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Sample records for glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue

  1. Discovery of the Once-Weekly Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Analogue Semaglutide.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jesper; Bloch, Paw; Schäffer, Lauge; Pettersson, Ingrid; Spetzler, Jane; Kofoed, Jacob; Madsen, Kjeld; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; McGuire, James; Steensgaard, Dorte Bjerre; Strauss, Holger Martin; Gram, Dorte X; Knudsen, Sanne Møller; Nielsen, Flemming Seier; Thygesen, Peter; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Kruse, Thomas

    2015-09-24

    Liraglutide is an acylated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue that binds to serum albumin in vivo and is approved for once-daily treatment of diabetes as well as obesity. The aim of the present studies was to design a once weekly GLP-1 analogue by increasing albumin affinity and secure full stability against metabolic degradation. The fatty acid moiety and the linking chemistry to GLP-1 were the key features to secure high albumin affinity and GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) potency and in obtaining a prolonged exposure and action of the GLP-1 analogue. Semaglutide was selected as the optimal once weekly candidate. Semaglutide has two amino acid substitutions compared to human GLP-1 (Aib(8), Arg(34)) and is derivatized at lysine 26. The GLP-1R affinity of semaglutide (0.38 ± 0.06 nM) was three-fold decreased compared to liraglutide, whereas the albumin affinity was increased. The plasma half-life was 46.1 h in mini-pigs following i.v. administration, and semaglutide has an MRT of 63.6 h after s.c. dosing to mini-pigs. Semaglutide is currently in phase 3 clinical testing.

  2. Differentiating effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue exendin-4 in a human neuronal cell model.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Paola; Deledda, Cristiana; Benvenuti, Susanna; Cellai, Ilaria; Squecco, Roberta; Monici, Monica; Cialdai, Francesca; Luciani, Giorgia; Danza, Giovanna; Di Stefano, Chiara; Francini, Fabio; Peri, Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an insulinotropic peptide with neurotrophic properties, as assessed in animal cell models. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 analogue, has been recently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to morphologically, structurally, and functionally characterize the differentiating actions of exendin-4 using a human neuronal cell model (i.e., SH-SY5Y cells). We found that exendin-4 increased the number of neurites paralleled by dramatic changes in intracellular actin and tubulin distribution. Electrophysiological analyses showed an increase in cell membrane surface and in stretch-activated-channels sensitivity, an increased conductance of Na(+) channels and amplitude of Ca(++) currents (T- and L-type), typical of a more mature neuronal phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that exendin-4 promotes neuronal differentiation in human cells. Noteworthy, our data support the claimed favorable role of exendin-4 against diabetic neuropathy as well as against different neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. A strategy for fusion expression and preparation of functional glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue by introducing an enterokinase cleavage site.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Ren, Limei; Ge, Lingmiao; Cui, Qingxin; Cao, Xiaofang; Hou, Yuanyuan; Bai, Fang; Bai, Gang

    2014-08-01

    KGLP-1, a 31-amino acid glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, has a great therapeutic potential for anti-diabetes. In this work, a strategy for expression and purification of functional KGLP-1 peptide has been established. KGLP-1 cDNA was fused with glutathione S-transferase (GST), with an enterokinase cleavage site in the fusion junction. The recombinant fusion protein GST-KGLP-1 was affinity purified via the GST-tag, and then digested with enterokinase. The resulting GST part as well as the enzymes were eliminated by ultra-filtration followed by size exclusion chromatograph. The yield of purified KGLP-1 was approximately 12.1 mg/L, with purity of 96.18 %. The recombinant KGLP-1 was shown to have similar bioactivity as native GLP-1 when evaluated in a Chinese hamster ovary cell line expressing a GLP-1 receptor-egfp reporter gene.

  4. Novel GLP-1 (Glucagon-Like Peptide-1) Analogues and Insulin in the Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Calsolaro, Valeria; Edison, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The link between diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been known for the last few decades. Since insulin and insulin receptors are known to be present in the brain, the downstream signalling as well as the effect of hyperinsulinemia have been extensively studied in both AD and Parkinson's disease. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone belonging to the incretin family, and its receptors (GLP-1Rs) can be found in pancreatic cells and in vascular endothelium. Interestingly, GLP-1Rs are found in the neuronal cell body and dendrites in the central nervous system (CNS), in particular in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb. Several studies have shown the importance of both insulin and GLP-1 signalling on cognitive function, and many preclinical studies have been performed to evaluate the potential protective role of GLP-1 on the brain. Here we review the underlying mechanism of insulin and GLP-1 signalling in the CNS, as well as the preclinical data for the use of GLP-1 analogues such as liraglutide, exenatide and lixisenatide in neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Once-weekly glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2015-07-01

    The once-weekly glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (QW GLP1RA) represent a major advancement in diabetes pharmaco-therapeutics. This review describes the basic, clinical, and comparative pharmacology of this novel class of drugs. It highlights the clinical placement and posology of these drugs.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide 1 and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Fava, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) is a major incretin hormone. This means that it is secreted by the gut in response to food and helps in reducing post-prandial glucose exertion. It achieves this through a number of mechanisms, including stimulating insulin release by pancreatic β-cells in a glucose-dependent manner; inhibition of glucagon release by pancreatic α-cells (also in a glucose-dependent manner); induction of central appetite suppression and by delaying gastric empting thereby inducing satiety and also reducing the rate of absorption of nutrients. However, GLP1 receptors have been described in a number of extra-pancreatic tissues, including the endothelium and the myocardium. This suggests that the physiological effects of GLP1 extend beyond post-prandial glucose control and raises the possibility that GLP1 might have cardiovascular effects. This is of importance in our understanding of incretin hormone physiology and especially because of the possible implications that it might have with regard to cardiovascular effects of incretin-based therapies, namely DPP-IV inhibitors (gliptins) and GLP1 analogues. This review analyzes the animal and human data on the effects of GLP1 on the cardiovascular system in health and in disease and the currently available data on cardiovascular effects of incretin-based therapies. It is the author's view that the physiological role of GLP1 is not only to minimize postprandial hypoglycaemia, but also protect against it.

  7. Bioactivity of a modified human Glucagon-like peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fangfang; Wang, Kevin Yueju; Wang, Nan; Li, Gangqiang; Liu, Dehu

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes has become the third largest cause of death in humans worldwide. Therefore, effective treatment for this disease remains a critical issue. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in glucose homeostasis, and therefore represents a promising candidate to use for the treatment of diabetes. Native GLP-1, however, is quickly degraded in in the circulatory system; which limits its clinical application. In the present study, a chemically-synthesized, modified analogue of human GLP-1 (mGLP-1) was designed. Our analyses indicated that, relative to native GLP-1, mGLP-1 is more resistant to trypsin and pancreatin degradation. mGLP-1 promotes mouse pancreatic β-cell proliferation by up-regulating the expression level of cyclin E, CDK2, Bcl-2 and down-regulating Bax, p21, and stimulates insulin secretion. An oral glucose tolerance test indicated that mGLP-1 significantly improved glucose tolerance in mice. Intraperitoneal injections of mGLP-1 into streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetic mice significantly reduced blood sugar levels and stimulated insulin secretion. Oral gavages of mGLP-1 in diabetic mice did not result in significant hypoglycemic activity. PMID:28152036

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors agonists (GLP1 RA).

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2013-10-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors agonists (GLP1RA) are a relatively new class of drugs, used for management of type 2 diabetes. This review studies the characteristics of these drugs, focusing upon their mechanism of action, intra-class differences, and utility in clinical practice. It compares them with other incretin based therapies, the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors, and predicts future developments in the use of these molecules, while highlighting the robust indications for the use of these drugs.

  9. The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue, exendin-4, decreases the rewarding value of food: a new role for mesolimbic GLP-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Suzanne L; Shirazi, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Bergquist, Filip; Nissbrandt, Hans; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2012-04-04

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) system is a recently established target for type 2 diabetes treatment. In addition to regulating glucose homeostasis, GLP-1 also reduces food intake. Previous studies demonstrate that the anorexigenic effects of GLP-1 can be mediated through hypothalamic and brainstem circuits which regulate homeostatic feeding. Here, we demonstrate an entirely novel neurobiological mechanism for GLP-1-induced anorexia in rats, involving direct effects of a GLP-1 agonist, Exendin-4 (EX4) on food reward that are exerted at the level of the mesolimbic reward system. We assessed the impact of peripheral, central, and intramesolimbic EX4 on two models of food reward: conditioned place preference (CPP) and progressive ratio operant-conditioning. Food-reward behavior was reduced in the CPP test by EX4, as rats no longer preferred an environment previously paired to chocolate pellets. EX4 also decreased motivated behavior for sucrose in a progressive ratio operant-conditioning paradigm when administered peripherally. We show that this effect is mediated centrally, via GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs). GLP-1Rs are expressed in several key nodes of the mesolimbic reward system; however, their function remains unexplored. Thus we sought to determine the neurobiological substrates underlying the food-reward effect. We found that the EX4-mediated inhibition of food reward could be driven from two key mesolimbic structures-ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens-without inducing concurrent malaise or locomotor impairment. The current findings, that activation of central GLP-1Rs strikingly suppresses food reward/motivation by interacting with the mesolimbic system, indicate an entirely novel mechanism by which the GLP-1R stimulation affects feeding-oriented behavior.

  10. Multiple Factors Related to the Secretion of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XingChun; Liu, Huan; Chen, Jiaqi; Li, Yan; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 is secreted by intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. It regulates the secretion and sensitivity of insulin while suppressing glucagon secretion and decreasing postprandial glucose levels. It also improves beta-cell proliferation and prevents beta-cell apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents. Additionally, glucagon-like peptide-1 delays gastric emptying and suppresses appetite. The impaired secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 has negative influence on diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance related diseases. Thus, glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) are now well accepted in the management of type 2 diabetes. The levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 are influenced by multiple factors including a variety of nutrients. The component of a meal acts as potent stimulants of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. The levels of its secretion change with the intake of different nutrients. Some drugs also have influence on GLP-1 secretion. Bariatric surgery may improve metabolism through the action on GLP-1 levels. In recent years, there has been a great interest in developing effective methods to regulate glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. This review summarizes the literature on glucagon-like peptide-1 and related factors affecting its levels. PMID:26366173

  11. Glucagon and glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Holst, Jens Juul

    2010-01-01

    The glucagon gene is expressed not only in the alpha cells of the pancreatic islets but also in the endocrine cells of the intestinal epithelium (so-called L-cells), and in certain neurons of the brain stem. Whereas in the pancreas, glucagon, the hyperglycaemic hormone, is cleaved out of the 160 amino acid precursor, proglucagon, leaving behind proglucagon fragments (PG 1-30 and PG 72-158, the so-called major proglucagon fragment (MPGF)) that are probably inactive, the intestinal processing leads to the formation of glicentin (PG 1-69; action uncertain) and glucagon-like peptides 1 (PG 78-107amide, a potent incretin homone, regulating insulin secretion, glucagon secretion, gastrointestinal motility and appetite) and 2 (PG 126-158, a regulator of gut mucosal growth and integrity). The two prohormone convertases PC2 and PC1/3, respectively, are responsible for the differential processing. After their release, the hormones are eliminated mainly in the kidneys, but both GLP-2 and in particular GLP-1, but not glucagon, are metabolized both locally and in the circulation and liver by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) which inactivates the peptides, suggesting that GLP-1 acts locally rather than in an endocrine manner. A number of transcription factors have been identified that can at least partly explain the differential cellular expression of the glucagon gene as well as the differential tissue-specific processing of the precursor.

  12. Cardiovascular and hemodynamic effects of glucagon-like peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Mather, Kieren J; Conteh, Abass M; Sassoon, Daniel J; Noblet, Jillian N; Tune, Johnathan D

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that has been shown to have hemodynamic and cardioprotective capacity in addition to its better characterized glucoregulatory actions. Because of this, emerging research has focused on the ability of GLP-1 based therapies to drive myocardial substrate selection, enhance cardiac performance and regulate heart rate, blood pressure and vascular tone. These studies have produced consistent and reproducible results amongst numerous laboratories. However, there are obvious disparities in findings obtained in small animal models versus those of higher mammals. This species dependent discrepancy calls to question, the translational value of individual findings. Moreover, few studies of GLP-1 mediated cardiovascular action have been performed in the presence of a pre-existing comorbidities (e.g. obesity/diabetes) which limits interpretation of the effectiveness of incretin-based therapies in the setting of disease. This review addresses cardiovascular and hemodynamic potential of GLP-1 based therapies with attention to species specific effects as well as the interaction between therapies and disease.

  13. Glucagon-like peptide-1: The missing link in the metabolic clock?

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Patricia L; Gil-Lozano, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Circadian expression of clock genes in peripheral tissues is critical to the coordinated regulation of intestinal digestive and absorptive functions, insulin secretion, and peripheral tissue nutrient deposition during periods of nutrient ingestion, thereby preventing metabolic dysregulation. As glucagon-like peptide-1 is a key incretin hormone that regulates glucose-dependent insulin secretion, we hypothesized that this intestinal hormone is a player in the peripheral metabolic clock, linking nutrient ingestion to insulin secretion. We have now established that secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 from the intestinal L cell shows a rhythmic pattern in rats and humans in vivo that is altered by circadian disruptors, such as constant light exposure, consumption of a Western diet and feeding at inappropriate times (i.e., during the light period in rodents). Interestingly, the alterations in the rhythm of the glucagon-like peptide-1 secretory responses were found to parallel the changes in the pattern of insulin responses in association with significant impairments in glucose tolerance. Furthermore, we have detected circadian clock gene expression, and showed circadian secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 from both the murine and human L cell in vitro. These findings demonstrate that glucagon-like peptide-1 is a functional component of the peripheral metabolic clock, and suggest that altered release of glucagon-like peptide-1 might play a role in the metabolic perturbations that result from circadian disruption.

  14. [Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on appetite and body weight: preclinical and clinical data].

    PubMed

    Sesti, Giorgio

    2011-12-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Pharmacological treatments of diabetes are mostly associated with weight gain, an undesirable event due to the fact that an increase in adiposity, especially visceral, is associated with reduced insulin sensitivity, worse cardiovascular risk profile and decreased adherence to treatment. Analogues of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) represent a new therapeutic option for type 2 diabetes, which offer the advantage of combining beneficial effects on metabolic control with a significant reduction in body weight. In this review, we discuss data of preclinical studies and clinical trials that evaluated the effects of liraglutide and exenatide, the two analogues of GLP-1 currently available in Italy, on body weight.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and pharmacodynamics of vitamin-B(12)-conjugated glucagon-like peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Clardy-James, Susan; Chepurny, Oleg G; Leech, Colin A; Holz, George G; Doyle, Robert P

    2013-04-01

    Clearing the way: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are proving a potent weapon in the treatment of type II diabetes. A new vitamin B(12)-GLP-1 conjugate is investigated and shown to have insulinotropic properties similar to the unmodified peptide. These results are critical to the exploitation of the vitamin B(12) oral uptake pathway for peptide delivery.

  16. Glucagon-like peptide 1 improves insulin resistance in vitro through anti-inflammation of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Guo, C.; Huang, T.; Chen, A.; Chen, X.; Wang, L.; Shen, F.; Gu, X.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a kind of gut hormone, is used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Emerging evidence indicates that GLP-1 has anti-inflammatory activity. Chronic inflammation in the adipose tissue of obese individuals is a cause of insulin resistance and T2D. We hypothesized that GLP-1 analogue therapy in patients with T2D could suppress the inflammatory response of macrophages, and therefore inhibit insulin resistance. Our results showed that GLP-1 agonist (exendin-4) not only attenuated macrophage infiltration, but also inhibited the macrophage secretion of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-β, IL-6, and IL-1β. Furthermore, we observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage conditioned media could impair insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. This effect was compensated by treatment with the conditioned media from macrophages treated with the combination of LPS and exendin-4. It was also observed that exendin-4 directly inhibited the activation of NF-κB in macrophages. In conclusion, our results indicated that GLP-1 improved inflammatory macrophage-derived insulin resistance by inhibiting NF-κB pathway and secretion of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Furthermore, our observations suggested that the anti-inflammatory effect of GLP-1 on macrophages can contribute to GLP-1 analogue therapy of T2D. PMID:27878229

  17. Glucagon-like peptide 1 in the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of clinical obesity

    PubMed Central

    Anandhakrishnan, Ananthi; Korbonits, Márta

    2016-01-01

    Though the pathophysiology of clinical obesity is undoubtedly multifaceted, several lines of clinical evidence implicate an important functional role for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) signalling. Clinical studies assessing GLP-1 responses in normal weight and obese subjects suggest that weight gain may induce functional deficits in GLP-1 signalling that facilitates maintenance of the obesity phenotype. In addition, genetic studies implicate a possible role for altered GLP-1 signalling as a risk factor towards the development of obesity. As reductions in functional GLP-1 signalling seem to play a role in clinical obesity, the pharmacological replenishment seems a promising target for the medical management of obesity in clinical practice. GLP-1 analogue liraglutide at a high dose (3 mg/d) has shown promising results in achieving and maintaining greater weight loss in obese individuals compared to placebo control, and currently licensed anti-obesity medications. Generally well tolerated, provided that longer-term data in clinical practice supports the currently available evidence of superior short- and long-term weight loss efficacy, GLP-1 analogues provide promise towards achieving the successful, sustainable medical management of obesity that remains as yet, an unmet clinical need. PMID:28031776

  18. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Formulation--the Present and Future Development in Diabetes Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chooi Yeng

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder that has become the fourth leading cause of death in the developed countries. The disorder is characterized by pancreatic β-cells dysfunction, which causes hyperglycaemia leading to several other complications. Treatment by far, which focuses on insulin administration and glycaemic control, has not been satisfactory. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) is an endogenous peptide that stimulates post-prandial insulin secretion. Despite being able to mimic the effect of insulin, GLP1 has not been the target drug in diabetes treatment due to the peptide's metabolic instability. After a decade-long effort to improve the pharmacokinetics of GLP1, a number of GLP1 analogues are currently available on the market. The current Minireview does not discuss these drugs but presents strategies that were undertaken to address the weaknesses of the native GLP1, particularly drug delivery techniques used in developing GLP1 nanoparticles and modified GLP1 molecule. The article highlights how each of the selected preparations has improved the efficacy of GLP1, and more importantly, through an overview of these studies, it will provide an insight into strategies that may be adopted in the future in the development of a more effective oral GLP1 formulation.

  19. Medicinal Plants Qua Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretagogue via Intestinal Nutrient Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Suk; Jang, Hyeung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) participates in glucose homeostasis and feeding behavior. Because GLP-1 is rapidly inactivated by the enzymatic cleavage of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) long-acting GLP-1 analogues, for example, exenatide and DPP4 inhibitors, for example, liraglutide, have been developed as therapeutics for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the inefficient clinical performance and the incidence of side effects reported on the existing therapeutics for T2DM have led to the development of a novel therapeutic strategy to stimulate endogenous GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells. Since the GLP-1 secretion of enteroendocrine L cells depends on the luminal nutrient constituents, the intestinal nutrient sensors involved in GLP-1 secretion have been investigated. In particular, nutrient sensors for tastants, cannabinoids, and bile acids are able to recognize the nonnutritional chemical compounds, which are abundant in medicinal plants. These GLP-1 secretagogues derived from medicinal plants are easy to find in our surroundings, and their effectiveness has been demonstrated through traditional remedies. The finding of GLP-1 secretagogues is directly linked to understanding of the role of intestinal nutrient sensors and their recognizable nutrients. Concurrently, this study demonstrates the possibility of developing novel therapeutics for metabolic disorders such as T2DM and obesity using nutrients that are readily accessible in our surroundings. PMID:26788106

  20. Glucagon-like peptide 1 and fatty acids amplify pulsatile insulin secretion from perifused rat islets.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Barbara A; Richard, Ann-Marie T; Dillon, Joseph S; Daley, Jennifer T; Civelek, Vildan N; Deeney, Jude T; Yaney, Gordon C; Corkey, Barbara E; Tornheim, Keith

    2003-01-01

    Glucose-induced insulin secretion from isolated, perifused rat islets is pulsatile with a period of about 5-10 min, similar to the insulin oscillations that are seen in healthy humans but which are impaired in Type II diabetes. We evaluated the pattern of enhancement by the potent incretin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). GLP-1 increased the amplitude of pulses and the magnitude of insulin secretion from the perifused islets, without affecting the average time interval between pulses. Forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine had the same effect, suggesting that the effect was due to elevated cAMP levels. The possibility that cAMP might enhance the amplitude of pulses by reducing phosphofructo-2-kinase (PFK-2) activity was eliminated when the liver isoform of PFK-2 was shown to be absent from beta-cells. The possibility that cAMP enhanced pulsatile secretion, at least in part, by stimulating lipolysis was supported by the observations that added oleate had a similar effect on secretion, and that the incretin effect of GLP-1 was inhibited by the lipase inhibitor orlistat. These data show that the physiological incretin GLP-1 preserves and enhances normal pulsatile insulin secretion, which may be essential in proposed therapeutic uses of GLP-1 or its analogues. PMID:12356335

  1. Real-time trafficking and signaling of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Roed, Sarah Noerklit; Wismann, Pernille; Underwood, Christina Rye; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Iversen, Helle; Cappelen, Karen Arevad; Schäffer, Lauge; Lehtonen, Janne; Hecksher-Soerensen, Jacob; Secher, Anna; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Whistler, Jennifer L; Knudsen, Sanne Moeller; Waldhoer, Maria

    2014-02-15

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 incretin receptor (GLP-1R) of family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a major drug target in type-2-diabetes due to its regulatory effect on post-prandial blood-glucose levels. The mechanism(s) controlling GLP-1R mediated signaling are far from fully understood. A fundamental mechanism controlling the signaling capacity of GPCRs is the post-endocytic trafficking of receptors between recycling and degradative fates. Here, we combined microscopy with novel real-time assays to monitor both receptor trafficking and signaling in living cells. We find that the human GLP-1R internalizes rapidly and with similar kinetics in response to equipotent concentrations of GLP-1 and the stable GLP-1 analogues exendin-4 and liraglutide. Receptor internalization was confirmed in mouse pancreatic islets. GLP-1R is shown to be a recycling receptor with faster recycling rates mediated by GLP-1 as compared to exendin-4 and liraglutide. Furthermore, a prolonged cycling of ligand-activated GLP-1Rs was observed and is suggested to be correlated with a prolonged cAMP signal.

  2. Oral Delivery of Pentameric Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 by Recombinant Lactobacillus in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Pelletier, Julien; Marcotte, Harold; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Hammarström, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone produced by intestinal cells and stimulates insulin secretion from the pancreas in a glucose-dependent manner. Exogenously supplied GLP-1 analogues are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. An anti-diabetic effect of Lactobacillus in lowering plasma glucose levels and its use as a vehicle for delivery of protein and antibody fragments has been shown previously. The aim of this study was to employ lactobacilli as a vehicle for in situ production and delivery of GLP-1 analogue to normalize blood glucose level in diabetic GK (Goto-Kakizaki) rats. In this study, we designed pentameric GLP-1 (5×GLP-1) analogues which were both expressed in a secreted form and anchored to the surface of lactobacilli. Intestinal trypsin sites were introduced within 5×GLP-1, leading to digestion of the pentamer into an active monomeric form. The E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides delivered by intestinal intubation to GK rats resulted in a significant improvement of glycemic control demonstrated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Meanwhile, the purified 5×GLP-1 (trypsin-digested) from the Lactobacillus cultures stimulated insulin secretion from HIT-T15 cells, similar to the E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides. When delivered by gavage to GK rats, non-expressor L. paracasei significantly lowered the blood glucose level but 5×GLP-1 expression did not provide an additional anti-diabetic effect, possibly due to the low levels produced. Our results indicate that lactobacilli themselves might be used as an alternative treatment method for type 2 diabetes, but further work is needed to increase the expression level of GLP-1 by lactobacilli in order to obtain a significant insulinotropic effect in vivo. PMID:27610615

  3. Mechanisms underlying glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M

    2016-04-01

    The incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and glucagon-like peptide-1, are secreted from intestinal K- and L cells, respectively, with the former being most abundant in the proximal small intestine, whereas the latter increase in number towards the distal gut. Although an overlap between K- and L cells can be observed immunohistochemically or in murine models expressing fluorescent markers under the control of the two hormone promoters, the majority (>80%) of labeled cells seems to produce only one of these hormones. Transcriptomic analysis showed a close relationship between small intestinal K- and L cells, and glucose sensing mechanisms appear similar in both cell types with a predominant role of electrogenic glucose uptake through sodium-coupled glucose transporter 1. Similarly, both cell types produce the long-chain fatty acid sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, FFAR1 (GPR40) and FFAR4 (GPR120), but differ in the expression/functionality of other lipid sensing receptors. GPR119 and FFAR2/3, for example, have clearly documented roles in glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion, whereas agonists for the endocannabinoid receptor type 1 have been found to show largely selective inhibition of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide secretion. In conclusion, although K- and L cell populations overlap and share key molecular nutrient-sensing mechanisms, subtle differences between the responsiveness of the different cell types might be exploited to differentially modulate glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide or glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion.

  4. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, reduces intimal thickening after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Hiromasa; Nomiyama, Takashi; Mita, Tomoya; Yasunari, Eisuke; Azuma, Kosuke; Komiya, Koji; Arakawa, Masayuki; Jin, Wen Long; Kanazawa, Akio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Hirose, Takahisa; Watada, Hirotaka

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Exendin-4 reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury in a mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 dose not alter metabolic parameters in non-diabetic, non-obese mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 reduces PDGF-induced cell proliferation in cultured SMCs. {yields} Exendin-4 may reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury at least in part through its direct action on SMCs. -- Abstract: Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a hormone secreted by L cells of the small intestine and stimulates glucose-dependent insulin response. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists such as exendin-4 are currently used in type 2 diabetes, and considered to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. To further elucidate the effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular diseases, we investigated the effects of exendin-4 on intimal thickening after endothelial injury. Under continuous infusion of exendin-4 at 24 nmol/kg/day, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to endothelial denudation injury of the femoral artery. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 reduced neointimal formation at 4 weeks after arterial injury without altering body weight or various metabolic parameters. In addition, in vitro studies of isolated murine, rat and human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells showed the expression of GLP-1 receptor. The addition of 10 nM exendin-4 to cultured smooth muscle cells significantly reduced their proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor. Our results suggested that exendin-4 reduced intimal thickening after vascular injury at least in part by the suppression of platelet-derived growth factor-induced smooth muscle cells proliferation.

  5. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Analogs: Recent Advances, New Possibilities, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that plays important physiological roles in glucose homeostasis. Produced from intestine upon food intake, it stimulates insulin secretion and keeps pancreatic β-cells healthy and proliferating. Because of these beneficial effects, it has attracted a great deal of attention in the past decade, and an entirely new line of diabetic therapeutics has emerged based on the peptide. In addition to the therapeutic applications, GLP-1 analogs have demonstrated a potential in molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells; this may be useful in early detection of the disease and evaluation of therapeutic interventions, including islet transplantation. In this Perspective, we focus on GLP-1 analogs for their studies on improvement of biological activities, enhancement of metabolic stability, investigation of receptor interaction, and visualization of the pancreatic islets. PMID:25349901

  6. Effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 on appetite and body weight: focus on the CNS.

    PubMed

    van Bloemendaal, L; Ten Kulve, J S; la Fleur, S E; Ijzerman, R G; Diamant, M

    2014-04-01

    The delivery of nutrients to the gastrointestinal tract after food ingestion activates the secretion of several gut-derived mediators, including the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA), such as exenatide and liraglutide, are currently employed successfully in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. GLP-1RA improve glycaemic control and stimulate satiety, leading to reductions in food intake and body weight. Besides gastric distension and peripheral vagal nerve activation, GLP-1RA induce satiety by influencing brain regions involved in the regulation of feeding, and several routes of action have been proposed. This review summarises the evidence for a physiological role of GLP-1 in the central regulation of feeding behaviour and the different routes of action involved. Also, we provide an overview of presently available data on pharmacological stimulation of GLP-1 pathways leading to alterations in CNS activity, reductions in food intake and weight loss.

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, obesity and psoriasis: diabetes meets dermatology.

    PubMed

    Drucker, D J; Rosen, C F

    2011-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterised by beta cell failure, which frequently develops in the setting of insulin resistance. Inflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes by impairing insulin action in peripheral tissues and via reduction of beta cell function. Inflammation may also play an important role in the development of complications that arise in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hence, the anti-inflammatory actions of commonly used glucose-lowering drugs may contribute, indirectly, to their mechanisms of action and therapeutic benefit. Herein we highlight the anti-inflammatory actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which exerts direct and indirect actions on immune function. The observations that GLP-1 receptor agonists exert anti-inflammatory actions in preclinical studies, taken together with case reports linking improvements in psoriasis with GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy, illustrates the emerging clinical implications of non-classical anti-inflammatory actions of incretin-based therapeutics.

  8. Role of the Glucagon-Like-Peptide-1 Receptor in the Control of Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Matthew R.; De Jonghe, Bart C.; Kanoski, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    The peripheral and central glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) systems play an essential role in glycemic and energy balance regulation. Thus, pharmacological targeting of peripheral and/or central GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) may represent a potential long-term treatment option for both obesity and type-II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Uncovering and understanding the neural pathways, physiological mechanisms, specific GLP-1R populations, and intracellular signaling cascades that mediate the food intake inhibitory and incretin effects produced by GLP-1R activation are vital to the development of these potential successful therapeutics. Particular focus will be given to the essential role of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the caudal brainstem, as well as the gut-to-brain communication by vagal afferent fibers in mediating the physiological and behavioral responses following GLP-1R activation. PMID:20226203

  9. Evaluation of neuroprotective effect of glucagon-like peptide 1 analogs using neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Femminella, Grazia D; Edison, Paul

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) analogs are neuroprotective in animal models. In transgenic mice, both insulin and GLP1 analogs reduced inflammation, increased stem cell proliferation, reduced apoptosis, and increased dendritic growth. Furthermore, insulin desensitization was also observed in these animals, and reduced glucose uptake in the brain, as shown on FDG-PET imaging. In this review we discussed the role of PET and MRI in evaluating the effect of GLP1 analogs in disease progression in both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. We have also discussed the potential novel PET markers that will allow us to understand the mechanism by which GLP1 exerts its effects.

  10. An intrinsic agonist mechanism for activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor by its extracellular domain

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yanting; Zhou, X Edward; Hou, Li; Zhao, Li-Hua; Liu, Bo; Wang, Gaihong; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is a class B G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays key roles in glucose metabolism and is a major therapeutic target for diabetes. The classic two-domain model for class B GPCR activation proposes that the apo-state receptor is auto-inhibited by its extracellular domain, which physically interacts with the transmembrane domain. The binding of the C-terminus of the peptide hormone to the extracellular domain allows the N-terminus of the hormone to insert into the transmembrane domain to induce receptor activation. In contrast to this model, here we demonstrate that glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor can be activated by N-terminally truncated glucagon-like peptide-1 or exendin-4 when fused to the receptor, raising the question regarding the role of N-terminal residues of peptide hormone in glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation. Mutations of cysteine 347 to lysine or arginine in intracellular loop 3 transform the receptor into a G protein-biased receptor and allow it to be activated by a nonspecific five-residue linker that is completely devoid of exendin-4 or glucagon-like peptide-1 sequence but still requires the presence of an intact extracellular domain. Moreover, the extracellular domain can activate the receptor in trans in the presence of an intact peptide hormone, and specific mutations in three extracellular loops abolished this extracellular domain trans-activation. Together, our data reveal a dominant role of the extracellular domain in glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation and support an intrinsic agonist model of the extracellular domain, in which peptide binding switches the receptor from the auto-inhibited state to the auto-activated state by releasing the intrinsic agonist activity of the extracellular domain. PMID:27917297

  11. An intrinsic agonist mechanism for activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor by its extracellular domain.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanting; Zhou, X Edward; Hou, Li; Zhao, Li-Hua; Liu, Bo; Wang, Gaihong; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is a class B G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays key roles in glucose metabolism and is a major therapeutic target for diabetes. The classic two-domain model for class B GPCR activation proposes that the apo-state receptor is auto-inhibited by its extracellular domain, which physically interacts with the transmembrane domain. The binding of the C-terminus of the peptide hormone to the extracellular domain allows the N-terminus of the hormone to insert into the transmembrane domain to induce receptor activation. In contrast to this model, here we demonstrate that glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor can be activated by N-terminally truncated glucagon-like peptide-1 or exendin-4 when fused to the receptor, raising the question regarding the role of N-terminal residues of peptide hormone in glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation. Mutations of cysteine 347 to lysine or arginine in intracellular loop 3 transform the receptor into a G protein-biased receptor and allow it to be activated by a nonspecific five-residue linker that is completely devoid of exendin-4 or glucagon-like peptide-1 sequence but still requires the presence of an intact extracellular domain. Moreover, the extracellular domain can activate the receptor in trans in the presence of an intact peptide hormone, and specific mutations in three extracellular loops abolished this extracellular domain trans-activation. Together, our data reveal a dominant role of the extracellular domain in glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation and support an intrinsic agonist model of the extracellular domain, in which peptide binding switches the receptor from the auto-inhibited state to the auto-activated state by releasing the intrinsic agonist activity of the extracellular domain.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the glucagon-like peptide-1 analog liraglutide in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Hall, M J; Adin, C A; Borin-Crivellenti, S; Rudinsky, A J; Rajala-Schultz, P; Lakritz, J; Gilor, C

    2015-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal hormone that induces glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion while suppressing glucagon secretion. Glucagon-like peptide-1 also increases beta cell mass and satiation while decelerating gastric emptying. Liraglutide is a fatty-acid derivative of GLP-1 with a protracted pharmacokinetic profile that is used in people for treatment of type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of liraglutide in healthy cats. Hyperglycemic clamps were performed on days 0 (HGC) and 14 (LgHGC) in 7 healthy cats. Liraglutide was administered subcutaneously (0.6 mg/cat) once daily on days 8 through 14. Compared with the HGC (mean ± standard deviation; 455.5 ± 115.8 ng/L), insulin concentrations during LgHGC were increased (760.8 ± 350.7 ng/L; P = 0.0022), glucagon concentrations decreased (0.66 ± 0.4 pmol/L during HGC vs 0.5 ± 0.4 pmol/L during LgHGC; P = 0.0089), and there was a trend toward an increased total glucose infused (median [range] = 1.61 (1.11-2.54) g/kg and 2.25 (1.64-3.10) g/kg, respectively; P = 0.087). Appetite reduction and decreased body weight (9% ± 3%; P = 0.006) were observed in all cats. Liraglutide has similar effects and pharmacokinetics profile in cats to those reported in people. With a half-life of approximately 12 h, once daily dosing might be feasible; however, significant effects on appetite and weight loss may necessitate dosage or dosing frequency reductions. Further investigation of liraglutide in diabetic cats and overweight cats is warranted.

  13. The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 reduces cocaine self-administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Reddy, India A; Weikop, Pia; Graham, Devon L; Stanwood, Gregg D; Wortwein, Gitta; Galli, Aurelio; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The ability of the GLP-1 system to decrease food intake in rodents has been well described and parallels results from clinical trials. GLP-1 receptors are expressed in the brain, including within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Dopaminergic neurons in the VTA project to the NAc, and these neurons play a pivotal role in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. Based on the anatomical distribution of GLP-1 receptors in the brain and the well-established effects of GLP-1 on food reward, we decided to investigate the effect of the GLP-1 analogue exendin-4 on cocaine- and dopamine D1-receptor agonist-induced hyperlocomotion, on acute and chronic cocaine self-administration, on cocaine-induced striatal dopamine release in mice and on cocaine-induced c-fos activation. Here, we report that GLP-1 receptor stimulation reduces acute and chronic cocaine self-administration and attenuates cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. In addition, we show that peripheral administration of exendin-4 reduces cocaine-induced elevation of striatal dopamine levels and striatal c-fos expression implicating central GLP-1 receptors in these responses. The present results demonstrate that the GLP-1 system modulates cocaine's effects on behavior and dopamine homeostasis, indicating that the GLP-1 receptor may be a novel target for the pharmacological treatment of drug addiction.

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism.

  15. A novel glucagon-like peptide 1 peptide identified from Ophisaurus harti.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingjing; Huang, Xian; Gao, Hong; Bao, Qiuying; Zhao, Yun; Hu, Jin-Feng; Xia, Gang

    2013-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) is a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Because of the short half-life of endogenous GLP1 peptide, other GLP1R agonists are considered to be appealing therapeutic candidates. A high-throughput assay has been established to screen for GLP1R agonists in a 60 000-well natural product compound library fractionated from 670 different herbs/materials widely used in traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). The screening is based on primary screen of GLP1R⁺ reporter gene assay with the counter screen in GLP1R⁻ cell line. An active fraction, A089-147, was identified from the screening. Fraction A089-147 was isolated from dried Ophisaurus harti, and the fact that its GLP1R agonist activity was sensitive to trypsin treatment indicates its peptidic nature. The active ingredient of A089-147 was later identified as O. harti GLP1 through transcriptome analysis. Chemically synthesized O. harti GLP1 showed GLP1R agonist activity and sensitivity to dipeptidase IV digestion. This study illustrated a comprehensive screening strategy to identify novel GLP1R agonists from TCMs libraries and at the same time underlined the difficulty of identifying a non-peptidic GLP1R agonist. The novel O. harti GLP1 peptide yielded from this study confirmed broader application of TCMs libraries in active peptide identification.

  16. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on body weight: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Monami, Matteo; Dicembrini, Ilaria; Marchionni, Niccolò; Rotella, Carlo M; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs), approved as glucose-lowering drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, have also been shown to reduce body weight. An extensive Medline, Cochrane database, and Embase search for "exenatide," "liraglutide," "albiglutide," "semaglutide," and "lixisenatide" was performed, collecting all randomized clinical trials on humans up to December 15, 2011, with a duration of at least 24 weeks, comparing GLP-1 receptor agonists with either placebo or active drugs. Twenty two (7,859 patients) and 7 (2,416 patients) trials with available results on body weight at 6 and 12 months, respectively, were included. When compared with placebo, GLP-1RAs determine a reduction of BMI at 6 months of -1.0 [-1.3; -0.6] kg/m(2). Considering the average BMI at baseline (32.4 kg/m(2)) these data means a weight reduction of about 3% at 6 months. This result could seem modest from a clinical standpoint; however, it could be affected by many factors contributing to an underestimation of the effect of GLP-1RA on body weight, such as non adequate doses, inclusion criteria, efficacy of GLP-1RA on reducing glycosuria, and association to non-pharmacological interventions not specifically aimed to weight reduction.

  17. Effects of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists on Body Weight: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monami, Matteo; Dicembrini, Ilaria; Marchionni, Niccolò; Rotella, Carlo M.; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs), approved as glucose-lowering drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, have also been shown to reduce body weight. An extensive Medline, Cochrane database, and Embase search for “exenatide,” “liraglutide,” “albiglutide,” “semaglutide,” and “lixisenatide” was performed, collecting all randomized clinical trials on humans up to December 15, 2011, with a duration of at least 24 weeks, comparing GLP-1 receptor agonists with either placebo or active drugs. Twenty two (7,859 patients) and 7 (2,416 patients) trials with available results on body weight at 6 and 12 months, respectively, were included. When compared with placebo, GLP-1RAs determine a reduction of BMI at 6 months of −1.0 [−1.3; −0.6] kg/m2. Considering the average BMI at baseline (32.4 kg/m2) these data means a weight reduction of about 3% at 6 months. This result could seem modest from a clinical standpoint; however, it could be affected by many factors contributing to an underestimation of the effect of GLP-1RA on body weight, such as non adequate doses, inclusion criteria, efficacy of GLP-1RA on reducing glycosuria, and association to non-pharmacological interventions not specifically aimed to weight reduction. PMID:22675341

  18. Carbohydrate-induced secretion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Seino, Yusuke; Maekawa, Ryuya; Ogata, Hidetada; Hayashi, Yoshitaka

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are the incretin hormones secreted from enteroendocrine K-cells and L-cells, respectively, by oral ingestion of various nutrients including glucose. K-cells, L-cells and pancreatic β-cells are glucose-responsive cells with similar glucose-sensing machinery including glucokinase and an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel comprising KIR6.2 and sulfonylurea receptor 1. However, the physiological role of the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel in GIP secretion in K-cells and GLP-1 secretion in L-cells is not elucidated. Recently, it was reported that GIP and GLP-1-producing cells are present also in pancreatic islets, and islet-derived GIP and GLP-1 contribute to glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. In this short review, we focus on GIP and GLP-1 secretion by monosaccharides, such as glucose or fructose, and the role of the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel in GIP and GLP-1 secretion.

  19. [Albiglutide (Eperzan): a new once-weekly agonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-04-01

    Albiglutide (Eperzan) is a new once-weekly agonist of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors that is indicated in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Two doses are available, 30 mg and 50 mg, to be injected subcutaneously once a week. It has been extensively evaluated in the HARMONY programme of eight large randomised controlled trials that were performed at different stages of type 2 diabetes, in comparison with placebo or an active comparator. The endocrine and metabolic effects of albiglutide are similar to those of other GLP-1 receptor agonists: stimulation of insulin secretion (incretin effect) and inhibition of glucagon secretion, both in a glucose-dependent manner, retardation of gastric emptying and increase of satiety. These effects lead to a reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) levels, combined with a weight reduction. The overall tolerance profile is good. Albiglutide is currently reimbursed in Belgium after failure (HbA(1c) > 7.5%) of and in combination with a dual therapy with metformin and a sulfonylurea as well as in combination with a basal insulin (with or without oral antidiabetic drugs). To avoid hypoglycaemia, a reduction in the dose of sulfonylurea or insulin may be recommended. A once-weekly administration should increase patient's acceptance of injectable therapy and improve compliance.

  20. Gastrointestinal actions of glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies: glycaemic control beyond the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Smits, M M; Tonneijck, L; Muskiet, M H A; Kramer, M H H; Cahen, D L; van Raalte, D H

    2016-03-01

    The gastrointestinal hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) lowers postprandial glucose concentrations by regulating pancreatic islet-cell function, with stimulation of glucose-dependent insulin and suppression of glucagon secretion. In addition to endocrine pancreatic effects, mounting evidence suggests that several gastrointestinal actions of GLP-1 are at least as important for glucose-lowering. GLP-1 reduces gastric emptying rate and small bowel motility, thereby delaying glucose absorption and decreasing postprandial glucose excursions. Furthermore, it has been suggested that GLP-1 directly stimulates hepatic glucose uptake, and suppresses hepatic glucose production, thereby adding to reduction of fasting and postprandial glucose levels. GLP-1 receptor agonists, which mimic the effects of GLP-1, have been developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Based on their pharmacokinetic profile, GLP-1 receptor agonists can be broadly categorized as short- or long-acting, with each having unique islet-cell and gastrointestinal effects that lower glucose levels. Short-acting agonists predominantly lower postprandial glucose excursions, by inhibiting gastric emptying and intestinal glucose uptake, with little effect on insulin secretion. By contrast, long-acting agonists mainly reduce fasting glucose levels, predominantly by increased insulin and reduced glucagon secretion, with potential additional direct inhibitory effects on hepatic glucose production. Understanding these pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences may allow personalized antihyperglycaemic therapy in type 2 diabetes. In addition, it may provide the rationale to explore treatment in patients with no or little residual β-cell function.

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists favorably address all components of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sanjay; Ghosal, Samit; Chatterjee, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular death is the leading cause of mortality for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The etiology of cardiovascular disease in diabetes may be divided into hyperglycemia per se and factors operating through components of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Hyperglycemia causes direct injury to vascular endothelium and possibly on cardiac myocytes. MetS is a cluster of risk factors like obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertension and dyslipidemia. The incidence of this syndrome is rising globally. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA) are a group of drugs, which address all components of this syndrome favorably. Experimental evidence suggests that they have favorable actions on myocardium as well. Several compounds belonging to GLP-1RA class are in market now and a large number awaiting their entry. Although, originally this class of drugs emerged as a treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus, more recent data generated revealed beneficial effects on multiple metabolic parameters. We have studied literature published between 2000 and 2016 to look into effects of GLP-1RA on components of MetS. Results from recently concluded clinical trials suggest that some of the molecules in this class may have favorable effects on cardiovascular outcome. PMID:27795818

  2. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T.; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O.; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G.; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  3. Farnesoid X receptor inhibits glucagon-like peptide-1 production by enteroendocrine L cells.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Mohamed-Sami; Daoudi, Mehdi; Prawitt, Janne; Ducastel, Sarah; Touche, Véronique; Sayin, Sama I; Perino, Alessia; Brighton, Cheryl A; Sebti, Yasmine; Kluza, Jérôme; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Hélène; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Dorchies, Emilie; Baud, Grégory; Spinelli, Valeria; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Caron, Sandrine; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Caiazzo, Robert; Reimann, Frank; Marchetti, Philippe; Lefebvre, Philippe; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Gribble, Fiona M; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pattou, François; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Lestavel, Sophie

    2015-07-02

    Bile acids are signalling molecules, which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex bile acids in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here, we show that FXR activation in L cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycaemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes.

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1: effect on pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Skov, Jeppe; Holst, Jens Juul; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2014-01-01

    The antihypertensive actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) receptor agonists have been linked to the release of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in mice. Whether a GLP1-ANP axis exists in humans is unknown. In this study, we examined 12 healthy young males in a randomized, controlled, double-blinded, single-day, cross-over study to evaluate the effects of a 2-h native GLP1 infusion. Plasma proANP concentrations were measured by an automated mid-region-directed proANP immunoassay and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) on Roche Modular E170. Urine was collected for measurements of sodium excretion. Although GLP1 infusion increased the urinary sodium excretion markedly, there were no significant changes in either proANP or proBNP concentrations. When GLP1 infusion was stopped, sodium excretion declined rapidly. As proANP concentration reflects ANP secretion, our data could not confirm the existence of a GLP1-ANP axis in humans. Especially, the natriuretic effects of GLP1 seem unlikely to be mediated exclusively via ANP.

  5. Uncoupling protein 2 negatively regulates glucose-induced glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjie; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiangying; Luo, Yun; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2012-04-01

    It is known that endogenous levels of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) can be enhanced by various secretagogues, but the mechanism underlying GLP1 secretion is still not fully understood. We assessed the possible effect of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) on GLP1 secretion in mouse intestinal tract and NCI-H716 cells, a well-characterized human enteroendocrine L cell model. Localization of UCP2 and GLP1 in the gastrointestinal tract was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Ucp2 mRNA levels in gut were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Human NCI-H716 cells were transiently transfected with siRNAs targeting UCP2. The plasma and ileum tissue levels of GLP1 (7-36) amide were measured using an ELISA kit. UCP2 was primarily expressed in the mucosal layer and colocalized with GLP1 in gastrointestinal mucosa. L cells secreting GLP1 also expressed UCP2. After glucose administration, UCP2-deficient mice showed increased glucose-induced GLP1 secretion compared with wild-type littermates. GLP1 secretion increased after NCI-H716 cells were transfected with siRNAs targeting UCP2. UCP2 was markedly upregulated in ileum tissue from ob/ob mice, and GLP1 secretion decreased compared with normal mice. Furthermore, GLP1 secretion increased after administration of genipin by oral gavage. Taken together, these results reveal an inhibitory role of UCP2 in glucose-induced GLP1 secretion.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1 is specifically involved in sweet taste transmission.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shingo; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Inoue, Mayuko; Iwata, Shusuke; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Drucker, Daniel J; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2015-06-01

    Five fundamental taste qualities (sweet, bitter, salty, sour, umami) are sensed by dedicated taste cells (TCs) that relay quality information to gustatory nerve fibers. In peripheral taste signaling pathways, ATP has been identified as a functional neurotransmitter, but it remains to be determined how specificity of different taste qualities is maintained across synapses. Recent studies demonstrated that some gut peptides are released from taste buds by prolonged application of particular taste stimuli, suggesting their potential involvement in taste information coding. In this study, we focused on the function of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in initial responses to taste stimulation. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) null mice had reduced neural and behavioral responses specifically to sweet compounds compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Some sweet responsive TCs expressed GLP-1 and its receptors were expressed in gustatory neurons. GLP-1 was released immediately from taste bud cells in response to sweet compounds but not to other taste stimuli. Intravenous administration of GLP-1 elicited transient responses in a subset of sweet-sensitive gustatory nerve fibers but did not affect other types of fibers, and this response was suppressed by pre-administration of the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-4(3-39). Thus GLP-1 may be involved in normal sweet taste signal transmission in mice.

  7. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Pirone, Andrea; Ding, Bao An; Giannessi, Elisabetta; Coli, Alessandra; Stornelli, Maria Rita; di Cossato, Margherita Marzoni Fecia; Piano, Ilaria; Lenzi, Carla

    2012-10-01

    The distribution of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) was investigated in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant using immunohistochemistry. GLP-1 immunoreactive cells were common in the small intestine, in the proventriculus and in the pancreas. Immunostained cells were not seen in the crop, in the gizzard and in the large intestine. Double labelling demonstrated that GLP-1 and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) were occasionally co-localized only in the duodenal villi. In contrast to what was previously described in the chicken and ostrich, we noted GLP-1 positive cells in the duodenum. These data were consistent with the presence of proglucagon mRNA in the chicken duodenum. Our findings indicate that GLP-1 might have an inhibitory effect on gastric and crop emptying and on acid secretion also in the pheasant. Moreover, the results of the present research regarding the initial region of the small intestine suggest a further direct mechanism of the GLP-1 release during the early digestion phase and an enhancement of its incretin role.

  8. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists (GLP-1RAs) in the Brain-Adipocyte Axis.

    PubMed

    Geloneze, Bruno; de Lima-Júnior, José Carlos; Velloso, Lício A

    2017-02-23

    The complexity of neural circuits that control food intake and energy balance in the hypothalamic nuclei explains some of the constraints involved in the prevention and treatment of obesity. Two major neuronal populations present in the arcuate nucleus control caloric intake and energy expenditure: one population co-expresses orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y and the other expresses the anorexigenic anorectic neuropeptides proopiomelanocortin and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (POMC/CART). In addition to integrating signals from neurotransmitters and hormones, the hypothalamic systems that regulate energy homeostasis are affected by nutrients. Fat-rich diets, for instance, elicit hypothalamic inflammation (reactive activation and proliferation of microglia, a condition named gliosis). This process generates resistance to the anorexigenic hormones leptin and insulin, contributing to the genesis of obesity. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) have increasingly been used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. One compound (liraglutide) was recently approved for the treatment of obesity. Although most studies suggest that GLP-1RAs promote weight loss mainly due to their inhibitory effect on food intake, other central effects that have been described for native GLP-1 and some GLP-1RAs in rodents and humans encourage future clinical trials to explore additional mechanisms that potentially underlie the beneficial effects observed with this drug class. In this article we review the most relevant data exploring the mechanisms involved in the effects of GLP-1RAs in the brain-adipocyte axis.

  9. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-05-19

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors.

  10. [Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics: a new treatment for Alzheimer's disease?].

    PubMed

    García-Casares, Natalia; García-Arnés, Juan Antonio; Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Valdivielso-Felices, Pedro; García-Arias, Carlota; González-Santos, Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Introduccion. Los analogos del glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) son una opcion terapeutica establecida en los pacientes con diabetes tipo 2. Sin embargo, las propiedades de los analogos del GLP-1 van mas alla del control estrictamente metabolico del paciente diabetico. Los efectos neuroprotectores de los analogos del GLP-1 se han puesto de manifiesto en estudios recientes y han abierto nuevos campos de investigacion en trastornos neurodegenerativos como la enfermedad de Alzheimer (EA), entre otros. Objetivo. Revision sistematica de los estudios experimentales y ensayos clinicos en humanos que demuestran las propiedades neuroprotectoras de los analogos del GLP-1 en la EA. Desarrollo. Los estudios experimentales que se han llevado a cabo en modelos de roedores con EA demuestran las propiedades neuroprotectoras de los analogos del GLP-1 sobre el sistema nervioso central que reducen las placas de beta-amiloide, el estres oxidativo y la respuesta inflamatoria cerebral. Recientemente se han puesto en marcha estudios con analogos del GLP-1 en humanos con deterioro cognitivo y EA. Conclusiones. Los analogos del GLP-1 presentan propiedades neuroprotectoras. Al considerarse la diabetes tipo 2 un factor de riesgo para el deterioro cognitivo y la demencia, deben considerarse los beneficios de los analogos del GLP-1 sobre la cognicion. Del mismo modo, los analogos del GLP-1 suponen un tratamiento prometedor en la EA.

  11. Optimal bone mechanical and material properties require a functional glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Mabilleau, Guillaume; Mieczkowska, Aleksandra; Irwin, Nigel; Flatt, Peter R; Chappard, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Bone is permanently remodeled by a complex network of local, hormonal, and neuronal factors that affect osteoclast and osteoblast biology. Among these factors, a role for gastrointestinal hormones has been proposed based on the evidence that bone resorption dramatically falls after a meal. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) is one of these gut hormones, and despite several reports suggesting an anabolic effect of GLP1, or its stable analogs, on bone mass, little is known about the effects of GLP1/GLP1 receptor on bone strength. In this study, we investigated by three-point bending, quantitative X-ray microradiography, microcomputed tomography, qBEI, and FTIRI bone strength and bone quality in male Glp1r knockout (Glp1r KO) mice when compared with control WT animals. Animals with a deletion of Glp1r presented with a significant reduction in ultimate load, yield load, stiffness, and total absorbed and post-yield energies when compared with WT animals. Furthermore, cortical thickness and bone outer diameter were significantly decreased in deficient animals. The mineral quantity and quality were not significantly different between Glp1r KO and WT animals. On the other hand, the maturity of the collagen matrix was significantly reduced in deficient animals and associated with lowered material properties. Taken together, these data support a positive effect of GLP1R on bone strength and quality.

  12. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Production by Enteroendocrine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    TRABELSI, Mohamed-Sami; DAOUDI, Mehdi; PRAWITT, Janne; DUCASTEL, Sarah; TOUCHE, Véronique; SAYIN, Sama I.; PERINO, Alessia; BRIGHTON, Cheryl A.; SEBTI, Yasmine; KLUZA, Jérôme; BRIAND, Olivier; DEHONDT, Hélène; VALLEZ, Emmanuelle; DORCHIES, Emilie; BAUD, Grégory; SPINELLI, Valeria; HENNUYER, Nathalie; CARON, Sandrine; BANTUBUNGI, Kadiombo; CAIAZZO, Robert; REIMANN, Frank; MARCHETTI, Philippe; LEFEBVRE, Philippe; BÄCKHED, Fredrik; GRIBBLE, Fiona M.; SCHOONJANS, Kristina; PATTOU, François; TAILLEUX, Anne; STAELS, Bart; LESTAVEL, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) are signalling molecules which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex BA in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L-cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L-cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here we show that FXR activation in L-cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR-deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes. PMID:26134028

  13. Intracerebroventricular injection of glucagon-like peptide-1 changes lipid metabolism in chicks.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tetsuya; Oikawa, Daichi; Adachi, Nami; Boswell, Tim; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2007-08-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), derived from proglucagon, is thought to act as a negative regulator of energy homeostasis in mammals, since intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of GLP-1 inhibits feeding behavior and enhances energy expenditure. The anorexigenic effect of GLP-1 is also observed in chicks, but whether brain GLP-1 enhances energy expenditure has not been investigated. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of ICV injection of GLP-1 on energy expenditure as well as metabolic changes in chicks. The injection of GLP-1 did not affect energy expenditure calculated from oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. On the other hand, the injection of GLP-1 significantly decreased respiratory quotient, suggesting that brain GLP-1 shifted the use of energy sources from carbohydrates to lipids. In support of this, ICV injection of GLP-1 increased plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentration while plasma glucose concentration was decreased. In conclusion, GLP-1 appears to act in the brain as a metabolic modulator rather than as a regulator of total energy expenditure in chicks.

  14. Male fertility and obesity: are ghrelin, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 pharmacologically relevant?

    PubMed

    Alves, Marco G; Jesus, Tito T; Sousa, Mário; Goldberg, Erwin; Silva, Branca M; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is rising to unprecedented numbers, affecting a growing number of children, adolescents and young adult men. These individuals face innumerous health problems, including subfertility or even infertility. Overweight and obese men present severe alterations in their body composition and hormonal profile, particularly in ghrelin, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. It is well known that male reproductive health is under the control of the individual's nutritional status and also of a tight network of regulatory signals, particularly hormonal signaling. However, few studies have been focused on the effects of ghrelin, leptin and GLP-1 in male reproduction and how energy homeostasis and male reproductive function are linked. These hormones regulate body glucose homeostasis and several studies suggest that they can serve as targets for anti-obesity drugs. In recent years, our understanding of the mechanisms of action of these hormones has grown significantly. Curiously, their effect on male reproductive potential, that is highly dependent of the metabolic cooperation established between testicular cells, remains a matter of debate. Herein, we review general concepts of male fertility and obesity, with a special focus on the effects of ghrelin, leptin and GLP-1 on male reproductive health. We also discuss the possible pharmacological relevance of these hormones to counteract the fertility problems that overweight and obese men face.

  15. Septal Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Expression Determines Suppression of Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harasta, Anne E; Power, John M; von Jonquieres, Georg; Karl, Tim; Drucker, Daniel J; Housley, Gary D; Schneider, Miriam; Klugmann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and its receptor GLP-1R are a key component of the satiety signaling system, and long-acting GLP-1 analogs have been approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Previous reports demonstrate that GLP-1 regulates glucose homeostasis alongside the rewarding effects of food. Both palatable food and illicit drugs activate brain reward circuitries, and pharmacological studies suggest that central nervous system GLP-1 signaling holds potential for the treatment of addiction. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1 in the attenuation of reward-oriented behavior, and the essential domains of the mesolimbic system mediating these beneficial effects, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the central regions of highest Glp-1r gene activity are essential in mediating responses to drugs of abuse. Here, we show that Glp-1r-deficient (Glp-1r−/−) mice have greatly augmented cocaine-induced locomotor responses and enhanced conditional place preference compared with wild-type (Glp-1r+/+) controls. Employing mRNA in situ hybridization we located peak Glp-1r mRNA expression in GABAergic neurons of the dorsal lateral septum, an anatomical site with a crucial function in reward perception. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of dorsal lateral septum neurons revealed that genetic Glp-1r ablation leads to increased excitability of these cells. Viral vector-mediated Glp-1r gene delivery to the dorsal lateral septum of Glp-1r−/− animals reduced cocaine-induced locomotion and conditional place preference to wild-type levels. This site-specific genetic complementation did not affect the anxiogenic phenotype observed in Glp-1r−/− controls. These data reveal a novel role of GLP-1R in dorsal lateral septum function driving behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:25669605

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mediates cardioprotection by remote ischaemic conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Basalay, Marina V.; Mastitskaya, Svetlana; Mrochek, Aleksander; Ackland, Gareth L.; del Arroyo, Ana Gutierrez; Sanchez, Jenifer; Sjoquist, Per-Ove; Pernow, John; Gourine, Alexander V.; Gourine, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Aims Although the nature of the humoral factor which mediates cardioprotection established by remote ischaemic conditioning (RIc) remains unknown, parasympathetic (vagal) mechanisms appear to play a critical role. As the production and release of many gut hormones is modulated by the vagus nerve, here we tested the hypothesis that RIc cardioprotection is mediated by the actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Methods and results A rat model of myocardial infarction (coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion) was used. Remote ischaemic pre- (RIPre) or perconditioning (RIPer) was induced by 15 min occlusion of femoral arteries applied prior to or during the myocardial ischaemia. The degree of RIPre and RIPer cardioprotection was determined in conditions of cervical or subdiaphragmatic vagotomy, or following blockade of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) using specific antagonist Exendin(9–39). Phosphorylation of PI3K/AKT and STAT3 was assessed. RIPre and RIPer reduced infarct size by ∼50%. In conditions of bilateral cervical or subdiaphragmatic vagotomy RIPer failed to establish cardioprotection. GLP-1R blockade abolished cardioprotection induced by either RIPre or RIPer. Exendin(9–39) also prevented RIPre-induced AKT phosphorylation. Cardioprotection induced by GLP-1R agonist Exendin-4 was preserved following cervical vagotomy, but was abolished in conditions of M3 muscarinic receptor blockade. Conclusions These data strongly suggest that GLP-1 functions as a humoral factor of remote ischaemic conditioning cardioprotection. This phenomenon requires intact vagal innervation of the visceral organs and recruitment of GLP-1R-mediated signalling. Cardioprotection induced by GLP-1R activation is mediated by a mechanism involving M3 muscarinic receptors. PMID:27702763

  17. Oxyntomodulin increases intrinsic heart rate in mice independent of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Sowden, Gillian L; Drucker, Daniel J; Weinshenker, David; Swoap, Steven J

    2007-02-01

    Oxyntomodulin (OXM), a postprandially released intestinal hormone, inhibits food intake via the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Although OXM may have clinical value in treating obesity, the cardiovascular effects of OXM are not well understood. Using telemetry to measure heart rate (HR), body temperature (Tb), and activity in conscious and freely moving mice, we tested 1) whether OXM affects HR and 2) whether this effect is mediated by the GLP-1R. We found that peripherally administered OXM significantly increased HR in wild-type mice, raising HR by >200 beats/min to a maximum of 728 +/- 11 beats/min. To determine the extent to which the sympathetic nervous system mediates the tachycardia of OXM, we delivered this hormone to mice deficient in dopamine-beta-hydroxylase [Dbh(-/-) mice], littermate controls [Dbh(+/-) mice], and autonomically blocked C57Bl mice. OXM increased HR equally in all groups (192 +/- 13, 197 +/- 21, and 216 +/- 11 beats/min, respectively), indicating that OXM elevated intrinsic HR. Intrinsic HR was also vigorously elevated by OXM in Glp-1R(-/-) mice (200 +/- 28 beats/min). In addition, peripherally administered OXM inhibited food intake and activity levels in wild-type mice and lowered Tb in autonomically blocked mice. None of these effects were observed in Glp-1R(-/-) mice. These data suggest multiple modes of action of OXM: 1) it directly elevates murine intrinsic HR through a GLP-1R-independent mechanism, perhaps via the glucagon receptor or an unidentified OXM receptor, and 2) it lowers food intake, activity, and Tb in a GLP-1R-dependent fashion.

  18. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 in diabetic rat small resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Zeliha; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Ozdem, Sadi S

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the functional effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1(7-36)] and GLP-1(9-36) and the mechanism(s) playing a role in the effects of these agents in isolated small resistance arteries from control and diabetic rats. Cumulative concentrations of GLP-1(7-36) and GLP-1(9-36) produced concentration-dependent relaxations in endothelium-intact but not endothelium-denuded arteries that were significantly decreased in diabetic rats. GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) significantly inhibited responses to GLP-1 analogs. Nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway blockers, but not indomethacin, significantly decreased responses to GLP-1(7-36) or GLP-1(9-36) in control and diabetic rats. 4-Aminopyridine or glibenclamide incubation did not alter relaxations to GLP-1 analogs. GLP-1(7-36)- and GLP-1(9-36)-induced relaxations were blunted significantly and to similar extends by charybdotoxin and apamin combination in control and diabetic rats. Catalase did not affect, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) caused a significant increase in relaxations to GLP-1 analogs only in diabetic rats. We provided evidence about the relaxant effects of GLP-1(7-36) and GLP-1(9-36) in resistance arteries that were reduced in diabetic rats. Both calcium-activated potassium channels and endothelium played a major role in relaxations. Increment in certain reactive oxygen species and/or reduction in superoxide dismutase function might play a role in reduced relaxant responses of resistance arteries to GLP-1(7-36) and GLP-1(9-36) in diabetic rats.

  19. Exogenous glucagon-like peptide 1 reduces contractions in human colon circular muscle.

    PubMed

    Amato, Antonella; Baldassano, Sara; Liotta, Rosa; Serio, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia

    2014-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) is a naturally occurring peptide secreted by intestinal L-cells. Though its primary function is to serve as an incretin, GLP1 reduces gastrointestinal motility. However, only a handful of animal studies have specifically evaluated the influence of GLP1 on colonic motility. Consequently, the aims of this study were to investigate the effects induced by exogenous GLP1, to analyze the mechanism of action, and to verify the presence of GLP1 receptors (GLP1Rs) in human colon circular muscular strips. Organ bath technique, RT-PCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescence were used. In human colon, exogenous GLP1 reduced, in a concentration-dependent manner, the amplitude of the spontaneous contractions without affecting the frequency and the resting basal tone. This inhibitory effect was significantly reduced by exendin (9-39), a GLP1R antagonist, which per se significantly increased the spontaneous mechanical activity. Moreover, it was abolished by tetrodotoxin, a neural blocker, or Nω-nitro-l-arginine - a blocker of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). The biomolecular analysis revealed a genic and protein expression of the GLP1R in the human colon. The double-labeling experiments with anti-neurofilament or anti-nNOS showed, for the first time, that immunoreactivity for the GLP1R was expressed in nitrergic neurons of the myenteric plexus. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that GLP1R is expressed in the human colon and, once activated by exogenous GLP1, mediates an inhibitory effect on large intestine motility through NO neural release.

  20. Increased glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion may be involved in antidiabetic effects of ginsenosides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Can; Zhang, Mian; Hu, Meng-Yue; Guo, Hai-Fang; Li, Jia; Yu, Yun-Li; Jin, Shi; Wang, Xin-Ting; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2013-05-01

    Panax ginseng is one of the most popular herbal remedies. Ginsenosides, major bioactive constituents in P. ginseng, have shown good antidiabetic action, but the precise mechanism was not fully understood. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) is considered to be an important incretin that can regulate glucose homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract after meals. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ginseng total saponins (GTS) exerts its antidiabetic effects via modulating GLP1 release. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), the most abundant constituent in GTS, was selected to further explore the underlying mechanisms in cultured NCI-H716 cells. Diabetic rats were developed by a combination of high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin injection. The diabetic rats orally received GTS (150 or 300 mg/kg) daily for 4 weeks. It was found that GTS treatment significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, accompanied by a significant increase in glucose-induced GLP1 secretion and upregulation of proglucagon gene expression. Data from NCI-H716 cells showed that both GTS and Rb1 promoted GLP1 secretion. It was observed that Rb1 increased the ratio of intracellular ATP to ADP concentration and intracellular Ca2+ concentration. The metabolic inhibitor azide (3 mM), the KATP channel opener diazoxide (340 μM), and the Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (20 μM) significantly reversed Rb1-mediated GLP1 secretion. All these results drew a conclusion that ginsenosides stimulated GLP1 secretion both in vivo and in vitro. The antidiabetic effects of ginsenosides may be a result of enhanced GLP1 secretion.

  1. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor expression in normal and diseased human thyroid and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Waser, Beatrice; Blank, Annika; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Perren, Aurel; Reubi, Jean C

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP1) analogs may induce thyroid or pancreatic diseases in animals, raising questions about their use in diabetic patients. There is, however, controversy regarding expression of GLP1 receptors (GLP1R) in human normal and diseased thyroid and pancreas. Here, 221 human thyroid and pancreas samples were analyzed for GLP1R immunohistochemistry and compared with quantitative in vitro GLP1R autoradiography. Neither normal nor hyperplastic human thyroids containing parafollicular C cells express GLP1R with either method. Papillary thyroid cancer do not, and medullary thyroid carcinomas rarely express GLP1R. Insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells in the normal pancreas express a high density of GLP1R, whereas acinar cells express them in low amounts. Ductal epithelial cells do not express GLP1R. All benign insulinomas express high densities of GLP1R, whereas malignant insulinomas rarely express them. All ductal pancreatic carcinomas are GLP1R negative, whereas 6/20 PanIN 1/2 and 0/12 PanIN 3 express GLP1R. Therefore, normal thyroid, including normal and hyperplastic C cells, or papillary thyroid cancer are not targets for GLP1 analogs in humans. Conversely, all pancreatic insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells are physiological GLP1 targets, as well as most acini. As normal ductal epithelial cells or PanIN 3 or ductal pancreatic carcinomas do not express GLP1R, it seems unlikely that GLP1R is related to neoplastic transformation in pancreas. GLP1R-positive medullary thyroid carcinomas and all benign insulinomas are candidates for in vivo GLP1R targeting.

