Wnt5a in INS-1 cell line and C57Bl/6 mouse pancreatic β-cells. Further mechanistic study demonstrated that exendin-4 promoted INS-1 cell proliferation partly through down-regulating the expression of Wnt5a. Furthermore, Wnt5a could induce the activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in INS-1 cells, thereby decreasing the cellular stable β-catenin and its nuclear translocation, and finally reduce the expression of cyclin D1. In addition, we also found that both of the receptors (Frz-2 and Ror-2) mediated the effect of Wnt5a on β cell line INS-1 proliferation. Taken together, this study suggests that Wnt5a plays a critical role in exendin-4-induced β-cell proliferation, indicating that Wnt5a might be a novel regulator in counterbalance of β cell mass.

  17. Adrenaline Stimulates Glucagon Secretion in Pancreatic A-Cells by Increasing the Ca2+ Current and the Number of Granules Close to the L-Type Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Gromada, Jesper; Bokvist, Krister; Ding, Wei-Guang; Barg, Sebastian; Buschard, Karsten; Renström, Erik; Rorsman, Patrik

    1997-01-01

    We have monitored electrical activity, voltage-gated Ca2+ currents, and exocytosis in single rat glucagon-secreting pancreatic A-cells. The A-cells were electrically excitable and generated spontaneous Na+- and Ca2+-dependent action potentials. Under basal conditions, exocytosis was tightly linked to Ca2+ influx through ω-conotoxin-GVIA–sensitive (N-type) Ca2+ channels. Stimulation of the A-cells with adrenaline (via β-adrenergic receptors) or forskolin produced a greater than fourfold PKA-dependent potentiation of depolarization-evoked exocytosis. This enhancement of exocytosis was due to a 50% enhancement of Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels, an effect that accounted for <30% of the total stimulatory action. The remaining 70% of the stimulation was attributable to an acceleration of granule mobilization resulting in a fivefold increase in the number of readily releasable granules near the L-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:9276750

  18. A Novel, Stable, Aqueous Glucagon Formulation Using Ferulic Acid as an Excipient

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiani, Parkash A.; Caputo, Nicholas; Castle, Jessica R.; Carroll, Julie M.; David, Larry L.; Roberts, Charles T.; Ward, W. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Commercial glucagon is unstable due to aggregation and degradation. In closed-loop studies, it must be reconstituted frequently. For use in a portable pump for 3 days, a more stable preparation is required. At alkaline pH, curcumin inhibited glucagon aggregation. However, curcumin is not sufficiently stable for long-term use. Here, we evaluated ferulic acid, a stable breakdown product of curcumin, for its ability to stabilize glucagon. Methods: Ferulic acid-formulated glucagon (FAFG), composed of ferulic acid, glucagon, L-methionine, polysorbate-80, and human serum albumin in glycine buffer at pH 9, was aged for 7 days at 37°C. Glucagon aggregation was assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and degradation by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A cell-based protein kinase A (PKA) assay was used to assess in vitro bioactivity. Pharmacodynamics (PD) of unaged FAFG, 7-day aged FAFG, and unaged synthetic glucagon was determined in octreotide-treated swine. Results: No fibrils were observed in TEM images of fresh or aged FAFG. Aged FAFG was 94% intact based on HPLC analysis and there was no loss of bioactivity. In the PD swine analysis, the rise over baseline of glucose with unaged FAFG, aged FAFG, and synthetic native glucagon (unmodified human sequence) was similar. Conclusions: After 7 days of aging at 37°C, an alkaline ferulic acid formulation of glucagon exhibited significantly less aggregation and degradation than that seen with native glucagon and was bioactive in vitro and in vivo. Thus, this formulation may be stable for 3-7 days in a portable pump for bihormonal closed-loop treatment of T1D. PMID:25253164

  19. Glucagon receptors: effect of exercise and fasting.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Carole

    2005-06-01

    One paradox of hormonal regulation during exercise is the maintenance of glucose homeostasis after endurance training despite a lower increase in plasma glucagon. One explanation could be that liver sensitivity to glucagon is increased by endurance training. Glucagon exerts its effect through a 62 KDa glycoprotein receptor, member of the G protein-coupled receptor. To determine whether changes with exercise in glucagon sensitivity occurred at the level of the glucagon receptor (GR), binding characteristics of hepatic glucagon receptors were ascertained in rat purified plasma membranes. Saturation kinetics indicated no difference in the dissociation constant or affinity of glucagon receptor, but a significantly higher glucagon receptor binding density in liver in endurance trained compared to untrained animals. Along with endurance training, it appears that fasting also changes GR binding characteristics. In animals fasting 24 hrs, a significant increase in glucagon receptor density was also reported. Although the exact mechanism remains unknown, there is no doubt that the liver can adapt to physiological stress through modulation of GR binding characteristics to enhance the hepatic glucose production responsiveness to glucagon.

  20. Stabilized Glucagon Formulation for Bihormonal Pump Use

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Solomon S; Li, Ming; Hauser, Robert; Pohl, Roderike

    2010-01-01

    Background A promising approach to treat diabetes is the development of an automated bihormonal pump administering glucagon and insulin. A physically and chemically stable glucagon formulation does not currently exist. Our goal is to develop a glucagon formulation that is stable as a clear ungelled solution, free of fibrils at a pH of 7 for at least 7 days at 37 °C. Methods Experimental glucagon formulations were studied for stability at 25 and 37 °C. Chemical degradation was quantified by reverse phase ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Physical changes were studied using light obscuration and visual observations. Results Glucagon content of Biodel glucagon and Lilly glucagon at pH 2 and pH 4, as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography at 25 °C, was 100% at 7 days compared to 87% and <7%, respectively. Light obscuration measurements indicated Lilly glucagon at pH 4 formed an opaque gel, while Biodel glucagon formulation remained a clear solution beyond 50 days at 37 °C. Visual observations confirmed these results. Conclusions Biodel glucagon is a stabilized formulation at physiological pH and remains chemically and physically stable beyond 7 days at 37 °C, suggesting its utility for use in a bihormonal pump. PMID:21129327

  1. GLP1- and GIP-producing cells rarely overlap and differ by bombesin receptor-2 expression and responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Berit; Pais, Ramona; Engelstoft, Maja S; Milev, Nikolay B; Richards, Paul; Christiansen, Charlotte B; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Jensen, Signe M; Habib, Abdella M; Gribble, Fiona M; Schwartz, Thue W; Reimann, Frank; Holst, Jens J

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are secreted from intestinal endocrine cells, the so-called L- and K-cells. The cells are derived from a common precursor and are highly related, and co-expression of the two hormones in so-called L/K-cells has been reported. To investigate the relationship between the GLP1- and GIP-producing cells more closely, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing a fluorescent marker in GIP-positive cells. In combination with a mouse strain with fluorescent GLP1 cells, we were able to estimate the overlap between the two cell types. Furthermore, we used primary cultured intestinal cells and isolated perfused mouse intestine to measure the secretion of GIP and GLP1 in response to different stimuli. Overlapping GLP1 and GIP cells were rare (∼5%). KCl, glucose and forskolin+IBMX increased the secretion of both GLP1 and GIP, whereas bombesin/neuromedin C only stimulated GLP1 secretion. Expression analysis showed high expression of the bombesin 2 receptor in GLP1 positive cells, but no expression in GIP-positive cells. These data indicate both expressional and functional differences between the GLP1-producing 'L-cell' and the GIP-producing 'K-cell'.

  2. Role of GLP-1 induced glucagon suppression in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hare, Kristine Juul

    2010-09-01

    This project consisted of two parts: a biochemical part and clinical studies. The overall aim was to elucidate the defective regulation of glucagon secretion in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The aim in the biochemical part was to develop a glucagon ELISA by using C- and N-terminal antibodies generated in the laboratory. Much effort was put into this attempt; however, we were unsuccessful and had to use an alternative method in our attempt to characterize the paradoxical diabetic glucagon response further. By using Sep-Pac and HPLC separation methods, plasma from patients with T2DM known to have a defective suppression of glucagon was analyzed using three antibodies and RIA. In this way the hyperglucagonaemia was found to consist mainly of authentic glucagon, rather than abnormally processed forms. The first clinical study included ten healthy controls matched to ten patients with T2DM. The aim was to investigate if GLP-1 induced glucagon inhibition was dose dependent and if suppression was equally potent in healthy controls and T2DM patients. Further, we investigated if the potency of the inhibition depended on the prevailing plasma glucose (PG) level. All participants were investigated with increasing doses of GLP-1 administered as iv-infusions and saline (control) during a glycaemic clamp at fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels. Patients were investigated on a third occasion with GLP-1 infusions after an over-night normalisation of PG using adjustable insulin infusions. From these experiments we were able to conclude that GLP-1-induced glucagon inhibition is dose-dependent, but surprisingly GLP-1 suppressed the alpha cell equally potently in patients and controls - and the suppression was independent of PG level. Therefore we concluded that the paradoxical glucagon response to orally ingested glucose is not caused by decreased potency of GLP-1 with respect to glucagon suppression. It may be due to the decreased secretion of this hormone reported in earlier studies. My

  3. Regulation of starvation-induced hyperactivity by insulin and glucagon signaling in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Huang, Rui; Ye, Jie; Zhang, Vivian; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Guo; Jia, Junling; Wang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Starvation induces sustained increase in locomotion, which facilitates food localization and acquisition and hence composes an important aspect of food-seeking behavior. We investigated how nutritional states modulated starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila. The receptor of the adipokinetic hormone (AKHR), the insect analog of glucagon, was required for starvation-induced hyperactivity. AKHR was expressed in a small group of octopaminergic neurons in the brain. Silencing AKHR+ neurons and blocking octopamine signaling in these neurons eliminated starvation-induced hyperactivity, whereas activation of these neurons accelerated the onset of hyperactivity upon starvation. Neither AKHR nor AKHR+ neurons were involved in increased food consumption upon starvation, suggesting that starvation-induced hyperactivity and food consumption are independently regulated. Single cell analysis of AKHR+ neurons identified the co-expression of Drosophila insulin-like receptor (dInR), which imposed suppressive effect on starvation-induced hyperactivity. Therefore, insulin and glucagon signaling exert opposite effects on starvation-induced hyperactivity via a common neural target in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15693.001 PMID:27612383

  4. Melatonin and Pancreatic Islets: Interrelationships between Melatonin, Insulin and Glucagon

    PubMed Central

    Peschke, Elmar; Bähr, Ina; Mühlbauer, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin exerts its influence in the periphery through activation of two specific trans-membrane receptors: MT1 and MT2. Both isoforms are expressed in the islet of Langerhans and are involved in the modulation of insulin secretion from β-cells and in glucagon secretion from α-cells. De-synchrony of receptor signaling may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. This notion has recently been supported by genome-wide association studies identifying particularly the MT2 as a risk factor for this rapidly spreading metabolic disturbance. Since melatonin is secreted in a clearly diurnal fashion, it is safe to assume that it also has a diurnal impact on the blood-glucose-regulating function of the islet. This factor has hitherto been underestimated; the disruption of diurnal signaling within the islet may be one of the most important mechanisms leading to metabolic disturbances. The study of melatonin–insulin interactions in diabetic rat models has revealed an inverse relationship: an increase in melatonin levels leads to a down-regulation of insulin secretion and vice versa. Elucidation of the possible inverse interrelationship in man may open new avenues in the therapy of diabetes. PMID:23535335

  5. Melatonin and pancreatic islets: interrelationships between melatonin, insulin and glucagon.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Elmar; Bähr, Ina; Mühlbauer, Eckhard

    2013-03-27

    The pineal hormone melatonin exerts its influence in the periphery through activation of two specific trans-membrane receptors: MT1 and MT2. Both isoforms are expressed in the islet of Langerhans and are involved in the modulation of insulin secretion from β-cells and in glucagon secretion from α-cells. De-synchrony of receptor signaling may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. This notion has recently been supported by genome-wide association studies identifying particularly the MT2 as a risk factor for this rapidly spreading metabolic disturbance. Since melatonin is secreted in a clearly diurnal fashion, it is safe to assume that it also has a diurnal impact on the blood-glucose-regulating function of the islet. This factor has hitherto been underestimated; the disruption of diurnal signaling within the islet may be one of the most important mechanisms leading to metabolic disturbances. The study of melatonin-insulin interactions in diabetic rat models has revealed an inverse relationship: an increase in melatonin levels leads to a down-regulation of insulin secretion and vice versa. Elucidation of the possible inverse interrelationship in man may open new avenues in the therapy of diabetes.

  6. Incretin physiology beyond glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide: cholecystokinin and gastrin peptides.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, J F

    2011-04-01

    Gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK) are homologous hormone systems known to regulate gastric acid secretion, gallbladder emptying, and cell growth in the pancreas and stomach. They are, however, also involved in the development and secretory functions of pancreatic islet cells. For instance, foetal and neonatal islets express significant amounts of gastrin, and human as well as porcine islet cells express the gastrin/CCK-B receptor abundantly. Therefore, exogenous gastrin and CCK peptides stimulate insulin and glucagon secretion in man. Accordingly, endogenous hypergastrinaemia is accompanied by islet cell hyperplasia and increased insulin secretion. Conventionally, the effect of gastrointestinal hormones on insulin secretion (the incretin effect) has been defined and quantified in relation to oral versus intravenous glucose loadings. Under these unphysiological conditions, the release of gastrin and CCK and, hence, their effect on insulin secretion are modest in comparison with the effects of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Consequently, the interest of CCK and gastrin in incretin research has for decades been limited. A few years ago, however, it was suggested that gastrin together with epidermal growth factor or later GLP-1 might stimulate beta cell growth and secretion. Recent studies have shown that the combination of gastrin and GLP-1 actually restores normoglycaemia in diabetic mice. Therefore, a short review of the incretin system in a broader functional context that includes gastrin and CCK peptides may be timely.

  7. Pancreatic small cells: Analysis of quiescence, long-term maintenance and insulin expression in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Petropavlovskaia, M. . E-mail: maria.petropavlovskaia@mail.mcgill.ca; Bodnar, C.A.; Behie, L.A.; Rosenberg, L.

    2007-03-10

    We have previously identified a novel population of small cells in human and canine pancreas characterized by immature morphology, quiescence, and a glucose-responsive insulin secretion. Based on their immature phenotype and predominant presence in small islets, we have hypothesized that small cells serve as islet progenitors. This hypothesis remains untested, however, due to persistent quiescence and scarcity of small cells in vitro. We have recently developed a culture medium that allowed for modest small cell proliferation. In this study we characterized the expression of genes potentially involved in small cell growth regulation by Q-RT-PCR. Our results suggest that quiescence of small cells correlates with up-regulation of Cdk inhibitors p27{sup Kip1}, p16{sup INK4a} and p21{sup CIP1}, PTEN, Hep27 and Foxo1a and with down-regulation of c-Myc and the receptors for EGF, FGF2 and HGF. The exit from quiescence correlates with activation of EGFR expression and down-regulation of p27{sup Kip1} and p16{sup INK4a}. We also report here that small cells can be maintained in long-term non-adherent cultures preserving insulin and glucagon production for up to 208 days. Therefore, expansion of small cells in vitro may have a significant potential for the treatment of diabetes. This study is an important step in understanding the mechanisms involved in small cell growth regulation, which is required to fully evaluate their functional potential.

  8. Protein kinase C pathway mediates the protective effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on the apoptosis of islet β-cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihai; Wang, Yuesheng; Wang, Jiao; Liu, Yinglan; Yin, Yanbin

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of diabetes has been increasing over previous years. It is hypothesized that promoting the survival of islet β-cells is a key direction for the treatment of diabetes. Although gastric bypass surgery improves certain types of diabetes and attenuates its progression, there are certain associated disadvantages (including intestinal obstruction and anastomotic leakage), and quality of life and physical status (such as malnutrition) are significantly affected by gastric bypass surgery. Therefore, it is important to determine the mechanisms underlying the improvement of diabetes by gastric bypass surgery and identify novel gene targets for diabetes therapeutics. In the present study, glucagon‑like peptide‑1 (GLP‑1), whose secretion was markedly increased following gastric bypass surgery, increased the activity of protein kinase C (PKC) in islet β‑cells in a dose‑dependent manner. Additionally, treatment with GLP‑1 boosted cell viability and decreased cell death in starved islet β‑cells, and inhibited mitochondria‑dependent apoptosis by regulating the expression levels of Bcl‑2/Bax. These effects were reversed by inhibiting the PKC pathway using hypericin. Therefore, the present study concluded that GLP‑1 may promote the survival and inhibit the apoptosis of islet β‑cells at least in part by activating the PKC pathway, which is an important underlying mechanism and may be exploited in the treatment of diabetes.

  9. Bioactivity of a modified human Glucagon-like peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fangfang; Wang, Kevin Yueju; Wang, Nan; Li, Gangqiang; Liu, Dehu

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes has become the third largest cause of death in humans worldwide. Therefore, effective treatment for this disease remains a critical issue. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in glucose homeostasis, and therefore represents a promising candidate to use for the treatment of diabetes. Native GLP-1, however, is quickly degraded in in the circulatory system; which limits its clinical application. In the present study, a chemically-synthesized, modified analogue of human GLP-1 (mGLP-1) was designed. Our analyses indicated that, relative to native GLP-1, mGLP-1 is more resistant to trypsin and pancreatin degradation. mGLP-1 promotes mouse pancreatic β-cell proliferation by up-regulating the expression level of cyclin E, CDK2, Bcl-2 and down-regulating Bax, p21, and stimulates insulin secretion. An oral glucose tolerance test indicated that mGLP-1 significantly improved glucose tolerance in mice. Intraperitoneal injections of mGLP-1 into streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetic mice significantly reduced blood sugar levels and stimulated insulin secretion. Oral gavages of mGLP-1 in diabetic mice did not result in significant hypoglycemic activity. PMID:28152036

  10. cAMP-dependent protein kinase and Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels mediate Raf-independent activation of extracellular regulated kinase in response to glucagon-like peptide-1 in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Edith; Pritchard, Catrin; Herbert, Terence P

    2002-12-13

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP1) is a G(s)-coupled receptor agonist that exerts multiple effects on pancreatic beta-cells, including the stimulation of insulin gene expression and secretion. In this report, we show that treatment of the mouse pancreatic beta-cell line MIN6 with GLP1 leads to the glucose-dependent activation of Erk. These effects are mimicked by forskolin, a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, and blocked by H89, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Additionally, we provide evidence that GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk requires an influx of calcium through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk is blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but GLP1 does not induce the activation of A-Raf, B-Raf, C-Raf, or Ras. Additionally, dominant negative forms of Ras(N17) and Rap1(N17) fail to block GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk. In conclusion, our results indicate that, in the presence of stimulatory concentrations of glucose, GLP1 stimulates the activation of Erk through a mechanism dependent on MEK but independent of both Raf and Ras. This requires 1) the activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, 2) an influx of extracellular Ca(2+) through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, and 3) the activation of CaM kinase II.

  11. Insulin and glucagon in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in suicide attempters and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Bendix, Marie; Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin; Petersson, Maria; Kaldo, Viktor; Åsberg, Marie; Jokinen, Jussi

    2017-03-23

    Mental disorders and related behaviors such as suicidality and violence have been associated to dysregulation of e g carbohydrate metabolism. We hypothesized that patients after suicide attempt, compared to healthy controls, would have higher insulin and lower glucagon levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid and that these changes would be associated to violent behavior. Twenty-eight medication-free patients (10 women, 18 men), hospitalized after suicide attempt, and 19 healthy controls (7 women, 12 men) were recruited with the aim to study risk factors for suicidal behavior. Psychological/psychiatric assessment was performed with SCID I and II or the SCID interview for healthy volunteers respectively, the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS) for assessment of lifetime violence expression behavior, the Montgomery-Åsberg-Depression-Scale (MADRS) and the Comprehensive Psychological Rating Scale (CPRS) for symptomatic assessment of depression and appetite. Fasting levels of insulin and glucagon were measured in plasma (P) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Suicide attempters had higher insulin- and lower glucagon-levels in plasma- and CSF compared to controls. Except for P-glucagon these associations remained significant after adjusting for age and/or BMI. Patients reported significantly more expressed interpersonal violence compared to healthy volunteers. Expressed violence was significantly positively correlated with P- and CSF-insulin and showed a significant negative correlation with P-glucagon in study participants. These findings confirm and extend prior reports that higher insulin and lower glucagon levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are associated with suicidal behavior pointing towards a potential autonomic dysregulation in the control of insulin and glucagon secretion in suicidal patients.

  12. Mouse insulin cells expressing an inducible RIPCre transgene are functionally impaired.

    PubMed

    Teitelman, Gladys; Kedees, Mamdouh

    2015-02-06

    We used cre-lox technology to test whether the inducible expression of Cre minimize the deleterious effect of the enzyme on beta cell function. We studied mice in which Cre is linked to a modified estrogen receptor (ER), and its expression is controlled by the rat insulin promoter (RIP). Following the injection of tamoxifen (TM), CreER- migrates to the nucleus and promotes the appearance of a reporter protein, enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP), in cells. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that 46.6 ± 2.1% insulin cells of adult RIPCreER- EYFP expressed EYFP. RIPCreER-EYFP (+TM) mice were normoglycemic throughout the study, and their glucose tolerance test results were similar to control CD-1 mice. However, an extended exposure to reagents that stimulate insulin synthesis was detrimental to the survival of IN+EYFP+cells. The administration of an inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP4i), which prevents the cleavage of glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), to adult RIPCreER-EYFP mice lead to a decrease in the percentage of IN+EYFP+ to 17.5 ± 1.73 and a significant increase in apoptotic cells in islets. Similarly, a 2-week administration of the GLP-1 analog exendin 4 (ex-4) induced an almost complete ablation of IN+ expressing a different reporter protein and a significant decrease in the beta cell mass and rate of beta cell proliferation. Since normal beta cells do not die when induced to increase insulin synthesis, our observations indicate that insulin cells expressing an inducible RIPCre transgene are functionally deficient. Studies employing these mice should carefully consider the pitfalls of the Cre-Lox technique.

  13. Glucagon deficiency and hyperaminoacidemia after total pancreatectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Boden, G; Master, R W; Rezvani, I; Palmer, J P; Lobe, T E; Owen, O E

    1980-01-01

    The first goal of this study was to investigate whether totally pancreatectomized patients are glucagon deficient and if so, to what degree. Immunoreactive glucagon (IRG) concentrations in peripheral plasma of nine pancreatectomized patients were not significantly different from those of 10 normal controls as measured by two antisera (30-K and RCS-5) both detecting the COOH-terminal portion of the molecule and one (RCS-5) postulated to be specific for pancreatic glucagon. Plasma from six of nine pancreatectomized patients were fractionated over Sephadex G-50 and IRG was measured with both antisera in the column eluates. Using 30-K, 80.8 +/- 9% of the IRG eluted within the void volume. This material was rechromatographed on Sephadex G-200 and found to have an apparent mol wt of approximately 200,000. Only 18.3 +/- 9% eluted in the IRG3500 region. IRG3500 was significantly reduced in pancreatectomized patients as compared to normal controls (49 +/- 9 vs. 18 +/- 9 pg/ml, P less than 0.05). Using RCS-5, all IRG (corresponding to 20 +/- 6 pg/ml of plasma) eluted in the IRG3500 region. The second goal of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic glucagon deficiency on plasma amino acids. In the nine pancreatectomized patients studied, postabsorptive plasma concentrations of serine, alanine, arginine, glycine, threonine, citrulline, alpha-aminobutyrate, and tryosine were significantly elevated compared to values obtained from 20 normal controls. Physiological glucagon increments produced in two pancreatectomized patients by infusion of glucagon (6.25 and 8.0 microgram/h, respectively) resulted in normalization of the hyperaminoacidemia within 22 h. We conclude (a) that pancreatectomized patients are partially glucagon deficient because of diminished basal as well as diminished stimulated glucagon secretion; (b) that fasting concentrations of certain glucogenic amino acids are elevated in pancreatectomized patients probably as result of reduce; hepatic

  14. AMPK-dependent regulation of GLP1 expression in L-like cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sushi; Zhai, Hening; Li, Danjie; Huang, Jiana; Zhang, Heng; Li, Ziru; Zhang, Weizhen; Xu, Geyang

    2016-10-01

    This study examined whether AMPK, an evolutionarily conserved sensor of cellular energy status, determines the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1). A negative relation existed between phosphorylation of AMPKα and the expression and secretion of GLP1 during changes in energy status in STC-1 cells, an L-like cell line. High concentration of glucose (25 mmol/L) decreased AMPKα phosphorylation, whereas it stimulated the expression and secretion of GLP1 relative to 5.6 mmol/L glucose. Serum starvation upregulated AMPKα phosphorylation, whereas it reduced GLP1 production significantly. Stimulation of AMPK phosphorylation by AICAR and overexpression of wild-type AMPKα1, constitutively active AMPKα1 plasmids, or AMPKα1 lentivirus particles suppressed proglucagon mRNA and protein contents in STC-1 cells. Inactivation of AMPK by Compound C, AMPKα1 siRNA or kinase-inactive AMPKα1 mutant increased the expression and secretion of GLP1. Our results suggest that AMPKα1 may link energy supply with the production of GLP1 in L-like cells.

  15. Exendin-4 increases oxygen consumption and thermogenic gene expression in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Choung, Jin-Seung; Lee, Young-Sun; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2017-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) has many anti-diabetic actions and also increases energy expenditure in vivo As skeletal muscle is a major organ controlling energy metabolism, we investigated whether GLP1 can affect energy metabolism in muscle. We found that treatment of differentiated C2C12 cells with exendin-4 (Ex-4), a GLP1 receptor agonist, reduced oleate:palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and triglyceride content compared with cells without Ex-4 treatment. When we examined the oxygen consumption rate (OCR), not only the basal OCR but also the OCR induced by oleate:palmitate addition was significantly increased in Ex-4-treated differentiated C2C12 cells, and this was inhibited by exendin-9, a GLP1 receptor antagonist. The expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), β3-adrenergic receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor a (PPARa) and farnesoid X receptor mRNA was significantly upregulated in Ex-4-treated differentiated C2C12 cells, and the upregulation of these mRNA was abolished by treatment with adenylate cyclase inhibitor (2'5'-dideoxyadenosine) or PKA inhibitor (H-89). As well, intramuscular injection of Ex-4 into diet-induced obese mice significantly increased the expression of UCP1, PPARa and p-AMPK in muscle. We suggest that exposure to GLP1 increases energy expenditure in muscle through the upregulation of fat oxidation and thermogenic gene expression, which may contribute to reducing obesity and insulin resistance.

  16. Characterization of an In Vitro Differentiation Assay for Pancreatic-Like Cell Development from Murine Embryonic Stem Cells: Detailed Gene Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chialin; Chai, Jing; Singh, Lipi; Kuo, Ching-Ying; Jin, Liang; Feng, Tao; Marzano, Scott; Galeni, Sheetal; Zhang, Nan; Iacovino, Michelina; Qin, Lihui; Hara, Manami; Stein, Roland; Bromberg, Jonathan S.; Kyba, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem (ES) cell technology may serve as a platform for the discovery of drugs to treat diseases such as diabetes. However, because of difficulties in establishing reliable ES cell differentiation methods and in creating cost-effective plating conditions for the high-throughput format, screening for molecules that regulate pancreatic beta cells and their immediate progenitors has been limited. A relatively simple and inexpensive differentiation protocol that allows efficient generation of insulin-expressing cells from murine ES cells was previously established in our laboratories. In this report, this system is characterized in greater detail to map developmental cell stages for future screening experiments. Our results show that sequential activation of multiple gene markers for undifferentiated ES cells, epiblast, definitive endoderm, foregut, and pancreatic lineages was found to follow the sequence of events that mimics pancreatic ontogeny. Cells that expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein, driven by pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 or insulin 1 promoter, correctly expressed known beta cell lineage markers. Overexpression of Sox17, an endoderm fate-determining transcription factor, at a very early stage of differentiation (days 2–3) enhanced pancreatic gene expression. Overexpression of neurogenin3, an endocrine progenitor cell marker, induced glucagon expression at stages when pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 message was present (days 10–16). Forced expression (between days 16 and 25) of MafA, a pancreatic maturation factor, resulted in enhanced expression of insulin genes, glucose transporter 2 and glucokinase, and glucose-responsive insulin secretion. Day 20 cells implanted in vivo resulted in pancreatic-like cells. Together, our differentiation assay recapitulates the proceedings and behaviors of pancreatic development and will be valuable for future screening of beta cell effectors. PMID:21395400

  17. Serum C peptide and IRI levels after administration of glucagon and glucose in non-insulin-dependent diabetics.

    PubMed

    Jayyab, A K; Heding, L G; Czyzyk, A; Malczewski, B; Królewski, A S

    1982-03-01

    A comparative study was carried out on B cell response to alternative intravenous glucagon (1.0 mg) and intravenous glucose (0.33 g per kg body weight) in healthy non-obese persons (c-NOb), healthy obese persons (C-Ob), non-obese non-insulin-dependent diabetics (NIDD-NOb) and obese non-insulin-dependent diabetics (NIDD-Ob). Each group comprised ten subjects. C-peptide (CP immunoassay using antiserum M 1230) and IRI in the serum were measured for each test. After glucose load in B-cell responses were significantly lower in both the diabetic groups than in the normal groups. After glucagon injection there were no significant differences in IRI and CP levels between NIDD-NOb and C-NOb, however, significantly lower levels of serum CP were noted among NIDD-Ob in comparison to C-Ob with a lack of these differences in IRI levels. This phenomenon is well reflected by the molar IRI/CP ratio expressed as a percentage. In the fasting state IRI accounted in C-Ob for 8.8 +/- 3.5 per cent of CP, while in NIDD-Ob for up to 25. +/- 10.4 percent of CP (P = 0.0004). In the latter group of patients, the IRI/CP ratio after glucagon reached the highest values (over 30 per cent) observed in this study. These data suggest the important role in insulin disposal played by the liver in non-insulin-dependent diabetes associated with obesity. Another explanation for these data is that more proinsulin is secreted in this group of patients as compared to other groups.

  18. Insulin versus glucagon crosstalk: central plus peripheral mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lechin, Fuad; Dijs, Bertha van der; Pardey-Maldonado, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Plasma glucose level depends on the peripheral intra-islet crosstalk between A cells (glucagon) + B-cells (insulin) and D-cells (somatostatin). Gastrointestinal hormones (secretin, CCK-PZ, gastrin, and serotonin) modulate the glucose- and amino acids-induced secretions of insulin and glucagon, respectively. Serotonin (5-HT) arose from the enterochromaffin cells during postprandial periods excites basal but inhibits excited B-cells. Serotonin excites adrenal glands that release adrenaline (Ad) + dopamine (DA). The former is positively correlated with hyperglycemia, whereas DA antagonizes this effect. Noradrenaline (NA) released from both sympathetic nerves and adrenal glands modulates the Ad release from this latter and excites A-cells. Thus, NA attenuates the hyperglycemic effects triggered by Ad. Dopamine released from both sources, adrenal glands and peripheral sympathetic nerves, antagonizes Ad-induced hyperglycemia plus the NA-triggered glucagon secretion. Both plasma insulin and glucagon cross the blood-brain barrier and excite A5(NA) and C1(Ad) neurons, respectively. C1 (Ad) neurons send excitatory drives to both islet A-cells and adrenal glands. Both central nervous system A5(NA) and C1(Ad) nuclei interchange inhibitory axons. Predominance of the former redounds in hyperinsulinism plus hypoglycemia, whereas the latter axis is responsible for hyperglucagonemia + hyperglycemia. In addition, the dorsal raphe serotonergic and the median raphe serotonergic nuclei interchange excitatory axons with the C1 (Ad) and the A5(NA) neurons, respectively. Hence, the former binomial axis (responsible for uncoping stress) is positively correlated with the hyperglycemic syndrome, whereas the A5(NA) + median raphe serotonergic binomial is correlated with hypoglycemia. Hence, the insulin resistance disorder should be underlain by the overactivity of both axes simultaneously. The above pathophysiological mechanisms are consistent with the successful neuropharmacological

  19. Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibition and the insulin: Glucagon ratio: Unexplored dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep; Patil, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are a novel class of glucose-lowering drugs which act by inhibiting the reabsorption of filtered glucose from the kidneys. Their effect on insulin and glucagon levels has recently been studied but is not fully explained. This communication proposes various hypotheses: A direct effect of SGLT-2 inhibition on the alpha cell receptors, a paracrine or intra-islet mediated effect on alpha cell sensitivity to glucose, and a calorie restriction mimetic action, to explain the impact of these drugs on the insulin glucagon ratio. PMID:25932403

  20. Uncoupling protein 2 negatively regulates glucose-induced glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjie; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiangying; Luo, Yun; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2012-04-01

    It is known that endogenous levels of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) can be enhanced by various secretagogues, but the mechanism underlying GLP1 secretion is still not fully understood. We assessed the possible effect of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) on GLP1 secretion in mouse intestinal tract and NCI-H716 cells, a well-characterized human enteroendocrine L cell model. Localization of UCP2 and GLP1 in the gastrointestinal tract was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Ucp2 mRNA levels in gut were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Human NCI-H716 cells were transiently transfected with siRNAs targeting UCP2. The plasma and ileum tissue levels of GLP1 (7-36) amide were measured using an ELISA kit. UCP2 was primarily expressed in the mucosal layer and colocalized with GLP1 in gastrointestinal mucosa. L cells secreting GLP1 also expressed UCP2. After glucose administration, UCP2-deficient mice showed increased glucose-induced GLP1 secretion compared with wild-type littermates. GLP1 secretion increased after NCI-H716 cells were transfected with siRNAs targeting UCP2. UCP2 was markedly upregulated in ileum tissue from ob/ob mice, and GLP1 secretion decreased compared with normal mice. Furthermore, GLP1 secretion increased after administration of genipin by oral gavage. Taken together, these results reveal an inhibitory role of UCP2 in glucose-induced GLP1 secretion.

  1. Modeling analysis of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated Ca2+ mobilization under the control of glucagon-like peptide-1 in mouse pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yukari; Shimayoshi, Takao; Holz, George G; Noma, Akinori

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinally derived blood glucose-lowering hormone that potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. The secretagogue action of GLP-1 is explained, at least in part, by its ability to stimulate cAMP production so that cAMP may facilitate the release of Ca(2+) from inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-regulated Ca(2+) stores. However, a quantitative model has yet to be provided that explains the molecular mechanisms and dynamic processes linking GLP-1-stimulated cAMP production to Ca(2+) mobilization. Here, we performed simulation studies to investigate how GLP-1 alters the abilities of Ca(2+) and IP3 to act as coagonists at IP3R Ca(2+) release channels. A new dynamic model was constructed based on the Kaftan model, which demonstrates dual steady-state allosteric regulation of the IP3R by Ca(2+) and IP3. Data obtained from β-cells were then analyzed to understand how GLP-1 facilitates IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization when UV flash photolysis is used to uncage Ca(2+) and IP3 intracellularly. When the dynamic model for IP3R activation was incorporated into a minimal cell model, the Ca(2+) transients and oscillations induced by GLP-1 were successfully reconstructed. Simulation studies indicated that transient and oscillatory responses to GLP-1 were produced by sequential positive and negative feedback regulation due to fast activation and slow inhibition of the IP3R by Ca(2+). The slow rate of Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition was revealed to provide a remarkable contribution to the time course of the decay of cytosolic Ca(2+) transients. It also served to drive and pace Ca(2+) oscillations that are significant when evaluating how GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion.

  2. Glucagon-Like Peptide 2 Increases Efficacy of Distraction Enterogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sueyoshi, Ryo; Ralls, Mathew W.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Application of distractive forces to small bowel induces intestinal growth, or enterogenesis. This emerging area of research may provide treatment for short bowel syndrome (SBS). Glucagon-like peptide 2(GLP-2) has also been reported to induce small bowel growth after bowel resection. We hypothesized that exogenous GLP-2 will result in enhanced distraction-induced enterogenesis. Methods Distraction-induced model was performed in 10-week-old C57B6 mice using osmotic forces with high molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG-stretch). Four groups were studied: Control group (PEG−/GLP-2−); PEG-stretch (PEG+/GLP-2−); GLP-2 control (PEG−/GLP-2+); and GLP-2 stretch (PEG+/GLP-2+). GLP-2 was given via subcutaneous osmotic pump over the 5 days of experiment. Morphology was measured by histomicrography. Epithelial cell (EC) proliferation was measured with PCNA immunofluorescent staining. Total intestinal growth and blood vessel volume was assessed with Micro CT volumetry. VEGF, FGF1 and 2, and PDGF were measured by RT-PCR. Results EC proliferation increased significantly in all groups compared to Controls, but was greatest in the GLP-2 stretch group. Diameter and length significantly increased in the PEG stretch and GLP-2 stretch groups. Moreover, there was statistically greater diameter, crypt depth and EC proliferation in the GLP-2 stretch vs. PEG stretch groups. GLP-2 stretch vessel volume was greater than all other groups and was significantly increased compared to controls. The relative expression of PDGF increased significantly in the PEG stretch group vs. the control group. Conclusions GLP-2 had an additive effect on EC proliferation, tissue growth, histomorphology and vascularization. The combination of enterogenesis and GLP-2 may yield an improved approach to treat SBS. PMID:23639355

  3. Reversal of diabetes in rats using GLP-1-expressing adult pancreatic duct-like precursor cells transformed from acinar to ductal cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Wen, Jing; Park, Jeong Youp; Kim, Sun-A; Lee, Eun Jig; Song, Si Young

    2009-09-01

    Pancreatic injury induces replacement of exocrine acinar cells with ductal cells. These ductal cells have the potential to regenerate the pancreas, but their origin still remains unknown. It has been reported that adult pancreatic acinar cells have the potential to transdifferentiate to ductal progenitor cells. In this regards, we established novel adult pancreatic duct-like progenitor cell lines YGIC4 and YGIC5 and assessed the usefulness of these ductal progenitors in the cell therapy of diabetic rats. Acinar cells were cultured from pancreata of male Sprague Dawley rats and gradually attained ductal cell characteristics, such as expression of CK19 and CFTR with a concomitant down-regulation of amylase expression over time, suggesting transdifferentiation from acinar to ductal cells. During cell culture, the expression of Pdx-1, c-Kit, and vimentin peaked and then decreased, suggesting that transdifferentiation recapitulated embryogenesis. Overexpression of pancreas development regulatory genes and CK19, as well as the ability to differentiate into insulin-producing cells, suggests that the YGIC5 cells had characteristics of pancreatic progenitor cells. Finally, YGIC5 cells coexpressing Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 under the activation of a zinc-inducible metallothionein promoter were intravenously infused to STZ-induced diabetic rats. Hyperglycemia was ameliorated with elevation of plasma insulin, and GFP-positive donor cells were colocalized in the acinar and islet areas of recipient pancreata following zinc treatment. In conclusion, after establishing pancreatic progenitor cell lines YGIC4 and YGIC5 under the concept of acinar to ductal transdifferentiation in vitro, we demonstrate how these adult pancreatic stem/progenitor cells can be used to regulate adult pancreatic differentiation toward developing therapy for pancreatic disease such as diabetes mellitus.

  4. Intravenous glucagon in a deliberate insulin overdose in an adolescent with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    White, Mary; Zacharin, Margaret R; Werther, George A; Cameron, Fergus J

    2016-02-01

    Massive insulin overdose may be associated with unpredictable and prolonged hypoglycemia. Concerns surrounding the potential provocation of insulin release from beta cells have previously prevented the use of intravenous glucagon as an adjunct to infusion of dextrose in this situation. We describe the case of a 15-yr-old boy with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who presented with profound hypoglycemia following an overdose of an unknown quantity of premixed insulin. Owing to an increasing dextrose requirement and a dependence on hourly intramuscular glucagon injections, a continuous intravenous infusion of glucagon was commenced which successfully avoided the requirement for central venous access or concentrated dextrose infusion. Nausea was managed with anti-emetics. Intramuscular and subcutaneous glucagon is effective in the management of refractory and severe hypoglycemia in youth with both T1DM and hyperinsulinism. Concerns regarding the precipitation of rebound hypoglycemia with the use of intravenous glucagon do not relate to those with T1DM. This treatment option may be a useful adjunct in the management of insulin overdose in youth with T1DM and may avoid the requirement for invasive central venous access placement.

  5. Adrenergically mediated intrapancreatic control of the glucagon response to glucopenia in the isolated rat pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Hisatomi, A; Maruyama, H; Orci, L; Vasko, M; Unger, R H

    1985-01-01

    Alpha adrenergic blockade with phentolamine (10 microM) reduces the glucagon response to severe glucopenia (from 150 to 25 mg/dl) to 22% of the control values in the isolated perfused rat pancreas. Propranolol (10 microM) had no significant effect. Neither alpha nor beta adrenergic blockade reduced the magnitude of glucopenic suppression of insulin secretion, but phentolamine increased insulin levels before and during glucopenia. The pattern of somatostatin secretion in these experiments resembled that of insulin. Depletion of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve endings by pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine lowered the pancreatic norepinephrine content to less than 20% of control values and reduced the glucagon response to glucopenia to 69% of the controls. Combined alpha and beta adrenergic blockade during less severe glucopenia (from 120 to 60 mg/dl) reduced the glucagon response to 21% of controls. However, slight glucopenia (from 100 to 80 mg/dl), which elicited only 11% increase in glucagon in the control experiments, was not altered significantly by combined alpha and beta adrenergic blockade. Morphologic studies of adrenergic nerve terminals labeled with [3H]norepinephrine revealed associations with alpha cells. It is concluded that in the isolated rat pancreas adrenergic mediation accounts for most of the glucagon but not insulin response to glucopenia. It is controlled within the pancreas itself, possibly through a direct enhancement by glucopenia of norepinephrine release from nerve endings. Images PMID:2857731

  6. Modulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 release by berberine: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunli; Liu, Li; Wang, Xinting; Liu, Xiang; Liu, Xiaodong; Xie, Lin; Wang, Guangji

    2010-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 is a potent glucose-dependent insulinotropic gut hormone released from intestinal L cells. Our previous studies showed that berberine increased GLP-1 secretion in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The aim of this study was to investigate whether berberine affected GLP-1 release in normal rats and in NCI-H716 cells. Proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3 genes regulating GLP-1 biosynthesis were analyzed by RT-PCR. Effects of pharmacological inhibitors on berberine-mediated GLP-1 release were studied. In vivo, 5-week treatment of berberine enhanced GLP-1 secretion induced by glucose load and promoted proglucagon mRNA expression as well as L cell proliferation in intestine. In vitro, berberine concentration-dependently stimulated GLP-1 release in NCI-H716 cells. Berberine also promoted both prohormone convertase 3 and proglucagon mRNA expression. Chelerythrine (inhibitor of PKC) concentration-dependently suppressed berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion. Compound C (inhibitor of AMPK) also inhibited berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion. But only low concentrations of H89 (inhibitor of PKA) showed inhibitory effects on berberine-mediated GLP-1 release. The present results demonstrated that berberine showed its modulation on GLP-1 via promoting GLP-1 secretion and GLP-1 biosynthesis. Some signal pathways including PKC-dependent pathway were involved in this process. Elucidation of mechanisms controlling berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion may facilitate the understanding of berberine's antidiabetic effects.

  7. Glucagon regulates hepatic kisspeptin to impair insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Song, Woo-Jin; Mondal, Prosenjit; Wolfe, Andrew; Alonso, Laura C; Stamateris, Rachel; Ong, Benny W T; Lim, Owen C; Yang, Kil S; Radovick, Sally; Novaira, Horacio J; Farber, Emily A; Farber, Charles R; Turner, Stephen D; Hussain, Mehboob A

    2014-04-01

    Early in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), dysregulated glucagon secretion from pancreatic α cells occurs prior to impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from β cells. However, whether hyperglucagonemia is causally linked to β cell dysfunction remains unclear. Here we show that glucagon stimulates via cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling hepatic production of the neuropeptide kisspeptin1, which acts on β cells to suppress GSIS. Synthetic kisspeptin suppresses GSIS in vivo in mice and from isolated islets in a kisspeptin1 receptor-dependent manner. Kisspeptin1 is increased in livers and in serum from humans with T2DM and from mouse models of diabetes mellitus. Importantly, liver Kiss1 knockdown in hyperglucagonemic, glucose-intolerant, high-fat-diet fed, and Lepr(db/db) mice augments GSIS and improves glucose tolerance. These observations indicate a hormonal circuit between the liver and the endocrine pancreas in glycemia regulation and suggest in T2DM a sequential link between hyperglucagonemia via hepatic kisspeptin1 to impaired insulin secretion.

