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Sample records for glucocorticoid receptor down-regulation

  1. Rosiglitazone reverses memory decline and hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor down-regulation in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Escribano, Luis; Simon, Ana-Maria; Perez-Mediavilla, Alberto; Salazar-Colocho, Pablo; Rio, Joaquin Del; Frechilla, Diana

    2009-02-06

    Clinical trials with rosiglitazone, a potent agonist at peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) suggest an improvement of cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The mechanisms mediating this potential beneficial effect remain to be fully elucidated. In mice overexpressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP), a model of AD, we found that memory impairment in the object recognition test was prevented and also reversed by chronic rosiglitazone treatment. Given the possible involvement of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in the actions of PPAR{gamma}-ligands, we studied the effect of chronic rosiglitazone treatment on GR levels in the hippocampus of hAPP mice. An early down-regulation of GR, not related to elevated plasma corticosterone levels, was found in different hippocampal subfields of the transgenic mice and this decrease was prevented by rosiglitazone. In parallel with behavioural studies, rosiglitazone also normalized GR levels in older animals. This effect may contribute to explain the attenuation of memory decline by PPAR{gamma} activation in an AD mouse model.

  2. Hippocampal microglial activation and glucocorticoid receptor down-regulation precipitate visceral hypersensitivity induced by colorectal distension in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gongliang; Zhao, Bing-Xue; Hua, Rong; Kang, Jie; Shao, Bo-Ming; Carbonaro, Theresa M; Zhang, Yong-Mei

    2016-03-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is a common characteristic in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other disorders with visceral pain. Although the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity remains speculative due to the absence of pathological changes, the long-lasting sensitization in neuronal circuitry induced by early life stress may play a critical role beyond the digestive system even after complete resolution of the initiating event. The hippocampus integrates multiple sources of afferent inputs and sculpts integrated autonomic outputs for pain and analgesia regulation. Here, we examined the hippocampal mechanism in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity with a rat model induced by neonatal and adult colorectal distensions (CRDs). Neither neonatal nor adult CRD evoked behavioral abnormalities in adulthood; however, adult re-exposure to CRD induced persistent visceral hypersensitivity, depression-like behaviors, and spatial learning impairment in rats that experienced neonatal CRD. Rats that experienced neonatal and adult CRDs presented a decrease in hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) immunofluorescence staining and protein expression, and increases in hippocampal microglial activation and cytokine (IL-1β and TNF-α) accumulation. The decrease in hippocampal GR expression and increase in hippocampal IL-1β and TNF-α accumulation could be prevented by hippocampal local infusion of minocycline, a microglial inhibitor. These results suggest that neonatal CRD can increase the vulnerability of hippocampal microglia, and adult CRD challenge facilitates the hippocampal cytokine release from the sensitized microglia, which down-regulates hippocampal GR protein expression and, subsequently, precipitates visceral hypersensitivity.

  3. Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    De Bosscher, Karolien

    2010-05-31

    The ancient two-faced Roman god Janus is often used as a metaphor to describe the characteristics of the Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1), which exhibits both a beneficial side, that serves to halt inflammation, and a detrimental side responsible for undesirable effects. However, recent developments suggest that the Glucocorticoid Receptor has many more faces with the potential to express a range of different functionalities, depending on factors that include the tissue type, ligand type, receptor variants, cofactor surroundings and target gene promoters. This behavior of the receptor has made the development of safer ligands, that trigger the expression program of only a desirable subset of genes, a real challenge. Thus more knowledge-based fundamental research is needed to ensure the design and development of selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators capable of reaching the clinic. Recent advances in the characterization of novel selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators, specifically in the context of anti-inflammatory strategies, will be described in this review.

  4. Down-regulated Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) in Lung Epithelial Cells Promotes a PPARγ Agonist-reversible Proinflammatory Phenotype in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)*

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Sowmya P.; Reddy, Aravind T.; Zhang, Yingze; Sciurba, Frank C.; Mallampalli, Rama K.; Duncan, Steven R.; Reddy, Raju C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive inflammatory condition and a leading cause of death, with no available cure. We assessed the actions in pulmonary epithelial cells of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear hormone receptor with anti-inflammatory effects, whose role in COPD is largely unknown. We found that PPARγ was down-regulated in lung tissue and epithelial cells of COPD patients, via both reduced expression and phosphorylation-mediated inhibition, whereas pro-inflammatory nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity was increased. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for COPD, and exposing airway epithelial cells to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) likewise down-regulated PPARγ and activated NF-κB. CSE also down-regulated and post-translationally inhibited the glucocorticoid receptor (GR-α) and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2), a corepressor important for glucocorticoid action and whose down-regulation is thought to cause glucocorticoid insensitivity in COPD. Treating epithelial cells with synthetic (rosiglitazone) or endogenous (10-nitro-oleic acid) PPARγ agonists strongly up-regulated PPARγ expression and activity, suppressed CSE-induced production and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and reversed its activation of NF-κB by inhibiting the IκB kinase pathway and by promoting direct inhibitory binding of PPARγ to NF-κB. In contrast, PPARγ knockdown via siRNA augmented CSE-induced chemokine release and decreases in HDAC activity, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory role of endogenous PPARγ. The results imply that down-regulation of pulmonary epithelial PPARγ by cigarette smoke promotes inflammatory pathways and diminishes glucocorticoid responsiveness, thereby contributing to COPD pathogenesis, and further suggest that PPARγ agonists may be useful for COPD treatment. PMID:24368768

  5. Down-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in lung epithelial cells promotes a PPARγ agonist-reversible proinflammatory phenotype in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Sowmya P; Reddy, Aravind T; Zhang, Yingze; Sciurba, Frank C; Mallampalli, Rama K; Duncan, Steven R; Reddy, Raju C

    2014-03-07

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive inflammatory condition and a leading cause of death, with no available cure. We assessed the actions in pulmonary epithelial cells of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear hormone receptor with anti-inflammatory effects, whose role in COPD is largely unknown. We found that PPARγ was down-regulated in lung tissue and epithelial cells of COPD patients, via both reduced expression and phosphorylation-mediated inhibition, whereas pro-inflammatory nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity was increased. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for COPD, and exposing airway epithelial cells to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) likewise down-regulated PPARγ and activated NF-κB. CSE also down-regulated and post-translationally inhibited the glucocorticoid receptor (GR-α) and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2), a corepressor important for glucocorticoid action and whose down-regulation is thought to cause glucocorticoid insensitivity in COPD. Treating epithelial cells with synthetic (rosiglitazone) or endogenous (10-nitro-oleic acid) PPARγ agonists strongly up-regulated PPARγ expression and activity, suppressed CSE-induced production and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and reversed its activation of NF-κB by inhibiting the IκB kinase pathway and by promoting direct inhibitory binding of PPARγ to NF-κB. In contrast, PPARγ knockdown via siRNA augmented CSE-induced chemokine release and decreases in HDAC activity, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory role of endogenous PPARγ. The results imply that down-regulation of pulmonary epithelial PPARγ by cigarette smoke promotes inflammatory pathways and diminishes glucocorticoid responsiveness, thereby contributing to COPD pathogenesis, and further suggest that PPARγ agonists may be useful for COPD treatment.

  6. Selective Androgen Receptor Down-Regulators (SARDs): A New Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    PCa (9). Thus far, the techniques that have been used to down-regulate the AR include antisense oligonucleotides (10, 11), ribozyme treatments (12...Our findings suggest that ICI may present a useful treatment option for patients with AR-dependent PCa. Unlike the ribozyme , antisense, siRNA, or...Catalytic cleavage of the androgen receptor messenger RNA and functional inhibition of androgen receptor activity by a hammerhead ribozyme . Mol Endocrinol

  7. Regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor down-regulation by UBPY-mediated deubiquitination at endosomes.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Emi; Iura, Takanobu; Mukai, Akiko; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Kitamura, Naomi; Komada, Masayuki

    2005-11-01

    Ligand-activated receptor tyrosine kinases undergo endocytosis and are transported via endosomes to lysosomes for degradation. This "receptor down-regulation" process is crucial to terminate the cell proliferation signals produced by activated receptors. During the process, ubiquitination of the receptors serves as a sorting signal for their trafficking from endosomes to lysosomes. Here, we describe the role of a deubiquitinating enzyme UBPY/USP8 in the down-regulation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR). Overexpression of UBPY reduced the ubiquitination level of EGFR and delayed its degradation in EGF-stimulated cells. Immunopurified UBPY deubiquitinated EGFR in vitro. In EGF-stimulated cells, UBPY underwent ubiquitination and bound to EGFR. Overexpression of Hrs or a dominant-negative mutant of SKD1, proteins that play roles in the endosomal sorting of ubiquitinated receptors, caused the accumulation of endogenous UBPY on exaggerated endosomes. A catalytically inactive UBPY mutant clearly localized on endosomes, where it overlapped with EGFR when cells were stimulated with EGF. Finally, depletion of endogenous UBPY by RNA interference resulted in elevated ubiquitination and accelerated degradation of EGF-activated EGFR. We conclude that UBPY negatively regulates the rate of EGFR down-regulation by deubiquitinating EGFR on endosomes.

  8. Down-regulation of rat kidney calcitonin receptors by salmon calcitonin infusion evidence by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bouizar, Z.; Rostene, W.H.; Milhaud, G.

    1987-08-01

    In treating age-related osteoporosis and Paget disease of bone, it is of major importance to avoid an escape phenomenon that would reduce effectiveness of the treatment. The factors involved in the loss of therapeutic efficacy with administration of large pharmacological doses of the hormone require special consideration. Down-regulation of the hormone receptors could account for the escape phenomenon. Specific binding sites for salmon calcitonin (sCT) were characterized and localized by autoradiography on rat kidney sections incubated with /sup 125/I-labeled sCT. Autoradiograms demonstrated a heterogeneous distribution of /sup 125/I-labeled sCT binding sites in the kidney, with high densities in both the superficial layer of the cortex and the outer medulla. Infusion of different doses of unlabeled sCT by means of Alzet minipumps for 7 days produced rapid changes in plasma calcium, phosphate, and magnesium levels, which were no longer observed after 2 or 6 days of treatment. Besides, infusion of high doses of sCT induced down-regulation of renal sCT binding sites located mainly in the medulla, where calcitonin (CT) has been shown to exert it physiological effects on water and ion reabsorption. These data suggest that the resistance to high doses of sCT often observed during long-term treatment of patients may be the consequence of not only bone-cell desensitization but also down-regulation of CT-sensitive kidney receptor sites.

  9. Down-regulation of pancreatic transcription factors and incretin receptors in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kaneto, Hideaki; Matsuoka, Taka-aki

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is one of the most prevalent and serious metabolic diseases. Under diabetic conditions, chronic hyperglycemia and subsequent induction of oxidative stress deteriorate pancreatic β-cell function, which leads to the aggravation of type 2 diabetes. Although such phenomena are well known as glucose toxicity, its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this review article, we describe the possible molecular mechanism for β-cell dysfunction found in type 2 diabetes, focusing on (1) oxidative stress, (2) pancreatic transcription factors (PDX-1 and MafA) and (3) incretin receptors (GLP-1 and GIP receptors). Under such conditions, nuclear expression levels of PDX-1 and MafA are decreased, which leads to suppression of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In addition, expression levels of GLP-1 and GIP receptors are decreased, which likely contributes to the impaired incretin effects found in diabetes. Taken together, it is likely that down-regulation of pancreatic transcription factors (PDX-1 and MafA) and down-regulation of incretin receptors (GLP-1 and GIP receptors) explain, at least in part, the molecular mechanism for β-cell dysfunction found in type 2 diabetes. PMID:24379916

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibits Glucocorticoid Receptor Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Tom; Vandevyver, Sofie; Dejager, Lien; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Pinheiro, Iris; Petta, Ioanna; Engblom, David; Kleyman, Anna; Schütz, Günther; Tuckermann, Jan; Libert, Claude

    2011-01-01

    As glucocorticoid resistance (GCR) and the concomitant burden pose a worldwide problem, there is an urgent need for a more effective glucocorticoid therapy, for which insights into the molecular mechanisms of GCR are essential. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis that TNFα, a strong pro-inflammatory mediator in numerous inflammatory diseases, compromises the protective function of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) against TNFα-induced lethal inflammation. Indeed, protection of mice by dexamethasone against TNFα lethality was completely abolished when it was administered after TNFα stimulation, indicating compromised GR function upon TNFα challenge. TNFα-induced GCR was further demonstrated by impaired GR-dependent gene expression in the liver. Furthermore, TNFα down-regulates the levels of both GR mRNA and protein. However, this down-regulation seems to occur independently of GC production, as TNFα also resulted in down-regulation of GR levels in adrenalectomized mice. These findings suggest that the decreased amount of GR determines the GR response and outcome of TNFα-induced shock, as supported by our studies with GR heterozygous mice. We propose that by inducing GCR, TNFα inhibits a major brake on inflammation and thereby amplifies the pro-inflammatory response. Our findings might prove helpful in understanding GCR in inflammatory diseases in which TNFα is intimately involved. PMID:21646349

  11. Down-Regulation of the Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase by Presenilin-dependent Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Foveau, Bénédicte; Ancot, Frédéric; Leroy, Catherine; Petrelli, Annalisa; Reiss, Karina; Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giordano, Silvia; Fafeur, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) acts through the membrane-anchored Met receptor tyrosine kinase to induce invasive growth. Deregulation of this signaling is associated with tumorigenesis and involves, in most cases, overexpression of the receptor. We demonstrate that Met is processed in epithelial cells by presenilin-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis (PS-RIP) independently of ligand stimulation. The proteolytic process involves sequential cleavage by metalloproteases and the γ-secretase complex, leading to generation of labile fragments. In normal epithelial cells, although expression of cleavable Met by PS-RIP is down-regulated, uncleavable Met displayed membrane accumulation and induced ligand-independent motility and morphogenesis. Inversely, in transformed cells, the Met inhibitory antibody DN30 is able to promote Met PS-RIP, resulting in down-regulation of the receptor and inhibition of the Met-dependent invasive growth. This demonstrates the original involvement of a proteolytic process in degradation of the Met receptor implicated in negative regulation of invasive growth. PMID:19297528

  12. Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0582 TITLE: Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 25 Sep 2013 - 24 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a risk factor for subsequent development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Abnormal tau

  13. Down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor receptors by blockade of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Alcázar, J A; Hernández, I; De la Torre, M P; García, I; Santiago, E; Muñoz-Yagüe, M T; Solís-Herruzo, J A

    1995-10-13

    We have studied the effect of blockade of mitochondrial respiration on the binding of human 125I-TNF alpha to L929 cell receptors. Specific TNF alpha binding was decreased to about 20-40% of controls by blocking mitochondrial respiration. This effect was dose- and time-related and was observed independently of the level at which the respiration was blocked (respiratory chain, proton backflow, ATPase, anaerobiosis). This blockade had no effect on the half-life of the specific TNF alpha binding, the internalization or degradation of TNF alpha-receptor complexes, or the number of TNF alpha-binding sites. Scatchard analysis of TNF alpha binding data indicated a 2-4-fold decrease in the affinity of these binding sites. These effects did not appear to be related to the protein kinase C activity or to reactive oxygen radicals, since they were not antagonized by pretreatment of cells with oxygen radical scavengers, deferoxamine, or inhibitors of protein kinase C. Decrease in TNF alpha binding capacity correlated significantly with cellular ATP content (r = 0.94; p < 0.01) and with the cytocidal activity of TNF alpha against L929 cells. These findings suggest that blockade of mitochondrial respiration down-regulates the binding of TNF alpha to cells, most likely by changing the affinity of receptors for this cytokine. This down-regulation may increase the resistance of cells to TNF alpha cytotoxicity.

  14. Metformin suppresses CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jae Ho; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2014-10-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1B1 by environmental xenobiotic chemicals or endogenous ligands through the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes related to cancer, such as transformation and tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of the anti-diabetes drug metformin on expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and inducible conditions. Our results indicated that metformin down-regulated the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced conditions. Down-regulation of AhR expression was required for metformin-mediated decreases in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression, and the metformin-mediated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 reduction is irrelevant to estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling. Furthermore, we found that metformin markedly down-regulated Sp1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. The use of genetic and pharmacological tools revealed that metformin-mediated down-regulation of AhR expression was mediated through the reduction of Sp1 protein. Metformin inhibited endogenous AhR ligand-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression by suppressing tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) expression in MCF-7 cells. Finally, metformin inhibits TDO expression through a down-regulation of Sp1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels. Our findings demonstrate that metformin reduces CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating AhR signaling. Metformin would be able to act as a potential chemopreventive agent against CYP1A1 and CYP1B1-mediated carcinogenesis and development of cancer. - Graphical abstract: Schematic of the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene regulation by metformin. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibits CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression. • Metformin down-regulates the AhR signaling. • Metformin reduces Sp1 protein expression. • Metformin suppresses TDO expression.

  15. Regulation of triglyceride metabolism by glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that play critical and complex roles in the regulation of triglyceride (TG) homeostasis. Depending on physiological states, glucocorticoids can modulate both TG synthesis and hydrolysis. More intriguingly, glucocorticoids can concurrently affect these two processes in adipocytes. The metabolic effects of glucocorticoids are conferred by intracellular glucocorticoid receptors (GR). GR is a transcription factor that, upon binding to glucocorticoids, regulates the transcriptional rate of specific genes. These GR primary target genes further initiate the physiological and pathological responses of glucocorticoids. In this article, we overview glucocorticoid-regulated genes, especially those potential GR primary target genes, involved in glucocorticoid-regulated TG metabolism. We also discuss transcriptional regulators that could act with GR to participate in these processes. This knowledge is not only important for the fundamental understanding of steroid hormone actions, but also are essential for future therapeutic interventions against metabolic diseases associated with aberrant glucocorticoid signaling, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, central obesity and hepatic steatosis. PMID:22640645

  16. Surfactant prevents quartz induced down-regulation of complement receptor 1 in human granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, G; Lundahl, J; Curstedt, T; Eklund, A

    1997-02-01

    Quartz is known to induce an inflammatory response in the alveolar space by recruitment of different effector cells. We investigated the interaction between granulocytes and quartz with respect to expression of complement receptor type 1 (CR1) and CR3, with and without the presence of surfactant. Granulocytes from hemolyzed blood were stimulated by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), which mobilize the intracellular pool of CR1 to the surface, and the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) measured by cytofluorometry was 47.4 (46-63.6) (median; interquartile range). Quartz exposure reduced the CR1 expression to 23.2 (22.8-30.6) MFI units (P < 0.01), a porcine surfactant preparation added during quartz exposure abolished the down-regulation completely, 47.7 (43.2-62.3) MFI units (P < 0.001). Similar results were obtained after preincubation of the cells with surfactant followed by quartz exposure. No significant influence on CR1 expression was found by a synthetic lipid mixture, nor was the CR3 expression affected. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the presence of surfactant inhibits quartz induced down-regulation of CR1 on activated granulocytes.

  17. Dysregulation of Ack1 inhibits down-regulation of the EGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Grovdal, Lene Melsaether; Johannessen, Lene E.; Rodland, Marianne Skeie; Madshus, Inger Helene; Stang, Espen

    2008-04-01

    The protein tyrosine kinase Ack1 has been linked to cancer when over-expressed. Ack1 has also been suggested to function in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and in down-regulation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR). We have studied the intracellular localization of over-expressed Ack1 and found that Ack1 co-localizes with the EGFR upon EGF-induced endocytosis in cells with moderate over-expression of Ack. This co-localization is mainly observed in early endosomes. Furthermore, we found that over-expression of Ack1 retained the EGFR at the limiting membrane of early endosomes, inhibiting sorting to inner vesicles of multivesicular bodies. Down-regulation of Ack1 in HeLa cells resulted in reduced rate of {sup 125}I-EGF internalization, whereas internalization of {sup 125}I-transferrin was not affected. In cells where Ack1 had been knocked down by siRNA, recycling of internalized {sup 125}I-EGF was increased, while degradation of {sup 125}I-EGF was inhibited. Together, these data suggest that Ack1 is involved in an early step of EGFR desensitization.

  18. Endosomal deubiquitinating enzymes control ubiquitination and down-regulation of protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Hasdemir, Burcu; Murphy, Jane E; Cottrell, Graeme S; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2009-10-09

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl ubiquitinates the G protein-coupled receptor protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR(2)), which is required for postendocytic sorting of activated receptors to lysosomes, where degradation terminates signaling. The mechanisms of PAR(2) deubiquitination and its importance in trafficking and signaling of endocytosed PAR(2) are unknown. We report that receptor deubiquitination occurs between early endosomes and lysosomes and involves the endosomal deubiquitinating proteases AMSH and UBPY. Expression of the catalytically inactive mutants, AMSH(D348A) and UBPY(C786S), caused an increase in PAR(2) ubiquitination and trapped the receptor in early endosomes, thereby preventing lysosomal trafficking and degradation. Small interfering RNA knockdown of AMSH or UBPY also impaired deubiquitination, lysosomal trafficking, and degradation of PAR(2). Trapping PAR(2) in endosomes through expression of AMSH(D348A) or UBPY(C786S) did not prolong the association of PAR(2) with beta-arrestin2 or the duration of PAR(2)-induced ERK2 activation. Thus, AMSH and UBPY are essential for trafficking and down-regulation of PAR(2) but not for regulating PAR(2) dissociation from beta-arrestin2 or PAR(2)-mediated ERK2 activation.

  19. Lysine 419 targets human glucocorticoid receptor for proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andrew D; Cao, Yan; Chandramouleeswaran, Sindhu; Cidlowski, John A

    2010-12-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are members of a highly conserved family of ligand dependent transcription factors which following hormone binding undergo homologous down-regulation reducing the levels of receptor protein. This decline in human GR (hGR) is due in part to a decrease in protein receptor stability that may limit cellular responsiveness to ligand. To examine the role of the proteasome protein degradation pathway in steroid-dependent hGR responsiveness, we utilized the proteasomal inhibitors MG-132, beta-lactone, and epoxomicin. HeLa cells and COS cells were treated with proteasome inhibitors in the presence of the GR agonist dexamethasone (Dex), or were pretreated with proteasomal inhibitor and then Dex. Dexamethasone induced glucocorticoid responsive reporter activity significantly over untreated controls, whereas cells treated with proteasomal inhibitors and Dex together showed 2-3-fold increase in activity. Protein sequence analysis of the hGR protein identified several candidate protein degradation motifs including a PEST element. Mutagenesis of this element at lysine 419 was done and mutant K419A hGR failed to undergo ligand dependent down-regulation. Mutant K419A hGR displayed 2-3-fold greater glucocorticoid responsive reporter activity in the presence of Dex than wild type hGR. These differences in transcriptional activity were not due to altered subcellular localization, since when the mutant K419A hGR was fused with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) it was found to move in and out of the nucleus similarly to wild type hGR. Together these results suggest that the proteasome and the identified PEST degradation motif limit steroid-dependent human glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide down-regulates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor content through proteasome activation.

    PubMed

    Martín-Garrido, A; Boyano-Adánez, M C; Alique, M; Calleros, L; Serrano, I; Griera, M; Rodríguez-Puyol, D; Griendling, K K; Rodríguez-Puyol, M

    2009-11-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is implicated in the regulation of signaling pathways leading to changes in vascular smooth muscle function. Contractile effects produced by H(2)O(2) are due to the phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase triggered by increases in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) from intracellular stores or influx of extracellular Ca(2+). One mechanism for mobilizing such stores involves the phosphoinositide pathway. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) by binding to a family of receptors (IP(3)Rs) on the endoplasmic-sarcoplasmic reticulum that act as ligand-gated Ca(2+) channels. IP(3)Rs can be rapidly ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome, causing a decrease in cellular IP(3)R content. In this study we show that IP(3)R(1) and IP(3)R(3) are down-regulated when vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are stimulated by H(2)O(2), through an increase in proteasome activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the decrease in IP(3)R by H(2)O(2) is accompanied by a reduction in calcium efflux induced by IP(3) in VSMC. Also, we observed that angiotensin II (ANGII) induces a decrease in IP(3)R by activation of NADPH oxidase and that preincubation with H(2)O(2) decreases ANGII-mediated calcium efflux and planar cell surface area in VSMC. The decreased IP(3) receptor content observed in cells was also found in aortic rings, which exhibited a decreased ANGII-dependent contraction after treatment with H(2)O(2). Altogether, these results suggest that H(2)O(2) mediates IP(3)R down-regulation via proteasome activity.