  2. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1/Glucagon Receptor Dual Agonism Reverses Obesity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pocai, Alessandro; Carrington, Paul E.; Adams, Jennifer R.; Wright, Michael; Eiermann, George; Zhu, Lan; Du, Xiaobing; Petrov, Aleksandr; Lassman, Michael E.; Jiang, Guoqiang; Liu, Franklin; Miller, Corey; Tota, Laurie M.; Zhou, Gaochao; Zhang, Xiaoping; Sountis, Michael M.; Santoprete, Alessia; Capito', Elena; Chicchi, Gary G.; Thornberry, Nancy; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Pessi, Antonello; Marsh, Donald J.; SinhaRoy, Ranabir

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Oxyntomodulin (OXM) is a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP1R)/glucagon receptor (GCGR) dual agonist peptide that reduces body weight in obese subjects through increased energy expenditure and decreased energy intake. The metabolic effects of OXM have been attributed primarily to GLP1R agonism. We examined whether a long acting GLP1R/GCGR dual agonist peptide exerts metabolic effects in diet-induced obese mice that are distinct from those obtained with a GLP1R-selective agonist. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We developed a protease-resistant dual GLP1R/GCGR agonist, DualAG, and a corresponding GLP1R-selective agonist, GLPAG, matched for GLP1R agonist potency and pharmacokinetics. The metabolic effects of these two peptides with respect to weight loss, caloric reduction, glucose control, and lipid lowering, were compared upon chronic dosing in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. Acute studies in DIO mice revealed metabolic pathways that were modulated independent of weight loss. Studies in Glp1r−/− and Gcgr−/− mice enabled delineation of the contribution of GLP1R versus GCGR activation to the pharmacology of DualAG. RESULTS Peptide DualAG exhibits superior weight loss, lipid-lowering activity, and antihyperglycemic efficacy comparable to GLPAG. Improvements in plasma metabolic parameters including insulin, leptin, and adiponectin were more pronounced upon chronic treatment with DualAG than with GLPAG. Dual receptor agonism also increased fatty acid oxidation and reduced hepatic steatosis in DIO mice. The antiobesity effects of DualAG require activation of both GLP1R and GCGR. CONCLUSIONS Sustained GLP1R/GCGR dual agonism reverses obesity in DIO mice and is a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of obesity. PMID:19602537

  3. Nutrient-induced glucagon like peptide-1 release is modulated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Ripken, Dina; van der Wielen, Nikkie; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Meijerink, Jocelijn; Witkamp, Renger F; Hendriks, Henk F J

    2016-06-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and serotonin are both involved in food intake regulation. GLP-1 release is stimulated upon nutrient interaction with G-protein coupled receptors by enteroendocrine cells (EEC), whereas serotonin is released from enterochromaffin cells (ECC). The central hypothesis for the current study was that nutrient-induced GLP-1 release from EECs is modulated by serotonin through a process involving serotonin receptor interaction. This was studied by assessing the effects of serotonin reuptake inhibition by fluoxetine on nutrient-induced GLP-1, PYY and CCK release from isolated pig intestinal segments. Next, serotonin-induced GLP-1 release was studied in enteroendocrine STC-1 cells, where effects of serotonin receptor inhibition were studied using specific and non-specific antagonists. Casein (1% w/v), safflower oil (3.35% w/v), sucrose (50mM) and rebaudioside A (12.5mM) stimulated GLP-1 release from intestinal segments, whereas casein only stimulated PYY and CCK release. Combining nutrients with fluoxetine further increased nutrient-induced GLP-1, PYY and CCK release. Serotonin release from intestinal tissue segments was stimulated by casein and safflower oil while sucrose and rebaudioside A had no effect. The combination with fluoxetine (0.155μM) further enhanced casein and safflower oil induced-serotonin release. Exposure of ileal tissue segments to serotonin (30μM) stimulated GLP-1 release whereas it did not induce PYY and CCK release. Serotonin (30 and 100μM) also stimulated GLP-1 release from STC-1 cells, which was inhibited by the non-specific 5HT receptor antagonist asenapine (1 and 10μM). These data suggest that nutrient-induced GLP-1 release is modulated by serotonin through a receptor mediated process.

  4. Central & peripheral glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling differentially regulate addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Schurdak, Jennifer D; Seeley, Randy J; Benoit, Stephen C; Davis, Jon F

    2016-07-01

    Recent data implicate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent anorexigenic peptide released in response to nutrient intake, as a regulator for the reinforcing properties of food, alcohol and psychostimulants. While, both central and peripheral mechanisms mediate effects of GLP-1R signaling on food intake, the extent to which central or peripheral GLP-1R signaling regulates reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse is unknown. Here, we examined amphetamine reinforcement, alcohol intake and hedonic feeding following peripheral administration of EX-4 (a GLP-1 analog) in FLOX and GLP-1R KD(Nestin) (GLP-1R selectively ablated from the central nervous system) mice (n=13/group). First, the effect of EX-4 pretreatment on the expression of amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (Amp-CPP) was examined in the FLOX and GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice. Next, alcohol intake (10% v/v) was evaluated in FLOX and GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice following saline or EX-4 injections. Finally, we assessed the effects of EX-4 pretreatment on hedonic feeding behavior. Results indicate that Amp-CPP was completely blocked in the FLOX mice, but not in the GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice following EX-4 pretreatment. Ex-4 pretreatment selectively blocked alcohol consumption in the FLOX mice, but was ineffective in altering alcohol intake in the GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice. Notably, hedonic feeding was partially blocked in the GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice, whereas it was abolished in the FLOX mice. The present study provides critical insights regarding the nature by which GLP-1 signaling controls reinforced behaviors and underscores the importance of both peripheral and central GLP-1R signaling for the regulation of addictive disorders.

  5. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog, Liraglutide, Delays Onset of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalitis in Lewis Rats.

    PubMed

    DellaValle, Brian; Brix, Gitte S; Brock, Birgitte; Gejl, Michael; Landau, Anne M; Møller, Arne; Rungby, Jørgen; Larsen, Agnete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recent findings indicate that metabolic disturbances are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology and influence the susceptibility to treatment, directing attention toward anti-diabetic drugs such as metformin and pioglitazone. Liraglutide, a drug of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) family, is also anti-diabetic and weight-reducing and is, moreover, directly neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory in a broad spectrum of experimental models of brain disease. In this study we investigate the potential for this FDA-approved drug, liraglutide, as a treatment for MS by utilizing the experimental model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE). Methods: EAE was induced in 30 female Lewis rats that subsequently received twice-daily liraglutide (200 μg/kg s.c.) or saline. Healthy controls were included (saline, n = 6, liraglutide, n = 7). Clinical score and weight were assessed daily by blinded observers. Animals were killed at peak disease severity (day 11) or if exceeding humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4). Protein levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), amyloid precursor protein (APP), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were determined. Results: Liraglutide treatment delayed disease onset (group clinical score significantly >0) by 2 days and markedly reduced disease severity (median clinical score 2 vs. 5; p = 0.0003). Fourteen of 15 (93%) of vehicle-treated rats reached the humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4) by day 11 compared to 5 of 15 (33%) of liraglutide-treated rats (p = 0.0004). Liraglutide substantially increased the mitochondrial antioxidant MnSOD (p < 0.01) and reduced the neurodegenerative marker APP (p = 0.036) in the brain. GFAP levels were not significantly changed with drug treatment (p = 0.09). Conclusion: We demonstrate, for the first time, that liraglutide treatment delays onset of EAE in Lewis rats and is associated with improved protective capacity against oxidative stress. These data suggest GLP-1

  6. Long-term management of type 2 diabetes with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Hamish; Nayar, Rahul; Rajeswaran, Chinnadorai; Jandhyala, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Continuously reducing excess blood glucose is a primary goal for the management of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Most patients with T2D require glucose-lowering medications to achieve and maintain adequate glycemic control; however, treatment failure may occur, limiting treatment options. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are an emerging therapeutic class that can be prescribed for patients instead of basal insulin after the failure of oral therapies. Recent studies have focused on the durability and tolerability of long-term GLP-1RA therapy. This review summarizes the key efficacy and safety findings from prospective phase 3 clinical studies of at least 76 weeks’ duration for the GLP-1RAs currently approved in the United States and the European Union (albiglutide, dulaglutide, exenatide twice daily [BID], exenatide once weekly [QW], liraglutide, and lixisenatide). Currently, most of the long-term data are from uncontrolled extension studies, and continuous patient benefit has been observed for up to 3 years with multiple GLP-1RAs. Four-year comparative data demonstrated a longer time to treatment failure for exenatide BID than for sulfonylurea, and 3-year comparative extension data demonstrated greater glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reductions and weight loss with exenatide QW than with insulin glargine. Currently, the longest extension study for a GLP-1RA is the DURATION-1 study of exenatide QW, with >7 years of clinical data available. Data from DURATION-1 demonstrated that continuous HbA1c reductions and weight loss were observed for the patients continuing on the treatment, with no unexpected adverse events. Taken together, these data support GLP-1RAs as a long-term noninsulin treatment option after the failure of oral therapies. PMID:28331351

  7. Stability of glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucagon in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Bak, Monika J; Hartmann, Bolette; Christensen, Louise Wulff; Kuhre, Rune E; Deacon, Carolyn F; Holst, Jens J

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the stability of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucagon in plasma under short- and long-term storage conditions. Pooled human plasma (n=20), to which a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor and aprotinin were added, was spiked with synthetic GLP-1 (intact, 7–36NH2 as well as the primary metabolite, GLP-1 9–36NH2) or glucagon. Peptide recoveries were measured in samples kept for 1 and 3 h at room temperature or on ice, treated with various enzyme inhibitors, after up to three thawing–refreezing cycles, and after storage at −20 and −80 °C for up to 1 year. Recoveries were unaffected by freezing cycles or if plasma was stored on ice for up to 3 h, but were impaired when samples stood at RT for more than 1 h. Recovery of intact GLP-1 increased by addition of a DPP4 inhibitor (no ice), but was not further improved by neutral endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor or an inhibitor cocktail. GLP-1, but not glucagon, was stable for at least 1 year. Surprisingly, the recovery of glucagon was reduced by almost 50% by freezing compared with immediate analysis, regardless of storage time. Plasma handling procedures can significantly influence results of subsequent hormone analysis. Our data support addition of DPP4 inhibitor for GLP-1 measurement as well as cooling on ice of both GLP-1 and glucagon. Freeze–thaw cycles did not significantly affect stability of GLP-1 or glucagon. Long-term storage may affect glucagon levels regardless of storage temperature and results should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25596009

  8. Role of Central Nervous System Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptors in Enteric Glucose Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D.; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Iglesias, Miguel A.; Chabo, Chantal; Waget, Aurélie; Colom, André; Rastrelli, Sophie; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Drucker, Daniel J.; Seeley, Randy J.; Burcelin, Remy

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Ingested glucose is detected by specialized sensors in the enteric/hepatoportal vein, which send neural signals to the brain, which in turn regulates key peripheral tissues. Hence, impairment in the control of enteric-neural glucose sensing could contribute to disordered glucose homeostasis. The aim of this study was to determine the cells in the brain targeted by the activation of the enteric glucose-sensing system. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We selectively activated the axis in mice using a low-rate intragastric glucose infusion in wild-type and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor knockout mice, neuropeptide Y–and proopiomelanocortin–green fluorescent protein–expressing mice, and high-fat diet diabetic mice. We quantified the whole-body glucose utilization rate and the pattern of c-Fos positive in the brain. RESULTS—Enteric glucose increased muscle glycogen synthesis by 30% and regulates c-Fos expression in the brainstem and the hypothalamus. Moreover, the synthesis of muscle glycogen was diminished after central infusion of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1Rc) antagonist Exendin 9-39 and abolished in GLP-1Rc knockout mice. Gut-glucose–sensitive c-Fos–positive cells of the arcuate nucleus colocalized with neuropeptide Y–positive neurons but not with proopiomelanocortin-positive neurons. Furthermore, high-fat feeding prevented the enteric activation of c-Fos expression. CONCLUSIONS—We conclude that the gut-glucose sensor modulates peripheral glucose metabolism through a nutrient-sensitive mechanism, which requires brain GLP-1Rc signaling and is impaired during diabetes. PMID:18519802

  9. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Regulates Cholecystokinin Production in β-Cells to Protect From Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Amelia K; Neuman, Joshua C; Battiola, Therese J; Wisinski, Jaclyn A; Kimple, Michelle E; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-07-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a classic gut hormone that is also expressed in the pancreatic islet, where it is highly up-regulated with obesity. Loss of CCK results in increased β-cell apoptosis in obese mice. Similarly, islet α-cells produce increased amounts of another gut peptide, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), in response to cytokine and nutrient stimulation. GLP-1 also protects β-cells from apoptosis via cAMP-mediated mechanisms. Therefore, we hypothesized that the activation of islet-derived CCK and GLP-1 may be linked. We show here that both human and mouse islets secrete active GLP-1 as a function of body mass index/obesity. Furthermore, GLP-1 can rapidly stimulate β-cell CCK production and secretion through direct targeting by the cAMP-modulated transcription factor, cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). We find that cAMP-mediated signaling is required for Cck expression, but CCK regulation by cAMP does not require stimulatory levels of glucose or insulin secretion. We also show that CREB directly targets the Cck promoter in islets from obese (Leptin(ob/ob)) mice. Finally, we demonstrate that the ability of GLP-1 to protect β-cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis is partially dependent on CCK receptor signaling. Taken together, our work suggests that in obesity, active GLP-1 produced in the islet stimulates CCK production and secretion in a paracrine manner via cAMP and CREB. This intraislet incretin loop may be one mechanism whereby GLP-1 protects β-cells from apoptosis.

  10. High fat diet impairs the function of glucagon-like peptide-1 producing L-cells

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Paul; Pais, Ramona; Habib, Abdella M.; Brighton, Cheryl A.; Yeo, Giles S.H.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) acts as a satiety signal and enhances insulin release. This study examined how GLP-1 production from intestinal L-cells is modified by dietary changes. Methods Transgenic mouse models were utilized in which L-cells could be purified by cell specific expression of a yellow fluorescent protein, Venus. Mice were fed on chow or 60% high fat diet (HFD) for 2 or 16 weeks. L-cells were purified by flow cytometry and analysed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Enteroendocrine cell populations were examined by FACS analysis, and GLP-1 secretion was assessed in primary intestinal cultures. Results Two weeks HFD reduced the numbers of GLP-1 positive cells in the colon, and of GIP positive cells in the small intestine. Purified small intestinal L-cells showed major shifts in their gene expression profiles. In mice on HFD for 16 weeks, significant reductions were observed in the expression of L-cell specific genes, including those encoding gut hormones (Gip, Cck, Sct, Nts), prohormone processing enzymes (Pcsk1, Cpe), granins (Chgb, Scg2), nutrient sensing machinery (Slc5a1, Slc15a1, Abcc8, Gpr120) and enteroendocrine-specific transcription factors (Etv1, Isl1, Mlxipl, Nkx2.2 and Rfx6). A corresponding reduction in the GLP-1 secretory responsiveness to nutrient stimuli was observed in primary small intestinal cultures. Conclusion Mice fed on HFD exhibited reduced expression in L-cells of many L-cell specific genes, suggesting an impairment of enteroendocrine cell function. Our results suggest that a western style diet may detrimentally affect the secretion of gut hormones and normal post-prandial signaling, which could impact on insulin secretion and satiety. PMID:26145551

  11. The role of glucagon-like peptide 1 in glucose homeostasis and in other aspects of human physiology.

    PubMed

    Franek, Edward; Gajos, Grzegorz; Gumprecht, Janusz; Kretowski, Adam; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara; Małecki, Maciej T

    2009-11-01

    This paper reviews the structure, function, and pathophysiology of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). It describes the physiology and pathophysiology of the incretin axis, of which GLP-1 is a component, as well as the biosynthesis, secretion, activity, and degradation of this intestinal hormone. Effects of GLP-1 on the endocrine function of the pancreas, cardiovascular system, central nervous system, and on water-electrolyte balance have been also presented.

  12. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog, Liraglutide, Delays Onset of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalitis in Lewis Rats

    PubMed Central

    DellaValle, Brian; Brix, Gitte S.; Brock, Birgitte; Gejl, Michael; Landau, Anne M.; Møller, Arne; Rungby, Jørgen; Larsen, Agnete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recent findings indicate that metabolic disturbances are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology and influence the susceptibility to treatment, directing attention toward anti-diabetic drugs such as metformin and pioglitazone. Liraglutide, a drug of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) family, is also anti-diabetic and weight-reducing and is, moreover, directly neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory in a broad spectrum of experimental models of brain disease. In this study we investigate the potential for this FDA-approved drug, liraglutide, as a treatment for MS by utilizing the experimental model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE). Methods: EAE was induced in 30 female Lewis rats that subsequently received twice-daily liraglutide (200 μg/kg s.c.) or saline. Healthy controls were included (saline, n = 6, liraglutide, n = 7). Clinical score and weight were assessed daily by blinded observers. Animals were killed at peak disease severity (day 11) or if exceeding humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4). Protein levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), amyloid precursor protein (APP), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were determined. Results: Liraglutide treatment delayed disease onset (group clinical score significantly >0) by 2 days and markedly reduced disease severity (median clinical score 2 vs. 5; p = 0.0003). Fourteen of 15 (93%) of vehicle-treated rats reached the humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4) by day 11 compared to 5 of 15 (33%) of liraglutide-treated rats (p = 0.0004). Liraglutide substantially increased the mitochondrial antioxidant MnSOD (p < 0.01) and reduced the neurodegenerative marker APP (p = 0.036) in the brain. GFAP levels were not significantly changed with drug treatment (p = 0.09). Conclusion: We demonstrate, for the first time, that liraglutide treatment delays onset of EAE in Lewis rats and is associated with improved protective capacity against oxidative stress. These data suggest GLP-1

  13. Interactions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) with the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kastin, Abba J; Akerstrom, Victoria; Pan, Weihong

    2002-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) reduces insulin requirement in diabetes mellitus and promotes satiety. GLP-1 in the periphery (outside the CNS) has been shown to act on the brain to reduce food ingestion. As GLP-1 is readily degraded in blood, we focused on the interactions of [Ser8]GLP-1, an analog with similar biological effects and greater stability, with the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The influx of radiolabeled [Ser8]GLP-1 into brain has several distinctive characteristics: 1. A rapid influx rate of 8.867 +/- 0.798 x 10(4) mL/g-min as measured by multiple-time regression analysis after iv injection in mice. 2. Lack of self-inhibition by excess doses of the unlabeled [Ser8]GLP-1 either iv or by in situ brain perfusion, indicating the absence of a saturable transport system at the BBB. 3. Lack of modulation by short-term fasting and some other ingestive peptides that may interact with GLP-1, including leptin, glucagon, insulin, neuropeptide Y, and melanin-concentrating hormone. 4. No inhibition of influx by the selective GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39), suggesting that the GLP-1 receptor is not involved in the rapid entry into brain. Similarly, there was no efflux system for [Ser8]GLP-1 to exit the brain other than following the reabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The fast influx was not associated with high lipid solubility. Upon reaching the brain compartment, substantial amounts of [Ser8]GLP-1 entered the brain parenchyma, but a large proportion was loosely associated with the vasculature at the BBB. Finally, the influx rate of [Ser8]GLP-1 was compared with that of GLP-1 in a blood-free brain perfusion system; radiolabeled GLP-1 had a more rapid influx than its analog and neither peptide showed the self-inhibition indicative of a saturable transport system. Therefore, we conclude that [Ser8]GLP-1 and the endogenous peptide GLP-1 can gain access to the brain from the periphery by simple diffusion and thus contribute to the regulation of feeding.

  14. [Protective effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on beta-cells: preclinical and clinical data].

    PubMed

    Consoli, Agostino; Di Biagio, Rosamaria

    2011-12-01

    Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Scienze dell'Invecchiamento, Università degli Studi "G. d'Annunzio", Chieti Continuing b-cell mass and function loss represents the key mechanism for the pathogenesis and the progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Drugs capable of arresting b-cell loss and eventually able to bring b-cell function close to be back to normal would then be a formidable help in type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists exenatide and liraglutide can stimulate in vitro neogenesis and prevent apoptosis in b-cell-like cell lines. Consistently, treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonists ameliorates glucose metabolism, preserves b-cell mass and improves b-cell function in several animal models of diabetes. For instance, in the db/db mice, liraglutide protects the b-cell from oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress-related damage. Data in humans, in vivo, are less definitive and often based on scarcely reliable indexes of b-cell function. However, short-term treatment (14 weeks) with liraglutide increased b-cell maximal response capacity in a dose-response fashion. A longer (1 year) exenatide treatment also was able to increase b-cell maximal response capacity, but the effect was no longer there after a 4-week washout period. However, a marginal, although significant as compared to glargine treatment, improvement in another b-cell function index (disposition index) was observed after a 4-week washout period following 3-year exenatide treatment. Finally, although no clinical trials with a long enough follow-up period are presently available, durable glucose control has been obtained during 2 years of liraglutide treatment in monotherapy. Since the durability of good control is strictly dependent upon a lack of further b-cell function deterioration, these clinical data may foster hope that GLP-1 receptor antagonist treatment might help preserving b-cell function also in individuals affected by type 2

  15. Blockade of Glucagon-like Peptide 1 Receptor Corrects Post-prandial Hypoglycemia After Gastric Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Marzieh; Gastaldelli, Amalia; D'Alessio, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Post-prandial glycemia excursions increase after gastric bypass surgery; this effect is even greater among individuals with recurrent hypoglycemia (blood glucose levels <50 mg/dL). These patients also have increased post-prandial levels of insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1). We performed a clinical trial to determine the role of GLP1 in post-prandial glycemia in patients with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome after gastric bypass. Methods Nine patients with recurrent hypoglycemia after gastric bypass (H-GB), 7 asymptomatic individuals with previous gastric bypass (A-GB), and 8 non-diabetic subjects who did not receive surgery (controls) were studied with a mixed-meal tolerance test (350 kcal) using a dual glucose tracer method on 2 days. On 1 day they received continuous infusion of GLP-1 receptor (GLP1R) antagonist, exendin-(9–39) (Ex-9), and on the other day, a saline control. Glucose kinetics and islet and gut hormone responses were measured before and after the meal. Results Infusion of Ex9 corrected hypoglycemia in all H-GB individuals. The reduction of post-prandial insulin secretion by Ex9 was greater in the H-GB group than other groups (H-GB, 50%±8%; A-GB, 13%±10%; and controls, 14%±10%) (P<.05). Meal-derived glucose (RaOral) was significantly greater among subjects who had undergone gastric bypass than controls, and in H-GB patients compared with A-GB subjects. Ex9 shortened the time to peak RaOral in all groups without any significant effect on the overall glucose flux. Post-prandial glucagon levels were higher among patients who had undergone gastric bypass than controls, and increased with Ex9 administration. Conclusions Hypoglycemia following gastric bypass can be corrected by administration of a GLP1R antagonist, which might be used to treat this disorder. These findings are consistent with reports that increased GLP1 activity contributes to hypoglycemia following gastric bypass. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT

  16. Positive Allosteric Modulation of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor by Diverse Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Ana B; Showalter, Aaron D; Wainscott, David B; Stutsman, Cynthia; Marín, Aranzazu; Ficorilli, James; Cabrera, Over; Willard, Francis S; Sloop, Kyle W

    2016-05-13

    Therapeutic intervention to activate the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves energy balance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies investigating mechanisms whereby peptide ligands activate GLP-1R have utilized mutagenesis, receptor chimeras, photo-affinity labeling, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and crystallography of the ligand-binding ectodomain to establish receptor homology models. However, this has not enabled the design or discovery of drug-like non-peptide GLP-1R activators. Recently, studies investigating 4-(3-benzyloxyphenyl)-2-ethylsulfinyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP), a GLP-1R-positive allosteric modulator, determined that Cys-347 in the GLP-1R is required for positive allosteric modulator activity via covalent modification. To advance small molecule activation of the GLP-1R, we characterized the insulinotropic mechanism of BETP. In guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding and INS1 832-3 insulinoma cell cAMP assays, BETP enhanced GLP-1(9-36)-NH2-stimulated cAMP signaling. Using isolated pancreatic islets, BETP potentiated insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner that requires both the peptide ligand and GLP-1R. In studies of the covalent mechanism, PAGE fluorography showed labeling of GLP-1R in immunoprecipitation experiments from GLP-1R-expressing cells incubated with [(3)H]BETP. Furthermore, we investigated whether other reported GLP-1R activators and compounds identified from screening campaigns modulate GLP-1R by covalent modification. Similar to BETP, several molecules were found to enhance GLP-1R signaling in a Cys-347-dependent manner. These chemotypes are electrophiles that react with GSH, and LC/MS determined the cysteine adducts formed upon conjugation. Together, our results suggest covalent modification may be used to stabilize the GLP-1R in an active conformation. Moreover, the findings provide pharmacological guidance for the discovery and

  17. Positive Allosteric Modulation of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor by Diverse Electrophiles*

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Aaron D.; Wainscott, David B.; Stutsman, Cynthia; Marín, Aranzazu; Ficorilli, James; Cabrera, Over

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention to activate the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves energy balance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies investigating mechanisms whereby peptide ligands activate GLP-1R have utilized mutagenesis, receptor chimeras, photo-affinity labeling, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and crystallography of the ligand-binding ectodomain to establish receptor homology models. However, this has not enabled the design or discovery of drug-like non-peptide GLP-1R activators. Recently, studies investigating 4-(3-benzyloxyphenyl)-2-ethylsulfinyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP), a GLP-1R-positive allosteric modulator, determined that Cys-347 in the GLP-1R is required for positive allosteric modulator activity via covalent modification. To advance small molecule activation of the GLP-1R, we characterized the insulinotropic mechanism of BETP. In guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding and INS1 832-3 insulinoma cell cAMP assays, BETP enhanced GLP-1(9–36)-NH2-stimulated cAMP signaling. Using isolated pancreatic islets, BETP potentiated insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner that requires both the peptide ligand and GLP-1R. In studies of the covalent mechanism, PAGE fluorography showed labeling of GLP-1R in immunoprecipitation experiments from GLP-1R-expressing cells incubated with [3H]BETP. Furthermore, we investigated whether other reported GLP-1R activators and compounds identified from screening campaigns modulate GLP-1R by covalent modification. Similar to BETP, several molecules were found to enhance GLP-1R signaling in a Cys-347-dependent manner. These chemotypes are electrophiles that react with GSH, and LC/MS determined the cysteine adducts formed upon conjugation. Together, our results suggest covalent modification may be used to stabilize the GLP-1R in an active conformation. Moreover, the findings provide pharmacological guidance for the discovery and

  18. The development of non-peptide glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ho-Sang; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Son, Moon-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is the main member of the incretin family and stimulates insulin secretion by binding with its specific receptor on pancreatic β-cells. In addition, GLP-1 exerts broad beneficial effects on the glucose regulation by suppressing food intake and delaying stomach emptying. Now, long acting GLP-1 analogs including exenatide and liraglutide have been approved for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, however long-term injection can limit their use for these chronic patients. In this report, the authors provide a review on the development of non-peptide GLP-1 receptor agonists and introduce a novel agonist DA-15864.

  19. Apelin stimulates both cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide 1 secretions in vitro and in vivo in rodents.

    PubMed

    Wattez, Jean-Sébastien; Ravallec, Rozenn; Cudennec, Benoit; Knauf, Claude; Dhulster, Pascal; Valet, Philippe; Breton, Christophe; Vieau, Didier; Lesage, Jean

    2013-10-01

    Apelin is an enteric peptide that exerts several digestive functions such as stimulation of cell proliferation and cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion. We investigated using murine enteroendocrine cell line (STC-1) and rats if apelin-13 stimulates both CCK and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretions. We demonstrated that, in vitro and in vivo, apelin-13 increases the release of these two hormones in a dose-dependent manner. Present data suggest that apelin may modulate digestive functions, food intake behavior and glucose homoeostasis via apelin-induced release of enteric CCK but also through a new incretin-releasing activity on enteric GLP-1.

  20. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Chun; Gusdon, Aaron M; Liu, Huan; Qu, Shen

    2014-10-28

    Glucagon-like peptide1 (GLP-1) is secreted from Langerhans cells in response to oral nutrient intake. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are a new class of incretin-based anti-diabetic drugs. They function to stimulate insulin secretion while suppressing glucagon secretion. GLP-1-based therapies are now well established in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and recent literature has suggested potential applications of these drugs in the treatment of obesity and for protection against cardiovascular and neurological diseases. As we know, along with change in lifestyles, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in China is rising more than that of viral hepatitis and alcoholic fatty liver disease, and NAFLD has become the most common chronic liver disease in recent years. Recent studies further suggest that GLP-1RAs can reduce transaminase levels to improve NAFLD by improving blood lipid levels, cutting down the fat content to promote fat redistribution, directly decreasing fatty degeneration of the liver, reducing the degree of liver fibrosis and improving inflammation. This review shows the NAFLD-associated effects of GLP-1RAs in animal models and in patients with T2DM or obesity who are participants in clinical trials.

  1. A continued saga of Boc5, the first non-peptidic glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist with in vivo activities.

    PubMed

    He, Min; Guan, Ni; Gao, Wei-wei; Liu, Qing; Wu, Xiao-yan; Ma, Da-wei; Zhong, Da-fang; Ge, Guang-bo; Li, Chuan; Chen, Xiao-yan; Yang, Ling; Liao, Jia-yu; Wang, Ming-wei

    2012-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy presents a promising option for treating type 2 diabetes. However, there are several limitations relative to the peptidic GLP-1 mimetics currently on the market or under development. This concern has led to a continued interest in the search for non-peptidic agonists for GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Here, we briefly review the discovery, characterization and current status of a novel class of cyclobutane-derivative-based non-peptidic agonists for GLP-1R, including Boc5 and its newly discovered analogue WB4-24. Although the oral bioavailability of such compounds still poses great challenges, the progress made so far encourages us to identify a truly 'druggable' small molecule agonist for GLP-1R.

  2. Does Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Ameliorate Oxidative Stress in Diabetes? Evidence Based on Experimental and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Karen Ekkelund; Rakipovski, Günaj; Raun, Kirsten; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has shown to influence the oxidative stress status in a number of in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies. Well-known effects of GLP-1 including better glycemic control, decreased food intake, increased insulin release and increased insulin sensitivity may indirectly contribute to this phenomenon, but glucose-independent effects on ROS level, production and antioxidant capacity have been suggested to also play a role. The potential ‘antioxidant’ activity of GLP-1 along with other proposed glucose-independent modes of action related to ameliorating redox imbalance remains a controversial topic but could hold a therapeutic potential against micro- and macrovascular diabetic complications. This review discusses the presently available knowledge from experimental and clinical studies on the effects of GLP-1 on oxidative stress in diabetes and diabetes-related complications. PMID:26381142

  3. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy is effective in two genetic mouse models of glucagon-like Peptide 1 receptor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Pérez, Hilary E; Chambers, Adam P; Ryan, Karen K; Li, Bailing; Sandoval, Darleen A; Stoffers, Doris; Drucker, Daniel J; Pérez-Tilve, Diego; Seeley, Randy J

    2013-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a peptide hormone that is released from the gut in response to nutrient ingestion and that has a range of metabolic effects, including enhancing insulin secretion and decreasing food intake. Postprandial GLP-1 secretion is greatly enhanced in rats and humans after some bariatric procedures, including vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), and has been widely hypothesized to contribute to reduced intake, weight loss, and the improvements in glucose homeostasis after VSG. We tested this hypothesis using two separate models of GLP-1 receptor deficiency. We found that VSG-operated GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice responded similarly to wild-type controls in terms of body weight and body fat loss, improved glucose tolerance, food intake reduction, and altered food selection. These data demonstrate that GLP-1 receptor activity is not necessary for the metabolic improvements induced by VSG surgery.

  4. TREATMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS IN A GOLDEN LION TAMARIN (LEONTOPITHECUS ROSALIA) WITH THE GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-1 MIMETIC EXENATIDE.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James G; Langan, Jennifer N; Gilor, Chen

    2016-09-01

    An 8-yr-old male golden lion tamarin ( Leontopithecus rosalia ) was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus based on hyperglycemia and persistent glycosuria. Initial treatment consisted of the oral antihyperglycemic medications glipizide and metformin that resulted in decreased blood glucose concentrations; however, marked glycosuria persisted. Insufficient improvement on oral antihyperglycemic therapy and poor feasibility of daily subcutaneous insulin therapy led to an investigation into an alternative therapy with extended-release exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetic, at a dosage of 0.13 mg/kg subcutaneously once per month. Following treatment with exenatide, the persistent glycosuria resolved, the animal maintained normal blood glucose concentrations, and had lower serum fructosamine concentrations compared to pretreatment levels. Based on these findings, extended-release exenatide could be considered as a therapeutic option in nonhuman primates with diabetes mellitus that do not respond to oral antihyperglycemics and in which daily subcutaneous insulin is not feasible.

  5. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-09-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  6. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  7. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Natural Putative Secretagogues of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1)

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Eamon P.; Wylie, Alastair R.; Elliott, Chris T.; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Grieve, David J.; Green, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal hormone with well-established glucose-lowering activity. The in vitro and in vivo actions of natural putative secretagogues of GLP-1 were investigated. The acute GLP-1 releasing activity of olive leaf extract (OLE), glutamine (GLN), alpha casein (ACAS), beta casein (BCAS) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) were assessed in STC-1 cells and C57BL/6 mice. All compounds except ACAS significantly increased acute in vitro GLP-1 secretion (66–386%; P<0.05–0.001). Oral gavage of OLE and GLN modestly increased plasma GLP-1 concentrations (48% and 41%, respectively), but did not lower glycaemic excursions. OLE and GLN are potent stimulators of GLP-1 secretion both in vitro and in vivo and chronic studies should assess their suitability as nutritional therapies for type 2 diabetes. PMID:21886907

  8. Orally administered glucagon-like peptide-1 affects glucose homeostasis following an oral glucose tolerance test in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Steinert, R E; Poller, B; Castelli, M C; Friedman, K; Huber, A R; Drewe, J; Beglinger, C

    2009-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts several effects on glucose homeostasis and reduces food intake. After its release from intestinal L cells, GLP-1 is subject to (i) rapid breakdown by dipeptidyl peptidase IV and (ii) high liver extraction. The highest concentrations of GLP-1 are found in the splanchnic blood rather than in the systemic circulation. An oral delivery system would mimic endogenous secretion. Here we investigated the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) effects of a single dose (2 mg) of oral GLP-1 administered prior to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 16 healthy males. GLP-1 was rapidly absorbed from the gut, leading to tenfold higher plasma concentrations compared with controls. The PD profile was consistent with reported pharmacology; GLP-1 significantly stimulated basal insulin release (P < 0.027), with marked effects on glucose levels. The postprandial glucose peak was delayed with GLP-1, suggesting an effect on gastric emptying.

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin production and signaling in the pancreatic islet as an adaptive response to obesity.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Amelia K; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2016-04-01

    Precise control of blood glucose is dependent on adequate β-cell mass and function. Thus, reductions in β-cell mass and function lead to insufficient insulin production to meet demand, and result in diabetes. Recent evidence suggests that paracrine signaling in the islet might be important in obesity, and disruption of this signaling could play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. For example, we recently discovered a novel islet incretin axis where glucagon-like peptide-1 regulates β-cell production of another classic gut hormone, cholecystokinin. This axis is stimulated by obesity, and plays a role in enhancing β-cell survival. In the present review, we place our observations in the wider context of the literature on incretin regulation in the islet, and discuss the potential for therapeutic targeting of these pathways.

  10. Modulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 release by berberine: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunli; Liu, Li; Wang, Xinting; Liu, Xiang; Liu, Xiaodong; Xie, Lin; Wang, Guangji

    2010-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 is a potent glucose-dependent insulinotropic gut hormone released from intestinal L cells. Our previous studies showed that berberine increased GLP-1 secretion in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The aim of this study was to investigate whether berberine affected GLP-1 release in normal rats and in NCI-H716 cells. Proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3 genes regulating GLP-1 biosynthesis were analyzed by RT-PCR. Effects of pharmacological inhibitors on berberine-mediated GLP-1 release were studied. In vivo, 5-week treatment of berberine enhanced GLP-1 secretion induced by glucose load and promoted proglucagon mRNA expression as well as L cell proliferation in intestine. In vitro, berberine concentration-dependently stimulated GLP-1 release in NCI-H716 cells. Berberine also promoted both prohormone convertase 3 and proglucagon mRNA expression. Chelerythrine (inhibitor of PKC) concentration-dependently suppressed berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion. Compound C (inhibitor of AMPK) also inhibited berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion. But only low concentrations of H89 (inhibitor of PKA) showed inhibitory effects on berberine-mediated GLP-1 release. The present results demonstrated that berberine showed its modulation on GLP-1 via promoting GLP-1 secretion and GLP-1 biosynthesis. Some signal pathways including PKC-dependent pathway were involved in this process. Elucidation of mechanisms controlling berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion may facilitate the understanding of berberine's antidiabetic effects.

  11. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Ligand Interactions: Structural Cross Talk between Ligands and the Extracellular Domain

    PubMed Central

    West, Graham M.; Willard, Francis S.; Sloop, Kyle W.; Showalter, Aaron D.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in pancreatic β-cells potentiates insulin production and is a current therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Like other class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the GLP-1R contains an N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. N-terminal truncations on the peptide agonist generate antagonists capable of binding to the extracellular domain, but not capable of activating full length receptor. The main objective of this study was to use Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) to identify how the amide hydrogen bonding network of peptide ligands and the extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R) were altered by binding interactions and to then use this platform to validate direct binding events for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. The HDX studies presented here for two glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) peptide ligands indicates that the antagonist exendin-4[9-39] is significantly destabilized in the presence of nonionic detergents as compared to the agonist exendin-4. Furthermore, HDX can detect stabilization of exendin-4 and exendin-4[9-39] hydrogen bonding networks at the N-terminal helix [Val19 to Lys27] upon binding to the N-terminal extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R). In addition we show hydrogen bonding network stabilization on nGLP-1R in response to ligand binding, and validate direct binding events with the extracellular domain of the receptor for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. PMID:25180755

  12. Metformin enhances glucagon-like peptide 1 via cooperation between insulin and Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hyun; Jee, Jae-Hwan; Park, Sunyoung; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kim, Kwang-Won; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2014-02-01

    One aspect of the effects of metformin on glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 might be associated with the mechanism by which the cross talk between insulin and Wnt signaling enhances GLP1 secretion, due to the action of metformin as an insulin sensitizer. However, this remains completely unknown. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms of the action of metformin on cross talk between insulin and Wnt signaling. GLP1 enhancement by meformin was determined in human NCI-H716 intestinal L-cells and hyperglycemic db/db mice treated with metformin (0.25 and 0.5 mM and/or 12.5 mg/kg body weight) for 24 h and 2 months. Metformin increased GLP1 secretion in L-cells and db/db mice. Metformin stimulated the nuclear translocation of β-catenin and TOPflash reporter activity, and gene depletion of β-catenin or enhancement of mutation of transcription factor 7-like 2 binding site offset GLP1. In addition, insulin receptor substrate 2 gene depletion blocked metformin-enhanced β-catenin translocation. These effects were preceded by an increase in glucose utilization and calcium influx, the activation of calcium-dependent protein kinase, and, in turn, the activation of insulin signaling, and the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, a potent inhibitor of β-catenin. Furthermore, high blood glucose levels were controlled via GLP1 receptor-dependent insulinotropic pathways in db/db mice, which were evidenced by the increase in GLP1 and insulin levels at 30 min after oral glucose loading and pancreatic insulinotropic gene expression. Our findings indicate that the cooperation between Wnt and its upstream insulin signaling pathways might be a novel and important mechanism underlying the effects of metformin on GLP1 production.

  13. Engineered glucagon-like peptide-1-producing hepatocytes lower plasma glucose levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Michael J; Lee, Corinna Wai Kwan; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2009-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 is an incretin hormone with well-characterized antidiabetic properties, including glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion and enhancement of beta-cell mass. GLP-1 agonists have recently been developed and are now in clinical use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Rapid degradation of GLP-1 by enzymes including dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP)-IV and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) 24.11, along with renal clearance, contribute to a short biological half-life, necessitating frequent injections to maintain therapeutic efficacy. Gene therapy may represent a promising alternative approach for achieving long-term increases in endogenous release of GLP-1. We have developed a novel strategy for glucose-regulated production of GLP-1 in hepatocytes by expressing a DPP-IV-resistant GLP-1 peptide in hepatocytes under control of the liver-type pyruvate kinase promoter. Adenoviral delivery of this construct to hepatocytes in vitro resulted in production and secretion of bioactive GLP-1 as measured by a luciferase-based bioassay developed to detect the NH2-terminally modified GLP-1 peptide engineered for this study. Transplantation of encapsulated hepatocytes into CD-1 mice resulted in an increase in plasma GLP-1 levels that was accompanied by a significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose levels. The results from this study demonstrate that a gene therapy approach designed to induce GLP-1 production in hepatocytes may represent a novel strategy for long-term secretion of bioactive GLP-1 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Molecular Characterisation of Small Molecule Agonists Effect on the Human Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Receptor Internalisation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aiysha; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Bain, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R), which is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways and ERK phosphorylation to stimulate insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to determine molecular details of the effect of small molecule agonists, compounds 2 and B, on GLP-1R mediated cAMP production, intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and its internalisation. In human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) expressing cells, compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production but caused no intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation or hGLP-1R internalisation. GLP-1 antagonists Ex(9–39) and JANT-4 and the orthosteric binding site mutation (V36A) in hGLP-1R failed to inhibit compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, confirming that their binding site distinct from the GLP-1 binding site on GLP-1R. However, K334A mutation of hGLP-1R, which affects Gαs coupling, inhibited GLP-1 as well as compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, indicating that GLP-1, compounds 2 and B binding induce similar conformational changes in the GLP-1R for Gαs coupling. Additionally, compound 2 or B binding to the hGLP-1R had significantly reduced GLP-1 induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and hGLP-1R internalisation. This study illustrates pharmacology of differential activation of GLP-1R by GLP-1 and compounds 2 and B. PMID:27100083

  15. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor: A Novel Pharmacological Target for Treating Human Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Rogliani, Paola; Calzetta, Luigino; Capuani, Barbara; Facciolo, Francesco; Cazzola, Mario; Lauro, Davide; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2016-12-01

    Asthma is associated with several comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, which may lead to bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR). Because glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 1 regulates glucose homeostasis, we pharmacologically investigated the influence of the GLP1 receptor (GLP1-R) agonist, exendin-4, on BHR induced in human isolated airways. The effect of exendin-4 was assessed in human isolated airways undergoing overnight passive sensitization and high-glucose stimulation, two conditions mimicking ex vivo the BHR typical of patients with asthma and diabetes, respectively. GLP1-R activation modulated the bronchial contractile tone induced by transmural stimulation (maximum effect -56.7 ± 3.6%; onset of action, 28.2 ± 4.4 min). Exendin-4 prevented BHR induced by both high-glucose stimulation and passive sensitization (-37.8 ± 7.5% and -74.9 ± 3.9%, P < 0.05 versus control, respectively) through selective activation of GLP1-R and in an epithelium-independent manner. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase A inhibitor, KT5720, reduced the protective role of exendin-4 (P > 0.05 versus passively sensitized tissues). The GLP1-R stimulation by overnight incubation with exendin-4 induced the overexpression of adenylyl cyclase isoform V (+48.4 ± 1.3%, P < 0.05 versus passively sensitized tissues) and restored the cAMP levels depleted by this procedure (+330.8 ± 63.3%, P < 0.05 versus passively sensitized tissues). In conclusion, GLP1-R may represent a novel target for treating BHR by activating the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway in human airways, and GLP1-R agonists could be used as a "new" class to treat patients with asthma and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with BHR.

  16. The contribution of serotonin 5-HT2C and melanocortin-4 receptors to the satiety signaling of glucagon-like peptide 1 and liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, in mice.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Suzuki, Marina; Sanuki, Marin; Wakameda, Mamoru; Tamari, Tomohiro

    2011-07-29

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an insulinotropic gastrointestinal peptide produced mainly from intestinal endocrine L-cells, and liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, induce satiety. The serotonin 5-HT2C receptor (5-HT2CR) and melanoroctin-4 receptor (MC4R) are involved in the regulation of food intake. Here we show that systemic administration of GLP-1 (50 and 200μg/kg)-induced anorexia was blunted in mice with a 5HT2CR null mutation, and was attenuated in mice with a heterozygous MC4R mutation. On the other hand, systemic administration of liraglutide (50 and 100μg/kg) suppressed food intake in mice lacking 5-HT2CR, mice with a heterozygous mutation of MC4R and wild-type mice matched for age. Moreover, once-daily consecutive intraperitoneal administration of liraglutide (100μg/kg) over 3days significantly suppressed daily food intake and body weight in mice with a heterozygous mutation of MC4R as well as wild-type mice. These findings suggest that GLP-1 and liraglutide induce anorexia via different central pathways.

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 protects hippocampal neurons against advanced glycation end product-induced tau hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; An, F-M; Yin, L; Liu, A-R; Yin, D-K; Yao, W-B; Gao, X-D

    2014-01-03

    We have previously demonstrated that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist ameliorated neurodegenerative changes in rat models of diabetes-related Alzheimer's disease (AD), and protected neurons from glucose toxicity in vitro. Herein, we investigated the effects of GLP-1 receptor mediates on cell toxicity and tau hyperphosphorylation induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are associated with glucose toxicity, and the molecular mechanism in PC12 cells and the primary hippocampal neurons. Our study demonstrated that the similar protection effects of GLP-1 existed in PC12 cells treated with glucose-bovine serum albumin (BSA) in hyperglycemic conditions or with glycoaldehyde-BSA alone. Additionally, glucose-BSA alone did not induce significant cytotoxicity in PC12 cells, but resulted in tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons in 24h. And we found that GLP-1 could reduce cell tau phosphorylation induced by high glucose or glucose-BSA. Furthermore, our data in the present study suggested that GLP-1 regulated tau phosphorylation induced by AGEs through a signaling pathway involving glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), similarly to the GSK-3β inhibitor, lithium chloride. Our findings suggest that GLP-1 can protect neurons from diabetes-associated AGE insults in vitro, and provide new evidence for a potential therapeutic value of GLP-1 receptor agonist in the treatment of AD especially diabetes-related AD.

  18. Monotreme glucagon-like peptide-1 in venom and gut: one gene – two very different functions

    PubMed Central

    Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; He, Chuan; Myers, Mark A.; Andrikopoulos, Sof; Wong, Nicole; Sexton, Patrick M.; Wootten, Denise; Forbes, Briony E.; Grutzner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The importance of Glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1) for metabolic control and insulin release sparked the evolution of genes mimicking GLP-1 action in venomous species (e.g. Exendin-4 in Heloderma suspectum (gila monster)). We discovered that platypus and echidna express a single GLP-1 peptide in both intestine and venom. Specific changes in GLP-1 of monotreme mammals result in resistance to DPP-4 cleavage which is also observed in the GLP-1 like Exendin-4 expressed in Heloderma venom. Remarkably we discovered that monotremes evolved an alternative mechanism to degrade GLP-1. We also show that monotreme GLP-1 stimulates insulin release in cultured rodent islets, but surprisingly shows low receptor affinity and bias toward Erk signaling. We propose that these changes in monotreme GLP-1 are the result of conflicting function of this peptide in metabolic control and venom. This evolutionary path is fundamentally different from the generally accepted idea that conflicting functions in a single gene favour duplication and diversification, as is the case for Exendin-4 in gila monster. This provides novel insight into the remarkably different metabolic control mechanism and venom function in monotremes and an unique example of how different selective pressures act upon a single gene in the absence of gene duplication. PMID:27898108

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P.; Sahay, Rakesh K.; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Uppal, Shweta; Adetunji, Omolara

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)–based therapy improves glycaemic control through multiple mechanisms, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and the additional benefit of clinically relevant weight loss. Since Starling and Bayliss first proposed the existence of intestinal secretions that stimulate the pancreas, tremendous progress has been made in the area of incretins. As a number of GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) continue to become available, physicians will soon face the challenge of selecting the right option customized to their patient's needs. The following discussion, derived from an extensive literature search using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide, provides a comprehensive review of existing and upcoming molecules in the GLP-1 RA class in terms of their structure, pharmacological profiles, efficacy, safety, and convenience. Search Methodology: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide. Relevant articles were those that discussed structural, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences, classification, long-acting and short-acting GLP-1 RAs, phase 3 trials, and expert opinions. Additional targeted searches were conducted on diabetes treatment guidelines and reviews on safety, as well as the American Diabetes Association/European Society for Study of Diabetes (ADA/EASD) statement on pancreatic safety. PMID:27042424

  20. Diuretic and Natriuretic Effects of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Teneligliptin: The Contribution of Glucagon-like Peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Moroi, Masao; Kubota, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are antidiabetic agents; however, their mechanisms of action are different. GLP-1R and DPP-4 are also expressed in the renal proximal tubular brush border, where they regulate Na reabsorption. We investigated whether the DPP-4 inhibitor, teneligliptin, has diuretic and natriuretic effects and whether these are associated with the stimulation of the GLP-1R in rats. Oral administration of teneligliptin resulted in a reduction of plasma DPP-4 activity over 6 hours, as well as an induction of diuresis and natriuresis. Although teneligliptin did not change the increase in blood glucose levels by glucose loading, percentage of urine volume and Na/K ratio with teneligliptin to vehicle were augmented by glucose loading. Peak levels of plasma GLP-1 did not change after oral administration of teneligliptin when glucose was not loaded but increased at least 2-fold with glucose loading. Furthermore, the natriuretic effect of teneligliptin was inhibited by the GLP-1R antagonist, exendin9-39, whereas the diuresis was not affected. These results suggest that the mechanism of natriuresis was different from that of diuresis, and the natriuresis is associated with the stimulation of GLP-1R. There may be mechanistic differences in DPP-4 inhibition between diuresis and natriuresis.

  1. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, provides neuroprotection in mice transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Shinichiro; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Yatomi, Kenji; Tanaka, Yasutaka; Oishi, Hidenori; Arai, Hajime; Hattori, Nobutaka; Urabe, Takao

    2011-08-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone known to stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion. The GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4, has similar properties to GLP-1 and is currently in clinical use for type 2 diabetes mellitus. As GLP-1 and exendin-4 confer cardioprotection after myocardial infarction, this study was designed to assess the neuroprotective effects of exendin-4 against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Mice received a transvenous injection of exendin-4, after a 60-minute focal cerebral ischemia. Exendin-4-treated vehicle and sham groups were evaluated for infarct volume, neurologic deficit score, various physiologic parameters, and immunohistochemical analyses at several time points after ischemia. Exendin-4 treatment significantly reduced infarct volume and improved functional deficit. It also significantly suppressed oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and cell death after reperfusion. Furthermore, intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were slightly higher in the exendin-4 group than in the vehicle group. No serial changes were noted in insulin and glucose levels in both groups. This study suggested that exendin-4 provides neuroprotection against ischemic injury and that this action is probably mediated through increased intracellular cAMP levels. Exendin-4 is potentially useful in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) induces M2 polarization of human macrophages via STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2012-08-24

    It is known that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone secreted postprandially from the L-cells of the small intestine and regulates glucose homeostasis. GLP-1 is now used for the treatment of diabetes because of its beneficial role against insulin resistance. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed on many cell types, including macrophages, and GLP-1 suppresses the development of atherosclerosis by inhibiting macrophage function. However, there have so far been few studies that have investigated the significance of GLP-1/GLP-1R signaling in macrophage activation. In the present study, we examined the effect of GLP-1 and exenatide, a GLP-1R agonist, on human monocyte-derived macrophage (HMDM) activation. We found that GLP-1 induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation. Silencing of GLP-1R suppressed the GLP-1-induced STAT3 activation. In addition, alternatively activated (M2) macrophage-related molecules, such as IL-10, CD163, and CD204 in HMDM, were significantly upregulated by GLP-1. Furthermore, the co-culture of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with GLP-1-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages increased the secretion of adiponectin compared to co-culture of the 3T3-L1 adipocytes with untreated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results demonstrate that GLP-1 induces macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype, which may contribute to the protective effects of GLP-1 against diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Hindbrain nucleus tractus solitarius glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling reduces appetitive and motivational aspects of feeding

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Harvey J.

    2014-01-01

    Central glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling reduces food intake by affecting a variety of neural processes, including those mediating satiation, motivation, and reward. While the literature suggests that separable neurons and circuits control these processes, this notion has not been adequately investigated. The intake inhibitory effects of GLP-1R signaling in the hindbrain medial nucleus tractus solitarius (mNTS) have been attributed to interactions with vagally transmitted gastrointestinal satiation signals that are also processed by these neurons. Here, behavioral and pharmacological techniques are used to test the novel hypothesis that the reduction of food intake following mNTS GLP-1R stimulation also results from effects on food-motivated appetitive behaviors. Results show that mNTS GLP-1R activation by microinjection of exendin-4, a long-acting GLP-1R agonist, reduced 1) intake of a palatable high-fat diet, 2) operant responding for sucrose under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement and 3) the expression of a conditioned place preference for a palatable food. Together, these data demonstrate that the intake inhibitory effects of mNTS GLP-1R signaling extend beyond satiation and include effects on food reward and motivation that are typically ascribed to midbrain and forebrain neurons. PMID:24944243

  4. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist enhances intrinsic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Onuma, Hirohisa; Inukai, Kouichi Kitahara, Atsuko; Moriya, Rie; Nishida, Susumu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Katsuta, Hidenori; Takahashi, Kazuto; Sumitani, Yoshikazu; Hosaka, Toshio; Ishida, Hitoshi

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • PPARγ activation was involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action. • Exendin-4 enhanced endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity in HUVECs. • H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement. • The anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 may be explained by PPARγ activation. - Abstract: Recent studies have suggested glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) signaling to exert anti-inflammatory effects on endothelial cells, although the precise underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether PPARγ activation is involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action on endothelial cells. When we treated HUVEC cells with 0.2 ng/ml exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity was significantly elevated, by approximately 20%, as compared with control cells. The maximum PPARγ activity enhancing effect of exendin-4 was observed 12 h after the initiation of incubation with exendin-4. As H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement, the signaling downstream from GLP-1 cross-talk must have been involved in PPARγ activation. In conclusion, our results suggest that GLP-1 has the potential to induce PPARγ activity, partially explaining the anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 on endothelial cells. Cross-talk between GLP-1 signaling and PPARγ activation would have major impacts on treatments for patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

  5. Berberine promotes glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide secretion in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shou-Si; Yu, Yun-Li; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Li; Liu, Yao-Wu; Wang, Ping; Xie, Lin; Wang, Guang-Ji

    2009-02-01

    Berberine (BBR), a hypoglycemic agent, has shown beneficial metabolic effects for anti-diabetes, but its precise mechanism was unclear. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is considered to be an important incretin that can decrease hyperglycemia in the gastrointestinal tract after meals. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BBR exerts its anti-diabetic effects via modulating GCG secretion. Diabetes-like rats induced by streptozotocin received BBR (120 mg/kg per day, i.g) for 5 weeks. Two hours following the last dose, the rats were anaesthetized and received 2.5 g/kg glucose by gavage. At 15-minute and 30-minute after glucose load, blood samples, pancreas, and intestines were obtained to measure insulin and GCG using ELISA kit. The number of L cells in the ileum and beta-cells in the pancreas were identified using immunohistology. The expression of proglucagon mRNA in the ileum was measured by RT-PCR. The results indicated that BBR treatment significantly increased GCG levels in plasma and intestine (P<0.05) accompanied with the increase of proglucagon mRNA expression and the number of L-cell compared with the controls (P<0.05). Furthermore, BBR increased insulin levels in plasma and pancreas as well as beta-cell number in pancreas. The data support the hypothesis that the anti-diabetic effects of BBR may partly result from enhancing GCG secretion.

  6. Screening of randomly mutagenized glucagon-like peptide-1 library by using an integrated yeast-mammalian assay system.

    PubMed

    Shigemori, Tomohiro; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-09-10

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) is a 30-amino acid peptide hormone activating the GLP1 receptor (GLP1R), a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), and is considered to be effective for treating diabetes and other metabolic diseases. Phage display is the first innovative technology in order to prepare and screen a large polypeptide library including GLP1R agonists, but this methodology is not as effective in discovering functional peptides such as activators for GPCRs. Here, we report a novel functional screening system for GPCR-acting peptides, which integrates a yeast peptide secretion system into a biological detection system with GPCR-producing mammalian cells. Using this screening system, we found attractive GLP1R agonists with several substitutions from a random mutant GLP1 library which was secreted by yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This system established here not only enables peptides to be analyzed in the soluble form but also needs no chemical synthesis, purification, and condensation of peptides of interests, and therefore, can be widely applied to the discovery of novel bioactive peptides acting on GPCRs.

  7. Integrative function of adrenaline receptors for glucagon-like peptide-1 exocytosis in enteroendocrine L cell line GLUTag.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2015-05-15

    Adrenaline reacts with three types of adrenergic receptors, α1, α2 and β-adrenergic receptors (ARs), inducing many physiological events including exocytosis. Although adrenaline has been shown to induce glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal L cells, the precise molecular mechanism by which adrenaline regulates GLP-1 secretion remains unknown. Here we show by live cell imaging that all types of adrenergic receptors are stimulated by adrenaline in enteroendocrine L cell line GLUTag cells and are involved in GLP-1 exocytosis. We performed RT-PCR analysis and found that α1B-, α2A-, α2B-, and β1-ARs were expressed in GLUTag cells. Application of adrenaline induced a significant increase of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP concentration ([Ca(2+)]i and [cAMP]i, respectively), and GLP-1 exocytosis in GLUTag cells. Blockade of α1-AR inhibited adrenaline-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase and exocytosis but not [cAMP]i increase, while blockade of β1-AR inhibited adrenaline-induced [cAMP]i increase and exocytosis but not [Ca(2+)]i increase. Furthermore, overexpression of α2A-AR suppressed the adrenaline-induced [cAMP]i increase and exocytosis. These results suggest that the fine-turning of GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells is established by the balance between α1-, α2-, and β-ARs activation.

  8. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 improves proliferation and differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells via upregulating VEGF generation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiao-Yun; Mo, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Ke; He, Hong-Hui; Xie, Yan-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1), released from enteroendocrine cells of the intestine, exerted cardiovascular protective effect. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in maintaining endothelial integrity regulating neovascularization and reendothelialization after endothelial injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important cytokine in the process of EPCs vascular differentiation and proliferation. Material/Methods This study was designed to investigate the association between VEGF changes and the proliferation/differentiation function of EPCs in the presence of GLP-1. Results We demonstrated that GLP-1 markedly enhanced the EPCs proliferation and expression of EC-specific markers, and simultaneously upregulated VEGF secretion in EPCs. Exogenous VEGF augmented EPCs proliferation/differentiation abilities in a dose-dependent manner. However, all of the beneficial effects of GLP-1 were suppressed by anti-VEGFmAb or the KDR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor SU1498. Conclusions These findings suggest that GLP-1 improves VEGF generation, which contributed to improvement of EPCs biological function, partly by tyrosine kinase KDR. VEGF is a necessary intermediate, mediating the effects of GLP-1 on EPCs. These changes offer a novel explanation that upregulation EPCs bioactivities may be one of the mechanisms of GLP-1 cardiovascular protective effect. PMID:21278683

  9. Stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion downstream of the ligand-gated ion channel TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Edward C.; Diakogiannaki, Eleftheria; Gentry, Clive; Psichas, Arianna; Habib, Abdella M.; Bevan, Stuart; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulus-coupled incretin secretion from enteroendocrine cells plays a fundamental role in glucose homeostasis, and could be targeted for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Here, we investigated the expression and function of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in enteroendocrine L-cells producing glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). By microarray and qPCR analysis we identified trpa1 as an L-cell enriched transcript in the small intestine. Calcium imaging of primary L-cells and the model cell line GLUTag revealed responses triggered by the TRPA1 agonists allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC, mustard oil), carvacrol and polyunsaturated fatty acids, that were blocked by TRPA1 antagonists. Electrophysiology in GLUTag cells showed that carvacrol induced a current with characteristics typical of TRPA1 and triggered the firing of action potentials. TRPA1 activation caused an increase in GLP-1 secretion from primary murine intestinal cultures and GLUTag cells; an effect that was abolished in cultures from trpa1−/− mice or by pharmacological TRPA1 inhibition. These findings present TRPA1 as a novel sensory mechanism in enteroendocrine L-cells, coupled to the facilitation of GLP-1 release, which may be exploitable as a target for treating diabetes. PMID:25325736

  10. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1-Mediated Modulation of Inflammatory Pathways in the Diabetic Brain: Relevance to Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Qin, LiMei; Chong, Thomas; Rodriguez, Richard; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation has emerged as an important cause of cognitive decline during aging and in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Chronic low-grade inflammation is observed in obesity and diabetes, which are important risk factors for AD. Therefore, we examined the markers of inflammation in the brain hippocampal samples of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Pathway-specific gene expression profiling revealed significant increases in the expression of oxidative stress and inflammatory genes. Western blot analysis further showed the activation of NF-kB, defective CREB phosphorylation, and decreases in the levels of neuroprotective CREB target proteins, including Bcl-2, BDNF, and BIRC3 in the diabetic rat brain samples, all of which are related to AD pathology. As therapies based on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are effective in controlling blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients, we tested the in vivo actions of GLP-1 in the diabetic brain by a 10-wk treatment of ZDF rats with alogliptin, an inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase. Alogliptin increased the circulating levels of GLP-1 by 125% and decreased blood glucose in diabetic rats by 59%. Normalization of defective signaling to CREB in the hippocampal samples of treated diabetic rats resulted in the increased expression of CREB targets. Dual actions of GLP-1 in the pancreatic beta cells and in the brain suggest that incretin therapies may reduce cognitive decline in the aging diabetic patients and also have the potential to be used in treating Alzheimer's patients.

  11. Insulin dose adjustments with add-on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Carla Francés; Stokes, Victoria; Tan, Garry D; Theodorakis, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are gaining ground as therapeutic modalities in combination with insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Exploiting the multiple benefits of incretin-based therapies in certain patient populations, especially in those who would benefit most from potential weight loss or prevention of body weight gain, has provided a valuable add-on option in diabetes management. However, caution needs to be exercised when initiating such a double injectable therapy, as evidence indicates that, in most instances, the insulin dose needs to be re-adjusted. The majority of published studies suggest reduction of insulin dose, especially related to the 'bolus' component; however, some have also recommended that insulin dose should actually be increased, but we found no credible evidence to support the latter. An important determinant of the titration process is the insulin formulation already in use at baseline. As more potent and long-acting GLP-1RAs are introduced, optimal insulin dose scaling is a major challenge, especially in a primary setting. We provide an overview of the current knowledge in this rapidly changing field. Based on currently reported evidence, a reduction of basal insulin by 10% and a decrease of prandial insulin by 30 - 40% is recommended on addition of GLP-1RAs.

  12. Dietary Mannoheptulose Increases Fasting Serum Glucagon Like Peptide-1 and Post-Prandial Serum Ghrelin Concentrations in Adult Beagle Dogs.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Leslie L; Eyre, Ryan; Gooding, Margaret A; Davenport, Gary M; Shoveller, Anna Kate

    2015-06-16

    There is a growing interest in the use of nutraceuticals for weight management in companion animals. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mannoheptulose (MH), a sugar in avocados that inhibits glycolysis, on energy metabolism in adult Beagle dogs. The study was a double-blind, randomized controlled trial where dogs were allocated to a control (CON, n = 10, 10.1 ± 0.4 kg) or MH containing diet (168 mg/kg, n = 10, 10.3 ± 0.4 kg). Blood was collected after an overnight fast and 1 h post-feeding (week 12) to determine serum satiety related hormones and biochemistry. Resting and post-prandial energy expenditure and respiratory quotient were determined by indirect calorimetry (weeks 4 and 8). Physical activity was measured using an accelerometer (weeks 3, 7, 11). Body composition was assessed using dual X-ray absorptiometry (week 12). MH significantly (p < 0.05) increased fasting serum glucagon-like peptide-1 and post-prandial serum ghrelin. MH tended (p < 0.1) to increase fasting serum gastric inhibitory peptide and decrease physical activity. Together, these findings suggest that dietary MH has the ability to promote satiation and lowers daily energy expenditure.

  13. Incretin physiology beyond glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide: cholecystokinin and gastrin peptides.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, J F

    2011-04-01

    Gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK) are homologous hormone systems known to regulate gastric acid secretion, gallbladder emptying, and cell growth in the pancreas and stomach. They are, however, also involved in the development and secretory functions of pancreatic islet cells. For instance, foetal and neonatal islets express significant amounts of gastrin, and human as well as porcine islet cells express the gastrin/CCK-B receptor abundantly. Therefore, exogenous gastrin and CCK peptides stimulate insulin and glucagon secretion in man. Accordingly, endogenous hypergastrinaemia is accompanied by islet cell hyperplasia and increased insulin secretion. Conventionally, the effect of gastrointestinal hormones on insulin secretion (the incretin effect) has been defined and quantified in relation to oral versus intravenous glucose loadings. Under these unphysiological conditions, the release of gastrin and CCK and, hence, their effect on insulin secretion are modest in comparison with the effects of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Consequently, the interest of CCK and gastrin in incretin research has for decades been limited. A few years ago, however, it was suggested that gastrin together with epidermal growth factor or later GLP-1 might stimulate beta cell growth and secretion. Recent studies have shown that the combination of gastrin and GLP-1 actually restores normoglycaemia in diabetic mice. Therefore, a short review of the incretin system in a broader functional context that includes gastrin and CCK peptides may be timely.

  14. An update in incretin-based therapy: a focus on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Krystal L; Stapleton, Megan; Weis, Jessica; Irons, Brian K

    2012-10-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, exenatide and liraglutide, offer a unique mechanism in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as part of the incretin system. Their mechanism of action is to increase insulin secretion, decrease glucagon release, reduce food intake, and slow gastric emptying. They target postprandial blood glucose values and have some effect on fasting levels as well. In addition, they promote weight loss and may help to preserve β-cell function, both major problems in T2DM patients. Changes in hemoglobin A1c are similar to those produced by other T2DM agents, including thiazolidinediones, low-dose metformin, and sulfonylureas, and better than those caused by α-reductase inhibitors and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. These agents have been safely studied in combination with metformin, sulfonylureas, meglitinides, thiazolidinediones, and insulin therapy. Overall, data are limited for head-to-head comparisons, but it appears that liraglutide may have better efficacy and tolerability compared with exenatide; however, more studies are needed. They are overall well tolerated, with the main adverse events being similar to those with metformin (gastrointestinal intolerances that are transient and dose dependent). However, patients must be monitored for pancreatitis as a rare but possible side effect. For T2DM patients willing to use an injectable agent, exenatide and liraglutide offer another therapeutic option to control hyperglycemia with the potential for weight loss and may be combined with other agents safely.

  15. Clinical Application of Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonists for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young Min; Wideman, Rhonda D.

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells in response to oral nutrient intake and elicits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while suppressing glucagon secretion. It also slows gastric emptying, which contributes to decreased postprandial glycemic excursions. In the 1990s, chronic subcutaneous infusion of GLP-1 was found to lower blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, GLP-1's very short half-life, arising from cleavage by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) and glomerular filtration by the kidneys, presented challenges for clinical use. Hence, DPP-4 inhibitors were developed, as well as several GLP-1 analogs engineered to circumvent DPP-4-mediated breakdown and/or rapid renal elimination. Three categories of GLP-1 analogs, are being developed and/or are in clinical use: short-acting, long-acting, and prolonged-acting GLP-1 analogs. Each class has different plasma half-lives, molecular size, and homology to native GLP-1, and consequently different characteristic effects on glucose metabolism. In this article, we review current clinical data derived from each class of GLP-1 analogs, and consider the clinical effects reported for each category in recent head to head comparison studies. Given the relatively brief clinical history of these compounds, we also highlight several important efficacy and safety issues which will require further investigation. PMID:24396690

  16. Selective targeting of glucagon-like peptide-1 signalling as a novel therapeutic approach for cardiovascular disease in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Mitchel; Chong, Aaron; Robinson, Emma; Green, Brian D; Grieve, David J

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone whose glucose-dependent insulinotropic actions have been harnessed as a novel therapy for glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. Although it has been known for some time that the GLP-1 receptor is expressed in the CVS where it mediates important physiological actions, it is only recently that specific cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 in the setting of diabetes have been described. GLP-1 confers indirect benefits in cardiovascular disease (CVD) under both normal and hyperglycaemic conditions via reducing established risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity, which are markedly increased in diabetes. Emerging evidence indicates that GLP-1 also exerts direct effects on specific aspects of diabetic CVD, such as endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, angiogenesis and adverse cardiac remodelling. However, the majority of studies have employed experimental models of diabetic CVD and information on the effects of GLP-1 in the clinical setting is limited, although several large-scale trials are ongoing. It is clearly important to gain a detailed knowledge of the cardiovascular actions of GLP-1 in diabetes given the large number of patients currently receiving GLP-1-based therapies. This review will therefore discuss current understanding of the effects of GLP-1 on both cardiovascular risk factors in diabetes and direct actions on the heart and vasculature in this setting and the evidence implicating specific targeting of GLP-1 as a novel therapy for CVD in diabetes. PMID:25231355

  17. Spergularia marina Induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in NCI-H716 Cells Through Bile Acid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong; Lee, Yu Mi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spergularia marina Griseb. (SM) is a halophyte that grows in mud flats. The aerial portions of SM have been eaten as vegetables and traditionally used to prevent chronic diseases in Korea. However, there has been no scientific report that demonstrates the pharmacological effects of SM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is important for the maintenance of glucose and energy homeostasis through acting as a signal in peripheral and neural systems. To discover a functional food for regulating glucose and energy homeostasis, we evaluated the effect of an aqueous ethanolic extract (AEE) of SM on GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. In addition, we explored the Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) agonist activity of AEE-SM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells transiently transfected with human TGR5. As a result, treatment of NCI-H716 cells with AEE-SM increased GLP-1 secretion and intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of NCI-H716 cells with TGR5-specific small interference RNA inhibited AEE-SM-induced GLP-1 secretion and the increase in Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Moreover, AEE-SM showed that the TGR5 agonist activity in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with TGR5. The results suggest that AEE-SM might be a candidate for a functional food to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:25260089

  18. Structural Determinants of Binding the Seven-transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Yang, Linlin; Song, Gaojie; Dai, Antao; Cai, Xiaoqing; Feng, Yang; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Hanson, Michael A; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-06-17

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors. Members of the class B family are distinguished by their large extracellular domain, which works cooperatively with the canonical seven-transmembrane (7TM) helical domain to signal in response to binding of various peptide hormones. We have combined structure-based site-specific mutational studies with molecular dynamics simulations of a full-length model of GLP-1R bound to multiple peptide ligand variants. Despite the high sequence similarity between GLP-1R and its closest structural homologue, the glucagon receptor (GCGR), nearly half of the 62 stably expressed mutants affected GLP-1R in a different manner than the corresponding mutants in GCGR. The molecular dynamics simulations of wild-type and mutant GLP-1R·ligand complexes provided molecular insights into GLP-1R-specific recognition mechanisms for the N terminus of GLP-1 by residues in the 7TM pocket and explained how glucagon-mimicking GLP-1 mutants restored binding affinity for (GCGR-mimicking) GLP-1R mutants. Structural analysis of the simulations suggested that peptide ligand binding mode variations in the 7TM binding pocket are facilitated by movement of the extracellular domain relative to the 7TM bundle. These differences in binding modes may account for the pharmacological differences between GLP-1 peptide variants.