  8. Altered glucagon release in biotin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Clarke, B L; Brown, J

    1987-01-01

    Classical biotin deficiency in young chickens is characterized by a reduction in the activity of liver biotin-dependent enzymes which thus impairs gluconeogenesis during periods of food withdrawal. Because the normal bird maintains an elevated fasting blood glucose level, the ability of the classically biotin-deficient animal to resist changes induced by fasting has not been established. Whether the release of insulin and/or glucagon is affected by biotin deficiency has not been investigated and so determining the importance of these hormones in maintaining fasting glucose levels as well as their ability to respond to a challenge is the objective of the present study. Experimental animals (15-week-old cockerels) were fed a biotin-deficient diet for 9 weeks while control animals (n = 8) were pair-fed biotin-supplemented diets. Before fasting, concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, and glucagon were not different between the two groups. After 72 h of fasting basal glucose levels remained the same in both groups and concentrations of plasma insulin were equally suppressed but concentrations of glucagon were significantly elevated in biotin-deficient animals (P less than 0.025). Ten minutes after an iv glucose challenge the magnitude of the increase in plasma insulin concentrations was equivalent for both groups of animals whereas the magnitude of the decline in plasma glucagon concentrations was greater for biotin-deficient birds. Twenty minutes after a protein challenge (purified casein diet) the levels of plasma glucagon in both groups were maximally increased although the concentrations remained elevated only in control animals. In conclusion the release of insulin and glucagon is not impaired in biotin-deficient animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Decorin expression in quiescent myogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Takanori Nozu, Kenjiro; Kishioka, Yasuhiro; Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Hattori, Akihito

    2008-06-06

    Satellite cells are quiescent muscle stem cells that promote postnatal muscle growth and repair. When satellite cells are activated by myotrauma, they proliferate, migrate, differentiate, and ultimately fuse to existing myofibers. The remainder of these cells do not differentiate, but instead return to quiescence and remain in a quiescent state until activation begins the process again. This ability to maintain their own population is important for skeletal muscle to maintain the capability to repair during postnatal life. However, the mechanisms by which satellite cells return to quiescence and maintain the quiescent state are still unclear. Here, we demonstrated that decorin mRNA expression was high in cell cultures containing a higher ratio of quiescent satellite cells when satellite cells were stimulated with various concentrations of hepatocyte growth factor. This result suggests that quiescent satellite cells express decorin at a high level compared to activated satellite cells. Furthermore, we examined the expression of decorin in reserve cells, which were undifferentiated myoblasts remaining after induction of differentiation by serum-deprivation. Decorin mRNA levels in reserve cells were higher than those in differentiated myotubes and growing myoblasts. These results suggest that decorin participates in the quiescence of myogenic cells.

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1 prevents methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis of beta cells through improving mitochondrial function and suppressing prolonged AMPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tien-Jyun; Tseng, Hsing-Chi; Liu, Meng-Wei; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of methylglyoxal (MG) contributes to glucotoxicity and mediates beta cell apoptosis. The molecular mechanism by which GLP-1 protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis remains unclear. Metformin is a first-line drug for treating type 2 diabetes associated with AMPK activation. However, whether metformin prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis is controversial. Here, we explored the signaling pathway involved in the anti-apoptotic effect of GLP-1, and investigated whether metformin had an anti-apoptotic effect on beta cells. MG treatment induced apoptosis of beta cells, impaired mitochondrial function, and prolonged activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). The MG-induced pro-apoptotic effects were abolished by an AMPK inhibitor. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed MG-induced apoptosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR)-induced apoptosis, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. However, metformin neither leads to beta cell apoptosis nor ameliorates MG-induced beta cell apoptosis. In parallel, GLP-1 also prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through PKA and PI3K-dependent pathway. In conclusion, these data indicates GLP-1 but not metformin protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through improving mitochondrial function, and alleviating the prolonged AMPK activation. Whether adding GLP-1 to metformin provides better beta cell survival and delays disease progression remains to be validated. PMID:26997114

  11. Treatment of type 1 diabetes with adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guiting; Wang, Guifang; Liu, Gang; Yang, Li-Jun; Chang, Lung-Ji; Lue, Tom F; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2009-12-01

    Due to the limited supply of donor pancreas, it is imperative that we identify alternative cell sources that can be used to treat diabetes mellitus (DM). Multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSC) can be abundantly and safely isolated for autologous transplantation and therefore are an ideal candidate. Here, we report the derivation of insulin-producing cells from human or rat ADSC by transduction with the pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) gene. RT-PCR analyses showed that native ADSC expressed insulin, glucagon, and NeuroD genes that were up-regulated following Pdx1 transduction. ELISA analyses showed that the transduced cells secreted increasing amount of insulin in response to increasing concentration of glucose. Transplantation of these cells under the renal capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats resulted in lowered blood glucose, higher glucose tolerance, smoother fur, and less cataract. Histological examination showed that the transplanted cells formed tissue-like structures and expressed insulin. Thus, ADSC-expressing Pdx1 appear to be suitable for treatment of DM.

  12. New insights into the role of cAMP in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1).

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2010-01-01

    The proglucagon gene (gcg) encodes both glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), produced in pancreatic alpha cells and intestinal endocrine L cells, respectively. The incretin hormone GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion and pro-insulin gene transcription. GLP-1 also enhances pancreatic beta-cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. A long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist, Byetta, has now been developed as the drug in treating type II diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. The expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP, and the crosstalk between PKA and the Wnt signaling pathway, are involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg transcription and GLP-1 production as well. Finally, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic beta cells are also mediated by PKA, Epac, as well as the effector of the Wnt signaling pathway. Together, these novel findings bring us a new insight into the role of cAMP in the production and function of the incretin hormone GLP-1.

  13. A monomer-trimer model supports intermittent glucagon fibril growth

    PubMed Central

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Cordsen, Pia; Kyrsting, Anders; Otzen, Daniel E.; Oddershede, Lene B.; Jensen, Mogens H.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate in vitro fibrillation kinetics of the hormone peptide glucagon at various concentrations using confocal microscopy and determine the glucagon fibril persistence length 60μm. At all concentrations we observe that periods of individual fibril growth are interrupted by periods of stasis. The growth probability is large at high and low concentrations and is reduced for intermediate glucagon concentrations. To explain this behavior we propose a simple model, where fibrils come in two forms, one built entirely from glucagon monomers and one entirely from glucagon trimers. The opposite building blocks act as fibril growth blockers, and this generic model reproduces experimental behavior well. PMID:25758791

  14. A monomer-trimer model supports intermittent glucagon fibril growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Cordsen, Pia; Kyrsting, Anders; Otzen, Daniel E.; Oddershede, Lene B.; Jensen, Mogens H.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate in vitro fibrillation kinetics of the hormone peptide glucagon at various concentrations using confocal microscopy and determine the glucagon fibril persistence length 60μm. At all concentrations we observe that periods of individual fibril growth are interrupted by periods of stasis. The growth probability is large at high and low concentrations and is reduced for intermediate glucagon concentrations. To explain this behavior we propose a simple model, where fibrils come in two forms, one built entirely from glucagon monomers and one entirely from glucagon trimers. The opposite building blocks act as fibril growth blockers, and this generic model reproduces experimental behavior well.

  15. Tryptophan hydroxylase expression in human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej; Pisarchik, Alexander; Johansson, Olle; Jing, Chen; Semak, Igor; Slugocki, George; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2003-10-15

    We attempted to further characterize cutaneous serotoninergic and melatoninergic pathways evaluating the key biosynthetic enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). There was wide expression of TPH mRNA in whole human skin, cultured melanocytes and melanoma cells, dermal fibroblasts, squamous cell carcinoma cells and keratinocytes. Gene expression was associated with detection of TPH immunoreactive species by Western blotting. Characterization of the TPH immunoreactive species performed with two different antibodies showed expression of the expected protein (55-60 kDa), and of forms with higher and lower molecular weights. This pattern of broad spectrum of TPH expression including presumed degradation products suggests rapid turnover of the enzyme, as previously reported in mastocytoma cells. RP-HPLC of skin extracts showed fluorescent species with the retention time of serotonin and N-acetylserotonin. Immunocytochemistry performed in skin biopsies localized TPH immunoreactivity to normal and malignant melanocytes. We conclude that while the TPH mRNA and protein are widely expressed in cultured normal and pathological epidermal and dermal skin cells, in vivo TPH expression is predominantly restricted to cells of melanocytic origin.

  16. Fundamentals of Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Expression of proteins in mammalian cells is a key technology important for many functional studies on human and higher eukaryotic genes. Studies include the mapping of protein interactions, solving protein structure by crystallization and X-ray diffraction or solution phase NMR and the generation of antibodies to enable a range of studies to be performed including protein detection in vivo. In addition the production of therapeutic proteins and antibodies, now a multi billion dollar industry, has driven major advances in cell line engineering for the production of grams per liter of active proteins and antibodies. Here the key factors that need to be considered for successful expression in HEK293 and CHO cells are reviewed including host cells, expression vector design, transient transfection methods, stable cell line generation and cultivation conditions.

  17. Novel dual agonist peptide analogues derived from dogfish glucagon show promising in vitro insulin releasing actions and antihyperglycaemic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    O'Harte, F P M; Ng, M T; Lynch, A M; Conlon, J M; Flatt, P R

    2016-08-15

    The antidiabetic potential of thirteen novel dogfish glucagon derived analogues were assessed in vitro and in acute in vivo studies. Stable peptide analogues enhanced insulin secretion from BRIN-BD11 β-cells (p < 0.001) and reduced acute glycaemic responses following intraperitoneal glucose (25 nmol/kg) in healthy NIH Swiss mice (p < 0.05-p<0.001). The in vitro insulinotropic actions of [S2a]dogfish glucagon, [S2a]dogfish glucagon-exendin-4(31-39) and [S2a]dogfish glucagon-Lys(30)-γ-glutamyl-PAL, were blocked (p < 0.05-p<0.001) by the specific GLP-1 and glucagon receptor antagonists, exendin-4(9-39) and (desHis(1)Pro(4)Glu(9))glucagon amide but not by (Pro(3))GIP, indicating lack of GIP receptor involvement. These analogues dose-dependently stimulated cAMP production in GLP-1 and glucagon (p < 0.05-p<0.001) but not GIP-receptor transfected cells. They improved acute glycaemic and insulinotropic responses in high-fat fed diabetic mice and in wild-type C57BL/6J and GIPR-KO mice (p < 0.05-p<0.001), but not GLP-1R-KO mice, confirming action on GLP-1 but not GIP receptors. Overall, dogfish glucagon analogues have potential for diabetes therapy, exerting beneficial metabolic effects via GLP-1 and glucagon receptors.

  18. Stability of glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucagon in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Bak, Monika J; Hartmann, Bolette; Christensen, Louise Wulff; Kuhre, Rune E; Deacon, Carolyn F; Holst, Jens J

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the stability of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucagon in plasma under short- and long-term storage conditions. Pooled human plasma (n=20), to which a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor and aprotinin were added, was spiked with synthetic GLP-1 (intact, 7–36NH2 as well as the primary metabolite, GLP-1 9–36NH2) or glucagon. Peptide recoveries were measured in samples kept for 1 and 3 h at room temperature or on ice, treated with various enzyme inhibitors, after up to three thawing–refreezing cycles, and after storage at −20 and −80 °C for up to 1 year. Recoveries were unaffected by freezing cycles or if plasma was stored on ice for up to 3 h, but were impaired when samples stood at RT for more than 1 h. Recovery of intact GLP-1 increased by addition of a DPP4 inhibitor (no ice), but was not further improved by neutral endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor or an inhibitor cocktail. GLP-1, but not glucagon, was stable for at least 1 year. Surprisingly, the recovery of glucagon was reduced by almost 50% by freezing compared with immediate analysis, regardless of storage time. Plasma handling procedures can significantly influence results of subsequent hormone analysis. Our data support addition of DPP4 inhibitor for GLP-1 measurement as well as cooling on ice of both GLP-1 and glucagon. Freeze–thaw cycles did not significantly affect stability of GLP-1 or glucagon. Long-term storage may affect glucagon levels regardless of storage temperature and results should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25596009

  19. Glucagon-like peptide 2 may mediate growth and development of the bovine gastrointestinal tract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), secreted by enteroendocrine cells, promotes growth, reduces apoptosis, and enhances blood flow, nutrient absorption, and barrier function in intestinal epithelium of monogastric species. Regulatory functions of GLP-2 in the ruminant gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are u...

  20. A novel glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/glucagon hybrid peptide with triple-acting agonist activity at glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, GLP-1, and glucagon receptors and therapeutic potential in high fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Gault, Victor A; Bhat, Vikas K; Irwin, Nigel; Flatt, Peter R

    2013-12-06

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon bind to related members of the same receptor superfamily and exert important effects on glucose homeostasis, insulin secretion, and energy regulation. The present study assessed the biological actions and therapeutic utility of novel GIP/glucagon/GLP-1 hybrid peptides. Nine novel peptides were synthesized and exhibited complete DPP-IV resistance and enhanced in vitro insulin secretion. The most promising peptide, [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG, stimulated cAMP production in GIP, GLP-1, and glucagon receptor-transfected cells. Acute administration of [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG in combination with glucose significantly lowered plasma glucose and increased plasma insulin in normal and obese diabetic (ob/ob) mice. Furthermore, [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG elicited a protracted glucose-lowering and insulinotropic effect in high fat-fed mice. Twice daily administration of [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG for 21 days decreased body weight and nonfasting plasma glucose and increased circulating plasma insulin concentrations in high fat-fed mice. Furthermore, [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG significantly improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity by day 21. Interestingly, locomotor activity was increased in [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG mice, without appreciable changes in aspects of metabolic rate. Studies in knock-out mice confirmed the biological action of [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG via multiple targets including GIP, GLP-1, and glucagon receptors. The data suggest significant promise for novel triple-acting hybrid peptides as therapeutic options for obesity and diabetes.

  1. Na+ current properties in islet α- and β-cells reflect cell-specific Scn3a and Scn9a expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Chibalina, Margarita V; Bengtsson, Martin; Groschner, Lukas N; Ramracheya, Reshma; Rorsman, Nils J G; Leiss, Veronika; Nassar, Mohammed A; Welling, Andrea; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank; Hofmann, Franz; Wood, John N; Ashcroft, Frances M; Rorsman, Patrik

    2014-11-01

    Mouse pancreatic β- and α-cells are equipped with voltage-gated Na(+) currents that inactivate over widely different membrane potentials (half-maximal inactivation (V0.5) at -100 mV and -50 mV in β- and α-cells, respectively). Single-cell PCR analyses show that both α- and β-cells have Nav1.3 (Scn3) and Nav1.7 (Scn9a) α subunits, but their relative proportions differ: β-cells principally express Nav1.7 and α-cells Nav1.3. In α-cells, genetically ablating Scn3a reduces the Na(+) current by 80%. In β-cells, knockout of Scn9a lowers the Na(+) current by >85%, unveiling a small Scn3a-dependent component. Glucagon and insulin secretion are inhibited in Scn3a(-/-) islets but unaffected in Scn9a-deficient islets. Thus, Nav1.3 is the functionally important Na(+) channel α subunit in both α- and β-cells because Nav1.7 is largely inactive at physiological membrane potentials due to its unusually negative voltage dependence of inactivation. Interestingly, the Nav1.7 sequence in brain and islets is identical and yet the V0.5 for inactivation is >30 mV more negative in β-cells. This may indicate the presence of an intracellular factor that modulates the voltage dependence of inactivation.

  2. Expression cloning of human B cell immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Wardemann, Hedda; Kofer, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas originate from B cells at the germinal center stage or beyond. Preferential selection of B cell clones by a limited set of antigens has been suggested to drive lymphoma development. However, little is known about the specificity of the antibodies expressed by lymphoma cells, and the role of antibody-specificity in lymphomagenesis remains elusive. Here, we describe a strategy to characterize the antibody reactivity of human B cells. The approach allows the unbiased characterization of the human antibody repertoire on a single cell level through the generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single primary human B cells of defined origin. This protocol offers a detailed description of the method starting from the flow cytometric isolation of single human B cells, to the RT-PCR-based amplification of the expressed Igh, Igκ, and Igλ chain genes, and Ig gene expression vector cloning for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies. The strategy may be used to obtain information on the clonal evolution of B cell lymphomas by single cell Ig gene sequencing and on the antibody reactivity of human lymphoma B cells.

  3. Glucagon-like peptide 1 and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Fava, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) is a major incretin hormone. This means that it is secreted by the gut in response to food and helps in reducing post-prandial glucose exertion. It achieves this through a number of mechanisms, including stimulating insulin release by pancreatic β-cells in a glucose-dependent manner; inhibition of glucagon release by pancreatic α-cells (also in a glucose-dependent manner); induction of central appetite suppression and by delaying gastric empting thereby inducing satiety and also reducing the rate of absorption of nutrients. However, GLP1 receptors have been described in a number of extra-pancreatic tissues, including the endothelium and the myocardium. This suggests that the physiological effects of GLP1 extend beyond post-prandial glucose control and raises the possibility that GLP1 might have cardiovascular effects. This is of importance in our understanding of incretin hormone physiology and especially because of the possible implications that it might have with regard to cardiovascular effects of incretin-based therapies, namely DPP-IV inhibitors (gliptins) and GLP1 analogues. This review analyzes the animal and human data on the effects of GLP1 on the cardiovascular system in health and in disease and the currently available data on cardiovascular effects of incretin-based therapies. It is the author's view that the physiological role of GLP1 is not only to minimize postprandial hypoglycaemia, but also protect against it.

  4. Baculovirus-insect cell expression systems.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Donald L

    2009-01-01

    In the early 1980s, the first-published reports of baculovirus-mediated foreign gene expression stimulated great interest in the use of baculovirus-insect cell systems for recombinant protein production. Initially, this system appeared to be the first that would be able to provide the high production levels associated with bacterial systems and the eukaryotic protein processing capabilities associated with mammalian systems. Experience and an increased understanding of basic insect cell biology have shown that these early expectations were not completely realistic. Nevertheless, baculovirus-insect cell expression systems have the capacity to produce many recombinant proteins at high levels and they also provide significant eukaryotic protein processing capabilities. Furthermore, important technological advances over the past 20 years have improved upon the original methods developed for the isolation of baculovirus expression vectors, which were inefficient, required at least some specialized expertise and, therefore, induced some frustration among those who used the original baculovirus-insect cell expression system. Today, virtually any investigator with basic molecular biology training can relatively quickly and efficiently isolate a recombinant baculovirus vector and use it to produce their favorite protein in an insect cell culture. This chapter will begin with background information on the basic baculovirus-insect cell expression system and will then focus on recent developments that have greatly facilitated the ability of an average investigator to take advantage of its attributes.

  5. Dynamics of single-cell gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Diane; Hasty, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Cellular behavior has traditionally been investigated by utilizing bulk-scale methods that measure average values for a population of cells. Such population-wide studies mask the behavior of individual cells and are often insufficient for characterizing biological processes in which cellular heterogeneity plays a key role. A unifying theme of many recent studies has been a focus on the development and utilization of single-cell experimental techniques that are capable of probing key biological phenomena in individual living cells. Recently, novel information about gene expression dynamics has been obtained from single-cell experiments that draw upon the unique capabilities of fluorescent reporter proteins. PMID:17130866

  6. Exenatide Alters Gene Expression of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM), Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule (ICAM), and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM) in the Hippocampus of Type 2 Diabetic Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gumuslu, Esen; Cine, Naci; Gökbayrak, Merve Ertan; Mutlu, Oguz; Celikyurt, Ipek Komsuoglu; Ulak, Guner

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor, ameliorates the symptoms of diabetes through stimulation of insulin secretion. Exenatide is a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor. Cell adhesion molecules are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and are involved in synaptic rearrangements in the mature brain. Material/Methods The present study demonstrated the effects of exenatide treatment (0.1 μg/kg, subcutaneously, twice daily for 2 weeks) on the gene expression levels of cell adhesion molecules, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in the brain tissue of diabetic BALB/c male mice by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/nicotinamide (STZ-NA) injection to male mice. Results The results of this study revealed that hippocampal gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were found to be up-regulated in STZ-NA-induced diabetic mice compared to those of controls. A significant decrease in the gene expression levels of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were determined after 2 weeks of exenatide administration. Conclusions Cell adhesion molecules may be involved in the molecular mechanism of diabetes. Exenatide has a strong beneficial action in managing diabetes induced by STZ/NA by altering gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM. PMID:27465247

  7. CIRCADIAN CLOCK AND CELL CYCLE GENE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Richard P.; Qu, Xiaoyu; Laffin, Brian; Earnest, David; Porter, Weston W.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (HC-11) and mammary tissues were analyzed for developmental changes in circadian clock, cellular proliferation and differentiation marker genes. Expression of the clock genes, Per1 and Bmal1, were elevated in differentiated HC-11 cells whereas Per2 mRNA levels were higher in undifferentiated cells. This differentiation-dependent profile of clock gene expression was consistent with that observed in mouse mammary glands as Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA levels were elevated in late pregnant and lactating mammary tissues, while Per2 expression was higher in proliferating virgin and early pregnant glands. In both HC-11 cells and mammary glands, elevated Per2 expression was positively correlated with c-Myc and Cyclin D1 mRNA levels while Per1 and Bmal1 expression changed in conjunction with ß-casein mRNA levels. Interestingly, developmental stage had differential effects on rhythms of clock gene expression in the mammary gland. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may play a role in mouse mammary gland development and differentiation. PMID:16261617

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 is specifically involved in sweet taste transmission.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shingo; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Inoue, Mayuko; Iwata, Shusuke; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Drucker, Daniel J; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2015-06-01

    Five fundamental taste qualities (sweet, bitter, salty, sour, umami) are sensed by dedicated taste cells (TCs) that relay quality information to gustatory nerve fibers. In peripheral taste signaling pathways, ATP has been identified as a functional neurotransmitter, but it remains to be determined how specificity of different taste qualities is maintained across synapses. Recent studies demonstrated that some gut peptides are released from taste buds by prolonged application of particular taste stimuli, suggesting their potential involvement in taste information coding. In this study, we focused on the function of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in initial responses to taste stimulation. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) null mice had reduced neural and behavioral responses specifically to sweet compounds compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Some sweet responsive TCs expressed GLP-1 and its receptors were expressed in gustatory neurons. GLP-1 was released immediately from taste bud cells in response to sweet compounds but not to other taste stimuli. Intravenous administration of GLP-1 elicited transient responses in a subset of sweet-sensitive gustatory nerve fibers but did not affect other types of fibers, and this response was suppressed by pre-administration of the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-4(3-39). Thus GLP-1 may be involved in normal sweet taste signal transmission in mice.

  9. Glucagon like peptide-2 induces intestinal restitution through VEGF release from subepithelial myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Kerem; Pennartz, Christian; Felderbauer, Peter; Meier, Juris J; Banasch, Matthias; Bulut, Daniel; Schmitz, Frank; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Hoffmann, Peter

    2008-01-14

    Glucagon like peptide-2 (GLP-2) exerts intestinotrophic actions, but the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. Recent studies demonstrated the expression of the GLP-2 receptor on fibroblasts located in the subepithelial tissue, where it might induce the release of growth factors such as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Therefore, in the present studies we sought to elucidate the downstream mechanisms involved in improved intestinal adaptation by GLP-2. Human colonic fibroblasts (CCD-18Co), human colonic cancer cells (Caco-2 cells) and rat ileum IEC-18 cells were used. GLP-2 receptor mRNA expression was determined using real time RT-PCR. Conditioned media from CCD-18Co cells were obtained following incubation with GLP-2 (50-250 nM) for 24 h. Cell viability was assessed by a 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-assay, and wound healing was determined with an established migration-assay. Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-beta), VEGF and KGF mRNA levels were determined by RT-PCR. Protein levels of VEGF and TGF-beta in CCD-18Co cells following GLP-2 stimulation were determined using ELISA. Neutralizing TGF-beta and VEGF-A antibodies were utilized to assess the role of TGF-beta and VEGF-A in the process of wound healing. GLP-2 receptor expression was detected in CCD-18Co cells. Conditioned media from CCD-18Co cells dose-dependently induced proliferation in Caco-2 cells, but not in IEC-18 cells. Conditioned media also enhanced cell migration in IEC-18 cells (P<0.01), while migration was even inhibited in Caco-2 cells (P<0.0012). GLP-2 significantly stimulated mRNA expression of VEGF and TGF-beta, but not of KGF in CCD-18Co. The migratory effects of GLP-2 were completely abolished in the presence of TGF-beta and VEGF-A antibodies. GLP-2 exerts differential effects on the epithelium of the small intestine and the colon. Thus, in small intestinal cells GLP-2 stimulates wound

  10. Neurofilament expression in cultured rat adenohypophysial cells.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, J L; Salinas, E

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate in cultured rat adenohypophysial cells: a) the presence of neurofilaments of 200 kDa (NF-H), b) the effect of thyroid hormone (T(3)) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) on the expression of NF-H and c) the possible role of NF-H on thyrotropin (TSH) secretion. The presence of NF-H was observed by immunocytochemistry in cultured rat adenohypophysial cells. The exposure to T(3) for 12 h produced a significant increase in NF-H expression; whereas incubation with TRH or T(3)+TRH resulted in no change. The cells treated with T(3) or TRH or T(3)+TRH for 24 h showed no alteration. However, incubation for 48 h with TRH or T(3)+TRH caused significant decrease in NF-H expression. Incubation with NF-H antibodies produced a significant inhibition of calcium-induced TSH release in digitonin-permeabilized adenohypophysial cells. These results provide evidence that NF-H is present in cultured rat adenohypophysial cells, and that T(3) and TRH can modify NF-H expression. It can be suggested that in cultured adenohypophysial cells, NF-H may play a role in the secretory process.

  11. Stimulatory short-term effects of free fatty acids on glucagon secretion at low to normal glucose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Bollheimer, L Cornelius; Landauer, Heike C; Troll, Stephanie; Schweimer, Joachim; Wrede, Christian E; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Buettner, Roland

    2004-11-01

    While free fatty acids (FFA) are well known as insulin secretagogues, their effects on pancreatic alpha cells have been mostly neglected. In the present study we therefore systematically analyzed the glucagon metabolism of rat pancreatic islets under the influence of FFA. Primary islets were incubated in the presence or absence of 200 micromol/L albumin-complexed palmitate or oleate at 2.8 mmol/L versus 16.7 mmol/L glucose and glucagon secretion was monitored over 8 hours. In addition to these time-course experiments, dose dependency of palmitate-induced effects was tested by a 2-hour incubation with 50 to 300 micromol/L albumin-complexed palmitate at 2.8 mmol/L and 5.6 mmol/L glucose. Apart from glucagon secretion, intracellular immunoreactive glucagon and cellular preproglucagon-mRNA (PPG-mRNA) content were determined from the remaining cell lysates. FFA, especially palmitate, induced a significant and dose-dependent increase of glucagon secretion (in average 2-fold above control) during the first 120 minutes of incubation at low to normal glucose (2.8 and 5.6 mmol/L). There was no significant glucagonotropic effect of FFA at concomitant 16.7 mmol/L glucose. Intracellular glucagon as well as cellular PPG-mRNA content were found to be dose-dependently diminished by palmitate when compared with untreated controls at 5.6 mmol/L glucose. The present analysis therefore points to a new role for FFA as a nutritient secretagogue and a modulator of alpha-cellular glucagon metabolism.

  12. Regulation of GIP and GLP1 receptor cell surface expression by N-glycosylation and receptor heteromerization.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Gina M; Lynn, Francis C; McIntosh, Christopher H S; Accili, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    In response to a meal, Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide (GIP) and Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) are released from gut endocrine cells into the circulation and interact with their cognate G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Receptor activation results in tissue-selective pleiotropic responses that include augmentation of glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. N-glycosylation and receptor oligomerization are co-translational processes that are thought to regulate the exit of functional GPCRs from the ER and their maintenance at the plasma membrane. Despite the importance of these regulatory processes, their impact on functional expression of GIP and GLP-1 receptors has not been well studied. Like many family B GPCRs, both the GIP and GLP-1 receptors possess a large extracellular N-terminus with multiple consensus sites for Asn-linked (N)-glycosylation. Here, we show that each of these Asn residues is glycosylated when either human receptor is expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. N-glycosylation enhances cell surface expression and function in parallel but exerts stronger control over the GIP receptor than the GLP-1 receptor. N-glycosylation mainly lengthens receptor half-life by reducing degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum. N-glycosylation is also required for expression of the GIP receptor at the plasma membrane and efficient GIP potentiation of glucose-induced insulin secretion from the INS-1 pancreatic beta cell line. Functional expression of a GIP receptor mutant lacking N-glycosylation is rescued by co-expressed wild type GLP1 receptor, which, together with data obtained using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer, suggests formation of a GIP-GLP1 receptor heteromer.

  13. Quercetin Blocks Airway Epithelial Cell Chemokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nanua, Suparna; Zick, Suzanna M.; Andrade, Juan E.; Sajjan, Umadevi S.; Burgess, John R.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2006-01-01

    Quercetin (3,3′,4′,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, is an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and potent antioxidant. We hypothesized that quercetin blocks airway epithelial cell chemokine expression via PI 3-kinase–dependent mechanisms. Pretreatment with quercetin and the PI 3–kinase inhibitor LY294002 each reduced TNF-α–induced IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (also called CCL2) expression in cultured human airway epithelial cells. Quercetin also inhibited TNF-α–induced PI 3-kinase activity, Akt phosphorylation, intracellular H2O2 production, NF-κB transactivation, IL-8 promoter activity, and steady-state mRNA levels, consistent with the notion that quercetin inhibits chemokine expression by attenuating NF-κB transactivation via a PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent pathway. Quercetin also reduced TNF-α–induced chemokine secretion in the presence of the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D, while inducing phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)-2α, suggesting that quercetin attenuates chemokine expression by post-transcriptional as well as transcriptional mechanisms. Finally, we tested the effects of quercetin in cockroach antigen–sensitized and –challenged mice. These mice show MCP-1–dependent airways hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Quercetin significantly reduced lung MCP-1 and methacholine responsiveness. We conclude that quercetin blocks airway cell chemokine expression via transcriptional and post-transcriptional pathways. PMID:16794257

  14. Cardiovascular responses to glucagon - Physiologic measurement by external recordings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, M. J.; Pigott, V.; Spodick, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Assessment by noninvasive polygraphic techniques of the cardiovascular responses of normal subjects to intravenous injections of glucagon and glucagon diluent. A blinding procedure which eliminated observer bias was used during the reading of tracings. Analysis of group results showed that glucagon provoked uniformly significant changes, including increase in heart rate, blood pressure, pressure-rate product, and ejection time index, and decrease in prejection period, mechanical and electromechanical systole, left ventricular ejection time, and the ratio PEP/LVET. The principal results correlated well with those of previous studies of the hemodynamic effects of glucagon.

  15. Response of extrapancreatic glucagon to gastrointestinal hormones in pancreatectomized dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohneda, A; Kobayashi, T; Nihei, J

    1985-08-01

    In order to investigate the effect of gastrointestinal hormones upon the secretion of extrapancreatic glucagon, tetragastrin, secretin, caerulein and cholecytokinin-pancreozymin octapeptide (CCK-octa) were administered during saline or arginine infusion in pancreatectomized dogs. Intravenous administration of tetragastrin (7 micrograms/kg) did not elicit any changes in plasma glucagon during saline infusion, while the plasma glucagon increased significantly following tetragastrin infusion during arginine infusion. The administration of secretin (3 U/kg) did not affect the plasma level of glucagon during saline or arginine infusion at all. Plasma glucagon did not change after the administration of caerulein (0.5 microgram/kg) during saline infusion, whereas it increased significantly following caerulein administration during arginine infusion. Intravenous administration of CCK-octa in a dose of 20 U/kg did not affect the plasma level of glucagon during saline infusion but exerted a significant rise of extrapancreatic glucagon during arginine infusion. It is concluded from the present experiment that the administration of tetragastrin, caerulein or CCK-octa enhances the release of extrapancreatic glucagon stimulated by arginine infusion while secretin infusion does not affect the secretion of extrapancreatic glucagon.

  16. Dental enamel cells express functional SOCE channels.

    PubMed

    Nurbaeva, Meerim K; Eckstein, Miriam; Concepcion, Axel R; Smith, Charles E; Srikanth, Sonal; Paine, Michael L; Gwack, Yousang; Hubbard, Michael J; Feske, Stefan; Lacruz, Rodrigo S

    2015-10-30

    Dental enamel formation requires large quantities of Ca(2+) yet the mechanisms mediating Ca(2+) dynamics in enamel cells are unclear. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) channels are important Ca(2+) influx mechanisms in many cells. SOCE involves release of Ca(2+) from intracellular pools followed by Ca(2+) entry. The best-characterized SOCE channels are the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. As patients with mutations in the CRAC channel genes STIM1 and ORAI1 show abnormal enamel mineralization, we hypothesized that CRAC channels might be an important Ca(2+) uptake mechanism in enamel cells. Investigating primary murine enamel cells, we found that key components of CRAC channels (ORAI1, ORAI2, ORAI3, STIM1, STIM2) were expressed and most abundant during the maturation stage of enamel development. Furthermore, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) but not ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression was high in enamel cells suggesting that IP3Rs are the main ER Ca(2+) release mechanism. Passive depletion of ER Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin resulted in a significant raise in [Ca(2+)]i consistent with SOCE. In cells pre-treated with the CRAC channel blocker Synta-66 Ca(2+) entry was significantly inhibited. These data demonstrate that enamel cells have SOCE mediated by CRAC channels and implicate them as a mechanism for Ca(2+) uptake in enamel formation.

  17. Dental enamel cells express functional SOCE channels

    PubMed Central

    Nurbaeva, Meerim K.; Eckstein, Miriam; Concepcion, Axel R.; Smith, Charles E.; Srikanth, Sonal; Paine, Michael L.; Gwack, Yousang; Hubbard, Michael J.; Feske, Stefan; Lacruz, Rodrigo S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental enamel formation requires large quantities of Ca2+ yet the mechanisms mediating Ca2+ dynamics in enamel cells are unclear. Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) channels are important Ca2+ influx mechanisms in many cells. SOCE involves release of Ca2+ from intracellular pools followed by Ca2+ entry. The best-characterized SOCE channels are the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. As patients with mutations in the CRAC channel genes STIM1 and ORAI1 show abnormal enamel mineralization, we hypothesized that CRAC channels might be an important Ca2+ uptake mechanism in enamel cells. Investigating primary murine enamel cells, we found that key components of CRAC channels (ORAI1, ORAI2, ORAI3, STIM1, STIM2) were expressed and most abundant during the maturation stage of enamel development. Furthermore, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) but not ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression was high in enamel cells suggesting that IP3Rs are the main ER Ca2+ release mechanism. Passive depletion of ER Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin resulted in a significant raise in [Ca2+]i consistent with SOCE. In cells pre-treated with the CRAC channel blocker Synta-66 Ca2+ entry was significantly inhibited. These data demonstrate that enamel cells have SOCE mediated by CRAC channels and implicate them as a mechanism for Ca2+ uptake in enamel formation. PMID:26515404

  18. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  19. Stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion downstream of the ligand-gated ion channel TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Edward C.; Diakogiannaki, Eleftheria; Gentry, Clive; Psichas, Arianna; Habib, Abdella M.; Bevan, Stuart; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulus-coupled incretin secretion from enteroendocrine cells plays a fundamental role in glucose homeostasis, and could be targeted for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Here, we investigated the expression and function of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in enteroendocrine L-cells producing glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). By microarray and qPCR analysis we identified trpa1 as an L-cell enriched transcript in the small intestine. Calcium imaging of primary L-cells and the model cell line GLUTag revealed responses triggered by the TRPA1 agonists allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC, mustard oil), carvacrol and polyunsaturated fatty acids, that were blocked by TRPA1 antagonists. Electrophysiology in GLUTag cells showed that carvacrol induced a current with characteristics typical of TRPA1 and triggered the firing of action potentials. TRPA1 activation caused an increase in GLP-1 secretion from primary murine intestinal cultures and GLUTag cells; an effect that was abolished in cultures from trpa1−/− mice or by pharmacological TRPA1 inhibition. These findings present TRPA1 as a novel sensory mechanism in enteroendocrine L-cells, coupled to the facilitation of GLP-1 release, which may be exploitable as a target for treating diabetes. PMID:25325736

  20. Toward stable gene expression in CHO cells

    PubMed Central

    Mariati; Koh, Esther YC; Yeo, Jessna HM; Ho, Steven CL; Yang, Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high gene expression level during long-term culture is critical when producing therapeutic recombinant proteins using mammalian cells. Transcriptional silencing of promoters, most likely due to epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, is one of the major mechanisms causing production instability. Previous studies demonstrated that the core CpG island element (IE) from the hamster adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene is effective to prevent DNA methylation. We generated one set of modified human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) promoters by insertion of one or two copies of IE in either forward or reverse orientations into different locations of the hCMV promoter. The modified hCMV with one copy of IE inserted between the hCMV enhancer and core promoter in reverse orientation (MR1) was most effective at enhancing expression stability in CHO cells without comprising expression level when compared with the wild type hCMV. We also found that insertion of IE into a chimeric murine CMV (mCMV) enhancer and human elongation factor-1α core (hEF) promoter in reverse orientation did not enhance expression stability, indicating that the effect of IE on expression stability is possibly promoter specific. PMID:25482237

  1. The glucagon-like peptide 2 pathway may mediate growth and development of the bovine gastrointestinal tract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), secreted by enteroendocrine cells, has a number of physiological effects on the intestine of monogastric species, including promotion of growth of intestinal epithelium, reduction of epithelial cell apoptosis, and enhancement of intestinal blood flow, nutrient absorp...

  2. Metabolism of forearm tissues in man. Studies with glucagon.

    PubMed

    Pozefsky, T; Tancredi, R G; Moxley, R T; Dupre, J; Tobin, J D

    1976-02-01

    The role of glucagon in regulating peripheral tissue metabolism in man was assessed in the present studies. To do this, glucagon was infused for two hours into the brachial artery to produce a high but physiologic increment in the glucagon content of arterial blood supplying ipsilateral tissues. Metabolic effects on muscle and on subcutaneous adipose tissue plus skin were sought in seven overnight-fasting subjects and seven subjects starved briefly (60 hours). In the overnight-fasted group the infusion increased bassl glucagon concentration by 1,216 pg./ml. but was without effect on forearm tissue metabolism of glucose, lactate,glycerol, or amino acids. Starvation significantly reduced basal insulin (11.0 to 7.4 muU./ml.) and increased endogenous glucagon (116 to 134 pg./ml.). Basally, there was substantial ketone utilization and a decrease in glucose consumption by both muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue plus skin. The glucagon infusion increased basal glucagon by 784 pg./ml. Muscle balances of glucose, lactate, acetoacetate, amino acids, and glycerol were unaffected. The metabolism of glucose, lactate, acetoacetate, glycerol, and free fatty acids by subcutaneous adipose tissue plus skin was also unchanged. It is concluded that physiologic increments of glucagon lasting two hours are without effect on forearm tissues in overnight-fasted and briefly starved man.

  3. Glucagon and heart in type 2 diabetes: new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Genovese, Stefano; Mannucci, Edoardo; Gronda, Edoardo

    2016-08-27

    Increased levels of glucagon in type 2 diabetes are well known and, until now, have been considered deleterious. However, glucagon has an important role in the maintenance of both heart and kidney function. Moreover, in the past, glucagon has been therapeutically used for heart failure treatment. The new antidiabetic drugs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors, are able to decrease and to increase glucagon levels, respectively, while contrasting data have been reported regarding the glucagon like peptide 1 receptors agonists. The cardiovascular outcome trials, requested by the FDA, raised some concerns about the possibility that the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors can precipitate the heart failure, while, at least for empagliflozin, a positive effect has been shown in decreasing both cardiovascular death and heart failure. The recent LEADER Trial, showed a significant reduction of cardiovascular death with liraglutide, but a neutral effect on heart failure. A possible explanation of the results with the DPPIV inhibitors and empagliflozin might be related to their divergent effect on glucagon levels. Due to unclear effects of glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists on glucagon, the possible role of this hormone in the Leader trial remains unclear.

  4. Physiologic action of glucagon on liver glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ramnanan, C. J.; Edgerton, D. S.; Kraft, G.; Cherrington, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Glucagon is a primary regulator of hepatic glucose production (HGP) in vivo during fasting, exercise and hypoglycaemia. Glucagon also plays a role in limiting hepatic glucose uptake and producing the hyperglycaemic phenotype associated with insulin deficiency and insulin resistance. In response to a physiological rise in glucagon, HGP is rapidly stimulated. This increase in HGP is entirely attributable to an enhancement of glycogenolysis, with little to no acute effect on gluconeogenesis. This dramatic rise in glycogenolysis in response to hyperglucagonemia wanes with time. A component of this waning effect is known to be independent of hyperglycemia, though the molecular basis for this tachyphylaxis is not fully understood. In the overnight fasted state, the presence of basal glucagon secretion is essential in countering the suppressive effects of basal insulin, resulting in the maintenance of appropriate levels of glycogenolysis, fasting HGP and blood glucose. The enhancement of glycogenolysis in response to elevated glucagon is critical in the life-preserving counterregulatory response to hypoglycaemia, as well as a key factor in providing adequate circulating glucose for working muscle during exercise. Finally, glucagon has a key role in promoting the catabolic consequences associated with states of deficient insulin action, which supports the therapeutic potential in developing glucagon receptor antagonists or inhibitors of glucagon secretion. PMID:21824265

  5. Effect of phorbol esters on mitochondrial actions of glucagon

    SciTech Connect

    Cardellach, F.; Moehren, G.; Hoek, J.B.

    1987-05-01

    Glucagon generates different second messenger signals in liver. It increases cAMP levels and elevates cytosolic Ca/sup 2 +/ levels by degradation of polyphosphoinositides. The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA) inhibits glucagon-induced calcium mobilization, but not cAMP formation. TPA can thus be used to assess the role of Ca/sup 2 +/ and cAMP in the activation of mitochondrial processes. In isolated hepatocytes, glucagon increased the steady state NAD(P)H level, probably by activating mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent dehydrogenases. TPA inhibited the glucagon-induced NAD(P) reduction without affecting phosphorylase activation. The effects of glucagon and TPA on mitochondrial respiratory activity and calcium retention were tested after isolation of the mitochondria from perfused livers. Electron transport rates were increased by 15-25% and calcium retention time was increased four-fold after glucagon treatment. When livers were pretreated with TPA, glucagon had no effect on electron transport activity, but calcium retention was increased by the same factor. The results suggest that glucagon-induced calcium mobilization is required for the stimulation of the respiratory activity but not for the increased capacity to retain a calcium overload in the mitochondria.

  6. Berberine promotes glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide secretion in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shou-Si; Yu, Yun-Li; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Li; Liu, Yao-Wu; Wang, Ping; Xie, Lin; Wang, Guang-Ji

    2009-02-01

    Berberine (BBR), a hypoglycemic agent, has shown beneficial metabolic effects for anti-diabetes, but its precise mechanism was unclear. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is considered to be an important incretin that can decrease hyperglycemia in the gastrointestinal tract after meals. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BBR exerts its anti-diabetic effects via modulating GCG secretion. Diabetes-like rats induced by streptozotocin received BBR (120 mg/kg per day, i.g) for 5 weeks. Two hours following the last dose, the rats were anaesthetized and received 2.5 g/kg glucose by gavage. At 15-minute and 30-minute after glucose load, blood samples, pancreas, and intestines were obtained to measure insulin and GCG using ELISA kit. The number of L cells in the ileum and beta-cells in the pancreas were identified using immunohistology. The expression of proglucagon mRNA in the ileum was measured by RT-PCR. The results indicated that BBR treatment significantly increased GCG levels in plasma and intestine (P<0.05) accompanied with the increase of proglucagon mRNA expression and the number of L-cell compared with the controls (P<0.05). Furthermore, BBR increased insulin levels in plasma and pancreas as well as beta-cell number in pancreas. The data support the hypothesis that the anti-diabetic effects of BBR may partly result from enhancing GCG secretion.