  1. The ubiquitin isopeptidase UBPY regulates endosomal ubiquitin dynamics and is essential for receptor down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Row, Paula E; Prior, Ian A; McCullough, John; Clague, Michael J; Urbé, Sylvie

    2006-05-05

    UBPY is a ubiquitin-specific protease that can deubiquitinate monoubiquitinated receptor tyrosine kinases, as well as process Lys-48- and Lys-63-linked polyubiquitin to lower denomination forms in vitro. Catalytically inactive UBPY localizes to endosomes, which accumulate ubiquitinated proteins. We have explored the sequelae of short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of UBPY. Global levels of ubiquitinated protein increase and ubiquitin accumulates on endosomes, although free ubiquitin levels are unchanged. UBPY-depleted cells have more and larger multivesicular endosomal structures that are frequently associated through extended contact areas, characterized by regularly spaced, electron-dense, bridging profiles. Degradation of acutely stimulated receptor tyrosine kinases, epidermal growth factor receptor and Met, is strongly inhibited in UBPY knockdown cells suggesting that UBPY function is essential for growth factor receptor down-regulation. In contrast, stability of the UBPY binding partner STAM is dramatically compromised in UBPY knockdown cells. The cellular functions of UBPY are complex but clearly distinct from those of the Lys-63-ubiquitin-specific protease, AMSH, with which it shares a binding site on the SH3 domain of STAM.

  2. Distinct Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Regulatory Surfaces Mediate the Cytotoxic and Cytostatic Effects of Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Rogatsky, Inez; Hittelman, Adam B.; Pearce, David; Garabedian, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Glucocorticoids act through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which can function as a transcriptional activator or repressor, to elicit cytostatic and cytotoxic effects in a variety of cells. The molecular mechanisms regulating these events and the target genes affected by the activated receptor remain largely undefined. Using cultured human osteosarcoma cells as a model for the GR antiproliferative effect, we demonstrate that in U20S cells, GR activation leads to irreversible growth inhibition, apoptosis, and repression of Bcl2. This cytotoxic effect is mediated by GR’s transcriptional repression function, since transactivation-deficient mutants and ligands still bring about apoptosis and Bcl2 down-regulation. In contrast, the antiproliferative effect of GR in SAOS2 cells is reversible, does not result in apoptosis or repression of Bcl2, and is a function of the receptor’s ability to stimulate transcription. Thus, the cytotoxic versus cytostatic outcome of glucocorticoid treatment is cell context dependent. Interestingly, the cytostatic effect of glucocorticoids in SAOS2 cells involves multiple GR activation surfaces. GR mutants and ligands that disrupt individual transcriptional activation functions (activation function 1 [AF-1] and AF-2) or receptor dimerization fail to fully inhibit cellular proliferation and, remarkably, discriminate between the targets of GR’s cytostatic action, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1. Induction of p21Cip1 is agonist dependent and requires AF-2 but not AF-1 or GR dimerization. In contrast, induction of p27Kip1 is agonist independent, does not require AF-2 or AF-1, but depends on GR dimerization. Our findings indicate that multiple GR transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that employ distinct receptor surfaces are used to evoke either the cytostatic or cytotoxic response to glucocorticoids. PMID:10373553

  3. AMPK Mediates Glucocorticoids Stress-Induced Downregulation of the Glucocorticoid Receptor in Cultured Rat Prefrontal Cortical Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Zhou, Hai-Yun; Long, Li-Hong; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Ni, Lan; Wang, Yi; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress induces altered energy metabolism and plays important roles in the etiology of depression, in which the glucocorticoid negative feedback is disrupted due to imbalanced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) functions. The mechanism underlying the dysregulation of GR by chronic stress remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), the key enzyme regulating cellular energy metabolism, and related signaling pathways in chronic stress-induced GR dysregulation. In cultured rat cortical astrocytes, glucocorticoid treatment decreased the level, which was accompanied by the decreased expression of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and reduced phosphorylation of AMPK. Glucocorticoid-induced effects were attenuated by glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) inhibitor GSK650394, which also inhibited glucocorticoid induced phosphorylation of Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a). Furthermore, glucocorticoid-induced down-regulation of GR was mimicked by the inhibition of AMPK and abolished by the AMPK activators or the histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) inhibitors. In line with the role of AMPK in GR expression, AMPK activator metformin reversed glucocorticoid-induced reduction of AMPK phosphorylation and GR expression as well as behavioral alteration of rats. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic stress activates SGK1 and suppresses the expression of LKB1 via inhibitory phosphorylation of FOXO3a. Downregulated LKB1 contributes to reduced activation of AMPK, leading to the dephosphorylation of HDAC5 and the suppression of transcription of GR. PMID:27513844

  4. Dehydroepiandrosterone down-regulates the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kajita, Kazuo; Ishizuka, Tatsuo; Mune, Tomoatsu; Miura, Atsushi; Ishizawa, Masayoshi; Kanoh, Yoshinori; Kawai, Yasunori; Natsume, Yoshiyuki; Yasuda, Keigo

    2003-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is expected to have a weight-reducing effect. In this study, we evaluated the effect of DHEA on genetically obese Otsuka Long Evans Fatty rats (OLETF) compared with Long-Evans Tokushima rats (LETO) as control. Feeding with 0.4% DHEA-containing food for 2 wk reduced the weight of sc, epididymal, and perirenal adipose tissue in association with decreased plasma leptin levels in OLETF. Adipose tissue from OLETF showed increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) protein, which was prevented by DHEA treatment. Further, we examined the effect of DHEA on PPARgamma in primary cultured adipocytes and monolayer adipocytes differentiated from rat preadipocytes. PPARgamma protein level was decreased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and DHEA significantly reduced mRNA levels of PPARgamma, adipocyte lipid-binding protein, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein, but not CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha. DHEA-sulfate also reduced the PPARgamma protein, but dexamethasone, testosterone, or androstenedione did not alter its expression. In addition, treatment with DHEA for 5 d reduced the triglyceride content in monolayer adipocytes. These results suggest that DHEA down-regulates adiposity through the reduction of PPARgamma in adipocytes.

  5. Reversal of islet GIP receptor down-regulation and resistance to GIP by reducing hyperglycemia in the Zucker rat

    SciTech Connect

    Piteau, Shalea; Olver, Amy; Kim, Su-Jin; Winter, Kyle; Pospisilik, John Andrew; Lynn, Francis; Manhart, Susanne; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Speck, Madeleine; Pederson, Raymond A.; McIntosh, Christopher H.S.

    2007-11-03

    In type 2 diabetes (T2DM) {beta}-cell responsiveness to glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is reduced. In a model of T2DM, the VDF Zucker rat, GIP receptor mRNA and protein levels were shown to be down-regulated. Possible restoration of responsiveness to GIP in Zucker rats by reducing hyperglycemia has been examined. ZDF rats with extreme hyperglycemia demonstrated greater islet GIP receptor mRNA down-regulation (94.3 {+-} 3.8%) than ZF rats (48.8 {+-} 22.8%). GIP receptor mRNA levels in ZDF rats returned to 83.0 {+-} 17.9% of lean following normalization of hyperglycemia by phlorizin treatment and pancreas perfusions demonstrated markedly improved GIP responsiveness. Treatment of VDF rats with a DP IV inhibitor (P32/98) resulted in improved glucose tolerance and restored sensitivity to GIP in isolated pancreata. These findings support the proposal that GIP receptor down-regulation in rodent T2DM is secondary to chronic hyperglycemia and that normalization of glycemia can restore GIP sensitivity.

  6. Endothelial glucocorticoid receptor suppresses atherogenesis- Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinbo; Rotllan, Noemi; Feng, Yan; Zhou, Han; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Yu, Jun; Sessa, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the role of the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Approach and Results Control mice and mice lacking the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor were bred onto an Apoe knockout background and subjected to high-fat diet feeding for 12 weeks. Assessment of body weight and total cholesterol and triglycerides before and after the diet revealed no differences between the two groups of mice. However, mice lacking the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor developed more severe atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta, brachiocephalic artery and aortic sinus as well as a heightened inflammatory milieu as evidence by increased macrophage recruitment in the lesions. Conclusions These data suggest the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor is important for tonic inhibition of inflammation and limitation of atherosclerosis progression in this model. PMID:25810297

  7. [Glucocorticoid receptors: basis for the diverse clinical actions of glucocorticoids].

    PubMed

    Gehring, Ulrich

    2004-05-15

    Domain structure of the receptor polypeptide and association with accessory proteins: This review summarizes our present knowledge on the different forms of the glucocorticoid receptor emphasizing structure and functional significance. The nonactivated receptor resides in the cytoplasm. It contains the human receptor polypeptide of 777 amino acids as heteromeric complex in association with two molecules of the heat-shock protein hsp90 and one immunophilin. After binding the hormonal ligand, the receptor becomes activated by dissociation of these accessory proteins. The receptor functions as transcriptional regulator: The receptor polypeptide itself, complexed with hormone, moves on into the cell nucleus to there interact with chromatin and to affect transcriptional processes. By binding as homodimer to specific response elements on the DNA, the receptor functions as positive transcription factor causing increased expression of tissue-specific genes. Alternatively, the receptor interacts with transcription factors like AP-1 or NF-kappaB and inhibits their effects on actively transcribed genes. Pharmacological considerations: The pharmacological possibilities of influencing the diverse medical actions of glucocorticoids are discussed on the level of receptors.

  8. Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Giulio Maria Pasinetti MD., PhD...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a risk factor for subsequent development of Alzheimer’s

  9. Homologous down-regulation of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Aleppo, G; Moskal, S F; De Grandis, P A; Kineman, R D; Frohman, L A

    1997-03-01

    Repeated stimulation of pituitary cell cultures with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) results in diminished responsiveness, a phenomenon referred to as homologous desensitization. One component of GHRH-induced desensitization is a reduction in GHRH-binding sites, which is reflected by the decreased ability of GHRH to stimulate a rise in intracellular cAMP. In the present study, we sought to determine if homologous down-regulation of GHRH receptor number is due to a decrease in GHRH receptor synthesis. To this end, we developed and validated a quantitative RT-PCR assay system that was capable of assessing differences in GHRH-R messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in total RNA samples obtained from rat pituitary cell cultures. Treatment of pituitary cells with GHRH, for as little as 4 h, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GHRH-R mRNA levels. The maximum effect was observed with 0.1 and 1 nM GHRH, which reduced GHRH-R mRNA levels to 49 +/- 4% (mean +/- SEM) and 54 +/- 11% of control values, respectively (n = three separate experiments; P < 0.05). Accompanying the decline in GHRH-R mRNA levels was a rise in GH release; reaching 320 +/- 31% of control values (P < 0.01). Because of the possibility that the rise in medium GH level is the primary regulator of GHRH-R mRNA, we pretreated pituitary cultures for 4 h with GH to achieve a concentration comparable with that induced by a maximal stimulation with GHRH (8 micrograms GH/ml medium). Following pretreatment, cultures were stimulated for 15 min with GHRH and intracellular cAMP accumulation was measured by RIA. GH pretreatment did not impair the ability of GHRH to induce a rise in cAMP concentrations. However, as anticipated, GHRH pretreatment (10 nM) significantly reduced subsequent GHRH-stimulated cAMP to 46% of untreated controls. These data suggest that GHRH, but not GH, directly reduces GHRH-R mRNA levels. To determine whether this effect was mediated through cAMP, cultures were treated with forskolin, a direct stimulator of

  10. Fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator, sensitizes estrogen receptor negative breast tumors to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Donghai; Huang, Yuan; Han, Ning; Xu, Mingjie; Xu, Liang; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Shu; Fan, Weimin

    2014-05-01

    Drug resistance frequently results in poor prognosis and high 5-year recurrence rate in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer patients. Herein, we examined the reversal effects of fulvestrant on multidrug resistance (MDR) in ER- breast cancer cells. Co-administration of fulvestrant significantly sensitized ER- MDR tumors to paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. Further analyses indicated that fulvestrant did not affect P-gp expression, but could inhibit P-gp function and subsequently reverse P-gp mediated drug resistance in ER- breast cancer cells. These results showed that combination of fulvestrant and chemotherapeutic agents might provide an effective treatment for ER- MDR breast cancers.

  11. Involvement of tyrosine residues located in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor in agonist-induced down-regulation of the receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Valiquette, M; Bonin, H; Hnatowich, M; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J; Bouvier, M

    1990-01-01

    Chronic exposure of various cell types to adrenergic agonists leads to a decrease in cell surface beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2AR) number. Sequestration of the receptor away from the cell surface as well as a down-regulation of the total number of cellular receptors are believed to contribute to this agonist-mediated regulation of receptor number. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not well characterized. Recently, tyrosine residues located in the cytoplasmic tails of several membrane receptors, such as the low density lipoprotein and mannose-6-phosphate receptors, have been suggested as playing an important role in the agonist-induced internalization of these receptors. Accordingly, we assessed the potential role of two tyrosine residues in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2AR in agonist-induced sequestration and down-regulation of the receptor. Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 of the human beta 2AR were replaced with alanine residues by site-directed mutagenesis and both wild-type and mutant beta 2AR were stably expressed in transformed Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The mutation dramatically decreased the ability of the beta 2AR to undergo isoproterenol-induced down-regulation. However, the substitution of Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 did not affect agonist-induced sequestration of the receptor. These results suggest that tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of human beta 2AR are crucial determinants involved in its down-regulation. PMID:2164220

  12. Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes. Role of third intracellular m2 loop and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Honma, T; Lameh, J; Sadée, W

    1998-02-27

    Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine m2 receptors (hm2 receptors) and a hm2 receptor mutant lacking a central part of the third intracellular loop (I3-del m2 receptor) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells stably expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Agonist-induced internalization of up to 80-90% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by measuring loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding sites from the cell surface, and transfer of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites from the plasma membrane into the light-vesicle fractions separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Additionally, translocation of hm2 receptors with endocytic vesicles were visualized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 60-70% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by determining the loss of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in the cells. The half-time (t1/2) of internalization and down-regulation in the presence of 10(-4) M carbamylcholine was estimated to be 9.5 min and 2.3 h, respectively. The rates of both internalization and down-regulation of hm2 receptors in the presence of 10(-6) M or lower concentrations of carbamylcholine were markedly increased by coexpression of GRK2. Agonist-induced internalization of I3-del m2 receptors was barely detectable upon incubation of cells for 1 h, but agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 40-50% of I3-del m2 receptors occurred upon incubation with 10(-4) M carbamylcholine for 16 h. However, the rate of down-regulation was lower compared with wild type receptors (t1/2 = 9.9 versus 2.3 h). These results indicate that rapid internalization of hm2 receptors is facilitated by their phosphorylation with GRK2 and does not occur in the absence of the third intracellular loop, but down-regulation of hm2 receptors may occur through both GRK2-facilitating pathway and third intracellular loop-independent pathways.

  13. The herpes simplex virus receptor nectin-1 is down-regulated after trans-interaction with glycoprotein D

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, Katie M.; Milne, Richard S.B.; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Krummenacher, Claude

    2008-03-30

    During herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry, membrane fusion occurs either on the cell surface or after virus endocytosis. In both cases, binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to a receptor such as nectin-1 or HVEM is required. In this study, we co-cultured cells expressing gD with nectin-1 expressing cells to investigate the effects of gD on nectin-1 at cell contacts. After overnight co-cultures with gD expressing cells, there was a down-regulation of nectin-1 in B78H1-C10, SY5Y, A431 and HeLa cells, which HSV enters by endocytosis. In contrast, on Vero cells, which HSV enters at the plasma membrane, nectin-1 was not down-regulated. Further analysis of B78H1-derived cells showed that nectin-1 down-regulation corresponds to the ability of gD to bind nectin-1 and is achieved by internalization and low-pH-dependent degradation of nectin-1. Moreover, gD is necessary for virion internalization in B78H1 cells expressing nectin-1. These data suggest that the determinants of gD-mediated internalization of nectin-1 may direct HSV to an endocytic pathway during entry.

  14. Distribution of beta-adrenergic receptors in failing human myocardium. Implications for mechanisms of down-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphree, S.S.; Saffitz, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    The density of beta-adrenergic receptors is reduced in crude membranes prepared from failing human myocardium. We used quantitative autoradiography of radioligand binding sites in intact tissue slices to determine whether the total tissue content of receptors is reduced and to characterize the transmural distribution of receptors in cardiac myocytes and the coronary vasculature in hearts obtained from nine cardiac transplant patients with severe congestive failure. Binding of (125Iodo)cyanopindolol to transmural slices of human myocardium was rapid, saturable, stereoselective, and displaceable by agonists and antagonists with an appropriate rank order of potency. Binding isotherms in four normal and nine failing ventricles showed a significant reduction in the total tissue content of beta-receptors in failing myocardium (38.3 +/- 2.0 fmol/mg protein) compared with normal tissue (52.4 +/- 1.7 fmol/mg protein, p = 0.038). In the normal ventricles, the greatest receptor density was observed autoradiographically in myocytic regions of the subendocardium. Receptor density of the coronary arterioles was approximately 70% of that in adjacent myocytic regions. The density of binding sites in both myocytic regions and arterioles was diminished in all regions of the failing ventricles, but down-regulation was due primarily to a selective reduction of beta-receptors of subendocardial myocytes (63 +/- 5% of subepicardial receptor density vs. 115 +/- 6% in controls, p less than 0.0001). These observations indicate that down-regulation occurs nonuniformly in the transmural distribution and thus is likely not related simply to elevated circulating catecholamine levels.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Labeur, Marta; Holsboer, Florian

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glu-cocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.

  16. Expression of thyroid hormone receptor isoforms down-regulated by thyroid hormone in human medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Monden, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Yasuyo; Hashida, Tetsu; Ishii, Sumiyasu; Tomaru, Takuya; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Hashimoto, Koshi; Satoh, Teturou; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo; Kasai, Kikuo

    2006-04-01

    The role of thyroid hormone (T3) in the regulation of growth and development of the central nervous system including the cerebellum has been well established. However, the effects of thyroid hormone on malignant tumors derived from the cerebellum remain poorly understood. Our analysis mainly focused on expression levels of TR isoforms and the effects of thyroid hormone in human medulloblastoma HTB-185 cells. Northern blot analysis revealed TRalpha2 mRNA but not TRalpha1, beta1 or beta2 mRNA in the cell. The TRalpha1 and TRbeta1 mRNAs were detected only by RT-PCR method and TRbeta2 was not expressed. Incubation of T3 for 24 h decreased TRalpha1, TRalpha2 and TRbeta1 mRNA. Addition of actinomycin D caused an acute increase in the basal TR mRNA levels and the rate of decrease of all kinds of TR isoform mRNA was accelerated in the T3-treated groups compared to controls, indicating that the stability of TR mRNA was affected by T3. Incubation with cycloheximide also blocked a decrease in TR mRNA levels in the T3-treated HTB-185 cells suggesting that down-regulation of TR mRNA required the synthesis of new protein. Our data provide novel evidence for the expression of TRs down-regulated by T3 in HTB-185 cells, suggesting that TR expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by T3 at the level of RNA stability.

  17. Down-regulation of the A3 adenosine receptor in human mast cells upregulates mediators of angiogenesis and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Rudich, Noam; Dekel, Ornit; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2015-05-01

    Adenosine activated mast cells have been long implicated in allergic asthma and studies in rodent mast cells have assigned the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R) a primary role in mediating adenosine responses. Here we analyzed the functional impact of A3R activation on genes that are implicated in tissue remodeling in severe asthma in the human mast cell line HMC-1 that shares similarities with lung derived human mast cells. Quantitative real time PCR demonstrated upregulation of IL6, IL8, VEGF, amphiregulin and osteopontin. Moreover, further upregulation of these genes was noted upon the addition of dexamethasone. Unexpectedly, activated A3R down regulated its own expression and knockdown of the receptor replicated the pattern of agonist induced gene upregulation. This study therefore identifies the human mast cell A3R as regulator of tissue remodeling gene expression in human mast cells and demonstrates a heretofore-unrecognized mode of feedback regulation that is exerted by this receptor.

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of tamoxifen derivatives with a long alkyl side chain as selective estrogen receptor down-regulators.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Takuji; Kato, Masashi; Harada, Rintaro; Fujisato, Takuma; Okuhira, Keiichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Inoue, Hideshi; Naito, Mikihiko; Kurihara, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) play a major role in the growth of human breast cancer cells. An antagonist that acts as not only an inhibitor of ligand binding but also an inducer of the down-regulation of ER would be useful for the treatment for ER-positive breast cancer. We previously reported the design and synthesis of a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator (SERD), (E/Z)-4-(1-{4-[2-(dodecylamino)ethoxy]phenyl}-2-phenylbut-1-en-1-yl)phenol (C12), which is a tamoxifen derivative having a long alkyl chain on the amine moiety. This compound induced degradation of ERα via a proteasome-dependent pathway and showed an antagonistic effect in MCF-7 cells. With the aim of increasing the potency of SERDs, we designed and synthesized various tamoxifen derivatives that have various lengths and terminal groups of the long alkyl side chain. During the course of our investigation, C10F having a 10-fluorodecyl group on the amine moiety of 4-OHT was shown to be the most potent compound among the tamoxifen derivatives. Moreover, computational docking analysis suggested that the long alkyl chain interacted with the hydrophobic region on the surface of the ER, which is a binding site of helix 12 and coactivator. These results provide useful information to develop promising candidates as SERDs.

  19. Expression of glucocorticoid receptors in the regenerating human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Filipović, D; Pirkmajer, S; Mis, K; Mars, T; Grubic, Z

    2011-01-01

    Many stress conditions are accompanied by skeletal muscle dysfunction and regeneration, which is essentially a recapitulation of the embryonic development. However, regeneration usually occurs under conditions of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal gland axis activation and therefore increased glucocorticoid (GC) levels. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the main determinant of cellular responsiveness to GCs, exists in two isoforms (GRalpha and GRbeta) in humans. While the role of GRalpha is well characterized, GRbeta remains an elusive player in GC signalling. To elucidate basic characteristics of GC signalling in the regenerating human skeletal muscle we assessed GRalpha and GRbeta expression pattern in cultured human myoblasts and myotubes and their response to 24-hour dexamethasone (DEX) treatment. There was no difference in GRalpha mRNA and protein expression or DEX-mediated GRalpha down-regulation in myoblasts and myotubes. GRbeta mRNA level was very low in myoblasts and remained unaffected by differentiation and/or DEX. GRbeta protein could not be detected. These results indicate that response to GCs is established very early during human skeletal muscle regeneration and that it remains practically unchanged before innervation is established. Very low GRbeta mRNA expression and inability to detect GRbeta protein suggests that GRbeta is not a major player in the early stages of human skeletal muscle regeneration.