  19. New Potential Targets of Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonists in Pancreatic β-Cells and Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that both insulin resistance and decreased insulin secretory capacity are important factors in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition to genetic factors, obesity and lipotoxicity can increase the risk of T2DM. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are novel antidiabetic drugs with multiple effects. They can stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibit postprandial glucagon release, delay gastric emptying, and induce pancreatic β-cell proliferation. They can also reduce the weight of patients with T2DM and relieve lipotoxicity at the cellular level. Many intracellular targets of GLP-1 have been found, but more remain to be identified. Elucidating these targets could be a basis for developing new potential drugs. My colleagues and I have investigated new targets of GLP-1, with a particular focus on pancreatic β-cell lines and hepatic cell lines. Herein, I summarize the recent work from my laboratory, with profound gratitude for receiving the prestigious 2016 Namgok Award. PMID:28181428

  20. REVIEW: Role of cyclic AMP signaling in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cells express the proglucagon gene (gcg) and thereby produce the peptide hormone glucagon, which stimulates hepatic glucose production and thereby increases blood glucose levels. The same gcg gene is also expressed in the intestinal endocrine L cells and certain neural cells in the brain. In the gut, gcg expression leads to the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). This incretin hormone stimulates insulin secretion when blood glucose level is high. In addition, GLP-1 stimulates pancreatic cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. Today, a long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist has been developed as a drug in treating diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. Extensive investigations have shown that the expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP signaling, and the crosstalk between PKA and Wnt signaling pathway, are also involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg expression and GLP-1 production. Furthermore, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic cells are mainly mediated by cAMP-PKA, cAMP-Epac and Wnt signaling pathways as well.

  1. Preliminary Examination of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Levels in Women with Purging Disorder and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Dossat, Amanda M.; Bodell, Lindsay P.; Williams, Diana L.; Eckel, Lisa A.; Keel, Pamela K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined pre- and post-prandial glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels in women with bulimia nervosa (BN), purging disorder (PD), and non-eating disorder control women to better understand whether alterations in satiation-related hormones in BN may be linked to binge-eating episodes or other altered ingestive behaviors. Method Participants included women with BN (n = 19), PD (n = 14), or controls (n = 14). Participants provided subjective ratings for hunger and fullness and plasma samples before and after consumption of a standardized test meal. Results As expected, GLP-1 levels increased significantly following test meal consumption; however, participants with BN displayed significantly lower GLP-1 levels compared to PD and control participants both before and after consumption of the test meal. There were no significant differences between PD and control participants in GLP-1 levels, but individuals with PD displayed significantly higher levels of fullness throughout the test meal as compared to both control and BN participants. Discussion Our findings provide preliminary evidence that reduced GLP-1 levels in individuals with BN may be associated with binge-eating episodes. Additionally, increased fullness in individuals with PD does not appear to be accounted for by exaggerated post-prandial GLP-1 release. PMID:24590464

  2. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta-cells from Death by Increasing Autophagic Flux and Restoring Lysosomal Function.

    PubMed

    Zummo, Francesco P; Cullen, Kirsty S; Honkanen-Scott, Minna; Shaw, James Am; Lovat, Penny E; Arden, Catherine

    2017-02-23

    Studies in animal models of type 2 diabetes have shown that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists prevent β-cell loss. Whether GLP-1 mediates β-cell survival via the key lysosomal-mediated process of autophagy is unknown.Here we report that treatment of INS-1E β-cells and primary islets with glucolipotoxicity (0.5mmol/l palmitate, 25mmol/l glucose) increases LC3 II, a marker of autophagy. Further analysis indicates a blockage in autophagic flux associated with lysosomal dysfunction. Accumulation of defective lysosomes leads to lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP) and release of Cathepsin D, which contributes to cell death. Our data further demonstrated defects in autophagic flux and lysosomal staining in human samples of type 2 diabetes. Co-treatment with the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 reversed the lysosomal dysfunction, relieving the impairment in autophagic flux and further stimulated autophagy. siRNA knockdown showed the restoration of autophagic flux is also essential for the protective effects of exendin-4.Collectively, our data highlights lysosomal dysfunction as a critical mediator of β-cell loss and shows that exendin-4 improves cell survival via restoration of lysosomal function and autophagic flux. Modulation of autophagy / lysosomal homeostasis may thus define a novel therapeutic strategy for type 2 diabetes, with the GLP-1 signalling pathway as a potential focus.

  3. Brain glucagon-like peptide-1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J; Kahn, C Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-12-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state.

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation reduces ischaemic brain damage following stroke in Type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Darsalia, Vladimer; Mansouri, Shiva; Ortsäter, Henrik; Olverling, Anna; Nozadze, Nino; Kappe, Camilla; Iverfeldt, Kerstin; Tracy, Linda M; Grankvist, Nina; Sjöholm, Åke; Patrone, Cesare

    2012-05-01

    Diabetes is a strong risk factor for premature and severe stroke. The GLP-1R (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor) agonist Ex-4 (exendin-4) is a drug for the treatment of T2D (Type 2 diabetes) that may also have neuroprotective effects. The aim of the present study was to determine the efficacy of Ex-4 against stroke in diabetes by using a diabetic animal model, a drug administration paradigm and a dose that mimics a diabetic patient on Ex-4 therapy. Furthermore, we investigated inflammation and neurogenesis as potential cellular mechanisms underlying the Ex-4 efficacy. A total of seven 9-month-old Type 2 diabetic Goto–Kakizaki rats were treated peripherally for 4 weeks with Ex-4 at 0.1, 1 or 5 μg/kg of body weight before inducing stroke by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and for 2–4 weeks thereafter. The severity of ischaemic damage was measured by evaluation of stroke volume and by stereological counting of neurons in the striatum and cortex. We also quantitatively evaluated stroke-induced inflammation, stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis. We show a profound anti-stroke efficacy of the clinical dose of Ex-4 in diabetic rats, an arrested microglia infiltration and an increase of stroke-induced neural stem cell proliferation and neuroblast formation, while stroke-induced neurogenesis was not affected by Ex-4. The results show a pronounced anti-stroke, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effect of peripheral and chronic Ex-4 treatment in middle-aged diabetic animals in a preclinical setting that has the potential to mimic the clinical treatment. Our results should provide strong impetus to further investigate GLP-1R agonists for their neuroprotective action in diabetes, and for their possible use as anti-stroke medication in non-diabetic conditions.

  5. Resistant maltodextrin promotes fasting glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion and production together with glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Hira, Tohru; Ikee, Asuka; Kishimoto, Yuka; Kanahori, Sumiko; Hara, Hiroshi

    2015-07-14

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which is produced and released from enteroendocrine L cells, plays pivotal roles in postprandial glycaemia. The ingestion of resistant maltodextrin (RMD), a water-soluble non-digestible saccharide, improves the glycaemic response. In the present study, we examined whether the continuous feeding of RMD to rats affected GLP-1 levels and glycaemic control. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks of age) were fed an American Institute of Nutrition (AIN)-93G-based diet containing either cellulose (5 %) as a control, RMD (2.5 or 5 %), or fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS, 2.5 or 5 %) for 7 weeks. During the test period, an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was performed after 6 weeks. Fasting GLP-1 levels were significantly higher in the 5 % RMD group than in the control group after 6 weeks. The IPGTT results showed that the glycaemic response was lower in the 5 % RMD group than in the control group. Lower caecal pH, higher caecal tissue and content weights were observed in the RMD and FOS groups. Proglucagon mRNA levels were increased in the caecum and colon of both RMD and FOS groups, whereas caecal GLP-1 content was increased in the 5 % RMD group. In addition, a 1 h RMD exposure induced GLP-1 secretion in an enteroendocrine L-cell model, and single oral administration of RMD increased plasma GLP-1 levels in conscious rats. The present study demonstrates that continuous ingestion of RMD increased GLP-1 secretion and production in normal rats, which could be stimulated by its direct and indirect (enhanced gut fermentation) effects on GLP-1-producing cells, and contribute to improving glucose tolerance.

  6. Isolation of Positive Modulator of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Signaling from Trigonella foenum-graecum (Fenugreek) Seed.

    PubMed

    King, Klim; Lin, Nai-Pin; Cheng, Yu-Hong; Chen, Gao-Hui; Chein, Rong-Jie

    2015-10-23

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many tissues and has been implicated in diverse physiological functions, such as energy homeostasis and cognition. GLP-1 analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are undergoing clinical trials for other disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 analog therapies maintain chronically high plasma levels of the analog and can lead to loss of spatiotemporal control of GLP-1R activation. To avoid adverse effects associated with current therapies, we characterized positive modulators of GLP-1R signaling. We screened extracts from edible plants using an intracellular cAMP biosensor and GLP-1R endocytosis assays. Ethanol extracts from fenugreek seeds enhanced GLP-1 signaling. These seeds have previously been found to reduce glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels in humans. An active compound (N55) with a new N-linoleoyl-2-amino-γ-butyrolactone structure was purified from fenugreek seeds. N55 promoted GLP-1-dependent cAMP production and GLP-1R endocytosis in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. N55 specifically enhanced GLP-1 potency more than 40-fold, but not that of exendin 4, to stimulate cAMP production. In contrast to the current allosteric modulators that bind to GLP-1R, N55 binds to GLP-1 peptide and facilitates trypsin-mediated GLP-1 inactivation. These findings identify a new class of modulators of GLP-1R signaling and suggest that GLP-1 might be a viable target for drug discovery. Our results also highlight a feasible approach for screening bioactive activity of plant extracts.

  7. Predictors of weight-loss response with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist treatment among adolescents with severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Nathan, B M; Rudser, K D; Abuzzahab, M J; Fox, C K; Coombes, B J; Bomberg, E M; Kelly, A S

    2016-02-01

    In two previous, separate clinical trials, we demonstrated significant reductions in body mass index (BMI) with exenatide in adolescents with severe obesity. In the present study, we pooled data from these near identical trials to evaluate factors that may predict BMI reduction at 3 months. Data from 32 patients (mean age 14.3 ± 2.2 years; 69% female; mean BMI 39.8 ± 5.8 kg m(-2)) were included. Exenatide treatment consisted of 5 mcg twice daily for 1 month, followed by an increase to 10 mcg twice daily for 2 additional months. Predictor variables included baseline BMI, BMI percent change at 1 month, incidence of nausea or vomiting and baseline appetite and satiety measures. Treatment effects of percent change in BMI from baseline were estimated within predictor subgroups using generalized estimating equations with exchangeable working correlation and robust variance estimation for confidence intervals and P-values to account for paired observations. The pooled data treatment effect on absolute BMI at 3 months was -3.42% (95% confidence interval: -5.41%, -1.42%) compared to placebo. Within treated participants, appetite at baseline (treatment effect in high [-4.28%] vs. low [1.02%], P = 0.028) and sex (treatment effect in female [-4.78%] vs. male [0.76%], P = 0.007) were significant predictors of change in BMI at 3 months. Baseline BMI, BMI percent change at 1 month, age, incidence of nausea, vomiting, or other gastrointestinal symptoms and satiety scores did not predict 3-month responses. Sex and measures of appetite may serve as useful predictors of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist treatment response among adolescents with severe obesity.

  8. Crosstalk between diabetes and brain: glucagon-like peptide-1 mimetics as a promising therapy against neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Duarte, A I; Candeias, E; Correia, S C; Santos, R X; Carvalho, C; Cardoso, S; Plácido, A; Santos, M S; Oliveira, C R; Moreira, P I

    2013-04-01

    According to World Health Organization estimates, type 2 diabetes (T2D) is an epidemic (particularly in under development countries) and a socio-economic challenge. This is even more relevant since increasing evidence points T2D as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), supporting the hypothesis that AD is a "type 3 diabetes" or "brain insulin resistant state". Despite the limited knowledge on the molecular mechanisms and the etiological complexity of both pathologies, evidence suggests that neurodegeneration/death underlying cognitive dysfunction (and ultimately dementia) upon long-term T2D may arise from a complex interplay between T2D and brain aging. Additionally, decreased brain insulin levels/signaling and glucose metabolism in both pathologies further suggests that an effective treatment strategy for one disorder may be also beneficial in the other. In this regard, one such promising strategy is a novel successful anti-T2D class of drugs, the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics (e.g. exendin-4 or liraglutide), whose potential neuroprotective effects have been increasingly shown in the last years. In fact, several studies showed that, besides improving peripheral (and probably brain) insulin signaling, GLP-1 analogs minimize cell loss and possibly rescue cognitive decline in models of AD, Parkinson's (PD) or Huntington's disease. Interestingly, exendin-4 is undergoing clinical trials to test its potential as an anti-PD therapy. Herewith, we aim to integrate the available data on the metabolic and neuroprotective effects of GLP-1 mimetics in the central nervous system (CNS) with the complex crosstalk between T2D-AD, as well as their potential therapeutic value against T2D-associated cognitive dysfunction.

  9. Distinct effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist on islet morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Morita, Asuka; Mukai, Eri; Hiratsuka, Ayano; Takatani, Tomozumi; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Lee, Eun Young; Miki, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Although the two anti-diabetic drugs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP4is) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (GLP1RAs), have distinct effects on the dynamics of circulating incretins, little is known of the difference in their consequences on morphology and function of pancreatic islets. We examined these in a mouse model of β cell injury/regeneration. The model mice were generated so as to express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor and a fluorescent protein (Tomato) specifically in β cells. The mice were treated with a DPP4i (MK-0626) and a GLP1RA (liraglutide), singly or doubly, and the morphology and function of the islets were compared. Prior administration of MK-0626 and/or liraglutide similarly protected β cells from DT-induced cell death, indicating that enhanced GLP-1 signaling can account for the cytoprotection. However, 2-week intervention of MK-0626 and/or liraglutide in DT-injected mice resulted in different islet morphology and function: β cell proliferation and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) were increased by MK-0626 but not by liraglutide; α cell mass was decreased by liraglutide but not by MK-0626. Although liraglutide administration nullified MK-0626-induced β cell proliferation, their co-administration resulted in increased GSIS, decreased α cell mass, and improved glucose tolerance. The pro-proliferative effect of MK-0626 was lost by co-administration of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39), indicating that GLP-1 signaling is required for this effect. Comparison of the effects of DPP4is and/or GLP1RAs treatment in a single mouse model shows that the two anti-diabetic drugs have distinct consequences on islet morphology and function.

  10. Dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are favourable to glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists: yes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2012-03-01

    The pharmacological treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is becoming increasingly complex, especially since the availability of incretin-based therapies. Compared with other glucose-lowering strategies, these novel drugs offer some advantages such as an absence of weight gain and a negligible risk of hypoglycaemia and, possibly, better cardiovascular and β-cell protection. The physician has now multiple choices to manage his/her patient after secondary failure of metformin, and the question whether it is preferable to add an oral dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor (gliptin) or an injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist will emerge. Obviously, DPP-4 inhibitors offer several advantages compared with GLP-1 receptor agonists, especially regarding easiness of use, tolerance profile and cost. However, because they can only increase endogenous GLP-1 concentrations to physiological (rather than pharmacological) levels, they are less potent to improve glucose control, promote weight reduction ("weight neutrality") and reduce blood pressure compared to GLP-1 receptor agonists. Of note, none of the two classes have proven long-term safety and positive impact on diabetic complications yet. The role of DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists in the therapeutic armamentarium of T2DM is rapidly evolving, but their respective potential strengths and weaknesses should be better defined in long-term head-to-head comparative controlled trials. Instead of trying to answer the question whether DPP-4 inhibitors are favourable to GLP-1 receptor agonists (or vice versa), it is probably more clinically relevant to look at which T2DM patient will benefit more from one or the other therapy considering all his/her individual clinical characteristics ("personalized medicine").

  11. Agonist-induced internalisation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is mediated by the Gαq pathway.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Aiysha; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and an important target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Upon stimulation with agonist, the GLP-1R signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways to stimulate insulin secretion. The agonist-induced GLP-1R internalisation has recently been shown to be important for insulin secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying GLP-1R internalisation remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the role of GLP-1R downstream signalling pathways in its internalisation. Agonist-induced human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) internalisation and activity were examined using a number of techniques including immunoblotting, ELISA, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays to determine cAMP production, intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and ERK phosphorylation. Agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation is dependent on caveolin-1 and dynamin. Inhibition of the Gαq pathway but not the Gαs pathway affected hGLP-1R internalisation. Consistent with this, hGLP-1R mutant T149M and small-molecule agonists (compound 2 and compound B), which activate only the Gαs pathway, failed to induce internalisation of the receptor. Chemical inhibitors of the Gαq pathway, PKC and ERK phosphorylation significantly reduced agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation. These inhibitors also suppressed agonist-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation demonstrating that the phosphorylated ERK acts downstream of the Gαq pathway in the hGLP-1R internalisation. In summary, agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation is mediated by the Gαq pathway. The internalised hGLP-1R stimulates insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, indicating the importance of GLP-1 internalisation for insulin secretion.

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-1 improves beta-cell antioxidant capacity via extracellular regulated kinases pathway and Nrf2 translocation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Millán, E; Martín, M A; Goya, L; Lizárraga-Mollinedo, E; Escrivá, F; Ramos, S; Álvarez, C

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance, two major pathophysiological abnormalities of type 2 diabetes. Expression levels of antioxidant enzymes in beta cells are very low, rendering them more susceptible to damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although the antioxidant effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its analogs have been previously reported, the exact mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that GLP-1 was able to effectively inhibit oxidative stress and cell death of INS-1E beta cells induced by the pro-oxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tert-BOOH). Incubation with GLP-1 enhanced cellular levels of glutathione and the activity of its related enzymes, glutathione-peroxidase (GPx) and -reductase (GR) in beta cells. However, inhibition of ERK, but not of the PI3K/AKT pathway abolished, at least in part, the antioxidant effect of GLP-1. Moreover, ERK activation seems to be protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent because inhibition of PKA with H-89 was sufficient to block the GLP-1-derived protective effect on beta cells. GLP-1 likewise increased the synthesis of GR and favored the translocation of the nuclear transcription factor erythroid 2p45-related factor (Nrf2), a transcription factor implicated in the expression of several antioxidant/detoxificant enzymes. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was also preserved in beta-cells challenged with tert-BOOH but pre-treated with GLP-1, probably through the down-regulation of the mitochondrial uncoupling-protein2 (UCP2). Thus, our results provide additional mechanisms of action of GLP-1 to prevent oxidative damage in beta cells through the modulation of signaling pathways involved in antioxidant enzyme regulation.

  13. Postprandial glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 responses to sucrose ingested with berries in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Törrönen, Riitta; Sarkkinen, Essi; Niskanen, Tarja; Tapola, Niina; Kilpi, Kyllikki; Niskanen, Leo

    2012-05-01

    Berries are often consumed with sucrose. They are also rich sources of polyphenols which may modulate glycaemia after carbohydrate ingestion. The present study investigated the postprandial glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) responses to sucrose ingested with berries, in comparison with a similar sucrose load without berries. A total of twelve healthy subjects were recruited to a randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. They participated in two meal tests on separate days. The berry meal was a purée (150 g) made of bilberries, blackcurrants, cranberries and strawberries with 35 g sucrose. The control meal included the same amount of sucrose and available carbohydrates in water. Fingertip capillary and venous blood samples were taken at baseline and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after starting to eat the meal. Glucose, insulin and GLP-1 concentrations were determined from the venous samples, and glucose also from the capillary samples. Compared to the control meal, ingestion of the berry meal resulted in lower capillary and venous plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations at 15 min (P = 0·021, P < 0·007 and P = 0·028, respectively), in higher concentrations at 90 min (P = 0·028, P = 0·021 and P = 0·042, respectively), and in a modest effect on the GLP-1 response (P = 0·05). It also reduced the maximum increases of capillary and venous glucose and insulin concentrations (P = 0·009, P = 0·011 and P = 0·005, respectively), and improved the glycaemic profile (P < 0·001 and P = 0·003 for capillary and venous samples, respectively). These results suggest that the glycaemic control after ingestion of sucrose can be improved by simultaneous consumption of berries.

  14. Evidence for a gut-brain axis used by glucagon-like peptide-1 to elicit hyperglycaemia in fish.

    PubMed

    Polakof, S; Míguez, J M; Soengas, J L

    2011-06-01

    In mammals, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) produces changes in glucose and energy homeostasis through a gut-pancreas-brain axis. In fish, the effects of GLP-1 are opposed to those described in other vertebrates, such as stimulation of hyperglycaemia and the lack of an effect of incretin. In the present study conducted in a teleost fish such as the rainbow trout, we present evidence of a gut-brain axis used by GLP-1 to exert its actions on glucose and energy homeostasis. We have assessed the effects of GLP-1 on glucose metabolism in the liver as well as the glucose-sensing potential in the hypothalamus and hindbrain. We confirm that peripheral GLP-1 administration elicits sustained hyperglycaemia, whereas, for the first time in a vertebrate species, we report that central GLP-1 treatment increases plasma glucose levels. We have observed (using capsaicin) that at least part of the action of GLP-1 on glucose homeostasis was mediated by vagal and splanchnic afferents. GLP-1 has a direct effect in parameters involved in glucose sensing in the hindbrain, whereas, in the hypothalamus, changes occurred indirectly through hyperglycaemia. Moreover, in the hindbrain, GLP-1 altered the expression of peptides involved in the control of food intake. We have elaborated a model for the actions of GLP-1 in fish in which this peptide uses a mammalian-like ancestral gut-brain axis to elicit the regulation of glucose homeostasis in different manner than the model described in mammals. Finally, it is worth noting that the hyperglycaemia induced by this peptide and the lack of incretin function could be related to the glucose intolerance observed in carnivorous teleost fish species such as the rainbow trout.

  15. Suppression of Food Intake by Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists: Relative Potencies and Role of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Lene; Aulinger, Benedikt A.; Hassel, Jonathan L.; Roy, Kyle J.; Smith, Eric P.; Greer, Todd M.; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2012-01-01

    Administration of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists GLP-1 and exendin-4 (Ex-4) directly into the central nervous system decreases food intake. But although Ex-4 potently suppresses food intake after peripheral administration, the effects of parenteral GLP-1 are variable and not as strong. A plausible explanation for these effects is the rapid inactivation of circulating GLP-1 by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), an enzyme that does not alter Ex-4 activity. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the relative potency of Ex-4 and GLP-1 under conditions in which DPP-4 activity was reduced. Outbred rats, wild-type mice, and mice with a targeted deletion of DPP-4 (Dpp4−/−) were treated with GLP-1 alone or in combination with the DPP-4 inhibitor vildagliptin, Ex-4, or saline, and food intake was measured. GLP-1 alone, even at high doses, did not affect feeding in wild-type mice or rats but did reduce food intake when combined with vildagliptin or given to Dpp4−/− mice. Despite plasma clearance similar to DPP-4-protected GLP-1, equimolar Ex-4 caused greater anorexia than vildagliptin plus GLP-1. To determine whether supraphysiological levels of endogenous GLP-1 would suppress food intake if protected from DPP-4, rats with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and significantly elevated postprandial plasma GLP-1 received vildagliptin or saline. Despite 5-fold greater postprandial GLP-1 in these animals, vildagliptin did not affect food intake in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass rats. Thus, in both mice and rats, peripheral GLP-1 reduces food intake significantly less than Ex-4, even when protected from DPP-4. These findings suggest distinct potencies of GLP-1 receptor agonists on food intake that cannot be explained by plasma pharmacokinetics. PMID:23033273

  16. ROLE OF CENTRAL GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-1 IN HYPOTHALAMO-PITUITARY-ADRENOCORTICAL FACILITATION FOLLOWING CHRONIC STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Tauchi, Miyuki; Zhang, Rong; D’Alessio, David A.; Seeley, Randy J; Herman, James P

    2008-01-01

    Central glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) regulates food intake, glucose homeostasis, and behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to acute stress. Given its pronounced role in acute stress regulation, the GLP-1 system is a prime candidate for mediating the prolonged drive of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis by chronic stress. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the necessity and sufficiency of GLP-1 for production of chronic stress-induced changes in HPA axis function. Exogenous GLP-1 or the GLP-1 receptor antagonist, dHG-exendin, were delivered into the 3rd ventricle of control animals or animals exposed to chronic variable stress (CVS) for 7 days. Animals in the CVS groups received GLP-1 or dHG-exendin immediately prior to each stress exposure. Prior to and at the end of the 7-day trial, chronically stressed animals were subjected to a novel stressor to test for HPA axis facilitation. Neither GLP-1 nor dHG-exendin affected CVS-associated increases in adrenal weight or decreases in basal plasma glucose levels. In addition, neither exogenous GLP-1 nor dHG-exendin altered any index of HPA axis activity in unstressed rats. However, GLP-1 enhanced CVS-induced facilitation of corticosterone (but not ACTH) response to an acute stress, whereas dHG-exendin inhibited facilitation. In addition, GLP-1 decreased body weight in chronically-stressed animals. dHG-exendin increased food intake and body weight in unstressed animals, consistent with a tonic role for GLP-1 in body weight regulation. Overall, our data suggest that brain GLP-1 modulates HPA axis activity within the context of chronic stress, perhaps at the level of the adrenal gland. PMID:18177641

  17. Metabolomic profiling reveals differential effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin on nutrient partitioning in ovine liver.

    PubMed

    El-Sabagh, Mabrouk; Taniguchi, Dai; Sugino, Toshihisa; Obitsu, Taketo

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify the insulin-independent actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 (7-36 amide)) in partitioning nutrient metabolism in ovine liver. Four Suffolk wethers (60.0 ± 6.7 kg body weight (BW)) were used in a repeated-measure design under euglycemic--hyperinsulinemic and hyper -GLP-1 clamps for 150 min with intravenous infusion of insulin (0.5 mU/kg BW/min; from 0 to 90 min), GLP-1 (0.5 µg/kg BW/min; from 60 to 150 min) and both hormones co-administered from 60 to 90 min. Liver biopsies were collected at 0, 60, 90 and 150 min to represent the metabolomic profiling of baseline, insulin, insulin plus GLP-1, and GLP-1, respectively, and were analyzed for metabolites using Capillary Electrophoresis Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer. Metabolomics analysis reveals 51 metabolites as being significantly altered (P < 0.05) by insulin and GLP-1 infusion compared to baseline values. Insulin infusion enhanced glycolysis, lipogenesis, oxidative stress defense and cell proliferation pathways, but reduced protein breakdown, gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis pathways. Conversely, GLP-1 infusion promoted lipolytic and ketogenic pathways accompanied by a lowered lipid clearance from the liver as well as elevated oxidative stress defense and nucleotide degradation. Despite further research still being warranted, our data suggest that GLP-1 may exert insulin-antagonistic effects on hepatic lipid and nucleotide metabolism in ruminants.

  18. Molecular basis of glucagon-like peptide 1 docking to its intact receptor studied with carboxyl-terminal photolabile probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Pinon, Delia I; Miller, Laurence J; Dong, Maoqing

    2009-12-04

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is a member of Family B G protein-coupled receptors and represents an important drug target for type 2 diabetes. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino-terminal domain of this receptor and that of several close family members, understanding of the molecular basis of natural ligand GLP1 binding to its intact receptor remains limited. The goal of this study was to explore spatial approximations between specific receptor residues within the carboxyl terminus of GLP1 and its receptor as normally docked. Therefore, we developed and characterized two high affinity, full-agonist photolabile GLP1 probes having sites for covalent attachment in positions 24 and 35. Both probes labeled the receptor specifically and saturably. Subsequent peptide mapping using chemical and proteinase cleavages of purified wild-type and mutant GLP1 receptor identified that the Arg(131)-Lys(136) segment at the juxtamembrane region of the receptor amino terminus contained the site of labeling for the position 24 probe, and the specific receptor residue labeled by this probe was identified as Glu(133) by radiochemical sequencing. Similarly, nearby residue Glu(125) within the same region of the receptor amino-terminal domain was identified as the site of labeling by the position 35 probe. These data represent the first direct demonstration of spatial approximation between GLP1 and its intact receptor as docked, providing two important constraints for the modeling of this interaction. This should expand our understanding of the molecular basis of natural agonist ligand binding to the GLP1 receptor and may be relevant to other family members.

  19. Glutamatergic phenotype of glucagon-like peptide 1 neurons in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, H.; Stornetta, R. L.; Agassandian, K.

    2017-01-01

    The expression of a vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) suffices to assign a glutamatergic phenotype to neurons and other secretory cells. For example, intestinal L cells express VGLUT2 and secrete glutamate along with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1). We hypothesized that GLP1-positive neurons within the caudal (visceral) nucleus of the solitary tract (cNST) also are glutamatergic. To test this, the axonal projections of GLP1 and other neurons within the cNST were labeled in rats via iontophoretic delivery of anterograde tracer. Dual immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy was used to visualize tracer-, GLP1-, and VGLUT2-positive fibers within brainstem, hypothalamic, and limbic forebrain nuclei that receive input from the cNST. Electron microscopy was used to confirm GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling within the same axon varicosities, and fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to examine VGLUT2 mRNA expression by GLP1-positive neurons. Most anterograde tracer-labeled fibers displayed VGLUT2-positive varicosities, providing new evidence that ascending axonal projections from the cNST are primarily glutamatergic. Virtually all GLP1-positive varicosities also were VGLUT2-positive. Electron microscopy confirmed the colocalization of GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling in axon terminals that formed asymmetric (excitatory-type) synapses with unlabeled dendrites in the hypothalamus. Finally, in situ hybridization confirmed that GLP1-positive cNST neurons express VGLUT2 mRNA. Thus, hindbrain GLP1 neurons in rats are equipped to store glutamate in synaptic vesicles, and likely co-release both glutamate and GLP1 from axon varicosities and terminals in the hypothalamus and other brain regions. PMID:25012114

  20. Glutamatergic phenotype of glucagon-like peptide 1 neurons in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H; Stornetta, R L; Agassandian, K; Rinaman, Linda

    2015-09-01

    The expression of a vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) suffices to assign a glutamatergic phenotype to neurons and other secretory cells. For example, intestinal L cells express VGLUT2 and secrete glutamate along with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1). We hypothesized that GLP1-positive neurons within the caudal (visceral) nucleus of the solitary tract (cNST) also are glutamatergic. To test this, the axonal projections of GLP1 and other neurons within the cNST were labeled in rats via iontophoretic delivery of anterograde tracer. Dual immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy was used to visualize tracer-, GLP1-, and VGLUT2-positive fibers within brainstem, hypothalamic, and limbic forebrain nuclei that receive input from the cNST. Electron microscopy was used to confirm GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling within the same axon varicosities, and fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to examine VGLUT2 mRNA expression by GLP1-positive neurons. Most anterograde tracer-labeled fibers displayed VGLUT2-positive varicosities, providing new evidence that ascending axonal projections from the cNST are primarily glutamatergic. Virtually all GLP1-positive varicosities also were VGLUT2-positive. Electron microscopy confirmed the colocalization of GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling in axon terminals that formed asymmetric (excitatory-type) synapses with unlabeled dendrites in the hypothalamus. Finally, in situ hybridization confirmed that GLP1-positive cNST neurons express VGLUT2 mRNA. Thus, hindbrain GLP1 neurons in rats are equipped to store glutamate in synaptic vesicles, and likely co-release both glutamate and GLP1 from axon varicosities and terminals in the hypothalamus and other brain regions.

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 preserves coronary microvascular endothelial function after cardiac arrest and resuscitation: potential antioxidant effects.

    PubMed

    Dokken, Betsy B; Piermarini, Charles V; Teachey, Mary K; Gura, Michael T; Dameff, Christian J; Heller, Brian D; Krate, Jonida; Ashgar, Aeen M; Querin, Lauren; Mitchell, Jennifer L; Hilwig, Ronald W; Kern, Karl B

    2013-02-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has protective effects in the heart. We hypothesized that GLP-1 would mitigate coronary microvascular and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction if administered after cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR). Eighteen swine were subjected to ventricular fibrillation followed by resuscitation. Swine surviving to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were randomized to receive an intravenous infusion of either human rGLP-1 (10 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1); n = 8) or 0.9% saline (n = 8) for 4 h, beginning 1 min after ROSC. CAR caused a decline in coronary flow reserve (CFR) in control animals (pre-arrest, 1.86 ± 0.20; 1 h post-ROSC, 1.3 ± 0.05; 4 h post-ROSC, 1.25 ± 0.06; P < 0.05). GLP-1 preserved CFR for up to 4 h after ROSC (pre-arrest, 1.31 ± 0.17; 1 h post-ROSC, 1.5 ± 0.01; 4 h post-ROSC, 1.55 ± 0.22). Although there was a trend toward improvement in LV relaxation in the GLP-1-treated animals, overall LV function was not consistently different between groups. 8-iso-PGF(2α), a measure of reactive oxygen species load, was decreased in post-ROSC GLP-1-treated animals [placebo, control (NS): 38.1 ± 1.54 pg/ml; GLP-1: 26.59 ± 1.56 pg/ml; P < 0.05]. Infusion of GLP-1 after CAR preserved coronary microvascular and LV diastolic function. These effects may be mediated through a reduction in oxidative stress.

  2. Novel Small Molecule Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Rodents and From Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sloop, Kyle W.; Willard, Francis S.; Brenner, Martin B.; Ficorilli, James; Valasek, Kathleen; Showalter, Aaron D.; Farb, Thomas B.; Cao, Julia X.C.; Cox, Amy L.; Michael, M. Dodson; Gutierrez Sanfeliciano, Sonia Maria; Tebbe, Mark J.; Coghlan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical effectiveness of parenterally-administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics to improve glucose control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes strongly supports discovery pursuits aimed at identifying and developing orally active, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. The purpose of these studies was to identify and characterize novel nonpeptide agonists of the GLP-1 receptor. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Screening using cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and insulin secretion assays with rodent and human islets were used to identify novel molecules. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and hyperglycemic clamp characterized the insulinotropic effects of compounds in vivo. RESULTS Novel low molecular weight pyrimidine-based compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion are described. These molecules induce GLP-1 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling in HEK293 cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and increase insulin secretion from rodent islets in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds activate GLP-1 receptor signaling, both alone or in an additive fashion when combined with the endogenous GLP-1 peptide; however, these agonists do not compete with radiolabeled GLP-1 in receptor-binding assays. In vivo studies using the IVGTT and the hyperglycemic clamp in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate increased insulin secretion in compound-treated animals. Further, perifusion assays with human islets isolated from a donor with type 2 diabetes show near-normalization of insulin secretion upon compound treatment. CONCLUSIONS These studies characterize the insulinotropic effects of an early-stage, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist and provide compelling evidence to support pharmaceutical optimization. PMID:20823098

  3. Chronic liraglutide therapy induces an enhanced endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 secretory response in early type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Caroline K; Zinman, Bernard; Choi, Haysook; Connelly, Philip W; Retnakaran, Ravi

    2017-02-09

    Sustained exogenous stimulation of a hormone-specific receptor can affect endogenous hormonal regulation. In this context, little is known about the impact of chronic treatment with glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists on the endogenous GLP-1 response. We therefore evaluated the impact of chronic liraglutide therapy on endogenous GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) response to an oral glucose challenge. A total of 51 people with type 2 diabetes of 2.6 ± 1.9 years' duration were randomized to daily subcutaneous liraglutide or placebo injection and followed for 48 weeks, with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) every 12 weeks. GLP-1 and GIP responses were assessed according to their respective area under the curve (AUC) from measurements taken at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes during each OGTT. There were no differences in AUCGIP between the groups. By contrast, although fasting GLP-1 was unaffected, the liraglutide arm had ~2-fold higher AUCGLP-1 at 12 weeks ( P  < .001), 24 weeks ( P  < .001), 36 weeks ( P  = .03) and 48 weeks ( P  = .03), as compared with placebo. Thus, chronic liraglutide therapy induces a previously unrecognized, robust and durable enhancement of the endogenous GLP-1 response, highlighting the need for further study of the long-term effects of incretin mimetics on L-cell physiology.

  4. Neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions of glucagon-like peptide-1: an emerging opportunity to treat neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Isidro; Tweedie, David; Li, Yazhou; Greig, Nigel H

    2012-01-01

    Like type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), neurodegenerative disorders and stroke are an ever increasing, health, social and economic burden for developed Westernized countries. Age is an important risk factor in all of these; due to the rapidly increasing rise in the elderly population T2DM and neurodegenerative disorders, both represent a looming threat to healthcare systems. Whereas several efficacious drugs are currently available to ameliorate T2DM, effective treatments to counteract pathogenic processes of neurodegenerative disorders are lacking and represent a major scientific and pharmaceutical challenge. Epidemiological data indicate an association between T2DM and most major neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Likewise, there is an association between T2DM and stroke incidence. Studies have revealed that common pathophysiological features, including oxidative stress, insulin resistance, abnormal protein processing and cognitive decline, occur across these. Based on the presence of shared mechanisms and signalling pathways in these seemingly distinct diseases, one could hypothesize that an effective treatment for one disorder could prove beneficial in the others. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based anti-diabetic drugs have drawn particular attention as an effective new strategy to not only regulate blood glucose but also to reduce apoptotic cell death of pancreatic beta cells in T2DM. Evidence supports a neurotrophic and neuroprotective role of GLP-1 receptor (R) stimulation in an increasing array of cellular and animal neurodegeneration models as well as in neurogenesis. Herein, we review the physiological role of GLP-1 in the nervous system, focused towards the potential benefit of GLP-1R stimulation as an immediately translatable treatment strategy for acute and chronic neurological disorders. PMID:22519295

  5. Endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 reduces drinking behavior and is differentially engaged by water and food intakes in rats.

    PubMed

    McKay, Naomi J; Galante, Daniela L; Daniels, Derek

    2014-12-03

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is produced in the ileum and the nucleus of the solitary tract. It is well known that GLP-1 controls food intake, but there is a growing literature indicating that GLP-1 also is involved in fluid intake. It is not known, however, if the observed effects are pharmacological or if endogenous GLP-1 and its receptor contribute to physiological fluid intake control. Accordingly, we blocked endogenous GLP-1 by application of a receptor antagonist and measured subsequent drinking. Furthermore, we measured changes in GLP-1-associated gene expression after water intake, and compared the effects of fluid intake to those caused by food intake. Rats injected with the antagonist exendin-9 (Ex-9) drank more fluid in response to either subcutaneous hypertonic saline or water deprivation with partial rehydration than did vehicle-treated rats. Analysis of licking behavior showed that Ex-9 increased fluid intake by increasing the number of licking bursts, without having an effect on the number of licks per burst, suggesting that endogenous GLP-1 suppresses fluid intake by influencing satiety. Subsequent experiments showed that water intake had a selective effect on central GLP-1-related gene expression, unlike food intake, which affected both central and peripheral GLP-1. Although water and food intakes both affected central GLP-1-relevant gene expression, there were notable differences in the timing of the effect. These results show a novel role of the endogenous GLP-1 system in fluid intake, and indicate that elements of the GLP-1 system can be engaged separately by different forms of ingestive behavior.

  6. A novel glucagon-like peptide 1/glucagon receptor dual agonist improves steatohepatitis and liver regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Valdecantos, M Pilar; Pardo, Virginia; Ruiz, Laura; Castro-Sánchez, Luis; Lanzón, Borja; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; García-Monzón, Carmelo; Arroba, Ana I; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Escrivá, Fernando; Álvarez, Carmen; Rupérez, Francisco J; Barbas, Coral; Konkar, Anish; Naylor, Jacqui; Hornigold, David; Santos, Ana Dos; Bednarek, Maria; Grimsby, Joseph; Rondinone, Cristina M; Valverde, Ángela M

    2017-03-01

    Because nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with impaired liver regeneration, we investigated the effects of G49, a dual glucagon-like peptide-1/glucagon receptor agonist, on NASH and hepatic regeneration. C57Bl/6 mice fed chow or a methionine and choline-deficient (MCD) diet for 1 week were divided into 4 groups: control (chow diet), MCD diet, chow diet plus G49, and M+G49 (MCD diet plus G49). Mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 10 weeks were divided into groups: HFD and H+G49 (HFD plus G49). Following 2 (MCD groups) or 3 (HFD groups) weeks of treatment with G49, partial hepatectomy (PH) was performed, and all mice were maintained on the same treatment schedule for 2 additional weeks. Analysis of liver function, hepatic regeneration, and comprehensive genomic and metabolic profiling were conducted. NASH was ameliorated in the M+G49 group, manifested by reduced inflammation, steatosis, oxidative stress, and apoptosis and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. G49 treatment was also associated with replenishment of intrahepatic glucose due to enhanced gluconeogenesis and reduced glucose use through the pentose phosphate cycle and oxidative metabolism. Following PH, G49 treatment increased survival, restored the cytokine-mediated priming phase, and enhanced the proliferative capacity and hepatic regeneration ratio in mice on the MCD diet. NASH markers remained decreased in M+G49 mice after PH, and glucose use was shifted to the pentose phosphate cycle and oxidative metabolism. G49 administered immediately after PH was also effective at alleviating the pathological changes induced by the MCD diet. Benefits in terms of liver regeneration were also found in mice fed HFD and treated with G49.

  7. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists for Type 2 Diabetes:A Clinical Update of Safety and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Drab, Scott R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Introduction Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) are increasingly being used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, but consideration of benefits and potential adverse events is required. This review examines the state of glycemic control, weight loss, blood pressure, and tolerability, as well as the current debate about the safety of GLP-1 RAs, including risk of pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, and thyroid cancer. Methods A MEDLINE search (2010-2015) identified publications that discussed longer-acting GLP-1 RAs. Search terms included GLP-1 receptor agonists, liraglutide, exenatide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, dulaglutide, albiglutide, efficacy, safety, pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, and thyroid cancer. Abstracts from the American Diabetes Association, European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists from 2010 to 2015 were also searched. Efficacy and safety studies, pooled analyses, and meta-analyses were prioritized. Results Research has confirmed that GLP-1 RAs provide robust glycemic control, weight loss, and blood pressure re-duction. Current studies do not prove increased risk of pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, or thyroid cancer but more trials are needed since publications that indicate safety or suggest increased risk have methodological flaws that prevent firm conclusions to be drawn about these rare, long-term events. Conclusion GLP-1 RA therapy in the context of individualized, patient-centered care continues to be supported by current literature. GLP-1 RA therapy provides robust glycemic control, blood pressure reduction, and weight loss, but studies are still needed to address concerns about tolerability and safety, including pancreatitis and cancer. PMID:26694823

  8. Isolation of Positive Modulator of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Signaling from Trigonella foenum-graecum (Fenugreek) Seed*

    PubMed Central

    King, Klim; Lin, Nai-Pin; Cheng, Yu-Hong; Chen, Gao-Hui; Chein, Rong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many tissues and has been implicated in diverse physiological functions, such as energy homeostasis and cognition. GLP-1 analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are undergoing clinical trials for other disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 analog therapies maintain chronically high plasma levels of the analog and can lead to loss of spatiotemporal control of GLP-1R activation. To avoid adverse effects associated with current therapies, we characterized positive modulators of GLP-1R signaling. We screened extracts from edible plants using an intracellular cAMP biosensor and GLP-1R endocytosis assays. Ethanol extracts from fenugreek seeds enhanced GLP-1 signaling. These seeds have previously been found to reduce glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels in humans. An active compound (N55) with a new N-linoleoyl-2-amino-γ-butyrolactone structure was purified from fenugreek seeds. N55 promoted GLP-1-dependent cAMP production and GLP-1R endocytosis in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. N55 specifically enhanced GLP-1 potency more than 40-fold, but not that of exendin 4, to stimulate cAMP production. In contrast to the current allosteric modulators that bind to GLP-1R, N55 binds to GLP-1 peptide and facilitates trypsin-mediated GLP-1 inactivation. These findings identify a new class of modulators of GLP-1R signaling and suggest that GLP-1 might be a viable target for drug discovery. Our results also highlight a feasible approach for screening bioactive activity of plant extracts. PMID:26336108

  9. Indirect effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 on the peripheral circadian clocks in mice.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hitoshi; Ushijima, Kentarou; Fujimura, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks in peripheral tissues are powerfully entrained by feeding. The mechanisms underlying this food entrainment remain unclear, although various humoral and neural factors have been reported to affect peripheral clocks. Because glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which is rapidly secreted in response to food ingestion, influences multiple humoral and neural signaling pathways, we suggest that GLP-1 plays a role in the food entrainment of peripheral clocks. To test this, we compared the effects of exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, on mRNA expression of the clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Nr1d1, Per1, Per2, and Cry1) with those of refeeding. In addition, we investigated whether exendin-4 could affect the rhythms of the peripheral clocks. In male C57BL/6J mice, although refeeding rapidly (within 2 h) altered mRNA levels of Per1 and Per2 in the liver and that of Per1 in adipose tissue, a single i.p. injection of exendin-4 did not cause such changes. However, unlike the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39), exendin-4 significantly influenced Per1 mRNA levels in the liver at 12 h after injection. Moreover, pretreatment with exendin-4 affected the rapid-feeding-induced change in Per1 not only in the liver, but also in adipose tissue, without effect on food intake. Furthermore, during light-phase restricted feeding, repeated dosing of exendin-4 at the beginning of the dark phase profoundly influenced both the food intake and daily rhythms of clock gene expression in peripheral tissues. Thus, these results suggest that exendin-4 modulates peripheral clocks via multiple mechanisms different from those of refeeding.

  10. β-Cell Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Contributes to Improved Glucose Tolerance After Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Garibay, Darline; McGavigan, Anne K; Lee, Seon A; Ficorilli, James V; Cox, Amy L; Michael, M Dodson; Sloop, Kyle W; Cummings, Bethany P

    2016-09-01

    Vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) produces high rates of type 2 diabetes remission; however, the mechanisms responsible for this remain incompletely defined. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut hormone that contributes to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and is elevated after VSG. VSG-induced increases in postprandial GLP-1 secretion have been proposed to contribute to the glucoregulatory benefits of VSG; however, previous work has been equivocal. In order to test the contribution of enhanced β-cell GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling we used a β-cell-specific tamoxifen-inducible GLP-1R knockout mouse model. Male β-cell-specific Glp-1r(β-cell+/+) wild type (WT) and Glp-1r(β-cell-/-) knockout (KO) littermates were placed on a high-fat diet for 6 weeks and then switched to high-fat diet supplemented with tamoxifen for the rest of the study. Mice underwent sham or VSG surgery after 2 weeks of tamoxifen diet and were fed ad libitum postoperatively. Mice underwent oral glucose tolerance testing at 3 weeks and were euthanized at 6 weeks after surgery. VSG reduced body weight and food intake independent of genotype. However, glucose tolerance was only improved in VSG WT compared with sham WT, whereas VSG KO had impaired glucose tolerance relative to VSG WT. Augmentation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during the oral glucose tolerance test was blunted in VSG KO compared with VSG WT. Therefore, our data suggest that enhanced β-cell GLP-1R signaling contributes to improved glucose regulation after VSG by promoting increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

  11. Neural effects of gut- and brain-derived glucagon-like peptide-1 and its receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Kenichi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is derived from both the enteroendocrine L cells and preproglucagon-expressing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem. As GLP-1 is cleaved by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 yielding a half-life of less than 2 min, it is plausible that the gut-derived GLP-1, released postprandially, exerts its effects on the brain mainly by interacting with vagal afferent neurons located at the intestinal or hepatic portal area. GLP-1 neurons in the NTS widely project in the central nervous system and act as a neurotransmitter. One of the physiological roles of brain-derived GLP-1 is restriction of feeding. GLP-1 receptor agonists have recently been used to treat type 2 diabetic patients, and have been shown to exhibit pleiotropic effects beyond incretin action, which involve brain functions. GLP-1 receptor agonist administered in the periphery is stable because of its resistance to dipeptidyl peptidase-4, and is highly likely to act on the brain by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as well as interacting with vagal afferent nerves. Central actions of GLP-1 have various roles including regulation of feeding, weight, glucose and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular functions, cognitive functions, and stress and emotional responses. In the present review, we focus on the source of GLP-1 and the pathway by which peripheral GLP-1 informs the brain, and then discuss recent findings on the central effects of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor agonists.

  12. The effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 in the management of diabetes mellitus: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Mohamed; Singh, Jaipaul; Rashed, Hameed; Tariq, Saeed; Zilahi, Erika; Adeghate, Ernest

    2014-11-01

    Incretins, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP)-1, have been shown to elevate plasma insulin concentration. The purpose of this study is to investigate the cellular and molecular basis of the beneficial effects of GLP-1. Normal and diabetic male Wistar rats were treated with GLP-1 (50 ng/kg body weight) for 10 weeks. At the end of the experiment, pancreatic tissues were taken for immunohistochemistry, immunoelectron microscopy and real-time polymerase chain reaction studies. Samples of blood were retrieved from the animals for the measurement of enzymes and insulin. The results show that treatment of diabetic rats with GLP-1 caused significant (P < 0.05) reduction in body weight gain and blood glucose level. GLP-1 (10(-12)-10(-6) M) induced significant (P < 0.01) dose-dependent increases in insulin release from the pancreas of normal and diabetic rats compared to basal. Diabetes-induced abnormal liver (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) and kidney (blood urea nitrogen and uric acid) parameters were corrected in GLP-1-treated rats compared to controls. GLP-1 treatment induced significant (P < 0.05) elevation in the expression of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1, heat shock protein-70, glutathione peroxidase, insulin receptor and GLP-1-receptor genes in diabetic animals compared to controls. GLP-1 is present in pancreatic beta cells and significantly (P < 0.05) increased the number of insulin-, glutathione reductase- and catalase-immunoreactive islet cells. The results of this study show that GLP-1 is co-localized with insulin and seems to exert its beneficial effects by increasing cellular concentrations of endogenous antioxidant genes and other genes involved in the maintenance of pancreatic beta cell structure and function.

  13. Obesity alters molecular and functional cardiac responses to ischemia/reperfusion and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonism.

    PubMed

    Sassoon, Daniel J; Goodwill, Adam G; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Herring, B Paul; McClintick, Jeanette N; Tune, Johnathan D; Mather, Kieren J

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that obesity alters the cardiac response to ischemia/reperfusion and/or glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation, and that these differences are associated with alterations in the obese cardiac proteome and microRNA (miRNA) transcriptome. Ossabaw swine were fed normal chow or obesogenic diet for 6 months. Cardiac function was assessed at baseline, during a 30-minutes coronary occlusion, and during 2 hours of reperfusion in anesthetized swine treated with saline or exendin-4 for 24 hours. Cardiac biopsies were obtained from normal and ischemia/reperfusion territories. Fat-fed animals were heavier, and exhibited hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Plasma troponin-I concentration (index of myocardial injury) was increased following ischemia/reperfusion and decreased by exendin-4 treatment in both groups. Ischemia/reperfusion produced reductions in systolic pressure and stroke volume in lean swine. These indices were higher in obese hearts at baseline and relatively maintained throughout ischemia/reperfusion. Exendin-4 administration increased systolic pressure in lean swine but did not affect the blood pressure in obese swine. End-diastolic volume was reduced by exendin-4 following ischemia/reperfusion in obese swine. These divergent physiologic responses were associated with obesity-related differences in proteins related to myocardial structure/function (e.g. titin) and calcium handling (e.g. SERCA2a, histidine-rich Ca(2+) binding protein). Alterations in expression of cardiac miRs in obese hearts included miR-15, miR-27, miR-130, miR-181, and let-7. Taken together, these observations validate this discovery approach and reveal novel associations that suggest previously undiscovered mechanisms contributing to the effects of obesity on the heart and contributing to the actions of GLP-1 following ischemia/reperfusion.

  14. The Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Regulates Endogenous Glucose Production and Muscle Glucose Uptake Independent of Its Incretin Action

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Julio E.; Bracy, Deanna P.; James, Freyja D.; Julien, Brianna M.; Wasserman, David H.; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) diminishes postmeal glucose excursions by enhancing insulin secretion via activation of the β-cell GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r). GLP-1 may also control glucose levels through mechanisms that are independent of this incretin effect. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (insulin clamp) and exercise were used to examine the incretin-independent glucoregulatory properties of the Glp1r because both perturbations stimulate glucose flux independent of insulin secretion. Chow-fed mice with a functional disruption of the Glp1r (Glp1r−/−) were compared with wild-type littermates (Glp1r+/+). Studies were performed on 5-h-fasted mice implanted with arterial and venous catheters for sampling and infusions, respectively. During insulin clamps, [3-3H]glucose and 2[14C]deoxyglucose were used to determine whole-body glucose turnover and glucose metabolic index (Rg), an indicator of glucose uptake. Rg in sedentary and treadmill exercised mice was determined using 2[3H]deoxyglucose. Glp1r−/− mice exhibited increased glucose disappearance, muscle Rg, and muscle glycogen levels during insulin clamps. This was not associated with enhanced muscle insulin signaling. Glp1r−/− mice exhibited impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production and hepatic glycogen accumulation during insulin clamps. This was associated with impaired liver insulin signaling. Glp1r−/− mice became significantly hyperglycemic during exercise. Muscle Rg was normal in exercised Glp1r−/− mice, suggesting that hyperglycemia resulted from an added drive to stimulate glucose production. Muscle AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was higher in exercised Glp1r−/− mice. This was associated with increased relative exercise intensity and decreased exercise endurance. In conclusion, these results show that the endogenous Glp1r regulates hepatic and muscle glucose flux independent of its ability to enhance insulin secretion. PMID:19008308

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Interacting Glucose-Sensing Mechanisms and Electrical Activity Underlying Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Riz, Michela; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal L-cells sense glucose and other nutrients, and in response release glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY and other hormones with anti-diabetic and weight-reducing effects. The stimulus-secretion pathway in L-cells is still poorly understood, although it is known that GLP-1 secreting cells use sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLT) and ATP-sensitive K+-channels (K(ATP)-channels) to sense intestinal glucose levels. Electrical activity then transduces glucose sensing to Ca2+-stimulated exocytosis. This particular glucose-sensing arrangement with glucose triggering both a depolarizing SGLT current as well as leading to closure of the hyperpolarizing K(ATP) current is of more general interest for our understanding of glucose-sensing cells. To dissect the interactions of these two glucose-sensing mechanisms, we build a mathematical model of electrical activity underlying GLP-1 secretion. Two sets of model parameters are presented: one set represents primary mouse colonic L-cells; the other set is based on data from the GLP-1 secreting GLUTag cell line. The model is then used to obtain insight into the differences in glucose-sensing between primary L-cells and GLUTag cells. Our results illuminate how the two glucose-sensing mechanisms interact, and suggest that the depolarizing effect of SGLT currents is modulated by K(ATP)-channel activity. Based on our simulations, we propose that primary L-cells encode the glucose signal as changes in action potential amplitude, whereas GLUTag cells rely mainly on frequency modulation. The model should be useful for further basic, pharmacological and theoretical investigations of the cellular signals underlying endogenous GLP-1 and peptide YY release. PMID:26630068

  16. Role of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase isozymes in murine colonic glucagon-like peptide 1 secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Ronn S; Moss, Catherine E; Mace, Jessica; Parker, Helen E; Tolhurst, Gwen; Habib, Abdella M; Wachten, Sebastian; Cooper, Dermot M; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells after food intake. Increasing GLP-1 signalling either through inhibition of the GLP-1 degrading enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase IV or injection of GLP-1-mimetics has recently been successfully introduced for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Boosting secretion from the L-cell has so far not been exploited, due to our incomplete understanding of L-cell physiology. Elevation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to be a strong stimulus for GLP-1 secretion and here we investigate the activities of adenylate cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes likely to shape cAMP responses in L-cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression of AC and PDE isoforms was quantified by RT-PCR. Single cell responses to stimulation or inhibition of AC and PDE isoforms were monitored with real-time cAMP probes. GLP-1 secretion was assessed by elisa. KEY RESULTS Quantitative PCR identified expression of protein kinase C- and Ca2+-activated ACs, corresponding with phorbolester and cytosolic Ca2+-stimulated cAMP elevation. Inhibition of PDE2, 3 and 4 were found to stimulate GLP-1 secretion from murine L-cells in primary culture. This corresponded with cAMP elevations monitored with a plasma membrane targeted cAMP probe. Inhibition of PDE3 but not PDE2 was further shown to prevent GLP-1 secretion in response to guanylin, a peptide secreted into the gut lumen, which had not previously been implicated in L-cell secretion. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results reveal several mechanisms shaping cAMP responses in GLP-1 secreting cells, with some of the molecular components specifically expressed in L-cells when compared with their epithelial neighbours, thus opening new strategies for targeting these cells therapeutically. PMID:21054345

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Interacting Glucose-Sensing Mechanisms and Electrical Activity Underlying Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Riz, Michela; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal L-cells sense glucose and other nutrients, and in response release glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY and other hormones with anti-diabetic and weight-reducing effects. The stimulus-secretion pathway in L-cells is still poorly understood, although it is known that GLP-1 secreting cells use sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLT) and ATP-sensitive K+-channels (K(ATP)-channels) to sense intestinal glucose levels. Electrical activity then transduces glucose sensing to Ca2+-stimulated exocytosis. This particular glucose-sensing arrangement with glucose triggering both a depolarizing SGLT current as well as leading to closure of the hyperpolarizing K(ATP) current is of more general interest for our understanding of glucose-sensing cells. To dissect the interactions of these two glucose-sensing mechanisms, we build a mathematical model of electrical activity underlying GLP-1 secretion. Two sets of model parameters are presented: one set represents primary mouse colonic L-cells; the other set is based on data from the GLP-1 secreting GLUTag cell line. The model is then used to obtain insight into the differences in glucose-sensing between primary L-cells and GLUTag cells. Our results illuminate how the two glucose-sensing mechanisms interact, and suggest that the depolarizing effect of SGLT currents is modulated by K(ATP)-channel activity. Based on our simulations, we propose that primary L-cells encode the glucose signal as changes in action potential amplitude, whereas GLUTag cells rely mainly on frequency modulation. The model should be useful for further basic, pharmacological and theoretical investigations of the cellular signals underlying endogenous GLP-1 and peptide YY release.

  18. Postprandial glucose, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 responses of different equine breeds adapted to meals containing micronized maize.

    PubMed

    Bamford, N J; Baskerville, C L; Harris, P A; Bailey, S R

    2015-07-01

    The enteroinsular axis is a complex system that includes the release of incretin hormones from the gut to promote the absorption and utilization of glucose after a meal. The insulinogenic effect of incretin hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) remains poorly characterized in the horse. The aim of this study was to compare postprandial glucose, insulin, and GLP-1 responses of different equine breeds adapted to twice-daily meals containing micronized maize. Four Standardbred horses, 4 mixed-breed ponies, and 4 Andalusian cross horses in moderate BCS (5.5 ± 0.2 out of 9) were fed meals at 0800 and 1600 h each day. The meals contained micronized maize (mixed with soaked soybean hulls and lucerne chaff), with the amount of maize gradually increased over 12 wk to reach a final quantity of 1.7 g/kg BW (1.1 g/kg BW starch) in each meal. Animals had ad libitum access to the same hay throughout. After 12 wk of acclimation, serial blood samples were collected from all animals over a 14-h period to measure concentrations of glucose, insulin, and GLP-1, with meals fed immediately after the 0 and 8 h samples. Glucose area under the curve (AUC) values were similar between breed groups (P = 0.41); however, ponies and Andalusian horses exhibited significantly higher insulin AUC values after both meals compared with Standardbred horses (both P < 0.005). Postprandial GLP-1 AUC values were also significantly higher in ponies and Andalusian horses compared with Standardbred horses (breed × time interaction; P < 0.001). Correlation analysis demonstrated a strong positive association between concentrations of insulin and GLP-1 over time (rs = 0.752; P < 0.001). The increased insulin concentrations in ponies and Andalusian horses may partly reflect lower insulin sensitivity but could also be attributed to increased GLP-1 release. Given that hyperinsulinemia is a recognized risk factor for the development of laminitis in domestic equids, this study provides evidence that the

  19. Oleic acid and glucose regulate glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor expression in a rat pancreatic ductal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Leshuai W.; McMahon Tobin, Grainne A.; Rouse, Rodney L.

    2012-10-15

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and has become an important target for a growing class of drugs designed to treat type 2 diabetes. In vitro studies were designed to investigate the effect of the GLP1R agonist, exenatide (Ex4), in “on-target” RIN-5mF (islet) cells as well as in “off-target” AR42J (acinar) and DSL-6A/C1 (ductal) cells in a diabetic environment. Ex4 increased islet cell proliferation but did not affect acinar cells or ductal cells at relevant concentrations. A high caloric, high fat diet is a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type-2 diabetes. An in vitro Oleic acid (OA) model was used to investigate the effect of Ex4 in a high calorie, high fat environment. At 0.1 and 0.4 mM, OA mildly decreased the proliferation of all pancreatic cell types. Ex4 did not potentiate the inhibitory effect of OA on cell proliferation. Akt phosphorylation in response to Ex4 was diminished in OA-treated ductal cells. GLP1R protein detected by western blot was time and concentration dependently decreased after glucose stimulation in OA-treated ductal cells. In ductal cells, OA treatment altered the intracellular localization of GLP1R and its co-localization with early endosome and recycling endosomes. Chloroquine (lysosomal inhibitor), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger) and wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor), fully or partially, rescued GLP1R protein in OA-pretreated, glucose-stimulated ductal cells. The impact of altered regulation on phenotype/function is presently unknown. However, these data suggest that GLP1R regulation in ductal cells can be altered by a high fat, high calorie environment. -- Highlights: ► Exenatide did not inhibit islet, acinar or ductal cell proliferation. ► GLP1R protein decreased after glucose stimulation in oleic acid-treated ductal cells. ► Oleic acid treatment altered localization of GLP1R with early and recycling

  20. Chronic administration of Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists improves trabecular bone mass and architecture in ovariectomised mice.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M; Jeyabalan, J; Jørgensen, C S; Hopkinson, M; Al-Jazzar, A; Roux, J P; Chavassieux, P; Orriss, I R; Cleasby, M E; Chenu, C

    2015-12-01

    Some anti-diabetic therapies can have adverse effects on bone health and increase fracture risk. In this study, we tested the skeletal effects of chronic administration of two Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA), increasingly used for type 2 diabetes treatment, in a model of osteoporosis associated bone loss and examined the expression and activation of GLP-1R in bone cells. Mice were ovariectomised (OVX) to induce bone loss and four weeks later they were treated with Liraglutide (LIR) 0.3mg/kg/day, Exenatide (Ex-4) 10 μg/kg/day or saline for four weeks. Mice were injected with calcein and alizarin red prior to euthanasia, to label bone-mineralising surfaces. Tibial micro-architecture was determined by micro-CT and bone formation and resorption parameters measured by histomorphometric analysis. Serum was collected to measure calcitonin and sclerostin levels, inhibitors of bone resorption and formation, respectively. GLP-1R mRNA and protein expression were evaluated in the bone, bone marrow and bone cells using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Primary osteoclasts and osteoblasts were cultured to evaluate the effect of GLP-1RA on bone resorption and formation in vitro. GLP-1RA significantly increased trabecular bone mass, connectivity and structure parameters but had no effect on cortical bone. There was no effect of GLP-1RA on bone formation in vivo but an increase in osteoclast number and osteoclast surfaces was observed with Ex-4. GLP-1R was expressed in bone marrow cells, primary osteoclasts and osteoblasts and in late osteocytic cell line. Both Ex-4 and LIR stimulated osteoclastic differentiation in vitro but slightly reduced the area resorbed per osteoclast. They had no effect on bone nodule formation in vitro. Serum calcitonin levels were increased and sclerostin levels decreased by Ex-4 but not by LIR. Thus, GLP-1RA can have beneficial effects on bone and the expression of GLP-1R in bone cells may imply that these effects are exerted directly

  1. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Dods, Rachel L; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-11-23

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide-receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design.

  2. The Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Agonists in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Brice, Kira R.; Tzefos, Maria K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To review the efficacy and safety of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists to determine their role in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Data sources: A Medline search was conducted using the keywords exenatide, liraglutide, glucagon-like peptide-1, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia, pharmacokinetics, pharmacology and safety. Study selection: All identified articles written in English were evaluated with priority given to controlled, randomized trials including human data. References of identified published trials were reviewed for additional trials to be included in the review. Data synthesis: Exenatide and liraglutide are GLP-1 agonists approved for the treatment of T2DM. Several randomized, active and placebo controlled trials examining the efficacy and safety of exenatide and liraglutide both as monotherapy and in combination therapy have been conducted. Both agents have demonstrated improved glycemic control in addition to weight loss and increased beta-cell function. The most common adverse effects are gastrointestinal in nature and appear to be transient. Conclusion: It appears exenatide and liraglutide are safe and effective in the treatment of T2DM and may exhibit effects that make them preferred over other anti-diabetic medications. PMID:22879790

  3. Effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 on counterregulatory hormone responses, cognitive functions, and insulin secretion during hyperinsulinemic, stepped hypoglycemic clamp experiments in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Nauck, Michael A; Heimesaat, Markus M; Behle, Kai; Holst, Jens J; Nauck, Markus S; Ritzel, Robert; Hüfner, Michael; Schmiegel, Wolff H

    2002-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and analogues are being evaluated as a new therapeutic principle for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 suppresses glucagon secretion, which could lead to disturbances of hypoglycemia counterregulation. This has, however, not been tested. Nine healthy volunteers with normal oral glucose tolerance received infusions of regular insulin (1 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1)) over 360 min on two occasions in the fasting state. Capillary glucose concentrations were clamped at plateaus of 4.3, 3.7, 3.0, and 2.3 mmol/liter for 90 min each (stepwise hypoglycemic clamp); on one occasion, GLP-1 (1.2 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) was administered i.v. (steady-state concentration, approximately 125 pmol/liter); on the other occasion, NaCl was administered as placebo. Glucagon, cortisol, GH (immunoassays), and catecholamines (radioenzymatic assay) were determined, autonomous and neuroglucopenic symptoms were assessed, and cognitive function was tested at each plateau. Insulin secretion rates were estimated by deconvolution (two-compartment model of C-peptide kinetics). At insulin concentrations of approximately 45 mU/liter, glucose infusion rates were similar with and without GLP-1 (P = 0.26). Only during the euglycemic plateau (4.3 mmol/liter), GLP-1 suppressed glucagon concentrations (4.1 +/- 0.4 vs. 6.5 +/- 0.7 pmol/liter; P = 0.012); at all hypoglycemic plateaus, glucagon increased similarly with GLP-1 or placebo, to maximum values greater than 20 pmol/liter (P = 0.97). The other counterregulatory hormones and autonomic or neuroglucopenic symptom scores increased, and cognitive functions decreased with decreasing glucose concentrations, but there were no significant differences comparing experiments with GLP-1 or placebo, except for a significant reduction of GH responses during hypoglycemia with GLP-1 (P = 0.04). GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion only at plasma glucose concentrations of at least 4.3 mmol/liter. In conclusion, the suppression of glucagon

  4. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (1–37) converts intestinal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 1 is produced through posttranslational processing of proglucagon and acts as a regulator of various homeostatic events. Among its analogs, however, the function of GLP-1-(1–37), synthesized in small amounts in the pancreas, has been unclear. Here, we find that GLP-1-(1–37) induces insulin production in developing and, to a lesser extent, adult intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo, a process mediated by up-regulation of the Notch-related gene ngn3 and its downstream targets, which are involved in pancreatic endocrine differentiation. These cells became responsive to glucose challenge in vitro and reverse insulin-dependent diabetes after implantation into diabetic mice. Our findings suggest that efficient induction of insulin production in intestinal epithelial cells by GLP-1-(1–37) could represent a new therapeutic approach to diabetes mellitus. PMID:12702762

  5. Physiologic and weight-focused treatment strategies for managing type 2 diabetes mellitus: the metformin, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, and insulin (MGI) approach.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Daniel A

    2013-05-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is rising in association with an increase in obesity rates. Current treatment options for patients with T2DM include lifestyle modifications and numerous antidiabetic medications. Despite the availability of effective and well-tolerated treatments, many patients do not achieve recommended glycemic targets. Lack of efficacy is complicated by the wide range of available agents and little specificity in treatment guidelines, thus challenging clinicians to understand the relative benefits and risks of individual options for each patient. In this article, lifestyle intervention strategies and current antidiabetic agents are evaluated for their efficacy, safety, and weight-loss potential. Because of the heterogeneous and progressive nature of T2DM, physicians should advocate approaches that emphasize weight management, limit the risk of hypoglycemia and adverse events, and focus on the core pathophysiologic defects in patients with T2DM. A healthy, plant-based diet that is low in saturated fat and refined carbohydrates but high in whole grains, vegetables, legumes, and fruits, coupled with resistance and aerobic exercise regimens, are recommended for patients with T2DM. When necessary, drug intervention, described in this article as the MGI (metformin, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, and insulin) approach, should begin with metformin and progress to the early addition of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists because of their weight loss potential and ability to target multiple pathophysiologic defects in patients with T2DM. For most patients, treatments that induce weight gain and hypoglycemia should be avoided. Long-acting insulin should be initiated if glycemic control is not achieved with metformin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist combination therapy, focusing on long-acting insulin analogs that induce the least weight gain and have the lowest hypoglycemic risk. Ultimately, a patient

  6. RANTES (CCL5) reduces glucose-dependent secretion of glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2 and impairs glucose-induced insulin secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Pais, Ramona; Zietek, Tamara; Hauner, Hans; Daniel, Hannelore; Skurk, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with elevated circulating levels of the chemokine RANTES and with decreased plasma levels of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). GLP-1 is a peptide secreted from intestinal L-cells upon nutrient ingestion. It enhances insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells and protects from β-cell loss but also promotes satiety and weight loss. In search of chemokines that may reduce GLP-1 secretion we identified RANTES and show that it reduces glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion in the human enteroendocrine cell line NCI-H716, blocked by the antagonist Met-RANTES, and in vivo in mice. RANTES exposure to mouse intestinal tissues lowers transport function of the intestinal glucose transporter SGLT1, and administration in mice reduces plasma GLP-1 and GLP-2 levels after an oral glucose load and thereby impairs insulin secretion. These data show that RANTES is involved in altered secretion of glucagon-like peptide hormones most probably acting through SGLT1, and our study identifies the RANTES-receptor CCR1 as a potential target in diabetes therapy.

