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Sample records for glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion

  1. Multiple Factors Related to the Secretion of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XingChun; Liu, Huan; Chen, Jiaqi; Li, Yan; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 is secreted by intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. It regulates the secretion and sensitivity of insulin while suppressing glucagon secretion and decreasing postprandial glucose levels. It also improves beta-cell proliferation and prevents beta-cell apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents. Additionally, glucagon-like peptide-1 delays gastric emptying and suppresses appetite. The impaired secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 has negative influence on diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance related diseases. Thus, glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) are now well accepted in the management of type 2 diabetes. The levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 are influenced by multiple factors including a variety of nutrients. The component of a meal acts as potent stimulants of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. The levels of its secretion change with the intake of different nutrients. Some drugs also have influence on GLP-1 secretion. Bariatric surgery may improve metabolism through the action on GLP-1 levels. In recent years, there has been a great interest in developing effective methods to regulate glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. This review summarizes the literature on glucagon-like peptide-1 and related factors affecting its levels. PMID:26366173

  2. Mechanisms underlying glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M

    2016-04-01

    The incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and glucagon-like peptide-1, are secreted from intestinal K- and L cells, respectively, with the former being most abundant in the proximal small intestine, whereas the latter increase in number towards the distal gut. Although an overlap between K- and L cells can be observed immunohistochemically or in murine models expressing fluorescent markers under the control of the two hormone promoters, the majority (>80%) of labeled cells seems to produce only one of these hormones. Transcriptomic analysis showed a close relationship between small intestinal K- and L cells, and glucose sensing mechanisms appear similar in both cell types with a predominant role of electrogenic glucose uptake through sodium-coupled glucose transporter 1. Similarly, both cell types produce the long-chain fatty acid sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, FFAR1 (GPR40) and FFAR4 (GPR120), but differ in the expression/functionality of other lipid sensing receptors. GPR119 and FFAR2/3, for example, have clearly documented roles in glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion, whereas agonists for the endocannabinoid receptor type 1 have been found to show largely selective inhibition of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide secretion. In conclusion, although K- and L cell populations overlap and share key molecular nutrient-sensing mechanisms, subtle differences between the responsiveness of the different cell types might be exploited to differentially modulate glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide or glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. PMID:27186350

  3. Oral administration of osteocalcin improves glucose utilization by stimulating glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Akiko; Yasutake, Yu; Higashi, Sen; Kawakubo-Yasukochi, Tomoyo; Chishaki, Sakura; Takahashi, Ichiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Masato

    2014-12-01

    Uncarboxylated osteocalcin (GluOC), a bone-derived hormone, regulates energy metabolism by stimulating insulin secretion and pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We previously showed that the effect of GluOC on insulin secretion is mediated largely by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secreted from the intestine in response to GluOC exposure. We have now examined the effect of oral administration of GluOC on glucose utilization as well as the fate of such administered GluOC in mice. Long-term intermittent or daily oral administration of GluOC reduced the fasting blood glucose level and improved glucose tolerance in mice without affecting insulin sensitivity. It also increased the fasting serum insulin concentration as well as the β-cell area in the pancreas. A small proportion of orally administered GluOC reached the small intestine and remained there for at least 24h. GluOC also entered the general circulation, and the serum GLP-1 concentration was increased in association with the presence of GluOC in the intestine and systemic circulation. The putative GluOC receptor, GPRC6A was detected in intestinal cells, and was colocalized with GLP-1 in some of these cells. Our results suggest that orally administered GluOC improved glucose handling likely by acting from both the intestinal lumen and the general circulation, with this effect being mediated in part by stimulation of GLP-1 secretion. Oral administration of GluOC warrants further study as a safe and convenient option for the treatment or prevention of metabolic disorders. PMID:25230237

  4. The role of apolipoprotein A-IV in regulating glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yang, Qing; Huesman, Sarah; Xu, Min; Li, Xiaoming; Lou, Danwen; Woods, Stephen C; Marziano, Corina; Tso, Patrick

    2015-10-15

    Both glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) are produced from the gut and enhance postprandial insulin secretion. This study investigated whether apoA-IV regulates nutrient-induced GLP-1 secretion and whether apoA-IV knockout causes compensatory GLP-1 release. Using lymph-fistula-mice, we first determined lymphatic GLP-1 secretion by administering apoA-IV before an intraduodenal Ensure infusion. apoA-IV changed neither basal nor Ensure-induced GLP-1 secretion relative to saline administration. We then assessed GLP-1 in apoA-IV-/- and wild-type (WT) mice administered intraduodenal Ensure. apoA-IV-/- mice had comparable lymph flow, lymphatic triglyceride, glucose, and protein outputs as WT mice. Intriguingly, apoA-IV-/- mice had higher lymphatic GLP-1 concentration and output than WT mice 30 min after Ensure administration. Increased GLP-1 was also observed in plasma of apoA-IV-/- mice at 30 min. apoA-IV-/- mice had comparable total gut GLP-1 content relative to WT mice under fasting, but a lower GLP-1 content 30 min after Ensure administration, suggesting that more GLP-1 was secreted. Moreover, an injection of apoA-IV protein did not reverse the increased GLP-1 secretion in apoA-IV-/- mice. Finally, we assessed gene expression of GLUT-2 and the lipid receptors, including G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40, GPR119, and GPR120 in intestinal segments. GLUT-2, GPR40 and GPR120 mRNAs were unaltered by apoA-IV knockout. However, ileal GPR119 mRNA was significantly increased in apoA-IV-/- mice. GPR119 colocalizes with GLP-1 in ileum and stimulates GLP-1 secretion by sensing OEA, lysophosphatidylcholine, and 2-monoacylglycerols. We suggest that increased ileal GPR119 is a potential mechanism by which GLP-1 secretion is enhanced in apoA-IV-/- mice. PMID:26294669

  5. Subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation counteracts glucagon-like peptide-1 potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Pan, Minglin; Yang, Guang; Cui, Xiuli; Yang, Shao-Nian

    2011-01-01

    The pancreatic β cell harbors α₂-adrenergic and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors on its plasma membrane to sense the corresponding ligands adrenaline/noradrenaline and GLP-1 to govern glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. However, it is not known whether these two signaling systems interact to gain the adequate and timely control of insulin release in response to glucose. The present work shows that the α₂-adrenergic agonist clonidine concentration-dependently depresses glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. On the contrary, GLP-1 concentration-dependently potentiates insulin secretory response to glucose. Importantly, the present work reveals that subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation with clonidine counteracts GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. This counteractory process relies on pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive Gi proteins since it no longer occurs following PTX-mediated inactivation of Gi proteins. The counteraction of GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation is likely to serve as a molecular mechanism for the delicate regulation of insulin release.

  6. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Activation Enhances Gut Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion and Improves Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peijian; Yan, Zhencheng; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Jing; Ni, Yinxing; Li, Li; Ma, Liqun; Zhao, Zhigang; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is rapidly prevailing as a serious global health problem. Current treatments for T2DM may cause side effects, thus highlighting the need for newer and safer therapies. We tested the hypothesis that dietary capsaicin regulates glucose homeostasis through the activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-mediated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion in the intestinal cells and tissues. Wild-type (WT) and TRPV1 knockout (TRPV1−/−) mice were fed dietary capsaicin for 24 weeks. TRPV1 was localized in secretin tumor cell-1 (STC-1) cells and ileum. Capsaicin stimulated GLP-1 secretion from STC-1 cells in a calcium-dependent manner through TRPV1 activation. Acute capsaicin administration by gastric gavage increased GLP-1 and insulin secretion in vivo in WT but not in TRPV1−/− mice. Furthermore, chronic dietary capsaicin not only improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin levels but also lowered daily blood glucose profiles and increased plasma GLP-1 levels in WT mice. However, this effect was absent in TRPV1−/− mice. In db/db mice, TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin ameliorated abnormal glucose homeostasis and increased GLP-1 levels in the plasma and ileum. The present findings suggest that TRPV1 activation–stimulated GLP-1 secretion could be a promising approach for the intervention of diabetes. PMID:22664955

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is present in pancreatic acinar cells and regulates amylase secretion through cAMP.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Heidenreich, Kaeli; Williams, John A

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a glucoincretin hormone that can act through its receptor (GLP-1R) on pancreatic β-cells and increase insulin secretion and production. GLP-1R agonists are used clinically to treat type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 may also regulate the exocrine pancreas at multiple levels, including inhibition through the central nervous system, stimulation indirectly through insulin, and stimulation directly on acinar cells. However, it has been unclear whether GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acini and what physiological functions these receptors regulate. In the current study we utilized GLP-1R knockout (KO) mice to study the role of GLP-1R in acinar cells. RNA expression of GLP-1R was detected in acutely isolated pancreatic acini. Acinar cell morphology and expression of digestive enzymes were not affected by loss of GLP-1R. GLP-1 induced amylase secretion in wild-type (WT) acini. In GLP-1R KO mice, this effect was abolished, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced amylase release in KO acini showed a pattern similar to that in WT acini. GLP-1 stimulated cAMP production and increased protein kinase A-mediated protein phosphorylation in WT acini, and these effects were absent in KO acini. These data show that GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acinar cells and that GLP-1 can regulate secretion through its receptor and cAMP signaling pathway.

  8. Spergularia marina Induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in NCI-H716 Cells Through Bile Acid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong; Lee, Yu Mi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spergularia marina Griseb. (SM) is a halophyte that grows in mud flats. The aerial portions of SM have been eaten as vegetables and traditionally used to prevent chronic diseases in Korea. However, there has been no scientific report that demonstrates the pharmacological effects of SM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is important for the maintenance of glucose and energy homeostasis through acting as a signal in peripheral and neural systems. To discover a functional food for regulating glucose and energy homeostasis, we evaluated the effect of an aqueous ethanolic extract (AEE) of SM on GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. In addition, we explored the Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) agonist activity of AEE-SM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells transiently transfected with human TGR5. As a result, treatment of NCI-H716 cells with AEE-SM increased GLP-1 secretion and intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of NCI-H716 cells with TGR5-specific small interference RNA inhibited AEE-SM-induced GLP-1 secretion and the increase in Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Moreover, AEE-SM showed that the TGR5 agonist activity in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with TGR5. The results suggest that AEE-SM might be a candidate for a functional food to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:25260089

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 modulates neurally evoked mucosal chloride secretion in guinea pig small intestine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Baldassano, Sara; Wang, Guo-Du; Mulè, Flavia; Wood, Jackie D

    2012-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) acts at the G protein-coupled receptor, GLP-1R, to stimulate secretion of insulin and to inhibit secretion of glucagon and gastric acid. Involvement in mucosal secretory physiology has received negligible attention. We aimed to study involvement of GLP-1 in mucosal chloride secretion in the small intestine. Ussing chamber methods, in concert with transmural electrical field stimulation (EFS), were used to study actions on neurogenic chloride secretion. ELISA was used to study GLP-1R effects on neural release of acetylcholine (ACh). Intramural localization of GLP-1R was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Application of GLP-1 to serosal or mucosal sides of flat-sheet preparations in Ussing chambers did not change baseline short-circuit current (I(sc)), which served as a marker for chloride secretion. Transmural EFS evoked neurally mediated biphasic increases in I(sc) that had an initial spike-like rising phase followed by a sustained plateau-like phase. Blockade of the EFS-evoked responses by tetrodotoxin indicated that the responses were neurally mediated. Application of GLP-1 reduced the EFS-evoked biphasic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) suppressed this action of GLP-1. The GLP-1 inhibitory action on EFS-evoked responses persisted in the presence of nicotinic or vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor antagonists but not in the presence of a muscarinic receptor antagonist. GLP-1 significantly reduced EFS-evoked ACh release. In the submucosal plexus, GLP-1R immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed by choline acetyltransferase-IR neurons, neuropeptide Y-IR neurons, somatostatin-IR neurons, and vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR neurons. Our results suggest that GLP-1R is expressed in guinea pig submucosal neurons and that its activation leads to a decrease in neurally evoked chloride secretion by suppressing release of ACh at neuroepithelial junctions in the enteric neural networks

  10. Novel Small Molecule Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Rodents and From Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sloop, Kyle W.; Willard, Francis S.; Brenner, Martin B.; Ficorilli, James; Valasek, Kathleen; Showalter, Aaron D.; Farb, Thomas B.; Cao, Julia X.C.; Cox, Amy L.; Michael, M. Dodson; Gutierrez Sanfeliciano, Sonia Maria; Tebbe, Mark J.; Coghlan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical effectiveness of parenterally-administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics to improve glucose control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes strongly supports discovery pursuits aimed at identifying and developing orally active, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. The purpose of these studies was to identify and characterize novel nonpeptide agonists of the GLP-1 receptor. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Screening using cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and insulin secretion assays with rodent and human islets were used to identify novel molecules. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and hyperglycemic clamp characterized the insulinotropic effects of compounds in vivo. RESULTS Novel low molecular weight pyrimidine-based compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion are described. These molecules induce GLP-1 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling in HEK293 cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and increase insulin secretion from rodent islets in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds activate GLP-1 receptor signaling, both alone or in an additive fashion when combined with the endogenous GLP-1 peptide; however, these agonists do not compete with radiolabeled GLP-1 in receptor-binding assays. In vivo studies using the IVGTT and the hyperglycemic clamp in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate increased insulin secretion in compound-treated animals. Further, perifusion assays with human islets isolated from a donor with type 2 diabetes show near-normalization of insulin secretion upon compound treatment. CONCLUSIONS These studies characterize the insulinotropic effects of an early-stage, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist and provide compelling evidence to support pharmaceutical optimization. PMID:20823098

  11. Naturally-occurring TGR5 agonists modulating glucagon-like peptide-1 biosynthesis and secretion.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Laila; Saleem, Samreen; Calderwood, Danielle; Gillespie, Anna; Mirza, Bushra; Green, Brian D

    2016-04-01

    Selective GLP-1 secretagogues represent a novel potential therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study examined the GLP-1 secretory activity of the ethnomedicinal plant, Fagonia cretica, which is postulated to possess anti-diabetic activity. After extraction and fractionation extracts and purified compounds were tested for GLP-1 and GIP secretory activity in pGIP/neo STC-1 cells. Intracellular levels of incretin hormones and their gene expression were also determined. Crude F. cretica extracts stimulated both GLP-1 and GIP secretion, increased cellular hormone content, and upregulated gene expression of proglucagon, GIP and prohormone convertase. However, ethyl acetate partitioning significantly enriched GLP-1 secretory activity and this fraction underwent bioactivity-guided fractionation. Three isolated compounds were potent and selective GLP-1 secretagogues: quinovic acid (QA) and two QA derivatives, QA-3β-O-β-D-glycopyranoside and QA-3β-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(28→1)-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester. All QA compounds activated the TGR5 receptor and increased intracellular incretin levels and gene expression. QA derivatives were more potent GLP-1 secretagogues than QA. This is the first time that QA and its naturally-occurring derivatives have been shown to activate TGR5 and stimulate GLP-1 secretion. These data provide a plausible mechanism for the ethnomedicinal use of F. cretica and may assist in the ongoing development of selective GLP-1 agonists. PMID:26820940

  12. Resistant maltodextrin promotes fasting glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion and production together with glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Hira, Tohru; Ikee, Asuka; Kishimoto, Yuka; Kanahori, Sumiko; Hara, Hiroshi

    2015-07-14

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which is produced and released from enteroendocrine L cells, plays pivotal roles in postprandial glycaemia. The ingestion of resistant maltodextrin (RMD), a water-soluble non-digestible saccharide, improves the glycaemic response. In the present study, we examined whether the continuous feeding of RMD to rats affected GLP-1 levels and glycaemic control. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks of age) were fed an American Institute of Nutrition (AIN)-93G-based diet containing either cellulose (5 %) as a control, RMD (2.5 or 5 %), or fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS, 2.5 or 5 %) for 7 weeks. During the test period, an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was performed after 6 weeks. Fasting GLP-1 levels were significantly higher in the 5 % RMD group than in the control group after 6 weeks. The IPGTT results showed that the glycaemic response was lower in the 5 % RMD group than in the control group. Lower caecal pH, higher caecal tissue and content weights were observed in the RMD and FOS groups. Proglucagon mRNA levels were increased in the caecum and colon of both RMD and FOS groups, whereas caecal GLP-1 content was increased in the 5 % RMD group. In addition, a 1 h RMD exposure induced GLP-1 secretion in an enteroendocrine L-cell model, and single oral administration of RMD increased plasma GLP-1 levels in conscious rats. The present study demonstrates that continuous ingestion of RMD increased GLP-1 secretion and production in normal rats, which could be stimulated by its direct and indirect (enhanced gut fermentation) effects on GLP-1-producing cells, and contribute to improving glucose tolerance.

  13. Combined contributions of over-secreted glucagon-like peptide 1 and suppressed insulin secretion to hyperglycemia induced by gatifloxacin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yunli; Wang, Xinting; Liu, Can; Yao, Dan; Hu, Mengyue; Li, Jia; Hu, Nan; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2013-02-01

    Accumulating evidences have showed that gatifloxacin causes dysglycemia in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Our preliminary study demonstrated that gatifloxacin stimulated glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal cells. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release and dysglycemia in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and explore the possible mechanisms. Oral administration of gatifloxacin (100 mg/kg/day and 200 mg/kg/day) for 3 and 12 days led to marked elevation of GLP-1 levels, accompanied by significant decrease in insulin levels and increase in plasma glucose. Similar results were found in normal rats treated with 3-day gatifloxacin. Gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release was further confirmed in NCI-H716 cells, which was abolished by diazoxide, a K{sub ATP} channel opener. QT-PCR analysis showed that gatifloxacin also upregulated expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3 mRNA. To clarify the contradiction on elevated GLP-1 without insulinotropic effect, effects of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin on insulin release were investigated using INS-1 cells. We found that short exposure (2 h) to GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion and biosynthesis, whereas long exposure (24 h and 48 h) to high level of GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. Moreover, we also confirmed gatifloxacin acutely stimulated insulin secretion while chronically inhibited insulin biosynthesis. All the results gave an inference that gatifloxacin stimulated over-secretion of GLP-1, in turn, high levels of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin synergistically impaired insulin release, worsening hyperglycemia. -- Highlights: ► Gatifloxacin induced hyperglycemia both in diabetic rats and normal rats. ► Gatifloxacin enhanced GLP-1 secretion but inhibited insulin secretion in rats. ► Long-term exposure to high GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. ► GLP-1 over-secretion may be

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-1: The missing link in the metabolic clock?

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Patricia L; Gil-Lozano, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Circadian expression of clock genes in peripheral tissues is critical to the coordinated regulation of intestinal digestive and absorptive functions, insulin secretion, and peripheral tissue nutrient deposition during periods of nutrient ingestion, thereby preventing metabolic dysregulation. As glucagon-like peptide-1 is a key incretin hormone that regulates glucose-dependent insulin secretion, we hypothesized that this intestinal hormone is a player in the peripheral metabolic clock, linking nutrient ingestion to insulin secretion. We have now established that secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 from the intestinal L cell shows a rhythmic pattern in rats and humans in vivo that is altered by circadian disruptors, such as constant light exposure, consumption of a Western diet and feeding at inappropriate times (i.e., during the light period in rodents). Interestingly, the alterations in the rhythm of the glucagon-like peptide-1 secretory responses were found to parallel the changes in the pattern of insulin responses in association with significant impairments in glucose tolerance. Furthermore, we have detected circadian clock gene expression, and showed circadian secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 from both the murine and human L cell in vitro. These findings demonstrate that glucagon-like peptide-1 is a functional component of the peripheral metabolic clock, and suggest that altered release of glucagon-like peptide-1 might play a role in the metabolic perturbations that result from circadian disruption. PMID:27186359

  15. The aglycone of ginsenoside Rg3 enables glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion in enteroendocrine cells and alleviates hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Suk; Jung Yang, Hea; Lee, In-Seung; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Park, Jiyoung; Jeong, Hyeon-Soo; Kim, Yoomi; Seok Ahn, Kwang; Na, Yun-Cheol; Jang, Hyeung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Ginsenosides can be classified on the basis of the skeleton of their aglycones. Here, we hypothesized that the sugar moieties attached to the dammarane backbone enable binding of the ginsenosides to the sweet taste receptor, eliciting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion in the enteroendocrine L cells. Using the human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells, we demonstrated that 15 ginsenosides stimulate GLP-1 secretion according to the position of their sugar moieties. Through a pharmacological approach and RNA interference technique to inhibit the cellular signal cascade and using the Gαgust−/− mice, we elucidated that GLP-1 secreting effect of Rg3 mediated by the sweet taste receptor mediated the signaling pathway. Rg3, a ginsenoside metabolite that transformed the structure through a steaming process, showed the strongest GLP-1 secreting effects in NCI-H716 cells and also showed an anti-hyperglycemic effect on a type 2 diabetic mouse model through increased plasma GLP-1 and plasma insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test. Our study reveals a novel mechanism where the sugar moieties of ginsenosides Rg3 stimulates GLP-1 secretion in enteroendocrine L cells through a sweet taste receptor-mediated signal transduction pathway and thus has an anti-hyperglycemic effect on the type 2 diabetic mouse model. PMID:26675132

  16. The aglycone of ginsenoside Rg3 enables glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion in enteroendocrine cells and alleviates hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Suk; Jung Yang, Hea; Lee, In-Seung; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Park, Jiyoung; Jeong, Hyeon-Soo; Kim, Yoomi; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Na, Yun-Cheol; Jang, Hyeung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Ginsenosides can be classified on the basis of the skeleton of their aglycones. Here, we hypothesized that the sugar moieties attached to the dammarane backbone enable binding of the ginsenosides to the sweet taste receptor, eliciting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion in the enteroendocrine L cells. Using the human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells, we demonstrated that 15 ginsenosides stimulate GLP-1 secretion according to the position of their sugar moieties. Through a pharmacological approach and RNA interference technique to inhibit the cellular signal cascade and using the Gαgust(-/-) mice, we elucidated that GLP-1 secreting effect of Rg3 mediated by the sweet taste receptor mediated the signaling pathway. Rg3, a ginsenoside metabolite that transformed the structure through a steaming process, showed the strongest GLP-1 secreting effects in NCI-H716 cells and also showed an anti-hyperglycemic effect on a type 2 diabetic mouse model through increased plasma GLP-1 and plasma insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test. Our study reveals a novel mechanism where the sugar moieties of ginsenosides Rg3 stimulates GLP-1 secretion in enteroendocrine L cells through a sweet taste receptor-mediated signal transduction pathway and thus has an anti-hyperglycemic effect on the type 2 diabetic mouse model. PMID:26675132

  17. Postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion is increased during the progression of glucose intolerance and obesity in high-fat/high-sucrose diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shingo; Hira, Tohru; Hara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-14

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted by distal enteroendocrine cells in response to luminal nutrients, and exerts insulinotropic and anorexigenic effects. Although GLP-1 secretory responses under established obese or diabetic conditions have been studied, it has not been investigated whether or how postprandial GLP-1 responses were affected during the progression of diet-induced obesity. In the present study, a meal tolerance test was performed every week in rats fed a high-fat and high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet to evaluate postprandial glycaemic, insulin and GLP-1 responses. In addition, gastric emptying was assessed by the acetaminophen method. After 8 weeks of HF/HS treatment, portal vein and intestinal mucosa were collected to examine GLP-1 production. Postprandial glucose in response to normal meal ingestion was increased in the HF/HS group within 2 weeks, and its elevation gradually returned close to that of the control group until day 50. Slower postprandial gastric emptying was observed in the HF/HS group on days 6, 13 and 34. Postprandial GLP-1 and insulin responses were increased in the HF/HS group at 7 weeks. Higher portal GLP-1 and insulin levels were observed in the HF/HS group, but mucosal gut hormone mRNA levels were unchanged. These results revealed that the postprandial GLP-1 response to meal ingestion is enhanced during the progression of diet-induced glucose intolerance and obesity in rats. The boosted postprandial GLP-1 secretion by chronic HF/HS diet treatment suggests increased sensitivity to luminal nutrients in the gut, and this may slow the establishment of glucose intolerance and obesity. PMID:25827219

  18. Postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion is increased during the progression of glucose intolerance and obesity in high-fat/high-sucrose diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shingo; Hira, Tohru; Hara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-14

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted by distal enteroendocrine cells in response to luminal nutrients, and exerts insulinotropic and anorexigenic effects. Although GLP-1 secretory responses under established obese or diabetic conditions have been studied, it has not been investigated whether or how postprandial GLP-1 responses were affected during the progression of diet-induced obesity. In the present study, a meal tolerance test was performed every week in rats fed a high-fat and high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet to evaluate postprandial glycaemic, insulin and GLP-1 responses. In addition, gastric emptying was assessed by the acetaminophen method. After 8 weeks of HF/HS treatment, portal vein and intestinal mucosa were collected to examine GLP-1 production. Postprandial glucose in response to normal meal ingestion was increased in the HF/HS group within 2 weeks, and its elevation gradually returned close to that of the control group until day 50. Slower postprandial gastric emptying was observed in the HF/HS group on days 6, 13 and 34. Postprandial GLP-1 and insulin responses were increased in the HF/HS group at 7 weeks. Higher portal GLP-1 and insulin levels were observed in the HF/HS group, but mucosal gut hormone mRNA levels were unchanged. These results revealed that the postprandial GLP-1 response to meal ingestion is enhanced during the progression of diet-induced glucose intolerance and obesity in rats. The boosted postprandial GLP-1 secretion by chronic HF/HS diet treatment suggests increased sensitivity to luminal nutrients in the gut, and this may slow the establishment of glucose intolerance and obesity.

  19. Dissociated effects of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide vs glucagon-like peptide-1 on beta-cell secretion and insulin clearance in mice.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Giovanni; Thomaseth, Karl; Ahrén, Bo

    2010-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) potently augment insulin response to glucose. It is less known what their effects are insulin clearance, which also contributes to peripheral hyperinsulinemia observed after administration of incretins together with glucose. The aims of this study were the quantification of C-peptide secretion and the evaluation of insulin clearance after administration of GIP with glucose. This allows the assessment of GIP's effects on hyperinsulinemia. In addition, GIP's effects were compared with those of GLP-1. Anesthetized female NMRI mice were injected intravenously with glucose alone (1 g/kg, n = 35) or glucose together with GIP (50 microg/kg, n = 12). Samples were taken through the following 50 minutes, and C-peptide and insulin concentrations were used to reconstruct C-peptide secretion rate and insulin clearance. In a previous study, GLP-1 (10 microg/kg) was used in 12 mice; and we used those GLP-1 results to compare GIP effects with those of GLP-1. C-peptide secretion rate peaked at 1 minute after glucose injection, and the immediate part of the insulin-releasing process was markedly augmented by both incretin hormones (1-minute suprabasal increment secretory rate was 20 +/- 2 pmol/min for GIP and 28 +/- 2 pmol/min for GLP-1, vs only 9 +/- 1 pmol/min for glucose alone; P < .001). Until 10 minutes after administration, C-peptide secretion remained higher with incretins (P < .0001), whereas starting from 20 minutes, the 3 patterns were undistinguishable (P > .2). Insulin clearance, previously shown to be abridged by 46% with GLP-1, was reduced only by a nonsignificant (P = .27) 21% with GIP. This study thus shows that the 2 incretins markedly augment glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mice by a preferential action on the immediate response to glucose of insulin secretion. However, the action of GIP is less effective than that of GLP-1. Insulin clearance with GIP is not significantly

  20. Short-term sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure alters time-dependent glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin secretion in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gil-Lozano, Manuel; Hunter, Paola M; Behan, Lucy-Ann; Gladanac, Bojana; Casper, Robert F; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal L cell is the principal source of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a major determinant of insulin release. Because GLP-1 secretion is regulated in a circadian manner in rodents, we investigated whether the activity of the human L cell is also time sensitive. Rhythmic fluctuations in the mRNA levels of canonical clock genes were found in the human NCI-H716 L cell model, which also showed a time-dependent pattern in their response to well-established secretagogues. A diurnal variation in GLP-1 responses to identical meals (850 kcal), served 12 h apart in the normal dark (2300) and light (1100) periods, was also observed in male volunteers maintained under standard sleep and light conditions. These findings suggest the existence of a daily pattern of activity in the human L cell. Moreover, we separately tested the short-term effects of sleep deprivation and nocturnal light exposure on basal and postprandial GLP-1, insulin, and glucose levels in the same volunteers. Sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure disrupted the melatonin and cortisol profiles and increased insulin resistance. Moreover, it also induced profound derangements in GLP-1 and insulin responses such that postprandial GLP-1 and insulin levels were markedly elevated and the normal variation in GLP-1 responses was abrogated. These alterations were not observed in sleep-deprived participants maintained under dark conditions, indicating a direct effect of light on the mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, the metabolic abnormalities known to occur in shift workers may be related to the effects of irregular light-dark cycles on these glucoregulatory pathways. PMID:26530153

  1. Short-term sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure alters time-dependent glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin secretion in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gil-Lozano, Manuel; Hunter, Paola M; Behan, Lucy-Ann; Gladanac, Bojana; Casper, Robert F; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal L cell is the principal source of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a major determinant of insulin release. Because GLP-1 secretion is regulated in a circadian manner in rodents, we investigated whether the activity of the human L cell is also time sensitive. Rhythmic fluctuations in the mRNA levels of canonical clock genes were found in the human NCI-H716 L cell model, which also showed a time-dependent pattern in their response to well-established secretagogues. A diurnal variation in GLP-1 responses to identical meals (850 kcal), served 12 h apart in the normal dark (2300) and light (1100) periods, was also observed in male volunteers maintained under standard sleep and light conditions. These findings suggest the existence of a daily pattern of activity in the human L cell. Moreover, we separately tested the short-term effects of sleep deprivation and nocturnal light exposure on basal and postprandial GLP-1, insulin, and glucose levels in the same volunteers. Sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure disrupted the melatonin and cortisol profiles and increased insulin resistance. Moreover, it also induced profound derangements in GLP-1 and insulin responses such that postprandial GLP-1 and insulin levels were markedly elevated and the normal variation in GLP-1 responses was abrogated. These alterations were not observed in sleep-deprived participants maintained under dark conditions, indicating a direct effect of light on the mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, the metabolic abnormalities known to occur in shift workers may be related to the effects of irregular light-dark cycles on these glucoregulatory pathways.

  2. Glucagon-like peptide 1 and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Fava, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) is a major incretin hormone. This means that it is secreted by the gut in response to food and helps in reducing post-prandial glucose exertion. It achieves this through a number of mechanisms, including stimulating insulin release by pancreatic β-cells in a glucose-dependent manner; inhibition of glucagon release by pancreatic α-cells (also in a glucose-dependent manner); induction of central appetite suppression and by delaying gastric empting thereby inducing satiety and also reducing the rate of absorption of nutrients. However, GLP1 receptors have been described in a number of extra-pancreatic tissues, including the endothelium and the myocardium. This suggests that the physiological effects of GLP1 extend beyond post-prandial glucose control and raises the possibility that GLP1 might have cardiovascular effects. This is of importance in our understanding of incretin hormone physiology and especially because of the possible implications that it might have with regard to cardiovascular effects of incretin-based therapies, namely DPP-IV inhibitors (gliptins) and GLP1 analogues. This review analyzes the animal and human data on the effects of GLP1 on the cardiovascular system in health and in disease and the currently available data on cardiovascular effects of incretin-based therapies. It is the author's view that the physiological role of GLP1 is not only to minimize postprandial hypoglycaemia, but also protect against it.

  3. Cardiovascular Effects of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yu Mi

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a member of the proglucagon incretin family, and GLP-1 receptor agonists (RAs) have been introduced as a new class of antidiabetic medications in the past decade. The benefits of GLP-1 RAs are derived from their pleiotropic effects, which include glucose-dependent insulin secretion, suppressed glucagon secretion, and reduced appetite. Moreover, GLP-1 RAs also exert beneficial roles on multiple organ systems in which the GLP-1 receptors exist, including the cardiovascular system. Cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 RAs have been of great interest since the burden from cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been unbearably increasing in a diabetic population worldwide, despite strict glycemic control and advanced therapeutic techniques to treat CVD. Preclinical studies have already demonstrated the beneficial effects of GLP-1 on myocardium and vascular endothelium, and many clinical studies evaluating changes in surrogate markers of CVD have suggested potential benefits from the use of GLP-1 RAs. Data from numerous clinical trials primarily evaluating the antihyperglycemic effects of multiple GLP-1 RAs have also revealed that changes in most CVD risk markers reported as secondary outcomes have been in favor of GLP-1 RAs treatment. However, to date, there is only one randomized clinical trial of GLP-1 RAs (the ELIXA study) evaluating major cardiovascular events as their primary outcomes, and in this study, a neutral cardiovascular effect of lixisenatide was observed in high-risk diabetic subjects. Therefore, the results of ongoing CVD outcome trials with the use of GLP-1 RAs should be awaited to elucidate the translation of benefits previously seen in CVD risk marker studies into large clinical trials with primary cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:27118277

  4. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and eating.

    PubMed

    Gutzwiller, Jean-Pierre; Degen, Lukas; Heuss, Ludwig; Beglinger, Christoph

    2004-08-01

    New information regarding gastrointestinal mechanisms that participate in the control of food intake has extended our understanding of appetite control. Although each new signaling pathway discovered in the gut is a potential target for drug development in the treatment of obesity, the growing number of such signaling molecules indicates that a highly complex process controls food intake. The present summary focuses on the role of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in this regulatory process. The different biological effects of GLP-1 (glucose-lowering properties, inhibition of appetite and food intake) provide a powerful impetus for development of GLP-1-based new drugs.

  5. The discovery of glucagon-like peptide 1.

    PubMed

    Lund, P Kay

    2005-06-15

    The discovery of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) began more than two decades ago with the observations that anglerfish islet proglucagon messenger RNAs (mRNAs) contained coding sequences for two glucagon-related peptides arranged in tandem. Subsequent analyses revealed that mammalian proglucagon mRNAs encoded a precursor containing the sequence of pancreatic glucagon, intestinal glicentin and two glucagon-related peptides termed GLP-1 and GLP-2. Multidisciplinary approaches were then required to define the structure of biologically active GLP-1 7-36 amide and its role as an incretin, satiety hormone and, most recently, a neuroprotective peptide. This historial perspective outlines the use of traditional recombinant DNA approaches to derive the GLP-1 sequence and highlights the challenges and combination of clinical and basic science approaches required to define the physiology and pathophysiology of bioactive peptides discovered through genomics. PMID:15780428

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1 binding to rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Delgado, E; Luque, M A; Alcántara, A; Trapote, M A; Clemente, F; Galera, C; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1995-01-01

    We have found [125I]glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)-amide-specific binding activity in rat skeletal muscle plasma membranes, with an estimated M(r) of 63,000 by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE. The specific binding was time and membrane protein concentration dependent, and displaceable by unlabeled GLP-1(7-36)-amide with an ID50 of 3 x 10(-9) M of the peptide; GLP-1(1-36)-amide also competed, whereas glucagon and insulin did not. GLP-1(7-36)-amide did not modify the basal adenylate cyclase activity in skeletal muscle plasma membranes. These data, together with our previous finding of a potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)-amide in rat soleus muscle, and also in isolated hepatocytes, which was not accompanied by a rise in the cell cyclic AMP content, lead use to believe that the insulin-like effects of this peptide on glucose metabolism in the muscle could be mediated by a type of receptor somehow different to that described for GLP-1 in pancreatic B cells, where GLP-1 action is mediated by the cyclic AMP-adenylate cyclase system.

  7. A Placebo-Controlled Study on the Effects of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Mimetic, Exenatide, on Insulin Secretion, Body Composition and Adipokines in Obese, Client-Owned Cats.

    PubMed

    Hoelmkjaer, Kirsten M; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Holst, Jens J; Cronin, Anna M; Nielsen, Dorte H; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Bjornvad, Charlotte R

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like Peptide-1 mimetics increase insulin secretion and reduces body weight in humans. In lean, healthy cats, short-term treatment has produced similar results, whereas the effect in obese cats or with extended duration of treatment is unknown. Here, prolonged (12 weeks) treatment with the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 mimetic, exenatide, was evaluated in 12 obese, but otherwise healthy, client-owned cats. Cats were randomized to exenatide (1.0 μg/kg) or placebo treatment twice daily for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was changes in insulin concentration; the secondary endpoints were glucose homeostasis, body weight, body composition as measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and overall safety. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg body weight) was conducted at week 0 and week 12. Exenatide did not change the insulin concentration, plasma glucose concentration or glucose tolerance (P>0.05 for all). Exenatide tended to reduce body weight on continued normal feeding. Median relative weight loss after 12 weeks was 5.1% (range 1.7 to 8.4%) in the exenatide group versus 3.2% (range -5.3 to 5.7%) in the placebo group (P = 0.10). Body composition and adipokine levels were unaffected by exenatide (P>0.05). Twelve weeks of exenatide was well-tolerated, with only two cases of mild, self-limiting gastrointestinal signs and a single case of mild hypoglycemia. The long-term insulinotropic effect of exenatide appeared less pronounced in obese cats compared to previous short-term studies in lean cats. Further investigations are required to fully elucidate the effect on insulin secretion, glucose tolerance and body weight in obese cats. PMID:27136422

  8. A Placebo-Controlled Study on the Effects of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Mimetic, Exenatide, on Insulin Secretion, Body Composition and Adipokines in Obese, Client-Owned Cats

    PubMed Central

    Hoelmkjaer, Kirsten M.; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J.; Holst, Jens J.; Cronin, Anna M.; Nielsen, Dorte H.; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Bjornvad, Charlotte R.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like Peptide-1 mimetics increase insulin secretion and reduces body weight in humans. In lean, healthy cats, short-term treatment has produced similar results, whereas the effect in obese cats or with extended duration of treatment is unknown. Here, prolonged (12 weeks) treatment with the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 mimetic, exenatide, was evaluated in 12 obese, but otherwise healthy, client-owned cats. Cats were randomized to exenatide (1.0 μg/kg) or placebo treatment twice daily for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was changes in insulin concentration; the secondary endpoints were glucose homeostasis, body weight, body composition as measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and overall safety. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg body weight) was conducted at week 0 and week 12. Exenatide did not change the insulin concentration, plasma glucose concentration or glucose tolerance (P>0.05 for all). Exenatide tended to reduce body weight on continued normal feeding. Median relative weight loss after 12 weeks was 5.1% (range 1.7 to 8.4%) in the exenatide group versus 3.2% (range -5.3 to 5.7%) in the placebo group (P = 0.10). Body composition and adipokine levels were unaffected by exenatide (P>0.05). Twelve weeks of exenatide was well-tolerated, with only two cases of mild, self-limiting gastrointestinal signs and a single case of mild hypoglycemia. The long-term insulinotropic effect of exenatide appeared less pronounced in obese cats compared to previous short-term studies in lean cats. Further investigations are required to fully elucidate the effect on insulin secretion, glucose tolerance and body weight in obese cats. PMID:27136422

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide secretion in response to nutrient ingestion in man: acute post-prandial and 24-h secretion patterns.

    PubMed

    Elliott, R M; Morgan, L M; Tredger, J A; Deacon, S; Wright, J; Marks, V

    1993-07-01

    The acute effects of different macronutrients on the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1(7-36)amide) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) were compared in healthy human subjects. Circulating levels of the two hormones were measured over a 24-h period during which subjects consumed a mixed diet. In the first study, eight subjects consumed three equicaloric (375 kcal) test meals of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Small increases in plasma GLP-1(7-36) amide were found after all meals. Levels reached a maximum 30 min after the carbohydrate and 150 min after the fat load. Ingestion of both carbohydrate and fat induced substantial rises in GIP secretion, but the protein meal had no effect. In a second study, eight subjects consumed 75 g glucose or the equivalent portion of complex carbohydrate as boiled brown rice or barley. Plasma GIP, insulin and glucose levels increased after all three meals, the largest increase being observed following glucose and the smallest following the barley meal. Plasma GLP-1(7-36)amide levels rose only following the glucose meal. In the 24-h study, plasma GLP-1(7-36)amide and GIP concentrations were increased following every meal and remained elevated throughout the day, only falling to fasting levels at night. The increases in circulating GLP-1(7-36)amide and GIP levels following carbohydrate or a mixed meal are consistent with their role as incretins. The more sustained rises observed in the daytime during the 24-h study are consistent with an anabolic role in lipid metabolism.

  10. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, reduces intimal thickening after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Hiromasa; Nomiyama, Takashi; Mita, Tomoya; Yasunari, Eisuke; Azuma, Kosuke; Komiya, Koji; Arakawa, Masayuki; Jin, Wen Long; Kanazawa, Akio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Hirose, Takahisa; Watada, Hirotaka

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Exendin-4 reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury in a mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 dose not alter metabolic parameters in non-diabetic, non-obese mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 reduces PDGF-induced cell proliferation in cultured SMCs. {yields} Exendin-4 may reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury at least in part through its direct action on SMCs. -- Abstract: Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a hormone secreted by L cells of the small intestine and stimulates glucose-dependent insulin response. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists such as exendin-4 are currently used in type 2 diabetes, and considered to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. To further elucidate the effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular diseases, we investigated the effects of exendin-4 on intimal thickening after endothelial injury. Under continuous infusion of exendin-4 at 24 nmol/kg/day, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to endothelial denudation injury of the femoral artery. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 reduced neointimal formation at 4 weeks after arterial injury without altering body weight or various metabolic parameters. In addition, in vitro studies of isolated murine, rat and human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells showed the expression of GLP-1 receptor. The addition of 10 nM exendin-4 to cultured smooth muscle cells significantly reduced their proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor. Our results suggested that exendin-4 reduced intimal thickening after vascular injury at least in part by the suppression of platelet-derived growth factor-induced smooth muscle cells proliferation.

  11. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Analogs and their Effects on Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Tudurí, Eva; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Nadal, Angel; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) exerts many actions that improve glycemic control. GLP-1 stimulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and protects β cells, while its extrapancreatic effects include cardioprotection, reduction of hepatic glucose production, and regulation of satiety. Although an appealing antidiabetic drug candidate, the rapid degradation of GLP-1 by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) means that its therapeutic use is unfeasible, and this prompted the development of two main GLP-1 therapies: long-acting GLP-1 analogs and DPP-4 inhibitors. In this review, we focus on the pancreatic effects exerted by current GLP-1 derivatives used to treat diabetes. Based on the results from in vitro and in vivo studies in humans and animal models, we describe the specific actions of GLP-1 analogs on the synthesis, processing, and secretion of insulin, islet morphology, and β cell proliferation and apoptosis. PMID:27062006

  12. Potentiation of insulin secretion and improvement of glucose intolerance by combining a novel G protein-coupled receptor 40 agonist DS-1558 with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ryutaro; Yano, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Junko; Tanaka, Naomi; Toda, Narihiro; Yoshida, Masao; Takano, Rieko; Inoue, Masahiro; Honda, Takeshi; Kume, Shoen; Matsumoto, Koji

    2014-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) is a Gq-coupled receptor for free fatty acids predominantly expressed in pancreatic β-cells. In recent years, GPR40 agonists have been investigated for use as novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We discovered a novel small molecule GPR40 agonist, (3S)-3-ethoxy-3-(4-{[(1R)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl]oxy}phenyl)propanoic acid (DS-1558). The GPR40-mediated effects of DS-1558 on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were evaluated in isolated islets from GPR40 knock-out and wild-type (littermate) mice. The GPR40-mediated effects on glucose tolerance and insulin secretion were also confirmed by an oral glucose tolerance test in these mice. Furthermore, oral administration of DS-1558 (0.03, 0.1 and 0.3mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently improved hyperglycemia and increased insulin secretion during the oral glucose tolerance test in Zucker fatty rats, the model of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Next, we examined the combination effects of DS-1558 with glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1). DS-1558 not only increased the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by GLP-1 but also potentiated the maximum insulinogenic effects of GLP-1 after an intravenous glucose injection in normal Sprague Dawley rats. Furthermore, the glucose lowering effects of exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, were markedly potentiated by the DS-1558 (3mg/kg) add-on in diabetic db/db mice during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. In conclusion, our results indicate that add-on GPR40 agonists to GLP-1 related agents might be a potential treatment compared to single administration of these compounds. Therefore the combinations of these agents are a novel therapeutic option for type 2 diabetes.

  13. The complexity of signalling mediated by the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Madeleine M; Halls, Michelle L; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Wootten, Denise

    2016-04-15

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a class B GPCR that is a major therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The receptor is activated by the incretin peptide GLP-1 promoting a broad range of physiological effects including glucose-dependent insulin secretion and biosynthesis, improved insulin sensitivity of peripheral tissues, preservation of β-cell mass and weight loss, all of which are beneficial in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Despite this, existing knowledge surrounding the underlying signalling mechanisms responsible for the physiological actions downstream of GLP-1R activation is limited. Here, we review the current understanding around GLP-1R-mediated signalling, in particular highlighting recent contributions to the field on biased agonism, the spatial and temporal aspects for the control of signalling and how these concepts may influence future drug development. PMID:27068973

  14. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Analogs: Recent Advances, New Possibilities, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that plays important physiological roles in glucose homeostasis. Produced from intestine upon food intake, it stimulates insulin secretion and keeps pancreatic β-cells healthy and proliferating. Because of these beneficial effects, it has attracted a great deal of attention in the past decade, and an entirely new line of diabetic therapeutics has emerged based on the peptide. In addition to the therapeutic applications, GLP-1 analogs have demonstrated a potential in molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells; this may be useful in early detection of the disease and evaluation of therapeutic interventions, including islet transplantation. In this Perspective, we focus on GLP-1 analogs for their studies on improvement of biological activities, enhancement of metabolic stability, investigation of receptor interaction, and visualization of the pancreatic islets. PMID:25349901

  15. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the glucagon-like peptide-1 analog liraglutide in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Hall, M J; Adin, C A; Borin-Crivellenti, S; Rudinsky, A J; Rajala-Schultz, P; Lakritz, J; Gilor, C

    2015-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal hormone that induces glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion while suppressing glucagon secretion. Glucagon-like peptide-1 also increases beta cell mass and satiation while decelerating gastric emptying. Liraglutide is a fatty-acid derivative of GLP-1 with a protracted pharmacokinetic profile that is used in people for treatment of type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of liraglutide in healthy cats. Hyperglycemic clamps were performed on days 0 (HGC) and 14 (LgHGC) in 7 healthy cats. Liraglutide was administered subcutaneously (0.6 mg/cat) once daily on days 8 through 14. Compared with the HGC (mean ± standard deviation; 455.5 ± 115.8 ng/L), insulin concentrations during LgHGC were increased (760.8 ± 350.7 ng/L; P = 0.0022), glucagon concentrations decreased (0.66 ± 0.4 pmol/L during HGC vs 0.5 ± 0.4 pmol/L during LgHGC; P = 0.0089), and there was a trend toward an increased total glucose infused (median [range] = 1.61 (1.11-2.54) g/kg and 2.25 (1.64-3.10) g/kg, respectively; P = 0.087). Appetite reduction and decreased body weight (9% ± 3%; P = 0.006) were observed in all cats. Liraglutide has similar effects and pharmacokinetics profile in cats to those reported in people. With a half-life of approximately 12 h, once daily dosing might be feasible; however, significant effects on appetite and weight loss may necessitate dosage or dosing frequency reductions. Further investigation of liraglutide in diabetic cats and overweight cats is warranted.

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 binding to rat hepatic membranes.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Delgado, E; Trapote, M A; Alcántara, A; Clemente, F; Luque, M A; Perea, A; Valverde, I

    1995-07-01

    We have found [125I]glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1(7-36)amide specific binding activity in rat liver and isolated hepatocyte plasma membranes, with an M(r) of approximately 63,000, estimated by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE. The specific binding was time- and membrane protein concentration-dependent, and equally displaced by unlabelled GLP-1(7-36)amide and by GLP-1(1-36)amide, achieving its ID50 at 3 x 10(-9) M of the peptides. GLP-1(7-36)amide did not modify the basal or the glucagon (10(-8) M)-stimulated adenylate cyclase in the hepatocyte plasma membranes. These data, together with our previous findings of a potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)amide in isolated rat hepatocytes, led us to postulate that the insulin-like effects of this peptide on glucose liver metabolism could be mediated by a type of receptor probably different from that described for GLP-1 in pancreatic B-cells or, alternatively, by the same receptor which, in this tissue as well as in muscle, uses a different transduction system.

  17. The mechanism of glucagon-like peptide-1 participation in the osmotic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Natochin, Yu V; Marina, A S; Kutina, A V; Balbotkina, E V; Karavashkina, T A

    2016-07-01

    We have found the physiological mechanism of intensification of the excessive fluid removal from the body under the action of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its analog exenatide. Under the water load in rats, exenatide significantly increased the clearance of lithium, reduced fluid reabsorption in the proximal tubule of the nephron and intensified reabsorption of sodium ions in the distal parts, which contributed to the formation of sodium-free water and faster recovery of osmotic homeostasis. Blocking this pathway with a selective antagonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors slowed down the elimination of excessive water from the body. PMID:27595820

  18. Glucagon-like peptide 1 and dysglycemia: Conflict in incretin science.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Although GLP-1 (glucagon like peptide-1) based therapies (GLP-1 agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) is currently playing a cornerstone role in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, dilemma does exist about some of its basic physiology. So far, we know that GLP-1 is secreted by the direct actions of luminal contents on the L cells in distal jejunum and proximal ileum. However, there is growing evidence now, which suggest that other mechanism via "neural" or "upper gut" signals may be playing a second fiddle and could stimulate GLP-1 secretion even before the luminal contents have reached into the proximities of L cells. Therefore, the contribution of direct and indirect mechanism to GLP-1 secretion remains elusive. Furthermore, no clear consensus exists about the pattern of GLP-1 secretion, although many believe it is monophasic. One of the most exciting issues in incretin science is GLP-1 level and GLP-1 responsiveness. It is not exactly known as to what happens to endogenous GLP-1 with progressive worsening of dysglycemia from normal glucose tolerance to impaired glucose to frank diabetes and furthermore with increasing duration of diabetes. Although, conventional wisdom suggests that there may be a decrease in endogenous GLP-1 level with the worsening of dysglycemia, literature showed discordant results. Furthermore, there is emerging evidence to suggest that GLP-1 response can vary with ethnicity. This mini review is an attempt to put a brief perspective on all these issues. PMID:25593851

  19. Farnesoid X receptor inhibits glucagon-like peptide-1 production by enteroendocrine L cells.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Mohamed-Sami; Daoudi, Mehdi; Prawitt, Janne; Ducastel, Sarah; Touche, Véronique; Sayin, Sama I; Perino, Alessia; Brighton, Cheryl A; Sebti, Yasmine; Kluza, Jérôme; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Hélène; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Dorchies, Emilie; Baud, Grégory; Spinelli, Valeria; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Caron, Sandrine; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Caiazzo, Robert; Reimann, Frank; Marchetti, Philippe; Lefebvre, Philippe; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Gribble, Fiona M; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pattou, François; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Lestavel, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are signalling molecules, which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex bile acids in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here, we show that FXR activation in L cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycaemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes. PMID:26134028

  20. Medicinal Plants Qua Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretagogue via Intestinal Nutrient Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Suk; Jang, Hyeung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) participates in glucose homeostasis and feeding behavior. Because GLP-1 is rapidly inactivated by the enzymatic cleavage of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) long-acting GLP-1 analogues, for example, exenatide and DPP4 inhibitors, for example, liraglutide, have been developed as therapeutics for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the inefficient clinical performance and the incidence of side effects reported on the existing therapeutics for T2DM have led to the development of a novel therapeutic strategy to stimulate endogenous GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells. Since the GLP-1 secretion of enteroendocrine L cells depends on the luminal nutrient constituents, the intestinal nutrient sensors involved in GLP-1 secretion have been investigated. In particular, nutrient sensors for tastants, cannabinoids, and bile acids are able to recognize the nonnutritional chemical compounds, which are abundant in medicinal plants. These GLP-1 secretagogues derived from medicinal plants are easy to find in our surroundings, and their effectiveness has been demonstrated through traditional remedies. The finding of GLP-1 secretagogues is directly linked to understanding of the role of intestinal nutrient sensors and their recognizable nutrients. Concurrently, this study demonstrates the possibility of developing novel therapeutics for metabolic disorders such as T2DM and obesity using nutrients that are readily accessible in our surroundings. PMID:26788106

  1. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Production by Enteroendocrine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    TRABELSI, Mohamed-Sami; DAOUDI, Mehdi; PRAWITT, Janne; DUCASTEL, Sarah; TOUCHE, Véronique; SAYIN, Sama I.; PERINO, Alessia; BRIGHTON, Cheryl A.; SEBTI, Yasmine; KLUZA, Jérôme; BRIAND, Olivier; DEHONDT, Hélène; VALLEZ, Emmanuelle; DORCHIES, Emilie; BAUD, Grégory; SPINELLI, Valeria; HENNUYER, Nathalie; CARON, Sandrine; BANTUBUNGI, Kadiombo; CAIAZZO, Robert; REIMANN, Frank; MARCHETTI, Philippe; LEFEBVRE, Philippe; BÄCKHED, Fredrik; GRIBBLE, Fiona M.; SCHOONJANS, Kristina; PATTOU, François; TAILLEUX, Anne; STAELS, Bart; LESTAVEL, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) are signalling molecules which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex BA in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L-cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L-cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here we show that FXR activation in L-cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR-deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes. PMID:26134028

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism.

  3. [Albiglutide (Eperzan): a new once-weekly agonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-04-01

    Albiglutide (Eperzan) is a new once-weekly agonist of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors that is indicated in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Two doses are available, 30 mg and 50 mg, to be injected subcutaneously once a week. It has been extensively evaluated in the HARMONY programme of eight large randomised controlled trials that were performed at different stages of type 2 diabetes, in comparison with placebo or an active comparator. The endocrine and metabolic effects of albiglutide are similar to those of other GLP-1 receptor agonists: stimulation of insulin secretion (incretin effect) and inhibition of glucagon secretion, both in a glucose-dependent manner, retardation of gastric emptying and increase of satiety. These effects lead to a reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) levels, combined with a weight reduction. The overall tolerance profile is good. Albiglutide is currently reimbursed in Belgium after failure (HbA(1c) > 7.5%) of and in combination with a dual therapy with metformin and a sulfonylurea as well as in combination with a basal insulin (with or without oral antidiabetic drugs). To avoid hypoglycaemia, a reduction in the dose of sulfonylurea or insulin may be recommended. A once-weekly administration should increase patient's acceptance of injectable therapy and improve compliance.

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism. PMID:26807480

  5. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Pirone, Andrea; Ding, Bao An; Giannessi, Elisabetta; Coli, Alessandra; Stornelli, Maria Rita; di Cossato, Margherita Marzoni Fecia; Piano, Ilaria; Lenzi, Carla

    2012-10-01

    The distribution of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) was investigated in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant using immunohistochemistry. GLP-1 immunoreactive cells were common in the small intestine, in the proventriculus and in the pancreas. Immunostained cells were not seen in the crop, in the gizzard and in the large intestine. Double labelling demonstrated that GLP-1 and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) were occasionally co-localized only in the duodenal villi. In contrast to what was previously described in the chicken and ostrich, we noted GLP-1 positive cells in the duodenum. These data were consistent with the presence of proglucagon mRNA in the chicken duodenum. Our findings indicate that GLP-1 might have an inhibitory effect on gastric and crop emptying and on acid secretion also in the pheasant. Moreover, the results of the present research regarding the initial region of the small intestine suggest a further direct mechanism of the GLP-1 release during the early digestion phase and an enhancement of its incretin role.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists increase pancreatic mass by induction of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Jacqueline A; Baggio, Laurie L; Cao, Xiemin; Abdulla, Tahmid; Campbell, Jonathan E; Secher, Thomas; Jelsing, Jacob; Larsen, Brett; Drucker, Daniel J

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) controls glucose homeostasis by regulating secretion of insulin and glucagon through a single GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). GLP-1R agonists also increase pancreatic weight in some preclinical studies through poorly understood mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the increase in pancreatic weight following activation of GLP-1R signaling in mice reflects an increase in acinar cell mass, without changes in ductal compartments or β-cell mass. GLP-1R agonists did not increase pancreatic DNA content or the number of Ki67(+) cells in the exocrine compartment; however, pancreatic protein content was increased in mice treated with exendin-4 or liraglutide. The increased pancreatic mass and protein content was independent of cholecystokinin receptors, associated with a rapid increase in S6 phosphorylation, and mediated through the GLP-1R. Rapamycin abrogated the GLP-1R-dependent increase in pancreatic mass but had no effect on the robust induction of Reg3α and Reg3β gene expression. Mass spectrometry analysis identified GLP-1R-dependent upregulation of Reg family members, as well as proteins important for translation and export, including Fam129a, eIF4a1, Wars, and Dmbt1. Hence, pharmacological GLP-1R activation induces protein synthesis, leading to increased pancreatic mass, independent of changes in DNA content or cell proliferation in mice.

  7. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Regulates Cholecystokinin Production in β-Cells to Protect From Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Amelia K.; Neuman, Joshua C.; Battiola, Therese J.; Wisinski, Jaclyn A.; Kimple, Michelle E.

    2015-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a classic gut hormone that is also expressed in the pancreatic islet, where it is highly up-regulated with obesity. Loss of CCK results in increased β-cell apoptosis in obese mice. Similarly, islet α-cells produce increased amounts of another gut peptide, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), in response to cytokine and nutrient stimulation. GLP-1 also protects β-cells from apoptosis via cAMP-mediated mechanisms. Therefore, we hypothesized that the activation of islet-derived CCK and GLP-1 may be linked. We show here that both human and mouse islets secrete active GLP-1 as a function of body mass index/obesity. Furthermore, GLP-1 can rapidly stimulate β-cell CCK production and secretion through direct targeting by the cAMP-modulated transcription factor, cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). We find that cAMP-mediated signaling is required for Cck expression, but CCK regulation by cAMP does not require stimulatory levels of glucose or insulin secretion. We also show that CREB directly targets the Cck promoter in islets from obese (Leptinob/ob) mice. Finally, we demonstrate that the ability of GLP-1 to protect β-cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis is partially dependent on CCK receptor signaling. Taken together, our work suggests that in obesity, active GLP-1 produced in the islet stimulates CCK production and secretion in a paracrine manner via cAMP and CREB. This intraislet incretin loop may be one mechanism whereby GLP-1 protects β-cells from apoptosis. PMID:25984632

  8. Oral Delivery of Pentameric Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 by Recombinant Lactobacillus in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Pelletier, Julien; Marcotte, Harold; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Hammarström, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone produced by intestinal cells and stimulates insulin secretion from the pancreas in a glucose-dependent manner. Exogenously supplied GLP-1 analogues are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. An anti-diabetic effect of Lactobacillus in lowering plasma glucose levels and its use as a vehicle for delivery of protein and antibody fragments has been shown previously. The aim of this study was to employ lactobacilli as a vehicle for in situ production and delivery of GLP-1 analogue to normalize blood glucose level in diabetic GK (Goto-Kakizaki) rats. In this study, we designed pentameric GLP-1 (5×GLP-1) analogues which were both expressed in a secreted form and anchored to the surface of lactobacilli. Intestinal trypsin sites were introduced within 5×GLP-1, leading to digestion of the pentamer into an active monomeric form. The E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides delivered by intestinal intubation to GK rats resulted in a significant improvement of glycemic control demonstrated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Meanwhile, the purified 5×GLP-1 (trypsin-digested) from the Lactobacillus cultures stimulated insulin secretion from HIT-T15 cells, similar to the E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides. When delivered by gavage to GK rats, non-expressor L. paracasei significantly lowered the blood glucose level but 5×GLP-1 expression did not provide an additional anti-diabetic effect, possibly due to the low levels produced. Our results indicate that lactobacilli themselves might be used as an alternative treatment method for type 2 diabetes, but further work is needed to increase the expression level of GLP-1 by lactobacilli in order to obtain a significant insulinotropic effect in vivo. PMID:27610615

  9. Oral Delivery of Pentameric Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 by Recombinant Lactobacillus in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yin; Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Pelletier, Julien; Marcotte, Harold; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Hammarström, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone produced by intestinal cells and stimulates insulin secretion from the pancreas in a glucose-dependent manner. Exogenously supplied GLP-1 analogues are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. An anti-diabetic effect of Lactobacillus in lowering plasma glucose levels and its use as a vehicle for delivery of protein and antibody fragments has been shown previously. The aim of this study was to employ lactobacilli as a vehicle for in situ production and delivery of GLP-1 analogue to normalize blood glucose level in diabetic GK (Goto-Kakizaki) rats. In this study, we designed pentameric GLP-1 (5×GLP-1) analogues which were both expressed in a secreted form and anchored to the surface of lactobacilli. Intestinal trypsin sites were introduced within 5×GLP-1, leading to digestion of the pentamer into an active monomeric form. The E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides delivered by intestinal intubation to GK rats resulted in a significant improvement of glycemic control demonstrated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Meanwhile, the purified 5×GLP-1 (trypsin-digested) from the Lactobacillus cultures stimulated insulin secretion from HIT-T15 cells, similar to the E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides. When delivered by gavage to GK rats, non-expressor L. paracasei significantly lowered the blood glucose level but 5×GLP-1 expression did not provide an additional anti-diabetic effect, possibly due to the low levels produced. Our results indicate that lactobacilli themselves might be used as an alternative treatment method for type 2 diabetes, but further work is needed to increase the expression level of GLP-1 by lactobacilli in order to obtain a significant insulinotropic effect in vivo. PMID:27610615

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists suppress water intake independent of effects on food intake.

    PubMed

    McKay, Naomi J; Kanoski, Scott E; Hayes, Matthew R; Daniels, Derek

    2011-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is produced by and released from the small intestine following ingestion of nutrients. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists applied peripherally or centrally decrease food intake and increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These effects make the GLP-1 system an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In addition to these more frequently studied effects of GLP-1R stimulation, previous reports indicate that GLP-1R agonists suppress water intake. The present experiments were designed to provide greater temporal resolution and site specificity for the effect of GLP-1 and the long-acting GLP-1R agonists, exendin-4 and liraglutide, on unstimulated water intake when food was and was not available. All three GLP-1R ligands suppressed water intake after peripheral intraperitoneal administration, both in the presence of and the absence of food; however, the magnitude and time frame of water intake suppression varied by drug. GLP-1 had an immediate, but transient, hypodipsic effect when administered peripherally, whereas the water intake suppression by IP exendin-4 and liraglutide was much more persistent. Additionally, intracerebroventricular administration of GLP-1R agonists suppressed water intake when food was absent, but the suppression of intake showed modest differences depending on whether the drug was administered to the lateral or fourth ventricle. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of GLP-1 receptor agonists affecting unstimulated, overnight intake in the absence of food, the first test for antidipsogenic effects of hindbrain application of GLP-1 receptor agonists, and the first test of a central effect (forebrain or hindbrain) of liraglutide on water intake. Overall, these results show that GLP-1R agonists have a hypodipsic effect that is independent of GLP-1R-mediated effects on food intake, and this occurs, in part, through central nervous system GLP-1R activation.

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-1, diabetes, and cognitive decline: possible pathophysiological links and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mossello, Enrico; Ballini, Elena; Boncinelli, Marta; Monami, Matteo; Lonetto, Giuseppe; Mello, Anna Maria; Tarantini, Francesca; Baldasseroni, Samuele; Mannucci, Edoardo; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders have a growing prevalence in Western countries. Available epidemiologic and neurobiological evidences support the existence of a pathophysiological link between these conditions. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), whose activity is reduced in insulin resistance, has been implicated in central nervous system function, including cognition, synaptic plasticity, and neurogenesis. We review the experimental researches suggesting that GLP-1 dysfunction might be a mediating factor between Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and neurodegeneration. Drug treatments enhancing GLP-1 activity hold out hope for treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cognitive decline.

  12. Oral Delivery of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Analogs: Alternatives for Diabetes Control?

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Francisca; Fonte, Pedro; Santos, Hélder A.; Sarmento, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. Current treatments are often associated with off-target effects and do not significantly impact disease progression. New therapies are therefore urgently needed to overcome this social burden. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an incretin hormone, has been used to control T2DM symptomatology. However, the administration of peptide or proteins drugs is still a huge challenge in the pharmaceutical field, requiring administration by parenteral routes. This article reviews the main hurdles in oral administration of GLP-1 and focuses on the strategies utilized to overcome them. PMID:23294796

  13. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-09-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  14. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  15. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25326836

  16. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-09-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25437458

  17. Positive Allosteric Modulation of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor by Diverse Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Ana B; Showalter, Aaron D; Wainscott, David B; Stutsman, Cynthia; Marín, Aranzazu; Ficorilli, James; Cabrera, Over; Willard, Francis S; Sloop, Kyle W

    2016-05-13

    Therapeutic intervention to activate the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves energy balance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies investigating mechanisms whereby peptide ligands activate GLP-1R have utilized mutagenesis, receptor chimeras, photo-affinity labeling, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and crystallography of the ligand-binding ectodomain to establish receptor homology models. However, this has not enabled the design or discovery of drug-like non-peptide GLP-1R activators. Recently, studies investigating 4-(3-benzyloxyphenyl)-2-ethylsulfinyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP), a GLP-1R-positive allosteric modulator, determined that Cys-347 in the GLP-1R is required for positive allosteric modulator activity via covalent modification. To advance small molecule activation of the GLP-1R, we characterized the insulinotropic mechanism of BETP. In guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding and INS1 832-3 insulinoma cell cAMP assays, BETP enhanced GLP-1(9-36)-NH2-stimulated cAMP signaling. Using isolated pancreatic islets, BETP potentiated insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner that requires both the peptide ligand and GLP-1R. In studies of the covalent mechanism, PAGE fluorography showed labeling of GLP-1R in immunoprecipitation experiments from GLP-1R-expressing cells incubated with [(3)H]BETP. Furthermore, we investigated whether other reported GLP-1R activators and compounds identified from screening campaigns modulate GLP-1R by covalent modification. Similar to BETP, several molecules were found to enhance GLP-1R signaling in a Cys-347-dependent manner. These chemotypes are electrophiles that react with GSH, and LC/MS determined the cysteine adducts formed upon conjugation. Together, our results suggest covalent modification may be used to stabilize the GLP-1R in an active conformation. Moreover, the findings provide pharmacological guidance for the discovery and

  18. Positive Allosteric Modulation of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor by Diverse Electrophiles*

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Aaron D.; Wainscott, David B.; Stutsman, Cynthia; Marín, Aranzazu; Ficorilli, James; Cabrera, Over

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention to activate the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves energy balance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies investigating mechanisms whereby peptide ligands activate GLP-1R have utilized mutagenesis, receptor chimeras, photo-affinity labeling, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and crystallography of the ligand-binding ectodomain to establish receptor homology models. However, this has not enabled the design or discovery of drug-like non-peptide GLP-1R activators. Recently, studies investigating 4-(3-benzyloxyphenyl)-2-ethylsulfinyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP), a GLP-1R-positive allosteric modulator, determined that Cys-347 in the GLP-1R is required for positive allosteric modulator activity via covalent modification. To advance small molecule activation of the GLP-1R, we characterized the insulinotropic mechanism of BETP. In guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding and INS1 832-3 insulinoma cell cAMP assays, BETP enhanced GLP-1(9–36)-NH2-stimulated cAMP signaling. Using isolated pancreatic islets, BETP potentiated insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner that requires both the peptide ligand and GLP-1R. In studies of the covalent mechanism, PAGE fluorography showed labeling of GLP-1R in immunoprecipitation experiments from GLP-1R-expressing cells incubated with [3H]BETP. Furthermore, we investigated whether other reported GLP-1R activators and compounds identified from screening campaigns modulate GLP-1R by covalent modification. Similar to BETP, several molecules were found to enhance GLP-1R signaling in a Cys-347-dependent manner. These chemotypes are electrophiles that react with GSH, and LC/MS determined the cysteine adducts formed upon conjugation. Together, our results suggest covalent modification may be used to stabilize the GLP-1R in an active conformation. Moreover, the findings provide pharmacological guidance for the discovery and

  19. Pharmacological Actions of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1, Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide, and Glucagon.

    PubMed

    Sekar, R; Singh, K; Arokiaraj, A W R; Chow, B K C

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon family of peptide hormones is a group of structurally related brain-gut peptides that exert their pleiotropic actions through interactions with unique members of class B1 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). They are key regulators of hormonal homeostasis and are important drug targets for metabolic disorders such as type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity, and dysregulations of the nervous systems such as migraine, anxiety, depression, neurodegeneration, psychiatric disorders, and cardiovascular diseases. The current review aims to provide a detailed overview of the current understanding of the pharmacological actions and therapeutic advances of three members within this family including glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon. PMID:27572131

  20. Function and expression of sulfonylurea, adrenergic, and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors in isolated porcine islets.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Amy C; Steyn, Leah V; Kitzmann, Jenna P; Anderson, Miranda J; Mueller, Kate R; Hart, Nathaniel J; Lynch, Ronald M; Papas, Klearchos K; Limesand, Sean W

    2014-01-01

    The scarcity of human cadaveric pancreata limits large-scale application of islet transplantation for patients with diabetes. Islets isolated from pathogen-free pigs provide an economical and abundant alternative source assuming immunologic barriers are appropriate. Membrane receptors involved in insulin secretion that also have potential as imaging targets were investigated in isolated porcine islets. Quantitative (q)PCR revealed that porcine islets express mRNA transcripts for sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1), inward rectifying potassium channel (Kir6.2, associated with Sur1), glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R), and adrenergic receptor alpha 2A (ADRα2A). Receptor function was assessed in static incubations with stimulatory glucose concentrations, and in the presence of receptor agonists. Glibenclamide, an anti-diabetic sulfonylurea, and exendin-4, a GLP-1 mimetic, potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion >2-fold. Conversely, epinephrine maximally reduced insulin secretion 72 ± 9% (P < 0.05) and had a half maximal inhibitory concentration of 60 nm in porcine islets (95% confidence interval of 45-830 nm). The epinephrine action was inhibited by the ADRα2A antagonist yohimbine. Our findings demonstrate that porcine islets express and are responsive to both stimulatory and inhibitory membrane localized receptors, which can be used as imaging targets after transplantation or to modify insulin secretion.