  20. Amphiphilic Nanoparticles Repress Macrophage Atherogenesis: Novel Core/Shell Designs for Scavenger Receptor Targeting and Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, an inflammatory lipid-rich plaque disease is perpetuated by the unregulated scavenger-receptor-mediated uptake of oxidized lipoproteins (oxLDL) in macrophages. Current treatments lack the ability to directly inhibit oxLDL accumulation and foam cell conversion within diseased arteries. In this work, we harness nanotechnology to design and fabricate a new class of nanoparticles (NPs) based on hydrophobic mucic acid cores and amphiphilic shells with the ability to inhibit the uncontrolled uptake of modified lipids in human macrophages. Our results indicate that tailored NP core and shell formulations repress oxLDL internalization via dual complementary mechanisms. Specifically, the most atheroprotective molecules in the NP cores competitively reduced NP-mediated uptake to scavenger receptor A (SRA) and also down-regulated the surface expression of SRA and CD36. Thus, nanoparticles can be designed to switch activated, lipid-scavenging macrophages to antiatherogenic phenotypes, which could be the basis for future antiatherosclerotic therapeutics. PMID:24972372

  1. Morphine-induced desensitization and down-regulation at mu-receptors in 7315C pituitary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Puttfarcken, P.S.; Cox, B.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Pituitary 7315c tumor cells maintained in culture were treated with varying concentrations of morphine from 10 nM to 300 {mu}M, for periods of five or forty-eight hours. The ability of the mu-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO, to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase in washed membrane preparations from the treated cells was compared with its activity in membranes from cells incubated in the absence of added morphine. In the same membrane preparations, the number and affinity of mu-opioid receptors was estimated by measurements of ({sup 3}H)diprenorphine binding. After 5 hr of treatment with morphine concentrations of 100 nM or higher, a significant reduction in inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by DAMGO was observed. Little further loss of agonist activity was observed when the incubations were extended to 48 hr. After 5 hr of morphine treatment, there was no change in either the number of receptors, or their affinity for ({sup 3}H)diprenorphine. However after 48 hr of morphine treatment, greater than 25% reductions in receptor number were apparent with morphine pretreatment concentrations of 10 {mu}M or higher. These results suggest that opioid tolerance in this system is primarily associated with a reduced ability of agonist-occupied receptor to activate the effector system. Receptor down-regulation was not necessary for loss of agonist response, although a reduction in receptor number occurred after exposure to high concentrations of morphine for periods longer than 5hr.

  2. Phospholipase C-epsilon augments epidermal growth factor-dependent cell growth by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sanguk; Hong, Won-Pyo; Choi, Jang Hyun; Yi, Kye Sook; Chae, Suhn-Kee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2008-01-04

    The down-regulation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is critical for the termination of EGF-dependent signaling, and the dysregulation of this process can lead to oncogenesis. In the present study, we suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of EGF receptor down-regulation by phospholipase C-epsilon. The overexpression of PLC-epsilon led to an increase in receptor recycling and decreased the down-regulation of the EGF receptor in COS-7 cells. Adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) was identified as a novel binding protein that associates with the PLC-epsilon RA2 domain independently of Ras. The interaction of PLC-epsilon with AP2 was responsible for the suppression of EGF receptor down-regulation, since a perturbation in this interaction abolished this effect. Enhanced EGF receptor stability by PLC-epsilon led to the potentiation of EGF-dependent growth in COS-7 cells. Finally, the knockdown of PLC-epsilon in mouse embryo fibroblast cells elicited a severe defect in EGF-dependent growth. Our results indicated that PLC-epsilon could promote EGF-dependent cell growth by suppressing receptor down-regulation.

  3. Down regulation of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor of the rat prostate following castration

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Miller, A.R.; Lepor, H.

    1985-07-01

    Prostatic secretion is dependent upon the integrity of the endocrine and autonomic nervous systems and is dramatically influenced by muscarinic cholinergic analogs. In this study, the authors have used radioligand receptor binding methods on whole tissue homogenates and slide mounted tissue sections of rat prostate to determine whether androgens regulate the density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the prostate. The muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding affinities (Kd) of (/sup 3/H) N-methylscopolamine in prostatic homogenates obtained from intact, castrate, and castrate rats receiving testosterone replacement (castrate + T) were similar (0.07 to 0.10 nM). The muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding capacity decreased 73 per cent following castration. Testosterone administration restored the density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in castrate rats to intact levels. In order to ensure that the loss of receptor density was not due to a decrease in the epithelial: stromal cell ratio, the number of muscarinic cholinergic receptors per unit area of epithelium was determined in the 3 treatment groups using autoradiography on slide mounted tissue sections. The density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in a unit area of epithelium was decreased 91 per cent following castration. Testosterone administration restored the density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the castrate rats to intact levels. The modulation of neurotransmitter receptors by steroid hormones may be a mechanism by which sex steroids regulate biological responsiveness of target tissues.

  4. Dopamine D2-Receptor Antagonists Down-Regulate CYP1A1/2 and CYP1B1 in the Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Harkitis, P.; Lang, M. A.; Marselos, M.; Fotopoulos, A.; Albucharali, G.; Konstandi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Dopaminergic systems regulate the release of several hormones including growth hormone (GH), thyroid hormones, insulin, glucocorticoids and prolactin (PRL) that play significant roles in the regulation of various Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. The present study investigated the role of dopamine D2-receptor-linked pathways in the regulation of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 that belong to a battery of genes controlled by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) and play a crucial role in the metabolism and toxicity of numerous environmental toxicants. Inhibition of dopamine D2-receptors with sulpiride (SULP) significantly repressed the constitutive and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B expression in the rat liver. The expression of AhR, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) was suppressed by SULP in B[a]P-treated livers, whereas the AhRR expression was increased by the drug suggesting that the SULP-mediated repression of the CYP1 inducibility is due to inactivation of the AhR regulatory system. At signal transduction level, the D2-mediated down-regulation of constitutive CYP1A1/2 and CYP1B1 expression appears to be mediated by activation of the insulin/PI3K/AKT pathway. PRL-linked pathways exerting a negative control on various CYPs, and inactivation of the glucocorticoid-linked pathways that positively control the AhR-regulated CYP1 genes, may also participate in the SULP-mediated repression of both, the constitutive and induced CYP1 expression. The present findings indicate that drugs acting as D2-dopamine receptor antagonists can modify several hormone systems that regulate the expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1, and may affect the toxicity and carcinogenicity outcome of numerous toxicants and pre-carcinogenic substances. Therefore, these drugs could be considered as a part of the strategy to reduce the risk of exposure to environmental pollutants and pre-carcinogens. PMID:26466350

  5. Glucocorticoid regulation of the vitamin D receptor.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A; Trump, Donald L; Johnson, Candace S

    2010-07-01

    Many studies indicate calcitriol has potent anti-tumor activity in different types of cancers. However, high levels of vitamin D can produce hypercalcemia in some patients. Glucocorticoids are used to ameliorate hypercalcemia and to enhance calcitriol anti-tumor activity. Calcitriol in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) protein levels and ligand binding in squamous cell carcinoma VII (SCC). In this study we found that both calcitriol and Dex induce VDR- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcription respectively, indicating both hormone receptors are active in SCC. Pre-treatment with Dex increases VDR-mediated transcription at the human CYP24A1 promoter. Whereas, pre-treatment with other steroid hormones, including dihydrotestosterone and R1881, has no effect on VDR-mediated transcription. Real-time PCR indicates treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time-dependent manner, suggesting Dex may directly regulate expression of Vdr. Numerous putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) were found in the Vdr gene. Chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated GR binding at several putative GREs located within the mouse Vdr gene. However, none of the putative GREs studied increase GR-mediated transcription in luciferase reporter assays. In an attempt to identify the response element responsible for Vdr transcript regulation, future studies will continue to analyze newly identified GREs more distal from the Vdr gene promoter.

  6. Down-regulation of chicken interleukin-17 receptor A in Eimeria infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both IL-17A and IL-17F are proinflammatory cytokines, which play an important role in intestinal homeostasis through their receptor signaling. In chickens, these two cytokines have been recently characterized, but to date, very little is known about their receptors and their functional activity. Th...

  7. Cell cycle regulation of glucocorticoid receptor function.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, S C; Qi, M; DeFranco, D B

    1992-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) nuclear translocation, transactivation and phosphorylation were examined during the cell cycle in mouse L cell fibroblasts. Glucocorticoid-dependent transactivation of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter was observed in G0 and S phase synchronized L cells, but not in G2 synchronized cells. G2 effects were selective on the glucocorticoid hormone signal transduction pathway, since glucocorticoid but not heavy metal induction of the endogenous Metallothionein-1 gene was also impaired in G2 synchronized cells. GRs that translocate to the nucleus of G2 synchronized cells in response to dexamethasone treatment were not efficiently retained there and redistributed to the cytoplasmic compartment. In contrast, GRs bound by the glucocorticoid antagonist RU486 were efficiently retained within nuclei of G2 synchronized cells. Inefficient nuclear retention was observed for both dexamethasone- and RU486-bound GRs in L cells that actively progress through G2 following release from an S phase arrest. Finally, site-specific alterations in GR phosphorylation were observed in G2 synchronized cells suggesting that cell cycle regulation of specific protein kinases and phosphatases could influence nuclear retention, recycling and transactivation activity of the GR. Images PMID:1505524

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T; van der Horst, Geertje; Hemmer, Daniëlle M; Marijt, Koen A; Hwang, Ming S; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M; Meijer, Onno C; Culig, Zoran; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we aim to elucidate the role of the GR in docetaxel-resistant PCa in order to improve the current PCa therapies. GR expression was analyzed in a tissue microarray of primary PCa specimens from chemonaive and docetaxel-treated patients, and in cultured PCa cell lines with an acquired docetaxel resistance (PC3-DR, DU145-DR, and 22Rv1-DR). We found a robust overexpression of the GR in primary PCa from docetaxel-treated patients and enhanced GR levels in cultured docetaxel-resistant human PCa cells, indicating a key role of the GR in docetaxel resistance. The capability of the GR antagonists (RU-486 and cyproterone acetate) to revert docetaxel resistance was investigated and revealed significant resensitization of docetaxel-resistant PCa cells for docetaxel treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in which a complete restoration of docetaxel sensitivity was achieved in both androgen receptor (AR)-negative and AR-positive cell lines. Mechanistically, we demonstrated down-regulation of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 upon GR antagonism, thereby defining potential treatment targets. In conclusion, we describe the involvement of the GR in the acquisition of docetaxel resistance in human PCa. Therapeutic targeting of the GR effectively resensitizes docetaxel-resistant PCa cells. These findings warrant further investigation of the clinical utility of the GR antagonists in the management of patients with advanced and docetaxel-resistant PCa.

  9. First Pharmacophore-Based Identification of Androgen Receptor Down-regulating Agents: Discovery of Potent Anti-Prostate Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Purushottamachar, Puranik; Khandelwal, Aakanksha; Chopra, Pankaj; Maheshwari, Neha; Gediya, Lalji K; Vasaitis, Tadas S.; Bruno, Robert; Clement, Omoshile O.; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative 3D pharmacophore model (a common feature based model or Catalyst HipHop algorithm) was developed for well known natural product androgen receptor down-regulating agents (ARDAs). The four common chemical features identified included: one hydrophobic group, one ring aromatic group and two hydrogen bond acceptors. This model served as a template in virtual screening of the Maybridge and NCI databases that resulted in identification of 6 new ARDAs (EC50 values 17.5 – 212 μM). Five of these molecules strongly inhibited the growth of human prostate LNCaP cells. These novel compounds may be used as leads to develop other novel anti-prostate cancer agents. PMID:17383188

  10. CRM 1-mediated degradation and agonist-induced down-regulation of beta-adrenergic receptor mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ying; Lu, Huafei; Machida, Curtis A

    2006-10-01

    The beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1-AR) mRNAs are post-transcriptionally regulated at the level of mRNA stability and undergo accelerated agonist-mediated degradation via interaction of its 3' untranslated region (UTR) with RNA binding proteins, including the HuR nuclear protein. In a previous report [Kirigiti et al. (2001). Mol. Pharmacol. 60:1308-1324], we examined the agonist-mediated down-regulation of the rat beta1-AR mRNAs, endogenously expressed in the rat C6 cell line and ectopically expressed in transfectant hamster DDT1MF2 and rat L6 cells. In this report, we determined that isoproterenol treatment of neonatal rat cortical neurons, an important cell type expressing beta1-ARs in the brain, results in significant decreases in beta1-AR mRNA stability, while treatment with leptomycin B, an inhibitor of the nuclear export receptor CRM 1, results in significant increases in beta1-AR mRNA stability and nuclear retention. UV-crosslinking/immunoprecipitation and glycerol gradient fractionation analyses indicate that the beta1-AR 3' UTR recognize complexes composed of HuR and multiple proteins, including CRM 1. Cell-permeable peptides containing the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) were used as inhibitors of CRM 1-mediated nuclear export. When DDT1MF2 transfectants were treated with isoproterenol and peptide inhibitors, only the co-addition of the NES inhibitor reversed the isoproterenol-induced reduction of beta1-AR mRNA levels. Our results suggest that CRM 1-dependent NES-mediated mechanisms influence the degradation and agonist-mediated down-regulation of the beta1-AR mRNAs.

  11. The carboxyl terminus of the chemokine receptor CCR3 contains distinct domains which regulate chemotactic signaling and receptor down-regulation in a ligand-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Sabroe, Ian; Jorritsma, Annelies; Stubbs, Victoria E L; Xanthou, Georgina; Jopling, Louise A; Ponath, Paul D; Williams, Timothy J; Murphy, Philip M; Pease, James E

    2005-04-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR3 regulates the chemotaxis of leukocytes implicated in allergic disease, such as eosinophils. Incubation of eosinophils with CCL11, CCL13 or CCL5 resulted in a rapid decrease of cell-surface CCR3 which was replicated using CCR3 transfectants. Progressive truncation of the CCR3 C terminus by 15 amino acids produced three constructs, Delta340, Delta325 and Delta310. Delta340 and Delta325 were able to bind CCL11 with affinities similar to wild-type CCR3. Delta340 transfectants exhibited enhanced migration and reduced receptor down-regulation in response to CCL11 and CCL13. Delta325 transfectants displayed chemotactic responses to CCL11 and CCL13 similar to wild-type CCR3, and had impaired down-regulation when stimulated with CCL13 but not CCL11. In contrast, neither the Delta325 nor Delta340 truncation affected chemotaxis or receptor down-regulation induced by CCL5. Delta310 transfectants bound CCL11 poorly and were biologically inactive. Inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI3-kinase antagonized eosinophil shape change responses and chemotaxis of transfectants to CCL11 and CCL13. In contrast, shape change but not chemotaxis was sensitive to inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase pathway suggesting differential regulation of the two responses. Thus, the CCR3 C terminus contains distinct domains responsible for the regulation of receptor desensitization and for coupling to chemotactic responses.

  12. Internalization and Down-Regulation of the ALK Receptor in Neuroblastoma Cell Lines upon Monoclonal Antibodies Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mazot, Pierre; Cazes, Alex; Dingli, Florent; Degoutin, Joffrey; Irinopoulou, Théano; Boutterin, Marie-Claude; Lombard, Bérangère; Loew, Damarys; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth Helen; Delattre, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Recently, activating mutations of the full length ALK receptor, with two hot spots at positions F1174 and R1275, have been characterized in sporadic cases of neuroblastoma. Here, we report similar basal patterns of ALK phosphorylation between the neuroblastoma IMR-32 cell line, which expresses only the wild-type receptor (ALKWT), and the SH-SY5Y cell line, which exhibits a heterozygous ALK F1174L mutation and expresses both ALKWT and ALKF1174L receptors. We demonstrate that this lack of detectable increased phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells is a result of intracellular retention and proteasomal degradation of the mutated receptor. As a consequence, in SH-SY5Y cells, plasma membrane appears strongly enriched for ALKWT whereas both ALKWT and ALKF1174L were present in intracellular compartments. We further explored ALK receptor trafficking by investigating the effect of agonist and antagonist mAb (monoclonal antibodies) on ALK internalization and down-regulation, either in SH-SY5Y cells or in cells expressing only ALKWT. We observe that treatment with agonist mAbs resulted in ALK internalization and lysosomal targeting for receptor degradation. In contrast, antagonist mAb induced ALK internalization and recycling to the plasma membrane. Importantly, we correlate this differential trafficking of ALK in response to mAb with the recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl and ALK ubiquitylation only after agonist stimulation. This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms regulating ALK trafficking and degradation, showing that various ALK receptor pools are regulated by proteasome or lysosome pathways according to their intracellular localization. PMID:22479414

  13. Berberine suppresses migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through down-regulation of chemokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadiankia, Naghmeh; Moghaddam, Hamid Kalalian; Mishan, Mohammad Amir; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Moghaddam, Maryam; Mirfeyzi, Seyed Jamal Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Berberine is one of the main alkaloids and it has been proven to have different pharmacological effects including inhibition of cell cycle and progression of apoptosis in various cancerous cells; however, its effects on cancer metastasis are not well known. Cancer cells obtain the ability to change their chemokine system and convert into metastatic cells. In this study, we examined the effect of berberine on breast cancer cell migration and its probable interaction with the chemokine system in cancer cells. Materials and Methods: The MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was cultured, and then, treated with berberine (10, 20, 40 and 80 μg/ml) for 24 hr. MTT assay was used in order to determine the cytotoxic effect of berberine on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Wound healing assay was applied to determine the inhibitory effect of berberine on cell migration. Moreover, real-time quantitative PCR analysis of selected chemokine receptors was performed to determine the probable molecular mechanism underlying the effect of berberine on breast cancer cell migration. Results: The results of wound healing assay revealed that berberine decreases cell migration. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of some chemokine receptors were reduced after berberine treatment, and this may be the underlying mechanism for decreased cell migration. Conclusion: Our results indicate that berberine might be a potential preventive biofactor for human breast cancer metastasis by targeting chemokine receptor genes. PMID:27081456

  14. Rapamycin down-regulates LDL-receptor expression independently of SREBP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Laura J.; Brown, Andrew J.

    2008-09-05

    As a key regulator of cholesterol homeostasis, sterol-regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) up-regulates expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (e.g., 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) Reductase) and uptake (the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor). Previously, we showed that Akt, a critical kinase in cell growth and proliferation, contributes to SREBP-2 activation. However, the specific Akt target involved is unknown. A potential candidate is the mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR. Rapamycin can cause hyperlipidaemia clinically, and we hypothesised that this may be mediated via an effect of mTOR on SREBP-2. Herein, we found that SREBP-2 activation and HMG-CoA Reductase gene expression were unaffected by rapamycin treatment. However, LDL-receptor gene expression was decreased by rapamycin, suggesting that this may contribute to the hyperlipidaemia observed in rapamycin-treated patients. Rapamycin did not affect mRNA stability, so the decrease in LDL-receptor gene expression is likely to be occurring at the transcriptional level, although independently of SREBP-2.

  15. Cobalt chloride-induced estrogen receptor alpha down-regulation involves hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jungyoon; Kim, Dukkyung; Lee, SeungKi; Lee, YoungJoo

    2005-05-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is down-regulated under hypoxia via a proteasome-dependent pathway. We studied the mechanism of ERalpha degradation under hypoxic mimetic conditions. Cobalt chloride-induced ERalpha down-regulation was dependent on the expression of newly synthesized protein(s), one possibility of which was hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha). To examine the role of HIF-1alpha expression in ERalpha down-regulation under hypoxic-mimetic conditions, we used a constitutively active form of HIF-1alpha, HIF-1alpha/herpes simplex viral protein 16 (VP16), constructed by replacing the transactivation domain of HIF-1alpha with that of VP16. Western blot analysis revealed that HIF-1alpha/VP16 down-regulated ERalpha in a dose-dependent manner via a proteasome-dependent pathway. The kinase pathway inhibitors PD98059, U0126, wortmannin, and SB203580 did not affect the down-regulation. A mammalian two-hybrid screen and immunoprecipitation assays indicated that ERalpha interacted with HIF-1alpha physically. These results suggest that ERalpha down-regulation under hypoxia involves protein-protein interactions between the ERalpha and HIF-1alpha.

  16. Leptin down-regulates insulin action through phosphorylation of serine-318 in insulin receptor substrate 1.

    PubMed

    Hennige, Anita M; Stefan, Norbert; Kapp, Katja; Lehmann, Rainer; Weigert, Cora; Beck, Alexander; Moeschel, Klaus; Mushack, Joanne; Schleicher, Erwin; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-06-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is found in obesity and type 2 diabetes. A mechanism for impaired insulin signaling in peripheral tissues is the inhibition of insulin action through serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (Irs) proteins that abolish the coupling of Irs proteins to the activated insulin receptor. Recently, we described serine-318 as a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation site in Irs1 (Ser-318) activated by hyperinsulinemia. Here we show in various cell models that the adipose hormone leptin, a putative mediator in obesity-related insulin resistance, promotes phosphorylation of Ser-318 in Irs1 by a janus kinase 2, Irs2, and PKC-dependent pathway. Mutation of Ser-318 to alanine abrogates the inhibitory effect of leptin on insulin-induced Irs1 tyrosine phosphorylation and glucose uptake in L6 myoblasts. In C57Bl/6 mice, Ser-318 phosphorylation levels in muscle tissue were enhanced by leptin and insulin administration in lean animals while in diet-induced obesity Ser-318 phosphorylation levels were already up-regulated in the basal state, and further stimulation was diminished. In analogy, in lymphocytes of obese hyperleptinemic human subjects basal Ser-318 phosphorylation levels were increased compared to lean individuals. During a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, the increment in Ser-318 phosphorylation observed in lean individuals was absent in obese. In summary, these data suggest that phosphorylation of Ser-318 in Irs1 mediates the inhibitory signal of leptin on the insulin-signaling cascade in obese subjects.