  7. Involvement of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in the Regulation of Selective Excretion of Sodium or Chloride Ions by the Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Marina, A S; Kutina, A V; Shakhmatoba, E I; Natochin, Yu V

    2017-02-01

    An increase of total glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentration in the plasma in rats was revealed 5 min after oral, but not intraperitoneal administration of NaCl or Trizma HCl solutions. The increase in GLP-1 level was similar to that after oral glucose administration. After intraperitoneal administration of 2.5% NaCl, GLP-1 mimetic exenatide accelerated natriuresis and urinary chloride excretion. Under conditions of normonatriemia and hyperchloremia induced by injection of 6.7% Trizma HCl, exenatide stimulated chloride excretion and reabsorption of sodium ions in the kidneys. These findings suggest that GLP-1 participates in selective regulation of the balance of sodium and chloride ions.

  8. [Dulaglutide (Trulicity®), a new once-weekly agonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors for type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2016-03-01

    Dulaglutide (Trulicity®) is a new once-weekly agonist of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors indicated in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Phase III clinical trials in AWARD programme demonstrated the efficacy and safety of dulaglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes treated by diet and exercise, metformin, a combination of metformin and a sulfonylurea or metformin and pioglitazone or even by supplements of prandial insulin. In the AWARD programme, dulaglutide (subcutaneous 0.75 or 1.5 mg once weekly) exerted a greater glucose-lowering activity than metformin, sitagliptin, exenatide or insulin glargine, and was non-inferior to liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily. Dulaglutide is currently reimbursed in Belgium after failure of and in combination with a dual oral therapy with metformin and a sulfonylurea or metformin and pioglitazone.

  9. [Impact of anti-diabetic therapy based on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on the cardiovascular risk of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Camafort-Babkowski, Miguel

    2013-08-17

    Anti-diabetic drugs have, in addition to their well-known glucose lowering-effect, different effects in the rest of cardiovascular factors that are associated with diabetes mellitus. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been incorporated to the therapeutic arsenal of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonists on different cardiovascular risk factors, mediated by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on the control of hyperglycaemia and the GLP-1 receptor agonists effect on other cardiovascular risk factors (weight control, blood pressure control, lipid profile and all other cardiovascular risk biomarkers). In addition, we present the emerging evidence with regards to the impact that GLP-1 receptor agonists therapy could have in the reduction of cardiovascular events and the currently ongoing studies addressing this issue.

  10. Imaging exocytosis of single glucagon-like peptide-1 containing granules in a murine enteroendocrine cell line with total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Kawakami, Hayato; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2009-12-04

    To analyze the exocytosis of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) granules, we imaged the motion of GLP-1 granules labeled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) fused to human growth hormone (hGH-Venus) in an enteroendocrine cell line, STC-1 cells, by total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF) microscopy. We found glucose stimulation caused biphasic GLP-1 granule exocytosis: during the first phase, fusion events occurred from two types of granules (previously docked granules and newcomers), and thereafter continuous fusion was observed mostly from newcomers during the second phase. Closely similar to the insulin granule fusion from pancreatic {beta} cells, the regulated biphasic exocytosis from two types of granules may be a common mechanism in glucose-evoked hormone release from endocrine cells.

  11. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Its Class B G Protein–Coupled Receptors: A Long March to Therapeutic Successes

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Chris; Donnelly, Dan; Wootten, Denise; Lau, Jesper; Sexton, Patrick M.; Miller, Laurence J.; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Liao, Jiayu; Fletcher, Madeleine M.; Brown, Alastair J. H.; Zhou, Caihong; Deng, Jiejie; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a class B G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the action of GLP-1, a peptide hormone secreted from three major tissues in humans, enteroendocrine L cells in the distal intestine, α cells in the pancreas, and the central nervous system, which exerts important actions useful in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity, including glucose homeostasis and regulation of gastric motility and food intake. Peptidic analogs of GLP-1 have been successfully developed with enhanced bioavailability and pharmacological activity. Physiologic and biochemical studies with truncated, chimeric, and mutated peptides and GLP-1R variants, together with ligand-bound crystal structures of the extracellular domain and the first three-dimensional structures of the 7-helical transmembrane domain of class B GPCRs, have provided the basis for a two-domain–binding mechanism of GLP-1 with its cognate receptor. Although efforts in discovering therapeutically viable nonpeptidic GLP-1R agonists have been hampered, small-molecule modulators offer complementary chemical tools to peptide analogs to investigate ligand-directed biased cellular signaling of GLP-1R. The integrated pharmacological and structural information of different GLP-1 analogs and homologous receptors give new insights into the molecular determinants of GLP-1R ligand selectivity and functional activity, thereby providing novel opportunities in the design and development of more efficacious agents to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:27630114

  12. Effects of the once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist dulaglutide on ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Keith C; White, William B; Calhoun, David A; Lonn, Eva M; Sager, Philip T; Brunelle, Rocco; Jiang, Honghua H; Threlkeld, Rebecca J; Robertson, Kenneth E; Geiger, Mary Jane

    2014-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus, are associated with small reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and increases in heart rate. However, findings based on clinic measurements do not adequately assess a drug's 24-hour pharmacodynamic profile. The effects of dulaglutide, a once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, on BP and heart rate were investigated using ambulatory BP monitoring. Patients (n=755; 56±10 years; 81% white; 48% women), with type 2 diabetes mellitus, taking ≥1 oral antihyperglycemic medication, with a clinic BP between 90/60 and 140/90 mm Hg were randomized to dulaglutide (1.5 or 0.75 mg) or placebo subcutaneously for 26 weeks. Ambulatory BP monitoring was performed at baseline and at 4, 16, and 26 weeks. The primary end point was change from baseline to week 16 in mean 24-hour SBP, a tree gatekeeping strategy compared the effects of dulaglutide to placebo. Both doses of dulaglutide were noninferior to placebo for changes in 24-hour SBP and diastolic blood pressure, and dulaglutide 1.5 mg significantly reduced SBP (least squares mean difference [95% confidence interval]), -2.8 mm Hg [-4.6, -1.0]; P≤0.001). Dulaglutide 0.75 mg was noninferior to placebo (1.6 bpm; [0.3, 2.9]; P≤0.02) for 24-hour heart rate (least squares mean difference [95% confidence interval]), but dulaglutide 1.5 mg was not (2.8 bpm [1.5, 4.2]). Dulaglutide 1.5 mg was associated with a reduction in 24-hour SBP and an increase in 24-hour heart rate. The mechanisms responsible for the observed effects remain to be clarified.

  13. Anti-atherogenic and anti-inflammatory properties of glucagon-like peptide-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypepide, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Tsutomu; Mori, Yusaku

    2016-04-01

    We reported that native incretins, liraglutide and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i) all confer an anti-atherosclerotic effect in apolipoprotein E-null (Apoe (-/-)) mice. We confirmed the anti-atherogenic property of incretin-related agents in the mouse wire injury model, in which the neointimal formation in the femoral artery is remarkably suppressed. Furthermore, we showed that DPP-4i substantially suppresses plaque formation in coronary arteries with a marked reduction in the accumulation of macrophages in cholesterol-fed rabbits. DPP-4i showed an anti-atherosclerotic effect in Apoe (-/-) mice mainly through the actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypepide. However, the dual incretin receptor antagonists partially attenuated the suppressive effect of DPP-4i on atherosclerosis in diabetic Apoe (-/-) mice, suggesting an incretin-independent mechanism. Exendin-4 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypepide elicited cyclic adenosine monophosphate generation, and suppressed the lipopolysaccharide-induced gene expression of inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in U937 human monocytes. This suppressive effect, however, was attenuated by an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase and mimicked by 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine monophosphate or forskolin. DPP-4i substantially suppressed the lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines without affecting cyclic adenosine monophosphate generation or cell proliferation. DPP-4i more strongly suppressed the lipopolysaccharide-induced gene expression of inflammatory molecules than incretins, most likely through inactivation of CD26. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypepide suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced macrophage foam cell formation in a receptor-dependent manner, which was associated with the downregulation of acyl-coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase-1 and CD36, as

  14. Acute effects of glucagon-like peptide-1, GLP-19-36 amide, and exenatide on mesenteric blood flow, cardiovascular parameters, and biomarkers in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bremholm, Lasse; Andersen, Ulrik B; Hornum, Mads; Hilsted, Linda; Veedfald, Simon; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2017-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, GLP-17-36amide) and its sister peptide glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) influence numerous intestinal functions and GLP-2 greatly increases intestinal blood flow. We hypothesized that GLP-1 also stimulates intestinal blood flow and that this would impact on the overall digestive and cardiovascular effects of the hormone. To investigate the influence of GLP-1 receptor agonism on mesenteric and renal blood flow and cardiovascular parameters, we carried out a double-blinded randomized clinical trial. A total of eight healthy volunteers received high physiological subcutaneous injections of GLP-1, GLP-19-36 amide (bioactive metabolite), exenatide (stable GLP-1 agonist), or saline on four separate days. Blood flow in mesenteric, celiac, and renal arteries was measured by Doppler ultrasound. Blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, and stroke volume were measured continuously using an integrated system. Plasma was analyzed for glucose, GLP-1 (intact and total), exenatide and Pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and serum for insulin and C-peptide. Neither GLP-1, GLP-19-36 amide, exenatide nor saline elicited any changes in blood flow parameters in the mesenteric or renal arteries. GLP-1 significantly increased heart rate (two-way ANOVA, injection [P = 0.0162], time [P = 0.0038], and injection × time [P = 0.082]; Tukey post hoc GLP-1 vs. saline and GLP-19-36amide [P < 0.011]), and tended to increase cardiac output and decrease stroke volume compared to GLP-19-36 amide and saline. Blood pressures were not affected. As expected, glucose levels fell and insulin secretion increased after infusion of both GLP-1 and exenatide.

  15. Evaluating preferences for profiles of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists among injection-naive type 2 diabetes patients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Gelhorn, Heather L; Bacci, Elizabeth D; Poon, Jiat Ling; Boye, Kristina S; Suzuki, Shuichi; Babineaux, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to use a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to estimate patients’ preferences for the treatment features, safety, and efficacy of two specific glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dulaglutide and liraglutide, among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Japan. Methods In Japan, patients with self-reported T2DM and naive to treatment with self-injectable medications were administered a DCE through an in-person interview. The DCE examined the following six attributes of T2DM treatment, each described by two levels: “dosing frequency”, “hemoglobin A1c change”, “weight change”, “type of delivery system”, “frequency of nausea”, and “frequency of hypoglycemia”. Part-worth utilities were estimated using logit models and were used to calculate the relative importance (RI) of each attribute. A chi-square test was used to determine the differences in preferences for the dulaglutide versus liraglutide profiles. Results The final evaluable sample consisted of 182 participants (mean age: 58.9 [standard deviation =10.0] years; 64.3% male; mean body mass index: 26.1 [standard deviation =5.0] kg/m2). The RI values for the attributes in rank order were dosing frequency (44.1%), type of delivery system (26.3%), frequency of nausea (15.1%), frequency of hypoglycemia (7.4%), weight change (6.2%), and hemoglobin A1c change (1.0%). Significantly more participants preferred the dulaglutide profile (94.5%) compared to the liraglutide profile (5.5%; P<0.0001). Conclusion This study elicited the preferences of Japanese T2DM patients for attributes and levels representing the actual characteristics of two existing glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists. In this comparison, dosing frequency and type of delivery system were the two most important characteristics, accounting for >70% of the RI. These findings are similar to those of a previous UK study, providing information about patients’ preferences that

  16. GSK2374697, a long duration glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, reduces postprandial circulating endogenous total GLP-1 and peptide YY in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Hodge, R J; O'Connor-Semmes, R L; Nunez, D J

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of a long-duration glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, GSK2374697, on postprandial endogenous total GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY). Two cohorts of healthy subjects, one normal/overweight and one obese, were randomized to receive GSK2374697 2 mg (n = 8 each) or placebo (n = 4 and n = 2) subcutaneously on days 1, 4 and 7. Samples for plasma endogenous GLP-1 and PYY were collected after breakfast on days -1 and 12. Weighted mean area under the curve (0-4 h) of total GLP-1 and PYY in treated subjects was reduced compared with placebo. The least squares mean difference for change from baseline was -1.24 pmol/l [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.33, -0.16] and -4.47 pmol/l (95% CI -8.74, -0.20) for total GLP-1 and PYY, respectively, in normal/overweight subjects (p < 0.05 for both), and -1.56 (95% CI -2.95, -0.16) and -3.02 (95% CI -8.58, 2.55), respectively, in obese subjects (p < 0.05 for GLP-1). In healthy subjects, GSK2374697 reduced postprandial total GLP-1 and PYY levels, suggesting feedback suppression of enteroendocrine L-cell secretion of these peptides.

  17. New insights into the role of cAMP in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1).

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2010-01-01

    The proglucagon gene (gcg) encodes both glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), produced in pancreatic alpha cells and intestinal endocrine L cells, respectively. The incretin hormone GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion and pro-insulin gene transcription. GLP-1 also enhances pancreatic beta-cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. A long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist, Byetta, has now been developed as the drug in treating type II diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. The expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP, and the crosstalk between PKA and the Wnt signaling pathway, are involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg transcription and GLP-1 production as well. Finally, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic beta cells are also mediated by PKA, Epac, as well as the effector of the Wnt signaling pathway. Together, these novel findings bring us a new insight into the role of cAMP in the production and function of the incretin hormone GLP-1.

  18. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Series of Long-Acting Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Pentasaccharide Conjugates for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Nigel; Patterson, Steven; de Kort, Martin; Moffett, R Charlotte; Wisse, Jeffry A J; Dokter, Wim H A; Bos, Ebo S; Miltenburg, André M M; Flatt, Peter R

    2015-08-01

    The present study details the development of a family of novel D-Ala(8) glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) peptide conjugates by site specific conjugation to an antithrombin III (ATIII) binding carrier pentasaccharide through tetraethylene glycol linkers. All conjugates were found to possess potent insulin-releasing activity. Peptides with short linkers (<25 atoms) conjugated at Lys(34) and Lys(37) displayed strong GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1-R) binding affinity. All D-Ala(8) GLP-1 conjugates exhibited prominent glucose-lowering action. Biological activity of the Lys(37) short-linker peptide was evident up to 72 h post-injection. In agreement, the pharmacokinetic profile of this conjugate (t1/2 , 11 h) was superior to that of the GLP-1-R agonist, exenatide. Once-daily injection of the Lys(37) short-linker peptide in ob/ob mice for 21 days significantly decreased food intake and improved HbA1c and glucose tolerance. Islet size was decreased, with no discernible change in islet number. The beneficial effects of the Lys(37) short-linker peptide were similar to or better than either exenatide or liraglutide, another GLP-1-R agonist. In conclusion, GLP-1 peptides conjugated to an ATIII binding carrier pentasaccharide have a substantially prolonged bioactive profile compatible for possible once-weekly treatment of type 2 diabetes in humans.

  19. Self-inducible secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) that allows MIN6 cells to maintain insulin secretion and insure cell survival.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Koji; Shimoda, Masashi; Hamamoto, Sumiko; Tatsumi, Fuminori; Hirukawa, Hidenori; Tawaramoto, Kazuhito; Kanda, Yukiko; Kaku, Kohei

    2012-02-26

    Based on the hypothesis that MIN6 cells could produce glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) to maintain cell survival, we analyzed the effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4 (Ex4), and antagonist, exendin-(9-39) (Ex9) on cell function and cell differentiation. MIN6 cells expressed proglucagon mRNAs and produced GLP-1, which was accelerated by Ex4 and suppressed by Ex9. Moreover, Ex4 further enhanced glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion, suggesting autocrine loop-contributed amplification of the GLP-1 signal. Ex4 up-regulated cell differentiation- and cell function-related CREBBP, Pdx-1, Pax6, proglucagon, and PC1/3 gene expressions. The confocal laser scanning images revealed that GLP-1 positive cells were dominant in the early stage of cells, but positive for insulin were more prominent in the mature stage of cells. Ex4 accelerated cell viability, while Ex9 and anti-GLP-1 receptor antibody enhanced cell apoptosis. MIN6 cells possess a mechanism of GLP-1 signal amplification in an autocrine fashion, by which the cells maintained insulin production and cell survival.

  20. Magnitude and Variability of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Response in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes up to 2 Years Following Gastric Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Van der Schueren, Bart J.; Homel, Peter; Alam, Mariam; Agenor, Keesandra; Wang, Gary; Reilly, David; Laferrère, Blandine

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the magnitude and variance of the change of glucose and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations, and to identify determinants of glucose control up to 2 years after gastric bypass (GBP). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Glucose and GLP-1 concentrations were measured during an oral glucose challenge before and 1, 12, and 24 months after GBP in 15 severely obese patients with type 2 diabetes. RESULTS Glucose area under the curve from 0 to 180 min (AUC0–180) started decreasing in magnitude (P < 0.05) 1 month after surgery. GLP-1 AUC0–180 increased in magnitude 1 month after GBP (P < 0.05), with increased variance only after 1 year (Pσ2 ≤ 0.001). GLP-1 AUC0–180 was positively associated with insulin AUC0–180 (P = 0.025). CONCLUSIONS The increase in variance of GLP-1 at 1 and 2 years after GBP suggests mechanisms other than proximal gut bypass to explain the enhancement of GLP-1 secretion. The association between GLP-1 and insulin concentrations supports the idea that the incretins are involved in glucose control after GBP. PMID:22124715

  1. Effect of surface chemistry of porous silicon microparticles on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) loading, release and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Huotari, Anne; Xu, Wujun; Mönkäre, Juha; Kovalainen, Miia; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Järvinen, Kristiina

    2013-09-15

    Recently, mesoporous silicon (PSi) microparticles have been shown to extend the duration of action of peptides, reducing the need for frequent injections. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a potential novel treatment for type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether GLP-1 loading into PSi microparticles reduce blood glucose levels over an extended period. GLP-1 (pI 5.4) was loaded and released from the negatively charged thermally oxidized (TOPSi, pI 1.8) and thermally carbonized (TCPSi, pI 2.6) PSi microparticles and from the novel positively charged amine modified microparticles, designated as TOPSi-NH2-D (pI 8.8) and TCPSi-NH2-D (pI 8.8), respectively. The adsorption of GLP-1 onto the PSi microparticles could be increased 3-4-fold by changing the PSi surface charge from negative to positive, indicating that the positive surface charge of PSi promoted an electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged peptide. All the GLP-1 loaded PSi microparticles lowered the blood glucose levels after a single s.c. injection but surprisingly, TOPSi-NH2-D and TCPSi-NH2-D were not able to prolong the effect when compared to TOPSi, TCPSi or GLP-1 solution. However, TOPSi-NH2-D and TCPSi-NH2-D microparticles were able to carry improved payloads of active GLP-1 encouraging continuing further attempts to achieve sustained release.

  2. Activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells in a cAMP-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hejun; Wei, Rui; Wang, Liang; Tian, Qing; Tao, Ming; Ke, Jing; Liu, Ye; Hou, Wenfang; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Jin; Hong, Tianpei

    2014-06-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) promotes pancreatic β-cell regeneration through GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation. However, whether it promotes exocrine pancreas growth and thereby increases the risk of pancreatic cancer has been a topic of debate in recent years. Clinical data and animal studies published so far have been controversial. In the present study, we report that GLP-1R activation with liraglutide inhibited growth and promoted apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro and attenuated pancreatic tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model in vivo. These effects of liraglutide were mediated through activation of cAMP production and consequent inhibition of Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in a GLP-1R-dependent manner. Moreover, we examined GLP-1R expression in human pancreatic cancer tissues and found that 43.3% of tumor tissues were GLP-1R-null. In the GLP-1R-positive tumor tissues (56.7%), the level of GLP-1R was lower compared with that in tumor-adjacent normal pancreatic tissues. Furthermore, the GLP-1R-positive tumors were significantly smaller than the GLP-1R-null tumors. Our study shows for the first time that GLP-1R activation has a cytoreductive effect on human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which may help address safety concerns of GLP-1-based therapies in the context of human pancreatic cancer.

  3. Insulinotropic toxins as molecular probes for analysis of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor-mediated signal transduction in pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Holz, George G.; Leech, Colin A.; Habener, Joel F.

    2010-01-01

    Cholera toxin, pertussis toxin, mastoparan, maitotoxin, and α-latrotoxin are complex protein or polyether-based toxins of bacterial, insect, or phytoplankton origin that act with high potency at the endocrine pancreas to stimulate secretion of insulin from β-cells located in the islets of Langerhans. The remarkable insulinotropic properties of these toxins have attracted considerable attention by virtue of their use as selective molecular probes for analyses of β-cell stimulus-secretion coupling. Targets of the toxins include heptahelical cell surface receptors, GTP-binding proteins, ion channels, Ca2+ stores, and the exocytotic secretory apparatus. Here we review the value of insulinotropic toxins from the perspective of their established use in the study of signal transduction pathways activated by the blood glucose-lowering hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Our analysis of one insulinotropic toxin (α-latrotoxin) leads us to conclude that there exists a process of molecular mimicry whereby the ‘lock and key’analogy inherent to hormone-receptor interactions is reproduced by a toxin related in structure to GLP-1. PMID:11086221

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 cleavage product GLP-1(9-36) amide rescues synaptic plasticity and memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tao; Du, Xueliang; Pick, Joseph E; Sui, Guangzhi; Brownlee, Michael; Klann, Eric

    2012-10-03

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an endogenous intestinal peptide that enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Its natural cleavage product GLP-1(9-36)(amide) possesses distinct properties and does not affect insulin secretion. Here we report that pretreatment of hippocampal slices with GLP-1(9-36)(amide) prevented impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and enhanced long-term depression induced by exogenous amyloid β peptide Aβ((1-42)). Similarly, hippocampal LTP impairments in amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) mutant mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD) were prevented by GLP-1(9-36)(amide). In addition, treatment of APP/PS1 mice with GLP-1(9-36)(amide) at an age at which they display impaired spatial and contextual fear memory resulted in a reversal of their memory defects. At the molecular level, GLP-1(9-36)(amide) reduced elevated levels of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species and restored dysregulated Akt-glycogen synthase kinase-3β signaling in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice. Our findings suggest that GLP-1(9-36)(amide) treatment may have therapeutic potential for AD and other diseases associated with cognitive dysfunction.

  5. Effects of insulin and the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist liraglutide on the kidney proteome in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Liljedahl, Leena; Norlin, Jenny; McGuire, James N; James, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a worldwide disease that affects 9% of the adult world population and type 2 DM accounts for 90% of those. A common consequence of DM is kidney complications, which could lead to kidney failure. We studied the potential effects of treatment with insulin and the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist liraglutide on the diabetic kidney proteome through the use of the db/db mouse model system and mass spectrometry (MS). Multivariate analyses revealed distinct effects of insulin and liraglutide on the db/db kidney proteome, which was seen on the protein levels of, for example, pterin-4 α-carbinolamine dehydratase/dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (PCBD1), neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated-8 (NEDD8), transcription elongation factor-B polypeptide-1 (ELOC) and hepcidin (HEPC). Furthermore, the separation of the insulin, liraglutide and vehicle db/db mouse groups in multivariate analyses was not mainly related to the albumin excretion rate (AER) or the level of glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c%) in the mice. In summary, we show that insulin and liraglutide give rise to separate protein profiles in the db/db mouse kidney.

  6. Application of Adaptive Design Methodology in Development of a Long-Acting Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog (Dulaglutide): Statistical Design and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Skrivanek, Zachary; Berry, Scott; Berry, Don; Chien, Jenny; Geiger, Mary Jane; Anderson, James H.; Gaydos, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Background Dulaglutide (dula, LY2189265), a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 analog, is being developed to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods To foster the development of dula, we designed a two-stage adaptive, dose-finding, inferentially seamless phase 2/3 study. The Bayesian theoretical framework is used to adaptively randomize patients in stage 1 to 7 dula doses and, at the decision point, to either stop for futility or to select up to 2 dula doses for stage 2. After dose selection, patients continue to be randomized to the selected dula doses or comparator arms. Data from patients assigned the selected doses will be pooled across both stages and analyzed with an analysis of covariance model, using baseline hemoglobin A1c and country as covariates. The operating characteristics of the trial were assessed by extensive simulation studies. Results Simulations demonstrated that the adaptive design would identify the correct doses 88% of the time, compared to as low as 6% for a fixed-dose design (the latter value based on frequentist decision rules analogous to the Bayesian decision rules for adaptive design). Conclusions This article discusses the decision rules used to select the dula dose(s); the mathematical details of the adaptive algorithm—including a description of the clinical utility index used to mathematically quantify the desirability of a dose based on safety and efficacy measurements; and a description of the simulation process and results that quantify the operating characteristics of the design. PMID:23294775

  7. A depot-forming glucagon-like peptide-1 fusion protein reduces blood glucose for five days with a single injection

    PubMed Central

    Amiram, M.; Luginbuhl, K. M.; Li, X.; Feinglos, M. N.; Chilkoti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide drugs are an exciting class of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of a variety of diseases; however, their short half-life dictates multiple and frequent injections causing undesirable side-effects. Herein, we describe a novel peptide delivery system that seeks to combine the attractive features of prolonged circulation time with a prolonged release formulation. This system consists of glucagon-like peptide-1, a type-2 diabetes drug fused to a thermally responsive, elastin-like-polypeptide (ELP) that undergoes a soluble-insoluble phase transition between room temperature and body temperature, thereby forming an injectable depot. We synthesized a set of GLP-1-ELP fusions and verified their proteolytic stability and potency in vitro. Significantly, a single injection of depot forming GLP-1-ELP fusions reduced blood glucose levels in mice for up to 5 days, 120 times longer than an injection of the native peptide. These findings demonstrate the unique advantages of using ELPs to release peptide-ELP fusions from a depot combined with enhanced systemic circulation to create a tunable peptide delivery system. PMID:23928357

  8. Glucagon-like peptide 1 interacts with ghrelin and leptin to regulate glucose metabolism and food intake through vagal afferent neuron signaling.

    PubMed

    Ronveaux, Charlotte C; Tomé, Daniel; Raybould, Helen E

    2015-04-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested a possible physiologic role for peripheral glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in regulating glucose metabolism and food intake. The likely site of action of GLP-1 is on vagal afferent neurons (VANs). The vagal afferent pathway is the major neural pathway by which information about ingested nutrients reaches the central nervous system and influences feeding behavior. Peripheral GLP-1 acts on VANs to inhibit food intake. The mechanism of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is unlike other gut-derived receptors; GLP-1Rs change their cellular localization according to feeding status rather than their protein concentrations. It is possible that several gut peptides are involved in mediating GLP-1R translocation. The mechanism of peripheral GLP-1R translocation still needs to be elucidated. We review data supporting the role of peripheral GLP-1 acting on VANs in influencing glucose homeostasis and feeding behavior. We highlight evidence demonstrating that GLP-1 interacts with ghrelin and leptin to induce satiation. Our aim was to understand the mechanism of peripheral GLP-1 in the development of noninvasive antiobesity treatments.

  9. Risk of bone fractures associated with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists' treatment: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Sheng, Hui; Zhang, Manna; Bu, Le; Yang, Peng; Li, Liang; Li, Fei; Sheng, Chunjun; Han, Yuqi; Qu, Shen; Wang, Jiying

    2015-02-01

    Traditional anti-diabetic drugs may have negative or positive effects on risk of bone fractures. Yet the relationship between the new class glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) and risk of bone fractures has not been established. We performed a meta-analysis including randomized controlled trials (RCT) to study the risk of bone fractures associated with liraglutide or exenatide, compared to placebo or other active drugs. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and clinical trial registration websites for published or unpublished RCTs comparing the effects of liraglutide or exenatide with comparators. Only studies with disclosed bone fracture data were included. Separate pooled analysis was performed for liraglutide or exenatide, respectively, by calculating Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (MH-OR). 16 RCTs were identified including a total of 11,206 patients. Liraglutide treatment was associated with a significant reduced risk of incident bone fractures (MH-OR=0.38, 95% CI 0.17-0.87); however, exenatide treatment was associated with an elevated risk of incident bone fractures (MH-OR=2.09, 95% CI 1.03-4.21). Publication bias and heterogeneity between studies were not observed. Our study demonstrated a divergent risk of bone fractures associated with different GLP-1 RA treatments. The current findings need to be confirmed by future well-designed prospective or RCT studies.

  10. Low incidence of anti-drug antibodies in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist dulaglutide.

    PubMed

    Milicevic, Z; Anglin, G; Harper, K; Konrad, R J; Skrivanek, Z; Glaesner, W; Karanikas, C A; Mace, K

    2016-05-01

    Therapeutic administration of peptides may result in anti-drug antibody (ADA) formation, hypersensitivity adverse events (AEs) and reduced efficacy. As a large peptide, the immunogenicity of once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist dulaglutide is of considerable interest. The present study assessed the incidence of treatment-emergent dulaglutide ADAs, hypersensitivity AEs, injection site reactions (ISRs), and glycaemic control in ADA-positive patients in nine phase II and phase III trials (dulaglutide, N = 4006; exenatide, N = 276; non-GLP-1 comparators, N = 1141). Treatment-emergent dulaglutide ADAs were detected using a solid-phase extraction acid dissociation binding assay. Neutralizing ADAs were detected using a cell-based assay derived from human endothelial kidney cells (HEK293). A total of 64 dulaglutide-treated patients (1.6% of the population) tested ADA-positive versus eight (0.7%) from the non-GLP-1 comparator group. Of these 64 patients, 34 (0.9%) had dulaglutide-neutralizing ADAs, 36 (0.9%) had native-sequence GLP-1 (nsGLP-1) cross-reactive ADAs and four (0.1%) had nsGLP-1 neutralization ADAs. The incidence of hypersensitivity AEs and ISRs was similar in the dulaglutide versus placebo groups. No dulaglutide ADA-positive patient reported hypersensitivity AEs. Because of the low incidence of ADAs, it was not possible to establish their effect on glycaemic control.

  11. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 improves reference memory performance and decreases immobility in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Isacson, Ruben; Nielsen, Elisabet; Dannaeus, Karin; Bertilsson, Göran; Patrone, Cesare; Zachrisson, Olof; Wikström, Lilian

    2011-01-10

    We have earlier shown that the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 stimulates neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and excerts anti-parkinsonian behavior. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of exendin-4 treatment on hippocampus-associated cognitive and mood-related behavior in adult rodents. To investigate potential effects of exendin-4 on hippocampal function, radial maze and forced swim test were employed. The time necessary to solve a radial maze task and the duration of immobility in the forced swim test were significantly reduced compared to respective vehicle groups if the animals had received exendin-4 during 1-2weeks before testing. In contrast to the positive control imipramine, single administration of exendin-4 1h before the challenge in the forced swim test had no effect. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine, a marker for DNA synthesis, as well as doublecortin expression was increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following chronic treatment with exendin-4 compared to vehicle-treated controls. The neurogenic effect of exendin-4 on hippocampus was confirmed by quantitative PCR showing an upregulation of mRNA expression for Ki-67, doublecortin and Mash-1. Since exendin-4 significantly improves hippocampus-associated behavior in adult rodents, it may be a candidate for alleviation of mood and cognitive disorders.

  12. A novel neurotrophic property of glucagon-like peptide 1: a promoter of nerve growth factor-mediated differentiation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Perry, TracyAnn; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Chen, Demao; Zhou, Jie; Shaw, Karen T Y; Egan, Josephine M; Greig, Nigel H

    2002-03-01

    The insulinotropic hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)-amide (GLP-1) has potent effects on glucose-dependent insulin secretion, insulin gene expression, and pancreatic islet cell formation and is presently in clinical trials as a therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We report on the effects of GLP-1 and two of its long-acting analogs, exendin-4 and exendin-4 WOT, on neuronal proliferation and differentiation, and on the metabolism of two neuronal proteins in the rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell line, which has been shown to express the GLP-1 receptor. We observed that GLP-1 and exendin-4 induced neurite outgrowth in a manner similar to nerve growth factor (NGF), which was reversed by coincubation with the selective GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39). Furthermore, exendin-4 could promote NGF-initiated differentiation and may rescue degenerating cells after NGF-mediated withdrawal. These effects were induced in the absence of cellular dysfunction and toxicity as quantitatively measured by 3-(4,5-cimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays, respectively. Our findings suggest that such peptides may be used in reversing or halting the neurodegenerative process observed in neurodegenerative diseases, such as the peripheral neuropathy associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Due to its novel twin action, GLP-1 and exendin-4 have therapeutic potential for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and these central nervous system disorders.

  13. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Imaging with [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-Exendin-4 for the Diagnosis of Recurrence or Dissemination of Medullary Thyroid Cancer: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Pach, D.; Sowa-Staszczak, A.; Jabrocka-Hybel, A.; Stefańska, A.; Tomaszuk, M.; Mikołajczak, R.; Janota, B.; Trofimiuk-Müldner, M.; Przybylik-Mazurek, E.; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Epidemiological studies on medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) have shown that neither a change in stage at diagnosis nor improvement in survival has occurred during the past 30 years. In patients with detectable serum calcitonin and no clinically apparent disease, a careful search for local recurrence, and nodal or distant metastases, should be performed. Conventional imaging modalities will not show any disease until basal serum calcitonin is at least 150 pg/mL. The objective of the study was to present the first experience with labelled glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 in the visualisation of MTC in humans. Material and Method. Four patients aged 22–74 years (two with sporadic and two with MEN2 syndrome-related disseminated MTC) were enrolled in the study. In all patients, GLP-1 receptor imaging was performed. Results. High-quality images were obtained in all patients. All previously known MTC lesions have been confirmed in GLP-1 scintigraphy. Moreover, one additional liver lesion was detected in sporadic MTC male patient. Conclusions. GLP-1 receptor imaging with [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 is able to detect MTC lesions. GLP-1 scintigraphy can serve as a confirmatory test in MTC patients, in whom other imaging procedures are inconsistent. PMID:23606839

  14. Desensitization of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors in insulin-secreting beta TC3 cells: role of PKA-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Gromada, J.; Dissing, S.; Rorsman, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. The cellular processes involved in the desensitization of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors were investigated by measurements of the glucagon-like peptide 1(7-36)amide (GLP-1(7-36)amide)-induced increases in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in insulin-secreting beta TC3 cells. 2. In the presence of 11.2 mM glucose, stimulation with GLP-1(7-36)amide led to a small membrane depolarization (< 10 mV), induction of electrical activity and a rapid increase in [Ca2+]i. The increase in [Ca2+]i was not observed in the presence of the L-type Ca(2+)-channel antagonist nifedipine. However, nifedipine was ineffective when applied after addition of GLP-1(7-36)amide. 3. The increase in [Ca2+]i evoked by GLP-1-(7-36)amide was transient and even in the continued presence of the agonist, [Ca2+]i returned to the basal value within 4-5 min. The latter process was slowed, but not prevented, by inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) by staurosporine and Ro31-8220. 4. Short pretreatment of the cells with the phorbol ester, 4-beta-phorbol-12-beta-myristate-13-alpha-acetate (PMA), an activator of PKC, reduced the GLP-1(7-36)amide-evoked increase in [Ca2+]i by 75%. This effect of PMA was fully reversed by staurosporine and Ro31-8220. 5. The ability of GLP-1(7-36)amide to increase [Ca2+]i disappeared upon pre-exposure of the cells to the hormone (desensitization). This process was maximal within 5 min of exposure to the agonist. Following removal of the agonist from the medium, the ability to respond to subsequent stimulation by GLP-1(7-36)amide recovered gradually with time; half and complete recovery requiring > 20 min and 60 min, respectively. The desensitizing action of GLP-1(7-36)amide persisted in the presence of either staurosporine or forskolin and did not require an elevation of [Ca2+]i. 6. Our data suggest that the GLP-1(7-36)amide-evoked increase in [Ca2+]i is initiated by Ca(2+)-influx though voltage-dependent and nifedipine-sensitive L-type Ca2+ channels but

  15. l-Glutamine and Whole Protein Restore First-Phase Insulin Response and Increase Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Samocha-Bonet, Dorit; Chisholm, Don J.; Holst, Jens J.; Greenfield, Jerry R.

    2015-01-01

    l-glutamine triggers glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release from L cells in vitro and when ingested pre-meal, decreases postprandial glycaemia and increases circulating insulin and GLP-1 in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. We aimed to evaluate the effect of oral l-glutamine, compared with whole protein low in glutamine, on insulin response in well-controlled T2D patients. In a randomized study with a crossover design, T2D patients (n = 10, 6 men) aged 65.1 ± 5.8, with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) 6.6% ± 0.7% (48 ± 8 mmol/mol), received oral l-glutamine (25 g), protein (25 g) or water, followed by an intravenous glucose bolus (0.3 g/kg) and hyperglycemic glucose clamp for 2 h. Blood was frequently collected for analyses of glucose, serum insulin and plasma total and active GLP-1 and area under the curve of glucose, insulin, total and active GLP-1 excursions calculated. Treatments were tested 1–2 weeks apart. Both l-glutamine and protein increased first-phase insulin response (p ≤ 0.02). Protein (p = 0.05), but not l-glutamine (p = 0.2), increased second-phase insulin response. Total GLP-1 was increased by both l-glutamine and protein (p ≤ 0.02). We conclude that oral l-glutamine and whole protein are similarly effective in restoring first-phase insulin response in T2D patients. Larger studies are required to further investigate the utility of similar approaches in improving insulin response in diabetes. PMID:25811109

  16. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 and Its Analogs Act in the Dorsal Raphe and Modulate Central Serotonin to Reduce Appetite and Body Weight.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Richard, Jennifer E; Eerola, Kim; López-Ferreras, Lorena; Banke, Elin; Hansson, Caroline; Nissbrandt, Hans; Berqquist, Filip; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Lamy, Christophe M; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2017-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and serotonin play critical roles in energy balance regulation. Both systems are exploited clinically as antiobesity strategies. Surprisingly, whether they interact in order to regulate energy balance is poorly understood. Here we investigated mechanisms by which GLP-1 and serotonin interact at the level of the central nervous system. Serotonin depletion impaired the ability of exendin-4, a clinically used GLP-1 analog, to reduce body weight in rats, suggesting that serotonin is a critical mediator of the energy balance impact of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation. Serotonin turnover and expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 2A (5-HT2A) and 5-HT2C serotonin receptors in the hypothalamus were altered by GLP-1R activation. We demonstrate that the 5-HT2A, but surprisingly not the 5-HT2C, receptor is critical for weight loss, anorexia, and fat mass reduction induced by central GLP-1R activation. Importantly, central 5-HT2A receptors are also required for peripherally injected liraglutide to reduce feeding and weight. Dorsal raphe (DR) harbors cell bodies of serotonin-producing neurons that supply serotonin to the hypothalamic nuclei. We show that GLP-1R stimulation in DR is sufficient to induce hypophagia and increase the electrical activity of the DR serotonin neurons. Finally, our results disassociate brain metabolic and emotionality pathways impacted by GLP-1R activation. This study identifies serotonin as a new critical neural substrate for GLP-1 impact on energy homeostasis and expands the current map of brain areas impacted by GLP-1R activation.

  17. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor induced suppression of food intake, and body weight is mediated by central IL-1 and IL-6.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Rozita; Palsdottir, Vilborg; Collander, Jim; Anesten, Fredrik; Vogel, Heike; Langlet, Fanny; Jaschke, Alexander; Schürmann, Annette; Prévot, Vincent; Shao, Ruijin; Jansson, John-Olov; Skibicka, Karolina Patrycja

    2013-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), produced in the intestine and the brain, can stimulate insulin secretion from the pancreas and alleviate type 2 diabetes. The cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) may enhance insulin secretion from β-cells by stimulating peripheral GLP-1 production. GLP-1 and its analogs also reduce food intake and body weight, clinically beneficial actions that are likely exerted at the level of the CNS, but otherwise are poorly understood. The cytokines IL-6 and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) may exert an anti-obesity effect in the CNS during health. Here we found that central injection of a clinically used GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4, potently increased the expression of IL-6 in the hypothalamus (11-fold) and the hindbrain (4-fold) and of IL-1β in the hypothalamus, without changing the expression of other inflammation-associated genes. Furthermore, hypothalamic and hindbrain interleukin-associated intracellular signals [phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3) and suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1)] were also elevated by exendin-4. Pharmacologic disruption of CNS IL-1 receptor or IL-6 biological activity attenuated anorexia and body weight loss induced by central exendin-4 administration in a rat. Simultaneous blockade of IL-1 and IL-6 activity led to a more potent attenuation of exendin-4 effects on food intake. Mice with global IL-1 receptor gene knockout or central IL-6 receptor knockdown showed attenuated decrease in food intake and body weight in response to peripheral exendin-4 treatment. GLP-1 receptor activation in the mouse neuronal Neuro2A cell line also resulted in increased IL-6 expression. These data outline a previously unidentified role of the central IL-1 and IL-6 in mediating the anorexic and body weight loss effects of GLP-1 receptor activation.

  18. Mosapride citrate, a 5-HT₄ receptor agonist, increased the plasma active and total glucagon-like peptide-1 levels in non-diabetic men.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kazutaka; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Masuda, Kiyomi; Togashi, Yu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    Mosapride citrate, a selective agonist of the 5-hydroxytryptaine (5-HT)₄ receptor, is typically used to treat heartburn, nausea, and vomiting associated with chronic gastritis or to prepare for a barium enema X-ray examination. Mosapride citrate reportedly improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. As mosapride citrate activates the motility of the gastrointestinal tract, we hypothesized that mosapride citrate affects incretin secretion. We examined the effect of the administration of mosapride citrate on the plasma glucose, serum insulin, plasma glucagon, and plasma incretin levels before breakfast and at 60, 120, and 180 min after breakfast in men with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to exclude gastropathy. Mosapride citrate was administered according to two different intake schedules (C: control (no drug), M: mosapride citrate 20 mg) in each of the subject groups. The area under the curve (AUC) of the plasma glucose levels was smaller in the M group than in the C group. The time profiles for the serum insulin levels at 60 and 120 min after treatment with mosapride citrate tended to be higher, although the difference was not statistically significant. The AUCs of the plasma active and total glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels were significantly larger in the M group than in the C group. No significant difference in the AUC of the plasma glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) level was observed between the two groups. Our results suggest that mosapride citrate may have an antidiabetic effect by increasing GLP-1 secretion.

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) reduces mortality and improves lung function in a model of experimental obstructive lung disease in female mice.

    PubMed

    Viby, Niels-Erik; Isidor, Marie S; Buggeskov, Katrine B; Poulsen, Steen S; Hansen, Jacob B; Kissow, Hannelouise

    2013-12-01

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an important insulin secretagogue and GLP-1 analogs are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 displays antiinflammatory and surfactant-releasing effects. Thus, we hypothesize that treatment with GLP-1 analogs will improve pulmonary function in a mouse model of obstructive lung disease. Female mice were sensitized with injected ovalbumin and treated with GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists. Exacerbation was induced with inhalations of ovalbumin and lipopolysaccharide. Lung function was evaluated with a measurement of enhanced pause in a whole-body plethysmograph. mRNA levels of GLP-1R, surfactants (SFTPs), and a number of inflammatory markers were measured. GLP-1R was highly expressed in lung tissue. Mice treated with GLP-1R agonists had a noticeably better clinical appearance than the control group. Enhanced pause increased dramatically at day 17 in all control mice, but the increase was significantly less in the groups of GLP-1R agonist-treated mice (P < .001). Survival proportions were significantly increased in GLP-1R agonist-treated mice (P < .01). SFTPB and SFTPA were down-regulated and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were increased in mice with obstructive lung disease, but levels were largely unaffected by GLP-1R agonist treatment. These results show that GLP-1R agonists have potential therapeutic potential in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, by decreasing the severity of acute exacerbations. The mechanism of action does not seem to be the modulation of inflammation and SFTP expression.

  20. Expression of cholecystokinin2-receptor in rat and human L cells and the stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion by gastrin treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Cao, Xun; Liu, Xiao-Min

    2015-03-01

    Gastrin is a gastrointestinal hormone secreted by G cells. Hypergastrinemia can improve blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. These positive effects are primarily due to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells. In recent years, many receptors that regulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) have been identified in enteroendocrine L cell lines. This led us to hypothesize that, in addition to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells, L cells also express cholecystokinin2-receptor (CCK2R), which may regulate GLP-1 secretion and have synergistic effects on glucose homeostasis. Our research provides a preliminary analysis of CCK2R expression and the stimulating effect of gastrin treatment on GLP-1 secretion in a human endocrine L cell line, using RT-PCR, Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and ELISA analyses. The expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3, which regulate GLP-1 biosynthesis, were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Double immunofluorescence labeling was utilized to assess the intracellular localization of CCK2R and GLP-1 in L cells harvested from rat colon tissue. Our results showed that CCK2R was expressed in both the human L cell line and the rat L cells. We also showed that treatment with gastrin, a CCK2R agonist, stimulated the secretion of GLP-1, and that this effect was likely due to increased expression of proglucagon and PCSK1 (also known as prohormone convertase 3 (PC3 gene)). These results not only provide a basis for the role gastrin may play in intestinal L cells, and may also provide the basis for the development of a method of gastrin-mediated glycemic regulation.

  1. A novel dual-glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor agonist is neuroprotective in transient focal cerebral ischemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Han, Ling; Hölscher, Christian; Xue, Guo-Fang; Li, Guanglai; Li, Dongfang

    2016-01-06

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor agonists have been shown to be neuroprotective in previous studies in animal models of Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. Recently, novel dual-GLP-1/GIP receptor agonists that activate both receptors (DA) were developed to treat diabetes. We tested the protective effects of a novel potent DA against middle cerebral artery occlusion injury in rats and compared it with a potent GLP-1 analog, Val(8)-GLP-1(glu-PAL). Animals were evaluated for neurologic deficit score, infarct volume, and immunohistochemical analyses of the brain at several time points after ischemia. The Val(8)-GLP-1(glu-PAL)-treated and DA-treated groups showed significantly reduced scores of neurological dysfunction, cerebral infarction size, and percentage of TUNEL-positive apoptotic neurons. Furthermore, the expression of the apoptosis marker Bax, the inflammation marker iNOS, and the survival marker Bcl-2 was significantly increased. The DA-treated group was better protected against neurodegeneration than the Val(8)-GLP-1(glu-PAL) group, and the scores of neurological dysfunction, cerebral infarction size, and expression of Bcl-2 were higher, whereas the percentage of TUNEL-positive neurons and the levels of Bax and iNOS were lower in the DA group. DA treatment reduced the infarct volume and improved the functional deficit. It also suppressed the inflammatory response and cell apoptosis after reperfusion. In conclusion, the novel GIP and GLP-1 dual-receptor agonist is more neuroprotective than a GLP-1 receptor agonist in key biomarkers of neuronal degeneration.

  2. Allosteric modulation of the activity of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) metabolite GLP-1 9-36 amide at the GLP-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Naichang; Lu, Jing; Willars, Gary B

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) released from intestinal L cells in response to nutrients has many physiological effects but particularly enhances glucose-dependent insulin release through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). GLP-1 7-36 amide, the predominant circulating active form of GLP-1, is rapidly truncated by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 to GLP-1 9-36 amide, which is generally considered inactive. Given its physiological roles, the GLP-1R is targeted for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Recently 'compound 2' has been described as both an agonist and positive allosteric modulator of GLP-1 7-36 amide affinity, but not potency, at the GLP-1R. Importantly, we demonstrated previously that exendin 9-39, generally considered a GLP-1R antagonist, enhances compound 2 efficacy (or vice versa) at the GLP-1R. Given that GLP-1 9-36 amide is the major circulating form of GLP-1 post-prandially and is a low affinity weak partial agonist or antagonist at the GLP-1R, we investigated interaction between this metabolite and compound 2 in a cell line with recombinant expression of the human GLP-1R and the rat insulinoma cell line, INS-1E, with native expression of the GLP-1R. We show compound 2 markedly enhances efficacy and potency of GLP-1 9-36 amide for key cellular responses including AMP generation, Ca(2+) signaling and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Thus, metabolites of peptide hormones including GLP-1 that are often considered inactive may provide a means of manipulating key aspects of receptor function and a novel therapeutic strategy.

  3. Second extracellular loop of human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) has a critical role in GLP-1 peptide binding and receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Koole, Cassandra; Wootten, Denise; Simms, John; Miller, Laurence J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M

    2012-02-03

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a therapeutically important family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is pleiotropically coupled to multiple signaling effectors and, with actions including regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion, is one of the key targets in the management of type II diabetes mellitus. However, there is limited understanding of the role of the receptor core in orthosteric ligand binding and biological activity. To assess involvement of the extracellular loop (ECL) 2 in ligand-receptor interactions and receptor activation, we performed alanine scanning mutagenesis of loop residues and assessed the impact on receptor expression and GLP-1(1-36)-NH(2) or GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2) binding and activation of three physiologically relevant signaling pathways as follows: cAMP formation, intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(i)) mobilization, and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (pERK1/2). Although antagonist peptide binding was unaltered, almost all mutations affected GLP-1 peptide agonist binding and/or coupling efficacy, indicating an important role in receptor activation. However, mutation of several residues displayed distinct pathway responses with respect to wild type receptor, including Arg-299 and Tyr-305, where mutation significantly enhanced both GLP-1(1-36)-NH(2)- and GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2)-mediated signaling bias for pERK1/2. In addition, mutation of Cys-296, Trp-297, Asn-300, Asn-302, and Leu-307 significantly increased GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2)-mediated signaling bias toward pERK1/2. Of all mutants studied, only mutation of Trp-306 to alanine abolished all biological activity. These data suggest a critical role of ECL2 of the GLP-1R in the activation transition(s) of the receptor and the importance of this region in the determination of both GLP-1 peptide- and pathway-specific effects.

  4. Characterization of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, in rat partial and full nigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, have been demonstrated to promote neuroprotection in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron loss. In this report, we characterized the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide (500µg/kg/day, s.c.) in the context of a partial or advanced (full) 6-OHDA induced nigral lesion in the rat. Rats received a low (3µg, partial lesion) or high (13.5µg, full lesion) 6-OHDA dose stereotaxically injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (n=17-20 rats per experimental group). Six weeks after induction of a partial nigral dopaminergic lesion, vehicle or liraglutide was administered for four weeks. In the full lesion model, vehicle dosing or liraglutide treatment was applied for a total of six weeks starting three weeks pre-lesion, or administered for three weeks starting on the lesion day. Quantitative stereology was applied to assess the total number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive dopaminergic neurons. As compared to vehicle controls, liraglutide had no effect on the rotational responsiveness to d-amphetamine or apomorphine, respectively. In correspondence, while numbers of TH-positive nigral neurons were significantly reduced in the lesion side (partial lesion ≈55%; full lesion ≈90%) liraglutide administration had no influence dopaminergic neuronal loss in either PD model setting. In conclusion, liraglutide showed no neuroprotective effects in the context of moderate or substantial midbrain dopaminergic neuronal loss and associated functional motor deficits in the rat 6-OHDA lesion model of PD.

  5. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, protects against amyloid-β peptide-induced impairment of spatial learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Tao; Ye-Tian; Yuan-Li; Zhang, Ge-Juan; Liu, Zhi-Qin; Di, Zheng-Li; Ying, Xiao-Ping; Fang, Yan; Song, Er-Fei; Qi, Jin-Shun; Pan, Yan-Fang

    2016-05-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) share specific molecular mechanisms, and agents with proven efficacy in one may be useful against the other. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 has similar properties to GLP-1 and is currently in clinical use for T2DM treatment. Thus, this study was designed to characterize the effects of exendin-4 on the impairment of learning and memory induced by amyloid protein (Aβ) and its probable molecular underlying mechanisms. The results showed that (1) intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Aβ1-42 resulted in a significant decline of spatial learning and memory of rats in water maze tests; (2) pretreatment with exendin-4 effectively and dose-dependently protected against the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spatial learning and memory; (3) exendin-4 treatment significantly decreased the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 and increased the expression of Bcl2 in Aβ1-42-induced Alzheimer's rats. The vision and swimming speed of the rats among all groups in the visible platform tests did not show any difference. These findings indicate that systemic pretreatment with exendin-4 can effectively prevent the behavioral impairment induced by neurotoxic Aβ1-42, and the underlying protective mechanism of exendin-4 may be involved in the Bcl2, Bax and caspase-3 pathways. Thus, the application of exendin-4 or the activation of its signaling pathways may be a promising strategy to ameliorate the degenerative processes observed in AD.

  6. Black widow spider α-latrotoxin: a presynaptic neurotoxin that shares structural homology with the glucagon-like peptide-1 family of insulin secretagogic hormones

    PubMed Central

    Holz, George G.; Habener, Joel F.

    2010-01-01

    α-Latrotoxin is a presynaptic neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the black widow spider Latrodectus tredecimguttatus. It exerts toxic effects in the vertebrate central nervous system by depolarizing neurons, by increasing [Ca2+]i and by stimulating uncontrolled exocytosis of neurotransmitters from nerve terminals. The actions of α-latrotoxin are mediated, in part, by a GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor referred to as CIRL or latrophilin. Exendin-4 is also a venom toxin, and it is derived from the salivary gland of the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. It acts as an agonist at the receptor for glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)-amide (GLP-1), thereby stimulating secretion of insulin from pancreatic β-cells of the islets of Langerhans. Here is reported a surprising structural homology between α-latrotoxin and exendin-4 that is also apparent amongst all members of the GLP-1-like family of secretagogic hormones (GLP-1, glucagon, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, secretin, pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide). On the basis of this homology, we report the synthesis and initial characterization of a chimeric peptide (Black Widow GLP-1) that stimulates Ca2+ signaling and insulin secretion in human β-cells and MIN6 insulinoma cells. It is also reported here that the GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors for α-latrotoxin and exendin-4 share highly significant structural similarity in their extracellularly-oriented amino-termini. We propose that molecular mimicry has generated conserved structural motifs in secretagogic toxins and their receptors, thereby explaining the evolution of defense or predatory strategies that are shared in common amongst distantly related species including spiders, lizards, and snakes. Evidently, the toxic effects of α-latrotoxin and exendin-4 are explained by their ability to interact with GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors that normally mediate the actions of endogenous hormones or neuropeptides. PMID:9972293

  7. Combined contributions of over-secreted glucagon-like peptide 1 and suppressed insulin secretion to hyperglycemia induced by gatifloxacin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yunli; Wang, Xinting; Liu, Can; Yao, Dan; Hu, Mengyue; Li, Jia; Hu, Nan; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2013-02-01

    Accumulating evidences have showed that gatifloxacin causes dysglycemia in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Our preliminary study demonstrated that gatifloxacin stimulated glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal cells. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release and dysglycemia in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and explore the possible mechanisms. Oral administration of gatifloxacin (100 mg/kg/day and 200 mg/kg/day) for 3 and 12 days led to marked elevation of GLP-1 levels, accompanied by significant decrease in insulin levels and increase in plasma glucose. Similar results were found in normal rats treated with 3-day gatifloxacin. Gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release was further confirmed in NCI-H716 cells, which was abolished by diazoxide, a K{sub ATP} channel opener. QT-PCR analysis showed that gatifloxacin also upregulated expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3 mRNA. To clarify the contradiction on elevated GLP-1 without insulinotropic effect, effects of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin on insulin release were investigated using INS-1 cells. We found that short exposure (2 h) to GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion and biosynthesis, whereas long exposure (24 h and 48 h) to high level of GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. Moreover, we also confirmed gatifloxacin acutely stimulated insulin secretion while chronically inhibited insulin biosynthesis. All the results gave an inference that gatifloxacin stimulated over-secretion of GLP-1, in turn, high levels of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin synergistically impaired insulin release, worsening hyperglycemia. -- Highlights: ► Gatifloxacin induced hyperglycemia both in diabetic rats and normal rats. ► Gatifloxacin enhanced GLP-1 secretion but inhibited insulin secretion in rats. ► Long-term exposure to high GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. ► GLP-1 over-secretion may be

  8. In vivo dual-delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor through composites prepared by microfluidics for diabetes therapy

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, F.; Shrestha, N.; Gomes, M. J.; Herranz-Blanco, B.; Liu, D.; Hirvonen, J. J.; Granja, P. L.; Santos, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Oral delivery of proteins is still a challenge in the pharmaceutical field. Nanoparticles are among the most promising carrier systems for the oral delivery of proteins by increasing their oral bioavailability. However, most of the existent data regarding nanosystems for oral protein delivery is from in vitro studies, lacking in vivo experiments to evaluate the efficacy of these systems. Herein, a multifunctional composite system, tailored by droplet microfluidics, was used for dual delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (iDPP4) in vivo. Oral delivery of GLP-1 with nano- or micro-systems has been studied before, but the simultaneous nanodelivery of GLP-1 with iDPP4 is a novel strategy presented here. The type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rat model, induced through the combined administration of streptozotocin and nicotinamide, a non-obese model of T2DM, was used. The combination of both drugs resulted in an increase in the hypoglycemic effects in a sustained, but prolonged manner, where the iDPP4 improved the therapeutic efficacy of GLP-1. Four hours after the oral administration of the system, blood glucose levels were decreased by 44%, and were constant for another 4 h, representing half of the glucose area under the curve when compared to the control. An enhancement of the plasmatic insulin levels was also observed 6 h after the oral administration of the dual-drug composite system and, although no statistically significant differences existed, the amount of pancreatic insulin was also higher. These are promising results for the oral delivery of GLP-1 to be pursued further in a chronic diabetic model study. PMID:27150301

  9. An interaction between glucagon-like peptide-1 and adenosine contributes to cardioprotection of a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Madoka; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Satoru; Kato, Hisakazu; Asano, Yoshihiro; Shinozaki, Yoshihiro; Mori, Hidezo; Minamino, Tetsuo; Asakura, Masanori; Sugimachi, Masaru; Mochizuki, Naoki; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2015-05-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors suppress the metabolism of the potent antihyperglycemic hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). DPP4 was recently shown to provide cardioprotection through a reduction of infarct size, but the mechanism for this remains elusive. Known interactions between DPP4 and adenosine deaminase (ADA) suggest an involvement of adenosine signaling in DPP4 inhibitor-mediated cardioprotection. We tested whether the protective mechanism of the DPP4 inhibitor alogliptin against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury involves GLP-1- and/or adenosine-dependent signaling in canine hearts. In anesthetized dogs, the coronary artery was occluded for 90 min followed by reperfusion for 6 h. A 4-day pretreatment with alogliptin reduced the infarct size from 43.1 ± 2.5% to 17.1 ± 5.0% without affecting collateral flow and hemodynamic parameters, indicating a potent antinecrotic effect. Alogliptin also suppressed apoptosis as demonstrated by the following analysis: 1) reduction in the Bax-to-Bcl2 ratio; 2) cytochrome c release, 3) an increase in Bad phosphorylation in the cytosolic fraction; and 4) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. This DPP4 inhibitor did not affect blood ADA activity or adenosine concentrations. In contrast, the nonselective adenosine receptor blocker 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline (8SPT) completely blunted the effect of alogliptin. Alogliptin did not affect Erk1/2 phosphorylation, but it did stimulate phosphorylation of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Only 8SPT prevented alogliptin-induced CREB phosphorylation. In conclusion, the DPP4 inhibitor alogliptin suppresses ischemia-reperfusion injury via adenosine receptor- and CREB-dependent signaling pathways.

  10. The Role of the Pharmacist in Managing Type 2 Diabetes with Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists as Add-On Therapy.

    PubMed

    Meece, Jerry

    2017-02-16

    The prevalence and associated clinical burden of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing in the USA and other countries. As a consequence, the role of the pharmacist in managing T2D is expanding, and it is becoming increasingly important for pharmacists to have a complete understanding of the disease course and treatment options. Pharmacists have a key role in the use of injectable therapies, including incretin-based treatment with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs). This article discusses the role of the pharmacist in the management of patients with T2D, particularly with respect to the use of GLP-1RAs to achieve glycemic control. GLP-1RAs are a class of injectable agents used as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with T2D. GLP-1RAs have been shown to lower glucose levels, slow gastric emptying, enhance satiety, and reduce body weight without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia. GLP-1RAs currently approved in the USA include exenatide twice daily, liraglutide once daily, and albiglutide, dulaglutide, and exenatide once weekly. Pharmacists can work with physicians to help identify patients for whom GLP-1RA therapy is appropriate. In addition, pharmacists can educate patients regarding medication storage, preparation, and injection techniques, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) targets, pre- and post-meal blood glucose goals, adverse events and management strategies, and the long-term benefits of reducing HbA1c. As members of the diabetes care team, pharmacists play an important role in improving patient outcomes.

  11. Characterization of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) gene in chickens: functional analysis, tissue distribution, and identification of its transcript variants.

    PubMed

    Huang, G; Li, J; Fu, H; Yan, Z; Bu, G; He, X; Wang, Y

    2012-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor plays a critical role in mediating the biological actions of GLP1 in mammals and fish; however, the gene structure, expression, and functionality of GLP1 receptor (GLP1R) remain largely unknown in birds. In this study, the full-length cDNA of chicken GLP1R (cGLP1R) was first cloned from brain tissue by reverse transcription PCR. The putative cGLP1R is 459 amino acids in length and shares high amino acid sequence identity with that of human (79%), rat (80%), and Xenopus (75%). Using a pGL3-CRE luciferase reporter system, we found that cGLP1R expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells could be potently activated by cGLP1 (EC(50), 0.11 nM) but not by other structurally related peptides, indicating that cGLP1R is a functional receptor specific to cGLP1. Interestingly, in addition to identification of the transcript encoding cGLP1R of 459 amino acids, eight transcript variants, which were generated by alternative mRNA splicing and predicted to encode either C-terminally or N-terminally truncated cGLP1Rs, were also identified from chicken brain or testis. In line with this finding, multiple cGLP1R transcripts were detected to be expressed in most chicken tissues examined, including pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, and various brain regions by reverse transcription PCR. Using the dual-luciferase reporter assay system, we further found that the 5'-flanking region of cGLP1R gene displays promoter activities in cultured HepG2 and HEK293 cells, suggesting that it may control cGLP1R gene transcription in chicken tissues, including nonpancreatic tissues. Taken together, the results from the present study establish a molecular basis to investigate the roles of GLP1 in chickens.

  12. Refinement of glucagon-like peptide 1 docking to its intact receptor using mid-region photolabile probes and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence J; Chen, Quan; Lam, Polo C-H; Pinon, Delia I; Sexton, Patrick M; Abagyan, Ruben; Dong, Maoqing

    2011-05-06

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is an important drug target within the B family of G protein-coupled receptors. Its natural agonist ligand, GLP1, has incretin-like actions and the receptor is a recognized target for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino terminus of the GLP1 receptor and several close family members, the molecular basis for GLP1 binding to and activation of the intact receptor remains unclear. We previously demonstrated molecular approximations between amino- and carboxyl-terminal residues of GLP1 and its receptor. In this work, we study spatial approximations with the mid-region of this peptide to gain insights into the orientation of the intact receptor and the ligand-receptor complex. We have prepared two new photolabile probes incorporating a p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine into positions 16 and 20 of GLP1(7-36). Both probes bound to the GLP1 receptor specifically and with high affinity. These were each fully efficacious agonists, stimulating cAMP accumulation in receptor-bearing CHO cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Each probe specifically labeled a single receptor site. Protease cleavage and radiochemical sequencing identified receptor residue Leu(141) above transmembrane segment one as its site of labeling for the position 16 probe, whereas the position 20 probe labeled receptor residue Trp(297) within the second extracellular loop. Establishing ligand residue approximation with this loop region is unique among family members and may help to orient the receptor amino-terminal domain relative to its helical bundle region.

  13. Spatial approximations between residues 6 and 12 in the amino-terminal region of glucagon-like peptide 1 and its receptor: a region critical for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Pinon, Delia I; Miller, Laurence J; Dong, Maoqing

    2010-08-06

    Understanding the molecular basis of natural ligand binding and activation of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor may facilitate the development of agonist drugs useful for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We previously reported molecular approximations between carboxyl-terminal residues 24 and 35 within GLP1 and its receptor. In this work, we have focused on the amino-terminal region of GLP1, known to be critical for receptor activation. We developed two high-affinity, full agonist photolabile GLP1 probes having sites of covalent attachment in positions 6 and 12 of the 30-residue peptide (GLP1(7-36)). Both probes bound to the receptor specifically and covalently labeled single distinct sites. Chemical and protease cleavage of the labeled receptor identified the juxtamembrane region of its amino-terminal domain as the region of covalent attachment of the position 12 probe, whereas the region of labeling by the position 6 probe was localized to the first extracellular loop. Radiochemical sequencing identified receptor residue Tyr(145), adjacent to the first transmembrane segment, as the site of labeling by the position 12 probe, and receptor residue Tyr(205), within the first extracellular loop, as the site of labeling by the position 6 probe. These data provide support for a common mechanism for natural ligand binding and activation of family B G protein-coupled receptors. This region of interaction of peptide amino-terminal domains with the receptor may provide a pocket that can be targeted by small molecule agonists.

  14. Bone fracture risk is not associated with the use of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists: a population-based cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Johanna H M; Henry, Ronald M A; van Onzenoort, Hein A W; Lalmohamed, Arief; Burden, Andrea M; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Neef, Cees; Leufkens, Hubert G M; de Vries, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Glucagon-like Peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP1-ra) are a relatively new class of anti-hyperglycemic drugs which may positively affect bone metabolism and thereby decrease (osteoporotic) bone fracture risk. Data on the effect of GLP1-ra on fracture risk are scarce and limited to clinical trial data only. The aim of this study was to investigate, in a population-based cohort, the association between the use of GLP1-ra and bone fracture risk. We conducted a population-based cohort study, with the use of data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database (2007-2012). The study population (N = 216,816) consisted of all individuals with type 2 diabetes patients with at least one prescription for a non-insulin anti-diabetic drug and were over 18 years of age. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio of fracture in GLP1-ra users versus never-GLP1-ra users. Time-dependent adjustments were made for age, sex, lifestyle, comorbidity and the use of other drugs. There was no decreased risk of fracture with current use of GLP1-ra compared to never-GLP1-ra use (adjusted HR 0.99, 95 % CI 0.82-1.19). Osteoporotic fracture risk was also not decreased by current GLP1-ra use (adjusted HR 0.97; 95 % CI 0.72-1.32). In addition, stratification according to cumulative dose did not show a decreased bone fracture risk with increasing cumulative GLP1-ra dose. We showed in a population-based cohort study that GLP1-ra use is not associated with a decreased bone fracture risk compared to users of other anti-hyperglycemic drugs. Future research is needed to elucidate the potential working mechanisms of GLP1-ra on bone.

  15. Effect of exercise combined with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist treatment on cardiac function: A randomised double-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Peter G; Jensen, Magnus T; Mensberg, Pernille; Storgaard, Heidi; Nyby, Signe; Jensen, Jan S; Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2017-02-11

    In patients with type 2 diabetes, both supervised exercise and treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) liraglutide may improve cardiac function. We evaluated cardiac function before and after 16 weeks of treatment with the GLP-1RA liraglutide or placebo combined with supervised exercise in 33 dysregulated patients with type 2 diabetes on diet and/or metformin. Early diastolic myocardial tissue velocity was improved by exercise in the placebo group (-7.1 ± 1.6 cm/s (mean ± standard deviation) to -7.7 ± 1.8 cm/s, p = 0.01), but not in the liraglutide group (-7.1 ± 1.4 to -7.0 ± 1.4 cm/s, p = 0.60; between groups: p = 0.02). Similarly, the ratio of early and atrial mitral annular tissue velocities improved in the placebo group (1.0 ± 0.4 to 1.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.003), but not in the liraglutide group (1.0 ± 0.3 to 1.0 ± 0.3, p = 0.87; between groups: p = 0.03). We found no significant differences in heart rate, left ventricular structure or function within or between the groups. In conclusion, addition of liraglutide to exercise in sedentary patients with dysregulated type 2 diabetes may blunt the suggested beneficial effect of exercise on left ventricular diastolic function.