  7. Oral Delivery of Pentameric Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 by Recombinant Lactobacillus in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Pelletier, Julien; Marcotte, Harold; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Hammarström, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone produced by intestinal cells and stimulates insulin secretion from the pancreas in a glucose-dependent manner. Exogenously supplied GLP-1 analogues are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. An anti-diabetic effect of Lactobacillus in lowering plasma glucose levels and its use as a vehicle for delivery of protein and antibody fragments has been shown previously. The aim of this study was to employ lactobacilli as a vehicle for in situ production and delivery of GLP-1 analogue to normalize blood glucose level in diabetic GK (Goto-Kakizaki) rats. In this study, we designed pentameric GLP-1 (5×GLP-1) analogues which were both expressed in a secreted form and anchored to the surface of lactobacilli. Intestinal trypsin sites were introduced within 5×GLP-1, leading to digestion of the pentamer into an active monomeric form. The E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides delivered by intestinal intubation to GK rats resulted in a significant improvement of glycemic control demonstrated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Meanwhile, the purified 5×GLP-1 (trypsin-digested) from the Lactobacillus cultures stimulated insulin secretion from HIT-T15 cells, similar to the E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides. When delivered by gavage to GK rats, non-expressor L. paracasei significantly lowered the blood glucose level but 5×GLP-1 expression did not provide an additional anti-diabetic effect, possibly due to the low levels produced. Our results indicate that lactobacilli themselves might be used as an alternative treatment method for type 2 diabetes, but further work is needed to increase the expression level of GLP-1 by lactobacilli in order to obtain a significant insulinotropic effect in vivo. PMID:27610615

  8. Role of Central Nervous System Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptors in Enteric Glucose Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D.; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Iglesias, Miguel A.; Chabo, Chantal; Waget, Aurélie; Colom, André; Rastrelli, Sophie; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Drucker, Daniel J.; Seeley, Randy J.; Burcelin, Remy

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Ingested glucose is detected by specialized sensors in the enteric/hepatoportal vein, which send neural signals to the brain, which in turn regulates key peripheral tissues. Hence, impairment in the control of enteric-neural glucose sensing could contribute to disordered glucose homeostasis. The aim of this study was to determine the cells in the brain targeted by the activation of the enteric glucose-sensing system. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We selectively activated the axis in mice using a low-rate intragastric glucose infusion in wild-type and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor knockout mice, neuropeptide Y–and proopiomelanocortin–green fluorescent protein–expressing mice, and high-fat diet diabetic mice. We quantified the whole-body glucose utilization rate and the pattern of c-Fos positive in the brain. RESULTS—Enteric glucose increased muscle glycogen synthesis by 30% and regulates c-Fos expression in the brainstem and the hypothalamus. Moreover, the synthesis of muscle glycogen was diminished after central infusion of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1Rc) antagonist Exendin 9-39 and abolished in GLP-1Rc knockout mice. Gut-glucose–sensitive c-Fos–positive cells of the arcuate nucleus colocalized with neuropeptide Y–positive neurons but not with proopiomelanocortin-positive neurons. Furthermore, high-fat feeding prevented the enteric activation of c-Fos expression. CONCLUSIONS—We conclude that the gut-glucose sensor modulates peripheral glucose metabolism through a nutrient-sensitive mechanism, which requires brain GLP-1Rc signaling and is impaired during diabetes. PMID:18519802

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-2 protects impaired intestinal mucosal barriers in obstructive jaundice rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Dong, Jia-Tian; Li, Xiao-Jing; Gu, Ye; Cheng, Zhi-Jian; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To observe the protective effect of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on the intestinal barrier of rats with obstructive jaundice and determine the possible mechanisms of action involved in the protective effect. METHODS: Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham operation group, an obstructive jaundice group, and a GLP-2 group; each group consisted of 12 rats. The GLP-2 group was treated with GLP-2 after the day of surgery, whereas the other two groups were treated with the same concentration of normal saline. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin, and endotoxin levels were recorded at 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 d. Furthermore, on the 14th day, body weight, the wet weight of the small intestine, pathological changes of the small intestine and the immunoglobulin A (IgA) expressed by plasma cells located in the small intestinal lamina propria were recorded for each group. RESULTS: In the rat model, jaundice was obvious, and the rats’ activity decreased 4-6 d post bile duct ligation. Compared with the sham operation group, the obstructive jaundice group displayed increased yellow staining of abdominal visceral serosa, decreased small intestine wet weight, thinning of the intestinal muscle layer and villi, villous atrophy, uneven height, fusion, partial villous epithelial cell shedding, substantial inflammatory cell infiltration and significantly reduced IgA expression. However, no significant gross changes were noted between the GLP-2 and sham groups. With time, the levels of ALT, endotoxin and bilirubin in the GLP-2 group were significantly increased compared with the sham group (P < 0.01). The increasing levels of the aforementioned markers were more significant in the obstructive jaundice group than in the GLP-2 group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: GLP-2 reduces intestinal mucosal injuries in obstructive jaundice rats, which might be attributed to increased intestinal IgA and reduced bilirubin and endotoxin. PMID:25593463

  10. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  11. The Effect of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Receptor Agonists on Colonic Anastomotic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Redstone, Heather A.; Buie, William D.; Hart, David A.; Wallace, Laurie; Hornby, Pamela J.; Sague, Sarah; Holst, Jen J.; Sigalet, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is an intestinal specific trophic hormone, with therapeutic potential; the effects on intestinal healing are unknown. We used a rat model of colonic healing, under normoxic, and stress (hypoxic) conditions to examine the effect of GLP-2 on intestinal healing. Methods. Following colonic transection and reanastomosis, animals were randomized to one of six groups (n = 8/group): controls, native GLP-2, long-acting GLP-2 (GLP-2- MIMETIBODY, GLP-2-MMB), animals were housed under normoxic or hypoxic (11%  O2) conditions. Animals were studied five days post-operation for anastomotic strength and wound characteristics. Results. Anastomotic bursting pressure was unchanged by GLP-2 or GLP-2-MMB in normoxic or hypoxic animals; both treatments increased crypt cell proliferation. Wound IL-1β increased with GLP-2; IFNγ with GLP-2 and GLP-2-MMB. IL-10 and TGF-β were decreased; Type I collagen mRNA expression increased in hypoxic animals while Type III collagen was reduced with both GLP-2 agonists. GLP-2 MMB, but not native GLP-2 increased TIMP 1-3 mRNA levels in hypoxia. Conclusions. The effects on CCP, cytokines and wound healing were similar for both GLP-2 agonists under normoxic and hypoxic conditions; anastomotic strength was not affected. This suggests that GLP-2 (or agonists) could be safely used peri-operatively; direct studies will be required. PMID:20953406

  12. Glucagon-induced acetylation of Foxa2 regulates hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    von Meyenn, Ferdinand; Porstmann, Thomas; Gasser, Emanuel; Selevsek, Nathalie; Schmidt, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Stoffel, Markus

    2013-03-05

    Circulating levels of insulin and glucagon reflect the nutritional state of animals and elicit regulatory responses in the liver that maintain glucose and lipid homeostasis. The transcription factor Foxa2 activates lipid metabolism and ketogenesis during fasting and is inhibited via insulin-PI3K-Akt signaling-mediated phosphorylation at Thr156 and nuclear exclusion. Here we show that, in addition, Foxa2 is acetylated at the conserved residue Lys259 following inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) class I-III and the cofactors p300 and SirT1 are involved in Foxa2 acetylation and deacetylation, respectively. Physiologically, fasting states and glucagon stimulation are sufficient to induce Foxa2 acetylation. Introduction of the acetylation-mimicking (K259Q) or -deficient (K259R) mutations promotes or inhibits Foxa2 activity, respectively, and adenoviral expression of Foxa2-K259Q augments expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis. Our study reveals a molecular mechanism by which glucagon signaling activates a fasting response through acetylation of Foxa2.

  13. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  14. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  15. Gastrointestinal actions of glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies: glycaemic control beyond the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Smits, M M; Tonneijck, L; Muskiet, M H A; Kramer, M H H; Cahen, D L; van Raalte, D H

    2016-03-01

    The gastrointestinal hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) lowers postprandial glucose concentrations by regulating pancreatic islet-cell function, with stimulation of glucose-dependent insulin and suppression of glucagon secretion. In addition to endocrine pancreatic effects, mounting evidence suggests that several gastrointestinal actions of GLP-1 are at least as important for glucose-lowering. GLP-1 reduces gastric emptying rate and small bowel motility, thereby delaying glucose absorption and decreasing postprandial glucose excursions. Furthermore, it has been suggested that GLP-1 directly stimulates hepatic glucose uptake, and suppresses hepatic glucose production, thereby adding to reduction of fasting and postprandial glucose levels. GLP-1 receptor agonists, which mimic the effects of GLP-1, have been developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Based on their pharmacokinetic profile, GLP-1 receptor agonists can be broadly categorized as short- or long-acting, with each having unique islet-cell and gastrointestinal effects that lower glucose levels. Short-acting agonists predominantly lower postprandial glucose excursions, by inhibiting gastric emptying and intestinal glucose uptake, with little effect on insulin secretion. By contrast, long-acting agonists mainly reduce fasting glucose levels, predominantly by increased insulin and reduced glucagon secretion, with potential additional direct inhibitory effects on hepatic glucose production. Understanding these pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences may allow personalized antihyperglycaemic therapy in type 2 diabetes. In addition, it may provide the rationale to explore treatment in patients with no or little residual β-cell function.

  16. Defective insulin secretion by chronic glucagon receptor activation in glucose intolerant mice.

    PubMed

    Ahlkvist, Linda; Omar, Bilal; Valeur, Anders; Fosgerau, Keld; Ahrén, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Stimulation of insulin secretion by short-term glucagon receptor (GCGR) activation is well characterized; however, the effect of long-term GCGR activation on β-cell function is not known, but of interest, since hyperglucagonemia occurs early during development of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we examined whether chronic GCGR activation affects insulin secretion in glucose intolerant mice. To induce chronic GCGR activation, high-fat diet fed mice were continuously (2 weeks) infused with the stable glucagon analog ZP-GA-1 and challenged with oral glucose and intravenous glucose±glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1). Islets were isolated to evaluate the insulin secretory response to glucose±GLP1 and their pancreas were collected for immunohistochemical analysis. Two weeks of ZP-GA-1 infusion reduced insulin secretion both after oral and intravenous glucose challenges in vivo and in isolated islets. These inhibitory effects were corrected for by GLP1. Also, we observed increased β-cell area and islet size. We conclude that induction of chronic ZP-GA-1 levels in glucose intolerant mice markedly reduces insulin secretion, and thus, we suggest that chronic activation of the GCGR may contribute to the failure of β-cell function during development of type 2 diabetes.

  17. Evaluation of immunohistochemical staining for glucagon in human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Gurlo, Tatyana; Butler, Peter C; Butler, Alexandra E

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) staining techniques are important diagnostic tools of anatomic pathology in the clinical setting and widely used analytical tools in research laboratories. In diabetes research, they are routinely used for the assessment of beta- and alpha-cell mass, for assessment of endocrine cell distribution within the pancreas, for evaluation of islet composition and islet morphology. Here, we present the evaluation of IHC techniques for the detection of alpha-cells in human pancreatic tissue. We compared the Horse Radish Peroxidase (HRP)-based method utilizing DAB Peroxidase Substrate to the Alkaline Phosphatase (AP)-based method utilizing Vector Red substrate. We conclude that HRP-DAB staining is a robust and reliable method for detection of alpha-cells using either rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal anti-glucagon antibodies. However, AP-Vector Red staining should be used with caution, because it is affected by the dehydration with ethanol and toluene preceding the mounting of slides with Permount mounting medium. When AP-Vector Red is a preferable method for alpha-cell labeling, slides should be mounted using aqueous mounting medium or, alternatively, they could be air-dried before permanent mounting.

  18. Comparative physiology of glucagon-like peptide 2 - Implications and applications for production and health of ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is a 33-amino acid peptide derived from proteolytic cleavage of proglucagon by prohormone convertase 1/3 in enteroendocrine L-cells. Studies conducted in humans, rodent models, and in vitro indicate that GLP-2 is secreted in response to the presence of molecules in th...

  19. Comparative physiology of glucagon-like peptide-2 – Implications and applications for production and health of ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a 33-amino acid peptide derived from proteolytic cleavage of proglucagon by prohormone convertase 1/3 in enteroendocrine L-cells. Studies conducted in humans, rodent models, and in vitro indicate that GLP-2 is secreted in response to the presence of molecules in th...

  20. Cell Cycle and Cell Size Dependent Gene Expression Reveals Distinct Subpopulations at Single-Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Dolatabadi, Soheila; Candia, Julián; Akrap, Nina; Vannas, Christoffer; Tesan Tomic, Tajana; Losert, Wolfgang; Landberg, Göran; Åman, Pierre; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Cell proliferation includes a series of events that is tightly regulated by several checkpoints and layers of control mechanisms. Most studies have been performed on large cell populations, but detailed understanding of cell dynamics and heterogeneity requires single-cell analysis. Here, we used quantitative real-time PCR, profiling the expression of 93 genes in single-cells from three different cell lines. Individual unsynchronized cells from three different cell lines were collected in different cell cycle phases (G0/G1 – S – G2/M) with variable cell sizes. We found that the total transcript level per cell and the expression of most individual genes correlated with progression through the cell cycle, but not with cell size. By applying the random forests algorithm, a supervised machine learning approach, we show how a multi-gene signature that classifies individual cells into their correct cell cycle phase and cell size can be generated. To identify the most predictive genes we used a variable selection strategy. Detailed analysis of cell cycle predictive genes allowed us to define subpopulations with distinct gene expression profiles and to calculate a cell cycle index that illustrates the transition of cells between cell cycle phases. In conclusion, we provide useful experimental approaches and bioinformatics to identify informative and predictive genes at the single-cell level, which opens up new means to describe and understand cell proliferation and subpopulation dynamics. PMID:28179914

  1. Prediabetes linked to excess glucagon in transgenic mice with pancreatic active AKT1.

    PubMed

    Albury-Warren, Toya M; Pandey, Veethika; Spinel, Lina P; Masternak, Michal M; Altomare, Deborah A

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase B/AKT has three isoforms (AKT1-3) and is renowned for its central role in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, due to its constitutive activation in various cancers. AKT2, which is highly expressed in insulin-responsive tissues, has been identified as a primary regulator of glucose metabolism as Akt2 knockout mice (Akt2(-/-)) are glucose-intolerant and insulin-resistant. However, the role of AKT1 in glucose metabolism is not as clearly defined. We previously showed that mice with myristoylated Akt1 (AKT1(Myr)) expressed through a bicistronic Pdx1-TetA and TetO-MyrAkt1 system were susceptible to islet cell carcinomas, and in this study we characterized an early onset, prediabetic phenotype. Beginning at weaning (3 weeks of age), the glucose-intolerant AKT1(Myr) mice exhibited non-fasted hyperglycemia, which progressed to fasted hyperglycemia by 5 months of age. The glucose intolerance was attributed to a fasted hyperglucagonemia, and hepatic insulin resistance detectable by reduced phosphorylation of the insulin receptor following insulin injection into the inferior vena cava. In contrast, treatment with doxycycline diet to turn off the transgene caused attenuation of the non-fasted and fasted hyperglycemia, thus affirming AKT1 hyperactivation as the trigger. Collectively, this model highlights a novel glucagon-mediated mechanism by which AKT1 hyperactivation affects glucose homeostasis and provides an avenue to better delineate the molecular mechanisms responsible for diabetes mellitus and the potential association with pancreatic cancer.

  2. Exogenous glucagon-like peptide 1 reduces contractions in human colon circular muscle.

    PubMed

    Amato, Antonella; Baldassano, Sara; Liotta, Rosa; Serio, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia

    2014-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) is a naturally occurring peptide secreted by intestinal L-cells. Though its primary function is to serve as an incretin, GLP1 reduces gastrointestinal motility. However, only a handful of animal studies have specifically evaluated the influence of GLP1 on colonic motility. Consequently, the aims of this study were to investigate the effects induced by exogenous GLP1, to analyze the mechanism of action, and to verify the presence of GLP1 receptors (GLP1Rs) in human colon circular muscular strips. Organ bath technique, RT-PCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescence were used. In human colon, exogenous GLP1 reduced, in a concentration-dependent manner, the amplitude of the spontaneous contractions without affecting the frequency and the resting basal tone. This inhibitory effect was significantly reduced by exendin (9-39), a GLP1R antagonist, which per se significantly increased the spontaneous mechanical activity. Moreover, it was abolished by tetrodotoxin, a neural blocker, or Nω-nitro-l-arginine - a blocker of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). The biomolecular analysis revealed a genic and protein expression of the GLP1R in the human colon. The double-labeling experiments with anti-neurofilament or anti-nNOS showed, for the first time, that immunoreactivity for the GLP1R was expressed in nitrergic neurons of the myenteric plexus. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that GLP1R is expressed in the human colon and, once activated by exogenous GLP1, mediates an inhibitory effect on large intestine motility through NO neural release.

  3. Expression Profiling of Cell Lines Expressing Regulated NP2 Transcripts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    EGF in the presence or absence of exogenous HRS . The results will provide a framework fo r the interpretation of future gene expression studies in...e studies require further verification. Small sam- ple size, tissue heterogeneity, and inter-indivi- dual variations among human patients may result ... studies we proposed using gene expression profiling to determine change s in gene expression as a function of expression of the neurofibromatosis-2 (NF2

  4. Treatment of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning with a Combination of Intravenous Glucagon, Digoxin and Antioxidant Agents

    PubMed Central

    Oghabian, Zohreh; Mehrpour, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium phosphide (AlP) is used to protect stored grains from rodents. It produces phosphine gas (PH3), a mitochondrial poison thought to cause toxicity by blocking the cytochrome c oxidase enzyme and inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation, which results in cell death. AlP poisoning has a high mortality rate among humans due to the rapid onset of cardiogenic shock and metabolic acidosis, despite aggressive treatment. We report a 21-year-old male who was referred to the Afzalipour Hospital, Kerman, Iran, in 2015 after having intentionally ingested a 3 g AlP tablet. He was successfully treated with crystalloid fluids, vasopressors, sodium bicarbonate, digoxin, glucagon and antioxidant agents and was discharged from the hospital six days after admission in good clinical condition. For the treatment of AlP poisoning, the combination of glucagon and digoxin with antioxidant agents should be considered. However, evaluation of further cases is necessary to optimise treatment protocols. PMID:27606117

  5. Gene Expression by Mouse Inner Ear Hair Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Déborah I.; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance. As a consequence, pathogenic variants in genes specifically expressed in hair cells often cause hereditary deafness. Hair cells are few in number and not easily isolated from the adjacent supporting cells, so the biochemistry and molecular biology of hair cells can be difficult to study. To study gene expression in hair cells, we developed a protocol for hair cell isolation by FACS. With nearly pure hair cells and surrounding cells, from cochlea and utricle and from E16 to P7, we performed a comprehensive cell type-specific RNA-Seq study of gene expression during mouse inner ear development. Expression profiling revealed new hair cell genes with distinct expression patterns: some are specific for vestibular hair cells, others for cochlear hair cells, and some are expressed just before or after maturation of mechanosensitivity. We found that many of the known hereditary deafness genes are much more highly expressed in hair cells than surrounding cells, suggesting that genes preferentially expressed in hair cells are good candidates for unknown deafness genes. PMID:25904789

  6. Anti-atherogenic and anti-inflammatory properties of glucagon-like peptide-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypepide, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Tsutomu; Mori, Yusaku

    2016-04-01

    We reported that native incretins, liraglutide and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i) all confer an anti-atherosclerotic effect in apolipoprotein E-null (Apoe (-/-)) mice. We confirmed the anti-atherogenic property of incretin-related agents in the mouse wire injury model, in which the neointimal formation in the femoral artery is remarkably suppressed. Furthermore, we showed that DPP-4i substantially suppresses plaque formation in coronary arteries with a marked reduction in the accumulation of macrophages in cholesterol-fed rabbits. DPP-4i showed an anti-atherosclerotic effect in Apoe (-/-) mice mainly through the actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypepide. However, the dual incretin receptor antagonists partially attenuated the suppressive effect of DPP-4i on atherosclerosis in diabetic Apoe (-/-) mice, suggesting an incretin-independent mechanism. Exendin-4 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypepide elicited cyclic adenosine monophosphate generation, and suppressed the lipopolysaccharide-induced gene expression of inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in U937 human monocytes. This suppressive effect, however, was attenuated by an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase and mimicked by 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine monophosphate or forskolin. DPP-4i substantially suppressed the lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines without affecting cyclic adenosine monophosphate generation or cell proliferation. DPP-4i more strongly suppressed the lipopolysaccharide-induced gene expression of inflammatory molecules than incretins, most likely through inactivation of CD26. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypepide suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced macrophage foam cell formation in a receptor-dependent manner, which was associated with the downregulation of acyl-coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase-1 and CD36, as

  7. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes.

  8. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1-Mediated Modulation of Inflammatory Pathways in the Diabetic Brain: Relevance to Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Qin, LiMei; Chong, Thomas; Rodriguez, Richard; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation has emerged as an important cause of cognitive decline during aging and in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Chronic low-grade inflammation is observed in obesity and diabetes, which are important risk factors for AD. Therefore, we examined the markers of inflammation in the brain hippocampal samples of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Pathway-specific gene expression profiling revealed significant increases in the expression of oxidative stress and inflammatory genes. Western blot analysis further showed the activation of NF-kB, defective CREB phosphorylation, and decreases in the levels of neuroprotective CREB target proteins, including Bcl-2, BDNF, and BIRC3 in the diabetic rat brain samples, all of which are related to AD pathology. As therapies based on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are effective in controlling blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients, we tested the in vivo actions of GLP-1 in the diabetic brain by a 10-wk treatment of ZDF rats with alogliptin, an inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase. Alogliptin increased the circulating levels of GLP-1 by 125% and decreased blood glucose in diabetic rats by 59%. Normalization of defective signaling to CREB in the hippocampal samples of treated diabetic rats resulted in the increased expression of CREB targets. Dual actions of GLP-1 in the pancreatic beta cells and in the brain suggest that incretin therapies may reduce cognitive decline in the aging diabetic patients and also have the potential to be used in treating Alzheimer's patients.

  9. Colony-forming progenitor cells in the postnatal mouse liver and pancreas give rise to morphologically distinct insulin-expressing colonies in 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Feng, Tao; Chai, Jing; Ghazalli, Nadiah; Gao, Dan; Zerda, Ricardo; Li, Zhuo; Hsu, Jasper; Mahdavi, Alborz; Tirrell, David A; Riggs, Arthur D; Ku, Hsun Teresa

    2014-01-01

    In our previous studies, colony-forming progenitor cells isolated from murine embryonic stem cell-derived cultures were differentiated into morphologically distinct insulin-expressing colonies. These colonies were small and not light-reflective when observed by phase-contrast microscopy (therefore termed "Dark" colonies). A single progenitor cell capable of giving rise to a Dark colony was termed a Dark colony-forming unit (CFU-Dark). The goal of the current study was to test whether endogenous pancreas, and its developmentally related liver, harbored CFU-Dark. Here we show that dissociated single cells from liver and pancreas of one-week-old mice give rise to Dark colonies in methylcellulose-based semisolid culture media containing either Matrigel or laminin hydrogel (an artificial extracellular matrix protein). CFU-Dark comprise approximately 0.1% and 0.03% of the postnatal hepatic and pancreatic cells, respectively. Adult liver also contains CFU-Dark, but at a much lower frequency (~0.003%). Microfluidic qRT-PCR, immunostaining, and electron microscopy analyses of individually handpicked colonies reveal the expression of insulin in many, but not all, Dark colonies. Most pancreatic insulin-positive Dark colonies also express glucagon, whereas liver colonies do not. Liver CFU-Dark require Matrigel, but not laminin hydrogel, to become insulin-positive. In contrast, laminin hydrogel is sufficient to support the development of pancreatic Dark colonies that express insulin. Postnatal liver CFU-Dark display a cell surface marker CD133⁺CD49f(low)CD107b(low) phenotype, while pancreatic CFU-Dark are CD133⁻. Together, these results demonstrate that specific progenitor cells in the postnatal liver and pancreas are capable of developing into insulin-expressing colonies, but they differ in frequency, marker expression, and matrix protein requirements for growth.

  10. Probing cell-free gene expression noise in femtoliter volumes.

    PubMed

    Karig, David K; Jung, Seung-Yong; Srijanto, Bernadeta; Collier, C Patrick; Simpson, Michael L

    2013-09-20

    Cell-free systems offer a simplified and flexible context that enables important biological reactions while removing complicating factors such as fitness, division, and mutation that are associated with living cells. However, cell-free expression in unconfined spaces is missing important elements of expression in living cells. In particular, the small volume of living cells can give rise to significant stochastic effects, which are negligible in bulk cell-free reactions. Here, we confine cell-free gene expression reactions to cell-relevant 20 fL volumes (between the volumes of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ), in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) containers. We demonstrate that expression efficiency varies widely among different containers, likely due to non-Poisson distribution of expression machinery at the observed scale. Previously, this phenomenon has been observed only in liposomes. In addition, we analyze gene expression noise. This analysis is facilitated by our use of cell-free systems, which allow the mapping of the measured noise properties to intrinsic noise models. In contrast, previous live cell noise analysis efforts have been complicated by multiple noise sources. Noise analysis reveals signatures of translational bursting, while noise dynamics suggest that overall cell-free expression is limited by a diminishing translation rate. In addition to offering a unique approach to understanding noise in gene circuits, our work contributes to a deeper understanding of the biophysical properties of cell-free expression systems, thus aiding efforts to harness cell-free systems for synthetic biology applications.

  11. Glucagon in the artificial pancreas: supply and marketing challenges.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The use of glucagon, in conjunction with insulin, in a dual chamber pump (artificial pancreas, AP) is a working goal for multiple companies and researchers. However, capital investment to create, operate, and maintain facilities with sufficient scale to produce enough glucagon to treat millions of patients, at a level of profit that makes it feasible, will be substantial. It can be assumed that the marketplace will expect the daily cost of glucagon (to the consumer) to be similar to the daily cost of insulin. After one subtracts wholesaler and pharmacy markup, there may be very few dollars remaining for the drug company to cover profit, capital expenditures, marketing, burden, and other costs. Without the potential for adequate margins, manufacturers may not be willing to take the risk. Assuming that the projections discussed in this article are in the right ballpark, advance planning for the supply for glucagon needs to start today and not wait for the AP to come to market.

  12. Expression of recombinant ADAMTS in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gavin C; Vankemmelbeke, Mireille N; Buttle, David J

    2010-01-01

    The "a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs" (ADAMTS) enzymes are secreted proteinases involved in development, blood clotting and the turnover of extracellular matrix. Manufacturing recombinant enzyme presents quite a challenge due to the presence of disulphide bridges, the large size and modular structure. A sub-group of these enzymes are known as "aggrecanases" and it is likely that they are involved in a number of pathologies related to increased turnover of the extracellular matrix, particularly in tissues where the concentration of proteoglycans is high, such as cartilage and the central nervous system. We have expressed three of these enzymes, ADAMTS-1, -4 and -5, in insect cells using plasmid-based systems.

  13. The fluctuation of blood glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations before and after insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Idam; Nasir, Zulfa

    2015-09-01

    A dynamical-systems model of plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations has been developed to investigate the effects of insulin therapy on blood glucose, insulin and glucagon regulations in type 1 diabetic patients. Simulation results show that the normal regulation of blood glucose concentration depends on insulin and glucagon concentrations. On type 1 diabetic case, the role of insulin on regulating blood glucose is not optimal because of the destruction of β cells in pancreas. These β cells destructions cause hyperglycemic episode affecting the whole body metabolism. To get over this, type 1 diabetic patients need insulin therapy to control the blood glucose level. This research has been done by using rapid acting insulin (lispro), long-acting insulin (glargine) and the combination between them to know the effects of insulin therapy on blood glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations. Simulation results show that these different types of insulin have different effects on blood glucose concentration. Insulin therapy using lispro shows better blood glucose control after consumption of meals. Glargin gives better blood glucose control between meals and during sleep. Combination between lispro and glargine shows better glycemic control for whole day blood glucose level.

  14. Altered mitochondrial function after acute alteration of the endogenous insulin/glucagon ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Rohweder-Dunn, G.; Aprille, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    Mannoheptulose (MH) affects pancreatic Islet cells to cause a drop in serum insulin and a rise in glucagon. This effect peaks 1 hr after injection and results in a 3-fold increase in serum glucose. Here they examined whether metabolic functions of liver mitochondria (mito) are altered by this change in hormone status. Rats fed ad lib on 12 hr light/dark cycles were given MH (2g/kg) or vehicle i.p. during the first 2 hrs of the light cycle. Liver mito were isolated 1 hr later. Acid-extracts were assayed for ATP+ADP+AMP (nmol/mg prot). Citrulline synthesis and pyruvate carboxylation rates (nmol/min/mg prot) were assayed by following H(/sup 14/C)O/sub 3//sup -/ fixation in appropriate media. State 3 and 2,4-DNP-uncoupled respiratory rates (1/2 nmol O/sub 2//min/mg prot) were assayed polarographically with succinate. The effects of MH on mito are comparable to reported effects of glucagon injection. MH evokes acute reciprocal changes in insulin and glucagon that are highly reproducible. Thus, MH offers an interesting model for studying the effect of endogenous hormones on mito functions.

  15. Effect of Butyrate on Collagen Expression, Cell Viability, Cell Cycle Progression and Related Proteins Expression of MG-63 Osteoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Ling; Liou, Eric Jein-Wein; Tang, Chia-Mei; Wang, Tong-Mei; Liu, Hsin-Cheng; Liao, Ming-Wei; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Chan, Chiu-Po; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Aims Butyric acid is one major metabolic product generated by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria of periodontal and root canal infection. Butyric acid affects the activity of periodontal cells such as osteoblasts. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of butyrate on MG-63 osteoblasts. Methods MG-63 cells were exposed to butyrate and cell viability was estimated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and cell cycle-related proteins were measured by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blotting or immunofluorescent staining. Cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence flow cytometry. Results Exposure to butyrate suppressed cell proliferation, and induced G2/M (8 and 16 mM) cell cycle arrest of MG-63 cells. Some cell apoptosis was noted. The mRNA expression of cdc2 and cyclin-B1 decreased after exposure to butyrate. The protein expression of type I collagen, cdc2 and cyclin B1 were decreased, whereas the expression of p21, p27 and p57 was stimulated. Under the treatment of butyrate, ROS production in MG-63 cells markedly increased. Conclusions The secretion of butyric acid by periodontal and root canal microorganisms may inhibit bone cell growth and matrix turnover. This is possibly due to induction of cell cycle arrest and ROS generation and inhibition of collagen expression. These results suggest the involvement of butyric acid in the pathogenesis of periodontal and periapical tissue destruction by impairing bone healing responses. PMID:27893752

  16. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the glucagon-like peptide-1 analog liraglutide in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Hall, M J; Adin, C A; Borin-Crivellenti, S; Rudinsky, A J; Rajala-Schultz, P; Lakritz, J; Gilor, C

    2015-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal hormone that induces glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion while suppressing glucagon secretion. Glucagon-like peptide-1 also increases beta cell mass and satiation while decelerating gastric emptying. Liraglutide is a fatty-acid derivative of GLP-1 with a protracted pharmacokinetic profile that is used in people for treatment of type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of liraglutide in healthy cats. Hyperglycemic clamps were performed on days 0 (HGC) and 14 (LgHGC) in 7 healthy cats. Liraglutide was administered subcutaneously (0.6 mg/cat) once daily on days 8 through 14. Compared with the HGC (mean ± standard deviation; 455.5 ± 115.8 ng/L), insulin concentrations during LgHGC were increased (760.8 ± 350.7 ng/L; P = 0.0022), glucagon concentrations decreased (0.66 ± 0.4 pmol/L during HGC vs 0.5 ± 0.4 pmol/L during LgHGC; P = 0.0089), and there was a trend toward an increased total glucose infused (median [range] = 1.61 (1.11-2.54) g/kg and 2.25 (1.64-3.10) g/kg, respectively; P = 0.087). Appetite reduction and decreased body weight (9% ± 3%; P = 0.006) were observed in all cats. Liraglutide has similar effects and pharmacokinetics profile in cats to those reported in people. With a half-life of approximately 12 h, once daily dosing might be feasible; however, significant effects on appetite and weight loss may necessitate dosage or dosing frequency reductions. Further investigation of liraglutide in diabetic cats and overweight cats is warranted.

  17. Evidence for a catabolic role of glucagon during an amino acid load.

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, M R; Adey, D B; Nair, K S

    1996-01-01

    Despite the strong association between protein catabolic conditions and hyperglucagonemia, and enhanced glucagon secretion by amino acids (AA), glucagon's effects on protein metabolism remain less clear than on glucose metabolism. To clearly define glucagon's catabolic effect on protein metabolism during AA load, we studied the effects of glucagon on circulating AA and protein dynamics in six healthy subjects. Five protocols were performed in each subject using somatostatin to inhibit the secretion of insulin, glucagon, and growth hormone (GH) and selectively replacing these hormones in different protocols. Total AA concentration was the highest when glucagon, insulin, and GH were low. Selective increase of glucagon levels prevented this increment in AA. Addition of high levels of insulin and GH to high glucagon had no effect on total AA levels, although branched chain AA levels declined. Glucagon mostly decreased glucogenic AA and enhanced glucose production. Endogenous leucine flux, reflecting proteolysis, decreased while leucine oxidation increased in protocols where AA were infused and these changes were unaffected by the hormones. Nonoxidative leucine flux reflecting protein synthesis was stimulated by AA, but high glucagon attenuated this effect. Addition of GH and insulin partially reversed the inhibitory effect of glucagon on protein synthesis. We conclude that glucagon is the pivotal hormone in amino acid disposal during an AA load and, by reducing the availability of AA, glucagon inhibits protein synthesis stimulated by AA. These data provide further support for a catabolic role of glucagon at physiological concentrations. PMID:8690809

  18. Glucagon sensitivity and clearance in type 1 diabetes: insights from in vivo and in silico experiments

    PubMed Central

    Hinshaw, Ling; Mallad, Ashwini; Dalla Man, Chiara; Cobelli, Claudio; Carter, Rickey E.; Kudva, Yogish C.; Basu, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon use in artificial pancreas for type 1 diabetes (T1D) is being explored for prevention and rescue from hypoglycemia. However, the relationship between glucagon stimulation of endogenous glucose production (EGP) viz., hepatic glucagon sensitivity, and prevailing glucose concentrations has not been examined. To test the hypothesis that glucagon sensitivity is increased at hypoglycemia vs. euglycemia, we studied 29 subjects with T1D randomized to a hypoglycemia or euglycemia clamp. Each subject was studied at three glucagon doses at euglycemia or hypoglycemia, with EGP measured by isotope dilution technique. The peak EGP increments and the integrated EGP response increased with increasing glucagon dose during euglycemia and hypoglycemia. However, the difference in dose response based on glycemia was not significant despite higher catecholamine concentrations in the hypoglycemia group. Knowledge of glucagon's effects on EGP was used to develop an in silico glucagon action model. The model-derived output fitted the obtained data at both euglycemia and hypoglycemia for all glucagon doses tested. Glucagon clearance did not differ between glucagon doses studied in both groups. Therefore, the glucagon controller of a dual hormone control system may not need to adjust glucagon sensitivity, and hence glucagon dosing, based on glucose concentrations during euglycemia and hypoglycemia. PMID:26152766

  19. Global gene expression analyses of hematopoietic stem cell-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Karin; Wirta, Valtteri; Dahl, Lina; Bruce, Sara; Lundeberg, Joakim; Carlsson, Leif; Williams, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in murine hematopoietic cells allows for the generation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like cell lines. To address the molecular basis of Lhx2 function, we generated HSC-like cell lines where Lhx2 expression is regulated by a tet-on system and hence dependent on the presence of doxycyclin (dox). These cell lines efficiently down-regulate Lhx2 expression upon dox withdrawal leading to a rapid differentiation into various myeloid cell types. Results Global gene expression of these cell lines cultured in dox was compared to different time points after dox withdrawal using microarray technology. We identified 267 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the genes overlapping with HSC-specific databases were those down-regulated after turning off Lhx2 expression and a majority of the genes overlapping with those defined as late progenitor-specific genes were the up-regulated genes, suggesting that these cell lines represent a relevant model system for normal HSCs also at the level of global gene expression. Moreover, in situ hybridisations of several genes down-regulated after dox withdrawal showed overlapping expression patterns with Lhx2 in various tissues during embryonic development. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis of HSC-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression has identified genes putatively linked to self-renewal / differentiation of HSCs, and function of Lhx2 in organ development and stem / progenitor cells of non-hematopoietic origin. PMID:16600034

  20. Metformin enhances glucagon-like peptide 1 via cooperation between insulin and Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hyun; Jee, Jae-Hwan; Park, Sunyoung; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kim, Kwang-Won; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2014-02-01

    One aspect of the effects of metformin on glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 might be associated with the mechanism by which the cross talk between insulin and Wnt signaling enhances GLP1 secretion, due to the action of metformin as an insulin sensitizer. However, this remains completely unknown. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms of the action of metformin on cross talk between insulin and Wnt signaling. GLP1 enhancement by meformin was determined in human NCI-H716 intestinal L-cells and hyperglycemic db/db mice treated with metformin (0.25 and 0.5 mM and/or 12.5 mg/kg body weight) for 24 h and 2 months. Metformin increased GLP1 secretion in L-cells and db/db mice. Metformin stimulated the nuclear translocation of β-catenin and TOPflash reporter activity, and gene depletion of β-catenin or enhancement of mutation of transcription factor 7-like 2 binding site offset GLP1. In addition, insulin receptor substrate 2 gene depletion blocked metformin-enhanced β-catenin translocation. These effects were preceded by an increase in glucose utilization and calcium influx, the activation of calcium-dependent protein kinase, and, in turn, the activation of insulin signaling, and the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, a potent inhibitor of β-catenin. Furthermore, high blood glucose levels were controlled via GLP1 receptor-dependent insulinotropic pathways in db/db mice, which were evidenced by the increase in GLP1 and insulin levels at 30 min after oral glucose loading and pancreatic insulinotropic gene expression. Our findings indicate that the cooperation between Wnt and its upstream insulin signaling pathways might be a novel and important mechanism underlying the effects of metformin on GLP1 production.

  1. Increased glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion may be involved in antidiabetic effects of ginsenosides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Can; Zhang, Mian; Hu, Meng-Yue; Guo, Hai-Fang; Li, Jia; Yu, Yun-Li; Jin, Shi; Wang, Xin-Ting; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2013-05-01

    Panax ginseng is one of the most popular herbal remedies. Ginsenosides, major bioactive constituents in P. ginseng, have shown good antidiabetic action, but the precise mechanism was not fully understood. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) is considered to be an important incretin that can regulate glucose homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract after meals. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ginseng total saponins (GTS) exerts its antidiabetic effects via modulating GLP1 release. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), the most abundant constituent in GTS, was selected to further explore the underlying mechanisms in cultured NCI-H716 cells. Diabetic rats were developed by a combination of high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin injection. The diabetic rats orally received GTS (150 or 300 mg/kg) daily for 4 weeks. It was found that GTS treatment significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, accompanied by a significant increase in glucose-induced GLP1 secretion and upregulation of proglucagon gene expression. Data from NCI-H716 cells showed that both GTS and Rb1 promoted GLP1 secretion. It was observed that Rb1 increased the ratio of intracellular ATP to ADP concentration and intracellular Ca2+ concentration. The metabolic inhibitor azide (3 mM), the KATP channel opener diazoxide (340 μM), and the Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (20 μM) significantly reversed Rb1-mediated GLP1 secretion. All these results drew a conclusion that ginsenosides stimulated GLP1 secretion both in vivo and in vitro. The antidiabetic effects of ginsenosides may be a result of enhanced GLP1 secretion.

  2. cell type–specific gene expression differences in complex tissues

    PubMed Central

    Shen-Orr, Shai S; Tibshirani, Robert; Khatri, Purvesh; Bodian, Dale L; Staedtler, Frank; Perry, Nicholas M; Hastie, Trevor; Sarwal, Minnie M; Davis, Mark M; Butte, Atul J

    2013-01-01

    We describe cell type–specific significance analysis of microarrays (cssam) for analyzing differential gene expression for each cell type in a biological sample from microarray data and relative cell-type frequencies. first, we validated cssam with predesigned mixtures and then applied it to whole-blood gene expression datasets from stable post-transplant kidney transplant recipients and those experiencing acute transplant rejection, which revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes that were otherwise undetectable. PMID:20208531

  3. Distinct effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist on islet morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Morita, Asuka; Mukai, Eri; Hiratsuka, Ayano; Takatani, Tomozumi; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Lee, Eun Young; Miki, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Although the two anti-diabetic drugs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP4is) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (GLP1RAs), have distinct effects on the dynamics of circulating incretins, little is known of the difference in their consequences on morphology and function of pancreatic islets. We examined these in a mouse model of β cell injury/regeneration. The model mice were generated so as to express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor and a fluorescent protein (Tomato) specifically in β cells. The mice were treated with a DPP4i (MK-0626) and a GLP1RA (liraglutide), singly or doubly, and the morphology and function of the islets were compared. Prior administration of MK-0626 and/or liraglutide similarly protected β cells from DT-induced cell death, indicating that enhanced GLP-1 signaling can account for the cytoprotection. However, 2-week intervention of MK-0626 and/or liraglutide in DT-injected mice resulted in different islet morphology and function: β cell proliferation and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) were increased by MK-0626 but not by liraglutide; α cell mass was decreased by liraglutide but not by MK-0626. Although liraglutide administration nullified MK-0626-induced β cell proliferation, their co-administration resulted in increased GSIS, decreased α cell mass, and improved glucose tolerance. The pro-proliferative effect of MK-0626 was lost by co-administration of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39), indicating that GLP-1 signaling is required for this effect. Comparison of the effects of DPP4is and/or GLP1RAs treatment in a single mouse model shows that the two anti-diabetic drugs have distinct consequences on islet morphology and function.

  4. Probing cell-free gene expression noise in femtoliter volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Karig, David K; Jung, Seung-Yong; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Collier, Pat; Simpson, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free systems offer a simplified and flexible context that enables important biological reactions while removing complicating factors such as fitness, division, and mutation that are associated with living cells. However, cell-free expression in unconfined spaces is missing important elements of expression in living cells. In particular, the small volume of living cells can give rise to significant stochastic effects, which are negligible in bulk cell-free reactions. Here, we confine cell-free gene expression reactions to cell relevant 20 fL volumes (between the volumes of E. coli and S. cerevisiae), in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) containers. We demonstrate that expression efficiency varies widely at this volume, and we analyze gene expression noise. Noise analysis reveals signatures of translational bursting while noise dynamics suggest that overall cell-free expression is limited by a diminishing translation rate. In addition to offering a unique approach to understanding noise in gene circuits, our work contributes to a deeper understanding of the biophysical properties of cell-free expression systems, thus aiding efforts to harness cell-free systems for synthetic biology applications.

  5. Coadministration of glucagon-like peptide-1 during glucagon infusion in humans results in increased energy expenditure and amelioration of hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tricia M; Field, Benjamin C T; McCullough, Katherine A; Troke, Rachel C; Chambers, Edward S; Salem, Victoria; Gonzalez Maffe, Juan; Baynes, Kevin C R; De Silva, Akila; Viardot, Alexander; Alsafi, Ali; Frost, Gary S; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2013-04-01

    Glucagon and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 are the primary products of proglucagon processing from the pancreas and gut, respectively. Giving dual agonists with glucagon and GLP-1 activity to diabetic, obese mice causes enhanced weight loss and improves glucose tolerance by reduction of food intake and by increase in energy expenditure (EE). We aimed to observe the effect of a combination of glucagon and GLP-1 on resting EE and glycemia in healthy human volunteers. In a randomized, double-blinded crossover study, 10 overweight or obese volunteers without diabetes received placebo infusion, GLP-1 alone, glucagon alone, and GLP-1 plus glucagon simultaneously. Resting EE--measured using indirect calorimetry--was not affected by GLP-1 infusion but rose significantly with glucagon alone and to a similar degree with glucagon and GLP-1 together. Glucagon infusion was accompanied by a rise in plasma glucose levels, but addition of GLP-1 to glucagon rapidly reduced this excursion, due to a synergistic insulinotropic effect. The data indicate that drugs with glucagon and GLP-1 agonist activity may represent a useful treatment for type 2 diabetes and obesity. Long-term studies are required to demonstrate that this combination will reduce weight and improve glycemia in patients.