  17. Internalization and down-regulation of mu opioid receptors by endomorphins and morphine in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kristen A; Zadina, James E

    2004-12-03

    The human neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y, was used to examine the effects of morphine and the endogenous opioid peptides, endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2), on mu opioid receptor (MOR) internalization and down-regulation. Treatment for 24 h with EM-1, EM-2 or morphine at 100 nM, 1 microM and 10 microM resulted in a dose-dependent down-regulation of mu receptors. Exposure of cells to 10 microM EM-1 for 2.5, 5 and 24 h resulted in a time-dependent down-regulation of mu receptors. Down-regulation of mu receptors by morphine and EM-1 was blocked by treatment with hypertonic sucrose, consistent with an endocytosis-dependent mechanism. Sensitive cell-surface binding studies with a radiolabeled mu antagonist revealed that morphine was able to induce internalization of mu receptors naturally expressed in SH-SY5Y cells. EM-1 produced a more rapid internalization of mu receptors than morphine, but hypertonic sucrose blocked the internalization induced by each of these agonists. This study demonstrates that, like morphine, the endomorphins down-regulate mu opioid receptors in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This study also demonstrates that morphine, as well as EM-1, can induce rapid, endocytosis-dependent internalization of mu opioid receptors in SH-SY5Y cells. These results may help elucidate the ability of mu agonists to regulate the number and responsiveness of their receptors.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of kinases downstream of the T cell receptor: another immunomodulatory mechanism of glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids affect peripheral immune responses, including modulation of T-cell activation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The quantity and quality of T-cell receptor (TCR)-triggered intracellular signals modulate T-cell function. Thus, glucocorticoids may affect T cells by interfering with the TCR signaling cascade. The purpose of the study was to search for glucocorticoid-modulated kinases downstream of the TCR. Methods Gene modulation in lymphoid cells either treated with glucocorticoids or from glucocorticoid-treated mice was studied using a RNase protection assay, real-time PCR, and western blotting. The sensitivity of genetically modified thymocytes to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis was studied by performing hypotonic propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. The Student’s t-test was employed for statistical evaluation. Results We found that transcription of Itk, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase of the Tec family, was up-regulated in a mouse T-cell hybridoma by the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. In contrast, dexamethasone down-regulated the expression of Txk, a Tec kinase that functions redundantly with Itk, and Lck, the Src kinase immediately downstream of the TCR. We investigated the expression of Itk, Txk, and Lck in thymocytes and mature lymphocytes following in vitro and in vivo dexamethasone treatment at different time points and doses. Kinase expression was differentially modulated and followed distinct kinetics. Itk was up-regulated in all cell types and conditions tested. Txk was strongly up-regulated in mature lymphocytes but only weakly up-regulated or non-modulated in thymocytes in vitro or in vivo, respectively. Conversely, Lck was down-regulated in thymocytes, but not modulated or up-regulated in mature lymphocytes in the different experimental conditions. This complex behaviour correlates with the presence of both positive and negative glucocorticoid responsive elements (GRE and nGRE, respectively) in the Itk, Txk

  19. Soluble Nogo Receptor Down-regulates Expression of Neuronal Nogo-A to Enhance Axonal Regeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiangmin; Zhou, Zhigang; Hu, Jian; Fink, David J.; Mata, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Nogo-A, a member of the reticulon family, is present in neurons and oligodendrocytes. Nogo-A in central nervous system (CNS) myelin prevents axonal regeneration through interaction with Nogo receptor 1, but the function of Nogo-A in neurons is less known. We found that after axonal injury, Nogo-A is increased in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons unable to regenerate following a dorsal root injury or a sciatic nerve ligation-cut injury and that exposure in vitro to CNS myelin dramatically enhanced neuronal Nogo-A mRNA and protein through activation of RhoA while inhibiting neurite growth. Knocking down neuronal Nogo-A by small interfering RNA results in a marked increase of neurite outgrowth. We constructed a nonreplicating herpes simplex virus vector (QHNgSR) to express a truncated soluble fragment of Nogo receptor 1 (NgSR). NgSR released from QHNgSR prevented myelin inhibition of neurite extension by hippocampal and DRG neurons in vitro. NgSR prevents RhoA activation by myelin and decreases neuronal Nogo-A. Subcutaneous inoculation of QHNgSR to transduce DRG neurons resulted in improved regeneration of myelinated fibers in both the dorsal root and the spinal dorsal root entry zone, with concomitant improvement in sensory behavior. The results indicate that neuronal Nogo-A is an important intermediate in neurite growth dynamics and its expression is regulated by signals related to axonal injury and regeneration, that CNS myelin appears to activate signaling events that mimic axonal injury, and that NgSR released from QHNgSR may be used to improve recovery after injury. PMID:19901030

  20. Down-regulation of endothelin receptors in the ventrolateral medulla of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, A.; Rebello, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The binding of ({sup 125}I) sarafotoxin 6b (SRT 6b) and ({sup 125}I) endothelin-1 (ET-1) to endothelin (ET) receptors of neuronal membranes prepared from cerebral cortex and ventrolateral medulla of 8 week old spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats was determined. ({sup 125}I) SRT 6b bound to the membranes of cerebral cortex and ventrolateral medulla at a single high affinity site. The binding of ({sup 125}I) SRT 6b in the cerebral cortex was found to be similar in SHR and WKY rats. However, in the ventrolateral medulla ({sup 125}I) SRT 6b binding was found to be significantly lower in SHR as compared to WKY rats. The decreased binding was due to decrease (48%) in the B{sub max} values in SHR rats as compared to WKY rats. The K{sub d} values were similar in SHR and WKY rats. ({sup 125}I) ET-1 also bound to the membranes of cerebral cortex and ventrolateral medulla at a single high affinity site. The binding of ({sup 125}I) ET-1 in the cerebral cortex was found to be similar in SHR and WKY rats. However, in the ventrolateral medulla ({sup 125}I) ET-1 binding was found to be significantly lower in SHR as compared to WKY rats. The decreased binding was due to 36% decrease in the B{sub max} values in SHR rats as compared to WKY rats. The K{sub d} values were similar in SHR and WKY rats. It is concluded that the population of ET receptors is less in the ventrolateral medulla of SHR rats and may be contributing to the regulation of blood pressure.

  1. Down-regulation of types I, II and III inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors is mediated by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Oberdorf, J; Webster, J M; Zhu, C C; Luo, S G; Wojcikiewicz, R J

    1999-01-01

    Activation of certain phosphoinositidase-C-linked cell-surface receptors is known to cause an acceleration of the proteolysis of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] receptors and, thus, lead to Ins(1,4,5)P3-receptor down-regulation. In the current study we have sought to determine whether the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway is involved in this adaptive response. The data presented show (i) that activation of phosphoinositidase-C-linked receptors causes Ins(1,4,5)P3-receptor ubiquitination in a range of cell types (AR4-2J cells, INS-1 cells and rat cerebellar granule cells), (ii) that the Ins(1,4,5)P3-receptor down-regulation induced by activation of these receptors is blocked by proteasome inhibitors, (iii) that all known Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptors (types I, II and III) are substrates for ubiquitination, (iv) that ubiquitination occurs while Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptors are membrane-bound, (v) that Ins(1,4, 5)P3-receptor ubiquitination and down-regulation are stimulated only by those agonists that elevate Ins(1,4,5)P3 concentration persistently, and (vi) that a portion of cellular Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptors (those that are not type-I-receptor-associated) can be resistant to ubiquitination and degradation. In total these data indicate that the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway mediates Ins(1,4, 5)P3-receptor down-regulation and suggest that ubiquitination is stimulated by the binding of Ins(1,4,5)P3 to its receptor. PMID:10191279

  2. Manganese induces oligomerization to promote down-regulation of the intracellular trafficking receptor used by Shiga toxin

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Ritika; Jarvela, Timothy; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) protects cells against lethal doses of purified Shiga toxin by causing the degradation of the cycling transmembrane protein GPP130, which the toxin uses as a trafficking receptor. Mn-induced GPP130 down-regulation, in addition to being a potential therapeutic approach against Shiga toxicosis, is a model for the study of metal-regulated protein sorting. Significantly, however, the mechanism by which Mn regulates GPP130 trafficking is unknown. Here we show that a transferable trafficking determinant within GPP130 bound Mn and that Mn binding induced GPP130 oligomerization in the Golgi. Alanine substitutions blocking Mn binding abrogated both oligomerization of GPP130 and GPP130 sorting from the Golgi to lysosomes. Further, oligomerization was sufficient because forced aggregation, using a drug-controlled polymerization domain, redirected GPP130 to lysosomes in the absence of Mn. These experiments reveal metal-induced oligomerization as a Golgi sorting mechanism for a medically relevant receptor for Shiga toxin. PMID:25079690

  3. Down regulation of cerebellar serotonergic receptors in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats: Effect of pyridoxine and Aegle marmelose.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Pretty Mary; Paul, Jes; Paulose, C S

    2010-04-29

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in cerebellar damage caused by diabetes, leading to deterioration in glucose homeostasis causing metabolic disorders. The present study was carried out to find the effects of Aegle marmelose leaf extract and insulin alone and in combination with pyridoxine on the cerebellar 5-HT through 5-HT(2A) receptor subtype, gene expression studies on the status of antioxidants-superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) and immunohistochemical studies in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. 5-HT and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding parameters, B(max) and K(d), showed a significant decrease (p<0.001) in the cerebellum of diabetic rats compared to control. Gene expression studies of SOD, GPx, 5-HT(2A) and 5-HTT in cerebellum showed a significant down regulation (p<0.001) in diabetic rats compared to control. Pyridoxine treated alone and in combination with insulin, A. marmelose to diabetic rats reversed the B(max), K(d) of 5-HT, 5-HT(2A) and the gene expression of SOD, GPx, 5-HT(2A) and 5-HTT in cerebellum to near control. The gene expression of 5-HT(2A) and 5-HTT were confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. Also, the Rotarod test confirms the motor dysfunction and recovery by treatment. These data suggest the antioxidant and neuroprotective role of pyridoxine and A. marmelose through the up regulation of 5-HT through 5-HT(2A) receptor in diabetic rats. Our results suggest that pyridoxine treated alone and in combination with insulin and A. marmelose has a role in the regulation of insulin synthesis and release, normalizing diabetic related oxidative stress and neurodegeneration affecting the motor ability of an individual by serotonergic receptors through 5-HT(2A) function. This has clinical significance in the management of diabetes.

  4. Down-regulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 by bortezomib sensitizes Jurkat leukemia T cells against glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Gao, Lu; Wu, Xiaosong; Wang, Hongmei; Yang, Guang; Zhan, Fenghuang; Shi, Jumei

    2013-01-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases type 2 (11β-HSD2), a key regulator for pre-receptor metabolism of glucocorticoids (GCs) by converting active GC, cortisol, to inactive cortisone, has been shown to be present in a variety of tumors. But its expression and roles have rarely been discussed in hematological malignancies. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has been shown to not only possess antitumor effects but also potentiate the activity of other chemotherapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that 11β-HSD2 was highly expressed in two GC-resistant T-cell leukemic cell lines Jurkat and Molt4. In contrast, no 11β-HSD2 expression was found in two GC-sensitive non-hodgkin lymphoma cell lines Daudi and Raji as well as normal peripheral blood T cells. Inhibition of 11β-HSD2 by 11β-HSD inhibitor 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid or 11β-HSD2 shRNA significantly increased cortisol-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. Additionally, pretreatment of Jurkat cells with low-dose bortezomib resulted in increased cellular sensitivity to GC as shown by elevated induction of apoptosis, more cells arrested at G1 stage and up-regulation of GC-induced leucine zipper which is an important mediator of GC action. Furthermore, we clarified that bortezomib could dose-dependently inhibit 11β-HSD2 messenger RNA and protein levels as well as activity (cortisol-cortisone conversion) through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Therefore, we suggest 11β-HSD2 is, at least partially if not all, responsible for impaired GC suppression in Jurkat cells and also indicate a novel mechanism by which proteasome inhibitor bortezomib may influence GC action.

  5. In vitro glucocorticoid receptor binding and transcriptional activation by topically active glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Smith, C L; Kreutner, W

    1998-09-01

    Mometasone furoate (MF, CAS 83919-23-7, Sch 32088), budesonide (BUD, CAS 51372-29-3), fluticasone propionate (FP, CAS 80474-14-2), and triamcinolone acetonide (TA, CAS-76-25-5) are corticosteroids that are either currently available or under development for allergic rhinitis and asthma. The relative affinity of these drugs for the glucocorticoid receptor and their ability to stimulate glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transactivation of gene expression were analyzed. All of the test compounds had a higher affinity for the recombinant glucocorticoid receptor than the reference glucocorticoid receptor ligand, dexamethasone (DEX, CAS 50-02-2). In addition, all compounds showed greater potency than dexamethasone in stimulating transcription of a synthetic target gene regulated by a glucocorticoid response element. Of the compounds tested, mometasone furoate had the highest relative binding affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor, followed by fluticasone propionate, budesonide, and triamcinolone acetonide. Similarly, mometasone furoate was the most potent stimulator of glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transactivation of gene expression, followed by fluticasone propionate, tri-amcinolone acetonide, and budesonide. These in vitro studies provide a sensitive means to compare the potency of glucocorticoids and may reliably predict the in vivo topical potency of these drugs.

  6. Engagement of the T-cell receptor during positive selection in the thymus down-regulates RAG-1 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Brändle, D; Müller, C; Rülicke, T; Hengartner, H; Pircher, H

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the expression of the recombination activating gene RAG-1 by in situ hybridization to thymi from mice bearing transgenes for the T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha chain, TCR beta chain, or both TCR alpha and beta chains. RAG-1 transcription was found in the thymic cortex of transgenic mice carrying a single TCR alpha- or TCR beta-chain transgene, comparable to normal mice. However, RAG-1 transcription was strikingly reduced in the thymic cortex from transgenic mice carrying both TCR alpha- and beta-chain genes and expressing major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (H-2b) molecules necessary for positive selection of the transgenic TCR. In contrast, thymi of transgenic mice also carrying both TCR alpha- and beta-chain genes but expressing MHC molecules (H-2d) that did not positively select the transgenic TCR displayed high levels of RAG-1 transcription. The low thymic RAG-1 expression coincided with high transgenic TCR alpha-chain surface expression and with inhibition of endogenous TCR alpha-chain rearrangement. Our findings suggest that binding of the TCR to self MHC molecules during positive selection down-regulates RAG-1 transcription in cortical thymocytes and thereby prevents further TCR alpha-chain rearrangements. Images PMID:1329099

  7. Glucocorticoid receptors in murine erythroleukaemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, K.D.; Torrance, J.M.; DiDomenico, M.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors in murine erythroleukaemic cells were studied in relation to hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) induced differentiation. Specific binding of dexamethasone was measured. A single class of saturable, high affinity binding sites was demonstrated in intact cells; with cell homogenates or fractions binding was low and could not be reliably quantified. Receptor binding in whole cell suspensions was lower in cells which had been treated with HMBA (36.5 +/- 8.2 pmol/g protein) than in untreated controls (87.9 +/- 23.6 pmol/g protein); dissociation constants were similar in treated (2.7 nM) and untreated cells (2.5 nM). Dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, corticosterone and progesterone competed with tritium-labelled dexamethasone for receptor binding sites; cortisone, deoxycorticosterone and oestradiol had little effect.

  8. Interleukin-10 receptor expression and signalling were down-regulated in CD4+ T cells of lupus nephritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, H D; Qi, Z M; Yang, L L; Qi, L; Zhang, N; Zhang, X L; Du, S Y; Jiang, Y

    2011-01-01

    Studies have indicated that interleukin (IL)-10 has a pathogenic role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); however, a protective effect of IL-10 in SLE was also observed. Because the exact mechanism of IL-10 signalling in the pathogenesis of SLE is unclear, this study sought to assess the expression and signalling of interleukin-10 receptor (IL-10R) in peripheral leucocytes from patients with SLE. We used flow cytometry to examine the expression of IL-10R1 on different peripheral leucocytes from 28 SLE patients, of whom 14 had lupus nephritis (LN) and 14 were healthy controls. We also examined the effects of IL-10 on phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 and STAT-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from 13 SLE patients and seven healthy controls. Plasma cytokines were detected by flow cytometric bead array (CBA) techniques. Although IL-10R1 expression levels on each peripheral leucocyte subset from 28 SLE patients and 14 healthy controls were similar, the expression levels on CD4+ T cells from LN patients were significantly lower than on CD4+ T cells from controls and SLE patients without nephritis (P < 0·01). IL-10R1 expression levels on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were correlated negatively with the SLE disease activity index (P < 0·01). Additionally, the phosphorylation of STAT-3 was delayed and reduced in PBMCs from LN patients and active SLE patients. Plasma IL-10 levels were significantly higher in LN patients than controls. IL-10R1 expression on CD4+ T cells and signalling in PBMCs were down-regulated in LN patients, indicating that IL-10 and its receptor may have a special role in LN pathogenesis. PMID:21635228

  9. Molecular mechanisms of benzodiazepine-induced down-regulation of GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit protein in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. J.; Bristow, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment of rat cerebellar granule cells induced a transient down-regulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor alpha 1 subunit protein, that was dose-dependent (1 nM-1 microM) and prevented by the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (1 microM). After 2 days of treatment with 1 microM flunitrazepam the alpha 1 subunit protein was reduced by 41% compared to untreated cells, which returned to, and remained at, control cell levels from 4-12 days of treatment. Chronic flunitrazepam treatment did not significantly alter the GABAA receptor alpha 6 subunit protein over the 2-12 day period. 2. GABA treatment for 2 days down-regulates the alpha 1 subunit protein in a dose-dependent (10 microM-1 mM) manner that was prevented by the selective GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 microM). At 10 microM and 1 mM GABA the reduction in alpha 1 subunit expression compared to controls was 31% and 66%, respectively. 3. The flunitrazepam-induced decrease in alpha 1 subunit protein is independent of GABA, which suggests that it involves a mechanism distinct from the GABA-dependent action of benzodiazepines on GABAA receptor channel activity. 4. Simultaneous treatment with flunitrazepam and GABA did not produce an additive down-regulation of alpha 1 subunit protein, but produced an effect of the same magnitude as that of flunitrazepam alone. This down-regulation induced by the combination of flunitrazepam and GABA was inhibited by flumazenil (78%), but unaffected by bicuculline. 5. The flunitrazepam-induced down-regulation of alpha 1 subunit protein at 2 days was completely reversed by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine (0.3 microM). 6. This study has shown that both flunitrazepam and GABA treatment, via their respective binding sites, caused a reduction in the expression of the GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit protein; an effect mediated through the same neurochemical mechanism. The results also imply that the benzodiazepine effect

  10. Fungal pattern receptors down-regulate the inflammatory response by a cross-inhibitory mechanism independent of interleukin-10 production.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mario; Márquez, Saioa; de la Rosa, Juan Vladimir; Alonso, Sara; Castrillo, Antonio; Sánchez Crespo, Mariano; Fernández, Nieves

    2017-02-01

    Cyclic AMP regulatory element binding protein and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) may control inflammation by several mechanisms, one of the best characterized is the induction of the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). STAT3 also down-regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-coupled receptors, a mechanism termed cross-inhibition. Because signalling via ITAM-dependent mechanisms is a hallmark of fungal pattern receptors, STAT3 activation might be involved in the cross-inhibition associated with invasive fungal infections. The fungal surrogate zymosan produced the phosphorylation of Y705-STAT3 and the expression of Ifnb1 and Socs3, but did not induce the interferon (IFN)-signature cytokines Cxcl9 and Cxcl10 in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Unlike lipopolysaccharide (LPS), zymosan induced IL-10 and phosphorylated Y705-STAT3 to a similar extent in Irf3 and Ifnar1 knockout and wild-type mice. Human dendritic cells showed similar results, although the induction of IFNB1 was less prominent. These results indicate that LPS and zymosan activate STAT3 through different routes. Whereas type I IFN is the main effector of LPS effect, the mechanism involved in Y705-STAT3 phosphorylation by zymosan is more complex, cannot be associated with type I IFN, IL-6 or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and seems dependent on several factors given that it was partially inhibited by the platelet-activating factor antagonist WEB2086 and high concentrations of COX inhibitors, p38 mitogen-activate protein kinase inhibitors, and blockade of tumour necrosis factor-α function. Altogether, these results indicate that fungal pattern receptors share with other ITAM-coupled receptors the capacity to produce cross-inhibition through a mechanism involving STAT3 and induction of SOCS3 and IL-10, but that cannot be explained through type I IFN

  11. HIV-1 gp120Bal down-regulates phosphorylated NMDA receptor subunit 1 in cortical neurons via activation of glutamate and chemokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Wenjuan; Tang, Shao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 (gp120) is a major virulence protein implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Although gp120 has been suggested to cause synaptic and neuronal injuries by disrupting NMDA receptor (NMDAR) function, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that gp120Bal down-regulates the phosphorylation of the NMDAR subunit 1 NR1 (at Ser896 and Ser897), which is essential for NMDAR function. This effect of gp120Bal is blocked by specific antagonists of both NMDA and AMPA receptors, indicating a critical role of synaptic activation. Furthermore, AMD3100 and maraviroc, antagonists of CCR5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors, respectively, inhibit the effect of gp120Bal on NR1, suggesting that CXCR4 and CCR5 activation are involved. These findings may provide mechanistic insights into the synaptopathogenesis caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:26582091

  12. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Christian; Madshus, Inger Helene; Stang, Espen

    2012-12-10

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  13. A model for migratory B cell oscillations from receptor down-regulation induced by external chemokine fields.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cliburn; Billard, Matthew; Ramirez, Samuel A; Schmidl, Harald; Monson, Eric; Kepler, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    receptor down-regulation induced by external chemokine fields can give rise to spontaneous interzonal and intrazonal oscillations in the absence of any extrinsic regulation. While the extent to which such simple feedback mechanisms contributes to B cell migration patterns in the germinal center is unknown, the model provides an alternative hypothesis for how complex B cell migration patterns might arise from very simple mechanisms.

  14. Rapid Glucocorticoid Feedback Inhibition of ACTH Secretion Involves Ligand-Dependent Membrane Association of Glucocorticoid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qiong; Riquelme, Denise; Trinh, Loc; Low, Malcolm J.; Tomić, Melanija; Stojilkovic, Stanko

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that rapid glucocorticoid inhibition of pituitary ACTH secretion mediates a feedforward/feedback mechanism responsible for the hourly glucocorticoid pulsatility was tested in cultured pituitary cells. Perifusion with 30 pM CRH caused sustained the elevation of ACTH secretion. Superimposed corticosterone pulses inhibited CRH-stimulated ACTH release, depending on prior glucocorticoid clearance. When CRH perifusion started after 2 hours of glucocorticoid-free medium, corticosterone levels in the stress range (1 μM) caused a delayed (25 min) and prolonged inhibition of CRH-stimulated ACTH secretion, up to 60 minutes after corticosterone withdrawal. In contrast, after 6 hours of glucocorticoid-free medium, basal corticosterone levels inhibited CRH-stimulated ACTH within 5 minutes, after rapid recovery 5 minutes after corticosterone withdrawal. The latter effect was insensitive to actinomycin D but was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU486, suggesting nongenomic effects of the classical glucocorticoid receptor. In hypothalamic-derived 4B cells, 10 nM corticosterone increased immunoreactive glucocorticoid receptor content in membrane fractions, with association and clearance rates paralleling the effects on ACTH secretion from corticotrophs. Corticosterone did not affect CRH-stimulated calcium influx, but in AtT-20 cells, it had biphasic effects on CRH-stimulated Src phosphorylation, with early inhibition and late stimulation, suggesting a role for Src phosphorylation on the rapid glucocorticoid feedback. The data suggest that the nongenomic/membrane effects of classical GR mediate rapid and reversible glucocorticoid feedback inhibition at the pituitary corticotrophs downstream of calcium influx. The sensitivity and kinetics of these effects is consistent with the hypothesis that pituitary glucocorticoid feedback is part of the mechanism for adrenocortical ultradian pulse generation. PMID:26121342

  15. A transgenic zebrafish model for monitoring glucocorticoid receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Randall G.; Poshusta, Tanya L.; Skuster, Kimberly J.; Berg, MaKayla R.; Gardner, Samantha L.; Clark, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulation resulting from glucocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid response element interactions is a hallmark feature of stress response signaling. Imbalanced glucocorticoid production and glucocorticoid receptor activity have been linked to socio-economically crippling neuropsychiatric disorders, and accordingly there is a need to develop in vivo models to help understand disease progression and management. Therefore, we developed the transgenic SR4G zebrafish reporter line with six glucocorticoid response elements used to promote expression of a short half-life green fluorescent protein following glucocorticoid receptor activation. Herein, we document the ability of this reporter line to respond to both chronic and acute exogenous glucocorticoid treatment. The green fluorescent protein expression in response to transgene activation was high in a variety of tissues including the brain, and provided single cell resolution in the effected regions. The specificity of these responses is demonstrated using the partial agonist mifepristone and mutation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Importantly, the reporter line also modeled the temporal dynamics of endogenous stress response signaling, including the increased production of the glucocorticoid cortisol following hyperosmotic stress and the fluctuations of basal cortisol concentrations with the circadian rhythm. Taken together, these results characterize our newly developed reporter line for elucidating environmental or genetic modifiers of stress response signaling, which may provide insights to the neuronal mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder. PMID:24679220

  16. The ACAT inhibitor VULM1457 significantly reduced production and secretion of adrenomedullin (AM) and down-regulated AM receptors on human hepatoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Drímal, J; Fáberová, V; Schmidtová, L; Bednáriková, M; Drímal, J; Drímal, D

    2005-12-01

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is an important enzyme in the pathways of cholesterol esterification. It has been shown that new ACAT inhibitor 1-(2,6-diisopropyl-phenyl)-3-[4-(4'-nitrophenylthio)phenyl] urea (VULM1457) significantly reduced atherogenic activity in animal experimental atherosclerosis. Proliferative hormone adrenomedullin (AM) has been shown to be released in response to hypoxia, however, its role in cellular protection has remained elusive. The effect of increased local production of AM in cells and resultant down-regulation of AM receptors has not been investigated yet. We hypothesized that increased expression of AM in hypoxic cells was the result of excessive AM production with resultant AM receptor down-regulation, surface-membrane protein degradation and that the new specific ACAT inhibitor would reduce AM induction in hypoxia and thus proliferation of cells. In order to investigate specific cellular AM signaling and protection induced by VULM1457, we characterized specific surface-membrane [125I]AM receptors expressed on cells, evaluated AM secretion (RIA assays), AM mRNA expression in cultured cells (RT-PCR analysis) and proliferation (incorporation of [3H]thymidine) in control, hypoxic and metabolically stressed human hepatoblastoma cell lines exposed to gradually increasing concentrations of VULM1457. The new ACAT inhibitor VULM1457 in concentration 0.03 and 0.1 micromol/l significantly down-regulated specific AM receptors on HepG2 cells, reduced AM secretion of HepG2 cells exposed to hypoxia. These results suggest that VULM1457, as new member of ACAT family of inhibitors could negatively regulate cell proliferation induced by AM, which may correlate with down-regulation of membrane-bound AM receptors on HepG2 cells, and moreover, with the induction and expression of AM in hypoxia.