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increases in plasma and colon tissue prior to estrus and circulating levels change with increasing age in reproductively competent Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michelle L; Saffrey, M Jill; Taylor, Victoria J

    2017-02-22

    There is a well-documented association between cyclic changes to food intake and the changing ovarian hormone levels of the reproductive cycle in female mammals. Limited research on appetite-controlling gastrointestinal peptides has taken place in females, simply because regular reproductive changes in steroid hormones present additional experimental factors to account for. This study focussed directly on the roles that gastrointestinal-secreted peptides may have in these reported, naturally occurring, changes to food intake during the rodent estrous cycle and aimed to determine whether peripheral changes occurred in the anorexigenic (appetite-reducing) hormones peptide-YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in female Wistar rats (32-44 weeks of age). Total forms of each peptide were measured in matched fed and fasted plasma and descending colon tissue samples for each animal during the dark (feeding) phase. PYY concentrations did not significantly change between defined cycle stages, in either plasma or tissue samples. GLP-1 concentrations in fed plasma and descending colon tissue were significantly increased during proestrus, just prior to a significant reduction in fasted stomach contents at estrus, suggesting increased satiety and reduced food intake at this stage of the cycle. Increased proestrus GLP-1 concentrations could contribute to the reported reduction in food intake during estrus and may also have biological importance in providing the optimal nutritional and metabolic environment for gametes at the potential point of conception. Additional analysis of the findings demonstrated significant interactions of ovarian cycle stage and fed/fasted status with age on GLP-1, but not PYY plasma concentrations. Slightly older females had reduced fed plasma GLP-1 suggesting that a relaxation of regulatory control of this incretin hormone may also take place with increasing age in reproductively competent females.

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 counteracts the detrimental effects of Advanced Glycation End-Products in the pancreatic beta cell line HIT-T 15

    SciTech Connect

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Durante, A.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced cell death. {yields} GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced oxidative stress. {yields} GLP-1 ameliorated AGEs-induced cell dysfunction. {yields} GLP-1 attenuates AGEs-induced RAGE increment. {yields} GLP-1 counteracts AGEs-induced pancreatic cell death and dysfunction. -- Abstract: Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs), a group of compounds resulting from the non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with the free amino group of proteins, are implicated in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T 15 to high concentrations of AGEs significantly decreases cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and affects transcription factors regulating insulin gene transcription. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that increases proinsulin biosynthesis, stimulates insulin secretion, and improves pancreatic beta-cell viability. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of GLP-1 on the function and viability of HIT-T 15 cells cultured with AGEs. HIT-T 15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs alone, or supplemented with 10 nmol/l GLP-1. Cell viability, insulin secretion, redox balance, and expression of the AGEs receptor (RAGE) were then determined. The results showed that GLP-1 protected beta cell against AGEs-induced cell death preventing both apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, addition of GLP-1 to the AGEs culture medium restored the redox balance, improved the responsiveness to glucose, and attenuated AGEs-induced RAGE expression. These findings provide evidence that GLP-1 protects beta cells from the dangerous effects of AGEs.

  18. The endocrine disrupting potential of monosodium glutamate (MSG) on secretion of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) gut hormone and GLP-1 receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Maeve; Green, Brian; Willars, Gary; Wilson, Jodie; Matthews, Natalie; Lamb, Joanna; Gillespie, Anna; Connolly, Lisa

    2017-01-04

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a suspected obesogen with epidemiological evidence positively correlating consumption to increased body mass index and higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. ELISA and high content analysis (HCA) were employed to examine the disruptive effects of MSG on the secretion of enteroendocrine hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), respectively. Following 3h MSG exposure of the enteroendocrine pGIP/neo: STC-1 cell line model (500μg/ml) significantly increased GLP-1 secretion (1.8 fold; P≤0.001), however, 72h exposure (500μg/ml) caused a 1.8 fold decline (P≤0.05). Also, 3h MSG exposure (0.5-500μg/ml) did not induce any cytotoxicity (including multiple pre-lethal markers) but 72h exposure at 250-500μg/ml, decreased cell number (11.8-26.7%; P≤0.05), increased nuclear area (23.9-29.8%; P≤0.001) and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (13-21.6%; P≤0.05). At 500μg/ml, MSG increased mitochondrial mass by 16.3% (P≤0.01). MSG did not agonise or antagonise internalisation of the GLP-1R expressed recombinantly in U2OS cells, following GLP-1 stimulation. In conclusion, 72h exposure of an enteroendocrine cell line at dietary levels of MSG, results in pre-lethal cytotoxicity and decline in GLP-1 secretion. These adverse events may play a role in the pathogenesis of obesity as outlined in the obesogen hypothesis by impairing GLP-1 secretion, related satiety responses and glucose-stimulated insulin release.

  19. Postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion is increased during the progression of glucose intolerance and obesity in high-fat/high-sucrose diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shingo; Hira, Tohru; Hara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-14

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted by distal enteroendocrine cells in response to luminal nutrients, and exerts insulinotropic and anorexigenic effects. Although GLP-1 secretory responses under established obese or diabetic conditions have been studied, it has not been investigated whether or how postprandial GLP-1 responses were affected during the progression of diet-induced obesity. In the present study, a meal tolerance test was performed every week in rats fed a high-fat and high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet to evaluate postprandial glycaemic, insulin and GLP-1 responses. In addition, gastric emptying was assessed by the acetaminophen method. After 8 weeks of HF/HS treatment, portal vein and intestinal mucosa were collected to examine GLP-1 production. Postprandial glucose in response to normal meal ingestion was increased in the HF/HS group within 2 weeks, and its elevation gradually returned close to that of the control group until day 50. Slower postprandial gastric emptying was observed in the HF/HS group on days 6, 13 and 34. Postprandial GLP-1 and insulin responses were increased in the HF/HS group at 7 weeks. Higher portal GLP-1 and insulin levels were observed in the HF/HS group, but mucosal gut hormone mRNA levels were unchanged. These results revealed that the postprandial GLP-1 response to meal ingestion is enhanced during the progression of diet-induced glucose intolerance and obesity in rats. The boosted postprandial GLP-1 secretion by chronic HF/HS diet treatment suggests increased sensitivity to luminal nutrients in the gut, and this may slow the establishment of glucose intolerance and obesity.

  20. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor PET/CT with 68Ga-NOTA-Exendin-4 for Detecting Localized Insulinoma: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yaping; Pan, Qingqing; Yao, Shaobo; Yu, Miao; Wu, Wenming; Xue, Huadan; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Zhu, Zhaohui; Li, Fang; Zhao, Yupei; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative localization of insulinoma is a clinical dilemma. We aimed to investigate whether glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) PET/CT with 68Ga-NOTA-MAL-cys40-exendin-4 (68Ga-NOTA-exendin-4) is efficient in detecting insulinoma. Methods In our prospective cohort study, patients with endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia were enrolled. CT, MRI, endoscopic ultrasound, and 99mTc-hydrazinonicotinamide-TOC SPECT/CT were done according to standard protocols. GLP-1R PET/CT was performed 30–60 min after the injection of 68Ga-NOTA-exendin-4. The gold standard for diagnosis was the histopathologic results after surgery. Results Of 52 recruited patients, 43 patients with histopathologically proven insulinomas were included for the imaging studies. Nine patients did not undergo surgical intervention. 68Ga-NOTA-exendin-4 PET/CT correctly detected insulinomas in 42 of 43 patients with high tumor uptake (mean SUVavg ± SD, 10.2 ± 4.9; mean SUVmax ± SD, 23.6 ± 11.7), resulting in sensitivity of 97.7%. In contrast, 99mTc-hydrazinonicotinamide-TOC SPECT/CT showed a low sensitivity of 19.5% (8/41) in this group of patients; however, it successfully localized the tumor that was false-negative with GLP-1R PET/CT. The sensitivities of CT, MR, and endoscopic ultrasonography were 74.4% (32/43), 56.0% (14/25), and 84.0% (21/25), respectively. Conclusion 68Ga-NOTA-exendin-4 PET/CT is a highly sensitive imaging technique for the localization of insulinoma. PMID:26795291

  1. New screening strategy and analysis for identification of allosteric modulators for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor using GLP-1 (9-36) amide.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Atsushi; Gotoh, Yusuke; Ichihara, Junji; Nagata, Hidetaka

    2015-12-15

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is an important physiologic regulator of insulin secretion and a major therapeutic target for diabetes mellitus. GLP-1 (7-36) amide (active form of GLP-1) is truncated to GLP-1 (9-36) amide, which has been described as a weak agonist of GLP-1R and the major form of GLP-1 in the circulation. New classes of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) for GLP-1R may offer improved therapeutic profiles. To identify these new classes, we developed novel and robust primary and secondary high-throughput screening (HTS) systems in which PAMs were identified to enhance the GLP-1R signaling induced by GLP-1 (9-36) amide. Screening enabled identification of two compounds, HIT-465 and HIT-736, which possessed new patterns of modulation of GLP-1R. We investigated the ability of these compounds to modify GLP-1R signaling enhanced GLP-1 (9-36) amide- and/or GLP-1 (7-36) amide-mediated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation. These compounds also had unique profiles with regard to allosteric modulation of multiple downstream signaling (PathHunter β-arrestin signaling, PathHunter internalization signaling, microscopy-based internalization assay). We found allosteric modulation patterns to be obviously different among HIT-465, HIT-736, and Novo Nordisk compound 2. This work may enable the design of new classes of drug candidates by targeting modulation of GLP-1 (7-36) amide and GLP-1 (9-36) amide.

  2. Modulation of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Potency by Endocannabinoid-like Lipids Represents a Novel Mode of Regulating GLP-1 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hong; Ho, Mei-Shang; Huang, Wei-Ting; Chou, Ying-Ting; King, Klim

    2015-06-05

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are in clinical trials for disorders including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many peripheral and neuronal tissues and is activated by circulating GLP-1. Other than food intake, little is known about factors regulating GLP-1 secretion. Given a normally basal circulating level of GLP-1, knowledge of mechanisms regulating GLP-1R signaling, which has diverse functions in extrapancreatic tissues, remains elusive. In this study, we found that the potency of GLP-1, not exendin 4, is specifically enhanced by the endocannabinoid-like lipids oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol but not by stearoylethanolamide (SEA) or palmitoylethanolamide. 9.2 μM OEA enhances the potency of GLP-1 in stimulating cAMP production by 10-fold but does not affect its receptor binding affinity. OEA and 2-oleoylglycerol, but not SEA, bind to GLP-1 in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. OEA but not SEA promoted GLP-1(7-36) amide to trypsin inactivation in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Susceptibility of GLP-1(7-36) amide to trypsin inactivation is increased 40-fold upon binding to OEA but not to SEA. Our findings indicate that OEA binds to GLP-1(7-36) amide and enhances the potency that may result from a conformational change of the peptide. In conclusion, modulating potency of GLP-1 by physiologically regulated endocannabinoid-like lipids allows GLP-1R signaling to be regulated spatiotemporally at a constant basal GLP-1 level.

  3. The pivotal role of high glucose-induced overexpression of PKCβ in the appearance of glucagon-like peptide-1 resistance in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, Gemma; De Nigris, Valeria; La Sala, Lucia; Testa, Roberto; Genovese, Stefano; Ceriello, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has a protective effect on endothelial cells. Our hypothesis is that this GLP-1 protective effect is partly lost when the cells are exposed to sustained high glucose concentrations. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured for 21 days in normal glucose (5 mmol/L, NG) or high glucose (25 mmol/L glucose, HG). GLP-1 (7-37) and Ruboxistaurin were added at 50 and 500 nM, respectively, alone or in combination, 1 h before cell harvesting. Analysis of GLP-1 receptor protein levels, as well as of the gene expression of different ER stress-related genes, proliferation markers, antioxidant cell response-related genes, and PKA subunits, was performed. ROS production was also measured in HUVECs exposed to mentioned treatments. GLP-1 receptor expression was reduced in HUVECs exposed to chronic high glucose concentrations but was partially restored by a chemical PKCβ-specific inhibitor. GLP-1, added as an acute treatment in endothelial cells, had the capacity to induce the expression of Nrf2-detoxifying enzyme targets, to increase transcription levels of scavenger genes, to attenuate the expression of high glucose-induced PKA subunits, ER stress and also the apoptotic phenotype of HUVECs; these effects occured only when high glucose-induced PKCβ overexpression was reduced by Ruboxistaurin. In a similar manner, ROS production induced by high glucose was reduced by GLP-1 in the presence of PKCβ inhibitor. This study suggests that an increase in PKCβ, induced by high glucose, could have a role in endothelial GLP-1 resistance, reducing GLP-1 receptor levels and disrupting the GLP-1 canonical pathway.

  4. In vivo dual-delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor through composites prepared by microfluidics for diabetes therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, F.; Shrestha, N.; Gomes, M. J.; Herranz-Blanco, B.; Liu, D.; Hirvonen, J. J.; Granja, P. L.; Santos, H. A.; Sarmento, B.

    2016-05-01

    Oral delivery of proteins is still a challenge in the pharmaceutical field. Nanoparticles are among the most promising carrier systems for the oral delivery of proteins by increasing their oral bioavailability. However, most of the existent data regarding nanosystems for oral protein delivery is from in vitro studies, lacking in vivo experiments to evaluate the efficacy of these systems. Herein, a multifunctional composite system, tailored by droplet microfluidics, was used for dual delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (iDPP4) in vivo. Oral delivery of GLP-1 with nano- or micro-systems has been studied before, but the simultaneous nanodelivery of GLP-1 with iDPP4 is a novel strategy presented here. The type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rat model, induced through the combined administration of streptozotocin and nicotinamide, a non-obese model of T2DM, was used. The combination of both drugs resulted in an increase in the hypoglycemic effects in a sustained, but prolonged manner, where the iDPP4 improved the therapeutic efficacy of GLP-1. Four hours after the oral administration of the system, blood glucose levels were decreased by 44%, and were constant for another 4 h, representing half of the glucose area under the curve when compared to the control. An enhancement of the plasmatic insulin levels was also observed 6 h after the oral administration of the dual-drug composite system and, although no statistically significant differences existed, the amount of pancreatic insulin was also higher. These are promising results for the oral delivery of GLP-1 to be pursued further in a chronic diabetic model study.

  5. Natural sweetener agave inhibits gastric emptying in rats by a cholecystokinin-2- and glucagon like peptide-1 receptor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bihter Gürler, E; Özbeyli, Dilek; Buzcu, Hülya; Bayraktar, Sezin; Carus, İrem; Dağ, Beyza; Geriş, Yasemin; Jeral, Seda; Yeğen, Berrak Ç

    2017-02-22

    Low-calorie sweeteners are considered to be beneficial in calorie control, but the impact of these sweeteners on gastric emptying is not well described. The purpose of this study was to compare the gastric emptying rate of agave nectar with those of glucose and fructose, and to evaluate the interaction of cholecystokinin (CCK)-1, CCK-2 and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors in agave-induced alterations in gastric emptying. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with gastric cannulas. Following the recovery, the gastric emptying rates of glucose, fructose and agave at 12.5%, 15% or 50% concentrations were measured and compared with that of saline. GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin fragment 9-39 (30 μg kg(-1)), CCK-1 receptor antagonist devazepide (1 mg kg(-1)) or gastrin/CCK-2 receptor antagonist YM022 (1 mg kg(-1)) was injected subcutaneously 1 min before the emptying of glucose, fructose or agave at their 50% concentrations. When compared with saline emptying, gastric emptying of glucose was significantly delayed at its 25% and 50% concentrations, but the emptying of 12.5% glucose was not different from that of saline. Agave emptying, which was delayed with respect to saline emptying, was not altered by CCK-1 receptor blockade; but agave emptied from the stomach as rapidly as saline following the blockade of either CCK-2 or GLP-1 receptors. The findings demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of agave on gastric emptying is mediated by both CCK-2 and GLP-1 receptors, suggesting that natural sweeteners including agave may have satiating effects through the inhibition of gastric motility via enteroendocrine mechanisms.

  6. Model-Based Quantification of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1–Induced Potentiation of Insulin Secretion in Response to a Mixed Meal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Man, Chiara; Micheletto, Francesco; Sathananthan, Matheni; Vella, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a powerful insulin secretagogue that is secreted in response to meal ingestion. The ability to quantify the effect of GLP-1 on insulin secretion could provide insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes. We used a modification of a model of GLP-1 action on insulin secretion using data from a hyperglycemic clamp with concomitant GLP-1 infusion. We tested this model using data from a mixed meal test (MMT), thereby measuring GLP-1-induced potentiation of insulin secretion in response to a meal. Materials and Methods: The GLP-1 model is based on the oral C-peptide minimal model and assumes that over-basal insulin secretion depends linearly on GLP-1 concentration through the parameter Π, representing the β-cell sensitivity to GLP-1. The model was tested on 62 subjects across the spectrum of glucose tolerance (age, 53 ± 1 years; body mass index, 29.7 ± 0.6 kg/m2) studied with an MMT and provided a precise estimate of both β-cell responsivity and Π indices. By combining Π with a measure of L-cell responsivity to glucose, one obtains a potentiation index (PI) (i.e., a measure of the L-cell's function in relation to prevailing β-cell sensitivity to GLP-1). Results: Model-based measurement of GLP-1-induced insulin secretion demonstrates that the PI is significantly reduced in people with impaired glucose tolerance, compared with those with normal glucose tolerance. Conclusions: We describe a model that can quantitate the GLP-1-based contribution to insulin secretion in response to meal ingestion. This methodology will allow a better understanding of β-cell function at various stages of glucose tolerance. PMID:26756104

  7. Short-term sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure alters time-dependent glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin secretion in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gil-Lozano, Manuel; Hunter, Paola M; Behan, Lucy-Ann; Gladanac, Bojana; Casper, Robert F; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal L cell is the principal source of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a major determinant of insulin release. Because GLP-1 secretion is regulated in a circadian manner in rodents, we investigated whether the activity of the human L cell is also time sensitive. Rhythmic fluctuations in the mRNA levels of canonical clock genes were found in the human NCI-H716 L cell model, which also showed a time-dependent pattern in their response to well-established secretagogues. A diurnal variation in GLP-1 responses to identical meals (850 kcal), served 12 h apart in the normal dark (2300) and light (1100) periods, was also observed in male volunteers maintained under standard sleep and light conditions. These findings suggest the existence of a daily pattern of activity in the human L cell. Moreover, we separately tested the short-term effects of sleep deprivation and nocturnal light exposure on basal and postprandial GLP-1, insulin, and glucose levels in the same volunteers. Sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure disrupted the melatonin and cortisol profiles and increased insulin resistance. Moreover, it also induced profound derangements in GLP-1 and insulin responses such that postprandial GLP-1 and insulin levels were markedly elevated and the normal variation in GLP-1 responses was abrogated. These alterations were not observed in sleep-deprived participants maintained under dark conditions, indicating a direct effect of light on the mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, the metabolic abnormalities known to occur in shift workers may be related to the effects of irregular light-dark cycles on these glucoregulatory pathways.

  8. Synthesis and Pharmacological Characterization of Novel Glucagon-like Peptide-2 (GLP-2) Analogues with Low Systemic Clearance.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Kazimierz; Sueiras-Diaz, Javier; Jiang, Guangcheng; Galyean, Robert; Lu, Mark; Thompson, Dorain; Wang, Yung-Chih; Croston, Glenn; Posch, Alexander; Hargrove, Diane M; Wiśniewska, Halina; Laporte, Régent; Dwyer, John J; Qi, Steve; Srinivasan, Karthik; Hartwig, Jennifer; Ferdyan, Nicky; Mares, Monica; Kraus, John; Alagarsamy, Sudarkodi; Rivière, Pierre J M; Schteingart, Claudio D

    2016-04-14

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor agonists have therapeutic potential for the treatment of intestinal diseases. The native hGLP-2, a 33 amino acid gastrointestinal peptide, is not a suitable clinical candidate, due to its very short half-life in humans. In search of GLP-2 receptor agonists with better pharmacokinetic characteristics, a series of GLP-2 analogues containing Gly substitution at position 2, norleucine in position 10, and hydrophobic substitutions in positions 11 and/or 16 was designed and synthesized. In vitro receptor potency at the human GLP-2, selectivity vs the human GLP-1 and GCG receptors, and PK profile in rats were determined for the new analogues. A number of compounds more potent at the hGLP-2R than the native hormone, showing excellent receptor selectivity and very low systemic clearance (CL) were discovered. Analogues 69 ([Gly(2),Nle(10),D-Thi(11),Phe(16)]hGLP-2-(1-30)-NH2), 72 ([Gly(2),Nle(10),D-Phe(11),Leu(16)]hGLP-2-(1-33)-OH), 73 ([Gly(2),Nle(10),D-Phe(11),Leu(16)]hGLP-2-(1-33)-NH2), 81 ([Gly(2),Nle(10),D-Phe(11),Leu(16)]hGLP-2-(1-33)-NHEt), and 85 ([Gly(2),Nle(10),D-Phe(11),Leu(16)]hGLP-2-(1-33)-NH-((CH2)2O)4-(CH2)2-CONH2) displayed the desired profiles (EC50 (hGLP-2R) < 100 pM, CL in rat <0.3 mL/min/kg, selective vs hGLP-1R and hGCGR). Compound 73 (FE 203799) was selected as a candidate for clinical development.

  9. Acute effects of the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, on intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thymann, Thomas; Stoll, Barbara; Mecklenburg, Lars; Burrin, Douglas G; Vegge, Andreas; Qvist, Niels; Eriksen, Thomas; Jeppesen, Palle B; Sangild, Per T

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal short bowel syndrome following massive gut resection is associated with malabsorption of nutrients. The intestinotrophic factor glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) improves gut function in adult patients with short bowel syndrome, but its effect in pediatric patients remains unknown. Our objective was to test the efficacy of the long-acting synthetic human GLP-2 analogue, teduglutide (ALX-0600), in a neonatal piglet jejunostomy model. Two-day-old pigs were subjected to resection of 50% of the small intestine (distal part), and the remnant intestine was exteriorized on the abdominal wall as a jejunostomy. All pigs were given total parenteral nutrition for 7 days and a single daily injection of the following doses of teduglutide: 0.01 (n = 6), 0.02 (n = 6), 0.1 (n = 5), or 0.2 mg · kg · day (n = 6), and compared with placebo (n = 9). Body weight increment was similar for all 4 teduglutide groups but higher than placebo (P < 0.05). There was a dose-dependent increase in weight per length of the remnant intestine (P < 0.01) and fractional protein synthesis rate in the intestine was increased in the 0.2 mg · kg · day group versus placebo (P < 0.001); however, functional and structural endpoints including activity of digestive enzymes, absorption of enteral nutrients, and immunohistochemistry (Ki67, villin, FABP2, ChgA, and GLP-2R) were not affected by the treatment. Teduglutide induces trophicity on the remnant intestine but has limited acute effects on functional endpoints. Significant effects of teduglutide on gut function may require a longer adaptation period and/or a more frequent administration of the peptide. In perspective, GLP-2 or its analogues may be relevant to improve intestinal adaptation in pediatric patients with short bowel syndrome.

  10. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide, attenuates the progression of overt diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Shigeki; Hirai, Keiji; Hirai, Aizan

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is one of the incretins, gut hormones released from the intestine in response to food intake. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have been used to treat type 2 diabetes. Here, we studied the effect of the administration of a GLP-1R agonist, liraglutide, on proteinuria and the progression of overt DN in type 2 diabetic patients. Twenty-three type 2 diabetic patients with overt DN, who had already been treated with blockade of renin-angiotensin system under dietary sodium restriction, were given liraglutide for a period of 12 months. Treatment with liraglutide caused a significant decrease in HbA1c from 7.4 ± 0.2% to 6.9 ± 0.3% (p = 0.04), and in body mass index (BMI) from 27.6 ± 0.9 kg/m² to 26.5 ± 0.8 kg/m² after 12 months (p < 0.001), while systolic blood pressure did not change. The progression of DN was determined as the rate of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). The 12-month administration of liraglutide caused a significant decrease in proteinuria from 2.53 ± 0.48 g/g creatinine to 1.47 ± 0.28 g/g creatinine (p = 0.002). The administration of liraglutide also substantially diminished the rate of decline in eGFR from 6.6 ± 1.5 mL/min/1.73 m²/year to 0.3 ± 1.9 mL/min/1.73 m²/year (p = 0.003). Liraglutide can be used not only for reducing HbA1c and BMI, but also for attenuating the progression of nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients.

  11. Exogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 attenuates the glycaemic response to postpyloric nutrient infusion in critically ill patients with type-2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) attenuates the glycaemic response to small intestinal nutrient infusion in stress-induced hyperglycaemia and reduces fasting glucose concentrations in critically ill patients with type-2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute administration of GLP-1 on the glycaemic response to small intestinal nutrient infusion in critically ill patients with pre-existing type-2 diabetes. Methods Eleven critically ill mechanically-ventilated patients with known type-2 diabetes received intravenous infusions of GLP-1 (1.2 pmol/kg/minute) and placebo from t = 0 to 270 minutes on separate days in randomised double-blind fashion. Between t = 30 to 270 minutes a liquid nutrient was infused intraduodenally at a rate of 1 kcal/min via a naso-enteric catheter. Blood glucose, serum insulin and C-peptide, and plasma glucagon were measured. Data are mean ± SEM. Results GLP-1 attenuated the overall glycaemic response to nutrient (blood glucose AUC30-270 min: GLP-1 2,244 ± 184 vs. placebo 2,679 ± 233 mmol/l/minute; P = 0.02). Blood glucose was maintained at < 10 mmol/l in 6/11 patients when receiving GLP-1 and 4/11 with placebo. GLP-1 increased serum insulin at 270 minutes (GLP-1: 23.4 ± 6.7 vs. placebo: 16.4 ± 5.5 mU/l; P < 0.05), but had no effect on the change in plasma glucagon. Conclusions Exogenous GLP-1 in a dose of 1.2 pmol/kg/minute attenuates the glycaemic response to small intestinal nutrient in critically ill patients with type-2 diabetes. Given the modest magnitude of the reduction in glycaemia the effects of GLP-1 at higher doses and/or when administered in combination with insulin, warrant evaluation in this group. Trial registration ANZCTR:ACTRN12610000185066 PMID:21255422

  12. Effect of glucagon-like peptide 1(7-36) amide on glucose effectiveness and insulin action in people with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vella, A; Shah, P; Basu, R; Basu, A; Holst, J J; Rizza, R A

    2000-04-01

    Although it is well established that glucagon-like peptide 1(7-36) amide (GLP-1) is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion, its effects on insulin action and glucose effectiveness are less clear. To determine whether GLP-1 increases insulin action and glucose effectiveness, subjects with type 2 diabetes were studied on two occasions. Insulin was infused during the night on both occasions to ensure that baseline glucose concentrations were comparable. On the morning of study, either GLP-1 (1.2 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) or saline were infused along with somatostatin and replacement amounts of glucagon. Glucose also was infused in a pattern mimicking that typically observed after a carbohydrate meal. Insulin concentrations were either kept constant at basal levels (n = 6) or varied so as to create a prandial insulin profile (n = 6). The increase in glucose concentration was virtually identical on the GLP-1 and saline study days during both the basal (1.21 +/- 0.15 vs. 1.32 +/- 0.19 mol/l per 6 h) and prandial (0.56 +/- 0.14 vs. 0.56 +/- 0.10 mol/l per 6 h) insulin infusions. During both the basal and prandial insulin infusions, glucose disappearance promptly increased after initiation of the glucose infusion to rates that did not differ on the GLP-1 and saline study days. Suppression of endogenous glucose production also was comparable on the GLP-1 and saline study days during both the basal (-2.7 +/- 0.3 vs. -3.1 +/- 0.2 micromol/kg) and prandial (-3.1 +/- 0.4 vs. -3.0 +/- 0.6 pmol/kg) insulin infusions. We conclude that when insulin and glucagon concentrations are matched, GLP-1 has negligible effects on either insulin action or glucose effectiveness in people with type 2 diabetes. These data strongly support the concept that GLP-1 improves glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes by increasing insulin secretion, by inhibiting glucagon secretion, and by delaying gastric emptying rather than by altering extrapancreatic glucose metabolism.

  13. Plasma Free Amino Acid Responses to Intraduodenal Whey Protein, and Relationships with Insulin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Energy Intake in Lean Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D.; Hutchison, Amy T.; Soenen, Stijn; Steinert, Robert E.; Clifton, Peter M.; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effects of increasing loads of intraduodenal (ID) dairy protein on plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations, and their relationships with serum insulin, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and energy intake. Sixteen healthy men had concentrations of AAs, GLP-1 and insulin measured in response to 60-min ID infusions of hydrolysed whey protein administered, in double-blinded and randomised order, at 2.1 (P2.1), 6.3 (P6.3) or 12.5 (P12.5) kJ/min (encompassing the range of nutrient emptying from the stomach), or saline control (C). Energy intake was quantified immediately afterwards. Compared with C, the concentrations of 19/20 AAs, the exception being cysteine, were increased, and this was dependent on the protein load. The relationship between AA concentrations in the infusions and the area under the curve from 0 to 60 min (AUC0–60 min) of each AA profile was strong for essential AAs (R2 range, 0.61–0.67), but more variable for non-essential (0.02–0.54) and conditional (0.006–0.64) AAs. The AUC0–60 min for each AA was correlated directly with the AUC0–60 min of insulin (R2 range 0.3–0.6), GLP-1 (0.2–0.6) and energy intake (0.09–0.3) (p < 0.05, for all), with the strongest correlations being for branched-chain AAs, lysine, methionine and tyrosine. These findings indicate that ID whey protein infused at loads encompassing the normal range of gastric emptying increases plasma concentrations of 19/20 AAs in a load-dependent manner, and provide novel information on the close relationships between the essential AAs, leucine, valine, isoleucine, lysine, methionine, and the conditionally-essential AA, tyrosine, with energy intake, insulin and GLP-1. PMID:26742062

  14. Improved Glycaemia Correlates with Liver Fat Reduction in Obese, Type 2 Diabetes, Patients Given Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Irwin, Andrew; Gardner, Chris J.; Daousi, Christina; Purewal, Tej; Furlong, Niall; Goenka, Niru; Thomas, E. Louise; Adams, Valerie L.; Pushpakom, Sudeep P.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Kemp, Graham J.

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) are effective for obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) because they concomitantly target obesity and dysglycaemia. Considering the high prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in patients with T2DM, we determined the impact of 6 months’ GLP-1 RA therapy on intrahepatic lipid (IHL) in obese, T2DM patients with hepatic steatosis, and evaluated the inter-relationship between changes in IHL with those in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), body weight, and volume of abdominal visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VAT and SAT). We prospectively studied 25 (12 male) patients, age 50±10 years, BMI 38.4±5.6 kg/m2 (mean ± SD) with baseline IHL of 28.2% (16.5 to 43.1%) and HbA1c of 9.6% (7.9 to 10.7%) (median and interquartile range). Patients treated with metformin and sulphonylureas/DPP-IV inhibitors were given 6 months GLP-1 RA (exenatide, n = 19; liraglutide, n = 6). IHL was quantified by liver proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) and VAT and SAT by whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was associated with mean weight loss of 5.0 kg (95% CI 3.5,6.5 kg), mean HbA1c reduction of 1·6% (17 mmol/mol) (0·8,2·4%) and a 42% relative reduction in IHL (−59.3, −16.5%). The relative reduction in IHL correlated with that in HbA1c (ρ = 0.49; p = 0.01) but was not significantly correlated with that in total body weight, VAT or SAT. The greatest IHL reduction occurred in individuals with highest pre-treatment levels. Mechanistic studies are needed to determine potential direct effects of GLP-1 RA on human liver lipid metabolism. PMID:23236362

  15. The role of the PDE4D cAMP phosphodiesterase in the regulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Ong, WK; Gribble, FM; Reimann, F; Lynch, MJ; Houslay, MD; Baillie, GS; Furman, BL; Pyne, NJ

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) augment the release/secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). As cAMP is hydrolysed by cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs), we determined the role of PDEs and particularly PDE4 in regulating GLP-1 release. Experimental approach: GLP-1 release, PDE expression and activity were investigated using rats and GLUTag cells, a GLP-1-releasing cell line. The effects of rolipram, a selective PDE4 inhibitor both in vivo and in vitro and stably overexpressed catalytically inactive PDE4D5 (D556A-PDE4D5) mutant in vitro on GLP-1 release were investigated. Key results: Rolipram (1.5 mg·kg−1 i.v.) increased plasma GLP-1 concentrations approximately twofold above controls in anaesthetized rats and enhanced glucose-induced GLP-1 release in GLUTag cells (EC50∼1.2 nmol·L−1). PDE4D mRNA transcript and protein were detected in GLUTag cells using RT-PCR with gene-specific primers and Western blotting with a specific PDE4D antibody respectively. Moreover, significant PDE activity was inhibited by rolipram in GLUTag cells. A GLUTag cell clone (C1) stably overexpressing the D556A-PDE4D5 mutant, exhibited elevated intracellular cAMP levels and increased basal and glucose-induced GLP-1 release compared with vector-transfected control cells. A role for intracellular cAMP/PKA in enhancing GLP-1 release in response to overexpression of D556A-PDE4D5 mutant was demonstrated by the finding that the PKA inhibitor H89 reduced both basal and glucose-induced GLP-1 release by 37% and 39%, respectively, from C1 GLUTag cells. Conclusions and implications: PDE4D may play an important role in regulating intracellular cAMP linked to the regulation of GLP-1 release. British Journal of Pharmacology (2009) 157, 633–644; doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2009.00194.x; published online 9 April 2009 PMID:19371330

  16. Efficacy and Acceptability of Glycemic Control of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists among Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhixia; Zhang, Yuan; Quan, Xiaochi; Yang, Zhirong; Zeng, Xiantao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To synthesize current evidence of the impact of Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) on hypoglycemia, treatment discontinuation and glycemic level in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Data Sources Literature search (Medline, Embase, the Cochrane library), website of clinical trial, bibliographies of published systematic reviews. Eligibility Criteria Randomized controlled trials with available data comparing GLP-1 RAs with placebo or traditional anti-diabetic drugs in patients with type 2 diabetes. Data Synthesis Traditional pairwise meta-analyses within DerSimonian-Laird random effects model and network meta-analysis within a Bayesian framework were performed to calculate odds ratios for the incidence of hypoglycemia, treatment discontinuation, HbA1c<7.0% and HbA1c<6.5%. Ranking probabilities for all treatments were estimated to obtain a treatment hierarchy using the surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) and mean ranks. Results 78 trials with 13 treatments were included. Overall, all GLP-1 RAs except for albiglutide increased the risk of hypoglycemia when compared to placebo. Reduction in the incidence of hypoglycemia was found for all GLP-1 RAs versus insulin (except for dulaglutide) and sulphonylureas. For the incidence of treatment discontinuation, increase was found for exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide and taspoglutide versus placebo, insulin and sitagliptin. For glycemic level, decrease was found for all GLP-1 RAs versus placebo. Dulaglutide, exenatide long-acting release (exe_lar), liraglutide and taspoglutide had significant lowering effect when compared with sitagliptin (HbA1c<7.0%) and insulin (HbA1c<6.5%). Finally, according to SUCRAs, placebo, thiazolidinediones and albiglutide had the best decrease effect on hypoglycemia; sulphanylureas, sitagliptin and insulin decrease the incidence of treatment discontinuation most; exe_lar and dulaglutide had the highest

  17. Effects of oligofructose on appetite profile, glucagon-like peptide 1 and peptide YY3-36 concentrations and energy intake.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Sanne P M; Meyer, Diederick; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2011-12-01

    In rats, oligofructose has been shown to stimulate satiety hormone secretion, reduce energy intake and promote weight loss. The present study aimed to examine the effect of oligofructose supplementation on appetite profiles, satiety hormone concentrations and energy intake in human subjects. A total of thirty-one healthy subjects (ten men and twenty-one women) aged 28 (SEM 3) years with a BMI of 24·8 (SEM 0·3) kg/m(2) were included in a randomised double-blind, cross-over study. The subjects received 10 g oligofructose, 16 g oligofructose or 16 g placebo (maltodextrin) daily for 13 d, with a 2-week washout period between treatments. Appetite profile, active glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY3-36 (PYY) concentrations and energy intake were assessed on days 0 and 13 of the treatment period. Time × treatment interaction revealed a trend of reduction in energy intake over days 0-13 by oligofructose (P = 0·068). Energy intake was significantly reduced (11 %) over time on day 13 compared with day 0 with 16 g/d oligofructose (2801 (SEM 301) v. 3217 (SEM 320) kJ, P < 0·05). Moreover, energy intake was significantly lower with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose on day 13 (2801 (SEM 301) v. 3177 (SEM 276) kJ, P < 0·05). Area under the curve (AUC) for GLP-1 on day 13 was significantly higher with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose (45 (SEM 4) v. 41 (SEM 3) pmol/l × h, P < 0·05). In the morning until lunch, AUC(0-230 min) for PYY on day 13 was significantly higher with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose and placebo (409 (SEM 35) v. 222 (SEM 19) and 211 (SEM 20) pg/ml × h, P < 0·01). In conclusion, 16 g/d and not 10 g/d oligofructose may be an effective dose to reduce energy intake, possibly supported by higher GLP-1 and PYY concentrations.

  18. Acute effects of the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, on intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal short bowel syndrome following massive gut resection is associated with malabsorption of nutrients. The intestinotrophic factor glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) improves gut function in adult patients with short bowel syndrome, but its effect in pediatric patients remains unknown. Our object...

  19. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism studies on the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-derived metabolite GLP-1(9-36)amide in male Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; McDonald, Thomas S; Landis, Margaret S; Stevens, Benjamin D; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)(7-36)amide is a 30-amino acid peptide hormone that is secreted from intestinal enteroendocrine L-cells in response to nutrients. GLP-1(7-36)amide possesses potent insulinotropic actions in the augmentation of glucose-dependent insulin secretion. GLP-1(7-36)amide is rapidly metabolized by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV to yield GLP-1(9-36)amide as the principal metabolite. Contrary to the earlier notion that peptide cleavage products of native GLP-1(7-36)amide [including GLP-1(9-36)amide] are pharmacologically inactive, recent studies have demonstrated cardioprotective and insulinomimetic effects with GLP-1(9-36)amide in mice, dogs and humans. In the present work, in vitro metabolism and pharmacokinetic properties of GLP-1(9-36)amide have been characterized in dogs, since this preclinical species has been used as an animal model to demonstrate the in vivo vasodilatory and cardioprotective effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry assay was developed for the quantitation of the intact peptide in hepatocyte incubations as opposed to a previously reported enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Although GLP-1(9-36)amide was resistant to proteolytic cleavage in dog plasma and bovine serum albumin (t1/2>240 min), the peptide was rapidly metabolized in dog hepatocytes with a t1/2 of 110 min. Metabolite identification studies in dog hepatocytes revealed a variety of N-terminus cleavage products, most of which, have also been observed in human and mouse hepatocytes. Proteolysis at the C-terminus was not observed in GLP-1(9-36)amide. Following the administration of a single intravenous bolus dose (20 µg/kg) to male Beagle dogs, GLP-1(9-36)amide exhibited a mean plasma clearance of 15 ml/min/kg and a low steady state distribution volume of 0.05 l/kg, which translated into a short elimination half life of 0.05 h. Following subcutaneous administration of GLP-1(9-36)amide at 50 µg/kg, systemic exposure of

  20. Coadministration of glucagon-like peptide-1 during glucagon infusion in humans results in increased energy expenditure and amelioration of hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tricia M; Field, Benjamin C T; McCullough, Katherine A; Troke, Rachel C; Chambers, Edward S; Salem, Victoria; Gonzalez Maffe, Juan; Baynes, Kevin C R; De Silva, Akila; Viardot, Alexander; Alsafi, Ali; Frost, Gary S; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2013-04-01

    Glucagon and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 are the primary products of proglucagon processing from the pancreas and gut, respectively. Giving dual agonists with glucagon and GLP-1 activity to diabetic, obese mice causes enhanced weight loss and improves glucose tolerance by reduction of food intake and by increase in energy expenditure (EE). We aimed to observe the effect of a combination of glucagon and GLP-1 on resting EE and glycemia in healthy human volunteers. In a randomized, double-blinded crossover study, 10 overweight or obese volunteers without diabetes received placebo infusion, GLP-1 alone, glucagon alone, and GLP-1 plus glucagon simultaneously. Resting EE--measured using indirect calorimetry--was not affected by GLP-1 infusion but rose significantly with glucagon alone and to a similar degree with glucagon and GLP-1 together. Glucagon infusion was accompanied by a rise in plasma glucose levels, but addition of GLP-1 to glucagon rapidly reduced this excursion, due to a synergistic insulinotropic effect. The data indicate that drugs with glucagon and GLP-1 agonist activity may represent a useful treatment for type 2 diabetes and obesity. Long-term studies are required to demonstrate that this combination will reduce weight and improve glycemia in patients.

  1. The Melanocortin-4 Receptor is Expressed in Enteroendocrine L Cells and Regulates the Release of Peptide YY and Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Panaro, Brandon L.; Tough, Iain R.; Engelstoft, Maja Storm; Matthews, Robert T.; Digby, Gregory J.; Møller, Cathrine Laustrup; Svendsen, Berit; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Holst, Jens J.; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.; Cox, Helen M.; Cone, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is expressed in the brainstem and vagal afferent nerves, and regulates a number of aspects of gastrointestinal function. Here we show that the receptor is also diffusely expressed in cells of the gastrointestinal system, from stomach to descending colon. Furthermore, MC4R is the second most highly expressed GPCR in peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide one (GLP-1) expressing enteroendocrine L cells. When vectorial ion transport is measured across mouse or human intestinal mucosa, administration of α-MSH induces a MC4R-specific PYY-dependent anti-secretory response consistent with a role for the MC4R in paracrine inhibition of electrolyte secretion. Finally, MC4R-dependent acute PYY and GLP-1 release from L cells can be stimulated in vivo by intraperitoneal administration of melanocortin peptides to mice. This suggests physiological significance for MC4R in L cells, and indicates a previously unrecognized peripheral role for the MC4R, complementing vagal and central receptor functions. PMID:25453189

  2. Truncated Glucagon-like Peptide-1 and Exendin-4 α-Conotoxin pl14a Peptide Chimeras Maintain Potency and α-Helicity and Reveal Interactions Vital for cAMP Signaling in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Joakim E; Schroeder, Christina I; Mitchell, Justin M; Fairlie, David P; Edmonds, David J; Griffith, David A; Ruggeri, Roger B; Derksen, David R; Loria, Paula M; Price, David A; Liras, Spiros; Craik, David J

    2016-07-22

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) signaling through the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a key regulator of normal glucose metabolism, and exogenous GLP-1R agonist therapy is a promising avenue for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. To date, the development of therapeutic GLP-1R agonists has focused on producing drugs with an extended serum half-life. This has been achieved by engineering synthetic analogs of GLP-1 or the more stable exogenous GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4). These synthetic peptide hormones share the overall structure of GLP-1 and Ex-4, with a C-terminal helical segment and a flexible N-terminal tail. Although numerous studies have investigated the molecular determinants underpinning GLP-1 and Ex-4 binding and signaling through the GLP-1R, these have primarily focused on the length and composition of the N-terminal tail or on how to modulate the helicity of the full-length peptides. Here, we investigate the effect of C-terminal truncation in GLP-1 and Ex-4 on the cAMP pathway. To ensure helical C-terminal regions in the truncated peptides, we produced a series of chimeric peptides combining the N-terminal portion of GLP-1 or Ex-4 and the C-terminal segment of the helix-promoting peptide α-conotoxin pl14a. The helicity and structures of the chimeric peptides were confirmed using circular dichroism and NMR, respectively. We found no direct correlation between the fractional helicity and potency in signaling via the cAMP pathway. Rather, the most important feature for efficient receptor binding and signaling was the C-terminal helical segment (residues 22-27) directing the binding of Phe(22) into a hydrophobic pocket on the GLP-1R.

  3. Effects of calcium salts of long-chain fatty acids and rumen-protected methionine on plasma concentrations of ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (7 to 36) amide and pancreatic hormones in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Fukumori, R; Sugino, T; Shingu, H; Moriya, N; Hasegawa, Y; Kojima, M; Kangawa, K; Obitsu, T; Kushibiki, S; Taniguchi, K

    2012-02-01

    Our objective was to determine the effects of calcium salts of long-chain fatty acids (CLFAs) and rumen-protected methionine (RPM) on plasma concentrations of ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (7 to 36) amide, and pancreatic hormones in lactating cows. Four Holstein cows in midlactation were used in a 4 by 4 Latin square experiment in each 2-wk period. Cows were fed corn silage-based diets with supplements of CLFAs (1.5% added on dry matter basis), RPM (20 g/d), CLFAs plus RPM, and without supplement. Jugular blood samples were taken from 1 h before to 2 h after morning feeding at 10-min intervals on day 12 of each period. CLFAs decreased dry matter intake, but RPM did not affect dry matter intake. Both supplements of CLFAs and RPM did not affect metabolizable energy intake and milk yield and composition. Plasma concentrations of NEFAs, triglyceride (TG), and total cholesterol (T-Cho) were increased with CLFAs alone, but increases of plasma concentrations of TG and T-Cho were moderated by CLFAs plus RPM. Calcium salts of long-chain fatty acids increased plasma ghrelin concentration, and the ghrelin concentration with CLFAs plus RPM was the highest among the treatments. Plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1, glucagon, and insulin were decreased with CLFAs, whereas adding RPM moderated the decrease of plasma glucagon concentration by CLFAs. These results indicate that the addition of methionine to cows given CLFAs increases plasma concentrations of ghrelin and glucagon associated with the decrease in plasma concentrations of TG and T-Cho.

  4. A Placebo-Controlled Study on the Effects of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Mimetic, Exenatide, on Insulin Secretion, Body Composition and Adipokines in Obese, Client-Owned Cats

    PubMed Central

    Hoelmkjaer, Kirsten M.; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J.; Holst, Jens J.; Cronin, Anna M.; Nielsen, Dorte H.; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Bjornvad, Charlotte R.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like Peptide-1 mimetics increase insulin secretion and reduces body weight in humans. In lean, healthy cats, short-term treatment has produced similar results, whereas the effect in obese cats or with extended duration of treatment is unknown. Here, prolonged (12 weeks) treatment with the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 mimetic, exenatide, was evaluated in 12 obese, but otherwise healthy, client-owned cats. Cats were randomized to exenatide (1.0 μg/kg) or placebo treatment twice daily for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was changes in insulin concentration; the secondary endpoints were glucose homeostasis, body weight, body composition as measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and overall safety. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg body weight) was conducted at week 0 and week 12. Exenatide did not change the insulin concentration, plasma glucose concentration or glucose tolerance (P>0.05 for all). Exenatide tended to reduce body weight on continued normal feeding. Median relative weight loss after 12 weeks was 5.1% (range 1.7 to 8.4%) in the exenatide group versus 3.2% (range -5.3 to 5.7%) in the placebo group (P = 0.10). Body composition and adipokine levels were unaffected by exenatide (P>0.05). Twelve weeks of exenatide was well-tolerated, with only two cases of mild, self-limiting gastrointestinal signs and a single case of mild hypoglycemia. The long-term insulinotropic effect of exenatide appeared less pronounced in obese cats compared to previous short-term studies in lean cats. Further investigations are required to fully elucidate the effect on insulin secretion, glucose tolerance and body weight in obese cats. PMID:27136422

  5. Intrameal Hepatic Portal and Intraperitoneal Infusions of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Reduce Spontaneous Meal Size in the Rat via Different Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rüttimann, Elisabeth B.; Arnold, Myrtha; Hillebrand, Jacquelien J.; Geary, Nori; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral administration of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 reduces food intake in animals and humans, but the sites and mechanism of this effect and its physiological significance are not yet clear. To investigate these issues, we prepared rats with chronic catheters and infused GLP-1 (0.2 ml/min; 2.5 or 5.0 min) during the first spontaneous dark-phase meals. Infusions were remotely triggered 2–3 min after meal onset. Hepatic portal vein (HPV) infusion of 1.0 or 3.0 (but not 0.33) nmol/kg GLP-1 reduced the size of the ongoing meal compared with vehicle without affecting the subsequent intermeal interval, the size of subsequent meals, or cumulative food intake. In double-cannulated rats, HPV and vena cava infusions of 1.0 nmol/kg GLP-1 reduced meal size similarly. HPV GLP-1 infusions of 1.0 nmol/kg GLP-1 also reduced meal size similarly in rats with subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentations and in sham-operated rats. Finally, HPV and ip infusions of 10 nmol/kg GLP-1 reduced meal size similarly in sham-operated rats, but only HPV GLP-1 reduced meal size in subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation rats. These data indicate that peripherally infused GLP-1 acutely and specifically reduces the size of ongoing meals in rats and that the satiating effect of ip, but not iv, GLP-1 requires vagal afferent signaling. The findings suggest that iv GLP-1 infusions do not inhibit eating via hepatic portal or hepatic GLP-1 receptors but may act directly on the brain. PMID:18948395

  6. Reduction of hepatic insulin clearance after oral glucose ingestion is not mediated by glucagon-like peptide 1 or gastric inhibitory polypeptide in humans.

    PubMed

    Meier, Juris J; Holst, Jens J; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Nauck, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Changes in hepatic insulin clearance can occur after oral glucose or meal ingestion. This has been attributed to the secretion and action of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1. Given the recent availability of drugs based on incretin hormones, such clearance effects may be important for the future treatment of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we determined insulin clearance in response to endogenously secreted and exogenously administered GIP and GLP-1. Insulin clearance was estimated from the molar C-peptide-to-insulin ratio calculated at basal conditions and from the respective areas under the curve after glucose, GIP, or GLP-1 administration. Oral glucose administration led to an approximately 60% reduction in the C-peptide-to-insulin ratio (P < 0.0001), whereas intravenous glucose administration had no effect (P = 0.09). The endogenous secretion of GIP or GLP-1 was unrelated to the changes in insulin clearance. The C-peptide-to-insulin ratio was unchanged after the intravenous administration of GIP or GLP-1 in the fasting state (P = 0.27 and P = 0.35, respectively). Likewise, infusing GLP-1 during a meal course did not alter insulin clearance (P = 0.87). An inverse nonlinear relationship was found between the C-peptide-to-insulin ratio and the integrated insulin levels after oral and during intravenous glucose administration. Insulin clearance is reduced by oral but not by intravenous glucose administration. Neither GIP nor GLP-1 has significant effects on insulin extraction. An inverse relationship between insulin concentrations and insulin clearance suggests that the secretion of insulin itself determines the rate of hepatic insulin clearance.

  7. Preserved glucagon-like peptide-1 responses to oral glucose, but reduced incretin effect, insulin secretion and sensitivity in young Asians with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yeow, Toh Peng; Pacini, Giovanni; Tura, Andrea; Lim, Shueh Lin; Tan, Florence Hui Sieng; Tong, Chin Voon; Hong, Janet Yeow Hua; Md Zain, Fuziah; Holst, Jens Juul; Wan Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon

    2017-01-01

    Objective Youth onset type 2 diabetes mellitus (YT2DM) is a globally rising phenomenon with substantial Asians representation. The understanding of its pathophysiology is derived largely from studies in the obese African-American and Caucasian populations, while studies on incretin effect are scarce. We examined the insulin resistance, β-cell function (BC), glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 hormone and incretin effect in Asian YT2DM. Research design and methods This case–control study recruited 25 Asian YT2DM and 15 healthy controls, matched for gender, ethnicity and body mass index. Serum glucose, insulin, C peptide and GLP-1 were sampled during 2-hour oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) and 1-hour intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs). Insulin sensitivity was derived from the Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI), Oral Glucose Insulin Sensitivity Index (OGIS) in OGTT and surrogate index of SI from the minimal model (calculated SI, CSI). Acute insulin response (AIR) was obtained from IVGTT. Total BC was computed as incremental area under the curve of insulin/incremental area under the curve of glucose, during OGTT (BCOG) and IVGTT (BCIV), respectively. Disposition index (DI) was calculated using the product of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. GLP-1 response to oral glucose was calculated as incremental area under the curve of GLP-1 (ΔAUCGLP-1). Per cent incretin effect was estimated as 100×(BCOG−BCIV)/BCOG). Results The YT2DM had marked impairment in BC (>80% reduction in AIR and BCOG, p<0.001) and lower QUICKI (p<0.001), OGIS (p<0.001) and CSI (p=0.015) compared with controls. There was no difference in GLP-1 at all time points and ΔAUCGLP-1 but the per cent incretin effect was reduced in the YT2DM compared with controls (12.1±8.93 vs 70.0±4.03, p<0.001). Conclusions Asian YT2DM showed similar GLP-1 response to oral glucose as controls but reduced incretin effect, BC and insulin sensitivity. The lack of compensatory

  8. Discovery of a Novel Series of Orally Bioavailable and CNS Penetrant Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R) Noncompetitive Antagonists Based on a 1,3-Disubstituted-7-aryl-5,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)-5,8-dihydropyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione Core.

    PubMed

    Nance, Kellie D; Days, Emily L; Weaver, C David; Coldren, Anastasia; Farmer, Tiffany D; Cho, Hyekyung P; Niswender, Colleen M; Blobaum, Anna L; Niswender, Kevin D; Lindsley, Craig W

    2017-02-23

    A duplexed, functional multiaddition high throughput screen and subsequent optimization effort identified the first orally bioavailable and CNS penetrant glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) noncompetitive antagonist. Antagonist 5d not only blocked exendin-4-stimulated insulin release in islets but also lowered insulin levels while increasing blood glucose in vivo.

  9. Sardine protein diet increases plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 levels and prevents tissue oxidative stress in rats fed a high-fructose diet.

    PubMed

    Madani, Zohra; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J; Dalila, Ait Yahia

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigated whether sardine protein mitigates the adverse effects of fructose on plasma glucagon‑like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and oxidative stress in rats. Rats were fed casein (C) or sardine protein (S) with or without high‑fructose (HF) for 2 months. Plasma glucose, insulin, GLP‑1, lipid and protein oxidation and antioxidant enzymes were assayed. HF rats developed obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and oxidative stress despite reduced energy and food intakes. High plasma creatinine and uric acid levels, in addition to albuminuria were observed in the HF groups. The S‑HF diet reduced plasma glucose, insulin, creatinine, uric acid and homeostasis model assessment‑insulin resistance index levels, however increased GLP‑1 levels compared with the C‑HF diet. Hydroperoxides were reduced in the liver, kidney, heart and muscle of S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. A reduction in liver, kidney and heart carbonyls was observed in S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. Reduced levels of nitric oxide (NO) were detected in the liver, kidney and heart of the S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. The S diet compared with the C diet reduced levels of liver hydroperoxides, heart carbonyls and kidney NO. The S‑HF diet compared with the C‑HF diet increased the levels of liver and kidney superoxide dismutase, liver and muscle catalase, liver, heart and muscle glutathione peroxidase and liver ascorbic acid. The S diet prevented and reversed insulin resistance and oxidative stress, and may have benefits in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  10. Effects of E2HSA, a Long-Acting Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist, on Glycemic Control and Beta Cell Function in Spontaneous Diabetic db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shaocong; Li, Caina; Huan, Yi; Liu, Shuainan; Liu, Quan; Sun, Sujuan; Jiang, Qian; Jia, Chunming; Shen, Zhufang

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists such as exendin-4 have been widely used but their short half-life limits their therapeutic value. The recombinant protein, E2HSA, is a novel, long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist generated by the fusion of exendin-4 with human serum albumin. In mouse pancreatic NIT-1 cells, E2HSA activated GLP-1 receptor with similar efficacy as exendin-4. After single-dose administration in ICR mice, E2HSA showed prolonged glucose lowering effects which lasted up to four days and extended inhibition on gastric emptying for at least 72 hours. Chronic E2HSA treatment in db/db mice significantly improved glucose tolerance, reduced elevated nonfasting and fasting plasma glucose levels, and also decreased HbA1c levels. E2HSA also increased insulin secretion and decreased body weight and appetite. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analysis showed that E2HSA increased β-cell area, improved islet morphology, and reduced β-cell apoptosis. In accordance with the promotion of β-cell function and survival, E2HSA upregulated genes such as Irs2, Pdx-1, Nkx6.1, and MafA and downregulated the expression levels of FoxO1 and proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. In conclusion, with prolonged glucose lowering effects and promoting β-cell function and survival, the fusion protein, E2HSA, is a promising new therapeutic for once weekly treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  11. Chronic treatment with exendin(9-39)amide indicates a minor role for endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 in metabolic abnormalities of obesity-related diabetes in ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Green, B D; Irwin, N; Gault, V A; Bailey, C J; O'Harte, F P M; Flatt, P R

    2005-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent insulinotropic hormone proposed to play a role in both the pathophysiology and treatment of type 2 diabetes. This study has employed the GLP-1 receptor antagonist, exendin-4(9-39)amide (Ex(9-39)) to evaluate the role of endogenous GLP-1 in genetic obesity-related diabetes and related metabolic abnormalities using ob/ob and normal mice. Acute in vivo antagonistic potency of Ex(9-39) was confirmed in ob/ob mice by blockade of the insulin-releasing and anti-hyperglycaemic actions of intraperitoneal GLP-1. In longer term studies, ob/ob mice were given once daily injections of Ex(9-39) or vehicle for 11 days. Feeding activity, body weight, and both basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were not significantly affected by chronic Ex(9-39) treatment. However, significantly elevated basal glucose concentrations and impaired glucose tolerance were evident at 11 days. These disturbances in glucose homeostasis were independent of changes of insulin sensitivity and reversed by discontinuation of the Ex(9-39) for 9 days. Similar treatment of normal mice did not affect any of the parameters measured. These findings illustrate the physiological extrapancreatic glucose-lowering actions of GLP-1 in ob/ob mice and suggest that the endogenous hormone plays a minor role in the metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity-related diabetes.

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists as insulin add-on therapy in patients with inadequate glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus: lixisenatide as a new therapeutic option.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Azriel, Sharona; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Vidal, Josep; de Pablos-Velasco, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    Despite the variety of therapeutic options for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, many patients fail to meet glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) targets. The relative contribution of postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) to overall HbA1c is estimated at 40-60%, with the effect of PPG on HbA1c being prominent in patients on basal insulin. The development of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) has been an important achievement in diabetes management and has become an established treatment. Of available GLP-1RAs, lixisenatide is a once-daily prandial GLP-1RA that has been shown to produce a reduction in HbA1c with a pronounced postprandial effect, suggesting a complementary effect between lixisenatide and basal insulin on PPG and fasting plasma glucose, resulting in a beneficial effect on body weight in all populations. Therefore, lixisenatide will make an important addition to current options for treating diabetes, especially for patients not achieving glycemic targets with basal insulin therapy.

  13. The effect of glucose when added to a fat load on the response of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and apolipoprotein B-48 in the postprandial phase.

    PubMed

    Zemánková, K; Mrázková, J; Piťha, J; Kovář, J

    2015-01-01

    Increased and prolonged postprandial lipemia has been identified as a risk factor of cardiovascular disease. However, there is no consensus on how to test postprandial lipemia, especially with respect to the composition of an experimental meal. To address this question of how glucose, when added to a fat load, affects the selected parameters of postprandial lipemia, we carried out a study in 30 healthy male volunteers. Men consumed an experimental meal containing either 75 g of fat + 25 g of glucose (F+G meal) or 75 g of fat (F meal) in a control experiment. Blood was taken before the meal and at selected time points within the following 8 h. Glucose, when added to a fat load, induced an increase of glycemia and insulinemia and, surprisingly, a 20 % reduction in the response of both total and active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentration. The addition of glucose did not affect the magnitude of postprandial triglyceridemia and TRL-C and TRL-TG concentrations but stimulated a faster response of chylomicrons to the test meal, evaluated by changes in apolipoprotein B-48 concentrations. The addition of glucose induced the physiological response of insulin and the lower response of GLP-1 to the test meal during the early postprandial phase, but had no effect on changes of TRL-cholesterol and TRL-TG within 8 h after the meal.

  14. Exaggerated glucagon-like peptide 1 response is important for improved β-cell function and glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Jacobsen, Siv H; Worm, Dorte; Hansen, Dorte L; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Naver, Lars; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens J

    2013-09-01

    β-Cell function improves in patients with type 2 diabetes in response to an oral glucose stimulus after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. This has been linked to the exaggerated secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), but causality has not been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of GLP-1 in improving β-cell function and glucose tolerance and regulating glucagon release after RYGB using exendin(9-39) (Ex-9), a GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R)-specific antagonist. Nine patients with type 2 diabetes were examined before and 1 week and 3 months after surgery. Each visit consisted of two experimental days, allowing a meal test with randomized infusion of saline or Ex-9. After RYGB, glucose tolerance improved, β-cell glucose sensitivity (β-GS) doubled, the GLP-1 response greatly increased, and glucagon secretion was augmented. GLP-1R blockade did not affect β-cell function or meal-induced glucagon release before the operation but did impair glucose tolerance. After RYGB, β-GS decreased to preoperative levels, glucagon secretion increased, and glucose tolerance was impaired by Ex-9 infusion. Thus, the exaggerated effect of GLP-1 after RYGB is of major importance for the improvement in β-cell function, control of glucagon release, and glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  15. Novel therapeutics for type 2 diabetes: incretin hormone mimetics (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Verspohl, E J

    2009-10-01

    Known treatments of type 2 diabetes mellitus have limitations such as weight gain, and hypoglycaemias. A new perspective is the use of incretin hormones and incretin enhancers. Incretins are defined as being responsible for the higher insulin release after an oral glucose load compared to an intravenous glucose load. The delicate balance of glucose homeostasis, in which incretin hormones are involved, is disturbed in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The incretin GLP-1 helps to maintain glucose homeostasis through stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of glucagon release in a glucose-dependent manner. This is associated with reductions in body weight, and no risk of hypoglycaemias. When classical oral agents have failed to maintain adequate glycaemic control, incretin mimetics may be of particular value for obese patients and those who have little control over meal sizes. Exenatide was marketed as a GLP-1 analogue and longer acting incretin mimetics such as liraglutide, albiglutide and others have the same pharmacological profile. In addition to incretin mimetics incretin enhancers which inhibit/delay degradation of incretins were developed: so-called DPP-4 inhibitors such as sitagliptin and vildagliptin are approved in Europe. Their differences from incretin mimetics include: oral bioavailability, less side effects with overdose, no direct CNS effects (nausea and vomiting) and no effect on weight. In rodent models of diabetes, but not yet in humans, GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors increase islet mass and preserve beta-cell function. Incretin mimetics and enhancers expand type 2 diabetes treatment, are still not first line therapy and it is discussed if they are to be prophylactically used.

  16. A novel glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/glucagon hybrid peptide with triple-acting agonist activity at glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, GLP-1, and glucagon receptors and therapeutic potential in high fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Gault, Victor A; Bhat, Vikas K; Irwin, Nigel; Flatt, Peter R

    2013-12-06

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon bind to related members of the same receptor superfamily and exert important effects on glucose homeostasis, insulin secretion, and energy regulation. The present study assessed the biological actions and therapeutic utility of novel GIP/glucagon/GLP-1 hybrid peptides. Nine novel peptides were synthesized and exhibited complete DPP-IV resistance and enhanced in vitro insulin secretion. The most promising peptide, [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG, stimulated cAMP production in GIP, GLP-1, and glucagon receptor-transfected cells. Acute administration of [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG in combination with glucose significantly lowered plasma glucose and increased plasma insulin in normal and obese diabetic (ob/ob) mice. Furthermore, [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG elicited a protracted glucose-lowering and insulinotropic effect in high fat-fed mice. Twice daily administration of [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG for 21 days decreased body weight and nonfasting plasma glucose and increased circulating plasma insulin concentrations in high fat-fed mice. Furthermore, [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG significantly improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity by day 21. Interestingly, locomotor activity was increased in [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG mice, without appreciable changes in aspects of metabolic rate. Studies in knock-out mice confirmed the biological action of [dA(2)]GLP-1/GcG via multiple targets including GIP, GLP-1, and glucagon receptors. The data suggest significant promise for novel triple-acting hybrid peptides as therapeutic options for obesity and diabetes.

  17. Functional coupling of Cys-226 and Cys-296 in the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor indicates a disulfide bond that is close to the activation pocket.

    PubMed

    Mann, Rosalind J; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; de Maturana, Rakel López; Sinfield, John K; Donnelly, Dan

    2010-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane α-helical (7TM) integral membrane proteins that play a central role in both cell signaling and in the action of many pharmaceuticals. The crystal structures of several Family A GPCRs have shown the presence of a disulfide bond linking transmembrane helix 3 (TM3) to the second extracellular loop (ECL2), enabling ECL2 to stabilize and contribute to the ligand binding pocket. Family B GPCRs share no significant sequence identity with those in Family A but nevertheless share two conserved cysteines in topologically equivalent positions. Since there are no available crystal structures for the 7TM domain of any Family B GPCR, we used mutagenesis alongside pharmacological analysis to investigate the role of ECL2 and the conserved cysteine residues. We mutated Cys-226, at the extracellular end of TM3 of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, to alanine and observed a 38-fold reduction in GLP-1 potency. Interestingly, this potency loss was restored by the additional substitution of Cys-296 in ECL2 to alanine. Alongside the complete conservation of these cysteine residues in Family B GPCRs, this functional coupling suggested the presence of a disulfide bond. Further mutagenesis demonstrated that the low potency observed at the C226A mutant, compared with the C226A-C296A double mutant, was the result of the bulky nature of the released Cys-296 side chain. Since this suggested that ECL2 was in close proximity to the agonist activation pocket, an alanine scan of ECL2 was carried out which confirmed the important role of this loop in agonist-induced receptor activation.

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist inhibits asymmetric dimethylarginine generation in the kidney of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by blocking advanced glycation end product-induced protein arginine methyltranferase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Ayako; Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Maeda, Sayaka; Nishino, Yuri; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Fukami, Kei; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) play a role in diabetic nephropathy. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, contributes to diabetic nephropathy. We have found that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) inhibits the AGE-induced inflammatory reactions in endothelial cells. However, effects of GLP-1 on the AGE-RAGE-ADMA axis are unknown. This study examined the effects of GLP-1 on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, gene expression of protein arginine methyltransfetase-1 (PRMT-1), an enzyme that mainly generates ADMA, and ADMA levels in human proximal tubular cells. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats received continuous i.p. infusion of 0.3 μg of vehicle or 1.5 μg of the GLP-1 analog exendin-4 per kilogram of body weight for 2 weeks. We further investigated whether and how exendin-4 treatment reduced ADMA levels and renal damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. GLP-1 inhibited the AGE-induced RAGE and PRMT-1 gene expression, ROS, and ADMA generation in tubular cells, which were blocked by small-interfering RNAs raised against GLP-1 receptor. Exendin-4 treatment decreased gene expression of Rage, Prmt-1, Icam-1, and Mcp-1 and ADMA level; reduced urinary excretions of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and albumin; and improved histopathologic changes of the kidney in diabetic rats. Our present study suggests that GLP-1 receptor agonist may inhibit the AGE-RAGE-mediated ADMA generation by suppressing PRMT-1 expression via inhibition of ROS generation, thereby protecting against the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Potentiation of insulin secretion and improvement of glucose intolerance by combining a novel G protein-coupled receptor 40 agonist DS-1558 with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ryutaro; Yano, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Junko; Tanaka, Naomi; Toda, Narihiro; Yoshida, Masao; Takano, Rieko; Inoue, Masahiro; Honda, Takeshi; Kume, Shoen; Matsumoto, Koji

    2014-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) is a Gq-coupled receptor for free fatty acids predominantly expressed in pancreatic β-cells. In recent years, GPR40 agonists have been investigated for use as novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We discovered a novel small molecule GPR40 agonist, (3S)-3-ethoxy-3-(4-{[(1R)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl]oxy}phenyl)propanoic acid (DS-1558). The GPR40-mediated effects of DS-1558 on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were evaluated in isolated islets from GPR40 knock-out and wild-type (littermate) mice. The GPR40-mediated effects on glucose tolerance and insulin secretion were also confirmed by an oral glucose tolerance test in these mice. Furthermore, oral administration of DS-1558 (0.03, 0.1 and 0.3mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently improved hyperglycemia and increased insulin secretion during the oral glucose tolerance test in Zucker fatty rats, the model of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Next, we examined the combination effects of DS-1558 with glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1). DS-1558 not only increased the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by GLP-1 but also potentiated the maximum insulinogenic effects of GLP-1 after an intravenous glucose injection in normal Sprague Dawley rats. Furthermore, the glucose lowering effects of exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, were markedly potentiated by the DS-1558 (3mg/kg) add-on in diabetic db/db mice during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. In conclusion, our results indicate that add-on GPR40 agonists to GLP-1 related agents might be a potential treatment compared to single administration of these compounds. Therefore the combinations of these agents are a novel therapeutic option for type 2 diabetes.