  1. The insulinotropic effect of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 is not affected by acute vagotomy in anaesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Veedfald, Simon; Hansen, Marie; Christensen, Louise Wulff; Larsen, Sara Agnete Hjort; Hjøllund, Karina Rahr; Plamboeck, Astrid; Hartmann, Bolette; Deacon, Carolyn Fiona; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? We investigated whether intestinal vagal afferents are necessary for the insulinotropic effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) infused into a mesenteric artery or a peripheral vein before and after acute truncal vagotomy. What is the main finding and its importance? We found no effect of truncal vagotomy on the insulinotropic effect of exogenous GLP-1 and speculate that high circulating concentrations of GLP-1 after i.v. and i.a. infusion might have overshadowed any neural signalling component. We propose that further investigations into the possible vagal afferent signalling of GLP-1 would best be pursued using enteral stimuli to provide high subepithelial levels of endogenous GLP-1. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is secreted from the gut in response to luminal stimuli and stimulates insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner. As a result of rapid enzymatic degradation of GLP-1 by dipeptidyl peptidase-4, a signalling pathway involving activation of intestinal vagal afferents has been proposed. We conducted two series of experiments in α-chloralose-anaesthetized pigs. In protocol I, pigs (n = 14) were allocated for either i.v. or i.a. (mesenteric) GLP-1 infusions (1 and 2 pmol kg(-1)  min(-1) , 30 min) while maintaining permissive glucose concentrations at 6 mmol l(-1) by i.v. glucose infusion. The GLP-1 infusions were repeated after acute truncal vagotomy. In protocol II, pigs (n = 27) were allocated into six groups. Glucagon-like peptide 1 was infused i.v. or i.a. (mesenteric) for 1 h at 3 or 30 pmol kg(-1)  min(-1) . During the steady state (21 min into the GLP-1 infusion), glucose (0.2 g kg(-1) , i.v.) was administered over 9 min to stimulate β-cell secretion. Thirty minutes after the glucose infusion, GLP-1 infusions were discontinued. Following a washout period, the vagal trunks were severed in four of six groups (vagal trunks were left intact in two of six groups), whereupon all

  2. Clinical Application of Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonists for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young Min; Wideman, Rhonda D.

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells in response to oral nutrient intake and elicits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while suppressing glucagon secretion. It also slows gastric emptying, which contributes to decreased postprandial glycemic excursions. In the 1990s, chronic subcutaneous infusion of GLP-1 was found to lower blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, GLP-1's very short half-life, arising from cleavage by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) and glomerular filtration by the kidneys, presented challenges for clinical use. Hence, DPP-4 inhibitors were developed, as well as several GLP-1 analogs engineered to circumvent DPP-4-mediated breakdown and/or rapid renal elimination. Three categories of GLP-1 analogs, are being developed and/or are in clinical use: short-acting, long-acting, and prolonged-acting GLP-1 analogs. Each class has different plasma half-lives, molecular size, and homology to native GLP-1, and consequently different characteristic effects on glucose metabolism. In this article, we review current clinical data derived from each class of GLP-1 analogs, and consider the clinical effects reported for each category in recent head to head comparison studies. Given the relatively brief clinical history of these compounds, we also highlight several important efficacy and safety issues which will require further investigation. PMID:24396690

  3. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Treatment for Pediatric Obesity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Aaron S

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a complex and retractable disease for which effective and durable treatments are elusive. Successful treatment of severe obesity with lifestyle modification therapy alone is highly unlikely, particularly for adolescents. Pharmacotherapy, if appropriately prescribed, can be an effective tool to use in conjunction with lifestyle modification therapy to achieve better weight loss outcomes. Only a few obesity medications have been evaluated in children and adolescents with results suggesting modest efficacy. However, a new pipeline of obesity drugs has been recently approved for use among adults. Among these, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) treatment appears to have reasonable weight loss efficacy along with other beneficial pleiotropic effects. Although larger trials will be required to confirm the results, two small pediatric clinical trials have suggested that GLP-1RA treatment may be useful in adolescents with severe obesity. Once sufficient evidence is generated supporting the safety and efficacy of GLP-1RAs and other obesity medications in youth, the pediatric medical community needs to become less resistant to the use of pharmacotherapy. Otherwise, poor outcomes will continue to be the norm.

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 is specifically involved in sweet taste transmission.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shingo; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Inoue, Mayuko; Iwata, Shusuke; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Drucker, Daniel J; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2015-06-01

    Five fundamental taste qualities (sweet, bitter, salty, sour, umami) are sensed by dedicated taste cells (TCs) that relay quality information to gustatory nerve fibers. In peripheral taste signaling pathways, ATP has been identified as a functional neurotransmitter, but it remains to be determined how specificity of different taste qualities is maintained across synapses. Recent studies demonstrated that some gut peptides are released from taste buds by prolonged application of particular taste stimuli, suggesting their potential involvement in taste information coding. In this study, we focused on the function of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in initial responses to taste stimulation. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) null mice had reduced neural and behavioral responses specifically to sweet compounds compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Some sweet responsive TCs expressed GLP-1 and its receptors were expressed in gustatory neurons. GLP-1 was released immediately from taste bud cells in response to sweet compounds but not to other taste stimuli. Intravenous administration of GLP-1 elicited transient responses in a subset of sweet-sensitive gustatory nerve fibers but did not affect other types of fibers, and this response was suppressed by pre-administration of the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-4(3-39). Thus GLP-1 may be involved in normal sweet taste signal transmission in mice.

  5. Activation of spinal glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors specifically suppresses pain hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Nian; Xiao, Qi; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Chang-Yue; Wang, Yan-Chao; Fan, Hui; Ma, Ai-Niu; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to identify the inhibitory role of the spinal glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling in pain hypersensitivity and its mechanism of action in rats and mice. First, GLP-1Rs were identified to be specifically expressed on microglial cells in the spinal dorsal horn, and profoundly upregulated after peripheral nerve injury. In addition, intrathecal GLP-1R agonists GLP-1(7-36) and exenatide potently alleviated formalin-, peripheral nerve injury-, bone cancer-, and diabetes-induced hypersensitivity states by 60-90%, without affecting acute nociceptive responses. The antihypersensitive effects of exenatide and GLP-1 were completely prevented by GLP-1R antagonism and GLP-1R gene knockdown. Furthermore, exenatide evoked β-endorphin release from both the spinal cord and cultured microglia. Exenatide antiallodynia was completely prevented by the microglial inhibitor minocycline, β-endorphin antiserum, and opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Our results illustrate a novel spinal dorsal horn microglial GLP-1R/β-endorphin inhibitory pathway in a variety of pain hypersensitivity states. PMID:24719110

  6. [Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics: a new treatment for Alzheimer's disease?].

    PubMed

    García-Casares, Natalia; García-Arnés, Juan Antonio; Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Valdivielso-Felices, Pedro; García-Arias, Carlota; González-Santos, Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Introduccion. Los analogos del glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) son una opcion terapeutica establecida en los pacientes con diabetes tipo 2. Sin embargo, las propiedades de los analogos del GLP-1 van mas alla del control estrictamente metabolico del paciente diabetico. Los efectos neuroprotectores de los analogos del GLP-1 se han puesto de manifiesto en estudios recientes y han abierto nuevos campos de investigacion en trastornos neurodegenerativos como la enfermedad de Alzheimer (EA), entre otros. Objetivo. Revision sistematica de los estudios experimentales y ensayos clinicos en humanos que demuestran las propiedades neuroprotectoras de los analogos del GLP-1 en la EA. Desarrollo. Los estudios experimentales que se han llevado a cabo en modelos de roedores con EA demuestran las propiedades neuroprotectoras de los analogos del GLP-1 sobre el sistema nervioso central que reducen las placas de beta-amiloide, el estres oxidativo y la respuesta inflamatoria cerebral. Recientemente se han puesto en marcha estudios con analogos del GLP-1 en humanos con deterioro cognitivo y EA. Conclusiones. Los analogos del GLP-1 presentan propiedades neuroprotectoras. Al considerarse la diabetes tipo 2 un factor de riesgo para el deterioro cognitivo y la demencia, deben considerarse los beneficios de los analogos del GLP-1 sobre la cognicion. Del mismo modo, los analogos del GLP-1 suponen un tratamiento prometedor en la EA.

  7. Male fertility and obesity: are ghrelin, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 pharmacologically relevant?

    PubMed

    Alves, Marco G; Jesus, Tito T; Sousa, Mário; Goldberg, Erwin; Silva, Branca M; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is rising to unprecedented numbers, affecting a growing number of children, adolescents and young adult men. These individuals face innumerous health problems, including subfertility or even infertility. Overweight and obese men present severe alterations in their body composition and hormonal profile, particularly in ghrelin, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. It is well known that male reproductive health is under the control of the individual's nutritional status and also of a tight network of regulatory signals, particularly hormonal signaling. However, few studies have been focused on the effects of ghrelin, leptin and GLP-1 in male reproduction and how energy homeostasis and male reproductive function are linked. These hormones regulate body glucose homeostasis and several studies suggest that they can serve as targets for anti-obesity drugs. In recent years, our understanding of the mechanisms of action of these hormones has grown significantly. Curiously, their effect on male reproductive potential, that is highly dependent of the metabolic cooperation established between testicular cells, remains a matter of debate. Herein, we review general concepts of male fertility and obesity, with a special focus on the effects of ghrelin, leptin and GLP-1 on male reproductive health. We also discuss the possible pharmacological relevance of these hormones to counteract the fertility problems that overweight and obese men face.

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists favorably address all components of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sanjay; Ghosal, Samit; Chatterjee, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular death is the leading cause of mortality for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The etiology of cardiovascular disease in diabetes may be divided into hyperglycemia per se and factors operating through components of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Hyperglycemia causes direct injury to vascular endothelium and possibly on cardiac myocytes. MetS is a cluster of risk factors like obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertension and dyslipidemia. The incidence of this syndrome is rising globally. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA) are a group of drugs, which address all components of this syndrome favorably. Experimental evidence suggests that they have favorable actions on myocardium as well. Several compounds belonging to GLP-1RA class are in market now and a large number awaiting their entry. Although, originally this class of drugs emerged as a treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus, more recent data generated revealed beneficial effects on multiple metabolic parameters. We have studied literature published between 2000 and 2016 to look into effects of GLP-1RA on components of MetS. Results from recently concluded clinical trials suggest that some of the molecules in this class may have favorable effects on cardiovascular outcome. PMID:27795818

  9. Oligomerization of a Glucagon-like Peptide 1 Analog: Bridging Experiment and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Frederiksen, Tine M.; Sønderby, Pernille; Ryberg, Line A.; Harris, Pernille; Bukrinski, Jens T.; Scharff-Poulsen, Anne M.; Elf-Lind, Maria N.; Peters, Günther H.

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analog, liraglutide, is a GLP-1 agonist and is used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. From a pharmaceutical perspective, it is important to know the oligomerization state of liraglutide with respect to stability. Compared to GLP-1, liraglutide has an added fatty acid (FA) moiety that causes oligomerization of liraglutide as suggested by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and multiangle static light scattering (MALS) results. SAXS data suggested a global shape of a hollow elliptical cylinder of size hexa-, hepta-, or octamer, whereas MALS data indicate a hexamer. To elaborate further on the stability of these oligomers and the role of the FA chains, a series of molecular-dynamics simulations were carried out on 11 different hexa-, hepta-, and octameric systems. Our results indicate that interactions of the fatty acid chains contribute noticeably to the stabilization. The simulation results indicate that the heptamer with paired FA chains is the most stable oligomer when compared to the 10 other investigated structures. Theoretical SAXS curves extracted from the simulations qualitatively agree with the experimentally determined SAXS curves supporting the view that liraglutide forms heptamers in solution. In agreement with the SAXS data, the heptamer forms a water-filled oligomer of elliptical cylindrical shape. PMID:26340816

  10. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: focus on glucagon-like peptide-1 based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Stranges, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a well known risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). While glycemic control has consistently been shown to prevent microvascular complications, large randomized trials have not demonstrated the same consistent beneficial effects of intensive glycemic control in improving cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. Thus, optimal glucose control alone is not sufficient to reduce CV risk. Aggressive management of CV risk factors such as blood pressure, lipids, and body weight is also necessary. A growing body of evidence suggests that the recently available glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have beneficial CV effects beyond glucose control. Studies have demonstrated beneficial effects in the myocardium, endothelium, vasculature and various markers of cardiovascular risk such as body weight, blood pressure and dyslipidemia. Despite the growing evidence, large, randomized, blinded clinical trials with hard CV endpoints have not been performed. Most human studies have been small, and have focused on surrogate endpoints. The findings need to be confirmed by prospective, randomized cardiovascular outcomes trials. In this review we examine the GLP-1R agonist data on weight reduction, blood pressure lowering, beneficial changes in dyslipidemia, and improvements in myocardial and endothelial function. The safety as well as potential role of these agents in treatment regimens for type 2 diabetes is also addressed. PMID:25083236

  11. An Emerging Role of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Preventing Advanced-Glycation-End-Product-Mediated Damages in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Puddu, Alessandra; Mach, François; Nencioni, Alessio; Viviani, Giorgio Luciano; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut hormone produced in the intestinal epithelial endocrine L cells by differential processing of the proglucagon gene. Released in response to the nutrient ingestion, GLP-1 plays an important role in maintaining glucose homeostasis. GLP-1 has been shown to regulate blood glucose levels by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion and inhibiting glucagon secretion, gastric emptying, and food intake. These antidiabetic activities highlight GLP-1 as a potential therapeutic molecule in the clinical management of type 2 diabetes, (a disease characterized by progressive decline of beta-cell function and mass, increased insulin resistance, and final hyperglycemia). Since chronic hyperglycemia contributed to the acceleration of the formation of Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs, a heterogeneous group of compounds derived from the nonenzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with free amino groups of proteins implicated in vascular diabetic complications), the administration of GLP-1 might directly counteract diabetes pathophysiological processes (such as pancreatic β-cell dysfunction). This paper outlines evidence on the protective role of GLP-1 in preventing the deleterious effects mediated by AGEs in type 2 diabetes. PMID:23365488

  12. Glucagon-like peptide 1 induces natriuresis in healthy subjects and in insulin-resistant obese men.

    PubMed

    Gutzwiller, Jean-Pierre; Tschopp, Stefan; Bock, Andreas; Zehnder, Carlos E; Huber, Andreas R; Kreyenbuehl, Monika; Gutmann, Heike; Drewe, Jürgen; Henzen, Christoph; Goeke, Burkhard; Beglinger, Christoph

    2004-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide (GLP-1) is involved in satiety control and glucose homeostasis. Animal studies suggest a physiological role for GLP-1 in water and salt homeostasis. This study's aim was to define the effects of GLP-1 on water and sodium excretion in both healthy and obese men. Fifteen healthy subjects and 16 obese men (mean body mass index, 36 kg/m2) were examined in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to demonstrate the effects of a 3-h infusion of GLP-1 on urinary sodium excretion, urinary output, and the glomerular filtration rate after an i.v. 9.9-g salt load. Infusion of GLP-1 evoked a dose-dependent increase in urinary sodium excretion in healthy subjects (from 74 +/- 8 to 143 +/- 18 mmol/180 min, P = 0.0013). In obese men, there was a significant increase in urinary sodium excretion (from 59 to 96 mmol/180 min, P = 0.015), a decrease in urinary H+ secretion (from 1.1 to 0.3 pmol/180 min, P = 0.013), and a 6% decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (from 151 +/- 8 to 142 +/- 8 ml/min, P = 0.022). Intravenous infusions of GLP-1 enhance sodium excretion, reduce H+ secretion, and reduce glomerular hyperfiltration in obese men. These findings suggest an action at the proximal renal tubule and a potential renoprotective effect.

  13. Functional Consequences of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Cross-talk and Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    Roed, Sarah Noerklit; Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Wismann, Pernille; Iversen, Helle; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Knudsen, Sanne Moeller; Waldhoer, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The signaling capacity of seven-transmembrane/G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) can be regulated through ligand-mediated receptor trafficking. Classically, the recycling of internalized receptors is associated with resensitization, whereas receptor degradation terminates signaling. We have shown previously that the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) internalizes fast and is primarily resensitized through recycling back to the cell surface. GLP-1R is expressed in pancreatic islets together with the closely related glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIPR) and glucagon (GCGR) receptors. The interaction and cross-talk between coexpressed receptors is a wide phenomenon of the 7TM/GPCR superfamily. Numerous reports show functional consequences for signaling and trafficking of the involved receptors. On the basis of the high structural similarity and tissue coexpression, we here investigated the potential cross-talk between GLP-1R and GIPR or GCGR in both trafficking and signaling pathways. Using a real-time time-resolved FRET-based internalization assay, we show that GLP-1R, GIPR, and GCGR internalize with differential properties. Remarkably, upon coexpression of the internalizing GLP-1R and the non-internalizing GIPR, GLP-1-mediated GLP-1R internalization was impaired in a GIPR concentration-dependent manner. As a functional consequence of such impaired internalization capability, GLP-1-mediated GLP-1R signaling was abrogated. A similar compromised signaling was found when GLP-1R internalization was abrogated by a dominant-negative version of dynamin (dynamin-1 K44E), which provides a mechanistic link between GLP-1R trafficking and signaling. This study highlights the importance of receptor internalization for full functionality of GLP-1R. Moreover, cross-talk between the two incretin receptors GLP-1R and GIPR is shown to alter receptor trafficking with functional consequences for GLP-1R signaling. PMID:25451942

  14. Role of lateral septum glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors in food intake.

    PubMed

    Terrill, Sarah J; Jackson, Christine M; Greene, Hayden E; Lilly, Nicole; Maske, Calyn B; Vallejo, Samantha; Williams, Diana L

    2016-07-01

    Hindbrain glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) neurons project to numerous forebrain areas, including the lateral septum (LS). Using a fluorescently labeled GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, Exendin 4 (Ex4), we demonstrated GLP-1 receptor binding throughout the rat LS. We examined the feeding effects of Ex4 and the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin (9-39) (Ex9) at doses subthreshold for effect when delivered to the lateral ventricle. Intra-LS Ex4 suppressed overnight chow and high-fat diet (HFD) intake, and Ex9 increased chow and HFD intake relative to vehicle. During 2-h tests, intra-LS Ex9 significantly increased 0.25 M sucrose and 4% corn oil. Ex4 can cause nausea, but intra-LS administration of Ex4 did not induce pica. Furthermore, intra-LS Ex4 had no effect on anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. We investigated the role of LS GLP-1R in motivation for food by examining operant responding for sucrose on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule, with and without a nutrient preload to maximize GLP-1 neuron activation. The preload strongly suppressed PR responding, but blockade of GLP-1R in the intermediate subdivision of the LS did not affect motivation for sucrose under either load condition. The ability of the nutrient load to suppress subsequent chow intake was significantly attenuated by intermediate LS Ex9 treatment. By contrast, blockade of GLP-1R in the dorsal subdivision of the LS increased both PR responding and overnight chow intake. Together, these studies suggest that endogenous activity of GLP-1R in the LS influence feeding, and dLS GLP-1Rs, in particular, play a role in motivation. PMID:27194565

  15. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 in diabetic rat small resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Zeliha; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Ozdem, Sadi S

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the functional effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1(7-36)] and GLP-1(9-36) and the mechanism(s) playing a role in the effects of these agents in isolated small resistance arteries from control and diabetic rats. Cumulative concentrations of GLP-1(7-36) and GLP-1(9-36) produced concentration-dependent relaxations in endothelium-intact but not endothelium-denuded arteries that were significantly decreased in diabetic rats. GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) significantly inhibited responses to GLP-1 analogs. Nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway blockers, but not indomethacin, significantly decreased responses to GLP-1(7-36) or GLP-1(9-36) in control and diabetic rats. 4-Aminopyridine or glibenclamide incubation did not alter relaxations to GLP-1 analogs. GLP-1(7-36)- and GLP-1(9-36)-induced relaxations were blunted significantly and to similar extends by charybdotoxin and apamin combination in control and diabetic rats. Catalase did not affect, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) caused a significant increase in relaxations to GLP-1 analogs only in diabetic rats. We provided evidence about the relaxant effects of GLP-1(7-36) and GLP-1(9-36) in resistance arteries that were reduced in diabetic rats. Both calcium-activated potassium channels and endothelium played a major role in relaxations. Increment in certain reactive oxygen species and/or reduction in superoxide dismutase function might play a role in reduced relaxant responses of resistance arteries to GLP-1(7-36) and GLP-1(9-36) in diabetic rats.

  16. The glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue Exendin-4 attenuates alcohol mediated behaviors in rodents.

    PubMed

    Egecioglu, Emil; Steensland, Pia; Fredriksson, Ida; Feltmann, Kristin; Engel, Jörgen A; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2013-08-01

    Development of alcohol use disorders largely depends on the effects of alcohol on the brain reward systems. Emerging evidence indicate that common mechanisms regulate food and alcohol intake and raise the possibility that endocrine signals from the gut may play an important role for alcohol consumption, alcohol-induced reward and the motivation to consume alcohol. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a gastrointestinal peptide regulating food intake and glucose homeostasis, has recently been shown to target central brain areas involved in reward and motivation, including the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens. Herein we investigated the effects of the GLP-1 receptor agonist, Exendin-4 (Ex4), on various measures of alcohol-induced reward as well as on alcohol intake and alcohol seeking behavior in rodents. Treatment with Ex4, at a dose with no effect per se, attenuated alcohol-induced locomotor stimulation and accumbal dopamine release in mice. Furthermore, conditioned place preference for alcohol was abolished by both acute and chronic treatment with Ex4 in mice. Finally we found that Ex4 treatment decreased alcohol intake, using the intermittent access 20% alcohol two-bottle-choice model, as well as alcohol seeking behavior, using the progressive ratio test in the operant self-administration model, in rats. These novel findings indicate that GLP-1 signaling attenuates the reinforcing properties of alcohol implying that the physiological role of GLP-1 extends beyond glucose homeostasis and food intake regulation. Collectively these findings implicate that the GLP-1 receptor may be a potential target for the development of novel treatment strategies for alcohol use disorders.

  17. Parabrachial Nucleus Contributions to Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist-Induced Hypophagia

    PubMed Central

    Swick, Jennifer C; Alhadeff, Amber L; Grill, Harvey J; Urrea, Paula; Lee, Stephanie M; Roh, Hyunsun; Baird, John-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Exendin-4 (Ex4), a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist approved to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus, is well known to induce hypophagia in human and animal models. We evaluated the contributions of the hindbrain parabrachial nucleus (PBN) to systemic Ex4-induced hypophagia, as the PBN receives gustatory and visceral afferent relays and descending input from several brain nuclei associated with feeding. Rats with ibotenic-acid lesions targeted to the lateral PBN (PBNx) and sham controls received Ex4 (1 μg/kg) before 24 h home cage chow or 90 min 0.3 M sucrose access tests, and licking microstructure was analyzed to identify components of feeding behavior affected by Ex4. PBN lesion efficacy was confirmed using conditioned taste aversion (CTA) tests. As expected, sham control but not PBNx rats developed a CTA. In sham-lesioned rats, Ex4 reduced chow intake within 4 h of injection and sucrose intake within 90 min. PBNx rats did not show reduced chow or sucrose intake after Ex4 treatment, indicating that the PBN is necessary for Ex4 effects under the conditions tested. In sham-treated rats, Ex4 affected licking microstructure measures associated with hedonic taste evaluation, appetitive behavior, oromotor coordination, and inhibitory postingestive feedback. Licking microstructure responses in PBNx rats after Ex4 treatment were similar to sham-treated rats with the exception of inhibitory postingestive feedback measures. Together, the results suggest that the PBN critically contributes to the hypophagic effects of systemically delivered GLP-1R agonists by enhancing visceral feedback. PMID:25703200

  18. Septal Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Expression Determines Suppression of Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harasta, Anne E; Power, John M; von Jonquieres, Georg; Karl, Tim; Drucker, Daniel J; Housley, Gary D; Schneider, Miriam; Klugmann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and its receptor GLP-1R are a key component of the satiety signaling system, and long-acting GLP-1 analogs have been approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Previous reports demonstrate that GLP-1 regulates glucose homeostasis alongside the rewarding effects of food. Both palatable food and illicit drugs activate brain reward circuitries, and pharmacological studies suggest that central nervous system GLP-1 signaling holds potential for the treatment of addiction. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1 in the attenuation of reward-oriented behavior, and the essential domains of the mesolimbic system mediating these beneficial effects, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the central regions of highest Glp-1r gene activity are essential in mediating responses to drugs of abuse. Here, we show that Glp-1r-deficient (Glp-1r−/−) mice have greatly augmented cocaine-induced locomotor responses and enhanced conditional place preference compared with wild-type (Glp-1r+/+) controls. Employing mRNA in situ hybridization we located peak Glp-1r mRNA expression in GABAergic neurons of the dorsal lateral septum, an anatomical site with a crucial function in reward perception. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of dorsal lateral septum neurons revealed that genetic Glp-1r ablation leads to increased excitability of these cells. Viral vector-mediated Glp-1r gene delivery to the dorsal lateral septum of Glp-1r−/− animals reduced cocaine-induced locomotion and conditional place preference to wild-type levels. This site-specific genetic complementation did not affect the anxiogenic phenotype observed in Glp-1r−/− controls. These data reveal a novel role of GLP-1R in dorsal lateral septum function driving behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:25669605

  19. Investigating G protein signalling bias at the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Weston, C; Poyner, D; Patel, V; Dowell, S; Ladds, G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor performs an important role in glycaemic control, stimulating the release of insulin. It is an attractive target for treating type 2 diabetes. Recently, several reports of adverse side effects following prolonged use of GLP-1 receptor therapies have emerged: most likely due to an incomplete understanding of signalling complexities. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We describe the expression of the GLP-1 receptor in a panel of modified yeast strains that couple receptor activation to cell growth via single Gα/yeast chimeras. This assay enables the study of individual ligand–receptor G protein coupling preferences and the quantification of the effect of GLP-1 receptor ligands on G protein selectivity. KEY RESULTS The GLP-1 receptor functionally coupled to the chimeras representing the human Gαs, Gαi and Gαq subunits. Calculation of the dissociation constant for a receptor antagonist, exendin-3 revealed no significant difference between the two systems. We obtained previously unobserved differences in G protein signalling bias for clinically relevant therapeutic agents, liraglutide and exenatide; the latter displaying significant bias for the Gαi pathway. We extended the use of the system to investigate small-molecule allosteric compounds and the closely related glucagon receptor. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results provide a better understanding of the molecular events involved in GLP-1 receptor pleiotropic signalling and establish the yeast platform as a robust tool to screen for more selective, efficacious compounds acting at this important class of receptors in the future. PMID:24712679

  20. Expression, purification, and C-terminal amidation of recombinant human glucagon-like peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Zhen; Yang, Sheng-Sheng; Dou, Hong; Mao, Ji-Fang; Li, Kang-Sheng

    2004-08-01

    Human glucagon-like peptide-1 (hGLP-1) (7-36) amide, a gastrointestinal hormone with a pharmaceutical potential in treating type 2 diabetes mellitus, is composed of 30 amino acid residues as a mature protein. We report here the development of a method for high-level expression and purification of recombinant hGLP-1 (7-36) amide (rhGLP-1) through glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion expression system. The cDNA of hGLP-1-Leu, the 31st-residue leucine-extended precursor peptide, was prepared by annealing and ligating of artificially synthetic oligonucleotide fragments, inserted into pBluescript SK (+/-) plasmid, and then cloned into pGEX-4T-3 GST fusion vector. The fusion protein GST-hGLP-1-Leu, expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3), was purified by affinity chromatography after high-level culture and sonication of bacteria. Following cleavage of GST-hGLP-1-Leu by cyanogen bromide, the recombinant hGLP-1-Leu was released from fusion protein, and purified using QAE Sepharose ion exchange and RP C(18) chromatography. After purification, the precursor hGLP-1-Leu was transacylated by carboxypeptidase Y, Arg-NH(2) as a nucleophile, to produce rhGLP-1. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed the molecular weight was as expected. The biological activity of rhGLP-1 in a rat model demonstrated that plasma glucose concentrations were significantly lower and insulin concentrations higher after intraperitoneal injection of rhGLP-1 together with glucose compared with glucose alone (P < 0.001). PMID:15249052

  1. Nutrient-induced glucagon like peptide-1 release is modulated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Ripken, Dina; van der Wielen, Nikkie; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Meijerink, Jocelijn; Witkamp, Renger F; Hendriks, Henk F J

    2016-06-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and serotonin are both involved in food intake regulation. GLP-1 release is stimulated upon nutrient interaction with G-protein coupled receptors by enteroendocrine cells (EEC), whereas serotonin is released from enterochromaffin cells (ECC). The central hypothesis for the current study was that nutrient-induced GLP-1 release from EECs is modulated by serotonin through a process involving serotonin receptor interaction. This was studied by assessing the effects of serotonin reuptake inhibition by fluoxetine on nutrient-induced GLP-1, PYY and CCK release from isolated pig intestinal segments. Next, serotonin-induced GLP-1 release was studied in enteroendocrine STC-1 cells, where effects of serotonin receptor inhibition were studied using specific and non-specific antagonists. Casein (1% w/v), safflower oil (3.35% w/v), sucrose (50mM) and rebaudioside A (12.5mM) stimulated GLP-1 release from intestinal segments, whereas casein only stimulated PYY and CCK release. Combining nutrients with fluoxetine further increased nutrient-induced GLP-1, PYY and CCK release. Serotonin release from intestinal tissue segments was stimulated by casein and safflower oil while sucrose and rebaudioside A had no effect. The combination with fluoxetine (0.155μM) further enhanced casein and safflower oil induced-serotonin release. Exposure of ileal tissue segments to serotonin (30μM) stimulated GLP-1 release whereas it did not induce PYY and CCK release. Serotonin (30 and 100μM) also stimulated GLP-1 release from STC-1 cells, which was inhibited by the non-specific 5HT receptor antagonist asenapine (1 and 10μM). These data suggest that nutrient-induced GLP-1 release is modulated by serotonin through a receptor mediated process. PMID:27142747

  2. Protective Role of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Against High-Glucose-Induced Endothelial Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lixin; Qiao, Yue; Zhang, Lina; Pan, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the protective effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) against cell damage induced by high glucose. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were divided into control group (5.5 mmol/L) and high glucose groups (19, 33, or 47 mmol/L), which were cultured with different concentrations of glucose for 48 hours, respectively. Cell viability was measured with MTT assay. Levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were monitored by flow cytometry and apoptotic cell death was measured by staining with Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. Cultured cells were detected with intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), VCAM-1, and JNK on protein. Compared with the control group, cell viability was decreased by 20% and 37%, respectively, when cultured under 33 and 47 mM, while increased in different GLP-1-treated groups (0.01 L, 0.1, 1, and 10 nmol/L). The GLP-1 treatment significantly reduced the ROS level of high glucose treatment group but not impact on the control group. Meanwhile, the level of apoptosis was elevated in the high glucose treatment group. Early apoptosis was significantly reversed in the GLP-1-treated group (0.1, 1, and 10 nmol/L). Late apoptosis was uniquely decreased in the GLP-1 concentrations of 10 nmol/L. Furthermore, GLP-1 could also reduce the protein levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and phospho JNK in the endothelial cells with high glucose treatment. GLP-1 could inhibit cell apoptosis and reduce ROS generation and JNK-Bax signaling pathway activation, which were induced by high glucose treatment. PMID:26632709

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist administration suppresses both water and saline intake in rats.

    PubMed

    McKay, N J; Daniels, D

    2013-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in energy homeostasis. Injections of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists suppress food intake, and endogenous GLP-1 is released when nutrients enter the gut. There is also growing evidence that the GLP-1 system is involved in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis. GLP-1R agonists suppress water intake independent of their effects on food intake. It is unknown, however, whether this suppressive effect of GLP-1R agonists extends to saline intake. Accordingly, we tested the effect of the GLP-1R agonists liraglutide (0.05 μg) and exendin-4 (0.05 μg) on water and saline intake, as stimulated either by angiotensin II (AngII) or by water deprivation with partial rehydration (WD-PR). Each agonist suppressed AngII-induced water intake; however, only exendin-4 suppressed saline intake. WD-PR-induced water and saline intakes were both attenuated by each agonist. Analysis of drinking microstructure after WD-PR found a reliable effect of the agonists on burst number. Furthermore, exendin-4 conditioned a robust taste avoidance to saccharine; however, there was no similar effect of liraglutide. To evaluate the relevance of the conditioned taste avoidance, we tested whether inducing visceral malaise by injection of lithium chloride (LiCl) suppressed fluid intake. Injection of LiCl did not suppress water or saline intakes. Overall, these results indicate that the fluid intake suppression by GLP-1R activation is not selective to water intake, is a function of post-ingestive feedback, and is not secondary to visceral malaise.

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P.; Sahay, Rakesh K.; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Uppal, Shweta; Adetunji, Omolara

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)–based therapy improves glycaemic control through multiple mechanisms, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and the additional benefit of clinically relevant weight loss. Since Starling and Bayliss first proposed the existence of intestinal secretions that stimulate the pancreas, tremendous progress has been made in the area of incretins. As a number of GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) continue to become available, physicians will soon face the challenge of selecting the right option customized to their patient's needs. The following discussion, derived from an extensive literature search using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide, provides a comprehensive review of existing and upcoming molecules in the GLP-1 RA class in terms of their structure, pharmacological profiles, efficacy, safety, and convenience. Search Methodology: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide. Relevant articles were those that discussed structural, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences, classification, long-acting and short-acting GLP-1 RAs, phase 3 trials, and expert opinions. Additional targeted searches were conducted on diabetes treatment guidelines and reviews on safety, as well as the American Diabetes Association/European Society for Study of Diabetes (ADA/EASD) statement on pancreatic safety. PMID:27042424

  5. Neuroendocrine function and response to stress in mice with complete disruption of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    MacLusky, N J; Cook, S; Scrocchi, L; Shin, J; Kim, J; Vaccarino, F; Asa, S L; Drucker, D J

    2000-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent regulator of glucose homeostasis, is also produced in the central nervous system, where GLP-1 has been implicated in the neuroendocrine control of hypothalamic-pituitary function, food intake, and the response to stress. The finding that intracerebroventricular GLP-1 stimulates LH, TSH, corticosterone, and vasopressin secretion in rats prompted us to assess the neuroendocrine consequences of disrupting GLP-1 signaling in mice in vivo. Male GLP-1 receptor knockout (GLP-1R-/-) mice exhibit reduced gonadal weights, and females exhibit a slight delay in the onset of puberty; however, male and female GLP-1R-/- animals reproduce successfully and respond appropriately to fluid restriction. Although adrenal weights are reduced in GLP-1R-/- mice, hypothalamic CRH gene expression and circulating levels of corticosterone, thyroid hormone, testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone are normal in the absence of GLP-1R-/- signaling. Intriguingly, GLP-1R-/- mice exhibit paradoxically increased corticosterone responses to stress as well as abnormal responses to acoustic startle that are corrected by glucocorticoid treatment. These findings suggest that although GLP-1R signaling is not essential for development and basal function of the murine hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, abrogation of GLP-1 signaling is associated with impairment of the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stress.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell damage via protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Ojima, Ayako; Nishino, Yuri; Nakashima, Sae; Maeda, Sayaka; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-11-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that renin-angiotensin system plays a role in diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we have found that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), one of the incretins, a gut hormone secreted from L cells in the intestine in response to food intake, inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in mesangial cells thorugh the interaction with the receptor of GLP-1. However, effects of GLP-1 on angiotensin II-exposed mesangial cells are unknown. This study investigated whether and how GLP-1 blocked the angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. GLP-1 completely blocked the angiotensin II-induced superoxide generation, NF-κB activation, up-regulation of mRNA levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in mesangial cells, all of which were prevented by the treatments with H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. The present results demonstrated for the first time that GLP-1 blocked the angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell injury by inhibiting superoxide-mediated NF-κB activation via protein kinase C pathway. Our present study suggests that strategies to enhance the biological actions of GLP-1 may be a promising strategy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  7. The inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase by glucagon-like peptide-1 contributes to neuroprotection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shingo; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Yoon, Hyung Shin; Odaka, Haruki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2016-03-11

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an insulinotropic peptide secreted from enteroendocrine cells, has been known to have a neuroprotective effect. However, it is not fully understood the intracellular mediator of GLP-1 signaling in neuronal cells. In the present study, we examined the change in intracellular signaling of cortical neurons after GLP-1 application and luminal glucose stimulation in vitro and in vivo. GLP-1 receptor was highly expressed in cultured cortical neurons and brain tissues including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The activation of GLP-1 receptor (5min) significantly decreased levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), which is involved in neuronal cell survival and death, in cultured cortical neurons. Oral glucose administration also rapidly reduced pERK levels in the prefrontal cortex, while intraperitoneal glucose injection did not show such an effect. Further, GLP-1 attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death and hyperactivity of ERK in cultured cortical neurons. It is possible that increased GLP-1 by luminal glucose stimulation affects cortical system including the maintenance of neuronal cell survival. PMID:26827720

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor stimulation increases blood pressure and heart rate and activates autonomic regulatory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Lee, Charlotte E.; Marcus, Jacob N.; Williams, Todd D.; Overton, J. Michael; Lopez, Marisol E.; Hollenberg, Anthony N.; Baggio, Laurie; Saper, Clifford B.; Drucker, Daniel J.; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2002-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) released from the gut functions as an incretin that stimulates insulin secretion. GLP-1 is also a brain neuropeptide that controls feeding and drinking behavior and gastric emptying and elicits neuroendocrine responses including development of conditioned taste aversion. Although GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are under development for the treatment of diabetes, GLP-1 administration may increase blood pressure and heart rate in vivo. We report here that centrally and peripherally administered GLP-1R agonists dose-dependently increased blood pressure and heart rate. GLP-1R activation induced c-fos expression in the adrenal medulla and neurons in autonomic control sites in the rat brain, including medullary catecholamine neurons providing input to sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Furthermore, GLP-1R agonists rapidly activated tyrosine hydroxylase transcription in brainstem catecholamine neurons. These findings suggest that the central GLP-1 system represents a regulator of sympathetic outflow leading to downstream activation of cardiovascular responses in vivo. PMID:12093887

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P; Sahay, Rakesh K; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Uppal, Shweta; Adetunji, Omolara

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy improves glycaemic control through multiple mechanisms, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and the additional benefit of clinically relevant weight loss. Since Starling and Bayliss first proposed the existence of intestinal secretions that stimulate the pancreas, tremendous progress has been made in the area of incretins. As a number of GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) continue to become available, physicians will soon face the challenge of selecting the right option customized to their patient's needs. The following discussion, derived from an extensive literature search using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide, provides a comprehensive review of existing and upcoming molecules in the GLP-1 RA class in terms of their structure, pharmacological profiles, efficacy, safety, and convenience. Search Methodology: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide. Relevant articles were those that discussed structural, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences, classification, long-acting and short-acting GLP-1 RAs, phase 3 trials, and expert opinions. Additional targeted searches were conducted on diabetes treatment guidelines and reviews on safety, as well as the American Diabetes Association/European Society for Study of Diabetes (ADA/EASD) statement on pancreatic safety.

  10. The influence of restricted feeding on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing cells in the chicken small intestine.

    PubMed

    Monir, M M; Hiramatsu, K; Yamasaki, A; Nishimura, K; Watanabe, T

    2014-04-01

    The influence of restricted feeding on the distribution of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing endocrine cells in the chicken small intestine was investigated using immunohistochemical and morphometrical techniques. This study demonstrated that the restricted feeding had an influence on the activity of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the chicken small intestine. There were differences in the localization and the frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the small intestine between control and restricted groups, especially 25% feed supply group provided with 25% of the intake during the adapting period. GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the control chickens were mainly located in epithelium from crypts to the lower part of intestinal villi. Those in restricted groups, however, tended to be located from crypts to the middle part of intestinal villi. The frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells was lowest in the control group, medium in 50% feed supply group and highest in 25% feed supply group at each intestinal region examined in this study, that is, increased with the advancement of restricting the amount of feed supply. These data show that the quantity of food intake is one of signals that have an influence on the secretion of GLP-1 from L cells in the chicken small intestine.

  11. REVIEW: Role of cyclic AMP signaling in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cells express the proglucagon gene (gcg) and thereby produce the peptide hormone glucagon, which stimulates hepatic glucose production and thereby increases blood glucose levels. The same gcg gene is also expressed in the intestinal endocrine L cells and certain neural cells in the brain. In the gut, gcg expression leads to the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). This incretin hormone stimulates insulin secretion when blood glucose level is high. In addition, GLP-1 stimulates pancreatic cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. Today, a long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist has been developed as a drug in treating diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. Extensive investigations have shown that the expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP signaling, and the crosstalk between PKA and Wnt signaling pathway, are also involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg expression and GLP-1 production. Furthermore, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic cells are mainly mediated by cAMP-PKA, cAMP-Epac and Wnt signaling pathways as well.

  12. β-Cell Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Contributes to Improved Glucose Tolerance After Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Garibay, Darline; McGavigan, Anne K; Lee, Seon A; Ficorilli, James V; Cox, Amy L; Michael, M Dodson; Sloop, Kyle W; Cummings, Bethany P

    2016-09-01

    Vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) produces high rates of type 2 diabetes remission; however, the mechanisms responsible for this remain incompletely defined. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut hormone that contributes to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and is elevated after VSG. VSG-induced increases in postprandial GLP-1 secretion have been proposed to contribute to the glucoregulatory benefits of VSG; however, previous work has been equivocal. In order to test the contribution of enhanced β-cell GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling we used a β-cell-specific tamoxifen-inducible GLP-1R knockout mouse model. Male β-cell-specific Glp-1r(β-cell+/+) wild type (WT) and Glp-1r(β-cell-/-) knockout (KO) littermates were placed on a high-fat diet for 6 weeks and then switched to high-fat diet supplemented with tamoxifen for the rest of the study. Mice underwent sham or VSG surgery after 2 weeks of tamoxifen diet and were fed ad libitum postoperatively. Mice underwent oral glucose tolerance testing at 3 weeks and were euthanized at 6 weeks after surgery. VSG reduced body weight and food intake independent of genotype. However, glucose tolerance was only improved in VSG WT compared with sham WT, whereas VSG KO had impaired glucose tolerance relative to VSG WT. Augmentation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during the oral glucose tolerance test was blunted in VSG KO compared with VSG WT. Therefore, our data suggest that enhanced β-cell GLP-1R signaling contributes to improved glucose regulation after VSG by promoting increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. PMID:27501183

  13. Molecular Characterisation of Small Molecule Agonists Effect on the Human Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Receptor Internalisation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aiysha; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Bain, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R), which is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways and ERK phosphorylation to stimulate insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to determine molecular details of the effect of small molecule agonists, compounds 2 and B, on GLP-1R mediated cAMP production, intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and its internalisation. In human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) expressing cells, compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production but caused no intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation or hGLP-1R internalisation. GLP-1 antagonists Ex(9–39) and JANT-4 and the orthosteric binding site mutation (V36A) in hGLP-1R failed to inhibit compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, confirming that their binding site distinct from the GLP-1 binding site on GLP-1R. However, K334A mutation of hGLP-1R, which affects Gαs coupling, inhibited GLP-1 as well as compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, indicating that GLP-1, compounds 2 and B binding induce similar conformational changes in the GLP-1R for Gαs coupling. Additionally, compound 2 or B binding to the hGLP-1R had significantly reduced GLP-1 induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and hGLP-1R internalisation. This study illustrates pharmacology of differential activation of GLP-1R by GLP-1 and compounds 2 and B. PMID:27100083

  14. Glucagon-like peptide 1 decreases lipotoxicity in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Matthew J.; Hull, Diana; Guo, Kathy; Barton, Darren; Hazlehurst, Jonathan M.; Gathercole, Laura L.; Nasiri, Maryam; Yu, Jinglei; Gough, Stephen C.; Newsome, Philip N.; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Insulin resistance and lipotoxicity are pathognomonic in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues are licensed for type 2 diabetes, but no prospective experimental data exists in NASH. This study determined the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide, on organ-specific insulin sensitivity, hepatic lipid handling and adipose dysfunction in biopsy-proven NASH. Methods Fourteen patients were randomised to 1.8 mg liraglutide or placebo for 12-weeks of the mechanistic component of a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov-NCT01237119). Patients underwent paired hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamps, stable isotope tracers, adipose microdialysis and serum adipocytokine/metabolic profiling. In vitro isotope experiments on lipid flux were performed on primary human hepatocytes. Results Liraglutide reduced BMI (−1.9 vs. +0.04 kg/m2; p <0.001), HbA1c (−0.3 vs. +0.3%; p <0.01), cholesterol-LDL (−0.7 vs. +0.05 mmol/L; p <0.01), ALT (−54 vs. −4.0 IU/L; p <0.01) and serum leptin, adiponectin, and CCL-2 (all p <0.05). Liraglutide increased hepatic insulin sensitivity (−9.36 vs. −2.54% suppression of hepatic endogenous glucose production with low-dose insulin; p <0.05). Liraglutide increased adipose tissue insulin sensitivity enhancing the ability of insulin to suppress lipolysis both globally (−24.9 vs. +54.8 pmol/L insulin required to ½ maximally suppress serum non-esterified fatty acids; p <0.05), and specifically within subcutaneous adipose tissue (p <0.05). In addition, liraglutide decreased hepatic de novo lipogenesis in vivo (−1.26 vs. +1.30%; p <0.05); a finding endorsed by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonist on primary human hepatocytes (24.6% decrease in lipogenesis vs. untreated controls; p <0.01). Conclusions Liraglutide reduces metabolic dysfunction, insulin resistance and lipotoxicity in the key metabolic organs in the pathogenesis of

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose metabolism in human myocytes.

    PubMed

    Luque, M A; González, N; Márquez, L; Acitores, A; Redondo, A; Morales, M; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    2002-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been shown to have insulin-like effects upon the metabolism of glucose in rat liver, muscle and fat, and on that of lipids in rat and human adipocytes. These actions seem to be exerted through specific receptors which, unlike that of the pancreas, are not - at least in liver and muscle - cAMP-associated. Here we have investigated the effect, its characteristics, and possible second messengers of GLP-1 on the glucose metabolism of human skeletal muscle, in tissue strips and primary cultured myocytes. In muscle strips, GLP-1, like insulin, stimulated glycogen synthesis, glycogen synthase a activity, and glucose oxidation and utilization, and inhibited glycogen phosphorylase a activity, all of this at physiological concentrations of the peptide. In cultured myotubes, GLP-1 exerted, from 10(-13) mol/l, a dose-related increase of the D-[U-(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen, with the same potency as insulin, together with an activation of glycogen synthase a; the effect of 10(-11) mol/l GLP-1 on both parameters was additive to that induced by the equimolar amount of insulin. Synthase a was still activated in cells after 2 days of exposure to GLP-1, as compared with myotubes maintained in the absence of peptide. In human muscle cells, exendin-4 and its truncated form 9-39 amide (Ex-9) are both agonists of the GLP-1 effect on glycogen synthesis and synthase a activity; but while neither GLP-1 nor exendin-4 affected the cellular cAMP content after 5-min incubation in the absence of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxantine (IBMX), an increase was detected with Ex-9. GLP-1, exendin-4, Ex-9 and insulin all induced the prompt hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs). This work shows a potent stimulatory effect of GLP-1 on the glucose metabolism of human skeletal muscle, and supports the long-term therapeutic value of the peptide. Further evidence for a GLP-1 receptor in this tissue, different from that of the pancreas, is also illustrated

  16. [Protective effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on beta-cells: preclinical and clinical data].

    PubMed

    Consoli, Agostino; Di Biagio, Rosamaria

    2011-12-01

    Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Scienze dell'Invecchiamento, Università degli Studi "G. d'Annunzio", Chieti Continuing b-cell mass and function loss represents the key mechanism for the pathogenesis and the progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Drugs capable of arresting b-cell loss and eventually able to bring b-cell function close to be back to normal would then be a formidable help in type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists exenatide and liraglutide can stimulate in vitro neogenesis and prevent apoptosis in b-cell-like cell lines. Consistently, treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonists ameliorates glucose metabolism, preserves b-cell mass and improves b-cell function in several animal models of diabetes. For instance, in the db/db mice, liraglutide protects the b-cell from oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress-related damage. Data in humans, in vivo, are less definitive and often based on scarcely reliable indexes of b-cell function. However, short-term treatment (14 weeks) with liraglutide increased b-cell maximal response capacity in a dose-response fashion. A longer (1 year) exenatide treatment also was able to increase b-cell maximal response capacity, but the effect was no longer there after a 4-week washout period. However, a marginal, although significant as compared to glargine treatment, improvement in another b-cell function index (disposition index) was observed after a 4-week washout period following 3-year exenatide treatment. Finally, although no clinical trials with a long enough follow-up period are presently available, durable glucose control has been obtained during 2 years of liraglutide treatment in monotherapy. Since the durability of good control is strictly dependent upon a lack of further b-cell function deterioration, these clinical data may foster hope that GLP-1 receptor antagonist treatment might help preserving b-cell function also in individuals affected by type 2

  17. Emerging cardiovascular actions of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1: potential therapeutic benefits beyond glycaemic control?

    PubMed Central

    Grieve, David J; Cassidy, Roslyn S; Green, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone secreted by the small intestine in response to nutrient ingestion. It has wide-ranging effects on glucose metabolism, including stimulation of insulin release, inhibition of glucagon secretion, reduction of gastric emptying and augmentation of satiety. Importantly, the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1 are uniquely dependent on ambient glucose concentrations, and it is this particular characteristic which has led to its recent emergence as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. Although the major physiological function of GLP-1 appears to be in relation to glycaemic control, there is growing evidence to suggest that it may also play an important role in the cardiovascular system. GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) are expressed in the heart and vasculature of both rodents and humans, and recent studies have demonstrated that GLP-1R agonists have wide-ranging cardiovascular actions, such as modulation of heart rate, blood pressure, vascular tone and myocardial contractility. Importantly, it appears that these agents may also have beneficial effects in the setting of cardiovascular disease (CVD). For example, GLP-1 has been found to exert cardioprotective actions in experimental models of dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertensive heart failure and myocardial infarction (MI). Preliminary clinical studies also indicate that GLP-1 infusion may improve cardiac contractile function in chronic heart failure patients with and without diabetes, and in MI patients after successful angioplasty. This review will discuss the current understanding of GLP-1 biology, examine its emerging cardiovascular actions in both health and disease and explore the potential use of GLP-1 as a novel treatment for CVD. PMID:19681866

  18. Frog skin peptides (tigerinin-1R, magainin-AM1, -AM2, CPF-AM1, and PGla-AM1) stimulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) by GLUTag cells.

    PubMed

    Ojo, O O; Conlon, J M; Flatt, P R; Abdel-Wahab, Y H A

    2013-02-01

    Skin secretions of several frog species contain host-defense peptides with multiple biological activities including in vitro and in vivo insulin-releasing actions. This study investigates the effects of tigerinin-1R from Hoplobatrachus rugulosus (Dicroglossidae) and magainin-AM1, magainin-AM2, caerulein precursor fragment (CPF-AM1) and peptide glycine leucine amide (PGLa-AM1) from Xenopus amieti (Pipidae) on GLP-1 secretion from GLUTag cells. Tigerinin-1R showed the highest potency producing a significant (P<0.05) increase in GLP-1 release at a concentration of 0.1nM for the cyclic peptide and 0.3nM for the reduced form. All peptides from X. amieti significantly (P<0.05) stimulated GLP-1 release at concentrations ⩾300nM with magainin-AM2 exhibiting the greatest potency (minimum concentration producing a significant stimulation=1nM). The maximum stimulatory response (3.2-fold of basal rate, P<0.001) was produced by CPF-AM1 at a concentration of 3μM. No peptide stimulated release of the cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase from GLUTag cells at concentrations up to 3μM indicating that the integrity of the plasma membrane had been preserved. The data indicate that frog skin peptides, by stimulating GLP-1 release as well as direct effects on insulin secretion, show therapeutic potential as agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  19. Prediction of the effect on antihyperglycaemic action of sitagliptin by plasma active form glucagon-like peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Kikuchi, Takako; Tanaka, Kentaro; Tahara, Tazu; Takao, Toshiko; Onishi, Yukiko; Yoshida, Yoko; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a prediction Factor of Effect of sitagliptin on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (GLP-1 FEST:UMIN000010645). METHODS: Seventy-six patients with type 2 diabetes, who had insufficient glycemic control [Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥ 7%] in spite of treatment with metformin and/or sulfonylurea, were included in the investigation. Patients were divided into three groups by tertiles of fasting plasma active GLP-1 level, before the administration of 50 mg sitagliptin. RESULTS: At baseline, body mass index, serum UA, insulin and HOMA-IR were higher in the high active GLP-1 group than in the other two groups. The high active GLP-1 group did not show any decline of HbA1c (7.6% ± 1.4% to 7.5% ± 1.5%), whereas the middle and low groups indicated significant decline of HbA1c (7.4 ± 0.7 to 6.8 ± 0.6 and 7.4 ± 1.2 to 6.9 ± 1.3, respectively) during six months. Only the low and middle groups showed a significant increment of active GLP-1, C-peptide level, a decreased log and proinsulin/insulin ratio after administration. In logistic analysis, the low or middle group is a significant explanatory variable for an HbA1c decrease of ≥ 0.5%, and its odds ratio is 4.5 (1.40-17.6) (P = 0.01) against the high active GLP-1 group. This remains independent when adjusted for HbA1c level before administration, patients’ medical history, medications, insulin secretion and insulin resistance. CONCLUSION: Plasma fasting active GLP-1 is an independent predictive marker for the efficacy of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor sitagliptin. PMID:27326345

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 improves beta-cell antioxidant capacity via extracellular regulated kinases pathway and Nrf2 translocation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Millán, E; Martín, M A; Goya, L; Lizárraga-Mollinedo, E; Escrivá, F; Ramos, S; Álvarez, C

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance, two major pathophysiological abnormalities of type 2 diabetes. Expression levels of antioxidant enzymes in beta cells are very low, rendering them more susceptible to damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although the antioxidant effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its analogs have been previously reported, the exact mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that GLP-1 was able to effectively inhibit oxidative stress and cell death of INS-1E beta cells induced by the pro-oxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tert-BOOH). Incubation with GLP-1 enhanced cellular levels of glutathione and the activity of its related enzymes, glutathione-peroxidase (GPx) and -reductase (GR) in beta cells. However, inhibition of ERK, but not of the PI3K/AKT pathway abolished, at least in part, the antioxidant effect of GLP-1. Moreover, ERK activation seems to be protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent because inhibition of PKA with H-89 was sufficient to block the GLP-1-derived protective effect on beta cells. GLP-1 likewise increased the synthesis of GR and favored the translocation of the nuclear transcription factor erythroid 2p45-related factor (Nrf2), a transcription factor implicated in the expression of several antioxidant/detoxificant enzymes. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was also preserved in beta-cells challenged with tert-BOOH but pre-treated with GLP-1, probably through the down-regulation of the mitochondrial uncoupling-protein2 (UCP2). Thus, our results provide additional mechanisms of action of GLP-1 to prevent oxidative damage in beta cells through the modulation of signaling pathways involved in antioxidant enzyme regulation. PMID:26968794

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 improves beta-cell antioxidant capacity via extracellular regulated kinases pathway and Nrf2 translocation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Millán, E; Martín, M A; Goya, L; Lizárraga-Mollinedo, E; Escrivá, F; Ramos, S; Álvarez, C

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance, two major pathophysiological abnormalities of type 2 diabetes. Expression levels of antioxidant enzymes in beta cells are very low, rendering them more susceptible to damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although the antioxidant effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its analogs have been previously reported, the exact mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that GLP-1 was able to effectively inhibit oxidative stress and cell death of INS-1E beta cells induced by the pro-oxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tert-BOOH). Incubation with GLP-1 enhanced cellular levels of glutathione and the activity of its related enzymes, glutathione-peroxidase (GPx) and -reductase (GR) in beta cells. However, inhibition of ERK, but not of the PI3K/AKT pathway abolished, at least in part, the antioxidant effect of GLP-1. Moreover, ERK activation seems to be protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent because inhibition of PKA with H-89 was sufficient to block the GLP-1-derived protective effect on beta cells. GLP-1 likewise increased the synthesis of GR and favored the translocation of the nuclear transcription factor erythroid 2p45-related factor (Nrf2), a transcription factor implicated in the expression of several antioxidant/detoxificant enzymes. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was also preserved in beta-cells challenged with tert-BOOH but pre-treated with GLP-1, probably through the down-regulation of the mitochondrial uncoupling-protein2 (UCP2). Thus, our results provide additional mechanisms of action of GLP-1 to prevent oxidative damage in beta cells through the modulation of signaling pathways involved in antioxidant enzyme regulation.

  2. Taspoglutide, an analog of human glucagon-like Peptide-1 with enhanced stability and in vivo potency.

    PubMed

    Sebokova, Elena; Christ, Andreas D; Wang, Haiyan; Sewing, Sabine; Dong, Jesse Z; Taylor, John; Cawthorne, Michael A; Culler, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    Taspoglutide is a novel analog of human glucagon-like peptide-1 [hGLP-1(7-36)NH2] in clinical development for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Taspoglutide contains alpha-aminoisobutyric acid substitutions replacing Ala(8) and Gly(35) of hGLP-1(7-36)NH2. The binding affinity [radioligand binding assay using [(125)I]hGLP-1(7-36)NH2], potency (cAMP production in CHO cells stably overexpressing hGLP-1 receptor), and in vitro plasma stability of taspoglutide compared with hGLP-1(7-36)NH2 have been evaluated. Effects on basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were determined in vitro in INS-1E cells and in vivo in normal rats. Taspoglutide has comparable affinity (affinity constant 1.1 +/- 0.2 nm) to the natural ligand (affinity constant 1.5 +/- 0.3 nm) for the hGLP-1 receptor and exhibits comparable potency in stimulating cAMP production (EC(50) Taspo 0.06 nm and EC(50) hGLP-1(7-36)NH2 0.08 nm). Taspoglutide exerts insulinotropic action in vitro and in vivo and retains the glucoincretin property of hGLP-1(7-36)NH2. Stimulation of insulin secretion is concentration dependent and evident in the presence of high-glucose concentrations (16.7 mm) with a taspoglutide concentration as low as 0.001 nm. Taspoglutide is fully resistant to dipeptidyl peptidase-4 cleavage (during 1 h incubation at room temperature with purified enzyme) and has an extended in vitro plasma half-life relative to hGLP-1(7-36)NH2 (9.8 h vs. 50 min). In vitro, taspoglutide does not inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-4 activity. This study provides the biochemical and pharmacological basis for the sustained plasma drug levels and prolonged therapeutic activity seen in early clinical trials of taspoglutide. Excellent stability and potency with substantial glucoincretin effects position taspoglutide as a promising new agent for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  3. Dual-purpose linker for alpha helix stabilization and imaging agent conjugation to glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Navaratna, Tejas; Liao, Jianshan; Thurber, Greg M

    2015-02-18

    Peptides display many characteristics of efficient imaging agents such as rapid targeting, fast background clearance, and low non-specific cellular uptake. However, poor stability, low affinity, and loss of binding after labeling often preclude their use in vivo. Using glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) ligands exendin and GLP-1 as a model system, we designed a novel α-helix-stabilizing linker to simultaneously address these limitations. The stabilized and labeled peptides showed an increase in helicity, improved protease resistance, negligible loss or an improvement in binding affinity, and excellent in vivo targeting. The ease of incorporating azidohomoalanine in peptides and efficient reaction with the dialkyne linker enable this technique to potentially be used as a general method for labeling α helices. This strategy should be useful for imaging beta cells in diabetes research and in developing and testing other peptide targeting agents. PMID:25594741

  4. Multifunctional Antibody Agonists Targeting Glucagon-like Peptide-1, Glucagon, and Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Du, Jintang; Zou, Huafei; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yuhan; Gonzalez, Jose; Chao, Elizabeth; Lu, Lucy; Yang, Pengyu; Parker, Holly; Nguyen-Tran, Van; Shen, Weijun; Wang, Danling; Schultz, Peter G; Wang, Feng

    2016-09-26

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R), glucagon (GCG) receptor (GCGR), and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP, also known as gastric inhibitory polypeptide) receptor (GIPR), are three metabolically related peptide hormone receptors. A novel approach to the generation of multifunctional antibody agonists that activate these receptors has been developed. Native or engineered peptide agonists for GLP-1R, GCGR, and GIPR were fused to the N-terminus of the heavy chain or light chain of an antibody, either alone or in pairwise combinations. The fusion proteins have similar in vitro biological activities on the cognate receptors as the corresponding peptides, but circa 100-fold longer plasma half-lives. The GLP-1R mono agonist and GLP-1R/GCGR dual agonist antibodies both exhibit potent effects on glucose control and body weight reduction in mice, with the dual agonist antibody showing enhanced activity in the latter. PMID:27595986

  5. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist enhances intrinsic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Onuma, Hirohisa; Inukai, Kouichi Kitahara, Atsuko; Moriya, Rie; Nishida, Susumu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Katsuta, Hidenori; Takahashi, Kazuto; Sumitani, Yoshikazu; Hosaka, Toshio; Ishida, Hitoshi

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • PPARγ activation was involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action. • Exendin-4 enhanced endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity in HUVECs. • H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement. • The anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 may be explained by PPARγ activation. - Abstract: Recent studies have suggested glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) signaling to exert anti-inflammatory effects on endothelial cells, although the precise underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether PPARγ activation is involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action on endothelial cells. When we treated HUVEC cells with 0.2 ng/ml exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity was significantly elevated, by approximately 20%, as compared with control cells. The maximum PPARγ activity enhancing effect of exendin-4 was observed 12 h after the initiation of incubation with exendin-4. As H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement, the signaling downstream from GLP-1 cross-talk must have been involved in PPARγ activation. In conclusion, our results suggest that GLP-1 has the potential to induce PPARγ activity, partially explaining the anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 on endothelial cells. Cross-talk between GLP-1 signaling and PPARγ activation would have major impacts on treatments for patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist therapeutics for total diabetes management: assessment of composite end-points.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Daisuke; Kuwata, Hitoshi; Usui, Ryota; Kurose, Takeshi; Seino, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the benefits of anti-diabetic drugs for type 2 diabetes requires analysis of composite end-points, taking HbA1c, bodyweight, hypoglycemia and other metabolic parameters into consideration; continuous, optimal glycemic control as well as bodyweight, blood pressure and lipid levels are critical to prevent micro- and macro-vascular complications. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are now established as an important total treatment strategy for type 2 diabetes, exerting glucose-lowering effects with little hypoglycemia risk and also ameliorating bodyweight, blood pressure and lipid levels, which are therapeutic targets for prevention of complications of the disease. The available data strongly suggest only beneficial effects of GLP-1RAs; however, long-term evaluation of the relevant composite end-points including health-related quality of life and cost-effectiveness remain to be investigated in adequately powered, prospective, controlled clinical trials. In the meantime, healthcare professionals need to be scrupulously attentive for potential, rare adverse events in patients using GLP-1RAs. PMID:25916903

  7. The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 reduces cocaine self-administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Reddy, India A; Weikop, Pia; Graham, Devon L; Stanwood, Gregg D; Wortwein, Gitta; Galli, Aurelio; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The ability of the GLP-1 system to decrease food intake in rodents has been well described and parallels results from clinical trials. GLP-1 receptors are expressed in the brain, including within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Dopaminergic neurons in the VTA project to the NAc, and these neurons play a pivotal role in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. Based on the anatomical distribution of GLP-1 receptors in the brain and the well-established effects of GLP-1 on food reward, we decided to investigate the effect of the GLP-1 analogue exendin-4 on cocaine- and dopamine D1-receptor agonist-induced hyperlocomotion, on acute and chronic cocaine self-administration, on cocaine-induced striatal dopamine release in mice and on cocaine-induced c-fos activation. Here, we report that GLP-1 receptor stimulation reduces acute and chronic cocaine self-administration and attenuates cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. In addition, we show that peripheral administration of exendin-4 reduces cocaine-induced elevation of striatal dopamine levels and striatal c-fos expression implicating central GLP-1 receptors in these responses. The present results demonstrate that the GLP-1 system modulates cocaine's effects on behavior and dopamine homeostasis, indicating that the GLP-1 receptor may be a novel target for the pharmacological treatment of drug addiction.

  8. Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Promotes Adipocyte Differentiation via the Wnt4 Mediated Sequestering of Beta-Catenin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Li, Na; Lin, Yi; Wang, Mei; Peng, Yongde; Lewi, Keidren; Wang, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays a role in the regulation of adipogenesis; however, the precise underlying molecular mechanism has not been fully defined. Wnt was recently identified as an important regulator of adipogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the involvement of the Wnt signaling pathway in the effects of GLP-1 on adipocyte differentiation. 3T3-L1 cells were induced to differentiate. The changes in the expression levels of adipogenic transcription factors and Wnts and the phosphorylation level and subcellular localization of β-catenin were quantified after GLP-1 treatment. GLP-1 stimulated adipocyte differentiation and lipid accumulation, which were accompanied by the expression of adipocyte marker genes. The expression of Wnt4 was upregulated in the process of adipocyte differentiation, which was further enhanced by treatment with GLP-1. β-catenin, an important mediator of the Wnt pathway, was immediately dephosphorylated and translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus when differentiation was induced. In the presence of GLP-1, however, β-catenin was redirected to the cell plasma membrane leading to its decreased accumulation in the nucleus. Knockdown of Wnt4 blocked the effect of GLP-1 on the cellular localization of β-catenin and expression level of adipogenic transcription factors. Our findings showed that GLP-1 promoted adipogenesis through the modulation of the Wnt4/β-catenin signaling pathway, suggesting that the GLP-1-Wntβ-catenin system might be a new target for the treatment of metabolic disease. PMID:27504979

  9. Selective targeting of glucagon-like peptide-1 signalling as a novel therapeutic approach for cardiovascular disease in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Mitchel; Chong, Aaron; Robinson, Emma; Green, Brian D; Grieve, David J

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone whose glucose-dependent insulinotropic actions have been harnessed as a novel therapy for glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. Although it has been known for some time that the GLP-1 receptor is expressed in the CVS where it mediates important physiological actions, it is only recently that specific cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 in the setting of diabetes have been described. GLP-1 confers indirect benefits in cardiovascular disease (CVD) under both normal and hyperglycaemic conditions via reducing established risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity, which are markedly increased in diabetes. Emerging evidence indicates that GLP-1 also exerts direct effects on specific aspects of diabetic CVD, such as endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, angiogenesis and adverse cardiac remodelling. However, the majority of studies have employed experimental models of diabetic CVD and information on the effects of GLP-1 in the clinical setting is limited, although several large-scale trials are ongoing. It is clearly important to gain a detailed knowledge of the cardiovascular actions of GLP-1 in diabetes given the large number of patients currently receiving GLP-1-based therapies. This review will therefore discuss current understanding of the effects of GLP-1 on both cardiovascular risk factors in diabetes and direct actions on the heart and vasculature in this setting and the evidence implicating specific targeting of GLP-1 as a novel therapy for CVD in diabetes. PMID:25231355

  10. Dietary Mannoheptulose Increases Fasting Serum Glucagon Like Peptide-1 and Post-Prandial Serum Ghrelin Concentrations in Adult Beagle Dogs.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Leslie L; Eyre, Ryan; Gooding, Margaret A; Davenport, Gary M; Shoveller, Anna Kate

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of nutraceuticals for weight management in companion animals. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mannoheptulose (MH), a sugar in avocados that inhibits glycolysis, on energy metabolism in adult Beagle dogs. The study was a double-blind, randomized controlled trial where dogs were allocated to a control (CON, n = 10, 10.1 ± 0.4 kg) or MH containing diet (168 mg/kg, n = 10, 10.3 ± 0.4 kg). Blood was collected after an overnight fast and 1 h post-feeding (week 12) to determine serum satiety related hormones and biochemistry. Resting and post-prandial energy expenditure and respiratory quotient were determined by indirect calorimetry (weeks 4 and 8). Physical activity was measured using an accelerometer (weeks 3, 7, 11). Body composition was assessed using dual X-ray absorptiometry (week 12). MH significantly (p < 0.05) increased fasting serum glucagon-like peptide-1 and post-prandial serum ghrelin. MH tended (p < 0.1) to increase fasting serum gastric inhibitory peptide and decrease physical activity. Together, these findings suggest that dietary MH has the ability to promote satiation and lowers daily energy expenditure. PMID:26479244

  11. Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Promotes Adipocyte Differentiation via the Wnt4 Mediated Sequestering of Beta-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Li, Na; Lin, Yi; Wang, Mei; Peng, Yongde; Lewi, Keidren; Wang, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays a role in the regulation of adipogenesis; however, the precise underlying molecular mechanism has not been fully defined. Wnt was recently identified as an important regulator of adipogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the involvement of the Wnt signaling pathway in the effects of GLP-1 on adipocyte differentiation. 3T3-L1 cells were induced to differentiate. The changes in the expression levels of adipogenic transcription factors and Wnts and the phosphorylation level and subcellular localization of β-catenin were quantified after GLP-1 treatment. GLP-1 stimulated adipocyte differentiation and lipid accumulation, which were accompanied by the expression of adipocyte marker genes. The expression of Wnt4 was upregulated in the process of adipocyte differentiation, which was further enhanced by treatment with GLP-1. β-catenin, an important mediator of the Wnt pathway, was immediately dephosphorylated and translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus when differentiation was induced. In the presence of GLP-1, however, β-catenin was redirected to the cell plasma membrane leading to its decreased accumulation in the nucleus. Knockdown of Wnt4 blocked the effect of GLP-1 on the cellular localization of β-catenin and expression level of adipogenic transcription factors. Our findings showed that GLP-1 promoted adipogenesis through the modulation of the Wnt4/β-catenin signaling pathway, suggesting that the GLP-1-Wntβ-catenin system might be a new target for the treatment of metabolic disease. PMID:27504979

  12. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 as Predictor of Body Mass Index and Dentate Gyrus Neurogenesis: Neuroplasticity and the Metabolic Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D.; Perera, Tarique D.; Fulton, Sasha L.; Banerji, Mary Ann; Dwork, Andrew J.; Kral, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) regulates carbohydrate metabolism and promotes neurogenesis. We reported an inverse correlation between adult body mass and neurogenesis in nonhuman primates. Here we examine relationships between physiological levels of the neurotrophic incretin, plasma GLP-1 (pGLP-1), and body mass index (BMI) in adolescence to adult neurogenesis and associations with a diabesity diathesis and infant stress. Morphometry, fasting pGLP-1, insulin resistance, and lipid profiles were measured in early adolescence in 10 stressed and 4 unstressed male bonnet macaques. As adults, dentate gyrus neurogenesis was assessed by doublecortin staining. High pGLP-1, low body weight, and low central adiposity, yet peripheral insulin resistance and high plasma lipids, during adolescence were associated with relatively high adult neurogenesis rates. High pGLP-1 also predicted low body weight with, paradoxically, insulin resistance and high plasma lipids. No rearing effects for neurogenesis rates were observed. We replicated an inverse relationship between BMI and neurogenesis. Adolescent pGLP-1 directly predicted adult neurogenesis. Two divergent processes relevant to human diabesity emerge—high BMI, low pGLP-1, and low neurogenesis and low BMI, high pGLP-1, high neurogenesis, insulin resistance, and lipid elevations. Diabesity markers putatively reflect high nutrient levels necessary for neurogenesis at the expense of peripheral tissues. PMID:25506432

  13. Albiglutide, an albumin-based fusion of glucagon-like peptide 1 for the potential treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2009-10-01

    Albiglutide, under development by GlaxoSmithKline plc for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is an albumin-fusion peptide. The compound is a mimetic of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a hormone that decreases glucose levels, but has a short half-life because of degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4. Albiglutide has a longer half-life as a result of its fusion with albumin and its resistance to degradation by DPP-4, caused by an amino acid substitution (Ala to Glu) at the DPP-4-sensitive hydrolysis site. Data from phase II clinical trials in patients with T2DM revealed that albiglutide was well tolerated and that the drug significantly reduced HbA1c levels compared with placebo. At the time of publication, phase III trials assessing albiglutide alone and in combination with other antidiabetic drugs were recruiting patients with T2DM. Albiglutide represents a promising new drug for the treatment of patients with T2DM; the results of long-term trials are awaited with interest.