  17. Decreased glucocorticoid receptor activity following glucocorticoid receptor antisense RNA gene fragment transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, M C; Barden, N

    1991-01-01

    Depression is often characterized by increased cortisol secretion caused by hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and by nonsuppression of cortisol secretion following dexamethasone administration. This hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis could result from a reduced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity in neurons involved in its control. To investigate the effect of reduced neuronal GR levels, we have blocked cellular GR mRNA processing and/or translation by introduction of a complementary GR antisense RNA strand. Two cell lines were transfected with a reporter plasmid carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter). This gene construction permitted assay of the sensitivity of the cells to glucocorticoid hormones. Cells were also cotransfected with a plasmid containing 1,815 bp of GR cDNA inserted in the reverse orientation downstream from either a neurofilament gene promoter element or the Rous sarcoma virus promoter element. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated formation of GR antisense RNA strands. Measurement of the sensitivity of CAT activity to exogeneous dexamethasone showed that although dexamethasone increased CAT activity by as much as 13-fold in control incubations, expression of GR antisense RNA caused a 2- to 4-fold decrease in the CAT response to dexamethasone. Stable transfectants bearing the GR antisense gene fragment construction demonstrated a 50 to 70% decrease of functional GR levels compared with normal cells, as evidenced by a ligand-binding assay with the type II glucocorticoid receptor-specific ligand [3H]RU 28362. These results validate the use of antisense RNA to GR to decrease cellular response to glucocorticoids. Images PMID:1996114

  18. p120-Catenin Down-Regulation and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Overexpression Results in a Transformed Epithelium That Mimics Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Heather L.; Yang, Xuebin; Welsh, Patricia A.; Stairs, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis due to its highly invasive and metastatic potential. The molecular pathogenesis underlying the invasive mechanism of ESCC is not well known because of the lack of existing models to study this disease. p120-Catenin (p120ctn) and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have each been implicated in several cancers, including ESCC. p120ctn is down-regulated in 60% of ESCC tumors, whereas EGFR is the most commonly overexpressed oncogene in ESCC. For these reasons, we investigated the cooperation between p120ctn and EGFR and its effect on ESCC invasion. We show that p120ctn down-regulation is commonly associated with EGFR overexpression. By using a three-dimensional culture system, we demonstrate that the inverse relationship between p120ctn and EGFR has biological implications. Specifically, p120ctn down-regulation coupled with EGFR overexpression in human esophageal keratinocytes (EPC1-PE) was required to promote invasion. Morphological comparison of EPC1-PE cells grown in three-dimensional culture and human ESCC revealed identical features, including significantly increased cellularity, nuclear grade, and proliferation. Molecular characteristics were measured by keratin expression patterns, which were nearly identical between EPC1-PE cells in three-dimensional culture and ESCC samples. Altogether, our analyses have demonstrated that p120ctn down-regulation and EGFR overexpression are able to mimic human ESCC in a relevant three-dimensional culture model. PMID:25529795

  19. Apigenin suppresses migration and invasion of transformed cells through down-regulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Kuang, Lisha; Hitron, John Andrew; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Budhraja, Amit; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhuo; Luo, Jia; Shi, Xianglin

    2013-10-01

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is known to cause various cancers. There are some potential relationships between cell malignant transformation and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expressions. Metastasis, one of the major characteristics of malignantly transformed cells, contributes to the high mortality of cells. CXCR4 and its natural chemokine ligand C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12) play a critical role in metastasis. Therefore, identification of nutritional factors which are able to inhibit CXCR4 is important for protection from environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis and for abolishing metastasis of malignantly transformed cells. The present study demonstrates that apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a natural dietary flavonoid, suppressed CXCR4 expression in arsenic-transformed Beas-2B cells (B-AsT) and several other types of transformed/cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitor had any effect in reducing the apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4, indicating that apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4 is not due to proteolytic degradation. The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to the inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Apigenin also abolished migration and invasion of transformed cells induced by CXCL12. In a xenograft mouse model, apigenin down-regulated CXCR4 expression and suppressed tumor growth. Taken together, our results show that apigenin is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression. This dietary flavonoid has the potential to suppress migration and invasion of transformed cells and prevent environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Apigenin has a potential in preventing environmental arsenic induced carcinogenesis. • Apigenin suppresses CXCR4 in malignant transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. • The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to inhibition of NF-κB activity.

  20. Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A During Ligand-Induced Down-Regulation of Luteinizing Hormone Receptor in the Ovary☆

    PubMed Central

    Harada, M.; Peegel, H.; Menon, K. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is one of the most important regulators of ovarian angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the temporal relationship between VEGF-A and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) mRNA expression during ligand-induced down-regulation of LHR. Immature female rats were treated with pregnant mare’s serum gonadotropin followed by 25 IU hCG 56h later (day 0). On day 5, treatment with hCG (50 IU) to down-regulate LHR showed a temporal decrease in VEGF-A mRNA and protein levels in parallel with decreasing LHR mRNA. This effect was specific since the expression of CYP11A1 mRNA showed no decline. Examination of VEGF-A mRNA expression, using in situ hybridization histochemistry with 35S-labeled antisense VEGF-A mRNA probe, showed intense signal in the corpora lutea on day 5. Treatment with 50 IU hCG to down-regulate LHR mRNA showed a decline in the intensity of VEGF-A mRNA in the corpora lutea. VEGF-A mRNA expression returned to control level 53 hours later when the expression of LHR mRNA also recovered. These results show that the transient down-regulation of VEGF-A mRNA and protein closely parallels the ligand-induced down-regulation of LHR mRNA. The present study establishes a close association between VEGF-A and LHR mRNA expression, suggesting the possibility that VEGF-A-induced vascularization of the ovary is dictated by the expression of LHR and this might play a regulatory role in ovarian physiology. PMID:20619315

  1. Glucocorticoid receptors on and in a unicellular organism, Cryptobia salmositica.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao; Woo, Patrick T K

    2014-03-01

    This is the first report to our knowledge that demonstrates a functional steroid hormone receptor in a protozoon. The study used Cryptobia salmositica, a pathogenic haemoflagellate found in salmonid fishes. It has been previously shown that cortisol and dexamethasone (a synthetic glucocorticoid) enhanced the multiplication of C. salmositica under in vitro conditions indicating the presence of glucocorticoid receptors on/in the parasite. Also, the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, mifepristone (RU486), inhibited the stimulatory effect of the two glucocorticoids on parasite multiplication. In the present study, we used an antibody (produced in a rabbit against glucocorticoid receptor protein) agglutination test and confocal microscopy with immunohistofluorescence staining to demonstrate cortisol-glucocorticoid receptor-like protein receptors on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm of the parasite. In two in vitro studies, the addition of 50ngml(-1) of RU486 was more effective in inhibiting parasite replication in cultures with 7,000parasitesml(-1) than in cultures with 14,000parasitesml(-1). Also, 100ngml(-1) of RU486/ml was more effective than 50ngml(-1) in inhibiting parasite multiplication in the 14,000 parasitesml(-1) cultures. These in vitro studies indicate that the number of binding sites on/in the parasite is finite. The findings may be important in future studies especially on steroid receptor signalling pathways and dissection of ligand-receptor interactions, and for evaluating the adaptations that develop in pathogens as part of the host-parasite interaction.

  2. Glucocorticoid receptor in human respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pujolsa, Laura; Mullol, Joaquim; Picado, Cèsar

    2009-01-01

    Inhaled and intranasal glucocorticoids (GCs) are the most common and effective drugs for controlling symptoms and airway inflammation in respiratory diseases such as allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis with/without nasal polyps, and asthma, and the respiratory epithelium is a primary target of GC anti-inflammatory actions. GC effects are mediated through the GC receptor (GR). In humans, one single GR gene gives rise to two main GR products, namely GRalpha and GRbeta, which are subject to translational and posttranslational modifications. GRalpha is expressed in virtually all human cells and tissues, including respiratory epithelial cells, and - at least in vitro - is downregulated by GC. GRalpha mediates the anti-inflammatory actions of GC by activating transcription of anti-inflammatory genes through binding of GRalpha to glucocorticoid response elements (GRE) located in the promoter region of target genes, repressing transcription of proinflammatory genes through direct interaction between GRalpha and proinflammatory transcription factors, such as AP-1 and NF-kappaB (transrepression), and also by destabilizing the mRNA of proinflammatory mediators. GRbeta acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of GRalpha-mediated transactivation and transrepression in certain in vitro studies with transfected cells. The GRbeta message is expressed at low levels in numerous tissues and its protein is mainly expressed in inflammatory cells, although it has also been detected in airway epithelial cells. Increased GRbeta expression has been reported in bronchial asthma and nasal polyposis, and after incubation of cells with certain proinflammatory stimuli. However, the role of GRbeta in modulating GC sensitivity in vivo has been highly debated and is as yet unclear.

  3. Binding and cross-linking of recombinant mouse interferon-. gamma. to receptors in mouse leukemic L1210 cells; interferon-. gamma. internalization and receptor down-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wietzerbin, J.; Gaudelet, C.; Aguet, M.; Falcoff, E.

    1986-04-01

    Recombinant E. coli-derived murine IFN-..gamma.. (Mu-rIFN-..gamma..; 5 x 10/sup 7/ U/mg) was radiolabeled with /sup 125/I by the chloramine-T method without loss of its antiviral activity. The /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFN-..gamma.. showed specific binding to L1210 cells. Scatchard analysis indicates about 4000 binding sites per cell and an apparent Kd of 5 x 10/sup -10/ M. Binding of /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFn-..gamma.. to cells inhibited by both natural (glycosylated) and rIFN-..gamma.., but not by IFN-..gamma../..beta... Receptor-bound /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFN-..gamma.. was rapidly internalized when incubation temperature was raised from 4/sup 0/C to 37/sup 0/C. On internalization, almost no IFN-..gamma.. degradation was observed during 16 hr incubation. /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFN-..gamma.. binding capacity decreased in cells preincubated with low doses of unlabeled Mu-rIFN-..gamma.., but not with IFN-..cap alpha../..beta... This receptor down-regulation was dose-dependent: 90% reduction of /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFN-..gamma.. binding was observed after preincubation with 100 U/ml. After removal of IFN-..gamma.. from the culture medium, the binding capacity increased with time. However, reappearance of receptor was completely blocked by cycloheximide or tunicamycin, suggesting that re-expression of receptors is not due to recycling but to the synthesis of new receptors, and that the receptor is probably a glycoprotein. Cross-linking of /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFN-..gamma.. to surface L1210 cell proteins by using bifunctional agents yielded a predominant complex of m.w. 110,000 +/- 5000. Thus, assuming a bimolecular complex, the m.w. of the receptor or receptor subunit would be close to 95,000 +/- 5000.

  4. Down-regulation of cerebellar 5-HT(2C) receptors in pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in rats: therapeutic role of Bacopa monnieri extract.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Amee; Abraham, Pretty Mary; Paul, Jes; Paulose, C S

    2009-09-15

    Epilepsy is a syndrome of episodic brain dysfunction characterized by recurrent unpredictable, spontaneous seizures. Cerebellar dysfunction is a recognized complication of temporal lobe epilepsy and it is associated with seizure generation, motor deficits and memory impairment. Serotonin is known to exert a modulatory action on cerebellar function through 5HT(2C) receptors. 5-HT(2C) receptors are novel targets for developing anti-convulsant drugs. In the present study, we investigated the changes in the 5-HT(2C) receptors binding and gene expression in the cerebellum of control, epileptic and Bacopa monnieri treated epileptic rats. There was a significant down regulation of the 5-HT content (p<0.001), 5-HT(2C) gene expression (p<0.001) and 5-HT(2C) receptor binding (p<0.001) with an increased affinity (p<0.001). Carbamazepine and B. monnieri treatments to epileptic rats reversed the down regulated 5-HT content (p<0.01), 5-HT(2C) receptor binding (p<0.001) and gene expression (p<0.01) to near control level. Also, the Rotarod test confirms the motor dysfunction and recovery by B. monnieri treatment. These data suggest the neuroprotective role of B. monnieri through the upregulation of 5-HT(2C) receptor in epileptic rats. This has clinical significance in the management of epilepsy.

  5. Ligation of human Fc receptor like-2 by monoclonal antibodies down-regulates B-cell receptor-mediated signalling

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mahdi; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Ulivieri, Cristina; Amirghofran, Zahra; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Shokri, Fazel

    2014-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signalling and its regulation through negative and positive regulators are critical for balancing B-cell response and function. Human Fc receptor like-2 (FCRL2), a member of the newly identified FCRL family, could influence B-cell signalling due to possession of both immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation and inhibitory motifs (ITAM and ITIM). Since the natural ligand of FCRL2 has not been identified, we generated FCRL2-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and employed them to investigate the influence of FCRL2 stimulation on BCR signalling in an FCRL2-expressing B-cell line. Two anti-FCRL2 mAb-producing hybridoma clones (5A7-E7 and 3D8-G8) were selected. None of the mAbs displayed any cross-reactivity with the other members of the FCRL family including recombinant FCRL1, -3, -4 and -5, as tested by FACS and ELISA techniques. Engagement of the FCRL2 by these mAbs resulted in significant inhibition of BCR signalling mediators such as calcium mobilization and phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases Erk, p38 and Jnk. These findings indicate that the FCRL2 ITIM motifs are functional and the anti-FCRL2 mAbs may mimic the natural ligand of FCRL2 by induction of inhibitory signals in B cells. PMID:24797767

  6. Epigenetic and Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Glutathione Peroxidase 3 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Byung Chull; Jung, Nak-Kyun; Park, Chun Young; Oh, In-Jae; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Park, Jae-Il; Lee, Seung-won

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3), an antioxidant enzyme, acts as a modulator of redox signaling, has immunomodulatory function, and catalyzes the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPx3 has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. Although hyper-methylation of the GPx3 promoter has been shown to down-regulate its expression, other mechanisms by which GPx3 expression is regulated have not been reported. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the mechanisms of GPx3 regulation. GPx3 gene analysis predicted the presence of ten glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) on the GPx3 gene. This result prompted us to investigate whether GPx3 expression is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is implicated in tumor response to chemotherapy. The corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) was used to examine the possible relationship between GR and GPx3 expression. Dex significantly induced GPx3 expression in H1299, H1650, and H1975 cell lines, which exhibit low levels of GPx3 expression under normal conditions. The results of EMSA and ChIP-PCR suggest that GR binds directly to GRE 6 and 7, both of which are located near the GPx3 promoter. Assessment of GPx3 transcription efficiency using a luciferase reporter system showed that blocking formation of the GR-GRE complexes reduced luciferase activity by 7–8-fold. Suppression of GR expression by siRNA transfection also induced down-regulation of GPx3. These data indicate that GPx3 expression can be regulated independently via epigenetic or GR-mediated mechanisms in lung cancer cells, and suggest that GPx3 could potentiate glucocorticoid (GC)-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling in lung cancer cells. PMID:27484907

  7. Glucocorticoids and the non-steroidal selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator, compound A, differentially affect colon cancer-derived myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Drebert, Zuzanna; Bracke, Marc; Beck, Ilse M

    2015-05-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor that positively or negatively regulates the transcription of various specific target genes. Not only steroidal glucocorticoids can bind and activate the glucocorticoid receptor, but also the intensively examined non-steroidal selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators can do so, albeit with a select effector profile skewed to glucocorticoid receptor transrepression. Glucocorticoids are widely used to treat inflammatory afflictions, but also as anti-cancer therapies or adjuvants thereof. As the impact of glucocorticoids and selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators has scarcely been researched in this setting, we focused on colon cancer and its stromal environment, in particular the stromal myofibroblasts, which are known to influence cancer cells via paracrine signaling. In these myofibroblasts, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone is able to drive the glucocorticoid receptor into the nucleus and thus negatively regulates the expression of particular pro-inflammatory genes in TNFα-stimulated cells. The selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator compound A has an impaired ability to translocate GR, presumably underpinning its modest anti-inflammatory properties in these cells. Only dexamethasone, and not compound A, can upregulate the glucocorticoid receptor transactivation-dependent GILZ expression. Neither dexamethasone, nor compound A affects myofibroblast cell viability. However, compound A retards the growth of this myofibroblast cell line. Additionally, dexamethasone can inhibit the expression of Tenascin C, hepatocyte growth factor, and TGFβ, which are all factors known for their impact on colon cancer cell invasion, in a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent manner. In contrast, compound A can only slightly diminish the expression of just hepatocyte growth factor, and not tenascin C or TGFβ. Combined, our results expose new tumor microenvironment-modulating effects of

  8. NALP3 inflammasome upregulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor cause glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Paugh, Steven W; Bonten, Erik J; Savic, Daniel; Ramsey, Laura B; Thierfelder, William E; Gurung, Prajwal; Malireddi, R K Subbarao; Actis, Marcelo; Mayasundari, Anand; Min, Jaeki; Coss, David R; Laudermilk, Lucas T; Panetta, John C; McCorkle, J Robert; Fan, Yiping; Crews, Kristine R; Stocco, Gabriele; Wilkinson, Mark R; Ferreira, Antonio M; Cheng, Cheng; Yang, Wenjian; Karol, Seth E; Fernandez, Christian A; Diouf, Barthelemy; Smith, Colton; Hicks, J Kevin; Zanut, Alessandra; Giordanengo, Audrey; Crona, Daniel; Bianchi, Joy J; Holmfeldt, Linda; Mullighan, Charles G; den Boer, Monique L; Pieters, Rob; Jeha, Sima; Dunwell, Thomas L; Latif, Farida; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L; Pui, Ching-Hon; Myers, Richard M; Guy, R Kiplin; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Relling, Mary V; Evans, William E

    2015-06-01

    Glucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and resistance to glucocorticoids in leukemia cells confers poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the prednisolone sensitivity of primary leukemia cells from 444 patients newly diagnosed with ALL and found significantly higher expression of CASP1 (encoding caspase 1) and its activator NLRP3 in glucocorticoid-resistant leukemia cells, resulting from significantly lower somatic methylation of the CASP1 and NLRP3 promoters. Overexpression of CASP1 resulted in cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor, diminished the glucocorticoid-induced transcriptional response and increased glucocorticoid resistance. Knockdown or inhibition of CASP1 significantly increased glucocorticoid receptor levels and mitigated glucocorticoid resistance in CASP1-overexpressing ALL. Our findings establish a new mechanism by which the NLRP3-CASP1 inflammasome modulates cellular levels of the glucocorticoid receptor and diminishes cell sensitivity to glucocorticoids. The broad impact on the glucocorticoid transcriptional response suggests that this mechanism could also modify glucocorticoid effects in other diseases.

  9. NALP3 inflammasome up-regulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor causes glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Paugh, Steven W.; Bonten, Erik J.; Savic, Daniel; Ramsey, Laura B.; Thierfelder, William E.; Gurung, Prajwal; Malireddi, R. K. Subbarao; Actis, Marcelo; Mayasundari, Anand; Min, Jaeki; Coss, David R.; Laudermilk, Lucas T.; Panetta, John C.; McCorkle, J. Robert; Fan, Yiping; Crews, Kristine R.; Stocco, Gabriele; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Cheng, Cheng; Yang, Wenjian; Karol, Seth E.; Fernandez, Christian A.; Diouf, Barthelemy; Smith, Colton; Hicks, J. Kevin; Zanut, Alessandra; Giordanengo, Audrey; Crona, Daniel; Bianchi, Joy J.; Holmfeldt, Linda; Mullighan, Charles G.; den Boer, Monique L.; Pieters, Rob; Jeha, Sima; Dunwell, Thomas L.; Latif, Farida; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Myers, Richard M.; Guy, R. Kiplin; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and leukemia cell resistant to glucocorticoids confers a poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the sensitivity to prednisolone of primary leukemia cells from 444 newly diagnosed ALL patients, revealing significantly higher expression of caspase 1 (CASP1) and its activator NLRP3 in glucocorticoid resistant leukemia cells, due to significantly lower somatic methylation of CASP1 and NLRP3 promoters. Over-expression of CASP1 resulted in cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor, diminished glucocorticoid-induced transcriptional response and increased glucocorticoid resistance. Knockdown or inhibition of CASP1 significantly increased glucocorticoid receptor levels and mitigated glucocorticoid resistance in CASP1 overexpressing ALL. Our findings establish a new mechanism by which the NLRP3/CASP1 inflammasome modulates cellular levels of the glucocorticoid receptor and diminishes cell sensitivity to glucocorticoids. The broad impact on glucocorticoid transcriptional response suggests this mechanism could also modify glucocorticoid effects in other diseases. PMID:25938942

  10. The effects of the β-agonist isoproterenol on the down-regulation, functional responsiveness, and trafficking of β2-adrenergic receptors with amino-terminal polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Koryakina, Yulia; Jones, Stacie M.; Cornett, Lawrence E.; Seely, Kathryn; Brents, Lisa; Prather, Paul L.; Kofman, Alexander; Kurten, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) is an important target for respiratory and cardiovascular disease medications. Clinical studies suggest that amino-terminal polymorphisms of the β2AR may act as disease modifiers. We hypothesized that polymorphisms at amino acids 16 and 27 result in differential trafficking and down-regulation of β2AR variants following β-agonist exposure. The functional consequences of the four possible combinations of these polymorphisms in the human β2AR (designated β2AR-RE, -GE, -RQ and -GQ) were studied using site-directed mutagenesis and recombinant expression in HEK 293 cells. Ligand binding assays demonstrated that after 24 h exposure to 1 μM isoproterenol, isoforms with Arg16 (β2AR-RE and β2AR-RQ) underwent increased down-regulation compared to isoforms with Gly16 (β2AR-GE and β2AR-GQ). Consistent with these differences in down-regulation between isoforms, prolonged isoproterenol treatment resulted in diminished cyclic AMP response to subsequent isoproterenol challenge in β2AR-RE relative to β2AR-GE. Confocal microscopy revealed that the receptor isoforms had similar co-localization with the early endosomal marker EEA1 following isoproterenol treatment, suggesting that they had similar patterns of internalization. None of the isoforms exhibited significant co-localization with the recycling endosome marker Rab11 in response to isoproterenol treatment. Furthermore, we found that prolonged isoproterenol treatment led to a higher degree of co-localization of β2AR-RE with the lysosomal marker Lamp1 compared to that of β2AR-GE. Taken together, these results indicate that a mechanism responsible for differential responses of these receptor isoforms to β-agonist involves differences in the efficiency with which agonist-activated receptors are trafficked to lysosomes for degradation, or differences in degradation in the lysosomes. PMID:22938397

  11. Apigenin suppresses migration and invasion of transformed cells through down-regulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Kuang, Lisha; Hitron, John Andrew; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Budhraja, Amit; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Poyil, Pratheeshkumar; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhuo; Luo, Jia; Shi, Xianglin

    2013-01-01

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is known to cause various cancers. There are some potential relationships between cell malignant transformation and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expressions. Metastasis, one of the major characteristics of malignantly transformed cells, contributes to the high mortality of cells. CXCR4 and its natural chemokine ligand C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12) play a critical role in metastasis. Therefore, identification of nutritional factors which are able to inhibit CXCR4 is important for protection from environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis and for abolishing metastasis of malignantly transformed cells. The present study demonstrates that apigenin (4′, 5, 7-trihydroxyflavone), a natural dietary flavonoid, suppressed CXCR4 expression in arsenic-transformed Beas-2B cells (B-AsT) and several other type of transformed/cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitor had any effect in reducing the apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4, indicating that apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4 is not due to proteolytic degradation. The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to the inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Apigenin also abolished migration and invasion of transformed cells induced by CXCL12. In a xenograft mouse model, apigenin down-regulated CXCR4 expression and suppressed tumor growth. Taken together, our results show that apigenin is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression. This dietary flavonoid has the potential to suppress migration and invasion of transformed cells and prevent environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:23743303

  12. [Modulation of glucocorticoid receptor interaction with non-steroidal drugs].