  20. Comparative effects of the endogenous agonist glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-(7-36) amide and the small-molecule ago-allosteric agent "compound 2" at the GLP-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Coopman, Karen; Huang, Yan; Johnston, Neil; Bradley, Sophie J; Wilkinson, Graeme F; Willars, Gary B

    2010-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mediates antidiabetogenic effects through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), which is targeted for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Small-molecule GLP-1R agonists have been sought due to difficulties with peptide therapeutics. Recently, 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert-butylaminoquinoxaline (compound 2) has been described as a GLP-1R allosteric modulator and agonist. Using human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing human GLP-1Rs, we extended this work to consider the impact of compound 2 on G protein activation, Ca(2+) signaling and receptor internalization and particularly to compare compound 2 and GLP-1 across a range of functional assays in intact cells. GLP-1 and compound 2 activated Galpha(s) in cell membranes and increased cellular cAMP in intact cells, with compound 2 being a partial and almost full agonist, respectively. GLP-1 increased intracellular [Ca(2+)] by release from intracellular stores, which was mimicked by compound 2, with slower kinetics. In either intact cells or membranes, the orthosteric antagonist exendin-(9-39), inhibited GLP-1 cAMP generation but increased the efficacy of compound 2. GLP-1 internalized enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged GLP-1Rs, but the speed and magnitude evoked by compound 2 were less. Exendin-(9-39) inhibited internalization by GLP-1 and also surprisingly that by compound 2. Compound 2 displays GLP-1R agonism consistent with action at an allosteric site, although an orthosteric antagonist increased its efficacy on cAMP and blocked compound 2-mediated receptor internalization. Full assessment of the properties of compound 2 was potentially hampered by damaging effects that were particularly manifest in either longer term assays with intact cells or in acute assays with membranes.

  1. Genetically-Encoded Photocrosslinkers Determine the Biological Binding Site of Exendin-4 in the N-Terminal Domain of the Intact Human Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Koole, Cassandra; Reynolds, Christopher A; Mobarec, Juan C; Hick, Caroline; Sexton, Patrick M; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2017-03-10

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a key therapeutic target in the management of type II diabetes mellitus, with actions including regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion, promotion of satiety and preservation of β-cell mass. Like most class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), there is limited knowledge linking biological activity of the GLP-1R with the molecular structure of an intact, full-length, functional receptor-ligand complex. In this study, we have utilized genetic code expansion to site-specifically incorporate the photoactive amino acid p-azido-L-phenylalanine (azF) into N-terminal residues of a full-length, functional human GLP-1R in mammalian cells. UV-mediated photolysis of azF was then carried out to induce targeted photocrosslinking to determine the proximity of the azido group in the mutant receptor with the peptide exendin-4. Crosslinking data were compared directly to the crystal structure of the isolated N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of the GLP-1R in complex with exendin(9-39), revealing both similarities as well as distinct differences in the mode of interaction. Generation of a molecular model to accommodate the photocrosslinking constraints highlights the potential influence of environmental conditions on the conformation of the receptor-peptide complex, including folding dynamics of the peptide and formation of dimeric and higher order oligomeric receptor multimers. These data demonstrate that crystal structures of isolated receptor regions may not give a complete reflection of peptide-receptor interactions, and should be combined with additional experimental constraints to reveal peptide-receptor interactions occurring in the dynamic, native, full-length receptor state.

  2. Concurrent pharmacological modification of cannabinoid-1 and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activity affects feeding behavior and body weight in rats fed a free-choice, high-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Radziszewska, Elżbieta; Wolak, Monika; Bojanowska, Ewa

    2014-02-01

    To extend preliminary studies on the effects on food intake of the combined use of cannabinoid (CB) 1 and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and antagonists, the effect of these drugs on the feeding behavior in rats maintained on a free-choice, high-carbohydrate diet was investigated over a longer period of time. Rats were fed a standard diet for 3 days and then fed with both the standard and the high-sucrose chow. After 4 days of the high-calorie diet, the following combination treatments were administered daily by an intraperitoneal injection for the next 3 days: 1 mg/kg AM 251 (a CB1 receptor antagonist) or 1 mg/kg WIN 55,212-2 (a CB1 receptor agonist) together with 3 µg/kg exendin-4 (Ex-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist) or 160 µg/kg exendin (9-39) [Ex (9-39), a GLP-1 receptor antagonist]. The total daily caloric intake and body weight were significantly reduced in rats treated with Ex-4 and AM 251 or WIN 55,212-2 compared with either of the drugs injected alone and the saline-injected controls. Both drug combinations selectively inhibited ingestion of the high-sucrose chow. Although Ex (9-39) administration did not significantly affect food consumption, it resulted in a marked body weight gain, indicating that the GLP-1 receptor antagonist caused a positive energy balance. It is concluded that AM 251 or WIN 55,212-2 and Ex-4, injected together, exert additive, inhibitory effects on the consumption of high-sugar food.

  3. Long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have direct access to and effects on pro-opiomelanocortin/cocaine- and amphetamine-stimulated transcript neurons in the mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Secher, Anna; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob; Pyke, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Liraglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist marketed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Besides lowering blood glucose, liraglutide reduces bodyweight, and has recently also been approved for the obesity indication. Acutely, GLP-1 markedly reduces gastric emptying, and this effect was previously believed to at least partly explain the effect on bodyweight loss. However, recent studies in both humans and animals have shown that GLP-1R agonists, such as liraglutide, that lead to pharmacological concentrations for 24 h/day only have a minor effect on gastric emptying; such an effect is unlikely to have lasting effects on appetite reduction. Liraglutide has been shown to have direct effects in the arcuate nucleus of the rodent brain, activating pro-opiomelanocortin neurons and increasing levels of the cocaine- and amphetamine-stimulated transcript neuropeptide messenger ribonucleic acid, which correlate nicely to clinical studies where liraglutide was shown to increase feelings of satiety. However, despite the lack of a GLP-1R on agouti-related peptide/neuropeptide Y neurons, liraglutide also was able to prevent a hunger associated increase in agouti-related peptide and neuropeptide Y neuropeptide messenger ribonucleic acid, again with a strong correlation to clinical studies that document reduced hunger feelings in patients while taking liraglutide. Studies using fluorescent labeled liraglutide, as well as other GLP-1R agonists, and analysis using single-plane illumination microscopy show that such medium-sized peptide-based compounds can directly access not only circumventricular organs of the brain, but also directly access discrete regions in the hypothalamus. The direct effects of long-acting GLP-1R agonists in the hypothalamus are likely to be an important new pathway in understanding GLP-1R agonist mediated weight loss.

  4. Role of capsaicin-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons in anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of cholecystokinin, peptide YY-(3-36), and glucagon-like peptide-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger; Haver, Alvin; Anders, Krista; Apenteng, Bettye

    2014-10-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced suppression of feeding is mediated by vagal sensory neurons that are destroyed by the neurotoxin capsaicin (CAP). Here we determined whether CAP-sensitive neurons mediate anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of gut hormones peptide YY-(3-36) [PYY-(3-36)] and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Rats received three intraperitoneal injections of CAP or vehicle (VEH) in 24 h. After recovery, non-food-deprived rats received at dark onset a 3-h intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (5, 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), PYY-(3-36) (5, 17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), or GLP-1 (17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹). CCK-8 was much less effective in reducing food intake in CAP vs. VEH rats. CCK-8 at 5 and 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 39 and 71% in VEH rats and 7 and 18% in CAP rats. In contrast, PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 were similarly effective in reducing food intake in VEH and CAP rats. PYY-(3-36) at 5, 17, and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 15, 33, and 70% in VEH rats and 13, 30, and 33% in CAP rats. GLP-1 at 17 and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 48 and 60% in VEH rats and 30 and 52% in CAP rats. These results suggest that anorexic responses to PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 are not primarily mediated by the CAP-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons (presumably vagal) that mediate CCK-8-induced anorexia.

  5. Modeling analysis of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated Ca2+ mobilization under the control of glucagon-like peptide-1 in mouse pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yukari; Shimayoshi, Takao; Holz, George G; Noma, Akinori

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinally derived blood glucose-lowering hormone that potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. The secretagogue action of GLP-1 is explained, at least in part, by its ability to stimulate cAMP production so that cAMP may facilitate the release of Ca(2+) from inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-regulated Ca(2+) stores. However, a quantitative model has yet to be provided that explains the molecular mechanisms and dynamic processes linking GLP-1-stimulated cAMP production to Ca(2+) mobilization. Here, we performed simulation studies to investigate how GLP-1 alters the abilities of Ca(2+) and IP3 to act as coagonists at IP3R Ca(2+) release channels. A new dynamic model was constructed based on the Kaftan model, which demonstrates dual steady-state allosteric regulation of the IP3R by Ca(2+) and IP3. Data obtained from β-cells were then analyzed to understand how GLP-1 facilitates IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization when UV flash photolysis is used to uncage Ca(2+) and IP3 intracellularly. When the dynamic model for IP3R activation was incorporated into a minimal cell model, the Ca(2+) transients and oscillations induced by GLP-1 were successfully reconstructed. Simulation studies indicated that transient and oscillatory responses to GLP-1 were produced by sequential positive and negative feedback regulation due to fast activation and slow inhibition of the IP3R by Ca(2+). The slow rate of Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition was revealed to provide a remarkable contribution to the time course of the decay of cytosolic Ca(2+) transients. It also served to drive and pace Ca(2+) oscillations that are significant when evaluating how GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion.

  6. Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue: a novel protective agent with anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant properties in mice with lung injury.

    PubMed

    Arda-Pirincci, Pelin; Oztay, Fusun; Bayrak, Bertan Boran; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2012-12-01

    Teduglutide is a long-acting synthetic analogue of human glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). GLP-2 regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis as well as normal physiology in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, possible cytoprotective and reparative effects of teduglutide were analyzed on a mouse model with lung injury induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and actinomycin D (Act D). BALB/c mice were divided into six groups: control mice (I), mice injected intraperitoneally with 15 μg/kg TNF-α (II), 800 μg/kg Act D (III), Act D 2 min prior to TNF-α administration with the same doses (IV), mice injected subcutaneously with 200 μg/kg teduglutide every 12h for 10 consecutive days (V), and mice given Act D 2 min prior to TNF-α administration on day 11 after receiving teduglutide for 10 days (VI). The TNF-α/Act D administration made the lung a sensitive organ to damage. Mice lung subjected to TNF-α/Act D were characterized by the disruption of alveolar wall, induced pulmonary endothelial/epithelial cell apoptosis and expression of active caspase-3. These mice exhibited an increase in lipid peroxidation, glutathione levels, and activities of myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and xanthine oxidase, as well as reduced tissue factor and sodium-potassium/ATPase activities. Teduglutide pretreatment regressed the structural damage, cell apoptosis and oxidative stress by reducing lipid peroxidation in mice received TNF-α/Act D. GLP-2 receptors were present on the cell membrane of type II pneumocytes and interstitial cells. Thus, teduglutide can be suggested as a novel protective agent, which possesses anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant properties, against lung injury.

  7. Effects of the glucagon-like polypeptide-1 analogue (Val8)GLP-1 on learning, progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the C57B/16 mouse brain.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Stephen F J; Hunter, Kerry; Hölscher, Christian

    2012-09-14

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has been identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Here, we tested the properties of the glucagon-like polypetide-1 (GLP-1) analogue (Val8)GLP-1, a drug originally developed as a treatment for T2DM at a range of doses (2.5 nmol; 25 nmol; 100 nmol; or 250 nmol/kg bw ip.) in an acute memory study in wild type C57B/l6 mice. We also tested (Val8)GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39) in a chronic study (3 weeks at 25 nmol/kg bw ip. once-daily). We found that (Val8)GLP-1 crossed the blood brain barrier readily and that peripheral injection increased levels in the brain 30 min post-injection ip. but not 2h post-injection in rats. In the acute study, the low dose of 2.5 nmol/kg ip. enhanced motor activity in the open field task, while total distance travelled, exploratory behaviour and anxiety was not affected at any dose. Learning an object recognition task was not affected either. In the chronic study, no effect was observed in the open field assessment. The antagonist exendin (9-39) impaired object recognition learning and spatial learning in a water maze task, demonstrating the importance of GLP-1 signalling in memory formation. Locomotor activity was also affected in some cases. Blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity was not affected in chronically treated mice. Neuronal stem cells and neurogenesis was enhanced by (Val8)GLP-1 in the dentate gyrus of wild type mice. The results demonstrate that (Val8)GLP-1 is safe in a range of doses, crosses the BBB and has potentially beneficial effects in the CNS by enhancing neurogenesis.

  8. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  9. Real-world medication persistence and outcomes associated with basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist free-dose combination therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes in the US

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jay; Lingohr-Smith, Melissa; Fan, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Background Free-dose combination treatment with basal insulin and short-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) reduces hyperglycemia via complementary targeting of fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels, however, in the real world, due to injection burden and clinical inertia, the full efficacy may not be able to translate into clinical and economic benefits. Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate treatment persistence and associated outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with a GLP-1 RA in free-dose combination with basal insulin. Methods Claims data were extracted on US adults with T2D with ≥1 prescription claim for both a GLP-1 RA and a basal insulin from July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2013, and continuous health plan coverage for 6 months prior to (baseline) and 12 months after the index date (follow-up period). Outcomes analyzed for patients stratified by treatment persistence included glycemic control, hypoglycemia, and health care costs and resource utilization. Multivariate analyses were used to examine factors associated with persistence or hypoglycemia. Results The analysis included 7,320 patients, of whom 16.9% were persistent with free-dose combination treatment. The median time to treatment discontinuation was 133 days. Compared with nonpersistent patients, persistent patients had greater glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1C) reductions (−0.80% vs −0.42%; P=0.032), were more likely to achieve A1C <7.0% (39% vs 22%; P<0.001), and were less likely to experience hypoglycemia (9.5% vs 6.8%; P=0.002). Persistent patients also had significantly fewer hospitalizations and shorter hospital stays. While prescription costs were significantly higher (all-cause: $14,691 vs $10,791; P<0.001; diabetes-related: $8,142 vs $5,124; P<0.001), total medical charges were significantly lower (all-cause: $28,405 vs $40,292; P=0.001; diabetes-related: $11,114 vs $15,203; P=0.003) for persistent patients compared with nonpersistent

  10. Simultaneous quantification of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor agonists in rodent plasma by on-line solid phase extraction and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Roth, Jonathan D; Taylor, Steven W

    2014-04-15

    Peptide agonists of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) and the cholecystokinin-1 receptor (CCK1-R) have therapeutic potential because of their marked anorexigenic and weight lowering effects. Furthermore, recent studies in rodents have shown that co-administration of these agents may prove more effective than treatment either of the peptide classes alone. To correlate the pharmacodynamic effects to the pharmacokinetics of these peptide drugs in vivo, a sensitive and robust bioanalytical method is essential. Furthermore, the simultaneous determination of both analytes in plasma samples by a single method offers obvious advantages. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is well suited to this goal through its ability to simultaneously monitor multiple analytes through selected reaction monitoring (SRM). However, it is a challenge to find appropriate conditions that allow two peptides with widely disparate physiochemical properties to be simultaneously analyzed while maintaining the necessary sensitivity for their accurate plasma concentrations. Herein, we report an on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantification of the CCK1-R agonist AC170222 and the GLP-1R agonist AC3174 in rodent plasma. The assay has a linear range from 0.0975 to 100ng/mL, with lower limits of quantification of 0.0975ng/mL and 0.195ng/mL for AC3174 and AC170222, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions were below 15%. The developed LC-MS/MS method was used to simultaneously quantify AC3174 and AC170222, the results showed that the terminal plasma concentrations of AC3174 or AC170222 were comparable between groups of animals that were administered with the peptides alone (247±15pg/mL of AC3174 and 1306±48pg/mL of AC170222), or in combination (222±32pg/mL and 1136±47pg/mL of AC3174 and AC170222, respectively). These data provide information on the drug exposure to aid in assessing the combination effects of AC3174 and AC

  11. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the ‘London’ (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and ‘Swedish’ mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  12. 99mTc Labeled Glucagon-Like Peptide-1-Analogue (99mTc-GLP1) Scintigraphy in the Management of Patients with Occult Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Trofimiuk-Müldner, Małgorzata; Stefańska, Agnieszka; Tomaszuk, Monika; Buziak-Bereza, Monika; Gilis-Januszewska, Aleksandra; Jabrocka-Hybel, Agata; Głowa, Bogusław; Małecki, Maciej; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kamiński, Grzegorz; Kowalska, Aldona; Mikołajczak, Renata; Janota, Barbara; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the utility of [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 scintigraphy in the management of patients with hypoglycemia, particularly in the detection of occult insulinoma. Materials and Methods Forty patients with hypoglycemia and increased/confusing results of serum insulin and C-peptide concentration and negative/inconclusive results of other imaging examinations were enrolled in the study. In all patients GLP-1 receptor imaging was performed to localise potential pancreatic lesions. Results Positive results of GLP-1 scintigraphy were observed in 28 patients. In 18 patients postsurgical histopathological examination confirmed diagnosis of insulinoma. Two patients had contraindications to the surgery, one patient did not want to be operated. One patient, who presented with postprandial hypoglycemia, with positive result of GLP-1 imaging was not qualified for surgery and is in the observational group. Eight patients were lost for follow up, among them 6 patients with positive GLP-1 scintigraphy result. One patient with negative scintigraphy was diagnosed with malignant insulinoma. In two patients with negative scintigraphy Munchausen syndrome was diagnosed (patients were taking insulin). Other seven patients with negative results of 99mTcGLP-1 scintigraphy and postprandial hypoglycemia with C-peptide and insulin levels within the limits of normal ranges are in the observational group. We would like to mention that 99mTc-GLP1-SPECT/CT was also performed in 3 pts with nesidioblastosis (revealing diffuse tracer uptake in two and a focal lesion in one case) and in two patients with malignant insulinoma (with the a focal uptake in the localization of a removed pancreatic headin one case and negative GLP-1 1 scintigraphy in the other patient). Conclusions 99mTc-GLP1-SPECT/CT could be helpful examination in the management of patients with hypoglycemia enabling proper localization of the pancreatic lesion and effective surgical treatment. This imaging technique may eliminate the need to perform invasive procedures in case of occult insulinoma. PMID:27526057

  13. cAMP-dependent protein kinase and Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels mediate Raf-independent activation of extracellular regulated kinase in response to glucagon-like peptide-1 in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Edith; Pritchard, Catrin; Herbert, Terence P

    2002-12-13

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP1) is a G(s)-coupled receptor agonist that exerts multiple effects on pancreatic beta-cells, including the stimulation of insulin gene expression and secretion. In this report, we show that treatment of the mouse pancreatic beta-cell line MIN6 with GLP1 leads to the glucose-dependent activation of Erk. These effects are mimicked by forskolin, a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, and blocked by H89, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Additionally, we provide evidence that GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk requires an influx of calcium through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk is blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but GLP1 does not induce the activation of A-Raf, B-Raf, C-Raf, or Ras. Additionally, dominant negative forms of Ras(N17) and Rap1(N17) fail to block GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk. In conclusion, our results indicate that, in the presence of stimulatory concentrations of glucose, GLP1 stimulates the activation of Erk through a mechanism dependent on MEK but independent of both Raf and Ras. This requires 1) the activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, 2) an influx of extracellular Ca(2+) through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, and 3) the activation of CaM kinase II.

  14. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM–5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9–39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N5-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1-R) mRNA in the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Shughrue, P J; Lane, M V; Merchenthaler, I

    1996-11-01

    GLP-1 has been shown to dramatically reduce food intake in fasted rats and is thought to exert its effects by modulating neuronal function in the hypothalamus. To date, little is known about the distribution of GLP1-R and its mRNA in the rodent hypothalamus. The purpose of the present study was to utilize in situ hybridization histochemistry to determine the anatomical distribution of GLP1-R mRNA in the rat hypothalamus. The results of these studies revealed an extensive distribution of GLP1-R mRNA throughout the rostral-caudal extent of the hypothalamus; with a dense accumulation of labeled cells in the supraoptic, paraventricular, and arcuate nuclei. Additional labeled cells were also detected in medial and lateral preoptic areas, periventricular nucleus, ventral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, lateral hypothalamus, and dorsomedial nucleus. The results of these in situ hybridization histochemical studies have provided detailed and novel information about the distribution of GLP1-R mRNA in the rat hypothalamus. In addition, this morphological data provides important information about the neuronal systems modulated by GLP-1 and their potential role in feeding behavior.

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 elicits vasodilation in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Asmar, Ali; Asmar, Meena; Simonsen, Lene; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens J; Hartmann, Bolette; Sorensen, Charlotte M; Bülow, Jens

    2017-02-01

    In healthy subjects, we recently demonstrated that during acute administration of GLP-1, cardiac output increased significantly, whereas renal blood flow remained constant. We therefore hypothesize that GLP-1 induces vasodilation in other organs, for example, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and/or splanchnic tissues. Nine healthy men were examined twice in random order during a 2-hour infusion of either GLP-1 (1.5 pmol kg(-1) min(-1)) or saline. Cardiac output was continuously estimated noninvasively concomitantly with measurement of intra-arterial blood pressure. Subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) was measured by the (133)Xenon clearance technique. Leg and splanchnic blood flow were measured by Fick's Principle, using indocyanine green as indicator. In the GLP-1 study, cardiac output increased significantly together with a significant increase in arterial pulse pressure and heart rate compared with the saline study. Subcutaneous, abdominal ATBF and leg blood flow increased significantly during the GLP-1 infusion compared with saline, whereas splanchnic blood flow response did not differ between the studies. We conclude that in healthy subjects, GLP-1 increases cardiac output acutely due to a GLP-1-induced vasodilation in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle together with an increase in cardiac work.

  17. Use of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Agonists to Improve Islet Graft Performance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Qi, Meirigeng; McGarrigle, James J.; Rady, Brian; Davis, Maureen; Vaca, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Human islet transplantation is an effective and promising therapy for Type I diabetes. However, long-term insulin independence is both difficult to achieve and inconsistent. De novo or early administration of incretin-based drugs is being explored for improving islet engraftment. In addition to its glucose-dependent insulinotropic effects, incretins also lower postprandial glucose excursion by inhibiting glucagon secretion, delaying gastric emptying, and can protect beta-cell function. Incretin therapy has so far proven clinically safe and tolerable with little hypoglycemic risk. The present review aims at highlighting the new frontiers in research involving incretins from both in vitro and in vivo animal studies in the field of islet transplant. It also provides an overview of the current clinical status of incretin usage in islet transplantation in the management of Type I diabetes. PMID:23925432

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-2: update of the recent clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Palle Bekker

    2006-02-01

    Although long-term parenteral nutrition is lifesaving in patients with intestinal failure, it is expensive and associated with serious complications such as catheter sepsis, venous occlusions, and liver failure and severely impairs the quality of life in the short bowel patients. Therefore, treatments that increase the absolute intestinal absorption, thereby eliminating or minimizing the need for parenteral support, are needed. In this respect, glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) has received attention. In this review, the nature of the short bowel syndrome is described, and the antisecretory, transit-modulating, but also intestinotrophic effects of GLP-2 are presented. As illustrated in 2 pilot studies, one using native GLP-2 and the other a degradation-resistant analogue, teduglutide, these new agents may prove important in optimizing remnant intestinal function, thereby eliminating the need for parenteral support and improving quality of life in short bowel patients with intestinal failure.

  19. Glucagon-Like Peptide 2 Increases Efficacy of Distraction Enterogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sueyoshi, Ryo; Ralls, Mathew W.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Application of distractive forces to small bowel induces intestinal growth, or enterogenesis. This emerging area of research may provide treatment for short bowel syndrome (SBS). Glucagon-like peptide 2(GLP-2) has also been reported to induce small bowel growth after bowel resection. We hypothesized that exogenous GLP-2 will result in enhanced distraction-induced enterogenesis. Methods Distraction-induced model was performed in 10-week-old C57B6 mice using osmotic forces with high molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG-stretch). Four groups were studied: Control group (PEG−/GLP-2−); PEG-stretch (PEG+/GLP-2−); GLP-2 control (PEG−/GLP-2+); and GLP-2 stretch (PEG+/GLP-2+). GLP-2 was given via subcutaneous osmotic pump over the 5 days of experiment. Morphology was measured by histomicrography. Epithelial cell (EC) proliferation was measured with PCNA immunofluorescent staining. Total intestinal growth and blood vessel volume was assessed with Micro CT volumetry. VEGF, FGF1 and 2, and PDGF were measured by RT-PCR. Results EC proliferation increased significantly in all groups compared to Controls, but was greatest in the GLP-2 stretch group. Diameter and length significantly increased in the PEG stretch and GLP-2 stretch groups. Moreover, there was statistically greater diameter, crypt depth and EC proliferation in the GLP-2 stretch vs. PEG stretch groups. GLP-2 stretch vessel volume was greater than all other groups and was significantly increased compared to controls. The relative expression of PDGF increased significantly in the PEG stretch group vs. the control group. Conclusions GLP-2 had an additive effect on EC proliferation, tissue growth, histomorphology and vascularization. The combination of enterogenesis and GLP-2 may yield an improved approach to treat SBS. PMID:23639355

  20. Combined treatment with dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor sitagliptin and elemental diets reduced indomethacin-induced intestinal injury in rats via the increase of mucosal glucagon-like peptide-2 concentration

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kaori; Inoue, Takuya; Yorifuji, Naoki; Iguchi, Munetaka; Sakanaka, Taisuke; Narabayashi, Ken; Kakimoto, Kazuki; Nouda, Sadaharu; Okada, Toshihiko; Ishida, Kumi; Abe, Yosuke; Masuda, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Fukunishi, Shinya; Umegaki, Eiji; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    The gut incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and the intestinotropic hormone GLP-2 are released from enteroendocrine L cells in response to ingested nutrients. Treatment with an exogenous GLP-2 analogue increases intestinal villous mass and prevents intestinal injury. Since GLP-2 is rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), DPP4 inhibition may be an effective treatment for intestinal ulcers. We measured mRNA expression and DPP enzymatic activity in intestinal segments. Mucosal DPP activity and GLP concentrations were measured after administration of the DPP4 inhibitor sitagliptin (STG). Small intestinal ulcers were induced by indomethacin (IM) injection. STG was given before IM treatment, or orally administered after IM treatment with or without an elemental diet (ED). DPP4 mRNA expression and enzymatic activity were high in the jejunum and ileum. STG dose-dependently suppressed ileal mucosal enzyme activity. Treatment with STG prior to IM reduced small intestinal ulcer scores. Combined treatment with STG and ED accelerated intestinal ulcer healing, accompanied by increased mucosal GLP-2 concentrations. The reduction of ulcers by ED and STG was reversed by co-administration of the GLP-2 receptor antagonist. DPP4 inhibition combined with luminal nutrients, which up-regulate mucosal concentrations of GLP-2, may be an effective therapy for the treatment of small intestinal ulcers. PMID:25759522

  1. Growth factor based therapies and intestinal disease: is glucagon-like peptide-2 the new way forward?

    PubMed

    Yazbeck, Roger; Howarth, Gordon S; Abbott, Catherine A

    2009-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, debilitating disease associated with severe damage to the intestinal mucosa. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a potent and specific gastrointestinal growth factor that is demonstrating therapeutic potential for the prevention or treatment of an expanding number of intestinal diseases, including short bowel syndrome (SBS), small bowel enteritis and IBD. The biological activity of GLP-2 is limited due to proteolytic inactivation by the protease dipeptidyl peptidase (DP)IV. Inhibitors of DPIV activity may represent a novel strategy to prolong the growth promoting actions of GLP-2. This review outlines evidence for the clinical application of GLP-2, its degradation resistant analogue, Teduglutide, and novel DPIV inhibitors in efficacy studies utilizing pre-clinical models of intestinal damage, in particular IBD.

  2. Characterization of amyloid formation by glucagon-like peptides: role of basic residues in heparin-mediated aggregation.

    PubMed

    Jha, Narendra Nath; Anoop, A; Ranganathan, Srivastav; Mohite, Ganesh M; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Maji, Samir K

    2013-12-10

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) have been reported to play a significant role in amyloid formation of a wide range of proteins/peptides either associated with diseases or native biological functions. The exact mechanism by which GAGs influence amyloid formation is not clearly understood. Here, we studied two closely related peptides, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) and glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2), for their amyloid formation in the presence and absence of the representative GAG heparin using various biophysical and computational approaches. We show that the aggregation and amyloid formation by these peptides follow distinct mechanisms: GLP1 follows nucleation-dependent aggregation, whereas GLP2 forms amyloids without any significant lag time. Investigating the role of heparin, we also found that heparin interacts with GLP1, accelerates its aggregation, and gets incorporated within its amyloid fibrils. In contrast, heparin neither affects the aggregation kinetics of GLP2 nor gets embedded within its fibrils. Furthermore, we found that heparin preferentially influences the stability of the GLP1 fibrils over GLP2 fibrils. To understand the specific nature of the interaction of heparin with GLP1 and GLP2, we performed all-atom MD simulations. Our in silico results show that the basic-nonbasic-basic (B-X-B) motif of GLP1 (K28-G29-R30) facilitates the interaction between heparin and peptide monomers. However, the absence of such a motif in GLP2 could be the reason for a significantly lower strength of interaction between GLP2 and heparin. Our study not only helps to understand the role of heparin in inducing protein aggregation but also provides insight into the nature of heparin-protein interaction.

  3. Acylation of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2: Interaction with Lipid Membranes and In Vitro Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Rahbek, Ulrik Lytt

    2014-01-01

    Background Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation as well as increasing enzymatic stability without disrupting biological potency. Acylation has furthermore been shown to increase interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells. The extent to which such interactions hinder or benefit delivery of acylated peptide drugs across cellular barriers such as the intestinal epithelia is currently unknown. The present study investigates the effect of acylating peptide drugs from a drug delivery perspective. Purpose We hypothesize that the membrane interaction is an important parameter for intestinal translocation, which may be used to optimize the acylation chain length for intestinal permeation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the intestinotrophic Glucagon-like peptide-2 by systematically increasing acyl chain length, in order to elucidate its influence on membrane interaction and intestinal cell translocation in vitro. Results Peptide self-association and binding to both model lipid and cell membranes was found to increase gradually with acyl chain length, whereas translocation across Caco-2 cells depended non-linearly on chain length. Short and medium acyl chains increased translocation compared to the native peptide, but long chain acylation displayed no improvement in translocation. Co-administration of a paracellular absorption enhancer was found to increase translocation irrespective of acyl chain length, whereas a transcellular enhancer displayed increased synergy with the long chain acylation. Conclusions These results show that membrane interactions play a prominent role during intestinal translocation of an acylated peptide. Acylation benefits permeation for shorter and medium chains due to increased membrane interactions, however, for longer chains insertion in the membrane becomes dominant and hinders translocation, i.e. the peptides get ‘stuck’ in the cell

  4. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists and Cardiovascular Events: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Monami, Matteo; Cremasco, Francesco; Lamanna, Caterina; Colombi, Claudia; Desideri, Carla Maria; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Marchionni, Niccolò; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Data from randomized clinical trials with metabolic outcomes can be used to address concerns about potential issues of cardiovascular safety for newer drugs for type 2 diabetes. This meta-analysis was designed to assess cardiovascular safety of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Design and Methods. MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized trials of GLP-1 receptor agonists (versus placebo or other comparators) with a duration ≥12 weeks, performed in type 2 diabetic patients. Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio with 95% confidence interval (MH-OR) was calculated for major cardiovascular events (MACE), on an intention-to-treat basis, excluding trials with zero events. Results. Out of 36 trials, 20 reported at least one MACE. The MH-OR for all GLP-1 receptor agonists was 0.74 (0.50–1.08), P = .12 (0.85 (0.50–1.45), P = .55, and 0.69 (0.40–1.22), P = .20, for exenatide and liraglutide, resp.). Corresponding figures for placebo-controlled and active comparator studies were 0.46 (0.25–0.83), P = .009, and 1.05 (0.63–1.76), P = .84, respectively. Conclusions. To date, results of randomized trials do not suggest any detrimental effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular events. Specifically designed longer-term trials are needed to verify the possibility of a beneficial effect. PMID:21584276

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist Liraglutide has anabolic bone effects in ovariectomized rats without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Nan; Sun, Hanxiao; Yu, JingJia; Wang, Xiaojing; Liu, Dongmei; Zhao, Lin; Sun, Lihao; Zhao, Hongyan; Tao, Bei; Liu, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a number of studies have demonstrated the potential beneficial role for novel anti-diabetic GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) in the skeleton metabolism in diabetic rodents and patients. In this study, we evaluated the impacts of the synthetic GLP-1RA Liraglutide on bone mass and quality in osteoporotic rats induced by ovariectomy (OVX) but without diabetes, as well as its effect on the adipogenic and osteoblastogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Three months after sham surgery or bilateral OVX, eighteen 5-month old female Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups to receive the following treatments for 2 months: (1) Sham + normal saline; (2) OVX + normal saline; and (3) OVX + Liraglutide (0.6 mg/day). As revealed by micro-CT analysis, Liraglutide improved trabecular volume, thickness and number, increased BMD, and reduced trabecular spacing in the femurs in OVX rats; similar results were observed in the lumbar vertebrae of OVX rats treated with Liraglutide. Following in vitro treatment of rat and human BMSCs with 10 nM Liraglutide, there was a significant increase in the mRNA expression of osteoblast-specific transcriptional factor Runx2 and the osteoblast markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen α1 (Col-1), but a significant decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). In conclusion, our results indicate that the anti-diabetic drug Liraglutide can exert a bone protective effect even in non-diabetic osteoporotic OVX rats. This protective effect is likely attributable to the impact of Liraglutide on the lineage fate determination of BMSCs.

  6. Exendin-4 induced glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation reverses behavioral impairments of mild traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Rachmany, Lital; Tweedie, David; Li, Yazhou; Rubovitch, Vardit; Holloway, Harold W; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J; Greig, Nigel H; Pick, Chaim G

    2013-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) represents a major and increasing public health concern and is both the most frequent cause of mortality and disability in young adults and a chief cause of morbidity in the elderly. Albeit mTBI patients do not show clear structural brain defects and, generally, do not require hospitalization, they frequently suffer from long-lasting cognitive, behavioral, and emotional problems. No effective pharmaceutical therapy is available, and existing treatment chiefly involves intensive care management after injury. The diffuse neural cell death evident after mTBI is considered mediated by oxidative stress and glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. Prior studies of the long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4 (Ex-4), an incretin mimetic approved for type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment, demonstrated its neurotrophic/protective activity in cellular and animal models of stroke, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, and, consequent to commonalities in mechanisms underpinning these disorders, Ex-4 was assessed in a mouse mTBI model. In neuronal cultures in this study, Ex-4 ameliorated H2O2-induced oxidative stress and glutamate toxicity. To evaluate in vivo translation, we administered steady-state Ex-4 (3.5 pM/kg/min) or saline to control and mTBI mice over 7 days starting 48 h prior to or 1 h post-sham or mTBI (30 g weight drop under anesthesia). Ex-4 proved well-tolerated and fully ameliorated mTBI-induced deficits in novel object recognition 7 and 30 days post-trauma. Less mTBI-induced impairment was evident in Y-maze, elevated plus maze, and passive avoidance paradigms, but when impairment was apparent Ex-4 induced amelioration. Together, these results suggest that Ex-4 may act as a neurotrophic/neuroprotective drug to minimize mTBI impairment.

  7. Glucagon-like peptide 2 therapy reduces negative effects of diarrhea on calf gut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Damage to the intestinal epithelium caused by diarrhea reduces nutrient absorption and growth rate, and may have long-term effects on the young animal. Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is an intestinotropic hormone that improves gut integrity and nutrient absorption, and has antioxidant effects in th...

  8. Glucagon-like peptide 2 may mediate growth and development of the bovine gastrointestinal tract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), secreted by enteroendocrine cells, promotes growth, reduces apoptosis, and enhances blood flow, nutrient absorption, and barrier function in intestinal epithelium of monogastric species. Regulatory functions of GLP-2 in the ruminant gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are u...

  9. Intestinal Permeability and Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 in Children with Autism: A Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Marli A.; Sigalet, David L.; Holst, Jens J.; Meddings, Jon B.; Wood, Julie; Sharkey, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    We measured small intestinal permeability using a lactulose:mannitol sugar permeability test in a group of children with autism, with current or previous gastrointestinal complaints. Secondly, we examined whether children with autism had an abnormal glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) response to feeding. Results were compared with sibling controls…

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following in...

  11. Glucagon-like peptide 2 in colon carcinogenesis: possible target for anti-cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Kannen, Vinicius; Garcia, Sergio Britto; Stopper, Helga; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria

    2013-07-01

    The role of glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2) in colon tissue has been studied extensively, from the time it was discovered that GLP2 promotes intestinal growth. A large number of studies have shown potential applications for GLP2 in human therapy. However, recent data have suggested the notion that GLP2 plays a key role in colon carcinogenesis. Questions have been arisen regarding the pro-proliferative effects of GLP2 and whether they might promote intestinal healing or advance colon tumor growth. Here, we provide striking evidence to show that the physiological activities of GLP2 are closely related to cancer-related molecular pathways that have been shown to circumvent drug desensitization. We further explore the different pathways of GLP2-signaling to suggest suitable GLP2-based therapeutic strategies in colon cancer.

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-2 increases splanchnic blood flow acutely in calves but loses effectiveness with chronic exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a 33-amino acid hormone secreted from the gastrointestinal tract that rapidly increases small intestinal blood flow. No experiments have been conducted evaluating the blood flow response to GLP-2 after extended administration, nor have investigations been performed...

  13. The CNS glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gut-brain axis plays a key role in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. In response to luminal stimulation of macronutrients and microbiotaderived metabolites (secondary bile acids and short chain fatty acids), glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and -2) are cosecreted from endocrine...

  14. Bile acids induce glucagon-like peptide 2 secretion with limited effects on intestinal adaptation in early weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early weaning is a stressful event characterized by a transient period of intestinal atrophy that may be mediated by reduced secretion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 2. We tested whether enterally fed bile acids or plant sterols could increase nutrient-dependent GLP-2 secretion and improve intestina...

  15. Comparative physiology of glucagon-like peptide 2 - Implications and applications for production and health of ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is a 33-amino acid peptide derived from proteolytic cleavage of proglucagon by prohormone convertase 1/3 in enteroendocrine L-cells. Studies conducted in humans, rodent models, and in vitro indicate that GLP-2 is secreted in response to the presence of molecules in th...

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases small intestinal blood flow and mucosal growth in ruminating calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), increases small intestinal mass and blood flow in non-ruminants, but its effect in ruminants is unknown. Eight Holstein calves with an ultrasonic flow probe around the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and catheters in the carotid artery and mesenteric vein, were pa...

  17. The glucagon-like peptide 2 pathway may mediate growth and development of the bovine gastrointestinal tract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), secreted by enteroendocrine cells, has a number of physiological effects on the intestine of monogastric species, including promotion of growth of intestinal epithelium, reduction of epithelial cell apoptosis, and enhancement of intestinal blood flow, nutrient absorp...

  18. Glucagon-like peptide 2 therapy reduces the negative impacts the proinflammatory response in the gut of calves with coccidiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Damage to the intestinal epithelium reduces nutrient absorption and animal growth, and can have negative long-term health effects on livestock. The intestinotropic hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) contributes to gut integrity, reduces inflammation, and improves nutrient absorption. The presen...

  19. Comparative physiology of glucagon-like peptide-2 – Implications and applications for production and health of ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a 33-amino acid peptide derived from proteolytic cleavage of proglucagon by prohormone convertase 1/3 in enteroendocrine L-cells. Studies conducted in humans, rodent models, and in vitro indicate that GLP-2 is secreted in response to the presence of molecules in th...

  20. Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma in a 69-Year-Old Woman Receiving Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zyczynski, Laura E; McHugh, Jonathan B; Gribbin, Thomas E; Schuetze, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman was diagnosed with alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) of the nasopharynx. She has a history of catastrophic thromboembolic event in the abdomen that caused short-gut syndrome and dependence on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) twelve hours per day. She was treated for short-gut syndrome with teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog, which led to reduction of TPN requirements. However, a few months later, she developed metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Though a causative relationship is unlikely between the peptide and ARMS due to the brief time course between teduglutide therapy and sarcoma diagnosis, neoplastic growth may have been accelerated by the GLP-2 analog, causing release of IGF-1. The transmembrane receptor for IGF-1 is frequently overexpressed in ARMS and is implicated in cell proliferation and metastatic behavior. This case describes a rare incidence of metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in a sexagenarian and possibly the first case reported associated with the use of teduglutide. Teduglutide was discontinued due to a potential theoretical risk of acceleration of sarcoma growth, and the patient's rhabdomyosarcoma is in remission following sarcoma chemotherapy.

  1. Intracerebroventricular administration of chicken glucagon-like peptide-2 potently suppresses food intake in chicks.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kazuhisa; Saneyasu, Takaoki; Shimatani, Tomohiko; Aoki, Koji; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Kiwako; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-related peptides, such as glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, GLP-2 and oxyntomodulin (OXM), are processed from an identical precursor proglucagon. In mammals, all of these peptides are suggested to be involved in the central regulation of food intake. We previously showed that intracerebroventricular administration of chicken OXM and GLP-1 significantly suppressed food intake in chicks. Here, we show that central administration of chicken GLP-2 potently suppresses food intake in chicks. Male 8-day-old chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) were used in all experiments. Intracerebroventricular administration of chicken GLP-2 significantly suppressed food intake in chicks. Plasma glucose concentration was significantly decreased by chicken GLP-2, whereas plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentration was significantly increased. Intracerebroventricular administration of chicken GLP-2 did not affect plasma corticosterone concentration. In addition, the anorexigenic effect of GLP-2 was not reversed by the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonist α-helical CRF, suggesting that CRF is not a downstream mediator of the anorexigenic pathway of GLP-2 in chicks. Intracerebroventricular administration of an equimolar amount of GLP-1 and GLP-2, but not OXM, significantly suppressed food intake in both broiler and layer chicks. All our findings suggest that GLP-2 functions as a potent anorexigenic peptide in the brain, as well as GLP-1, in chicks.

  2. Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma in a 69-Year-Old Woman Receiving Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zyczynski, Laura E.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Gribbin, Thomas E.; Schuetze, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman was diagnosed with alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) of the nasopharynx. She has a history of catastrophic thromboembolic event in the abdomen that caused short-gut syndrome and dependence on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) twelve hours per day. She was treated for short-gut syndrome with teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog, which led to reduction of TPN requirements. However, a few months later, she developed metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Though a causative relationship is unlikely between the peptide and ARMS due to the brief time course between teduglutide therapy and sarcoma diagnosis, neoplastic growth may have been accelerated by the GLP-2 analog, causing release of IGF-1. The transmembrane receptor for IGF-1 is frequently overexpressed in ARMS and is implicated in cell proliferation and metastatic behavior. This case describes a rare incidence of metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in a sexagenarian and possibly the first case reported associated with the use of teduglutide. Teduglutide was discontinued due to a potential theoretical risk of acceleration of sarcoma growth, and the patient's rhabdomyosarcoma is in remission following sarcoma chemotherapy. PMID:26266067

  3. The Effect of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Receptor Agonists on Colonic Anastomotic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Redstone, Heather A.; Buie, William D.; Hart, David A.; Wallace, Laurie; Hornby, Pamela J.; Sague, Sarah; Holst, Jen J.; Sigalet, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is an intestinal specific trophic hormone, with therapeutic potential; the effects on intestinal healing are unknown. We used a rat model of colonic healing, under normoxic, and stress (hypoxic) conditions to examine the effect of GLP-2 on intestinal healing. Methods. Following colonic transection and reanastomosis, animals were randomized to one of six groups (n = 8/group): controls, native GLP-2, long-acting GLP-2 (GLP-2- MIMETIBODY, GLP-2-MMB), animals were housed under normoxic or hypoxic (11%  O2) conditions. Animals were studied five days post-operation for anastomotic strength and wound characteristics. Results. Anastomotic bursting pressure was unchanged by GLP-2 or GLP-2-MMB in normoxic or hypoxic animals; both treatments increased crypt cell proliferation. Wound IL-1β increased with GLP-2; IFNγ with GLP-2 and GLP-2-MMB. IL-10 and TGF-β were decreased; Type I collagen mRNA expression increased in hypoxic animals while Type III collagen was reduced with both GLP-2 agonists. GLP-2 MMB, but not native GLP-2 increased TIMP 1-3 mRNA levels in hypoxia. Conclusions. The effects on CCP, cytokines and wound healing were similar for both GLP-2 agonists under normoxic and hypoxic conditions; anastomotic strength was not affected. This suggests that GLP-2 (or agonists) could be safely used peri-operatively; direct studies will be required. PMID:20953406

  4. Angioplastic necrolytic migratory erythema. Unique association of necrolytic migratory erythema, extensive angioplasia, and high molecular weight glucagon-like polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Franchimont, C.; Pierard, G.E.; Luyckx, A.S.; Gerard, J.; Lapiere, C.M.

    1982-12-01

    A diabetic patient developed necrolytic migratory erythema with extensive angioplasia and high molecular weight glucagon-like polypeptide. There was no associated neoplasm such as glucagonoma. Lesions in the skin were studied by standard optical microscopy and by radioautography after incorporation of tritiated thymidine. Alterations in the skin begin as focal necrosis in the epidermis and in epithelial structures of adnexa, followed by marked angioplasia and a superficial and deep perivascular dermatitis.

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    PubMed Central

    Vegge, Andreas; Thymann, Thomas; Lund, Pernille; Stoll, Barbara; Bering, Stine B.; Hartmann, Bolette; Jelsing, Jacob; Qvist, Niels; Burrin, Douglas G.; Jeppesen, Palle B.; Holst, Jens J.

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following intestinal resection in preterm pigs. Preterm pigs were fed enterally for 48 h before undergoing resection of 50% of the small intestine and establishment of a jejunostomy. Following resection, pigs were maintained on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) without (SBS, n = 8) or with GLP-2 treatment (3.5 μg/kg body wt per h, SBS+GLP-2, n = 7) and compared with a group of unresected preterm pigs (control, n = 5). After 5 days of TPN, all piglets were fed enterally for 24 h, and a nutrient balance study was performed. Intestinal resection was associated with markedly reduced endogenous GLP-2 levels. GLP-2 increased the relative absorption of wet weight (46 vs. 22%), energy (79 vs. 64%), and all macronutrients (all parameters P < 0.05). These findings were supported by a 200% increase in sucrase and maltase activities, a 50% increase in small intestinal epithelial volume (P < 0.05), as well as increased DNA and protein contents and increased total protein synthesis rate in SBS+GLP-2 vs. SBS pigs (+100%, P < 0.05). Following intestinal resection in preterm pigs, GLP-2 induced structural and functional adaptation, resulting in a higher relative absorption of fluid and macronutrients. GLP-2 treatment may be a promising therapy to enhance intestinal adaptation and improve digestive function in preterm infants with jejunostomy following intestinal resection. PMID:23764891

  6. Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Improves Both Acute and Late Experimental Radiation Enteritis in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Sandra

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Acute and/or chronic radiation enteritis can develop after radiotherapy for pelvic cancers. Experimental and clinical observations have provided evidence of a role played by acute mucosal disruption in the appearance of late effects. The therapeutic potential of acute administration of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) against acute and chronic intestinal injury was investigated in this study. Methods and Materials: Intestinal segments were surgically exteriorized and exposed to 16.7 or 19 Gy X-rays. The rats were treated once daily with vehicle or a protease-resistant GLP-2 derivative for 14 days before irradiation, with or without 7 days of GLP-2 after treatment. Macroscopic and microscopic observations were made 2 and 15 weeks after radiation exposure. Results: In the control animals, GLP-2 induced an increase in intestinal mucosal mass, along with an increase in villus height and crypt depth. GLP-2 administration before and after irradiation completely prevented the acute radiation-induced mucosal ulcerations observed after exposure to 16.7 Gy. GLP-2 treatment strikingly reduced the late radiation damage observed after 19 Gy irradiation. Microscopic observations revealed an improved organization of the intestinal wall and an efficient wound healing process, especially in the smooth muscle layers. Conclusion: GLP-2 has a clear therapeutic potential against both acute and chronic radiation enteritis. This therapeutic effect is mediated through an increased mucosal mass before tissue injury and the stimulation of still unknown mechanisms of tissue response to radiation damage. Although these preliminary results still need to be confirmed, GLP-2 might be a way to limit patient discomfort during radiotherapy and reduce the risk of consequential late effects.

  7. Effects of PEGylated porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 therapy in weaning piglets challenged with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ke-ke; Wu, Jie; Xu, Zi-wei

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the therapeutic effect of polyethylene glycosylated porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 (pGLP-2), a long-acting form of pGLP-2, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged piglets. Eighteen 21-day-old weaning piglets were randomly assigned into three groups: control (saline solution), LPS (100 μg/kg LPS), and PEG-pGLP-2 (10 nmol/kg PEG-pGLP-2+100 μg/kg LPS). All treatments were administered intraperitoneally. Compared with the control treatment, LPS treatment significantly decreased (P<0.05) the villus heights of the duodenum and jejunum, as well as the villus height/crypt depth ratio of the jejunum. However, PEG-pGLP-2 therapy reduced these effects (P>0.05). Specifically, PEG-pGLP-2 infusion significantly increased the villus height/crypt depth ratio of the duodenum (P<0.05) compared with LPS treatment. Compared with the control treatment, LPS treatment significantly increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the jejunum. However, PEG-pGLP-2 therapy reduced these effects (P<0.05). Specifically, PEG-pGLP-2 infusion significantly decreased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-8 and TNF-α in the duodenum and jejunum, IL-10 in the duodenum, and IFN-γ in the jejunum compared with the LPS treatment. LPS treatment increased the caspase-3 activity of the ileum mucosal (P<0.05), and this effect was significantly reduced by PEG-pGLP-2 treatment. These results indicate that PEG-pGLP-2 infusion alleviates the severity of intestinal injury in weaning piglets by reducing the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and the caspase-3 activity, and increasing the villus height/crypt depth ratio.

  8. Whey protein potentiates the intestinotrophic action of glucagon-like peptide-2 in parenterally fed rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowen; Murali, Sangita G; Holst, Jens J; Ney, Denise M

    2009-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-regulated intestinotrophic hormone derived from proglucagon in the distal intestine. Enteral nutrients (EN) potentiate the action of GLP-2 to reverse parenteral nutrition (PN)-induced mucosal hypoplasia. The objective was to determine what enteral protein component, casein, soy, or whey protein, potentiates the intestinal growth response to GLP-2 in rats with PN-induced mucosal hypoplasia. Rats received PN and continuous intravenous infusion of GLP-2 (100 microg/kg/day) for 7 days. Six EN groups received PN+GLP-2 for days 1-3 and partial PN+GLP-2 plus EN for days 4-7. EN was provided by ad libitum intake of a semielemental liquid diet with different protein sources: casein, hydrolyzed soy, whey protein concentrate (WPC), and hydrolyzed WPC+casein. Controls received PN+GLP-2 alone. EN induced significantly greater jejunal sucrase activity and gain of body weight, and improved feed efficiency compared with PN+GLP-2 alone. EN induced greater ileal proglucagon expression, increased plasma concentration of bioactive GLP-2 by 35%, and reduced plasma dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) activity compared with PN+GLP-2 alone, P < 0.05. However, only whey protein, and not casein or soy, potentiated the ability of GLP-2 to reverse PN-induced mucosal hypoplasia and further increase ileal villus height, crypt depth, and mucosa cellularity compared with PN+GLP-2 alone, P < 0.05. The ability of whey protein to induce greater mucosal surface area was associated with decreased DPP-IV activity in ileum and colon compared with casein, soy, or PN+GLP-2 alone, P < 0.05. In conclusion, whey protein potentiates the action of GLP-2 to reverse PN-induced mucosal hypoplasia in association with decreased intestinal DPP-IV activity.

  9. Dietary lipids and sweeteners regulate glucagon-like peptide-2 secretion.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Hokari, Ryota; Kurihara, Chie; Sato, Hirokazu; Narimatsu, Kazuyuki; Hozumi, Hideaki; Ueda, Toshihide; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Okada, Yoshikiyo; Watanabe, Chikako; Komoto, Shunsuke; Tomita, Kengo; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Nagao, Shigeaki; Miura, Soichiro

    2013-04-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a potent intestinal growth factor derived from enteroendocrine L cells. Although food intake is known to increase GLP-2 secretion, its regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown as a result of its very short half-life in venules. The aims of this study were to compare the effects of luminal nutrients on the stimulation of GLP-2 secretion in vivo using lymph samples and to clarify the involvement of the sweet taste receptor in this process in vitro. Lymph samples were collected from the thoracic duct after bolus administration of dietary lipids or sweetening agents into the duodenum of rats. Human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells were also used to compare the effects of various nutrients on GLP-2 secretion. GLP-2 concentrations were measured by ELISA in vivo and in vitro. GLP-2 secretion was enhanced by polyunsaturated fatty acid- and monounsaturated fatty acid-rich dietary oils, dietary carbohydrates, and some kinds of sweeteners in rats; this effect was reproduced in NCI-H716 cells using α-linolenic acid (αLA), glucose, and sweeteners. GLP-2 secretion induced by sweetening agents was inhibited by lactisole, a sweetness-antagonizing inhibitor of T1R3. In contrast, lactisole was unable to inhibit GLP-2 secretion induced by αLA alone. Our results suggested that fatty acid- and sweetener-induced GLP-2 secretion may be mediated by two different pathways, with the sweet taste receptor involved in the regulation of the latter.

  10. Glucagon-like polypeptide agonists in type 2 diabetes mellitus: efficacy and tolerability, a balance

    PubMed Central

    Tella, Sri Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like polypeptide (GLP-1) receptor agonist treatment has multiple effects on glucose metabolism, supports the β cell, and promotes weight loss. There are now five GLP-1 agonists in clinical use with more in development. GLP-1 treatment typically can induce a lowering of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 0.5–1.5% over time with weight loss of 2–5%. In some individuals, a progressive loss of weight occurs. There is evidence that GLP-1 therapy opposes the loss of β cells which is a feature of type 2 diabetes. The chief downside of GLP-1 treatment is the gastrointestinal motility disturbance which is one of the modes of action of the hormone; significant nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may lead to discontinuation of treatment. Although daily injection of GLP-1 agents is successful, the development of extended release preparations allows for injection once weekly, and perhaps much longer in the future. The indication for GLP-1 use is diabetes, but now, liraglutide has been approved for primary treatment of obesity. When oral agents fail to control glucose levels in type 2 diabetes, there is a choice between long-acting insulin and GLP-1 agonists as additional treatments. The lowering of HbA1c by either modality is equivalent in most studies. Patients lose weight with GLP-1 treatment and gain weight on insulin. There is a lower incidence of hypoglycemia with GLP-1 therapy but a much higher incidence of gastrointestinal complaints. Insulin dosing is flexible while GLP-1 agents have historically been administered at fixed dosages. Now, the use of combined long-acting insulin and GLP-1 agonists is promising a major therapeutic change. Combined therapy takes advantage of the benefits of both insulin and GLP-1 agents. Furthermore, direct admixture of both in the same syringe will permit flexible dosing, improvement of glucose levels, and reduction of both hypoglycemia and gastrointestinal side effects. PMID:26137215

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-2 protects impaired intestinal mucosal barriers in obstructive jaundice rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Dong, Jia-Tian; Li, Xiao-Jing; Gu, Ye; Cheng, Zhi-Jian; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To observe the protective effect of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on the intestinal barrier of rats with obstructive jaundice and determine the possible mechanisms of action involved in the protective effect. METHODS: Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham operation group, an obstructive jaundice group, and a GLP-2 group; each group consisted of 12 rats. The GLP-2 group was treated with GLP-2 after the day of surgery, whereas the other two groups were treated with the same concentration of normal saline. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin, and endotoxin levels were recorded at 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 d. Furthermore, on the 14th day, body weight, the wet weight of the small intestine, pathological changes of the small intestine and the immunoglobulin A (IgA) expressed by plasma cells located in the small intestinal lamina propria were recorded for each group. RESULTS: In the rat model, jaundice was obvious, and the rats’ activity decreased 4-6 d post bile duct ligation. Compared with the sham operation group, the obstructive jaundice group displayed increased yellow staining of abdominal visceral serosa, decreased small intestine wet weight, thinning of the intestinal muscle layer and villi, villous atrophy, uneven height, fusion, partial villous epithelial cell shedding, substantial inflammatory cell infiltration and significantly reduced IgA expression. However, no significant gross changes were noted between the GLP-2 and sham groups. With time, the levels of ALT, endotoxin and bilirubin in the GLP-2 group were significantly increased compared with the sham group (P < 0.01). The increasing levels of the aforementioned markers were more significant in the obstructive jaundice group than in the GLP-2 group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: GLP-2 reduces intestinal mucosal injuries in obstructive jaundice rats, which might be attributed to increased intestinal IgA and reduced bilirubin and endotoxin. PMID:25593463

  12. Whey protein potentiates the intestinotrophic action of glucagon-like peptide-2 in parenterally fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaowen; Murali, Sangita G.; Holst, Jens J.

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-regulated intestinotrophic hormone derived from proglucagon in the distal intestine. Enteral nutrients (EN) potentiate the action of GLP-2 to reverse parenteral nutrition (PN)-induced mucosal hypoplasia. The objective was to determine what enteral protein component, casein, soy, or whey protein, potentiates the intestinal growth response to GLP-2 in rats with PN-induced mucosal hypoplasia. Rats received PN and continuous intravenous infusion of GLP-2 (100 μg/kg/day) for 7 days. Six EN groups received PN+GLP-2 for days 1–3 and partial PN+GLP-2 plus EN for days 4–7. EN was provided by ad libitum intake of a semielemental liquid diet with different protein sources: casein, hydrolyzed soy, whey protein concentrate (WPC), and hydrolyzed WPC+casein. Controls received PN+GLP-2 alone. EN induced significantly greater jejunal sucrase activity and gain of body weight, and improved feed efficiency compared with PN+GLP-2 alone. EN induced greater ileal proglucagon expression, increased plasma concentration of bioactive GLP-2 by 35%, and reduced plasma dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) activity compared with PN+GLP-2 alone, P < 0.05. However, only whey protein, and not casein or soy, potentiated the ability of GLP-2 to reverse PN-induced mucosal hypoplasia and further increase ileal villus height, crypt depth, and mucosa cellularity compared with PN+GLP-2 alone, P < 0.05. The ability of whey protein to induce greater mucosal surface area was associated with decreased DPP-IV activity in ileum and colon compared with casein, soy, or PN+GLP-2 alone, P < 0.05. In conclusion, whey protein potentiates the action of GLP-2 to reverse PN-induced mucosal hypoplasia in association with decreased intestinal DPP-IV activity. PMID:19776251

  13. Do Lactation-Induced Changes in Ghrelin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1, and Peptide YY Influence Appetite and Body Weight Regulation during the First Postpartum Year?

    PubMed

    Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Schueler, Jessica; Kyle, Erin; Austin, Kathleen J; Hart, Ann Marie; Alexander, Brenda M

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether fasting and meal-induced appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with body weight retention after childbearing, we studied 24 exclusively breastfeeding women (BMI = 25.2 ± 3.6 kg/m(2)) at 4-5 weeks postpartum and 20 never-pregnant controls (BMI = 24.0 ± 3.1 kg/m(2)). Ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and appetite ratings were measured before/and 150 minutes after a standardized breakfast and 60 minutes after an ad libitum lunch. Body weight/composition were measured at 6 and 12 months. Fasting and area under-the-curve responses for appetite-regulating hormones did not differ between lactating and control groups; ghrelinacyl, however, tended to track higher after the standardized breakfast in lactating women and was higher (p < 0.05) after the ad libitum lunch despite a 24% higher energy intake (p < 0.05). By 12 months, lactating women lost 5.3 ± 2.2 kg (n = 18), whereas control women (n = 15) remained weight stable (p = 0.019); fifteen of the lactating women returned to within ±2.0 kg of prepregnancy weight but three retained >6.0 kg. The retainers had greater (p < 0.05) postmeal ghrelin rebound responses following breakfast. Overall these studies do not support the hypothesis that appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with postpartum weight retention. Altered ghrelin responses, however, deserve further exploration.

  14. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist prevents mTBI-induced changes in hippocampus gene expression and memory deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tweedie, D.; Rachmany, L.; Rubovitch, V.; Lehrmann, E.; Zhang, Y.; Becker, K.G.; Perez, E.; Miller, J.; Hoffer, B.J.; Greig, N.H.; Pick, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a global problem reaching near epidemic numbers that manifests clinically with cognitive problems that decades later may result in dementias like Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Presently, little can be done to prevent ensuing neurological dysfunctions by pharmacological means. Recently, it has become apparent that several CNS diseases share common terminal features of neuronal cell death. The effects of exendin-4 (Ex-4), a neuroprotective agent delivered via a subcutaneous micro-osmotic pump, were examined in the setting of mild TBI (mTBI). Utilizing a model of mTBI, where cognitive disturbances occur over time, animals were subjected to four treatments: sham; Ex-4; mTBI and Ex-4/mTBI. mTBI mice displayed deficits in novel object recognition, while Ex-4/mTBI mice performed similar to sham. Hippocampal gene expression, assessed by gene array methods, showed significant differences with little overlap in co-regulated genes between groups. Importantly, changes in gene expression induced by mTBI, including genes associated with AD were largely prevented by Ex-4. These data suggest a strong beneficial action of Ex-4 in managing secondary events induced by a traumatic brain injury. PMID:23059457

  15. Systematic Design of Trypsin Cleavage Site Mutated Exendin4-Cysteine 1, an Orally Bioavailable Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Sai, Wenbo; Tian, Hong; Yang, Kangmin; Tang, Daoqi; Bao, Jinxiao; Ge, Yang; Song, Xiaoda; Zhang, Yu; Luo, Cheng; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2017-01-01

    Exendin-4 is a strong therapeutic candidate for the treatment of metabolic syndrome. Related receptor agonist drugs have been on the market since 2005. However, technical limitations and the pain caused by subcutaneous injection have severely limited patient compliance. The goal of the study is to investigate a biologically active exendin-4 analog could be administered orally. Using intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, we discovered that exendin4-cysteine administered by oral gavage had a distinct hypoglycemic effect in C57BL/6J mice. Using Rosetta Design and Amber, we designed and screened a series of exendin4-cysteine analogs to identify those that retained biological activity while resisting trypsin digestion. Trypsin Cleavage Site Mutated Exendin4-cysteine 1 (TSME-1), an analog whose bioactivity was similar to exendin-4 and was almost completely resistant to trypsin, was screened out. In addition, TSME-1 significantly normalized the blood glucose levels and the availability of TSME-1 was significantly higher than that of exendin-4 and exendin4-cysteine. Collectively orally administered TSME-1, a trypsin-resistant exendin-4 analog obtained by the system, is a strong candidate for future treatments of type 2 diabetes. PMID:28282854

  16. Radioiodinated Exendin-4 Is Superior to the Radiometal-Labelled Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Probes Overcoming Their High Kidney Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Läppchen, Tilman; Tönnesmann, Roswitha; Eersels, Jos; Meyer, Philipp T.; Maecke, Helmut R.; Rylova, Svetlana N.

    2017-01-01

    GLP-1 receptors are ideal targets for preoperative imaging of benign insulinoma and for quantifying the beta cell mass. The existing clinical tracers targeting GLP-1R are all agonists with low specific activity and very high kidney uptake. In order to solve those issues we evaluated GLP-1R agonist Ex-4 and antagonist Ex(9–39) radioiodinated at Tyr40 side by side with [Nle14,Lys40(Ahx-DOTA-68Ga)NH2]Ex-4 (68Ga-Ex-4) used in the clinic. The Kd, Bmax, internalization and binding kinetics of [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex-4 and [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex(9–39) were studied in vitro using Ins-1E cells. Biodistribution and imaging studies were performed in nude mice bearing Ins-1E xenografts. In vitro evaluation demonstrated high affinity binding of the [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex-4 agonist to the Ins-1E cells with fast internalization kinetics reaching a plateau after 30 min. The antagonist [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex(9–39) did not internalize and had a 4–fold higher Kd value compared to the agonist. In contrast to [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex(9–39), which showed low and transient tumor uptake, [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex-4 demonstrated excellent in vivo binding properties with tumor uptake identical to that of 68Ga-Ex-4, but substantially lower kidney uptake resulting in a tumor-to-kidney ratio of 9.7 at 1 h compared to 0.3 with 68Ga-Ex-4. Accumulation of activity in thyroid and stomach for both peptides, which was effectively blocked by irenat, confirms that in vivo deiodination is the mechanism behind the low kidney retention of iodinated peptides. The 124I congener of [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex-4 demonstrated a similar favourable biodistribution profile in the PET imaging studies in contrast to the typical biodistribution pattern of [Nle14,Lys40(Ahx-DOTA-68Ga)NH2]Ex-4. Our results demonstrate that iodinated Ex-4 is a very promising tracer for imaging of benign insulinomas. It solves the problem of high kidney uptake of the radiometal-labelled tracers by improving the tumor-to-kidney ratio measured for [Nle14,Lys40(Ahx-DOTA-68Ga)NH2]Ex-4 by 32 fold. PMID:28103285

  17. Blast traumatic brain injury induced cognitive deficits are attenuated by pre- or post-injury treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4

    PubMed Central

    Tweedie, David; Rachmany, Lital; Rubovitch, Vardit; Li, Yazhou; Holloway, Harold W.; Lehrmann, Elin; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Perez, Evelyn; Hoffer, Barry J.; Pick, Chaim G.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Blast traumatic brain injury (B-TBI) affects military and civilian personnel. Presently there are no approved drugs for blast brain injury. Methods Exendin-4, administered subcutaneously, was evaluated as a pre-treatment (48 hours) and post-injury treatment (2 hours) on neurodegeneration, behaviors and gene expressions in a murine open field model of blast injury. Results B-TBI induced neurodegeneration, changes in cognition and genes expressions linked to dementia disorders. Exendin-4, administered pre- or post-injury ameliorated B-TBI-induced neurodegeneration at 72 hours, memory deficits from days 7–14 and attenuated genes regulated by blast at day 14 post-injury. Conclusions The present data suggest shared pathological processes between concussive and B-TBI, with endpoints amenable to beneficial therapeutic manipulation by exendin-4. B-TBI-induced dementia-related gene pathways and cognitive deficits in mice somewhat parallel epidemiological studies of Barnes and co-workers who identified a greater risk in US military veterans who experienced diverse TBIs, for dementia in later life. PMID:26327236

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-1 prevents methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis of beta cells through improving mitochondrial function and suppressing prolonged AMPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tien-Jyun; Tseng, Hsing-Chi; Liu, Meng-Wei; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of methylglyoxal (MG) contributes to glucotoxicity and mediates beta cell apoptosis. The molecular mechanism by which GLP-1 protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis remains unclear. Metformin is a first-line drug for treating type 2 diabetes associated with AMPK activation. However, whether metformin prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis is controversial. Here, we explored the signaling pathway involved in the anti-apoptotic effect of GLP-1, and investigated whether metformin had an anti-apoptotic effect on beta cells. MG treatment induced apoptosis of beta cells, impaired mitochondrial function, and prolonged activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). The MG-induced pro-apoptotic effects were abolished by an AMPK inhibitor. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed MG-induced apoptosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR)-induced apoptosis, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. However, metformin neither leads to beta cell apoptosis nor ameliorates MG-induced beta cell apoptosis. In parallel, GLP-1 also prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through PKA and PI3K-dependent pathway. In conclusion, these data indicates GLP-1 but not metformin protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through improving mitochondrial function, and alleviating the prolonged AMPK activation. Whether adding GLP-1 to metformin provides better beta cell survival and delays disease progression remains to be validated. PMID:26997114

  19. Protein kinase C pathway mediates the protective effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on the apoptosis of islet β-cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihai; Wang, Yuesheng; Wang, Jiao; Liu, Yinglan; Yin, Yanbin

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of diabetes has been increasing over previous years. It is hypothesized that promoting the survival of islet β-cells is a key direction for the treatment of diabetes. Although gastric bypass surgery improves certain types of diabetes and attenuates its progression, there are certain associated disadvantages (including intestinal obstruction and anastomotic leakage), and quality of life and physical status (such as malnutrition) are significantly affected by gastric bypass surgery. Therefore, it is important to determine the mechanisms underlying the improvement of diabetes by gastric bypass surgery and identify novel gene targets for diabetes therapeutics. In the present study, glucagon‑like peptide‑1 (GLP‑1), whose secretion was markedly increased following gastric bypass surgery, increased the activity of protein kinase C (PKC) in islet β‑cells in a dose‑dependent manner. Additionally, treatment with GLP‑1 boosted cell viability and decreased cell death in starved islet β‑cells, and inhibited mitochondria‑dependent apoptosis by regulating the expression levels of Bcl‑2/Bax. These effects were reversed by inhibiting the PKC pathway using hypericin. Therefore, the present study concluded that GLP‑1 may promote the survival and inhibit the apoptosis of islet β‑cells at least in part by activating the PKC pathway, which is an important underlying mechanism and may be exploited in the treatment of diabetes.

  20. [Roles of rs 6923761 gene variant in glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor on weight, cardiovascular risk factor and serum adipokine levels in morbid obese patients].