  14. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 and feeding on gastric volumes in diabetes mellitus with cardio-vagal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Aros, S; Vella, A; Camilleri, M; Low, P A; Burton, D D; Thomforde, G M; Stephens, D

    2003-08-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increases gastric volume in humans possibly through the vagus nerve. Gastric volume response to feeding is preserved after vagal denervation in animals. We evaluated gastric volume responses to GLP-1 and placebo in seven diabetic patients with vagal neuropathy in a crossover study. We also compared gastric volume response to feeding in diabetes with that in healthy controls. We measured gastric volume using SPECT imaging. Data are median (interquartile range). In diabetic patients, GLP-1 did not increase gastric volume during fasting [5 mL (-3; 30)] relative to placebo [4 mL (-14; 50) P = 0.5], or postprandially [Delta postprandial minus fasting volume 469 mL (383; 563) with GLP-1 and 452 mL (400; 493) with placebo P = 0.3]. Change in gastric volume over fasting in diabetic patients on placebo was comparable to that of healthy controls [452 mL (400; 493)], P = 0.5. In contrast to effects in health, GLP-1 did not increase gastric volume in diabetics with vagal neuropathy, suggesting GLP-1's effects on stomach volume are vagally mediated. Normal gastric volume response to feeding in diabetics with vagal neuropathy suggests that other mechanisms compensate for vagal denervation.

  15. Metformin ameliorates lipotoxicity-induced mesangial cell apoptosis partly via upregulation of glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Heo, Young-ran; Park, Soo-hyun

    2015-10-15

    Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), known to be expressed in pancreatic beta cells, is also expressed in glomerular mesangial cells and its agonist has protective effects in diabetic nephropathy. However, its regulatory mechanisms by lipotoxicity in glomerular mesangial cells are not understood. We found that palmitate-mediated lipotoxicity increased apoptosis and decreased GLP-1R expression in a rat mesangial cell line. Silencing GLP-1R expression also increased mesangial cell apoptosis. Interestingly, metformin, one of the biguanide drugs that has anti-diabetic effects, attenuated lipotoxicity-induced mesangial cell apoptosis and restored GLP-1R expression. Moreover, this treatment alleviated GLP-1R knockdown-induced mesangial cell apoptosis. To further evaluate in vivo, diabetic obese db/db mice were administered metformin. Glomerular GLP-1R expression was diminished in db/db mice, as compared with db/m control mice. However, this decrease significantly recovered on metformin administration. Together, these data provide novel evidence that lipotoxicity decreases the mesangial GLP-1R expression in intact cells and in vivo. The decrease induced mesangial cell apoptosis. Furthermore, we provided the evidence that metformin treatment has a renal protective effect partly via increased mesangial GLP-1R expression. Our data suggested that regulation of GLP-1R expression could be a promising approach to treat diabetic nephropathy and the novel mechanism of metformin mediated GLP-1R regulation.

  16. Ingestion of coffee polyphenols increases postprandial release of the active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1(7-36)) amide in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshie; Osaki, Noriko; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The widespread prevalence of diabetes, caused by impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance, is now a worldwide health problem. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a major intestinal hormone that stimulates glucose-induced insulin secretion from β cells. Prolonged activation of the GLP-1 signal has been shown to attenuate diabetes in animals and human subjects. Therefore, GLP-1 secretagogues are attractive targets for the treatment of diabetes. Recent epidemiological studies have reported that an increase in daily coffee consumption lowers diabetes risk. The present study examined the hypothesis that the reduction in diabetes risk associated with coffee consumption may be mediated by the stimulation of GLP-1 release by coffee polyphenol extract (CPE). GLP-1 secretion by human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells was augmented in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of CPE, and was compatible with the increase in observed active GLP-1(7-36) amide levels in the portal blood after administration with CPE alone in mice. CPE increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner, but this was not mediated by G protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119). The oral administration of CPE increased diet (starch and glyceryl trioleate)-induced active GLP-1 secretion and decreased glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide release. Although CPE administration did not affect diet-induced insulin secretion, it decreased postprandial hyperglycaemia, which indicates that higher GLP-1 levels after the ingestion of CPE may improve insulin sensitivity. We conclude that dietary coffee polyphenols augment gut-derived active GLP-1 secretion via the cAMP-dependent pathway, which may contribute to the reduced risk of type 2 diabetes associated with daily coffee consumption.

  17. Isolation of Positive Modulator of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Signaling from Trigonella foenum-graecum (Fenugreek) Seed.

    PubMed

    King, Klim; Lin, Nai-Pin; Cheng, Yu-Hong; Chen, Gao-Hui; Chein, Rong-Jie

    2015-10-23

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many tissues and has been implicated in diverse physiological functions, such as energy homeostasis and cognition. GLP-1 analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are undergoing clinical trials for other disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 analog therapies maintain chronically high plasma levels of the analog and can lead to loss of spatiotemporal control of GLP-1R activation. To avoid adverse effects associated with current therapies, we characterized positive modulators of GLP-1R signaling. We screened extracts from edible plants using an intracellular cAMP biosensor and GLP-1R endocytosis assays. Ethanol extracts from fenugreek seeds enhanced GLP-1 signaling. These seeds have previously been found to reduce glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels in humans. An active compound (N55) with a new N-linoleoyl-2-amino-γ-butyrolactone structure was purified from fenugreek seeds. N55 promoted GLP-1-dependent cAMP production and GLP-1R endocytosis in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. N55 specifically enhanced GLP-1 potency more than 40-fold, but not that of exendin 4, to stimulate cAMP production. In contrast to the current allosteric modulators that bind to GLP-1R, N55 binds to GLP-1 peptide and facilitates trypsin-mediated GLP-1 inactivation. These findings identify a new class of modulators of GLP-1R signaling and suggest that GLP-1 might be a viable target for drug discovery. Our results also highlight a feasible approach for screening bioactive activity of plant extracts. PMID:26336108

  18. Protein kinase A mediates glucagon-like peptide 1-induced nitric oxide production and muscle microvascular recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhenhua; Chai, Weidong; Wang, Wenhui; Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Cao, Wenhong

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) causes vasodilation and increases muscle glucose uptake independent of insulin. Recently, we have shown that GLP-1 recruits muscle microvasculature and increases muscle glucose use via a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a major signaling intermediate downstream of GLP-1 receptors. To examine whether PKA mediates GLP-1's microvascular action in muscle, GLP-1 was infused to overnight-fasted male rats for 120 min in the presence or absence of H89, a PKA inhibitor. Hindleg muscle microvascular recruitment and glucose use were determined. GLP-1 infusion acutely increased muscle microvascular blood volume within 30 min without altering microvascular blood flow velocity or blood pressure. This effect persisted throughout the 120-min infusion period, leading to a significant increase in muscle microvascular blood flow. These changes were paralleled with an approximately twofold increase in plasma NO levels and hindleg glucose extraction. Systemic infusion of H89 completely blocked GLP-1-mediated muscle microvascular recruitment and increases in NO production and muscle glucose extraction. In cultured endothelial cells, GLP-1 acutely increased PKA activity and stimulated endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation at Ser1177 and NO production. PKA inhibition abolished these effects. In ex vivo studies, perfusion of the distal saphenous artery with GLP-1 induced significant vasorelaxation that was also abolished by pretreatment of the vessels with PKA inhibitor H89. We conclude that GLP-1 recruits muscle microvasculature by expanding microvascular volume and increases glucose extraction in muscle via a PKA/NO-dependent pathway in the vascular endothelium. This may contribute to postprandial glycemic control and complication prevention in diabetes. PMID:23193054

  19. Obesity alters molecular and functional cardiac responses to ischemia/reperfusion and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonism.

    PubMed

    Sassoon, Daniel J; Goodwill, Adam G; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Herring, B Paul; McClintick, Jeanette N; Tune, Johnathan D; Mather, Kieren J

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that obesity alters the cardiac response to ischemia/reperfusion and/or glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation, and that these differences are associated with alterations in the obese cardiac proteome and microRNA (miRNA) transcriptome. Ossabaw swine were fed normal chow or obesogenic diet for 6 months. Cardiac function was assessed at baseline, during a 30-minutes coronary occlusion, and during 2 hours of reperfusion in anesthetized swine treated with saline or exendin-4 for 24 hours. Cardiac biopsies were obtained from normal and ischemia/reperfusion territories. Fat-fed animals were heavier, and exhibited hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Plasma troponin-I concentration (index of myocardial injury) was increased following ischemia/reperfusion and decreased by exendin-4 treatment in both groups. Ischemia/reperfusion produced reductions in systolic pressure and stroke volume in lean swine. These indices were higher in obese hearts at baseline and relatively maintained throughout ischemia/reperfusion. Exendin-4 administration increased systolic pressure in lean swine but did not affect the blood pressure in obese swine. End-diastolic volume was reduced by exendin-4 following ischemia/reperfusion in obese swine. These divergent physiologic responses were associated with obesity-related differences in proteins related to myocardial structure/function (e.g. titin) and calcium handling (e.g. SERCA2a, histidine-rich Ca(2+) binding protein). Alterations in expression of cardiac miRs in obese hearts included miR-15, miR-27, miR-130, miR-181, and let-7. Taken together, these observations validate this discovery approach and reveal novel associations that suggest previously undiscovered mechanisms contributing to the effects of obesity on the heart and contributing to the actions of GLP-1 following ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:27234258

  20. Dietary Mannoheptulose Increases Fasting Serum Glucagon Like Peptide-1 and Post-Prandial Serum Ghrelin Concentrations in Adult Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Leslie L.; Eyre, Ryan; Gooding, Margaret A.; Davenport, Gary M.; Shoveller, Anna Kate

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary There is increased interest in the use of nutraceuticals for weight management in companion animals. A nutraceutical can broadly be considered a food (or a part of) that provides a health benefit. Mannoheptulose (MH), a sugar found in avocados, is being investigated as a nutraceutical for dogs. In this study, dogs fed a diet containing MH had increased concentrations of blood biomarkers related to energy intake. In addition, dogs fed MH were less physically active than dogs fed a control diet. These findings suggest that dietary MH has the ability to alter energy intake and lower daily energy expenditure. Abstract There is a growing interest in the use of nutraceuticals for weight management in companion animals. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mannoheptulose (MH), a sugar in avocados that inhibits glycolysis, on energy metabolism in adult Beagle dogs. The study was a double-blind, randomized controlled trial where dogs were allocated to a control (CON, n = 10, 10.1 ± 0.4 kg) or MH containing diet (168 mg/kg, n = 10, 10.3 ± 0.4 kg). Blood was collected after an overnight fast and 1 h post-feeding (week 12) to determine serum satiety related hormones and biochemistry. Resting and post-prandial energy expenditure and respiratory quotient were determined by indirect calorimetry (weeks 4 and 8). Physical activity was measured using an accelerometer (weeks 3, 7, 11). Body composition was assessed using dual X-ray absorptiometry (week 12). MH significantly (p < 0.05) increased fasting serum glucagon-like peptide-1 and post-prandial serum ghrelin. MH tended (p < 0.1) to increase fasting serum gastric inhibitory peptide and decrease physical activity. Together, these findings suggest that dietary MH has the ability to promote satiation and lowers daily energy expenditure. PMID:26479244

  1. Crosstalk between diabetes and brain: glucagon-like peptide-1 mimetics as a promising therapy against neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Duarte, A I; Candeias, E; Correia, S C; Santos, R X; Carvalho, C; Cardoso, S; Plácido, A; Santos, M S; Oliveira, C R; Moreira, P I

    2013-04-01

    According to World Health Organization estimates, type 2 diabetes (T2D) is an epidemic (particularly in under development countries) and a socio-economic challenge. This is even more relevant since increasing evidence points T2D as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), supporting the hypothesis that AD is a "type 3 diabetes" or "brain insulin resistant state". Despite the limited knowledge on the molecular mechanisms and the etiological complexity of both pathologies, evidence suggests that neurodegeneration/death underlying cognitive dysfunction (and ultimately dementia) upon long-term T2D may arise from a complex interplay between T2D and brain aging. Additionally, decreased brain insulin levels/signaling and glucose metabolism in both pathologies further suggests that an effective treatment strategy for one disorder may be also beneficial in the other. In this regard, one such promising strategy is a novel successful anti-T2D class of drugs, the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics (e.g. exendin-4 or liraglutide), whose potential neuroprotective effects have been increasingly shown in the last years. In fact, several studies showed that, besides improving peripheral (and probably brain) insulin signaling, GLP-1 analogs minimize cell loss and possibly rescue cognitive decline in models of AD, Parkinson's (PD) or Huntington's disease. Interestingly, exendin-4 is undergoing clinical trials to test its potential as an anti-PD therapy. Herewith, we aim to integrate the available data on the metabolic and neuroprotective effects of GLP-1 mimetics in the central nervous system (CNS) with the complex crosstalk between T2D-AD, as well as their potential therapeutic value against T2D-associated cognitive dysfunction.

  2. Endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 reduces drinking behavior and is differentially engaged by water and food intakes in rats.

    PubMed

    McKay, Naomi J; Galante, Daniela L; Daniels, Derek

    2014-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is produced in the ileum and the nucleus of the solitary tract. It is well known that GLP-1 controls food intake, but there is a growing literature indicating that GLP-1 also is involved in fluid intake. It is not known, however, if the observed effects are pharmacological or if endogenous GLP-1 and its receptor contribute to physiological fluid intake control. Accordingly, we blocked endogenous GLP-1 by application of a receptor antagonist and measured subsequent drinking. Furthermore, we measured changes in GLP-1-associated gene expression after water intake, and compared the effects of fluid intake to those caused by food intake. Rats injected with the antagonist exendin-9 (Ex-9) drank more fluid in response to either subcutaneous hypertonic saline or water deprivation with partial rehydration than did vehicle-treated rats. Analysis of licking behavior showed that Ex-9 increased fluid intake by increasing the number of licking bursts, without having an effect on the number of licks per burst, suggesting that endogenous GLP-1 suppresses fluid intake by influencing satiety. Subsequent experiments showed that water intake had a selective effect on central GLP-1-related gene expression, unlike food intake, which affected both central and peripheral GLP-1. Although water and food intakes both affected central GLP-1-relevant gene expression, there were notable differences in the timing of the effect. These results show a novel role of the endogenous GLP-1 system in fluid intake, and indicate that elements of the GLP-1 system can be engaged separately by different forms of ingestive behavior.

  3. Enzymatic mono-pegylation of glucagon-like peptide 1 towards long lasting treatment of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Selis, Fabio; Schrepfer, Rodolfo; Sanna, Riccardo; Scaramuzza, Silvia; Tonon, Giancarlo; Dedoni, Simona; Onali, Pierluigi; Orsini, Gaetano; Genovese, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a physiological gastrointestinal peptide with glucose-dependent insulinotropic effects which is therefore considered an interesting antidiabetic agent. However, after in vivo administration, exogenous GLP-1 does not exert its physiological action due to the combination of rapid proteolytic degradation by ubiquitous dipeptidyldipeptidase IV (DPP IV) enzyme and renal clearance resulting in an extremely short circulating half-life. In this work we describe the conjugation of GLP-1-(7-36)-amide derivatives with polyethylene glycol (PEG) by enzymatic site-specific transglutamination reaction as an approach to reduce both the proteolysis and the renal clearance rates. The compound GLP-1-(7-36)-amide-Q23-PEG 20 kDa monopegylated on the single glutamine residue naturally present in position 23 maintained the ability to activate the GLP-1 receptor expressed in the rat β-cell line RIN-m5F with nanomolar potency along with an increased in vitro resistance to DDP IV and a circulating half-life of about 12 h after subcutaneous administration in rats. These properties enabled GLP-(7-36)-amide-Q23-PEG 20 kDa to exert a glucose-stabilizing effect for a period as long as 8 h, as demonstrated by a single subcutaneous injection to diabetic mice concomitantly challenged with an oral glucose load. The results reported in this work indicate that GLP-(7-36)-amide-Q23-PEG 20 kDa could be a lead compound for the development of long-lasting anti-diabetic agents useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes affected patients. PMID:25755995

  4. Novel Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog Delivered Orally Reduces Postprandial Glucose Excursions in Porcine and Canine Models

    PubMed Central

    Eldor, Roy; Kidron, Miriam; Greenberg-Shushlav, Yael; Arbit, Ehud

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its analogs are associated with a gamut of physiological processes, including induction of insulin release, support of normoglycemia, β-cell function preservation, improved lipid profiles, and increased insulin sensitivity. Thus, GLP-1 harbors significant therapeutic potential for regulating type 2 diabetes mellitus, where its physiological impact is markedly impaired. To date, GLP-1 analogs are only available as injectable dosage forms, and its oral delivery is expected to provide physiological portal/peripheral concentration ratios while fostering patient compliance and adherence. Methods Healthy, fasting, enterically cannulated pigs and beagle canines were administered a single dose of the exenatide-based ORMD-0901 formulation 30 min before oral glucose challenges. Blood samples were collected every 15 min for evaluation of ORMD-0901 safety and efficacy in regulating postchallenge glucose excursions. Results Enterically delivered ORMD-0901 was well tolerated by all animals. ORMD-0901 formulations RG3 and AG2 led to reduced glucose excursions in pigs when delivered prior to a 5 g/kg glucose challenge, where area under the curve (AUC)0–120 values were up to 43% lower than in control sessions. All canines challenged with a glucose load with no prior exposure to exenatide, demonstrated higher AUC0–150 values than in their exenatide-treated sessions. Subcutaneous exenatide delivery amounted to a 51% reduction in mean glucose AUC0–150, while formulations AG4 and AG3 prompted 43% and 29% reductions, respectively. Conclusions When delivered enterically, GLP-1 (ORMD-0901) is absorbed from the canine and porcine gastrointestinal tracts and retains its biological activity. Further development of this drug class in an oral dosage form is expected to enhance diabetes control and patient compliance. PMID:21129350

  5. Isolation of Positive Modulator of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Signaling from Trigonella foenum-graecum (Fenugreek) Seed*

    PubMed Central

    King, Klim; Lin, Nai-Pin; Cheng, Yu-Hong; Chen, Gao-Hui; Chein, Rong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many tissues and has been implicated in diverse physiological functions, such as energy homeostasis and cognition. GLP-1 analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are undergoing clinical trials for other disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 analog therapies maintain chronically high plasma levels of the analog and can lead to loss of spatiotemporal control of GLP-1R activation. To avoid adverse effects associated with current therapies, we characterized positive modulators of GLP-1R signaling. We screened extracts from edible plants using an intracellular cAMP biosensor and GLP-1R endocytosis assays. Ethanol extracts from fenugreek seeds enhanced GLP-1 signaling. These seeds have previously been found to reduce glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels in humans. An active compound (N55) with a new N-linoleoyl-2-amino-γ-butyrolactone structure was purified from fenugreek seeds. N55 promoted GLP-1-dependent cAMP production and GLP-1R endocytosis in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. N55 specifically enhanced GLP-1 potency more than 40-fold, but not that of exendin 4, to stimulate cAMP production. In contrast to the current allosteric modulators that bind to GLP-1R, N55 binds to GLP-1 peptide and facilitates trypsin-mediated GLP-1 inactivation. These findings identify a new class of modulators of GLP-1R signaling and suggest that GLP-1 might be a viable target for drug discovery. Our results also highlight a feasible approach for screening bioactive activity of plant extracts. PMID:26336108

  6. Neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions of glucagon-like peptide-1: an emerging opportunity to treat neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Isidro; Tweedie, David; Li, Yazhou; Greig, Nigel H

    2012-01-01

    Like type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), neurodegenerative disorders and stroke are an ever increasing, health, social and economic burden for developed Westernized countries. Age is an important risk factor in all of these; due to the rapidly increasing rise in the elderly population T2DM and neurodegenerative disorders, both represent a looming threat to healthcare systems. Whereas several efficacious drugs are currently available to ameliorate T2DM, effective treatments to counteract pathogenic processes of neurodegenerative disorders are lacking and represent a major scientific and pharmaceutical challenge. Epidemiological data indicate an association between T2DM and most major neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Likewise, there is an association between T2DM and stroke incidence. Studies have revealed that common pathophysiological features, including oxidative stress, insulin resistance, abnormal protein processing and cognitive decline, occur across these. Based on the presence of shared mechanisms and signalling pathways in these seemingly distinct diseases, one could hypothesize that an effective treatment for one disorder could prove beneficial in the others. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based anti-diabetic drugs have drawn particular attention as an effective new strategy to not only regulate blood glucose but also to reduce apoptotic cell death of pancreatic beta cells in T2DM. Evidence supports a neurotrophic and neuroprotective role of GLP-1 receptor (R) stimulation in an increasing array of cellular and animal neurodegeneration models as well as in neurogenesis. Herein, we review the physiological role of GLP-1 in the nervous system, focused towards the potential benefit of GLP-1R stimulation as an immediately translatable treatment strategy for acute and chronic neurological disorders. PMID:22519295

  7. The effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 in the management of diabetes mellitus: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Mohamed; Singh, Jaipaul; Rashed, Hameed; Tariq, Saeed; Zilahi, Erika; Adeghate, Ernest

    2014-11-01

    Incretins, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP)-1, have been shown to elevate plasma insulin concentration. The purpose of this study is to investigate the cellular and molecular basis of the beneficial effects of GLP-1. Normal and diabetic male Wistar rats were treated with GLP-1 (50 ng/kg body weight) for 10 weeks. At the end of the experiment, pancreatic tissues were taken for immunohistochemistry, immunoelectron microscopy and real-time polymerase chain reaction studies. Samples of blood were retrieved from the animals for the measurement of enzymes and insulin. The results show that treatment of diabetic rats with GLP-1 caused significant (P < 0.05) reduction in body weight gain and blood glucose level. GLP-1 (10(-12)-10(-6) M) induced significant (P < 0.01) dose-dependent increases in insulin release from the pancreas of normal and diabetic rats compared to basal. Diabetes-induced abnormal liver (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) and kidney (blood urea nitrogen and uric acid) parameters were corrected in GLP-1-treated rats compared to controls. GLP-1 treatment induced significant (P < 0.05) elevation in the expression of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1, heat shock protein-70, glutathione peroxidase, insulin receptor and GLP-1-receptor genes in diabetic animals compared to controls. GLP-1 is present in pancreatic beta cells and significantly (P < 0.05) increased the number of insulin-, glutathione reductase- and catalase-immunoreactive islet cells. The results of this study show that GLP-1 is co-localized with insulin and seems to exert its beneficial effects by increasing cellular concentrations of endogenous antioxidant genes and other genes involved in the maintenance of pancreatic beta cell structure and function.

  8. 64Cu Labeled Sarcophagine Exendin-4 for MicroPET Imaging of Glucagon like Peptide-1 Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhanhong; Liu, Shuanglong; Nair, Indu; Omori, Keiko; Scott, Stephen; Todorov, Ivan; Shively, John E.; Conti, Peter S.; Li, Zibo; Kandeel, Fouad

    2014-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) has become an important target for imaging due to its elevated expression profile in pancreatic islets, insulinoma, and the cardiovascular system. Because native GLP-1 is degraded rapidly by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), several studies have conjugated different chelators to a more stable analog of GLP-1 (such as exendin-4) as PET or SPECT imaging agents with various advantages and disadvantages. Based on the recently developed Sarcophagin chelator, here, we describe the construction of GLP-1R targeted PET probes containing monomeric and dimeric exendin-4 subunit. The in vitro binding affinity of BarMalSar-exendin-4 and Mal2Sar-(exendin-4)2 was evaluated in INS-1 cells, which over-express GLP-1R. Mal2Sar-(exendin-4)2 demonstrated around 3 times higher binding affinity compared with BaMalSar-exendin-4. After 64Cu labeling, microPET imaging of 64Cu-BaMalSar-exendin-4 and 64Cu-Mal2Sar-(exendin-4)2 were performed on subcutaneous INS-1 tumors, which were clearly visualized with both probes. The tumor uptake of 64Cu-Mal2Sar-(exendin-4)2 was significantly higher than that of 64Cu-BaMaSarl-exendin-4, which could be caused by polyvalency effect. The receptor specificity of these probes was confirmed by effective blocking of the uptake in both tumor and normal positive organs with 20-fold excess of unlabeled exendin-4. In conclusion, sarcophagine cage conjugated exendin-4 demonstrated persistent and specific uptake in INS-1 insulinoma model. Dimerization of exendin-4 could successfully lead to increased tumor uptake in vivo. Both 64Cu-BaMalSar-exendin-4 and 64Cu-Mal2Sar-(exendin-4)2 hold a great potential for GLP-1R targeted imaging. PMID:24955138

  9. Dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are favourable to glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists: yes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2012-03-01

    The pharmacological treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is becoming increasingly complex, especially since the availability of incretin-based therapies. Compared with other glucose-lowering strategies, these novel drugs offer some advantages such as an absence of weight gain and a negligible risk of hypoglycaemia and, possibly, better cardiovascular and β-cell protection. The physician has now multiple choices to manage his/her patient after secondary failure of metformin, and the question whether it is preferable to add an oral dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor (gliptin) or an injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist will emerge. Obviously, DPP-4 inhibitors offer several advantages compared with GLP-1 receptor agonists, especially regarding easiness of use, tolerance profile and cost. However, because they can only increase endogenous GLP-1 concentrations to physiological (rather than pharmacological) levels, they are less potent to improve glucose control, promote weight reduction ("weight neutrality") and reduce blood pressure compared to GLP-1 receptor agonists. Of note, none of the two classes have proven long-term safety and positive impact on diabetic complications yet. The role of DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists in the therapeutic armamentarium of T2DM is rapidly evolving, but their respective potential strengths and weaknesses should be better defined in long-term head-to-head comparative controlled trials. Instead of trying to answer the question whether DPP-4 inhibitors are favourable to GLP-1 receptor agonists (or vice versa), it is probably more clinically relevant to look at which T2DM patient will benefit more from one or the other therapy considering all his/her individual clinical characteristics ("personalized medicine").

  10. Neural effects of gut- and brain-derived glucagon-like peptide-1 and its receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Kenichi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is derived from both the enteroendocrine L cells and preproglucagon-expressing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem. As GLP-1 is cleaved by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 yielding a half-life of less than 2 min, it is plausible that the gut-derived GLP-1, released postprandially, exerts its effects on the brain mainly by interacting with vagal afferent neurons located at the intestinal or hepatic portal area. GLP-1 neurons in the NTS widely project in the central nervous system and act as a neurotransmitter. One of the physiological roles of brain-derived GLP-1 is restriction of feeding. GLP-1 receptor agonists have recently been used to treat type 2 diabetic patients, and have been shown to exhibit pleiotropic effects beyond incretin action, which involve brain functions. GLP-1 receptor agonist administered in the periphery is stable because of its resistance to dipeptidyl peptidase-4, and is highly likely to act on the brain by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as well as interacting with vagal afferent nerves. Central actions of GLP-1 have various roles including regulation of feeding, weight, glucose and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular functions, cognitive functions, and stress and emotional responses. In the present review, we focus on the source of GLP-1 and the pathway by which peripheral GLP-1 informs the brain, and then discuss recent findings on the central effects of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor agonists. PMID:27186358

  11. Molecular Basis of Glucagon-like Peptide 1 Docking to Its Intact Receptor Studied with Carboxyl-terminal Photolabile Probes*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Quan; Pinon, Delia I.; Miller, Laurence J.; Dong, Maoqing

    2009-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is a member of Family B G protein-coupled receptors and represents an important drug target for type 2 diabetes. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino-terminal domain of this receptor and that of several close family members, understanding of the molecular basis of natural ligand GLP1 binding to its intact receptor remains limited. The goal of this study was to explore spatial approximations between specific receptor residues within the carboxyl terminus of GLP1 and its receptor as normally docked. Therefore, we developed and characterized two high affinity, full-agonist photolabile GLP1 probes having sites for covalent attachment in positions 24 and 35. Both probes labeled the receptor specifically and saturably. Subsequent peptide mapping using chemical and proteinase cleavages of purified wild-type and mutant GLP1 receptor identified that the Arg131–Lys136 segment at the juxtamembrane region of the receptor amino terminus contained the site of labeling for the position 24 probe, and the specific receptor residue labeled by this probe was identified as Glu133 by radiochemical sequencing. Similarly, nearby residue Glu125 within the same region of the receptor amino-terminal domain was identified as the site of labeling by the position 35 probe. These data represent the first direct demonstration of spatial approximation between GLP1 and its intact receptor as docked, providing two important constraints for the modeling of this interaction. This should expand our understanding of the molecular basis of natural agonist ligand binding to the GLP1 receptor and may be relevant to other family members. PMID:19815559

  12. Efficacy and tolerability of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Delilah J.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been evaluated for use in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) due to its role in glucose regulation. Four GLP-1 receptor agonists (RAs) are currently indicated for T2DM in the USA. Exenatide and liraglutide are short-acting and require twice-daily and daily dosing, respectively. Two longer acting agents, exenatide long-acting release (LAR) and albiglutide, were formulated to allow for once-weekly dosing. All four GLP-1 RAs have demonstrated reductions in hemoglobin A1c, fasting blood glucose, and body weight both as monotherapy and in combination with first- and second-line diabetes agents including metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, and insulin. Greater glycemic control was seen with liraglutide compared with the other GLP-1 treatment options; however, the two long-acting agents were superior to exenatide twice daily. All agents were well tolerated with most adverse events being mild or moderate in nature. The most common adverse event was transient nausea which typically resolved 4–8 weeks after treatment initiation. Long-acting agents had lower rates of nausea but an increased incidence of injection site reactions. Trials have suggested GLP-1 RAs may improve cardiovascular risk factors including blood pressure, lipid parameters and inflammatory markers. Future trials are needed to confirm the clinical outcomes of these agents. Overall, GLP-1 RAs will provide benefit for patients with T2DM intolerable to or not reaching glycemic goals with first-line agents, especially in patients in need of weight loss. PMID:25678952

  13. Evidence for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling to activate ATP-sensitive potassium channels in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hye-Jung; Park, Hyun-Sun; Park, Sung-Hee; Park, Jae-Hyung; Shin, Su-Kyung; Song, Seung Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Cho, Ho-Chan; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut peptide that promotes insulin release from pancreatic beta cells. GLP-1 has been shown to confer glucose-insensitive beta cells with glucose sensitivity by modulation of the activity of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel. The channel closing effect of GLP-1, interacting with corresponding G-protein-coupled receptors, has been well established; however, to our knowledge, no study has shown whether GLP-1 directly induces activation of beta-cell KATP channels. Here, we aimed to evaluate whether the activation of beta-cell KATP channels by GLP-1 exists and affects intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i). KATP channel activity was measured in isolated rat pancreatic beta cells by whole-cell perforated patch-clamp recordings with a diazoxide-containing pipette solution. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i and the subcellular localization of KATP channels were observed using the calcium-sensitive dye fura-4/AM and anti-Kir6.2 antibodies in INS-1 beta cells, respectively. To eliminate the well-known inhibitory effects of GLP-1 on KATP channel activity, channels were fully inhibited by pretreatment with methyl pyruvate and epigallocatechin-3-gallate. In the pretreated beta cells, GLP-1 and exendin-4 promptly activated the channels, reducing [Ca(2+)]i. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 blocked the effects of GLP-1 on channel activity. Moreover, phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate mimicked the effects of GLP-1. These results suggested that beta-cell GLP-1 receptor signaling involved activation of KATP channels via a PI3K-dependent pathway. This alternative mechanism of GLP-1 function may act as a negative feedback pathway, modulating the glucose-dependent GLP-1 inhibition on KATP channel activity. PMID:26655814

  14. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Its Class B G Protein-Coupled Receptors: A Long March to Therapeutic Successes.

    PubMed

    Graaf, Chris de; Donnelly, Dan; Wootten, Denise; Lau, Jesper; Sexton, Patrick M; Miller, Laurence J; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Liao, Jiayu; Fletcher, Madeleine M; Yang, Dehua; Brown, Alastair J H; Zhou, Caihong; Deng, Jiejie; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the action of GLP-1, a peptide hormone secreted from three major tissues in humans, enteroendocrine L cells in the distal intestine, α cells in the pancreas, and the central nervous system, which exerts important actions useful in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity, including glucose homeostasis and regulation of gastric motility and food intake. Peptidic analogs of GLP-1 have been successfully developed with enhanced bioavailability and pharmacological activity. Physiologic and biochemical studies with truncated, chimeric, and mutated peptides and GLP-1R variants, together with ligand-bound crystal structures of the extracellular domain and the first three-dimensional structures of the 7-helical transmembrane domain of class B GPCRs, have provided the basis for a two-domain-binding mechanism of GLP-1 with its cognate receptor. Although efforts in discovering therapeutically viable nonpeptidic GLP-1R agonists have been hampered, small-molecule modulators offer complementary chemical tools to peptide analogs to investigate ligand-directed biased cellular signaling of GLP-1R. The integrated pharmacological and structural information of different GLP-1 analogs and homologous receptors give new insights into the molecular determinants of GLP-1R ligand selectivity and functional activity, thereby providing novel opportunities in the design and development of more efficacious agents to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:27630114

  15. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Its Class B G Protein–Coupled Receptors: A Long March to Therapeutic Successes

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Chris; Donnelly, Dan; Wootten, Denise; Lau, Jesper; Sexton, Patrick M.; Miller, Laurence J.; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Liao, Jiayu; Fletcher, Madeleine M.; Brown, Alastair J. H.; Zhou, Caihong; Deng, Jiejie; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a class B G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the action of GLP-1, a peptide hormone secreted from three major tissues in humans, enteroendocrine L cells in the distal intestine, α cells in the pancreas, and the central nervous system, which exerts important actions useful in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity, including glucose homeostasis and regulation of gastric motility and food intake. Peptidic analogs of GLP-1 have been successfully developed with enhanced bioavailability and pharmacological activity. Physiologic and biochemical studies with truncated, chimeric, and mutated peptides and GLP-1R variants, together with ligand-bound crystal structures of the extracellular domain and the first three-dimensional structures of the 7-helical transmembrane domain of class B GPCRs, have provided the basis for a two-domain–binding mechanism of GLP-1 with its cognate receptor. Although efforts in discovering therapeutically viable nonpeptidic GLP-1R agonists have been hampered, small-molecule modulators offer complementary chemical tools to peptide analogs to investigate ligand-directed biased cellular signaling of GLP-1R. The integrated pharmacological and structural information of different GLP-1 analogs and homologous receptors give new insights into the molecular determinants of GLP-1R ligand selectivity and functional activity, thereby providing novel opportunities in the design and development of more efficacious agents to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:27630114

  16. Involvement of glucagon-like peptide 1 in the glucose homeostasis regulation in obese and pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism affected dogs.

    PubMed

    Miceli, D D; Cabrera Blatter, M F; Gallelli, M F; Pignataro, O P; Castillo, V A

    2014-10-01

    The incretin glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) enhances insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to assess GLP-1, glucose and insulin concentrations, Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA insulin sensitivity and HOMA β-cell function) in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH), and compare these values with those in normal and obese dogs. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test was performed and the glucose, GLP-1 and insulin concentrations were evaluated at baseline, and after 15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes. Both basal concentration and those corresponding to the subsequent times, for glucose, GLP-1 and insulin, were statistically elevated in PDH dogs compared to the other groups. Insulin followed a similar behaviour together with variations of GLP-1. HOMA insulin sensitivity was statistically decreased and HOMA β-cell function increased in dogs with PDH. The higher concentrations of GLP-1 in PDH could play an important role in the impairment of pancreatic β-cells thus predisposing to diabetes mellitus.

  17. Changes in the concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide and gastric inhibitory polypeptide during the lactation cycle in goats.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, A; Martin, P A

    1998-08-01

    Plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) were determined at fortnightly intervals for over a year throughout the pregnancy-lactation cycle of goats. Both GIP and GLP concentrations were elevated during lactation and fell rapidly when milk secretion was terminated. At the onset of lactation GLP concentrations rose rapidly whereas GIP concentrations showed a delayed response. GLP concentrations remained high throughout lactation but those of GIP declined linearly as milk yields fell. Serum insulin concentrations correlated positively with plasma glucose concentrations but not with either GIP or GLP concentrations. Negative correlations were found between serum insulin concentrations and milk yield and plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations. The results are consistent with plasma GIP and GLP concentrations being determined by other factors in addition to nutrient intake and absorption. Changes in GIP concentrations mirrored reported changes in the hypertrophy and atrophy of the intestine in ruminants while GLP concentrations may be more dependent on the neural and endocrine factors associated with lactation. The elevated concentrations of both peptides indicated a specific role in lactation independent of their normal anabolic and insulinotropic effects.

  18. GSK2374697, a long duration glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, reduces postprandial circulating endogenous total GLP-1 and peptide YY in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Hodge, R J; O'Connor-Semmes, R L; Nunez, D J

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of a long-duration glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, GSK2374697, on postprandial endogenous total GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY). Two cohorts of healthy subjects, one normal/overweight and one obese, were randomized to receive GSK2374697 2 mg (n = 8 each) or placebo (n = 4 and n = 2) subcutaneously on days 1, 4 and 7. Samples for plasma endogenous GLP-1 and PYY were collected after breakfast on days -1 and 12. Weighted mean area under the curve (0-4 h) of total GLP-1 and PYY in treated subjects was reduced compared with placebo. The least squares mean difference for change from baseline was -1.24 pmol/l [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.33, -0.16] and -4.47 pmol/l (95% CI -8.74, -0.20) for total GLP-1 and PYY, respectively, in normal/overweight subjects (p < 0.05 for both), and -1.56 (95% CI -2.95, -0.16) and -3.02 (95% CI -8.58, 2.55), respectively, in obese subjects (p < 0.05 for GLP-1). In healthy subjects, GSK2374697 reduced postprandial total GLP-1 and PYY levels, suggesting feedback suppression of enteroendocrine L-cell secretion of these peptides.

  19. Importance of Large Intestine in Regulating Bile Acids and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Germ-Free Mice.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Csanaky, Iván L; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-10-01

    It is known that 1) elevated serum bile acids (BAs) are associated with decreased body weight, 2) elevated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels can decrease body weight, and 3) germ-free (GF) mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a lack of intestinal microbiota results in more BAs in the body, resulting in increased BA-mediated transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) signaling and increased serum GLP-1 as a mechanism of resistance of GF mice to diet-induced obesity. GF mice had 2- to 4-fold increased total BAs in the serum, liver, bile, and ileum. Fecal excretion of BAs was 63% less in GF mice. GF mice had decreased secondary BAs and increased taurine-conjugated BAs, as anticipated. Surprisingly, there was an increase in non-12α-OH BAs, namely, β-muricholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and their taurine conjugates, in GF mice. Further, in vitro experiments confirmed that UDCA is a primary BA in mice. There were minimal changes in the mRNA of farnesoid X receptor target genes in the ileum (Fibroblast growth factor 15, small heterodimer protein, and ileal bile acid-binding protein), in the liver (small heterodimer protein, liver receptor homolog-1, and cytochrome P450 7a1), and BA transporters (apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter, organic solute transporter α, and organic solute transporter β) in the ileum of GF mice. Surprisingly, there were marked increases in BA transporters in the large intestine. Increased GLP-1 levels and gallbladder size were observed in GF mice, suggesting activation of TGR5 signaling. In summary, the GF condition results in increased expression of BA transporters in the colon, resulting in 1) an increase in total BA concentrations in tissues, 2) a change in BA composition to favor an increase in non-12α-OH BAs, and 3) activation of TGR5 signaling with increased gallbladder size and GLP-1.

  20. Importance of Large Intestine in Regulating Bile Acids and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Germ-Free Mice

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Csanaky, Iván L.; Zhang, Youcai

    2015-01-01

    It is known that 1) elevated serum bile acids (BAs) are associated with decreased body weight, 2) elevated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels can decrease body weight, and 3) germ-free (GF) mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a lack of intestinal microbiota results in more BAs in the body, resulting in increased BA-mediated transmembrane G protein–coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) signaling and increased serum GLP-1 as a mechanism of resistance of GF mice to diet-induced obesity. GF mice had 2- to 4-fold increased total BAs in the serum, liver, bile, and ileum. Fecal excretion of BAs was 63% less in GF mice. GF mice had decreased secondary BAs and increased taurine-conjugated BAs, as anticipated. Surprisingly, there was an increase in non–12α-OH BAs, namely, β-muricholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and their taurine conjugates, in GF mice. Further, in vitro experiments confirmed that UDCA is a primary BA in mice. There were minimal changes in the mRNA of farnesoid X receptor target genes in the ileum (Fibroblast growth factor 15, small heterodimer protein, and ileal bile acid–binding protein), in the liver (small heterodimer protein, liver receptor homolog-1, and cytochrome P450 7a1), and BA transporters (apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter, organic solute transporter α, and organic solute transporter β) in the ileum of GF mice. Surprisingly, there were marked increases in BA transporters in the large intestine. Increased GLP-1 levels and gallbladder size were observed in GF mice, suggesting activation of TGR5 signaling. In summary, the GF condition results in increased expression of BA transporters in the colon, resulting in 1) an increase in total BA concentrations in tissues, 2) a change in BA composition to favor an increase in non–12α-OH BAs, and 3) activation of TGR5 signaling with increased gallbladder size and GLP-1. PMID:26199423

  1. Oleic acid and glucose regulate glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor expression in a rat pancreatic ductal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Leshuai W.; McMahon Tobin, Grainne A.; Rouse, Rodney L.

    2012-10-15

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and has become an important target for a growing class of drugs designed to treat type 2 diabetes. In vitro studies were designed to investigate the effect of the GLP1R agonist, exenatide (Ex4), in “on-target” RIN-5mF (islet) cells as well as in “off-target” AR42J (acinar) and DSL-6A/C1 (ductal) cells in a diabetic environment. Ex4 increased islet cell proliferation but did not affect acinar cells or ductal cells at relevant concentrations. A high caloric, high fat diet is a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type-2 diabetes. An in vitro Oleic acid (OA) model was used to investigate the effect of Ex4 in a high calorie, high fat environment. At 0.1 and 0.4 mM, OA mildly decreased the proliferation of all pancreatic cell types. Ex4 did not potentiate the inhibitory effect of OA on cell proliferation. Akt phosphorylation in response to Ex4 was diminished in OA-treated ductal cells. GLP1R protein detected by western blot was time and concentration dependently decreased after glucose stimulation in OA-treated ductal cells. In ductal cells, OA treatment altered the intracellular localization of GLP1R and its co-localization with early endosome and recycling endosomes. Chloroquine (lysosomal inhibitor), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger) and wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor), fully or partially, rescued GLP1R protein in OA-pretreated, glucose-stimulated ductal cells. The impact of altered regulation on phenotype/function is presently unknown. However, these data suggest that GLP1R regulation in ductal cells can be altered by a high fat, high calorie environment. -- Highlights: ► Exenatide did not inhibit islet, acinar or ductal cell proliferation. ► GLP1R protein decreased after glucose stimulation in oleic acid-treated ductal cells. ► Oleic acid treatment altered localization of GLP1R with early and recycling

  2. GLP-1(28-36)amide, the Glucagon-like peptide-1 metabolite: friend, foe, or pharmacological folly?

    PubMed

    Taing, Meng-Wong; Rose, Felicity J; Whitehead, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) axis has emerged as a major therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 mediates its key insulinotropic effects via a G-protein coupled receptor expressed on β-cells and other pancreatic cell types. The insulinotropic activity of GLP-1 is terminated via enzymatic cleavage by dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Until recently, GLP-1-derived metabolites were generally considered metabolically inactive; however, accumulating evidence indicates some have biological activity that may contribute to the pleiotropic effects of GLP-1 independent of the GLP-1 receptor. Recent reports describing the putative effects of one such metabolite, the GLP-1-derived nonapeptide GLP-1(28-36) amide, are the focus of this review. Administration of the nonapeptide elevates cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and activates protein kinase A, β-catenin, and cAMP response-element binding protein in pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes. In stressed cells, the nonapeptide targets the mitochondria and, via poorly defined mechanisms, helps to maintain mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular adenosine triphosphate levels and to reduce cytotoxicity and apoptosis. In mouse models of diet-induced obesity, treatment with the nonapeptide reduces weight gain and ameliorates associated pathophysiology, including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic steatosis. Nonapeptide administration in a streptozotocin-induced model of type 1 diabetes also improves glucose disposal concomitant with elevated insulin levels and increased β-cell mass and proliferation. Collectively, these results suggest some of the beneficial effects of GLP-1 receptor analogs may be mediated by the nonapeptide. However, the concentrations required to elicit some of these effects are in the micromolar range, leading to reservations about potentially related therapeutic benefits. Moreover, although controversial, concerns have been raised about the potential for incretin

  3. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor stimulation reverses key deficits in distinct rodent models of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Harkavyi, Alexander; Abuirmeileh, Amjad; Lever, Rebecca; Kingsbury, Ann E; Biggs, Christopher S; Whitton, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Background It has recently become apparent that neuroinflammation may play a significant role in Parkinson's disease (PD). This is also the case in animal paradigms of the disease. The potential neuroprotective action of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist exendin-4 (EX-4), which is protective against cytokine mediated apoptosis and may stimulate neurogenesis, was investigated In paradigms of PD. Methods Two rodent 'models' of PD, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and lipopolysaccaride (LPS), were used to test the effects of EX-4. Rats were then investigated in vivo and ex vivo with a wide range of behavioural, neurochemical and histological tests to measure integrity of the nigrostriatal system. Results EX-4 (0.1 and 0.5 μg/kg) was given seven days after intracerebral toxin injection. Seven days later circling behaviour was measured following apomorphine challenge. Circling was significantly lower in rats given EX-4 at both doses compared to animals given 6-OHDA/LPS and vehicle. Consistent with these observations, striatal tissue DA concentrations were markedly higher in 6-OHDA/LPS + EX-4 treated rats versus 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle groups, whilst assay of L-DOPA production by tyrosine hydroxylase was greatly reduced in the striata of 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle rats, but this was not the case in rats co-administered EX-4. Furthermore nigral TH staining recorded in 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle treated animals was markedly lower than in sham-operated or EX-4 treated rats. Finally, EX-4 clearly reversed the loss of extracellular DA in the striata of toxin lesioned freely moving rats. Conclusion The apparent ability of EX-4 to arrest progression of, or even reverse nigral lesions once established, suggests that pharmacological manipulation of the GLP-1 receptor system could have substantial therapeutic utility in PD. Critically, in contrast to other peptide agents that have been demonstrated to possess neuroprotective properties in pre-clinical models of PD, EX-4 is in

  4. Postprandial glucose, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 responses of different equine breeds adapted to meals containing micronized maize.

    PubMed

    Bamford, N J; Baskerville, C L; Harris, P A; Bailey, S R

    2015-07-01

    The enteroinsular axis is a complex system that includes the release of incretin hormones from the gut to promote the absorption and utilization of glucose after a meal. The insulinogenic effect of incretin hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) remains poorly characterized in the horse. The aim of this study was to compare postprandial glucose, insulin, and GLP-1 responses of different equine breeds adapted to twice-daily meals containing micronized maize. Four Standardbred horses, 4 mixed-breed ponies, and 4 Andalusian cross horses in moderate BCS (5.5 ± 0.2 out of 9) were fed meals at 0800 and 1600 h each day. The meals contained micronized maize (mixed with soaked soybean hulls and lucerne chaff), with the amount of maize gradually increased over 12 wk to reach a final quantity of 1.7 g/kg BW (1.1 g/kg BW starch) in each meal. Animals had ad libitum access to the same hay throughout. After 12 wk of acclimation, serial blood samples were collected from all animals over a 14-h period to measure concentrations of glucose, insulin, and GLP-1, with meals fed immediately after the 0 and 8 h samples. Glucose area under the curve (AUC) values were similar between breed groups (P = 0.41); however, ponies and Andalusian horses exhibited significantly higher insulin AUC values after both meals compared with Standardbred horses (both P < 0.005). Postprandial GLP-1 AUC values were also significantly higher in ponies and Andalusian horses compared with Standardbred horses (breed × time interaction; P < 0.001). Correlation analysis demonstrated a strong positive association between concentrations of insulin and GLP-1 over time (rs = 0.752; P < 0.001). The increased insulin concentrations in ponies and Andalusian horses may partly reflect lower insulin sensitivity but could also be attributed to increased GLP-1 release. Given that hyperinsulinemia is a recognized risk factor for the development of laminitis in domestic equids, this study provides evidence that the

  5. Bile acids induce glucagon-like peptide 2 secretion with limited effects on intestinal adaptation in early weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early weaning is a stressful event characterized by a transient period of intestinal atrophy that may be mediated by reduced secretion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 2. We tested whether enterally fed bile acids or plant sterols could increase nutrient-dependent GLP-2 secretion and improve intestina...

  6. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 is a functional part of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor complex in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Robitaille, Mélanie; Showalter, Aaron D; Huang, Xinyi; Liu, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Alpana; Willard, Francis S; Han, Junfeng; Froese, Sean; Wei, Li; Gaisano, Herbert Y; Angers, Stéphane; Sloop, Kyle W; Dai, Feihan F; Wheeler, Michael B

    2014-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis. Because of their direct stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are now important therapeutic options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. To better understand the mechanisms that control the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1, affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) were employed to uncover potential proteins that functionally interact with the GLP-1R. AP-MS performed on Chinese hamster ovary cells or MIN6 β cells, both expressing the human GLP-1R, revealed 99 proteins potentially associated with the GLP-1R. Three novel GLP-1R interactors (PGRMC1, Rab5b, and Rab5c) were further validated through co-immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and immunofluorescence. Functional studies revealed that overexpression of PGRMC1, a novel cell surface receptor that associated with liganded GLP-1R, enhanced GLP-1-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) with the most robust effect. Knockdown of PGRMC1 in β cells decreased GIIS, indicative of positive interaction with GLP-1R. To gain insight mechanistically, we demonstrated that the cell surface PGRMC1 ligand P4-BSA increased GIIS, whereas its antagonist AG-205 decreased GIIS. It was then found that PGRMC1 increased GLP-1-induced cAMP accumulation. PGRMC1 activation and GIIS induced by P4-BSA could be blocked by inhibition of adenylyl cyclase/EPAC signaling or the EGF receptor-PI3K signal transduction pathway. These data reveal a dual mechanism for PGRMC1-increased GIIS mediated through cAMP and EGF receptor signaling. In conclusion, we identified several novel GLP-1R interacting proteins. PGRMC1 expressed on the cell surface of β cells was shown to interact with the activated GLP-1R to enhance the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1.

  7. Incretin therapies: highlighting common features and differences in the modes of action of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nauck, M

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, incretin-based therapies have emerged as important agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). These agents exert their effect via the incretin system, specifically targeting the receptor for the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which is partly responsible for augmenting glucose-dependent insulin secretion in response to nutrient intake (the 'incretin effect'). In patients with T2D, pharmacological doses/concentrations of GLP-1 can compensate for the inability of diabetic β cells to respond to the main incretin hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, and this is therefore a suitable parent compound for incretin-based glucose-lowering medications. Two classes of incretin-based therapies are available: GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. GLP-1RAs promote GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signalling by providing GLP-1R stimulation through 'incretin mimetics' circulating at pharmacological concentrations, whereas DPP-4 inhibitors prevent the degradation of endogenously released GLP-1. Both agents produce reductions in plasma glucose and, as a result of their glucose-dependent mode of action, this is associated with low rates of hypoglycaemia; however, there are distinct modes of action resulting in differing efficacy and tolerability profiles. Furthermore, as their actions are not restricted to stimulating insulin secretion, these agents have also been associated with additional non-glycaemic benefits such as weight loss, improvements in β-cell function and cardiovascular risk markers. These attributes have made incretin therapies attractive treatments for the management of T2D and have presented physicians with an opportunity to tailor treatment plans. This review endeavours to outline the commonalities and differences among incretin-based therapies and to provide guidance regarding agents most suitable for treating T2D in individual patients.

  8. Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 Is a Functional Part of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Complex in Pancreatic β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Robitaille, Mélanie; Showalter, Aaron D.; Huang, Xinyi; Liu, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Alpana; Willard, Francis S.; Han, Junfeng; Froese, Sean; Wei, Li; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Angers, Stéphane; Sloop, Kyle W.; Dai, Feihan F.; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis. Because of their direct stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are now important therapeutic options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. To better understand the mechanisms that control the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1, affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) were employed to uncover potential proteins that functionally interact with the GLP-1R. AP-MS performed on Chinese hamster ovary cells or MIN6 β cells, both expressing the human GLP-1R, revealed 99 proteins potentially associated with the GLP-1R. Three novel GLP-1R interactors (PGRMC1, Rab5b, and Rab5c) were further validated through co-immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and immunofluorescence. Functional studies revealed that overexpression of PGRMC1, a novel cell surface receptor that associated with liganded GLP-1R, enhanced GLP-1-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) with the most robust effect. Knockdown of PGRMC1 in β cells decreased GIIS, indicative of positive interaction with GLP-1R. To gain insight mechanistically, we demonstrated that the cell surface PGRMC1 ligand P4-BSA increased GIIS, whereas its antagonist AG-205 decreased GIIS. It was then found that PGRMC1 increased GLP-1-induced cAMP accumulation. PGRMC1 activation and GIIS induced by P4-BSA could be blocked by inhibition of adenylyl cyclase/EPAC signaling or the EGF receptor–PI3K signal transduction pathway. These data reveal a dual mechanism for PGRMC1-increased GIIS mediated through cAMP and EGF receptor signaling. In conclusion, we identified several novel GLP-1R interacting proteins. PGRMC1 expressed on the cell surface of β cells was shown to interact with the activated GLP-1R to enhance the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1. PMID:25044020

  9. Correlation of Glypican-4 Level with Basal Active Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Level in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Gwanpyo; Cho, Suk Ju; Yoo, So-Yeon; Chin, Sang Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported that glypican-4 (GPC4) regulates insulin signaling by interacting with insulin receptor and through adipocyte differentiation. However, GPC4 has not been studied with regard to its effects on clinical factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We aimed to identify factors associated with GPC4 level in T2DM. Methods Between January 2010 and December 2013, we selected 152 subjects with T2DM and collected serum and plasma into tubes pretreated with aprotinin and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor to preserve active gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). GPC4, active GLP-1, active GIP, and other factors were measured in these plasma samples. We performed a linear regression analysis to identify factors associated with GPC4 level. Results The subjects had a mean age of 58.1 years, were mildly obese (mean body mass index [BMI], 26.1 kg/m2), had T2DM of long-duration (mean, 101.3 months), glycated hemoglobin 7.5%, low insulin secretion, and low insulin resistance (mean homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR], 1.2). Their mean GPC4 was 2.0±0.2 ng/mL. In multivariate analysis, GPC4 was independently associated with age (β=0.224, P=0.009), and levels of active GLP-1 (β=0.171, P=0.049) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST; β=–0.176, P=0.043) after being adjusted for other clinical factors. Conclusion GPC4 was independently associated with age, active GLP-1, and AST in T2DM patients, but was not associated with HOMA-IR and BMI, which are well known factors related to GPC4. Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms of the association between GPC4 and basal active GLP-1 levels. PMID:27704740

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1 mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ and stimulates mitochondrial ATP synthesis in pancreatic MIN6 beta-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Takashi; da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Holz, George G; Jouaville, Laurence S; Thomas, Andrew P; Rutter, Guy A

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent regulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion whose mechanisms of action are only partly understood. In the present paper, we show that at low (3 mM) glucose concentrations, GLP-1 increases the free intramitochondrial concentrations of both Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](m)), and ATP ([ATP](m)) in clonal MIN6 beta-cells. Suggesting that cAMP-mediated release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores is responsible for these effects, increases in [ATP](m) that were induced by GLP-1 were completely blocked by the Rp isomer of adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate (Rp-cAMPS), or by chelation of intracellular Ca(2+). Furthermore, inhibition of Ins(1,4,5) P (3) (IP(3)) receptors with xestospongin C, or application of ryanodine, partially inhibited GLP-1-induced [ATP](m) increases, and the simultaneous blockade of both IP(3) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) completely eliminated the rise in [ATP](m). GLP-1 appeared to prompt Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release through IP(3) receptors via a protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation event, since ryanodine-insensitive [ATP](m) increases were abrogated with the PKA inhibitor, H89. In contrast, the effects of GLP-1 on RyR-mediated [ATP](m) increases were apparently mediated by the cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor cAMP-GEFII, since xestospongin C-insensitive [ATP](m) increases were blocked by a dominant-negative form of cAMP-GEFII (G114E,G422D). Taken together, these results demonstrate that GLP-1 potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin release in part via the mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), and the stimulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. PMID:12410638

  11. Effects of prepartum fat supplementation on plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY, adropin, insulin, and leptin in periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Rizaldy C; Salehi, Reza; Ambrose, Divakar J; Chelikani, Prasanth K

    2015-10-01

    Dietary fat supplementation during the periparturient period is one strategy to increase energy intake and attenuate the degree of negative energy balance during early lactation; however, little is known of the underlying hormonal and metabolic adaptations. We evaluated the effects of prepartum fat supplementation on energy-balance parameters and plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), adropin, insulin, leptin, glucose, nonesterified fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyric acid in dairy cows. Twenty-four pregnant dairy cows were randomized to diets containing either rolled canola or sunflower seed at 8% of dry matter, or no oilseed supplementation, during the last 5 wk of gestation and then assigned to a common lactation diet postpartum. Blood samples were collected at -2, +2, and +14 h relative to feeding, at 2 wk after the initiation of the diets, and at 2 wk postpartum. Dietary canola and sunflower supplementation alone did not affect energy balance, body weight, and plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1, PYY, adropin, insulin, leptin, nonesterified fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyric acid; however, canola decreased and sunflower tended to decrease dry matter intake. We also observed that the physiological stage had a significant, but divergent, effect on circulating hormones and metabolite concentrations. Plasma glucagon-like peptide-1, PYY, adropin, nonesterified fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyric acid concentrations were greater postpartum than prepartum, whereas glucose, insulin, leptin, body weight, and energy balance were greater prepartum than postpartum. Furthermore, the interaction of treatment and stage was significant for leptin and adropin, and tended toward significance for PYY and insulin; only insulin exhibited an apparent postprandial increase. Postpartum PYY concentrations exhibited a strong negative correlation with body weight, suggesting that PYY may be associated with body weight regulation during

  12. Exploration of structure-activity relationships at the two C-terminal residues of potent 11mer Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 receptor agonist peptides via parallel synthesis.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tasir S; Martinez, Rogelio L; Lee, Ving G; Riexinger, Douglas G; Lei, Ming; Feng, Ming; Koplowitz, Barry; Mapelli, Claudio; Cooper, Christopher B; Zhang, Ge; Huang, Christine; Ewing, William R; Krupinski, John

    2010-07-01

    We report the identification of potent agonists of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) via evaluation of two positional scanning libraries and a two-dimensional focused library, synthesized in part on SynPhase Lanterns. These compounds are 11 amino acid peptides containing several unnatural amino acids, including (in particular) analogs of biphenylalanine (Bip) at the two C-terminal positions. Typical activities of the most potent peptides in this class are in the picomolar range in an in vitro functional assay using human GLP-1 receptor.

  13. Identification of potent 11mer glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist peptides with novel C-terminal amino acids: Homohomophenylalanine analogs.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tasir S; Lee, Ving G; Riexinger, Douglas; Lei, Ming; Malmstrom, Sarah; Xin, Li; Han, Songping; Mapelli, Claudio; Cooper, Christopher B; Zhang, Ge; Ewing, William R; Krupinski, John

    2010-05-01

    We report the identification of potent agonists of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R). These compounds are short, 11 amino acid peptides containing several unnatural amino acids, including (in particular) analogs of homohomophenylalanine (hhPhe) at the C-terminal position. Typically the functional activity of the more potent peptides in this class is in the low picomolar range in an in vitro cAMP assay, with one example demonstrating excellent in vivo activity in an ob/ob mouse model of diabetes.

  14. The putative signal peptide of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is not required for receptor synthesis but promotes receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yunjun; Yang, Dehua; Dai, Antao; Zhou, Caihong; Zhu, Yue; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    GLP-1R (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor) mediates the ‘incretin effect’ and many other anti-diabetic actions of its cognate ligand, GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1). It belongs to the class B family of GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors) and possesses an N-terminal putative SP (signal peptide). It has been reported that this sequence is required for the synthesis of GLP-1R and is cleaved after receptor synthesis. In the present study, we conducted an in-depth exploration towards the role of the putative SP in GLP-1R synthesis. A mutant GLP-1R without this sequence was expressed in HEK293 cells (human embryonic kidney 293 cells) and displayed normal functionality with respect to ligand binding and activation of adenylate cyclase. Thus the putative SP does not seem to be required for receptor synthesis. Immunoblotting analysis shows that the amount of GLP-1R synthesized in HEK293 cells is low when the putative SP is absent. This indicates that the role of the sequence is to promote the expression of GLP-1R. Furthermore, epitopes tagged at the N-terminal of GLP-1R are detectable by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting in our experiments. In conclusion, the present study points to different roles of SP in GLP-1R expression which broadens our understanding of the functionality of this putative SP of GLP-1R and possibly other Class B GPCRs. PMID:25330813

  15. Effects of oligofructose on appetite profile, glucagon-like peptide 1 and peptide YY3-36 concentrations and energy intake.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Sanne P M; Meyer, Diederick; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2011-12-01

    In rats, oligofructose has been shown to stimulate satiety hormone secretion, reduce energy intake and promote weight loss. The present study aimed to examine the effect of oligofructose supplementation on appetite profiles, satiety hormone concentrations and energy intake in human subjects. A total of thirty-one healthy subjects (ten men and twenty-one women) aged 28 (SEM 3) years with a BMI of 24·8 (SEM 0·3) kg/m(2) were included in a randomised double-blind, cross-over study. The subjects received 10 g oligofructose, 16 g oligofructose or 16 g placebo (maltodextrin) daily for 13 d, with a 2-week washout period between treatments. Appetite profile, active glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY3-36 (PYY) concentrations and energy intake were assessed on days 0 and 13 of the treatment period. Time × treatment interaction revealed a trend of reduction in energy intake over days 0-13 by oligofructose (P = 0·068). Energy intake was significantly reduced (11 %) over time on day 13 compared with day 0 with 16 g/d oligofructose (2801 (SEM 301) v. 3217 (SEM 320) kJ, P < 0·05). Moreover, energy intake was significantly lower with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose on day 13 (2801 (SEM 301) v. 3177 (SEM 276) kJ, P < 0·05). Area under the curve (AUC) for GLP-1 on day 13 was significantly higher with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose (45 (SEM 4) v. 41 (SEM 3) pmol/l × h, P < 0·05). In the morning until lunch, AUC(0-230 min) for PYY on day 13 was significantly higher with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose and placebo (409 (SEM 35) v. 222 (SEM 19) and 211 (SEM 20) pg/ml × h, P < 0·01). In conclusion, 16 g/d and not 10 g/d oligofructose may be an effective dose to reduce energy intake, possibly supported by higher GLP-1 and PYY concentrations.

  16. A Dual-Purpose Linker for Alpha Helix Stabilization and Imaging Agent Conjugation to Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Navaratna, Tejas; Liao, Jianshan; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides display many characteristics of efficient imaging agents such as rapid targeting, fast background clearance, and low non-specific cellular uptake. However, poor stability, low affinity, and loss of binding after labeling often preclude their use in vivo. Using the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) ligands exendin and GLP-1 as a model system, we designed a novel alpha helix stabilizing linker to simultaneously address these limitations. The stabilized and labeled peptides showed an increase in helicity, improved protease resistance, negligible loss or an improvement in binding affinity, and excellent in vivo targeting. The ease of incorporating azidohomoalanine in peptides and efficient reaction with the dialkyne linker enables this technique to potentially be used as a general method for labeling alpha helices. This strategy should be useful for imaging beta cells in diabetes research and in developing and testing other peptide targeting agents. PMID:25594741

  17. [Dulaglutide (Trulicity®), a new once-weekly agonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors for type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2016-03-01

    Dulaglutide (Trulicity®) is a new once-weekly agonist of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors indicated in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Phase III clinical trials in AWARD programme demonstrated the efficacy and safety of dulaglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes treated by diet and exercise, metformin, a combination of metformin and a sulfonylurea or metformin and pioglitazone or even by supplements of prandial insulin. In the AWARD programme, dulaglutide (subcutaneous 0.75 or 1.5 mg once weekly) exerted a greater glucose-lowering activity than metformin, sitagliptin, exenatide or insulin glargine, and was non-inferior to liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily. Dulaglutide is currently reimbursed in Belgium after failure of and in combination with a dual oral therapy with metformin and a sulfonylurea or metformin and pioglitazone.

  18. [Impact of anti-diabetic therapy based on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on the cardiovascular risk of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Camafort-Babkowski, Miguel

    2013-08-17

    Anti-diabetic drugs have, in addition to their well-known glucose lowering-effect, different effects in the rest of cardiovascular factors that are associated with diabetes mellitus. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been incorporated to the therapeutic arsenal of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonists on different cardiovascular risk factors, mediated by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on the control of hyperglycaemia and the GLP-1 receptor agonists effect on other cardiovascular risk factors (weight control, blood pressure control, lipid profile and all other cardiovascular risk biomarkers). In addition, we present the emerging evidence with regards to the impact that GLP-1 receptor agonists therapy could have in the reduction of cardiovascular events and the currently ongoing studies addressing this issue.

  19. [Dulaglutide (Trulicity®), a new once-weekly agonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors for type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2016-03-01

    Dulaglutide (Trulicity®) is a new once-weekly agonist of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors indicated in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Phase III clinical trials in AWARD programme demonstrated the efficacy and safety of dulaglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes treated by diet and exercise, metformin, a combination of metformin and a sulfonylurea or metformin and pioglitazone or even by supplements of prandial insulin. In the AWARD programme, dulaglutide (subcutaneous 0.75 or 1.5 mg once weekly) exerted a greater glucose-lowering activity than metformin, sitagliptin, exenatide or insulin glargine, and was non-inferior to liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily. Dulaglutide is currently reimbursed in Belgium after failure of and in combination with a dual oral therapy with metformin and a sulfonylurea or metformin and pioglitazone. PMID:27311248

  20. [Impact of anti-diabetic therapy based on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on the cardiovascular risk of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Camafort-Babkowski, Miguel

    2013-08-17

    Anti-diabetic drugs have, in addition to their well-known glucose lowering-effect, different effects in the rest of cardiovascular factors that are associated with diabetes mellitus. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been incorporated to the therapeutic arsenal of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonists on different cardiovascular risk factors, mediated by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on the control of hyperglycaemia and the GLP-1 receptor agonists effect on other cardiovascular risk factors (weight control, blood pressure control, lipid profile and all other cardiovascular risk biomarkers). In addition, we present the emerging evidence with regards to the impact that GLP-1 receptor agonists therapy could have in the reduction of cardiovascular events and the currently ongoing studies addressing this issue. PMID:23332622

  1. Imaging exocytosis of single glucagon-like peptide-1 containing granules in a murine enteroendocrine cell line with total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Kawakami, Hayato; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2009-12-04

    To analyze the exocytosis of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) granules, we imaged the motion of GLP-1 granules labeled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) fused to human growth hormone (hGH-Venus) in an enteroendocrine cell line, STC-1 cells, by total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF) microscopy. We found glucose stimulation caused biphasic GLP-1 granule exocytosis: during the first phase, fusion events occurred from two types of granules (previously docked granules and newcomers), and thereafter continuous fusion was observed mostly from newcomers during the second phase. Closely similar to the insulin granule fusion from pancreatic {beta} cells, the regulated biphasic exocytosis from two types of granules may be a common mechanism in glucose-evoked hormone release from endocrine cells.