    PubMed

    Golikov, P P; Nikolaeva, N Iu

    1993-01-01

    The Scatchard analysis of the specific binding of triamcinolone 3H-acetonide (TA-3HA) to Type II glucocorticoid receptors of cytosol from the liver of female Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g has shown that emoxipin at concentrations of 1 and 2 mM and analgin at concentrations of 5 and 10 mM reduce the density of glucocorticoid receptors and the association constant of a hormone-receptor complex. Analgin, 5 mM, increases the dissociation velocity constant of TA-3HA 5 times the effect of unlabeled triamcinolone acetonide. Emoxipin, 1 mM, produces the same effect on the receptor dissociation velocity constant of TA-3HA as the unlabeled triamcinolone acetonide. The Berke analysis has established that emoxipin and analgin reduce glucocorticoid receptor interactions by uncompetitive inhibition.

  13. Effects of suspension on tissue levels of glucocorticoid receptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Differential muscle responses can be simulated by hypokinetic/hypodynamic (H/H) suspension of rats with complete unloading of the hindlimb muscles. Since mechanism(s) underlying these atrophic effects were not clearly elucidated, experiments were initiated to investigate a possible role for glucocorticoids in the physiological and biochemical responses to H/H. The principal objective was to assess the potential for alterations in peripheral responsiveness to glucocorticoids in response to H/H. Studies have initially focused on the determination of tissue levels of glucocorticoid receptors as one index of hormonal sensitivity at the cellular level. Four hindlimb muscles (soleus, gastrocnemius, plantaris and EDL), previously demonstrated to exhibit differential responses to H/H, were investigated. Receptor levels in other glucocorticoid sensitive tissues (heart, liver, and kidney) were determined. Male rats (180-200g) were suspended for 7 or 14 days, sacrificed by cervical dislocation, and the tissues excised.

  14. Alteration of the glucocorticoid receptor subcellular localization by non steroidal compounds.

    PubMed

    Prima, V; Depoix, C; Masselot, B; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    2000-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) engages transient or stable interactions with chaperones (hsp90, hsp70), co-chaperones (p60/hop, hsp40) and several other polypeptides such as immunophilins (Cyp40, FKBP59) and p23 to achieve a high affinity ligand binding state. This complex dissociates in response to hormonal stimuli and holo-GR translocates into the nucleus, where it regulates the activity of glucocorticoid-sensitive genes. GR activity is controlled through its ligand binding domain by steroids displaying either agonistic or antagonistic activity. An alternative approach to modulate GR activity is to target receptor-associated proteins (RAPs), and several non steroidal compounds binding to RAPs affect GR transcriptional activity. We have studied the effect of such drugs on the intracellular localization of a EGFP-GR fusion protein, which has wild type GR pharmacological properties. Agonist and antagonist binding induced nuclear translocation of GR, whereas rifampicin was found to be inactive in our system. Immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A were able to induce partial nuclear translocation of GR, suggesting that potentiation of glucocorticoid action by these compounds may also proceed through enhanced GR nuclear transfer. Short treatment of cells with the hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) did not prevent nuclear translocation of GR. However, longer treatments, in parrallel to the inhibition of GR transcriptional activity, strongly perturbed GR subcellular localization concomitantly to the disruption of the actin network, and caused GR aggregation and down-regulation. The GA-induced transcriptional shutdown was also observed for other nuclear receptors which do not interact stably with hsp90. Thus RAP-binding compounds may exert their effects at least in part through perturbation of the GR cytosol to nucleus partitioning, and identify these proteins as valuable therapeutic targets to control nuclear receptor activity.

  15. The Liver X Receptor Ligand T0901317 Down-regulates APOA5 GeneExpression through Activation of SREBP-1c

    SciTech Connect

    Jakel, Heidelinde; Nowak, Maxime; Moitrot, Emanuelle; Dehondt, Helene; Hum, Dean W.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart,Jean-Charles

    2004-07-23

    Alterations in the expression of the recently discovered apolipoprotein A5 gene strongly affect plasma triglyceride levels. In this study, we investigated the contribution of APOA5 to the liver X-receptor (LXR) ligand mediated effect on plasma triglyceride levels.Following treatment with the LXR ligand T0901317, we found that APOA5mRNA levels were decreased in hepatoma cell lines. The observation that no down-regulation of APOA5 promoter activity was obtained by LXR-retinoid X receptor (RXR) co-transfection prompted us to explore the possible involvement of the known LXR target gene SREBP-1c (sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c). In fact, we found that co-transfection with the active form of SREBP-1c down-regulated APOA5promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. We then scanned the human APOA5 promoter sequence and identified two putative E-box elements that were able to bind specifically SREBP-1c in gel-shift assays and were shown to be functional by mutation analysis. Subsequent suppression of SREBP-1 mRNA through small interfering RNA interference abolished the decrease of APOA5 mRNA in response to T0901317. Finally, administration of T0901317 to hAPOA5 transgenic mice revealed a significant decrease OF APOA5 mRNA in liver tissue and circulating apolipoprotein AV protein in plasma, confirming that the described down-regulation also occurs in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrate that APOA5 gene expression is regulated by the LXR ligand T0901317 in a negative manner through SREBP-1c. These findings may provide a new mechanism responsible for the elevation of plasma triglyceride levels by LXR ligands and support the development of selective LXR agonists, not affecting SREBP-1c, as beneficial modulators of lipid metabolism.

  16. Down-regulation of transcobalamin receptor TCblR/CD320 by siRNA inhibits cobalamin uptake and proliferation of cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Shao-Chiang; Nakayama, Yasumi; Sequeira, Jeffrey M.; Quadros, Edward V.

    2011-07-01

    The clinical phenotype of cobalamin (Cbl) deficiency is dictated by the essential role of this vitamin in two key enzymatic reactions. Multiple proteins and receptors participate in the absorption, transport and delivery of this vitamin to tissue cells. Cellular uptake of Cbl is mediated by transcobalamin (TC), a plasma protein and a transmembrane receptor (TCblR) with high affinity for TC saturated with Cbl. Knockdown of TCblR with siRNA results in decreased TC-Cbl uptake. The ensuing Cbl deficiency leads to an increase in doubling time and decreased proliferation of these cells. The study confirms the seminal role of this receptor in the cellular uptake of Cbl and its down-regulation as a potential strategy to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells.

  17. Negative glucocorticoid receptor response elements and their role in glucocorticoid action.

    PubMed

    Dostert, A; Heinzel, T

    2004-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) belongs to the steroid hormone receptor subclass of nuclear receptors and controls physiological processes through activation and repression of specific target genes. The ligand-activated receptor dimer activates gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences (glucocorticoid response element, GRE) in the promoter regions of glucocorticoid-regulated genes. In contrast to the regulation of these classical GREs, the repression of negatively regulated target genes is mediated by negative GREs (nGRE), composite GREs or by transrepression. Due to their broad therapeutic spectrum and superior therapeutic effects glucocorticoids (GCs) are the most effective drugs used for the treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Unfortunately, long term systemic therapy with GCs is restricted due to their metabolic side effects. It is assumed that transrepression of transcription factors such as AP-1 and NF-kappa B is the main mechanism by which glucocorticoids mediate their anti-inflammatory activity, whereas the side effects of GCs are mainly mediated by GR-DNA-interaction either by activation or by negative regulation of gene expression. While trans-repression has been characterized in detail, the molecular mechanisms of DNA-dependent cis-repression remain unclear. In this review, we focus on current knowledge about nGRE-mediated target gene repression and the relevance and function of these genes for glucocorticoid action. Negative GREs contribute to the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis (POMC and CRH), bone (osteocalcin) and skin (keratins) function, inflammation (IL-1beta), angiogenesis (proliferin) and lactation (prolactin). The discovery of the underlying mechanisms, especially the comparison to positive GREs and trans-repression may help in the future to discover and analyze novel selective GR agonists.

  18. Glucocorticoid receptor activation and inactivation in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R H; Leach, K L; La Forest, A C; O'Toole, T E; Wagner, R; Pratt, W B

    1981-01-10

    Although glucocorticoids are not cytolytic for and do not inhibit the growth of the IM-9 line of cultured human lymphoblasts, these cells have a high steroid-binding capacity. We have used IM-9 cells in order to examine whether unoccupied glucocorticoid receptors are inactivated and activated in intact cells. when IM-9 cells are incubated in glucose-free medium in a nitrogen atmosphere, both their ability to bind triamcinolone acetonide and their ATP levels decline and, when glucose and oxygen are reintroduced, ATP levels and receptor activity return. The specific glucocorticoid-binding activity of cytosol prepared from cells exposed to various degrees of energy limitation is directly correlated with the ATP content. Receptor activation in intact cells is rapid and independent of protein synthesis. Cytosol prepared from inactivated cells cannot be activated by addition of ATP. The inactivation of glucocorticoid receptors that occurs when cytosol from normal IM-9 cells is incubated at 25 degrees C is inhibited by molybdate, vanadate, fluoride, ATP, and several other nucleotides. The experiments with intact human lymphoblasts suggest that assays of specific glucocorticoid-binding capacity do not necessarily reflect the cellular content of receptor protein.

  19. Down-regulation of the tumor suppressor gene retinoic acid receptor beta2 through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Bruno; Brand, Céline; Flajollet, Sébastien; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2006-09-01

    The retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2) is a potent, retinoid-inducible tumor suppressor gene, which is a critical molecular relay for retinoid actions in cells. Its down-regulation, or loss of expression, leads to resistance of cancer cells to retinoid treatment. Up to now, no primary mechanism underlying the repression of the RARbeta2 gene expression, hence affecting cellular retinoid sensitivity, has been identified. Here, we demonstrate that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway affects cellular retinoid sensitivity, by regulating corepressor recruitment to the RARbeta2 promoter. Through direct phosphorylation of the corepressor silencing mediator for retinoic and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT), Akt stabilized RAR/SMRT interaction, leading to an increased tethering of SMRT to the RARbeta2 promoter, decreased histone acetylation, down-regulation of the RARbeta2 expression, and impaired cellular differentiation in response to retinoid. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway, an important modulator of cellular survival, has thus a direct impact on cellular retinoid sensitivity, and its deregulation may be the triggering event in retinoid resistance of cancer cells.

  20. Clobetasol down-regulates SLPI expression in U937 monocytoid cells.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Naoko; Yoshida, Hitomi; Kitagishi, Yasuko; Nishimura, Yuri; Matsuda, Satoru

    2012-02-01

    In order to investigate how glucocorticoids affect the expression of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI), which is overexpressed in a variety of cancers, clobetasol was added to cell culture medium of U937 cells and the SLPI mRNA levels were examined. The in vitro effect of the treatment on SLPI expression was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Clobetasol treatment of U937 cells induced an up- and down-regulation of SLPI expression in a dose-dependent manner. Western blotting confirmed the down-regulation of SLPI protein expression. We hypothesized a loop formation in the SLPI genome domain, in which the glucocorticoid receptor regulates bi-directional transcriptional activity.

  1. Proopiomelanocortin, glucocorticoid, and CRH receptor expression in human ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Cassarino, Maria Francesca; Sesta, Antonella; Pagliardini, Luca; Losa, Marco; Lasio, Giovanni; Cavagnini, Francesco; Pecori Giraldi, Francesca

    2017-03-01

    ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors are by definition partially autonomous, i.e., secrete ACTH independent of physiological control. However, only few, small-sized studies on proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) or glucocorticoids are available. Objective of the present study was to report on constitutive and CRH- and dexamethasone-regulated POMC, CRH (CRH-R1), and glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) gene expression in a large series of human corticotrope adenomas. Fifty-three ACTH-secreting adenomas were incubated with 10 nM CRH or 10 nM dexamethasone for 24 h. POMC, CRH-R1, NR3C1, and its alpha and beta isoforms were quantified and medium ACTH measured. Constitutive POMC expression proved extremely variable, with macroadenomas exhibiting higher levels than microadenomas. POMC increased during CRH in most specimens; conversely, changes induced by dexamethasone were varied, ranging from decrease to paradoxical increase. No correlation between POMC and ACTH was detected in any experimental condition. CRH-R1 expression was not linked to the response to CRH while NR3C1 was expressed at greater levels in specimens who failed to inhibit during dexamethasone; glucocorticoid receptor α was the more abundant isoform and subject to down-regulation by dexamethasone. Our results demonstrate a considerable variability in POMC expression among tumors and no correlation between POMC and ACTH, suggesting that POMC peptide processing/transport plays a major role in modulating ACTH secretion. Further, CRH-R1 and NR3C1 expression were not linked to the expected ligand-induced outcome, indicating that receptor signaling rather than abundance determines corticotrope responses. Our findings pave the way to new avenues of research into Cushing's disease pathophysiology.

  2. Novel selective glucocorticoid receptor agonists (SEGRAs) with a covalent warhead for long-lasting inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ryabtsova, Oksana; Joossens, Jurgen; Van Der Veken, Pieter; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Augustyns, Koen; De Winter, Hans

    2016-10-15

    The synthesis and in vitro properties of six analogues of the selective glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonist GSK866, bearing a warhead for covalent linkage to the glucocorticoid receptor, is described.

  3. Specific glucocorticoid receptor binding to DNA reconstituted in a nucleosome.

    PubMed Central

    Perlmann, T; Wrange, O

    1988-01-01

    We have reconstituted a nucleosome with core histones from rat liver using a restriction fragment containing a sequence from the mouse mammary tumour virus (MTV) long terminal repeat (LTR). This sequence harbours glucocorticoid responsive elements (GREs) which mediate glucocorticoid hormone induction of transcription from the MTV promoter via glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding. Exonuclease III and DNase I footprinting demonstrated that the reconstituted nucleosome was specifically located between positions -219 and -76. A nucleosome was previously shown to be located at a similar or identical position in the MTV promoter in situ and to be structurally altered upon glucocorticoid hormone induction. We demonstrated, by DNase I footprinting, that GR is able to bind sequence specifically to the DNA in the in vitro assembled nucleosome. No evidence for unfolding of the nucleosome was obtained, but the DNase I footprinting pattern demonstrated GR induced local alterations in the DNA. Images PMID:2846275

  4. Ischemic postconditioning and pinacidil suppress calcium overload in anoxia-reoxygenation cardiomyocytes via down-regulation of the calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shengli; Yao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic postconditioning (IPC) and ATP sensitive potassium channel (KATP) agonists (e.g. pinacidil and diazoxide) postconditioning are effective methods to defeat myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, but their specific mechanisms of reducing I/R injury are not fully understood. We observed an intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) overload in Anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) cardiomyocytes, which can be reversed by KATP agonists diazoxide or pinacidil. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis. CaSR was reported to be involved in the I/R-induced apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes. We therefore hypothesize that IPC and pinacidil postconditioning (PPC) reduce calcium overload in I/R cardiomyocytes by the down-regulation of CaSR. A/R model was established with adult rat caridomyocyte. mRNA and protein expression of CaSR were detected, IPC, PPC and KATP’s effects on [Ca2+]i concentration was assayed too. IPC and PPC ameliorated A/R insult induced [Ca2+]i overload in cardiomyocytes. In addition, they down-regulated the mRNA and protein level of CaSR as we expected. CaSR agonist spermine and KATP blocker glibenclamide offset IPC’s effects on CaSR expression and [Ca2+]i modulation. Our data indicate that CaSR down-regulation contributes to the mitigation of calcium overload in A/R cardiomyocytes, which may partially represents IPC and KATP’s myocardial protective mechanism under I/R circumstances. PMID:27833799

  5. Modulatory effects of unsaturated fatty acids on the binding of glucocorticoids to rat liver glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Vallette, G; Vanet, A; Sumida, C; Nunez, E A

    1991-09-01

    Binding of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone to the rat liver cytosol glucocorticoid receptor was inhibited by physiological concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids as a function of increasing dose, degree of unsaturation, and chain length of the fatty acid. Polyunsaturated fatty acids were the most potent inhibitors. Scatchard analysis and Line-weaver-Burk plots of the binding data revealed that both the association constants and number of binding sites decreased and that polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibition was of a mixed non-competitive type. The dissociation rate constant of [3H]dexamethasone from glucocorticoid receptors was increased by up to 10 times in the presence of docosahexaenoic acid, whereas a competitive inhibitor like the glucocorticoid antagonist RU 38486 had no effect. Moreover, sucrose density gradient analysis showed that docosahexaenoic acid inhibited the binding of [3H] dexamethasone to both the 8.8S and 4S forms. The results strongly suggest that unsaturated fatty acids are interacting at a site on the receptor different from the hormone binding site and the heat shock protein and that by binding to a second site unsaturated fatty acids greatly change the conformation of the hormone binding site to reduce its affinity for the hormone, either partially or completely depending on the concentration and the class of the fatty acid.

  6. Interaction of rat liver glucocorticoid receptor with sodium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Murakami, N; Healy, S P; Moudgil, V K

    1982-06-15

    Effects of sodium tungstate on various properties of rat liver glucocorticoid receptor were examined at pH7 and pH 8. At pH 7, [3H]triamcinolone acetonide binding in rat liver cytosol preparations was completely blocked in the presence of 10--20 mM-sodium tungstate at 4 degrees C, whereas at 37 degrees C a 30 min incubation of cytosol receptor preparation with 1 mM-sodium tungstate reduced the loss of unoccupied receptor by 50%. At pH 8.0, tungstate presence during the 37 degrees C incubation maintained the steroid-binding capacity of unoccupied glucocorticoid receptor at control (4 degrees C) levels. In addition, heat-activation of cytosolic glucocorticoid-receptor complex was blocked by 1 mM- and 10 mM-sodium tungstate at pH 7 and pH 8 respectively. The DNA-cellulose binding by activated receptor was also inhibited completely and irreversibly by 5 mM-tungstate at pH 7, whereas at pH 8 no significant effect was observed with up to 20 mM-tungstate. The entire DNA-cellulose-bound glucocorticoid-receptor complex from control samples could be extracted by incubation with 1 mM- and 20 mM-tungstate at pH 7 and pH 8 respectively, and appeared to sediment as a 4.3--4.6 S molecule, both in 0.01 M- and 0.3 M-KCl-containing sucrose gradients. Tungstate effects are, therefore, pH-dependent and appear to involve an interaction with both the non-activated and the activated forms of the glucocorticoid receptor.

  7. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor inhibits the growth and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma via down-regulating midkine expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiu Yan; Tang, Hui Jun; Wang, Min; Cao, Guo Li; Yi, Ting Zhuang; Wu, Sheng Lan; Xu, Wei Jie; Tang, Shao Hui

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) overexpression contributes to the development of a variety of cancers. The present study explored the role of IGF-1R in the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the possibility of IGF-1R silencing by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) as a therapeutic target for HCC. We showed that IGF-1R mRNA was up-regulated in Huh7 and Hep3B cells and human HCC tissues, and that IGF-1R knockdown by RNAi led to decreased proliferation, apoptosis induction, and decreased migration and invasion of Huh7 and Hep3B cells. Further, the in vivo study indicated that IGF-1R knockdown markedly diminished the tumorigenesis and metastasis of Huh7 xenograft. Moreover, the intratumoral administration of lentivirus-IGF-1R siRNA led to significant tumor growth inhibition in an established Huh7 xenograft model. Mechanistic investigations showed that midkine was found to be the most significantly down-regulated protein in Huh7 cells with IGF-1R knockdown, and ectopic overexpression of midkine significantly rescued inhibition of Huh7 cell proliferation, migration, and invasion caused by IGF-1R suppression. Collectively, these data suggest that IGF-1R inhibition by RNAi can significantly suppress HCC growth and invasion at least partially through down-regulating midkine expression, and IGF-1R is a potential target for HCC gene therapy. PMID:27813495

  8. Calcitriol May Down-Regulate mRNA Over-Expression of Toll-Like Receptor-2 and -4, LL-37 and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Cultured Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Mi Sook; Kim, Ji-Yun; Lee, He In

    2014-01-01

    Background Although vitamin D analogs have been used in the topical treatment of psoriasis, their mechanisms of action are not well understand. Calcitriol, the hormonally active vitamin D3 metabolite, has been demonstrated to exert immunomodulatory effects in the skin by down-regulating the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and proinflammatory cytokines. Objective We investigated the effects of calcitriol on the expression of TLR2, TLR4, antimicrobial peptide LL-37, and proinflammatory cytokines in cultured human keratinocytes. Methods The mRNA expression levels of TLR2, TLR4, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and LL-37 in cultured human keratinocytes were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription (RT). Furthermore, we measured supernatant TNF-α levels by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to confirm the effects of calcitriol on TLR2 and TLR4. Results As measured by RT-PCR and real-time PCR, calcitriol was found to suppress the lipopolysaccharide- and ultraviolet B radiation-mediated induction of expression of TLRs, LL-37 and proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β in normal human keratinocytes. The supernatant TNF-α levels measured by ELISA were also suppressed after treatment with calcitriol. Conclusion Calcitriol may down-regulate inflammatory stated over-expression of LL-37 and proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:24966627

  9. Glucocorticoid receptors in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes from patients with glucocorticoid resistance and a glucocorticoid-resistant New World primate species.