    PubMed

    de Luis, Daniel Antonio; Pacheco, David; Aller, Rocío; Izaola, Olatz; Bachiller, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    Antecedentes: Los estudios de receptor de GLP-1 se han dirigido a la identificación de polimorfismos en el gen receptor de GLP- 1 que pueden ser un factor que contribuye en la patogénesis de la diabetes mellitus y factores de riesgo cardiovascular. Sin embargo, el papel de las variantes del receptor de GLP-1 variantes en el peso corporal, factores de riesgo cardiovasculares y adipocitoquinas sigue estando poco estudiado en pacientes con obesidad morbida. Objetivo: Nuestro objetivo fue analizar los efectos del polimorfismo del receptor de GLP-1 rs6923761 sobre el peso corporal, factores de riesgo cardiovascular y los niveles de adipocitoquinas séricas en pacientes con obesidad mórbida. Diseño: Se estudió una muestra de 175 obesos mórbidos. La glucosa en ayunas, proteína C reactiva (PCR), insulina, resistencia a la insulina ( HOMA), colesterol total, LDL- colesterol, HDL- colesterol, triglicéridos y la concentración de adipoquinas se midieron. También se determinaron el peso, índice de masa corporal, circunferencia de la cintura, masa grasa a través de bioimpedancia y la presión arterial. Resultados: Un total de 87 obesos (49,7%) tenían el genotipo GG y 88 (50,3%) de los sujetos del estudio tenían los siguientes genotipos; GA (71 obesos, el 40,6%) o AA (17 sujetos del estudio, el 9,7%) ( segundo grupo) . En el grupo con genotipo GG, los niveles de glucosa (4,4 ± 2,3 mg/dl, p < 0,05), triglicéridos (6,8 ± 4,3 mg/dl , p < 0,05), insulina (4,5 ± 2,3 UI/l , p < 0,05) y HOMA (1,5 ± 0,9 unidades, p < 0,05 ) fueron mayores que en el grupo mutante. No se detectaron diferencias en el resto de parámetros analizados Conclusión: Existe una asociación entre los parámetros metabólicos y el alelo mutante (A) del polimorfismo rs6923761 del receptor de GLP- 1 en pacientes con obesidad mórbida. Los niveles de triglicéridos, insulina y resistencia a la insulina son más elevados en los sujetos portadores del alelo A.

  1. Stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor through exendin-4 preserves myocardial performance and prevents cardiac remodeling in infarcted myocardium

    PubMed Central

    DeNicola, Megan; Du, Jianfeng; Wang, Zhengke; Yano, Naohiro; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yigang; Qin, Gangjian; Zhuang, Shougang

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that GLP-1 improved myocardial functional recovery in acute myocardial ischemic injury. However, whether stimulation of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) with exendin-4, a selective GLP-1R agonist, could initiate a protective effect in the heart remains to be determined. Mouse myocardial infarction (MI) was created by ligation of the left descending artery. After 48 h of MI, animals were divided into the following groups (n = 5–7/group): 1) sham (animals that underwent thoracotomy without ligation), 2) MI [animals that underwent MI and received a daily dose of intraperitoneal injection (ip) of saline]; and 3) MI + exendin-4 [infarcted mice that received injections of exendin-4 (0.1 mg/kg ip)]. Two weeks later, cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and an isovolumetrically perfused heart. Compared with control MI hearts, stimulation of GLP-1R improved cardiac function, which was associated with attenuation of myocardial hypertrophy, the mitigation of interstitial fibrosis, and an increase in survival rate in post-MI hearts. Furthermore, H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were preconditioned with exendin-4 at a dose of 100 nmol/l and then subjected to hydrogen peroxide exposure at concentrations of 50 and 100 μmol/l. The exendin-4 treatment decreased lactate dehydrogenase leakage and increased cell survival. Notably, this event was also associated with the reduction of cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 and attenuation of reactive oxygen species production. Exendin-4 treatments improved mitochondrial respiration and suppressed the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and protected mitochondria function. Our results indicate that GLP-1R serves as a novel approach to eliciting cardioprotection and mitigating oxidative stress-induced injury. PMID:25117407

  2. Do Lactation-Induced Changes in Ghrelin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1, and Peptide YY Influence Appetite and Body Weight Regulation during the First Postpartum Year?

    PubMed Central

    Larson-Meyer, D. Enette; Schueler, Jessica; Kyle, Erin; Austin, Kathleen J.; Hart, Ann Marie; Alexander, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether fasting and meal-induced appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with body weight retention after childbearing, we studied 24 exclusively breastfeeding women (BMI = 25.2 ± 3.6 kg/m2) at 4-5 weeks postpartum and 20 never-pregnant controls (BMI = 24.0 ± 3.1 kg/m2). Ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and appetite ratings were measured before/and 150 minutes after a standardized breakfast and 60 minutes after an ad libitum lunch. Body weight/composition were measured at 6 and 12 months. Fasting and area under-the-curve responses for appetite-regulating hormones did not differ between lactating and control groups; ghrelinacyl, however, tended to track higher after the standardized breakfast in lactating women and was higher (p < 0.05) after the ad libitum lunch despite a 24% higher energy intake (p < 0.05). By 12 months, lactating women lost 5.3 ± 2.2 kg (n = 18), whereas control women (n = 15) remained weight stable (p = 0.019); fifteen of the lactating women returned to within ±2.0 kg of prepregnancy weight but three retained >6.0 kg. The retainers had greater (p < 0.05) postmeal ghrelin rebound responses following breakfast. Overall these studies do not support the hypothesis that appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with postpartum weight retention. Altered ghrelin responses, however, deserve further exploration. PMID:27313876

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) but not (9-36) augments cardiac output during myocardial ischemia via a Frank-Starling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Tune, Johnathan D; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Sassoon, Daniel; Casalini, Eli D; Mather, Kieren J

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 (7-36) or (9-36) on myocardial oxygen consumption, function and systemic hemodynamics in vivo during normal perfusion and during acute, regional myocardial ischemia. Lean Ossabaw swine received systemic infusions of saline vehicle or GLP-1 (7-36 or 9-36) at 1.5, 3.0, and 10.0 pmol/kg/min in sequence for 30 min at each dose, followed by ligation of the left circumflex artery during continued infusion at 10.0 pmol/kg/min. Systemic GLP-1 (9-36) had no effect on coronary flow, blood pressure, heart rate or indices of cardiac function before or during regional myocardial ischemia. Systemic GLP-1 (7-36) exerted no cardiometabolic or hemodynamic effects prior to ischemia. During ischemia, GLP-1 (7-36) increased cardiac output by approximately 2 L/min relative to vehicle-controls (p = 0.003). This response was not diminished by treatment with the non-depolarizing ganglionic blocker hexamethonium. Left ventricular pressure-volume loops measured during steady-state conditions with graded occlusion of the inferior vena cava to assess load-independent contractility revealed that GLP-1 (7-36) produced marked increases in end-diastolic volume (74 ± 1 to 92 ± 5 ml; p = 0.03) and volume axis intercept (8 ± 2 to 26 ± 8; p = 0.05), without any change in the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship vs. vehicle during regional ischemia. GLP-1 (9-36) produced no changes in any of these parameters compared to vehicle. These findings indicate that short-term systemic treatment with GLP-1 (7-36) but not GLP-1 (9-36) significantly augments cardiac output during regional myocardial ischemia, via increases in ventricular preload without changes in cardiac inotropy.

  4. Increased Glucose-induced Secretion of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Mice Lacking the Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 2 (CEACAM2)*

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Simona S.; Heinrich, Garrett; Lester, Sumona G.; Pfeiffer, Verena; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Patel, Payal R.; DeAngelis, Anthony M.; Dai, Tong; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K.; Smiley, Zachary N.; Jung, Dae Y.; Lee, Yongjin; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Ergun, Suleyman; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Kim, Jason K.; Giovannucci, David R.; Najjar, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 2 (CEACAM2) regulates food intake as demonstrated by hyperphagia in mice with the Ceacam2 null mutation (Cc2−/−). This study investigated whether CEACAM2 also regulates insulin secretion. Ceacam2 deletion caused an increase in β-cell secretory function, as assessed by hyperglycemic clamp analysis, without affecting insulin response. Although CEACAM2 is expressed in pancreatic islets predominantly in non-β-cells, basal plasma levels of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin, islet areas, and glucose-induced insulin secretion in pooled Cc2−/− islets were all normal. Consistent with immunofluorescence analysis showing CEACAM2 expression in distal intestinal villi, Cc2−/− mice exhibited a higher release of oral glucose-mediated GLP-1, an incretin that potentiates insulin secretion in response to glucose. Compared with wild type, Cc2−/− mice also showed a higher insulin excursion during the oral glucose tolerance test. Pretreating with exendin(9–39), a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, suppressed the effect of Ceacam2 deletion on glucose-induced insulin secretion. Moreover, GLP-1 release into the medium of GLUTag enteroendocrine cells was increased with siRNA-mediated Ceacam2 down-regulation in parallel to an increase in Ca2+ entry through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Thus, CEACAM2 regulates insulin secretion, at least in part, by a GLP-1-mediated mechanism, independent of confounding metabolic factors. PMID:26586918

  5. Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Regulates Release of Chylomicrons From the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Satya; Xiao, Changting; Morgantini, Cecilia; Connelly, Philip W.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Lewis, Gary F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The intestine efficiently incorporates and rapidly secretes dietary fat as chylomicrons (lipoprotein particles comprising triglycerides, phospholipids, cholesterol, and proteins) that contain the apolipoprotein isoform apoB-48. The gut can store lipids for many hours after their ingestion, and release them in chylomicrons in response to oral glucose, sham feeding, or unidentified stimuli. The gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) facilitates intestinal absorption of lipids, but its role in chylomicron secretion in human beings is unknown. METHODS We performed a randomized, single-blind, cross-over study, with 2 study visits 4 weeks apart, to assess the effects of GLP-2 administration on triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) apoB-48 in 6 healthy men compared with placebo. Subjects underwent constant intraduodenal feeding, with a pancreatic clamp and primed constant infusion of deuterated leucine. In a separate randomized, single-blind, cross-over validation study, 6 additional healthy men ingested a high-fat meal containing retinyl palmitate and were given either GLP-2 or placebo 7 hours later with measurement of TRL triglyceride, TRL retinyl palmitate, and TRL apoB-48 levels. RESULTS GLP-2 administration resulted in a rapid (within 30 minutes) and transient increase in the concentration of TRL apoB-48, compared with placebo (P = .03). Mathematic modeling of stable isotope enrichment and the mass of the TRL apoB-48 suggested that the increase resulted from the release of stored, presynthesized apoB-48 from the gut. In the validation study, administration of GLP-2 at 7 hours after the meal, in the absence of additional food intake, robustly increased levels of TRL triglycerides (P = .007), TRL retinyl palmitate (P = .002), and TRL apoB-48 (P = .04) compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS Administration of GLP-2 to men causes the release of chylomicrons that comprise previously synthesized and stored apoB-48 and lipids. This transiently increases TRL

  6. Umami Receptor Activation Increases Duodenal Bicarbonate Secretion via Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Release in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joon-Ho; Inoue, Takuya; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Guth, Paul H.; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Luminal nutrient chemosensing during meal ingestion is mediated by intestinal endocrine cells, which regulate secretion and motility via the release of gut hormones. We have reported that luminal coperfusion of l-Glu and IMP, common condiments providing the umami or proteinaceous taste, synergistically increases duodenal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) possibly via taste receptor heterodimers, taste receptor type 1, member 1 (T1R1)/R3. We hypothesized that glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) or glucagon-like peptide (GLP) is released by duodenal perfusion with l-Glu/IMP. We measured DBS with pH and CO2 electrodes through a perfused rat duodenal loop in vivo. GIP, exendin (Ex)-4 (GLP-1 receptor agonist), or GLP-2 was intravenously infused (0.01–1 nmol/kg/h). l-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally perfused with or without bolus intravenous injection (3 or 30 nmol/kg) of the receptor antagonists Pro3GIP, Ex-3(9-39), or GLP-2(3-33). GIP or GLP-2 infusion dose-dependently increased DBS, whereas Ex-4 infusion gradually decreased DBS. Luminal perfusion of l-Glu/IMP increased DBS, with no effect of Pro3GIP or Ex-3(9-39), whereas GLP-2(3-33) inhibited l-Glu/IMP-induced DBS. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)(6–28) intravenously or NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester coperfusion inhibited the effect of l-Glu/IMP. Perfusion of l-Glu/IMP increased portal venous concentrations of GLP-2, followed by a delayed increase of GLP-1, with no effect on GIP release. GLP-1/2 and T1R1/R3 were expressed in duodenal endocrine-like cells. These results suggest that luminal l-Glu/IMP-induced DBS is mediated via GLP-2 release and receptor activation followed by VIP and nitric oxide release. Because GLP-1 is insulinotropic and GLP-2 is intestinotrophic, umami receptor activation may have additional benefits in glucose metabolism and duodenal mucosal protection and regeneration. PMID:21846840

  7. Glucagon like peptide-2 induces intestinal restitution through VEGF release from subepithelial myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Kerem; Pennartz, Christian; Felderbauer, Peter; Meier, Juris J; Banasch, Matthias; Bulut, Daniel; Schmitz, Frank; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Hoffmann, Peter

    2008-01-14

    Glucagon like peptide-2 (GLP-2) exerts intestinotrophic actions, but the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. Recent studies demonstrated the expression of the GLP-2 receptor on fibroblasts located in the subepithelial tissue, where it might induce the release of growth factors such as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Therefore, in the present studies we sought to elucidate the downstream mechanisms involved in improved intestinal adaptation by GLP-2. Human colonic fibroblasts (CCD-18Co), human colonic cancer cells (Caco-2 cells) and rat ileum IEC-18 cells were used. GLP-2 receptor mRNA expression was determined using real time RT-PCR. Conditioned media from CCD-18Co cells were obtained following incubation with GLP-2 (50-250 nM) for 24 h. Cell viability was assessed by a 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-assay, and wound healing was determined with an established migration-assay. Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-beta), VEGF and KGF mRNA levels were determined by RT-PCR. Protein levels of VEGF and TGF-beta in CCD-18Co cells following GLP-2 stimulation were determined using ELISA. Neutralizing TGF-beta and VEGF-A antibodies were utilized to assess the role of TGF-beta and VEGF-A in the process of wound healing. GLP-2 receptor expression was detected in CCD-18Co cells. Conditioned media from CCD-18Co cells dose-dependently induced proliferation in Caco-2 cells, but not in IEC-18 cells. Conditioned media also enhanced cell migration in IEC-18 cells (P<0.01), while migration was even inhibited in Caco-2 cells (P<0.0012). GLP-2 significantly stimulated mRNA expression of VEGF and TGF-beta, but not of KGF in CCD-18Co. The migratory effects of GLP-2 were completely abolished in the presence of TGF-beta and VEGF-A antibodies. GLP-2 exerts differential effects on the epithelium of the small intestine and the colon. Thus, in small intestinal cells GLP-2 stimulates wound

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases net amino acid utilization by the portal-drained viscera of ruminatinhg calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases small intestinal mass and blood flow in ruminant calves, but its impact on nutrient metabolism across the portal-drained viscera (PDV) and liver is unknown. Eight Holstein calves with catheters in the carotid artery, mesenteric vein, portal vein and hepatic ...

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-2 intracellularly stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and specifically induces submucosal arteriole vasodilation via a sheer stress-independent, local neural mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-responsive neuropeptide that exerts diverse actions in the gastrointestinal tract, including enhancing mucosal cell survival and proliferation, mucosal blood flow, luminal nutrient uptake, and suppressing gastric motility and secretion. We have shown th...

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-2 but not imipramine exhibits antidepressant-like effects in ACTH-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Takashi; Ohnuki, Tomoko; Sasaki-Hamada, Sachie; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Sugiyama, Azusa; Oka, Jun-Ichiro

    2013-04-15

    We investigated the effectiveness of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) against refractory depression in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated mice as a model of tricyclic antidepressant (TCA)-resistant depression. Chronic ACTH treatment (0.45 mg/kg, s.c., 14 days) weakened the antidepressant-like effects of imipramine (20 mg/kg, i.p., 6 days) in the forced-swim test (FST). Conversely, GLP-2 (3 μg/mice, i.c.v., 6 days) induced antidepressant-like effects in the ACTH-treated mice in the FST. ACTH-treatment increased basal serum corticosterone levels, with an additional increase induced by the FST. Imipramine or GLP-2 had no effect on the basal corticosterone level, but GLP-2 attenuated the additional increase caused by the FST. Moreover, GLP-2 increased 5-HT levels, but not 5-HIAA. These results suggest that GLP-2 induced antidepressant-like effects under imipramine-resistant conditions through increase in 5-HT levels.

  11. Brain glucagon-like peptide–1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D.; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A.; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide–1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9–39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state. PMID:16322793

  12. Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 analog for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, including short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yazbeck, Roger

    2010-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a potent intestinotrophic growth factor with therapeutic potential for the prevention or treatment of an expanding number of gastrointestinal diseases, including short bowel syndrome (SBS). Teduglutide, being developed by NPS Allelix and licensee Nycomed, is a protease-resistant analog of GLP-2 for the potential treatment of gastrointestinal disease. Teduglutide has prolonged biological activity compared with native GLP-2, and preclinical studies demonstrated significant intestinotrophic activity in models of SBS, experimental colitis and chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. Patients with SBS rely on parenteral nutrition (PN) following bowel resection, and in a phase III clinical trial with teduglutide, > 20% reduction in PN was observed in patients with SBS receiving teduglutide. A phase II clinical trial for teduglutide in Crohn's disease observed remission rates of 55.6% in patients. At the time of publication, phase III clinical trials for SBS were ongoing, as were preclinical studies for chemotherapy-induced mucositis and pediatric indications. Teduglutide represents a novel, efficacious drug capable of increasing intestinal growth and improving intestinal function, and may change clinical management of intestinal disease and damage.

  13. Overall distribution of glucagon-like immunoreactivity in the chicken retina: an immunohistochemical study with flat-mounts.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Y; Ishimoto, I; Fukuda, M; Shimiza, Y; Shiosaka, S; Inagaki, S; Senba, E; Sakanaka, M; Takagi, H; Takatsuki, K; Hara, Y; Kawai, Y; Tohyama, M

    1982-05-01

    Pancreatic glucagon-like immunoreactivity (GLI) in the chicken retina was investigated by immunohistochemical methods with frozen sections and flat-mounts. Observations of the frozen sections showed that GLI is localized in the amacrine cells. Flat-mounts showed the GLI cells are evenly localized in the retina (n= or approximately 400/mm2) and composed to two types of cells--one is larger and the other is small. The former cell type occupies mainly the peripheral retinal region and the latter the central region. In addition, flat-mounts showed two types of GLI fiber plexuses in the inner plexiform layer; one is located in the area between laminae 2 and 3 and runs circularly and the other is located in lamina 1 and runs randomly. The relationship between GLI and cyclic AMP was also examined. an increase of the formation of cyclic AMP was caused by pancreatic glucagon in the chicken retina, suggesting that this peptide might have neurotransmitter or neuromodulator roles in the chicken retina.

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-2 modulates neurally evoked mucosal chloride secretion in guinea pig small intestine in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baldassano, Sara; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Mei-Hu; Mulè, Flavia

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is an important neuroendocrine peptide in intestinal physiology. It influences digestion, absorption, epithelial growth, motility, and blood flow. We studied involvement of GLP-2 in intestinal mucosal secretory behavior. Submucosal-mucosal preparations from guinea pig ileum were mounted in Ussing chambers for measurement of short-circuit current (Isc) as a surrogate for chloride secretion. GLP-2 action on neuronal release of acetylcholine was determined with ELISA. Enteric neuronal expression of the GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) was studied with immunohistochemical methods. Application of GLP-2 (0.1–100 nM) to the serosal or mucosal side of the preparations evoked no change in baseline Isc and did not alter transepithelial ionic conductance. Transmural electrical field stimulation (EFS) evoked characteristic biphasic increases in Isc, with an initially rapid rising phase followed by a sustained phase. Application of GLP-2 reduced the EFS-evoked biphasic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. The GLP-2R antagonist GLP-2-(3-33) significantly reversed suppression of the EFS-evoked responses by GLP-2. Tetrodotoxin, scopolamine, and hexamethonium, but not vasoactive intestinal peptide type 1 receptor (VPAC1) antagonist abolished or reduced to near zero the EFS-evoked responses. GLP-2 suppressed EFS-evoked acetylcholine release as measured by ELISA. Pretreatment with GLP-2-(3-33) offset this action of GLP-2. In the submucosal plexus, GLP-2R immunoreactivity (-IR) was expressed in choline acetyltransferase-IR neurons, somatostatin-IR neurons, neuropeptide Y-IR neurons, and vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR neurons. We conclude that submucosal neurons in the guinea pig ileum express GLP-2R. Activation of GLP-2R decreases neuronally evoked epithelial chloride secretion by suppressing acetylcholine release from secretomotor neurons. PMID:19628655

  15. IGF Binding Protein-4 is Required for the Growth Effects of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 in Murine Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Kaori; Imam, Nuvair A.; Pintar, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is an enteroendocrine hormone that stimulates the growth of the intestinal epithelium. We have previously demonstrated that GLP-2 exerts its intestinotropic effect through an indirect mechanism that requires both IGF-1 and the intestinal epithelial IGF-1 receptor. However, the biological activity of IGF-1 is modulated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), including IGFBP-4, which is highly expressed in the intestine. To determine the role of IGFBP-4 in the tropic effects of GLP-2, IGFBP-4 knockout (KO) and control mice were treated with degradation-resistant GLP-2 or vehicle for 10 days. Comparable levels of IGFBP-1–3/5–7 mRNAs were observed in the intestinal mucosa of all animals. IGFBP-4 KO mice had greater small intestinal weight and length, and deeper crypts (P < .05) as compared with controls, suggesting that IGFBP-4 has an inhibitory role in basal intestinal growth. However, small intestinal weight, crypt-villus height and crypt cell proliferation increased in response to GLP-2 in control mice (P < .05), and these changes were abrogated with IGFBP-4 KO. In contrast, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A KO mice, which have increased levels of circulating IGFBP-4, demonstrated a normal intestinotropic response to GLP-2. Finally, GLP-2 treatment of control mice significantly increased IGFBP-4 mRNA expression in the jejunal mucosa (P < .05), a finding that was recapitulated by GLP-2 treatment of fetal rat intestinal cells in culture (10−8M for 2 h; P < .05). Collectively, these results indicate that the IGF-I-modulating protein, IGFBP-4, exerts a negative effect on basal intestinal growth but plays a positive regulatory role in the intestinotropic actions of GLP-2. PMID:25514089

  16. Effect of Glucagon-Like Peptide 2 on Hepatic, Renal, and Intestinal Disposition of 1-Chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Silvina S. M.; Perdomo, Virginia G.; Ruiz, María L.; Rigalli, Juan P.; Arias, Agostina; Luquita, Marcelo G.; Vore, Mary; Catania, Viviana A.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of the liver, small intestine, and kidney to synthesize and subsequently eliminate dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione (DNP-SG), a substrate for multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2), was assessed in rats treated with glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2, 12 μg/100 g b.wt. s.c. every 12 h for 5 consecutive days). An in vivo perfused jejunum model with simultaneous bile and urine collection was used. A single intravenous dose of 30 μmol/kg b.wt. 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) was administered, and its conjugate, DNP-SG, and dinitrophenyl cysteinyl glycine (DNP-CG), resulting from the action of γ-glutamyltransferase on DNP-SG, were determined in bile, intestinal perfusate, and urine by high-performance liquid chromatography. Tissue content of DNP-SG was also assessed in liver, intestine, and kidneys. Biliary excretion of DNP-SG+DNP-CG was decreased in GLP-2 rats with respect to controls. In contrast, their intestinal excretion was substantially increased, whereas urinary elimination was not affected. Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction studies revealed preserved levels of Mrp2 protein and mRNA in liver and renal cortex and a significant increase in intestine in response to GLP-2 treatment. Tissue content of DNP-SG detected 5 min after CDNB administration was decreased in liver, increased in intestine, and unchanged in kidney in GLP-2 versus control group, consistent with GLP-2-induced down-regulation of expression of glutathione transferase (GST) Mu in liver and up-regulation of GST-Alpha in intestine at both protein and mRNA levels. In conclusion, GLP-2 induced selective changes in hepatic and intestinal disposition of a common GST and Mrp2 substrate administered systemically that could be of pharmacological or toxicological relevance under therapeutic treatment conditions. PMID:22453052

  17. Teduglutide, a novel glucagon-like peptide 2 analog, in the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Palle Bekker

    2012-05-01

    Short bowel syndrome results from surgical resection, congenital defect or disease-associated loss of absorption. Parenteral support (PS) is lifesaving in patients with short bowel syndrome and intestinal failure who are unable to compensate for their malabsorption by metabolic or pharmacologic adaptation. Together, the symptoms of short bowel syndrome and the inconvenience and complications in relation to PS (e.g. catheter-related blood steam infections, central thrombosis and intestinal failure associated liver disease) may impair the quality of life of patients. The aim of treatment is to maximize intestinal absorption, minimize the inconvenience of diarrhea, and avoid, reduce or eliminate the need for PS to achieve the best possible quality of life for the patient. Conventional treatments include dietary manipulations, oral rehydration solutions, and antidiarrheal and antisecretory treatments. However, the evidence base for these interventions is limited and treatments that improve the structural and functional integrity of the remaining intestine are needed. Teduglutide, an analog of glucagon-like peptide 2, improves intestinal rehabilitation by promoting mucosal growth and possibly by restoring gastric emptying and secretion, thereby reducing intestinal losses and promoting intestinal absorption. In a 3-week, phase II balance study, teduglutide reduced diarrhea by around 700 g/day and fecal energy losses by around 0.8 MJ/day. In two randomized, placebo-controlled, 24-week, phase III studies, similar findings were obtained when evaluating the fluid composite effect, which is the sum of the beneficial effects of teduglutide - reduction in the need for PS, increase in urine production and reduction in oral fluid intake. The fluid composite effect reflects the increase in intestinal fluid absorption (and the concomitant reduction in diarrhea) and may be used in studies in which metabolic balance assessments are not performed. In studies of up to 24 weeks

  18. Short communication: Promotion of glucagon-like peptide-2 secretion in dairy calves with a bioactive extract from Olea europaea.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S Y; Pastor, J J; Quintela, J C; Holst, J J; Hartmann, B; Drackley, J K; Ipharraguerre, I R

    2017-03-01

    Diarrhea episodes in dairy calves involve profound alterations in the mechanism controlling gut barrier function that ultimately compromise intestinal permeability to macromolecules, including pathogenic bacteria. Intestinal dysfunction models suggest that a key element of intestinal adaptation during the neonatal phase is the nutrient-induced secretion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 and associated effects on mucosal cell proliferation, barrier function, and inflammatory response. Bioactive molecules found in Olea europaea have been shown to induce the release of regulatory peptides from model enteroendocrine cells. The ability to enhance GLP-2 secretion via the feeding of putative GLP-2 secretagogues is untested in newborn calves. The objectives of this study were to determine whether feeding a bioactive extract from Olea europaea (OBE) mixed in the milk replacer (1) can stimulate GLP-2 secretion beyond the response elicited by enteral nutrients and, thereby, (2) improve intestinal permeability and animal growth as well as (3) reduce the incidence of diarrhea in preweaning dairy calves. Holstein heifer calves (n = 60) were purchased, transported to the research facility, and blocked by body weight and total serum protein and assigned to 1 of 3 treatments. Treatments were control (CON), standard milk replacer (MR) and ad libitum starter; CON plus OBE added into MR at 30 mg/kg of body weight (OBE30); and CON plus OBE added into MR at 60 mg/kg of body weight (OBE60). The concentration of GLP-2 was measured at the end of wk 2. Intestinal permeability was measured at the onset of the study and the end of wk 2 and 6, with lactulose and d-mannitol as markers. Treatments did not affect calf growth and starter intake. Compared with CON, administration of OBE60 increased the nutrient-induced response in GLP-2 by about 1 fold and reduced MR intake during the second week of study. Throughout the study, however, all calves had compromised intestinal permeability and a high

  19. Teduglutide, a novel glucagon-like peptide 2 analog, in the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome results from surgical resection, congenital defect or disease-associated loss of absorption. Parenteral support (PS) is lifesaving in patients with short bowel syndrome and intestinal failure who are unable to compensate for their malabsorption by metabolic or pharmacologic adaptation. Together, the symptoms of short bowel syndrome and the inconvenience and complications in relation to PS (e.g. catheter-related blood steam infections, central thrombosis and intestinal failure associated liver disease) may impair the quality of life of patients. The aim of treatment is to maximize intestinal absorption, minimize the inconvenience of diarrhea, and avoid, reduce or eliminate the need for PS to achieve the best possible quality of life for the patient. Conventional treatments include dietary manipulations, oral rehydration solutions, and antidiarrheal and antisecretory treatments. However, the evidence base for these interventions is limited and treatments that improve the structural and functional integrity of the remaining intestine are needed. Teduglutide, an analog of glucagon-like peptide 2, improves intestinal rehabilitation by promoting mucosal growth and possibly by restoring gastric emptying and secretion, thereby reducing intestinal losses and promoting intestinal absorption. In a 3-week, phase II balance study, teduglutide reduced diarrhea by around 700 g/day and fecal energy losses by around 0.8 MJ/day. In two randomized, placebo-controlled, 24-week, phase III studies, similar findings were obtained when evaluating the fluid composite effect, which is the sum of the beneficial effects of teduglutide – reduction in the need for PS, increase in urine production and reduction in oral fluid intake. The fluid composite effect reflects the increase in intestinal fluid absorption (and the concomitant reduction in diarrhea) and may be used in studies in which metabolic balance assessments are not performed. In studies of up to 24 weeks

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-2 reduces intestinal permeability but does not modify the onset of type 1 diabetes in the nonobese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Hadjiyanni, Irene; Li, Kunmin Karen; Drucker, Daniel J

    2009-02-01

    The development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been linked to environmental factors and dietary components. Increasing evidence indicates that the integrity of the gut mucosa plays a role in the development of autoimmune diseases, and evidence from both preclinical and clinical studies demonstrates that increased leakiness of the intestinal epithelium precedes the development of type 1 diabetes. However, there is limited information on modulation of gut barrier function and its relationship to diabetes development. Here we show that the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, a model of T1D, exhibits enhanced intestinal transcellular permeability before the development of autoimmune diabetes. Treatment of NOD mice with a glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) analog, synthetic human [Gly(2)] glucagon-like peptide-2 (h[Gly(2)]GLP-2, increased the length and weight of the small bowel and significantly improved jejunal transepithelial resistance. However, chronic administration of once daily h[Gly(2)]GLP-2 failed to delay or reverse the onset of T1D when treatment was initiated in young, normoglycemic female NOD mice. Furthermore, h[Gly(2)]GLP-2 administration had no significant effect on lymphocyte subpopulations in NOD mice. These findings demonstrate that h[Gly(2)]GLP-2-mediated enhancement of gut barrier function in normoglycemic NOD mice disease is not sufficient to prevent or delay the development of experimental T1D.

  1. Unique roles of glucagon and glucagon-like peptides: Parallels in understanding the functions of adipokinetic hormones in stress responses in insects.

    PubMed

    Bednářová, Andrea; Kodrík, Dalibor; Krishnan, Natraj

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon is conventionally regarded as a hormone, counter regulatory in function to insulin and plays a critical anti-hypoglycemic role by maintaining glucose homeostasis in both animals and humans. Glucagon performs this function by increasing hepatic glucose output to the blood by stimulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in response to starvation. Additionally it plays a homeostatic role by decreasing glycogenesis and glycolysis in tandem to try and maintain optimal glucose levels. To perform this action, it also increases energy expenditure which is contrary to what one would expect and has actions which are unique and not entirely in agreement with its role in protection from hypoglycemia. Interestingly, glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and GLP-2) from the major fragment of proglucagon (in non-mammalian vertebrates, as well as in mammals) may also modulate response to stress in addition to their other physiological actions. These unique modes of action occur in response to psychological, metabolic and other stress situations and mirror the role of adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) in insects which perform a similar function. The findings on the anti-stress roles of glucagon and glucagon-like peptides in mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates may throw light on the multiple stress responsive mechanisms which operate in a concerted manner under regulation by AKH in insects thus functioning as a stress responsive hormone while also maintaining organismal homeostasis.

  2. Clinical trial simulations in pediatric patients using realistic covariates: application to teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 analog in neonates and infants with short-bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mouksassi, M S; Marier, J F; Cyran, J; Vinks, A A

    2009-12-01

    Teduglutide, a synthetic glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog with activity relating to the regeneration, maintenance, and repair of the intestinal epithelium, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of short-bowel syndrome (SBS), Crohn's disease, and other gastrointestinal disorders. On the basis of promising results from teduglutide studies in adults with SBS and from studies in neonatal and juvenile animal models, a pediatric multiple-dose phase I clinical study was designed to determine the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of teduglutide in pediatric patients with SBS who have undergone resection for necrotizing enterocolitis, malrotation, or intestinal atresia. This report details the application of clinical trial simulations coupled with a novel approach using generalized additive modeling for location, scale, and shape (GAMLSS) that facilitates the simulation of demographic covariates specific to the targeted patient populations. The goal was to optimize phase I dosing strategies and the likelihood of achieving target exposure and therapeutic effect.

  3. GLP-1 analogue CJC-1131 prevents amyloid β protein-induced impirments of spatial memory and synaptic plasticity in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng-Xiao; Cai, Hong-Yan; Ma, Xiao-Wen; Yuan, Li; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Li, Yu-Feng; Qi, Jin-Shun

    2017-03-15

    Although amyloid β protein (Aβ) has been recognized as one of the main pathological characteristics in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the effective strategies against Aβ neurotoxicity are still deficient up to now. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a natural gut hormone, was found to be effective in modulating insulin signaling and neural protection, but short half-life limited its clinical application in AD treatment. CJC-1131, a newly designed GLP-1 analogue with very longer half-life, has shown good effectiveness in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is unclear whether CJC-1131 could alleviate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in cognitive behavior and electrophysiological property. The present study investigated the effects of CJC-1131 on the Aβ-induced impairments in spatial memory and synaptic plasticity of rats by using Morris water maze test and in vivo field potential recording. The results showed that Aβ1-42-induced increase in the escape latency of rats in hidden platform test and decrease in swimming time percent in target quadrant were effectively reversed by CJC-1131 pretreatment. Further, CJC-1131 prevented against Aβ1-42-induced suppression of hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP). In addition, Aβ1-42 injection resulted in a significant decrease of p-PKA in the hippocampus, which was effectively prevented by CJC-1131 treatment. These results indicated that CJC-1131 protected the cognitive function and synaptic plasticity of rats against Aβ-induced impairments, suggesting that GLP-1 analogue CJC-1131 might be potentially beneficial to the prevention and treatment of AD, especially those with T2DM or blood glucose abnormality.

  4. Endogenous GLP1 and GLP1 analogue alter CNS responses to palatable food consumption.

    PubMed

    Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; Veltman, Dick J; van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; Groot, Paul F C; Ruhé, Henricus G; Barkhof, Frederik; Diamant, Michaela; Ijzerman, Richard G

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) affects appetite, supposedly mediated via the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we investigate whether modulation of CNS responses to palatable food consumption may be a mechanism by which GLP1 contributes to the central regulation of feeding. Using functional MRI, we determined the effects of endogenous GLP1 and treatment with the GLP1 analogue liraglutide on CNS activation to chocolate milk receipt. Study 1 included 20 healthy lean individuals and 20 obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Scans were performed on two occasions: during infusion of the GLP1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 (blocking actions of endogenous GLP1) and during placebo infusion. Study 2 was a randomised, cross-over intervention study carried out in 20 T2DM patients, comparing treatment with liraglutide to insulin, after 10 days and 12 weeks. Compared with lean individuals, T2DM patients showed reduced activation to chocolate milk in right insula (P = 0.04). In lean individuals, blockade of endogenous GLP1 effects inhibited activation in bilateral insula (P ≤ 0.03). Treatment in T2DM with liraglutide, vs insulin, increased activation to chocolate milk in right insula and caudate nucleus after 10 days (P ≤ 0.03); however, these effects ceased to be significant after 12 weeks. Our findings in healthy lean individuals indicate that endogenous GLP1 is involved in the central regulation of feeding by affecting central responsiveness to palatable food consumption. In obese T2DM, treatment with liraglutide may improve the observed deficit in responsiveness to palatable food, which may contribute to the induction of weight loss observed during treatment. However, no long-term effects of liraglutide were observed.

  5. Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-gamma in the actions of glucagon-like peptide-2 on the murine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Anini, Younes; Izzo, Angelo; Oudit, Gavin Y; Backx, Peter H; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2007-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) enhances intestinal growth and function through a cAMP-linked G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed in the mucosal layer and enteric nervous system. Because the type 1B gamma-isoform of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) is activated by GPCRs, we determined whether this enzyme plays a role in the intestinal actions of GLP-2 by using PI3-Kgamma knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type (WT), heterozygous, and KO mice were treated with vehicle or 1 microg Gly2-GLP-2 (a long-acting analog) twice daily for 10 days and analyzed for changes in intestinal growth, motility, and cAMP production. Basal small intestinal wet weight was increased in KO mice in association with enhanced crypt-villus height and crypt cell proliferation (P < 0.05-0.01). However, the GLP-2-induced changes in these parameters were not different between KO and WT animals. GLP-2 treatment also enhanced the number of mucous cells in the intestinal epithelium, but this effect was lost in the PI3-Kgamma KO mice. Both basal and GLP-2-induced suppression of intestinal transit were normal in KO mice. In contrast, the ability of GLP-2 to stimulate cAMP levels in isolated muscle strips was abrogated by loss of PI3-Kgamma, despite the expression of GLP-2 receptor mRNA transcripts in this tissue. Together, the results of this study demonstrate a role for PI3-Kgamma in basal but not GLP-2-induced small intestinal mucosal growth. However, PI3-Kgamma is important for the enhancement of mucous cell number by GLP-2 and in the ability of the GLP-2 receptor to couple to cAMP in the enteric nervous system.

  6. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog, following multiple ascending subcutaneous administrations in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Marier, Jean-Francois; Beliveau, Martin; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Shaw, Paula; Cyran, Jane; Kesavan, Jothi; Wallens, John; Zahir, Hamim; Wells, David; Caminis, John

    2008-11-01

    Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of short-bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, and other gastrointestinal disorders. The pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of teduglutide in healthy subjects (N = 64) were assessed following daily subcutaneous administrations for 8 days in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, ascending-dose study. Teduglutide treatments were administered as a 50-mg/mL (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 50, and 80 mg) or 20-mg/mL (20 mg) formulation. Blood samples were collected on days 1 and 8, and plasma concentrations of teduglutide were measured using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method. Mean systemic exposures to teduglutide were very similar on days 1 and 8, suggesting minimal, if any, accumulation following once-daily repeated administrations. The apparent clearance of teduglutide following administration of the 50-mg/mL formulation was constant over the dose range, with mean values in male and female subjects of 0.155 and 0.159 L/h/kg, respectively. Peak plasma concentrations and total exposure of teduglutide after subcutaneous injection of a 20-mg/mL formulation (1.0 mL) were approximately 15% and 78% higher than those observed with the 50-mg/mL formulation (0.4 mL), respectively. Teduglutide treatments were safe and well tolerated. All but 1 adverse event was assessed as mild or moderate in severity. No relationship between teduglutide treatments and frequency of adverse events was observed, with the exception of injection site pain, which increased as a function of dose and injected volume. Results from the current study will assist in the dose selection in future efficacy studies.

  7. Short Bowel Patients Treated for Two Years with Glucagon-Like Peptide 2: Effects on Intestinal Morphology and Absorption, Renal Function, Bone and Body Composition, and Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, P. B.; Lund, P.; Gottschalck, I. B.; Nielsen, H. B.; Holst, J. J.; Mortensen, J.; Poulsen, S. S.; Quistorff, B.; Mortensen, P. B.

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims. In a short-term study, Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) has been shown to improve intestinal absorption in short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients. This study describes longitudinal changes in relation to GLP-2 treatment for two years. Methods. GLP-2, 400 micrograms, s.c.,TID, were offered, to eleven SBS patients keeping parenteral support constant. 72-hour nutritional balance studies were performed at baseline, weeks 13, 26, 52 during two years intermitted by an 8-week washout period. In addition, mucosal morphometrics, renal function (by creatinine clearance), body composition and bone mineral density (by DEXA), biochemical markers of bone turnover (by s-CTX and osteocalcin, PTH and vitamin D), and muscle function (NMR, lungfunction, exercise test) were measured. Results. GLP-2 compliance was >93%. Three of eleven patients did not complete the study. In the remaining 8 patients, GLP-2 significantly reduced the fecal wet weight from approximately 3.0 to approximately 2.0 kg/day. This was accompanied by a decline in the oral wet weight intake, maintaining intestinal wet weight absorption and urinary weight constant. Renal function improved. No significant changes were demonstrated in energy intake or absorption, and GLP-2 did not significantly affect mucosal morphology, body composition, bone mineral density or muscle function. Conclusions. GLP-2 treatment reduces fecal weight by approximately 1000 g/d and enables SBS patients to maintain their intestinal fluid and electrolyte absorption at lower oral intakes. This was accompanied by a 28% improvement in creatinine clearance. PMID:19707516

  8. Intestinotrophic Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 (GLP-2) Activates Intestinal Gene Expression and Growth Factor-Dependent Pathways Independent of the Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Gene in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yusta, Bernardo; Holland, Dianne; Waschek, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The enteroendocrine and enteric nervous systems convey signals through an overlapping network of regulatory peptides that act either as circulating hormones or as localized neurotransmitters within the gastrointestinal tract. Because recent studies invoke an important role for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) as a downstream mediator of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) action in the gut, we examined the importance of the VIP-GLP-2 interaction through analysis of Vip−/− mice. Unexpectedly, we detected abnormal villous architecture, expansion of the crypt compartment, increased crypt cell proliferation, enhanced Igf1 and Kgf gene expression, and reduced expression of Paneth cell products in the Vip−/− small bowel. These abnormalities were not reproduced by antagonizing VIP action in wild-type mice, and VIP administration did not reverse the intestinal phenotype of Vip−/− mice. Exogenous administration of GLP-2 induced the expression of ErbB ligands and immediate-early genes to similar levels in Vip+/+ vs. Vip−/− mice. Moreover, GLP-2 significantly increased crypt cell proliferation and small bowel growth to comparable levels in Vip+/+ vs. Vip−/− mice. Unexpectedly, exogenous GLP-2 administration had no therapeutic effect in mice with dextran sulfate-induced colitis; the severity of colonic injury and weight loss was modestly reduced in female but not male Vip−/− mice. Taken together, these findings extend our understanding of the complex intestinal phenotype arising from loss of the Vip gene. Furthermore, although VIP action may be important for the antiinflammatory actions of GLP-2, the Vip gene is not required for induction of a gene expression program linked to small bowel growth after enhancement of GLP-2 receptor signaling. PMID:22535770

  9. Sustained glucagon-like peptide-2 infusion is required for intestinal adaptation, and cessation reverses increased cellularity in rats with intestinal failure

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, Matthew C.; Chen, Xueyan; Holst, Jens J.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent, proglucagon-derived hormone that is a proposed treatment for human short bowel syndrome (SBS). The objective was to determine how the timing, duration, and cessation of GLP-2 administration affect intestinal adaptation and enterocyte kinetics in a rat model of human SBS that results in intestinal failure requiring total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Rats underwent 60% jejunoileal resection plus cecectomy and jugular vein cannulation and were maintained exclusively with TPN for 18 days in these treatments: TPN control (no GLP-2); sustained GLP-2 (1–18 days); early GLP-2 (1–7 days, killed at 7 or 18 days); and delayed GLP-2 (12–18 days). Body weight gain was similar across groups, and plasma bioactive GLP-2 was significantly increased with coinfusion of GLP-2 (100 μg·kg−1·day−1) with TPN. GLP-2-treated rats showed significant increases in duodenum and jejunum mucosal dry mass, protein, DNA, and sucrase activity compared with TPN control. The increased jejunum cellularity reflected significantly decreased apoptosis and increased crypt mitosis and crypt fission due to GLP-2. When GLP-2 infusion stopped at 7 days, these effects were reversed at 18 days. Sustained GLP-2 infusion significantly increased duodenum length and decreased 18-day mortality to 0% from 37.5% deaths in TPN control (P = 0.08). Colon proglucagon expression quantified by real-time RT-qPCR was increased in TPN controls and attenuated by GLP-2 infusion; jejunal expression of the GLP-2 receptor did not differ among groups. In summary, early, sustained GLP-2 infusion reduces mortality, induces crypt fission, and is required for intestinal adaptation, whereas cessation of GLP-2 reverses gains in mucosal cellularity in a rat model of intestinal failure. PMID:20864657

  10. A pilot study examining the relationship among Crohn disease activity, glucagon-like peptide-2 signalling and intestinal function in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Sigalet, David L; Kravarusic, Dragan; Butzner, Decker; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Meddings, Jon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The relationship between the enteroendocrine hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) and intestinal inflammation is unclear. GLP-2 promotes mucosal growth, decreases permeability and reduces inflammation in the intestine; physiological stimulation of GLP-2 release is triggered by nutrient contact. The authors hypothesized that ileal Crohn disease (CD) affects GLP-2 release. METHODS: With ethics board approval, pediatric patients hospitalized with CD were studied; controls were recruited from local schools. Inclusion criteria were endoscopy-confirmed CD (primarily of the small intestine) with a disease activity index >150. Fasting and post-prandial GLP-2 levels and quantitative urinary recovery of orally administered 3-O-methyl-glucose (active transport) and lactulose/mannitol (passive) were quantified during the acute and remission phases. RESULTS: Seven patients (mean [± SD] age 15.3±1.3 years) and 10 controls (10.3±1.6 years) were studied. In patients with active disease, fasting levels of GLP-2 remained stable but postprandial levels were reduced. Patients with active disease exhibited reduced glucose absorption and increased lactulose/mannitol recovery; all normalized with disease remission. The change in the lactulose/mannitol ratio was due to both reduced lactulose and increased mannitol absorption. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that pediatric patients with acute ileal CD have decreased postprandial GLP-2 release, reduced glucose absorption and increased intestinal permeability. Healing of CD resulted in normalization of postprandial GLP-2 release and mucosal functioning (nutrient absorption and permeability), the latter due to an increase in mucosal surface area. These findings have implications for the use of GLP-2 and feeding strategies as a therapy in CD patients; further studies of the effects of inflammation and the GLP-2 axis are recommended. PMID:24106731

  11. Short Bowel Patients Treated for Two Years with Glucagon-Like Peptide 2 (GLP-2): Compliance, Safety, and Effects on Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, P. B.; Lund, P.; Gottschalck, I. B.; Nielsen, H. B.; Holst, J. J.; Mortensen, J.; Poulsen, S. S.; Quistorff, B.; Mortensen, P. B.

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims. Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) has been shown to improve intestinal absorption in short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients in a short-term study. This study describes safety, compliance, and changes in quality of life in 11 SBS patients at baseline, week 13, 26, and 52 during two years of subcutaneous GLP-2 treatment, 400 microgram TID, intermitted by an 8-week washout period. Methods. Safety and compliance was evaluated during the admissions. The Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), Short Form 36 (SF 36), and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ) evaluated quality of life. Results. The predominant adverse event was transient abdominal discomfort in 5 of 11 patients, but in 2, both suffering from Crohns disease, it progressed to abdominal pain and led to discontinuation of GLP-2 treatment. One had a fibrostenotic lesion electively resected at the jejuno-ascendo-anastomosis. The investigator excluded a patient due to unreliable feedback. Stoma nipple enlargement was seen in all 9 jejunostomy patients. Reported GLP-2 compliance was excellent (>93%). GLP-2 improved the overall quality of life VAS-score (4.1 ± 2.8 cm versus 6.0 ± 2.4 cm, P < .01), the overall SIP score (10.3 ± 8.9% versus 6.2 ± 9.5%, P < .001), the mental component of the SF-36 (45 ± 13% versus 53 ± 11%, P < .05), and the overall IBDQ score (5.1 ± 0.9 versus 5.4 ± 0.9, P < .007) in the 8 patients completing the study. Conclusions. Long-term treatment with GLP-2 is feasible in SBS patients, although caution must be exercised in patients with a history of abdominal pain. Although conclusions cannot be made in a noncontrolled trial, the high reported compliance might reflect a high treatment satisfaction, where the clinical benefits of GLP-2 may outweigh the discomforts of injections. PMID:19590736

  12. Effect of Teduglutide, a Glucagon-like Peptide 2 Analog, on Citrulline Levels in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome in Two Phase III Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Seidner, Douglas L; Joly, Francisca; Youssef, Nader N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In clinical trials, treatment with the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide was associated with improved fluid and nutrient absorption and increased intestinal villus height and crypt depth in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Plasma citrulline, an amino acid produced by enterocytes, is considered a measure of enterocyte mass. This analysis assessed changes in plasma citrulline levels in patients with SBS in 2 phase III clinical studies of teduglutide. Methods: Both teduglutide studies (0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg/day in CL0600-004 and 0.05 mg/kg/day in CL0600-020) were phase III, 24-week, double-blind, and placebo controlled. Plasma citrulline levels were analyzed and validated by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Results: In both the CL0600-004 and CL0600-020 studies, change in mean plasma citrulline concentrations at Week 24 vs. baseline was significantly greater with teduglutide compared with placebo (10.9 (0.05-mg/kg/day dose) and 15.7 (0.10-mg/kg/day dose) vs. 2.0 μmol/L and 20.6 vs. 0.7 μmol/L, respectively, for each study (P≤0.0001 for each comparison with placebo)). Teduglutide treatment was associated with reductions from baseline in PS (parenteral support) volume requirements; however, a significant correlation between PS reduction and increase in plasma citrulline at Week 24 was observed in only one out of the three teduglutide treatment groups. Conclusions: In 2 phase III studies, patients receiving teduglutide had significant increases in plasma citrulline at Week 24 compared with patients receiving placebo. Increases in plasma citrulline concentrations likely reflect enterocyte mass expansion, but no clear correlation was detected between change in plasma citrulline and change in weekly PS volume. PMID:26111125

  13. Nutrient-intake-level-dependent regulation of intestinal development in newborn intrauterine growth-restricted piglets via glucagon-like peptide-2.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Liu, Z; Gao, L; Chen, L; Zhang, H

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the intestinal development of newborn intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR) piglets subjected to normal nutrient intake (NNI) or restricted nutrient intake (RNI). Newborn normal birth weight (NBW) and IUGR piglets were allotted to NNI or RNI levels for 4 weeks from day 8 postnatal. IUGR piglets receiving NNI had similar growth performance compared with that of NBW piglets. Small intestine length and villous height were greater in IUGR piglets fed the NNI than that of piglets fed the RNI. Lactase activity was increased in piglets fed the NNI compared with piglets fed the RNI. Absorptive function, represented by active glucose transport by the Ussing chamber method and messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of two main intestinal glucose transporters, Na+-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), were greater in IUGR piglets fed the NNI compared with piglets fed the RNI regimen. The apoptotic process, characterized by caspase-3 activity (a sign of activated apoptotic cells) and mRNA expressions of p53 (pro-apoptotic), bcl-2-like protein 4 (Bax) (pro-apoptotic) and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) (anti-apoptotic), were improved in IUGR piglets fed the NNI regimen. To test the hypothesis that improvements in intestinal development of IUGR piglets fed NNI might be mediated through circulating glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), GLP-2 was injected subcutaneously to IUGR piglets fed the RNI from day 8 to day 15 postnatal. Although the intestinal development of IUGR piglets fed the RNI regimen was suppressed compared with those fed the NNI regimen, an exogenous injection of GLP-2 was able to bring intestinal development to similar levels as NNI-fed IUGR piglets. Collectively, our results demonstrate that IUGR neonates that have NNI levels could improve intestinal function via the regulation of GLP-2.

  14. Evaluation of intragastric vs intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests in the evaluation of insulin resistance in a rodent model of burn injury and glucagon-like polypeptide-1 treatment.

    PubMed

    Watada, Susumu; Yu, Yong-Ming; Fischman, Alan J; Kurihara, Tomohiro; Shen, Chuan-An; Tompkins, Ronald G; Fagan, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of glucose tolerance in rodent models is usually performed after intraperitroneal administration of glucose (intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test [IPGTT]), whereas in humans the test is performed with oral glucose. Hyperglycemia is a major clinical manifestation of burn injury. Our previous studies using IPGTT have demonstrated burn injury-induced insulin resistance and the beneficial effects of glucagon-like polypeptide-1 (GLP-1) in improving insulin resistance. The goal of the present study is to compare the results of these two procedures under 1) burn injury-induced insulin resistance and 2) GLP-1 treatment after burn. Male CD rats were divided into three groups: sham burn, burn, and burn with GLP-1. Blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were measured during intragastric glucose tolerance test (IGGTT) on day 6 after 40% of full-thickness burn injury. The results were compared with our previous IPGTT. Blood glucose curves for IGGTT and IPGTT showed a similar pattern. However, IGGTT demonstrated a significant lower level of maximal blood glucose when compared with IPGTT. This was accompanied by higher peak insulin levels in sham burn and burn groups. In contrast, peak insulin levels of each burn with GLP-1 group were similar. 1) Both IPGTT and IGGTT demonstrated burn injury-induced insulin resistance and the efficacy of GLP-1 for reducing hyperglycemia after burn injury. 2) The observed differences in the plasma glucose and insulin levels between IGGTT and IPGTT suggest that endogenously produced GLP-1 during the IGGTT may play a role in ameliorating insulin resistance after burn injury.

  15. Short communication: Glucagon-like peptide-2 and coccidiosis alter tight junction gene expression in the gastrointestinal tract of dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Walker, M P; Evock-Clover, C M; Elsasser, T H; Connor, E E

    2015-05-01

    Tight junction (TJ) proteins are integral factors involved in gut barrier function, and therapy with glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) enhances gut integrity. Our aim was to assess effects of GLP-2 treatment on mRNA expression of 8 TJ complex proteins in the intestine of dairy calves not infected or infected with Eimeria bovis at 11±3d of age. Mucosal epithelium from jejunum, ileum, and cecum was collected at slaughter from Holstein bull calves assigned to 4 groups: noninfected, buffer-treated (n=5); noninfected, GLP-2 treated (n=4); E. bovis-infected, buffer-treated (n=5); and E. bovis-infected, GLP-2-treated (n=4). Infected calves were orally dosed with 100,000 to 200,000 sporulated E. bovis oocysts on d 0; GLP-2-treated calves received 50 µg of GLP-2/kg of body weight subcutaneously twice daily for 10d beginning on d 18; and buffer-treated calves received an equal injection volume of 0.01 M Na bicarbonate buffer. All calves were killed on d 28. The mRNA expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), claudins 1, 2, and 4 (CLDN1, CLDN2, and CLDN4), F11 receptor (F11R), junction adhesion molecule 2 (JAM2), occludin (OCLN), and tight junction protein ZO-1 (TJP1) was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. In jejunum and ileum, an interaction of E. bovis infection and GLP-2 treatment on gene expression was noted. In jejunum of noninfected calves, GLP-2 increased CXADR, CLDN2, OCLN, and TJP1 mRNA expression but had no effect on mRNA expression in infected calves. Treatment with GLP-2 also increased tight junction protein ZO-1 protein expression in jejunum of noninfected calves as determined by immunohistochemistry. In ileum, E. bovis decreased expression of JAM2, OCLN, and TJP1 in buffer-treated calves, and GLP-2 increased TJP1 expression in infected calves. In cecum, E. bovis infection reduced expression of CXADR, CLDN4, F11R, and OCLN, and GLP-2 therapy increased expression of CLDN4, F11R, OCLN, and TJP1. Results are consistent with studies in

  16. PEGylated porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 improved the intestinal digestive function and prevented inflammation of weaning piglets challenged with LPS.

    PubMed

    Qi, K K; Wu, J; Deng, B; Li, Y M; Xu, Z W

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects on intestinal function, anti-inflammatory role and possible mechanism of polyethylene glycosylated (PEGylated) porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 (pGLP-2), a long-acting form of pGLP-2, in weaning piglets challenged with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We divided 18 weaned piglets on day 21 into three groups (control, LPS and LPS+PEG-pGLP-2; n=6). The piglets from the LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 group were injected with PEG-pGLP-2 at 10 nmol/kg BW from 5 to 7 days of the trials daily. On 8th day, the piglets in the LPS and LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 groups were intraperitoneally administered with 100 µg LPS/kg. The control group was administered with the same volume of saline solution. The piglets were then sacrificed on day 28. Afterwards, serum, duodenum, jejunum and ileum samples were collected for analysis of structural and functional endpoints. LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment increased (P<0.05) lactase activities in the duodenum and the jejunum compared with LPS treatment. LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment also significantly increased sucrase activity in the jejunum compared with LPS treatment. Furthermore, LPS treatment increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-8, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-10 in the ileum compared with the control treatment. By contrast, LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment decreased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α in the ileum compared with the LPS treatment. LPS treatment also increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression level of GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) and the percentage of GLP-2R-positive cells in the ileum; by comparison, these results were (P<0.05) reduced by LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment. Moreover, LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment increased (P<0.05) the content of serum keratinocyte growth factor compared with the control group and the LPS group. The protective effects of PEG-pGLP-2 on intestinal digestive function were associated with the release of GLP-2R mediator (keratinocyte

  17. Enteral nutrients potentiate glucagon-like peptide-2 action and reduce dependence on parenteral nutrition in a rat model of human intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Adam S; Murali, Sangita G; Hitt, Stacy; Solverson, Patrick M; Holst, Jens J; Ney, Denise M

    2012-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent, proglucagon-derived gut hormone that shows promise for the treatment of short bowel syndrome (SBS). Our objective was to investigate how combination GLP-2 + enteral nutrients (EN) affects intestinal adaption in a rat model that mimics severe human SBS and requires parenteral nutrition (PN). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups and maintained with PN for 18 days: total parenteral nutrition (TPN) alone, TPN + GLP-2 (100 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)), PN + EN + GLP-2(7 days), PN + EN + GLP-2(18 days), and a nonsurgical oral reference group. Animals underwent massive distal bowel resection followed by jejunocolic anastomosis and placement of jugular catheters. Starting on postoperative day 4, rats in the EN groups were allowed ad libitum access to EN. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 had their rate of PN reduced by 0.25 ml/day starting on postoperative day 6. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 demonstrated significantly greater body weight gain with similar energy intake and a safe 80% reduction in PN compared with TPN ± GLP-2. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 for 7 or 18 days showed similar body weight gain, residual jejunal length, and digestive capacity. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 showed increased jejunal GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) expression. Treatment with TPN + GLP-2 demonstrated increased jejunal expression of epidermal growth factor. Cessation of GLP-2 after 7 days with continued EN sustained the majority of intestinal adaption and significantly increased expression of colonic proglucagon compared with PN + EN + GLP-2 for 18 days, and increased plasma GLP-2 concentrations compared with TPN alone. In summary, EN potentiate the intestinotrophic actions of GLP-2 by improving body weight gain allowing for a safe 80% reduction in PN with increased jejunal expression of GLP-2R, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 following distal bowel

  18. Enteral nutrients potentiate the intestinotrophic action of glucagon-like peptide-2 in association with increased insulin-like growth factor-I responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowen; Murali, Sangita G; Holst, Jens J; Ney, Denise M

    2008-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent, intestinotrophic hormone derived from posttranslational processing of proglucagon in the distal bowel. GLP-2 is thought to act through indirect mediators, such as IGF-I. We investigated whether intestinal expression of GLP-2 and IGF-I system components are increased with the mucosal growth induced by enteral nutrient (EN) and/or a low dose of GLP-2 in parenterally fed rats. Rats were randomized to four treatment groups using a 2 x 2 design and maintained with parenteral nutrition (PN) for 7 days: PN alone, EN, GLP-2, and EN+GLP-2; n = 7-9. The two main treatment effects are +/-GLP-2 (100 microg.kg body wt(-1).day(-1)) and +/-EN (43% of energy needs, days 4-6). Combination treatment with EN+GLP-2 induced synergistic intestinal growth in ileum, resulting in greater mucosal cellularity, sucrase segmental activity, and gain of body weight (ENxGLP-2, P < 0.04). In addition, EN+GLP-2 induced a significant 28% increase in plasma concentration of bioactive GLP-2, a significant 102% increase in ileal proglucagon mRNA with no change in ileal dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) specific activity, and significantly reduced plasma DPP-IV activity compared with GLP-2. This indicates that EN potentiates the intestinotrophic action of GLP-2. Proliferation of enterocytes due to GLP-2 infusion was associated with greater expression of ileal proglucagon, GLP-2 receptor, IGF-I, IGF binding protein-3 mRNAs, and greater IGF-I peptide concentration in ileum (P < 0.032). Ileal IGF-I mRNA was positively correlated with expression of proglucagon, GLP-2R, and IGFBP-5 mRNAs (R2 = 0.43-0.56, P < 0.0001). Our findings support the hypothesis that IGF-I is one of the downstream mediators of GLP-2 action in a physiological model of intestinal growth.

  19. COMPARATIVE GUT PHYSIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Comparative physiology of glucagon-like peptide-2: Implications and applications for production and health of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Connor, E E; Evock-Clover, C M; Walker, M P; Elsasser, T H; Kahl, S

    2015-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a 33-amino acid peptide derived from proteolytic cleavage of proglucagon by prohormone convertase 1/3 in enteroendocrine L cells. Studies conducted in humans, in rodent models, and in vitro indicate that GLP-2 is secreted in response to the presence of molecules in the intestinal lumen, including fatty acids, carbohydrates, amino acids, and bile acids, which are detected by luminal chemosensors. The physiological actions of GLP-2 are mediated by its G protein-coupled receptor expressed primarily in the intestinal tract on enteric neurons, enteroendocrine cells, and myofibroblasts. The biological activity of GLP-2 is further regulated by dipeptidyl peptidase IV, which rapidly cleaves the N-terminus of GLP-2 that is responsible for GLP-2 receptor activation. Within the gut, GLP-2 increases nutrient absorption, crypt cell proliferation, and mesenteric blood flow and decreases gut permeability and motility, epithelial cell apoptosis, and inflammation. Outside the gut, GLP-2 reduces bone resorption, can suppress appetite, and is cytoprotective in the lung. Thus, GLP-2 has been studied intensively as a therapeutic to improve intestinal function of humans during parenteral nutrition and following small bowel resection and, more recently, as a treatment for osteoporosis and obesity-related disorders and to reduce cellular damage associated with inflammation of the gut and lungs. Recent studies demonstrate that many biological actions and properties of GLP-2 in ruminants are similar to those in nonruminants, including the potential to reduce intestinal nitro-oxidative stress in calves caused by parasitic diseases such as coccidiosis. Because of its beneficial impacts on nutrient absorption, gut healing, and normal gut development, GLP-2 therapy offers significant opportunities to improve calf health and production efficiency. However, GLP-2 therapies require an extended time course to achieve desired physiological responses, as well as

  20. Mechanism of Action of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 to Increase IGF-I mRNA in Intestinal Subepithelial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Leen, Jason L. S.; Izzo, Angelo; Upadhyay, Chandani; Rowland, Katherine J.; Dubé, Philip E.; Gu, Steven; Heximer, Scott P.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Storm, Daniel R.; Lund, P. Kay

    2011-01-01

    IGF-I, a known secretory product of intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs), is essential for the intestinotropic effects of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). Furthermore, GLP-2 increases IGF-I mRNA transcript levels in vitro in heterogeneous fetal rat intestinal cultures, as well as in vivo in the rodent small intestine. To determine the mechanism underlying the stimulatory effect of GLP-2 on intestinal IGF-I mRNA, murine ISEMF cells were placed into primary culture. Immunocytochemistry showed that the ISEMF cells appropriately expressed α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin but not desmin. The cells also expressed GLP-2 receptor and IGF-I mRNA transcripts. Treatment of ISEMF cells with (Gly2)GLP-2 induced IGF-I mRNA transcripts by up to 5-fold of basal levels after treatment with 10−8 m GLP-2 for 2 h (P < 0.05) but did not increase transcript levels for other intestinal growth factors, such as ErbB family members. Immunoblot revealed a 1.6-fold increase in phospho (p)-Akt/total-(t)Akt with 10−8 m GLP-2 treatment (P < 0.05) but no changes in cAMP, cAMP-dependent β-galactosidase expression, pcAMP response element-binding protein/tcAMP response element-binding protein, pErk1/2/tErk1/2, or intracellular calcium. Furthermore, pretreatment of ISEMF cells with the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitors, LY294002 and wortmannin, abrogated the IGF-I mRNA response to GLP-2, as did overexpression of kinase-dead Akt. The role of PI3K/Akt in GLP-2-induced IGF-I mRNA levels in the murine jejunum was also confirmed in vivo. These findings implicate the PI3K/Akt pathway in the stimulatory effects of GLP-2 to enhance intestinal IGF-I mRNA transcript levels and provide further evidence in support of a role for IGF-I produced by the ISEMF cells in the intestinotropic effects of GLP-2. PMID:21159855

  1. Enteral nutrients potentiate glucagon-like peptide-2 action and reduce dependence on parenteral nutrition in a rat model of human intestinal failure

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Adam S.; Murali, Sangita G.; Hitt, Stacy; Solverson, Patrick M.; Holst, Jens J.

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent, proglucagon-derived gut hormone that shows promise for the treatment of short bowel syndrome (SBS). Our objective was to investigate how combination GLP-2 + enteral nutrients (EN) affects intestinal adaption in a rat model that mimics severe human SBS and requires parenteral nutrition (PN). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups and maintained with PN for 18 days: total parenteral nutrition (TPN) alone, TPN + GLP-2 (100 μg·kg−1·day−1), PN + EN + GLP-2(7 days), PN + EN + GLP-2(18 days), and a nonsurgical oral reference group. Animals underwent massive distal bowel resection followed by jejunocolic anastomosis and placement of jugular catheters. Starting on postoperative day 4, rats in the EN groups were allowed ad libitum access to EN. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 had their rate of PN reduced by 0.25 ml/day starting on postoperative day 6. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 demonstrated significantly greater body weight gain with similar energy intake and a safe 80% reduction in PN compared with TPN ± GLP-2. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 for 7 or 18 days showed similar body weight gain, residual jejunal length, and digestive capacity. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 showed increased jejunal GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) expression. Treatment with TPN + GLP-2 demonstrated increased jejunal expression of epidermal growth factor. Cessation of GLP-2 after 7 days with continued EN sustained the majority of intestinal adaption and significantly increased expression of colonic proglucagon compared with PN + EN + GLP-2 for 18 days, and increased plasma GLP-2 concentrations compared with TPN alone. In summary, EN potentiate the intestinotrophic actions of GLP-2 by improving body weight gain allowing for a safe 80% reduction in PN with increased jejunal expression of GLP-2R, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 following distal bowel

  2. Protective effects of GLP-1 analogues exendin-4 and GLP-1(9-36) amide against ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Sonne, David P; Engstrøm, Thomas; Treiman, Marek

    2008-02-07

    Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin peptide secreted from intestinal L-cells, whose potent plasma glucose-lowering action has prompted intense efforts to develop GLP-1 receptor-targeting drugs for treatment of diabetic hyperglycemia. More recently, GLP-1 and its analogues have been shown to exert cardiovascular effects in a number of experimental models. Here we tested exendin-4 (Exe-4), a peptide agonist at GLP-1 receptors, and GLP-1(9-36) amide, the primary endogenous metabolite of GLP-1 (both in the concentration range 0.03-3.0 nM), for their protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in an isolated rat heart preparation. When administered, the agents were only present for the first 15 min of a 120 min reperfusion period (postconditioning protocol). Exe-4, but not GLP-1(9-36) amide, showed a strong infarct-limiting action (from 33.2% +/-2.7% to 14.5% +/-2.2% of the ischemic area, p<0.05). This infarct size-limiting effect of Exe-4 was abolished by exendin(9-39) (Exe(9-39)), a GLP-1 receptor antagonist. In contrast, both Exe-4 and GLP-1(9-36) amide were able to augment left ventricular performance (left ventricular developed pressure and rate-pressure product) during the last 60 min of reperfusion. These effects were only partially antagonized by Exe(9-39). We suggest that Exe-4, in addition to being currently exploited in treatment of diabetes, may present a suitable candidate for postconditioning trials in clinical settings of IRI. The divergent agonist effects of Exe-4 and GLP-1(9-36), along with correspondingly divergent antagonistic efficacy of Exe(9-39), seem consistent with the presence of more than one type of GLP-1 receptor in this system.

  3. Characterization of glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor (GLP2R) gene in chickens: functional analysis, tissue distribution, and developmental expression profile of GLP2R in embryonic intestine.

    PubMed

    Mo, C; Zhong, Y; Wang, Y; Yan, Z; Li, J

    2014-07-01

    This study characterized the glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor (GLP2R) gene of chickens because relatively little is known about the underlying mechanism of GLP2 actions in nonmammalian species. With the use of reverse transcription PCR, we first cloned the chicken GLP2R (cGLP2R) from adult intestine, which was predicted to encode a 529-amino acid receptor precursor. With the use of a pGL3-CRE luciferase reporter system, we demonstrated that cGLP2R expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells could be potently activated by cGLP2 (half maximal effective concentration, 1.06 nM) but not by its structurally related peptides, including the newly identified glucagon-like peptide, indicating that cGLP2R is a functional receptor specific to cGLP2. Reverse transcription PCR assay revealed that cGLP2R mRNA was widely expressed in adult chicken tissues, including pancreas and various parts of the gastrointestinal tract. With the use of quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR assays, we further investigated the mRNA expression of cGLP2R and its potential downstream mediators, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands (heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, epiregulin, and amphiregulin), in the distal duodenum of developing embryos. The mRNA expression levels of GLP2R and EGFR ligands (heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor and amphiregulin) were shown to increase (P < 0.05 or 0.01) during the late embryonic stages (E16 and E20), implying a potential coordinated action of GLP2 and EGFR ligands on embryonic intestine development. Taken together, our findings not only establish a molecular basis to explore the physiological roles of GLP2 in birds, but they also provide comparative insights into the roles of GLP2R and its ligand in vertebrates, such as its roles in embryonic intestine development.