  2. Imaging exocytosis of single glucagon-like peptide-1 containing granules in a murine enteroendocrine cell line with total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Kawakami, Hayato; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2009-12-01

    To analyze the exocytosis of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) granules, we imaged the motion of GLP-1 granules labeled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) fused to human growth hormone (hGH-Venus) in an enteroendocrine cell line, STC-1 cells, by total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF) microscopy. We found glucose stimulation caused biphasic GLP-1 granule exocytosis: during the first phase, fusion events occurred from two types of granules (previously docked granules and newcomers), and thereafter continuous fusion was observed mostly from newcomers during the second phase. Closely similar to the insulin granule fusion from pancreatic beta cells, the regulated biphasic exocytosis from two types of granules may be a common mechanism in glucose-evoked hormone release from endocrine cells.

  3. Renal extraction and acute effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on central and renal hemodynamics in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Asmar, Ali; Simonsen, Lene; Asmar, Meena; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens J; Frandsen, Erik; Moro, Cedric; Jonassen, Thomas; Bülow, Jens

    2015-04-15

    The present experiments were performed to elucidate the acute effects of intravenous infusion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 on central and renal hemodynamics in healthy men. Seven healthy middle-aged men were examined on two different occasions in random order. During a 3-h infusion of either GLP-1 (1.5 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) or saline, cardiac output was estimated noninvasively, and intraarterial blood pressure and heart rate were measured continuously. Renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate, and uptake/release of hormones and ions were measured by Fick's Principle after catheterization of a renal vein. Subjects remained supine during the experiments. During GLP-1 infusion, both systolic blood pressure and arterial pulse pressure increased by 5±1 mmHg (P=0.015 and P=0.002, respectively). Heart rate increased by 5±1 beats/min (P=0.005), and cardiac output increased by 18% (P=0.016). Renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate as well as the clearance of Na⁺ and Li⁺ were not affected by GLP-1. However, plasma renin activity decreased (P=0.037), whereas plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide were unaffected. Renal extraction of intact GLP-1 was 43% (P<0.001), whereas 60% of the primary metabolite GLP-1 9-36amide was extracted (P=0.017). In humans, an acute intravenous administration of GLP-1 leads to increased cardiac output due to a simultaneous increase in stroke volume and heart rate, whereas no effect on renal hemodynamics could be demonstrated despite significant extraction of both the intact hormone and its primary metabolite. PMID:25670826

  4. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism studies on the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-derived metabolite GLP-1(9-36)amide in male Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; McDonald, Thomas S; Landis, Margaret S; Stevens, Benjamin D; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)(7-36)amide is a 30-amino acid peptide hormone that is secreted from intestinal enteroendocrine L-cells in response to nutrients. GLP-1(7-36)amide possesses potent insulinotropic actions in the augmentation of glucose-dependent insulin secretion. GLP-1(7-36)amide is rapidly metabolized by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV to yield GLP-1(9-36)amide as the principal metabolite. Contrary to the earlier notion that peptide cleavage products of native GLP-1(7-36)amide [including GLP-1(9-36)amide] are pharmacologically inactive, recent studies have demonstrated cardioprotective and insulinomimetic effects with GLP-1(9-36)amide in mice, dogs and humans. In the present work, in vitro metabolism and pharmacokinetic properties of GLP-1(9-36)amide have been characterized in dogs, since this preclinical species has been used as an animal model to demonstrate the in vivo vasodilatory and cardioprotective effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry assay was developed for the quantitation of the intact peptide in hepatocyte incubations as opposed to a previously reported enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Although GLP-1(9-36)amide was resistant to proteolytic cleavage in dog plasma and bovine serum albumin (t1/2>240 min), the peptide was rapidly metabolized in dog hepatocytes with a t1/2 of 110 min. Metabolite identification studies in dog hepatocytes revealed a variety of N-terminus cleavage products, most of which, have also been observed in human and mouse hepatocytes. Proteolysis at the C-terminus was not observed in GLP-1(9-36)amide. Following the administration of a single intravenous bolus dose (20 µg/kg) to male Beagle dogs, GLP-1(9-36)amide exhibited a mean plasma clearance of 15 ml/min/kg and a low steady state distribution volume of 0.05 l/kg, which translated into a short elimination half life of 0.05 h. Following subcutaneous administration of GLP-1(9-36)amide at 50 µg/kg, systemic exposure of

  5. Differential effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on microvascular recruitment and glucose metabolism in short- and long-term insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sjøberg, Kim A; Rattigan, Stephen; Jeppesen, Jacob F; Lundsgaard, Anne-Marie; Holst, Jens J; Kiens, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute infusion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has potent effects on blood flow distribution through the microcirculation in healthy humans and rats. A high fat diet induces impairments in insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment (MVR) and muscle glucose uptake, and here we examined whether this could be reversed by GLP-1. Using contrast-enhanced ultrasound, microvascular recruitment was assessed by continuous real-time imaging of gas-filled microbubbles in the microcirculation after acute (5 days) and prolonged (8 weeks) high fat diet (HF)-induced insulin resistance in rats. A euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (3 mU min−1 kg−1), with or without a co-infusion of GLP-1 (100 pmol l−1), was performed in anaesthetized rats. Consumption of HF attenuated the insulin-mediated MVR in both 5 day and 8 week HF interventions which was associated with a 50% reduction in insulin-mediated glucose uptake compared to controls. Acute administration of GLP-1 restored the normal microvascular response by increasing the MVR after both 5 days and 8 weeks of HF intervention (P < 0.05). This effect of GLP-1 was associated with a restoration of both whole body insulin sensitivity and increased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle by 90% (P < 0.05) after 5 days of HF but not after 8 weeks of HF. The present study demonstrates that GLP-1 increases MVR in rat skeletal muscle and can reverse early stages of high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in vivo. Key points Acute glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) infusion reversed the high fat diet-induced microvascular insulin resistance that occurred after both 5 days and 8 weeks of a high fat diet intervention. When GLP-1 was co-infused with insulin it had overt effects on whole body insulin sensitivity as well as insulin-mediated skeletal muscle glucose uptake after 5 days of a high fat diet, but not after 8 weeks of high fat diet intervention. Acute GLP-1 infusion did not have an additive

  6. Evaluating preferences for profiles of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists among injection-naive type 2 diabetes patients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Gelhorn, Heather L; Bacci, Elizabeth D; Poon, Jiat Ling; Boye, Kristina S; Suzuki, Shuichi; Babineaux, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to use a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to estimate patients’ preferences for the treatment features, safety, and efficacy of two specific glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dulaglutide and liraglutide, among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Japan. Methods In Japan, patients with self-reported T2DM and naive to treatment with self-injectable medications were administered a DCE through an in-person interview. The DCE examined the following six attributes of T2DM treatment, each described by two levels: “dosing frequency”, “hemoglobin A1c change”, “weight change”, “type of delivery system”, “frequency of nausea”, and “frequency of hypoglycemia”. Part-worth utilities were estimated using logit models and were used to calculate the relative importance (RI) of each attribute. A chi-square test was used to determine the differences in preferences for the dulaglutide versus liraglutide profiles. Results The final evaluable sample consisted of 182 participants (mean age: 58.9 [standard deviation =10.0] years; 64.3% male; mean body mass index: 26.1 [standard deviation =5.0] kg/m2). The RI values for the attributes in rank order were dosing frequency (44.1%), type of delivery system (26.3%), frequency of nausea (15.1%), frequency of hypoglycemia (7.4%), weight change (6.2%), and hemoglobin A1c change (1.0%). Significantly more participants preferred the dulaglutide profile (94.5%) compared to the liraglutide profile (5.5%; P<0.0001). Conclusion This study elicited the preferences of Japanese T2DM patients for attributes and levels representing the actual characteristics of two existing glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists. In this comparison, dosing frequency and type of delivery system were the two most important characteristics, accounting for >70% of the RI. These findings are similar to those of a previous UK study, providing information about patients’ preferences that

  7. Risk of bone fractures associated with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists' treatment: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Sheng, Hui; Zhang, Manna; Bu, Le; Yang, Peng; Li, Liang; Li, Fei; Sheng, Chunjun; Han, Yuqi; Qu, Shen; Wang, Jiying

    2015-02-01

    Traditional anti-diabetic drugs may have negative or positive effects on risk of bone fractures. Yet the relationship between the new class glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) and risk of bone fractures has not been established. We performed a meta-analysis including randomized controlled trials (RCT) to study the risk of bone fractures associated with liraglutide or exenatide, compared to placebo or other active drugs. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and clinical trial registration websites for published or unpublished RCTs comparing the effects of liraglutide or exenatide with comparators. Only studies with disclosed bone fracture data were included. Separate pooled analysis was performed for liraglutide or exenatide, respectively, by calculating Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (MH-OR). 16 RCTs were identified including a total of 11,206 patients. Liraglutide treatment was associated with a significant reduced risk of incident bone fractures (MH-OR=0.38, 95% CI 0.17-0.87); however, exenatide treatment was associated with an elevated risk of incident bone fractures (MH-OR=2.09, 95% CI 1.03-4.21). Publication bias and heterogeneity between studies were not observed. Our study demonstrated a divergent risk of bone fractures associated with different GLP-1 RA treatments. The current findings need to be confirmed by future well-designed prospective or RCT studies.

  8. Low incidence of anti-drug antibodies in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist dulaglutide.

    PubMed

    Milicevic, Z; Anglin, G; Harper, K; Konrad, R J; Skrivanek, Z; Glaesner, W; Karanikas, C A; Mace, K

    2016-05-01

    Therapeutic administration of peptides may result in anti-drug antibody (ADA) formation, hypersensitivity adverse events (AEs) and reduced efficacy. As a large peptide, the immunogenicity of once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist dulaglutide is of considerable interest. The present study assessed the incidence of treatment-emergent dulaglutide ADAs, hypersensitivity AEs, injection site reactions (ISRs), and glycaemic control in ADA-positive patients in nine phase II and phase III trials (dulaglutide, N = 4006; exenatide, N = 276; non-GLP-1 comparators, N = 1141). Treatment-emergent dulaglutide ADAs were detected using a solid-phase extraction acid dissociation binding assay. Neutralizing ADAs were detected using a cell-based assay derived from human endothelial kidney cells (HEK293). A total of 64 dulaglutide-treated patients (1.6% of the population) tested ADA-positive versus eight (0.7%) from the non-GLP-1 comparator group. Of these 64 patients, 34 (0.9%) had dulaglutide-neutralizing ADAs, 36 (0.9%) had native-sequence GLP-1 (nsGLP-1) cross-reactive ADAs and four (0.1%) had nsGLP-1 neutralization ADAs. The incidence of hypersensitivity AEs and ISRs was similar in the dulaglutide versus placebo groups. No dulaglutide ADA-positive patient reported hypersensitivity AEs. Because of the low incidence of ADAs, it was not possible to establish their effect on glycaemic control. PMID:26847401

  9. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 receptor signaling in the lateral parabrachial nucleus contributes to the control of food intake and motivation to feed.

    PubMed

    Alhadeff, Amber L; Baird, John-Paul; Swick, Jennifer C; Hayes, Matthew R; Grill, Harvey J

    2014-08-01

    Central glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation reduces food intake and the motivation to work for food, but the neurons and circuits mediating these effects are not fully understood. Although lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) neurons are implicated in the control of food intake and reward, the specific role of GLP-1R-expressing lPBN neurons is unexplored. Here, neuroanatomical tracing, immunohistochemical, and behavioral/pharmacological techniques are used to test the hypothesis that lPBN neurons contribute to the anorexic effect of central GLP-1R activation. Results indicate that GLP-1-producing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius project monosynaptically to the lPBN, providing a potential endogenous mechanism by which lPBN GLP-1R signaling may exert effects on food intake control. Pharmacological activation of GLP-1R in the lPBN reduced food intake, and conversely, antagonism of GLP-1R in the lPBN increased food intake. In addition, lPBN GLP-1R activation reduced the motivation to work for food under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. Taken together, these data establish the lPBN as a novel site of action for GLP-1R-mediated control of food intake and reward. PMID:24681814

  10. Application of Adaptive Design Methodology in Development of a Long-Acting Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog (Dulaglutide): Statistical Design and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Skrivanek, Zachary; Berry, Scott; Berry, Don; Chien, Jenny; Geiger, Mary Jane; Anderson, James H.; Gaydos, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Background Dulaglutide (dula, LY2189265), a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 analog, is being developed to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods To foster the development of dula, we designed a two-stage adaptive, dose-finding, inferentially seamless phase 2/3 study. The Bayesian theoretical framework is used to adaptively randomize patients in stage 1 to 7 dula doses and, at the decision point, to either stop for futility or to select up to 2 dula doses for stage 2. After dose selection, patients continue to be randomized to the selected dula doses or comparator arms. Data from patients assigned the selected doses will be pooled across both stages and analyzed with an analysis of covariance model, using baseline hemoglobin A1c and country as covariates. The operating characteristics of the trial were assessed by extensive simulation studies. Results Simulations demonstrated that the adaptive design would identify the correct doses 88% of the time, compared to as low as 6% for a fixed-dose design (the latter value based on frequentist decision rules analogous to the Bayesian decision rules for adaptive design). Conclusions This article discusses the decision rules used to select the dula dose(s); the mathematical details of the adaptive algorithm—including a description of the clinical utility index used to mathematically quantify the desirability of a dose based on safety and efficacy measurements; and a description of the simulation process and results that quantify the operating characteristics of the design. PMID:23294775

  11. Inositolphosphoglycans possibly mediate the effects of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide on rat liver and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Márquez, L; Trapote, M A; Luque, M A; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1998-03-01

    Insulin-like effects of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1) in rat liver, skeletal muscle and fat, and also the presence of GLP-1 receptors in these extrapancreatic tissues, have been documented. In skeletal muscle and liver, the action of GLP-1 is not associated with an activation of adenylate cyclase, and in cultured murine myocytes and hepatoma cell lines, it was found that GLP-1 provokes the generation of inositolphosphoglycan molecules (IPGs), which are considered second messengers of insulin action. In the present work, we document in isolated normal rat adipocytes and hepatocytes that GLP-1 exerts a rapid decrease of the radiolabelled glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs)--precursors of IPGs--in the same manner as insulin, indicating their hydrolysis and the immediate short-lived generation of IPGs. Thus, IPGs could be mediators in the GLP-1 actions in adipose tissue and liver, as well as in skeletal muscle, through GLP-1 receptors which are, at least functionally, different from that of the pancreatic B-cell.

  12. Presence and characterization of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36) amide receptors in solubilized membranes of rat adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Mérida, E; Delgado, E; Trapote, M A; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1993-01-01

    Specific binding of [125I]glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide ([125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide) to solubilized rat adipose tissue membranes was found to be dependent on temperature, time, and membrane protein concentration and readily dissociated. GLP-1(1-36)amide, GLP-2, or glucagon (10(-6) M) did not compete with [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide binding. Half-maximal binding was achieved with 8 x 10(-10) M unlabeled GLP-1(7-36)amide, and the Scatchard plot revealed the presence of high and low affinity binding sites with Kd values of approximately 0.6 and 20 nM, respectively. The binding capacity of [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide was about 3 times higher than that of [125I]glucagon, while the high affinity Kd and the half-maximal binding of the two peptides were similar. The presence and abundance of GLP-1(7-36)amide receptors in fat tissue together with the previous findings that the peptide stimulates glycerol and cAMP production in rat adipocytes and stimulates fatty acid synthesis in explants of rat adipose tissue open the possibility that this insulinotropic intestinal peptide may also be involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism in health and disease.

  13. The cytoplasmic domain close to the transmembrane region of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor contains sequence elements that regulate agonist-dependent internalisation.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Patricia; Roncero, Isabel; Blázquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2005-07-01

    In order to gain better insight into the molecular events involved in the signal transduction generated through glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors, we tested the effect of deletions and point mutations within the cytoplasmic tail of this receptor with a view to establishing relationships between signal transduction desensitisation and receptor internalisation. Wild-type and truncated (deletion of the last 27 amino acids (GLPR 435R) and deletion of 44 amino acids (GLPR 418R)) GLP-1 receptors bound the agonist with similar affinity. Deletion of the last 27 amino acids decreased the internalisation rate by 78%, while deletion of 44 amino acids containing all the phosphorylation sites hitherto described in this receptor decreased the internalisation rate by only 47%. Binding of the ligand to both receptors stimulated adenylyl cyclase. In contrast, deletion of the region containing amino acids 419 to 435 (GLPR 419delta435) increased the internalisation rate by 268%, and the replacement of EVQ(408-410) by alanine (GLPR A(408-410)) increased this process to 296%. In both receptors, the efficacy in stimulating adenylate cyclase was decreased. All the receptors studied were internalised by coated pits, except for the receptor with a deletion of the last 44 amino acids, which also had a faster resensitisation rate. Our findings indicate that the neighbouring trans-membrane domain of the carboxyl-terminal tail of the GLP-1 receptor contains sequence elements that regulate agonist-dependent internalisation and transmembrane signalling.

  14. The Role of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists in Type 2 Diabetes: Understanding How Data Can Inform Clinical Practice in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Suk; Ahn, Kyu Jeong; Jeong, In-Kyung; Kim, Byung-Joon; Kang, Jun Goo

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) reduce glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, 0.5% to 1.0%), and are associated with moderate weight loss and a relatively low risk of hypoglycemia. There are differences between Asian and non-Asian populations. We reviewed available data on GLP-1RAs, focusing on Korean patients, to better understand their risk/benefit profile and help inform local clinical practice. Control of postprandial hyperglycemia is important in Asians in whom the prevalence of post-challenge hyperglycemia is higher (vs. non-Asians). The weight lowering effects of GLP-1RAs are becoming more salient as the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Korean patients increases. The higher rate of gastrointestinal adverse events amongst Asian patients in clinical trials may be caused by higher drug exposure due to the lower body mass index of the participants (vs. non-Asian studies). Data on the durability of weight loss, clinically important health outcomes, safety and optimal dosing in Korean patients are lacking. Use of GLP-1RAs is appropriate in several patient groups, including patients whose HbA1c is uncontrolled, especially if this is due to postprandial glucose excursions and patients who are overweight or obese due to dietary problems (e.g., appetite control). The potential for gastrointestinal adverse events should be explained to patients at treatment initiation to facilitate the promotion of better compliance. PMID:26124987

  15. A depot-forming glucagon-like peptide-1 fusion protein reduces blood glucose for five days with a single injection

    PubMed Central

    Amiram, M.; Luginbuhl, K. M.; Li, X.; Feinglos, M. N.; Chilkoti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide drugs are an exciting class of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of a variety of diseases; however, their short half-life dictates multiple and frequent injections causing undesirable side-effects. Herein, we describe a novel peptide delivery system that seeks to combine the attractive features of prolonged circulation time with a prolonged release formulation. This system consists of glucagon-like peptide-1, a type-2 diabetes drug fused to a thermally responsive, elastin-like-polypeptide (ELP) that undergoes a soluble-insoluble phase transition between room temperature and body temperature, thereby forming an injectable depot. We synthesized a set of GLP-1-ELP fusions and verified their proteolytic stability and potency in vitro. Significantly, a single injection of depot forming GLP-1-ELP fusions reduced blood glucose levels in mice for up to 5 days, 120 times longer than an injection of the native peptide. These findings demonstrate the unique advantages of using ELPs to release peptide-ELP fusions from a depot combined with enhanced systemic circulation to create a tunable peptide delivery system. PMID:23928357

  16. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 improves reference memory performance and decreases immobility in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Isacson, Ruben; Nielsen, Elisabet; Dannaeus, Karin; Bertilsson, Göran; Patrone, Cesare; Zachrisson, Olof; Wikström, Lilian

    2011-01-10

    We have earlier shown that the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 stimulates neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and excerts anti-parkinsonian behavior. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of exendin-4 treatment on hippocampus-associated cognitive and mood-related behavior in adult rodents. To investigate potential effects of exendin-4 on hippocampal function, radial maze and forced swim test were employed. The time necessary to solve a radial maze task and the duration of immobility in the forced swim test were significantly reduced compared to respective vehicle groups if the animals had received exendin-4 during 1-2weeks before testing. In contrast to the positive control imipramine, single administration of exendin-4 1h before the challenge in the forced swim test had no effect. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine, a marker for DNA synthesis, as well as doublecortin expression was increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following chronic treatment with exendin-4 compared to vehicle-treated controls. The neurogenic effect of exendin-4 on hippocampus was confirmed by quantitative PCR showing an upregulation of mRNA expression for Ki-67, doublecortin and Mash-1. Since exendin-4 significantly improves hippocampus-associated behavior in adult rodents, it may be a candidate for alleviation of mood and cognitive disorders.

  17. The Incretins and Pancreatic beta-Cells: Use of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide to Cure Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2010-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The complications associated with T2DM result in increased mortality and financial cost for those affected. T2DM has long been known to be associated with insulin resistance in peripheral tissues and a relative degree of insulin deficiency. However, the concept that insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity are not linked through a hyperbolic relationship in T2DM has continuously been demonstrated in many clinical trials. Thus, in order to prevent and treat T2DM, it is necessary to identify the substance(s) that will improve the function and survival of the pancreatic beta-cells in both normal and pathologic conditions, so that production and secretion of insulin can be enhanced. Incretin hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), have been shown to lower the postprandial and fasting glucose and the glycated hemoglobin levels, suppress the elevated glucagon level, and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin synthesis and secretion. In this report, we will review the biological actions and mechanisms associated with the actions of incretin hormones, GLP-1 and GIP, on beta-cell health and compare the differences between GLP-1 and GIP.

  18. Expression and Distribution of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor mRNA, Protein and Binding in the Male Nonhuman Primate (Macaca mulatta) Brain

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Kristy M.; Kirigiti, Melissa; Secher, Anna; Paulsen, Sarah Juel; Buckingham, Rikley; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte B.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released from endocrine L-cells lining the gut in response to food ingestion. However, GLP-1 is also produced in the nucleus of the solitary tract, where it acts as an anorectic neurotransmitter and key regulator of many autonomic and neuroendocrine functions. The expression and projections of GLP-1-producing neurons is highly conserved between rodent and primate brain, although a few key differences have been identified. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) has been mapped in the rodent brain, but no studies have described the distribution of GLP-1Rs in the nonhuman primate central nervous system. Here, we characterized the distribution of GLP-1R mRNA and protein in the adult macaque brain using in situ hybridization, radioligand receptor autoradiography, and immunohistochemistry with a primate specific GLP-1R antibody. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the GLP-1R is localized to cell bodies and fiber terminals in a very selective distribution throughout the brain. Consistent with the functional role of the GLP-1R system, we find the highest concentration of GLP-1R-immunoreactivity present in select hypothalamic and brainstem regions that regulate feeding, including the paraventricular and arcuate hypothalamic nuclei, as well as the area postrema, nucleus of the solitary tract, and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. Together, our data demonstrate that GLP-1R distribution is highly conserved between rodent and primate, although a few key species differences were identified, including the amygdala, where GLP-1R expression is much higher in primate than in rodent. PMID:25380238

  19. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor activation regulates cocaine actions and dopamine homeostasis in the lateral septum by decreasing arachidonic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Reddy, I A; Pino, J A; Weikop, P; Osses, N; Sørensen, G; Bering, T; Valle, C; Bluett, R J; Erreger, K; Wortwein, G; Reyes, J G; Graham, D; Stanwood, G D; Hackett, T A; Patel, S; Fink-Jensen, A; Torres, G E; Galli, A

    2016-01-01

    Agonism of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) has been effective at treating aspects of addictive behavior for a number of abused substances, including cocaine. However, the molecular mechanisms and brain circuits underlying the therapeutic effects of GLP-1R signaling on cocaine actions remain elusive. Recent evidence has revealed that endogenous signaling at the GLP-1R within the forebrain lateral septum (LS) acts to reduce cocaine-induced locomotion and cocaine conditioned place preference, both considered dopamine (DA)-associated behaviors. DA terminals project from the ventral tegmental area to the LS and express the DA transporter (DAT). Cocaine acts by altering DA bioavailability by targeting the DAT. Therefore, GLP-1R signaling might exert effects on DAT to account for its regulation of cocaine-induced behaviors. We show that the GLP-1R is highly expressed within the LS. GLP-1, in LS slices, significantly enhances DAT surface expression and DAT function. Exenatide (Ex-4), a long-lasting synthetic analog of GLP-1 abolished cocaine-induced elevation of DA. Interestingly, acute administration of Ex-4 reduces septal expression of the retrograde messenger 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), as well as a product of its presynaptic degradation, arachidonic acid (AA). Notably, AA reduces septal DAT function pointing to AA as a novel regulator of central DA homeostasis. We further show that AA oxidation product γ-ketoaldehyde (γ-KA) forms adducts with the DAT and reduces DAT plasma membrane expression and function. These results support a mechanism in which postsynaptic septal GLP-1R activation regulates 2-AG levels to alter presynaptic DA homeostasis and cocaine actions through AA. PMID:27187231

  20. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Protects against Hyperglycemic-Induced Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Improves Myocardial Dysfunction by Suppressing Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Zhang, Guang-hao; Feng, Min; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jia-ning; Dong, Wen-qian; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Under high glucose conditions, endothelial cells respond by acquiring fibroblast characteristics, that is, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), contributing to diabetic cardiac fibrosis. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has cardioprotective properties independent of its glucose-lowering effect. However, the potential mechanism has not been fully clarified. Here we investigated whether GLP-1 inhibits myocardial EndMT in diabetic mice and whether this is mediated by suppressing poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). Streptozotocin diabetic C57BL/6 mice were treated with or without GLP-1 analog (24 nmol/kg daily) for 24 wks. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to assess cardiac function. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were cultured in normal glucose (NG) (5.5 mmol/L) or high glucose (HG) (30 mmol/L) medium with or without GLP-1analog. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blot were performed to evaluate EndMT and PARP-1 activity. Diabetes mellitus attenuated cardiac function and increased cardiac fibrosis. Treatment with the GLP-1 analog improved diabetes mellitus–related cardiac dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that hyperglycemia markedly increased the percentage of von Willebrand factor (vWF)+/alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)+ cells in total α-SMA+ cells in diabetic hearts compared with controls, which was attenuated by GLP-1 analog treatment. In cultured HAECs, immunofluorescent staining and Western blot also showed that both GLP-1 analog and PARP-1 gene silencing could inhibit the HG-induced EndMT. In addition, GLP-1 analog could attenuate PARP-1 activation by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, GLP-1 treatment could protect against the hyperglycemia-induced EndMT and myocardial dysfunction. This effect is mediated, at least partially, by suppressing PARP-1 activation. PMID:25715248

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 attenuates advanced oxidation protein product-mediated damage in islet microvascular endothelial cells partly through the RAGE pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Yang, Lei; Lei, Lei; Chen, Rongping; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) are knownt to play a role in the pathogenesis of diseases and related complications. However, whether AOPPs affect the survival of islet microvascular endothelial cells (IMECs) has not been reported to date, at least to the best of our knowledge. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying AOPP-mediated damage in IMECs and the protective role of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which has been suggested to exert beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. IMECs were treated with AOPPs (0–200 µg/ml) for 0–72 h in the presence or absence of GLP-1 (100 nmol/l). Apoptosis, cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were examined, the expression levels of p53, Bax, receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and NAD(P)H oxidase subunit were determined, and the activity of NAD(P)H oxidase, caspase-9 and caspase-3 was also determined. The results revealed that AOPPs increased the expression of RAGE, p47phox and p22phox; induced NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent ROS generation, increased p53 and Bax expression, enhanced the activity of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and induced cell apoptosis. Treatment with GLP-1 decreased the expression of RAGE, inhibited NAD(P)H oxidase activity, decreased cell apoptosis and increased cell viability. On the whole, our findings indicate that AOPPs induce the apoptosis of IMECs via the RAGE-NAD(P) H oxidase-dependent pathway and that treatment with GLP-1 effectively reverses these detrimental effects by decreasing AOPP-induced RAGE expression and restoring the redox balance. Our data may indicate that GLP-1 may prove to be beneficial in attenuating the progression of diabetes mellitus. PMID:27574116

  2. Plasma Free Amino Acid Responses to Intraduodenal Whey Protein, and Relationships with Insulin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Energy Intake in Lean Healthy Men.

    PubMed

    Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D; Hutchison, Amy T; Soenen, Stijn; Steinert, Robert E; Clifton, Peter M; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2016-01-04

    This study determined the effects of increasing loads of intraduodenal (ID) dairy protein on plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations, and their relationships with serum insulin, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and energy intake. Sixteen healthy men had concentrations of AAs, GLP-1 and insulin measured in response to 60-min ID infusions of hydrolysed whey protein administered, in double-blinded and randomised order, at 2.1 (P2.1), 6.3 (P6.3) or 12.5 (P12.5) kJ/min (encompassing the range of nutrient emptying from the stomach), or saline control (C). Energy intake was quantified immediately afterwards. Compared with C, the concentrations of 19/20 AAs, the exception being cysteine, were increased, and this was dependent on the protein load. The relationship between AA concentrations in the infusions and the area under the curve from 0 to 60 min (AUC0-60 min) of each AA profile was strong for essential AAs (R² range, 0.61-0.67), but more variable for non-essential (0.02-0.54) and conditional (0.006-0.64) AAs. The AUC0-60 min for each AA was correlated directly with the AUC0-60 min of insulin (R² range 0.3-0.6), GLP-1 (0.2-0.6) and energy intake (0.09-0.3) (p < 0.05, for all), with the strongest correlations being for branched-chain AAs, lysine, methionine and tyrosine. These findings indicate that ID whey protein infused at loads encompassing the normal range of gastric emptying increases plasma concentrations of 19/20 AAs in a load-dependent manner, and provide novel information on the close relationships between the essential AAs, leucine, valine, isoleucine, lysine, methionine, and the conditionally-essential AA, tyrosine, with energy intake, insulin and GLP-1.

  3. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, protects against amyloid-β peptide-induced impairment of spatial learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Tao; Ye-Tian; Yuan-Li; Zhang, Ge-Juan; Liu, Zhi-Qin; Di, Zheng-Li; Ying, Xiao-Ping; Fang, Yan; Song, Er-Fei; Qi, Jin-Shun; Pan, Yan-Fang

    2016-05-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) share specific molecular mechanisms, and agents with proven efficacy in one may be useful against the other. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 has similar properties to GLP-1 and is currently in clinical use for T2DM treatment. Thus, this study was designed to characterize the effects of exendin-4 on the impairment of learning and memory induced by amyloid protein (Aβ) and its probable molecular underlying mechanisms. The results showed that (1) intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Aβ1-42 resulted in a significant decline of spatial learning and memory of rats in water maze tests; (2) pretreatment with exendin-4 effectively and dose-dependently protected against the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spatial learning and memory; (3) exendin-4 treatment significantly decreased the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 and increased the expression of Bcl2 in Aβ1-42-induced Alzheimer's rats. The vision and swimming speed of the rats among all groups in the visible platform tests did not show any difference. These findings indicate that systemic pretreatment with exendin-4 can effectively prevent the behavioral impairment induced by neurotoxic Aβ1-42, and the underlying protective mechanism of exendin-4 may be involved in the Bcl2, Bax and caspase-3 pathways. Thus, the application of exendin-4 or the activation of its signaling pathways may be a promising strategy to ameliorate the degenerative processes observed in AD. PMID:26992957

  4. Cardioprotection Resulting from Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Administration Involves Shifting Metabolic Substrate Utilization to Increase Energy Efficiency in the Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Aravindhan, Karpagam; Bao, Weike; Harpel, Mark R.; Willette, Robert N.; Lepore, John J.; Jucker, Beat M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) provides cardiovascular benefits independent of its role on peripheral glycemic control. However, the precise mechanism(s) by which GLP-1 treatment renders cardioprotection during myocardial ischemia remain unresolved. Here we examined the role for GLP-1 treatment on glucose and fatty acid metabolism in normal and ischemic rat hearts following a 30 min ischemia and 24 h reperfusion injury, and in isolated cardiomyocytes (CM). Relative carbohydrate and fat oxidation levels were measured in both normal and ischemic hearts using a 1-13C glucose clamp coupled with NMR-based isotopomer analysis, as well as in adult rat CMs by monitoring pH and O2 consumption in the presence of glucose or palmitate. In normal heart, GLP-1 increased glucose uptake (↑64%, p<0.05) without affecting glycogen levels. In ischemic hearts, GLP-1 induced metabolic substrate switching by increasing the ratio of carbohydrate versus fat oxidation (↑14%, p<0.01) in the LV area not at risk, without affecting cAMP levels. Interestingly, no substrate switching occurred in the LV area at risk, despite an increase in cAMP (↑106%, p<0.05) and lactate (↑121%, p<0.01) levels. Furthermore, in isolated CMs GLP-1 treatment increased glucose utilization (↑14%, p<0.05) and decreased fatty acid oxidation (↓15%, p<0.05) consistent with in vivo finding. Our results show that this benefit may derive from distinct and complementary roles of GLP-1 treatment on metabolism in myocardial sub-regions in response to this injury. In particular, a switch to anaerobic glycolysis in the ischemic area provides a compensatory substrate switch to overcome the energetic deficit in this region in the face of reduced tissue oxygenation, whereas a switch to more energetically favorable carbohydrate oxidation in more highly oxygenated remote regions supports maintaining cardiac contractility in a complementary manner. PMID:26098939

  5. Cardioprotection Resulting from Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Administration Involves Shifting Metabolic Substrate Utilization to Increase Energy Efficiency in the Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Aravindhan, Karpagam; Bao, Weike; Harpel, Mark R; Willette, Robert N; Lepore, John J; Jucker, Beat M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) provides cardiovascular benefits independent of its role on peripheral glycemic control. However, the precise mechanism(s) by which GLP-1 treatment renders cardioprotection during myocardial ischemia remain unresolved. Here we examined the role for GLP-1 treatment on glucose and fatty acid metabolism in normal and ischemic rat hearts following a 30 min ischemia and 24 h reperfusion injury, and in isolated cardiomyocytes (CM). Relative carbohydrate and fat oxidation levels were measured in both normal and ischemic hearts using a 1-13C glucose clamp coupled with NMR-based isotopomer analysis, as well as in adult rat CMs by monitoring pH and O2 consumption in the presence of glucose or palmitate. In normal heart, GLP-1 increased glucose uptake (↑64%, p<0.05) without affecting glycogen levels. In ischemic hearts, GLP-1 induced metabolic substrate switching by increasing the ratio of carbohydrate versus fat oxidation (↑14%, p<0.01) in the LV area not at risk, without affecting cAMP levels. Interestingly, no substrate switching occurred in the LV area at risk, despite an increase in cAMP (↑106%, p<0.05) and lactate (↑121%, p<0.01) levels. Furthermore, in isolated CMs GLP-1 treatment increased glucose utilization (↑14%, p<0.05) and decreased fatty acid oxidation (↓15%, p<0.05) consistent with in vivo finding. Our results show that this benefit may derive from distinct and complementary roles of GLP-1 treatment on metabolism in myocardial sub-regions in response to this injury. In particular, a switch to anaerobic glycolysis in the ischemic area provides a compensatory substrate switch to overcome the energetic deficit in this region in the face of reduced tissue oxygenation, whereas a switch to more energetically favorable carbohydrate oxidation in more highly oxygenated remote regions supports maintaining cardiac contractility in a complementary manner.

  6. In vivo dual-delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor through composites prepared by microfluidics for diabetes therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, F.; Shrestha, N.; Gomes, M. J.; Herranz-Blanco, B.; Liu, D.; Hirvonen, J. J.; Granja, P. L.; Santos, H. A.; Sarmento, B.

    2016-05-01

    Oral delivery of proteins is still a challenge in the pharmaceutical field. Nanoparticles are among the most promising carrier systems for the oral delivery of proteins by increasing their oral bioavailability. However, most of the existent data regarding nanosystems for oral protein delivery is from in vitro studies, lacking in vivo experiments to evaluate the efficacy of these systems. Herein, a multifunctional composite system, tailored by droplet microfluidics, was used for dual delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (iDPP4) in vivo. Oral delivery of GLP-1 with nano- or micro-systems has been studied before, but the simultaneous nanodelivery of GLP-1 with iDPP4 is a novel strategy presented here. The type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rat model, induced through the combined administration of streptozotocin and nicotinamide, a non-obese model of T2DM, was used. The combination of both drugs resulted in an increase in the hypoglycemic effects in a sustained, but prolonged manner, where the iDPP4 improved the therapeutic efficacy of GLP-1. Four hours after the oral administration of the system, blood glucose levels were decreased by 44%, and were constant for another 4 h, representing half of the glucose area under the curve when compared to the control. An enhancement of the plasmatic insulin levels was also observed 6 h after the oral administration of the dual-drug composite system and, although no statistically significant differences existed, the amount of pancreatic insulin was also higher. These are promising results for the oral delivery of GLP-1 to be pursued further in a chronic diabetic model study.

  7. In vivo dual-delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor through composites prepared by microfluidics for diabetes therapy

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, F.; Shrestha, N.; Gomes, M. J.; Herranz-Blanco, B.; Liu, D.; Hirvonen, J. J.; Granja, P. L.; Santos, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Oral delivery of proteins is still a challenge in the pharmaceutical field. Nanoparticles are among the most promising carrier systems for the oral delivery of proteins by increasing their oral bioavailability. However, most of the existent data regarding nanosystems for oral protein delivery is from in vitro studies, lacking in vivo experiments to evaluate the efficacy of these systems. Herein, a multifunctional composite system, tailored by droplet microfluidics, was used for dual delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (iDPP4) in vivo. Oral delivery of GLP-1 with nano- or micro-systems has been studied before, but the simultaneous nanodelivery of GLP-1 with iDPP4 is a novel strategy presented here. The type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rat model, induced through the combined administration of streptozotocin and nicotinamide, a non-obese model of T2DM, was used. The combination of both drugs resulted in an increase in the hypoglycemic effects in a sustained, but prolonged manner, where the iDPP4 improved the therapeutic efficacy of GLP-1. Four hours after the oral administration of the system, blood glucose levels were decreased by 44%, and were constant for another 4 h, representing half of the glucose area under the curve when compared to the control. An enhancement of the plasmatic insulin levels was also observed 6 h after the oral administration of the dual-drug composite system and, although no statistically significant differences existed, the amount of pancreatic insulin was also higher. These are promising results for the oral delivery of GLP-1 to be pursued further in a chronic diabetic model study. PMID:27150301

  8. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor activation regulates cocaine actions and dopamine homeostasis in the lateral septum by decreasing arachidonic acid levels

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, I A; Pino, J A; Weikop, P; Osses, N; Sørensen, G; Bering, T; Valle, C; Bluett, R J; Erreger, K; Wortwein, G; Reyes, J G; Graham, D; Stanwood, G D; Hackett, T A; Patel, S; Fink-Jensen, A; Torres, G E; Galli, A

    2016-01-01

    Agonism of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) has been effective at treating aspects of addictive behavior for a number of abused substances, including cocaine. However, the molecular mechanisms and brain circuits underlying the therapeutic effects of GLP-1R signaling on cocaine actions remain elusive. Recent evidence has revealed that endogenous signaling at the GLP-1R within the forebrain lateral septum (LS) acts to reduce cocaine-induced locomotion and cocaine conditioned place preference, both considered dopamine (DA)-associated behaviors. DA terminals project from the ventral tegmental area to the LS and express the DA transporter (DAT). Cocaine acts by altering DA bioavailability by targeting the DAT. Therefore, GLP-1R signaling might exert effects on DAT to account for its regulation of cocaine-induced behaviors. We show that the GLP-1R is highly expressed within the LS. GLP-1, in LS slices, significantly enhances DAT surface expression and DAT function. Exenatide (Ex-4), a long-lasting synthetic analog of GLP-1 abolished cocaine-induced elevation of DA. Interestingly, acute administration of Ex-4 reduces septal expression of the retrograde messenger 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), as well as a product of its presynaptic degradation, arachidonic acid (AA). Notably, AA reduces septal DAT function pointing to AA as a novel regulator of central DA homeostasis. We further show that AA oxidation product γ-ketoaldehyde (γ-KA) forms adducts with the DAT and reduces DAT plasma membrane expression and function. These results support a mechanism in which postsynaptic septal GLP-1R activation regulates 2-AG levels to alter presynaptic DA homeostasis and cocaine actions through AA. PMID:27187231

  9. Spatial Approximations between Residues 6 and 12 in the Amino-terminal Region of Glucagon-like Peptide 1 and Its Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Quan; Pinon, Delia I.; Miller, Laurence J.; Dong, Maoqing

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of natural ligand binding and activation of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor may facilitate the development of agonist drugs useful for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We previously reported molecular approximations between carboxyl-terminal residues 24 and 35 within GLP1 and its receptor. In this work, we have focused on the amino-terminal region of GLP1, known to be critical for receptor activation. We developed two high-affinity, full agonist photolabile GLP1 probes having sites of covalent attachment in positions 6 and 12 of the 30-residue peptide (GLP1(7–36)). Both probes bound to the receptor specifically and covalently labeled single distinct sites. Chemical and protease cleavage of the labeled receptor identified the juxtamembrane region of its amino-terminal domain as the region of covalent attachment of the position 12 probe, whereas the region of labeling by the position 6 probe was localized to the first extracellular loop. Radiochemical sequencing identified receptor residue Tyr145, adjacent to the first transmembrane segment, as the site of labeling by the position 12 probe, and receptor residue Tyr205, within the first extracellular loop, as the site of labeling by the position 6 probe. These data provide support for a common mechanism for natural ligand binding and activation of family B G protein-coupled receptors. This region of interaction of peptide amino-terminal domains with the receptor may provide a pocket that can be targeted by small molecule agonists. PMID:20529866

  10. Refinement of Glucagon-like Peptide 1 Docking to Its Intact Receptor Using Mid-region Photolabile Probes and Molecular Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laurence J.; Chen, Quan; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Pinon, Delia I.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Abagyan, Ruben; Dong, Maoqing

    2011-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is an important drug target within the B family of G protein-coupled receptors. Its natural agonist ligand, GLP1, has incretin-like actions and the receptor is a recognized target for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino terminus of the GLP1 receptor and several close family members, the molecular basis for GLP1 binding to and activation of the intact receptor remains unclear. We previously demonstrated molecular approximations between amino- and carboxyl-terminal residues of GLP1 and its receptor. In this work, we study spatial approximations with the mid-region of this peptide to gain insights into the orientation of the intact receptor and the ligand-receptor complex. We have prepared two new photolabile probes incorporating a p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine into positions 16 and 20 of GLP1(7–36). Both probes bound to the GLP1 receptor specifically and with high affinity. These were each fully efficacious agonists, stimulating cAMP accumulation in receptor-bearing CHO cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Each probe specifically labeled a single receptor site. Protease cleavage and radiochemical sequencing identified receptor residue Leu141 above transmembrane segment one as its site of labeling for the position 16 probe, whereas the position 20 probe labeled receptor residue Trp297 within the second extracellular loop. Establishing ligand residue approximation with this loop region is unique among family members and may help to orient the receptor amino-terminal domain relative to its helical bundle region. PMID:21454562

  11. Split Ssp DnaB mini-intein-mediated production of recombinant human glucagon-like peptide-1/7-36.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Aiqin; Jin, Wenbo; Zhao, Feng; Tang, Yanchun; Sun, Ziyong; Liu, Jian-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in the regulation of postprandial insulin release. Here, we used the split DnaB mini-intein system to produce recombinant human GLP-1/7-36 (rhGLP-1) in Escherichia coli. The C-terminal domain of DnaB mini-intein (IntC) was genetically fused at the N-terminus of rhGLP-1 to produce IntC-GLP-1. IntC-GLP-1 and N-terminal domain of DnaB mini-intein (IntN) protein were prepared in a denatured buffer of pH 8.0. IntC-GLP-1 was diluted 1:8 into the phosphate buffer of pH 6.6. IntN was added into the diluted solution of IntC-GLP-1 at the molar ratio of 1:2. Then, rhGLP-1 was released from IntC-GLP-1 via inducible C-terminal peptide-bond cleavage by shifting pH from 8.0 to 6.6 at 25 °C for 24-H incubation. Then, the supernatant was applied to a Ni-Sepharose column, and the pass through fraction was collected. About 5.34 mg of rhGLP-1 with the purity of 97% was obtained from 1 L of culture medium. Mass spectrometry showed the molecular weight of 3,300.45 Da, which was equal to the theoretical value of GLP-1/7-36. The glucose-lowering activity of rhGLP-1 was confirmed by the glucose tolerance test in mice. In conclusion, the reported method was an efficient strategy to produce rhGLP-1 without using enzyme or chemical reagents, which could also be used for other similar peptides.

  12. Characterization of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, in rat partial and full nigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, have been demonstrated to promote neuroprotection in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron loss. In this report, we characterized the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide (500µg/kg/day, s.c.) in the context of a partial or advanced (full) 6-OHDA induced nigral lesion in the rat. Rats received a low (3µg, partial lesion) or high (13.5µg, full lesion) 6-OHDA dose stereotaxically injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (n=17-20 rats per experimental group). Six weeks after induction of a partial nigral dopaminergic lesion, vehicle or liraglutide was administered for four weeks. In the full lesion model, vehicle dosing or liraglutide treatment was applied for a total of six weeks starting three weeks pre-lesion, or administered for three weeks starting on the lesion day. Quantitative stereology was applied to assess the total number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive dopaminergic neurons. As compared to vehicle controls, liraglutide had no effect on the rotational responsiveness to d-amphetamine or apomorphine, respectively. In correspondence, while numbers of TH-positive nigral neurons were significantly reduced in the lesion side (partial lesion ≈55%; full lesion ≈90%) liraglutide administration had no influence dopaminergic neuronal loss in either PD model setting. In conclusion, liraglutide showed no neuroprotective effects in the context of moderate or substantial midbrain dopaminergic neuronal loss and associated functional motor deficits in the rat 6-OHDA lesion model of PD.

  13. Satiation and Stress-Induced Hypophagia: Examining the Role of Hindbrain Neurons Expressing Prolactin-Releasing Peptide or Glucagon-Like Peptide 1

    PubMed Central

    Maniscalco, James W.; Kreisler, Alison D.; Rinaman, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Neural circuits distributed within the brainstem, hypothalamus, and limbic forebrain interact to control food intake and energy balance under normal day-to-day conditions, and in response to stressful conditions under which homeostasis is threatened. Experimental studies using rats and mice have generated a voluminous literature regarding the functional organization of circuits that inhibit food intake in response to satiety signals, and in response to stress. Although the central neural bases of satiation and stress-induced hypophagia often are studied and discussed as if they were distinct, we propose that both behavioral states are generated, at least in part, by recruitment of two separate but intermingled groups of caudal hindbrain neurons. One group comprises a subpopulation of noradrenergic (NA) neurons within the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (cNST; A2 cell group) that is immunopositive for prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP). The second group comprises non-adrenergic neurons within the cNST and nearby reticular formation that synthesize glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Axonal projections from PrRP and GLP-1 neurons target distributed brainstem and forebrain regions that shape behavioral, autonomic, and endocrine responses to actual or anticipated homeostatic challenge, including the challenge of food intake. Evidence reviewed in this article supports the view that hindbrain PrRP and GLP-1 neurons contribute importantly to satiation and stress-induced hypophagia by modulating the activity of caudal brainstem circuits that control food intake. Hindbrain PrRP and GLP-1 neurons also engage hypothalamic and limbic forebrain networks that drive parallel behavioral and endocrine functions related to food intake and homeostatic challenge, and modulate conditioned and motivational aspects of food intake. PMID:23346044

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-1 protects cardiomyocytes from advanced oxidation protein product-induced apoptosis via the PI3K/Akt/Bad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Xiong, Zhouyi; Wang, Jiao; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Lei, Lei; Yang, Li; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is a major event in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Currently, no single effective treatment for diabetic cardiomyopathy exists. The present study investigated whether advanced oxidative protein products (AOPPs) have a detrimental role in the survival of cardiomyocytes and if glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts a cardioprotective effect under these circumstances. The present study also aimed to determine the underlying mechanisms. H9c2 cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of AOPPs in the presence or absence of GLP-1, and the viability and apoptotic rate were detected using a cell counting kit-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. In addition, a phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002, was employed to illustrate the mechanism of the antiapoptotic effect of GLP-1. The expression levels of the apoptotic-associated proteins, Akt, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2, Bcl-2-associated death promoter (Bad), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and caspase-3 were measured by western blotting. It was revealed that GLP-1 significantly attenuated AOPP-induced cell toxicity and apoptosis. AOPPs inactivated the phosphorylation of Akt, reduced the phosphorylation of Bad, decreased the expression of Bcl-2, increased the expression of Bax and the activation of caspase-3 in H9c2 cells. GLP-1 reversed the above changes induced by AOPPs and the protective effects of GLP-1 were abolished by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the present data suggested that GLP-1 protected cardiomyocytes against AOPP-induced apoptosis, predominantly via the PI3K/Akt/Bad pathway. These results provided a conceivable mechanism for the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy and rendered a novel application of GLP-1 exerting favorable cardiac effects for the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  15. Substitution of the cysteine 438 residue in the cytoplasmic tail of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor alters signal transduction activity.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Patricia; Roncero, Isabel; Blázquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2005-04-01

    Several G-protein-coupled receptors contain cysteine residues in the C-terminal tail that may modulate receptor function. In this work we analysed the substitution of Cys438 by alanine in the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLPR), which led to a threefold decrease in cAMP production, although endocytosis and cellular redistribution of GLP-1 receptor agonist-induced processes were unaffected. Additionally, cysteine residues in the C-terminal tail of several G-protein-coupled receptors were found to act as substrates for palmitoylation, which might modify the access of protein kinases to this region. His-tagged GLP-1 receptors incorporated 3H-palmitate. Nevertheless, substitution of Cys438 prevented the incorporation of palmitate. Accordingly, we also investigated the effect of substitution of the consensus sequence by protein kinase C (PKC) Ser431/432 in both wild-type and Ala438 GLP-1 receptors. Substitution of Ser431/432 by alanine did not modify the ability of wild-type receptors to stimulate adenylate cyclase or endocytosis and recycling processes. By contrast, the substitution of Ser431/432 by alanine in the receptor containing Ala438 increased the ability to stimulate adenylate cyclase. All types of receptors were mainly internalised through coated pits. Thus, cysteine 438 in the cytoplasmic tail of the GLP-1 receptor would regulate its interaction with G-proteins and the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. Palmitoylation of this residue might control the access of PKC to Ser431/432.

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 protects cardiomyocytes from advanced oxidation protein product-induced apoptosis via the PI3K/Akt/Bad signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HUA; XIONG, ZHOUYI; WANG, JIAO; ZHANG, SHUANGSHUANG; LEI, LEI; YANG, LI; ZHANG, ZHEN

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is a major event in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Currently, no single effective treatment for diabetic cardiomyopathy exists. The present study investigated whether advanced oxidative protein products (AOPPs) have a detrimental role in the survival of cardiomyocytes and if glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts a cardioprotective effect under these circumstances. The present study also aimed to determine the underlying mechanisms. H9c2 cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of AOPPs in the presence or absence of GLP-1, and the viability and apoptotic rate were detected using a cell counting kit-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. In addition, a phosphatidylino-sitol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002, was employed to illustrate the mechanism of the antiapoptotic effect of GLP-1. The expression levels of the apoptotic-associated proteins, Akt, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2, Bcl-2-associated death promoter (Bad), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and caspase-3 were measured by western blotting. It was revealed that GLP-1 significantly attenuated AOPP-induced cell toxicity and apoptosis. AOPPs inactivated the phosphorylation of Akt, reduced the phosphorylation of Bad, decreased the expression of Bcl-2, increased the expression of Bax and the activation of caspase-3 in H9c2 cells. GLP-1 reversed the above changes induced by AOPPs and the protective effects of GLP-1 were abolished by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the present data suggested that GLP-1 protected cardiomyocytes against AOPP-induced apoptosis, predominantly via the PI3K/Akt/Bad pathway. These results provided a conceivable mechanism for the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy and rendered a novel application of GLP-1 exerting favorable cardiac effects for the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26717963

  17. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  18. Association of Anti-Diabetic Medications Targeting the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Pathway and Heart Failure Events in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Mauricio; Peterson, Edward L.; Wells, Karen; Swadia, Tanmay; Sabbah, Hani N.; Williams, L. Keoki; Lanfear, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (GLP-1 agents) may be protective in heart failure (HF). We set out to determine whether GLP-1 agent use is associated with HF risk in diabetics. Methods and Results Retrospective cohort study of members of a large health system. We identified >19,000 adult diabetics from January 1, 2000–July 1, 2012. GLP-1 agent users were matched 1:2 to controls using propensity matching based on age, race, gender, coronary disease, HF, diabetes duration, and number of anti-diabetic medications. The association of GLP-1 agents with time to HF hospitalization was tested with multivariable Cox regression. All-cause hospitalization and mortality were secondary endpoints. We identified 1,426 users of GLP-1 agents and 2,798 controls. Both were similar except for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blocker (ACEi/ARB) use, number of anti-diabetic medications and age. There were 199 hospitalizations, of which 128 were for HF, and 114 deaths. GLP-1 agents were associated with reduced risk of HF hospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34–0.77, p=0.002), all-cause hospitalization (aHR 0.54; 95% CI 0.38–0.74, p=0.001), and death (aHR 0.31; 95% CI 0.18–0.53, p=0.001). Conclusions GLP-1 agents may reduce the risk of HF events in diabetics. PMID:25451709

  19. A silica-based pH-sensitive nanomatrix system improves the oral absorption and efficacy of incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wei; Li, Yong; Hovgaard, Lars; Li, Song; Dai, Wenbin; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (7–36) is a peptide incretin hormone released from the endocrine L-cells of the intestinal mucosa with unique antidiabetic potential. Due to low absorption efficiency and instability in the gastrointestinal tract, the introduction of orally active GLP-1 is a large challenge. Here we developed a novel silica-based pH-sensitive nanomatrix of GLP-1 (SPN-GLP-1) in order to provide a strategy for oral peptide delivery. Methods SPN-GLP-1 composed of silica nanoparticles and pH-sensitive Eudragit® was prepared and characterized by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, high-performance liquid chromatography, surface analysis, drug release, and so on. Its permeability across the Caco-2 cell monolayer and intestinal mucosa, proteolytic stability against the intestinal enzymes, pharmacokinetics, hypoglycemic effect in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), and primary toxicity were then evaluated. Results It was indicated that the nanomatrix system obtained had a unique nanoscale structure and pH-sensitivity in drug release. It displayed a five-fold intestinal mucosa permeability and significantly higher proteolytic stability compared to native GLP-1 (P < 0.001). A longer half-life was observed after oral administration of SPN-GLP-1, and its relative bioavailability was 35.67% in comparison to intraperitoneal GLP-1. Oral delivery of SPN-GLP-1 significantly reduced the blood glucose level and its hypoglycemic effect over intraperitoneal GLP-1 reached 77%. There was no evident toxicity of SPN-GLP-1 found from both animal status and histochemical analysis of gastrointestinal tissues. Conclusion The silica-based pH-sensitive nanomatrix designed and prepared here might be considered as a potential oral delivery system not only for GLP-1, but also for other peptide or macromolecular drugs. PMID:23028226

  20. The Melanocortin-4 Receptor is Expressed in Enteroendocrine L Cells and Regulates the Release of Peptide YY and Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Panaro, Brandon L.; Tough, Iain R.; Engelstoft, Maja Storm; Matthews, Robert T.; Digby, Gregory J.; Møller, Cathrine Laustrup; Svendsen, Berit; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Holst, Jens J.; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.; Cox, Helen M.; Cone, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is expressed in the brainstem and vagal afferent nerves, and regulates a number of aspects of gastrointestinal function. Here we show that the receptor is also diffusely expressed in cells of the gastrointestinal system, from stomach to descending colon. Furthermore, MC4R is the second most highly expressed GPCR in peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide one (GLP-1) expressing enteroendocrine L cells. When vectorial ion transport is measured across mouse or human intestinal mucosa, administration of α-MSH induces a MC4R-specific PYY-dependent anti-secretory response consistent with a role for the MC4R in paracrine inhibition of electrolyte secretion. Finally, MC4R-dependent acute PYY and GLP-1 release from L cells can be stimulated in vivo by intraperitoneal administration of melanocortin peptides to mice. This suggests physiological significance for MC4R in L cells, and indicates a previously unrecognized peripheral role for the MC4R, complementing vagal and central receptor functions. PMID:25453189

  1. Circulating concentrations of glucagon-like peptide 1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, peptide YY, and insulin in client-owned lean, overweight, and diabetic cats.

    PubMed

    McMillan, C J; Zapata, R C; Chelikani, P K; Snead, E C R; Cosford, K

    2016-01-01

    Our objectives were to measure plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), and peptide YY (PYY) in client-owned newly diagnosed diabetic cats and nondiabetic lean or overweight cats and to determine whether circulating concentrations of these hormones differed between study groups and if they increased postprandially as seen in other species. A total of 31 cats were recruited and placed into 1 of 3 study groups: lean (body condition score 4-5 on a scale of 1-9; n = 10), overweight (body condition score 6-8; n = 11), or diabetic (n = 10). Diabetics were newly diagnosed and had not had prior insulin therapy. Preprandial (fasting) and postprandial (60 min after meal) plasma hormone and glucose concentrations were measured at baseline and 2 and 4 wk. All cats were exclusively fed a commercially available high-protein and low-carbohydrate diet commonly prescribed to feline diabetic patients for 2 wk before the 2-wk assessment and continued through the 4-wk assessment. Results showed that plasma concentrations of GLP-1, GIP, PYY, and insulin increased in general after a meal in all study groups. Plasma PYY concentrations did not differ (P > 0.10) between study groups. Diabetics had greater plasma concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP compared with the other study groups at baseline (P < 0.05), and greater preprandial and postprandial GLP-1 concentrations than lean cats at 2 and 4 wk (P < 0.05). Preprandial plasma GIP concentrations were greater in diabetics than obese and lean (P < 0.05) cats at week 4. Postprandial plasma GIP concentrations in diabetics were greater than lean (P < 0.05) at week 2 and obese and lean cats (P < 0.05) at week 4. Together, our findings suggest that diabetic status is an important determinant of circulating concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP, but not PYY, in cats. The role of GLP-1, GIP, and PYY in the pathophysiology of feline obesity and diabetes remains to be determined.

  2. Plasma Free Amino Acid Responses to Intraduodenal Whey Protein, and Relationships with Insulin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Energy Intake in Lean Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D.; Hutchison, Amy T.; Soenen, Stijn; Steinert, Robert E.; Clifton, Peter M.; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effects of increasing loads of intraduodenal (ID) dairy protein on plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations, and their relationships with serum insulin, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and energy intake. Sixteen healthy men had concentrations of AAs, GLP-1 and insulin measured in response to 60-min ID infusions of hydrolysed whey protein administered, in double-blinded and randomised order, at 2.1 (P2.1), 6.3 (P6.3) or 12.5 (P12.5) kJ/min (encompassing the range of nutrient emptying from the stomach), or saline control (C). Energy intake was quantified immediately afterwards. Compared with C, the concentrations of 19/20 AAs, the exception being cysteine, were increased, and this was dependent on the protein load. The relationship between AA concentrations in the infusions and the area under the curve from 0 to 60 min (AUC0–60 min) of each AA profile was strong for essential AAs (R2 range, 0.61–0.67), but more variable for non-essential (0.02–0.54) and conditional (0.006–0.64) AAs. The AUC0–60 min for each AA was correlated directly with the AUC0–60 min of insulin (R2 range 0.3–0.6), GLP-1 (0.2–0.6) and energy intake (0.09–0.3) (p < 0.05, for all), with the strongest correlations being for branched-chain AAs, lysine, methionine and tyrosine. These findings indicate that ID whey protein infused at loads encompassing the normal range of gastric emptying increases plasma concentrations of 19/20 AAs in a load-dependent manner, and provide novel information on the close relationships between the essential AAs, leucine, valine, isoleucine, lysine, methionine, and the conditionally-essential AA, tyrosine, with energy intake, insulin and GLP-1. PMID:26742062

  3. Efficacy and Acceptability of Glycemic Control of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists among Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhixia; Zhang, Yuan; Quan, Xiaochi; Yang, Zhirong; Zeng, Xiantao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To synthesize current evidence of the impact of Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) on hypoglycemia, treatment discontinuation and glycemic level in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Data Sources Literature search (Medline, Embase, the Cochrane library), website of clinical trial, bibliographies of published systematic reviews. Eligibility Criteria Randomized controlled trials with available data comparing GLP-1 RAs with placebo or traditional anti-diabetic drugs in patients with type 2 diabetes. Data Synthesis Traditional pairwise meta-analyses within DerSimonian-Laird random effects model and network meta-analysis within a Bayesian framework were performed to calculate odds ratios for the incidence of hypoglycemia, treatment discontinuation, HbA1c<7.0% and HbA1c<6.5%. Ranking probabilities for all treatments were estimated to obtain a treatment hierarchy using the surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) and mean ranks. Results 78 trials with 13 treatments were included. Overall, all GLP-1 RAs except for albiglutide increased the risk of hypoglycemia when compared to placebo. Reduction in the incidence of hypoglycemia was found for all GLP-1 RAs versus insulin (except for dulaglutide) and sulphonylureas. For the incidence of treatment discontinuation, increase was found for exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide and taspoglutide versus placebo, insulin and sitagliptin. For glycemic level, decrease was found for all GLP-1 RAs versus placebo. Dulaglutide, exenatide long-acting release (exe_lar), liraglutide and taspoglutide had significant lowering effect when compared with sitagliptin (HbA1c<7.0%) and insulin (HbA1c<6.5%). Finally, according to SUCRAs, placebo, thiazolidinediones and albiglutide had the best decrease effect on hypoglycemia; sulphanylureas, sitagliptin and insulin decrease the incidence of treatment discontinuation most; exe_lar and dulaglutide had the highest

  4. Modeling analysis of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated Ca2+ mobilization under the control of glucagon-like peptide-1 in mouse pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yukari; Shimayoshi, Takao; Holz, George G; Noma, Akinori

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinally derived blood glucose-lowering hormone that potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. The secretagogue action of GLP-1 is explained, at least in part, by its ability to stimulate cAMP production so that cAMP may facilitate the release of Ca(2+) from inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-regulated Ca(2+) stores. However, a quantitative model has yet to be provided that explains the molecular mechanisms and dynamic processes linking GLP-1-stimulated cAMP production to Ca(2+) mobilization. Here, we performed simulation studies to investigate how GLP-1 alters the abilities of Ca(2+) and IP3 to act as coagonists at IP3R Ca(2+) release channels. A new dynamic model was constructed based on the Kaftan model, which demonstrates dual steady-state allosteric regulation of the IP3R by Ca(2+) and IP3. Data obtained from β-cells were then analyzed to understand how GLP-1 facilitates IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization when UV flash photolysis is used to uncage Ca(2+) and IP3 intracellularly. When the dynamic model for IP3R activation was incorporated into a minimal cell model, the Ca(2+) transients and oscillations induced by GLP-1 were successfully reconstructed. Simulation studies indicated that transient and oscillatory responses to GLP-1 were produced by sequential positive and negative feedback regulation due to fast activation and slow inhibition of the IP3R by Ca(2+). The slow rate of Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition was revealed to provide a remarkable contribution to the time course of the decay of cytosolic Ca(2+) transients. It also served to drive and pace Ca(2+) oscillations that are significant when evaluating how GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion. PMID:26741144

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists versus insulin glargine for type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Xin; Gou, Jian-Feng; Tian, Jin-Hui; Yan, Xiang; Yang, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new class of hypoglycemic drugs, including exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, lixisenatide, and taspoglutide. Insulin glargine is a standard agent used to supplement basal insulin in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Objective: The aim of this study was to review the efficacy and safety profiles of GLP-1 receptor agonists versus insulin glargine in type 2 diabetic patients who have not achieved treatment goals with oral hypoglycemic agents. Methods: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and the database of ongoing trials were searched from inception through April 2010. Additional data were sought from relevant Web sites, the American Diabetes Association, reference lists of included trials and related (systematic) reviews, and industry. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were selected if they were ≥3 months in duration, compared GLP-1 receptor agonists with insulin glargine in patients with T2DM, and included ≥1 of the following outcomes: mortality, complications of T2DM, glycemie control, weight, lipids, blood pressure, adverse effects, and health-related quality of life. Quasirandomized controlled trials were excluded. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed on the basis of the following aspects: randomization procedure, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcome data (intent-to-treat [ITT] analysis), selective outcome reporting, and publication bias. Results: A total of 410 citations were retrieved; 5 multicenter RCTs that met the inclusion criteria were identified. They were all open-label designs with an insulin glargine arm, predefined outcomes reported, and ITT analysis. One trial had an unclear randomization procedure and allocation concealment. Publication bias was not able to be determined. No data wete found with regard to mortality or diabetes-associated complications, and few data were found on quality of life. The results of

  6. Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)-Induced Cholecystokinin and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Release in the STC-1 Enteroendocrine Cell Model Is Mediated by Calcium-Sensing Receptor and Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin-1 Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J

    2015-06-01

    Food refusal is a hallmark of exposure of experimental animals to the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a common foodborne contaminant. Although studies in the mouse suggest that DON suppresses food intake by aberrantly inducing the release of satiety hormones from enteroendocrine cells (EECs) found in the gut epithelium, the underlying mechanisms for this effect are not understood. To address this gap, we employed the murine neuroendocrine tumor STC-1 cell line, a widely used EEC model, to test the hypothesis that DON-induced hormone exocytosis is mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. The results indicate for the first time that DON elicits Ca(2)-dependent secretion of cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36) amide (GLP-1), hormones that regulate food intake and energy homeostasis and that are products of 2 critical EEC populations--I cells of the small intestine and L cells of the large intestine, respectively. Furthermore, these effects were mediated by the GPCR Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) and involved the following serial events: (1)PLC-mediated activation of the IP3 receptor and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, (2) activation of transient receptor potential melastatin-5 ion channel and resultant L-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channel-facilitated extracellular Ca(2+) entry, (3) amplification of extracellular Ca(2+) entry by transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 channel activation, and finally (4) Ca(2+)-driven CCK and GLP-1 excytosis. These in vitro findings provide a foundation for future investigation of mechanisms by which DON and other trichothecenes modulate EEC function in ex vivo and in vivo models. PMID:25787141

  7. Demonstration of the innate electrophilicity of 4-(3-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-2-(ethylsulfinyl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP), a small-molecule positive allosteric modulator of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; McDonald, Thomas S; Edmonds, David J; Fortin, Jean-Philippe; Li, Xianping; Stevens, Benjamin D; Griffith, David A; Limberakis, Chris; Nolte, Whitney M; Price, David A; Jackson, Margaret; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2013-08-01

    4-(3-(Benzyloxy)phenyl)-2-(ethylsulfinyl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP) represents a novel small-molecule activator of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), and exhibits glucose-dependent insulin secretion in rats following i.v. (but not oral) administration. To explore the quantitative pharmacology associated with GLP-1R agonism in preclinical species, the in vivo pharmacokinetics of BETP were examined in rats after i.v. and oral dosing. Failure to detect BETP in circulation after oral administration of a 10-mg/kg dose in rats was consistent with the lack of an insulinotropic effect of orally administered BETP in this species. Likewise, systemic concentrations of BETP in the rat upon i.v. administration (1 mg/kg) were minimal (and sporadic). In vitro incubations in bovine serum albumin, plasma, and liver microsomes from rodents and humans indicated a facile degradation of BETP. Failure to detect metabolites in plasma and liver microsomal incubations in the absence of NADP was suggestive of a covalent interaction between BETP and a protein amino acid residue(s) in these matrices. Incubations of BETP with glutathione (GSH) in buffer revealed a rapid nucleophilic displacement of the ethylsulfoxide functionality by GSH to yield adduct M1, which indicated that BETP was intrinsically electrophilic. The structure of M1 was unambiguously identified by comparison of its chromatographic and mass spectral properties with an authentic standard. The GSH conjugate of BETP was also characterized in NADPH- and GSH-supplemented liver microsomes and in plasma samples from the pharmacokinetic studies. Unlike BETP, M1 was inactive as an allosteric modulator of the GLP-1R. PMID:23653442

  8. JTT-130, a novel intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, suppresses food intake and gastric emptying with the elevation of plasma peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 in a dietary fat-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hata, Takahiro; Mera, Yasuko; Ishii, Yukihito; Tadaki, Hironobu; Tomimoto, Daisuke; Kuroki, Yukiharu; Kawai, Takashi; Ohta, Takeshi; Kakutani, Makoto

    2011-03-01

    The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) takes part in the mobilization and secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from enterocytes and hepatocytes. In this study, we investigated the effects of diethyl-2-({3-dimethylcarbamoyl-4-[(4'-trifluoromethylbiphenyl-2-carbonyl) amino] phenyl}acetyloxymethyl)-2-phenylmalonate (JTT-130), a novel intestine-specific MTP inhibitor, on food intake, gastric emptying, and gut peptides using Sprague-Dawley rats fed 3.1% fat, 13% fat, or 35% fat diets. JTT-130 treatment suppressed cumulative food intake and gastric emptying in rats fed a 35% fat diet, but not a 3.1% fat diet. In rats fed a 13% fat diet, JTT-130 treatment decreased cumulative food intake but not gastric emptying. In addition, treatment with orlistat, a lipase inhibitor, completely abolished the reduction of food intake and gastric emptying by JTT-130 in rats fed a 35% fat diet. On the other hand, JTT-130 treatment increased the plasma concentrations of gut peptides, peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) but not cholecystokinin, in the portal vein in rats fed a 35% fat diet. These elevations in PYY and GLP-1 were also abolished by treatment with orlistat. Furthermore, JTT-130 treatment in rats fed a 35% fat diet increased the contents of triglycerides and free fatty acids in the intestinal lumen, which might contribute to the elevation of PYY and GLP-1 levels. The present findings indicate that JTT-130 causes satiety responses, decreased food intake, and gastric emptying in a dietary fat-dependent manner, with enhanced production of gut peptides such as PYY and GLP-1 from the intestine.