  6. Gastrin: a distinct fate of neurogenin3 positive progenitor cells in the embryonic pancreas.

    PubMed

    Suissa, Yaron; Magenheim, Judith; Stolovich-Rain, Miri; Hija, Ayat; Collombat, Patrick; Mansouri, Ahmed; Sussel, Lori; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz; McCracken, Kyle; Wells, James M; Heller, R Scott; Dor, Yuval; Glaser, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenin3(+) (Ngn3(+)) progenitor cells in the developing pancreas give rise to five endocrine cell types secreting insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin. Gastrin is a hormone produced primarily by G-cells in the stomach, where it functions to stimulate acid secretion by gastric parietal cells. Gastrin is expressed in the embryonic pancreas and is common in islet cell tumors, but the lineage and regulators of pancreatic gastrin(+) cells are not known. We report that gastrin is abundantly expressed in the embryonic pancreas and disappears soon after birth. Some gastrin(+) cells in the developing pancreas co-express glucagon, ghrelin or pancreatic polypeptide, but many gastrin(+) cells do not express any other islet hormone. Pancreatic gastrin(+) cells express the transcription factors Nkx6.1, Nkx2.2 and low levels of Pdx1, and derive from Ngn3(+) endocrine progenitor cells as shown by genetic lineage tracing. Using mice deficient for key transcription factors we show that gastrin expression depends on Ngn3, Nkx2.2, NeuroD1 and Arx, but not Pax4 or Pax6. Finally, gastrin expression is induced upon differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to pancreatic endocrine cells expressing insulin. Thus, gastrin(+) cells are a distinct endocrine cell type in the pancreas and an alternative fate of Ngn3+ cells.

  7. Estradiol Upregulates c-FLIPlong Expression in Anterior Pituitary Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaita, G; Zárate, S; Ferraris, J; Gottardo, M F; Eijo, G; Magri, M L; Pisera, D; Seilicovich, A

    2016-04-01

    Anterior pituitary cell turnover depends on a tight balance between proliferation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that estrogens sensitize anterior pituitary cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli. c-FLIP (cellular-FLICE-inhibitory-protein) isoforms are regulatory proteins of apoptosis triggered by death receptors. c-FLIPshort isoform competes with procaspase-8 inhibiting its activation. However, c-FLIPlong isoform may have a pro- or anti-apoptotic function depending on its expression level. In the present study, we explored whether estrogens modulate c-FLIP expression in anterior pituitary cells from ovariectomized (OVX) rats and in GH3 cells, a somatolactotrope cell line. Acute administration of 17β-estradiol to OVX rats increased c-FLIPlong expression in the anterior pituitary gland without changing c-FLIPshort expression as assessed by Western blot. Estradiol in vitro also increased c-FLIPlong expression in anterior pituitary cells but not in GH3 cells. As determined by flow cytometry, the percentage of anterior pituitary cells expressing c-FLIP was higher than in GH3 cells. However, c-FLIP fluorescence intensity in GH3 cells was higher than in anterior pituitary cells. FasL increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive GH3 cells incubated either with or without estradiol suggesting that the pro-apoptotic action of Fas activation is estrogen-independent. Our results show that unlike what happens in nontumoral pituitary cells, estrogens do not modulate either c-FLIPlong expression or FasL-induced apoptosis in GH3 cells. The stimulatory effect of estradiol on c-FLIPlong expression could be involved in the sensitizing effect of this steroid to apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells. The absence of this estrogenic action in tumor pituitary cells could be involved in their tumor-like behavior.

  8. Characteristics and EGFP expression of goat mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y-M; He, X-Y; Zhang, Y

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to establish a goat mammary gland epithelial (GMGE) cell line, and (ii) to determine if these GMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of GMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating goat. The passage 16 GMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in GMGE cells was test by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was test for GMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that when grown at low density on a plastic substratum, the GMGE cells formed islands, and when grown to confluency, the cells formed a monolayer and aggregated with the characteristic cobble-stone morphology of epithelial cells. GMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the lumen-like structures formed among the cells. Several blister-like structures appeared in the appearance of the cells. The GMGE cells contained different cell types, majority of the cells were short shuttle-like or polygon which were beehive-like. A part of cells were round and flat, a small number of cells were elongated. Some of the GMGE cells contained milk drops. The cell nuclei were round which had 2-4 obvious cores. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells in GMGE cells by immunofluorescence. The GMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the GMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected GMGE (ET-GMGE) cell line and maintained it long-term in culture by continuous subculturing.

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) induces M2 polarization of human macrophages via STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2012-08-24

    It is known that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone secreted postprandially from the L-cells of the small intestine and regulates glucose homeostasis. GLP-1 is now used for the treatment of diabetes because of its beneficial role against insulin resistance. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed on many cell types, including macrophages, and GLP-1 suppresses the development of atherosclerosis by inhibiting macrophage function. However, there have so far been few studies that have investigated the significance of GLP-1/GLP-1R signaling in macrophage activation. In the present study, we examined the effect of GLP-1 and exenatide, a GLP-1R agonist, on human monocyte-derived macrophage (HMDM) activation. We found that GLP-1 induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation. Silencing of GLP-1R suppressed the GLP-1-induced STAT3 activation. In addition, alternatively activated (M2) macrophage-related molecules, such as IL-10, CD163, and CD204 in HMDM, were significantly upregulated by GLP-1. Furthermore, the co-culture of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with GLP-1-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages increased the secretion of adiponectin compared to co-culture of the 3T3-L1 adipocytes with untreated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results demonstrate that GLP-1 induces macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype, which may contribute to the protective effects of GLP-1 against diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Advantages and applications of CAR-expressing natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Glienke, Wolfgang; Esser, Ruth; Priesner, Christoph; Suerth, Julia D; Schambach, Axel; Wels, Winfried S; Grez, Manuel; Kloess, Stephan; Arseniev, Lubomir; Koehl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to donor T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are known to mediate anti-cancer effects without the risk of inducing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In order to improve cytotoxicity against resistant cancer cells, auspicious efforts have been made with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T- and NK cells. These CAR-modified cells express antigen receptors against tumor-associated surface antigens, thus redirecting the effector cells and enhancing tumor-specific immunosurveillance. However, many cancer antigens are also expressed on healthy tissues, potentially leading to off tumor/on target toxicity by CAR-engineered cells. In order to control such potentially severe side effects, the insertion of suicide genes into CAR-modified effectors can provide a means for efficient depletion of these cells. While CAR-expressing T cells have entered successfully clinical trials, experience with CAR-engineered NK cells is mainly restricted to pre-clinical investigations and predominantly to NK cell lines. In this review we summarize the data on CAR expressing NK cells focusing on the possible advantage using these short-lived effector cells and discuss the necessity of suicide switches. Furthermore, we address the compliance of such modified NK cells with regulatory requirements as a new field in cellular immunotherapy.

  11. Transferrin receptor expression by stimulated cells in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Walton, K W

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TRFr) expression by cells in mixed lymphocyte culture increases steadily for the first 5 days, but then reaches a plateau. By the sixth day in culture, about 20% of viable cells express TRFr in two-way mixed lymphocyte reactions. This subpopulation of TRFr-positive cells represents the proliferating population; it is heterogeneous, containing T-cell blasts and smaller cells which are a mixture of T and non-T cells. A small group of non-T cells have phenotypic similarity to natural killer (NK) cells. T cells appear to divide earlier in the course of the response than non-T cells. The biphasic nature of this response and the slower non-T reactivity may be due to a secondary stimulation of non-T cells by factors released from activated T cells (such as interleukin-2). PMID:2982734

  12. Glutamatergic phenotype of glucagon-like peptide 1 neurons in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, H.; Stornetta, R. L.; Agassandian, K.

    2017-01-01

    The expression of a vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) suffices to assign a glutamatergic phenotype to neurons and other secretory cells. For example, intestinal L cells express VGLUT2 and secrete glutamate along with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1). We hypothesized that GLP1-positive neurons within the caudal (visceral) nucleus of the solitary tract (cNST) also are glutamatergic. To test this, the axonal projections of GLP1 and other neurons within the cNST were labeled in rats via iontophoretic delivery of anterograde tracer. Dual immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy was used to visualize tracer-, GLP1-, and VGLUT2-positive fibers within brainstem, hypothalamic, and limbic forebrain nuclei that receive input from the cNST. Electron microscopy was used to confirm GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling within the same axon varicosities, and fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to examine VGLUT2 mRNA expression by GLP1-positive neurons. Most anterograde tracer-labeled fibers displayed VGLUT2-positive varicosities, providing new evidence that ascending axonal projections from the cNST are primarily glutamatergic. Virtually all GLP1-positive varicosities also were VGLUT2-positive. Electron microscopy confirmed the colocalization of GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling in axon terminals that formed asymmetric (excitatory-type) synapses with unlabeled dendrites in the hypothalamus. Finally, in situ hybridization confirmed that GLP1-positive cNST neurons express VGLUT2 mRNA. Thus, hindbrain GLP1 neurons in rats are equipped to store glutamate in synaptic vesicles, and likely co-release both glutamate and GLP1 from axon varicosities and terminals in the hypothalamus and other brain regions. PMID:25012114

  13. Glutamatergic phenotype of glucagon-like peptide 1 neurons in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H; Stornetta, R L; Agassandian, K; Rinaman, Linda

    2015-09-01

    The expression of a vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) suffices to assign a glutamatergic phenotype to neurons and other secretory cells. For example, intestinal L cells express VGLUT2 and secrete glutamate along with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1). We hypothesized that GLP1-positive neurons within the caudal (visceral) nucleus of the solitary tract (cNST) also are glutamatergic. To test this, the axonal projections of GLP1 and other neurons within the cNST were labeled in rats via iontophoretic delivery of anterograde tracer. Dual immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy was used to visualize tracer-, GLP1-, and VGLUT2-positive fibers within brainstem, hypothalamic, and limbic forebrain nuclei that receive input from the cNST. Electron microscopy was used to confirm GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling within the same axon varicosities, and fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to examine VGLUT2 mRNA expression by GLP1-positive neurons. Most anterograde tracer-labeled fibers displayed VGLUT2-positive varicosities, providing new evidence that ascending axonal projections from the cNST are primarily glutamatergic. Virtually all GLP1-positive varicosities also were VGLUT2-positive. Electron microscopy confirmed the colocalization of GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling in axon terminals that formed asymmetric (excitatory-type) synapses with unlabeled dendrites in the hypothalamus. Finally, in situ hybridization confirmed that GLP1-positive cNST neurons express VGLUT2 mRNA. Thus, hindbrain GLP1 neurons in rats are equipped to store glutamate in synaptic vesicles, and likely co-release both glutamate and GLP1 from axon varicosities and terminals in the hypothalamus and other brain regions.

  14. Interleukin 10-expressing B cells inhibit tumor-infiltrating T cell function and correlate with T cell Tim-3 expression in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chen; Zhang, Jin; Li, Minyu; Wu, Zhen-Jie; Song, Ken H; Zhan, Tina W; Wang, Lin-Hui; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2016-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is among the leading causes of cancer-related death and was found to induce IL-10. We started by focusing on IL-10-secreting cells in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in renal cell carcinoma patients and observed that both CD3(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cells contributed to an elevated IL-10 expression. We then focused on IL-10-expressing B cells, and found that compared to non-IL-10-producing B cells, the IL-10-expressing B cells had significantly lower levels of CD19 and CD20 expression, a lack of IgM and IgD expression, while the level of CD27 was elevated. Moreover, culturing under unstimulated conditions resulted in higher antibody production by these IL-10-producing B cells than their peripheral blood counterparts, which strongly suggested that they are plasmablast-differentiating cells. Both IgA and IgG subtypes were found but IgA had a higher relative abundance in the tumor-infiltrating fraction. We then observed inverse correlations between the frequency of IL-10-producing B cells and pro-inflammatory cytokine-producing T cells and T cell proliferation. The expression of T cell exhaustion marker Tim-3, however, was upregulated in patients with high frequencies of IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, supernatant from tumor B cells suppressed T cell inflammation. In addition, frequencies of IL-10-producing tumor-infiltrating B cells were inversely correlated with resected tumor size, and were higher in later stage tumors. Together, our data demonstrated that IL-10-producing B cells had plasmablast-differentiating phenotype, and could contribute to T cell immunosuppression in renal cell carcinoma.

  15. Transforming Lepidopteran Insect Cells for Improved Protein Processing and Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lepidopteran insect cells used with the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) are capable of synthesizing and accurately processing foreign proteins. However, proteins expressed in baculovirus-infected cells often fail to be completely processed, or are not processed in a manner that meet...

  16. Cancer testis antigen expression in testicular germ cell tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bode, Peter K; Thielken, Andrea; Brandt, Simone; Barghorn, André; Lohe, Bernd; Knuth, Alexander; Moch, Holger

    2014-06-01

    Cancer testis antigens are encoded by germ line-associated genes that are present in normal germ cells of testis and ovary but not in differentiated tissues. Their expression in various human cancer types has been interpreted as 're-expression' or as intratumoral progenitor cell signature. Cancer testis antigen expression patterns have not yet been studied in germ cell tumorigenesis with specific emphasis on intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified as a precursor lesion for testicular germ cell tumors. Immunohistochemistry was used to study MAGEA3, MAGEA4, MAGEC1, GAGE1 and CTAG1B expression in 325 primary testicular germ cell tumors, including 94 mixed germ cell tumors. Seminomatous and non-seminomatous components were separately arranged and evaluated on tissue microarrays. Spermatogonia in the normal testis were positive, whereas intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified was negative for all five CT antigens. Cancer testis antigen expression was only found in 3% (CTAG1B), 10% (GAGE1, MAGEA4), 33% (MAGEA3) and 40% (MAGEC1) of classic seminoma but not in non-seminomatous testicular germ cell tumors. In contrast, all spermatocytic seminomas were positive for cancer testis antigens. These data are consistent with a different cell origin in spermatocytic seminoma compared with classic seminoma and support a progression model with loss of cancer testis antigens in early tumorigenesis of testicular germ cell tumors and later re-expression in a subset of seminomas.

  17. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line.

  18. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-09-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  19. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  20. Connexin expression in nonneoplastic human prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Saladino, Francesca; Carruba, Giuseppe; Quader, Salmaan T A; Amoroso, Maria; Di Cristina, Antoniette; Webber, Mukta M; Castagnetta, Luigi A M

    2002-06-01

    Expression of gap-junction proteins connexins (Cx), specifically Cx43, Cx32, and Cx26, in both nontumorigenic (RWPE-1) and tumorigenic (RWPE-2) human prostate epithelial cells as well as in two cell clones (WPEI-7 and WPEI-10) originating from the RWPE-1 cell line was investigated. The aim was to determine whether individual connexins are differentially expressed in cultured cells. Western blot analysis revealed striking differences in the expression of individual connexins in the cell lines studied. In particular, Cx43 is largely expressed in RWPE-1 and WPEI-10 cells, whereas Cx32 is expressed predominantly in RWPE-2 and WPEI-7 cells. In addition, both forskolin and estrone increase Cx43 expression levels in WPEI-10 cells, with no apparent effect on WPEI-7 cells. Conversely, forskolin and especially estrone induce a marked increase of Cx32 in WPEI-7 cells, whereas Cx32 expression is limitedly affected by both agents in WPEI-10 cells. Overall, expression levels of Cx43 and Cx32 appear to be inversely related, with RWPE-1 and WPEI-10 cells having a significantly higher Cx43 to Cx32 ratio than that observed in RWPE-2 and WPEI-7 cells. We recently reported that junctional communication could be rescued in RWPE-1 cells by either forskolin or estrone and that restoration of GJIC is associated with an increase of Cx43 or a decrease of Cx32, or both, eventually leading to a marked rise of the Cx43 to Cx32 ratio. Studies are currently ongoing in our laboratories to assess the potential effect of agents increasing the Cx43 to Cx32 ratio on GJIC activity in these systems.

  1. Geometry of the Gene Expression Space of Individual Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korem, Yael; Szekely, Pablo; Hart, Yuval; Sheftel, Hila; Hausser, Jean; Mayo, Avi; Rothenberg, Michael E.; Kalisky, Tomer; Alon, Uri

    2015-01-01

    There is a revolution in the ability to analyze gene expression of single cells in a tissue. To understand this data we must comprehend how cells are distributed in a high-dimensional gene expression space. One open question is whether cell types form discrete clusters or whether gene expression forms a continuum of states. If such a continuum exists, what is its geometry? Recent theory on evolutionary trade-offs suggests that cells that need to perform multiple tasks are arranged in a polygon or polyhedron (line, triangle, tetrahedron and so on, generally called polytopes) in gene expression space, whose vertices are the expression profiles optimal for each task. Here, we analyze single-cell data from human and mouse tissues profiled using a variety of single-cell technologies. We fit the data to shapes with different numbers of vertices, compute their statistical significance, and infer their tasks. We find cases in which single cells fill out a continuum of expression states within a polyhedron. This occurs in intestinal progenitor cells, which fill out a tetrahedron in gene expression space. The four vertices of this tetrahedron are each enriched with genes for a specific task related to stemness and early differentiation. A polyhedral continuum of states is also found in spleen dendritic cells, known to perform multiple immune tasks: cells fill out a tetrahedron whose vertices correspond to key tasks related to maturation, pathogen sensing and communication with lymphocytes. A mixture of continuum-like distributions and discrete clusters is found in other cell types, including bone marrow and differentiated intestinal crypt cells. This approach can be used to understand the geometry and biological tasks of a wide range of single-cell datasets. The present results suggest that the concept of cell type may be expanded. In addition to discreet clusters in gene-expression space, we suggest a new possibility: a continuum of states within a polyhedron, in which the

  2. Engineered glucagon-like peptide-1-producing hepatocytes lower plasma glucose levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Michael J; Lee, Corinna Wai Kwan; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2009-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 is an incretin hormone with well-characterized antidiabetic properties, including glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion and enhancement of beta-cell mass. GLP-1 agonists have recently been developed and are now in clinical use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Rapid degradation of GLP-1 by enzymes including dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP)-IV and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) 24.11, along with renal clearance, contribute to a short biological half-life, necessitating frequent injections to maintain therapeutic efficacy. Gene therapy may represent a promising alternative approach for achieving long-term increases in endogenous release of GLP-1. We have developed a novel strategy for glucose-regulated production of GLP-1 in hepatocytes by expressing a DPP-IV-resistant GLP-1 peptide in hepatocytes under control of the liver-type pyruvate kinase promoter. Adenoviral delivery of this construct to hepatocytes in vitro resulted in production and secretion of bioactive GLP-1 as measured by a luciferase-based bioassay developed to detect the NH2-terminally modified GLP-1 peptide engineered for this study. Transplantation of encapsulated hepatocytes into CD-1 mice resulted in an increase in plasma GLP-1 levels that was accompanied by a significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose levels. The results from this study demonstrate that a gene therapy approach designed to induce GLP-1 production in hepatocytes may represent a novel strategy for long-term secretion of bioactive GLP-1 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  3. Molecular Characterisation of Small Molecule Agonists Effect on the Human Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Receptor Internalisation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aiysha; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Bain, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R), which is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways and ERK phosphorylation to stimulate insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to determine molecular details of the effect of small molecule agonists, compounds 2 and B, on GLP-1R mediated cAMP production, intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and its internalisation. In human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) expressing cells, compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production but caused no intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation or hGLP-1R internalisation. GLP-1 antagonists Ex(9–39) and JANT-4 and the orthosteric binding site mutation (V36A) in hGLP-1R failed to inhibit compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, confirming that their binding site distinct from the GLP-1 binding site on GLP-1R. However, K334A mutation of hGLP-1R, which affects Gαs coupling, inhibited GLP-1 as well as compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, indicating that GLP-1, compounds 2 and B binding induce similar conformational changes in the GLP-1R for Gαs coupling. Additionally, compound 2 or B binding to the hGLP-1R had significantly reduced GLP-1 induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and hGLP-1R internalisation. This study illustrates pharmacology of differential activation of GLP-1R by GLP-1 and compounds 2 and B. PMID:27100083

  4. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals dynamic, random monoallelic gene expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiaolin; Ramsköld, Daniel; Reinius, Björn; Sandberg, Rickard

    2014-01-10

    Expression from both alleles is generally observed in analyses of diploid cell populations, but studies addressing allelic expression patterns genome-wide in single cells are lacking. Here, we present global analyses of allelic expression across individual cells of mouse preimplantation embryos of mixed background (CAST/EiJ × C57BL/6J). We discovered abundant (12 to 24%) monoallelic expression of autosomal genes and that expression of the two alleles occurs independently. The monoallelic expression appeared random and dynamic because there was considerable variation among closely related embryonic cells. Similar patterns of monoallelic expression were observed in mature cells. Our allelic expression analysis also demonstrates the de novo inactivation of the paternal X chromosome. We conclude that independent and stochastic allelic transcription generates abundant random monoallelic expression in the mammalian cell.

  5. Acinar cell carcinoma of exocrine pancreas in two horses.

    PubMed

    de Brot, S; Junge, H; Hilbe, M

    2014-05-01

    Two horses were presented with non-specific clinical signs of several weeks' duration and were humanely destroyed due to a poor prognosis. At necropsy examination, both horses had multiple small, white nodules replacing pancreatic tissue and involving the serosal surface of the abdominal cavity, the liver and the lung. Microscopically, neoplastic cells were organized in acini and contained abundant (case 1) or sparse (horse 2) intracytoplasmic zymogen granules. Immunohistochemically, both tumours expressed amylase and pan-cytokeratin, but not insulin or neuron-specific enolase. In case 2, a low percentage of neoplastic cells expressed glucagon and synaptophysin. The presence of zymogen granules was confirmed in both cases by electron microscopy and occasional fibrillary or glucagon granules were observed in cases 1 and 2, respectively. A diagnosis of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma was established in both horses.

  6. The added value of single-cell gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Rusnakova, Vendula; Kubista, Mikael

    2013-03-01

    Cells are the basic unit of life and they have remarkable abilities to respond individually as well as in concert to internal and external stimuli in a specific manner. Studying complex tissues and whole organs requires understanding of cell heterogeneity and responses to stimuli at the single-cell level. In this review, we discuss the potential of single-cell gene expression profiling, focusing on data analysis and biological interpretation. We exemplify several aspects of the added value of single-cell analysis by comparing the same experimental data at both single-cell and cell population level. Data normalization and handling of missing data are two important steps in data analysis that are performed differently at single-cell level compared with cell population level. Furthermore, we discuss how single-cell gene expression data can be viewed and how subpopulations of cells can be identified and characterized.

  7. Glucagon receptor antagonism induces increased cholesterol absorption[S

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hong-Ping; Yang, Xiaodong; Lu, Ku; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Castro-Perez, Jose M.; Previs, Stephen; Wright, Michael; Shah, Vinit; Herath, Kithsiri; Xie, Dan; Szeto, Daphne; Forrest, Gail; Xiao, Jing Chen; Palyha, Oksana; Sun, Li-Ping; Andryuk, Paula J.; Engel, Samuel S.; Xiong, Yusheng; Lin, Songnian; Kelley, David E.; Erion, Mark D.; Davis, Harry R.; Wang, Liangsu

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon and insulin have opposing action in governing glucose homeostasis. In type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), plasma glucagon is characteristically elevated, contributing to increased gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia. Therefore, glucagon receptor (GCGR) antagonism has been proposed as a pharmacologic approach to treat T2DM. In support of this concept, a potent small-molecule GCGR antagonist (GRA), MK-0893, demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy to reduce hyperglycemia, with an HbA1c reduction of 1.5% at the 80 mg dose for 12 weeks in T2DM. However, GRA treatment was associated with dose-dependent elevation of plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c). The current studies investigated the cause for increased LDL-c. We report findings that link MK-0893 with increased glucagon-like peptide 2 and cholesterol absorption. There was not, however, a GRA-related modulation of cholesterol synthesis. These findings were replicated using structurally diverse GRAs. To examine potential pharmacologic mitigation, coadministration of ezetimibe (a potent inhibitor of cholesterol absorption) in mice abrogated the GRA-associated increase of LDL-c. Although the molecular mechanism is unknown, our results provide a novel finding by which glucagon and, hence, GCGR antagonism govern cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26373568

  8. PAS kinase as a nutrient sensor in neuroblastoma and hypothalamic cells required for the normal expression and activity of other cellular nutrient and energy sensors.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Carneiro, Verónica; Roncero, Isabel; Blazquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira; Sanz, Carmen

    2013-12-01

    PAS kinase (PASK) is a nutrient sensor that is highly conserved throughout evolution. PASK-deficient mice reveal a metabolic phenotype similar to that described in S6 kinase-1 S6K1-deficient mice that are protected against obesity. Hypothalamic metabolic sensors, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), play an important role in feeding behavior, the homeostasis of body weight, and energy balance. These sensors respond to changes in nutrient levels in the hypothalamic areas involved in feeding behavior and in neuroblastoma N2A cells, and we have recently reported that those effects are modulated by the anorexigenic peptide glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Here, we identified PASK in both N2A cells and rat VMH and LH areas and found that its expression is regulated by glucose and GLP-1. High levels of glucose decreased Pask gene expression. Furthermore, PASK-silenced N2A cells record an impaired response by the AMPK and mTOR/S6K1 pathways to changes in glucose levels. Likewise, GLP-1 effect on the activity of AMPK, S6K1, and other intermediaries of both pathways and the regulatory role at the level of gene expression were also blocked in PASK-silenced cells. The absence of response to low glucose concentrations in PASK-silenced cells correlates with increased ATP content, low expression of mRNA coding for AMPK upstream kinase LKB1, and enhanced activation of S6K1. Our findings indicate that, at least in N2A cells, PASK is a key kinase in GLP-1 actions and exerts a coordinated response with the other metabolic sensors, suggesting that PASK might play an important role in feeding behavior.

  9. Determining cell division symmetry through the dissection of dividing cells using single-cell expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Jasnos, Lukasz; Sawado, Tomoyuki

    2014-03-01

    Symmetric cell divisions give rise to two sister cells that are identical to each other, whereas asymmetric divisions produce two sister cells with distinctive phenotypes. Although cell division symmetry is usually determined on the basis of a few markers or biological functions, the overall similarity between sister cells has not been thoroughly examined at a molecular level. Here we provide a protocol to separate sister embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and to conduct multiplexed gene expression analyses at the single-cell level by using 48 ESC genes. The procedure includes the dissection of dividing, paired sister cells by micromanipulation, followed by cell lysis, reverse transcription, gene-specific cDNA amplification and multiplexed quantitative PCR analyses. This protocol can be completed in 10 d, and it can be readily adapted to other cell types that are able to grow in suspension culture.

  10. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  11. Wheat germ systems for cell-free protein expression.

    PubMed

    Harbers, Matthias

    2014-08-25

    Cell-free protein expression plays an important role in biochemical research. However, only recent developments led to new methods to rapidly synthesize preparative amounts of protein that make cell-free protein expression an attractive alternative to cell-based methods. In particular the wheat germ system provides the highest translation efficiency among eukaryotic cell-free protein expression approaches and has a very high success rate for the expression of soluble proteins of good quality. As an open in vitro method, the wheat germ system is a preferable choice for many applications in protein research including options for protein labeling and the expression of difficult-to-express proteins like membrane proteins and multiple protein complexes. Here I describe wheat germ cell-free protein expression systems and give examples how they have been used in genome-wide expression studies, preparation of labeled proteins for structural genomics and protein mass spectroscopy, automated protein synthesis, and screening of enzymatic activities. Future directions for the use of cell-free expression methods are discussed.

  12. Enrichment of cells exhibiting tetracycline regulated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nahreini, Piruz; Hanson, Amy J; Prasad, Kedar N

    2003-05-01

    Tetracycline controlled gene expression varies significantly among cells within a cell line. Chromosomal integration sites of the tetracycline transactivator (tTA) gene and/or the test gene presumably account for the variable efficacy of this system. We hypothesized that the efficacy of tetracycline regulated gene expression is more dependent on the level of tTA inside cells and less dependent on the integration sites of the tetracycline transcription units. To test this hypothesis, we established a TetOff regulatied expression of a short-lived enhanced GFP (d2EGFP) via retroviral vectors in a neuroblastoma cell line (NBP2). We then enriched for two populations of NBP2 cells; one expressing high levels of d2EGFP (HG) and the other expressing low levels of d2EGFP (LG) in the absence of doxycycline. We show that the tTA is more abundant in HG cells than in LG cells; the cAMP-mediated transactivation of tTA's promoter further increases the efficacy of the tetracycline system; and the efficient doxycycline regulated expression of a test gene (i.e., VP16CREB) is achieved in HG cells. Therefore, we have developed a simple method to enrich for a population of tetracycline-responsive cells with no need for screening for tetracycline-responsive clonal cell lines.

  13. CD39 Expression Identifies Terminally Exhausted CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prakash K; Godec, Jernej; Wolski, David; Adland, Emily; Yates, Kathleen; Pauken, Kristen E; Cosgrove, Cormac; Ledderose, Carola; Junger, Wolfgang G; Robson, Simon C; Wherry, E John; Alter, Galit; Goulder, Philip J R; Klenerman, Paul; Sharpe, Arlene H; Lauer, Georg M; Haining, W Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    Exhausted T cells express multiple co-inhibitory molecules that impair their function and limit immunity to chronic viral infection. Defining novel markers of exhaustion is important both for identifying and potentially reversing T cell exhaustion. Herein, we show that the ectonucleotidse CD39 is a marker of exhausted CD8+ T cells. CD8+ T cells specific for HCV or HIV express high levels of CD39, but those specific for EBV and CMV do not. CD39 expressed by CD8+ T cells in chronic infection is enzymatically active, co-expressed with PD-1, marks cells with a transcriptional signature of T cell exhaustion and correlates with viral load in HIV and HCV. In the mouse model of chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus infection, virus-specific CD8+ T cells contain a population of CD39high CD8+ T cells that is absent in functional memory cells elicited by acute infection. This CD39high CD8+ T cell population is enriched for cells with the phenotypic and functional profile of terminal exhaustion. These findings provide a new marker of T cell exhaustion, and implicate the purinergic pathway in the regulation of T cell exhaustion.

  14. Cell-free expression of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Orbán, Erika; Proverbio, Davide; Haberstock, Stefan; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free expression has emerged as a new standard for the production of membrane proteins. The reduction of expression complexity in cell-free systems eliminates central bottlenecks and allows the reliable and efficient synthesis of many different types of membrane proteins. Furthermore, the open accessibility of cell-free reactions enables the co-translational solubilization of cell-free expressed membrane proteins in a large variety of supplied additives. Hydrophobic environments can therefore be adjusted according to the requirements of individual membrane protein targets. We present different approaches for the preparative scale cell-free production of G-protein-coupled receptors using the extracts of Escherichia coli cells. We exemplify expression conditions implementing detergents, nanodiscs, or liposomes. The generated protein samples could be directly used for further functional characterization.

  15. Expression of ets family genes in hematopoietic-cells.

    PubMed

    Romanospica, V; Suzuki, H; Georgiou, P; Chen, S; Ascione, R; Papas, T; Bhat, N

    1994-03-01

    We have examined the expression of the ets family of transcription factors in different types of hematopoietic cells. Our results demonstrate that several members of the ets gene family are expressed differentially in hematopoietic cells. During phorbol ester induced differentiation of HL60 cells, ETS2, PEA3, as well as GABPalpha and GABPbeta mRNAs are coordinately induced. During the activation of T-cells, ETS2 proteins are induced; however, the expression of the ETS1 and ERGB gene products are reduced. These results demonstrate that the regulation of ets family of genes is complex and depends on cell type. This observation leads to the conclusion that the regulation of ets target genes, will be dependent, in part, upon the type of ets genes expressed in each particular cell type.

  16. Expression of Thy-1 on human hematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Expression of Thy-1 on hematopoietic cells from human fetal liver (FL), cord blood (CB), and bone marrow (BM) was studied with a novel anti-Thy- 1 antibody, 5E10. Specificity of 5E10 for human Thy-1 was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of a 25-35-kD molecule, and the sequence of a cDNA that was cloned by immunoselection of COS cells transfected with a cDNA library derived from a 5E10+ cell line. Two- and three-color immunofluorescence staining experiments revealed that the Thy-1 expression is restricted to, an average, 1-4% of FL, CB, and BM cells, and binding to these cell types is essentially restricted to a very small subset of lymphoid cells and approximately 25% of CD34+ cells. Thy-1+ CD34+ cells were further characterized as CD38lo/CD45RO+/CD45RA- /CD71lo/c-kit(lo) and rhodamine 123dull. When CD34+ cells were sorted on the basis of Thy-1 expression, the majority of clonogenic cells were recovered in the CD34+Thy-1- fraction, whereas the majority of cells capable of producing myeloid colonies after 5-8 wk of long-term culture (long-term culture initiating cells) were recovered in the Thy-1+CD34+ fraction. In addition to CD34+ cells, Thy-1 was found to be expressed on a variable, very small number (< 1%) of CD34- mononuclear cells in BM, CB, and peripheral blood that were further characterized as CD3+ CD4+ lymphocytes. The restricted expression of Thy-1 on primitive hematopoietic cells is in agreement with a previous report (Baum et al., 1992. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 89:2804) in which Thy-1 expression was used to enrich for primitive hematopoietic cells from fetal tissue. Compared with those previous studies, we found Thy-1 expression on a larger proportion of CD34+ cells (25% in our study vs. 5% in Baum et al.) and furthermore performed studies on Thy-1 expression on CD34+ cells from CB, FL, and BM in relation to markers that are known to be differentially expressed on hematopoietic cells. Taken together our results indicate that Thy-1-specific antibody

  17. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  18. Intraclonal Protein Expression Heterogeneity in Recombinant CHO Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pilbrough, Warren; Munro, Trent P.; Gray, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic glycoproteins have played a major role in the commercial success of biotechnology in the post-genomic era. But isolating recombinant mammalian cell lines for large-scale production remains costly and time-consuming, due to substantial variation and unpredictable stability of expression amongst transfected cells, requiring extensive clone screening to identify suitable high producers. Streamlining this process is of considerable interest to industry yet the underlying phenomena are still not well understood. Here we examine an antibody-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) clone at single-cell resolution using flow cytometry and vectors, which couple light and heavy chain transcription to fluorescent markers. Expression variation has traditionally been attributed to genetic heterogeneity arising from random genomic integration of vector DNA. It follows that single cell cloning should yield a homogeneous cell population. We show, in fact, that expression in a clone can be surprisingly heterogeneous (standard deviation 50 to 70% of the mean), approaching the level of variation in mixed transfectant pools, and each antibody chain varies in tandem. Phenotypic variation is fully developed within just 18 days of cloning, yet is not entirely explained by measurement noise, cell size, or the cell cycle. By monitoring the dynamic response of subpopulations and subclones, we show that cells also undergo slow stochastic fluctuations in expression (half-life 2 to 11 generations). Non-genetic diversity may therefore play a greater role in clonal variation than previously thought. This also has unexpected implications for expression stability. Stochastic gene expression noise and selection bias lead to perturbations from steady state at the time of cloning. The resulting transient response as clones reestablish their expression distribution is not ordinarily accounted for but can contribute to declines in median expression over timescales of up to 50 days. Noise

  19. CARD14 expression in dermal endothelial cells in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Harden, Jamie L; Lewis, Steven M; Pierson, Katherine C; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Lentini, Tim; Ortenzio, Francesca S; Zaba, Lisa C; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Bowcock, Anne M; Lowes, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, family member 14 (CARD14) gene have recently been described in psoriasis patients, and explain the psoriasis susceptibility locus 2 (PSORS2). CARD14 is a scaffolding protein that regulates NF-κB activation, and psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations lead to enhanced NF-κB signaling. CARD14 is expressed mainly in epidermal keratinocytes, but also in unidentified dermal cells. In this manuscript, the identity of the dermal cell types expressing CARD14, as well the potential functional consequence of overactive CARD14 in these dermal cell types, was determined. Using two-color immunofluorescence, dermal CARD14 did not co-localize with T-cells, dendritic cells, or macrophages. However, dermal CARD14 did highly co-localize with CD31(+) endothelial cells (ECs). CARD14 was also expressed non-dermal endothelial cells, such as aortic endothelial cells, which may indicate a role of CARD14(+)ECs in the systemic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidities associated with psoriasis. Additionally, phosphorylated NF-κB was found in psoriatic CARD14(+) CD31(+) ECs, demonstrating this pathway is active in dermal ECs in psoriasis. Transfection of dermal ECs with psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations resulted in increased expression of several chemokines, including CXCL10, IL-8, and CCL2. These results provide preliminary evidence that CARD14 expression in ECs may contribute to psoriasis through increased expression of chemokines and facilitating recruitment of immune cells into skin.

  20. LKB1 expression reverses the tumorigenicity of L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Ge; Gao, Qing; Tao, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    The tumor-suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed protein kinase, plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we revealed that human hepatic L02 cells had severely impaired endogenous LKB1 expression as gauged by western blot, northern blot and RT-PCR analyses. Stable ectopic expression of LKB1 in L02 cells resulted in decreased cell growth, hypophosphorylation of Rb, and marked attenuation of colony formation on soft agar. Inoculation of L02 cells into immunocompromised mice resulted in the development of subcutaneous tumors, which could be completely abrogated by ectopic LKB1 expression. The tumors that formed in the mouse model recapitulated the histopathological features of hepatocellular carcinoma under the microscope. Our results jointly suggest that severely compromised endogenous LKB1 expression in the L02 cell line may confer to L02 cells tumor-initiating capacities in vivo and in vitro, and ectopic LKB1 expression antagonizes the tumorigenic properties of L02 cells. Our findings imply that caution may be needed to interpret the results obtained on the widely used human hepatic L02 cell line. The L02 cell line may be a new model to define the cellular mechanisms of liver transformation, and to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth suppressive effect of LKB1.

  1. Random Monoallelic Gene Expression Increases upon Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Eckersley-Maslin, Mélanie A.; Thybert, David; Bergmann, Jan H.; Marioni, John C.; Flicek, Paul; Spector, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Random autosomal monoallelic gene expression refers to the transcription of a gene from one of two homologous alleles. We assessed the dynamics of monoallelic expression during development through an allele-specific RNA sequencing screen in clonal populations of hybrid mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs). We identified 67 and 376 inheritable autosomal random monoallelically expressed genes in ESCs and NPCs respectively, a 5.6-fold increase upon differentiation. While DNA methylation and nuclear positioning did not distinguish the active and inactive alleles, specific histone modifications were differentially enriched between the two alleles. Interestingly, expression levels of 8% of the monoallelically expressed genes remained similar between monoallelic and biallelic clones. These results support a model in which random monoallelic expression occurs stochastically during differentiation, and for some genes is compensated for by the cell to maintain the required transcriptional output of these genes. PMID:24576421

  2. Cell Cycle Programs of Gene Expression Control Morphogenetic Protein Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Matthew; Yang, Melody C.; Mischke, Michelle; Chant, John

    2000-01-01

    Genomic studies in yeast have revealed that one eighth of genes are cell cycle regulated in their expression. Almost without exception, the significance of cell cycle periodic gene expression has not been tested. Given that many such genes are critical to cellular morphogenesis, we wanted to examine the importance of periodic gene expression to this process. The expression profiles of two genes required for the axial pattern of cell division, BUD3 and BUD10/AXL2/SRO4, are strongly cell cycle regulated. BUD3 is expressed close to the onset of mitosis. BUD10 is expressed in late G1. Through promotor-swap experiments, the expression profile of each gene was altered and the consequences examined. We found that an S/G2 pulse of BUD3 expression controls the timing of Bud3p localization, but that this timing is not critical to Bud3p function. In contrast, a G1 pulse of BUD10 expression plays a direct role in Bud10p localization and function. Bud10p, a membrane protein, relies on the polarized secretory machinery specific to G1 to be delivered to its proper location. Such a secretion-based targeting mechanism for membrane proteins provides cells with flexibility in remodeling their architecture or evolving new forms. PMID:11134078

  3. Expression and function of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kiriyama, Kenji; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kubo, Terufumi; Tamura, Yasuaki; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Takahashi, Akari; Nakazawa, Emiri; Saka, Eri; Ragnarsson, Charlotte; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Inoda, Satoko; Asanuma, Hiroko; Takasu, Hideo; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Yasoshima, Takahiro; Hirata, Koichi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Invasion into the matrix is one of hallmarks of malignant diseases and is the first step for tumor metastasis. Thus, analysis of the molecular mechanisms of invasion is essential to overcome tumor cell invasion. In the present study, we screened for colon carcinoma-specific genes using a cDNA microarray database of colon carcinoma tissues and normal colon tissues, and we found that fermitin family member-1 (FERMT1) is overexpressed in colon carcinoma cells. FRRMT1, FERMT2 and FERMT3 expression was investigated in colon carcinoma cells. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that only FERMT1 had cancer cell-specific expression. Protein expression of FERMT1 was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. To address the molecular functions of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells, we established FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing colon carcinoma cells. FERMT1-overexpressing cells exhibited greater invasive ability than did FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells. On the other hand, FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells exhibited enhancement of cell growth. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that FERMT1 is expressed specifically in colon carcinoma cells, and has roles in matrix invasion and cell growth. These findings indicate that FERMT1 is a potential molecular target for cancer therapy.

  4. Expression of MIF and CD74 in leukemic cell lines: correlation to DR expression destiny.

    PubMed

    Georgouli, Mirella; Papadimitriou, Lina; Glymenaki, Maria; Patsaki, Valia; Athanassakis, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Invariant chain (Ii) or CD74 is a non-polymorphic glycoprotein, which apart from its role as a chaperone dedicated to MHCII molecules, is known to be a high-affinity receptor for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). The present study aimed to define the roles of CD74 and MIF in the immune surveillance escape process. Towards this direction, the cell lines HL-60, Raji, K562 and primary pre-B leukemic cells were examined for expression and secretion of MIF. Flow cytometry analysis detected high levels of MIF and intracellular/membrane CD74 expression in all leukemic cells tested, while MIF secretion was shown to be inversely proportional to intracellular HLA-DR (DR) expression. In the MHCII-negative cells, IFN-γ increased MIF expression and induced its secretion in HL-60 and K562 cells, respectively. In K562 cells, CD74 (Iip33Iip35) was shown to co-precipitate with HLA-DOβ (DOβ), inhibiting thus MIF or DR binding. Induced expression of DOα in K562 (DOα-DOβ+) cells in different transfection combinations decreased MIF expression and secretion, while increasing surface DR expression. Thus, MIF could indeed be part of the antigen presentation process.

  5. [VEGF gene expression in transfected human multipotent stromal cells].

    PubMed

    Smirnikhina, S A; Lavrov, A V; Bochkov, N P

    2011-01-01

    Dynamics of VEGF gene expression in transfected multipotent stromal cells from adipose tissue was examined using electroporation and lipofection. Differences in the potency and dynamics of plasmid elimination (up to day 9) between cell cultures were observed. All cultures were divided into fast and slow plasmid-eliminating ones. Interculture differences in VEGF expression were detected. The possibility of a 5-6-fold increase of VEGF expression was shown. There were no differences in transfection potency, plasmid elimination dynamics, and VEGF expression after transfection by both nonviral methods.

  6. Expression of the beta 7 integrin by human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brezinschek, R. I.; Brezinschek, H. P.; Lazarovits, A. I.; Lipsky, P. E.; Oppenheimer-Marks, N.