  4. Basal insulin combined incretin mimetic therapy with glucagon-like protein 1 receptor agonists as an upcoming option in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a practical guide to decision making

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    The combination of basal insulin and glucagon-like protein 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) is a new intriguing therapeutic option for patients with type 2 diabetes. In our daily practice we abbreviate this therapeutic concept with the term BIT (basal insulin combined incretin mimetic therapy) in a certain analogy to BOT (basal insulin supported oral therapy). In most cases BIT is indeed an extension of BOT, if fasting, prandial or postprandial blood glucose values have not reached the target range. In our paper we discuss special features of combinations of short- or prandial-acting and long- or continuous-acting GLP-1 RAs like exenatide, lixisenatide and liraglutide with basal insulin in relation to different glycemic targets. Overall it seems appropriate to use a short-acting GLP-1 RA if, after the near normalization of fasting blood glucose with BOT, the prandial or postprandial values are elevated. A long-acting GLP-1 RA might well be given, if fasting blood glucose values are the problem. Based on pathophysiological findings, recent clinical studies and our experience with BIT and BOT as well as BOTplus we developed chart-supported algorithms for decision making, including features and conditions of patients. The development of these practical tools was guided by the need for a more individualized antidiabetic therapy and the availability of the new BIT principle. PMID:25419451

  5. Analogue Gravity.

    PubMed

    Barceló, Carlos; Liberati, Stefano; Visser, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Analogue gravity is a research programme which investigates analogues of general relativistic gravitational fields within other physical systems, typically but not exclusively condensed matter systems, with the aim of gaining new insights into their corresponding problems. Analogue models of (and for) gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. In this review article we will discuss the history, aims, results, and future prospects for the various analogue models. We start the discussion by presenting a particularly simple example of an analogue model, before exploring the rich history and complex tapestry of models discussed in the literature. The last decade in particular has seen a remarkable and sustained development of analogue gravity ideas, leading to some hundreds of published articles, a workshop, two books, and this review article. Future prospects for the analogue gravity programme also look promising, both on the experimental front (where technology is rapidly advancing) and on the theoretical front (where variants of analogue models can be used as a springboard for radical attacks on the problem of quantum gravity).

  6. The Effects of Glucagon-like Peptide-2 on the Tight Junction and Barrier Function in IPEC-J2 Cells through Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Protein Kinase B–Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Changsong; Jia, Gang; Deng, Qiuhong; Zhao, Hua; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Guangmang; Wang, Kangning

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is important for intestinal barrier function and regulation of tight junction (TJ) proteins, but the intracellular mechanisms of action remain undefined. The purpose of this research was to determine the protective effect of GLP-2 mediated TJ and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stressed IPEC-J2 cells and to test the hypothesis that GLP-2 regulate TJ and TER through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in IPEC-J2 cells. Wortmannin and LY294002 are specific inhibitors of PI3K. The results showed that 100 μg/mL LPS stress decreased TER and TJ proteins occludin, claudin-1 and zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) mRNA, proteins expressions (p<0.01) respectively. GLP-2 (100 nmol/L) promote TER and TJ proteins occludin, claudin-1, and zo-1 mRNA, proteins expressions in LPS stressed and normal IPEC-J2 cells (p<0.01) respectively. In normal cells, both wortmannin and LY294002, PI3K inhibitors, prevented the mRNA and protein expressions of Akt and mTOR increase induced by GLP-2 (p<0.01) following with the significant decreasing of occludin, claudin-1, ZO-1 mRNA and proteins expressions and TER (p<0.01). In conclusion, these results indicated that GLP-2 can promote TJ’s expression and TER in LPS stressed and normal IPEC-J2 cells and GLP-2 could regulate TJ and TER through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. PMID:26954146

  7. Glucagon-related peptide 1 (GLP-1): hormone and neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Philip J; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-06-15

    The interest in glucagon-like petide-1 (GLP-1) and other pre-proglucagon derived peptides has risen almost exponentially since seminal papers in the early 1990s proposed to use GLP-1 agonists as therapeutic agents for treatment of type 2 diabetes. A wealth of interesting studies covering both normal and pathophysiological role of GLP-1 have been published over the last two decades and our understanding of GLP-1 action has widened considerably. In the present review, we have tried to cover our current understanding of GLP-1 actions both as a peripheral hormone and as a central neurotransmitter. From an initial focus on glycaemic control, GLP-1 research has been diverted to study its role in energy homeostasis, neurodegeneration, cognitive functions, anxiety and many more functions. With the upcoming introduction of GLP-1 agonists on the pharmaceutical venue, we have witnessed an outstanding example of how initial ideas from basic science laboratories have paved their way to become a novel therapeutic strategy to fight diabetes.

  8. The role of glucagon-like peptide-2 on apoptosis, cell proliferation, and oxidant-antioxidant system at a mouse model of intestinal injury induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha/actinomycin D.

    PubMed

    Arda-Pirincci, Pelin; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2011-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a multifunctional cytokine, which has the ability to produce cytotoxicity via induction of cell death and cell cycle arrest. Blocking the synthesis of protective proteins through a transcriptional inhibitor such as actinomycin D (Act D) sensitizes many cell types to TNF-α toxicity. Teduglutide, h[Gly(2)]GLP-2, is a protease-resistant synthetic analog of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) which is an intestinotrophic peptide. In this study, we evaluated this potential of GLP-2 on apoptosis, cell proliferation, and oxidant-antioxidant system on a mouse model of intestinal injury induced by TNF-α/Act D. The intestinal injury was induced by intraperitoneal administration of 15 μg/kg TNF-α and 800 μg/kg Act D per mouse. Animals were injected subcutaneously 200 μg/kg h[Gly(2)]GLP-2 every 12 h for 10 consecutive days prior to the administration of TNF-α and Act D. The model of intestinal injury induced by TNF-α/Act D, which is the new animal model for the intestinal disorders, was characterized by the degeneration of intestinal mucosa, an increase in apoptotic index, expression of active caspase-3, lipid peroxidation and glutathione (GSH) levels, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities; a decrease in cell proliferation and catalase (CAT) activity. h[Gly(2)]GLP-2 pretreatment prevented the TNF-α/Act D-induced oxidative injury by a significant reduction in the intestinal injury, apoptotic index, expression of active caspase-3, lipid peroxidation and GSH levels, GPx and SOD activities; a markedly increase in cell proliferation, and CAT activity. These results demonstrate that GLP-2 has a protective, antiapoptotic, proliferative, and antioxidant effects against to TNF-α/Act D-induced intestinal injury. It is suggested that GLP-2 may potentially be useful as a therapeutic agent in TNF-α-mediated intestinal disorders.

  9. Survey of Analogue Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    Analogue spacetimes (and more boldly, analogue models both of and for gravity), have attracted significant and increasing attention over the last decade and a half. Perhaps the most straightforward physical example, which serves as a template for most of the others, is Bill Unruh's model for a dumb hole,(mute black hole, acoustic black hole), wherein sound is dragged along by a moving fluid—and can even be trapped behind an acoustic horizon. This and related analogue models for curved spacetimes are useful in many ways: analogue spacetimes provide general relativists with extremely concrete physical models to help focus their thinking, and conversely the techniques of curved spacetime can sometimes help improve our understanding of condensed matter and/or optical systems by providing an unexpected and countervailing viewpoint. In this chapter, I shall provide a few simple examples of analogue spacetimes as general background for the rest of the contributions.

  10. Aspartame and Its Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. A.; Komarova, T. V.; Davidovich, Yurii A.; Rogozhin, S. V.

    1981-04-01

    The results of studies on the biochemistry of the sweet taste are briefly reviewed. The methods of synthesis of "aspartame" — a sweet dipeptide — are considered, its structural analogues are described, and quantitative estimates are made of the degree of sweetness relative to sucrose. Attention is concentrated mainly on problems of the relation between the structure of the substance and its taste in the series of aspartyl derivatives. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  11. Quantum analogue computing.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  12. Radiolabelled GLP-1 analogues for in vivo targeting of insulinomas.

    PubMed

    Brom, Maarten; Joosten, Lieke; Oyen, Wim J G; Gotthardt, Martin; Boerman, Otto C

    2012-01-01

    Internalizing agonists are usually selected for peptide receptor targeting. There is increasing evidence that non-internalizing receptor antagonists can be used for this purpose. We investigated whether the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist exendin(9-39) can be used for in vivo targeting of GLP-1R expressing tumours and compared the in vitro and in vivo characteristics with the GLP-1R agonists exendin-3 and exendin-4. The binding and internalization kinetics of labelled [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-3, [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-4 and [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin(9-39) were determined in vitro using INS-1 cells. The in vivo targeting properties of [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-3, [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-4 and [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin(9-39) were examined in BALB/c nude mice with subcutaneous INS-1 tumours. (nat) In-labelled [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-3, [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-4 and [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin(9-39) exhibited similar IC(50) values (13.5, 14.4 and 13.4 n m, respectively) and bound to 26 × 10(3) , 41 × 10(3) and 37 × 10(3) receptors per cell, respectively. [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-3 and [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-4 showed rapid in vitro binding and internalization kinetics, whereas [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin(9-39) showed lower binding and minimal internalization in vitro. In mice, high specific uptake of [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-3 [25.0 ± 6.0% injected dose (ID) g(-1) ] in the tumour was observed at 0.5 h post-injection (p.i.) with similar uptake up to 4 h p.i. [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-4 showed higher tumour uptake at 1 and 4 h p.i. (40.8 ± 7.0 and 41.9 ± 7.2% ID g(-1), respectively). Remarkably, [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin(9-39) showed only low specific uptake in the tumour at 0.5 h p.i. (3.2 ± 0.7% ID g(-1)), rapidly decreasing over time. In conclusion, the GLP-1R agonists [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-3 and [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-4 labelled with (111

  13. Analogue-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analogue Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses circuits for three-bit and four-bit analogue digital converters and digital analogue converters. These circuits feature slow operating speeds that enable the circuitry to be used to demonstrate the mode of operation using oscilloscopes and signal generators. (DDR)

  14. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd M; Parekh, Vishwas

    2016-09-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that shares the same histologic appearance and ETV6 gene (12p13) rearrangement as secretory carcinoma of the breast. Prior to its recognition, MASC cases were commonly labeled acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. Despite distinctive histologic features, MASC may be difficult to distinguish from other salivary gland tumors, in particular zymogen-poor acinic cell carcinoma and low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Although characteristic morphologic and immunohistochemical features form the basis of a diagnosis of MASC, the presence of an ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is confirmatory. Given its recent recognition the true prognostic import of MASC is not yet clearly defined.

  15. NASA/ESMD Analogue Mission Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation exploring Earth and its analogues is shown. The topics include: 1) ESMD Goals for the Use of Earth Analogues; 2) Stakeholders Summary; 3) Issues with Current Analogue Situation; 4) Current state of Analogues; 5) External Implementation Plan (Second Step); 6) Recent Progress in Utilizing Analogues; 7) Website Layout Example-Home Page; 8) Website Layout Example-Analogue Site; 9) Website Layout Example-Analogue Mission; 10) Objectives of ARDIG Analog Initiatives; 11) Future Plans; 12) Example: Cold-Trap Sample Return; 13) Example: Site Characterization Matrix; 14) Integrated Analogue Studies-Prerequisites for Human Exploration; and 15) Rating Scale Definitions.

  16. New drug treatments show neuroprotective effects in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Insulin signaling in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease is impaired. Preclinical studies of growth factors showed impressive neuroprotective effects. In animal models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, insulin, glia-derived neurotrophic factor, or analogues of the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 prevented neurodegenerative processes and improved neuronal and synaptic functionality in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. On the basis of these promising findings, several clinical trials are ongoing with the first encouraging clinical results published. This gives hope for developing effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease that are currently unavailable.

  17. Human neutrophil peptide-1 decreases during ageing in selected Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; de Haro-Acosta, Jeny; Torres-Juarez, Flor; Frausto-Lujan, Isabel; Marin-Luevano, Paulina; González-Amaro, Roberto; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptide innate immunity plays a central role in the susceptibility to infectious diseases, as has been described extensively in different settings. However, the role that these molecules play in the immunity mediated by polymorphonuclear phagocytes as part of the innate immunity of ageing individuals has not been described. In the present study, we addressed the question whether antimicrobial activity in polymorphonuclear cells from elderly individuals was altered in comparison with young adults. We compared phagocytosis index, bacterial killing efficiency, myeloperoxidase activity and cathelicidin expression. Results showed that there were no statistical differences among groups. However, human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) was decreased in the elderly individuals group. Results suggest that the decreased HNP-1 production in the polymorphonuclear phagocytes form elderly individuals might have an important participation in the increased susceptibility to infectious diseases.

  18. ZmPep1, an ortholog of Arabidopsis elicitor Peptide 1, regulates maize innate immunity and enhances disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ZmPep1 is a bioactive peptide encoded by a previously uncharacterized maize gene termed ZmPROPEP1. The gene was identified by sequence similarity as an ortholog of the Arabidopsis AtPROPEP1 gene, which encodes the precursor protein of elicitor peptide 1 (AtPep1). Together with its receptors, AtPEPR1...

  19. Positive reinforcing effects of RFamide-related peptide-1 in the rat central nucleus of amygdala.

    PubMed

    Lénárd, László; Kovács, Anita; Ollmann, Tamás; Péczely, László; Zagoracz, Olga; Gálosi, Rita; László, Kristóf

    2014-12-15

    The amygdaloid body (AMY) plays an important role in memory, learning and reward-related processes. RFamide-related peptide-1 (RFRP-1) immunoreactive fibers and NPFF1 receptors were identified in the AMY, and previously we verified that neuropeptide RFRP-1 infused into the central nucleus of AMY (CeA) caused food intake decrease. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible rewarding or aversive effects of RFRP-1 in the CeA. In conditioned place preference, test male Wistar rats were microinjected bilaterally with 50 or 100ng RFRP-1 in volume of 0.4μl. In other groups of animals, 20ng NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 was applied or the antagonist was used 15min before 50ng RFRP-1 treatment. Fifty nanograms of RFRP-1 had positive reinforcing properties, while 100ng RFRP-1 had no effect. Prior treatment with NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 could block the rewarding effects of RFRP-1, while the antagonist applied alone did not influence the behavior of rats in place preference paradigm. Our results show that RFRP-1 and NPFF-1 receptors play important roles in the amygdaloid rewarding-reinforcing mechanisms.

  20. Ingested (oral) SIRS peptide 1-21 suppresses type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Brod, Staley A; Hood, Zachary

    2008-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic disorder that results from autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cell. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a model of the human autoimmune disease T1D. Soluble immune response suppressor (SIRS) is a nonspecific protein suppressor of immune response produced by immunomodulatory T cells stimulated by type I interferon (IFN). SIRS inhibits antibody responses in vivo, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever, and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. Previous investigators have isolated the N-terminal sequence of SIRS protein consisting of 21 amino acids. Mice ingesting 1 microg SIRS peptide 1-21 showed significant delayed onset of T1D and a decreased frequency of T1D compared with mock-fed and 10-microg-fed mice and a significant decrease in islet inflammation. There were significant decreases in islet lymphocyte chemokine production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage inflammatory protein-1 gamma (MIP-1 gamma), regulated upon activation, normal T cell-expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTES), and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the SIRS-fed mice, factors important in migration of inflammatory cell into the islets. Ingested (oral) SIRS peptide inhibits clinical T1D by decreasing target organ cellular migration of islet destructive populations by suppression of islet lymphocyte chemokine secretion.

  1. [Potential of pharmacological modulation of level and activity incretins on diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Spasov, A A; Chepljaeva, N I

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes data on the main approaches used for the search of biologically active compounds modulating the level and physiological activity of incretins. Currently two groups of drugs are used in clinical practice: they either replenish the deficit of incretins (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists) or inhibit the degradation processes (dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors). In addition, new groups of substances are actively searched. These include non-peptide agonists of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors, agonists/antagonists of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, the hybrid polypeptides based on glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucagon.

  2. Revisiting and re-engineering the classical zinc finger peptide: consensus peptide-1 (CP-1).

    PubMed

    Besold, Angelique N; Widger, Leland R; Namuswe, Frances; Michalek, Jamie L; Michel, Sarah L J; Goldberg, David P

    2016-04-01

    Zinc plays key structural and catalytic roles in biology. Structural zinc sites are often referred to as zinc finger (ZF) sites, and the classical ZF contains a Cys2His2 motif that is involved in coordinating Zn(II). An optimized Cys2His2 ZF, named consensus peptide 1 (CP-1), was identified more than 20 years ago using a limited set of sequenced proteins. We have reexamined the CP-1 sequence, using our current, much larger database of sequenced proteins that have been identified from high-throughput sequencing methods, and found the sequence to be largely unchanged. The CCHH ligand set of CP-1 was then altered to a CAHH motif to impart hydrolytic activity. This ligand set mimics the His2Cys ligand set of peptide deformylase (PDF), a hydrolytically active M(II)-centered (M = Zn or Fe) protein. The resultant peptide [CP-1(CAHH)] was evaluated for its ability to coordinate Zn(II) and Co(II) ions, adopt secondary structure, and promote hydrolysis. CP-1(CAHH) was found to coordinate Co(II) and Zn(II) and a pentacoordinate geometry for Co(II)-CP-1(CAHH) was implicated from UV-vis data. This suggests a His2Cys(H2O)2 environment at the metal center. The Zn(II)-bound CP-1(CAHH) was shown to adopt partial secondary structure by 1-D (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Both Zn(II)-CP-1(CAHH) and Co(II)-CP-1(CAHH) show good hydrolytic activity toward the test substrate 4-nitrophenyl acetate, exhibiting faster rates than most active synthetic Zn(II) complexes.

  3. SV-IV Peptide1–16 reduces coagulant power in normal Factor V and Factor V Leiden

    PubMed Central

    Di Micco, Biagio; Lepretti, Marilena; Rota, Lidia; Quaglia, Ilaria; Ferrazzi, Paola; Di Micco, Gianluca; Di Micco, Pierpaolo

    2007-01-01

    Native Factor V is an anticoagulant, but when activated by thrombin, Factor X or platelet proteases, it becomes a procoagulant. Due to these double properties, Factor V plays a crucial role in the regulation of coagulation/anticoagulation balance. Factor V Leiden (FVL) disorder may lead to thrombophilia. Whether a reduction in the activation of Factor V or Factor V Leiden may correct the disposition to thrombophilia is unknown. Therefore we tested SV-IV Peptide 1–16 (i.e. a peptide derived by seminal protein vescicle number IV, SV-IV) to assess its capacity to inhibit the procoagulant activity of normal clotting factor V or Factor V Leiden (FVL). We found that SV-IV protein has potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties and also exerts procoagulant activity. In the present work we show that the SV-IV Peptide 1–16, incubated with plasma containing normal Factor V or FVL plasma for 5 minutes reduces the procoagulant capacity of both substances. This is an anticoagulant effect whereas SV-IV protein is a procoagulant. This activity is effective both in terms of the coagulation tests, where coagulation times are increased, and in terms of biochemical tests conducted with purified molecules, where Factor X activation is reduced. Peptide 1–16 was, in the pure molecule system, first incubated for 5 minutes with purified Factor V then it was added to the mix of phosphatidylserine, Ca2+, Factor X and its chromogenic molecule Chromozym X. We observed a more than 50% reduction in lysis of chromogenic molecule Chromozym X by Factor Xa, compared to the sample without Peptide 1–16. Such reduction in Chromozym X lysis, is explained with the reduced activation of Factor X by partial inactivation of Factor V by Peptide 1–16. Thus our study demonstrates that Peptide 1–16 reduces the coagulation capacity of Factor V and Factor V Leiden in vitro, and, in turn, causes factor X reduced activation. PMID:18154667

  4. The incretin hormone glucagon‐like peptide 1 increases mitral cell excitability by decreasing conductance of a voltage‐dependent potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn‐Smith, Ida J.; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Trapp, Stefan; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2016-01-01

    Key points The gut hormone called glucagon‐like peptide 1 (GLP‐1) is a strong moderator of energy homeostasis and communication between the peripheral organs and the brain.GLP‐1 signalling occurs in the brain; using a newly developed genetic reporter line of mice, we have discovered GLP‐synthesizing cells in the olfactory bulb.GLP‐1 increases the firing frequency of neurons (mitral cells) that encode olfactory information by decreasing activity of voltage‐dependent K channels (Kv1.3).Modifying GLP‐1 levels, either therapeutically or following the ingestion of food, could alter the excitability of neurons in the olfactory bulb in a nutrition or energy state‐dependent manner to influence olfactory detection or metabolic sensing.The results of the present study uncover a new function for an olfactory bulb neuron (deep short axon cells, Cajal cells) that could be capable of modifying mitral cell activity through the release of GLP‐1. This might be of relevance for the action of GLP‐1 mimetics now widely used in the treatment of diabetes. Abstract The olfactory system is intricately linked with the endocrine system where it may serve as a detector of the internal metabolic state or energy homeostasis in addition to its classical function as a sensor of external olfactory information. The recent development of transgenic mGLU‐yellow fluorescent protein mice that express a genetic reporter under the control of the preproglucagon reporter suggested the presence of the gut hormone, glucagon‐like peptide (GLP‐1), in deep short axon cells (Cajal cells) of the olfactory bulb and its neuromodulatory effect on mitral cell (MC) first‐order neurons. A MC target for the peptide was determined using GLP‐1 receptor binding assays, immunocytochemistry for the receptor and injection of fluorescence‐labelled GLP‐1 analogue exendin‐4. Using patch clamp recording of olfactory bulb slices in the whole‐cell configuration, we report that GLP‐1 and its

  5. Neuronal Analogues of Conditioning Paradigms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-24

    Although the mechanisms of interneuronal communication have been well established, the changes underlying most forms of learning have thus far eluded...stimulating electrodes on one of the connectives was adjusted so as to produce a small excitatory postsynaptic potential ( EPSP ) in the impaled cell...two stimuli would constitute a neuronal analogue of conditioning by producing an increased EPSP in response to the test stimulus alone. If so, then

  6. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  7. Ecstasy analogues found in cacti.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jan G; El-Seedi, Hesham R; Stephanson, Nikolai; Beck, Olof; Shulgin, Alexander T

    2008-06-01

    Human interest in psychoactive phenethylamines is known from the use of mescaline-containing cacti and designer drugs such as Ecstasy. From the alkaloid composition of cacti we hypothesized that substances resembling Ecstasy might occur naturally. In this article we show that lophophine, homopiperonylamine and lobivine are new minor constituents of two cactus species, Lophophora williamsii (peyote) and Trichocereus pachanoi (San Pedro). This is the first report of putatively psychoactive phenethylamines besides mescaline in these cacti. A search for further biosynthetic analogues may provide new insights into the structure-activity relationships of mescaline. An intriguing question is whether the new natural compounds can be called "designer drugs."

  8. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOEpatents

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  9. Template polymerization of nucleotide analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work on the template-directed reactions of the natural D-nucleotides has made it clear that l-nucleotides and nucleotide-like derivatives of other sugars would strongly inhibit the formation of long oligonucleotides. Consequently, attention is focusing on molecules simpler than nucleotides that might have acted as monomers of an information transfer system. We have begun a general exploration of the template directed reactions of diverse peptide analogues. I will present work by Dr. Taifeng Wu on oxidative oligomerization of phosphorothioates and of Dr. Mary Tohidi on the cyclic polymerization of nucleoside and related cyclic pyrophosphates.

  10. Choline Analogues in Malaria Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peyrottes, Suzanne; Caldarelli, Sergio; Wein, Sharon; Périgaud, Christian; Pellet, Alain; Vial, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Emerging resistance against well-established anti-malaria drugs warrants the introduction of new therapeutic agents with original mechanisms of action. Inhibition of membrane-based phospholipid biosynthesis, which is crucial for the parasite, has thus been proposed as a novel and promising therapeutic strategy. This review compiles literature concerning the design and study of choline analogues and related cation derivatives as potential anti-malarials. It covers advances achieved over the last two decades and describes: the concept validation, the design and selection of a clinical candidate (Albitiazolium), back-up derivatives while also providing insight into the development of prodrug approaches. PMID:22607139

  11. Electrostatic evaluation of isosteric analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayle, Roger; Nicholls, Anthony

    2006-04-01

    A method is presented for enumerating a large number of isosteric analogues of a ligand from a known protein-ligand complex structure and then rapidly calculating an estimate of their binding energies. This approach takes full advantage of the observed crystal structure, by reusing the atomic co-ordinates determined experimentally for one ligand, to approximate those of similar compounds that have approximately the same shape. By assuming that compounds with similar shapes adopt similar binding poses, and that entropic and protein flexibility effects are approximately constant across such an isosteric series ("the frozen ligand approximation"), it is possible to order their binding affinities relatively accurately. Additionally, the constraint that the atomic coordinates are invariant allows for a dramatic simplification in the Poisson-Boltzmann method used to calculation the electrostatic component of the binding energy. This algorithmic improvement allows for the calculation of tens of thousands of binding energies per second for drug-like molecules, enabling this technique to be used in screening large virtual libraries of isosteric analogues. Most significantly, this procedure is shown to be able to reproduce SAR effects of subtle medicinal chemistry substitutions. Finally, this paper reports the results of the proposed methodology on␣seven model systems; dihydrofolate reductase, Lck␣kinase, ribosome inactivating protein, l-arabinose binding protein, neuraminidase, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and COX-2.

  12. The Valles natural analogue project

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C.; McConnell, V.

    1994-12-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  13. Heteroatom-Containing Porphyrin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tamal; Shetti, Vijayendra S; Sharma, Ritambhara; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli

    2017-02-22

    The heteroatom-containing porphyrin analogues or core-modified porphyrins that resulted from the replacement of one or two pyrrole rings with other five-membered heterocycles such as furan, thiophene, selenophene, tellurophene, indene, phosphole, and silole are highly promising macrocycles and exhibit quite different physicochemical properties compared to regular azaporphyrins. The properties of heteroporphyrins depend on the nature and number of different heterocycle(s) present in place of pyrrole ring(s). The heteroporphyrins provide unique and unprecedented coordination environments for metals. Unlike regular porphyrins, the monoheteroporphyrins are known to stabilize metals in unusual oxidation states such as Cu and Ni in +1 oxidation states. The diheteroporphyrins, which are neutral macrocycles without ionizable protons, also showed interesting coordination chemistry. Thus, significant progress has been made in last few decades on core-modified porphyrins in terms of their synthesis, their use in building multiporphyrin arrays for light-harvesting applications, their use as ligands to form interesting metal complexes, and also their use for several other studies. The synthetic methods available in the literature allow one to prepare mono- and diheteroporphyrins and their functionalized derivatives, which were used extensively to prepare several covalent and noncovalent heteroporphyrin-based multiporphyrin arrays. The methods are also developed to synthesize different hetero analogues of porphyrin derivatives such as heterocorroles, heterochlorins, heterocarbaporphyrinoids, heteroatom-substituted confused porphyrins, and so on. This Review summarizes the key developments that have occurred in heteroporphyrin chemistry over the last four decades.

  14. Osteoinductive Effects of Free and Immobilized Bone Forming Peptide-1 on Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xianghui; Ge, Yanjun; Chen, Tong; Liu, Yunsong; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Most synthetic polymeric materials currently used for bone tissue engineering lack specific signals through which cells can identify and interact with the surface, resulting in incompatibility and compromised osteogenic activity. Soluble inductive factors also have issues including a short half-live in vivo. Bone forming peptide-1 is a truncated peptide from the immature form of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) that displays higher osteogenic activity than full-length, mature BMP-7. In this study, we used a mussel-inspired immobilization strategy mediated by polymerization of dopamine to introduce recently discovered stimulators of bone forming peptide-1 (BFP-1) onto the surface of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) substrate to form a biomaterial that overcomes these challenges. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs), being abundant and easy accessible, were used to test the osteogenic activity of BFP-1 and the novel biomaterial. Under osteoinductive conditions, cells treated with both BFP-1 alone and BFP-1-coated biomaterials displayed elevated expression of the osteogenic markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), and RUNX2. Furthermore, hASCs associated with poly-dopamine-assisted BFP-1-immobilized PLGA (pDA-BFP-1-PLGA) scaffolds promoted in vivo bone formation in nude mice. Our novel materials may hold great promise for future bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26930062

  15. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  16. Macrolactam analogues of macrolide natural products.

    PubMed

    Hügel, Helmut M; Smith, Andrew T; Rizzacasa, Mark A

    2016-12-07

    The chemical modification of macrolide natural products into aza- or lactam analogues is a strategy employed to improve their metabolic stability and biological activity. The methods for the synthesis of several lactam analogues of macrolide natural products are highlighted and aspects of their biological properties presented.

  17. The future of somatostatin analogue therapy.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P M; James, R A

    1999-10-01

    Since its discovery almost 30 years ago, the mode of action and therapeutic applications of somatostatin have been defined. In particular the cloning and characterization of somatostatin receptor subtypes has facilitated the development of high affinity analogues. In the context of pituitary disease, long-acting somatostatin analogues (octreotide, lanreotide) have been used to treat a variety of pituitary tumours but are most efficacious for the treatment of GH and TSH-secreting adenomas. In patients with acromegaly, depot preparations of these analogues are administered intramuscularly every 10-28 days and provide consistent suppression of GH levels to < 5 mU/l in approximately 50-65% of all cases. Even more specific somatostatin receptor analogues are under development. Finally, radiolabelled somatostatin analogue scintigraphy and, in larger doses, therapy, are now established tools in the evaluation and treatment of neuroendocrine tumours.

  18. Continuous analogues of matrix factorizations

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Alex; Trefethen, Lloyd N.

    2015-01-01

    Analogues of singular value decomposition (SVD), QR, LU and Cholesky factorizations are presented for problems in which the usual discrete matrix is replaced by a ‘quasimatrix’, continuous in one dimension, or a ‘cmatrix’, continuous in both dimensions. Two challenges arise: the generalization of the notions of triangular structure and row and column pivoting to continuous variables (required in all cases except the SVD, and far from obvious), and the convergence of the infinite series that define the cmatrix factorizations. Our generalizations of triangularity and pivoting are based on a new notion of a ‘triangular quasimatrix’. Concerning convergence of the series, we prove theorems asserting convergence provided the functions involved are sufficiently smooth. PMID:25568618

  19. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-03-03

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers.

  20. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer

    PubMed Central

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  1. [The extra-glycemic effects of liraglutide: focus on cardiometabolic markers].

    PubMed

    Giglio, Rosaria Vincenza; Patti, Angelo Maria; Nikolic, Dragana; Castellino, Giuseppa; Noto, Marcello; Parrino, Alessandro; Montalto, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Manfredi

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of innovative therapeutic approaches for type 2 diabetes mellitus is to customize the antidiabetic treatment to each patient's need, in order to intensify glucose-lowering effects without hypoglycemia, reduce adverse events, and prevent cardiovascular events. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues are effective drugs in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and they also seem to have beneficial effects on several risk factors for cardiovascular disease, leading to cardiovascular risk reduction independent of hypoglycemic effects. Among these new drugs, liraglutide, a GLP-1 analogue with a homology of 97% to native GLP-1, exerts an effect on body weight, lipid parameters, blood pressure and endothelial function, inflammatory markers, markers of oxidative stress, and subclinical atherosclerosis. The results of numerous studies and meta-analyses on liraglutide suggest that this drug improves quality of life through the reduction in hypoglycemic episodes, glucose effectiveness, and the improvement of cardiovascular risk factors.

  2. Plant Volatile Analogues Strengthen Attractiveness to Insect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  3. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-09-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mltogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  4. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  5. Space analogue studies in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lugg, D; Shepanek, M

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  6. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  7. Large-scale production of soluble recombinant amyloid-β peptide 1-42 using cold-inducible expression system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Jeong Chan; Lee, Jeong Mi; Jeong, Min Seop; Oh, Choongseob; Ahn, Sung-Min; Yoo, Yung Joon; Jang, Ho Hee

    2012-11-01

    Amyloid-β peptide 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)), the predominant form in senile plaques, plays important roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Because Aβ(1-42) has aggregation-prone nature, it has been difficult to produce in a soluble state in bacterial expression systems. In this study, we modified our expression system to increase the soluble fraction of Aβ(1-42) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. The expression level and solubility of recombinant Aβ(1-42) induced at the low temperature (16°C) is highly increased compared to that induced at 37°C. To optimize expression temperature, the coding region of Aβ(1-42) was constructed in a pCold vector, pCold-TF, which has a hexahistidine-tagged trigger factor (TF). Recombinant Aβ(1-42) was expressed primarily as a soluble protein using pCold vector system and purified with a nickel-chelating resin. When the toxic effect of recombinant Aβ(1-42) examined on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, the purified Aβ(1-42) induced cell toxicity on SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, the system developed in this study will provide a useful method for the production of aggregation prone-peptide such as Aβ(1-42).

  8. The glucagon‐like peptide 1 receptor agonist liraglutide attenuates the reinforcing properties of alcohol in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Vallöf, Daniel; Maccioni, Paola; Colombo, Giancarlo; Mandrapa, Minja; Jörnulf, Julia Winsa; Egecioglu, Emil; Engel, Jörgen A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The incretin hormone, glucagon‐like peptide 1 (GLP‐1), regulates gastric emptying, glucose‐dependent stimulation of insulin secretion and glucagon release, and GLP‐1 analogs are therefore approved for treatment of type II diabetes. GLP‐1 receptors are expressed in reward‐related areas such as the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens, and GLP‐1 was recently shown to regulate several alcohol‐mediated behaviors as well as amphetamine‐induced, cocaine‐induced and nicotine‐induced reward. The present series of experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of the GLP‐1 receptor agonist, liraglutide, on several alcohol‐related behaviors in rats that model different aspects of alcohol use disorder in humans. Acute liraglutide treatment suppressed the well‐documented effects of alcohol on the mesolimbic dopamine system, namely alcohol‐induced accumbal dopamine release and conditioned place preference in mice. In addition, acute administration of liraglutide prevented the alcohol deprivation effect and reduced alcohol intake in outbred rats, while repeated treatment of liraglutide decreased alcohol intake in outbred rats as well as reduced operant self‐administration of alcohol in selectively bred Sardinian alcohol‐preferring rats. Collectively, these data suggest that GLP‐1 receptor agonists could be tested for treatment of alcohol dependence in humans. PMID:26303264

  9. Glucagonlike Peptide 2 Analogue Teduglutide

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Lakshmi S.; Basson, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Short bowel syndrome occurs when a shortened intestine cannot absorb sufficient nutrients or fluids. Teduglutide is a recombinant analogue of human glucagonlike peptide 2 that reduces dependence on parenteral nutrition in patients with short bowel syndrome by promoting enterocytic proliferation, increasing the absorptive surface area. However, enterocyte function depends not only on the number of cells that are present but also on differentiated features that facilitate nutrient absorption and digestion. OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that teduglutide impairs human intestinal epithelial differentiation. DESIGN AND SETTING We investigated the effects of teduglutide in the modulation of proliferation and differentiation in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells at a basic science laboratory. This was an in vitro study using Caco-2 cells, a human-derived intestinal epithelial cell line commonly used to model enterocytic biology. EXPOSURE Cells were exposed to teduglutide or vehicle control. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES We analyzed the cell cycle by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation or propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry and measured cell proliferation by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. We used quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to assay the expression of the enterocytic differentiation markers villin, sucrase-isomaltase, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), as well as that of the putative differentiation signals schlafen 12 (SLFN12) and caudal-related homeobox intestine-specific transcription factor (Cdx2). Villin promoter activity was measured by a luciferase-based assay. RESULTS The MTS assay demonstrated that teduglutide increased cell numbers by a mean (SD) of 10% (2%) over untreated controls at a maximal 500nM (n = 6, P < .05). Teduglutide increased bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells vs untreated controls by a mean (SD

  10. On the mechanical analogue of DNA.

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, Ludmila

    2017-03-01

    The creation of mechanical analogues of biological systems is known as a useful instrument that helps to understand better the dynamical mechanisms of the functioning of living organisms. Mechanical analogues of biomolecules are usually constructed for imitation of their internal mobility, which is one of the most important properties of the molecules. Among the different types of internal motions, angular oscillations of nitrous bases are of special interest because they make a substantial contribution to the base pairs opening that in turn is an important element of the process of the DNA-protein recognition. In this paper, we investigate the possibility to construct a mechanical analogue for imitation of angular oscillations of nitrous bases in inhomogeneous DNA. It is shown that the analogue has the form of a mechanical chain of non-identical pendulums that oscillate in the gravitational field of the Earth and coupled by identical springs. The masses and lengths of pendulums, as well as the distances between neighboring pendulums and the rigidity of springs are calculated. To illustrate the approach, we present the result of construction of the mechanical analogue of the fragment of the sequence of bacteriophage T7D.

  11. Analogue Downscaling of Seasonal Rainfall Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, A. N.; Timbal, B.; Hendon, H.

    2010-12-01

    We have taken an existing statistical downscaling model (SDM), based on meteorological analogues that was developed for downscaling climate change projections (Timbal et al 2009), and applied it in the seasonal forecasting context to produce downscaled rainfall hindcasts from a coupled model seasonal forecast system (POAMA). Downscaling of POAMA forecasts is required to provide seasonal climate information at local scales of interest. Analogue downscaling is a simple technique to generate rainfall forecasts appropriate to the local scale by conditioning on the large scale predicted GCM circulation and the local topography and climate. Analogue methods are flexible and have been shown to produce good results when downscaling 20th century South Eastern Australian rainfall output from climate models. A set of re-forecasts for three month rainfall at 170 observing stations in the South Murray Darling region of Australia were generated using predictors from the POAMA re-forecasts as input for the analogue SDM. The predictors were optimised over a number of different GCMS in previous climate change downscaling studies. Downscaling with the analogue SDM results in predicted rainfall with realistic variance while maintaining the modest predictive skill of the dynamical model. Evaluation of the consistency between the large scale mean of downscaled and direct GCM output precipitation is encouraging.

  12. GABAA Receptor Modulation by Etomidate Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Pejo, Ervin; Santer, Peter; Wang, Lei; Dershwitz, Philip; Husain, S. Shaukat; Raines, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Etomidate is a highly potent anesthetic agent that is believed to produce hypnosis by enhancing γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor function. We characterized the GABAA receptor and hypnotic potencies of etomidate analogues. We then used computational techniques to build statistical and graphical models that relate the potencies of these etomidate analogues to their structures in order to identify the specific molecular determinants of potency. Methods GABAA receptor potencies were defined with voltage-clamp electrophysiology using α1β3γ2 receptors harboring a channel mutation (α1(L264T)) that enhances anesthetic sensitivity (n = 36 – 60 measurements per concentration-response curve). The hypnotic potencies of etomidate analogues were defined using a loss of righting reflexes assay in Sprague Dawley rats (n = 9 – 21 measurements per dose-response curve). Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships were determined in silico using comparative molecular field analysis. Results The GABAA receptor and hypnotic potencies of etomidate and the etomidate analogues ranged by 91-fold and 53-fold, respectively. These potency measurements were significantly correlated (r2 = 0.72), but neither measurement correlated with drug hydrophobicity (r2 = 0.019 and 0.005, respectively). Statistically significant and predictive comparative molecular field analysis models were generated and a pharmacophore model was built that revealed both the structural elements in etomidate analogues associated with high potency and the interactions that these elements make with the etomidate binding site. Conclusion There are multiple specific structural elements in etomidate and etomidate analogues that mediate GABAA receptor modulation. Modifying any one element can alter receptor potency by an order of magnitude or more. PMID:26691905

  13. Preventive effect of chrysin on experimental autoimmune uveitis triggered by injection of human IRBP peptide 1-20 in mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangda; Fang, Sijie; Zhang, Zhuhong; Wang, Yang; You, Caiyun; Zhang, Jingkai; Yan, Hua

    2016-03-21

    Uveitis is a common cause of blindness worldwide. Experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) is an animal model of noninfectious uveitis. Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a member of the flavonoid family and has anti-inflammatory effects. We immunized C57BL/6J mice with human interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein peptide 1-20 to induce EAU. Chrysin was administered intragastrically at 25 mg/kg daily to the chrysin-treated mice from 3 days before immunization to 21 days after immunization. Vehicle was administered to the mice in the control group according to the same protocol. Lower clinical and histopathological scores, increased integrity of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) and higher expression of tight junction proteins were observed in the chrysin-treated mice. Chrysin significantly decreased the proportions of Th1, Th17 and CD4(+)CD3(+)CD62L(+) Th0 cells, and increased the proportion of Treg cells. Both macrophage infiltration and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the retina were efficiently inhibited by chrysin treatment. In chrysin-treated mice, the expression of interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α was reduced in the retina, whereas higher levels of transforming growth factor-β were detected. Furthermore, NF-κBp65 was downregulated after chrysin treatment. In conclusion, as an anti-inflammatory molecule, chrysin exerts a preventive effect on EAU by modulating the balance among helper T-cell subsets and suppressing ocular inflammation, thereby maintaining the integrity of the BRB.Cellular & Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 21 March 2016; doi:10.1038/cmi.2015.107.

  14. Classical Simulated Annealing Using Quantum Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Troupe, James E.; Mark, Hans M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider the use of certain classical analogues to quantum tunneling behavior to improve the performance of simulated annealing on a discrete spin system of the general Ising form. Specifically, we consider the use of multiple simultaneous spin flips at each annealing step as an analogue to quantum spin coherence as well as modifications of the Boltzmann acceptance probability to mimic quantum tunneling. We find that the use of multiple spin flips can indeed be advantageous under certain annealing schedules, but only for long anneal times.

  15. Insulin analogues: action profiles beyond glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Kristin; Eckel, Jürgen

    2008-02-01

    A variety of studies have documented significant improvements in the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetes after the introduction of artificial insulins. This review gives an overview of insulin analogues which are currently approved for therapeutical use. Clinical data regarding the efficiency to control blood glucose level as well as improving HbA1c level in comparison to conventional insulin preparations in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients are summarized. Furthermore, special features of insulin analogues regarding their signalling properties are discussed with focus on the proliferative effects of insulin glargine as well as some recent data of insulin detemir.

  16. Dumb holes: analogues for black holes.

    PubMed

    Unruh, W G

    2008-08-28

    The use of sonic analogues to black and white holes, called dumb or deaf holes, to understand the particle production by black holes is reviewed. The results suggest that the black hole particle production is a low-frequency and low-wavenumber process.

  17. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-03-01

    Project overview provides background on carbonic anhydrase transport mechanism for CO2 in the human body and proposed approach for ARPA-E project to create a synthetic enzyme analogue and utilize it in a membrane for CO2 capture from flue gas.

  18. Solanapyrone analogues from a Hawaiian fungicolous fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four new solanayrone analogues (solanapyrones J-M; 1-4) have been isolated from an unidentified fungicolous fungus collected in Hawaii. The structures and relative configurations of these compounds were determined by analysis of ID NMR, 2D NMR, and MS data. Solanapyrone J(1) showed antifungal acti...

  19. [Dmt(1)]DALDA analogues modified with tyrosine analogues at position 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunxin; Lu, Dandan; Chen, Zhen; Ding, Yi; Chung, Nga N; Li, Tingyou; Schiller, Peter W

    2016-08-01

    Analogues of [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt=2',6'-dimethyltyrosine), a potent μ opioid agonist peptide with mitochondria-targeted antioxidant activity were prepared by replacing Dmt with various 2',6'-dialkylated Tyr analogues, including 2',4',6'-trimethyltyrosine (Tmt), 2'-ethyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Emt), 2'-isopropyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Imt) and 2',6'-diethyltyrosine (Det). All compounds were selective μ opioid agonists and the Tmt(1)-, Emt(1) and Det(1)-analogues showed subnanomolar μ opioid receptor binding affinities. The Tmt(1)- and Emt(1)-analogues showed improved antioxidant activity compared to the Dmt(1)-parent peptide in the DPPH radical-scavenging capacity assay, and thus are of interest as drug candidates for neuropathic pain treatment.

  20. Tryptophan analogues. 1. Synthesis and antihypertensive activity of positional isomers.

    PubMed

    Safdy, M E; Kurchacova, E; Schut, R N; Vidrio, H; Hong, E

    1982-06-01

    A series of tryptophan analogues having the carboxyl function at the beta-position was synthesized and tested for antihypertensive activity. The 5-methoxy analogue 46 exhibited antihypertensive activity in the rat via the oral route and was much more potent than the normal tryptophan analogue. The methyl ester was found to be a critical structural feature for activity.

  1. [Treatment strategy for elderly diabetic patient with insulin or GLP-1 receptor agonist].

    PubMed

    Ando, Yasuyo

    2013-11-01

    It has been established that diabetes is an independent risk factor for microvascular and macrovascular complications, and many studies indicate that diabetic subjects are at greater risk of dementia, depression and fracture. Risk reductions for microvascular, macrovascular and death were observed by intensive therapy using insulin or oral diabetic agents. But a history of hypoglycemia was increased myocardial infarction, mortality, dementia and fracture. So it is important that optimum glycemic control has to be achieved without hypoglycemia. Treatment with a long-acting basal insulin analogue or glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1) receptor agonist, provide effective glycemic control without serious hypoglycemia in elderly patients. Self-monitoring of blood glucose might be effective in improving glycemic control in elderly patients, and it is useful for the diagnosis of hypoglycemia.

  2. [LIRAGUTIDE AT A DOSE OF 3.0 MG (SAXENDA): NEW INDICATION FOR THE TREATMENT OF OBESITY].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2016-05-01

    Liraglutide is an analogue of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) already indicated under the trade name of Victoza for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, at usual doses of 1.2 or 1.8 mg as once daily subcutaneous injection. It is henceforth indicated at a dose of 3.0 mg, also as once daily subcutaneous injection, for the treatment of obesity or overweight with comorbidities under the trade name of Saxenda, in combination with diet and exercise. Besides a specific action on the endocrine pancreas, mainly responsible for the antihyperglycaemic effect, liraglutide helps controlling appetite at the hypothamalic level. A specific programme of controlled trials (especially SCALE studies) demonstrated both efficacy and safety of the 3.0 mg dose of liraglutide in obese or overweight patients with various comorbidities.

  3. [New therapies for diabetes: beyond injectable insulin and oral antidiabetics].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, John Edwin Feliciano; Ariza, Iván Darío Sierra

    2008-01-01

    New medicines for the therapy of the type 1 and type 2 diabetes have been incorporated in the list of traditional drugs: oral agents and injectable insulin. These treatment alternatives have a new mechanism of action that takes advantage of the antidiabetic properties of certain peptides such as amylin and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), whose levels are wanting or insufficient in diabetes. This is attained through amylin and GLP-1 analogues, although it can also be achieved by inhibiting the enzyme that degrades the latter. Furthermore, a new system to administer insulin in a noninvasive way through inhalation has become available in the market. This paper summarizes the most important and updated findings on the action mechanism, efficacy, adverse effects and indications of these innovative drugs.

  4. [Incretin-based therapy for treating patients with type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, György

    2011-11-27

    In the last couple of years, a new class of antidiabetic drugs became available for the clinical practice. Due to the intensive research, several new drugs reached the market. Among the incretinmimetics both the GLP-1 (glucagon like peptide-1)-receptor agonist exenatide and the GLP-1-analogue liraglutide can be used for treatment. As for incretin enhancers (dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 [DPP-4]-inhibitors), sitagliptin, vildagliptin and saxagliptin are available in Hungary, linagliptin will be introduced to the market in the near future. In clinical practice, any incretin-based new drugs can be used for treating patients with type 2 diabetes, preferably in combination with metformin. The clinical experiences with these new drugs are reviewed focusing on both the benefits and the potential side-effects of the particular compounds.

  5. New drug treatments show neuroprotective effects in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hölscher, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Insulin signaling in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease is impaired. Preclinical studies of growth factors showed impressive neuroprotective effects. In animal models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, insulin, glia-derived neurotrophic factor, or analogues of the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 prevented neurodegenerative processes and improved neuronal and synaptic functionality in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. On the basis of these promising findings, several clinical trials are ongoing with the first encouraging clinical results published. This gives hope for developing effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease that are currently unavailable. PMID:25558231

  6. Current therapeutic agents and anesthetic considerations for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyoseok

    2012-09-01

    As the incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) continues to increase worldwide, more diabetic patients will be presented for surgery and anesthesia. This increase of DM is a consequence of the rise in new patients of type 2 DM, and is likely attributable to rapid economic development, improved living standards, aging population, obesity, and lack of exercise. The primary goal of management in DM is to delay, or prevent the macro- and microvascular complications by achieving good glycemic control. More understanding of the pathophysiology of DM has contributed to the advance of new pharmacological approaches. In addition to the conventional therapy for DM, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), and insulin analogues are currently available effective hypoglycemic agents for the management of the patients with DM in the perioperative period and also consider the adverse effects of newly introduced agents that need more clinical observations.

  7. Purslane Effect on GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Heidarzadeh, Sara; Farzanegi, Parvin; Azarbayjani, Mohammad Ali; Daliri, Roja

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of purslane seeds in glucagon-like peptide-1 concentration and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor in women with diabetes. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study. The population was consisted of the city of Sari where diabetic women with diabetes II who had no history of using purslane seeds. All individuals used the same dose of metformin under the specialist supervision. Among these individuals, 16 were assigned at random to Purslane group and control group. The purslane group consumed 2.5 grams Purslane with lunch and along with 5 grams of purslane (Portulaca oleracea seeds 7.5 g daily) with dinner meals twice daily for 8 weeks. Blood sample was taken before and after 8 weeks, after 12 hours of fasting to 5 ml of the left brachial vein. Results: After 8 weeks using purslane seeds in the experimental group, a significant increase was seen in glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations (p<0.007), but there was no significant difference in the concentration of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (p <0.455). No significant relationship was found between changes in glucagon-like peptide-1 and its receptor. Conclusion: The use of purslane seeds improved Type II diabetes; therefore it can be effective in improving the health of women with diabetes. PMID:26120386

  8. Optimization of propafenone analogues as antimalarial leads.

    PubMed

    Lowes, David J; Guiguemde, W Armand; Connelly, Michele C; Zhu, Fangyi; Sigal, Martina S; Clark, Julie A; Lemoff, Andrew S; Derisi, Joseph L; Wilson, Emily B; Guy, R Kiplin

    2011-11-10

    Propafenone, a class Ic antiarrythmic drug, inhibits growth of cultured Plasmodium falciparum. While the drug's potency is significant, further development of propafenone as an antimalarial would require divorcing the antimalarial and cardiac activities as well as improving the pharmacokinetic profile of the drug. A small array of propafenone analogues was designed and synthesized to address the cardiac ion channel and PK liabilities. Testing of this array revealed potent inhibitors of the 3D7 (drug sensitive) and K1 (drug resistant) strains of P. falciparum that possessed significantly reduced ion channel effects and improved metabolic stability. Propafenone analogues are unusual among antimalarial leads in that they are more potent against the multidrug resistant K1 strain of P. falciparum compared to the 3D7 strain.

  9. Enzymatic synthesis of lipid II and analogues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Huang, Shih-Hsien; Chang, Ya-Chih; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Cheng, Ting-Jen R; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2014-07-28

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has prompted active research in the development of antibiotics with new modes of action. Among all essential bacterial proteins, transglycosylase polymerizes lipid II into peptidoglycan and is one of the most favorable targets because of its vital role in peptidoglycan synthesis. Described in this study is a practical enzymatic method for the synthesis of lipid II, coupled with cofactor regeneration, to give the product in a 50-70% yield. This development depends on two key steps: the overexpression of MraY for the synthesis of lipid I and the use of undecaprenol kinase for the preparation of polyprenol phosphates. This method was further applied to the synthesis of lipid II analogues. It was found that MraY and undecaprenol kinase can accept a wide range of lipids containing various lengths and configurations. The activity of lipid II analogues for bacterial transglycolase was also evaluated.

  10. Polyamine analogues targeting epigenetic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Marton, Laurence J; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2009-11-04

    Over the past three decades the metabolism and functions of the polyamines have been actively pursued as targets for antineoplastic therapy. Interactions between cationic polyamines and negatively charged nucleic acids play a pivotal role in DNA stabilization and RNA processing that may affect gene expression, translation and protein activity. Our growing understanding of the unique roles that the polyamines play in chromatin regulation, and the discovery of novel proteins homologous with specific regulatory enzymes in polyamine metabolism, have led to our interest in exploring chromatin remodelling enzymes as potential therapeutic targets for specific polyamine analogues. One of our initial efforts focused on utilizing the strong affinity that the polyamines have for chromatin to create a backbone structure, which could be combined with active-site-directed inhibitor moieties of HDACs (histone deacetylases). Specific PAHAs (polyaminohydroxamic acids) and PABAs (polyaminobenzamides) polyamine analogues have demonstrated potent inhibition of the HDACs, re-expression of p21 and significant inhibition of tumour growth. A second means of targeting the chromatin-remodelling enzymes with polyamine analogues was facilitated by the recent identification of flavin-dependent LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1). The existence of this enzyme demonstrated that histone lysine methylation is a dynamic process similar to other histone post-translational modifications. LSD1 specifically catalyses demethylation of mono- and di-methyl Lys4 of histone 3, key positive chromatin marks associated with transcriptional activation. Structural and catalytic similarities between LSD1 and polyamine oxidases facilitated the identification of biguanide, bisguanidine and oligoamine polyamine analogues that are potent inhibitors of LSD1. Cellular inhibition of LSD1 by these unique compounds led to the re-activation of multiple epigenetically silenced genes important in tumorigenesis. The use of

  11. Benchmarking analogue models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido; Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Boutelier, Jennifer; Burberry, Caroline; Callot, Jean-Paul; Cavozzi, Cristian; Cerca, Mariano; Chen, Jian-Hong; Cristallini, Ernesto; Cruden, Alexander R.; Cruz, Leonardo; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Da Poian, Gabriela; Garcia, Victor H.; Gomes, Caroline J. S.; Grall, Céline; Guillot, Yannick; Guzmán, Cecilia; Hidayah, Triyani Nur; Hilley, George; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Koyi, Hemin A.; Lu, Chia-Yu; Maillot, Bertrand; Meriaux, Catherine; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Pan, Chang-Chih; Pillot, Daniel; Portillo, Rodrigo; Rosenau, Matthias; Schellart, Wouter P.; Schlische, Roy W.; Take, Andy; Vendeville, Bruno; Vergnaud, Marine; Vettori, Matteo; Wang, Shih-Hsien; Withjack, Martha O.; Yagupsky, Daniel; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    We performed a quantitative comparison of brittle thrust wedge experiments to evaluate the variability among analogue models and to appraise the reproducibility and limits of model interpretation. Fifteen analogue modeling laboratories participated in this benchmark initiative. Each laboratory received a shipment of the same type of quartz and corundum sand and all laboratories adhered to a stringent model building protocol and used the same type of foil to cover base and sidewalls of the sandbox. Sieve structure, sifting height, filling rate, and details on off-scraping of excess sand followed prescribed procedures. Our analogue benchmark shows that even for simple plane-strain experiments with prescribed stringent model construction techniques, quantitative model results show variability, most notably for surface slope, thrust spacing and number of forward and backthrusts. One of the sources of the variability in model results is related to slight variations in how sand is deposited in the sandbox. Small changes in sifting height, sifting rate, and scraping will result in slightly heterogeneous material bulk densities, which will affect the mechanical properties of the sand, and will result in lateral and vertical differences in peak and boundary friction angles, as well as cohesion values once the model is constructed. Initial variations in basal friction are inferred to play the most important role in causing model variability. Our comparison shows that the human factor plays a decisive role, and even when one modeler repeats the same experiment, quantitative model results still show variability. Our observations highlight the limits of up-scaling quantitative analogue model results to nature or for making comparisons with numerical models. The frictional behavior of sand is highly sensitive to small variations in material state or experimental set-up, and hence, it will remain difficult to scale quantitative results such as number of thrusts, thrust spacing

  12. Antitumoral cyclic peptide analogues of chlamydocin.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, E; Fauchere, J L; Atassi, G; Viallefont, P; Lazaro, R

    1993-01-01

    A series of cyclic tetrapeptides bearing the bioactive alkylating group on an epsilon-amino-lysyl function have been examined for their antitumoral activity on L1210 and P388 murine leukemia cell lines. One analogue belonging to the chlamydocin family and bearing a beta-chloroethylnitrosourea group was found to be potent at inhibiting L1210 cell proliferation and had a higher therapeutic index than the reference compound bis-beta-chloroethylnitrosourea (BCNU) on the in vivo P388-induced leukemia model.

  13. Synthesis of constrained analogues of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Negrato, Marco; Abbiati, Giorgio; Dell’Acqua, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Summary A Lewis acid-catalysed diastereoselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of vinylindoles and methyl 2-acetamidoacrylate, leading to methyl 3-acetamido-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole-3-carboxylate derivatives, is described. Treatment of the obtained cycloadducts under hydrolytic conditions results in the preparation of a small library of compounds bearing the free amino acid function at C-3 and pertaining to the class of constrained tryptophan analogues. PMID:26664620

  14. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  15. Thymidine analogues for tracking DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Brenton L; Walker, Tom; Norazit, Anwar; Meedeniya, Adrian C B

    2011-09-15

    Replicating cells undergo DNA synthesis in the highly regulated, S-phase of the cell cycle. Analogues of the pyrimidine deoxynucleoside thymidine may be inserted into replicating DNA, effectively tagging dividing cells allowing their characterisation. Tritiated thymidine, targeted using autoradiography was technically demanding and superseded by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and related halogenated analogues, detected using antibodies. Their detection required the denaturation of DNA, often constraining the outcome of investigations. Despite these limitations BrdU alone has been used to target newly synthesised DNA in over 20,000 reviewed biomedical studies. A recent breakthrough in "tagging DNA synthesis" is the thymidine analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The alkyne group in EdU is readily detected using a fluorescent azide probe and copper catalysis using 'Huisgen's reaction' (1,3-dipolar cycloaddition or 'click chemistry'). This rapid, two-step biolabelling approach allows the tagging and imaging of DNA within cells whilst preserving the structural and molecular integrity of the cells. The bio-orthogonal detection of EdU allows its application in more experimental assays than previously possible with other "unnatural bases". These include physiological, anatomical and molecular biological experimentation in multiple fields including, stem cell research, cancer biology, and parasitology. The full potential of EdU and related molecules in biomedical research remains to be explored.

  16. Blood Loss Estimation Using Gauze Visual Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Ali Algadiem, Emran; Aleisa, Abdulmohsen Ali; Alsubaie, Huda Ibrahim; Buhlaiqah, Noora Radhi; Algadeeb, Jihad Bagir; Alsneini, Hussain Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating intraoperative blood loss can be a difficult task, especially when blood is mostly absorbed by gauze. In this study, we have provided an improved method for estimating blood absorbed by gauze. Objectives To develop a guide to estimate blood absorbed by surgical gauze. Materials and Methods A clinical experiment was conducted using aspirated blood and common surgical gauze to create a realistic amount of absorbed blood in the gauze. Different percentages of staining were photographed to create an analogue for the amount of blood absorbed by the gauze. Results A visual analogue scale was created to aid the estimation of blood absorbed by the gauze. The absorptive capacity of different gauze sizes was determined when the gauze was dripping with blood. The amount of reduction in absorption was also determined when the gauze was wetted with normal saline before use. Conclusions The use of a visual analogue may increase the accuracy of blood loss estimation and decrease the consequences related to over or underestimation of blood loss. PMID:27626017

  17. Beta2-amino acids-syntheses, occurrence in natural products, and components of beta-peptides1,2.

    PubMed

    Lelais, Gérald; Seebach, Dieter

    2004-01-01

    Although they are less abundant than their alpha-analogues, beta-amino acids occur in nature both in free form and bound to peptides. Oligomers composed exclusively of beta-amino acids (so-called beta-peptides) might be the most thoroughly investigated peptidomimetics. Beside the facts that they are stable to metabolism, exhibit slow microbial degradation, and are inherently stable to proteases and peptidases, they fold into well-ordered secondary structures consisting of helices, turns, and sheets. In this respect, the most intriguing effects have been observed when beta2-amino acids are present in the beta-peptide backbone. This review gives an overview of the occurrence and importance of beta2-amino acids in nature, placing emphasis on the metabolic pathways of beta-aminoisobutyric acid (beta-Aib) and the appearance of beta2-amino acids as secondary metabolites or as components of more complex natural products, such as peptides, depsipeptides, lactones, and alkaloids. In addition, a compilation of the syntheses of both achiral and chiral beta2-amino acids is presented. While there are numerous routes to achiral beta2-amino acids, their EPC synthesis is currently the subject of many investigations. These include the diastereoselective alkylation and Mannich-type reactions of cyclic- or acyclic beta-homoglycine derivatives containing chiral auxiliaries, the Curtius degradation, the employment of transition-metal catalyzed reactions such as enantioselective hydrogenations, reductions, C-H insertions, and Michael-type additions, and the resolution of rac. beta2-amino acids, as well as several miscellaneous methods. In the last part of the review, the importance of beta2-amino acids in the formation of beta-peptide secondary structures is discussed.

  18. Polyamine analogues bind human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, R; N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Thomas, T J; Thomas, T; Carpentier, R; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2007-10-01

    Polyamine analogues show antitumor activity in experimental models, and their ability to alter activity of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer is well documented. Association of polyamines with nucleic acids and protein is included in their mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with several polyamine analogues, such as 1,11-diamino-4,8-diazaundecane (333), 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333), and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333), in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using a constant protein concentration and various polyamine contents (microM to mM). FTIR, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polyamine binding mode and the effects of polyamine complexation on protein stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that polyamines bind nonspecifically (H-bonding) via polypeptide polar groups with binding constants of K333 = 9.30 x 10(3) M(-1), KBE-333 = 5.63 x 10(2) M(-1), and KBE-3333 = 3.66 x 10(2) M(-1). The protein secondary structure showed major alterations with a reduction of alpha-helix from 55% (free protein) to 43-50% and an increase of beta-sheet from 17% (free protein) to 29-36% in the 333, BE-333, and BE-3333 complexes, indicating partial protein unfolding upon polyamine interaction. HSA structure was less perturbed by polyamine analogues compared to those of the biogenic polyamines.

  19. New synthetic approaches towards analogues of bedaquiline.

    PubMed

    Priebbenow, Daniel L; Barbaro, Lisa; Baell, Jonathan B

    2016-10-12

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is of growing global concern and threatens to undermine increasing efforts to control the worldwide spread of tuberculosis (TB). Bedaquiline has recently emerged as a new drug developed to specifically treat MDR-TB. Despite being highly effective as a result of its unique mode of action, bedaquiline has been associated with significant toxicities and as such, safety concerns are limiting its clinical use. In order to access pharmaceutical agents that exhibit an improved safety profile for the treatment of MDR-TB, new synthetic pathways to facilitate the preparation of bedaquiline and analogues thereof have been discovered.

  20. The Lehmer Matrix and Its Recursive Analogue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number . 1. REPORT DATE 2010 2. REPORT...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Lehmer matrix and its recursive analogue 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  1. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission natural analogue research program

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, L.A.; Ott, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    This article describes the natural analogue research program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC). It contains information on the regulatory context and organizational structure of the high-level radioactive waste research program plan. It also includes information on the conditions and processes constraining selection of natural analogues, describes initiatives of the US NRC, and describes the role of analogues in the licensing process.

  2. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-09-14

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  3. Synthesis of a cyanopeptide-analogue with trypsin activating properties.

    PubMed

    Radau, G; Rauh, D

    2000-04-17

    An efficient synthesis of a peptidic analogue of cyanobacterial metabolites with proposed serine protease inhibitory activity has been developed. Surprisingly, one trypsin activating compound was obtained.

  4. Long-term predictions using natural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    One of the unique and scientifically most challenging aspects of nuclear waste isolation is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} years) required by regulatory agencies for performance assessment. The direct validation of these extrapolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the lay public that there is a demonstrable and reasonable basis for accepting the long-term extrapolations. Natural systems (e.g., {open_quotes}natural analogues{close_quotes}) provide perhaps the only means of partial {open_quotes}validation,{close_quotes} as well as data that may be used directly in the models that are used in the extrapolation. Natural systems provide data on very large spatial (nm to km) and temporal (10{sup 3}-10{sup 8} years) scales and in highly complex terranes in which unknown synergisms may affect radionuclide migration. This paper reviews the application (and most importantly, the limitations) of data from natural analogue systems to the {open_quotes}validation{close_quotes} of performance assessments.

  5. Self-Powered Analogue Smart Skin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mayue; Zhang, Jinxin; Chen, Haotian; Han, Mengdi; Shankaregowda, Smitha A; Su, Zongming; Meng, Bo; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-04-26

    The progress of smart skin technology presents unprecedented opportunities for artificial intelligence. Resolution enhancement and energy conservation are critical to improve the perception and standby time of robots. Here, we present a self-powered analogue smart skin for detecting contact location and velocity of the object, based on a single-electrode contact electrification effect and planar electrostatic induction. Using an analogue localizing method, the resolution of this two-dimensional smart skin can be achieved at 1.9 mm with only four terminals, which notably decreases the terminal number of smart skins. The sensitivity of this smart skin is remarkable, which can even perceive the perturbation of a honey bee. Meanwhile, benefiting from the triboelectric mechanism, extra power supply is unnecessary for this smart skin. Therefore, it solves the problems of batteries and connecting wires for smart skins. With microstructured poly(dimethylsiloxane) films and silver nanowire electrodes, it can be covered on the skin with transparency, flexibility, and high sensitivity.

  6. Space Analogue Environments: Are the Populations Comparable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandal, G. M.

    Background: Much of our present understanding about psychology in space is based on studies of groups operating in so-called analogue environments where personnel are exposed to many of the same stressors as those experienced by astronauts in space. One possible problem with extrapolating results is that personnel operating in various hazardous and confined environments might differ in characteristics influencing coping, interaction, and performance. The object of this study was to compare the psychological similarity of these populations in order to get a better understanding of whether this extrapolation is justifiable. The samples investigated include polar crossings (N= 22), personnel on Antarctic research stations (N= 183), several military occupations (N= 187), and participants in space simulation studies (N=20). Methods: Personnel in each of these environments were assessed using the Personality Characteristic Inventory (PCI) and Utrecht Coping List (UCL). The PCI is a multidimensional trait assessment battery that measures various aspects of achievement orientation and social competence. The UCL is a questionnaire designed to assess habitual coping strategies when encountering stressful or demanding situations. Results: Only minor differences in use of habitual coping strategies were evident across the different samples. In relation to personality scores, the military subjects and participants in space simulation studies indicated higher competitiveness and negative instrumentality compared to both the personnel on Antarctic research stations and participants in polar expedition. Among the personnel on Antarctic research stations, significant gender differences were found with women scoring lower on competitiveness, negative instrumentality and impatience/irritability. Compared to the other samples, the participants in polar expeditions were found to be more homogeneous in personality and no significant gender differences were evident on the traits that

  7. A nonlinear dynamic analogue model of substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Roberts, D. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Büchner, J.

    Linear prediction filter studies have shown that the magnetospheric response to energy transfer from the solar wind contains both directly driven and unloading components. These studies have also shown that the magnetospheric response is significantly nonlinear and, thus, the linear prediction filtering technique and other correlative techniques which assume a linear magnetospheric response cannot give a complete deacription of that response. Here, the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is discussed within the framework of deterministic nonlinear dynamics. An earlier dripping faucet mechanical analogue to the magnetosphere is first reviewed and then the plasma physical counterpart to the mechanical model is constructed. A Faraday loop in the magnetotail is considered and the relationship of electric potentials on the loop to changes in the magnetic flux threading the loop is developed. This approach leads to a model of geomagnetic activity which is similar to the earlier mechanical model but described in terms of the geometry and plasma contents of the magnetotail. This Faraday loop response model contains analogues to both the directly driven and the storage-release magnetospheric responses and it includes, in a fundamental way, the inherent nonlinearity of the solar wind-magnetosphere system. It can be chancterized as a nonlinear, damped harmonic oscillator that is driven by the loading-unloading substorm cycle. The model is able to explain many of the features of the linear prediction filter results. In particular, at low geomagnetic activity levels the model exbibits the "regular dripping" response which provides an explanation for the unloading component at 1 hour lag in the linear prediction filters. Further, the model suggests that the disappearance of the unloading component in the linear prediction filters at high geomagnetic activity levels is due to a chaotic transition beyond which the loading-unloading mechanism becomes aperiodic. The model predicts

  8. Tren-based analogues of bacillibactin: structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Dertz, Emily A; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2006-07-10

    Synthetic analogues were designed to highlight the effect of the glycine moiety of bacillibactin on the overall stability of the ferric complex as compared to synthetic analogues of enterobactin. Insertion of a variety of amino acids to catecholamide analogues based on a Tren (tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) backbone increased the overall acidity of the ligands, causing an enhancement of the stability of the resulting ferric complex as compared to TRENCAM. Solution thermodynamic behavior of these siderophores and their synthetic analogues was investigated through potentiometric and spectrophotometric titrations. X-ray crystallography, circular dichroism, and molecular modeling were used to determine the chirality and geometry of the ferric complexes of bacillibactin and its analogues. In contrast to the Tren scaffold, addition of a glycine to the catechol chelating arms causes an inversion of the trilactone backbone, resulting in opposite chiralities of the two siderophores and a destabilization of the ferric complex of bacillibactin compared to ferric enterobactin.

  9. Analogue Divider by Averaging a Triangular Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, Krishnagiri Chinnathambi

    2017-03-01

    A new analogue divider circuit by averaging a triangular wave using operational amplifiers is explained in this paper. The triangle wave averaging analog divider using operational amplifiers is explained here. The reference triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level up towards positive power supply voltage level. Its positive portion is obtained by a positive rectifier and its average value is obtained by a low pass filter. The same triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level to down towards negative power supply voltage level. Its negative portion is obtained by a negative rectifier and its average value is obtained by another low pass filter. Both the averaged voltages are combined in a summing amplifier and the summed voltage is given to an op-amp a