  9. Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)-Induced Cholecystokinin and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Release in the STC-1 Enteroendocrine Cell Model Is Mediated by Calcium-Sensing Receptor and Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin-1 Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J

    2015-06-01

    Food refusal is a hallmark of exposure of experimental animals to the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a common foodborne contaminant. Although studies in the mouse suggest that DON suppresses food intake by aberrantly inducing the release of satiety hormones from enteroendocrine cells (EECs) found in the gut epithelium, the underlying mechanisms for this effect are not understood. To address this gap, we employed the murine neuroendocrine tumor STC-1 cell line, a widely used EEC model, to test the hypothesis that DON-induced hormone exocytosis is mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. The results indicate for the first time that DON elicits Ca(2)-dependent secretion of cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36) amide (GLP-1), hormones that regulate food intake and energy homeostasis and that are products of 2 critical EEC populations--I cells of the small intestine and L cells of the large intestine, respectively. Furthermore, these effects were mediated by the GPCR Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) and involved the following serial events: (1)PLC-mediated activation of the IP3 receptor and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, (2) activation of transient receptor potential melastatin-5 ion channel and resultant L-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channel-facilitated extracellular Ca(2+) entry, (3) amplification of extracellular Ca(2+) entry by transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 channel activation, and finally (4) Ca(2+)-driven CCK and GLP-1 excytosis. These in vitro findings provide a foundation for future investigation of mechanisms by which DON and other trichothecenes modulate EEC function in ex vivo and in vivo models.

  10. Effects of Green Tea Extract on Insulin Resistance and Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Lipid Abnormalities: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, and Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Yu; Huang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Lin-Huang; Chen, I-Ju; Chiu, Jung-Peng; Hsu, Chung-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of green tea extract on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid abnormalities on glycemic and lipid profiles, and hormone peptides by a double-blinded, randomized and placebo-controlled clinical trial. This trial enrolled 92 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid abnormalities randomized into 2 arms, each arm comprising 46 participants. Of the participants, 39 in therapeutic arm took 500 mg green tea extract, three times a day, while 38 in control arm took cellulose with the same dose and frequency to complete the 16-week study. Anthropometrics measurements, glycemic and lipid profiles, safety parameters, and obesity-related hormone peptides were analyzed at screening and after 16-week course. Within-group comparisons showed that green tea extract caused a significant decrease in triglyceride and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index after 16 weeks. Green tea extract also increased significantly high density lipoprotein cholesterol. The HOMA-IR index decreased from 5.4±3.9 to 3.5±2.0 in therapeutic arm only. Adiponectin, apolipoprotein A1, and apolipoprotein B100 increased significantly in both arms, but only glucagon-like peptide 1 increased in the therapeutic arm. However, only decreasing trend in triglyceride was found in between-group comparison. Our study suggested that green tea extract significantly improved insulin resistance and increased glucagon-like peptide 1 only in within-group comparison. The potential effects of green tea extract on insulin resistance and glucagon-like peptide 1 warrant further investigation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01360567 PMID:24614112

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-2 modulates neurally evoked mucosal chloride secretion in guinea pig small intestine in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baldassano, Sara; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Mei-Hu; Mulè, Flavia

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is an important neuroendocrine peptide in intestinal physiology. It influences digestion, absorption, epithelial growth, motility, and blood flow. We studied involvement of GLP-2 in intestinal mucosal secretory behavior. Submucosal-mucosal preparations from guinea pig ileum were mounted in Ussing chambers for measurement of short-circuit current (Isc) as a surrogate for chloride secretion. GLP-2 action on neuronal release of acetylcholine was determined with ELISA. Enteric neuronal expression of the GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) was studied with immunohistochemical methods. Application of GLP-2 (0.1–100 nM) to the serosal or mucosal side of the preparations evoked no change in baseline Isc and did not alter transepithelial ionic conductance. Transmural electrical field stimulation (EFS) evoked characteristic biphasic increases in Isc, with an initially rapid rising phase followed by a sustained phase. Application of GLP-2 reduced the EFS-evoked biphasic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. The GLP-2R antagonist GLP-2-(3-33) significantly reversed suppression of the EFS-evoked responses by GLP-2. Tetrodotoxin, scopolamine, and hexamethonium, but not vasoactive intestinal peptide type 1 receptor (VPAC1) antagonist abolished or reduced to near zero the EFS-evoked responses. GLP-2 suppressed EFS-evoked acetylcholine release as measured by ELISA. Pretreatment with GLP-2-(3-33) offset this action of GLP-2. In the submucosal plexus, GLP-2R immunoreactivity (-IR) was expressed in choline acetyltransferase-IR neurons, somatostatin-IR neurons, neuropeptide Y-IR neurons, and vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR neurons. We conclude that submucosal neurons in the guinea pig ileum express GLP-2R. Activation of GLP-2R decreases neuronally evoked epithelial chloride secretion by suppressing acetylcholine release from secretomotor neurons. PMID:19628655

  12. The effect of a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist on glucose tolerance in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus: protocol for an investigator-initiated, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, parallel intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Vedtofte, Louise; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Svare, Jens A; Gluud, Lise L; Holst, Jens J; Damm, Peter; Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pregnancy is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity, which is usually overcome by a compensatory increase in insulin secretion. Some pregnant women are not able to increase their insulin secretion sufficiently, and consequently develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The disease normally disappears after delivery. Nevertheless, women with previous GDM have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) later in life. We aim to investigate the early development of T2D in women with previous GDM and to evaluate whether treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, liraglutide, may modify their risk of developing T2D. Methods and analyses 100 women with previous GDM will be randomised to either liraglutide or placebo treatment for 1 year (blinded) with an open-label extension for another 4 years. Additionally, 15 women without previous GDM will constitute a baseline control group. Women will be tested with an oral glucose tolerance test (primary endpoint: area under the curve for plasma glucose) and an isoglycaemic intravenous glucose infusion at baseline, after 1 year and after 5 years. Additional evaluations include a glucagon test, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, imaging of the liver (ultrasound elastography and fibroscanning), an ad libitum meal for food intake evaluation and questionnaires related to appetite, quality of life and alcohol consumption habits. Ethics and dissemination The protocol has been approved by the Danish Medicines Agency, the Scientific-Ethical Committee of the Capital Region of Denmark, and the Danish Data Protection Agency and will be carried out under the surveillance and guidance of the GCP unit at Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg in compliance with the ICH-GCP guidelines and in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration. Positive, negative and inconclusive results will be published at scientific conferences and as one or more scientific manuscripts in peer

  13. Intrameal Hepatic Portal and Intraperitoneal Infusions of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Reduce Spontaneous Meal Size in the Rat via Different Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rüttimann, Elisabeth B.; Arnold, Myrtha; Hillebrand, Jacquelien J.; Geary, Nori; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral administration of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 reduces food intake in animals and humans, but the sites and mechanism of this effect and its physiological significance are not yet clear. To investigate these issues, we prepared rats with chronic catheters and infused GLP-1 (0.2 ml/min; 2.5 or 5.0 min) during the first spontaneous dark-phase meals. Infusions were remotely triggered 2–3 min after meal onset. Hepatic portal vein (HPV) infusion of 1.0 or 3.0 (but not 0.33) nmol/kg GLP-1 reduced the size of the ongoing meal compared with vehicle without affecting the subsequent intermeal interval, the size of subsequent meals, or cumulative food intake. In double-cannulated rats, HPV and vena cava infusions of 1.0 nmol/kg GLP-1 reduced meal size similarly. HPV GLP-1 infusions of 1.0 nmol/kg GLP-1 also reduced meal size similarly in rats with subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentations and in sham-operated rats. Finally, HPV and ip infusions of 10 nmol/kg GLP-1 reduced meal size similarly in sham-operated rats, but only HPV GLP-1 reduced meal size in subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation rats. These data indicate that peripherally infused GLP-1 acutely and specifically reduces the size of ongoing meals in rats and that the satiating effect of ip, but not iv, GLP-1 requires vagal afferent signaling. The findings suggest that iv GLP-1 infusions do not inhibit eating via hepatic portal or hepatic GLP-1 receptors but may act directly on the brain. PMID:18948395

  14. Sardine protein diet increases plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 levels and prevents tissue oxidative stress in rats fed a high-fructose diet.

    PubMed

    Madani, Zohra; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J; Dalila, Ait Yahia

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigated whether sardine protein mitigates the adverse effects of fructose on plasma glucagon‑like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and oxidative stress in rats. Rats were fed casein (C) or sardine protein (S) with or without high‑fructose (HF) for 2 months. Plasma glucose, insulin, GLP‑1, lipid and protein oxidation and antioxidant enzymes were assayed. HF rats developed obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and oxidative stress despite reduced energy and food intakes. High plasma creatinine and uric acid levels, in addition to albuminuria were observed in the HF groups. The S‑HF diet reduced plasma glucose, insulin, creatinine, uric acid and homeostasis model assessment‑insulin resistance index levels, however increased GLP‑1 levels compared with the C‑HF diet. Hydroperoxides were reduced in the liver, kidney, heart and muscle of S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. A reduction in liver, kidney and heart carbonyls was observed in S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. Reduced levels of nitric oxide (NO) were detected in the liver, kidney and heart of the S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. The S diet compared with the C diet reduced levels of liver hydroperoxides, heart carbonyls and kidney NO. The S‑HF diet compared with the C‑HF diet increased the levels of liver and kidney superoxide dismutase, liver and muscle catalase, liver, heart and muscle glutathione peroxidase and liver ascorbic acid. The S diet prevented and reversed insulin resistance and oxidative stress, and may have benefits in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  15. Alteration of gut microbiota by vancomycin and bacitracin improves insulin resistance via glucagon-like peptide 1 in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Injae; Park, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Kim, Yo Na; Ka, Sojeong; Lee, Ho Young; Seong, Je Kyung; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Kim, Jae Bum

    2015-06-01

    Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, 2 major phyla of gut microbiota, are involved in lipid and bile acid metabolism to maintain systemic energy homeostasis in host. Recently, accumulating evidence has suggested that dietary changes promptly induce the alteration of abundance of both Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes in obesity and its related metabolic diseases. Nevertheless, the metabolic roles of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes on such disease states remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of antibiotic-induced depletion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes on dysregulation of energy homeostasis in obesity. Treatment of C57BL/6J mice with the antibiotics (vancomycin [V] and bacitracin [B]), in the drinking water, before diet-induced obesity (DIO) greatly decreased both Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes in the gut as revealed by pyrosequencing of the microbial 16S rRNA gene. Concomitantly, systemic glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance in DIO were ameliorated via augmentation of GLP-1 secretion (active form; 2.03-fold, total form; 5.09-fold) independently of obesity as compared with untreated DIO controls. Furthermore, there were increases in metabolically beneficial metabolites derived from the gut. Together, our data suggest that Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes potentially mediate insulin resistance through modulation of GLP-1 secretion in obesity.

  16. The effect of glucose when added to a fat load on the response of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and apolipoprotein B-48 in the postprandial phase.

    PubMed

    Zemánková, K; Mrázková, J; Piťha, J; Kovář, J

    2015-01-01

    Increased and prolonged postprandial lipemia has been identified as a risk factor of cardiovascular disease. However, there is no consensus on how to test postprandial lipemia, especially with respect to the composition of an experimental meal. To address this question of how glucose, when added to a fat load, affects the selected parameters of postprandial lipemia, we carried out a study in 30 healthy male volunteers. Men consumed an experimental meal containing either 75 g of fat + 25 g of glucose (F+G meal) or 75 g of fat (F meal) in a control experiment. Blood was taken before the meal and at selected time points within the following 8 h. Glucose, when added to a fat load, induced an increase of glycemia and insulinemia and, surprisingly, a 20 % reduction in the response of both total and active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentration. The addition of glucose did not affect the magnitude of postprandial triglyceridemia and TRL-C and TRL-TG concentrations but stimulated a faster response of chylomicrons to the test meal, evaluated by changes in apolipoprotein B-48 concentrations. The addition of glucose induced the physiological response of insulin and the lower response of GLP-1 to the test meal during the early postprandial phase, but had no effect on changes of TRL-cholesterol and TRL-TG within 8 h after the meal. PMID:26680669

  17. Protection against the Metabolic Syndrome by Guar Gum-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids Depends on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1.

    PubMed

    den Besten, Gijs; Gerding, Albert; van Dijk, Theo H; Ciapaite, Jolita; Bleeker, Aycha; van Eunen, Karen; Havinga, Rick; Groen, Albert K; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Bakker, Barbara M

    2015-01-01

    The dietary fiber guar gum has beneficial effects on obesity, hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia in both humans and rodents. The major products of colonic fermentation of dietary fiber, the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), have been suggested to play an important role. Recently, we showed that SCFAs protect against the metabolic syndrome via a signaling cascade that involves peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ repression and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanism via which the dietary fiber guar gum protects against the metabolic syndrome. C57Bl/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with 0% or 10% of the fiber guar gum for 12 weeks and effects on lipid and glucose metabolism were studied. We demonstrate that, like SCFAs, also guar gum protects against high-fat diet-induced metabolic abnormalities by PPARγ repression, subsequently increasing mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 expression and AMP/ATP ratio, leading to the activation of AMPK and culminating in enhanced oxidative metabolism in both liver and adipose tissue. Moreover, guar gum markedly increased peripheral glucose clearance, possibly mediated by the SCFA-induced colonic hormone glucagon-like peptide-1. Overall, this study provides novel molecular insights into the beneficial effects of guar gum on the metabolic syndrome and strengthens the potential role of guar gum as a dietary-fiber intervention. PMID:26292284

  18. Protection against the Metabolic Syndrome by Guar Gum-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids Depends on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    den Besten, Gijs; Gerding, Albert; van Dijk, Theo H.; Ciapaite, Jolita; Bleeker, Aycha; van Eunen, Karen; Havinga, Rick; Groen, Albert K.; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The dietary fiber guar gum has beneficial effects on obesity, hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia in both humans and rodents. The major products of colonic fermentation of dietary fiber, the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), have been suggested to play an important role. Recently, we showed that SCFAs protect against the metabolic syndrome via a signaling cascade that involves peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ repression and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanism via which the dietary fiber guar gum protects against the metabolic syndrome. C57Bl/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with 0% or 10% of the fiber guar gum for 12 weeks and effects on lipid and glucose metabolism were studied. We demonstrate that, like SCFAs, also guar gum protects against high-fat diet-induced metabolic abnormalities by PPARγ repression, subsequently increasing mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 expression and AMP/ATP ratio, leading to the activation of AMPK and culminating in enhanced oxidative metabolism in both liver and adipose tissue. Moreover, guar gum markedly increased peripheral glucose clearance, possibly mediated by the SCFA-induced colonic hormone glucagon-like peptide-1. Overall, this study provides novel molecular insights into the beneficial effects of guar gum on the metabolic syndrome and strengthens the potential role of guar gum as a dietary-fiber intervention. PMID:26292284

  19. New Insights Concerning the Glucose-dependent Insulin Secretagogue Action of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Holz, G.

    2010-01-01

    The GLP-1 receptor is a Class B heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptor that stimulates cAMP production in pancreatic β-cells. GLP-1 utilizes this receptor to activate two distinct classes of cAMP-binding proteins: protein kinase A (PKA) and the Epac family of cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factors (cAMPGEFs). Actions of GLP-1 mediated by PKA and Epac include the recruitment and priming of secretory granules, thereby increasing the number of granules available for Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Simultaneously, GLP-1 promotes Ca2+ influx and mobilizes an intracellular source of Ca2+. GLP-1 sensitizes intracellular Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine and IP3 receptors) to stimulatory effects of Ca2+, thereby promoting Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). In the model presented here, CICR activates mitochondrial dehydrogenases, thereby upregulating glucose-dependent production of ATP. The resultant increase in cytosolic [ATP]/[ADP] concentration ratio leads to closure of ATP-sensitive K+ channels (K-ATP), membrane depolarization, and influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs). Ca2+ influx stimulates exocytosis of secretory granules by promoting their fusion with the plasma membrane. Under conditions where Ca2+ release channels are sensitized by GLP-1, Ca2+ influx also stimulates CICR, generating an additional round of ATP production and K-ATP channel closure. In the absence of glucose, no “fuel” is available to support ATP production, and GLP-1 fails to stimulate insulin secretion. This new “feed-forward” hypothesis of β-cell stimulus-secretion coupling may provide a mechanistic explanation as to how GLP-1 exerts a beneficial blood glucose-lowering effect in type 2 diabetic subjects. PMID:15655710

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 stimulates luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone secretion in a rodent hypothalamic neuronal cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Beak, S A; Heath, M M; Small, C J; Morgan, D G; Ghatei, M A; Taylor, A D; Buckingham, J C; Bloom, S R; Smith, D M

    1998-01-01

    To examine the influence of the putative satiety factor (GLP-1) on the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis, we used GT1-7 cells as a model of neuronal luteinizing hormone- releasing hormone (LHRH) release. GLP-1 caused a concentration-dependent increase in LHRH release from GT1-7 cells. Specific, saturable GLP-1 binding sites were demonstrated on these cells. The binding of [125I]GLP-1 was time-dependent and consistent with a single binding site (Kd = 0.07+/-0.016 nM; binding capacity = 160+/-11 fmol/mg protein). The specific GLP-1 receptor agonists, exendin-3 and exendin-4, also showed high affinity (Ki = 0.3+/-0.05 and 0.32+/-0.06 nM, respectively) as did the antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ki = 0.98+/-0.24 nM). At concentrations that increased LHRH release, GLP-1 (0.5-10 nM) also caused an increase in intracellular cAMP in GT1-7 cells (10 nM GLP-1: 7.66+/-0.4 vs. control: 0.23+/-0.02 nmol/mg protein; P < 0.001). Intracerebroventricular injection of GLP-1 at a single concentration (10 microg) produced a prompt increase in the plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in male rats (GLP-1: 1.09+/-0.11 vs. saline: 0.69+/-0.06 ng/ml; P < 0.005). GLP-1 levels in the hypothalami of 48-h-fasted male rats showed a decrease, indicating a possible association of the satiety factor with the low luteinizing hormone levels in animals with a negative energy balance. PMID:9502775

  1. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor as a potential treatment target in alcohol use disorder: evidence from human genetic association studies and a mouse model of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Suchankova, P; Yan, J; Schwandt, M L; Stangl, B L; Caparelli, E C; Momenan, R; Jerlhag, E; Engel, J A; Hodgkinson, C A; Egli, M; Lopez, M F; Becker, H C; Goldman, D; Heilig, M; Ramchandani, V A; Leggio, L

    2015-06-16

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) regulates appetite and food intake. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation also attenuates the reinforcing properties of alcohol in rodents. The present translational study is based on four human genetic association studies and one preclinical study providing data that support the hypothesis that GLP-1R may have a role in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Case-control analysis (N = 908) was performed on a sample of individuals enrolled in the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) intramural research program. The Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) sample (N = 3803) was used for confirmation purposes. Post hoc analyses were carried out on data from a human laboratory study of intravenous alcohol self-administration (IV-ASA; N = 81) in social drinkers and from a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in alcohol-dependent individuals (N = 22) subjected to a Monetary Incentive Delay task. In the preclinical study, a GLP-1R agonist was evaluated in a mouse model of alcohol dependence to demonstrate the role of GLP-1R for alcohol consumption. The previously reported functional allele 168Ser (rs6923761) was nominally associated with AUD (P = 0.004) in the NIAAA sample, which was partially replicated in males of the SAGE sample (P = 0.033). The 168 Ser/Ser genotype was further associated with increased alcohol administration and breath alcohol measures in the IV-ASA experiment and with higher BOLD response in the right globus pallidus when receiving notification of outcome for high monetary reward. Finally, GLP-1R agonism significantly reduced alcohol consumption in a mouse model of alcohol dependence. These convergent findings suggest that the GLP-1R may be an attractive target for personalized pharmacotherapy treatment of AUD.

  2. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor as a potential treatment target in alcohol use disorder: evidence from human genetic association studies and a mouse model of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Suchankova, P; Yan, J; Schwandt, M L; Stangl, B L; Caparelli, E C; Momenan, R; Jerlhag, E; Engel, J A; Hodgkinson, C A; Egli, M; Lopez, M F; Becker, H C; Goldman, D; Heilig, M; Ramchandani, V A; Leggio, L

    2015-01-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) regulates appetite and food intake. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation also attenuates the reinforcing properties of alcohol in rodents. The present translational study is based on four human genetic association studies and one preclinical study providing data that support the hypothesis that GLP-1R may have a role in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Case–control analysis (N=908) was performed on a sample of individuals enrolled in the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) intramural research program. The Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) sample (N=3803) was used for confirmation purposes. Post hoc analyses were carried out on data from a human laboratory study of intravenous alcohol self-administration (IV-ASA; N=81) in social drinkers and from a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in alcohol-dependent individuals (N=22) subjected to a Monetary Incentive Delay task. In the preclinical study, a GLP-1R agonist was evaluated in a mouse model of alcohol dependence to demonstrate the role of GLP-1R for alcohol consumption. The previously reported functional allele 168Ser (rs6923761) was nominally associated with AUD (P=0.004) in the NIAAA sample, which was partially replicated in males of the SAGE sample (P=0.033). The 168Ser/Ser genotype was further associated with increased alcohol administration and breath alcohol measures in the IV-ASA experiment and with higher BOLD response in the right globus pallidus when receiving notification of outcome for high monetary reward. Finally, GLP-1R agonism significantly reduced alcohol consumption in a mouse model of alcohol dependence. These convergent findings suggest that the GLP-1R may be an attractive target for personalized pharmacotherapy treatment of AUD. PMID:26080318

  3. Role of capsaicin-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons in anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of cholecystokinin, peptide YY-(3-36), and glucagon-like peptide-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger; Haver, Alvin; Anders, Krista; Apenteng, Bettye

    2014-10-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced suppression of feeding is mediated by vagal sensory neurons that are destroyed by the neurotoxin capsaicin (CAP). Here we determined whether CAP-sensitive neurons mediate anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of gut hormones peptide YY-(3-36) [PYY-(3-36)] and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Rats received three intraperitoneal injections of CAP or vehicle (VEH) in 24 h. After recovery, non-food-deprived rats received at dark onset a 3-h intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (5, 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), PYY-(3-36) (5, 17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), or GLP-1 (17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹). CCK-8 was much less effective in reducing food intake in CAP vs. VEH rats. CCK-8 at 5 and 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 39 and 71% in VEH rats and 7 and 18% in CAP rats. In contrast, PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 were similarly effective in reducing food intake in VEH and CAP rats. PYY-(3-36) at 5, 17, and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 15, 33, and 70% in VEH rats and 13, 30, and 33% in CAP rats. GLP-1 at 17 and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 48 and 60% in VEH rats and 30 and 52% in CAP rats. These results suggest that anorexic responses to PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 are not primarily mediated by the CAP-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons (presumably vagal) that mediate CCK-8-induced anorexia.

  4. A Hydrogen-Bonded Polar Network in the Core of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Is a Fulcrum for Biased Agonism: Lessons from Class B Crystal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Christopher A.; Koole, Cassandra; Smith, Kevin J.; Mobarec, Juan C.; Simms, John; Quon, Tezz; Coudrat, Thomas; Furness, Sebastian G. B.; Miller, Laurence J.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor is a class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is a key target for treatments for type II diabetes and obesity. This receptor, like other class B GPCRs, displays biased agonism, though the physiologic significance of this is yet to be elucidated. Previous work has implicated R2.60190, N3.43240, Q7.49394, and H6.52363 as key residues involved in peptide-mediated biased agonism, with R2.60190, N3.43240, and Q7.49394 predicted to form a polar interaction network. In this study, we used novel insight gained from recent crystal structures of the transmembrane domains of the glucagon and corticotropin releasing factor 1 (CRF1) receptors to develop improved models of the GLP-1 receptor that predict additional key molecular interactions with these amino acids. We have introduced E6.53364A, N3.43240Q, Q7.49394N, and N3.43240Q/Q7.49394N mutations to probe the role of predicted H-bonding and charge-charge interactions in driving cAMP, calcium, or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. A polar interaction between E6.53364 and R2.60190 was predicted to be important for GLP-1- and exendin-4-, but not oxyntomodulin-mediated cAMP formation and also ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In contrast, Q7.49394, but not R2.60190/E6.53364 was critical for calcium mobilization for all three peptides. Mutation of N3.43240 and Q7.49394 had differential effects on individual peptides, providing evidence for molecular differences in activation transition. Collectively, this work expands our understanding of peptide-mediated signaling from the GLP-1 receptor and the key role that the central polar network plays in these events. PMID:26700562

  5. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor stimulation and blockade on food consumption and body weight in rats treated with a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2

    PubMed Central

    Radziszewska, Elżbieta; Bojanowska, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and endocannabinoids are involved in appetite control. Recently we have demonstrated that cannabinoid (CB)1 receptor antagonist and GLP-1 receptor agonist synergistically suppress food intake in the rat. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of GLP-1 receptor stimulation or blockade on feeding behavior in rats treated with WIN 55,212-2, a CB1 receptor agonist. Material/Methods Experiments were performed on adult male Wistar rats. In the first experiment the effects of increasing doses (0.5–4.0 mg/kg) of WIN 55,212-2 injected intraperitoneally on 24-hour food consumption were tested. In further experiments a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, exendin (9-39), and WIN 55,212-2 or a GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4, and WIN 55,212-2 were injected intraperitoneally at subthreshold doses (that alone did not change food intake and body weight) to investigate whether these agents may interact to affect food intake in rats. Results WIN 55,212-2 administered at low doses (0.5–2 mg/kg) did not markedly change 24-hour food consumption; however, at the highest dose, daily food intake was inhibited. Combined administration of WIN 55,212-2 and exendin (9-39) did not change the amount of food consumed compared to either the control group or to each agent injected alone. Combined injection of WIN 55,212-2 and exendin-4 at subthreshold doses resulted in a significant decrease in food intake and body weight in rats. Conclusions Stimulation of the peripheral CB1 receptor by its agonist WIN 55,212-2 can induce anorexigenic effects or potentiate, even at a subthreshold dose, the effects of exendin-4, a known anorectic agent. Hence, this dual action of the cannabinoid system should be considered in the medical use of CB1 agonists. PMID:23291632

  6. Mycoprotein reduces energy intake and postprandial insulin release without altering glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide tyrosine-tyrosine concentrations in healthy overweight and obese adults: a randomised-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bottin, Jeanne H; Swann, Jonathan R; Cropp, Eleanor; Chambers, Edward S; Ford, Heather E; Ghatei, Mohammed A; Frost, Gary S

    2016-07-01

    Dietary mycoprotein decreases energy intake in lean individuals. The effects in overweight individuals are unclear, and the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of mycoprotein on energy intake, appetite regulation, and the metabolic phenotype in overweight and obese volunteers. In two randomised-controlled trials, fifty-five volunteers (age: 31 (95 % CI 27, 35) years), BMI: 28·0 (95 % CI 27·3, 28·7) kg/m2) consumed a test meal containing low (44 g), medium (88 g) or high (132 g) mycoprotein or isoenergetic chicken meals. Visual analogue scales and blood samples were collected to measure appetite, glucose, insulin, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Ad libitum energy intake was assessed after 3 h in part A (n 36). Gastric emptying by the paracetamol method, resting energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were recorded in part B (n 14). Metabonomics was used to compare plasma and urine samples in response to the test meals. Mycoprotein reduced energy intake by 10 % (280 kJ (67 kcal)) compared with chicken at the high content (P=0·009). All mycoprotein meals reduced insulin concentrations compared with chicken (incremental AUClow (IAUClow): -8 %, IAUCmedium: -12 %, IAUChigh: -21 %, P=0·004). There was no significant difference in glucose, PYY, GLP-1, gastric emptying rate and energy expenditure. Following chicken intake, paracetamol-glucuronide was positively associated with fullness. After mycoprotein, creatinine and the deamination product of isoleucine, α-keto-β-methyl-N-valerate, were inversely related to fullness, whereas the ketone body, β-hydroxybutyrate, was positively associated. In conclusion, mycoprotein reduces energy intake and insulin release in overweight volunteers. The mechanism does not involve changes in PYY and GLP-1. The metabonomics analysis may bring new understanding to the appetite regulatory properties of food.

  7. Efficacy and safety of liraglutide, a once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, in Latino/Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes: post hoc analysis of data from four phase III trials.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J A; Ørsted, D D; Campos, C

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in Latino/Hispanic individuals with type 2 diabetes, in addition to comparing its treatment effects with those observed in non-Latino/Hispanic individuals. Analyses were performed on patient-level data from a subset of individuals self-defined as Latino/Hispanic from four phase III studies, the LEAD-3, LEAD-4, LEAD-6 and 1860-LIRA-DPP-4 trials. Endpoints included change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and body weight from baseline. In Latino/Hispanic patients (n = 505; 323 treated with liraglutide) after 26 weeks, mean HbA1c reductions were significantly greater with both liraglutide 1.2 and 1.8 mg versus comparator or placebo in the LEAD-3 and LEAD-4 studies, and with 1.8 mg liraglutide in the 1860-LIRA-DPP-4 trial. In LEAD-3 both doses led to significant differences in body weight change among Latino/Hispanic patients versus the comparator. With 1.8 mg liraglutide, difference in weight change was significant only in the 1860-LIRA-DPP-4 trial versus sitagliptin. For both endpoints Latino/Hispanic and non-Latino/Hispanic patients responded to liraglutide similarly. In summary, liraglutide is efficacious for treatment of type 2 diabetes in Latino/Hispanic patients, with a similar efficacy to that seen in non-Latino/Hispanic patients. PMID:26936426

  8. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on advanced glycation endproduct-induced aortic endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: possible roles of Rho kinase- and AMP kinase-mediated nuclear factor κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tang, Song-Tao; Zhang, Qiu; Tang, Hai-Qin; Wang, Chang-Jiang; Su, Huan; Zhou, Qing; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Hua-Qing; Wang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and receptor for AGEs (RAGE) as well as downstream pathways leads to vascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been reported to attenuate endothelial dysfunction in the models of atherosclerosis. However, whether GLP-1 exerts protective effects on aortic endothelium in diabetic animal model and the underlying mechanisms are still not well defined. Experimental diabetes was induced through administration with combination of high-fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Rats were randomly divided into four groups, including controls, diabetes, diabetes + sitagliptin (30 mg/kg/day), diabetes + exenatide (3 μg/kg/12 h). Eventually, endothelial damage, markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, were measured. After 12 weeks administration, diabetic rats received sitagliptin and exenatide showed significant elevation of serum NO level and reduction of ET-1 as well as inflammatory cytokines levels. Moreover, sitagliptin and exenatide significantly inhibited aortic oxidative stress level and improved aortic endothelial function in diabetic rats. Importantly, these drugs inhibited the protein expression level in AGE/RAGE-induced RhoA/ROCK/NF-κB/IκBα signaling pathways and activated AMPK in diabetic aorta. Finally, the target proteins of p-eNOS, iNOS, and ET-1, which reflect endothelial function, were also changed by these drugs. Our present study indicates that sitagliptin and exenatide administrations can improve endothelial function in diabetic aorta. Of note, RAGE/RhoA/ROCK and AMPK mediated NF-κB signaling pathways may be the intervention targets of these drugs to protect aortic endothelium. PMID:26758998

  9. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) can reverse AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and S6 kinase (P70S6K) activities induced by fluctuations in glucose levels in hypothalamic areas involved in feeding behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Carneiro, Verónica; Sanz, Carmen; Roncero, Isabel; Vazquez, Patricia; Blazquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2012-04-01

    The anorexigenic peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), reduces glucose metabolism in the human hypothalamus and brain stem. The brain activity of metabolic sensors such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) responds to changes in glucose levels. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K), integrate nutrient and hormonal signals. The hypothalamic mTOR/p70S6K pathway has been implicated in the control of feeding and the regulation of energy balances. Therefore, we investigated the coordinated effects of glucose and GLP-1 on the expression and activity of AMPK and p70S6K in the areas involved in the control of feeding. The effect of GLP-1 on the expression and activities of AMPK and p70S6K was studied in hypothalamic slice explants exposed to low- and high-glucose concentrations by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and by the quantification of active-phosphorylated protein levels by immunoblot. In vivo, the effects of exendin-4 on hypothalamic AMPK and p70S6K activation were analysed in male obese Zucker and lean controls 1 h after exendin-4 injection to rats fasted for 48 h or after re-feeding for 2-4 h. High-glucose levels decreased the expression of Ampk in the lateral hypothalamus and treatment with GLP-1 reversed this effect. GLP-1 treatment inhibited the activities of AMPK and p70S6K when the activation of these protein kinases was maximum in both the ventromedial and lateral hypothalamic areas. Furthermore, in vivo s.c. administration of exendin-4 modulated AMPK and p70S6K activities in those areas, in both fasted and re-fed obese Zucker and lean control rats.

  10. Comparative Effects of the Endogenous Agonist Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1)-(7-36) Amide and the Small-Molecule Ago-Allosteric Agent “Compound 2” at the GLP-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Coopman, Karen; Huang, Yan; Johnston, Neil; Bradley, Sophie J.; Wilkinson, Graeme F.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mediates antidiabetogenic effects through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), which is targeted for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Small-molecule GLP-1R agonists have been sought due to difficulties with peptide therapeutics. Recently, 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert-butylaminoquinoxaline (compound 2) has been described as a GLP-1R allosteric modulator and agonist. Using human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing human GLP-1Rs, we extended this work to consider the impact of compound 2 on G protein activation, Ca2+ signaling and receptor internalization and particularly to compare compound 2 and GLP-1 across a range of functional assays in intact cells. GLP-1 and compound 2 activated Gαs in cell membranes and increased cellular cAMP in intact cells, with compound 2 being a partial and almost full agonist, respectively. GLP-1 increased intracellular [Ca2+] by release from intracellular stores, which was mimicked by compound 2, with slower kinetics. In either intact cells or membranes, the orthosteric antagonist exendin-(9-39), inhibited GLP-1 cAMP generation but increased the efficacy of compound 2. GLP-1 internalized enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged GLP-1Rs, but the speed and magnitude evoked by compound 2 were less. Exendin-(9-39) inhibited internalization by GLP-1 and also surprisingly that by compound 2. Compound 2 displays GLP-1R agonism consistent with action at an allosteric site, although an orthosteric antagonist increased its efficacy on cAMP and blocked compound 2-mediated receptor internalization. Full assessment of the properties of compound 2 was potentially hampered by damaging effects that were particularly manifest in either longer term assays with intact cells or in acute assays with membranes. PMID:20507928

  11. Simultaneous quantification of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor agonists in rodent plasma by on-line solid phase extraction and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Roth, Jonathan D; Taylor, Steven W

    2014-04-15

    Peptide agonists of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) and the cholecystokinin-1 receptor (CCK1-R) have therapeutic potential because of their marked anorexigenic and weight lowering effects. Furthermore, recent studies in rodents have shown that co-administration of these agents may prove more effective than treatment either of the peptide classes alone. To correlate the pharmacodynamic effects to the pharmacokinetics of these peptide drugs in vivo, a sensitive and robust bioanalytical method is essential. Furthermore, the simultaneous determination of both analytes in plasma samples by a single method offers obvious advantages. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is well suited to this goal through its ability to simultaneously monitor multiple analytes through selected reaction monitoring (SRM). However, it is a challenge to find appropriate conditions that allow two peptides with widely disparate physiochemical properties to be simultaneously analyzed while maintaining the necessary sensitivity for their accurate plasma concentrations. Herein, we report an on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantification of the CCK1-R agonist AC170222 and the GLP-1R agonist AC3174 in rodent plasma. The assay has a linear range from 0.0975 to 100ng/mL, with lower limits of quantification of 0.0975ng/mL and 0.195ng/mL for AC3174 and AC170222, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions were below 15%. The developed LC-MS/MS method was used to simultaneously quantify AC3174 and AC170222, the results showed that the terminal plasma concentrations of AC3174 or AC170222 were comparable between groups of animals that were administered with the peptides alone (247±15pg/mL of AC3174 and 1306±48pg/mL of AC170222), or in combination (222±32pg/mL and 1136±47pg/mL of AC3174 and AC170222, respectively). These data provide information on the drug exposure to aid in assessing the combination effects of AC3174 and AC

  12. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  13. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the ‘London’ (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and ‘Swedish’ mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  14. In vitro metabolism of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-derived metabolites GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide in mouse and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raman; McDonald, Thomas S; Eng, Heather; Limberakis, Chris; Stevens, Benjamin D; Patel, Sheena; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have revealed that the glucoincretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)(7-36)amide is metabolized by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) and neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP) to yield GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide, respectively, as the principal metabolites. Contrary to the previous notion that GLP-1(7-36)amide metabolites are pharmacologically inactive, recent studies have demonstrated cardioprotective and insulinomimetic effects with both GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide in animals and humans. In the present work, we examined the metabolic stability of the two GLP-1(7-36)amide metabolites in cryopreserved hepatocytes, which have been used to demonstrate the in vitro insulin-like effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide on gluconeogenesis. To examine the metabolic stability of the GLP-1(7-36)amide metabolites, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay was developed for the quantitation of the intact peptides in hepatocyte incubations. GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide were rapidly metabolized in mouse [GLP-1(9-36)amide: t(1/2) = 52 minutes; GLP-1(28-36)amide: t(1/2) = 13 minutes] and human hepatocytes [GLP-1(9-36)amide: t(1/2) = 180 minutes; GLP-1(28-36)amide: t(1/2) = 24 minutes), yielding a variety of N-terminal cleavage products that were characterized using mass spectrometry. Metabolism at the C terminus was not observed for either peptides. The DPP-IV and NEP inhibitors diprotin A and phosphoramidon, respectively, did not induce resistance in the two peptides toward proteolytic cleavage. Overall, our in vitro findings raise the intriguing possibility that the insulinomimetic effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide on gluconeogenesis and oxidative stress might be due, at least in part, to the actions of additional downstream metabolites, which are obtained from the enzymatic cleavage of the peptide backbone in the parent compounds.

  15. Successful Pregnancy after Improving Insulin Resistance with the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analogue in a Woman with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qianying; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common cause of anovulatory infertility. It is diagnosed by the presence of hyperandrogenemia, insulin resistance (IR), obesity and other endocrine or metabolic disorders. Exenatide (EX) is a kind of glucagon-like peptide, which is a new option for patients with diabetes mellitus. We present a patient with infertility for PCOS. She was overweight and her medical history included IR, right-sided ovarian mucinous cystadenomas, and left-sided teratoma. Although she had been treated with ovarian surgery, clomiphene citrate and gonadotropins, weight loss and metformin, which have been effective for dominant follicle development, she still failed to conceive. Then EX was initiated to intervene for 2 months. EX treatment was successful to improve IR; after that the infertile woman with PCOS became pregnant. EX improves IR and reproduction capacity in PCOS patients, reducing insulin level and ameliorating endocrine disorders, thereby improving ovarian function, promoting follicle development, and providing new avenues for the treatment of infertility with PCOS. PMID:27300746

  16. Glucagon-like peptide 1: a potent glycogenic hormone.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Morales, M; Clemente, F; López-Delgado, M I; Delgado, E; Perea, A; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1994-08-01

    GLP-1(7-36)amide is an insulinotropic peptide derived from the intestinal post-translational proglucagon process, the release of which is increased mainly after a carbohydrate meal; also, its anti-diabetogenic effect in normal and diabetic states has been reported. In this study, GLP-1(7-36)amide stimulates the formation of glycogen from glucose in isolated rat hepatocytes, such a glycogenic effect being achieved with physiological concentrations of the peptide. The GLP-1(7-36)amide-induced glycogenesis is abolished by glucagon, and it is accompanied by stimulation of the glycogen synthase alpha activity and by a decrease in the basal and glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP content. These findings could explain, at least in part, the GLP-1(7-36)amide insulin-independent plasma glucose lowering effect.

  17. Efficacy and safety of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide added to insulin therapy in poorly regulated patients with type 1 diabetes—a protocol for a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study: The Lira-1 study

    PubMed Central

    Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Knop, Filip Krag; Tarnow, Lise; Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Hansen, Tanja Stenbæk; Almdal, Thomas; Holst, Jens Juul; Madsbad, Sten; Andersen, Henrik Ullits

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intensive insulin therapy is recommended for the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Hypoglycaemia and weight gain are the common side effects of insulin treatment and may reduce compliance. In patients with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes, the addition of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) therapy has proven effective in reducing weight gain and insulin dose. The present publication describes a protocol for a study evaluating the efficacy and safety of adding a GLP-1RA to insulin treatment in overweight patients with T1D in a randomised, double-blinded, controlled design. Methods and analysis In total, 100 patients with type 1 diabetes, poor glycaemic control (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) >8%) and overweight (body mass index >25 kg/m2) will be randomised to either liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily or placebo as an add-on to intensive insulin therapy in this investigator initiated, double-blinded, placebo-controlled parallel study. The primary end point is glycaemic control as measured by changes in HbA1c. Secondary end points include changes in the insulin dose, hypoglyacemic events, body weight, lean body mass, fat mass, food preferences and adverse events. Glycaemic excursions, postprandial glucagon levels and gastric emptying rate during a standardised liquid meal test will also be studied. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Danish Medicines Authority, the Regional Scientific-Ethical Committee of the Capital Region of Denmark and the Data Protection Agency. The study will be carried out under the surveillance and guidance of the good clinical practice (GCP) unit at Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg in accordance with the ICH-GCP guidelines and the Helsinki Declaration. Trial registration number NCT01612468. PMID:25838513

  18. Gut adaptation and the glucagon-like peptides

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, D J

    2002-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptides GLP-1 and GLP-2 are synthesised and then released from enteroendocrine cells in the small and large intestine. GLP-1 promotes efficient nutrient assimilation while GLP-2 regulates energy absorption via effects on nutrient intake, gastric acid secretion and gastric emptying, nutrient absorption, and mucosal permeability. Preliminary human studies indicate that GLP-2 may enhance energy absorption and reduce fluid loss in subjects with short bowel syndrome suggesting that GLP-2 functions as a key regulator of mucosal integrity, permeability, and nutrient absorption. Hence GLP-2 may be therapeutically useful in diseases characterised by injury or dysfunction of the gastrointestinal epithelium. PMID:11839727

  19. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM–5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9–39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N5-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  20. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM-5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9-39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N(5)-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  1. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM-5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9-39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N(5)-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  2. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM–5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9–39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N5-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  3. Glucagon-like peptides activate hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mommsen, T P; Andrews, P C; Plisetskaya, E M

    1987-07-13

    Piscine (anglerfish, catfish, coho salmon) glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), applied at 3.5 nM, stimulate (1.1-1.9-fold) flux through gluconeogenesis above control levels in isolated trout and salmon hepatocytes. Human GLP-1 and GLP-2 also activate gluconeogenesis, but to a lesser degree than their piscine counterparts. Minor increases of substrate oxidation are noticed at times of peak gluconeogenic activation through GLPs. These hormones, which are derived from the same precursor peptide as glucagon are more potent activators of gluconeogenesis than glucagon when applied at equimolar concentrations, and do not appear to employ cAMP or cGMP as the intracellular messenger in hepatic tissue. PMID:3109952

  4. Murine nonvolatile pheromones: isolation of exocrine-gland secreting Peptide 1.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Hiroko; Touhara, Kazushige

    2013-01-01

    Our search for a substance recognized by the vomeronasal neurons revealed that the extra-orbital lacrimal gland (ELG) isolated from adult male mice produced the male-specific peptide pheromone exocrine gland-secreting peptide 1 (ESP1). The following protocol reveals how ESP1 may be extracted from the ELG, purified using anion-exchange and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and analyzed by mass spectrometry. This protocol has been specifically designed for the purification of ESP1, but may be modified to isolate a variety of peptides from the exocrine glands. Peptides purified in this manner may help further define the molecular mechanisms underlying pheromone communication in the vomeronasal system.

  5. Comparative physiology of glucagon-like peptide-2 – Implications and applications for production and health of ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a 33-amino acid peptide derived from proteolytic cleavage of proglucagon by prohormone convertase 1/3 in enteroendocrine L-cells. Studies conducted in humans, rodent models, and in vitro indicate that GLP-2 is secreted in response to the presence of molecules in th...

  6. Taste signaling elements expressed in gut enteroendocrine cells regulate nutrient-responsive secretion of gut hormones.

    PubMed

    Kokrashvili, Zaza; Mosinger, Bedrich; Margolskee, Robert F

    2009-09-01

    Many of the receptors and downstream signaling elements involved in taste detection and transduction are also expressed in enteroendocrine cells where they underlie the chemosensory functions of the gut. In one well-known example of gastrointestinal chemosensation (the "incretin effect"), it is known that glucose that is given orally, but not systemically, induces secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (the incretin hormones), which in turn regulate appetite, insulin secretion, and gut motility. Duodenal L cells express sweet taste receptors, the taste G protein gustducin, and several other taste transduction elements. Knockout mice that lack gustducin or the sweet taste receptor subunit T1r3 have deficiencies in secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and in the regulation of plasma concentrations of insulin and glucose in response to orally ingested carbohydrate-ie, their incretin effect is dysfunctional. Isolated small intestine and intestinal villi from gustducin null mice displayed markedly defective glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion in response to glucose, indicating that this is a local circuit of sugar detection by intestinal cells followed by hormone secretion from these same cells. Modulating hormone secretion from gut "taste cells" may provide novel treatments for obesity, diabetes, and malabsorption syndromes. PMID:19571229

  7. Glucagon-like receptor 1 agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors: potential therapies for the treatment of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Darsalia, Vladimer; Larsson, Martin; Nathanson, David; Klein, Thomas; Nyström, Thomas; Patrone, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    During the past decades, candidate drugs that have shown neuroprotective efficacy in the preclinical setting have failed in clinical stroke trials. As a result, no treatment for stroke based on neuroprotection is available today. The activation of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1) for reducing stroke damage is a relatively novel concept that has shown neuroprotective effects in animal models. In addition, clinical studies are currently ongoing. Herein, we review this emerging research field and discuss the next milestones to be achieved to develop a novel antistroke therapy. PMID:25669907

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-2 intracellularly stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and specifically induces submucosal arteriole vasodilation via a sheer stress-independent, local neural mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-responsive neuropeptide that exerts diverse actions in the gastrointestinal tract, including enhancing mucosal cell survival and proliferation, mucosal blood flow, luminal nutrient uptake, and suppressing gastric motility and secretion. We have shown th...

  9. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  10. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist Liraglutide has anabolic bone effects in ovariectomized rats without diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, JingJia; Wang, Xiaojing; Liu, Dongmei; Zhao, Lin; Sun, Lihao; Zhao, Hongyan; Tao, Bei; Liu, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a number of studies have demonstrated the potential beneficial role for novel anti-diabetic GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) in the skeleton metabolism in diabetic rodents and patients. In this study, we evaluated the impacts of the synthetic GLP-1RA Liraglutide on bone mass and quality in osteoporotic rats induced by ovariectomy (OVX) but without diabetes, as well as its effect on the adipogenic and osteoblastogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Three months after sham surgery or bilateral OVX, eighteen 5-month old female Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups to receive the following treatments for 2 months: (1) Sham + normal saline; (2) OVX + normal saline; and (3) OVX + Liraglutide (0.6 mg/day). As revealed by micro-CT analysis, Liraglutide improved trabecular volume, thickness and number, increased BMD, and reduced trabecular spacing in the femurs in OVX rats; similar results were observed in the lumbar vertebrae of OVX rats treated with Liraglutide. Following in vitro treatment of rat and human BMSCs with 10 nM Liraglutide, there was a significant increase in the mRNA expression of osteoblast-specific transcriptional factor Runx2 and the osteoblast markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen α1 (Col-1), but a significant decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). In conclusion, our results indicate that the anti-diabetic drug Liraglutide can exert a bone protective effect even in non-diabetic osteoporotic OVX rats. This protective effect is likely attributable to the impact of Liraglutide on the lineage fate determination of BMSCs. PMID:26177280

  12. Inositolphosphoglycans are possible mediators of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (7-36)amide action in the liver.

    PubMed

    Trapote, M A; Clemente, F; Galera, C; Morales, M; Alcántara, A I; López-Delgado, M I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Valverde, I

    1996-02-01

    A potent glycogenic effect for GLP-1(7-36)amide has been found in rat hepatocytes and skeletal muscle, and the specific receptors detected for GLP-1(7-36)amide in these tissue membranes do not seem to be associated to adenylate cyclase. On the other hand, inositolphosphoglycan molecules (IPGs) have been implicated as second messengers in the action of insulin. In a human hepatoma cell line (HEP G-2), we have observed the presence of [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide specific binding, and a stimulatory effect of the peptide upon glycogen synthesis, confirming the findings in isolated rat hepatocytes. Also, GLP-1(7-36)amide modulates the cell content of radiolabelled glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs), in the same manner as insulin, indicating hydrolysis of GPIs and an immediate and short-lived generation of IPGs. Thus, IPGs could be mediators in the GLP-1(7-36)amide glycogenic action in the liver.

  13. Intestinal Permeability and Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 in Children with Autism: A Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Marli A.; Sigalet, David L.; Holst, Jens J.; Meddings, Jon B.; Wood, Julie; Sharkey, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    We measured small intestinal permeability using a lactulose:mannitol sugar permeability test in a group of children with autism, with current or previous gastrointestinal complaints. Secondly, we examined whether children with autism had an abnormal glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) response to feeding. Results were compared with sibling controls…

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following in...

  15. Glucagon-like peptide analogues for type 2 diabetes mellitus: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) analogues are a new class of drugs used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. They are given by injection, and regulate glucose levels by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion and biosynthesis, suppressing glucagon secretion, and delaying gastric emptying and promoting satiety. This systematic review aims to provide evidence on the clinical effectiveness of the GLP-1 agonists in patients not achieving satisfactory glycaemic control with one or more oral glucose lowering drugs. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science were searched to find the relevant papers. We identified 28 randomised controlled trials comparing GLP-1 analogues with placebo, other glucose-lowering agents, or another GLP-1 analogue, in patients with type 2 diabetes with inadequate control on a single oral agent, or on dual therapy. Primary outcomes included HbA1c, weight change and adverse events. Results Studies were mostly of short duration, usually 26 weeks. All GLP-1 agonists reduced HbA1c by about 1% compared to placebo. Exenatide twice daily and insulin gave similar reductions in HbA1c, but exenatide 2 mg once weekly and liraglutide 1.8 mg daily reduced it by 0.20% and 0.30% respectively more than glargine. Liraglutide 1.2 mg daily reduced HbA1c by 0.34% more than sitagliptin 100 mg daily. Exenatide and liraglutide gave similar improvements in HbA1c to sulphonylureas. Exenatide 2 mg weekly and liraglutide 1.8 mg daily reduced HbA1c by more than exenatide 10 μg twice daily and sitagliptin 100 mg daily. Exenatide 2 mg weekly reduced HbA1c by 0.3% more than pioglitazone 45 mg daily. Exenatide and liraglutide resulted in greater weight loss (from 2.3 to 5.5 kg) than active comparators. This was not due simply to nausea. Hypoglycaemia was uncommon, except when combined with a sulphonylurea. The commonest adverse events with all GLP-1 agonists were initial nausea and vomiting. The GLP-1 agonists have some effect on beta

  16. Isolation of alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula) glucagon, oxyntomodulin, and glucagon-like peptide: amino acid sequences of oxyntomodulin and glucagon-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Pollock, H G; Kimmel, J R; Ebner, K E; Hamilton, J W; Rouse, J B; Lance, V; Rawitch, A B

    1988-01-01

    Oxyntomodulin, glucagon, and a glucagon-like peptide (GLP) have been isolated from the endocrine pancreas of the alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula), a ganoid fish. The three peptides were isolated by gel filtration and HPLC and were identified by size, composition, and glucagon-like immunoreactivity. The amino acid sequences of the oxyntomodulin and GLP were determined. The oxyntomodulin contains 36 amino acid residues and its sequence is H S Q G T F T N D Y S K Y L D T R R A Q D F V Q W L M S T K R S G G I T. The composition of the glucagon is identical to the N-terminal 29 residues of the gar oxyntomodulin. The single form of GLP found contains 34 amino acid residues in the following sequence: H A D G T Y T S D V S S Y L Q D Q A A K K F V T W L K Q G Q D R R E. These findings suggest that all three peptides are derived from a common precursor. PMID:3282974

  17. Isolation of alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula) glucagon, oxyntomodulin, and glucagon-like peptide: amino acid sequences of oxyntomodulin and glucagon-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Pollock, H G; Kimmel, J R; Ebner, K E; Hamilton, J W; Rouse, J B; Lance, V; Rawitch, A B

    1988-01-01

    Oxyntomodulin, glucagon, and a glucagon-like peptide (GLP) have been isolated from the endocrine pancreas of the alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula), a ganoid fish. The three peptides were isolated by gel filtration and HPLC and were identified by size, composition, and glucagon-like immunoreactivity. The amino acid sequences of the oxyntomodulin and GLP were determined. The oxyntomodulin contains 36 amino acid residues and its sequence is H S Q G T F T N D Y S K Y L D T R R A Q D F V Q W L M S T K R S G G I T. The composition of the glucagon is identical to the N-terminal 29 residues of the gar oxyntomodulin. The single form of GLP found contains 34 amino acid residues in the following sequence: H A D G T Y T S D V S S Y L Q D Q A A K K F V T W L K Q G Q D R R E. These findings suggest that all three peptides are derived from a common precursor.

  18. Glucagon like peptide-2 induces intestinal restitution through VEGF release from subepithelial myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Kerem; Pennartz, Christian; Felderbauer, Peter; Meier, Juris J; Banasch, Matthias; Bulut, Daniel; Schmitz, Frank; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Hoffmann, Peter

    2008-01-14

    Glucagon like peptide-2 (GLP-2) exerts intestinotrophic actions, but the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. Recent studies demonstrated the expression of the GLP-2 receptor on fibroblasts located in the subepithelial tissue, where it might induce the release of growth factors such as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Therefore, in the present studies we sought to elucidate the downstream mechanisms involved in improved intestinal adaptation by GLP-2. Human colonic fibroblasts (CCD-18Co), human colonic cancer cells (Caco-2 cells) and rat ileum IEC-18 cells were used. GLP-2 receptor mRNA expression was determined using real time RT-PCR. Conditioned media from CCD-18Co cells were obtained following incubation with GLP-2 (50-250 nM) for 24 h. Cell viability was assessed by a 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-assay, and wound healing was determined with an established migration-assay. Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-beta), VEGF and KGF mRNA levels were determined by RT-PCR. Protein levels of VEGF and TGF-beta in CCD-18Co cells following GLP-2 stimulation were determined using ELISA. Neutralizing TGF-beta and VEGF-A antibodies were utilized to assess the role of TGF-beta and VEGF-A in the process of wound healing. GLP-2 receptor expression was detected in CCD-18Co cells. Conditioned media from CCD-18Co cells dose-dependently induced proliferation in Caco-2 cells, but not in IEC-18 cells. Conditioned media also enhanced cell migration in IEC-18 cells (P<0.01), while migration was even inhibited in Caco-2 cells (P<0.0012). GLP-2 significantly stimulated mRNA expression of VEGF and TGF-beta, but not of KGF in CCD-18Co. The migratory effects of GLP-2 were completely abolished in the presence of TGF-beta and VEGF-A antibodies. GLP-2 exerts differential effects on the epithelium of the small intestine and the colon. Thus, in small intestinal cells GLP-2 stimulates wound

  19. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor-Dependent GLP-1 and PYY Secretion in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Rievaj, Juraj; Larraufie, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the key hormone mediator of the renin angiotensin system, which regulates blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. Here we report that in the colonic epithelium, the Ang II type 1 receptor is highly and exclusively expressed in enteroendocrine L cells, which produce the gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY (PYY). Ang II stimulated glucagon-like peptide-1 and PYY release from primary cultures of mouse and human colon, which was antagonized by the specific Ang II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan. Ang II raised intracellular calcium levels in L cells in primary cultures, recorded by live-cell imaging of L cells specifically expressing the fluorescent calcium sensor GCaMP3. In Ussing chamber recordings, Ang II reduced short circuit currents in mouse distal colon preparations, which was antagonized by candesartan or a specific neuropeptide Y1 receptor inhibitor but insensitive to amiloride. We conclude that Ang II stimulates PYY secretion, in turn inhibiting epithelial anion fluxes, thereby reducing net fluid secretion into the colonic lumen. Our findings highlight an important role of colonic L cells in whole-body fluid homeostasis by controlling water loss through the intestine. PMID:27447725

  20. Evidence for the presence of glucagon-like immunoreactivity (GLI) in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Unger, R H

    1976-12-01

    Glucagon-like immunoreactivity (GLI), which can be separated from glucagon by isoelectric focusing, has been detected in partially purified canine pancreatic extracts. Like gastrointestinal GLI, this insular GLI reacts with crossreacting antiserum 78J but not with glucagon "specific" antiserum 30K and has an isoelectric point (pl) of 9.5, whereas canine pancreatic glucagon has a pl of 6.25. When combined with glucagon, the GLI-glucagon mixture gives 48J assay values between GLI and this crossreacting antiglucagon serum and thus conceals it in glucagon-containing extracts.

  1. Induction of intestinal epithelial proliferation by glucagon-like peptide 2.

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, D J; Erlich, P; Asa, S L; Brubaker, P L

    1996-01-01

    Injury, inflammation, or resection of the small intestine results in severe compromise of intestinal function. Nevertheless, therapeutic strategies for enhancing growth and repair of the intestinal mucosal epithelium are currently not available. We demonstrate that nude mice bearing subcutaneous proglucagon-producing tumors exhibit marked proliferation of the small intestinal epithelium. The factor responsible for inducing intestinal proliferation was identified as glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), a 33-aa peptide with no previously ascribed biological function. GLP-2 stimulated crypt cell proliferation and consistently induced a marked increase in bowel weight and villus growth of the jejunum and ileum that was evident within 4 days after initiation of GLP-2 administration. These observations define a novel biological role for GLP-2 as an intestinal-derived peptide stimulator of small bowel epithelial proliferation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:8755576

  2. Pancreatic proglucagon processing: isolation and structures of glucagon and glucagon-like peptide from gene I.

    PubMed

    Nichols, R; Lee, T D; Andrews, P C

    1988-12-01

    The anglerfish endocrine pancreas expresses two different genes for preproglucagon. The regions of the two proglucagons that correspond to glucagon have different sequences, as do the two glucagon-like peptides (GLPs). The products derived from processing the more abundant proglucagon-II have recently been determined. However, it was not known whether proglucagon-I was processed to similar products. The two major biologically active products of preproglucagon-I processing (glucagon-I and GLP-I) have now been purified to homogeneity. Their structures were determined using automated gas phase Edman degradation, tryptic mapping, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The preproglucagon-I-processing sites were identified. Glucagon-I represents residues 53-81, and GLP-I corresponds to preproglucagon-I-(91-124) (numbering from the initiator Met). PMID:3058456

  3. Characterization of the hypotensive effects of glucagon-like peptide-2 in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Takashi; Kaneko, Maki; Sasaki-Hamada, Sachie; Oka, Jun-Ichiro

    2013-08-29

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a proglucagon-derived peptide released from enteroendocrine cells and neurons. We recently reported that GLP-2 induced hypotension. In the present study, we characterized the mechanisms of GLP-2-induced hypotension. GLP-2 was administered peripherally or centrally to male Wistar rats anesthetized with urethane and α-chloralose. The rats were vagotomized or systemically pretreated with atropine, prazosin, or propranolol before the GLP-2 administration. The central and peripheral administration of GLP-2 reduced mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). The maximum change of MAP (maximum ΔMAP) was reduced by vagotomy or prazosin, but not propranolol. The effects of the central but not peripheral administration of GLP-2 were reduced by atropine. These results suggest that GLP-2 modulates vagal afferent inputs and inhibits the sympathetic nervous system in the brain to induce hypotension. PMID:23867714

  4. The CNS glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gut-brain axis plays a key role in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. In response to luminal stimulation of macronutrients and microbiotaderived metabolites (secondary bile acids and short chain fatty acids), glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and -2) are cosecreted from endocrine...

  5. Acute effects of the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, on intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal short bowel syndrome following massive gut resection is associated with malabsorption of nutrients. The intestinotrophic factor glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) improves gut function in adult patients with short bowel syndrome, but its effect in pediatric patients remains unknown. Our object...

  6. cAMP-mediated and metabolic amplification of insulin secretion are distinct pathways sharing independence of β-cell microfilaments.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Nizar I; Nenquin, Myriam; Henquin, Jean-Claude

    2012-10-01

    Insulin secretion is triggered by an increase in the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) in β-cells. Ca(2+)-induced exocytosis of insulin granules can be augmented by metabolic amplification (unknown signals generated through glucose metabolism) or neurohormonal amplification (in particular cAMP mediated). Functional actin microfilaments are not required for metabolic amplification, but their possible role in cAMP-mediated amplification is unknown. It is also uncertain whether cAMP (generated in response to glucose) is implicated in metabolic amplification. These questions were addressed using isolated mouse islets. cAMP levels were increased by phosphodiesterase inhibition (with isobutylmethylxanthine) and adenylate-cyclase stimulation (with forskolin or glucagon-like peptide-1, 7-36 amide). Raising cAMP levels had no steady-state impact on actin polymerization in control islets. Neither disruption (depolymerization by latrunculin) nor stabilization (polymerization by jasplakinolide) of actin microfilaments was counteracted by cAMP. Both changes increased both phases of glucose- or tolbutamide-induced insulin secretion but did not prevent further amplification by cAMP. These large changes in secretion were not caused by changes in [Ca(2+)](c), which was only slightly increased by cAMP. Both phases of insulin secretion were larger in response to glucose than tolbutamide, although [Ca(2+)](c) was lower. This difference in secretion, which reflects metabolic amplification, was independent of microfilaments, was not attributable to differences in cAMP, and persisted in presence of dibutyryl-cAMP or when cAMP levels were variably raised by isobutylmethylxanthine + forskolin or glucagon-like peptide-1, 7-36 amide. We conclude that metabolic and cAMP-mediated amplification of insulin secretion are distinct pathways that accelerate acquisition of release competence by insulin granules that can access exocytotic sites without intervention of microfilaments.

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-2-loaded microspheres as treatment for ulcerative colitis in the murine model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Qi, Keke; Xu, Ziwei; Wan, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is an intestinal hormone that promotes intestinal growth, but the rapid degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV limits its applications. PLGA microsphere is a well-developed drug delivery system, while seldom been studied as a solution for prolonging in vivo effects of GLP-2. In this study, we encapsulated porcine GLP-2 (pGLP-2) into microspheres and investigated its therapeutic effects in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-treated mice. pGLP-2 microspheres showed 20.36% in initial burst and constant release for at least 9 d. In the DSS-treated mice, a single injection of GLP-2 microspheres significantly increased the body weight, colonic length, small intestinal weight and mRNA expression of Occludin, decreased the colonic damage score, mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ. In conclusion, pGLP-2 microspheres were resistant to degradation and decreased the severity of DSS-induced ulcerative colitis which suggested that GLP-2-loaded microspheres could be a proper candidate for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

  8. Dibutyl Phthalate Exposure Disrupts Evolutionarily Conserved Insulin and Glucagon-Like Signaling in Drosophila Males.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael J; Wiemerslage, Lyle; Gohel, Priya; Kheder, Sania; Kothegala, Lakshmi V; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-06-01

    Phthalate diesters are commonly used as industrial plasticisers, as well as in cosmetics and skin care products, as a result people are constantly exposed to these xenobiotics. Recent epidemiological studies have found a correlation between circulating phthalate levels and type 2 diabetes, whereas animal studies indicate that phthalates are capable of disrupting endocrine signaling. Nonetheless, how phthalates interfere with metabolic function is still unclear. Here, we show that feeding Drosophila males the xenobiotic dibutyl phthalate (DBP) affects conserved insulin- and glucagon-like signaling. We report that raising flies on food containing DBP leads to starvation resistance, increased lipid storage, hyperglycemia, and hyperphagia. We go on to show that the starvation-resistance phenotype can be rescued by overexpression of the glucagon analogue adipokinetic hormone (Akh). Furthermore, although acute DBP exposure in adult flies is able to affect insulin levels, only chronic feeding influences Akh expression. We establish that raising flies on DBP-containing food or feeding adults DBP food affects the expression of homologous genes involved in xenobiotic and lipid metabolism (AHR [Drosophila ss], NR1I2 [Hr96], ABCB1 [MDR50], ABCC3 [MRP], and CYP3A4 [Cyp9f2]). Finally, we determined that the expression of these genes is also influenced by Akh. Our results provide comprehensive evidence that DBP can disrupt metabolism in Drosophila males, by regulating genes involved in glucose, lipid, and xenobiotic metabolism. PMID:27100621

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-2-induced memory improvement and anxiolytic effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Takashi; Jin, Kazushi; Ohnuki, Tomoko; Sasaki-Hamada, Sachie; Nakamura, Minami; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Sugiyama, Azusa; Ikeda, Masaatsu; Tanabe, Mitsuo; Oka, Jun-Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on memory impairment in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice, and anxiety-like behavior in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated mice. In the Y-maze test, LPS (10 µg/mouse, i.c.v.) significantly decreased spontaneous alternation, which was prevented by pretreatment with GLP-2 (0.01-0.3 µg/mouse, i.c.v.). The GLP-2 treatment just before the Y-maze test also improved LPS-induced memory impairment. Continuous treatment with GLP-2 (3 µg/mouse, i.c.v.) had no effect on the open-field test in saline-treated or ACTH-treated mice. Chronic ACTH treatment did not cause anxiogenic effects in the elevated plus-maze test. GLP-2 showed weak anxiolytic-like effects in the elevated plus-maze test in ACTH-treated, but not saline-treated mice. Moreover, GLP-2 increased 5-HT, but not 5-HIAA and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 levels in the amygdala of ACTH-treated mice. Pharmacological depletion of 5-HT prevented the anxiolytic effects of GLP-2. These results suggest that GLP-2 protected and improved memory function in LPS-treated mice, and also had anxiolytic effects due to changes in the 5-HT system.

  10. Angioplastic necrolytic migratory erythema. Unique association of necrolytic migratory erythema, extensive angioplasia, and high molecular weight glucagon-like polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Franchimont, C.; Pierard, G.E.; Luyckx, A.S.; Gerard, J.; Lapiere, C.M.

    1982-12-01

    A diabetic patient developed necrolytic migratory erythema with extensive angioplasia and high molecular weight glucagon-like polypeptide. There was no associated neoplasm such as glucagonoma. Lesions in the skin were studied by standard optical microscopy and by radioautography after incorporation of tritiated thymidine. Alterations in the skin begin as focal necrosis in the epidermis and in epithelial structures of adnexa, followed by marked angioplasia and a superficial and deep perivascular dermatitis.

  11. Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Improves Both Acute and Late Experimental Radiation Enteritis in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Sandra

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Acute and/or chronic radiation enteritis can develop after radiotherapy for pelvic cancers. Experimental and clinical observations have provided evidence of a role played by acute mucosal disruption in the appearance of late effects. The therapeutic potential of acute administration of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) against acute and chronic intestinal injury was investigated in this study. Methods and Materials: Intestinal segments were surgically exteriorized and exposed to 16.7 or 19 Gy X-rays. The rats were treated once daily with vehicle or a protease-resistant GLP-2 derivative for 14 days before irradiation, with or without 7 days of GLP-2 after treatment. Macroscopic and microscopic observations were made 2 and 15 weeks after radiation exposure. Results: In the control animals, GLP-2 induced an increase in intestinal mucosal mass, along with an increase in villus height and crypt depth. GLP-2 administration before and after irradiation completely prevented the acute radiation-induced mucosal ulcerations observed after exposure to 16.7 Gy. GLP-2 treatment strikingly reduced the late radiation damage observed after 19 Gy irradiation. Microscopic observations revealed an improved organization of the intestinal wall and an efficient wound healing process, especially in the smooth muscle layers. Conclusion: GLP-2 has a clear therapeutic potential against both acute and chronic radiation enteritis. This therapeutic effect is mediated through an increased mucosal mass before tissue injury and the stimulation of still unknown mechanisms of tissue response to radiation damage. Although these preliminary results still need to be confirmed, GLP-2 might be a way to limit patient discomfort during radiotherapy and reduce the risk of consequential late effects.

  12. Metabolic response of teleost hepatocytes to glucagon-like peptide and glucagon.

    PubMed

    Mommsen, T P; Moon, T W

    1990-07-01

    Salmon glucagon-like peptide (GLP), bovine glucagon (B-glucagon) and anglerfish glucagon (AF-glucagon), all activate glucose production in teleost hepatocytes through gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, but notable species differences exist in their respective effectiveness. In trout hepatocytes, gluconeogenesis appears to be the main target of hormone action. In eel cells, sampled in November, glycogenolysis was activated threefold, while gluconeogenesis was increased by 12% only. In March, glycogenolytic activation was 1.7-fold, while gluconeogenesis was increased by about 1.7-fold after exposure to B-glucagon. In brown bullhead cells, increases in glycogenolysis from seven- (GLP) to tenfold (B- and AF-glucagon) were noted, while activation of gluconeogenesis was slight. Fragments of two AF-glucagons (19-29) revealed only insignificant metabolic activity. Treatment of eel cells with B-glucagon led to large (up to 20-fold) increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentrations, while exposure to GLP was accompanied by a modest (less than twofold) increase in cAMP, although metabolic effectiveness (gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis) was similar for the two treatments. Under identical conditions, brown bullhead cellular cAMP responded poorly. Levels of cAMP peaked within 15 min following hormone application. The results imply that no simple or direct relationship exists between the amount of intracellular cAMP and the metabolic action of the glucagon family of hormones. It can further be concluded that GLPs are important regulators of hepatic metabolism, influencing identical targets as glucagon, while the mechanisms of action seem to differ. PMID:2166124

  13. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    PubMed Central

    Vegge, Andreas; Thymann, Thomas; Lund, Pernille; Stoll, Barbara; Bering, Stine B.; Hartmann, Bolette; Jelsing, Jacob; Qvist, Niels; Burrin, Douglas G.; Jeppesen, Palle B.; Holst, Jens J.