    1996-01-01

    Integrin adhesion receptors mediate fundamental intercellular interactions of many cell types as well as cellular interactions with specific extracellular matrix molecules. To date, the beta 7 integrin has been shown to be expressed by leukocyte subsets and to mediate interactions of these cells with extracellular matrix molecules as well as with endothelial and epithelial cells. The data presented here indicate that human endothelial cells also express the beta 7 integrin both in vitro and in situ. Analysis of cDNA indicated that endothelial beta 7 was identical to that expressed by leukocytes. Cell surface expression of beta 7 was increased by exposure of the endothelium to the pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta. In leukocytes, beta 7 complexes with alpha 4 or alpha E integrin chains. Endothelial cells also expressed a number of alpha-integrin chains, including alpha 4, but not alpha E. The expression and utilization of beta 7, presumably complexed with alpha 4, by endothelial cells may be instrumental in the maintenance of the function or phenotype of endothelial cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8909254

  7. Hypothalamic prolyl endopeptidase (PREP) regulates pancreatic insulin and glucagon secretion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Dae; Toda, Chitoku; D’Agostino, Giuseppe; Zeiss, Caroline J.; DiLeone, Ralph J.; Elsworth, John D.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Chan, Owen; Harvey, Brandon K.; Richie, Christopher T.; Savolainen, Mari; Myöhänen, Timo; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Prolyl endopeptidase (PREP) has been implicated in neuronal functions. Here we report that hypothalamic PREP is predominantly expressed in the ventromedial nucleus (VMH), where it regulates glucose-induced neuronal activation. PREP knockdown mice (Prepgt/gt) exhibited glucose intolerance, decreased fasting insulin, increased fasting glucagon levels, and reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion compared with wild-type controls. Consistent with this, central infusion of a specific PREP inhibitor, S17092, impaired glucose tolerance and decreased insulin levels in wild-type mice. Arguing further for a central mode of action of PREP, isolated pancreatic islets showed no difference in glucose-induced insulin release between Prepgt/gt and wild-type mice. Furthermore, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies showed no difference between Prepgt/gt and wild-type control mice. Central PREP regulation of insulin and glucagon secretion appears to be mediated by the autonomic nervous system because Prepgt/gt mice have elevated sympathetic outflow and norepinephrine levels in the pancreas, and propranolol treatment reversed glucose intolerance in these mice. Finally, re-expression of PREP by bilateral VMH injection of adeno-associated virus–PREP reversed the glucose-intolerant phenotype of the Prepgt/gt mice. Taken together, our results unmask a previously unknown player in central regulation of glucose metabolism and pancreatic function. PMID:25071172

  8. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1/Glucagon Receptor Dual Agonism Reverses Obesity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pocai, Alessandro; Carrington, Paul E.; Adams, Jennifer R.; Wright, Michael; Eiermann, George; Zhu, Lan; Du, Xiaobing; Petrov, Aleksandr; Lassman, Michael E.; Jiang, Guoqiang; Liu, Franklin; Miller, Corey; Tota, Laurie M.; Zhou, Gaochao; Zhang, Xiaoping; Sountis, Michael M.; Santoprete, Alessia; Capito', Elena; Chicchi, Gary G.; Thornberry, Nancy; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Pessi, Antonello; Marsh, Donald J.; SinhaRoy, Ranabir

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Oxyntomodulin (OXM) is a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP1R)/glucagon receptor (GCGR) dual agonist peptide that reduces body weight in obese subjects through increased energy expenditure and decreased energy intake. The metabolic effects of OXM have been attributed primarily to GLP1R agonism. We examined whether a long acting GLP1R/GCGR dual agonist peptide exerts metabolic effects in diet-induced obese mice that are distinct from those obtained with a GLP1R-selective agonist. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We developed a protease-resistant dual GLP1R/GCGR agonist, DualAG, and a corresponding GLP1R-selective agonist, GLPAG, matched for GLP1R agonist potency and pharmacokinetics. The metabolic effects of these two peptides with respect to weight loss, caloric reduction, glucose control, and lipid lowering, were compared upon chronic dosing in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. Acute studies in DIO mice revealed metabolic pathways that were modulated independent of weight loss. Studies in Glp1r−/− and Gcgr−/− mice enabled delineation of the contribution of GLP1R versus GCGR activation to the pharmacology of DualAG. RESULTS Peptide DualAG exhibits superior weight loss, lipid-lowering activity, and antihyperglycemic efficacy comparable to GLPAG. Improvements in plasma metabolic parameters including insulin, leptin, and adiponectin were more pronounced upon chronic treatment with DualAG than with GLPAG. Dual receptor agonism also increased fatty acid oxidation and reduced hepatic steatosis in DIO mice. The antiobesity effects of DualAG require activation of both GLP1R and GCGR. CONCLUSIONS Sustained GLP1R/GCGR dual agonism reverses obesity in DIO mice and is a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of obesity. PMID:19602537

  9. Regulation of global gene expression and cell proliferation by APP

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Si; Xu, Qin; Zou, Haiyan; Zhou, Weihui; Cai, Fang; Li, Tingyu; Song, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is one of the most common genetic disorders. Patients with DS display growth retardation and inevitably develop characteristic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology, including neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. The expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is increased in both DS and AD patients. To reveal the function of APP and elucidate the pathogenic role of increased APP expression in DS and AD, we performed gene expression profiling using microarray method in human cells overexpressing APP. A set of genes are significantly altered, which are involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and p53 signaling. We found that overexpression of APP inhibits cell proliferation. Furthermore, we confirmed that the downregulation of two validated genes, PSMA5 and PSMB7, inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting that the downregulation of PSMA5 and PSMB7 is involved in APP-induced cell proliferation impairment. Taken together, this study suggests that APP regulates global gene expression and increased APP expression inhibits cell proliferation. Our study provides a novel insight that APP overexpression may contribute to the growth impairment in DS patients and promote AD pathogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation including neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis. PMID:26936520

  10. Regulation of global gene expression and cell proliferation by APP.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Si; Xu, Qin; Zou, Haiyan; Zhou, Weihui; Cai, Fang; Li, Tingyu; Song, Weihong

    2016-03-03

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is one of the most common genetic disorders. Patients with DS display growth retardation and inevitably develop characteristic Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, including neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. The expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is increased in both DS and AD patients. To reveal the function of APP and elucidate the pathogenic role of increased APP expression in DS and AD, we performed gene expression profiling using microarray method in human cells overexpressing APP. A set of genes are significantly altered, which are involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and p53 signaling. We found that overexpression of APP inhibits cell proliferation. Furthermore, we confirmed that the downregulation of two validated genes, PSMA5 and PSMB7, inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting that the downregulation of PSMA5 and PSMB7 is involved in APP-induced cell proliferation impairment. Taken together, this study suggests that APP regulates global gene expression and increased APP expression inhibits cell proliferation. Our study provides a novel insight that APP overexpression may contribute to the growth impairment in DS patients and promote AD pathogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation including neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis.

  11. Modulation of vascular cell function by bim expression.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Margaret E; Palenski, Tammy L; Jamali, Nasim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis of vascular cells, including pericytes and endothelial cells, contributes to disease pathogenesis in which vascular rarefaction plays a central role. Bim is a proapoptotic protein that modulates not only apoptosis but also cellular functions such as migration and extracellular matrix (ECM) protein expression. Endothelial cells and pericytes each make a unique contribution to vascular formation and function although the details require further delineation. Here we set out to determine the cell autonomous impact of Bim expression on retinal endothelial cell and pericyte function using cells prepared from Bim deficient (Bim(-/-)) mice. Bim(-/-) endothelial cells displayed an increased production of ECM proteins, proliferation, migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression but, a decreased eNOS expression and nitric oxide production. In contrast, pericyte proliferation decreased in the absence of Bim while migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression were increased. In addition, we demonstrated that the coculturing of either wild-type or Bim(-/-) endothelial cells with Bim(-/-) pericytes diminished their capillary morphogenesis. Thus, our data further emphasizes the importance of vascular cell autonomous regulatory mechanisms in modulation of vascular function.

  12. Free fatty acid receptor GPR120 is highly expressed in enteroendocrine K cells of the upper small intestine and has a critical role in GIP secretion after fat ingestion.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kanako; Harada, Norio; Sasaki, Kazuki; Yamane, Shunsuke; Iida, Keiko; Suzuki, Kazuyo; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Nasteska, Daniela; Shibue, Kimitaka; Joo, Erina; Harada, Takanari; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-03-01

    Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin secreted from enteroendocrine K cells in response to meal ingestion. Recently free fatty acid receptor G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 120 was identified as a lipid sensor involved in glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. However, Gpr 120 gene expression and its role in K cells remain unclear, partly due to difficulties in separation of K cells from other intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we purified K cells using GIP-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice, in which K cells can be visualized by GFP fluorescence. GFP-positive cells (K cells) were observed in the small intestine but not in the stomach and colon. K cell number and GIP content in K cells were significantly higher in the upper small intestine than those in the lower small intestine. We also examined the expression levels of several free fatty acid receptors in K cells. Among free fatty acid receptors, GPR120 was highly expressed in the K cells of the upper small intestine compared with the lower small intestine. To clarify the role of GPR120 on K cells in vivo, we used GPR120-deficient mice (GPR120(-/-)). GPR120(-/-) exhibited significantly lower GIP secretion (75% reduction, P < .01) after lard oil ingestion compared with that in wild-type mice. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of GPR120 with grifolic acid methyl ether in wild-type mice significantly attenuated lard oil-induced GIP secretion. In conclusion, GPR120 is expressed abundantly in K cells of the upper small intestine and plays a critical role in lipid-induced GIP secretion.

  13. Expression of pleiotrophin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Q; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a kind of heparin binding growth factor closely related to tumor progression. This study aimed to discuss the significance of the expression of PTN in benign and malignant lung cancer tissues, especially small cell lung cancer. Lung cancer samples were collected for study and lung tissue samples with benign lesions were taken as controls. The expression of PTN was detected using tissue chip combined with the immunohistochemical method, and the differences of small cell lung cancer with non-small cell lung cancer and benign lesion tissue were compared. It was found that PTN expression was mainly located in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells; PTN expression in the lung cancer group was higher than that in the control group (p < 0.01), and PTN expression in the small cell cancer group was higher than that in the squamous carcinoma group and glandular cancer group (p < 0.05). In addition, PTN expression quantity in patients with lung cancer were in close correlation with TNM staging, pathological type and tumor differentiation degree (p < 0.05). PTN was found to express abnormally high in lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer tissue. PTN is most likely to be a new tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer.

  14. Binding and action of glucagon in isolated adipocytes from cortisol-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Calle, C; Sanchez-Casas, P; Simón, M A; Mayor, P

    1987-05-29

    Evidence for pre-receptor, receptor and post-receptor glucagon defects was investigated in adipocytes from cortisol-treated rats. A decrease in glucagon binding due to a decreased number of receptors was observed. No changes in receptor affinity were detected. Both, the lipolytic response of glucagon and the ability of glucagon to increase basal and theophylline-stimulated cAMP accumulation remained unaltered. Moreover, a hyperglucagonemia accompanied by an increase in glucagon degradation in the serum of cortisol-treated rats was observed. Such alterations could represent a new mechanism by which glucocorticoids exert their biological actions.

  15. Effects of c-myc expression on cell cycle progression.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, K D; Shichiri, M; Follansbee, M R; Sedivy, J M

    1994-01-01

    We used targeted homologous recombination to disrupt one c-myc gene copy in a diploid fibroblast cell line and found that a twofold reduction in Myc expression resulted in lower exponential growth rates and a lengthening of the G0-to-S-phase transition (M. Shichiri, K. D. Hanson and J. M. Sedivy, Cell Growth Differ. 4:93-104, 1993). Myc is a transcription factor, and the number of target genes whose regulation could result in differential growth rates may be very large. We have approached this problem by examining effects of reduced c-myc expression in three broad areas: (i) secretion of growth factors, (ii) expression of growth factor receptors, and (iii) intracellular signal transduction between Myc and components of the intrinsic cell cycle clock. We have found no evidence that differential medium conditioning can account for the growth phenotypes. Likewise, the expression of receptors for platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor I was the same in diploid and heterozygous cells (platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor are the sole growth factors required by these cells for growth in serum-free medium). In contrast, expression of cyclin E, cyclin A, and Rb phosphorylation were delayed when quiescent c-myc heterozygous cells were stimulated to enter the cell cycle. Expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and Cdk2 was not affected. The timing of cyclin E induction was the earliest observable effect of reduced Myc expression. Our data indicate that Myc contributes to regulation of proliferation by a cell-autonomous mechanism that involves the modulation of cyclin E expression and, consequently, progression through the restriction point of the cell cycle. Images PMID:8065309

  16. Oxygen-regulated gene expression in murine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Kind, Karen L; Tam, Kimberley K Y; Banwell, Kelly M; Gauld, Ashley D; Russell, Darryl L; Macpherson, Anne M; Brown, Hannah M; Frank, Laura A; Peet, Daniel J; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an important component of the environment of the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC), both in vivo within the ovarian follicle and during in vitro oocyte maturation (IVM). Cumulus cells have a key role in supporting oocyte development, and cumulus cell function and gene expression are known to be altered when the environment of the COC is perturbed. Oxygen-regulated gene expression is mediated through the actions of the transcription factors, the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). In the present study, the effect of oxygen on cumulus cell gene expression was examined following in vitro maturation of the murine COC at 2%, 5% or 20% oxygen. Increased expression of HIF-responsive genes, including glucose transporter-1, lactate dehydrogenase A and BCL2/adenovirus E1B interacting protein 3, was observed in cumulus cells matured at 2% or 5%, compared with 20% oxygen. Stabilisation of HIF1α protein in cumulus cells exposed to low oxygen was confirmed by western blot and HIF-mediated transcriptional activity was demonstrated using a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein under the control of a promoter containing hypoxia response elements. These results indicate that oxygen concentration influences cumulus cell gene expression and support a role for HIF1α in mediating the cumulus cell response to varying oxygen.

  17. Expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Almeida, Maria Carolina Leal; Costa, Alessandra Scorse; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Serrano, Rodrigo Lorenzetti; Machado Filho, Carlos D'Apparecida Santos

    2016-01-01

    Background Heparanase is an enzyme that cleaves heparan sulfate chains. Oligosaccharides generated by heparanase induce tumor progression. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma comprise types of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Objectives Evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and expression of heparanase in two human cell lines established in culture, immortalized skin keratinocyte (HaCaT) and squamous cell carcinoma (A431) and also investigate the expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and eyelid skin of individuals not affected by the disease (control). Methods Glycosaminoglycans were quantified by electrophoresis and indirect ELISA method. The heparanase expression was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRTPCR). Results The A431 strain showed significant increase in the sulfated glycosaminoglycans, increased heparanase expression and decreased hyaluronic acid, comparing to the HaCaT lineage. The mRNA expression of heparanase was significantly higher in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma compared with control skin samples. It was also observed increased heparanase expression in squamous cell carcinoma compared to the Basal cell carcinoma. Conclusion The glycosaminoglycans profile, as well as heparanase expression are different between HaCaT and A431 cell lines. The increased expression of heparanase in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma suggests that this enzyme could be a marker for the diagnosis of such types of non-melanoma cancers, and may be useful as a target molecule for future alternative treatment. PMID:27828631

  18. Cytoskeletal Expression and Remodeling in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boraas, Liana C.; Guidry, Julia B.; Pineda, Emma T.; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    Many emerging cell-based therapies are based on pluripotent stem cells, though complete understanding of the properties of these cells is lacking. In these cells, much is still unknown about the cytoskeletal network, which governs the mechanoresponse. The objective of this study was to determine the cytoskeletal state in undifferentiated pluripotent stem cells and remodeling with differentiation. Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), as well as the original un-reprogrammed embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), were evaluated for expression of cytoskeletal markers. We found that pluripotent stem cells overall have a less developed cytoskeleton compared to fibroblasts. Gene and protein expression of smooth muscle cell actin, vimentin, lamin A, and nestin were markedly lower for ESCs than MEFs. Whereas, iPSC samples were heterogeneous with most cells expressing patterns of cytoskeletal proteins similar to ESCs with a small subpopulation similar to MEFs. This indicates that dedifferentiation during reprogramming is associated with cytoskeletal remodeling to a less developed state. In differentiation studies, it was found that shear stress-mediated differentiation resulted in an increase in expression of cytoskeletal intermediate filaments in ESCs, but not in iPSC samples. In the embryoid body model of spontaneous differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, however, both ESCs and iPSCs had similar gene expression for cytoskeletal proteins during early differentiation. With further differentiation, however, gene levels were significantly higher for iPSCs compared to ESCs. These results indicate that reprogrammed iPSCs more readily reacquire cytoskeletal proteins compared to the ESCs that need to form the network de novo. The strategic selection of the parental phenotype is thus critical not only in the context of reprogramming but also the ultimate functionality of the iPSC-differentiated cell population. Overall, this

  19. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  20. Hamster thecal cells express muscle characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Self, D.A.; Schroeder, P.C.; Gown, A.M.

    1988-08-01

    Contraction of the follicular wall about the time of ovulation appears to be a coordinated event; however, the cells that mediate it remain poorly studied. We examined the theca externa cells in the wall of hamster follicles for the presence of a functional actomyosin system, both in developing follicles and in culture. We used a monoclonal antibody (HHF35) that recognizes the alpha and gamma isoelectric variants of actin normally found in muscle, but not the beta variant associated with non-muscle sources, to evaluate large preovulatory follicles for actin content and composition. Antibody staining of sectioned ovaries showed intense circumferential reactivity in the outermost wall of developing follicles. Immunoblots from two-dimensional gels of theca externa lysates demonstrated the presence of the two muscle-specific isozymes of actin. Immunofluorescence of cultured follicular cells pulse-labeled with (3H) thymidine (for autoradiographic detection of DNA replication) revealed the presence, in many dividing cells, of actin filaments aligned primarily along the longitudinal axis of the cells. In cultures exposed to the calcium ionophore A23187 (10(-4) M) for varying periods (5 min to 1 h), contraction of many individual muscle-actin-positive cells was observed. Immunofluorescence of these cells, fixed immediately after ionophore-induced contraction, revealed compaction of the actin filaments. Our findings demonstrate that the cells of the theca externa contain muscle actins from an early stage and that these cells are capable of contraction even while proliferating in subconfluent cultures. They suggest that follicular growth may include a naturally occurring developmental sequence in which a contractile cell type proliferates in the differentiated state.

  1. Salmonella induces PD-L1 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella persists for a long time in B cells; however, the mechanism(s) through which infected B cells avoid effector CD8 T cell responses has not been characterized. In this study, we show that Salmonella infects and survives within all B1 and B2 cell subpopulations. B cells are infected with a Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing an ovalbumin (OVA) peptide (SIINFEKL) to evaluate whether B cells process and present Salmonella antigens in the context of MHC-I molecules. Our data showed that OVA peptides are presented by MHC class I K(b)-restricted molecules and the presented antigen is generated through proteasomal degradation and vacuolar processing. In addition, Salmonella-infected B cells express co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80, and CD86 as well as inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1. Thus, the cross-presentation of Salmonella antigens and the expression of activation molecules suggest that infected B cells are able to prime and activate specific CD8(+) T cells. However, the Salmonella infection-stimulated expression of PD-L1 suggests that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may be involved in turning off the cytotoxic effector response during Salmonella persistent infection, thereby allowing B cells to become a reservoir for the bacteria.

  2. Programmed cell death ligand 1 expression in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jacson K; Cote, Gregory M; Choy, Edwin; Yang, Pei; Harmon, David; Schwab, Joseph; Nielsen, G Petur; Chebib, Ivan; Ferrone, Soldano; Wang, Xinhui; Wang, Yangyang; Mankin, Henry; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2014-07-01

    Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1, also known as B7H1) is a cell-surface protein that suppresses the cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune response. PDL1 expression and its clinical relevance in sarcomas are not well understood. Therefore, we sought to measure RNA expression levels for PDL1 in 38 clinically annotated osteosarcoma tumor samples and aimed to determine if PDL1 expression correlates with clinical features and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR for PDL1 was optimized in 18 cell lines, of which 5 were osteosarcoma derived. qRT-PCR results were validated via flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in select cell lines. Total RNA was isolated from 38 human osteosarcoma samples for qRT-PCR analysis. Clinical data were sorted, and significance was determined by the Student t test. TILs were examined in patient samples by tissue microarray hematoxylin-eosin staining. We confirmed the constitutive PDL1 mRNA expression in cell lines by qRT-PCR, flow cytometry, and IHC. Across human osteosarcoma samples, PDL1 mRNA gene expression ranged over 4 log (>5,000-fold difference). Relative expression levels were evaluated against clinical factors such as age/gender, metastasis, recurrence, chemotherapy, percentage of necrosis, and survival; no significant associations were identified. The presence of TILs was associated with high PDL1 expression (R(2) = 0.37; P = 0.01). In summary, we developed an RNA-based assay to determine PDL1 expression levels, and we show, for the first time, that high levels of PDL1 are expressed in a subset of osteosarcoma, and PDL1 expression is positively correlated with TILs. Multiple agents targeting PD1/PDL1 are in clinical development, and this may be a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for osteosarcoma clinical trials.

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-2 intracellularly stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and specifically induces submucosal arteriole vasodilation via a sheer stress-independent, local neural mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-responsive neuropeptide that exerts diverse actions in the gastrointestinal tract, including enhancing mucosal cell survival and proliferation, mucosal blood flow, luminal nutrient uptake, and suppressing gastric motility and secretion. We have shown th...

  4. Ectopic ERK Expression Induces Phenotypic Conversion of C10 Cells and Alters DNA Methyltransferase Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2012-05-04

    In some model systems constitutive extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activation is sufficient to promote an oncogenic phenotype. Here we investigate whether constitutive ERK expression influences phenotypic conversion in murine C10 type II alveolar epithelial cells. C10 cells were stably transduced with an ERK1-green fluorescent protein (ERK1-GFP) chimera or empty vector and ectopic ERK expression was associated with the acquisition of soft agar focus-forming potential in late passage, but not early passage cells. Late passage ERK1-GFP cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyl transferases (DNMT1 and 3b) and a marked increase in sensitivity to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC)-mediated toxicity, relative to early passage ERK1-GFP cells and vector controls. The expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were significantly increased in late passage cells, suggesting enhanced DNA damage recognition and repair activity which we interpret as a reflection of genomic instability. Phospho-ERK levels were dramatically decreased in late passage ERK1-GFP cells, relative to early passage and vector controls, and phospho-ERK levels were restored by treatment with sodium orthovanadate, indicating a role for phosphatase activity in this response. Collectively these observations suggest that ectopic ERK expression promotes phenotypic conversion of C10 cells that is associated with latent effects on epigenetic programming and phosphatase activities.

  5. Neurogenin 3 Expressing Cells in the Human Exocrine Pancreas Have the Capacity for Endocrine Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Danielle L.; O’Driscoll, Marci; Sheets, Timothy P.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Oberholzer, Jose; McGarrigle, James J.; Shamblott, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenin 3 (NGN3) is necessary and sufficient for endocrine differentiation during pancreatic development and is expressed by a population of progenitor cells that give rise exclusively to hormone-secreting cells within islets. NGN3 protein can be detected in the adult rodent pancreas only following certain types of injury, when it is transiently expressed by exocrine cells undergoing reprogramming to an endocrine cell fate. Here, NGN3 protein can be detected in 2% of acinar and duct cells in living biopsies of histologically normal adult human pancreata and 10% in cadaveric biopsies of organ donor pancreata. The percentage and total number of NGN3+ cells increase during culture without evidence of proliferation or selective cell death. Isolation of highly purified and viable NGN3+ cell populations can be achieved based on coexpression of the cell surface glycoprotein CD133. Transcriptome and targeted expression analyses of isolated CD133+ / NGN3+ cells indicate that they are distinct from surrounding exocrine tissue with respect to expression phenotype and Notch signaling activity, but retain high level mRNA expression of genes indicative of acinar and duct cell function. NGN3+ cells have an mRNA expression profile that resembles that of mouse early endocrine progenitor cells. During in vitro differentiation, NGN3+ cells express genes in a pattern characteristic of endocrine development and result in cells that resemble beta cells on the basis of coexpression of insulin C-peptide, chromogranin A and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1. NGN3 expression in the adult human exocrine pancreas marks a dedifferentiating cell population with the capacity to take on an endocrine cell fate. These cells represent a potential source for the treatment of diabetes either through ex vivo manipulation, or in vivo by targeting mechanisms controlling their population size and endocrine cell fate commitment. PMID:26288179

  6. Monitoring cell physiology by expression profiles and discovering cell type-specific genes by compiled expression profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, Kousaku; Itoh, Kouichi; Fukushima, Atsushi; Yoshii, Junji; Matsubara, Kenichi

    1995-11-20

    A gene expression profile is the list showing the expressed gene species and the abundance of their transcripts in a given cell or tissue. This list is made by constructing 3{prime}-directed cDNA libraries consisting of only the 3{prime}-termini of mRNA and sequencing randomly selected clones from such libraries: genes are identified by the sequences, and the composition of mRNA, which reflects gene activities, is measured from the frequency of appearance of the gene transcripts. For practical reasons, the number of sequenced clones has been limited to approximately 1000 per library at present, but the resulting profile covers almost all highly or moderately expressed genes, along with many less active genes. We constructed expression profiles from the HL60 human promyelocytic cell line and two of its derivatives, granulocytoids induced by DMSO and monocytoids induced by TPA. In HL60, a significant fraction of the abundantly expressed genes was for protein synthesis. Upon induction, these genes were partially or totally silenced; transcripts for proteins that characterize the granulocytes and monocyte-macrophages became abundant. By compiling and comparing different expression profiles, genes can be categorized into those expressed in diverse cell types and those active only in limited cell types. Although at present, the number of expression profiles that can be compiled is limited and this categorization is applicable only to abundantly expressed genes, 13 novel genes that may represent granulocyte- or monocyte-specific functions have been discovered. 37 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. An Exercise to Estimate Differential Gene Expression in Human Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    The expression of genes in cells of various tissue types varies considerably and is correlated with the function of a particular organ. The pattern of gene expression changes in diseased tissues, in response to therapy or infection and exposure to environmental mutagens, chemicals, ultraviolet light, and ionizing radiation. To better understand…

  8. Once-weekly glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2015-07-01

    The once-weekly glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (QW GLP1RA) represent a major advancement in diabetes pharmaco-therapeutics. This review describes the basic, clinical, and comparative pharmacology of this novel class of drugs. It highlights the clinical placement and posology of these drugs.

  9. 21 CFR 862.1335 - Glucagon test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glucagon test system. 862.1335 Section 862.1335 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1335 - Glucagon test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glucagon test system. 862.1335 Section 862.1335 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  11. Metal-Catalyzed Oxidation and Photo-oxidation of Glucagon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The oxidation of glucagon by the H2O2/Cu(2+) system and by simulated sunlight was studied using HPLC-MS methodologies. It was found that copper ion-catalyzed oxidation is much faster in the residue 1-12 region than in photo-oxidation, but it is slower than photo-oxidation in the residue 18-29 region. This difference is due to the unique feature of the primary sequence of glucagon. The residue 1-12 region contains His-1 and Asp-9 that can bind to Cu(2+) ions and catalyze the oxidation of His-1 and Tyr-10, while the residue 18-29 region lacks these charged residues near the liable Met-27 and Trp-25 and hence no catalysis by the neighboring groups occurs. Fragment (residue 13-17) was more stable than the other regions of the peptide toward photo-oxidation because it contains only one oxidizable residue, Tyr-13. These findings may help explain the mechanism of action of glucagon and provide some hints for the development of effective anti-diabetic drug molecules and stable glucagon formulations.

  12. 21 CFR 862.1335 - Glucagon test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glucagon test system. 862.1335 Section 862.1335 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1335 - Glucagon test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glucagon test system. 862.1335 Section 862.1335 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  14. Modification of Schwann cell gene expression by electroporation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Aspalter, Manuela; Vyas, Alka; Feiner, Jeffrey; Griffin, John; Brushart, Thomas; Redett, Richard

    2009-01-30

    Clinical outcomes of nerve grafting are often inferior to those of end-to-end nerve repair. This may be due, in part, to the routine use of cutaneous nerve to support motor axon regeneration. In previous work, we have demonstrated that Schwann cells express distinct sensory and motor phenotypes, and that these promote regeneration in a modality-specific fashion. Intra-operative modification of graft Schwann cell phenotype might therefore improve clinical outcomes. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of electroporating genes into intact nerve to modify Schwann cell gene expression. Initial trials established 70 V, 5 ms as optimum electroporation parameters. Intact, denervated, and reinnervated rat tibial nerves were electroporated with the YFP gene and evaluated serially by counting S-100 positive cells that expressed YFP. In intact nerve, a mean of 28% of Schwann cells expressed the gene at 3 days, falling to 20% at 7 days with little expression at later times. There were no significant differences among the three groups at each time period. Electronmicroscopic evaluation of treated, intact nerve revealed only occasional demyelination and axon degeneration. Intra-operative electroporation of nerve graft is thus a practical means of altering Schwann cell gene expression without the risks inherent in viral transfection.

  15. Gene expression profiles of bronchoalveolar cells in Pulmonary TB

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Bindu; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Belitskaya-Lévy, Ilana; Dawson, Rod; Ress, Stanley; Gold, Jeffrey A.; Condos, Rany; Pine, Richard; Brown, Stuart; Nolan, Anna; Rom, William N.; Weiden, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis includes macrophage activation, inflammation with increased immune effector cells, tissue necrosis and cavity formation, and fibrosis, distortion, and bronchiectasis. To evaluate the molecular basis of the immune response in the lungs of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), we used bronchoalveolar lavage to obtain cells at the site of infection. Affymetrix Genechip micro-arrays and cDNA nylon filter microarrays interrogated gene expression in BAL cells from 11 healthy controls and 17 patients with active pulmonary TB. We found altered gene expression for 69 genes in TB versus normal controls that included cell surface markers, cytokines, chemokines, receptors, transcription factors, and complement components. In addition, TB BAL cell gene expression patternssegregated into 2 groups: one suggestive of a T helper type 1 (Th1) cellular immune response with increased STAT-4, IFN-γ receptor, and MIG expression with increased IFN-γ protein levels in BAL fluid; the other group displayed characteristics of Th2 immunity with increased STAT-6, CD81, and IL-10 receptor expression. We were able to demonstrate that a Th2 presentation could change to a Th1 pattern after anti-tuberculous treatment in one TB patient studied serially. These gene expression data support the conclusion that pulmonary TB produces a global change in the BAL cell transcriptome with manifestations of either Th1 or Th2 immunity. PMID:17921069

  16. Novel Small Molecule Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Rodents and From Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sloop, Kyle W.; Willard, Francis S.; Brenner, Martin B.; Ficorilli, James; Valasek, Kathleen; Showalter, Aaron D.; Farb, Thomas B.; Cao, Julia X.C.; Cox, Amy L.; Michael, M. Dodson; Gutierrez Sanfeliciano, Sonia Maria; Tebbe, Mark J.; Coghlan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical effectiveness of parenterally-administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics to improve glucose control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes strongly supports discovery pursuits aimed at identifying and developing orally active, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. The purpose of these studies was to identify and characterize novel nonpeptide agonists of the GLP-1 receptor. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Screening using cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and insulin secretion assays with rodent and human islets were used to identify novel molecules. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and hyperglycemic clamp characterized the insulinotropic effects of compounds in vivo. RESULTS Novel low molecular weight pyrimidine-based compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion are described. These molecules induce GLP-1 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling in HEK293 cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and increase insulin secretion from rodent islets in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds activate GLP-1 receptor signaling, both alone or in an additive fashion when combined with the endogenous GLP-1 peptide; however, these agonists do not compete with radiolabeled GLP-1 in receptor-binding assays. In vivo studies using the IVGTT and the hyperglycemic clamp in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate increased insulin secretion in compound-treated animals. Further, perifusion assays with human islets isolated from a donor with type 2 diabetes show near-normalization of insulin secretion upon compound treatment. CONCLUSIONS These studies characterize the insulinotropic effects of an early-stage, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist and provide compelling evidence to support pharmaceutical optimization. PMID:20823098

  17. IGF Binding Protein-4 is Required for the Growth Effects of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 in Murine Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Kaori; Imam, Nuvair A.; Pintar, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is an enteroendocrine hormone that stimulates the growth of the intestinal epithelium. We have previously demonstrated that GLP-2 exerts its intestinotropic effect through an indirect mechanism that requires both IGF-1 and the intestinal epithelial IGF-1 receptor. However, the biological activity of IGF-1 is modulated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), including IGFBP-4, which is highly expressed in the intestine. To determine the role of IGFBP-4 in the tropic effects of GLP-2, IGFBP-4 knockout (KO) and control mice were treated with degradation-resistant GLP-2 or vehicle for 10 days. Comparable levels of IGFBP-1–3/5–7 mRNAs were observed in the intestinal mucosa of all animals. IGFBP-4 KO mice had greater small intestinal weight and length, and deeper crypts (P < .05) as compared with controls, suggesting that IGFBP-4 has an inhibitory role in basal intestinal growth. However, small intestinal weight, crypt-villus height and crypt cell proliferation increased in response to GLP-2 in control mice (P < .05), and these changes were abrogated with IGFBP-4 KO. In contrast, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A KO mice, which have increased levels of circulating IGFBP-4, demonstrated a normal intestinotropic response to GLP-2. Finally, GLP-2 treatment of control mice significantly increased IGFBP-4 mRNA expression in the jejunal mucosa (P < .05), a finding that was recapitulated by GLP-2 treatment of fetal rat intestinal cells in culture (10−8M for 2 h; P < .05). Collectively, these results indicate that the IGF-I-modulating protein, IGFBP-4, exerts a negative effect on basal intestinal growth but plays a positive regulatory role in the intestinotropic actions of GLP-2. PMID:25514089

  18. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  19. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  20. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  1. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  2. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohuai; Xia, Hui; Chen, Yong; Liu, Xiaofen; Zhou, Cheng; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhenghong

    2012-12-15

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7-8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 from activated dendritic cells. [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation demonstrated that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 both inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocyte induced by activated dendritic cells. Furthermore, this immunosuppressive effect was blocked by CTOP, a specific antagonist of µ-opioid receptors. Our experimental findings indicate that activated dendritic cells can induce the expression and secretion of endomorphins, and that endomorphins suppress T lymphocyte proliferation through activation of µ-opioid receptors.

  3. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  4. Chronic administration of Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists improves trabecular bone mass and architecture in ovariectomised mice.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M; Jeyabalan, J; Jørgensen, C S; Hopkinson, M; Al-Jazzar, A; Roux, J P; Chavassieux, P; Orriss, I R; Cleasby, M E; Chenu, C

    2015-12-01

    Some anti-diabetic therapies can have adverse effects on bone health and increase fracture risk. In this study, we tested the skeletal effects of chronic administration of two Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA), increasingly used for type 2 diabetes treatment, in a model of osteoporosis associated bone loss and examined the expression and activation of GLP-1R in bone cells. Mice were ovariectomised (OVX) to induce bone loss and four weeks later they were treated with Liraglutide (LIR) 0.3mg/kg/day, Exenatide (Ex-4) 10 μg/kg/day or saline for four weeks. Mice were injected with calcein and alizarin red prior to euthanasia, to label bone-mineralising surfaces. Tibial micro-architecture was determined by micro-CT and bone formation and resorption parameters measured by histomorphometric analysis. Serum was collected to measure calcitonin and sclerostin levels, inhibitors of bone resorption and formation, respectively. GLP-1R mRNA and protein expression were evaluated in the bone, bone marrow and bone cells using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Primary osteoclasts and osteoblasts were cultured to evaluate the effect of GLP-1RA on bone resorption and formation in vitro. GLP-1RA significantly increased trabecular bone mass, connectivity and structure parameters but had no effect on cortical bone. There was no effect of GLP-1RA on bone formation in vivo but an increase in osteoclast number and osteoclast surfaces was observed with Ex-4. GLP-1R was expressed in bone marrow cells, primary osteoclasts and osteoblasts and in late osteocytic cell line. Both Ex-4 and LIR stimulated osteoclastic differentiation in vitro but slightly reduced the area resorbed per osteoclast. They had no effect on bone nodule formation in vitro. Serum calcitonin levels were increased and sclerostin levels decreased by Ex-4 but not by LIR. Thus, GLP-1RA can have beneficial effects on bone and the expression of GLP-1R in bone cells may imply that these effects are exerted directly

  5. Expression of arginine decarboxylase in brain regions and neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyo, Abiye H.; Zhu, Meng-Yang; Ordway, Gregory A.; Regunathan, Soundar

    2010-01-01

    After our initial report of a mammalian gene for arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme for the synthesis of agmatine from arginine, we have determined the regional expression of ADC in rat. We have analyzed the expression of ADC in rat brain regions by activity, protein and mRNA levels, and the regulation of expression in neuronal cells by RNA interference. In rat brain, ADC was widely expressed in major brain regions, with a substantial amount in hypothalamus, followed by cortex, and with least amounts in locus coeruleus and medulla. ADC mRNA was detected in primary astrocytes and C6 glioma cells. While no ADC message was detected in fresh neurons (3 days old), significant message appeared in differentiated neurons (3 weeks old). PC12 cells, treated with nerve growth factor, had higher ADC mRNA compared with naive cells. The siRNA mixture directed towards the N-terminal regions of ADC cDNA down-regulated the levels of mRNA and protein in cultured neurons/C6 glioma cells and these cells produced lower agmatine. Thus, this study demonstrates that ADC message is expressed in rat brain regions, that it is regulated in neuronal cells and that the down-regulation of ADC activity by specific siRNA leads to lower agmatine production. PMID:16445852

  6. Transthyretin expression in medulloblastomas and medulloblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, S; Bayer, T A; Kraus, J A; Pietsch, T

    1995-10-01

    Transthyretin is a protein crucial to the transport of lipophilic molecules such as thyroid hormones and retinoids. In the central nervous system, large amounts of transthyretin are synthesized by the choroid plexus and are secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid. The choroid plexus is the only site of transthyretin synthesis in the brain. Transthyretin is expressed by most benign and malignant choroid plexus tumours while gliomas and meningiomas do not express transthyretin. Other major sites of transthyretin synthesis are the retinal pigment epithelium and hepatocytes. Medulloblastoma is the prototypical primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the cerebellum and can show multiple lines of differentiation, including the expression of retinal markers. In this study, we examined transthyretin expression both at the RNA and protein level in four medulloblastomas and six medulloblastoma cell lines using Northern and Western blot analysis, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), RNA in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. All four medulloblastomas and five of the six medulloblastoma cell lines expressed transthyretin-mRNA as demonstrated by reverse PCR and in situ hybridization while three medulloblastomas and one cell line were positive on Northern blot. The medulloblastoma with the most abundant RNA expression was transthyretin-immunoreactive on cryosections and the medulloblastoma cell line that was positive on Northern blot also expressed transthyretin at levels detectable by Western blot. No transthyretin-immunoreactivity was seen in 16 additional medulloblastomas studied on paraffin sections. These findings indicate that low-level expression of transthyretin-mRNA is common in medulloblastomas and medulloblastoma cell lines. Expression of transthyretin protein occurs rarely but can reach significant levels. Transthyretin expression in medulloblastoma is consistent with retinal pigment epithelium differentiation in medulloblastomas and reflects

  7. Effects of sodium tungstate on insulin and glucagon secretion in the perfused rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gallardo, J; Silvestre, R A; Egido, E M; Marco, J

    2000-08-18

    Both the direct effect of sodium tungstate on insulin and glucagon secretion in the perfused rat pancreas, and the insulin response to glucose and arginine in pancreases isolated from tungstate-pretreated rats were studied. Infusion of tungstate stimulated insulin output in a dose-dependent manner. The insulinotropic effect of tungstate was observed at normal (5.5 mM), and moderately high (9 mM) glucose concentrations, but not at a low glucose concentration (3.2 mM). Tungstate-induced insulin output was blocked by diazoxide, somatostatin, and amylin, suggesting several targets for tungstate at the B-cell secretory machinery. Glucagon release was not modified by tungstate. Pancreases from chronically tungstate-treated rats showed an enhanced response to glucose but not to arginine. Our results indicate that the reported reduction of glycemia caused by tungstate administration is, at least in part, due to its direct insulinotropic activity. Furthermore, chronic tungstate treatment may prime the B-cell, leading to over-response to a glucose stimulus.

  8. S100 protein expression in human melanoma cells: Comparison of levels of expression among different cell lines and individual cells in different phases of the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, A.; O'Hanlon, D.; Dunn, R. ); Petsche, D.; Baumal, R. ); Kwong, P.C.; Stead, R. ); Liao, S.K. Biotherapeutics, Inc., Franklin, TN )

    1990-03-01

    The synthesis of S100 protein in cultured human melanoma cells was examined using metabolic labeling with ({sup 35}S)methionine, immunoprecipitation with anti-S100 protein antiserum, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Six of seven cell lines derived from melanomas synthesized relatively large amounts of S100 protein, whereas three cell lines derived from normal melanocytes synthesized lesser amounts. Synthesis of S100 protein was not detected in 10 human cell lines of non-neuroectodermal origin. Analysis of poly(A{sup +}) RNA form one melanoma cell line by Northern blot hybridization with a probe specific for the {beta} subunit of rat S100 protein revealed a single mRNA species of 1.0 kb coding for the human protein. Flow cytometric analysis of individual cells of two melanoma cell lines and the rat glioma cell line C6 indicated that G0/G1 cells were heterogeneous with respect to S100 protein expression, while almost all the cells in S+G2+M expressed S100 protein. These results suggest that expression of S100 protein in G0/G1 could be a prerequisite for progression of the cells through the cell cycle.

  9. Androgen regulates ADAMTS15 gene expression in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Molokwu, Chidi N; Adeniji, Olajumoke O; Chandrasekharan, Shankar; Hamdy, Freddie C; Buttle, David J

    2010-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a major cause of mortality, largely as a consequence of metastases and transformation to androgen-independent growth. Metalloproteinases are implicated in cancer progression. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) are expressed in prostate cancer cells, with ADAMTS-1 and ADAMTS-15 being the most abundant. ADAMTS-15 but not ADAMTS-1 expression was downregulated by androgen in LNCaP prostate cancer cells, possibly through androgen response elements associated with the gene. ADAMTS-15 expression is predictive for survival in breast cancer, and the situation may be similar in prostate cancer, as androgen independence is usually due to aberrant signaling through its receptor.

  10. Expression and purification of recombinant nattokinase in Spodoptera frugiperda cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Xiaoli; Xiong, Shaoling; Zhang, Jing; Cai, Litao; Yang, Yanyan

    2007-10-01

    A recombinant baculovirus, rv-egfp-NK, containing a reporter gene encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), was used to express nattokinase (NK), a fibrinolytic enzyme, in Spodoptera frugiperda (SF-9) cells. The recombinant protein also included a histidine tag for purification using Ni(2+) resins. The recombinant NK, approximately 30 kDa, retained fibrinolytic activity (60 U/ml). The integration of the EGFP expression cassette in the Bac-to-Bac system is thus an effective method for the expression and purification of recombinant NK protein in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells.

  11. Association between SET expression and glioblastoma cell apoptosis and proliferation.

    PubMed

    He, Kunyan; Shi, Lihong; Jiang, Tingting; Li, Qiang; Chen, Yao; Meng, Chuan

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was one of the first cancer types systematically studied at a genomic and transcriptomic level due to its high incidence and aggressivity; however, the detailed mechanism remains unclear, even though it is known that numerous cytokines are involved in the occurrence and development of GBM. The present study aimed to determine whether the SET gene has a role in human glioblastoma carcinogenesis. A total of 32 samples, including 18 cases of glioma, 2 cases of meningioma and 12 normal brain tissue samples, were detected using the streptavidin-peroxidase method through immunohistochemistry. To reduce SET gene expression in U251 and U87MG cell lines, the RNA interference technique was used and transfection with small interfering (si)RNA of the SET gene was performed. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry, cell migration was examined by Transwell migration assay and cell proliferation was determined by Cell Counting Kit-8. SET, Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 mRNA and protein expression levels were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Positive protein expression of SET was observed in the cell nucleus, with the expression level of SET significantly higher in glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissue (P=0.001). Elevated expression of SET was significantly associated with gender (P=0.002), tumors classified as World Health Organization grade II (P=0.031), III (P=0.003) or IV (P=0.001), and moderately (P=0.031) or poorly differentiated (P=0.001) tumors. Compared with the negative and non-treatment (blank) control cells, SET gene expression was significantly inhibited (P=0.006 and P<0.001), cell apoptosis was significantly increased (P=0.001 and P<0.001), cell proliferation was significantly inhibited (P=0.002 and P=0.015), and cell migration was significantly decreased (P=0.001 and P=0.001) in siRNA-transfected U87MG(-SET) and U251(-SET) cells, respectively. In

  12. HIV Cell-to-Cell Spread Results in Earlier Onset of Viral Gene Expression by Multiple Infections per Cell

    PubMed Central

    Boullé, Mikaël; Müller, Thorsten G.; Dähling, Sabrina; Jackson, Laurelle; Mahamed, Deeqa; Oom, Lance; Lustig, Gila

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell spread of HIV, a directed mode of viral transmission, has been observed to be more rapid than cell-free infection. However, a mechanism for earlier onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was previously uncharacterized. Here we used time-lapse microscopy combined with automated image analysis to quantify the timing of the onset of HIV gene expression in a fluorescent reporter cell line, as well as single cell staining for infection over time in primary cells. We compared cell-to-cell spread of HIV to cell-free infection, and limited both types of transmission to a two-hour window to minimize differences due to virus transit time to the cell. The mean time to detectable onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was accelerated by 19% in the reporter cell line and by 35% in peripheral blood mononuclear cells relative to cell-free HIV infection. Neither factors secreted by infected cells, nor contact with infected cells in the absence of transmission, detectably changed onset. We recapitulated the earlier onset by infecting with multiple cell-free viruses per cell. Surprisingly, the acceleration in onset of viral gene expression was not explained by cooperativity between infecting virions. Instead, more rapid onset was consistent with a model where the fastest expressing virus out of the infecting virus pool sets the time for infection independently of the other co-infecting viruses. PMID:27812216

  13. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    PONIEWIERSKA-BARAN, AGATA; SUSZYNSKA, MALWINA; SUN, WENYUE; ABDELBASET-ISMAIL, AHMED; SCHNEIDER, GABRIELA; BARR, FREDERIC G.; RATAJCZAK, MARIUSZ Z.