    PubMed

    Tomita, M; Brandon, D D; Chrousos, G P; Vingerhoeds, A C; Foster, C M; Fowler, D; Loriaux, D L; Lipsett, M B

    1986-06-01

    Members of a previously reported family with glucocorticoid resistance and several New World primates have high plasma cortisol concentrations without any signs of glucocorticoid excess. The glucocorticoid receptor in circulating leukocytes and cultured skin fibroblasts from these patients and the animals is characterized by a decreased affinity for dexamethasone. On the other hand, the cell content of receptor is similar to that of corresponding tissues of normal humans. Detailed biochemical-biophysical studies of the glucocorticoid receptor in this familial syndrome and animal model became possible with the use of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocyte lines. Cell lines from patients with this syndrome and from the marmoset (Saguinus oedipus) contained decreased amounts of glucocorticoid receptors with concomitant decreases in nuclear receptor content compared to cultured Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes from normal human subjects. This may reflect diminished induction of glucocorticoid receptor during viral transformation of cells from the patients and the animal model. Receptors from a severely affected glucocorticoid-resistant patient and the marmoset had decreased affinity for dexamethasone. Evidence for a mild affinity defect of the glucocorticoid receptor in a patient with asymptomatic glucocorticoid resistance was obtained by increased hormone-receptor dissociation at an elevated temperature. Thermal stability, mero-receptor formation, thermal activation of cytosolic receptor, and mol wt of receptors from all cell lines were normal. Only the receptors of the severely affected patient had a discernible defect in temperature-induced activation of intact cells. We conclude that the major detectable change in the receptor in both the patients and the animal model is the decreased affinity for glucocorticoid. Viral receptor induction is decreased in both patient and marmoset cells. The physiological relevance of this phenomenon is not known. Gross

  10. Down-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 adversely affects the expression of Alzheimer's disease-relevant genes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuchner, Thole; Schliebs, Reinhard; Perez-Polo, J Regino

    2005-10-01

    Beta-amyloid peptides play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, preventing beta-amyloid formation by inhibition of the beta site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 is considered as a potential strategy to treat AD. Cholinergic mechanisms have been shown to control amyloid precursor protein processing and the number of muscarinic M2-acetylcholine receptors is decreased in brain regions of patients with AD enriched with senile plaques. Therefore, the present study investigates the effect of this M2 muscarinic receptor down-regulation by siRNA on total gene expression and on regulation of BACE1 in particular in SK-SH-SY5Y cells. This model system was used for microarray analysis after carbachol stimulation of siRNA-treated cells compared with carbachol stimulated, non-siRNA-treated cells. The same model system was used to elucidate changes at the protein level by using two-dimensional gels followed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis. Taken together, the results indicate that the M2 acetylcholine receptor down-regulation in brains of patients with AD has important effects on the expression of several genes and proteins with major functions in the pathology of AD. This includes beta-secretase BACE1 as well as several modulators of the tau protein and other AD-relevant genes and proteins. Moreover, most of these genes and proteins are adversely affected against the background of AD.

  11. Desensitization of pigment granule aggregation in Xenopus leavis melanophores: melatonin degradation rather than receptor down-regulation is responsible.

    PubMed

    Teh, Muy-Teck; Sugden, David

    2002-05-01

    Xenopus laevis melanophores express a high density (B(max) 1224 fmol/mg protein) of high-affinity (K(d) 37 pm) cell membrane melatonin receptors. Treatment of melanophores with melatonin resulted in a loss of membrane melatonin receptors reaching a maximum (approximately 60%) by 6 h. In addition to receptor loss, a decline in the potency of melatonin to produce pigment aggregation was observed on prolonged treatment. However, the loss of potency (3.8-fold in 24 h and 162-fold in 96 h) was much slower than loss of receptors, and was completely prevented by inclusion of eserine (100 microm), an inhibitor of melatonin deacetylation in the culture medium. Incubation of melanophores with [(3)H]-melatonin showed that eserine prevented metabolism of melatonin to 5-methoxytryptamine. These results indicate that although receptor density does decline on prolonged treatment, this is not responsible for the diminishing melatonin potency, which is entirely due to degradation of melatonin by deacetylation and subsequent deamination in melanophores.

  12. The glucocorticoid receptor: pivot of depression and of antidepressant treatment?

    PubMed

    Anacker, Christoph; Zunszain, Patricia A; Carvalho, Livia A; Pariante, Carmine M

    2011-04-01

    Hyperactivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and increased levels of glucocorticoid hormones in patients with depression have mostly been ascribed to impaired feedback regulation of the HPA axis, possibly caused by altered function of the receptor for glucocorticoid hormones, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Antidepressants, in turn, ameliorate many of the neurobiological disturbances in depression, including HPA axis hyperactivity, and thereby alleviate depressive symptoms. There is strong evidence for the notion that antidepressants exert these effects by modulating the GR. Such modulations, however, can be manifold and range from regulation of receptor expression to post-translational modifications, which may result in differences in GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent gene transcription. The idea that the therapeutic action of antidepressants is mediated, at least in part, by restoring GR function, is consistent with studies showing that decreased GR function contributes to HPA axis hyperactivity and to the development of depressive symptoms. Conversely, excessive glucocorticoid signalling, which requires an active GR, is associated with functional impairments in the depressed brain, especially in the hippocampus, where it results in reduced neurogenesis and impaired neuroplasticity. In this review, we will focus on the GR as a key player in the precipitation, development and resolution of depression. We will discuss potential explanations for the apparent controversy between glucocorticoid resistance and the detrimental effects of excessive glucocorticoid signalling. We will review some of the evidence for modulation of the GR by antidepressants and we will provide further insight into how antidepressants may regulate the GR to overcome depressive symptoms.

  13. Angiotensin II receptor blockade promotes repair of skeletal muscle through down-regulation of aging-promoting C1q expression

    PubMed Central

    Yabumoto, Chizuru; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Rie; Yano, Masamichi; Kudo-Sakamoto, Yoko; Sumida, Tomokazu; Kamo, Takehiro; Yagi, Hiroki; Shimizu, Yu; Saga-Kamo, Akiko; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Sakata, Yasushi; Uejima, Etsuko; Komuro, Issei

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor prolonged life span in mice. Since aging-related decline in skeletal muscle function was retarded in Atgr1a−/− mice, we examined the role of AT1 receptor in muscle regeneration after injury. Administration of AT1 receptor blocker irbesartan increased the size of regenerating myofibers, decreased fibrosis, and enhanced functional muscle recovery after cryoinjury. We recently reported that complement C1q, secreted by macrophages, activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and promoted aging-related decline in regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle. Notably, irbesartan induced M2 polarization of macrophages, but reduced C1q expression in cryoinjured muscles and in cultured macrophage cells. Irbesartan inhibited up-regulation of Axin2, a downstream gene of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, in cryoinjured muscles. In addition, topical administration of C1q reversed beneficial effects of irbesartan on skeletal muscle regeneration after injury. These results suggest that AT1 receptor blockade improves muscle repair and regeneration through down-regulation of the aging-promoting C1q-Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26571361

  14. Glomerular Glucocorticoid Receptors Expression and Clinicopathological Types of Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Yasser; Badawy, Ahlam; Swelam, Salwa; Tawfeek, Mostafa S K; Gad, Eman Fathalla

    2017-02-01

    Glucocorticoids are primary therapy of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS). However, not all children respond to steroid therapy. We assessed glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression in fifty-one children with INS and its relation to response to steroid therapy and to histopathological type. Clinical, laboratory and glomerular expression of glucocorticoid receptors were compared between groups with different steroid response. Glomerular glucocorticoid expression was slightly higher in controls than in minimal change early responders, which in turn was significantly higher than in minimal change late responders. There was significantly lower glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression in steroid-resistance compared to early responders, late responders and controls. Glomerular glucocorticoid expression was significantly higher in all minimal change disease (MCD) compared to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In INS, response to glucocorticoid is dependent on glomerular expression of receptors and peripheral expression. Evaluation of glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression at time of diagnosis of NS can predict response to steroid therapy.

  15. Glucocorticoid activity detected by in vivo zebrafish assay and in vitro glucocorticoid receptor bioassay at environmental relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiyu; Jia, Ai; Snyder, Shane A; Gong, Zhiyuan; Lam, Siew Hong

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids are pharmaceutical contaminants of emerging concern due to their incomplete removal during wastewater treatment, increased presence in aquatic environment and their biological potency. The zebrafish is a popular model for aquatic toxicology and environmental risk assessment. This study aimed to determine if glucocorticoids at environmental concentrations would perturb expression of selected glucocorticoid-responsive genes in zebrafish and to investigate their potentials as an in vivo zebrafish assay in complementing in vitro glucocorticoid receptor bioassay. The relative expression of eleven glucocorticoid-responsive genes in zebrafish larvae and liver of adult male zebrafish exposed to three representative glucocorticoids (dexamethasone, prednisolone and triamcinolone) was determined. The expression of pepck, baiap2 and pxr was up-regulated in zebrafish larvae and the expression of baiap2, pxr and mmp-2 was up-regulated in adult zebrafish exposed to glucocorticoids at concentrations equivalent to total glucocorticoids reported in environmental samples. The responsiveness of the specific genes were sufficiently robust in zebrafish larvae exposed to a complex environmental sample detected with in vitro glucocorticoid activity equivalent to 478 pM dexamethasone (DEX-EQ) and confirmed to contain low concentration (0.2 ng/L or less) of the targeted glucocorticoids, and possibly other glucocorticoid-active compounds. The findings provided in vivo relevance to the in vitro glucocorticoid activity and suggested that the environmental sample can perturb glucocorticoid-responsive genes in its original, or half the diluted, concentration as may be found in the environment. The study demonstrated the important complementary roles of in vivo zebrafish and in vitro bioassays coupled with analytical chemistry in monitoring environmental glucocorticoid contaminants.

  16. Estrogen Receptor α Mediates Proliferation of Osteoblastic Cells Stimulated by Estrogen and Mechanical Strain, but Their Acute Down-regulation of the Wnt Antagonist Sost Is Mediated by Estrogen Receptor β*

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Gabriel L.; Meakin, Lee B.; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Zebda, Noureddine; Sunters, Andrew; Taipaleenmaki, Hanna; Stein, Gary S.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lanyon, Lance E.; Price, Joanna S.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical strain and estrogens both stimulate osteoblast proliferation through estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated effects, and both down-regulate the Wnt antagonist Sost/sclerostin. Here, we investigate the differential effects of ERα and -β in these processes in mouse long bone-derived osteoblastic cells and human Saos-2 cells. Recruitment to the cell cycle following strain or 17β-estradiol occurs within 30 min, as determined by Ki-67 staining, and is prevented by the ERα antagonist 1,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-5-[4-(2-piperidinylethoxy)phenol]-1H-pyrazole dihydrochloride. ERβ inhibition with 4-[2-phenyl-5,7-bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrazolo[1,5-β]pyrimidin-3-yl] phenol (PTHPP) increases basal proliferation similarly to strain or estradiol. Both strain and estradiol down-regulate Sost expression, as does in vitro inhibition or in vivo deletion of ERα. The ERβ agonists 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile and ERB041 also down-regulated Sost expression in vitro, whereas the ERα agonist 4,4′,4″-[4-propyl-(1H)-pyrazol-1,3,5-triyl]tris-phenol or the ERβ antagonist PTHPP has no effect. Tamoxifen, a nongenomic ERβ agonist, down-regulates Sost expression in vitro and in bones in vivo. Inhibition of both ERs with fulvestrant or selective antagonism of ERβ, but not ERα, prevents Sost down-regulation by strain or estradiol. Sost down-regulation by strain or ERβ activation is prevented by MEK/ERK blockade. Exogenous sclerostin has no effect on estradiol-induced proliferation but prevents that following strain. Thus, in osteoblastic cells the acute proliferative effects of both estradiol and strain are ERα-mediated. Basal Sost down-regulation follows decreased activity of ERα and increased activity of ERβ. Sost down-regulation by strain or increased estrogens is mediated by ERβ, not ERα. ER-targeting therapy may facilitate structurally appropriate bone formation by enhancing the distinct ligand-independent, strain-related contributions to proliferation

  17. Dienogest, a synthetic progestin, down-regulates expression of CYP19A1 and inflammatory and neuroangiogenesis factors through progesterone receptor isoforms A and B in endometriotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Masayuki; Mita, Shizuka; Shimizu, Yutaka; Imada, Kazunori; Kiyono, Tohru; Bono, Yukiko; Kyo, Satoru

    2015-03-01

    Dienogest (DNG) is a selective progesterone receptor (PR) agonist and oral administration of DNG is used for the treatment of endometriosis. DNG is considered to act on PR to down-regulate pathophysiological factors associated with endometriosis. PR exists as two major isoforms, PR-A and PR-B, and their physiological functions are mostly distinct. It was suggested that PR isoform expression patterns are altered in endometriosis, but it is unknown whether the pharmacological effects of DNG are exerted through PR-A, PR-B or both. In the present study, we investigated the pharmacological effects of DNG through these PR isoforms on the expression of CYP19A1 which encodes aromatase and inflammatory and neuroangiogenesis factors associated with the pain and progression of endometriosis. We used immortalized human endometriotic epithelial cell lines that specifically express PR-A or PR-B in a spheroid cell culture system, and treated them with DNG. We evaluated messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of CYP19A1, prostaglandin (PG)E2 synthase (cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and microsomal PGE2 synthase (mPGES)-1), inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) and neuroangiogenesis factors (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF)) using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, PGE2 production was measured by enzyme immunoassay. We found that DNG down-regulated mRNA expression of CYP19A1, COX-2, mPGES-1, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, NGF and VEGF, and PGE2 production in human endometriotic epithelial cell lines that specifically express either PR-A or PR-B. These results demonstrate that DNG activates both PR-A and PR-B and down-regulates the expression of pathophysiological factors associated with pain and progression of endometriosis. Our results suggest that DNG exerts therapeutic efficacy against the pain and progression of endometriosis regardless of PR isoform expression patterns.

  18. The glucocorticoid-glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction pathway, transforming growth factor-beta, and embryonic mouse lung development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jaskoll, T; Choy, H A; Melnick, M

    1996-05-01

    Lung morphogenesis has been shown to be regulated by glucocorticoids (CORT). Because CORT has been primarily thought to affect fetal lung development, previous studies have focused on the role of CORT receptor (GR)-mediated regulation of fetal lung development. Although endogenous CORT increases during embryonic and fetal stages and exogenous CORT treatment in vivo and in vitro clearly accelerates embryonic lung development, little is known about the morphoregulatory role of the embryonic CORT-GR signal transduction pathway during lung development. In this study, we characterize the embryonic mouse CORT-GR pathway and demonstrate: stage-specific in situ patterns of GR immunolocalization; similarity in GR relative mobility with progressive (E13 --> E17) development; that embryonic GR can be activated to bind a GR response element (GRE); significantly increasing levels of functional GR with increasing lung maturation; and the presence of heat shock protein (hsp) 70 and hsp90 from early (E13) to late (E17) developmental stages. These results support the purported importance of the embryonic CORT-GR signal transduction pathway in progressive lung differentiation. To demonstrate that the embryonic CORT-GR directed pathway plays a role in lung development, early embryonic (E12) lungs were exposed to CORT in utero and surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) expression was analyzed; CORT treatment up-regulates SP-A mRNA expression and spatiotemporal protein distribution. Finally, to determine whether CORT-GR-directed pulmonary morphogenesis in vivo involves the modulation of growth factors, we studied the effect of CORT on TGF-beta gene expression. Northern analysis of TGF-beta 1, TGF-beta 2, and TGF-beta 3 transcript levels in vivo indicates that CORT regulates the rate of lung morpho- and histodifferentiation by down-regulating TGF-beta 3 gene expression.

  19. Cytisine confers neuronal protection against excitotoxic injury by down-regulating GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Jiao; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Kun; Guo, Yan-Yan; Li, Xu-Bo; Yang, Le; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Wu, Yu-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Cytisine (CYT), one of the principal bioactive components derived from the seeds of Cytisus laborinum L, has been widely used for central nervous system (CNS) diseases treatment. The present study investigated the protective effect of CYT on cultured cortical neural injury induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). Our data showed that CYT conferred protective effect against loss of cellular viability induced by brief exposure to 200 μM NMDA in a concentration-dependent manner. CYT significantly inhibited the neuronal apoptosis induced by NMDA exposure by reversing intracellular Ca(2+) overload and balancing Bcl-2 and Bax expression levels. Furthermore, CYT significantly reversed the up-regulation of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors by exposure to NMDA, but it did not affect the level of GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors. These findings suggest that CYT protects cortical neurons, at least partially, by inhibiting the level of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors and regulating Bcl-2 family.

  20. Properties of binding of partially purified glucocorticoid receptor from rat liver with glucocorticoids of different biopotencies.

    PubMed

    Izawa, M; Satoh, Y; Yoshida, A; Ichii, S

    1985-06-01

    To elucidate the relationship between binding parameters and biopotencies of glucocorticoids, we partially purified the receptor from the liver cytosol of rats in a dexamethasone-bound and unactivated form by precipitation with protamine sulfate, gel filtration and DEAE-cellulose chromatography (approximately 100-fold) and examined the interaction of the preparation with 3 glucocorticoids of different biopotencies (dexamethasone; Dex, corticosterone; Cort and prednisolone; Pred). The partially purified receptor (PPR) was stable at -20 degrees C for at least 2 months in the presence of bovine serum albumin, glycerol, molybdate and dithiothreitol. Treatment of the PPR with p-hydroxymercuribenzoate liberated the ligands and the treated PPR reassociated 3H-glucocorticoids efficiently following the addition of dithiothreitol. The reassociated PPR was bound to the DNA-cellulose after a brief heating. Metabolic activity on ligands and inactivation of the binding sites in the PPR were insignificant under the conditions used. Kd's were approximately 0.9, approximately 3 and approximately 6 nM for Dex, Cort and Pred, respectively (at 0 degree C). Relative binding affinity of ligands to the PPR which was estimated by competitions was higher in the order of triamcinolone acetonide greater than Dex greater than Cort greater than Pred greater than progesterone greater than cortexolone. Association of Dex and Cort was relatively rapid and significantly accelerated by raising the incubation temperature, while the association of Pred was slower and effects of the temperature was moderate. The rate of dissociations was also varied with ligands. The rate of dissociation of Dex was the lowest among the 3 ligands and was elevated by raising the temperature. Because the effect of temperature was more pronounced in the dissociation than in the association, apparent Ka's decreased at higher temperature. Thermodynamic examinations of glucocorticoid binding in the PPR revealed that the

  1. Selective glucocorticoid receptor-activating adjuvant therapy in cancer treatments

    PubMed Central

    Sundahl, Nora; Clarisse, Dorien; Bracke, Marc; Offner, Fritz; Berghe, Wim Vanden; Beck, Ilse M.

    2016-01-01

    Although adverse effects and glucocorticoid resistance cripple their chronic use, glucocorticoids form the mainstay therapy for acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, and play an important role in treatment protocols of both lymphoid malignancies and as adjuvant to stimulate therapy tolerability in various solid tumors. Glucocorticoid binding to their designate glucocorticoid receptor (GR), sets off a plethora of cell-specific events including therapeutically desirable effects, such as cell death, as well as undesirable effects, including chemotherapy resistance, systemic side effects and glucocorticoid resistance. In this context, selective GR agonists and modulators (SEGRAMs) with a more restricted GR activity profile have been developed, holding promise for further clinical development in anti-inflammatory and potentially in cancer therapies. Thus far, the research into the prospective benefits of selective GR modulators in cancer therapy limped behind. Our review discusses how selective GR agonists and modulators could improve the therapy regimens for lymphoid malignancies, prostate or breast cancer. We summarize our current knowledge and look forward to where the field should move to in the future. Altogether, our review clarifies novel therapeutic perspectives in cancer modulation via selective GR targeting. PMID:27713909

  2. The role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) polymorphisms in human erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Varricchio, Lilian; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are endogenous steroid hormones that regulate several biological functions including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in numerous cell types in response to stress. Synthetic glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone (Dex) are used to treat a variety of diseases ranging from allergy to depression. Glucocorticoids exert their effects by passively entering into cells and binding to a specific Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) present in the cytoplasm. Once activated by its ligand, GR may elicit cytoplasmic (mainly suppression of p53), and nuclear (regulation of transcription of GR responsive genes), responses. Human GR is highly polymorphic and may encode > 260 different isoforms. This polymorphism is emerging as the leading cause for the variability of phenotype and response to glucocorticoid therapy observed in human populations. Studies in mice and clinical observations indicate that GR controls also the response to erythroid stress. This knowledge has been exploited in-vivo by using synthetic GR agonists for treatment of the erythropoietin-refractory congenic Diamond Blackfan Anemia and in-vitro to develop culture conditions that may theoretically generate red cells in numbers sufficient for transfusion. However, the effect exerted by GR polymorphism on the variability of the phenotype of genetic and acquired erythroid disorders observed in the human population is still poorly appreciated. This review will summarize current knowledge on the biological activity of GR and of its polymorphism in non-hematopoietic diseases and discuss the implications of these observations for erythropoiesis.

  3. The role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) polymorphisms in human erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Varricchio, Lilian; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are endogenous steroid hormones that regulate several biological functions including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in numerous cell types in response to stress. Synthetic glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone (Dex) are used to treat a variety of diseases ranging from allergy to depression. Glucocorticoids exert their effects by passively entering into cells and binding to a specific Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) present in the cytoplasm. Once activated by its ligand, GR may elicit cytoplasmic (mainly suppression of p53), and nuclear (regulation of transcription of GR responsive genes), responses. Human GR is highly polymorphic and may encode > 260 different isoforms. This polymorphism is emerging as the leading cause for the variability of phenotype and response to glucocorticoid therapy observed in human populations. Studies in mice and clinical observations indicate that GR controls also the response to erythroid stress. This knowledge has been exploited in-vivo by using synthetic GR agonists for treatment of the erythropoietin-refractory congenic Diamond Blackfan Anemia and in-vitro to develop culture conditions that may theoretically generate red cells in numbers sufficient for transfusion. However, the effect exerted by GR polymorphism on the variability of the phenotype of genetic and acquired erythroid disorders observed in the human population is still poorly appreciated. This review will summarize current knowledge on the biological activity of GR and of its polymorphism in non-hematopoietic diseases and discuss the implications of these observations for erythropoiesis. PMID:25755906

  4. Prolonged nicotine exposure down-regulates presynaptic NMDA receptors in dopaminergic terminals of the rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Alessia; Zappettini, Stefania; Grilli, Massimo; Olivero, Guendalina; Agostinho, Paula; Tomé, Angelo R; Chen, Jiayang; Pittaluga, Anna; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Marchi, Mario

    2014-04-01

    The presynaptic control of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) by glutamate and acetylcholine has a profound impact on reward signaling. Here we provide immunocytochemical and neurochemical evidence supporting the co-localization and functional interaction between nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors in dopaminergic terminals of the NAc. Most NAc dopaminergic terminals possessed the nAChR α4 subunit and the pre-exposure of synaptosomes to nicotine (30 μM) or to the α4β2-containing nAChR agonist 5IA85380 (10 nM) selectively inhibited the NMDA (100 μM)-evoked, but not the 4-aminopyridine (10 μM)-evoked, [(3)H] dopamine outflow; this inhibition was blunted by mecamylamine (10 μM). Nicotine and 5IA85380 pretreatment also inhibited the NMDA (100 μM)-evoked increase of calcium levels in single nerve terminals, an effect prevented by dihydro-β-erythroidine (1 μM). This supports a functional interaction between α4β2-containing nAChR and NMDA receptors within the same terminal, as supported by the immunocytochemical co-localization of α4 and GluN1 subunits in individual NAc dopaminergic terminals. The NMDA-evoked [(3)H]dopamine outflow was blocked by MK801 (1 μM) and inhibited by the selective GluN2B-selective antagonists ifenprodil (1 μM) and RO 25-6981 (1 μM), but not by the GluN2A-preferring antagonists CPP-19755 (1 μM) and ZnCl2 (1 nM). Notably, nicotine pretreatment significantly decreased the density of biotin-tagged GluN2B proteins in NAc synaptosomes. These results show that nAChRs dynamically and negatively regulate NMDA receptors in NAc dopaminergic terminals through the internalization of GluN2B receptors.

  5. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexandra L.; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3’-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death. PMID:26715915

  6. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alexandra L; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Rosen, Steven T

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death.