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following intestinal resection in preterm pigs. Preterm pigs were fed enterally for 48 h before undergoing resection of 50% of the small intestine and establishment of a jejunostomy. Following resection, pigs were maintained on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) without (SBS, n = 8) or with GLP-2 treatment (3.5 μg/kg body wt per h, SBS+GLP-2, n = 7) and compared with a group of unresected preterm pigs (control, n = 5). After 5 days of TPN, all piglets were fed enterally for 24 h, and a nutrient balance study was performed. Intestinal resection was associated with markedly reduced endogenous GLP-2 levels. GLP-2 increased the relative absorption of wet weight (46 vs. 22%), energy (79 vs. 64%), and all macronutrients (all parameters P < 0.05). These findings were supported by a 200% increase in sucrase and maltase activities, a 50% increase in small intestinal epithelial volume (P < 0.05), as well as increased DNA and protein contents and increased total protein synthesis rate in SBS+GLP-2 vs. SBS pigs (+100%, P < 0.05). Following intestinal resection in preterm pigs, GLP-2 induced structural and functional adaptation, resulting in a higher relative absorption of fluid and macronutrients. GLP-2 treatment may be a promising therapy to enhance intestinal adaptation and improve digestive function in preterm infants with jejunostomy following intestinal resection. PMID:23764891

  14. Glucagon-like polypeptide agonists in type 2 diabetes mellitus: efficacy and tolerability, a balance

    PubMed Central

    Tella, Sri Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like polypeptide (GLP-1) receptor agonist treatment has multiple effects on glucose metabolism, supports the β cell, and promotes weight loss. There are now five GLP-1 agonists in clinical use with more in development. GLP-1 treatment typically can induce a lowering of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 0.5–1.5% over time with weight loss of 2–5%. In some individuals, a progressive loss of weight occurs. There is evidence that GLP-1 therapy opposes the loss of β cells which is a feature of type 2 diabetes. The chief downside of GLP-1 treatment is the gastrointestinal motility disturbance which is one of the modes of action of the hormone; significant nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may lead to discontinuation of treatment. Although daily injection of GLP-1 agents is successful, the development of extended release preparations allows for injection once weekly, and perhaps much longer in the future. The indication for GLP-1 use is diabetes, but now, liraglutide has been approved for primary treatment of obesity. When oral agents fail to control glucose levels in type 2 diabetes, there is a choice between long-acting insulin and GLP-1 agonists as additional treatments. The lowering of HbA1c by either modality is equivalent in most studies. Patients lose weight with GLP-1 treatment and gain weight on insulin. There is a lower incidence of hypoglycemia with GLP-1 therapy but a much higher incidence of gastrointestinal complaints. Insulin dosing is flexible while GLP-1 agents have historically been administered at fixed dosages. Now, the use of combined long-acting insulin and GLP-1 agonists is promising a major therapeutic change. Combined therapy takes advantage of the benefits of both insulin and GLP-1 agents. Furthermore, direct admixture of both in the same syringe will permit flexible dosing, improvement of glucose levels, and reduction of both hypoglycemia and gastrointestinal side effects. PMID:26137215

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-2 and mouse intestinal adaptation to a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Baldassano, Sara; Amato, Antonella; Cappello, Francesco; Rappa, Francesca; Mulè, Flavia

    2013-04-01

    Endogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP2) is a key mediator of refeeding-induced and resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth. This study investigated the potential role of GLP2 in mediating the mucosal responses to a chronic high-fat diet (HFD). In this view, the murine small intestine adaptive response to a HFD was analyzed and a possible involvement of endogenous GLP2 was verified using GLP2 (3-33) as GLP2 receptor (GLP2R) antagonist. In comparison with animals fed a standard diet, mice fed a HFD for 14 weeks exhibited an increase in crypt-villus mean height (duodenum, 27.5±3.0%; jejunum, 36.5±2.9%; P<0.01), in the cell number per villus (duodenum, 28.4±2.2%; jejunum, 32.0±2.9%; P<0.01), and in Ki67-positive cell number per crypt. No change in the percent of caspase-3-positive cell in the villus-crypt was observed. The chronic exposure to a HFD also caused a significant increase in GLP2 plasma levels and in GLP2R intestinal expression. Daily administration of GLP2 (3-33) (30-60  ng) for 4 weeks did not modify the crypt-villus height in control mice. In HFD-fed mice, chronic treatment with GLP2 (3-33) reduced the increase in crypt-villus height and in the cell number per villus through reduction of cell proliferation and increase in apoptosis. This study provides the first experimental evidence for a role of endogenous GLP2 in the intestinal adaptation to HFD in obese mice and for a dysregulation of the GLP2/GLP2R system after a prolonged HFD.

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 prevents methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis of beta cells through improving mitochondrial function and suppressing prolonged AMPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tien-Jyun; Tseng, Hsing-Chi; Liu, Meng-Wei; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of methylglyoxal (MG) contributes to glucotoxicity and mediates beta cell apoptosis. The molecular mechanism by which GLP-1 protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis remains unclear. Metformin is a first-line drug for treating type 2 diabetes associated with AMPK activation. However, whether metformin prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis is controversial. Here, we explored the signaling pathway involved in the anti-apoptotic effect of GLP-1, and investigated whether metformin had an anti-apoptotic effect on beta cells. MG treatment induced apoptosis of beta cells, impaired mitochondrial function, and prolonged activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). The MG-induced pro-apoptotic effects were abolished by an AMPK inhibitor. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed MG-induced apoptosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR)-induced apoptosis, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. However, metformin neither leads to beta cell apoptosis nor ameliorates MG-induced beta cell apoptosis. In parallel, GLP-1 also prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through PKA and PI3K-dependent pathway. In conclusion, these data indicates GLP-1 but not metformin protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through improving mitochondrial function, and alleviating the prolonged AMPK activation. Whether adding GLP-1 to metformin provides better beta cell survival and delays disease progression remains to be validated. PMID:26997114

  17. Examination of mercaptobenzyl sulfonates as catalysts for native chemical ligation: application to the assembly of a glycosylated Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue.

    PubMed

    Cowper, Ben; Sze, Tsz Mei; Premdjee, Bhavesh; Bongat White, Aileen F; Hacking, Andrew; Macmillan, Derek

    2015-02-21

    3/4-Mercaptobenzyl sulfonates were investigated as aryl thiol catalysts for native chemical ligation (NCL). Whilst catalysing NCL processes at a similar rate to 4-mercaptophenyl acetic acid (MPAA), the increased polarity and solubility of 3-mercaptobenzyl sulfonate in particular may favour its selection as NCL catalyst in many instances. PMID:25605668

  18. 99mTc Labeled Glucagon-Like Peptide-1-Analogue (99mTc-GLP1) Scintigraphy in the Management of Patients with Occult Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Trofimiuk-Müldner, Małgorzata; Stefańska, Agnieszka; Tomaszuk, Monika; Buziak-Bereza, Monika; Gilis-Januszewska, Aleksandra; Jabrocka-Hybel, Agata; Głowa, Bogusław; Małecki, Maciej; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kamiński, Grzegorz; Kowalska, Aldona; Mikołajczak, Renata; Janota, Barbara; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the utility of [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 scintigraphy in the management of patients with hypoglycemia, particularly in the detection of occult insulinoma. Materials and Methods Forty patients with hypoglycemia and increased/confusing results of serum insulin and C-peptide concentration and negative/inconclusive results of other imaging examinations were enrolled in the study. In all patients GLP-1 receptor imaging was performed to localise potential pancreatic lesions. Results Positive results of GLP-1 scintigraphy were observed in 28 patients. In 18 patients postsurgical histopathological examination confirmed diagnosis of insulinoma. Two patients had contraindications to the surgery, one patient did not want to be operated. One patient, who presented with postprandial hypoglycemia, with positive result of GLP-1 imaging was not qualified for surgery and is in the observational group. Eight patients were lost for follow up, among them 6 patients with positive GLP-1 scintigraphy result. One patient with negative scintigraphy was diagnosed with malignant insulinoma. In two patients with negative scintigraphy Munchausen syndrome was diagnosed (patients were taking insulin). Other seven patients with negative results of 99mTcGLP-1 scintigraphy and postprandial hypoglycemia with C-peptide and insulin levels within the limits of normal ranges are in the observational group. We would like to mention that 99mTc-GLP1-SPECT/CT was also performed in 3 pts with nesidioblastosis (revealing diffuse tracer uptake in two and a focal lesion in one case) and in two patients with malignant insulinoma (with the a focal uptake in the localization of a removed pancreatic headin one case and negative GLP-1 1 scintigraphy in the other patient). Conclusions 99mTc-GLP1-SPECT/CT could be helpful examination in the management of patients with hypoglycemia enabling proper localization of the pancreatic lesion and effective surgical treatment. This imaging technique may eliminate the need to perform invasive procedures in case of occult insulinoma. PMID:27526057

  19. [Roles of rs 6923761 gene variant in glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor on weight, cardiovascular risk factor and serum adipokine levels in morbid obese patients].

    PubMed

    de Luis, Daniel Antonio; Pacheco, David; Aller, Rocío; Izaola, Olatz; Bachiller, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    Antecedentes: Los estudios de receptor de GLP-1 se han dirigido a la identificación de polimorfismos en el gen receptor de GLP- 1 que pueden ser un factor que contribuye en la patogénesis de la diabetes mellitus y factores de riesgo cardiovascular. Sin embargo, el papel de las variantes del receptor de GLP-1 variantes en el peso corporal, factores de riesgo cardiovasculares y adipocitoquinas sigue estando poco estudiado en pacientes con obesidad morbida. Objetivo: Nuestro objetivo fue analizar los efectos del polimorfismo del receptor de GLP-1 rs6923761 sobre el peso corporal, factores de riesgo cardiovascular y los niveles de adipocitoquinas séricas en pacientes con obesidad mórbida. Diseño: Se estudió una muestra de 175 obesos mórbidos. La glucosa en ayunas, proteína C reactiva (PCR), insulina, resistencia a la insulina ( HOMA), colesterol total, LDL- colesterol, HDL- colesterol, triglicéridos y la concentración de adipoquinas se midieron. También se determinaron el peso, índice de masa corporal, circunferencia de la cintura, masa grasa a través de bioimpedancia y la presión arterial. Resultados: Un total de 87 obesos (49,7%) tenían el genotipo GG y 88 (50,3%) de los sujetos del estudio tenían los siguientes genotipos; GA (71 obesos, el 40,6%) o AA (17 sujetos del estudio, el 9,7%) ( segundo grupo) . En el grupo con genotipo GG, los niveles de glucosa (4,4 ± 2,3 mg/dl, p < 0,05), triglicéridos (6,8 ± 4,3 mg/dl , p < 0,05), insulina (4,5 ± 2,3 UI/l , p < 0,05) y HOMA (1,5 ± 0,9 unidades, p < 0,05 ) fueron mayores que en el grupo mutante. No se detectaron diferencias en el resto de parámetros analizados Conclusión: Existe una asociación entre los parámetros metabólicos y el alelo mutante (A) del polimorfismo rs6923761 del receptor de GLP- 1 en pacientes con obesidad mórbida. Los niveles de triglicéridos, insulina y resistencia a la insulina son más elevados en los sujetos portadores del alelo A.

  20. Combination of soya protein and polydextrose reduces energy intake and glycaemic response via modulation of gastric emptying rate, ghrelin and glucagon-like peptide-1 in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Soong, Yean Yean; Lim, Wen Xin; Leow, Melvin Khee Shing; Siow, Phei Ching; Teh, Ai Ling; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2016-06-01

    The short-term effect of soya protein, polydextrose and their combination on energy intake (EI) was investigated in Chinese. In total, twenty-seven healthy, normotensive and lean Chinese men aged 21-40 years were given four different soyabean curd preloads with or without polydextrose. The study was a repeated-measure, randomised, cross-over design. The consumption of high-protein soyabean curd alone or in addition with polydextrose as a preload led to greater reduction in EI at a subsequent meal. A similar observation was also found after intake of low-protein soyabean curd with polydextrose. The gut hormone responses mirrored the reduction in food intake. It appears that incorporation of polydextrose either with low- or high-protein soyabean curd could be a potential strategy to reduce EI and assist with weight management. The popular consumption of soyabean curd in Chinese makes it an ideal vehicle for incorporation of polydextrose. This evidence-based dietary approach can serve as a guideline for developing functional foods for weight reduction and weight maintenance. PMID:27185412

  1. Examination of mercaptobenzyl sulfonates as catalysts for native chemical ligation: application to the assembly of a glycosylated Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue.

    PubMed

    Cowper, Ben; Sze, Tsz Mei; Premdjee, Bhavesh; Bongat White, Aileen F; Hacking, Andrew; Macmillan, Derek

    2015-02-21

    3/4-Mercaptobenzyl sulfonates were investigated as aryl thiol catalysts for native chemical ligation (NCL). Whilst catalysing NCL processes at a similar rate to 4-mercaptophenyl acetic acid (MPAA), the increased polarity and solubility of 3-mercaptobenzyl sulfonate in particular may favour its selection as NCL catalyst in many instances.

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) but not (9-36) augments cardiac output during myocardial ischemia via a Frank-Starling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Tune, Johnathan D; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Sassoon, Daniel; Casalini, Eli D; Mather, Kieren J

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 (7-36) or (9-36) on myocardial oxygen consumption, function and systemic hemodynamics in vivo during normal perfusion and during acute, regional myocardial ischemia. Lean Ossabaw swine received systemic infusions of saline vehicle or GLP-1 (7-36 or 9-36) at 1.5, 3.0, and 10.0 pmol/kg/min in sequence for 30 min at each dose, followed by ligation of the left circumflex artery during continued infusion at 10.0 pmol/kg/min. Systemic GLP-1 (9-36) had no effect on coronary flow, blood pressure, heart rate or indices of cardiac function before or during regional myocardial ischemia. Systemic GLP-1 (7-36) exerted no cardiometabolic or hemodynamic effects prior to ischemia. During ischemia, GLP-1 (7-36) increased cardiac output by approximately 2 L/min relative to vehicle-controls (p = 0.003). This response was not diminished by treatment with the non-depolarizing ganglionic blocker hexamethonium. Left ventricular pressure-volume loops measured during steady-state conditions with graded occlusion of the inferior vena cava to assess load-independent contractility revealed that GLP-1 (7-36) produced marked increases in end-diastolic volume (74 ± 1 to 92 ± 5 ml; p = 0.03) and volume axis intercept (8 ± 2 to 26 ± 8; p = 0.05), without any change in the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship vs. vehicle during regional ischemia. GLP-1 (9-36) produced no changes in any of these parameters compared to vehicle. These findings indicate that short-term systemic treatment with GLP-1 (7-36) but not GLP-1 (9-36) significantly augments cardiac output during regional myocardial ischemia, via increases in ventricular preload without changes in cardiac inotropy.

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 prevents methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis of beta cells through improving mitochondrial function and suppressing prolonged AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tien-Jyun; Tseng, Hsing-Chi; Liu, Meng-Wei; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of methylglyoxal (MG) contributes to glucotoxicity and mediates beta cell apoptosis. The molecular mechanism by which GLP-1 protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis remains unclear. Metformin is a first-line drug for treating type 2 diabetes associated with AMPK activation. However, whether metformin prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis is controversial. Here, we explored the signaling pathway involved in the anti-apoptotic effect of GLP-1, and investigated whether metformin had an anti-apoptotic effect on beta cells. MG treatment induced apoptosis of beta cells, impaired mitochondrial function, and prolonged activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). The MG-induced pro-apoptotic effects were abolished by an AMPK inhibitor. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed MG-induced apoptosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR)-induced apoptosis, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. However, metformin neither leads to beta cell apoptosis nor ameliorates MG-induced beta cell apoptosis. In parallel, GLP-1 also prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through PKA and PI3K-dependent pathway. In conclusion, these data indicates GLP-1 but not metformin protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through improving mitochondrial function, and alleviating the prolonged AMPK activation. Whether adding GLP-1 to metformin provides better beta cell survival and delays disease progression remains to be validated. PMID:26997114

  4. Do Lactation-Induced Changes in Ghrelin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1, and Peptide YY Influence Appetite and Body Weight Regulation during the First Postpartum Year?

    PubMed Central

    Larson-Meyer, D. Enette; Schueler, Jessica; Kyle, Erin; Austin, Kathleen J.; Hart, Ann Marie; Alexander, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether fasting and meal-induced appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with body weight retention after childbearing, we studied 24 exclusively breastfeeding women (BMI = 25.2 ± 3.6 kg/m2) at 4-5 weeks postpartum and 20 never-pregnant controls (BMI = 24.0 ± 3.1 kg/m2). Ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and appetite ratings were measured before/and 150 minutes after a standardized breakfast and 60 minutes after an ad libitum lunch. Body weight/composition were measured at 6 and 12 months. Fasting and area under-the-curve responses for appetite-regulating hormones did not differ between lactating and control groups; ghrelinacyl, however, tended to track higher after the standardized breakfast in lactating women and was higher (p < 0.05) after the ad libitum lunch despite a 24% higher energy intake (p < 0.05). By 12 months, lactating women lost 5.3 ± 2.2 kg (n = 18), whereas control women (n = 15) remained weight stable (p = 0.019); fifteen of the lactating women returned to within ±2.0 kg of prepregnancy weight but three retained >6.0 kg. The retainers had greater (p < 0.05) postmeal ghrelin rebound responses following breakfast. Overall these studies do not support the hypothesis that appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with postpartum weight retention. Altered ghrelin responses, however, deserve further exploration. PMID:27313876

  5. Molecular mechanisms of glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from perfused rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kuhre, Rune E; Frost, Charlotte R; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-02-01

    Glucose is an important stimulus for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion, but the mechanisms of secretion have not been investigated in integrated physiological models. We studied glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine. Luminal glucose (5% and 20% w/v) stimulated the secretion dose dependently, but vascular glucose was without significant effect at 5, 10, 15, and 25 mmol/L. GLP-1 stimulation by luminal glucose (20%) secretion was blocked by the voltage-gated Ca channel inhibitor, nifedipine, or by hyperpolarization with diazoxide. Luminal administration (20%) of the nonmetabolizable sodium-glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) substrate, methyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (α-MGP), stimulated release, whereas the SGLT1 inhibitor phloridzin (luminally) abolished responses to α-MGP and glucose. Furthermore, in the absence of luminal NaCl, luminal glucose (20%) did not stimulate a response. Luminal glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion was also sensitive to luminal GLUT2 inhibition (phloretin), but in contrast to SGLT1 inhibition, phloretin did not eliminate the response, and luminal glucose (20%) stimulated larger GLP-1 responses than luminal α-MGP in matched concentrations. Glucose transported by GLUT2 may act after metabolization, closing KATP channels similar to sulfonylureas, which also stimulated secretion. Our data indicate that SGLT1 activity is the driving force for glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion and that KATP-channel closure is required to stimulate a full-blown glucose-induced response.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide 2 therapy reduces negative effects of diarrhea on calf gut.

    PubMed

    Connor, E E; Kahl, S; Elsasser, T H; Baldwin, R L; Fayer, R; Santin-Duran, M; Sample, G L; Evock-Clover, C M

    2013-03-01

    Damage to the intestinal epithelium reduces nutrient absorption and animal growth, and can have negative long-term health effects on livestock. Because the intestinotropic hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) has been shown to contribute to gut integrity, reduce inflammation, and improve nutrient absorption, the present study was designed to determine whether administration of GLP-2 to calves with coccidiosis in the first month of life affects intestinal growth and mediates negative effects of the proinflammatory response. Holstein bull calves (n=19) were assigned to 4 treatment groups of 4 to 5 calves each: (1) infected with Eimeria bovis, GLP-2 treated; (2) noninfected, GLP-2 treated; (3) infected with E. bovis, buffer treated; and (4) noninfected, buffer treated. Infected calves received 100,000 to 200,000 sporulated E. bovis oocysts suspended in milk replacer on d 0 of the study. On d 18, calves in the GLP-2 groups received a subcutaneous injection of 50 μg of bovine GLP-2/kg of body weight twice daily for 10 d, and calves in the buffer-treated groups received an equivalent volume of sodium bicarbonate buffer only. On d 28, calves were slaughtered 2h after injection of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Intestinal tissues were measured and villus height, crypt depth, and BrdU immunostaining were evaluated in segments of the small intestine. Nitrotyrosine immunostaining, a measure of nitro-oxidative damage, was evaluated in the ileum and cecum. No GLP-2 treatment by E. bovis infection interaction was observed for any parameter measured, with the exception of nitrotyrosine immunostaining in the cecum. Large intestinal weight was greater in infected than noninfected calves and with GLP-2 treatment relative to buffer treatment. Calves that received GLP-2 also had greater small intestinal weight but no difference in cell proliferation, as assessed by BrdU labeling, relative to buffer-treated calves. No treatment effects were detected for villus height, crypt depth

  7. A novel, long-acting glucagon-like peptide receptor-agonist: dulaglutide

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Tara; Shyangdan, Deepson S; O’Hare, Joseph Paul; Waugh, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Background Dulaglutide is a new, long-acting glucagon-like peptide analogue in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It is available in two doses, 0.75 and 1.5 mg, given by injection once weekly. This systematic review reports the effectiveness and safety of dulaglutide in type 2 diabetes in dual and triple therapy. Methods MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, and conference abstracts were searched from 2005 to August 2014, and updated in January 2015. Company websites and references of included studies were checked for potentially relevant studies. European Medicines Agency and US Food and Drug Administration websites were searched. Results Four trials were included. All were manufacturer-funded randomized controlled trials from the Assessment of Weekly Administration of Dulaglutide in Diabetes (AWARD) program. AWARD-1 compared dulaglutide 1.5 mg against exenatide 10 µg twice daily and placebo, AWARD-2 compared dulaglutide 0.75 and 1.5 mg against insulin glargine, AWARD-5 compared dulaglutide 0.75 and 1.5 mg against sitagliptin 100 mg and placebo, and AWARD-6 compared dulaglutide 1.5 mg against liraglutide 1.8 mg. The duration of follow-up in the trials ranged from 26 to 104 weeks. The primary outcome of all the included trials was change in HbA1c. At 26 weeks, greater HbA1c reductions were seen with dulaglutide than with twice daily exenatide (dulaglutide 1.5/0.75 mg: −1.5%/−1.3%; exe: 0.99%) and sitagliptin (1.5/0.75 mg −1.22%/−1.01%; sitagliptin: −0.6%). HbA1c change was greater with dulaglutide 1.5 mg (−1.08%) than with glargine (−0.63%), but not with dulaglutide 0.75 mg (−0.76%). Dulaglutide 1.5 mg was found to be noninferior to liraglutide 1.8 mg. More patients treated with dulaglutide achieved HbA1c targets of <7% and ≤6.5%. Reduction in weight was greater with dulaglutide than with sitagliptin and exenatide. Hypoglycemia was infrequent. The main adverse events were nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting. Conclusion

  8. Minireview: Dopaminergic Regulation of Insulin Secretion from the Pancreatic Islet

    PubMed Central

    Ustione, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous dopamine inhibits insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, but the lack of dopaminergic neurons in pancreatic islets has led to controversy regarding the importance of this effect. Recent data, however, suggest a plausible physiologic role for dopamine in the regulation of insulin secretion. We review the literature underlying our current understanding of dopaminergic signaling that can down-regulate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. In this negative feedback loop, dopamine is synthesized in the β-cells from circulating l-dopa, serves as an autocrine signal that is cosecreted with insulin, and causes a tonic inhibition on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. On the whole animal scale, l-dopa is produced by cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and its concentration in the blood plasma increases following a mixed meal. By reviewing the outcome of certain types of bariatric surgery that result in rapid amelioration of glucose tolerance, we hypothesize that dopamine serves as an “antiincretin” signal that counterbalances the stimulatory effect of glucagon-like peptide 1. PMID:23744894

  9. Snapin mediates incretin action and augments glucose-dependent insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Song, Woo-Jin; Seshadri, Madhav; Ashraf, Uzair; Mdluli, Thembi; Mondal, Prosenjit; Keil, Meg; Azevedo, Monalisa; Kirschner, Lawrence S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Hussain, Mehboob A

    2011-03-01

    Impaired insulin secretion contributes to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) potentiates insulin secretion and improves metabolic control in humans with T2DM. GLP-1 receptor-mediated signaling leading to insulin secretion occurs via cyclic AMP stimulated protein kinase A (PKA)- as well as guanine nucleotide exchange factor-mediated pathways. However, how these two pathways integrate and coordinate insulin secretion remains poorly understood. Here we show that these incretin-stimulated pathways converge at the level of snapin, and that PKA-dependent phosphorylation of snapin increases interaction among insulin secretory vesicle-associated proteins, thereby potentiating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). In diabetic islets with impaired GSIS, snapin phosphorylation is reduced, and expression of a snapin mutant, which mimics site-specific phosphorylation, restores GSIS. Thus, snapin is a critical node in GSIS regulation and provides a potential therapeutic target to improve β cell function in T2DM. PMID:21356520

  10. Cell signalling in insulin secretion: the molecular targets of ATP, cAMP and sulfonylurea.

    PubMed

    Seino, S

    2012-08-01

    Clarification of the molecular mechanisms of insulin secretion is crucial for understanding the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of diabetes and for development of novel therapeutic strategies for the disease. Insulin secretion is regulated by various intracellular signals generated by nutrients and hormonal and neural inputs. In addition, a variety of glucose-lowering drugs including sulfonylureas, glinide-derivatives, and incretin-related drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are used for glycaemic control by targeting beta cell signalling for improved insulin secretion. There has been a remarkable increase in our understanding of the basis of beta cell signalling over the past two decades following the application of molecular biology, gene technology, electrophysiology and bioimaging to beta cell research. This review discusses cell signalling in insulin secretion, focusing on the molecular targets of ATP, cAMP and sulfonylurea, an essential metabolic signal in glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS), a critical signal in the potentiation of GIIS, and the commonly used glucose-lowering drug, respectively.

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases net amino acid utilization by the portal-drained viscera of ruminatinhg calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases small intestinal mass and blood flow in ruminant calves, but its impact on nutrient metabolism across the portal-drained viscera (PDV) and liver is unknown. Eight Holstein calves with catheters in the carotid artery, mesenteric vein, portal vein and hepatic ...

  12. COMPARATIVE GUT PHYSIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Comparative physiology of glucagon-like peptide-2: Implications and applications for production and health of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Connor, E E; Evock-Clover, C M; Walker, M P; Elsasser, T H; Kahl, S

    2015-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a 33-amino acid peptide derived from proteolytic cleavage of proglucagon by prohormone convertase 1/3 in enteroendocrine L cells. Studies conducted in humans, in rodent models, and in vitro indicate that GLP-2 is secreted in response to the presence of molecules in the intestinal lumen, including fatty acids, carbohydrates, amino acids, and bile acids, which are detected by luminal chemosensors. The physiological actions of GLP-2 are mediated by its G protein-coupled receptor expressed primarily in the intestinal tract on enteric neurons, enteroendocrine cells, and myofibroblasts. The biological activity of GLP-2 is further regulated by dipeptidyl peptidase IV, which rapidly cleaves the N-terminus of GLP-2 that is responsible for GLP-2 receptor activation. Within the gut, GLP-2 increases nutrient absorption, crypt cell proliferation, and mesenteric blood flow and decreases gut permeability and motility, epithelial cell apoptosis, and inflammation. Outside the gut, GLP-2 reduces bone resorption, can suppress appetite, and is cytoprotective in the lung. Thus, GLP-2 has been studied intensively as a therapeutic to improve intestinal function of humans during parenteral nutrition and following small bowel resection and, more recently, as a treatment for osteoporosis and obesity-related disorders and to reduce cellular damage associated with inflammation of the gut and lungs. Recent studies demonstrate that many biological actions and properties of GLP-2 in ruminants are similar to those in nonruminants, including the potential to reduce intestinal nitro-oxidative stress in calves caused by parasitic diseases such as coccidiosis. Because of its beneficial impacts on nutrient absorption, gut healing, and normal gut development, GLP-2 therapy offers significant opportunities to improve calf health and production efficiency. However, GLP-2 therapies require an extended time course to achieve desired physiological responses, as well as

  13. Bacterial Metabolite Indole Modulates Incretin Secretion from Intestinal Enteroendocrine L Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chimerel, Catalin; Emery, Edward; Summers, David K.; Keyser, Ulrich; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Summary It has long been speculated that metabolites, produced by gut microbiota, influence host metabolism in health and diseases. Here, we reveal that indole, a metabolite produced from the dissimilation of tryptophan, is able to modulate the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from immortalized and primary mouse colonic L cells. Indole increased GLP-1 release during short exposures, but it reduced secretion over longer periods. These effects were attributed to the ability of indole to affect two key molecular mechanisms in L cells. On the one hand, indole inhibited voltage-gated K+ channels, increased the temporal width of action potentials fired by L cells, and led to enhanced Ca2+ entry, thereby acutely stimulating GLP-1 secretion. On the other hand, indole slowed ATP production by blocking NADH dehydrogenase, thus leading to a prolonged reduction of GLP-1 secretion. Our results identify indole as a signaling molecule by which gut microbiota communicate with L cells and influence host metabolism. PMID:25456122

  14. The glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor is expressed in enteric neurons and not in the epithelium of the intestine.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jens; Pedersen, Nis B; Brix, Sophie W; Grunddal, Kaare Villum; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Hartmann, Bolette; Ørskov, Cathrine; Poulsen, Steen S; Holst, Jens J

    2015-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is a potent intestinotrophic growth factor with therapeutic potential in the treatment of intestinal deficiencies. It has recently been approved for the treatment of short bowel syndrome. The effects of GLP-2 are mediated by specific binding of the hormone to the GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) which was cloned in 1999. However, consensus about the exact receptor localization in the intestine has never been established. By physical, chemical and enzymatic tissue fragmentation, we were able to divide rat jejunum into different compartments consisting of: (1) epithelium alone, (2) mucosa with lamina propria and epithelium, (3) the external muscle coat including myenteric plexus, (4) a compartment enriched for the myenteric plexus and (5) intestine without epithelium. Expression of Glp2r; chromogranin A; tubulin, beta 3; actin, gamma 2, smooth muscle, enteric and glial fibrillary acidic protein in these isolated tissue fractions was quantified with qRT-PCR. Expression of the Glp2r was confined to compartments containing enteric neurons and receptor expression was absent in the epithelium. Our findings provide evidence for the expression of the GLP-2R in intestinal compartments rich in enteric neurons and, importantly they exclude significant expression in the epithelium of rat jejunal mucosa.

  15. Structure and biological activity of glucagon and glucagon-like peptide from a primitive bony fish, the bowfin (Amia calva).

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, J M; Youson, J H; Mommsen, T P

    1993-01-01

    The bowfin, Amia calva (order Amiiformes) occupies an important position in phylogeny as a surviving representative of a group of primitive ray-finned fishes from which the present-day teleosts may have evolved. Glucagon and glucagon-like peptide (GLP) were isolated from an extract of bowfin pancreas and their primary structures determined. Bowfin glucagon shows only four amino acid substitutions compared with human glucagon, and bowfin glucagon was equipotent and equally effective as human glucagon in stimulation of glycogenolysis in dispersed hepatocytes from a teleost fish, the copper rockfish, Sebastes caurinus. In contrast, bowfin GLP shows 15 amino acid substitutions and three amino acid deletions compared with the corresponding region of human GLP-1-(7-37)-peptide. In particular, the bowfin peptide contains an N-terminal tyrosine residue rather than the N-terminal histidine residue found in all other glucagon-related peptides so far characterized. Bowfin GLP stimulated glycogenolysis in rockfish hepatocytes, but was 3-fold less effective and 23-fold less potent than human GLP-1-(7-37)-peptide. We speculate that selective mutations in the GLP domain of bowfin preproglucagon may be an adaptive response to the previously demonstrated low biological potency of bowfin insulin. PMID:8240302

  16. Isolation and structure of the principal products of preproglucagon processing, including an amidated glucagon-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Andrews, P C; Hawke, D H; Lee, T D; Legesse, K; Noe, B D; Shively, J E

    1986-06-25

    The principal products derived from in vivo processing of anglerfish preproglucagon II were isolated and their structures determined. The structures were confirmed by a combination of automated Edman degradation, amino acid analysis, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The peptide corresponding to anglerfish preproglucagon II-(22-49) (numbering from the amino terminus of preproglucagon) was isolated intact and defines the site of signal cleavage to be between Gln-21 and Met-22. Glucagon from the anglerfish preproglucagon gene II was found to correspond to preproglucagon II-(52-80) (numbering from the amino terminus). Three forms of a glucagon-like peptide derived from preproglucagon II were also isolated. The structure of the longest form was consistent with the sequence of preproglucagon II-(89-122) deduced from the cDNA, His-Ala-Asp-Gly-Thr-Tyr-Thr-Ser-Asp-Val-Ser-Ser-Tyr-Leu-Gln-Asp-Gln-Ala- Ala-Lys-Asp-Phe-Val-Ser-Trp-Leu-Lys-Ala-Gly-Arg-Gly-Arg-Arg-Glu. The carboxyl-terminal portion deduced from the cDNA remains intact in this form. A second form, preproglucagon II-(89-119) appears to result from proteolytic processing of the major form at the two adjacent arginine residues occurring at the carboxyl terminus. This second form has a glycine residue at its carboxyl terminus and is processed to the third form (preproglucagon II-(89-118)) which contains a carboxyl-terminal arginineamide. Radiolabeling studies in primary tissue culture support the observation that glucagon (preproglucagon II-(52-80], preproglucagon II-(89-122), and preproglucagon II-(89-119) are products of proglucagon processing in vivo. PMID:3755132

  17. Synthesis and Pharmacological Characterization of Novel Glucagon-like Peptide-2 (GLP-2) Analogues with Low Systemic Clearance.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Kazimierz; Sueiras-Diaz, Javier; Jiang, Guangcheng; Galyean, Robert; Lu, Mark; Thompson, Dorain; Wang, Yung-Chih; Croston, Glenn; Posch, Alexander; Hargrove, Diane M; Wiśniewska, Halina; Laporte, Régent; Dwyer, John J; Qi, Steve; Srinivasan, Karthik; Hartwig, Jennifer; Ferdyan, Nicky; Mares, Monica; Kraus, John; Alagarsamy, Sudarkodi; Rivière, Pierre J M; Schteingart, Claudio D

    2016-04-14

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor agonists have therapeutic potential for the treatment of intestinal diseases. The native hGLP-2, a 33 amino acid gastrointestinal peptide, is not a suitable clinical candidate, due to its very short half-life in humans. In search of GLP-2 receptor agonists with better pharmacokinetic characteristics, a series of GLP-2 analogues containing Gly substitution at position 2, norleucine in position 10, and hydrophobic substitutions in positions 11 and/or 16 was designed and synthesized. In vitro receptor potency at the human GLP-2, selectivity vs the human GLP-1 and GCG receptors, and PK profile in rats were determined for the new analogues. A number of compounds more potent at the hGLP-2R than the native hormone, showing excellent receptor selectivity and very low systemic clearance (CL) were discovered. Analogues 69 ([Gly(2),Nle(10),D-Thi(11),Phe(16)]hGLP-2-(1-30)-NH2), 72 ([Gly(2),Nle(10),D-Phe(11),Leu(16)]hGLP-2-(1-33)-OH), 73 ([Gly(2),Nle(10),D-Phe(11),Leu(16)]hGLP-2-(1-33)-NH2), 81 ([Gly(2),Nle(10),D-Phe(11),Leu(16)]hGLP-2-(1-33)-NHEt), and 85 ([Gly(2),Nle(10),D-Phe(11),Leu(16)]hGLP-2-(1-33)-NH-((CH2)2O)4-(CH2)2-CONH2) displayed the desired profiles (EC50 (hGLP-2R) < 100 pM, CL in rat <0.3 mL/min/kg, selective vs hGLP-1R and hGCGR). Compound 73 (FE 203799) was selected as a candidate for clinical development. PMID:26986178

  18. Effect of Glucagon-Like Peptide 2 on Hepatic, Renal, and Intestinal Disposition of 1-Chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Silvina S. M.; Perdomo, Virginia G.; Ruiz, María L.; Rigalli, Juan P.; Arias, Agostina; Luquita, Marcelo G.; Vore, Mary; Catania, Viviana A.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of the liver, small intestine, and kidney to synthesize and subsequently eliminate dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione (DNP-SG), a substrate for multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2), was assessed in rats treated with glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2, 12 μg/100 g b.wt. s.c. every 12 h for 5 consecutive days). An in vivo perfused jejunum model with simultaneous bile and urine collection was used. A single intravenous dose of 30 μmol/kg b.wt. 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) was administered, and its conjugate, DNP-SG, and dinitrophenyl cysteinyl glycine (DNP-CG), resulting from the action of γ-glutamyltransferase on DNP-SG, were determined in bile, intestinal perfusate, and urine by high-performance liquid chromatography. Tissue content of DNP-SG was also assessed in liver, intestine, and kidneys. Biliary excretion of DNP-SG+DNP-CG was decreased in GLP-2 rats with respect to controls. In contrast, their intestinal excretion was substantially increased, whereas urinary elimination was not affected. Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction studies revealed preserved levels of Mrp2 protein and mRNA in liver and renal cortex and a significant increase in intestine in response to GLP-2 treatment. Tissue content of DNP-SG detected 5 min after CDNB administration was decreased in liver, increased in intestine, and unchanged in kidney in GLP-2 versus control group, consistent with GLP-2-induced down-regulation of expression of glutathione transferase (GST) Mu in liver and up-regulation of GST-Alpha in intestine at both protein and mRNA levels. In conclusion, GLP-2 induced selective changes in hepatic and intestinal disposition of a common GST and Mrp2 substrate administered systemically that could be of pharmacological or toxicological relevance under therapeutic treatment conditions. PMID:22453052

  19. B-cell translocation gene 2 positively regulates GLP-1-stimulated insulin secretion via induction of PDX-1 in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung-Lark; Kwon, Okyun; Kim, Sun-Gyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Yong Deuk

    2013-05-24

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent glucoincretin hormone and an important agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we demonstrate that B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is a crucial regulator in GLP-1-induced insulin gene expression and insulin secretion via upregulation of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) in pancreatic β-cells. GLP-1 treatment significantly increased BTG2, PDX-1 and insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Notably, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of BTG2 significantly elevated insulin secretion, as well as insulin and PDX-1 gene expression. Physical interaction studies showed that BTG2 is associated with increased PDX-1 occupancy on the insulin gene promoter via a direct interaction with PDX-1. Exendin-4 (Ex-4), a GLP-1 agonist, and GLP-1 in pancreatic β-cells increased insulin secretion through the BTG2-PDX-1-insulin pathway, which was blocked by endogenous BTG2 knockdown using a BTG2 small interfering RNA knockdown system. Finally, we revealed that Ex-4 and GLP-1 significantly elevated insulin secretion via upregulation of the BTG2-PDX-1 axis in pancreatic islets, and this phenomenon was abolished by endogenous BTG2 knockdown. Collectively, our current study provides a novel molecular mechanism by which GLP-1 positively regulates insulin gene expression via BTG2, suggesting that BTG2 has a key function in insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.

  20. Gustatory stimuli representing different perceptual qualities elicit distinct patterns of neuropeptide secretion from taste buds.

    PubMed

    Geraedts, Maartje C P; Munger, Steven D

    2013-04-24

    Taste stimuli that evoke different perceptual qualities (e.g., sweet, umami, bitter, sour, salty) are detected by dedicated subpopulations of taste bud cells that use distinct combinations of sensory receptors and transduction molecules. Here, we report that taste stimuli also elicit unique patterns of neuropeptide secretion from taste buds that are correlated with those perceptual qualities. We measured tastant-dependent secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucagon, and neuropeptide Y (NPY) from circumvallate papillae of Tas1r3(+/+), Tas1r3(+/-) and Tas1r3 (-/-) mice. Isolated tongue epithelia were mounted in modified Ussing chambers, permitting apical stimulation of taste buds; secreted peptides were collected from the basal side and measured by specific ELISAs. Appetitive stimuli (sweet: glucose, sucralose; umami: monosodium glutamate; polysaccharide: Polycose) elicited GLP-1 and NPY secretion and inhibited basal glucagon secretion. Sweet and umami stimuli were ineffective in Tas1r3(-/-) mice, indicating an obligatory role for the T1R3 subunit common to the sweet and umami taste receptors. Polycose responses were unaffected by T1R3 deletion, consistent with the presence of a distinct polysaccharide taste receptor. The effects of sweet stimuli on peptide secretion also required the closing of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels, as the KATP channel activator diazoxide inhibited the effects of glucose and sucralose on both GLP-1 and glucagon release. Both sour citric acid and salty NaCl increased NPY secretion but had no effects on GLP-1 or glucagon. Bitter denatonium showed no effects on these peptides. Together, these results suggest that taste stimuli of different perceptual qualities elicit unique patterns of neuropeptide secretion from taste buds.

  1. Nesfatin-1 stimulates cholecystokinin and suppresses peptide YY expression and secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Naresh; Mortazavi, Sima; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-03-25

    Nesfatin-1 is an 82 amino acid secreted peptide encoded in the precursor, nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). It is an insulinotropic anorexigen abundantly expressed in the stomach and hypothalamus. Post-prandial insulin secretion is predominantly regulated by incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). Nesfatin-1 was previously reported to modulate GLP-1 and GIP secretion in vitro in an enteroendocrine (STC-1) cell line. Intestine is a source of additional hormones including cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) that regulate metabolism. We hypothesized that nesfatin-1 modulates CCK and PYY secretion. Immunofluorescence histochemistry showed NUCB2/nesfatin-1 co-localizing CCK and PYY in the intestinal mucosa of mice. Static incubation of STC-1 cells with nesfatin-1 upregulated both CCK mRNA expression (1 and 10 nM) and secretion (0.1, 1 and 10 nM) at 1 h post-incubation. In contrast, nesfatin-1 treatment for 1 h downregulated PYY mRNA expression (all doses tested) and secretion (0.01 and 0.1 nM) in STC-1 cells. Continuous infusion of nesfatin-1 using osmotic mini-pumps for 12 h upregulated CCK mRNA expression in large intestine, and downregulated PYY mRNA expression in both large and small intestines of male C57BL/6J mice. In these tissues, Western blot analysis found a corresponding increase in CCK and a decrease in PYY content. Collectively, we provide new information on the cell specific localization of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the intestinal mucosa, and a novel function for nesfatin-1 in modulating intestinal CCK and PYY expression and secretion in mice.

  2. Intraportal infusion of ghrelin could inhibit glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion by enteric neural net in Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiyao; Li, Wensong; Li, Ping; Chang, Manli; Huang, Xu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

    2014-01-01

    As a regulator of food intake and energy metabolism, the role of ghrelin in glucose metabolism is still not fully understood. In this study, we determined the in vivo effect of ghrelin on incretin effect. We demonstrated that ghrelin inhibited the glucose-stimulated release of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) when infused into the portal vein of Wistar rat. Hepatic vagotomy diminished the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion. In addition, phentolamine, a nonselective α receptor antagonist, could recover the decrease of GLP-1 release induced by ghrelin infusion. Pralmorelin (an artificial growth hormone release peptide) infusion into the portal vein could also inhibit the glucose-stimulated release of GLP-1. And growth hormone secretagogue receptor antagonist, [D-lys3]-GHRP-6, infusion showed comparable increases of glucose stimulated GLP-1 release compared to ghrelin infusion into the portal vein. The data showed that intraportal infusion of ghrelin exerted an inhibitory effect on GLP-1 secretion through growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1α (GHS1α receptor), which indicated that the downregulation of ghrelin secretion after food intake was necessary for incretin effect. Furthermore, our results suggested that the enteric neural net involved hepatic vagal nerve and sympathetic nerve mediated inhibition effect of ghrelin on incretin effect. PMID:25247193

  3. GLP-1 secretion is stimulated by 1,10-phenanthroline via colocalized T2R5 signal transduction in human enteroendocrine L cell.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Lee, In-Seung; Jeong, Hyeon-soo; Kim, Yumi; Jang, Hyeung-Jin

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) hormone is known to regulate blood glucose by an insulinotropic effect and increases proliferation as and also prevents apoptosis of pancreatic β cells. We know that GLP-1 is secreted by nutrients such as fatty acids and sweet compounds but also bitter compounds via stimulation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the gut. Among these, bitter compounds are multiply-contained in phytochemicals or artificial materials and perceived as ligands of various bitter taste receptors. We hypothesized that GLP-1 hormone is secreted through stimulation of a single bitter taste receptor by 1,10-phenanthroline which is known agonist of taste receptor type 2 member 5 (T2R5). To prove this hypothesis, we used the representatively well-known 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand of single receptor and evaluated the existence of T2R5 by double-labeling immunofluorescence and then 1,10-phenanthroline is able to secrete GLP-1 hormone through stimulation of T2R5 in human enteroendocrine cells. Consequently, we verify that GLP-1 hormone is colocalized with T2R5 in the human duodenum and ileum tissue and is secreted by 1,10-phenanthroline via T2R5 signal transduction in differentiated human enteroendocrine L cells. PMID:26505793

  4. SUMO1 enhances cAMP-dependent exocytosis and glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiao-Qing; Spigelman, Aliya F; Khan, Shara; Braun, Matthias; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; MacDonald, Patrick E

    2014-09-01

    Post-translational modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier-1 (SUMO1) limits insulin secretion from β-cells by inhibiting insulin exocytosis and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor signalling. The secretion of glucagon from α-cells is regulated in a manner opposite to that of insulin; it is inhibited by elevated glucose and GLP-1, and increased by adrenergic signalling. We therefore sought to determine whether SUMO1 modulates mouse and human α-cell function. Action potentials (APs), ion channel function and exocytosis in single α-cells from mice and humans, identified by glucagon immunostaining, and glucagon secretion from intact islets were measured. The effects of SUMO1 on α-cell function and the respective inhibitory and stimulatory effects of exendin 4 and adrenaline were examined. Upregulation of SUMO1 increased α-cell AP duration, frequency and amplitude, in part as a result of increased Ca(2+) channel activity that led to elevated exocytosis. The ability of SUMO1 to enhance α-cell exocytosis was cAMP-dependent and resulted from an increased L-type Ca(2+) current and a shift away from exocytosis dependent on non-L-type channels, an effect that was mimicked by knockdown of the deSUMOylating enzyme sentrin/SUMO-specific protease-1 (SENP1). Finally, although SUMO1 prevented GLP-1 receptor-mediated inhibition of α-cell Na(+) channels and single-cell exocytosis, it failed to prevent the exendin 4-mediated inhibition of glucagon secretion. Consistent with its cAMP dependence, however, SUMO1 enhanced α-cell exocytosis and glucagon secretion stimulated by adrenaline. Thus, by contrast with its inhibitory role in β-cell exocytosis, SUMO1 is a positive regulator of α-cell exocytosis and glucagon secretion under conditions of elevated cAMP.

  5. Expression of the fatty acid receptor GPR120 in the gut of diet-induced-obese rats and its role in GLP-1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Sarah Juel; Larsen, Leif Kongskov; Hansen, Gitte; Chelur, Shekar; Larsen, Philip Just; Vrang, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation of the G protein coupled receptor GPR120 has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects, to promote glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion, and to play a key role in sensing dietary fat and control energy balance. In a search for differentially expressed genes potentially involved in food intake and body-weight regulation we identified GPR120 to be differentially regulated in the intestine of selectively bred diet induced obese (DIO) and diet resistant (DR) rats. Subsequently we investigated the effect of GPR120 receptor stimulation with the long chain fatty acid alpha linolenic acid (ALA) on GLP-1 secretion in rats. Independent of diet (high or low fat), GPR120 expression showed a two-fold increase in the intestine of DIO compared to DR rats. In situ hybridization revealed a broad expression of GPR120 in the gut mucosa in both intestinal epithelial and endocrine cells. Using double in situ hybridization GPR120 mRNA did not appear to be enriched in preproglucagon expressing L-cells. In line with the anatomical data, ALA administration did not increase circulating GLP-1 levels. Our data shows a widespread expression of GPR120 in the gut epithelium and can not confirm a major role for GPR120 in the regulation of GLP-1 secretion. The broad expression of GPR120 in the gut epithelium supports reports indicating a putative role of GPR120 as a sensor of dietary fat.

  6. Effects of carbohydrate sugars and artificial sweeteners on appetite and the secretion of gastrointestinal satiety peptides.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Robert E; Frey, Florian; Töpfer, Antonia; Drewe, Jürgen; Beglinger, Christoph

    2011-05-01

    In vitro, both carbohydrate sugars and artificial sweeteners (AS) stimulate the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). It has been suggested that the gut tastes sugars and AS through the same mechanisms as the tongue, with potential effects on gut hormone release. We investigated whether the human gut responds in the same way to AS and carbohydrate sugars, which are perceived by lingual taste as equisweet. We focused on the secretion of gastrointestinal (GI) satiety peptides in relation to appetite perception. We performed a placebo-controlled, double-blind, six-way, cross-over trial including twelve healthy subjects. On separate days, each subject received an intragastric infusion of glucose, fructose or an AS (aspartame, acesulfame K and sucralose) dissolved in 250 ml of water or water only (control). In a second part, four subjects received an intragastric infusion of the non-sweet, non-metabolisable sugar analogue 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Glucose stimulated GLP-1 (P = 0·002) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY; P = 0·046) secretion and reduced fasting plasma ghrelin (P = 0·046), whereas fructose was less effective. Both carbohydrate sugars increased satiety and fullness (albeit not significantly) compared with water. In contrast, equisweet loads of AS did not affect gastrointestinal peptide secretion with minimal effects on appetite. 2-Deoxy-d-glucose increased hunger ratings, however, with no effects on GLP-1, PYY or ghrelin. Our data demonstrate that the secretion of GLP-1, PYY and ghrelin depends on more than the detection of (1) sweetness or (2) the structural analogy to glucose.

  7. Energy-Dependent Modulation of Glucagon-Like Signaling in Drosophila via the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Braco, Jason T.; Gillespie, Emily L.; Alberto, Gregory E.; Brenman, Jay E.; Johnson, Erik C.

    2012-01-01

    Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) is the equivalent of mammalian glucagon, as it is the primary insect hormone that causes energy mobilization. In Drosophila, current knowledge of the mechanisms regulating AKH signaling is limited. Here, we report that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is critical for normal AKH secretion during periods of metabolic challenges. Reduction of AMPK in AKH cells causes a suite of behavioral and physiological phenotypes resembling AKH cell ablations. Specifically, reduced AMPK function increases life span during starvation and delays starvation-induced hyperactivity. Neither AKH cell survival nor gene expression is significantly impacted by reduced AMPK function. AKH immunolabeling was significantly higher in animals with reduced AMPK function; this result is paralleled by genetic inhibition of synaptic release, suggesting that AMPK promotes AKH secretion. We observed reduced secretion in AKH cells bearing AMPK mutations employing a specific secretion reporter, confirming that AMPK functions in AKH secretion. Live-cell imaging of wild-type AKH neuroendocrine cells shows heightened excitability under reduced sugar levels, and this response was delayed and reduced in AMPK-deficient backgrounds. Furthermore, AMPK activation in AKH cells increases intracellular calcium levels in constant high sugar levels, suggesting that the underlying mechanism of AMPK action is modification of ionic currents. These results demonstrate that AMPK signaling is a critical feature that regulates AKH secretion, and, ultimately, metabolic homeostasis. The significance of these findings is that AMPK is important in the regulation of glucagon signaling, suggesting that the organization of metabolic networks is highly conserved and that AMPK plays a prominent role in these networks. PMID:22798489

  8. Energy-dependent modulation of glucagon-like signaling in Drosophila via the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Braco, Jason T; Gillespie, Emily L; Alberto, Gregory E; Brenman, Jay E; Johnson, Erik C

    2012-10-01

    Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) is the equivalent of mammalian glucagon, as it is the primary insect hormone that causes energy mobilization. In Drosophila, current knowledge of the mechanisms regulating AKH signaling is limited. Here, we report that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is critical for normal AKH secretion during periods of metabolic challenges. Reduction of AMPK in AKH cells causes a suite of behavioral and physiological phenotypes resembling AKH cell ablations. Specifically, reduced AMPK function increases life span during starvation and delays starvation-induced hyperactivity. Neither AKH cell survival nor gene expression is significantly impacted by reduced AMPK function. AKH immunolabeling was significantly higher in animals with reduced AMPK function; this result is paralleled by genetic inhibition of synaptic release, suggesting that AMPK promotes AKH secretion. We observed reduced secretion in AKH cells bearing AMPK mutations employing a specific secretion reporter, confirming that AMPK functions in AKH secretion. Live-cell imaging of wild-type AKH neuroendocrine cells shows heightened excitability under reduced sugar levels, and this response was delayed and reduced in AMPK-deficient backgrounds. Furthermore, AMPK activation in AKH cells increases intracellular calcium levels in constant high sugar levels, suggesting that the underlying mechanism of AMPK action is modification of ionic currents. These results demonstrate that AMPK signaling is a critical feature that regulates AKH secretion, and, ultimately, metabolic homeostasis. The significance of these findings is that AMPK is important in the regulation of glucagon signaling, suggesting that the organization of metabolic networks is highly conserved and that AMPK plays a prominent role in these networks. PMID:22798489

  9. Vascular, but not luminal, activation of FFAR1 (GPR40) stimulates GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Louise W; Kuhre, Rune E; Janus, Charlotte; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays a central role in modern treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the form of GLP-1 enhancers and GLP-1 mimetics. An alternative treatment strategy is to stimulate endogenous GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells using a targeted approach. The G-protein-coupled receptor, FFAR1 (previously GPR40), expressed on L cells and activated by long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) is a potential target. A link between FFAR1 activation and GLP-1 secretion has been demonstrated in cellular models and small-molecule FFAR1 agonists have been developed. In this study, we examined the effect of FFAR1 activation on GLP-1 secretion using isolated, perfused small intestines from rats, a physiologically relevant model allowing distinction between direct and indirect effects of FFAR1 activation. The endogenous FFAR1 ligand, linoleic acid (LA), and four synthetic FFAR1 agonists (TAK-875, AMG 837, AM-1638, and AM-5262) were administered through intraluminal and intra-arterial routes, respectively, and dynamic changes in GLP-1 secretion were evaluated. Vascular administration of 10 μmol/L TAK-875, 10 μmol/L AMG 837, 1 μmol/L and 0.1 μmol/L AM-1638, 1 μmol/L AM-6252, and 1 mmol/L LA, all significantly increased GLP-1 secretion compared to basal levels (P < 0.05), whereas luminal administration of LA and FFAR1 agonists was ineffective. Thus, both natural and small-molecule agonists of the FFAR1 receptor appear to require absorption prior to stimulating GLP-1 secretion, indicating that therapies based on activation of nutrient sensing may be more complex than hitherto expected. PMID:26381015

  10. Vascular, but not luminal, activation of FFAR1 (GPR40) stimulates GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Louise W; Kuhre, Rune E; Janus, Charlotte; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays a central role in modern treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the form of GLP-1 enhancers and GLP-1 mimetics. An alternative treatment strategy is to stimulate endogenous GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells using a targeted approach. The G-protein-coupled receptor, FFAR1 (previously GPR40), expressed on L cells and activated by long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) is a potential target. A link between FFAR1 activation and GLP-1 secretion has been demonstrated in cellular models and small-molecule FFAR1 agonists have been developed. In this study, we examined the effect of FFAR1 activation on GLP-1 secretion using isolated, perfused small intestines from rats, a physiologically relevant model allowing distinction between direct and indirect effects of FFAR1 activation. The endogenous FFAR1 ligand, linoleic acid (LA), and four synthetic FFAR1 agonists (TAK-875, AMG 837, AM-1638, and AM-5262) were administered through intraluminal and intra-arterial routes, respectively, and dynamic changes in GLP-1 secretion were evaluated. Vascular administration of 10 μmol/L TAK-875, 10 μmol/L AMG 837, 1 μmol/L and 0.1 μmol/L AM-1638, 1 μmol/L AM-6252, and 1 mmol/L LA, all significantly increased GLP-1 secretion compared to basal levels (P < 0.05), whereas luminal administration of LA and FFAR1 agonists was ineffective. Thus, both natural and small-molecule agonists of the FFAR1 receptor appear to require absorption prior to stimulating GLP-1 secretion, indicating that therapies based on activation of nutrient sensing may be more complex than hitherto expected.

  11. Meal induced gut hormone secretion is altered in aerobically trained compared to sedentary young healthy males.

    PubMed

    Lund, Michael Taulo; Taudorf, Lærke; Hartmann, Bolette; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Holst, Jens Juel; Dela, Flemming

    2013-11-01

    Postprandial insulin release is lower in healthy aerobically trained (T) compared to untrained (UT) individuals. This may be mediated by a lower release of the two incretin hormones [glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP)] in T. The aim of this study was to assess and compare gut hormone response and satiety changes after a liquid meal intake in young, healthy T and UT males. Postprandial gut hormone release and subjective feelings of hunger, satiety, fullness and prospective food consumption were assessed before and frequently for the following 3 h after a 200 ml liquid meal (1,260 kJ and 27, 41 and 32 energy % as protein, carbohydrates and fat, respectively) in ten T and ten UT young, healthy male subjects. The insulin and GIP responses were markedly lower in T than UT and correlated during the first 30 min after the liquid meal. Baseline GLP-1 concentration was higher in T versus UT, but the response in the following 3 h after a liquid meal was similar in T and UT. Satiety measures did not differ between groups throughout the test. It is possible that in aerobically T subjects, a lower GIP release is partly responsible for a lower postprandial incretin stimulated insulin secretion.

  12. Role of glial cell-line derived neurotropic factor family receptor alpha2 in the actions of the glucagon-like peptides on the murine intestine.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Sean C; Lee, Jenny; Izzo, Angelo; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2007-08-01

    The intestinal glucagon-like peptides GLP-1 and GLP-2 inhibit intestinal motility, whereas GLP-2 also stimulates growth of the intestinal mucosa. However, the mechanisms of action of these peptides in the intestine remain poorly characterized. To determine the role of the enteric nervous system in the actions of GLP-1 and GLP-2 on the intestine, the glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor family receptor alpha(2) (GFRalpha2) knockout (KO) mouse was employed. The mice exhibited decreased cholinergic staining, as well as reduced mRNA transcripts for substance P-ergic excitatory motoneurons in the enteric nervous system (ENS) (P < 0.05). Examination of parameters of intestinal growth (including small and large intestinal weight and small intestinal villus height, crypt depth, and crypt cell proliferation) demonstrated no differences between wild-type and KO mice in either basal or GLP-2-stimulated mucosal growth. Nonetheless, KO mice exhibited reduced numbers of synaptophysin-positive enteroendocrine cells (P < 0.05), as well as a markedly impaired basal gastrointestinal (GI) transit rate (P < 0.05). Furthermore, acute administration of GLP-1 and GLP-2 significantly inhibited transit rates in wild-type mice (P < 0.05-0.01) but had no effect in GFRalpha2 KO mice. Despite these changes, expression of mRNA transcripts for the GLP receptors was not reduced in the ENS of KO animals, suggesting that GLP-1 and -2 modulate intestinal transit through enhancement of inhibitory input to cholinergic/substance P-ergic excitatory motoneurons. Together, these findings demonstrate a role for GFRalpha2-expressing enteric neurons in the downstream signaling of the glucagon-like peptides to inhibit GI motility, but not in intestinal growth.

  13. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, inhibits Aβ25-35-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells by suppressing the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Wu, Junfeng; Zeng, Weichen; Zhao, Yongfei; Zu, Hengbing

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are chronic and progressive disease. Exendin-4 (Ex-4) can function as a neuroprotective agent and has novel therapeutic ability for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we aimed to explore the neuroprotective effect of Ex-4 on PC12 cell apoptosis induced by Aβ25-35 in molecular level. The apoptosis of PC12 cells was detected by MTT assay, TUNEL staining and flow cytometry. The expression of ERS (endoplasmic reticulum stress, ERS) related proteins such as CHOP, GRP78 and Caspase-12 were determined by Western blot and cell immunocytochemistry. Results showed the apoptotic rate of PC12 cells significantly increased after Aβ25-35 addition, which was remarkably reduced after Ex-4 treatment. The expression of CHOP, GRP78 and Caspase-12 were significantly upregulated, and then remarkably reduced after Ex-4 treatment, while in the presence of Exendin9-39, the effect of Ex-4 was reversed. In conclusion, endoplasmic reticulum stress might be involved in the apoptosis process of PC12 cell induced by Aβ25-35 and Ex-4 might provide a potential strategy for the treatment and prevention of cell apoptosis-associated disorders. PMID:26722468

  14. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor MK-626 restores insulin secretion through enhancing autophagy in high fat diet-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limei; Liu, Jian; Yu, Xiaoxing

    2016-02-12

    Autophagy is cellular machinery for maintenance of β-cell function and mass. The current study aimed to investigate the regulatory effects of MK-626, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, on insulin secretion through the activation of autophagy in high fat diet-induced obese mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a rodent diet containing 45 kcal% fat for 16 weeks to induce obesity and then were received either vehicle or MK-626 (3 mg/kg/day) orally during the final 4 weeks. Mouse islets were isolated. Phosphorylation of serine/threonine-protein kinase mTOR and levels of light chain 3B I (LC3B I), LC3B II, sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1/p62) and autophagy-related protein-7 (Atg7) were examined by Western blotting. Glucagon like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) level and insulin secretion were measured by ELISA. GLP-1 level in plasma was decreased in obese mice, which was elevated by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor MK-626. In the islets of obese mice, phosphorylation of mTOR, ratio of LC3B I and LC3B II, and level of p62 were elevated and the expression of Atg7 and insulin secretion were reduced compared to those of C57BL/6 mice. However, such effects were reversed by MK-626. Autophagy activator rapamycin stimulated insulin secretion in obese mice but autophagy inhibitor chloroquine treatment inhibited insulin secretion in obese mice administrated by MK-626. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of MK-626 were inhibited by GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39. The present study reveals the activation of autophagy to mediate the anti-diabetic effect of GLP-1.

  15. Potentiation of Glucose-stimulated Insulin Secretion by the GPR40–PLC–TRPC Pathway in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hodaka; Yoshida, Masashi; Ito, Kiyonori; Dezaki, Katsuya; Yada, Toshihiko; Ishikawa, San-e; Kakei, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are expressed in pancreatic beta-cells. G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) contributes to medium- or long-chain fatty acid-induced amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and GPR40 agonists are promising therapeutic targets in type 2 diabetes. Recently, we demonstrated that glucagon-like peptide 1, a ligand of pancreatic GPCR, activates a class of nonselective cation channels (NSCCs) and enhances GSIS. The aim of the current study was to determine whether the GPR40 signal interacts with NSCCs. A GPR40 agonist (fasiglifam) potentiated GSIS at 8.3 and 16.7 mM glucose but not 2.8 mM glucose. The NSCC current was activated by fasiglifam at 5.6 mM glucose with 100 μM tolbutamide (−70 mV), and this activation was prevented by the presence of pyrazole-3 (transient receptor potential canonical; a TRPC3 channel blocker). Inhibitors of phospholipase C or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibited the increases in GSIS and the NSCC current induced by GPR40 stimulation. The present study demonstrates a novel mechanism for the regulation of insulin secretion by GPR40 agonist in pancreatic beta-cells. The stimulation of the GPR40–PLC/PKC–TRPC3 channel pathway potentiates GSIS by the depolarization of the plasma membrane in pancreatic beta-cell. PMID:27180622

  16. Prkar1a in the regulation of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M A; Stratakis, C; Kirschner, L

    2012-09-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is rapidly increasing worldwide with significant consequences on individual quality of life as well as economic burden on states' healthcare costs. While origins of the pathogenesis of T2DM are poorly understood, an early defect in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells is considered a hallmark of T2DM. Upon a glucose stimulus, insulin is secreted in a biphasic manner with an early first-phase burst of insulin, which is followed by a second, more sustained phase of insulin output. First phase insulin secretion is diminished early in T2DM as well is in subjects who are at risk of developing T2DM. An effective treatment of T2DM with incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or its long acting peptide analogue exendin-4 (E4), restores first-phase and augments second-phase glucose stimulated insulin secretion. This effect of incretin action occurs within minutes of GLP-1/E4 infusion in T2DM humans. An additional important consideration is that incretin hormones augment GSIS only above a certain glucose threshold, which is slightly above the normal glucose range. This ensures that incretin hormones stimulate GSIS only when glucose levels are high, while they are ineffective when insulin levels are below a certain threshold. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor, which is highly expressed on pancreatic β-cells, stimulates 2 -distinct intracellular signaling pathways: a) the cAMP-protein kinase A branch and b) the cAMP-EPAC2 (EPAC=exchange protein activated by cAMP) branch. While the EPAC2 branch is considered to mediate GLP-1 effects on first-phase GSIS, the PKA branch is necessary for the former branch to be active. However, how these 2 branches interplay and converge and how their effects on insulin secretion and insulin vesicle exocytosis are coordinated is poorly understood.Thus, at the outset of our studies we have a poorly understood intracellular interplay of cAMP-dependent signaling

  17. The primary structure of glucagon-like peptide but not insulin has been conserved between the American eel, Anguilla rostrata and the European eel, Anguilla anguilla.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J M; Andrews, P C; Thim, L; Moon, T W

    1991-04-01

    Insulin was isolated from the pancreas of the American eel, Anguilla rostrata, and its primary structure was established as (Formula: see text). Eel insulin contains unusual substitutions at B-21, B-22, and B-26 in the putative receptor-binding region of the molecule compared with other mammalian and fish insulins. The A-chain of insulin from the European eel contains an asparagine rather than a serine residue at position A-12. Similarly, amino acid composition data indicate the B-chain of insulin from the European eel is appreciably different from that from the American eel. The primary structure of glucagon-like peptide (GLP) from the American eel is identical to that from the European eel, Anguilla anguilla. The primary structure of the peptide was established as (Formula: see text). Fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry demonstrated that the COOH-terminal arginyl residue is alpha-amidated. The strong evolutionary pressure to conserve the structure of GLP provides further support for the assertion that the peptide plays an important regulatory role in teleost fish.

  18. The effect of encapsulated glutamine on gut peptide secretion in human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Claire L.; Lewis, Hannah B.; Vergese, Bensi; Park, Adrian; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Context Weight loss and improved blood glucose control after bariatric surgery have been attributed in part to increased ileal nutrient delivery with enhanced release of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Non-surgical strategies to manage obesity are required. The aim of the current study was to assess whether encapsulated glutamine, targeted to the ileum, could increase GLP-1 secretion, improve glucose tolerance or reduce meal size. Methods A single-center, randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study was performed in 24 healthy volunteers and 8 patients with type 2 diabetes. Fasting participants received a single dose of encapsulated ileal-release glutamine (3.6 or 6.0 g) or placebo per visit with blood sampling at baseline and for 4 h thereafter. Glucose tolerance and meal size were studied using a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test and ad libitum meal respectively. Results In healthy volunteers, ingestion of 6.0 g glutamine was associated with increased GLP-1 concentrations after 90 min compared with placebo (mean 10.6 pg/ml vs 6.9 pg/ml, p = 0.004), increased insulin concentrations after 90 min (mean 70.9 vs 48.5, p = 0.048), and increased meal size at 120 min (mean 542 g eaten vs 481 g, p = 0.008). Ingestion of 6.0 g glutamine was not associated with significant differences in GLP-1, glucose or insulin concentrations after a glucose tolerance test in healthy or type 2 diabetic participants. Conclusions Single oral dosing of encapsulated glutamine did not provoke consistent increases in GLP-1 and insulin secretion and was not associated with beneficial metabolic effects in healthy volunteers or patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26541888

  19. Pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus type 2: beyond the duo "insulin resistance-secretion deficit".

    PubMed

    Carrera Boada, C A; Martínez-Moreno, J M

    2013-03-01

    T2DM involves at least two primary pathogenic mechanisms: (a) a progressive decline in pancreatic islet cell function resulting in reduced insulin secretion and (b) peripheral insulin resistance resulting in a decrease in the metabolic responses to insulin. This dynamic interaction between insulin secretion and insulin resistance is essential to the maintenance of normal glucose tolerance (NGT). The transition from the normal control of glucose metabolism to type 2 diabetes mellitus occurs through the intermediate states of altered metabolism that worsen over time. The first state of the disease is known as prediabetes, and consists of a set of metabolic disorder characterized by a great hyperglycemia, enough to increase of retinopathies, nephropathies and neuropathies incidence. If we advance in the T2DM temporal sequence we found a remarkable change in the pancreatic cells population that form the Langerhans islets, mainly caused by amylin fibers accumulation over these cells from polypeptide hormone called amyloid polypeptide or IAPP. The IAPP hypersecretion and amylin fibers deposition attached to the endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by excessive workload due to biosynthesis overproduction of insulin and IAPP result in ?-cell apoptosis. In addition to these alterations, we must also consider the changes observed in incretins profiles like GIP (glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide) and GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide 1) directly related to glucose homeostasis maintenance. Risk factors that predispose to a healthy individual to develop T2DM are several, but the most important is the obesity. The body mass index (BMI) has been used in numerous epidemiological studies as a powerful indicator of T2DM risk. Lipotoxicity caused by circulating free fatty acids increased, changes in lipoprotein profiles, body fat distribution and glucotoxicity caused by cells over-stimulation are other risk factors to consider in T2DM developing.