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  14. Connexin 43 expressed in endothelial cells modulates monocyte‑endothelial adhesion by regulating cell adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongdong; Sun, Guoliang; Zhang, Rui; Luo, Chenfang; Ge, Mian; Luo, Gangjian; Hei, Ziqing

    2015-11-01

    Adhesion between circulating monocytes and vascular endothelial cells is a key initiator of atherosclerosis. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated that the expression of connexin (Cx)43 in monocytes modulates cell adhesion, however, the effects of the expression of Cx43 in endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study investigated the role of the expression of Cx43 in endothelial cells in the process of cell adhesion. A total of four different methods with distinct mechanisms were used to change the function and expression of Cx43 channels in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: Cx43 channel inhibitor (oleamide), enhancer (retinoic acid), overexpression of Cx43 by transfection with pcDNA‑Cx43 and knock‑down of the expression of Cx43 by small interfering RNA against Cx43. The results indicated that the upregulation of the expression of Cx43 enhanced monocyte‑endothelial adhesion and this was markedly decreased by downregulation of Cx43. This mechanism was associated with Cx43‑induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 and intercellular cell adhesion molecule‑1. The effects of Cx43 in endothelial cells was independent of Cx37 or Cx40. These experiments suggested that local regulation of endothelial Cx43 expression within the vasculature regulates monocyte‑endothelial adhesion, a critical event in the development of atherosclerosis and other inflammatory pathologies, with baseline adhesion set by the expression of Cx43. This balance may be crucial in controlling leukocyte involvement in inflammatory cascades.

  15. Cell-specific expression of TLR9 isoforms in inflammation.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Kelly J; Highton, John; Hessian, Paul A

    2011-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key pattern recognition receptors during an immune response. With five isoforms of human TLR9 described, we hypothesised that differential expression of TLR9 isoforms in different cell types would result in variable contributions to the overall input from TLR9 during inflammation. We assessed the molecular expression of the TLR9 isoforms, TLR9-A, -C and -D. In normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, B-lymphocytes express ∼100-fold more TLR9-A transcript than monocytes or T-lymphocytes, which predominantly express the TLR9-C transcript. Switches in isoform predominance accompany B-lymphocyte development. TLR9 protein expression in rheumatoid inflammatory lesions reflected the TLR9 isoform expression by immune cells. Herein we suggest that B-lymphocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute the ∼3-fold higher TLR9-A transcript levels observed in inflamed synovium when compared to subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules. In contrast, macrophages and T-lymphocytes contribute the ∼4-fold higher TLR9-C transcript levels seen in nodules, compared to synovia. From protein sequence, predictions of subcellular localisation suggest TLR9-B may locate to the mitochondria, whereas TLR9-D adopts an opposing orientation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Consistent with this, structure models raise the possibility of alternative ligands for the TLR9-B and TLR9-D variants. Our results highlight differences in the expression of human TLR9 isoforms in normal and inflamed tissues, with differing contributions to inflammation.

  16. Tet2: breaking down barriers to T cell cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chao; Zhu, Jinfang

    2015-04-21

    It has been unclear whether alteration in DNA methylation at cytokine genes during T helper (Th) cell differentiation is a cause or consequence of gene expression. In this issue of Immunity, Ichiyama et al. (2015) show that oxidation of 5-methylcytosine by the methylcytosine dioxygenase Tet2 regulates cytokine production in Th cells.

  17. All-optical regulation of gene expression in targeted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yisen; He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Liu, Dayong; Lan, Bei; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-06-01

    Controllable gene expression is always a challenge and of great significance to biomedical research and clinical applications. Recently, various approaches based on extra-engineered light-sensitive proteins have been developed to provide optogenetic actuators for gene expression. Complicated biomedical techniques including exogenous genes engineering, transfection, and material delivery are needed. Here we present an all-optical method to regulate gene expression in targeted cells. Intrinsic or exogenous genes can be activated by a Ca2+-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) driven by a short flash of femtosecond-laser irradiation. When applied to mesenchymal stem cells, expression of a differentiation regulator Osterix can be activated by this method to potentially induce differentiation of them. A laser-induced ``Ca2+-comb'' (LiCCo) by multi-time laser exposure is further developed to enhance gene expression efficiency. This noninvasive method hence provides an encouraging advance of gene expression regulation, with promising potential of applying in cell biology and stem-cell science.

  18. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  19. The expression of ADAMTS13 in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anyou; Duan, Qiaohong; Wu, Jingsheng; Liu, Xin; Sun, Zimin

    2016-06-01

    ADAMTS13, as a specific von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease, prevents microvascular thrombosis of VWF/platelet thrombi. It has been reported that human vascular endothelial cells could also synthesize and secrete ADAMTS13, and these reports were focused in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Considering the particularity of its huge quantity and structure of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) in the body, whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs also needs to be confirmed. To investigate whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) amplification detected ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1 cell line. The expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF were detected by fluorescence immunoassay and western blot. We observed the expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 in HMECs. We confirmed the expression of ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1, and found that there were some partly common distributions of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF. This study provides the evidence that HMECs also express ADAMTS13. HMECs might also be a primary source for human plasma ADAMTS13. The overlap region for the distribution of ADAMTS13 and VWF suggests that ADAMTS13 might have a potential regulation role for VWF inside cells.

  20. Expression of ZNF396 in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bai, Juncheng; Kito, Yusuke; Okubo, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Tamotsu

    2014-05-01

    Zfp191 represses differentiation and keeps various cells in the stem/progenitor stage. Here, we report that a Zfp191 homolog protein, ZNF396, is expressed in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and possibly represses the expression of a Notch system effector molecule, Hes1 (hairy and enhancer of split-1), and prevents BCC cells from undergoing Notch-mediated squamous cell differentiation. ZNF396 immunoreactivity was found in the nucleus of 35 of 38 cutaneous BCC and 4 of 74 squamous cell carcinoma tissue specimens. In non-tumorous epidermal tissues, ZNF396 immunoreactivity was restricted in basal cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of ZNF396 induced the expression of Notch2, Hes1, and involucrin in cultured BCC cells. Finally, we found that siRNA-mediated silencing of ZNF396 gene inhibited the proliferation of TE354.T basal cell carcinoma cells. ZNF396 might repress Notch-Hes1 signaling axis and prevent tumor cells from undergoing squamous differentiation in BCC.

  1. Phenolic Compounds from Fermented Berry Beverages Modulated Gene and Protein Expression To Increase Insulin Secretion from Pancreatic β-Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michelle H; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez

    2016-03-30

    Berries are a rich source of bioactive phenolic compounds that are able to bind and inhibit the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), a current target for type-2 diabetes therapy. The objectives were to determine the role of berry phenolic compounds to modulate incretin-cleaving DPP-IV and its substrate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, and genes and proteins involved in the insulin secretion pathway using cell culture. Anthocyanins (ANC) from 50% blueberry-50% blackberry (Blu-Bla) and 100% blackberry (Bla) fermented beverages at 50 μM cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents increased (p < 0.05) glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells (iNS-1E) both when applied directly and following simulated absorption through Caco-2 cells (by 233 and 100 μIU insulin/mL, respectively). ANC 50%Blu-Bla and ANC 100%Bla upregulated the gene for incretin hormone GLP-1 (fold-change 3.0 ± 1.4 and 2.0 ± 0.3, respectively) and genes in the insulin secretory pathway including insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (iGF1R, 2.3 ± 0.6 and 1.6 ± 0.3, respectively), and increased (p < 0.05) the protein expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-II), insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-2 and 3), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in iNS-1E cells. Taken together, anthocyanins, predominantly delphinidin-3-arabinoside, from fermented berry beverages have the potential to modulate DPP-IV and its substrate GLP-1, to increase insulin secretion, and to upregulate expression of mRNA of insulin-receptor associated genes and proteins in pancreatic β-cells.

  2. Structural Determinants of Binding the Seven-transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Yang, Linlin; Song, Gaojie; Dai, Antao; Cai, Xiaoqing; Feng, Yang; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Hanson, Michael A; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-06-17

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors. Members of the class B family are distinguished by their large extracellular domain, which works cooperatively with the canonical seven-transmembrane (7TM) helical domain to signal in response to binding of various peptide hormones. We have combined structure-based site-specific mutational studies with molecular dynamics simulations of a full-length model of GLP-1R bound to multiple peptide ligand variants. Despite the high sequence similarity between GLP-1R and its closest structural homologue, the glucagon receptor (GCGR), nearly half of the 62 stably expressed mutants affected GLP-1R in a different manner than the corresponding mutants in GCGR. The molecular dynamics simulations of wild-type and mutant GLP-1R·ligand complexes provided molecular insights into GLP-1R-specific recognition mechanisms for the N terminus of GLP-1 by residues in the 7TM pocket and explained how glucagon-mimicking GLP-1 mutants restored binding affinity for (GCGR-mimicking) GLP-1R mutants. Structural analysis of the simulations suggested that peptide ligand binding mode variations in the 7TM binding pocket are facilitated by movement of the extracellular domain relative to the 7TM bundle. These differences in binding modes may account for the pharmacological differences between GLP-1 peptide variants.

  3. Prognostic significance of metallothionein expression in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mitropoulos, Dionisios; Kyroudi-Voulgari, Aspasia; Theocharis, Stamatis; Serafetinides, Efraim; Moraitis, Epaminondas; Zervas, Anastasios; Kittas, Christos

    2005-01-01

    Background Metallothionein (MT) protein expression deficiency has been implicated in carcinogenesis while MT over expression in tumors is indicative of tumor resistance to anti-cancer treatment. The purpose of the study was to examine the expression of MT expression in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to correlate MT positivity, the pattern and extent of MT expression with tumor histologic cell type and nuclear grade, pathologic stage and patients' survival. Patients and methods The immunohistochemical expression of MT was determined in 43 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded RCC specimens, using a mouse monoclonal antibody that reacts with both human MT-I and MT-II. Correlation was sought between immunohistochemical (MT positivity, intensity and extension of staining) and clinico-pathological data (histological cell type, tumor nuclear grade, pathologic stage and patients' survival). Results Positive MT staining was present in 21 cases (49%), being mild/moderate and intense in 8 and 13 cases, respectively. The pattern was cytoplasmic in 7 cases and was both cytoplasmic and nuclear in 14 cases. MT expression in a percentage of up to 25% of tumor cells (negative MT staining included) was observed in 31 cases, in a percentage 25–50% of tumor cells in 7 cases, and in a percentage of 50–75% of tumor cells in 5 cases. There was no significant correlation of MT intensity of staining to histological type, stage and patients' survival, while it was inversely correlated to higher tumor nuclear grade. MT extent of staining did not correlate with histological type, nuclear grade, and pathologic stage while a statistically significant association was found with patients' survival. Conclusions The inverse correlation between MT staining intensity and tumor nuclear grade in RCC suggests a role of MT in tumor differentiation process. Since extent of MT expression is inversely correlated with survival it may be possibly used as a clinical prognostic parameter. PMID

  4. A unique mechanism regulating gene expression in 1-cell embryos

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, Ryoma; AOKI, Fugaku

    2016-01-01

    After fertilization, the genome of zygotes is transcriptionally silent. The timing of the initiation of transcription is species-specific and occurs at the mid-1-cell stage in mice. Recent analyses using high-throughput sequencing (HTS) have identified thousands of genes transcribed at the 1-cell stage, and the pattern of expression among these genes appears to be unique. In this article, we show the result of an additional analysis using HTS data from a previous study, and present the hypothesis that an extremely loose chromatin structure causes promiscuous gene expression in 1-cell embryos. PMID:27867162

  5. Genetic modification of primate amniotic fluid-derived stem cells produces pancreatic progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Mack, David L; Williams, J Koudy; Mirmalek-Sani, Sayed-Hadi; Moorefield, Emily; Chun, So-Young; Wang, Jun; Lorenzetti, Diego; Furth, Mark; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay

    2013-01-01

    Insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes does not prevent serious long-term complications including vascular disease, neuropathy, retinopathy and renal failure. Stem cells, including amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells - highly expansive, multipotent and nontumorigenic cells - could serve as an appropriate stem cell source for β-cell differentiation. In the current study we tested whether nonhuman primate (nhp)AFS cells ectopically expressing key pancreatic transcription factors were capable of differentiating into a β-cell-like cell phenotype in vitro. nhpAFS cells were obtained from Cynomolgus monkey amniotic fluid by immunomagnetic selection for a CD117 (c-kit)-positive population. RT-PCR for endodermal and pancreatic lineage-specific markers was performed on AFS cells after adenovirally transduced expression of PDX1, NGN3 and MAFA. Expression of MAFA was sufficient to induce insulin mRNA expression in nhpAFS cell lines, whereas a combination of MAFA, PDX1 and NGN3 further induced insulin expression, and also induced the expression of other important endocrine cell genes such as glucagon, NEUROD1, NKX2.2, ISL1 and PCSK2. Higher induction of these and other important pancreatic genes was achieved by growing the triply infected AFS cells in media supplemented with a combination of B27, betacellulin and nicotinamide, as well as culturing the cells on extracellular matrix-coated plates. The expression of pancreatic genes such as NEUROD1, glucagon and insulin progressively decreased with the decline of adenovirally expressed PDX1, NGN3 and MAFA. Together, these experiments suggest that forced expression of pancreatic transcription factors in primate AFS cells induces them towards the pancreatic lineage.

  6. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, Chandramu; Dontula, Ranadheer; Gujrati, Meena; Lakka, Sajani S.

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  7. The effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 in the management of diabetes mellitus: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Mohamed; Singh, Jaipaul; Rashed, Hameed; Tariq, Saeed; Zilahi, Erika; Adeghate, Ernest

    2014-11-01

    Incretins, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP)-1, have been shown to elevate plasma insulin concentration. The purpose of this study is to investigate the cellular and molecular basis of the beneficial effects of GLP-1. Normal and diabetic male Wistar rats were treated with GLP-1 (50 ng/kg body weight) for 10 weeks. At the end of the experiment, pancreatic tissues were taken for immunohistochemistry, immunoelectron microscopy and real-time polymerase chain reaction studies. Samples of blood were retrieved from the animals for the measurement of enzymes and insulin. The results show that treatment of diabetic rats with GLP-1 caused significant (P < 0.05) reduction in body weight gain and blood glucose level. GLP-1 (10(-12)-10(-6) M) induced significant (P < 0.01) dose-dependent increases in insulin release from the pancreas of normal and diabetic rats compared to basal. Diabetes-induced abnormal liver (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) and kidney (blood urea nitrogen and uric acid) parameters were corrected in GLP-1-treated rats compared to controls. GLP-1 treatment induced significant (P < 0.05) elevation in the expression of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1, heat shock protein-70, glutathione peroxidase, insulin receptor and GLP-1-receptor genes in diabetic animals compared to controls. GLP-1 is present in pancreatic beta cells and significantly (P < 0.05) increased the number of insulin-, glutathione reductase- and catalase-immunoreactive islet cells. The results of this study show that GLP-1 is co-localized with insulin and seems to exert its beneficial effects by increasing cellular concentrations of endogenous antioxidant genes and other genes involved in the maintenance of pancreatic beta cell structure and function.

  8. Can dead bacterial cells be defined and are genes expressed after cell death?

    PubMed

    Trevors, J T

    2012-07-01

    There is a paucity of knowledge on gene expression in dead bacterial cells. Why would this knowledge be useful? The cells are dead. However, the time duration of gene expression following cell death is often unknown, and possibly in the order of minutes. In addition, it is a challenge to determine if bacterial cells are dead, or viable but non-culturable (VBNC), and what is an agreed upon correct definition of dead bacteria. Cells in the bacterial population or community may die at different rates or times and this complicates both the viability and gene expression analysis. In this article, the definition of dead bacterial cells is discussed and its significance in continued gene expression in cells following death. The definition of living and dead has implications for possible, completely, synthetic bacterial cells that may be capable of growth and division.

  9. TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population in murine epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Qiao, Liangjun; Du, Jia; Li, Shuang; Zhao, Hengguang; Wang, Fangfang; Huang, Qiaorong; Meng, Wentong; Zhu, Hongyan; Bu, Hong; Li, Hui; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2014-01-01

    Normal interfollicular epidermis (IFE) homeostasis is maintained throughout the entire life by its own stem cells that self-renew and generate progeny that undergo terminal differentiation. However, the fine markers of the stem cells in interfollicular epidermis are not well defined yet. Here we found that TLR7 identified the existence of progenitors and interfollicular epidermal stem cells in murine skin. In vitro, TLR7-expressing cells comprised of two subpopulations that were competent to proliferate and exhibited distinct differentiation potentials. Three-dimensional (3D) organotypic culture and skin reconstitution assays showed that TLR7-expressing cells were able to reconstruct the interfollicular epidermis. Finally, TLR7-expressing cells maintained the intact interfollicular epidermal structures revealed in serial transplantation assays in vivo in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population. PMID:25060222

  10. Analysis of allelic expression patterns in clonal somatic cells by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Reinius, Björn; Mold, Jeff E; Ramsköld, Daniel; Deng, Qiaolin; Johnsson, Per; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Frisén, Jonas; Sandberg, Rickard

    2016-11-01

    Cellular heterogeneity can emerge from the expression of only one parental allele. However, it has remained controversial whether, or to what degree, random monoallelic expression of autosomal genes (aRME) is mitotically inherited (clonal) or stochastic (dynamic) in somatic cells, particularly in vivo. Here we used allele-sensitive single-cell RNA-seq on clonal primary mouse fibroblasts and freshly isolated human CD8(+) T cells to dissect clonal and dynamic monoallelic expression patterns. Dynamic aRME affected a considerable portion of the cells' transcriptomes, with levels dependent on the cells' transcriptional activity. Notably, clonal aRME was detected, but it was surprisingly scarce (<1% of genes) and mainly affected the most weakly expressed genes. Consequently, the overwhelming majority of aRME occurs transiently within individual cells, and patterns of aRME are thus primarily scattered throughout somatic cell populations rather than, as previously hypothesized, confined to patches of clonally related cells.

  11. Growth dynamics and cyclin expression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Biskup, Edyta; Manfé, Valentina; Kamstrup, Maria R.; Gniadecki, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated cell growth dynamics and cyclins B1 and E expression in cell lines derived from mycosis fungoides (MyLa), Sézary syndrome (SeAx), and CD30+ lympho-proliferative diseases (Mac1, Mac2a, JK). Mac1 and Mac2a had the highest growth rate (doubling time 18–28 h, >90% cycling cells) whereas SeAx was proliferating slowly (doubling time 55 h, approximately 35% cycling cells). Expression of cyclin B1 correlated positively with doubling time whereas expression of cyclin E was unscheduled and constant across the investigated cell lines. All cell lines exhibited high expression of PCNA. Thus, we concluded that cyclin B1 could be used for rapid screening of cell proliferation in malignant lymphocytes derived from cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. PMID:25386244

  12. Viscumins functionally modulate cell motility-associated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Schötterl, Sonja; Hübner, Miriam; Armento, Angela; Veninga, Vivien; Wirsik, Naita Maren; Bernatz, Simon; Lentzen, Hans; Mittelbronn, Michel; Naumann, Ulrike

    2017-02-01

    In Europe extracts from Viscum album L., the European white-berry mistletoe, are widely used as a complementary cancer therapy. Viscumins (mistletoe lectins, ML) have been scrutinized as important active components of mistletoe and exhibit a variety of anticancer effects such as stimulation of the immune system, induction of cytotoxicity, reduction of tumor cell motility as well as changes in the expression of genes associated with cancer development and progression. By microarray expression analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and RT-PCR based validation of microarray data we demonstrate for the Viscum album extract Iscador Qu and for the lectins Aviscumine and ML-1 that in glioma cells these drugs differentially modulate the expression of genes involved in the regulation of cell migration and invasion, including processes modulating cell architecture and cell adhesion. A variety of differentially expressed genes in ML treated cells are associated with the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway or are targets of TGF-β. ML treatment downregulated the expression of TGF-β itself, of the TGF-β receptor II (TGFBR2), of the TGF-β intracellular signal transducer protein SMAD2, and of matrix-metalloproteinases (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-14. Even if the changes in gene expression differ between Aviscumine, Iscador Qu and ML-1, the overall regulation of motility associated gene expression by all drugs showed functional effects since tumor cell motility was reduced in a ML-dependent manner. Therefore, ML containing compounds might provide clinical benefit as adjuvant therapeutics in the treatment of patients with invasively growing tumors such as glioblastomas.

  13. Long Noncoding RNA Expression during Human B-Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Andreas; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Thrue, Charlotte Albæk; Hagedorn, Peter H.; Schmitz, Alexander; Bødker, Julie Støve; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of diverse cellular processes, but their roles in the developing immune system are poorly understood. In this study, we analysed lncRNA expression during human B-cell development by array-based expression profiling of eleven distinct flow-sorted B-cell subsets, comprising pre-B1, pre-B2, immature, naive, memory, and plasma cells from bone marrow biopsies (n = 7), and naive, centroblast, centrocyte, memory, and plasmablast cells from tonsil tissue samples (n = 6), respectively. A remapping strategy was used to assign the array probes to 37630 gene-level probe sets, reflecting recent updates in genomic and transcriptomic databases, which enabled expression profiling of 19579 long noncoding RNAs, comprising 3947 antisense RNAs, 5277 lincRNAs, 7625 pseudogenes, and 2730 additional lncRNAs. As a first step towards inferring the functions of the identified lncRNAs in developing B-cells, we analysed their co-expression with well-characterized protein-coding genes, a method known as “guilt by association”. By using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we identified 272 lincRNAs, 471 antisense RNAs, 376 pseudogene RNAs, and 64 lncRNAs within seven sub-networks associated with distinct stages of B-cell development, such as early B-cell development, B-cell proliferation, affinity maturation of antibody, and terminal differentiation. These data provide an important resource for future studies on the functions of lncRNAs in development of the adaptive immune response, and the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies that originate from distinct B-cell subpopulations. PMID:26394393

  14. Selenoprotein expression is regulated at multiple levels in prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Rebsch, Cheryl M; Penna, Frank J; Copeland, Paul R

    2006-12-01

    Selenium supplementation in a population with low basal blood selenium levels has been reported to decrease the incidence of several cancers including prostate cancer. Based on the clinical findings, it is likely that the antioxidant function of one or more selenoproteins is responsible for the chemopreventive effect, although low molecular weight seleno-compounds have also been posited to selectively induce apoptosis in transformed cells. To address the effects of selenium supplementation on selenoprotein expression in prostate cells, we have undertaken an analysis of antioxidant selenoprotein expression as well as selenium toxicity in non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1) and prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and PC-3). Our results show that two of the glutathione peroxidase family members (GPX1 and GPX4) are highly induced by supplemental selenium in prostate cancer cells but only slightly induced in RWPE-1 cells. In addition, GPX1 levels are dramatically lower in PC-3 cells as compared to RWPE-1 or LNCaP cells. GPX2 protein and mRNA, however, are only detectable in RWPE-1 cells. Of the three selenium compounds tested (sodium selenite, sodium selenate and selenomethionine), only sodium selenite shows toxicity in a physiological range of selenium concentrations. Notably and in contrast to previous studies, RWPE-1 cells were significantly more sensitive to selenite than either of the prostate cancer cell lines. These results demonstrate that selenoproteins and selenium metabolism are regulated at multiple levels in prostate cells.

  15. Positive Allosteric Modulation of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor by Diverse Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Ana B; Showalter, Aaron D; Wainscott, David B; Stutsman, Cynthia; Marín, Aranzazu; Ficorilli, James; Cabrera, Over; Willard, Francis S; Sloop, Kyle W

    2016-05-13

    Therapeutic intervention to activate the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves energy balance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies investigating mechanisms whereby peptide ligands activate GLP-1R have utilized mutagenesis, receptor chimeras, photo-affinity labeling, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and crystallography of the ligand-binding ectodomain to establish receptor homology models. However, this has not enabled the design or discovery of drug-like non-peptide GLP-1R activators. Recently, studies investigating 4-(3-benzyloxyphenyl)-2-ethylsulfinyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP), a GLP-1R-positive allosteric modulator, determined that Cys-347 in the GLP-1R is required for positive allosteric modulator activity via covalent modification. To advance small molecule activation of the GLP-1R, we characterized the insulinotropic mechanism of BETP. In guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding and INS1 832-3 insulinoma cell cAMP assays, BETP enhanced GLP-1(9-36)-NH2-stimulated cAMP signaling. Using isolated pancreatic islets, BETP potentiated insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner that requires both the peptide ligand and GLP-1R. In studies of the covalent mechanism, PAGE fluorography showed labeling of GLP-1R in immunoprecipitation experiments from GLP-1R-expressing cells incubated with [(3)H]BETP. Furthermore, we investigated whether other reported GLP-1R activators and compounds identified from screening campaigns modulate GLP-1R by covalent modification. Similar to BETP, several molecules were found to enhance GLP-1R signaling in a Cys-347-dependent manner. These chemotypes are electrophiles that react with GSH, and LC/MS determined the cysteine adducts formed upon conjugation. Together, our results suggest covalent modification may be used to stabilize the GLP-1R in an active conformation. Moreover, the findings provide pharmacological guidance for the discovery and

  16. Umami Receptor Activation Increases Duodenal Bicarbonate Secretion via Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Release in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joon-Ho; Inoue, Takuya; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Guth, Paul H.; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Luminal nutrient chemosensing during meal ingestion is mediated by intestinal endocrine cells, which regulate secretion and motility via the release of gut hormones. We have reported that luminal coperfusion of l-Glu and IMP, common condiments providing the umami or proteinaceous taste, synergistically increases duodenal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) possibly via taste receptor heterodimers, taste receptor type 1, member 1 (T1R1)/R3. We hypothesized that glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) or glucagon-like peptide (GLP) is released by duodenal perfusion with l-Glu/IMP. We measured DBS with pH and CO2 electrodes through a perfused rat duodenal loop in vivo. GIP, exendin (Ex)-4 (GLP-1 receptor agonist), or GLP-2 was intravenously infused (0.01–1 nmol/kg/h). l-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally perfused with or without bolus intravenous injection (3 or 30 nmol/kg) of the receptor antagonists Pro3GIP, Ex-3(9-39), or GLP-2(3-33). GIP or GLP-2 infusion dose-dependently increased DBS, whereas Ex-4 infusion gradually decreased DBS. Luminal perfusion of l-Glu/IMP increased DBS, with no effect of Pro3GIP or Ex-3(9-39), whereas GLP-2(3-33) inhibited l-Glu/IMP-induced DBS. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)(6–28) intravenously or NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester coperfusion inhibited the effect of l-Glu/IMP. Perfusion of l-Glu/IMP increased portal venous concentrations of GLP-2, followed by a delayed increase of GLP-1, with no effect on GIP release. GLP-1/2 and T1R1/R3 were expressed in duodenal endocrine-like cells. These results suggest that luminal l-Glu/IMP-induced DBS is mediated via GLP-2 release and receptor activation followed by VIP and nitric oxide release. Because GLP-1 is insulinotropic and GLP-2 is intestinotrophic, umami receptor activation may have additional benefits in glucose metabolism and duodenal mucosal protection and regeneration. PMID:21846840

  17. Positive Allosteric Modulation of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor by Diverse Electrophiles*

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Aaron D.; Wainscott, David B.; Stutsman, Cynthia; Marín, Aranzazu; Ficorilli, James; Cabrera, Over

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention to activate the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves energy balance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies investigating mechanisms whereby peptide ligands activate GLP-1R have utilized mutagenesis, receptor chimeras, photo-affinity labeling, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and crystallography of the ligand-binding ectodomain to establish receptor homology models. However, this has not enabled the design or discovery of drug-like non-peptide GLP-1R activators. Recently, studies investigating 4-(3-benzyloxyphenyl)-2-ethylsulfinyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP), a GLP-1R-positive allosteric modulator, determined that Cys-347 in the GLP-1R is required for positive allosteric modulator activity via covalent modification. To advance small molecule activation of the GLP-1R, we characterized the insulinotropic mechanism of BETP. In guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding and INS1 832-3 insulinoma cell cAMP assays, BETP enhanced GLP-1(9–36)-NH2-stimulated cAMP signaling. Using isolated pancreatic islets, BETP potentiated insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner that requires both the peptide ligand and GLP-1R. In studies of the covalent mechanism, PAGE fluorography showed labeling of GLP-1R in immunoprecipitation experiments from GLP-1R-expressing cells incubated with [3H]BETP. Furthermore, we investigated whether other reported GLP-1R activators and compounds identified from screening campaigns modulate GLP-1R by covalent modification. Similar to BETP, several molecules were found to enhance GLP-1R signaling in a Cys-347-dependent manner. These chemotypes are electrophiles that react with GSH, and LC/MS determined the cysteine adducts formed upon conjugation. Together, our results suggest covalent modification may be used to stabilize the GLP-1R in an active conformation. Moreover, the findings provide pharmacological guidance for the discovery and

  18. Characterization of the Effects of Arginine and Glucose on Glucagon and Insulin Release from the Perfused Rat Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gerich, John E.; Charles, M. Arthur; Grodsky, Gerold M.

    1974-01-01

    To characterize the mechanisms by which arginine and glucose affect pancreatic alpha and beta cell function, the effects of these agents over their full dose response, both alone and in various combinations, were studied using the perfused rat pancreas. Arginine (0-38 mM), in the absence of glucose, stimulated biphasic glucagon (IRG) secretion (Km≃3-4 mM) at concentrations less than 1 mM and caused nonphasic insulin (IRI) release (Km≃12-13 mM) but only at concentrations greater than 6 mM. Glucose (0-27.5 mM) alone stimulated biphasic IRI release (Km≃9-10 mM) at concentrations in excess of 5.5 mM and caused nonphasic inhibition of IRG secretion (Kt≃5-6 mM) at concentrations as low as 4.1 mM. These results demonstrate fundamental differences in pancreatic alpha and beta cell secretory patterns in response to glucose and arginine and suggest that glucagon secretion is more sensitive to the effect of both glucose and arginine. Various concentrations of arginine in the presence of 5.5 mM glucose stimulated biphasic IRG and IRI release: IRG responses were diminished and IRI responses were enhanced compared with those seen with arginine in the absence of glucose. Glucose (0-27.5 mM) in the presence of 3.2 or 19.2 mM arginine caused similar inhibition of IRG secretion (Km≃5-6 mM) and stimulation of IRI release (Km≃9-10 mM) as that seen with glucose alone, although greater IRG and IRI release occurred. This augmentation of IRI secretion was greater than that expected from mere additive effects of glucose and arginine. Classical Lineweaver-Burk analysis of these results indicates that glucose is a non-competitive inhibitor arginine-stimulated glucagon secretion and suggests that glucose and arginine affect pancreatic alpha and beta cell function via different mechanisms. In addition, comparison of simultaneous insulin and glucagon secretion patterns under various conditions suggests that endogenous insulin per se has little or no direct effect on IRG secretion

  19. Gene expression profile induced by BCNU in human glioma cell lines with differential MGMT expression.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Eva; Andion, Esther; Escalada, Alvaro; Honorato, Beatriz; Catalan, Victoria; Cubedo, Elena; Cordeu, Lucia; Garcia, Fermin; Zarate, Ruth; Zabalegui, Natalia; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus

    2005-07-01

    Chemotherapy with the alkylating agent BCNU (1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea) is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent for gliomas. However, the usefulness of this agent is limited because tumor cell resistance to BCNU is frequently found in clinical brain tumor therapy. The O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein (MGMT) reverses alkylation at the O6 position of guanine and we have reported the role of MGMT in the response of brain tumors to alkylating agents. However, the different mechanisms underlying the patterns related to MGMT remain unclear. To better understand the molecular mechanism by which BCNU exerts its effect in glioma cell lines according MGMT expression, we used microarray technology to interrogate 3800 known genes and determine the gene expression profiles altered by BCNU treatment. Our results showed that treatment with BCNU alters the expression of a diverse group of genes in a time-dependent manner. A subset of gene changes was found common in both glioma cell lines and other subset is specific of each cell line. After 24 h of BCNU treatment, up-regulation of transcription factors involved in the nucleation of both RNA polymerase II and III transcription initiation complexes was reported. Interestingly, BCNU promoted the expression of actin-dependent regulators of chromatin. Similar effects were found with higher BCNU doses in MGMT+ cell line showing a similar mechanism that in MGMT-deficient cell with standard doses. Our data suggest that human glioma cell lines treated with BCNU, independently of MGMT expression, show changes in the expression of cell cycle and survival-related genes interfering the transcription mechanisms and the chromatin regulation.

  20. Runx3 negatively regulates Osterix expression in dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Iohara, Koichiro; Ishikawa, Masaki; Into, Takeshi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Matsushita, Kenji; Nakashima, Misako

    2007-07-01

    Osterix, a zinc-finger-containing transcription factor, is required for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Osterix is also expressed in dental mesenchymal cells of the tooth germ. However, transcriptional regulation by Osterix in tooth development is not clear. Genetic studies in osteogenesis place Osterix downstream of Runx2 (Runt-related 2). The expression of Osterix in odontoblasts overlaps with Runx3 during terminal differentiation in vivo. Runx3 down-regulates Osterix expression in mouse DPCs (dental pulp cells). Therefore the regulatory role of Runx3 on Osterix expression in tooth development was investigated. Enforced expression of Runx3 down-regulated the activity of the Osterix promoter in the human embryonic kidney 293 cell line. When the Runx3 responsive element on the Osterix promoter, located at -713 to -707 bp (site 3, AGTGGTT) relative to the cap site, was mutated, this down-regulation was abrogated. Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility-shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in mouse DPCs demonstrated direct functional binding of Runx3 to the Osterix promoter. These results demonstrate the transcriptional regulation of Osterix expression by Runx3 during differentiation of dental pulp cells into odontoblasts during tooth development.

  1. Expression and stabilization of bacterial luciferase in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Stacey S.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Current mammalian bioreporters using either firefly luciferase (luc) or GFP constructs require lysis and/or exogenous excitation to evoke a measurable response. Consequently, these cells cannot serve as continuous, on-line monitoring devices for in vivo imaging. Bacterial luciferase, lux, produces a photonic reaction that is cyclic, resulting in autonomous signal generation without the requirement for exogenous substrates or external activation. Therefore, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporters are the only truly autonomous light-generating sensors in existence. Unfortunately, the bacterial lux system has not yet been efficiently expressed in mammalian cells. In this research, three approaches for optimal expression of the a and b subunits of the bacterial luciferase protein were compared and reporter signal stability was evaluated from stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Maximum light levels were obtained from cells expressing the luciferase subunits linked with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Cells harboring this construct produced bioluminescence equaling 2.6 X 106 photons/sec compared to 7.2 X 104 photons/sec obtained from cells expressing the luciferase from a dual promoter vector and 3.5 X 104 photons/sec from a Lux fusion protein. Furthermore, the bioluminescence levels remained stable for more than forty cell passages (5 months) in the absence of antibiotic selection. After this time, bioluminescence signals dropped at a rate of approximately 5% per cell passage. These data indicate that mammalian cell lines can be engineered to efficiently express the bacterial lux system, thus lending themselves to possible long-term continuous monitoring or imaging applications in vivo.

  2. Transcriptional Regulation of Tlr11 Gene Expression in Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Sanchez, Amir; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Yang, Jianghua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2009-01-01

    As sensors of invading microorganisms, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed not only on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) but also on epithelial cells. In the TLR family, Tlr11 appears to have the unique feature in that it is expressed primarily on epithelial cells, although it is also expressed on DCs and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that transcription of the Tlr11 gene is regulated through two cis-acting elements, one Ets-binding site and one interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. The Ets element interacts with the epithelium-specific transcription factors, ESE-1 and ESE-3, and the IRF motif interacts with IRF-8. Thus, Tlr11 expression on epithelial cells is regulated by the transcription factors that are presumably distinct from transcription factors that regulate the expression of TLRs in innate immune cells such as macrophages and DCs. Our results imply that the distinctive transcription regulatory machinery for TLRs on epithelium may represent a promising new avenue for the development of epithelia-specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:19801549

  3. GILT expression in B cells diminishes cathepsin S steady-state protein expression and activity

    PubMed Central

    Phipps-Yonas, Hannah; Semik, Vikki; Hastings, Karen Taraszka

    2013-01-01

    MHC class II-restricted Ag processing requires protein degradation in the endocytic pathway for the activation of CD4+ T cells. Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) facilitates Ag processing by reducing protein disulfide bonds in this compartment. Lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin S (CatS) contains disulfide bonds and mediates essential steps in MHC class II-restricted processing, including proteolysis of large polypeptides and cleavage of the invariant chain. We sought to determine whether GILT’s reductase activity regulates CatS expression and function. Confocal microscopy confirmed that GILT and CatS colocalized within lysosomes of B cells. GILT expression posttranscriptionally decreased the steady-state protein expression of CatS in primary B cells and B-cell lines. GILT did not substantially alter the expression of other lysosomal proteins, including H2-M, H2-O, or CatL. GILT’s reductase active site was necessary for diminished CatS protein levels, and GILT expression decreased the half-life of CatS, suggesting that GILT-mediated reduction of protein disulfide bonds enhances CatS degradation. GILT expression decreased the proteolysis of a CatS selective substrate. This study illustrates a physiologic mechanism that regulates CatS and has implications for fine tuning MHC class II-restricted Ag processing and for the development of CatS inhibitors, which are under investigation for the treatment of autoimmune disease. PMID:23012103

  4. Glucagon Treatment Interferes with an Early Step of Duck Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hild, Marc; Weber, Olaf; Schaller, Heinz

    1998-01-01

    The effect of glucagon on the establishment of hepadnavirus infection was studied in vitro with the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) model. The presence of the peptide hormone throughout infection or starting up to 8 h after virus uptake resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the levels of intra- and extracellular viral gene products and of secreted virions. Treatment with forskolin or dibutyryl-cyclic AMP, two drugs that also stimulate the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal transduction pathway, resulted in comparable inhibition, suggesting that the inhibitor effect is related to changes in the activity of protein kinase A. In persistently infected hepatocytes, only a slight, but continuous, decrease in viral replication was observed upon prolonged drug treatment. Time course analysis, including detection of DHBV covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA templates, revealed that glucagon acts late during the establishment of infection, at a time when the virus is already internalized, but before detectable ccc DNA accumulation in the nucleus. These data suggest that nuclear import (and reimport) of DHBV DNA genomes from cytosolic capsids is subject to cAMP-mediated regulation by cellular factors responding to changes in the state of the host cell. PMID:9525576

  5. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells Through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    the cell surface GRP78-expressing subpopulation of cells supports nuclear Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling. These findings are important because they are...original tasks outlined in the approved statement of work. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, cell surface GRP78, cancer stem cell, Snail -1 16. SECURITY...associated with cell surface GRP78 (Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1) were upregulated in GRP78(+) relative to GRP78(-) prostate cancer cells. Our results in this

  6. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Chun; Gusdon, Aaron M; Liu, Huan; Qu, Shen

    2014-10-28

    Glucagon-like peptide1 (GLP-1) is secreted from Langerhans cells in response to oral nutrient intake. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are a new class of incretin-based anti-diabetic drugs. They function to stimulate insulin secretion while suppressing glucagon secretion. GLP-1-based therapies are now well established in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and recent literature has suggested potential applications of these drugs in the treatment of obesity and for protection against cardiovascular and neurological diseases. As we know, along with change in lifestyles, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in China is rising more than that of viral hepatitis and alcoholic fatty liver disease, and NAFLD has become the most common chronic liver disease in recent years. Recent studies further suggest that GLP-1RAs can reduce transaminase levels to improve NAFLD by improving blood lipid levels, cutting down the fat content to promote fat redistribution, directly decreasing fatty degeneration of the liver, reducing the degree of liver fibrosis and improving inflammation. This review shows the NAFLD-associated effects of GLP-1RAs in animal models and in patients with T2DM or obesity who are participants in clinical trials.

  7. High Throughput Gene Expression Analysis Identifies Reliable Expression Markers of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Zhenzhi; Peh, Gary S. L.; Herath, Wishva B.; Cheng, Terence Y. D.; Ang, Heng-Pei; Toh, Kah-Peng; Robson, Paul; Mehta, Jodhbir S.; Colman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated for the development of suitable corneal endothelial graft alternatives through cell-tissue engineering, which can potentially alleviate the shortage of corneal transplant material. The advent of less invasive suture-less key-hole surgery options such as Descemet’s Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSEK) and Descemet’s Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty (DMEK), which involve transplantation of solely the endothelial layer instead of full thickness cornea, provide further impetus for the development of alternative endothelial grafts for clinical applications. A major challenge for this endeavor is the lack of specific markers for this cell type. To identify genes that reliably mark corneal endothelial cells (CECs) in vivo and in vitro, we performed RNA-sequencing on freshly isolated human CECs (from both young and old donors), CEC cultures, and corneal stroma. Gene expression of these corneal cell types was also compared to that of other human tissue types. Based on high throughput comparative gene expression analysis, we identified a panel of markers that are: i) highly expressed in CECs from both young donors and old donors; ii) expressed in CECs in vivo and in vitro; and iii) not expressed in corneal stroma keratocytes and the activated corneal stroma fibroblasts. These were SLC4A11, COL8A2 and CYYR1. The use of this panel of genes in combination reliably ascertains the identity of the CEC cell type. PMID:23844023

  8. Epigenetic control of retrotransposon expression in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Macia, Angela; Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Cortes, Jose Luis; Hastings, Robert K; Morell, Santiago; Lucena-Aguilar, Gema; Marchal, Juan Antonio; Badge, Richard M; Garcia-Perez, Jose Luis

    2011-01-01

    Long interspersed element 1s (LINE-1s or L1s) are a family of non-long-terminal-repeat retrotransposons that predominate in the human genome. Active LINE-1 elements encode proteins required for their mobilization. L1-encoded proteins also act in trans to mobilize short interspersed elements (SINEs), such as Alu elements. L1 and Alu insertions have been implicated in many human diseases, and their retrotransposition provides an ongoing source of human genetic diversity. L1/Alu elements are expected to ensure their transmission to subsequent generations by retrotransposing in germ cells or during early embryonic development. Here, we determined that several subfamilies of Alu elements are expressed in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and that most expressed Alu elements are active elements. We also exploited expression from the L1 antisense promoter to map expressed elements in hESCs. Remarkably, we found that expressed Alu elements are enriched in the youngest subfamily, Y, and that expressed L1s are mostly located within genes, suggesting an epigenetic control of retrotransposon expression in hESCs. Together, these data suggest that distinct subsets of active L1/Alu elements are expressed in hESCs and that the degree of somatic mosaicism attributable to L1 insertions during early development may be higher than previously anticipated.