  20. Sustained glucagon-like peptide-2 infusion is required for intestinal adaptation, and cessation reverses increased cellularity in rats with intestinal failure

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, Matthew C.; Chen, Xueyan; Holst, Jens J.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent, proglucagon-derived hormone that is a proposed treatment for human short bowel syndrome (SBS). The objective was to determine how the timing, duration, and cessation of GLP-2 administration affect intestinal adaptation and enterocyte kinetics in a rat model of human SBS that results in intestinal failure requiring total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Rats underwent 60% jejunoileal resection plus cecectomy and jugular vein cannulation and were maintained exclusively with TPN for 18 days in these treatments: TPN control (no GLP-2); sustained GLP-2 (1–18 days); early GLP-2 (1–7 days, killed at 7 or 18 days); and delayed GLP-2 (12–18 days). Body weight gain was similar across groups, and plasma bioactive GLP-2 was significantly increased with coinfusion of GLP-2 (100 μg·kg−1·day−1) with TPN. GLP-2-treated rats showed significant increases in duodenum and jejunum mucosal dry mass, protein, DNA, and sucrase activity compared with TPN control. The increased jejunum cellularity reflected significantly decreased apoptosis and increased crypt mitosis and crypt fission due to GLP-2. When GLP-2 infusion stopped at 7 days, these effects were reversed at 18 days. Sustained GLP-2 infusion significantly increased duodenum length and decreased 18-day mortality to 0% from 37.5% deaths in TPN control (P = 0.08). Colon proglucagon expression quantified by real-time RT-qPCR was increased in TPN controls and attenuated by GLP-2 infusion; jejunal expression of the GLP-2 receptor did not differ among groups. In summary, early, sustained GLP-2 infusion reduces mortality, induces crypt fission, and is required for intestinal adaptation, whereas cessation of GLP-2 reverses gains in mucosal cellularity in a rat model of intestinal failure. PMID:20864657

  1. A pilot study examining the relationship among Crohn disease activity, glucagon-like peptide-2 signalling and intestinal function in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Sigalet, David L; Kravarusic, Dragan; Butzner, Decker; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Meddings, Jon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The relationship between the enteroendocrine hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) and intestinal inflammation is unclear. GLP-2 promotes mucosal growth, decreases permeability and reduces inflammation in the intestine; physiological stimulation of GLP-2 release is triggered by nutrient contact. The authors hypothesized that ileal Crohn disease (CD) affects GLP-2 release. METHODS: With ethics board approval, pediatric patients hospitalized with CD were studied; controls were recruited from local schools. Inclusion criteria were endoscopy-confirmed CD (primarily of the small intestine) with a disease activity index >150. Fasting and post-prandial GLP-2 levels and quantitative urinary recovery of orally administered 3-O-methyl-glucose (active transport) and lactulose/mannitol (passive) were quantified during the acute and remission phases. RESULTS: Seven patients (mean [± SD] age 15.3±1.3 years) and 10 controls (10.3±1.6 years) were studied. In patients with active disease, fasting levels of GLP-2 remained stable but postprandial levels were reduced. Patients with active disease exhibited reduced glucose absorption and increased lactulose/mannitol recovery; all normalized with disease remission. The change in the lactulose/mannitol ratio was due to both reduced lactulose and increased mannitol absorption. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that pediatric patients with acute ileal CD have decreased postprandial GLP-2 release, reduced glucose absorption and increased intestinal permeability. Healing of CD resulted in normalization of postprandial GLP-2 release and mucosal functioning (nutrient absorption and permeability), the latter due to an increase in mucosal surface area. These findings have implications for the use of GLP-2 and feeding strategies as a therapy in CD patients; further studies of the effects of inflammation and the GLP-2 axis are recommended. PMID:24106731

  2. Effects of the glucagon-like polypeptide-1 analogue (Val8)GLP-1 on learning, progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the C57B/16 mouse brain.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Stephen F J; Hunter, Kerry; Hölscher, Christian

    2012-09-14

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has been identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Here, we tested the properties of the glucagon-like polypetide-1 (GLP-1) analogue (Val8)GLP-1, a drug originally developed as a treatment for T2DM at a range of doses (2.5 nmol; 25 nmol; 100 nmol; or 250 nmol/kg bw ip.) in an acute memory study in wild type C57B/l6 mice. We also tested (Val8)GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39) in a chronic study (3 weeks at 25 nmol/kg bw ip. once-daily). We found that (Val8)GLP-1 crossed the blood brain barrier readily and that peripheral injection increased levels in the brain 30 min post-injection ip. but not 2h post-injection in rats. In the acute study, the low dose of 2.5 nmol/kg ip. enhanced motor activity in the open field task, while total distance travelled, exploratory behaviour and anxiety was not affected at any dose. Learning an object recognition task was not affected either. In the chronic study, no effect was observed in the open field assessment. The antagonist exendin (9-39) impaired object recognition learning and spatial learning in a water maze task, demonstrating the importance of GLP-1 signalling in memory formation. Locomotor activity was also affected in some cases. Blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity was not affected in chronically treated mice. Neuronal stem cells and neurogenesis was enhanced by (Val8)GLP-1 in the dentate gyrus of wild type mice. The results demonstrate that (Val8)GLP-1 is safe in a range of doses, crosses the BBB and has potentially beneficial effects in the CNS by enhancing neurogenesis. PMID:22867941

  3. Combination of Peptide YY3–36 with GLP-17–36 amide Causes an Increase in First-Phase Insulin Secretion after IV Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tricia M.; Salem, Victoria; Troke, Rachel C.; Alsafi, Ali; Field, Benjamin C. T.; De Silva, Akila; Misra, Shivani; Baynes, Kevin C. R.; Donaldson, Mandy; Minnion, James; Ghatei, Mohammad A.; Godsland, Ian F.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The combination of peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed as a potential treatment for diabetes and obesity. However, the combined effects of these hormones, PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide, on glucose homeostasis are unknown. Objective: This study sought to investigate the acute effects of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide, individually and in combination, on insulin secretion and sensitivity. Setting and Design: Using a frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) and minimal modeling, this study measured the effects of PYY3–36 alone, GLP-17–36 amide alone, and a combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide on acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) and insulin sensitivity index (SI) in 14 overweight human volunteers, studied in a clinical research facility. Results: PYY3–36 alone caused a small but nonsignificant increase in AIRg. GLP-17–36 amide alone and the combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide did increase AIRg significantly. No significant differences in SI were observed with any intervention. Conclusions: PYY3–36 lacks any significant acute effects on first-phase insulin secretion or SI when tested using an FSIVGTT. Both GLP-17–36 amide alone and the combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide increase first-phase insulin secretion. There does not seem to be any additive or synergistic effect between PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide on first-phase insulin secretion. Neither hormone alone nor the combination had any significant effects on SI. PMID:25144632

  4. Free fatty acid receptor GPR120 is highly expressed in enteroendocrine K cells of the upper small intestine and has a critical role in GIP secretion after fat ingestion.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kanako; Harada, Norio; Sasaki, Kazuki; Yamane, Shunsuke; Iida, Keiko; Suzuki, Kazuyo; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Nasteska, Daniela; Shibue, Kimitaka; Joo, Erina; Harada, Takanari; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-03-01

    Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin secreted from enteroendocrine K cells in response to meal ingestion. Recently free fatty acid receptor G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 120 was identified as a lipid sensor involved in glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. However, Gpr 120 gene expression and its role in K cells remain unclear, partly due to difficulties in separation of K cells from other intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we purified K cells using GIP-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice, in which K cells can be visualized by GFP fluorescence. GFP-positive cells (K cells) were observed in the small intestine but not in the stomach and colon. K cell number and GIP content in K cells were significantly higher in the upper small intestine than those in the lower small intestine. We also examined the expression levels of several free fatty acid receptors in K cells. Among free fatty acid receptors, GPR120 was highly expressed in the K cells of the upper small intestine compared with the lower small intestine. To clarify the role of GPR120 on K cells in vivo, we used GPR120-deficient mice (GPR120(-/-)). GPR120(-/-) exhibited significantly lower GIP secretion (75% reduction, P < .01) after lard oil ingestion compared with that in wild-type mice. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of GPR120 with grifolic acid methyl ether in wild-type mice significantly attenuated lard oil-induced GIP secretion. In conclusion, GPR120 is expressed abundantly in K cells of the upper small intestine and plays a critical role in lipid-induced GIP secretion.

  5. PEGylated porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 improved the intestinal digestive function and prevented inflammation of weaning piglets challenged with LPS.

    PubMed

    Qi, K K; Wu, J; Deng, B; Li, Y M; Xu, Z W

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects on intestinal function, anti-inflammatory role and possible mechanism of polyethylene glycosylated (PEGylated) porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 (pGLP-2), a long-acting form of pGLP-2, in weaning piglets challenged with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We divided 18 weaned piglets on day 21 into three groups (control, LPS and LPS+PEG-pGLP-2; n=6). The piglets from the LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 group were injected with PEG-pGLP-2 at 10 nmol/kg BW from 5 to 7 days of the trials daily. On 8th day, the piglets in the LPS and LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 groups were intraperitoneally administered with 100 µg LPS/kg. The control group was administered with the same volume of saline solution. The piglets were then sacrificed on day 28. Afterwards, serum, duodenum, jejunum and ileum samples were collected for analysis of structural and functional endpoints. LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment increased (P<0.05) lactase activities in the duodenum and the jejunum compared with LPS treatment. LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment also significantly increased sucrase activity in the jejunum compared with LPS treatment. Furthermore, LPS treatment increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-8, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-10 in the ileum compared with the control treatment. By contrast, LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment decreased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α in the ileum compared with the LPS treatment. LPS treatment also increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression level of GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) and the percentage of GLP-2R-positive cells in the ileum; by comparison, these results were (P<0.05) reduced by LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment. Moreover, LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment increased (P<0.05) the content of serum keratinocyte growth factor compared with the control group and the LPS group. The protective effects of PEG-pGLP-2 on intestinal digestive function were associated with the release of GLP-2R mediator (keratinocyte

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-2 activates beta-catenin signaling in the mouse intestinal crypt: role of insulin-like growth factor-I.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Philip E; Rowland, Katherine J; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2008-01-01

    Chronic administration of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) induces intestinal growth and crypt cell proliferation through an indirect mechanism requiring IGF-I. However, the intracellular pathways through which IGF-I mediates GLP-2-induced epithelial tropic signaling remain undefined. Because beta-catenin and Akt are important regulators of crypt cell proliferation, we hypothesized that GLP-2 activates these signaling pathways through an IGF-I-dependent mechanism. In this study, fasted mice were administered Gly(2)-GLP-2 or LR(3)-IGF-I (positive control) for 0.5-4 h. Nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in non-Paneth crypt cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry and expression of its downstream proliferative markers, c-myc and Sox9, by quantitative RT-PCR. Akt phosphorylation and activation of its targets, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and caspase-3, were determined by Western blot. IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) and IGF-I signaling were blocked by preadministration of NVP-AEW541 and through the use of IGF-I knockout mice, respectively. We found that GLP-2 increased beta-catenin nuclear translocation in non-Paneth crypt cells by 72 +/- 17% (P < 0.05) and increased mucosal c-myc and Sox9 mRNA expression by 90 +/- 20 and 376 +/- 170%, respectively (P < 0.05-0.01), with similar results observed with IGF-I. This effect of GLP-2 was prevented by blocking the IGF-IR as well as ablation of IGF-I signaling. GLP-2 also produced a time- and dose-dependent activation of Akt in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.01), most notably in the epithelium. This action was reduced by IGF-IR inhibition but not IGF-I knockout. We concluded that acute administration of GLP-2 activates beta-catenin and proliferative signaling in non-Paneth murine intestinal crypt cells as well as Akt signaling in the mucosa. However, IGF-I is required only for the GLP-2-induced alterations in beta-catenin.

  7. Improving Effect of the Acute Administration of Dietary Fiber-Enriched Cereals on Blood Glucose Levels and Gut Hormone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dietary fiber improves hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes through its physicochemical properties and possible modulation of gut hormone secretion, such as glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). We assessed the effect of dietary fiber-enriched cereal flakes (DC) on postprandial hyperglycemia and gut hormone secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes. Thirteen participants ate isocaloric meals based on either DC or conventional cereal flakes (CC) in a crossover design. DC or CC was provided for dinner, night snack on day 1 and breakfast on day 2, followed by a high-fat lunch. On day 2, the levels of plasma glucose, GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and insulin were measured. Compared to CC, DC intake exhibited a lower post-breakfast 2-hours glucose level (198.5±12.8 vs. 245.9±15.2 mg/dL, P<0.05) and a lower incremental peak of glucose from baseline (101.8±9.1 vs. 140.3±14.3 mg/dL, P<0.001). The incremental area under the curve (iAUC) of glucose after breakfast was lower with DC than with CC (P<0.001). However, there were no differences in the plasma insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP levels. In conclusion, acute administration of DC attenuates postprandial hyperglycemia without any significant change in the representative glucose-regulating hormones in patients with type 2 diabetes (ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT 01997281). PMID:26839476

  8. Effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation depend on treatment dose, treatment duration and meal contents

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Masayuki; Ebato, Chie; Mita, Tomoya; Hirose, Takahisa; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Watada, Hirotaka

    2009-12-18

    Beta-cell proliferation is regulated by various metabolic demands including peripheral insulin resistance, obesity, and hyperglycemia. In addition to enhancement of glucose-induced insulin secretion, agonists for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) stimulate proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of beta-cells, thereby probably preserve beta-cell mass. To evaluate the beta-cell preserving actions of GLP-1R agonists, we assessed the acute and chronic effects of exendin-4 on beta-cell proliferation, mass and glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice under various conditions. Short-term administration of high-dose exendin-4 transiently stimulated beta-cell proliferation. Comparative transcriptomic analysis showed upregulation of IGF-1 receptor and its downstream effectors in islets. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 daily for 4 weeks (long-term administration) and feeding high-fat diet resulted in significant inhibition of weight gain and improvement of glucose tolerance with reduced insulin secretion and beta-cell mass. These findings suggest that long-term GLP-1 treatment results in insulin sensitization of peripheral organs, rather than enhancement of beta-cell proliferation and function, particularly when animals are fed high-fat diet. Thus, the effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation largely depend on treatment dose, duration of treatment and meal contents. While GLP-1 enhances proliferation of beta-cells in some diabetic mice models, our results suggest that GLP-1 stimulates beta-cell growth only when expansion of beta-cell mass is required to meet metabolic demands.

  9. GPR119 Agonist AS1269574 Activates TRPA1 Cation Channels to Stimulate GLP-1 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Chepurny, Oleg G; Holz, George G; Roe, Michael W; Leech, Colin A

    2016-06-01

    GPR119 is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed on intestinal L cells that synthesize and secrete the blood glucose-lowering hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). GPR119 agonists stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells, and for this reason there is interest in their potential use as a new treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus. AS1269574 is one such GPR119 agonist, and it is the prototype of a series of 2,4,6 trisubstituted pyrimidines that exert positive glucoregulatory actions in mice. Here we report the unexpected finding that AS1269574 stimulates GLP-1 release from the STC-1 intestinal cell line by directly promoting Ca(2+) influx through transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channels. These GPR119-independent actions of AS1269574 are inhibited by TRPA1 channel blockers (AP-18, A967079, HC030031) and are not secondary to intracellular Ca(2+) release or cAMP production. Patch clamp studies reveal that AS1269574 activates an outwardly rectifying membrane current with properties expected of TRPA1 channels. However, the TRPA1 channel-mediated action of AS1269574 to increase intracellular free calcium concentration is not replicated by GPR119 agonists (AR231453, oleoylethanolamide) unrelated in structure to AS1269574. Using human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing recombinant rat TRPA1 channels but not GPR119, direct TRPA1 channel activating properties of AS1269574 are validated. Because we find that AS1269574 also acts in a conventional GPR119-mediated manner to stimulate proglucagon gene promoter activity in the GLUTag intestinal L cell line, new findings reported here reveal the surprising capacity of AS1269574 to act as a dual agonist at two molecular targets (GPR119/TRPA1) important to the control of L-cell function and type 2 diabetes mellitus drug discovery research. PMID:27082897

  10. α/β-Hydrolase domain-6 and saturated long chain monoacylglycerol regulate insulin secretion promoted by both fuel and non-fuel stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shangang; Poursharifi, Pegah; Mugabo, Yves; Levens, Emily J.; Vivot, Kevin; Attane, Camille; Iglesias, Jose; Peyot, Marie-line; Joly, Erik; Madiraju, S.R. Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Objective α/β-Hydrolase domain-6 (ABHD6) is a newly identified monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipase. We recently reported that it negatively regulates glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in the β cells by hydrolyzing lipolysis-derived MAG that acts as a metabolic coupling factor and signaling molecule via exocytotic regulator Munc13-1. Whether ABHD6 and MAG play a role in response to all classes of insulin secretagogues, in particular various fuel and non-fuel stimuli, is unknown. Methods Insulin secretion in response to various classes of secretagogues, exogenous MAG and pharmacological agents was measured in islets of mice deficient in ABHD6 specifically in the β cell (BKO). Islet perifusion experiments and determinations of glucose and fatty acid metabolism, cytosolic Ca2+ and MAG species levels were carried out. Results Deletion of ABHD6 potentiated insulin secretion in response to the fuels glutamine plus leucine and α-ketoisocaproate and to the non-fuel stimuli glucagon-like peptide 1, carbamylcholine and elevated KCl. Fatty acids amplified GSIS in control and BKO mice to the same extent. Exogenous 1-MAG amplified insulin secretion in response to fuel and non-fuel stimuli. MAG hydrolysis activity was greatly reduced in BKO islets without changes in total diacylglycerol and triacylglycerol lipase activity. ABHD6 deletion induced insulin secretion independently from KATP channels and did not alter the glucose induced rise in intracellular Ca2+. Perifusion studies showed elevated insulin secretion during second phase of GSIS in BKO islets that was not due to altered cytosolic Ca2+ signaling or because of changes in glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Glucose increased islet saturated long chain 1-MAG species and ABHD6 deletion caused accumulation of these 1-MAG species at both low and elevated glucose. Conclusion ABHD6 regulates insulin secretion in response to fuel stimuli at large and some non-fuel stimuli by controlling long chain saturated 1-MAG levels

  11. Addition of sitagliptin or metformin to insulin monotherapy improves blood glucose control via different effects on insulin and glucagon secretion in hyperglycemic Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Suguru; Furukawa, Asami; Kosuda, Minami; Nakazaki, Mitsuhiro; Ishihara, Hisamitsu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin and the biguanide metformin on the secretion of insulin and glucagon, as well as incretin levels, in Japanese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus poorly controlled with insulin monotherapy. This was a single-center, randomized, open-label, parallel group study, enrolling 25 subjects. Eleven patients (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] 8.40 ± 0.96%) and 10 patients (8.10 ± 0.54%) on insulin monotherapy completed 12-week treatment with sitagliptin (50 mg) and metformin (750 mg), respectively. Before and after treatment, each subject underwent a meal tolerance test. The plasma glucose, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), C-peptide, and glucagon responses to a meal challenge were measured. HbA1c reductions were similar in patients treated with sitagliptin (0.76 ± 0.18%) and metformin (0.77 ± 0.17%). In the sitagliptin group, glucose excursion during a meal tolerance test was reduced and accompanied by elevations in active GLP-1 and active GIP concentrations. C-peptide levels were unaltered despite reduced glucose responses, while glucagon responses were significantly suppressed (-7.93 ± 1.95% of baseline). In the metformin group, glucose excursion and incretin responses were unaltered. C-peptide levels were slightly increased but glucagon responses were unchanged. Our data indicate that sitagliptin and metformin exert different effects on islet hormone secretion in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients on insulin monotherapy. A glucagon suppressing effect of sitagliptin could be one of the factors improving blood glucose control in patients inadequately controlled with insulin therapy.

  12. Anorexigenic effects of miglitol in concert with the alterations of gut hormone secretion and gastric emptying in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Tajiri, Y; Yamada, K

    2012-04-01

    Although the α-glucosidase inhibitor miglitol (MG) has been reported to have anorexigenic effects, the mechanism remains to be elucidated. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of MG on appetite in relation to concomitant changes in postprandial gut hormone levels. This randomized open-label crossover study included 20 healthy volunteers. The effects of 50 mg MG on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), and ghrelin levels were assessed in conjunction with a simultaneous determination of appetite scores using visual analogue scales (VAS) over 3 h after the ingestion of a 592 kcal test cookie. Additionally, the gastric emptying rate (GER) was measured using breath ¹³CO₂ appearance in 10 subjects. 12 subjects were administered 50 mg MG thrice a day for 1 week, and alterations of the gut hormone levels and the VAS scores for appetite were evaluated. MG pre-administration resulted in a significant enhancement of GLP-1 and PYY responses induced by the cookie ingestion. Following MG administration, ghrelin level declined at 1 h, with a persistent suppression during the postprandial phase in contrast to the restoration to the basal level without MG. Furthermore, MG pre-administration suppressed appetite and maintained satiety evaluated using a VAS rating with concomitant inhibition of GER after cookie ingestion. One-week administration of MG did not influence either gut hormone levels before a meal or VAS rating during a whole day. These observations suggest that MG exerts an anorexigenic effects with concomitant alterations of gut hormone secretions and gastric emptying after meal ingestion. PMID:22351480

  13. Isolation of INS-1-derived cell lines with robust ATP-sensitive K+ channel-dependent and -independent glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Hohmeier, H E; Mulder, H; Chen, G; Henkel-Rieger, R; Prentki, M; Newgard, C B

    2000-03-01

    The biochemical mechanisms involved in regulation of insulin secretion are not completely understood. The rat INS-1 cell line has been used to gain insight in this area because it secretes insulin in response to glucose concentrations in the physiological range. However, the magnitude of the response is far less than that seen in freshly isolated rat islets. In the current study, we have stably transfected INS-1 cells with a plasmid containing the human proinsulin gene. After antibiotic selection and clonal expansion, 67% of the resultant clones were found to be poorly responsive to glucose in terms of insulin secretion (< or =2-fold stimulation by 15 mmol/l compared with 3 mmol/l glucose), 17% of the clones were moderately responsive (2- to 5-fold stimulation), and 16% were strongly responsive (5- to 13-fold stimulation). The differences in responsiveness could not be ascribed to differences in insulin content. Detailed analysis of one of the strongly responsive lines (832/13) revealed that its potent response to glucose (average of 10-fold) was stable over 66 population doublings (approximately 7.5 months of tissue culture) with half-maximal stimulation at 6 mmol/l glucose. Furthermore, in the presence of 15 mmol/l glucose, insulin secretion was potentiated significantly by 100 pmol/l isobutylmethylxanthine (320%), 1 mmol/l oleate/palmitate (77%), and 50 nmol/l glucagon-like peptide 1 (60%), whereas carbachol had no effect. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was also potentiated by the sulfonylurea tolbutamide (threefold at 3 mmol/l glucose and 50% at 15 mmol/l glucose) and was abolished by diazoxide, which demonstrates the operation of the ATP-sensitive K+ channel (K(ATP)) in 832/13 cells. Moreover, when the K(ATP) channel was bypassed by incubation of cells in depolarizing K+ (35 mmol/l), insulin secretion was more effectively stimulated by glucose in 832/13 cells than in parental INS-1 cells, which demonstrates the presence of a K(ATP) channel

  14. Palmitic acid in the sn-2 position of dietary triacylglycerols does not affect insulin secretion or glucose homeostasis in healthy men and women

    PubMed Central

    Filippou, A; Teng, K-T; Berry, S E; Sanders, T A B

    2014-01-01

    Background/objectives: Dietary triacylglycerols containing palmitic acid in the sn-2 position might impair insulin release and increase plasma glucose. Subjects/Methods: We used a cross-over designed feeding trial in 53 healthy Asian men and women (20–50 years) to test this hypothesis by exchanging 20% energy of palm olein (PO; control) with randomly interesterified PO (IPO) or high oleic acid sunflower oil (HOS). After a 2-week run-in period on PO, participants were fed PO, IPO and HOS for 6 week consecutively in randomly allocated sequences. Fasting (midpoint and endpoint) and postprandial blood at the endpoint following a test meal (3.54 MJ, 14 g protein, 85 g carbohydrate and 50 g fat as PO) were collected for the measurement of C-peptide, insulin, glucose, plasma glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1, lipids and apolipoproteins; pre-specified primary and secondary outcomes were postprandial changes in C-peptide and plasma glucose. Results: Low density lipoprotein cholesterol was 0.3 mmol/l (95% confidence interval (95% CI)) 0.1, 0.5; P<0.001) lower on HOS than on PO or IPO as predicted, indicating good compliance to the dietary intervention. There were no significant differences (P=0.58) between diets among the 10 male and 31 female completers in the incremental area under the curve (0–2 h) for C-peptide in nmol.120 min/l: GM (95% CI) were PO 220 (196, 245), IPO 212 (190, 235) and HOS 224 (204, 244). Plasma glucose was 8% lower at 2 h on IPO vs PO and HOS (both P<0.05). Conclusion: Palmitic acid in the sn-2 position does not adversely impair insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25052227

  15. Functional Enhancement of Electrofusion-derived BRIN-BD11 Insulin-secreting Cells After Implantation into Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Emma L.; Abdel-Wahab, Yasser H. A.; Flatt, Peter R.

    2001-01-01

    Electrofusion-derived BRIN-BD11 cells are glucosesensitive insulin-secreting cells which provide an archetypal bioengineered surrogate β-cell for insulin replacement therapy in diabetes mellitus, 5x106 BRIN-BD11 cells were implanted intraperitoneally into severely hyperglycaemic (>24mmol/l) streptozotocin-induced insulin-treated diabetic athymic nude (nu/nu) mice. The implants reduced hyperglycaemia such that insulin injections were discontinued by 5–16 days (<17mmol/l) and normoglycaemia (<9mmol/l) was achieved by 7–20 days. Implanted cells were removed after 28 days and re-established in culture. After re-culture for 20 days, glucose-stimulated (16.7mmol/l) insulin release was enhanced by 121% (p<0.001) compared to non-implanted cells. Insulin responses to glucagon-like peptide-1 (10−9mol/l), cholecystokinin-8 (10−8 mol/l) and L-alanine (10 mmol/l) were increased by 32%, 31% and 68% respectively (p<0.05–0.01). Insulin content of the cells was 148% greater at 20 days after re-culture than before implantation (p<0.001), but basal insulin release (at 5.6 mmol/l glucose) was not changed. After re-culture for 40 days, insulin content declined to 68% of the content before implantation (p<0.01), although basal insulin release was unchanged. However, the insulin secretory responses to glucose, glucagonlike peptide-1, cholecystokinin-8 and L-alanine were decreased after 40 days of re-culture to 65%, 72%, 73% and 42% respectively of the values before implantation (p<0.05–0.01). The functional enhancement of electrofusion-derived surrogate β-cells that were re-cultured for 20 days after implantation and restoration of normoglycaemia indicates that the in vivo environment could greatly assist β-cell engineering approaches to therapy for diabetes. PMID:12369723

  16. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Grider, John R.; Murthy, Karnam S.; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  17. Rp-cAMPS Prodrugs Reveal the cAMP Dependence of First-Phase Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Schwede, Frank; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Kaufholz, Melanie; Bertinetti, Daniela; Leech, Colin A.; Cabrera, Over; Zhu, Yingmin; Mei, Fang; Cheng, Xiaodong; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E.; MacDonald, Patrick E.; Genieser, Hans-G.; Herberg, Friedrich W.

    2015-01-01

    cAMP-elevating agents such as the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. However, a debate has existed since the 1970s concerning whether or not cAMP signaling is essential for glucose alone to stimulate insulin secretion. Here, we report that the first-phase kinetic component of GSIS is cAMP-dependent, as revealed through the use of a novel highly membrane permeable para-acetoxybenzyl (pAB) ester prodrug that is a bioactivatable derivative of the cAMP antagonist adenosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer (Rp-cAMPS). In dynamic perifusion assays of human or rat islets, a step-wise increase of glucose concentration leads to biphasic insulin secretion, and under these conditions, 8-bromoadenosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer, 4-acetoxybenzyl ester (Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB) inhibits first-phase GSIS by up to 80%. Surprisingly, second-phase GSIS is inhibited to a much smaller extent (≤20%). Using luciferase, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays performed in living cells, we validate that Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB does in fact block cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation. Novel effects of Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB to block the activation of cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Epac1, Epac2) are also validated using genetically encoded Epac biosensors, and are independently confirmed in an in vitro Rap1 activation assay using Rp-cAMPS and Rp-8-Br-cAMPS. Thus, in addition to revealing the cAMP dependence of first-phase GSIS from human and rat islets, these findings establish a pAB-based chemistry for the synthesis of highly membrane permeable prodrug derivatives of Rp-cAMPS that act with micromolar or even nanomolar potency to inhibit cAMP signaling in living cells. PMID:26061564

  18. Rp-cAMPS Prodrugs Reveal the cAMP Dependence of First-Phase Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Frank; Chepurny, Oleg G; Kaufholz, Melanie; Bertinetti, Daniela; Leech, Colin A; Cabrera, Over; Zhu, Yingmin; Mei, Fang; Cheng, Xiaodong; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; MacDonald, Patrick E; Genieser, Hans-G; Herberg, Friedrich W; Holz, George G

    2015-07-01

    cAMP-elevating agents such as the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. However, a debate has existed since the 1970s concerning whether or not cAMP signaling is essential for glucose alone to stimulate insulin secretion. Here, we report that the first-phase kinetic component of GSIS is cAMP-dependent, as revealed through the use of a novel highly membrane permeable para-acetoxybenzyl (pAB) ester prodrug that is a bioactivatable derivative of the cAMP antagonist adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer (Rp-cAMPS). In dynamic perifusion assays of human or rat islets, a step-wise increase of glucose concentration leads to biphasic insulin secretion, and under these conditions, 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer, 4-acetoxybenzyl ester (Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB) inhibits first-phase GSIS by up to 80%. Surprisingly, second-phase GSIS is inhibited to a much smaller extent (≤20%). Using luciferase, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays performed in living cells, we validate that Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB does in fact block cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation. Novel effects of Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB to block the activation of cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Epac1, Epac2) are also validated using genetically encoded Epac biosensors, and are independently confirmed in an in vitro Rap1 activation assay using Rp-cAMPS and Rp-8-Br-cAMPS. Thus, in addition to revealing the cAMP dependence of first-phase GSIS from human and rat islets, these findings establish a pAB-based chemistry for the synthesis of highly membrane permeable prodrug derivatives of Rp-cAMPS that act with micromolar or even nanomolar potency to inhibit cAMP signaling in living cells. PMID:26061564

  19. Characterization of glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor (GLP2R) gene in chickens: functional analysis, tissue distribution, and developmental expression profile of GLP2R in embryonic intestine.

    PubMed

    Mo, C; Zhong, Y; Wang, Y; Yan, Z; Li, J

    2014-07-01

    This study characterized the glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor (GLP2R) gene of chickens because relatively little is known about the underlying mechanism of GLP2 actions in nonmammalian species. With the use of reverse transcription PCR, we first cloned the chicken GLP2R (cGLP2R) from adult intestine, which was predicted to encode a 529-amino acid receptor precursor. With the use of a pGL3-CRE luciferase reporter system, we demonstrated that cGLP2R expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells could be potently activated by cGLP2 (half maximal effective concentration, 1.06 nM) but not by its structurally related peptides, including the newly identified glucagon-like peptide, indicating that cGLP2R is a functional receptor specific to cGLP2. Reverse transcription PCR assay revealed that cGLP2R mRNA was widely expressed in adult chicken tissues, including pancreas and various parts of the gastrointestinal tract. With the use of quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR assays, we further investigated the mRNA expression of cGLP2R and its potential downstream mediators, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands (heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, epiregulin, and amphiregulin), in the distal duodenum of developing embryos. The mRNA expression levels of GLP2R and EGFR ligands (heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor and amphiregulin) were shown to increase (P < 0.05 or 0.01) during the late embryonic stages (E16 and E20), implying a potential coordinated action of GLP2 and EGFR ligands on embryonic intestine development. Taken together, our findings not only establish a molecular basis to explore the physiological roles of GLP2 in birds, but they also provide comparative insights into the roles of GLP2R and its ligand in vertebrates, such as its roles in embryonic intestine development.

  20. Intestinal regulation of urinary sodium excretion and the pathophysiology of diabetic kidney disease: a focus on glucagon-like peptide 1 and dipeptidyl peptidase 4.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Volker; Docherty, Neil G

    2014-09-01

    The tubular hypothesis of glomerular filtration and nephropathy in diabetes is a pathophysiological concept that assigns a critical role to the tubular system, including proximal tubular hyper-reabsorption and growth, which is relevant for early glomerular hyperfiltration and later chronic kidney disease. Here we focus on how harnessing the bioactivity of hormones released from the gut may ameliorate the early effects of diabetes on the kidney in part by attenuating proximal tubular hyper-reabsorption and growth. The endogenous tone of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)/GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) system and its pharmacological activation are nephroprotective in diabetes independent of changes in blood glucose. This is associated with suppression of increases in kidney weight and glomerular hyperfiltration, which may reflect, at least in part, its inhibitory effects on tubular hyper-reabsorption and growth. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) is also nephroprotective independent of changes in blood glucose and involves GLP-1/GLP-1R-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 induces natriuresis via activation of the GLP-1R. In contrast, DPP4 inhibition increases circulating GLP-1, but drives a GLP-1R-independent natriuretic response, implying a role for other DPP-4 substrates. The extent to which the intrarenal DPP-4/GLP-1 receptor system contributes to all these changes remains to be established, as does the direct impact of the system on renal inflammation. PMID:25085841

  1. Basal insulin combined incretin mimetic therapy with glucagon-like protein 1 receptor agonists as an upcoming option in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a practical guide to decision making

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    The combination of basal insulin and glucagon-like protein 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) is a new intriguing therapeutic option for patients with type 2 diabetes. In our daily practice we abbreviate this therapeutic concept with the term BIT (basal insulin combined incretin mimetic therapy) in a certain analogy to BOT (basal insulin supported oral therapy). In most cases BIT is indeed an extension of BOT, if fasting, prandial or postprandial blood glucose values have not reached the target range. In our paper we discuss special features of combinations of short- or prandial-acting and long- or continuous-acting GLP-1 RAs like exenatide, lixisenatide and liraglutide with basal insulin in relation to different glycemic targets. Overall it seems appropriate to use a short-acting GLP-1 RA if, after the near normalization of fasting blood glucose with BOT, the prandial or postprandial values are elevated. A long-acting GLP-1 RA might well be given, if fasting blood glucose values are the problem. Based on pathophysiological findings, recent clinical studies and our experience with BIT and BOT as well as BOTplus we developed chart-supported algorithms for decision making, including features and conditions of patients. The development of these practical tools was guided by the need for a more individualized antidiabetic therapy and the availability of the new BIT principle. PMID:25419451

  2. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide: effects on insulin and glucagon secretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mikkel Bring

    2016-04-01

    The hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted by enteroendocrine cells in the intestinal mucosa in response to nutrient ingestion. They are called incretin hormones because of their ability to enhance insulin secretion. However, in recent years it has become clear that the incretin hormones also affect glucagon secretion. While GLP-1 decreases glucagon levels, the effect of GIP on glucagon levels has been unclear. The regulation of glucagon secretion is interesting, as the combination of inadequate insulin secretion and excessive glucagon secretion are essential contributors to the hyperglycaemia that characterise patients with type 2 diabetes. Moreover, the near absence of a well-timed glucagon response contributes to an increased risk of hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes. The overall aim of this PhD thesis was to investigate how the blood glucose level affects the glucagon and insulin responses to GIP in healthy subjects (Study 1) and patients with Type 2 diabetes (Study 2), and more specifically to investigate the effects of GIP and GLP-1 at low blood glucose in patients with Type 1 diabetes without endogenous insulin secretion (Study 3). The investigations in the three mentioned study populations have been described in three original articles. The employed study designs were in randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover set-up, in which the same research subject is subjected to several study days thereby acting as his own control. Interventions were intravenous administration of hormones GIP, GLP-1 and placebo (saline) during different blood glucose levels maintained (clamped) at a certain level. The end-points were plasma concentrations of glucagon and insulin as well as the amount of glucose used to clamp the blood glucose levels. In Study 3, we also used stable glucose isotopes to estimate the endogenous glucose production and assessed symptoms and cognitive function during

  3. The Effects of Glucagon-like Peptide-2 on the Tight Junction and Barrier Function in IPEC-J2 Cells through Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Protein Kinase B–Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Changsong; Jia, Gang; Deng, Qiuhong; Zhao, Hua; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Guangmang; Wang, Kangning

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is important for intestinal barrier function and regulation of tight junction (TJ) proteins, but the intracellular mechanisms of action remain undefined. The purpose of this research was to determine the protective effect of GLP-2 mediated TJ and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stressed IPEC-J2 cells and to test the hypothesis that GLP-2 regulate TJ and TER through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in IPEC-J2 cells. Wortmannin and LY294002 are specific inhibitors of PI3K. The results showed that 100 μg/mL LPS stress decreased TER and TJ proteins occludin, claudin-1 and zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) mRNA, proteins expressions (p<0.01) respectively. GLP-2 (100 nmol/L) promote TER and TJ proteins occludin, claudin-1, and zo-1 mRNA, proteins expressions in LPS stressed and normal IPEC-J2 cells (p<0.01) respectively. In normal cells, both wortmannin and LY294002, PI3K inhibitors, prevented the mRNA and protein expressions of Akt and mTOR increase induced by GLP-2 (p<0.01) following with the significant decreasing of occludin, claudin-1, ZO-1 mRNA and proteins expressions and TER (p<0.01). In conclusion, these results indicated that GLP-2 can promote TJ’s expression and TER in LPS stressed and normal IPEC-J2 cells and GLP-2 could regulate TJ and TER through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. PMID:26954146

  4. Immunoreactivity to peptides belonging to the pancreatic polypeptide family (NPY, aPY, PP, PYY) and to glucagon-like peptide in the endocrine pancreas and anterior intestine of adult lampreys, Petromyzon marinus: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Cheung, R; Andrews, P C; Plisetskaya, E M; Youson, J H

    1991-01-01

    Immunoreactivity of antisera directed against human neuropeptide Y (NPY), anglerfish polypeptide YG (aPY), bovine pancreatic polypeptide (bPP), salmon pancreatic polypeptide (sPP), porcine peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY), and salmon glucagon-like peptide (GLP) was investigated in the endocrine pancreas and anterior intestine of adult lampreys, Petromyzon marinus, by immunohistochemical analysis. There was no immunoreactivity to anti-sPP and anti-bPP in any tissue and anti-GLP immunostaining was only present in the anterior intestine. The immunoreactivity to antisera raised against NPY, aPY, and PYY was colocalized within the same small number of cells in the caudal and cranial pancreas of juveniles and the caudal pancreas of upstream migrant adults. These antibodies did not immunostain B- or D-cells and thus, NPY, aPY, and PYY were likely localized in a third cell type (3a) in the lamprey pancreas. Immunostaining of a few cells with only anti-aPY suggested the possibility of a fourth cell type (3b). Immunoreactivity was similar in the cranial and caudal pancreas of male upstream migrants; however, in the female cranial pancreas, a few cells demonstrated intense immunoreaction to anti-aPY, while weaker immunostaining with this antiserum was observed in B-cells. In the intestine of juvenile and upstream migrant lampreys, positive immunostaining to GLP, NPY, aPY, and PYY antibodies was colocalized within the same cell. We believe that this cell may contain PYY/glucagon family peptides. Other intestinal cells immunostained with either GLP or somatostatin-34 antiserum. PMID:2026316

  5. Effects of different metabolic states and surgical models on glucose metabolism and secretion of ileal L-cell peptides: protocol for a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Alper; Dixon, John B; Pouwels, Sjaak; Celik, Bahri Onur; Karaca, Fatih Can; Gupta, Adarsh; Santoro, Sergio; Ugale, Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are increasing worldwide, reaching pandemic proportions. The understanding of the role of functional restriction and gut hormones can be a beneficial tool in treating obesity and diabetes. However, the exact hormonal profiles in different metabolic states and surgical models are not known. Methods and analysis The HIPER-1 Study is a single-centre cross-sectional study in which 240 patients (in different metabolic states and surgical models) will receive an oral mixed-meal tolerance test (OMTT). At baseline and after 30, 60 and 120 min, peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide 1 levels and glucose and insulin sensitivity will be measured. The primary end point of the study will be the area under the glucagon-like peptide 1 and peptide YY curves after the OMTT. Secondary study end points will include examination of the difference in plasma levels of the distal ileal hormones in subjects with various health statuses and in patients who have been treated with different surgical techniques. Ethics and dissemination An independent ethics committee, the Institutional Review Board of Istanbul Sisli Kolan International Hospital, Turkey, has approved the study protocol. Dissemination will occur via publication, national and international conference presentations, and exchanges with regional, provincial and national stakeholders. Trial registration number NCT02532829; Pre-results. PMID:26975937

  6. Brain GLP-1 and insulin sensitivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes is often treated with a class of drugs referred to as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs. GLP-1 is a peptide secreted by the gut that acts through only one known receptor, the GLP-1 receptor. The primary function of GLP-1 is thought to be lowering of postprandial glucose levels....

  7. Triphenyltin impairs a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent increase of cytosolic Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} and PKA-independent increase of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} associated with insulin secretion in hamster pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Yoshikazu . E-mail: y-miura@dokkyomed.ac.jp; Matsui, Hisao

    2006-11-01

    Oral administration of triphenyltin chloride (TPT) (60 mg/kg body weight) inhibits the insulin secretion by decreasing the cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i}) induced by glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in pancreatic {beta}-cells of the hamster. To test the possibility that the abnormal level of [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i} induced by TPT administration could be due to a defect in the cAMP-dependent cytoplasmic Na{sup +} concentration ([Na{sup +}] {sub i}) in the {beta}-cells, we investigated the effects of TPT administration on the changes of [Na{sup +}] {sub i} induced by GIP, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), or forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, and on the changes of [Na{sup +}] {sub i} or [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i} induced by 6-Bnz-cAMP, an activator of protein kinase A (PKA), and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, an activator of Epac. The [Na{sup +}] {sub i} and [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i} were measured in islet cells loaded with sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate (SBFI) and fura-2, respectively. In the presence of 135 mM Na{sup +}, TPT administration significantly reduced the rise in [Na{sup +}] {sub i} by 10 nM GLP-1, 10 {mu}M forskolin, and 50 {mu}M 6-Bnz-cAMP, but had not effect in a Na{sup +}-free medium. In the presence of 135 mM Na{sup +}, TPT administration also reduced the rise in [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i} by 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP plus10 {mu}M H-89, a inhibitor of PKA, and 6-Bnz-cAMP. Moreover, TPT administration significantly reduced the insulin secretion by 2 mM db-cAMP, GLP-1, GIP, and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP with and without H-89, and that by 6-Bnz-cAMP and forskolin. Our study suggested that TPT has inhibitory effects on the cellular Ca{sup 2+} response due to a reduced Na{sup +} permeability through PKA-dependent mechanisms in hamster islet cells. Also TPT has the reduction of [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i} related to Na{sup +}-dependent insulin secretion after an activation of Epac.

  8. Increased secretion of insulin and proliferation of islet {beta}-cells in rats with mesenteric lymph duct ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagino, Ko; Yokozawa, Junji; Sasaki, Yu; Matsuda, Akiko; Takeda, Hiroaki; Kawata, Sumio

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion was increased during the OGTT or IVGTT in mesenteric lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferation of islet {beta}-cells was upregulated in lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesenteric lymph duct flow has a role in glucose metabolism. -- Abstract: Background and aims: It has been suggested that intestinal lymph flow plays an important role in insulin secretion and glucose metabolism after meals. In this study, we investigated the influence of ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct on glucose metabolism and islet {beta}-cells in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (10 weeks old) were divided into two groups: one underwent ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct above the cistern (ligation group), and the other underwent a sham operation (sham group). After 1 and 2 weeks, fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and the active form of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured. At 2 weeks after the operation, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) were performed. After the rats had been sacrificed, the insulin content of the pancreas was measured and the proliferation of {beta}-cells was assessed immunohistochemically using antibodies against insulin and Ki-67. Results: During the OGTT, the ligation group showed a significant decrease in the plasma glucose concentration at 120 min (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in the plasma insulin concentration by more than 2-fold at 15 min (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the plasma GIP concentration was significantly decreased at 60 min (p < 0.01) in the ligated group, while the active form of GLP-1 showed a significantly higher level at 90 min (1.7-fold; p < 0.05) and 120 min (2.5-fold; p < 0.01). During the IVGTT, the plasma insulin concentration in the ligation group was significantly higher at 2

  9. Neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 in term and preterm parturition.

    PubMed

    Romero, R; Ceska, M; Avila, C; Mazor, M; Behnke, E; Lindley, I

    1991-10-01

    The neutrophil is the leukocyte most frequently recruited into the amniotic fluid in cases of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity. Neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 is a newly identified cytokine that is capable of inducing selective neutrophil chemotaxis and activation. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between amniotic fluid concentrations of neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8, microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity, and parturition (term and preterm). Amniotic fluid neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 was measured with an immunoassay validated for human amniotic fluid (sensitivity 0.3 ng/ml). Fluid was obtained from women in the following groups: midtrimester (n = 38), term not in labor (n = 38), term in active labor (n = 67), and preterm labor with intact membranes (n = 62). Fluid was cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacterial and Mycoplasma. Sterile amniotic fluid from most women in the midtrimester of pregnancy and women at term not in labor did not contain immunoreactive neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8. Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity was associated with increased concentrations of neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8. The amniotic fluid of women with preterm labor and sterile amniotic fluid who had preterm delivery contained higher neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 levels than did the amniotic fluid of women who responded to tocolysis and had delivery at term. Term parturition is associated with increased concentrations of neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 in the amniotic fluid. We conclude that neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 is part of the host response to microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and that increased amniotic fluid availability of this cytokine occurs in term and preterm parturition. PMID:1951537

  10. Targeting the TGR5-GLP-1 pathway to combat type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Pols, T W H; Auwerx, J; Schoonjans, K

    2010-01-01

    Incretin-based therapies have shown promise in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we review our current understanding of TGR5 as a target to induce glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. These new observations suggest that TGR5 agonists may constitute a novel approach to treat type 2 diabetes, as well as complications of diabetes, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:20444564

  11. The glucagon‐like peptide 1 receptor agonist liraglutide attenuates the reinforcing properties of alcohol in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Vallöf, Daniel; Maccioni, Paola; Colombo, Giancarlo; Mandrapa, Minja; Jörnulf, Julia Winsa; Egecioglu, Emil; Engel, Jörgen A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The incretin hormone, glucagon‐like peptide 1 (GLP‐1), regulates gastric emptying, glucose‐dependent stimulation of insulin secretion and glucagon release, and GLP‐1 analogs are therefore approved for treatment of type II diabetes. GLP‐1 receptors are expressed in reward‐related areas such as the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens, and GLP‐1 was recently shown to regulate several alcohol‐mediated behaviors as well as amphetamine‐induced, cocaine‐induced and nicotine‐induced reward. The present series of experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of the GLP‐1 receptor agonist, liraglutide, on several alcohol‐related behaviors in rats that model different aspects of alcohol use disorder in humans. Acute liraglutide treatment suppressed the well‐documented effects of alcohol on the mesolimbic dopamine system, namely alcohol‐induced accumbal dopamine release and conditioned place preference in mice. In addition, acute administration of liraglutide prevented the alcohol deprivation effect and reduced alcohol intake in outbred rats, while repeated treatment of liraglutide decreased alcohol intake in outbred rats as well as reduced operant self‐administration of alcohol in selectively bred Sardinian alcohol‐preferring rats. Collectively, these data suggest that GLP‐1 receptor agonists could be tested for treatment of alcohol dependence in humans. PMID:26303264

  12. Reversible immortalization of Nestin-positive precursor cells from pancreas and differentiation into insulin-secreting cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Pei; Li, Li; Qi, Hui; Zhou, Han-xin; Deng, Chun-yan; Li, Fu-rong

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NPPCs from mouse pancreas were isolated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tet-on system for SV40 large in NPPCs was used to get RINPPCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RINPPCs can undergo at least 80 population doublings without senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RINPPCs can be induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The combination of GLP-1 and sodium butyrate promoted the differentiation process. -- Abstract: Pancreatic stem cells or progenitor cells posses the ability of directed differentiation into pancreatic {beta} cells. However, these cells usually have limited proliferative capacity and finite lifespan in vitro. In the present study, Nestin-positive progenitor cells (NPPCs) from mouse pancreas that expressed the pancreatic stem cells or progenitor cell marker Nestin were isolated to obtain a sufficient number of differentiated pancreatic {beta} cells. Tet-on system for SV40 large T-antigen expression in NPPCs was used to achieve reversible immortalization. The reversible immortal Nestin-positive progenitor cells (RINPPCs) can undergo at least 80 population doublings without senescence in vitro while maintaining their biological and genetic characteristics. RINPPCs can be efficiently induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells that contain a combination of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and sodium butyrate. The results of the present study can be used to explore transplantation therapy of type I diabetes mellitus.

  13. Waking up the gut in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Meier, Juris J

    2010-01-01

    Multiorgan failure frequently develops in critically ill patients. While therapeutic efforts in such patients are often focused on the lungs, on the cardiovascular system as well as on the kidneys, it is important to also consider the functional alterations in gut motility and hormone secretion. Given the central regulatory functions of many gut hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide 1, glucagon-like peptide 2, ghrelin and others, exogenous supplementation of some of these factors may be beneficial under conditions of critical illness. From a pragmatic point of view, the most feasible way towards a restoration of gut hormone secretion in critically ill patients is to provide enteral nutritional supply as soon as possible.

  14. Human embryonic stem cell differentiation into insulin secreting β-cells for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bose, Bipasha; Shenoy, Sudheer P; Konda, Sudhakar; Wangikar, Pralhad

    2012-11-01

    hESC (human embryonic stem cells), when differentiated into pancreatic β ILC (islet-like clusters), have enormous potential for the cell transplantation therapy for Type 1 diabetes. We have developed a five-step protocol in which the EBs (embryoid bodies) were first differentiated into definitive endoderm and subsequently into pancreatic lineage followed by formation of functional endocrine β islets, which were finally matured efficiently under 3D conditions. The conventional cytokines activin A and RA (retinoic acid) were used initially to obtain definitive endoderm. In the last step, ILC were further matured under 3D conditions using amino acid rich media (CMRL media) supplemented with anti-hyperglycaemic hormone-Glp1 (glucagon-like peptide 1) analogue Liraglutide with prolonged t(½) and Exendin 4. The differentiated islet-like 3D clusters expressed bonafide mature and functional β-cell markers-PDX1 (pancreatic and duodenal homoeobox-1), C-peptide, insulin and MafA. Insulin synthesis de novo was confirmed by C-peptide ELISA of culture supernatant in response to varying concentrations of glucose as well as agonist and antagonist of functional 3D β islet cells in vitro. Our results indicate the presence of almost 65% of insulin producing cells in 3D clusters. The cells were also found to ameliorate hyperglycaemia in STZ (streptozotocin) induced diabetic NOD/SCID (non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency) mouse up to 96 days of transplantation. This protocol provides a basis for 3D in vitro generation of long-term in vivo functionally viable islets from hESC.

  15. Infanticide secrets

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jennieffer A.; Beck, Cheryl T.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore thoughts of infanticide that did not lead to the act among mothers with postpartum depression. DESIGN A phenomenologic hermeneutic study in which women were invited to share their experiences of having thoughts of infanticide. SETTING Community setting in a large metropolitan city, Brisbane, Australia. PARTICIPANTS Fifteen women who had been diagnosed as clinically depressed with postpartum onset whose babies were 12 months of age or younger. METHOD Audiotaped, in-depth interviews were transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis commenced immediately after the first interview, and data collection continued until saturation was achieved. A questioning approach that reflected hermeneutics was facilitated by use of journals by the researchers. MAIN FINDINGS Six themes emerged from the data: imagined acts of infanticide, the experience of horror, distorted sense of responsibility, consuming negativity, keeping secrets, and managing the crisis. CONCLUSION Women who experienced nonpsychotic depression preferred not to disclose their thoughts of infanticide to health professionals, including trusted general practitioners or psychiatrists. These women were more likely to mention their suicidal thoughts than their infanticidal thoughts in order to obtain health care. General practitioners and other health professionals should directly ask about whether a woman has been experiencing thoughts of harming herself or her baby, regardless of the reason why she has presented. PMID:19074717

  16. Preparation and PEGylation of exendin-4 peptide secreted from yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Cai, Zhong-Hua; Li, Lei; Kou, Chuang; Gao, Yun-Feng

    2009-06-01

    Exendin-4, a peptide analogue of glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), has been developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Herein, the secretive exendin-4 peptide, expressed by methanol induction in Pichia pastoris, was purified to near homogeneity by Ni-NTA agarose chromatography. 103.6 mg of protein was obtained from 1 L of the supernatant and its purity was 96.1%. Subsequently, the PEGylated exendin-4 was prepared. The bioactivity of exendin-4 was determined by examining the glucose-lowering and insulin-releasing ability in plasma. Then, a safety evaluation was performed by histological examination of the main organs (liver, kidney and pancreas). PEGylated exendin-4 displayed glucose-lowering and insulin-stimulating action in vivo without obvious damage to the above organs. The results suggest that the P. pastoris expression could be used to produce large quantities of exendin-4, and PEGylation is a useful tool to maintain and enhance bioactivity of the peptide. PMID:19462477

  17. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D; Akiba, Yasutada

    2012-10-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal L-glutamate (L-Glu) and 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3- secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. L-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3- secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3- secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal L-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3- secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3- secretion.

  18. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H.; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal l-glutamate (l-Glu) and 5′-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3− secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3− secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3− secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. l-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced l-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3− secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3− secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3− secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced l-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3− secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal l-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3− secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3− secretion

  19. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D; Akiba, Yasutada

    2012-10-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal L-glutamate (L-Glu) and 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3- secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. L-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3- secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3- secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal L-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3- secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3- secretion. PMID:22821947

  20. Gut hormone secretion, gastric emptying, and glycemic responses to erythritol and xylitol in lean and obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wölnerhanssen, Bettina K; Cajacob, Lucian; Keller, Nino; Doody, Alison; Rehfeld, Jens F; Drewe, Juergen; Peterli, Ralph; Beglinger, Christoph; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity and a possible association with increasing sucrose consumption, nonnutritive sweeteners are gaining popularity. Given that some studies indicate that artificial sweeteners might have adverse effects, alternative solutions are sought. Xylitol and erythritol have been known for a long time and their beneficial effects on caries prevention and potential health benefits in diabetic patients have been demonstrated in several studies. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are released from the gut in response to food intake, promote satiation, reduce gastric emptying (GE), and modulate glucose homeostasis. Although glucose ingestion stimulates sweet taste receptors in the gut and leads to incretin and gastrointestinal hormone release, the effects of xylitol and erythritol have not been well studied. Ten lean and 10 obese volunteers were given 75 g of glucose, 50 g of xylitol, or 75 g of erythritol in 300 ml of water or placebo (water) by a nasogastric tube. We examined plasma glucose, insulin, active GLP-1, CCK, and GE with a [(13)C]sodium acetate breath test and assessed subjective feelings of satiation. Xylitol and erythritol led to a marked increase in CCK and GLP-1, whereas insulin and plasma glucose were not (erythritol) or only slightly (xylitol) affected. Both xylitol and erythritol induced a significant retardation in GE. Subjective feelings of appetite were not significantly different after carbohydrate intake compared with placebo. In conclusion, acute ingestion of erythritol and xylitol stimulates gut hormone release and slows down gastric emptying, whereas there is no or only little effect on insulin release. PMID:27117004

  1. Gut hormone secretion, gastric emptying, and glycemic responses to erythritol and xylitol in lean and obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wölnerhanssen, Bettina K; Cajacob, Lucian; Keller, Nino; Doody, Alison; Rehfeld, Jens F; Drewe, Juergen; Peterli, Ralph; Beglinger, Christoph; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity and a possible association with increasing sucrose consumption, nonnutritive sweeteners are gaining popularity. Given that some studies indicate that artificial sweeteners might have adverse effects, alternative solutions are sought. Xylitol and erythritol have been known for a long time and their beneficial effects on caries prevention and potential health benefits in diabetic patients have been demonstrated in several studies. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are released from the gut in response to food intake, promote satiation, reduce gastric emptying (GE), and modulate glucose homeostasis. Although glucose ingestion stimulates sweet taste receptors in the gut and leads to incretin and gastrointestinal hormone release, the effects of xylitol and erythritol have not been well studied. Ten lean and 10 obese volunteers were given 75 g of glucose, 50 g of xylitol, or 75 g of erythritol in 300 ml of water or placebo (water) by a nasogastric tube. We examined plasma glucose, insulin, active GLP-1, CCK, and GE with a [(13)C]sodium acetate breath test and assessed subjective feelings of satiation. Xylitol and erythritol led to a marked increase in CCK and GLP-1, whereas insulin and plasma glucose were not (erythritol) or only slightly (xylitol) affected. Both xylitol and erythritol induced a significant retardation in GE. Subjective feelings of appetite were not significantly different after carbohydrate intake compared with placebo. In conclusion, acute ingestion of erythritol and xylitol stimulates gut hormone release and slows down gastric emptying, whereas there is no or only little effect on insulin release.

  2. Incretin-based drugs for type 2 diabetes: Focus on East Asian perspectives.

    PubMed

    Seino, Yutaka; Kuwata, Hitoshi; Yabe, Daisuke

    2016-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes in East Asians is characterized primarily by β-cell dysfunction, and with less adiposity and less insulin resistance compared with that in Caucasians. Such pathophysiological differences can determine the appropriate therapeutics for the disease. Incretins, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1, are secreted in response to meal ingestion, and enhance insulin secretion glucose-dependently. Incretin-based drugs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i) and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, that ameliorate β-cell dysfunction with limited hypoglycemia risk are now widely used in type 2 diabetes management. Recent meta-analyses of clinical trials on DPP-4i and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists found that the drugs were more effective in Asians, most likely because of amelioration of β-cell dysfunction. In addition, we found increased glycated hemoglobin-lowering effects of DPP-4i to be associated with intake of fish in type 2 diabetes, which suggests that dietary customs of East Asians might also underlie the greater efficacy of DPP-4i. Despite the limited risk, cases of severe hypoglycemia were reported for DPP-4i/sulfonylureas combinations. Importantly, hypoglycemia was more frequent in patients also receiving glibenclamide or glimepiride, which activate exchange protein directly activated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate 2, a critical mediator of incretin signaling, and was less frequent in patients receiving gliclazide, which does not activate exchange protein directly activated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate 2. Prevention of insulin-associated hypoglycemia by DPP-4i has gained attention with regard to the enhancement of hypoglycemia-induced glucagon secretion by insulinotropic polypeptide, but remains to be investigated in East Asians. Despite the safety issues, which are paramount and must be carefully monitored, the incretin-based drugs could have potential as a first choice therapy in

  3. [Potential of pharmacological modulation of level and activity incretins on diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Spasov, A A; Chepljaeva, N I

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes data on the main approaches used for the search of biologically active compounds modulating the level and physiological activity of incretins. Currently two groups of drugs are used in clinical practice: they either replenish the deficit of incretins (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists) or inhibit the degradation processes (dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors). In addition, new groups of substances are actively searched. These include non-peptide agonists of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors, agonists/antagonists of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, the hybrid polypeptides based on glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucagon.

  4. Electrospun fibers immobilized with bone forming peptide-1 derived from BMP7 for guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Ji-Hye; Cho, Hyeong-Jin; Kim, Hyung Keun; Yoon, Taek Rim; Shin, Heungsoo

    2013-07-01

    The development of ideal barrier membranes with appropriate porosity and bioactivity is essential for the guidance of new bone formation in orthopedic and craniomaxillofacial surgery. In this study, we developed bioactive electrospun fibers based on poly (lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) by immobilizing bone-forming peptide 1 (BFP1) derived from the immature region of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7). We exploited polydopamine chemistry for the immobilization of BFP1; polydopamine (PD) was coated on the electrospun PLGA fibers, on which BFP1 was subsequently immobilized under weakly basic conditions. The immobilization of BFP1 was verified by characterizing the surface chemical composition and quantitatively measured by fluorescamine assay. The immobilization of BPF1 on the electrospun fibers supported the compact distribution of collagen I and the spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). SEM micrographs demonstrated the aggregation of globular mineral accretions, with significant increases in ALP activity and calcium deposition when hMSCs were cultured on fibers immobilized with BFP1 for 14 days. We then implanted the prepared fibers onto mouse calvarial defects and analyzed bone formation after 2 months. Semi-quantification of bone growth from representative X-ray images showed that the bone area was approximately 20% in the defect-only group, while the group implanted with PLGA fibers showed significant improvements of 44.27 ± 7.37% and 57.59 ± 15.24% in the groups implanted with PD-coated PLGA and with BFP1-coated PLGA, respectively. Based on these results, our approach may be a promising tool to develop clinically-applicable bioactive membranes for guided bone regeneration."

  5. Revisiting and re-engineering the classical zinc finger peptide: consensus peptide-1 (CP-1).

    PubMed

    Besold, Angelique N; Widger, Leland R; Namuswe, Frances; Michalek, Jamie L; Michel, Sarah L J; Goldberg, David P

    2016-04-01

    Zinc plays key structural and catalytic roles in biology. Structural zinc sites are often referred to as zinc finger (ZF) sites, and the classical ZF contains a Cys2His2 motif that is involved in coordinating Zn(II). An optimized Cys2His2 ZF, named consensus peptide 1 (CP-1), was identified more than 20 years ago using a limited set of sequenced proteins. We have reexamined the CP-1 sequence, using our current, much larger database of sequenced proteins that have been identified from high-throughput sequencing methods, and found the sequence to be largely unchanged. The CCHH ligand set of CP-1 was then altered to a CAHH motif to impart hydrolytic activity. This ligand set mimics the His2Cys ligand set of peptide deformylase (PDF), a hydrolytically active M(II)-centered (M = Zn or Fe) protein. The resultant peptide [CP-1(CAHH)] was evaluated for its ability to coordinate Zn(II) and Co(II) ions, adopt secondary structure, and promote hydrolysis. CP-1(CAHH) was found to coordinate Co(II) and Zn(II) and a pentacoordinate geometry for Co(II)-CP-1(CAHH) was implicated from UV-vis data. This suggests a His2Cys(H2O)2 environment at the metal center. The Zn(II)-bound CP-1(CAHH) was shown to adopt partial secondary structure by 1-D (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Both Zn(II)-CP-1(CAHH) and Co(II)-CP-1(CAHH) show good hydrolytic activity toward the test substrate 4-nitrophenyl acetate, exhibiting faster rates than most active synthetic Zn(II) complexes.

  6. SV-IV Peptide1–16 reduces coagulant power in normal Factor V and Factor V Leiden

    PubMed Central

    Di Micco, Biagio; Lepretti, Marilena; Rota, Lidia; Quaglia, Ilaria; Ferrazzi, Paola; Di Micco, Gianluca; Di Micco, Pierpaolo

    2007-01-01

    Native Factor V is an anticoagulant, but when activated by thrombin, Factor X or platelet proteases, it becomes a procoagulant. Due to these double properties, Factor V plays a crucial role in the regulation of coagulation/anticoagulation balance. Factor V Leiden (FVL) disorder may lead to thrombophilia. Whether a reduction in the activation of Factor V or Factor V Leiden may correct the disposition to thrombophilia is unknown. Therefore we tested SV-IV Peptide 1–16 (i.e. a peptide derived by seminal protein vescicle number IV, SV-IV) to assess its capacity to inhibit the procoagulant activity of normal clotting factor V or Factor V Leiden (FVL). We found that SV-IV protein has potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties and also exerts procoagulant activity. In the present work we show that the SV-IV Peptide 1–16, incubated with plasma containing normal Factor V or FVL plasma for 5 minutes reduces the procoagulant capacity of both substances. This is an anticoagulant effect whereas SV-IV protein is a procoagulant. This activity is effective both in terms of the coagulation tests, where coagulation times are increased, and in terms of biochemical tests conducted with purified molecules, where Factor X activation is reduced. Peptide 1–16 was, in the pure molecule system, first incubated for 5 minutes with purified Factor V then it was added to the mix of phosphatidylserine, Ca2+, Factor X and its chromogenic molecule Chromozym X. We observed a more than 50% reduction in lysis of chromogenic molecule Chromozym X by Factor Xa, compared to the sample without Peptide 1–16. Such reduction in Chromozym X lysis, is explained with the reduced activation of Factor X by partial inactivation of Factor V by Peptide 1–16. Thus our study demonstrates that Peptide 1–16 reduces the coagulation capacity of Factor V and Factor V Leiden in vitro, and, in turn, causes factor X reduced activation. PMID:18154667

  7. Authentication Without Secrets

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, Lyndon G.; Robertson, Perry J.

    2015-11-01

    This work examines a new approach to authentication, which is the most fundamental security primitive that underpins all cyber security protections. Current Internet authentication techniques require the protection of one or more secret keys along with the integrity protection of the algorithms/computations designed to prove possession of the secret without actually revealing it. Protecting a secret requires physical barriers or encryption with yet another secret key. The reason to strive for "Authentication without Secret Keys" is that protecting secrets (even small ones only kept in a small corner of a component or device) is much harder than protecting the integrity of information that is not secret. Promising methods are examined for authentication of components, data, programs, network transactions, and/or individuals. The successful development of authentication without secret keys will enable far more tractable system security engineering for high exposure, high consequence systems by eliminating the need for brittle protection mechanisms to protect secret keys (such as are now protected in smart cards, etc.). This paper is a re-release of SAND2009-7032 with new figures numerous edits.

  8. Preoperative β-cell function in patients with type 2 diabetes is important for the outcome of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Michael Taulo; Hansen, Merethe; Skaaby, Stinna; Dalby, Sina; Støckel, Mikael; Floyd, Andrea Karen; Bech, Karsten; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Holst, Jens Juul; Dela, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) show remission after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This is the result of increased postoperative insulin sensitivity and β-cell secretion. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of the preoperative β-cell function in T2DM for the chance of remission after RYGB. Fifteen patients with and 18 without T2DM had 25 g oral (OGTT) and intravenous (IVGTT) glucose tolerance tests performed at inclusion, after a diet-induced weight loss, and 4 and 18 months after RYGB. Postoperative first phase insulin secretion rate (ISR) during the IVGTT and β-cell glucose sensitivity during the OGTT increased in T2DM. Postoperative insulin sensitivity and the disposition index (DI) markedly increased in both groups. By stratifying the T2DM into two groups according to highest (T2DMhigh) and lowest (T2DMlow) baseline DI, a restoration of first phase ISR and β-cell glucose sensitivity were seen only in T2DMhigh. Remission of type 2 diabetes was 71 and 38% in T2DMhigh and T2DMlow, respectively. Postoperative postprandial GLP-1 concentrations increased markedly, but did not differ between the groups. Our findings emphasize the importance of the preoperative of β-cell function for remission of diabetes after RYGB. Key points Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery leads to remission of type 2 diabetes in the majority of patients suffering from the disease. The gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 is believed to be of major importance for the remission process. The present project demonstrates a marked difference in the chance of remission of type 2 diabetes in patients with low or high preoperative β-cell function in spite of a similar post-surgery increase in postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 release. Furthermore, post-surgery intravenous glucose administration, which does not stimulate release of glucagon-like peptide-1, leads to increased insulin secretion in the patients with the best preoperative

  9. Secrets to success.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2014-02-01

    A new national study reveals what it takes for physician practices to stay financially viable. Several Texas practices, among those rated as "better performers," share their secrets to success. One of those secrets, a physician says, is "hiring good people and getting out of their way." PMID:24500918

  10. Secrets in "The Day of Ahmed's Secret."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckett, Peter; Knox, Marjorie

    2001-01-01

    Examines images and the written text in the picture book, "The Day of Ahmed's Secret," by Florence Parry Heide and Judith Heide Gilliland. Examines the book in greater detail by looking for issues of authenticity as well as social issues within the book's pictures and written texts. (SG)

  11. Dose-dependent effects of a soluble dietary fibre (pectin) on food intake, adiposity, gut hypertrophy and gut satiety hormone secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Adam, Clare L; Williams, Patricia A; Garden, Karen E; Thomson, Lynn M; Ross, Alexander W

    2015-01-01

    Soluble fermentable dietary fibre elicits gut adaptations, increases satiety and potentially offers a natural sustainable means of body weight regulation. Here we aimed to quantify physiological responses to graded intakes of a specific dietary fibre (pectin) in an animal model. Four isocaloric semi-purified diets containing 0, 3.3%, 6.7% or 10% w/w apple pectin were offered ad libitum for 8 or 28 days to young adult male rats (n = 8/group). Measurements were made of voluntary food intake, body weight, initial and final body composition by magnetic resonance imaging, final gut regional weights and histology, and final plasma satiety hormone concentrations. In both 8- and 28-day cohorts, dietary pectin inclusion rate was negatively correlated with food intake, body weight gain and the change in body fat mass, with no effect on lean mass gain. In both cohorts, pectin had no effect on stomach weight but pectin inclusion rate was positively correlated with weights and lengths of small intestine and caecum, jejunum villus height and crypt depth, ileum crypt depth, and plasma total glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) concentrations, and at 8 days was correlated with weight and length of colon and with caecal mucosal depth. Therefore, the gut's morphological and endocrine adaptations were dose-dependent, occurred within 8 days and were largely sustained for 28 days during continued dietary intervention. Increasing amounts of the soluble fermentable fibre pectin in the diet proportionately decreased food intake, body weight gain and body fat content, associated with proportionately increased satiety hormones GLP-1 and PYY and intestinal hypertrophy, supporting a role for soluble dietary fibre-induced satiety in healthy body weight regulation. PMID:25602757

  12. Prebiotic Fiber Increases Hepatic Acetyl CoA Carboxylase Phosphorylation and Suppresses Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Secretion More Effectively When Used with Metformin in Obese Rats1,2

    PubMed Central

    Pyra, Kim A.; Saha, Dolan C.; Reimer, Raylene A.

    2013-01-01

    Independently, metformin (MET) and the prebiotic, oligofructose (OFS), have been shown to increase glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) secretion. Our objective was to determine whether using OFS as an adjunct with MET augments GLP-1 secretion in obese rats. Male, diet-induced obese Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to: 1) high-fat/-sucrose diet [HFHS; control (C); 20% fat, 50% sucrose wt:wt]; 2) HFHS+10% OFS (OFS); 3) HFHS + MET [300 mg/kg/d (MET)]; 4) HFHS+10% OFS+MET (OFS +MET). Body composition, glycemia, satiety hormones, and mechanisms related to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) activity in plasma, hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK; Western blots), and gut microbiota (qPCR) were examined. Direct effects of MET and SCFA were examined in human enteroendocrine cells. The interaction between OFS and MET affected fat mass, hepatic TG, secretion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and leptin, and AMPKα2 mRNA and phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase (pACC) levels (P < 0.05). Combined, OFS and MET reduced GIP secretion to a greater extent than either treatment alone (P < 0.05). The hepatic pACC level was increased by OFS+MET by at least 50% above all other treatments, which did not differ from each other (P < 0.05). OFS decreased plasma DPP4 activity (P < 0.001). Cecal Bifidobacteria (P < 0.001) were markedly increased and C. leptum decreased (P < 0.001) with OFS consumption. In human enteroendocrine cells, the interaction between MET and SCFA affected GLP-1 secretion (P < 0.04) but was not associated with higher GLP-1 than the highest individual doses. In conclusion, the combined actions of OFS and MET were associated with important interaction effects that have the potential to improve metabolic outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:22223580

  13. Six secrets of champagne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard

    2015-12-01

    Popping open a bottle of champagne is one of life's great delights, but how much do you really know about the science behind this greatest of wines? Gérard Liger-Belair reveals his six favourite champagne secrets.

  14. Secret quality of love.

    PubMed

    Strachan-Hall, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    Many of us can recite three Donabedian dimensions of the quality of care of structure, process and outcome. Recently, I was introduced to another of Avedis Donabedian's quotes about the 'secret quality of love'. PMID:27581908

  15. Efficient quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huawang; Dai, Yuewei

    2016-05-01

    An efficient quantum secret sharing scheme is proposed, in which the dealer generates some single particles and then uses the operations of quantum-controlled-not and Hadamard gate to encode a determinate secret into these particles. The participants get their shadows by performing the single-particle measurements on their particles, and even the dealer cannot know their shadows. Compared to the existing schemes, our scheme is more practical within the present technologies.

  16. Osteoinductive Effects of Free and Immobilized Bone Forming Peptide-1 on Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyue; Zheng, Yunfei; Zhao, Xianghui; Ge, Yanjun; Chen, Tong; Liu, Yunsong; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Most synthetic polymeric materials currently used for bone tissue engineering lack specific signals through which cells can identify and interact with the surface, resulting in incompatibility and compromised osteogenic activity. Soluble inductive factors also have issues including a short half-live in vivo. Bone forming peptide-1 is a truncated peptide from the immature form of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) that displays higher osteogenic activity than full-length, mature BMP-7. In this study, we used a mussel-inspired immobilization strategy mediated by polymerization of dopamine to introduce recently discovered stimulators of bone forming peptide-1 (BFP-1) onto the surface of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) substrate to form a biomaterial that overcomes these challenges. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs), being abundant and easy accessible, were used to test the osteogenic activity of BFP-1 and the novel biomaterial. Under osteoinductive conditions, cells treated with both BFP-1 alone and BFP-1-coated biomaterials displayed elevated expression of the osteogenic markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), and RUNX2. Furthermore, hASCs associated with poly-dopamine-assisted BFP-1-immobilized PLGA (pDA-BFP-1-PLGA) scaffolds promoted in vivo bone formation in nude mice. Our novel materials may hold great promise for future bone tissue engineering applications.

  17. Osteoinductive Effects of Free and Immobilized Bone Forming Peptide-1 on Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyue; Zheng, Yunfei; Zhao, Xianghui; Ge, Yanjun; Chen, Tong; Liu, Yunsong; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Most synthetic polymeric materials currently used for bone tissue engineering lack specific signals through which cells can identify and interact with the surface, resulting in incompatibility and compromised osteogenic activity. Soluble inductive factors also have issues including a short half-live in vivo. Bone forming peptide-1 is a truncated peptide from the immature form of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) that displays higher osteogenic activity than full-length, mature BMP-7. In this study, we used a mussel-inspired immobilization strategy mediated by polymerization of dopamine to introduce recently discovered stimulators of bone forming peptide-1 (BFP-1) onto the surface of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) substrate to form a biomaterial that overcomes these challenges. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs), being abundant and easy accessible, were used to test the osteogenic activity of BFP-1 and the novel biomaterial. Under osteoinductive conditions, cells treated with both BFP-1 alone and BFP-1-coated biomaterials displayed elevated expression of the osteogenic markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), and RUNX2. Furthermore, hASCs associated with poly-dopamine-assisted BFP-1-immobilized PLGA (pDA-BFP-1-PLGA) scaffolds promoted in vivo bone formation in nude mice. Our novel materials may hold great promise for future bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26930062

  18. Osteoinductive Effects of Free and Immobilized Bone Forming Peptide-1 on Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xianghui; Ge, Yanjun; Chen, Tong; Liu, Yunsong; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Most synthetic polymeric materials currently used for bone tissue engineering lack specific signals through which cells can identify and interact with the surface, resulting in incompatibility and compromised osteogenic activity. Soluble inductive factors also have issues including a short half-live in vivo. Bone forming peptide-1 is a truncated peptide from the immature form of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) that displays higher osteogenic activity than full-length, mature BMP-7. In this study, we used a mussel-inspired immobilization strategy mediated by polymerization of dopamine to introduce recently discovered stimulators of bone forming peptide-1 (BFP-1) onto the surface of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) substrate to form a biomaterial that overcomes these challenges. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs), being abundant and easy accessible, were used to test the osteogenic activity of BFP-1 and the novel biomaterial. Under osteoinductive conditions, cells treated with both BFP-1 alone and BFP-1-coated biomaterials displayed elevated expression of the osteogenic markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), and RUNX2. Furthermore, hASCs associated with poly-dopamine-assisted BFP-1-immobilized PLGA (pDA-BFP-1-PLGA) scaffolds promoted in vivo bone formation in nude mice. Our novel materials may hold great promise for future bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26930062

  19. Pathophysiology of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2004-02-01

    Defects in pancreatic islet beta-cell function play a major role in the development of diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a more or less rapid destruction of pancreatic beta cells, and the autoimmune process begins years before the beta-cell destruction becomes complete, thereby providing a window of opportunity for intervention. During the preclinical period and early after diagnosis, much of the insulin deficiency may be the result of functional inhibition of insulin secretion that may be at least partially and transiently reversible. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a progressive loss of beta-cell function throughout the course of the disease. The pattern of loss is an initial (probably of genetic origin) defect in acute or first-phase insulin secretion, followed by a decreasing maximal capacity of insulin secretion. Last, a defective steady-state and basal insulin secretion develops, leading to almost complete beta-cell failure requiring insulin treatment. Because of the reciprocal relation between insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, valid representation of beta-cell function requires interpretation of insulin responses in the context of the prevailing degree of insulin sensitivity. This appropriate approach highlights defects in insulin secretion at the various stages of the natural history of type 2 diabetes and already present in individuals at risk to develop the disease. To date none of the available therapies can stop the progressive beta-cell defect and the progression of the metabolic disorder. The better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease should lead to the development of new strategies to preserve beta-cell function in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Salivary Gland Secretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, H. L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes materials and procedures for an experiment utilizing a live dog to demonstrate: (1) physiology of the salivary gland; (2) parasympathetic control of the salivary gland; (3) influence of varying salivary flow rates on sodium and potassium ions, osmolarity and pH; and (4) salivary secretion as an active process. (DS)

  1. Biliary lipid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hişmioğullari, Adnan Adil; Bozdayi, A Mithat; Rahman, Khalid

    2007-06-01

    The liver has many biochemical functions, of which one of the most important is bile formation. Bile is both a secretory and an excretory fluid and two of its most important functions are the delivery to the intestinal tract of: (i) bile acids to assist in fat digestion and absorption; and (ii) liver-derived metabolites of potentially toxic materials prior to their elimination from the body in the feces. Bile contains numerous solutes, including bile acids, phospholipids and cholesterol. Biliary lipids mainly consist of cholesterol and phospholipids and their secretion into bile is affected by the secretion of bile acids. Phospholipids and cholesterol are synthesized in the hepatocytes and are thought to be transferred via vesicle- and non-vesicle-mediated mechanisms into the bile canaliculus. Hepatocytes acquire biliary lipid by three pathways, which are biosynthesis, lipoproteins and existing molecules drawn from intracellular membranes, with the newly synthesized biliary lipid accounting for less than 20% of the total lipids. The hepatic determinants of biliary cholesterol elimination are not limited to total cholesterol homeostasis, but also concern biliary disease conditions, since excess biliary cholesterol secretion is involved in cholesterol gallstone formation, as well as being a major risk factor for gallbladder cancer. The purpose of this review was to highlight some of the major mechanisms involved in biliary lipid secretion.

  2. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  3. Telling stories: keeping secrets.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the reticence of some farm women to share their experiences with historians and how that desire to keep secrets collides with the desire by scholars to tell the stories of these women. It argues that scholars must continue to struggle with the issue of which stories to tell publicly and which to keep private. The author discusses her own experience telling stories about rural women in the 1970s and the need to give voice to the heritage of rural women, especially of groups that have feared revealing their experiences. She offers examples of historians of rural women who have successfully worked with formerly silenced populations and urges historians to continue to tell stories about these lives, to reevaluate what has been already learned, to ask new questions, and to discuss which secrets need to be shared.

  4. Cell secretion: an update.

    PubMed

    Jeremic, A

    2008-08-01

    This past decade has witnessed the publication of a flurry of scientific papers and reports on the subject of cell secretion, following discovery of a permanent plasma membrane structure termed 'porosome' and its determination as the universal secretory machinery in cells. This discovery has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the secretory process, demonstrating that membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the porosome base to release their contents to the cell exterior. The regulated release of intravesicular contents during cell secretion is governed by dilation of the porosome opening to the outside, and the extent of vesicle swelling. In agreement, a great number of articles have been written and studies performed, which are briefly discussed in this article.

  5. Cell secretion: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jeremic, A

    2008-01-01

    This past decade has witnessed the publication of a flurry of scientific papers and reports on the subject of cell secretion, following discovery of a permanent plasma membrane structure termed ‘porosome’ and its determination as the universal secretory machinery in cells. This discovery has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the secretory process, demonstrating that membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the porosome base to release their contents to the cell exterior. The regulated release of intravesicular contents during cell secretion is governed by dilation of the porosome opening to the outside, and the extent of vesicle swelling. In agreement, a great number of articles have been written and studies performed, which are briefly discussed in this article. PMID:18363838

  6. Bile Formation and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Bile is a unique and vital aqueous secretion of the liver that is formed by the hepatocyte and modified down stream by absorptive and secretory properties of the bile duct epithelium. Approximately 5% of bile consists of organic and inorganic solutes of considerable complexity. The bile-secretory unit consists of a canalicular network which is formed by the apical membrane of adjacent hepatocytes and sealed by tight junctions. The bile canaliculi (~1 μm in diameter) conduct the flow of bile countercurrent to the direction of portal blood flow and connect with the canal of Hering and bile ducts which progressively increase in diameter and complexity prior to the entry of bile into the gallbladder, common bile duct, and intestine. Canalicular bile secretion is determined by both bile salt-dependent and independent transport systems which are localized at the apical membrane of the hepatocyte and largely consist of a series of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport proteins that function as export pumps for bile salts and other organic solutes. These transporters create osmotic gradients within the bile canalicular lumen that provide the driving force for movement of fluid into the lumen via aquaporins. Species vary with respect to the relative amounts of bile salt-dependent and independent canalicular flow and cholangiocyte secretion which is highly regulated by hormones, second messengers, and signal transduction pathways. Most determinants of bile secretion are now characterized at the molecular level in animal models and in man. Genetic mutations serve to illuminate many of their functions. PMID:23897680

  7. Catechin secretion and phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Shail

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates that the invasiveness of Centaurea stoebe is attributed to the stronger allelopathic effects on the native North American species than on the related European species, which is one of the unquestionable aspects of the “novel weapons hypothesis (NWH).” Studies originating from controlled to field conditions have shown that C. stoebe utilizes its biochemical potential to exert its invasiveness. The roots of C. stoebe secrete a potent phytotoxin, catechin, which has a detrimental effect on the surrounding plant species. Although, studies on catechin secretion and phytotoxicity represent one of the most well studied systems describing negative plant-plant interactions, it has also sparked controversies lately due to its phytotoxicity dosages and secretion effluxes. Previous reports negate the phytotoxic and pro-oxidant nature of catechin.1–3 In our recent study we have shown that catechin is highly phytotoxic against Arabidopsis thaliana and Festuca idahoensis. We also show that (±) catechin applied to roots of A. thaliana induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) confirming the pro-oxidant nature of catechin. In addition, activation of signature cell death genes such as acd2 and cad1 post catechin treatment in A. thaliana ascertains the phytotoxic nature of catechin. PMID:21057643

  8. Large-scale production of soluble recombinant amyloid-β peptide 1-42 using cold-inducible expression system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Jeong Chan; Lee, Jeong Mi; Jeong, Min Seop; Oh, Choongseob; Ahn, Sung-Min; Yoo, Yung Joon; Jang, Ho Hee

    2012-11-01

    Amyloid-β peptide 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)), the predominant form in senile plaques, plays important roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Because Aβ(1-42) has aggregation-prone nature, it has been difficult to produce in a soluble state in bacterial expression systems. In this study, we modified our expression system to increase the soluble fraction of Aβ(1-42) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. The expression level and solubility of recombinant Aβ(1-42) induced at the low temperature (16°C) is highly increased compared to that induced at 37°C. To optimize expression temperature, the coding region of Aβ(1-42) was constructed in a pCold vector, pCold-TF, which has a hexahistidine-tagged trigger factor (TF). Recombinant Aβ(1-42) was expressed primarily as a soluble protein using pCold vector system and purified with a nickel-chelating resin. When the toxic effect of recombinant Aβ(1-42) examined on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, the purified Aβ(1-42) induced cell toxicity on SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, the system developed in this study will provide a useful method for the production of aggregation prone-peptide such as Aβ(1-42).

  9. Surface Behavior and Lipid Interaction of Alzheimer β-Amyloid Peptide 1–42: A Membrane-Disrupting Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ambroggio, Ernesto E.; Kim, Dennis H.; Separovic, Frances; Barrow, Colin J.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Bagatolli, Luis A.; Fidelio, Gerardo D.

    2005-01-01

    Amyloid aggregates, found in patients that suffer from Alzheimer's disease, are composed of fibril-forming peptides in a β-sheet conformation. One of the most abundant components in amyloid aggregates is the β-amyloid peptide 1–42 (Aβ 1–42). Membrane alterations may proceed to cell death by either an oxidative stress mechanism, caused by the peptide and synergized by transition metal ions, or through formation of ion channels by peptide interfacial self-aggregation. Here we demonstrate that Langmuir films of Aβ 1–42, either in pure form or mixed with lipids, develop stable monomolecular arrays with a high surface stability. By using micropipette aspiration technique and confocal microscopy we show that Aβ 1–42 induces a strong membrane destabilization in giant unilamellar vesicles composed of palmitoyloleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol, lowering the critical tension of vesicle rupture. Additionally, Aβ 1–42 triggers the induction of a sequential leakage of low- and high-molecular-weight markers trapped inside the giant unilamellar vesicles, but preserving the vesicle shape. Consequently, the Aβ 1–42 sequence confers particular molecular properties to the peptide that, in turn, influence supramolecular properties associated to membranes that may result in toxicity, including: 1), an ability of the peptide to strongly associate with the membrane; 2), a reduction of lateral membrane cohesive forces; and 3), a capacity to break the transbilayer gradient and puncture sealed vesicles. PMID:15681641

  10. Neuropeptides and nasal secretion.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, J N; Kaliner, M

    1991-10-01

    The nasal mucosa is innervated by the sensory, parasympathetic, and sympathetic nervous systems. Nociceptive sensory nerves are stimulated by mucosal injury, inhalation of irritants, or mast cell degranulation and release of the calcitonin gene-related peptide, the tachykinins substance P and neurokinin A, and other peptides by the axon response mechanism. Sensory nerve stimulation initiates systemic reflexes, such as the sneeze, and central parasympathetic reflexes which release acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and other peptides and lead to glandular secretion. In concert, these proinflammatory neural responses lead to vasodilation, vascular permeability, and glandular secretion. Sympathetic nerves release neuropeptide Y and norepinephrine, potent vasoconstrictors which act to decompress the nasal mucosa and produce nasal patency. The balance between the effects of parasympathetic and sympathetic neurotransmitters may regulate nasal homeostasis, whereas the nociceptive sensory system may be held in reserve as a defense mechanism. Dysfunction of these systems may lead to pathological nasal syndromes. In the future, specific neuropeptide agonists and antagonists may be useful for the treatment of human rhinitic diseases. PMID:1928355

  11. Modeling mechanisms of cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Osinga, Hinke M; Tabak, Joël; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2010-12-01

    Secretion is a fundamental cellular process involving the regulated release of intracellular products from cells. Physiological functions such as neurotransmission, or the release of hormones and digestive enzymes, are all governed by cell secretion. Anomalies in the processes involved in secretion contribute to the development and progression of diseases such as diabetes and other hormonal disorders. To unravel the mechanisms that govern such diseases, it is essential to understand how hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters are synthesized and processed, and how their signals are recognized, amplified and transmitted by intracellular signaling pathways in the target cells. Here, we discuss diverse aspects of the detailed mechanisms involved in secretion based on mathematical models. The models range from stochastic ones describing the trafficking of secretory vesicles to deterministic ones investigating the regulation of cellular processes that underlie hormonal secretion. In all cases, the models are closely related to experimental results and suggest theoretical predictions for the secretion mechanisms.

  12. Protecting Trade Secrets in Canada.

    PubMed

    Courage, Noel; Calzavara, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Patents in the life sciences industries are a key form of intellectual property (IP), particularly for products such as brand-name drugs and medical devices. However, trade secrets can also be a useful tool for many types of innovations. In appropriate cases, trade secrets can offer long-term protection of IP for a lower financial cost than patenting. This type of protection must be approached with caution as there is little room for error when protecting a trade secret. Strong agreements and scrupulous security can help to protect the secret. Once a trade secret is disclosed to the public, it cannot be restored as the owner's property; however, if the information is kept from the public domain, the owner can have a property right of unlimited duration in the information. In some situations patents and trade secrets may be used cooperatively to protect innovation, particularly for manufacturing processes. PMID:25986591

  13. Salmonella-secreted Virulence Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Heffron, Fred; Niemann, George; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-05-01

    In this short review we discuss secreted virulence factors of Salmonella, which directly affect Salmonella interaction with its host. Salmonella secretes protein to subvert host defenses but also, as discussed, to reduce virulence thereby permitting the bacteria to persist longer and more successfully disperse. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is the best known and well studied of the mechanisms that enable secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm. Other secretion systems include outer membrane vesicles, which are present in all Gram-negative bacteria examined to date, two-partner secretion, and type VI secretion will also be addressed. Excellent reviews of Salmonella secreted effectors have focused on themes such as actin rearrangements, vesicular trafficking, ubiquitination, and the activities of the virulence factors themselves. This short review is based on S. Typhimurium infection of mice because it is a model of typhoid like disease in humans. We have organized effectors in terms of events that happen during the infection cycle and how secreted effectors may be involved.

  14. Expansible quantum secret sharing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Xu, Sheng-Wei; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Niu, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2013-08-01

    In the practical applications, member expansion is a usual demand during the development of a secret sharing network. However, there are few consideration and discussion on network expansibility in the existing quantum secret sharing schemes. We propose an expansible quantum secret sharing scheme with relatively simple and economical quantum resources and show how to split and reconstruct the quantum secret among an expansible user group in our scheme. Its trait, no requirement of any agent's assistant during the process of member expansion, can help to prevent potential menaces of insider cheating. We also give a discussion on the security of this scheme from three aspects.

  15. Identification of an HIV-1 Mutation in Spacer Peptide 1 That Stabilizes the Immature CA-SP1 Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Paul W.; Urano, Emiko; Ablan, Sherimay D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Upon release of HIV-1 particles from the infected cell, the viral protease cleaves the Gag polyprotein at specific sites, triggering maturation. During this process, which is essential for infectivity, the capsid protein (CA) reassembles into a conical core. Maturation inhibitors (MIs) block HIV-1 maturation by interfering with protease-mediated CA-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) processing, concomitantly stabilizing the immature CA-SP1 lattice; virions from MI-treated cells retain an immature-like CA-SP1 lattice, whereas mutational abolition of cleavage at the CA-SP1 site results in virions in which the CA-SP1 lattice converts to a mature-like form. We previously reported that propagation of HIV-1 in the presence of MI PF-46396 selected for assembly-defective, compound-dependent mutants with amino acid substitutions in the major homology region (MHR) of CA. Propagation of these mutants in the absence of PF-46396 resulted in the acquisition of second-site compensatory mutations. These included a Thr-to-Ile substitution at SP1 residue 8 (T8I), which results in impaired CA-SP1 processing. Thus, the T8I mutation phenocopies PF-46396 treatment in terms of its ability to rescue the replication defect imposed by the MHR mutations and to impede CA-SP1 processing. Here, we use cryo-electron tomography to show that, like MIs, the T8I mutation stabilizes the immature-like CA-SP1 lattice. These results have important implications for the mechanism of action of HIV-1 MIs; they also suggest that T8I may provide a valuable tool for structural definition of the CA-SP1 boundary region, which has thus far been refractory to high-resolution analysis, apparently because of conformational flexibility in this region of Gag. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 maturation involves dissection of the Gag polyprotein by the viral protease and assembly of a conical capsid enclosing the viral ribonucleoprotein. Maturation inhibitors (MIs) prevent the final cleavage step at the site between the capsid protein

  16. Solubility and secretability.

    PubMed

    Schein, C H

    1993-08-01

    The solubility and secretability of proteins can often be affected by extremely small changes in their primary structure. Attempts to determine empirical rules for the alteration of protein structure to improve either of these characteristics have met with only partial success. Those (mostly serendipitous) improvements in solubility that have been obtained via mutagenesis cannot be considered to be 'protein engineering'. The most successful examples where directed mutagenesis has been used to alter protein solubility, hemoglobin and insulin, have relied on established crystal structures and a wealth of data about the relationship between sequence and structure of the targeted protein. Currently, optimizing culture growth conditions by trial and error remains the fastest way to improve expression.

  17. Discovery of a Potent and Orally Efficacious TGR5 Receptor Agonist.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sameer; Patil, Amit; Aware, Umesh; Deshmukh, Prashant; Darji, Brijesh; Sasane, Santosh; Sairam, Kalapatapu V V M; Priyadarsiny, Priyanka; Giri, Poonam; Patel, Harilal; Giri, Suresh; Jain, Mukul; Desai, Ranjit C

    2016-01-14

    TGR5 is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), activation of which promotes secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and modulates insulin secretion. The 2-thio-imidazole derivative 6g was identified as a novel, potent, and selective TGR5 agonist (hTGR5 EC50 = 57 pM, mTGR5 = 62 pM) with a favorable pharmacokinetic profile. The compound 6g was found to have potent glucose lowering effects in vivo during an oral glucose tolerance test in DIO C57 mice with ED50 of 7.9 mg/kg and ED90 of 29.2 mg/kg. PMID:26819665

  18. The dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor NVP-DPP728 reduces plasma glucagon concentration in cats.

    PubMed

    Furrer, Daniela; Kaufmann, Karin; Tschuor, Flurin; Reusch, Claudia E; Lutz, Thomas A

    2010-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues and inhibitors of its degrading enzyme, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV), are interesting therapy options in human diabetics because they increase insulin secretion and reduce postprandial glucagon secretion. Given the similar pathophysiology of human type 2 and feline diabetes mellitus, this study investigated whether the DPPIV inhibitor NVP-DPP728 reduces plasma glucagon levels in cats. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (ivGTT; 0.5 g/kg glucose after 12 h fasting) and a meal response test (test meal of 50% of average daily food intake, offered after 24 h fasting) were performed in healthy experimental cats. NVP-DPP728 (0.5-2.5 mg/kg i.v. or s.c.) significantly reduced glucagon output in all tests and increased insulin output in the ivGTT. Follow-up studies will investigate the potential usefulness as therapy in diabetic cats.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of GLP-1-Based Therapies beyond Glucose Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone mainly secreted from intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. GLP-1 has beneficial effects for glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells, delaying gastric emptying, decreasing plasma glucagon, reducing food intake, and stimulating glucose disposal. Therefore, GLP-1-based therapies such as GLP-1 receptor agonists and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4, which is a GLP-1 inactivating enzyme, have been developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In addition to glucose-lowering effects, emerging data suggests that GLP-1-based therapies also show anti-inflammatory effects in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 1 and 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, diabetic nephropathy, asthma, and psoriasis. This review outlines the anti-inflammatory actions of GLP-1-based therapies on diseases associated with chronic inflammation in vivo and in vitro, and their molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27110066

  20. Study Guide: Seven Simple Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterfield, Nancy; Breaux, Annette; Whitaker, Todd

    2007-01-01

    This study guide has been developed to accompany the "Seven Simple Secrets" book written by Dr. Todd Whitaker and Annette Breaux. "Seven Simple Secrets" focuses on those attributes that have been found to help teachers be their absolute best in their daily challenges of teaching and improving student learning. The study guide is divided into the…

  1. Bacterial Secretion Systems: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Green, Erin R; Mecsas, Joan

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial pathogens utilize a multitude of methods to invade mammalian hosts, damage tissue sites, and thwart the immune system from responding. One essential component of these strategies for many bacterial pathogens is the secretion of proteins across phospholipid membranes. Secreted proteins can play many roles in promoting bacterial virulence, from enhancing attachment to eukaryotic cells, to scavenging resources in an environmental niche, to directly intoxicating target cells and disrupting their functions. Many pathogens use dedicated protein secretion systems to secrete virulence factors from the cytosol of the bacteria into host cells or the host environment. In general, bacterial protein secretion apparatuses can be divided into classes, based on their structures, functions, and specificity. Some systems are conserved in all classes of bacteria and secrete a broad array of substrates, while others are only found in a small number of bacterial species and/or are specific to only one or a few proteins. In this chapter, we review the canonical features of several common bacterial protein secretion systems, as well as their roles in promoting the virulence of bacterial pathogens. Additionally, we address recent findings that indicate that the innate immune system of the host can detect and respond to the presence of protein secretion systems during mammalian infection.

  2. Unconventional Protein Secretion in Plants.

    PubMed

    Davis, Destiny J; Kang, Byung-Ho; Heringer, Angelo S; Wilkop, Thomas E; Drakakaki, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Unconventional protein secretion (UPS) describes secretion pathways that bypass one or several of the canonical secretion pit-stops on the way to the plasma membrane, and/or involve the secretion of leaderless proteins. So far, alternatives to conventional secretion were primarily observed and studied in yeast and animal cells. The sessile lifestyle of plants brings with it unique restraints on how they adapt to adverse conditions and environmental challenges. Recently, attention towards unconventional secretion pathways in plant cells has substantially increased, with the large number of leaderless proteins identified through proteomic studies. While UPS pathways in plants are certainly not yet exhaustively researched, an emerging notion is that induction of UPS pathways is correlated with pathogenesis and stress responses. Given the multitude UPS events observed, comprehensively organizing the routes proteins take to the apoplast in defined UPS categories is challenging. With the establishment of a larger collection of studied plant proteins taking these UPS pathways, a clearer picture of endomembrane trafficking as a whole will emerge. There are several novel enabling technologies, such as vesicle proteomics and chemical genomics, with great potential for dissecting secretion pathways, providing information about the cargo that travels along them and the conditions that induce them. PMID:27665550

  3. Secret key generation via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Evans, P. G.; Lawrie, B.; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, W.; Williams, B. P.; Qi, B.; Grice, W. P.

    2015-05-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over ~6km of telecom. fiber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N - 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and significantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  4. Secret Key Generation via a Modified Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Smith IV, Amos M; Evans, Philip G; Lawrie, Benjamin J; Legre, Matthieu; Lougovski, Pavel; Ray, William R; Williams, Brian P; Qi, Bing; Grice, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over 6km of telecom. ber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N > 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and signicantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  5. Progesterone inhibits mast cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Vasiadi, M; Kempuraj, D; Boucher, W; Kalogeromitros, D; Theoharides, T C

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, where they secrete numerous vasoactive, inflammatory and nociceptive mediators in response to immunoglobulin E (IgE) and antigen. However, they have also been implicated in inflammatory conditions, such as painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and migraines, all of which occur more often in women and are exacerbated during ovulation, but are suppressed during pregnancy. Mast cells express high affinity estrogen receptors and estradiol augments their secretion, while tamoxifen inhibits it. Here we report that progesterone (100 nM), but not the structurally related cholesterol, inhibits histamine secretion from purified rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated immunologically or by substance P (SP), an effect also documented by electron microscopy. These results suggest that mast cell secretion may be regulated by progesterone and may explain the reduced symptoms of certain inflammatory conditions during pregnancy.

  6. Plant secretome: unlocking secrets of the secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Jwa, Nam-Soo; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Job, Dominique; Rakwal, Randeep

    2010-02-01

    Plant secretomics is a newly emerging area of the plant proteomics field. It basically describes the global study of secreted proteins into the extracellular space of plant cell or tissue at any given time and under certain conditions through various secretory mechanisms. A combination of biochemical, proteomics and bioinformatics approaches has been developed to isolate, identify and profile secreted proteins using complementary in vitro suspension-cultured cells and in planta systems. Developed inventories of secreted proteins under normal, biotic and abiotic conditions revealed several different types of novel secreted proteins, including the leaderless secretory proteins (LSPs). On average, LSPs can account for more than 50% of the total identified secretome, supporting, as in other eukaryotes, the existence of novel secretory mechanisms independent of the classical endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi secretory pathway, and suggesting that this non-classical mechanism of protein expression is, for as yet unknown reasons, more massively used than in other eukaryotic systems. Plants LSPs, which seem to be potentially involved in the defense/stress responses, might have dual (extracellular and/or intracellular) roles as most of them have established intracellular functions, yet presently unknown extracellular functions. Evidence is emerging on the role of glycosylation in the apical sorting and trafficking of secretory proteins. These initial secretome studies in plants have considerably advanced our understanding on secretion of different types of proteins and their underlying mechanisms, and opened a door for comparative analyses of plant secretomes with those of other organisms. In this first review on plant secretomics, we summarize and discuss the secretome definition, the applied approaches for unlocking secrets of the secreted proteins in the extracellular fluid, the possible functional significance and secretory mechanisms of LSPs, as well as glycosylation of

  7. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively.

  8. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  9. Nonlinear Secret Image Sharing Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2⁡m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  10. Cell secretion and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2005-07-01

    Secretion occurs in all cells of multicellular organisms and involves the delivery of secretory products packaged in membrane-bound vesicles to the cell exterior. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion or hormone release utilize a highly regulated secretory process. Secretory vesicles are transported to specific sites at the plasma membrane, where they dock and fuse to release their contents. Similar to other cellular processes, cell secretion is found to be highly regulated and a precisely orchestrated event. It has been demonstrated that membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and fuse at porosomes, which are specialized supramolecular structures at the cell plasma membrane. Swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of pressure, allowing expulsion of intravesicular contents. The extent of secretory vesicle swelling dictates the amount of intravesicular contents expelled during secretion. The discovery of the porosome, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle fusion at the base of porosomes, and vesicle swelling, has also been resolved. These findings reveal the molecular mechanism of cell secretion.

  11. Second messengers in renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Churchill, P C

    1985-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays a central role in electrolyte homeostasis and in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. The level of activity of this system is determined primarily by the rate at which the kidneys secrete renin into the blood. Although many factors affect renin secretion in vivo, it is certain that all extracellular first messengers affect the activity of the renin-secreting cell by altering its intracellular concentrations of only a few second messengers. The thesis of this review is that free ionic calcium (Ca2+) and cAMP are inhibitory and stimulatory second messengers in renin secretion and that Ca2+ is preeminent. In general, intracellular Ca2+ is controlled by two mechanisms of Ca2+ efflux (Na-Ca exchange; primary active Ca2+ transport) and two mechanisms of Ca2+ influx and/or mobilization (voltage-sensitive Ca channels; receptor-operated channels). There is evidence to suggest that first messengers affect intracellular Ca2+, and therefore renin secretion, by affecting these efflux, influx, and mobilization pathways.

  12. Thyroid hormones and renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    Circulating angiotensin is produced by the action of renin from the kidneys on circulating angiotensinogen. There are other renin-angiotensin systems in various organs in the body, and recent observations raise the intriguing possibility that angiotensin II is produced by a totally intracellular pathway in the juxtaglomerular cells, the gonadotrops of the anterior pituitary, neurons, in the brain, salivary duct cells, and neuroblastoma cells. Circulating angiotensin II levels depend in large part on the plasma concentration of angiotensinogen, which is hormonally regulated, and on the rate of renin secretion. Renin secretion is regulated by an intrarenal baroreceptor mechanism, a macula densa mechanism, angiotensin II, vasopressin, and the sympathetic nervous system. The increase in renin secretion produced by sympathetic discharge is mediated for the most part by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the juxtaglomerular cells. Hyperthyroidism would be expected to be associated with increased renin secretion in view of the increased beta-adrenergic activity in this condition, and hypothyroidism would be associated with decreased plasma renin activity due to decreased beta-adrenergic activity. Our recent research on serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion that depend on the integrity of the dorsal raphe nucleus and the mediobasal hypothalamus has led us to investigate the effect of the pituitary on the renin response to p-chloroamphetamine. The response is potentiated immediately after hypophysectomy, but 22 days after the operation, it is abolished. This slowly developing decrease in responsiveness may be due to decreased thyroid function.

  13. On family secrets and -K.

    PubMed

    Orgad, Yariv

    2014-08-01

    In this paper I present a novel interpretation of family secrets. Leaning on Bion's concept of -K, the constitution of secrecy is interpreted in terms of family dynamics that actively prevent knowledge formation and mental growth. Family secrets are interpreted as a destructive process that attacks the family's truth-generating-space - the shared semiotic space within which meanings are constituted through family relationships. The paper explores the microstructure interpersonal process of -K through the analysis of Mike Leigh's movie, Secrets and Lies. Two scenes in the movie are used to demonstrate how -K is worked out in the form of a specific intersubjective semiotic endeavor that unconsciously blocks the process of meaning-making. PMID:24902493

  14. On family secrets and -K.

    PubMed

    Orgad, Yariv

    2014-08-01

    In this paper I present a novel interpretation of family secrets. Leaning on Bion's concept of -K, the constitution of secrecy is interpreted in terms of family dynamics that actively prevent knowledge formation and mental growth. Family secrets are interpreted as a destructive process that attacks the family's truth-generating-space - the shared semiotic space within which meanings are constituted through family relationships. The paper explores the microstructure interpersonal process of -K through the analysis of Mike Leigh's movie, Secrets and Lies. Two scenes in the movie are used to demonstrate how -K is worked out in the form of a specific intersubjective semiotic endeavor that unconsciously blocks the process of meaning-making.

  15. Secrets and Disclosures: How Young Children Handle Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anagnostaki, Lida; Wright, Michael J.; Papathanasiou, Athanasia

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the influence of content and verbal cues on young children's understanding of secret information and of its disclosure. Participants were 209 5- and 6-year-old children in an experiment where a puppet, named Zinc, was the protagonist. Children were asked to whom Zinc would disclose a list of pieces of information, some of…

  16. Lixisenatide: first global approval.

    PubMed

    Elkinson, Shelley; Keating, Gillian M

    2013-03-01

    The selective once-daily prandial glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist lixisenatide (Lyxumia(®)) is under development with Sanofi for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lixisenatide belongs to a class of GLP-1 compounds designed to mimic the endogenous hormone GLP-1. Native GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner, as well as suppressing glucagon production and slowing gastric emptying. A once-daily subcutaneous formulation of lixisenatide has been approved in the EU, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Mexico for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and is under regulatory review in the USA, Switzerland, Brazil, Canada, Ukraine, South Africa, Japan and Australia. This article summarizes the milestones in the development of lixisenatide, leading to this first approval for use in adults with type 2 diabetes.

  17. Mechanisms of surgical control of type 2 diabetes: GLP-1 is the key factor-Maybe.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Marzieh; D'Alessio, David A

    2016-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for obesity and diabetes. The 2 most commonly performed weight-loss procedures, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy, improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes independent of weight loss. One of the early hypotheses raised to explain the immediate antidiabetic effect of RYGB was that rapid delivery of nutrients from the stomach pouch into the distal small intestine enhances enteroinsular signaling to promote insulin signaling. Given the tenfold increase in postmeal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response compared to unchanged integrated levels of postprandial glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide after RYGB, enhanced meal-induced insulin secretion after this procedure was thought to be the result of elevated glucose and GLP-1 levels. In this contribution to the larger point-counterpoint debate about the role of GLP-1 after bariatric surgery, most of the focus will be on RYGB. PMID:27568473

  18. Glucose-lowering effects of intestinal bile acid sequestration through enhancement of splanchnic glucose utilization.

    PubMed

    Prawitt, Janne; Caron, Sandrine; Staels, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal bile acid (BA) sequestration efficiently lowers plasma glucose concentrations in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Because BAs act as signaling molecules via receptors, including the G protein-coupled receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor), to regulate glucose homeostasis, BA sequestration, which interrupts the entero-hepatic circulation of BAs, constitutes a plausible action mechanism of BA sequestrants. An increase of intestinal L-cell glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion upon TGR5 activation is the most commonly proposed mechanism, but recent studies also argue for a direct entero-hepatic action to enhance glucose utilization. We discuss here recent findings on the mechanisms of sequestrant-mediated glucose lowering via an increase of splanchnic glucose utilization through entero-hepatic FXR signaling.

  19. GLP-1 based therapeutics: simultaneously combating T2DM and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Kristy M.; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances meal-related insulin secretion, which lowers blood glucose excursions. In addition to its incretin action, GLP-1 acts on the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in the brain to suppress feeding. These combined actions of GLP-1R signaling cause improvements in glycemic control as well as weight loss in type II diabetes (T2DM) patients treated with GLP-1R agonists. This is a superior advantage of GLP-1R pharmaceuticals as many other drugs used to treat T2DM are weight neutral or actual cause weight gain. This review summarizes GLP-1R action on energy and glucose metabolism, the effectiveness of current GLP-1R agonists on weight loss in T2DM patients, as well as GLP-1R combination therapies. PMID:25852463

  20. Do Incretins Play a Role in the Remission of Type 2 Diabetes after Gastric Bypass Surgery: What are the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Mousumi; Oliván, Blanca; Teixeira, Julio; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier; Laferrère, Blandine

    2010-01-01

    Gastric bypass surgery (GBP), in addition to weight loss, results in dramatic remission of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The mechanisms by which this remission occurs are unclear. Besides weight loss and caloric restriction, the changes in gut hormones that occur after GBP are increasingly gaining recognition as key players in glucose control. Incretins are gut peptides that stimulate insulin secretion postprandially; the levels of these hormones, particularly glucagon-like peptide-1, increase after GBP in response to nutrient stimulation. Whether these changes are causal to changes in glucose homeostasis remain to be determined. The purpose of this review is to assess the evidence on incretin changes and T2DM remission after GBP, and the possible mechanisms by which these changes occur. Our goals are to provide a thorough update on this field of research so that recommendations for future research and criteria for bariatric surgery can be evaluated. PMID:18820978

  1. GLP-1 and Amylin in the Treatment of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Jorsal, T; Rungby, J; Knop, F K; Vilsbøll, T

    2016-01-01

    For decades, extensive research has aimed to clarify the role of pancreas and gut-derived peptide hormones in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and feeding behavior. Among these are the beta-cell hormone amylin and the intestinal L cell hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). They exhibit distinct and yet several similar physiological actions including suppression of food intake, postprandial glucagon secretion, and gastric emptying-altogether lowering plasma glucose and body weight. These actions have been clinically exploited by the development of amylin and GLP-1 hormone analogs now used for treatment of diabetes and obesity. This review will outline the physiology and pharmacological potential of amylin and GLP-1, respectively, and focus on innovative peptide drug development leading to drugs acting on two or more distinct receptors, such as an amylin and GLP-1 peptide hybrid, potentially producing a more effective treatment strategy to combat the rapidly increasing global obesity.

  2. Intestinal GLP-1 and satiation: from man to rodents and back.

    PubMed

    Steinert, R E; Beglinger, C; Langhans, W

    2016-02-01

    In response to luminal food stimuli during meals, enteroendocrine cells release gastrointestinal (GI) peptides that have long been known to control secretory and motor functions of the gut, pancreas and liver. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has emerged as one of the most important GI peptides because of a combination of functions not previously ascribed to any other molecule. GLP-1 potentiates glucose-induced insulin secretion, suppresses glucagon release, slows gastric emptying and may serve as a satiation signal, although the physiological status of the latter function has not been fully established yet. Here we review the available evidence for intestinal GLP-1 to fulfill a number of established empirical criteria for assessing whether a hormone inhibits eating by eliciting physiological satiation in man and rodents.

  3. The Year of Secret Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Jaclyn

    2004-01-01

    The path to "novelist" was a convoluted one for Moriarty, who began writing fiction as doctoral student at Cambridge University. Her interest in young adults stems from an appreciation for the "troubles, strengths, and surprises of that age group." Now, in a uniquely formatted book titled "The Year of Secret Assignments," we peek inside the mind…

  4. Wnt Secretion and Gradient Formation

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Gonzalo P.; Lüchtenborg, Anne-Marie; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2013-01-01

    Concentration gradients formed by the lipid-modified morphogens of the Wnt family are known for their pivotal roles during embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Wnt morphogens are also implicated in a variety of human diseases, especially cancer. Therefore, the signaling cascades triggered by Wnts have received considerable attention during recent decades. However, how Wnts are secreted and how concentration gradients are formed remains poorly understood. The use of model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster has provided important advances in this area. For instance, we have previously shown that the lipid raft-associated reggie/flotillin proteins influence Wnt secretion and spreading in Drosophila. Our work supports the notion that producing cells secrete Wnt molecules in at least two pools: a poorly diffusible one and a reggie/flotillin-dependent highly diffusible pool which allows morphogen spreading over long distances away from its source of production. Here we revise the current views of Wnt secretion and spreading, and propose two models for the role of the reggie/flotillin proteins in these processes: (i) reggies/flotillins regulate the basolateral endocytosis of the poorly diffusible, membrane-bound Wnt pool, which is then sorted and secreted to apical compartments for long-range diffusion, and (ii) lipid rafts organized by reggies/flotillins serve as “dating points” where extracellular Wnt transiently interacts with lipoprotein receptors to allow its capture and further spreading via lipoprotein particles. We further discuss these processes in the context of human breast cancer. A better understanding of these phenomena may be relevant for identification of novel drug targets and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23455472

  5. Tamper-proof secret image-sharing scheme for identifying cheated secret keys and shared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Liu, Chong-An

    2013-01-01

    A (t,n) secret image-sharing scheme shares a secret image to n participants, and the t users recover the image. During the recovery procedure of a conventional secret image-sharing scheme, cheaters may use counterfeit secret keys or modified shared images to cheat other users' secret keys and shared images. A cheated secret key or shared image leads to an incorrect secret image. Unfortunately, the cheater cannot be identified. We present an exponent and modulus-based scheme to provide a tamper-proof secret image-sharing scheme for identifying cheaters on secret keys or shared images. The proposed scheme allows users to securely select their secret key. This assignment can be performed over networks. Modulus results of each shared image is calculated to recognize cheaters of a shared image. Experimental results indicate that the proposed scheme is excellent at identifying cheated secret keys and shared images.

  6. Mucins in cat airway secretions.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J R; Gallagher, J T; Richardson, P S; Sheehan, J K; Carlstedt, I

    1991-01-01

    Mucous secretions were obtained from cat tracheas that had received [3H]glucose and [35S]sulphate to radiolabel mucus glycoproteins biosynthetically. Samples were collected under resting ('basal') conditions as well as after pilocarpine stimulation and were separated into gel and sol phases by centrifugation. Macromolecules were partially purified by using gel chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B, and the species that were eluted with the void volume were then separated into two major populations with isopycnic density-gradient centrifugation in CsCl. The major component from the gel phase of pilocarpine-induced secretions had a buoyant density typical of mucins and was observed as linear and apparently flexible chains by electron microscopy. Reduction of disulphide bonds gave subunits that could be further cleaved by trypsin digestion into components of approximately the same size as the high-Mr glycopeptides obtained from other mucins after this treatment. In contrast, the dominant species in the gel phase of the 'basal' secretion had a significantly higher buoyant density than expected for mucins and was largely unaffected by reduction, as studied by gel chromatography. The macromolecules were fragmented by trypsin, suggesting that they contain a polypeptide backbone. This more dense component also predominated in the sol phase both from the 'basal' secretions and from the pilocarpine-released secretions. Digestion with DNAase, chondroitin ABC lyase or heparan sulphate lyase had no effect, which shows that this component is not DNA, a dermatan sulphate/chondroitin sulphate or a heparan sulphate proteoglycan. In contrast, endo-beta-galactosidase and keratanase caused some fragmentation, suggesting that the molecules contain some linkages of the poly-(N-acetyl-lactosamine) type, although the degradation was not as extensive as expected for keratan sulphate. Treatment with alkaline borohydride resulted in extensive fragmentation of the high-Mr glycopeptides from both

  7. Tight junction gene expression in gastrointestinal tract of dairy calves with coccidiosis and treated with glucagon-like peptide-2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selective permeability of the intestinal epithelium and efficient nutrient absorption are important functions for proper growth and development of calves. Damage to the intestinal mucosa can give rise to harmful long-term health effects and reduce productivity of the mature animal. Tight junction pr...

  8. Glucagon-like peptide 2 and its beneficial effects on gut function and health in production animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous endocrine cell subtypes exist within the intestinal mucosa and produce peptides contributing to the regulation of critical physiological processes including appetite, energy metabolism, gut function, and gut health. The mechanisms of action and the extent of the physiological effects of the...

  9. Immunoreactive prohormone atrial natriuretic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 - Existence of a single circulating amino-terminal peptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yu-Ming; Whitson, Peggy A.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    Sep-Pak C18 extraction of human plasma and radioimmunoassay using antibodies which recognize atrial natriuretic peptide (99-128) and the prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 resulted in mean values from 20 normal subjects of 26.2 (+/- 9.2), 362 (+/- 173) and 368 (+/- 160) pg/ml, respectively. A high correlation coefficient between values obtained using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 was observed (R = 0.84). Extracted plasma immunoreactivity of 1-30 and 31-67 both eluted at 46 percent acetonitrile. In contrast, chromatographic elution of synthetic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 was observed at 48 and 39 percent acetonitrile, respectively. Data suggest that the radioimmunoassay of plasma using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 may represent the measurement of a unique larger amino-terminal peptide fragment containing antigenic sites recognized by both antisera.

  10. Sec-mediated secretion by Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterial pathogen that replicates within a phagolysosome-like parasitophorous vacuole (PV) of macrophages. PV formation requires delivery of effector proteins directly into the host cell cytoplasm by a type IVB secretion system. However, additional secretion systems are likely responsible for modification of the PV lumen microenvironment that promote pathogen replication. Results To assess the potential of C. burnetii to secrete proteins into the PV, we analyzed the protein content of modified acidified citrate cysteine medium for the presence of C. burnetii proteins following axenic (host cell-free) growth. Mass spectrometry generated a list of 105 C. burnetii proteins that could be secreted. Based on bioinformatic analysis, 55 proteins were selected for further study by expressing them in C. burnetii with a C-terminal 3xFLAG-tag. Secretion of 27 proteins by C. burnetii transformants was confirmed by immunoblotting culture supernatants. Tagged proteins expressed by C. burnetii transformants were also found in the soluble fraction of infected Vero cells, indicating secretion occurs ex vivo. All secreted proteins contained a signal sequence, and deletion of this sequence from selected proteins abolished secretion. These data indicate protein secretion initially requires translocation across the inner-membrane into the periplasm via the activity of the Sec translocase. Conclusions C. burnetii secretes multiple proteins, in vitro and ex vivo, in a Sec-dependent manner. Possible roles for secreted proteins and secretion mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24093460

  11. Prolactin-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Mary C.; Schriock, Eldon D.; Jaffe, Robert B.

    1983-01-01

    Prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma is a common cause of gynecologic problems that include oligomenorrhea, infertility, amenorrhea and galactorrhea. Diagnosis requires a combination of endocrine testing and radiologic evaluation. The diagnosis of macroadenomas is usually straightforward and these large tumors may be associated with mass effects such as severe headache, nerve palsies or visual changes. Microadenomas may be more subtle in presentation, and the diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia without radiologic evidence of a tumor frequently is problematic. The management of prolactin-secreting adenoma remains controversial, with no clear consensus or indication for surgical versus medical treatment. Surgical intervention is a realistic option for those patients who have access to an experienced neurosurgeon and who have tumor characteristics that offer a reasonable hope for cure. Many questions remain to be answered, including the cause, natural history of development and the optimum treatment for individual cases. Images PMID:6659490

  12. Renal tubular secretion of pramipexole.

    PubMed

    Knop, Jana; Hoier, Eva; Ebner, Thomas; Fromm, Martin F; Müller, Fabian

    2015-11-15

    The dopamine agonist pramipexole is cleared predominantly by the kidney with a major contribution of active renal secretion. Previously the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) was shown to be involved in the uptake of pramipexole by renal tubular cells, while the mechanism underlying efflux into tubular lumen remains unclear. Cimetidine, a potent inhibitor of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins 1 (MATE1) and 2-K (MATE2-K), decreases renal pramipexole clearance in humans. We hypothesized that, in addition to OCT2, pramipexole may be a substrate of MATE-mediated transport. Pramipexole uptake was investigated using MDCK or HEK cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K and the respective vector controls (Co). Transcellular pramipexole transport was investigated in MDCK cells single- or double-transfected with OCT2 and/or MATE1 and in Co cells, separating a basal from an apical compartment in a model for renal tubular secretion. Pramipexole uptake was 1.6-, 1.1-, or 1.6-folds in cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K, respectively as compared to Co cells (p<0.05). In transcellular transport experiments, intracellular pramipexole accumulation was 1.7-folds in MDCK-OCT2 (p<0.001), and transcellular pramipexole transport was 2.2- and 4.0-folds in MDCK-MATE1 and MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells as compared to Co cells (p<0.001). Transcellular pramipexole transport was pH dependent and inhibited by cimetidine with IC50 values of 12μM and 5.5μM in MATE1 and OCT2-MATE1 cells, respectively. Taken together, coordinate activity of OCT2-mediated uptake and MATE-mediated efflux determines pramipexole renal secretion. Reduced OCT2 or MATE transport activity due to genetic variation or drug-drug interactions may affect pramipexole renal secretion.

  13. Electronic enhancement of tear secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, Mark; Lim Chung, Jae; Kossler, Andrea; Kook, Koung Hoon; Loudin, Jim; Franke, Manfred; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Objective. To study electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves for enhanced tear secretion, as a potential treatment for dry eye disease. We investigate the response pathways and electrical parameters to safely maximize tear secretion. Approach. We evaluated the tear response to electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves in isofluorane-anesthetized rabbits. In acute studies, electrical stimulation was performed using bipolar platinum foil electrodes, implanted beneath the inferior lacrimal gland, and a monopolar electrode placed near the afferent ethmoid nerve. Wireless microstimulators with bipolar electrodes were implanted beneath the lacrimal gland for chronic studies. To identify the response pathways, we applied various pharmacological inhibitors. To optimize the stimulus, we measured tear secretion rate (Schirmer test) as a function of pulse amplitude (1.5-12 mA), duration (0.1-1 ms) and repetition rate (10-100 Hz). Main results. Stimulation of the lacrimal gland increased tear secretion by engaging efferent parasympathetic nerves. Tearing increased with stimulation amplitude, pulse duration and repetition rate, up to 70 Hz. Stimulation with 3 mA, 500 μs pulses at 70 Hz provided a 4.5 mm (125%) increase in Schirmer score. Modulating duty cycle further increased tearing up to 57%, compared to continuous stimulation in chronically implanted animals (36%). Ethmoid (afferent) nerve stimulation increased tearing similar to gland stimulation (3.6 mm) via a reflex pathway. In animals with chronically implanted stimulators, a nearly 6 mm increase (57%) was achieved with 12-fold less charge density per pulse (0.06-0.3 μC mm-2 with 170-680 μs pulses) than the damage threshold (3.5 μC mm-2 with 1 ms pulses). Significance. Electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland or afferent nerves may be used as a treatment for dry eye disease. Clinical trials should validate this approach in patients with aqueous tear deficiency, and

  14. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance.

  15. Multiscale modelling of saliva secretion.

    PubMed

    Sneyd, James; Crampin, Edmund; Yule, David

    2014-11-01

    We review a multiscale model of saliva secretion, describing in brief how the model is constructed and what we have so far learned from it. The model begins at the level of inositol trisphosphate receptors (IPR), and proceeds through the cellular level (with a model of acinar cell calcium dynamics) to the multicellular level (with a model of the acinus), finally to a model of a saliva production unit that includes an acinus and associated duct. The model at the level of the entire salivary gland is not yet completed. Particular results from the model so far include (i) the importance of modal behaviour of IPR, (ii) the relative unimportance of Ca(2+) oscillation frequency as a controller of saliva secretion, (iii) the need for the periodic Ca(2+) waves to be as fast as possible in order to maximise water transport, (iv) the presence of functional K(+) channels in the apical membrane increases saliva secretion, (v) the relative unimportance of acinar spatial structure for isotonic water transport, (vi) the prediction that duct cells are highly depolarised, (vii) the prediction that the secondary saliva takes at least 1mm (from the acinus) to reach ionic equilibrium. We end with a brief discussion of future directions for the model, both in construction and in the study of scientific questions.

  16. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance. PMID:23613592

  17. Comparative analysis of the secretion capability of early and late flagellar type III secretion substrates

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Hanna M.; Erhardt, Marc; Hughes, Kelly T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A remarkable feature of the flagellar-specific type III secretion system (T3SS) is the selective recognition of a few substrate proteins among the many thousand cytoplasmic proteins. Secretion substrates are divided into two specificity classes: early substrates secreted for hook-basal body (HBB) construction and late substrates secreted after HBB completion. Secretion was reported to require a disordered N-terminal secretion signal, mRNA secretion signals within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) and for late substrates, piloting proteins known as the T3S chaperones. Here, we utilized translational β-lactamase fusions to probe the secretion efficacy of the N-terminal secretion signal of fourteen secreted flagellar substrates in Salmonella enterica. We observed a surprising variety in secretion capability between flagellar proteins of the same secretory class. The peptide secretion signals of the early-type substrates FlgD, FlgF, FlgE and the late-type substrate FlgL were analysed in detail. Analysing the role of the 5′-UTR in secretion of flgB and flgE revealed that the native 5′-UTR substantially enhanced protein translation and secretion. Based on our data, we propose a multicomponent signal that drives secretion via the flagellar T3SS. Both mRNA and peptide signals are recognized by the export apparatus and together with substrate-specific chaperones allowing for targeted secretion of flagellar substrates. PMID:24946091

  18. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF PROSTATIC SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Clark, Philip Johnson

    1940-01-01

    Cystic hyperplasia of the prostate occurs spontaneously in senile dogs only when they possess physiologically effective amounts of androgenic hormone. The cysts are closely grouped and radially arranged in a conical manner with the base of the cone at the periphery of the gland. Flattened and columnar epithelium, varying from about 5 to 25µ are seen in each cyst. The cysts communicate with the urethra by way of ducts. Both normal and cystic prostates undergo marked atrophy when the testes are removed, the chief difference 3 months after orchiectomy being the persistence of slightly dilated clefts and spaces at the site of the former cysts in the senile state. In the castrate dog whose prostate gland is being reconstructed as result of the influence of daily injections of androgen, certain doses of estrogen prevent increase of secretion and still larger doses greatly depress the output of the gland. In dogs so treated by daily injections of testosterone propionate, 10 mg., the amount of secretion is maintained from day to day at a level by daily injections of stilbestrol, 0.4 to 0.6 mg. and greatly depressed by doses of 1 to 1.5 mg. When the larger amounts of estrogen are used, together with androgen, squamous metaplasia occurs in the posterior lobe of the prostate while the epithelium of the acini decreases in height to cuboidal or low columnar form; these histological signs of activity of both androgen and estrogen on the prostate show that inhibition of the male hormone by stilbestrol is incomplete at these ratios. In dogs with either normal or cystic prostate glands, the prostate decreases in size when estrogen is injected in amounts to depress prostatic secretion profoundly. The gland is maintained in an atrophic state and overdosage avoided by controlled periodic injections of stilbestrol until secretion is reduced to the minimum, followed by free intervals, the estrogen being again administered when secretion measurably increases. The shrinkage is related to

  19. A universal nanoparticle cell secretion capture assay.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles

    2013-02-01

    Secreted proteins play an important role in intercellular interactions, especially between cells of the immune system. Currently, there is no universal assay that allows a simple noninvasive identification and isolation of cells based on their secretion of various products. We have developed such a method. Our method is based on the targeting, to the cell surface, of heterofunctional nanoparticles coupled to a cell surface-specific antibody and to a secreted protein-specific antibody, which captures the secreted protein on the surface of the producing cell. Importantly, this method does not compromise cellviability and is compatible with further culture and expansion of the secreting cells.

  20. Studies into secretions of Tetrahymena: enzymes secreted into inorganic medium.

    PubMed

    Kovács, P; Karsa, J; Csaba, G

    1992-01-01

    The peptides secreted by Tetrahymena cells into inorganic medium were chromatographed. Six fractions showing a marked enzyme-like activity were examined for influence on certain physiological parameters of Tetrahymena. The enzymatically active fractions increased the phagocytic activity of Tetrahymena and decreased its binding capacity for lectins and hormone (insulin), but enhanced insulin imprinting at primary interaction. It remains to be clarified whether these effects were due to the enzymatic or other components of the fractions investigated, or to lack of the compensatory influence of the fractions not studied.

  1. Semiquantum secret sharing using entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qin; Chan, W. H.; Long Dongyang

    2010-08-15

    Secret sharing is a procedure for sharing a secret among a number of participants such that only the qualified subsets of participants have the ability to reconstruct the secret. Even in the presence of eavesdropping, secret sharing can be achieved when all the members are quantum. So what happens if not all the members are quantum? In this paper, we propose two semiquantum secret sharing protocols by using maximally entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type states in which quantum Alice shares a secret with two classical parties, Bob and Charlie, in a way that both parties are sufficient to obtain the secret, but one of them cannot. The presented protocols are also shown to be secure against eavesdropping.

  2. Calcium calmodulin and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, B L; Walker, S W; Tomlinson, S

    1985-08-01

    As long ago as 1970, it was proposed that Ca2+ can act as a 'second messenger' like cAMP (Rasmussen & Nagata, 1979). The recognition that calmodulin is a major Ca2+ binding protein in non-muscle cells has prompted the suggestion that calmodulin may serve an analogous role for Ca2+ to that served by protein kinase for cAMP (Wang & Waisman, 1979), or at least to the regulatory subunit of the cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases. It is becoming clear that calmodulin probably does play a role in stimulus secretion coupling in endocrine cells. Nevertheless, some of the experimental approaches which have led to this rather tentative conclusion do induce some doubts, as we have attempted to indicate. Many of the pharmacological agents used in the studies cited in this review are not specific in their interaction with calmodulin. For example, the phenothiazines also inhibit phospholipid-sensitive protein kinase. The introduction of more specific drugs, such as the naphthalene sulphonamides, may lead to a clearer picture of the role of calmodulin in hormone secretion. Relationships probably exist between cyclic nucleotides, calcium, calmodulin, phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover and phospholipids in the overall control of the secretory process (see Fig. 1). There is considerable evidence that calcium is the primary internal signal initiating exocytosis of hormone from many glands. However, it appears that cyclic nucleotides can modulate the calcium signal either positively or negatively and it is possible that cAMP and calcium can separately activate secretion. The presence of both calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in the same tissue would appear to suggest either spatial or temporal control mechanisms or that (diagram; see text) the calcium requirement for calmodulin activation differs between the two enzymes. The true explanation is probably far more complex and involves perhaps as yet unknown factors that can differentially

  3. Controlling secretion to limit chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Georgilis, Athena; Gil, Jesús

    2016-08-15

    The tumor microenvironment influences cancer progression and therapy outcome by mechanisms not yet fully understood. In this issue of Genes & Development, Bent and colleagues (pp. 1811-1821) show how chemotherapy causes endothelial senescence. Interestingly, senescent endothelial cells do not mount a typical senescence-associated secretory phenotype but instead acutely secrete IL-6, promoting chemoresistance. This study unveils a physiological switch involving PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling that restrains the senescence secretory responses to limit the detrimental consequences of persistent inflammation. PMID:27601527

  4. Synchronous connections: nursing's little secret.

    PubMed

    Krejci, J W

    1995-07-01

    As nurses prepare for their place in health care reform, it is becoming more important than ever to be clear about the unique contribution nurses make to health care outcomes. In our technology-driven society, however, some of nursing's most powerful contributions go unacknowledged. An unexpected finding of a study on nurse experts' perceptions of synchrony revealed that nurses themselves frequently do not document or even dialog about important contributions if they cannot be captured within the dominant paradigm of high-technology care. The article describes nurses "little secret" that must be exposed.

  5. Differential responses of the incretin hormones GIP and GLP-1 to increasing doses of dietary carbohydrate but not dietary protein in lean rats.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Stephanie M; Yang, Qing; Kindel, Tammy L; Tso, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that oral ingestion of nutrients stimulates secretion of the incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1); however, it is unclear whether there is a dose-dependent response between the amount of nutrient ingested and the secretion of the hormones in vivo. Using our lymph fistula rat model, we previously demonstrated that both GIP and GLP-1 responded dose dependently to increasing amounts of infused dietary lipid and that the GLP-1-secreting cells were more sensitive to changes in intestinal lipid content. In the present study, we investigated the dose-dependent relationships between incretin secretion and the two remaining macronutrients, carbohydrate and protein. To accomplish this objective, the major mesenteric lymphatic duct of male Sprague-Dawley rats was cannulated. Each animal received a single bolus (3 ml) of saline, dextrin, whey protein, or casein hydrolysate (0.275, 0.55, 1.1, 2.2, 4.4 kcal) via a surgically inserted duodenal or ileal feeding tube. Lymph was continuously collected for 3 h and analyzed for GIP and GLP-1 content. Both GIP and GLP-1 outputs responded dose dependently to increasing amounts of dietary carbohydrate but not protein. Additionally, we found that the GIP-secreting cells were more sensitive than the GLP-1-secreting cells to changes in intestinal carbohydrate content.

  6. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D

    2007-10-01

    Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient includes routine methods for maintaining mucociliary function, as well as techniques for secretion removal. Humidification, mobilization of the patient, and airway suctioning are all routine procedures for managing secretions in the ventilated patient. Early ambulation of the post-surgical patient and routine turning of the ventilated patient are common secretion-management techniques that have little supporting evidence of efficacy. Humidification is a standard of care and a requisite for secretion management. Both active and passive humidification can be used. The humidifier selected and the level of humidification required depend on the patient's condition and the expected duration of intubation. In patients with thick, copious secretions, heated humidification is superior to a heat and moisture exchanger. Airway suctioning is the most important secretion removal technique. Open-circuit and closed-circuit suctioning have similar efficacy. Instilling saline prior to suctioning, to thin the secretions or stimulate a cough, is not supported by the literature. Adequate humidification and as-needed suctioning are the foundation of secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient. Intermittent therapy for secretion removal includes techniques either to simulate a cough, to mechanically loosen secretions, or both. Patient positioning for secretion drainage is also widely used. Percussion and postural drainage have been widely employed for mechanically ventilated patients but have not been shown to reduce ventilator-associated pneumonia or atelectasis. Manual hyperinflation and insufflation-exsufflation, which attempt to improve secretion removal by simulating a cough, have been described in mechanically ventilated patients, but neither has been studied sufficiently to support routine use. Continuous lateral rotation with a specialized bed reduces atelectasis in some patients, but has not been shown

  7. Matroids and quantum-secret-sharing schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep; Raussendorf, Robert

    2010-05-15

    A secret-sharing scheme is a cryptographic protocol to distribute a secret state in an encoded form among a group of players such that only authorized subsets of the players can reconstruct the secret. Classically, efficient secret-sharing schemes have been shown to be induced by matroids. Furthermore, access structures of such schemes can be characterized by an excluded minor relation. No such relations are known for quantum secret-sharing schemes. In this paper we take the first steps toward a matroidal characterization of quantum-secret-sharing schemes. In addition to providing a new perspective on quantum-secret-sharing schemes, this characterization has important benefits. While previous work has shown how to construct quantum-secret-sharing schemes for general access structures, these schemes are not claimed to be efficient. In this context the present results prove to be useful; they enable us to construct efficient quantum-secret-sharing schemes for many general access structures. More precisely, we show that an identically self-dual matroid that is representable over a finite field induces a pure-state quantum-secret-sharing scheme with information rate 1.

  8. Modification of a traditional breakfast leads to increased satiety along with attenuated plasma increments of glucose, C-peptide, insulin, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide in humans.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Bodil; Höglund, Peter; Roth, Bodil; Darwiche, Gassan

    2016-04-01

    Our hypothesis was that carbohydrate, fat, and protein contents of meals affect satiety, glucose homeostasis, and hormone secretion. The objectives of this crossover trial were to examine satiety, glycemic-insulinemic response, and plasma peptide levels in response to 2 different recommended diabetes diets with equivalent energy content. One traditional reference breakfast and one test breakfast, with lower carbohydrate and higher fat and protein content, were randomly administered to healthy volunteers (8 men, 12 women). Blood samples were collected, and satiety was scored on a visual analog scale before and 3 hours after meals. Plasma glucose was measured, and levels of C-peptide, ghrelin, glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), insulin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and adipokines were analyzed by Luminex. Greater satiety, visual analog scale, and total and delta area under the curve (P < .001), and lower glucose postprandial peak (max) and change from baseline (dmax; P < .001) were observed after test meal compared with reference meal. Postprandial increments of C-peptide, insulin, and GIP were suppressed after test meal compared with reference meal (total delta area under the curve [P = .03, .006, and .004], delta area under the curve [P = .006, .003, and .02], max [P = .01, .007, and .002], and dmax [P = .004, .008, and .007], respectively). Concentrations of other peptides were similar between meals. A lower carbohydrate and higher fat and protein content provides greater satiety and attenuation of C-peptide, glucose, insulin, and GIP responses compared with the reference breakfast but does not affect adipokines, ghrelin, glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. PMID:27001281

  9. Mitochondrial function and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Maechler, Pierre

    2013-10-15

    In the endocrine fraction of the pancreas, the β-cell rapidly reacts to fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations by adjusting the rate of insulin secretion. Glucose-sensing coupled to insulin exocytosis depends on transduction of metabolic signals into intracellular messengers recognized by the secretory machinery. Mitochondria play a central role in this process by connecting glucose metabolism to insulin release. Mitochondrial activity is primarily regulated by metabolic fluxes, but also by dynamic morphology changes and free Ca(2+) concentrations. Recent advances of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis are discussed; in particular the roles of the newly-identified mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter MCU and its regulatory partner MICU1, as well as the mitochondrial Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger. This review describes how mitochondria function both as sensors and generators of metabolic signals; such as NADPH, long chain acyl-CoA, glutamate. The coupling factors are additive to the Ca(2+) signal and participate to the amplifying pathway of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

  10. Bacterial secrets of secretion: EuroConference on the biology of type IV secretion processes.

    PubMed

    Baron, Christian; OCallaghan, David; Lanka, Erich

    2002-03-01

    Type IV secretion systems (TFSS) mediate secretion or direct cell-to-cell transfer of virulence factors (proteins or protein-DNA complexes) from many Gram-negative animal, human and plant pathogens, such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bartonella tribocorum, Bordetella pertussis, Brucella suis, Helicobacter pylori, Legionella pneumophila and Rickettsia prowazekii, into eukaryotic cells. Bacterial conjugation is also classified as a TFSS-like process mediating the spread of broad-host-range plasmids between Gram-negative bacteria such as RP4 and R388, which carry antibiotic resistance genes. Genetic, biochemical, cell biological and structural biology experiments led to significant progress in the understanding of several aspects of TFSS processes. X-ray crystallography revealed that homologues of the A. tumefaciens inner membrane-associated proteins VirB11 and VirD4 from H. pylori and R388, respectively, may form channels for substrate translocation or assembly of the transmembrane TFSS machinery. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed interactions between components of the periplasmic core components VirB8, VirB9 and VirB10, which may form the translocation channel. Analysis of A. tumefaciens virulence proteins VirE2 and VirF suggested that the periplasmic translocation route of the pertussi