  9. SNAP25 Expression in Mammalian Retinal Horizontal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Arlene A.; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut; Morgans, Catherine W.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal cells mediate inhibitory feedforward and feedback lateral interactions in the outer retina at photoreceptor terminals and bipolar cell dendrites; however, the mechanisms that underlie synaptic transmission from mammalian horizontal cells are poorly understood. The localization of a vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT) to horizontal cell processes in primate and rodent retinae suggested that mammalian horizontal cells release transmitter in a vesicular manner. Toward determining whether the molecular machinery for vesicular transmitter release is present in horizontal cells, we investigated the expression of SNAP25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa), a key SNARE protein, by immunocytochemistry with cell type-specific markers in the retinae of mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey. Different commercial antibodies to SNAP25 were tested on vertical sections of retina. We report the robust expression of SNAP25 in both plexiform layers. Double labeling with SNAP25 and calbindin antibodies demonstrated that horizontal cell processes and their endings in photoreceptor triad synapses were strongly labeled for both proteins in mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey retinae. Double labeling with parvalbumin antibodies in monkey retina verified SNAP25 immunoreactivity in all horizontal cells. Pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy in rabbit retina confirmed expression of SNAP25 in lateral elements within photoreceptor triad synapses. The SNAP25 immunoreactivity in the plexiform layers and outer nuclear layer fell into at least three patterns depending on the antibody, suggesting a differential distribution of SNAP25 isoforms. The presence of SNAP25a and SNAP25b isoforms in mouse retina was established by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. SNAP25 expression in mammalian horizontal cells along with other SNARE proteins is consistent with vesicular exocytosis. PMID:21280047

  10. Serum-dependent and cell cycle-dependent expression from a cytomegalovirus-based mammalian expression vector.

    PubMed

    Brightwell, G; Poirier, V; Cole, E; Ivins, S; Brown, K W

    1997-07-18

    Cytomegalovirus-based mammalian expression vectors are widely used to drive the expression of transfected genes in cultured cells. Immunofluorescent staining of the WT1 protein in 3T3 and 293 cell clones, stably transfected with a cyomegalovirus (CMV) expression vector carrying a cDNA coding for the tumour suppressor protein WT1, showed extreme cell to cell variation in the amount of recombinant protein expressed, indicative of cell cycle dependence. This was investigated further by Western blot and FACS analysis which showed that WT1 protein expression was highest in S phase and almost absent in G0/G1. Northern blot analysis of cell clones expressing sense or antisense WT1 cDNAs regulated by the CMV promoter/enhancer showed that RNA expression was also cell cycle-dependent. Western blotting of cells expressing a luciferase reporter gene driven by the CMV promoter/enhancer also showed apparent cell cycle-dependent expression. We further demonstrated that the expression of these gene constructs was serum responsive with a 10-fold increase in expression occurring 2 h after the addition of serum. These results show that the CMV promoter/enhancer system varied in its response to serum and the cell cycle state. Therefore, care must be taken when interpreting any phenotypic alterations (or lack of them) produced in cells transfected with CMV-based expression vectors.

  11. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically `leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  12. Human myeloma cells express the CD38 ligand CD31.

    PubMed

    Vallario, A; Chilosi, M; Adami, F; Montagna, L; Deaglio, S; Malavasi, F; Caligaris-Cappio, F

    1999-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) plasma cells (PC) are CD38+. A ligand for CD38 is the adhesion molecule CD31. By flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry we have investigated whether malignant PC co-express CD38 and CD31. All 68 patients studied were CD38+. 14/14 monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) and 39/39 plasmacytic MM patients co-expressed CD38 and CD31 at high density. Only 1/11 plasmablastic MM and 1/4 plasma cell leukaemias (PCL) expressed CD31. These data indicated that PC malignancies co-expressed high levels of both CD38 and its ligand CD31, with the exception of plasmablastic MM and PCL.

  13. Y-box-binding protein-1 expression is not correlated with p53 expression but with proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Takashi; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Yashima, Yasunori; Gu, Chundong; Morita, Masaru; Sugio, Kenji; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Yasumoto, Kosei

    2005-01-01

    Transcription factor Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1), which binds to the inverted CCAAT box, is not only involved in the transcription of various genes, but also in cell proliferation and DNA repair. The aim of this study was to detect YB-1 and p53 expression and their relationship to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, and to evaluate the relationship between their expression levels and the prognosis of patients with NSCLC. Positive expressions of YB-1, p53 and PCNA were detected in NSCLC cells in 43 (45.7%), 33 (35.0%) and 45 (47.9%) out of 94 patients, respectively. No significant differences were observed between YB-1 expression and the patients' gender, age at surgery, pathological stage, pathological T status, pathological N status, or pathological M status. The mean PCNA-labelling index (LI) for cells was 40.7+/-2.6. Also, a significant correlation between YB-1 and PCNA-LI was found (p<0.01), but none was found between p53 expression and PCNA. The positive expression of YB-1 was associated with squamous cell carcinoma and large cell carcinoma, compared with adenocarcinomas (p<0.01), and higher levels of PCNA-LI were associated with large cell carcinoma compared with adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinoma (p<0.01). These results suggest that YB-1 expression is correlated with PCNA expression in NSCLC. In addition, the DNA repair pathway and tumor proliferation mediated by YB-1 linking to PCNA may be responsible for controlling the growth of NSCLC.

  14. Baculovirus-mediated expression of GPCRs in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Saarenpää, Tuulia; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Goldman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large family of seven transmembrane proteins that influence a considerable number of cellular events. For this reason, they are one of the most studied receptor types for their pharmacological and structural properties. Solving the structure of several GPCR receptor types has been possible using almost all expression systems, including Escherichia coli, yeast, mammalian, and insect cells. So far, however, most of the GPCR structures solved have been done using the baculovirus insect cell expression system. The reason for this is mainly due to cost-effectiveness, posttranslational modification efficiency, and overall effortless maintenance. The system has evolved so much that variables starting from vector type, purification tags, cell line, and growth conditions can be varied and optimized countless ways to suit the needs of new constructs. Here, we present the array of techniques that enable the rapid and efficient optimization of expression steps for maximal protein quality and quantity, including our emendations.

  15. Expression pattern of embryonic stem cell markers in DFAT cells and ADSCs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qian; Zhao, Lili; Song, Ziyi; Yang, Gongshe

    2012-05-01

    Mature adipocytes can revert to a more primitive phenotype and gain cell proliferative ability under the condition of ceiling method, named dedifferentiated fat cells (DFAT cells). These cells exhibit multilineage potential as adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs). However, the stem molecular signature of DFAT cells and the difference distinct from ADSCs are still not sure. To study the molecular signature of DFAT cells better, highly purified mature adipocytes were obtained from rats and the purity was more than 98%, and about 98.6% were monocytes. These mature adipocytes dedifferentiated into fibroblast-like cells spontaneously by the ceiling culture method, these cells proliferated rapidly in vitro, grew in the same direction and formed vertex, and expressed extensively embryonic stem cell markers such as Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Nanog, surface antigen SSEA-1, CD105, and CD31, moreover, these cells possessed ALP and telomerase activity. The expression level was Oct4 1.3%, Sox2 1.3%, c-Myc 1.2%, Nanog 1.2%, CD105 0.6%, CD31 0.6% and SSEA-1 0.4%, respectively, which was lower than that in ADSCs, but the purity of DFAT cells was much higher than that of ADSCs. In conclusion, DFAT cells is a highly purified stem cell population, and expressed some embryonic stem cell markers like ADSCs, which seems to be a good candidate source of adult stem cells for the future cell replacement therapy.

  16. Loss of c-KIT expression in thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Panebianco, Federica; Tantillo, Elena; La Ferla, Marco; Menicagli, Michele; Aretini, Paolo; Apollo, Alessandro; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Marchetti, Ivo; Mazzanti, Chiara Maria

    2017-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most frequent histologic type of thyroid tumor. Few studies investigated the role of c-KIT expression in thyroid tumors, suggesting a role for this receptor and its ligand in differentiation and growth control of thyroid epithelium and a receptor loss following malignant transformation. We investigated and correlated c-KIT expression levels and two known markers of thyrocytes differentiation, PAX8 and TTF-1, in malignant and benign cytological thyroid samples. Moreover, we performed functional studies on human papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line to associated c-KIT expression to thyrocytes differentiation and tumor proliferation. c-KIT and PAX8 expression resulted higher in benign samples compared to the malignant ones, and the expression levels of these two genes were significantly correlated to each other. We also observed that c-KIT overexpression led to an increase of PAX8 expression level together with a decrease of proliferation. Furthermore, c-KIT overexpressing cells showed a regression of typical morphological features of malignancy. Taken together these results suggest that c-KIT could be involved in the differentiation of thyroid cells and in tumor progression.

  17. Loss of c-KIT expression in thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Panebianco, Federica; Tantillo, Elena; La Ferla, Marco; Menicagli, Michele; Aretini, Paolo; Apollo, Alessandro; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Marchetti, Ivo; Mazzanti, Chiara Maria

    2017-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most frequent histologic type of thyroid tumor. Few studies investigated the role of c-KIT expression in thyroid tumors, suggesting a role for this receptor and its ligand in differentiation and growth control of thyroid epithelium and a receptor loss following malignant transformation. We investigated and correlated c-KIT expression levels and two known markers of thyrocytes differentiation, PAX8 and TTF-1, in malignant and benign cytological thyroid samples. Moreover, we performed functional studies on human papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line to associated c-KIT expression to thyrocytes differentiation and tumor proliferation. c-KIT and PAX8 expression resulted higher in benign samples compared to the malignant ones, and the expression levels of these two genes were significantly correlated to each other. We also observed that c-KIT overexpression led to an increase of PAX8 expression level together with a decrease of proliferation. Furthermore, c-KIT overexpressing cells showed a regression of typical morphological features of malignancy. Taken together these results suggest that c-KIT could be involved in the differentiation of thyroid cells and in tumor progression. PMID:28301608

  18. Modulation of GLO1 Expression Affects Malignant Properties of Cells.

    PubMed

    Hutschenreuther, Antje; Bigl, Marina; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Debebe, Tewodros; Gaunitz, Frank; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2016-12-18

    The energy metabolism of most tumor cells relies on aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) characterized by an increased glycolytic flux that is accompanied by the increased formation of the cytotoxic metabolite methylglyoxal (MGO). Consequently, the rate of detoxification of this reactive glycolytic byproduct needs to be increased in order to prevent deleterious effects to the cells. This is brought about by an increased expression of glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) that is the rate-limiting enzyme of the MGO-detoxifying glyoxalase system. Here, we overexpressed GLO1 in HEK 293 cells and silenced it in MCF-7 cells using shRNA. Tumor-related properties of wild type and transformed cells were compared and key glycolytic enzyme activities assessed. Furthermore, the cells were subjected to hypoxic conditions to analyze the impact on cell proliferation and enzyme activities. Our results demonstrate that knockdown of GLO1 in the cancer cells significantly reduced tumor-associated properties such as migration and proliferation, whereas no functional alterations where found by overexpression of GLO1 in HEK 293 cells. In contrast, hypoxia caused inhibition of cell growth of all cells except of those overexpressing GLO1. Altogether, we conclude that GLO1 on one hand is crucial to maintaining tumor characteristics of malignant cells, and, on the other hand, supports malignant transformation of cells in a hypoxic environment when overexpressed.

  19. Modulation of GLO1 Expression Affects Malignant Properties of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hutschenreuther, Antje; Bigl, Marina; Hemdan, Nasr Y. A.; Debebe, Tewodros; Gaunitz, Frank; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The energy metabolism of most tumor cells relies on aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) characterized by an increased glycolytic flux that is accompanied by the increased formation of the cytotoxic metabolite methylglyoxal (MGO). Consequently, the rate of detoxification of this reactive glycolytic byproduct needs to be increased in order to prevent deleterious effects to the cells. This is brought about by an increased expression of glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) that is the rate-limiting enzyme of the MGO-detoxifying glyoxalase system. Here, we overexpressed GLO1 in HEK 293 cells and silenced it in MCF-7 cells using shRNA. Tumor-related properties of wild type and transformed cells were compared and key glycolytic enzyme activities assessed. Furthermore, the cells were subjected to hypoxic conditions to analyze the impact on cell proliferation and enzyme activities. Our results demonstrate that knockdown of GLO1 in the cancer cells significantly reduced tumor-associated properties such as migration and proliferation, whereas no functional alterations where found by overexpression of GLO1 in HEK 293 cells. In contrast, hypoxia caused inhibition of cell growth of all cells except of those overexpressing GLO1. Altogether, we conclude that GLO1 on one hand is crucial to maintaining tumor characteristics of malignant cells, and, on the other hand, supports malignant transformation of cells in a hypoxic environment when overexpressed. PMID:27999356

  20. Differential expression of Dickkopf-1 among non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiao Jun; Liu, Ya Wen; Chen, Dian Dian; Yu, Shuang

    2015-08-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is a negative regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which is expressed in various human cancers. It was hypothesized that DKK1 was oncogenic and involved in invasive growth in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. The present study aimed to investigate whether DKK1 gene expression levels differ among various NSCLC cells. The DKK1 expression pattern was analyzed in various human NSCLC cell lines and tissues. The DKK1 protein and gene expression levels were quantified using immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunohistochemistry. The majority of the lung cancer cell lines analyzed revealed increased expression levels of DKK1. Furthermore, DKK1 expression was highly transactivated in the majority of these cancer cell lines. Clinical samples were obtained from 98 NSCLC patients for immunohistochemical analysis. Of the 98 samples analyzed, 62 (63.3%) demonstrated positive staining for DKK1, whereas the remaining 36 (37%) exhibited negative staining. However, no immunohistopathological staining was detected in normal tissues. The relative effects of DKK1 were assessed in a high-expression cell line (LTEP-a-2) and a low-expression cell line (95D). The differential expression of genes involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, signaling pathway, invasion and metastasis were evaluated, relative to DKK1 levels. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that DKK1 functioned as a key regulator in the progression of NSCLC. The results confirmed the differential expression of DKK1 in NSCLC cells, which may present a potential therapeutic target for cancer prevention.

  1. Rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression in human retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Di Polo, A; Farber, D B

    1995-01-01

    Retinoblastoma cells in culture have previously been shown to express cone-specific genes but not their rod counterparts. We have detected the messages for the rod alpha, beta, and gamma subunits of cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE), the rod alpha subunit of transducin, rod opsin, and the cone alpha' subunit of PDE in RNA of human Y-79 retinoblastoma cells by reverse transcription-PCR. Quantitative analysis of the mRNAs for the rod alpha and cone alpha' PDE subunits revealed that they were expressed at comparable levels; however, the transcript encoding the rod beta PDE subunit was 10 times more abundant in these cells. Northern hybridization analysis of Y-79 cell RNA confirmed the presence of the transcripts for rod and cone PDE catalytic subunits. To test whether the transcriptional machinery required for the expression of rod-specific genes was endogenous in Y-79 retinoblastoma cells, cultures were transfected with a construct containing the promoter region of the rod beta PDE subunit gene attached to the firefly luciferase reporter vector. Significant levels of reporter enzyme activity were observed in the cell lysates. Our results demonstrate that the Y-79 retinoblastoma cell line is a good model system for the study of transcriptional regulation of rod-specific genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7732024

  2. A gene expression fingerprint of mouse stomach ECL cells.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Niklas; Skrtic, Sofia Movérare; Håkanson, Rolf; Ohlsson, Claes

    2005-07-01

    Many of the endocrine cells in the stomach are poorly characterized with respect to physiological significance. In some cases, the anticipated hormone has not yet been identified. Global gene expression analysis of mouse stomach was performed in an attempt to identify the ECL-cell peptide/protein. Specific functional activation (omeprazole-induced hypergastrinaemia) was used as a tool to generate a gene expression fingerprint of the ECL cells. The proposed fingerprint includes 14 genes, among them six are known to be expressed by ECL cells (=positive controls), and some novel ones, which are likely to be ECL-cell-related. The known ECL-cell-related genes are those encoding histidine decarboxylase, chromogranin A and B, vesicular monoamine transporter 2, synaptophysin, and the cholecystokinin-B receptor. In addition, the fingerprint included five genes, which might be involved in the process of secretion and three ESTs with unknown function. Interestingly, parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh) was identified as a candidate ECL-cell peptide hormone.

  3. T cell development critically depends on prethymic stromal patched expression.

    PubMed

    Uhmann, Anja; van den Brandt, Jens; Dittmann, Kai; Hess, Ina; Dressel, Ralf; Binder, Claudia; Lühder, Fred; Christiansen, Hans; Fassnacht, Martin; Bhandoola, Avinash; Wienands, Jürgen; Reichardt, Holger M; Hahn, Heidi

    2011-03-15

    We recently described that T cell specification in mice deficient in the Hedgehog (Hh) receptor Patched (Ptch) is blocked at the level of the common lymphoid progenitor in the bone marrow (BM). Adoptive transfer of wild-type BM in Ptch-deficient mice provides evidence that T cell development strictly depends on Ptch expression in the nonhematopoietic compartment. Transplantation experiments using BM deficient in the glucocorticoid receptor exclude any involvement of the stress hormone corticosterone in our model. Using cell-type-specific knockout mice, we show that T cell development is independent of T cell-intrinsic Ptch expression. Furthermore, Ptch expression by the thymus stroma is dispensable, as revealed by fetal thymus organ culture and thymus transplantation. In contrast, analysis of the earliest thymic progenitors in Ptch-deficient mice indicated that Ptch is required for the development or supply of thymic homing progenitors that give rise to earliest thymic progenitors. Collectively, our findings identified Ptch as an exclusive T cell-extrinsic factor necessary for proper development of T cells at their prethymic stage. This observation may be important for current considerations using Hh inhibitors upstream of Ptch in diseases accompanied by aberrant Hh signaling.

  4. Heparanase expression and glycosaminoglycans profile in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Batista, Lucas Teixeira E Aguiar; Matos, Leandro Luongo; Machado, Leopoldo Ruiz; Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Martins, João Roberto Maciel; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2012-11-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of renal cell carcinogenesis could contribute to a decrease in the mortality rate of this disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and heparanase expression in renal cell carcinoma. The study included 24 patients submitted to nephrectomy with confirmed pathological diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. The majority of the samples (87.5%) were classified in the initial stage of renal cell carcinoma (clinical stages I and II). Heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans were identified and quantified by agarose gel electrophoresis of renal cell carcinoma samples or non-neoplastic tissues obtained from the same patients (control group). The sulfated glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid were analyzed in urine samples of the patients before and after surgery. The data showed a significant statistical increase in chondroitin sulfate, and a decrease in heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate present in neoplastic tissues compared with non-neoplastic tissues. Higher heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression in the neoplastic tissues was also shown, compared with the non-neoplastic tissues. The urine glycosaminoglycans profile showed no significant difference between renal cell carcinoma and control samples. Extracellular matrix changes observed in the present study clarify that heparanase is possibly involved with heparan sulfate turnover, and that heparanase and the glycosaminoglycans can modulate initial events of renal cell carcinoma development.

  5. SATB2 expression increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng; Jordan, Ashley; Kluz, Thomas; Shen, Steven; Sun, Hong; Cartularo, Laura A; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    The special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 (SATB2) is a protein that binds to the nuclear matrix attachment region of the cell and regulates gene expression by altering chromatin structure. In our previous study, we reported that SATB2 gene expression was induced in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells transformed by arsenic, chromium, nickel and vanadium. In this study , we show that ectopic expression of SATB2 in the normal human bronchial epithelial cell-line BEAS-2B increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration, meanwhile, shRNA – mediated knockdown of SATB2 significantly decreased anchorage-independent growth in Ni transformed BEAS-2B cells. RNA sequencing analyses of SATB2 regulated genes revealed the enrichment of those involved in cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and cell-movement pathways. Our evidence supports the hypothesis that SATB2 plays an important role in BEAS-2B cell transformation. PMID:26780400

  6. Oxytocin increases extrapancreatic glucagon secretion and glucose production in pancreatectomized dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Altszuler, N.; Puma, F.; Winkler, B.; Fontan, N.; Saudek, C.D.

    1986-05-01

    Infusion of oxytocin into normal dogs increases plasma levels of insulin and glucagon and glucose production and uptake. To determine whether infused oxytocin also increases glucagon secretion from extrapancreatic sites, pancreatectomized dogs, off insulin of 18 hr, were infused with oxytocin and plasma glucagon, and glucose production and uptake were measured using the (6-/sup 3/H)glucose primer-infusion technique. The diabetic dogs, in the control period, had elevated plasma glucose and glucagon levels, an increased rate of glucose production, and a relative decrease in glucose uptake (decreased clearance). Infusion of oxytocin (500 ..mu..U/kg/min) caused a rise in plasma glucagon and glucose levels, increased glucose production, and further decreased glucose clearance. it is concluded that oxytocin can stimulate secretion of extrapancreatic glucagon, which contributes to the increased glucose production.

  7. Interference of immunoglobulins in two glucagon radioimmunoassays. [Blood donor and patient immunoglobulins

    SciTech Connect

    Von Schenck, H.; Grubb, A.O.

    1982-05-01

    Radioimmunoassays of glucagon in plasma may be complicated by interaction with other substances of high molecular mass. Precipitates of such substances with ammonium sulfate showed, after isoelectric focusing, two fractions having glucagon immunoreactivity. One fraction (pI approx.10) evidently is associated with the Fc portion (but not the Fab portion) of purified polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG). Equal amounts of purified monoclonal IgG of various subclasses, especially IgG 1, gave different ''glucagon'' readings, suggesting that some IgG may interfere more strongly than others. The other fraction (pI 5-6) appeared less consistently, and on gel chromatography appeared to be slightly larger than IgG. Together these fractions add about 50-100 ng/L to the immunoreactive glucagon values in plasma. Therefore methods in which glucagon is extracted before assay should be used for determining the concentration of glucagon present physiologically.

  8. Noncompetitive affinity assays of glucagon and amylin using mirror-image aptamers as affinity probes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven; Roper, Michael G

    2016-03-21

    The ability to detect picomolar concentrations of glucagon and amylin using fluorescently labeled mirror-image aptamers, so-called Spiegelmers, is demonstrated. Spiegelmers rival the specificity of antibodies and overcome the problem of biostability of natural aptamers in a biological matrix. Using Spiegelmers as affinity probes, noncompetitive capillary electrophoresis affinity assays of glucagon and murine amylin were developed and optimized. The detection limit for glucagon was 6 pM and for amylin was 40 pM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and -2 did not interfere with the glucagon assay, while the amylin assay showed cross-reactivity to calcitonin gene related peptide. The developed assays were combined with a competitive immunoassay for insulin to measure glucagon, amylin, and insulin secretion from batches of islets after incubation with different glucose concentrations. The development of these assays is an important step towards incorporation into an online measurement system for monitoring dynamic secretion from single islets.

  9. s-SHIP expression identifies a subset of murine basal prostate cells as neonatal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Brocqueville, Guillaume; Chmelar, Renee S.; Bauderlique-Le Roy, Hélène; Deruy, Emeric; Tian, Lu; Vessella, Robert L.; Greenberg, Norman M.; Bourette, Roland P.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of prostate stem cells (PSCs) is crucial for understanding their biology during normal development and tumorigenesis. In this aim, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing GFP from the stem cell-specific s-SHIP promoter to mark putative stem cells during postnatal prostate development. Here we show that cells identified by GFP expression are present transiently during early prostate development and localize to the basal cell layer of the epithelium. These prostate GFP+ cells are a subpopulation of the Lin− CD24+ Sca-1+ CD49f+ cells and are capable of self-renewal together with enhanced growth potential in sphere-forming assay in vitro, a phenotype consistent with that of a PSC population. Transplantation assays of prostate GFP+ cells demonstrate reconstitution of prostate ducts containing both basal and luminal cells in renal grafts. Altogether, these results demonstrate that s-SHIP promoter expression is a new marker for neonatal basal prostate cells exhibiting stem cell properties that enables PSCs in situ identification and isolation via a single consistent parameter. Transcriptional profiling of these GFP+ neonatal stem cells showed an increased expression of several components of the Wnt signaling pathway. It also identified stem cell regulators with potential applications for further analyses of normal and cancer stem cells. PMID:27081082

  10. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states.

  11. Conserved Expression Signatures between Medaka and Human Pigment Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Kneitz, Susanne; Wilde, Brigitta; Wagner, Toni; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Spaink, Herman P.; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in gene expression are a hallmark of cancer cells. Differential tumor-specific transcript levels of single genes or whole sets of genes may be critical for the neoplastic phenotype and important for therapeutic considerations or useful as biomarkers. As an approach to filter out such relevant expression differences from the plethora of changes noted in global expression profiling studies, we searched for changes of gene expression levels that are conserved. Transcriptomes from massive parallel sequencing of different types of melanoma from medaka were generated and compared to microarray datasets from zebrafish and human melanoma. This revealed molecular conservation at various levels between fish models and human tumors providing a useful strategy for identifying expression signatures strongly associated with disease phenotypes and uncovering new melanoma molecules. PMID:22693581

  12. Expression of stem cell pluripotency factors during regeneration in newts.

    PubMed

    Maki, Nobuyasu; Suetsugu-Maki, Rinako; Tarui, Hiroshi; Agata, Kiyokazu; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2009-06-01

    In this study, we present data indicating that mammalian stem cell pluripotency-inducing factors are expressed during lens and limb regeneration in newts. The apparent expression even in intact tissues and the ensued regulation during regeneration raises the possibility that these factors might regulate tissue-specific reprogramming and regeneration. Furthermore, these factors should enable us to understand the similarities and differences between animal regeneration in the newt and stem cell strategies in mammals. Developmental Dynamics 238:1613-1616, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Neuropilin 1 expression correlates with differentiation status of epidermal cells and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Wang, Lili; Zwaans, Bernadette M M; Santana, Jeans M; Shimizu, Akio; Takashima, Seiji; Kreuter, Michael; Coultas, Leigh; D'Amore, Patricia A; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Akslen, Lars A; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2014-07-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are cell surface receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and SEMA3 (class 3 semaphorin) family members. The role of NRPs in neurons and endothelial cells has been investigated, but the expression and role of NRPs in epithelial cells is much less clear. Herein, the expression and localization of NRP1 was investigated in human and mouse skin and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Results indicated that NRP1 mRNA and protein was expressed in the suprabasal epithelial layers of the skin sections. NRP1 staining did not overlap with that of keratin 14 (K14) or proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but did co-localize with staining for keratin 1, indicating that differentiated keratinocytes express NRP1. Similar to the expression of NRP1, VEGF-A was expressed in suprabasal epithelial cells, whereas Nrp2 and VEGFR2 were not detectable in the epidermis. The expression of NRP1 correlated with a high degree of differentiation in human SCC specimens, human SCC xenografts, and mouse K14-HPV16 transgenic SCC. UVB irradiation of mouse skin induced Nrp1 upregulation. In vitro, Nrp1 was upregulated in primary keratinocytes in response to differentiating media or epidermal growth factor-family growth factors. In conclusion, the expression of NRP1 is regulated in the skin and is selectively produced in differentiated epithelial cells. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester VEGF ligand within the epithelial compartment, thereby modulating its bioactivity.

  14. Neuropilin 1 expression correlates with differentiation status of epidermal cells and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Wang, Lili; Zwaans, Bernadette M. M.; Santana, Jeans M.; Shimizu, Akio; Takashima, Seiji; Kreuter, Michael; Coultas, Leigh; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Akslen, Lars A.; Bielenberg, Diane R.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropilins (NRP) are cell surface receptors for VEGF and SEMA3 family members. The role of NRP in neurons and endothelial cells has been investigated, but the expression and role of NRP in epithelial cells is much less clear. Herein, the expression and localization of neuropilin 1 (NRP1) was investigated in human and mouse skin and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Results indicated that NRP1 mRNA and protein was expressed in the suprabasal epithelial layers of skin sections. NRP1 staining did not overlap with that of keratin 14 (K14) or proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but did colocalize with staining for keratin 1, indicating that differentiated keratinocytes express NRP1. Similar to the expression of NRP1, VEGF-A was expressed in suprabasal epithelial cells, whereas Nrp2 and VEGFR2 were not detectable in the epidermis. The expression of NRP1 correlated with a high degree of differentiation in human SCC specimens, human SCC xenografts, and mouse K14-HPV16 transgenic SCC. UVB irradiation of mouse skin induced Nrp1 upregulation. In vitro, Nrp1 was upregulated in primary keratinocytes in response to differentiating media or EGF-family growth factors. In conclusion, the expression of NRP1 is regulated in the skin and is selectively produced in differentiated epithelial cells. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester VEGF ligand within the epithelial compartment, thereby modulating its bioactivity. PMID:24791743

  15. Effect of Hypergravity on Endothelial Cell Function and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Lucia; Marziliano, Nicola; Basile, Venere; Pezzatini, Silvia; Romano, Giovanni; Conti, Antonio; Monici, Monica

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that endothelial cells (ECs), which play a major role in cardiovascular system functioning, are very sensitive to mechanical stimuli. It has been demonstrated that changes in inertial conditions (i.e. microgravity and hypergravity) can affect both phenotypic and genotypic expression in ECs. In this report we describe the effects of hypergravity on ECs isolated from bovine aorta (BAECs). ECs were repeatedly exposed to discontinuous hypergravity conditions (5 × 10 min at 10× g with 10 min at 1× g between sets), simulated in a hyperfuge. Then, cell morphology and metabolism were analyzed by autofluorescence techniques. The phenotypic expression of cytoskeleton constituents ( β-actin, vimentin, tubulin), adhesion and survival signals (integrins), mediators of inflammation and angiogenesis was evaluated by immunocytofluorescence. Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) with Low Density Arrays (LDAs) was used to evaluate modifications in gene expression. After hypergravity exposure, no significant changes were observed in cell morphology and energy metabolism. Cells remained adherent to the substratum, but integrin distribution was modified. Accordingly, the cytoskeletal network reorganized, documenting cell activation. There was a reduction in expression of genes controlling vasoconstriction and inflammation. Proapoptotic signals were downregulated. On the whole, the results documented that hypergravity exposure maintained EC survival and function by activation of adaptive mechanisms.

  16. Aldosterone does not modify gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Verhovez, A; Williams, T A; Morello, F; Monticone, S; Brizzi, M F; Dentelli, P; Fallo, F; Fabris, B; Amenta, F; Gomez-Sanchez, C; Veglio, F; Mulatero, P

    2012-03-01

    The toxic effects of aldosterone on the vasculature, and in particular on the endothelial layer, have been proposed as having an important role in the cardiovascular pathology observed in mineralocorticoid-excess states. In order to characterize the genomic molecular mechanisms driving the aldosterone-induced endothelial dysfunction, we performed an expression microarray on transcripts obtained from both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human coronary artery endothelial cells stimulated with 10 - 7 M aldosterone for 18 h. The results were then subjected to qRT-PCR confirmation, also including a group of genes known to be involved in the control of the endothelial function or previously described as regulated by aldosterone. The state of activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor was investigated by means of a luciferase-reporter assay using a plasmid encoding a mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid-sensitive promoter. Aldosterone did not determine any significant change in gene expression in either cell type both in the microarray and in the qRT-PCR analysis. The luciferase-reporter assay showed no activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor following aldosterone stimulation. The status of nonfunctionality of the mineralocorticoid receptor expressed in cultured human umbilical and coronary artery endothelial cells does not allow aldosterone to modify gene expression and provides evidence against either a beneficial or harmful genomic effect of aldosterone on healthy endothelial cells.

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors agonists (GLP1 RA).

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2013-10-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors agonists (GLP1RA) are a relatively new class of drugs, used for management of type 2 diabetes. This review studies the characteristics of these drugs, focusing upon their mechanism of action, intra-class differences, and utility in clinical practice. It compares them with other incretin based therapies, the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors, and predicts future developments in the use of these molecules, while highlighting the robust indications for the use of these drugs.

  18. Human glucagon receptor antagonists based on alkylidene hydrazides.

    PubMed

    Ling, Anthony; Plewe, Michael; Gonzalez, Javier; Madsen, Peter; Sams, Christian K; Lau, Jesper; Gregor, Vlad; Murphy, Doug; Teston, Kimberly; Kuki, Atsuo; Shi, Shenghua; Truesdale, Larry; Kiel, Dan; May, John; Lakis, James; Anderes, Kenna; Iatsimirskaia, Eugenia; Sidelmann, Ulla G; Knudsen, Lotte B; Brand, Christian L; Polinsky, Alex

    2002-02-25

    A series of alkylidene hydrazide derivatives containing an alkoxyaryl moiety was optimized. The resulting hydrazide-ethers were competitive antagonists at the human glucagon receptor. Pharmacokinetic experiments showed fast clearance of most of the compounds tested. A representative compound [4-hydroxy-3-cyanobenzoic acid (4-isopropylbenzyloxy-3,5-dimethoxymethylene)hydrazide] with an IC50 value of 20 nM was shown to reduce blood glucose levels in fasted rats.

  19. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Analogs: Recent Advances, New Possibilities, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that plays important physiological roles in glucose homeostasis. Produced from intestine upon food intake, it stimulates insulin secretion and keeps pancreatic β-cells healthy and proliferating. Because of these beneficial effects, it has attracted a great deal of attention in the past decade, and an entirely new line of diabetic therapeutics has emerged based on the peptide. In addition to the therapeutic applications, GLP-1 analogs have demonstrated a potential in molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells; this may be useful in early detection of the disease and evaluation of therapeutic interventions, including islet transplantation. In this Perspective, we focus on GLP-1 analogs for their studies on improvement of biological activities, enhancement of metabolic stability, investigation of receptor interaction, and visualization of the pancreatic islets. PMID:25349901

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, obesity and psoriasis: diabetes meets dermatology.

    PubMed

    Drucker, D J; Rosen, C F

    2011-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterised by beta cell failure, which frequently develops in the setting of insulin resistance. Inflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes by impairing insulin action in peripheral tissues and via reduction of beta cell function. Inflammation may also play an important role in the development of complications that arise in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hence, the anti-inflammatory actions of commonly used glucose-lowering drugs may contribute, indirectly, to their mechanisms of action and therapeutic benefit. Herein we highlight the anti-inflammatory actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which exerts direct and indirect actions on immune function. The observations that GLP-1 receptor agonists exert anti-inflammatory actions in preclinical studies, taken together with case reports linking improvements in psoriasis with GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy, illustrates the emerging clinical implications of non-classical anti-inflammatory actions of incretin-based therapeutics.

  1. Expression of dystrophin Dp71 during PC12 cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, B; Rendon, A; Genty, V; Aranda, G; Marquez, F; Mornet, D; Montañez, C

    1996-08-02

    The expression of dystrophin-protein 71 (Dp71) was investigated during nerve growth factor (NGF) induced differentiation of PC12 cells. A semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was designed to measure Dp71 mRNA, whereas the Dp71 protein amount was evaluated by immunoblot analysis using an anti-dystrophin monoclonal antibody. Comparison with control cultures showed that Dp71 mRNA and protein levels increased in parallel with NGF treatment peaking with increments of 60% and 1.4 times, respectively. The upregulation of Dp71 expression during PC12 cells differentiation point at PC12 cells as a suitable model for studying the function of Dp71 in neuronal cells.

  2. A second glucagon in the pancreatic islets of the daddy sculpin Cottus scorpius.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, S M; Cutfield, J F

    1993-09-01

    The peptide hormone glucagon has been isolated from the islet tissue (Brockmann bodies) of the teleost Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin) and sequenced. The sequence is HSEGTSNDYSKYLEDRKAQDFVQWLMNN differing at four positions from the glucagon found earlier in the same species by Conlon and coworkers (1987b, Eur. J. Biochem, 164, 117-122). Thus sculpin, in common with anglerfish, possesses two distinct glucagons. Comparative sequence data are presented as a phylogenetic tree.

  3. Inhibitory Mechanism of an Allosteric Antibody Targeting the Glucagon Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Mukund, Susmith; Shang, Yonglei; Clarke, Holly J.; Madjidi, Azadeh; Corn, Jacob E.; Kates, Lance; Kolumam, Ganesh; Chiang, Vicky; Luis, Elizabeth; Murray, Jeremy; Zhang, Yingnan; Hötzel, Isidro; Koth, Christopher M.; Allan, Bernard B.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated glucagon levels and increased hepatic glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling contribute to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We have identified a monoclonal antibody that inhibits GCGR, a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), through a unique allosteric mechanism. Receptor inhibition is mediated by the binding of this antibody to two distinct sites that lie outside of the glucagon binding cleft. One site consists of a patch of residues that are surface-exposed on the face of the extracellular domain (ECD) opposite the ligand-binding cleft, whereas the second binding site consists of residues in the αA helix of the ECD. A docking model suggests that the antibody does not occlude the ligand-binding cleft. We solved the crystal structure of GCGR ECD containing a naturally occurring G40S mutation and found a shift in the register of the αA helix that prevents antibody binding. We also found that alterations in the αA helix impact the normal function of GCGR. We present a model for the allosteric inhibition of GCGR by a monoclonal antibody that may form the basis for the development of allosteric modulators for the treatment of diabetes and other class B GPCR-related diseases. PMID:24189067

  4. Inhibitory mechanism of an allosteric antibody targeting the glucagon receptor.

    PubMed

    Mukund, Susmith; Shang, Yonglei; Clarke, Holly J; Madjidi, Azadeh; Corn, Jacob E; Kates, Lance; Kolumam, Ganesh; Chiang, Vicky; Luis, Elizabeth; Murray, Jeremy; Zhang, Yingnan; Hötzel, Isidro; Koth, Christopher M; Allan, Bernard B

    2013-12-13

    Elevated glucagon levels and increased hepatic glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling contribute to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We have identified a monoclonal antibody that inhibits GCGR, a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), through a unique allosteric mechanism. Receptor inhibition is mediated by the binding of this antibody to two distinct sites that lie outside of the glucagon binding cleft. One site consists of a patch of residues that are surface-exposed on the face of the extracellular domain (ECD) opposite the ligand-binding cleft, whereas the second binding site consists of residues in the αA helix of the ECD. A docking model suggests that the antibody does not occlude the ligand-binding cleft. We solved the crystal structure of GCGR ECD containing a naturally occurring G40S mutation and found a shift in the register of the αA helix that prevents antibody binding. We also found that alterations in the αA helix impact the normal function of GCGR. We present a model for the allosteric inhibition of GCGR by a monoclonal antibody that may form the basis for the development of allosteric modulators for the treatment of diabetes and other class B GPCR-related diseases.

  5. Differentially expressed genes in giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Babeto, Erica; Conceição, André Luis Giacometti; Valsechi, Marina Curado; Peitl Junior, Paulo; de Campos Zuccari, Débora Aparecida Pires; de Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano; Bonilha, Jane Lopes; de Freitas Calmon, Marília; Cordeiro, José Antônio; Rahal, Paula

    2011-04-01

    Giant cells tumors of bone (GCTB) are benign in nature but cause osteolytic destruction with a number of particular characteristics. These tumors can have uncertain biological behavior often contain a significant proportion of highly multinucleated cells, and may show aggressive behavior. We have studied differential gene expression in GCTB that may give a better understanding of their physiopathology, and might be helpful in prognosis and treatment. Rapid subtractive hybridization (RaSH) was used to identify and measure novel genes that appear to be differentially expressed, including KTN1, NEB, ROCK1, and ZAK using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry in the samples of GCTBs compared to normal bone tissue. Normal bone was used in the methodology RaSH for comparison with the GCTB in identification of differentially expressed genes. Functional annotation indicated that these genes are involved in cellular processes related to their tumor phenotype. The differential expression of KTN1, ROCK1, and ZAK was independently confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The expression of the KTN1 and ROCK1 genes were increased in samples by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, and ZAK had reduced expression. Since ZAK have CpG islands in their promoter region and low expression in tumor tissue, their methylation pattern was analyzed by MSP-PCR. The genes identified KTN1, ROCK1, and ZAK may be responsible for loss of cellular homeostasis in GCTB since they are responsible for various functions related to tumorigenesis such as cell migration, cytoskeletal organization, apoptosis, and cell cycle control and thus may contribute at some stage in the process of formation and development of GCTB.

  6. Effects of trichostatin A on HDAC8 expression, proliferation and cell cycle of Molt-4 cells.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Liu, Hongli; Chen, Yan

    2006-01-01

    The effects of Trichostatin A (TSA) on histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) expression, proliferation and cell cycle arrest in T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Molt-4 cells in vitro were investigated. The effect of TSA on the growth of Molt-4 cells was studied by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to examine the cell cycle. The expression of HDAC8 was detected by using immunocytochemistry and Western blot. The results showed that proliferation of Molt-4 cells was inhibited in TSA-treated group in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The IC50 of TSA exposures for 24 h and 36 h were 254.3236 and 199.257 microg/L respectively. The cell cycle analysis revealed that Molt-4 was mostly in G0/G1 phase, and after treatment with TSA from 50 to 400 microg/L for 24 h, the percents of G0/G1 cells were decreased and cells were arrested in G2/M phase. Treatment of TSA for 24 h could significantly inhibit the expression of HDAC8 protein in Molt-4 cells (P<0.01). It was concluded that TSA could decrease the expression of HDAC8 in Molt-4 cells, which contributed to the inhibition of proliferation and induction of cell cycle arrest in Molt-4 cells.

  7. Impact of NPR-A expression in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Qu, Jingkun; Yang, Ya; Li, Min; Zhang, Mingxin; Cui, Xiaohai; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    Background: The receptors for the cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A), have been reported to be expressed in lung cancer, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer. NPR-A expression and signaling is important for tumor growth, its deficiency protect C57BL/6 mice from lung, skin, and ovarian cancers, and these result suggest that NPR-A is a new target for cancer therapy. Recently, NPR-A has been demonstrated to be expressed in pre-implantation embryos and in ES cells, it has a novel role in the maintenance of self-renewal and pluripotency of ES cells. However, the direct role of NPR-A signaling in gastric cancer remains unclear. Method: NPR-A expression was downregulated by transfection of shRNA. The proliferation of gastric cancer cells was measured by Hoechst 33342 stain. Cell proliferation and invasion were determined via BrdU and transwell assays, respectively. Results: Down-regulation of NPR-A expression by shNPR-A induced apoptosis, inhibited proliferation and invasion in AGS cells. The mechanism of shNPR-A-induced anti-AGS effects was linked to NPR-A-induced expression of KCNQ1, a gene to be overexpressed in AGS and significantly reduced by shNPR-A. Conclusion: Collectively, these results suggest that NPR-A promotes gastric cancer development in part by regulating KCNQ1. Our findings also suggest that NPR-A is a target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:25419351

  8. Atorvastatin inhibits myocardin expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Jiang, Jixin; Yin, Hao; Wang, Lifeng; Tian, Ruijuan; Li, Haijie; Wang, Zengyong; Li, Dong; Wang, Yuebing; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P; Zheng, Xi-Long

    2012-07-01

    Atorvastatin (ATV), an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, is widely prescribed as a lipid-lowering drug. It also inhibits the RhoA-Rho-associated kinase pathway in vascular smooth muscle (SM) cells and critically inhibits SM function. Myocardin is a coactivator of serum response factor, which upregulates SM contractile proteins. The RhoA-Rho-associated kinase pathway, which directly triggers SM contraction, also increases myocardin gene expression. Therefore, we investigated whether ATV inhibits myocardin gene expression in SM cells. In mice injected with ATV (IP 20 μg/g per day) for 5 days, myocardin gene expression was significantly downregulated in aortic and carotid arterial tissues with decreased expression of myocardin target genes SM α-actin and SM22. Correspondingly, the contractility of aortic rings in mice treated with ATV or the Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was reduced in response to treatment with either KCl or phenylephrine. In cultured mouse and human aortic SM cells, KCl treatment stimulated the expression of myocardin, SM α-actin, and SM22. These stimulatory effects were prevented by ATV treatment. ATV-induced inhibition of myocardin expression was prevented by pretreatment with either mevalonate or geranylgeranylpyrophosphate but not farnesylpyrophosphate. Treatment with Y-27632 mimicked ATV effects on the gene expression of myocardin, SM α-actin, and SM22, further suggesting a role for the RhoA-Rho-associated kinase pathway in ATV effects. Furthermore, ATV treatment inhibited RhoA membrane translocation and activation; these effects were prevented by pretreatment with mevalonate. We conclude that ATV inhibits myocardin gene expression in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a novel mechanism for ATV inhibition of vascular contraction.

  9. Apelin stimulates both cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide 1 secretions in vitro and in vivo in rodents.

    PubMed

    Wattez, Jean-Sébastien; Ravallec, Rozenn; Cudennec, Benoit; Knauf, Claude; Dhulster, Pascal; Valet, Philippe; Breton, Christophe; Vieau, Didier; Lesage, Jean

    2013-10-01

    Apelin is an enteric peptide that exerts several digestive functions such as stimulation of cell proliferation and cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion. We investigated using murine enteroendocrine cell line (STC-1) and rats if apelin-13 stimulates both CCK and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretions. We demonstrated that, in vitro and in vivo, apelin-13 increases the release of these two hormones in a dose-dependent manner. Present data suggest that apelin may modulate digestive functions, food intake behavior and glucose homoeostasis via apelin-induced release of enteric CCK but also through a new incretin-releasing activity on enteric GLP-1.

  10. Global gene expression response to telomerase in bovine adrenocortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perrault, Steven D.; Hornsby, Peter J.; Betts, Dean H. . E-mail: bettsd@uoguelph.ca

    2005-09-30

    The infinite proliferative capability of most immortalized cells is dependent upon the presence of the enzyme telomerase and its ability to maintain telomere length and structure. However, telomerase may be involved in a greater system than telomere length regulation, as recent evidence has shown it capable of increasing wound healing in vivo, and improving cellular proliferation rate and survival from apoptosis in vitro. Here, we describe the global gene expression response to ectopic telomerase expression in an in vitro bovine adrenocortical cell model. Telomerase-immortalized cells showed an increased ability for proliferation and survival in minimal essential medium above cells transgenic for GFP. cDNA microarray analyses revealed an altered cell state indicative of increased adrenocortical cell proliferation regulated by the IGF2 pathway and alterations in members of the TGF-B family. As well, we identified alterations in genes associated with development and wound healing that support a model that high telomerase expression induces a highly adaptable, progenitor-like state.

  11. Immunoglobulin expression and synthesis by human haemic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J; Hough, D; Karpas, A; Smith, J L

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-six human cell lines derived from a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies, were investigated for their immunological markers, with special reference to the class of immunoglobulin expressed. Twenty-five of the lines stained positively for surface immunoglobulin and IgD together with IgM proved to be the major immunoglobulin classes on these cells. Six of the lines were chosen for a study of their immunoglobulin synthesis patterns over an 18-h period and the immunoglobulin produced was analysed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patterns obtained from the cell lines were similar to that from normal lymph node lymphocytes and differed markedly to plasma cells. Two of the cell lines had abnormal immunoglobulin synthesis patterns characterized as free light chains in one case. The cell lines are evaluated for their usefulness as models of immunoglobulin synthesis and analogues of normal and neoplastic states. PMID:608682

  12. The interaction of glucagon and pentagastrin on the lower oesophageal sphincter in man and dog

    PubMed Central

    Jennewein, H. M.; Waldeck, F.; Siewert, R.; Weiser, F.; Thimm, R.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of glucagon on the pressure inside the lower oesophageal sphincter in conscious human subjects and anaesthetized dogs was investigated using the continuous withdrawal method. Glucagon causes a decrease in sphincteric resting pressure in both man and dog and antagonizes the pentagastrin-induced pressure increase of the lower oesophageal sphincter. In experiments on isolated muscle strips of the lower oesophageal sphincter of dogs glucagon decreases the tension and antagonizes the increase in tension induced by pentagastrin. The elevated pressure in patients suffering from achalasia is significantly reduced by glucagon. PMID:4761605

  13. Inability of Some Commercial Assays to Measure Suppression of Glucagon Secretion.

    PubMed

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Veedfald, Simon; Plamboeck, Astrid; Deacon, Carolyn F; Hartmann, Bolette; Knop, Filip K; Vilsboll, Tina; Holst, Jens J

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon levels are increasingly being included as endpoints in clinical study design and more than 400 current diabetes-related clinical trials have glucagon as an outcome measure. The reliability of immune-based technologies used to measure endogenous glucagon concentrations is, therefore, important. We studied the ability of immunoassays based on four different technologies to detect changes in levels of glucagon under conditions where glucagon levels are strongly suppressed. To our surprise, the most advanced technological methods, employing electrochemiluminescence or homogeneous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) detection, were not capable of detecting the suppression induced by a glucose clamp (6 mmol/L) with or without atropine in five healthy male participants, whereas a radioimmunoassay and a spectrophotometry-based ELISA were. In summary, measurement of glucagon is challenging even when state-of-the-art immune-based technologies are used. Clinical researchers using glucagon as outcome measures may need to reconsider the validity of their chosen glucagon assay. The current study demonstrates that the most advanced approach is not necessarily the best when measuring a low-abundant peptide such as glucagon in humans.

  14. Interleukin-6 amplifies glucagon secretion: coordinated control via the brain and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Tammy M; Otero, Yolanda F; Elliott, Amicia D; Locke, Alicia D; Malabanan, Carlo M; Coldren, Anastasia G; Brissova, Marcela; Piston, David W; McGuinness, Owen P

    2014-11-15

    Inappropriate glucagon secretion contributes to hyperglycemia in inflammatory disease. Previous work implicates the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in glucagon secretion. IL-6-KO mice have a blunted glucagon response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that is restored by intravenous replacement of IL-6. Given that IL-6 has previously been demonstrated to have a transcriptional (i.e., slow) effect on glucagon secretion from islets, we hypothesized that the rapid increase in glucagon following LPS occurred by a faster mechanism, such as by action within the brain. Using chronically catheterized conscious mice, we have demonstrated that central IL-6 stimulates glucagon secretion uniquely in the presence of an accompanying stressor (hypoglycemia or LPS). Contrary to our hypothesis, however, we found that IL-6 amplifies glucagon secretion in two ways; IL-6 not only stimulates glucagon secretion via the brain but also by direct action on islets. Interestingly, IL-6 augments glucagon secretion from both sites only in the presence of an accompanying stressor (such as epinephrine). Given that both adrenergic tone and plasma IL-6 are elevated in multiple inflammatory diseases, the interactions of the IL-6 and catecholaminergic signaling pathways in regulating GCG secretion may contribute to our present understanding of these diseases.

  15. Inability of Some Commercial Assays to Measure Suppression of Glucagon Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J.; Veedfald, Simon; Plamboeck, Astrid; Deacon, Carolyn F.; Hartmann, Bolette; Knop, Filip K.; Vilsboll, Tina; Holst, Jens J.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon levels are increasingly being included as endpoints in clinical study design and more than 400 current diabetes-related clinical trials have glucagon as an outcome measure. The reliability of immune-based technologies used to measure endogenous glucagon concentrations is, therefore, important. We studied the ability of immunoassays based on four different technologies to detect changes in levels of glucagon under conditions where glucagon levels are strongly suppressed. To our surprise, the most advanced technological methods, employing electrochemiluminescence or homogeneous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) detection, were not capable of detecting the suppression induced by a glucose clamp (6 mmol/L) with or without atropine in five healthy male participants, whereas a radioimmunoassay and a spectrophotometry-based ELISA were. In summary, measurement of glucagon is challenging even when state-of-the-art immune-based technologies are used. Clinical researchers using glucagon as outcome measures may need to reconsider the validity of their chosen glucagon assay. The current study demonstrates that the most advanced approach is not necessarily the best when measuring a low-abundant peptide such as glucagon in humans. PMID:26839899

  16. SOX10 induced Nestin expression regulates cancer stem cell properties of TNBC cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wen; Liu, Sihai; Zhu, Ruixia; Li, Baojian; Zhu, Zhu; Yang, Jinshan; Song, Chunhui

    2017-04-01

    The mechanisms modulating the cancer stem cell (CSC) properties of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells were not fully understood. In this study, we performed data mining in Breast Cancer Gene-Expression Miner v4.0 and found that TNBC tumors had significantly higher NES mRNA expression than other breast cancer subtypes. Pooled data suggested that NES mRNA expression is associated worse metastatic relapse (MR) free survival and also worse any event (AE) free survival in TNBC patients. Following data mining in multiple big data databases confirmed a positive correlation between SOX10 mRNA expression and NES mRNA expression in breast cancer tissues. In addition, the expression of SOX10 mRNA is significantly higher in TNBC tissues than in other breast cancer subtypes. SOX10 overexpression resulted in Nestin upregulation at both mRNA and protein levels. Bioinformatic analysis predicted a SOX10 binding site in NES promoter and the following dual luciferase assay verified the binding site. Functionally, SOX10 overexpression substantially increased CSC properties of TNBC cells, while SOX10 knockdown decreased the CSC properties, in terms of CD24(-)/CD44(+) cell ratio and tumorsphere-forming capabilities. Enforced Nestin expression partly counteracted the effect of SOX10 knockdown on reducing the CSC properties. Based on these findings, we infer that SOX10 regulates cancer stem cell properties of TNBC cells via inducing Nestin expression.

  17. Mast cells express IL-17A in rheumatoid arthritis synovium.

    PubMed

    Hueber, Axel J; Asquith, Darren L; Miller, Ashley M; Reilly, Jim; Kerr, Shauna; Leipe, Jan; Melendez, Alirio J; McInnes, Iain B

    2010-04-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine IL-17A is considered a crucial player in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. In experimental models of autoimmune arthritis, it has been suggested that the cellular source of IL-17A is CD4(+) T cells (Th17 cells). However, little is known about the source of IL-17 in human inflamed RA tissue. We explored the cellular sources of IL-17A in human RA synovium. Surprisingly, only a small proportion of IL-17-expressing cells were T cells, and these were CCR6 negative. Unexpectedly, the majority of IL-17A expression colocalized within mast cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated in vitro that mast cells produced RORC-dependent IL-17A upon stimulation with TNF-alpha, IgG complexes, C5a, and LPS. These data are consistent with a crucial role for IL-17A in RA pathogenesis but suggest that in addition to T cells innate immune pathways particularly mediated via mast cells may be an important component of the effector IL-17A response.

  18. Expression of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor in Cultured Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: Regulation in Response to Cell Density

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Steven D.; Hobbs, Justin T.; Tracy, Steven M.; Chapman, Nora M.

    1999-01-01

    Primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) express the human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (HCAR). Whereas HCAR expression in HeLa cells was constant with respect to cell density, HCAR expression in HUVEC increased with culture confluence. HCAR expression in HUVEC was not quantitatively altered by infection with coxsackievirus B. PMID:10400813

  19. PDGFR-{beta} expression in small cell lung cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Gonzalez, Adriana; Massion, Pierre P.; Olson, Sandra J.; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Shyr, Yu; Carbone, David P.; Johnson, David H.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Lu Bo . E-mail: bo.lu@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-02-01

    Background: Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGFR-{beta} are expressed and have been found to have prognostic value in several human cancers. Data in non-small-cell cancer cell lines have suggested that PDGFR is a therapeutic target for drug development. In the current study PDGFR-{beta} expression and prognostic value in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was investigated. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from 53 patients with limited and extensive stage SCLC were obtained for immunohistochemical staining. Tumors from each patient were sampled 3 times and stained with PDGFR-{beta} specific antibody. Patients were divided into low and high staining groups based on intensity. Results: There was high intensity PDGFR-{beta} staining in 20 patients with SCLC. Another 29 expressed low intensity PDGFR-{beta} staining, with only 4 patients showing no PDGFR-{beta} staining. There was no statistically significant difference in 5 year overall survival between patients with low levels of PDGFR-{beta} staining vs. those with high level staining SCLC tumors (p = 0.538). Conclusions: The present study found that the majority of SCLC patients express, at least, a low level of PDGF-{beta}. However, the level of PDGFR-{beta} expression was not a statistically significant predictor of 5 year overall survival in SCLC.

  20. GLUT-1 Expression in Cutaneous Basal and Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Eldien, Marwa Mohammad Serag; Elsakka, Daliah

    2015-09-01

    Glucose uptake is a key regulating step in glucose metabolism and is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs), and GLUT-1 is the predominant glucose transporter in many types of human cells. Cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) represent the most common skin cancer in Egypt. The present study aimed at evaluation of the pattern and distribution of GLUT-1 in cutaneous BCC (16 cases) and SCC (16 cases) by means of immunohistochemistry. GLUT-1 was expressed in all SCC (100%) and in 62.5% of BCC. Membranous pattern of GLUT-1 was seen in 62.5% of SCC and 31.25% of BCC. Positivity (P = .02) and percentage (P = .000) of GLUT-1 expression were in favor of SCC in comparison to BCC. The high percentage of GLUT-1 expression was associated with high grade in SCC (P = .03). The immunoreactivity for GLUT-1 was more in the periphery of malignant nests of SCC while it was more in the center of BCC nests. GLUT-1 is overexpressed in cutaneous non-melanoma skin cancer. Its expression in SCC is related to differentiation status, and its expression in BCC is intimately associated with squamous metaplastic areas.

  1. Enhancement of endothelial cell migration by constitutively active LPA{sub 1}-expressing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kitayoshi, Misaho; Kato, Kohei; Tanabe, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Kyohei; Fukui, Rie; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} stimulates cell migration of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF expressions are increased by mutated LPA{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} is involved in angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} promotes cancer cell progression. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors belong to G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors (LPA receptors; LPA{sub 1} to LPA{sub 6}). They indicate a variety of cellular response by the interaction with LPA, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Recently, we have reported that constitutive active mutated LPA{sub 1} induced the strong biological effects of rat neuroblastoma B103 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of mutated LPA{sub 1} on the interaction between B103 cells and endothelial F-2 cells. Each LPA receptor expressing B103 cells were maintained in serum-free DMEM and cell motility assay was performed with a Cell Culture Insert. When F-2 cells were cultured with conditioned medium from Lpar1 and Lpar3-expressing cells, the cell motility of F-2 cells was significantly higher than control cells. Interestingly, the motile activity of F-2 cells was strongly induced by mutated LPA{sub 1} than other cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A and Vegf-C. Pretreatment of LPA signaling inhibitors inhibited F-2 cell motility stimulated by mutated LPA{sub 1}. These results suggest that activation of LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} may play an important role in the promotion of angiogenesis in rat neuroblastoma cells.

  2. PGC-1α Promotes Ureagenesis in Mouse Periportal Hepatocytes through SIRT3 and SIRT5 in Response to Glucagon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lulu; Zhang, Ping; Bao, Zhengxi; Wang, Tongxin; Liu, Shuang; Huang, Feiruo

    2016-01-01

    Excess ammonia is produced during fasting when amino acids are used for glucogenesis. Together with ureagenesis, glucogenesis occurs in periportal hepatocytes mediated mainly through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α). In vivo experiments showed that fasting strongly stimulated mice glucagon secretion, hepatic PGC-1α, sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) and sirtuin 5 (SIRT5) expression and ureagenesis enzymatic activity such as carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) and ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC). Interestingly, 15N-labeled urea and 13C-labeled glucose production in wild-type mice were significantly increased compared with PGC-1α null mice by [15N,13C]alanine perfused liver. Glucagon significantly stimulated ureagenesis, expression of SIRT3, SIRT5 and the activities of CPS1 and OCT but did not stimulate PGC-1α silencing hepatocytes in mice periportal hepatocytes. Contrarily, PGC-1α overexpression significantly increased the expression of SIRT3, SIRT5 and the activities of CPS1 and OTC, but induced no significant changes in CPS1 and OTC expression. Morever, SIRT3 directly deacetylates and upregulates the activity of OTC, while SIRT5 deacetylates and stimulates the activity of CPS1. During fasting, PGC-1α facilitates ureagenesis in mouse periportal hepatocytes by deacetylating CPS1 and OTC modulated by mitochondrial deacetylase, SIRT3 and SIRT5. This mechanism may be relevant to ammonia detoxification and metabolic homeostasis in liver during fasting. PMID:27052737

  3. PGC-1α Promotes Ureagenesis in Mouse Periportal Hepatocytes through SIRT3 and SIRT5 in Response to Glucagon.

    PubMed

    Li, Lulu; Zhang, Ping; Bao, Zhengxi; Wang, Tongxin; Liu, Shuang; Huang, Feiruo

    2016-04-07

    Excess ammonia is produced during fasting when amino acids are used for glucogenesis. Together with ureagenesis, glucogenesis occurs in periportal hepatocytes mediated mainly through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α). In vivo experiments showed that fasting strongly stimulated mice glucagon secretion, hepatic PGC-1α, sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) and sirtuin 5 (SIRT5) expression and ureagenesis enzymatic activity such as carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) and ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC). Interestingly, (15)N-labeled urea and (13)C-labeled glucose production in wild-type mice were significantly increased compared with PGC-1α null mice by [(15)N,(13)C]alanine perfused liver. Glucagon significantly stimulated ureagenesis, expression of SIRT3, SIRT5 and the activities of CPS1 and OCT but did not stimulate PGC-1α silencing hepatocytes in mice periportal hepatocytes. Contrarily, PGC-1α overexpression significantly increased the expression of SIRT3, SIRT5 and the activities of CPS1 and OTC, but induced no significant changes in CPS1 and OTC expression. Morever, SIRT3 directly deacetylates and upregulates the activity of OTC, while SIRT5 deacetylates and stimulates the activity of CPS1. During fasting, PGC-1α facilitates ureagenesis in mouse periportal hepatocytes by deacetylating CPS1 and OTC modulated by mitochondrial deacetylase, SIRT3 and SIRT5. This mechanism may be relevant to ammonia detoxification and metabolic homeostasis in liver during fasting.

  4. S-100 protein expressing spindle cells in spindle cell lipoma: a diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Mentzel, T; Rütten, A; Hantschke, M; Hornick, J L; Brenn, T

    2016-10-01

    Spindle cell lipoma represents a distinct clinicopathological entity and is related to cellular angiofibroma and mammary-type myofibroblastoma. Spindle cell lipomas are composed of mature lipogenic cells and a variable number of CD34-positive spindle cells that show loss of retinoblastoma protein expression. Spindle cell lipomas occasionally express S-100 protein. We studied one case of purely dermal spindle cell lipoma and four cases of classical subcutaneous spindle cell lipoma arising in one female and four male patients (age ranged from 55 to 69 years). The neoplasms arose on the nose, the chin, the neck, the forehead and retroauricular, and all lesions had been marginally or incompletely excised. The studied cases showed classical histological and immunohistochemical features of spindle cell lipoma and, in addition, strong expression of S-100 protein by spindle-shaped tumour cells. S-100-expression in spindle cell lipoma may cause problems in the differential diagnosis with neural and melanocytic neoplasms and emphasizes the plasticity of the spindle cells in spindle cell lipoma.

  5. Finding Balance: T cell Regulatory Receptor Expression during Aging.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Mary M; Qi, Qian; Weyand, Cornelia M; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2011-10-01

    Aging is associated with a variety of changes to immune responsiveness. Reduced protection against infection, reduced responses to vaccination and increased risk of autoimmunity are all hallmarks of advanced age. Here we consider how changes in the expression of regulatory receptors on the T cell surface contribute to altered immunity during aging.

  6. Prion protein expression in bovine podocytes and extraglomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Amselgruber, W M; Steffl, M; Didier, A; Märtlbauer, E; Pfaff, E; Büttner, M

    2006-06-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(c)) is thought to be a substrate for an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(sc)). One emerging hypothesis is that the proposed conversion phenomenon takes place at the site at which the infectious agent meets PrP(c). PrP(c) is abundant in the central nervous system, but little is known about the cell-type-specific distribution of PrP(c) in non-neuronal tissues of cattle. We have studied whether PrP(c), a protein found predominantly in neurons, also exists in bovine podocytes, since neurons and podocytes share a large number of similarities. We have therefore examined the expression of PrP(c) by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis. Immunostained serial sections and specific antibodies against PrP(c) have revealed that PrP(c) is selectively localized in podocytes and is particularly strongly expressed in extraglomerular mesangial cells but not in endothelial or intraglomerular mesangial cells. The selective expression of PrP(c) in podocytes is of special importance, as it suggests that these cells represent possible targets for peripheral infection with prions and demonstrates that PrP(c) can be added to the list of neuronal factors expressed in mammalian podocytes.

  7. Metastasis regulation by PPARD expression in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xiangsheng; Xu, Weiguo; Xu, Min; Tian, Rui; Moussalli, Micheline J.; Mao, Fei; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jing; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Eng, Cathy; Maru, Dipen M.; Rashid, Asif; Broaddus, Russell; Wei, Daoyan; Hung, Mien-Chie; Sood, Anil K.

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor–δ (PPARD) is upregulated in many major human cancers, but the role that its expression in cancer cells has in metastasis remains poorly understood. Here, we show that specific PPARD downregulation or genetic deletion of PPARD in cancer cells significantly repressed metastasis in various cancer models in vivo. Mechanistically, PPARD promoted angiogenesis via interleukin 8 in vivo and in vitro. Analysis of transcriptome profiling of HCT116 colon cancer cells with or without genetic deletion of PPARD and gene expression patterns in The Cancer Genome Atlas colorectal adenocarcinoma database identified novel pro-metastatic genes (GJA1, VIM, SPARC, STC1, SNCG) as PPARD targets. PPARD expression in cancer cells drastically affected epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, and invasion, further underscoring its necessity for metastasis. Clinically, high PPARD expression in various major human cancers (e.g., colorectal, lung, breast) was associated with significantly reduced metastasis-free survival. Our results demonstrate that PPARD, a druggable protein, is an important molecular target in metastatic cancer. PMID:28097239

  8. E-cadherin expression in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, A.; Benito, N.; Navarro, P.; Palacios, J.; Cano, A.; Quintanilla, M.; Contreras, F.; Gamallo, C.

    1994-01-01

    E-cadherin (E-CD) is a calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule which is expressed in almost all epithelial tissues. E-CD expression is involved in epidermal morphogenesis and is reduced during tumour progression of mouse epidermal carcinogenesis. It has been suggested that E-CD could play a role as an invasion-suppressor molecule. In the present work we have studied the E-CD expression in 31 patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) using an immunohistochemical technique with a monoclonal antibody (HECD-1) specific for human E-CD. E-CD expression was preserved in all specimens of superficial and nodular BCC, and was reduced in 10 of 15 infiltrative BCCs. A heterogeneous distribution of cells with different immunostaining intensity was more frequently observed in specimens of infiltrative BCC. These results suggest that E-CD might be related to the growth pattern and the local aggressive behaviour of BCC, and support the idea that E-CD might play a role as an invasion-suppressor molecule in vivo. Images Figure 1 PMID:8286199

  9. Regulation of erythroid cell-specific gene expression during erythropoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, P. R.; Plumb, M.; Frampton, J.; Llewellyn, D.; Chester, J.; Chambers, I.; MacLeod, K.; Fleming, J.; O'Prey, J.; Walker, M.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of our group's work over the past few years has been to investigate the molecular mechanisms regulating erythroid cell-specific gene expression during erythroid cell differentiation. In addition to the alpha-globin gene, we have focussed on two non-globin genes of interest encoding the rabbit red cell-specific lipoxygenase (LOX) and the mouse glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX), an important seleno-enzyme responsible for protection against peroxide-damage. Characterisation of the GSHPX gene showed that the seleno-cysteine residue in the active site of the enzyme is encoded by UGA, which usually functions as a translation-termination codon. This novel finding has important implications regarding mRNA sequence context effects affecting codon recognition. The regulation of the GSHPX and red cell LOX genes has been investigated by functional transfection experiments. The 700 bp upstream of the GSHPX promoter seems to function equally well when linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene and transfected into mouse erythroid or fibroblast cell lines. However, the presence of tissue-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSS) in the 3' flanking region of the GSHPX gene suggests that such sites may be important in its regulation in the various cell types in which it is highly expressed, i.e., erythroid cells, liver and kidney. The transcription unit of the RBC LOX gene has also been defined and 5' and 3' flanking regions are being investigated for erythroid-specific regulatory elements: a region upstream of the LOX gene gives increased expression of a linked CAT gene when transfected into mouse erythroid cell lines compared to non-erythroid cell lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3151147

  10. Expression of T cell antigen receptor during differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, J.P.; Lanier, L.L.; Guyden, J.; Richie, E.R.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have used flow cytometry with monoclonal antibodies, radioimmuneprecipitation with a rabbit antiserum to common epitopes of the TCR, and Northern and Southern blot analysis with cloned TCR genes to study antigen receptor (TCR) expression by normal murine and human thymocytes and by primary murine thymomas. L3T4-,Lyt2- murine thymomas corresponding to the earliest stage of thymic differentiation, were found to have rearranged TCR beta genes, and to express low levels of beta transcript, but lacked alpha gene transcript and failed to express TCR on the cell surface. L3T4+,Lyt2+ thymomas were variable, but the majority were found to contain significant levels of both alpha and beta transcripts and to express TCR at the cell surface. Similarly, alpha and beta transcripts and TCR protein were detected in sorted L3T4+,Lyt2+ murine thymocytes. Using three color fluorescence, the authors determined that app. 70% of human T4+T8+ thymocytes also expressed T3, a component of the TCR complex. These data indicate that in mouse and man expression of TCR occurs in the immature, or cortical, thymic population.

  11. Carbohydrate-induced secretion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Seino, Yusuke; Maekawa, Ryuya; Ogata, Hidetada; Hayashi, Yoshitaka

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are the incretin hormones secreted from enteroendocrine K-cells and L-cells, respectively, by oral ingestion of various nutrients including glucose. K-cells, L-cells and pancreatic β-cells are glucose-responsive cells with similar glucose-sensing machinery including glucokinase and an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel comprising KIR6.2 and sulfonylurea receptor 1. However, the physiological role of the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel in GIP secretion in K-cells and GLP-1 secretion in L-cells is not elucidated. Recently, it was reported that GIP and GLP-1-producing cells are present also in pancreatic islets, and islet-derived GIP and GLP-1 contribute to glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. In this short review, we focus on GIP and GLP-1 secretion by monosaccharides, such as glucose or fructose, and the role of the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel in GIP and GLP-1 secretion.

  12. Establishment a CHO Cell Line Expressing Human CD52 Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Kadijeh, Tati; Mahsa, Yazdanpanah-Samani; Amin, Ramezani; Elham, Mahmoudi Maymand; Abbas, Ghaderi

    2016-01-01

    Background: CD52 is a small glycoprotein with a GPI anchor at its C-terminus. CD52 is expressed by Normal and malignant T and B lymphocytes and monocytes. There are detectable amounts of soluble CD52 in plasma of patients with CLL and could be used as a tumor marker. Although the biological function of CD52 is unknown but it seems that CD52 may be involved in migration and activation of T-cells .The aim of this study was to clone and express human CD52 gene in CHO cell line and studying its function in more details Methods: Based on GenBank databases two specific primers were designed for amplification of cd52 gene. Total RNA was extracted from Raji cell line and cDNA synthesized. Amplified fragment was cloned in pBudCE4.1 vector. The new construct was transfected to CHO-K1 cell line using electroporation method. Expression of recombinant CD52 protein was evaluated by Real time PCR and flow cytometry methods. Results: Amplification of CD52 gene using specific primers on Raji cDNA showed a 209 bp band. New construct was confirmed by PCR and restriction pattern and sequence analysis. The new construct was designated as pBudKT1. RT-PCR analysis detected cd52 mRNAs in transfected cells and Flow cytometry Results showed that 78.4 % of cells represented CD52 in their surfaces. Conclusion: In conclusion, we established a human CD52 positive cell line, CHO-CD52, and the protein was expressed on the membrane. Cloning of the CD52 gene could be the first step for the production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and detection systems for soluble CD52 in biological fluids PMID:28070536

  13. PROFILES OF GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATED WITH TETRACYCLINE OVER EXPRESSION OF HSP70 IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Profiles of gene expression associated with tetracycline over expression of HSP70 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) protect cells from damage through their function as molecular chaperones. Some cancers reveal high levels of HSP70 expression in asso...

  14. Cell surface expression of biologically active influenza C virus HEF glycoprotein expressed from cDNA.

    PubMed

    Pekosz, A; Lamb, R A

    1999-10-01

    The hemagglutinin, esterase, and fusion (HEF) glycoprotein of influenza C virus possesses receptor binding, receptor destroying, and membrane fusion activities. The HEF cDNAs from influenza C/Ann Arbor/1/50 (HEF-AA) and influenza C/Taylor/1223/47 (HEF-Tay) viruses were cloned and expressed, and transport of HEF to the cell surface was monitored by susceptibility to cleavage by exogenous trypsin, indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Previously it has been found in studies with the C/Johannesburg/1/66 strain of influenza C virus (HEF-JHB) that transport of HEF to the cell surface is severely inhibited, and it is thought that the short cytoplasmic tail, Arg-Thr-Lys, is involved in blocking HEF cell surface expression (F. Oeffner, H.-D. Klenk, and G. Herrler, J. Gen. Virol. 80:363-369, 1999). As the cytoplasmic tail amino acid sequences of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay are identical to that of HEF-JHB, the data indicate that cell surface expression of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay is not inhibited by this amino acid sequence. Furthermore, the abundant cell surface transport of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay indicates that their cell surface expression does not require coexpression of another viral protein. The HEF-AA and HEF-Tay HEF glycoproteins bound human erythrocytes, promoted membrane fusion in a low-pH and trypsin-dependent manner, and displayed esterase activity, indicating that the HEF glycoprotein alone mediates all three known functions at the cell surface.

  15. Fasting-induced changes in ECL cell gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Nils W G; Yakubov, Iskandar; Sachs, George

    2007-10-22

    Gastric enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells release histamine in response to food because of elevation of gastrin and neural release of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP). Acid secretion is at a basal level in the absence of food but is rapidly stimulated with feeding. Rats fasted for 24 h showed a significant decrease of mucosal histamine despite steady-state expression of the histamine-synthesizing enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC). Comparative transcriptomal analysis using gene expression oligonucleotide microarrays of 95% pure ECL cells from fed and 24-h fasted rats, thereby eliminating mRNA contamination from other gastric mucosal cell types, identified significantly increased gene expression of the enzymes histidase and urocanase catabolizing the HDC substrate L-histidine but significantly decreased expression of the cellular L-histidine uptake transporter SN2 and of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT-2) responsible for histamine uptake into secretory vesicles. This was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction of gastric fundic mucosal samples from fed and 24-h fasted rats. The decrease of VMAT-2 gene expression was also shown by a decrease in VMAT-2 protein content in protein extracts from fed and 24-h fasted rats compared with equal amounts of HDC protein and Na-K-ATPase alpha(1)-subunit protein content. These results indicate that rat gastric ECL cells regulate their histamine content during 24-h fasting not by a change in HDC gene or protein expression but by regulation of substrate concentration for HDC and a decreased histamine secretory pool.

  16. Expression and functionality of TRPV1 in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Lea V; Al-Refae, Klaudia; Wölk, Gerhard; Bonatz, Gabriele; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels contribute to the regulation of intracellular calcium, which can promote cancer hallmarks in cases of dysregulation of gene transcription and calcium-dependent pro-proliferative or anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Several studies have begun to elucidate the roles of TRPV1, TRPV6, TRPM8, and TRPC1 in cancer progression; however, no study has examined the expression profiles of human TRP channels in breast cancer on a large scale. This study focused on the expression and functionality of TRPV1, a nonselective cation channel that was found to be expressed in different carcinoma tissues. Next-generation sequencing analyses revealed the expression of TRPV1 in several native breast cancer tissues, which was subsequently validated via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Activation of TRPV1 by its ligand capsaicin was associated with the growth inhibition of some cancer cell types; however, the signaling components involved are complex. In this study, stimulation by the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, of SUM149PT cells, a model system for the most aggressive breast cancer subtype, triple-negative breast cancer, led to intracellular calcium signals that were diminished by the specific TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepin. Activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin caused significant inhibition of cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis and necrosis. In conclusion, the current study revealed the expression profiles of human TRP channels in 60 different breast cancer tissues and cell lines and furthermore validated the antitumor activity of TRPV1 against SUM149PT breast cancer cells, indicating that activation of TRPV1 could be used as a therapeutic target, even in the most aggressive breast cancer types. PMID:28008282

  17. Expression and functionality of TRPV1 in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Lea V; Al-Refae, Klaudia; Wölk, Gerhard; Bonatz, Gabriele; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels contribute to the regulation of intracellular calcium, which can promote cancer hallmarks in cases of dysregulation of gene transcription and calcium-dependent pro-proliferative or anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Several studies have begun to elucidate the roles of TRPV1, TRPV6, TRPM8, and TRPC1 in cancer progression; however, no study has examined the expression profiles of human TRP channels in breast cancer on a large scale. This study focused on the expression and functionality of TRPV1, a nonselective cation channel that was found to be expressed in different carcinoma tissues. Next-generation sequencing analyses revealed the expression of TRPV1 in several native breast cancer tissues, which was subsequently validated via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Activation of TRPV1 by its ligand capsaicin was associated with the growth inhibition of some cancer cell types; however, the signaling components involved are complex. In this study, stimulation by the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, of SUM149PT cells, a model system for the most aggressive breast cancer subtype, triple-negative breast cancer, led to intracellular calcium signals that were diminished by the specific TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepin. Activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin caused significant inhibition of cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis and necrosis. In conclusion, the current study revealed the expression profiles of human TRP channels in 60 different breast cancer tissues and cell lines and furthermore validated the antitumor activity of TRPV1 against SUM149PT breast cancer cells, indicating that activation of TRPV1 could be used as a therapeutic target, even in the most aggressive breast cancer types.

  18. [Alteration of isozyme gene expression during cell differentiation and oncogenesis].

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Noguchi, T

    1995-05-01

    Rat pyruvate kinase (PK) has four isozymes, called the M1-, M2-, L-, and R-types. The M1- and M2-type isozymes of PK are produced from the PKM gene by alternative splicing, whereas the L- and R-type isozymes of PK are produced from the PKL gene by use of different tissue-specific promoters. In early development, only M2-type PK expresses in all tissues. After late morphogenesis, M1-, L-, and R-type PK express tissue-specifically. In contrast, cell proliferation such as regenerating liver and oncogenesis lead to decrease or cessation of the expression of tissue-specific PK isozymes and to stimulation of the expression of M2-type PK. These phenomena from the point of view transcriptional regulatory apparatus of the PKM and PKL gene are discussed.

  19. Expression of Stem Cell Markers in Primo Vessel of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Seok; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Won Jin; Heo, Jinbeom; Shin, Dong Myung; Leem, Chae Hun

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating line of evidence support that adult tissues contain a rare population of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), which differentiate into all types of cells in our body. Bonghan microcell (primo microcells (PMCs)) discovered in 1960s was reported to have a pluripotency like a stem cell in vivo as well as in vitro condition. Here, we describe the detailed morphology and molecular features of PMCs. PMCs reside in Bonghan duct (primo vessel (PV)) reported as a corresponding structure of acupuncture points and meridian system. We found that PMCs were frequently observed in the liver surface of the rat between 300 g and 400 g from April to June, suggesting that the their detection frequency depends on the weight, the season, and the organ of rat. As reported, PMCs freshly isolated from PVs were spherical ~1-2 μm microsized cells. In contrast, a unique bithread or budding-shaped PMCs emerged during tissue culture around 8 days. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that PVs-derived cells express the Oct4, the most important PSCs gene, in addition to several PSCs markers (Sox2, Stella, Rex1, and Klf4). Thus, we for the first time provide the evidence about Oct4-expressing stem-like characteristics for cells resident in PVs, a possible novel stem cell enriched niche. PMID:23983780

  20. Expression of stem cell markers in primo vessel of rat.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Seok; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Won Jin; Heo, Jinbeom; Shin, Dong Myung; Leem, Chae Hun

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating line of evidence support that adult tissues contain a rare population of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), which differentiate into all types of cells in our body. Bonghan microcell (primo microcells (PMCs)) discovered in 1960s was reported to have a pluripotency like a stem cell in vivo as well as in vitro condition. Here, we describe the detailed morphology and molecular features of PMCs. PMCs reside in Bonghan duct (primo vessel (PV)) reported as a corresponding structure of acupuncture points and meridian system. We found that PMCs were frequently observed in the liver surface of the rat between 300 g and 400 g from April to June, suggesting that the their detection frequency depends on the weight, the season, and the organ of rat. As reported, PMCs freshly isolated from PVs were spherical ~1-2  μ m microsized cells. In contrast, a unique bithread or budding-shaped PMCs emerged during tissue culture around 8 days. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that PVs-derived cells express the Oct4, the most important PSCs gene, in addition to several PSCs markers (Sox2, Stella, Rex1, and Klf4). Thus, we for the first time provide the evidence about Oct4-expressing stem-like characteristics for cells resident in PVs, a possible novel stem cell enriched niche.

  1. Receptor binding and cell-mediated metabolism of (/sup 125/I)monoiodoglucagon by isolated canine hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hagopian, W.A.; Tager, H.S.

    1984-07-25

    A reverse-phase HPLC method has been developed to purify /sup 125/I-labeled products resulting from the chloramine-T-based iodination of glucagon. In addition the products ((/sup 125/I)iodoTyr/sup 10/ /sup 13/)glucagon, ((/sup 125/I)iodoTyr/sup 13/)glucagon, and ((/sup 125/I)iodoTyr/sup 10/)glucagon) have been used to study the receptor binding of glucagon and the cell-mediated metabolism of the hormone by isolated canine hepatocytes. It was concluded that (a) not withstanding apparent differences in affinities exhibited by the three peptides, the interactions with the glucagon receptor are functionally equivalent, and (b) the cell-mediated metabolism of receptor-bound glucagon involves the formation of hormone-derived peptides in which the biologically important NH/sub 2/-terminal region of the hormone has been modified by limited proteolytic cleavage.

  2. Tumor endothelial cells express high pentraxin 3 levels.

    PubMed

    Hida, Kyoko; Maishi, Nako; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Kenji; Hojo, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Masumi; Torii, Chisaho; Shinohara, Nobuo; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2016-12-01

    It has been described that tumor progression has many similarities to inflammation and wound healing in terms of the signaling processes involved. Among biological responses, angiogenesis, which is necessary for tumor progression and metastasis, is a common hallmark; therefore, tumor blood vessels have been considered as important therapeutic targets in anticancer therapy. We focused on pentraxin 3 (PTX3), which is a marker of cancer-related inflammation, but we found no reports on its expression and function in tumor blood vessels. Here we showed that PTX3 is expressed in mouse and human tumor blood vessels based on immunohistochemical analysis. We found that PTX3 is upregulated in primary mouse and human tumor endothelial cells compared to normal endothelial cells. We also showed that PTX3 plays an important role in the proliferation of the tumor endothelial cells. These results suggest that PTX3 is an important target for antiangiogenic therapy.

  3. 'Fluorescent Cell Chip' for immunotoxicity testing: Development of the c-fos expression reporter cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Trzaska, Dominika; Zembek, Patrycja; Olszewski, Maciej; Adamczewska, Violetta; Ulleras, Erik; Dastych, JarosIaw . E-mail: jdastych@cbm.pan.pl

    2005-09-01

    The Fluorescent Cell Chip for in vitro immunotoxicity testing employs cell lines derived from lymphocytes, mast cells, and monocytes-macrophages transfected with various EGFP cytokine reporter gene constructs. While cytokine expression is a valid endpoint for in vitro immunotoxicity screening, additional marker for the immediate-early response gene expression level could be of interest for further development and refinement of the Fluorescent Cell Chip. We have used BW.5147.3 murine thymoma transfected with c-fos reporter constructs to obtain reporter cell lines expressing ECFP under the control of murine c-fos promoter. These cells upon serum withdrawal and readdition and incubation with heavy metal compounds showed paralleled induction of c-Fos expression as evidenced by Real-Time PCR and ECFP fluorescence as evidenced by computer-supported fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, we developed fluorescent reporter cell lines that could be employed in a simple and time-efficient screening assay for possible action of chemicals on c-Fos expression in lymphocytes. The evaluation of usefulness of these cells for the Fluorescent Cell Chip-based detection of immunotoxicity will require additional testing with a larger number of chemicals.

  4. Production of stable GFP-expressing neural cells from P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Esmaeili, Fariba; Bakhshalizadeh, Shabnam; Ebrahimie, Marzieh; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2017-04-01

    Murine P19 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells are convenient to differentiate into all germ layer derivatives. One of the advantages of P19 cells is that the exogenous DNA can be easily inserted into them. Here, at the first part of this study, we generated stable GFP-expressing P19 cells (P19-GFP(+)). FACS and western-blot analysis confirmed stable expression of GFP in the cells. We previously demonstrated the efficient induction of neuronal differentiation from mouse ES and EC cells by application of a neuroprotective drug, selegiline In the second part of this study selegiline was used to induce differentiation of P19-GFP(+) into stable GFP-expressing neuron-like cells. Cresyl violet staining confirmed neuronal morphology of the differentiated cells. Furthermore, real-time PCR and immunoflourescence approved the expression of neuron specific markers. P19-GFP(+) cells were able to survive, migrate and integrated into host tissues when transplanted to developing chick embryo CNS. The obtained live GFP-expressing cells can be used as an abundant source of developmentally pluripotent material for transplantation studies, investigating the cellular and molecular aspects of early differentiation.

  5. Expression of the Bitter Taste Receptor, T2R38, in Enteroendocrine Cells of the Colonic Mucosa of Overweight/Obese vs. Lean Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Rocco; Huynh, Jennifer; Mazzoni, Maurizio; Gupta, Arpana; Bonora, Elena; Clavenzani, Paolo; Chang, Lin; Mayer, Emeran A.; De Giorgio, Roberto; Sternini, Catia

    2016-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) are expressed in the mammalian gastrointestinal mucosa. In the mouse colon, T2R138 is localized to enteroendocrine cells and is upregulated by long-term high fat diet that induces obesity. The aims of this study were to test whether T2R38 expression is altered in overweight/obese (OW/OB) compared to normal weight (NW) subjects and characterize the cell types expressing T2R38, the human counterpart of mouse T2R138, in human colon. Colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained during colonoscopy from 35 healthy subjects (20 OW/OB and 15 NW) and processed for quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry using antibodies to T2R38, chromogranin A (CgA), glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), or peptide YY (PYY). T2R38 mRNA levels in the colonic mucosa of OW/OB were increased (> 2 fold) compared to NW subjects but did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06). However, the number of T2R38 immunoreactive (IR) cells was significantly increased in OW/OB vs. NW subjects (P = 0.01) and was significantly correlated with BMI values (r = 0.7557; P = 0.001). In both OW/OB and NW individuals, all T2R38-IR cells contained CgA-IR supporting they are enteroendocrine. In both groups, T2R38-IR colocalized with CCK-, GLP1- or PYY-IR. The overall CgA-IR cell population was comparable in OW/OB and NW individuals. This study shows that T2R38 is expressed in distinct populations of enteroendocrine cells in the human colonic mucosa and supports T2R38 upregulation in OW/OB subjects. T2R38 might mediate host functional responses to increased energy balance and intraluminal changes occurring in obesity, which could involve peptide release from enteroendocrine cells. PMID:26866366

  6. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiming; Modiano, Jaime F; Ito, Daisuke

    2017-03-30

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1(-) and SSEA-1(+) cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines.

  7. Cardiomyocyte Expression and Cell-specific Processing of Procholecystokinin*

    PubMed Central

    Goetze, Jens P.; Johnsen, Anders H.; Kistorp, Caroline; Gustafsson, Finn; Johnbeck, Camilla B.; Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2015-01-01

    Heart muscle cells produce peptide hormones such as natriuretic peptides. Developing hearts also express the gene for the classic intestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) in amounts similar to those in the intestine and brain. However, cardiac expression of peptides other than natriuretic peptides has only been suggested using transcriptional measures or methods, with the post-translational phase of gene expression unaddressed. In this study, we examined the cardiac expression of the CCK gene in adult mammals and its expression at the protein level. Using quantitative PCR, a library of sequence-specific pro-CCK assays, peptide purification, and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that the mammalian heart expresses pro-CCK in amounts comparable to natriuretic prohormones and processes it to a unique, triple-sulfated, and N-terminally truncated product distinct from intestinal and cerebral CCK peptides. Isoprenaline rapidly stimulated cardiac CCK gene expression in vitro and in vivo, which suggests that the cardiac-specific truncated pro-CCK may have pathophysiological relevance as a new marker of heart failure. The suggestion is confirmed by measurement of plasma from heart failure patients. PMID:25627687

  8. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  9. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  10. Expression of hyaluronidase by tumor cells induces angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D; Pearlman, E; Diaconu, E; Guo, K; Mori, H; Haqqi, T; Markowitz, S; Willson, J; Sy, M S

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the "molecular saboteurs" to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8755562

  11. Expression of Hyaluronidase by Tumor Cells Induces Angiogenesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dacai; Pearlman, Eric; Diaconu, Eugenia; Guo, Kun; Mori, Hiroshi; Haqqi, Tariq; Markowitz, Sanford; Willson, James; Sy, Man-Sun

    1996-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the ``molecular saboteurs'' to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs.

  12. Altered expression of uncoupling protein 2 in GLP-1-producing cells after chronic high glucose exposure: implications for the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francesca; Filippello, Agnese; Di Pino, Antonino; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Mauro, Stefania; Pappalardo, Alessandro; Rabuazzo, Agata Maria; Purrello, Michele; Purrello, Francesco; Piro, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut L-cell hormone that enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Several approaches that prevent GLP-1 degradation or activate the GLP-1 receptor are being used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. In T2DM, GLP-1 secretion has been suggested to be impaired, and this defect appears to be a consequence rather than a cause of impaired glucose homeostasis. However, although defective GLP-1 secretion has been correlated with insulin resistance, little is known about the direct effects of chronic high glucose concentrations, which are typical in diabetes patients, on GLP-1-secreting cell function. In the present study, we demonstrate that glucotoxicity directly affects GLP-1 secretion in GLUTag cells chronically exposed to high glucose. Our results indicate that this abnormality is associated with a decrease in ATP production due to the elevated expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). Furthermore, UCP2 inhibition using small interfering R