  7. Inhibition of mTOR down-regulates scavenger receptor, class B, type I (SR-BI) expression, reduces endothelial cell migration and impairs nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Krieger, Sigurd; Winter, Katharina; Rosner, Margit; Mikula, Mario; Weichhart, Thomas; Bittman, Robert; Hengstschläger, Markus; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibiting drug rapamycin (Sirolimus) has severe side effects in patients including hyperlipidemia, an established risk factor for atherosclerosis. Recently, it was shown that rapamycin decreases hepatic LDL receptor (LDL-R) expression, which likely contributes to hypercholesterolemia. Scavenger receptor, class B, type I (SR-BI) is the major HDL receptor and consequently regulating HDL-cholesterol levels and the athero-protective effects of HDL. By using the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, we show that SR-BI is down-regulated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). This reduction of SR-BI protein as well as mRNA levels by about 50% did not alter HDL particle uptake or HDL-derived lipid transfer. However, rapamycin reduced HDL-induced activation of eNOS and stimulation of endothelial cell migration. The effects on cell migration could be counteracted by SR-BI overexpression, indicating that decreased SR-BI expression is in part responsible for the rapamycin-induced effects. We demonstrate that inhibition of mTOR leads to endothelial cell dysfunction and decreased SR-BI expression, which may contribute to atherogenesis during rapamycin treatment.

  8. Reduction of fibroblast size/mechanical force down-regulates TGF-β type II receptor: implications for human skin aging.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Gary J; Shao, Yuan; He, Tianyuan; Qin, Zhaoping; Perry, Daniel; Voorhees, John J; Quan, Taihao

    2016-02-01

    The structural integrity of human skin is largely dependent on the quality of the dermal extracellular matrix (ECM), which is produced, organized, and maintained by dermal fibroblasts. Normally, fibroblasts attach to the ECM and thereby achieve stretched, elongated morphology. A prominent characteristic of dermal fibroblasts in aged skin is reduced size, with decreased elongation and a more rounded, collapsed morphology. Here, we show that reduced size of fibroblasts in mechanically unrestrained three-dimensional collagen lattices coincides with reduced mechanical force, measured by atomic force microscopy. Reduced size/mechanical force specifically down-regulates TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) and thus impairs TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. Both TβRII mRNA and protein were decreased, resulting in 90% loss of TGF-β binding to fibroblasts. Down-regulation of TβRII was associated with significantly decreased phosphorylation, DNA-binding, and transcriptional activity of its key downstream effector Smad3 and reduced expression of Smad3-regulated essential ECM components type I collagen, fibronectin, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2). Restoration of TβRII significantly increased TGF-β induction of Smad3 phosphorylation and stimulated expression of ECM components. Reduced expression of TβRII and ECM components in response to reduced fibroblast size/mechanical force was fully reversed by restoring size/mechanical force. Reduced fibroblast size was associated with reduced expression of TβRII and diminished ECM production, in aged human skin. Taken together, these data reveal a novel mechanism that provides a molecular basis for loss of dermal ECM, with concomitant increased fragility, which is a prominent feature of human skin aging.

  9. AB283. SPR-10 Down-regulation of ryanodine receptor gene expression in murine urinary bladder smooth muscle following partial bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Javed, Elham; Addya, Shankar; Fortina, Paolo; Zderic, Stephen; Wein, Alan; Chacko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM) displays spontaneous action potentials and this potential is related to the phasic nature of spontaneous contractions in this tissue. The amplitude of a phasic contraction depends on the increase in Ca2+ entry caused by membrane depolarization. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in UBSM decreases the force production by decreasing the frequency of phasic contractions through interactions with large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) and small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels. Microarray and network analysis were employed to determine the changes in mRNA in 14-day obstructed murine bladders. We found that obstruction significantly down-regulated the RyRs in bladder smooth muscle (BSM). Methods Male C57Bl/6 mice were surgically obstructed and kept for 14 days. Sham-operated mice served as a control. Bladders were excised; urothelium scraped off with a scalpel, and the serosa was removed. BSM obtained from PBOO and sham control animals were used for microarray and western blotting Results Pathway-based analysis of these gene signatures showed significant number of under-expressed genes in obstructed bladder and they were mapped to proteins involved in calcium signaling. We focused our work on RyR protein expression in BSM. There was a four-fold reduction of RyR3 in BSM in 14-day obstructed groups as shown by microarray and immunoblotting compared to that of sham-operated animals. Conclusions These results confirm that the RyR gene expression is down-regulated in obstructed murine bladder smooth muscle. Funding Source(s) None

  10. Down-regulation of E-cadherin in human bronchial epithelial cells leads to epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent Th2 cell-promoting activity.

    PubMed

    Heijink, Irene H; Kies, P Marcel; Kauffman, Henk F; Postma, Dirkje S; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Vellenga, Edo

    2007-06-15

    Airway epithelial cells are well-known producers of thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), a Th2 cell-attracting chemokine that may play an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation. However, the mechanism responsible for up-regulation of TARC in allergy is still unknown. In the asthmatic airways, loss of expression of the cell-cell contact molecule E-cadherin and reduced epithelial barrier function has been observed, which may be the result of an inadequate repair response. Because E-cadherin also suppressed multiple signaling pathways, we studied whether disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell contact may contribute to increased proallergic activity of epithelial cells, e.g., production of the chemokine TARC. We down-regulated E-cadherin in bronchial epithelial cells by small interference RNA and studied effects on electrical resistance, signaling pathways, and TARC expression (by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, immunodetection, immunofluorescent staining, and real-time PCR). Small interference RNA silencing of E-cadherin resulted in loss of E-cadherin-mediated junctions, enhanced phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and the downstream targets MEK/ERK-1/2 and p38 MAPK, finally resulting in up-regulation of TARC as well as thymic stromal lymphopoietin expression. The use of specific inhibitors revealed that the effect on TARC is mediated by EGFR-dependent activation of the MAPK pathways. In contrast to TARC, expression of the Th1/Treg cell-attracting chemokine RANTES was unaffected by E-cadherin down-regulation. In summary, we show that loss of E-cadherin-mediated epithelial cell-cell contact by damaging stimuli, e.g., allergens, may result in reduced suppression of EGFR-dependent signaling pathways and subsequent induction of Th2 cell-attracting molecule TARC. Thus, disruption of intercellular epithelial contacts may specifically promote Th2 cell recruitment in allergic asthma.

  11. Muscarinic receptor plasticity in the brain of senescent rats: down-regulation after repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; Volpe, M.T.; Michalek, H.

    1988-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the response of Fischer 344 rats to subchronic treatment with diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in terms of brain cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition and muscarinic receptor sites. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were sc injected with sublethal doses of DFP for 2 weeks and killed 48 hrs after the last treatment. In the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum of control rats a significant age-related reduction of ChE and of maximum number of /sup 3/H-QNB binding sites (Bmax) was observed. The administration of DFP to senescent rats resulted in more pronounced and longer lasting syndrome of cholinergic stimulation, with marked body weight loss and 60% mortality. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE induced by DFP did not differ between young and senescent rats. As expected, in young rats DFP caused a significant decrease of Bmax, which in the cerebral cortex reached about 40%. In the surviving senescent rats, the percentage decrease of Bmax due to DFP with respect to age-matched controls was very similar to that of young animals, especially in the cerebral cortex. Thus there is great variability in the response of aged rats to DFP treatment, from total failure of adaptive mechanisms resulting in death to considerable muscarinic receptor plasticity.

  12. Glucocorticoid-induced hypertension and cardiac injury: effects of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Takuya; Murase, Tamayo; Iwase, Erika; Takahashi, Keiji; Ohtake, Masafumi; Tsuboi, Koji; Ohtake, Mayuko; Miyachi, Masaaki; Murohara, Toyoaki; Nagata, Kohzo

    2013-02-01

    Glucocorticoids are widely administered for the treatment of various disorders, although their long-term use results in adverse effects associated with glucocorticoid excess. We investigated the pathophysiological roles of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) in the cardiac changes induced by exogenous corticosterone in rats. Corticosterone or vehicle was injected twice daily in rats from 8 to 12 weeks of age. The effects of the GR antagonist RU486, the MR antagonist spironolactone, or both agents on corticosterone action were also determined. Corticosterone induced hypertension, left ventricular (LV) fibrosis, and LV diastolic dysfunction. Neither RU486 nor spironolactone affected corticosterone-induced hypertension, whereas spironolactone, but not RU486, attenuated the effects of corticosterone on LV fibrosis and diastolic function. Corticosterone also increased cardiac oxidative stress and inflammation in a manner sensitive to spironolactone but not to RU486. The corticosterone-induced LV atrophy was not affected by either RU486 or spironolactone. Our results implicate MRs in the cardiac fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction, but not MRs or GRs in the cardiac atrophy, induced by corticosterone. Neither MRs nor GRs appear to contribute to corticosterone-induced hypertension.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor type-1 receptor down-regulation associated with dwarfism in Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Blum, J W; Elsasser, T H; Greger, D L; Wittenberg, S; de Vries, F; Distl, O

    2007-10-01

    Perturbations in endocrine functions can impact normal growth. Endocrine traits were studied in three dwarf calves exhibiting retarded but proportionate growth and four phenotypically normal half-siblings, sired by the same bull, and four unrelated control calves. Plasma 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine and thyroxine concentrations in dwarfs and half-siblings were in the physiological range and responded normally to injected thyroid-releasing hormone. Plasma glucagon concentrations were different (dwarfs, controls>half-siblings; P<0.05). Plasma growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin concentrations in the three groups during an 8-h period were similar, but integrated GH concentrations (areas under concentration curves) were different (dwarfs>controls, P<0.02; half-siblings>controls, P=0.08). Responses of GH to xylazine and to a GH-releasing-factor analogue were similar in dwarfs and half-siblings. Relative gene expression of IGF-1, IGF-2, GH receptor (GHR), insulin receptor, IGF-1 type-1 and -2 receptors (IGF-1R, IGF-2R), and IGF binding proteins were measured in liver and anconeus muscle. GHR mRNA levels were different in liver (dwarfs

  14. Familial glucocorticoid resistance caused by a splice site deletion in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, M.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Encio, I.J.; Stratakis, C.A.; Hurley, D.M.; Accili, D.; Chrousos, G.P. Erasmus Univ. of Rotterdam )

    1993-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of generalized, compensated glucocorticoid resistance is characterized by increased cortisol secretion without clinical evidence of hyper- or hypocortisolism, and manifestations of androgen and/or mineralocorticoid excess. This condition results from partial failure of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to modulate transcription of its target genes. The authors studied the molecular mechanisms of this syndrome in a Dutch kindred, whose affected members had hypercortisolism and approximately half of normal GRs, and whose proband was a young woman with manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify and sequence each of the nine exons of the GR gene [alpha], along with their 5[prime]- and 3[prime]-flanking regions, the authors identified a 4-base deletion at the 3[prime]-boundary of exon 6 in one GR allele ([Delta][sub 4]), which removed a donor splice site in all three affected members studied. In contrast, the sequence of exon 6 in the two unaffected siblings was normal. A single nucleotide substitution causing an amino acid substitution in the amino terminal domain of the GR (asparagine to serine, codon 363) was also discovered in exon 2 of the other allele (G[sub 1220]) in the proband, in one of her affected brothers and in her unaffected sister. This deletion in the glucocorticoid receptor gene was associated with the expression of only one allele and a decrease of GR protein by 50% in affected members of this glucocorticoid resistant family. The mutation identified in exon 2 did not segregate with the disease and appears to be of no functional significance. The presence of the null allele was apparently compensated for by increased cortisol production at the expense of concurrent hyperandrogenism. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most effective anti-inflammatory treatment for allergic diseases, and inhaled glucocorticoids have now become the first-line treatment for asthma. Glucocorticoids were discovered in the 1940s as extracts of the adrenal cortex and this was followed by the isolation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from pituitary gland extracts. Cortisone and ACTH were found to be very beneficial in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and Kendall, Reichstein and Hench received the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for this work in 1950. Bordley and colleagues first showed that ACTH was very beneficial in the treatment of allergic diseases in 1949, but the use of systemic glucocorticoids was limited by side effects. Inhaled glucocorticoids were discovered from topical steroids developed for skin inflammation and beclomethasone dipropionate was introduced in 1972, initially in low doses but later in higher doses, and became the standard treatment for persistent asthma. Subsequently, inhaled glucocorticoids were combined with long-acting β2-agonists in combination inhalers for even greater therapeutic benefit. There is now a good understanding of the molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids in allergic diseases. The search for even safer glucocorticoids based on the dissociation of anti-inflammatory and side effect mechanisms is currently ongoing.

  16. Inhibition of mouse mammary ductal morphogenesis and down-regulation of the EGF receptor by epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Coleman, S; Daniel, C W

    1990-02-01

    EGF, initially demonstrated to be a potent mitogen for a variety of cell types, has more recently been shown to inhibit proliferation of several cell lines. Few studies, however, have addressed the effects of EGF on growth and morphogenesis of tissues in vivo, particularly with regard to EGF as a possible inhibitor. We now demonstrate that EGF treatment of vigorously growing mammary ducts, administered directly to the glands by slow release plastic implants, inhibited normal ductal growth. Inhibition was restricted to the region around the implant and untreated glands in the same animal were normal, indicating direct effects of EGF. EGF-treated end buds were smaller and demonstrated reduced levels of DNA synthesis, although remnants of a stem (cap) cell layer persisted. Full inhibition of growth occurred within 3 days of implantation and required extended exposure to EGF, since treatment of 5 hr or less had no effect on ductal growth. At the lower inhibitory doses tested, growth resumed within 8 days, indicating reversibility of inhibition. No lobuloalveolar or hyperplastic response was seen. 125I-EGF autoradiography revealed that ductal growth inhibition was preceded by the disappearance of EGF receptors located in the cap cell layer of the end bud epithelium and in stromal cells adjacent to the buds. These results, in conjunction with our previous evidence demonstrating the growth-stimulatory effect by EGF on nonproliferating mammary ducts, suggest a growth regulatory role for EGF in mouse mammary ductal morphogenesis.

  17. Down-regulation of endothelial protein C receptor shedding by persicarin and isorhamnetin-3-O-galactoside.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Han, Min-Su; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2013-07-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that beyond its role in coagulation, endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) plays an important role in the cytoprotective pathway. Previous reports have shown that EPCR can be shed from the cell surface, and that this is mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) and that sEPCR levels are increased in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases. Persicarin and isorhamnetin-3-O-galactoside (I3G) are active compounds from Oenanthe javanica, which has been widely studied for its neuroprotective, antioxidant, and barrier protective activities. However, little is known of the effects of persicarin on EPCR shedding. Here, we investigated this issue by monitoring the effects of persicarin and I3G on phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and on cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-mediated EPCR shedding and underlying mechanisms. According to the results, persicarin and I3G induced potent inhibition of PMA and CLP-induced EPCR shedding by suppressing expression of TACE. In addition, persicarin and I3G reduced PMA-stimulated phosphorylation of p38MAPK, extracellular regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Given these results, persicarin and I3G could be used as a candidate therapeutic for treatment of severe vascular inflammatory diseases.

  18. Altered glucocorticoid receptor expression and function during mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Budunova, I V; Carbajal, S; Kang, H; Viaje, A; Slaga, T J

    1997-03-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most potent inhibitors of tumor promotion in mouse skin, when applied with a promoting agent at the early stages of promotion. However, established skin papillomas become resistant to growth inhibition by glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoid control of cellular functions is mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a well-known transcription factor. Here we present data on GR expression and function in mouse papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Tumors were produced in SENCAR mice by a 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate two-stage protocol. In early papillomas (after 15-20 wk of promotion), northern blotting revealed a decrease in the GR mRNA level that was confirmed by a binding assay. However, in late papillomas (after 30-40 wk of promotion), and especially in squamous cell carcinomas, the level of GR in both assays was similar to or higher than the GR level in normal epidermis. To test the functional capability of GR in tumors, we compared the effect of the synthetic glucocorticoid fluocinolone acetonide (FA) on keratinocyte proliferation and on expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes in normal epidermis, hyperplastic skin surrounding tumors, and mouse skin papillomas. FA strongly inhibited DNA synthesis in keratinocytes in normal skin and tumor-surrounding skin but had no effect on DNA synthesis in papillomas. In addition, FA strongly induced metallothionein 1 expression and inhibited connexin 26 expression in skin but did not affect expression of these genes in tumors. These data suggest that alteration of both the expression and function of GR may be an important mechanism of tumor promotion in skin.

  19. Cancer cell-selective promoter recognition accompanies antitumor effect by glucocorticoid receptor-targeted gold nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Samaresh; Agarwalla, Pritha; Mukherjee, Sudip; Bag, Indira; Sreedhar, Bojja; Pal-Bhadra, Manika; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied on the delivery of `exogenous' genes invoking gene knockdown or replacement. Practically, there are no instances for the nanoparticle-mediated promoter regulation of `endogenous' genes, more so, as a cancer selective phenomenon. In this regard, we report the development of a simple, easily modifiable GNP-formulation, which promoted/up-regulated the expression of a specific category of `endogenous' genes, the glucocorticoid responsive genes. This genetic up-regulation was induced in only cancer cells by modified GNP-mediated transcriptional activation of its cytoplasmic receptor, glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Normal cells and their GR remained primarily unperturbed by this GNP-formulation. The most potent gene up-regulating GNP-formulation down-regulated a cancer-specific proliferative signal, phospho-Akt in cancer cells, which accompanied retardation of tumor growth in the murine melanoma model. We show that GR-targeted GNPs may find potential use in the targeting and modulation of genetic information in cancer towards developing novel anticancer therapeutics.Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied

  20. The human glucocorticoid receptor: molecular basis of biologic function.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, Nicolas C; Galata, Zoi; Kino, Tomoshige; Chrousos, George P; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of the subfamily of steroid hormone receptors has enhanced our understanding of how a set of hormonally derived lipophilic ligands controls cellular and molecular functions to influence development and help achieve homeostasis. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the first member of this subfamily, is a ubiquitously expressed intracellular protein, which functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. The effector domains of the GR mediate transcriptional activation by recruiting coregulatory multi-subunit complexes that remodel chromatin, target initiation sites, and stabilize the RNA-polymerase II machinery for repeated rounds of transcription of target genes. This review summarizes the basic aspects of the structure and actions of the human (h) GR, and the molecular basis of its biologic functions.

  1. Evolution of hormone selectivity in glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael E; Funder, John W; Kattoula, Stephanie R

    2013-09-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) are descended from an ancestral corticoid receptor (CR). To date, the earliest CR have been found in lamprey and hagfish, two jawless fish (cyclostomes) that evolved at the base of the vertebrate line. Lamprey CR has both MR and GR activity. Distinct orthologs of the GR and MR first appear in skates and sharks, which are cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes). Aldosterone, the physiological mineralocorticoid in terrestrial vertebrates, first appears in lobe-finned fish, such as lungfish and coelacanth, forerunners of terrestrial vertebrates, but not in sharks, skates or ray-finned fish. Skate MR are transcriptionally activated by glucocorticoids, such as corticosterone and cortisol, as well as by mineralocorticoids such as deoxycorticosterone and (experimentally) aldosterone; skate GR have low affinity for all human corticosteroids and 1α-OH-corticosterone, which has been proposed to be biologically active glucocorticoid. In fish, cortisol is both physiological mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid; in terrestrial vertebrates, cortisol or corticosterone are the physiological glucocorticoids acting through GR, and aldosterone via MR as the physiologic mineralocorticoid. MR have equally high affinity for cortisol, corticosterone and progesterone. We review this evolutionary process through an analysis of changes in sequence and structure of vertebrate GR and MR, identifying changes in these receptors in skates and lobe-fined fish important in allowing aldosterone to act as an agonist at epithelial MR and glucocorticoid specificity for GR. hMR and hGR have lost a key contact between helix 3 and helix 5 that was present in their common ancestor. A serine that is diagnostic for vertebrate MR, and absent in terrestrial and fish GR, is present in lamprey CR, skate MR and GR, but not in coelacanth GR, marking the transition of the GR from MR ancestor. Based on the response of the CR and skate MR and GR to

  2. Glucocorticoid hormone resistance during primate evolution: receptor-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chrousos, G P; Renquist, D; Brandon, D; Eil, C; Pugeat, M; Vigersky, R; Cutler, G B; Loriaux, D L; Lipsett, M B

    1982-03-01

    The concentrations of total and protein-unbound plasma cortisol of New World monkeys are higher than those of Old World primates and prosimians. The urinary free-cortisol excretion also is increased markedly. However, there is no physiologic evidence of increased cortisol effect. These findings suggest end-organ resistance to glucocorticoids. This was confirmed by showing that the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis is resistant to suppression by dexamethasone. To study this phenomenon, glucocorticoid receptors were examined in circulating mononuclear leukocytes and cultured skin fibroblasts from both New and Old World species. The receptor content is the same in all species, but the New World monkeys have a markedly decreased binding affinity for dexamethasone. Thus, the resistance of these species to the action of cortisol is due to the decreased binding affinity of the glucocorticoid receptor. This presumed mutation must have occurred after the bifurcation of Old and New World primates (approximately 60 x 10(6) yr ago) and before the diversion of the New World primates from each other (approximately 15 x 10(6) yr ago).

  3. Characterization of human glucocorticoid receptor complexes formed with DNA fragments containing or lacking glucocorticoid response elements

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, D.B.; Cidlowski, J.A. )

    1989-03-07

    Sucrose density gradient shift assays were used to study the interactions of human glucocorticoid receptors (GR) with small DNA fragments either containing or lacking glucocorticoid response element (GRE) DNA consensus sequences. When crude cytoplasmic extracts containing ({sup 3}H)triamcinolone acetonide (({sup 3}H)TA) labeled GR were incubated with unlabeled DNA under conditions of DNA excess, a GRE-containing DNA fragment obtained from the 5' long terminal repeat of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV LTR) formed a stable 12-16S complex with activated, but not nonactivated, ({sup 3}H)TA receptor. By contrast, if the cytosols were treated with calf thymus DNA-cellulose to deplete non-GR-DNA-binding proteins prior to heat activation, a smaller 7-10S complex was formed with the MMTV LTR DNA fragment. Activated ({sup 3}H)TA receptor from DNA-cellulose pretreated cytosols also interacted with two similarly sized fragments from pBR322 DNA. Stability of the complexes formed between GR and these three DNA fragments was strongly affected by even moderate alterations in either the salt concentration or the pH of the gradient buffer. Under all conditions tested, the complex formed with the MMTV LTR DNA fragment was more stable than the complexes formed with either of the pBR322 DNA fragments. Together these observations indicate that the formation of stable complexes between activated GR and isolated DNA fragments requires the presence of GRE consensus sequences in the DNA.

  4. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor signaling contributes to constitutive activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway in term human placenta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingbing; Palomares, Kristy; Parobchak, Nataliya; Cece, John; Rosen, Max; Nguyen, Anh; Rosen, Todd

    2013-02-01

    Our recent study demonstrated that constitutively activated RelB/NF-κB2 positively regulates the CRH in the human placenta. In the current study, we explored the role of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling in constitutive activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway. A glucocorticoid response element (GRE) motif search suggests that both NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK) and RelB genes, which are key regulators of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway, have a putative GRE within their promoter, approximately 1 kb upstream from the transcription start site. By using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay we identified that the GR and phosphorylated GR at Ser211 were associated with the GREs of both NIK and RelB. Dexamethasone stimulated expression of NIK, RelB, NF-κB2 as well as CRH and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Repression of GR by short interfering RNA resulted in inhibition of NIK, RelB, NF-κB2, CRH, and COX-2. In addition, depletion of GR attenuated glucocorticoid-mediated up-regulation of NIK, RelB, NF-κB2, CRH, and COX-2. Furthermore, siRNA specifically targeting NIK down-regulated CRH and COX-2. Taken together, these results suggest that constitutive activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway in term human placenta is driven by the GR signaling, which in turn up-regulates placental CRH and other NF-κB-responsive genes.

  6. DHEA modulates the effect of cortisol on RACK1 expression via interference with the splicing of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Antonella; Malacrida, Beatrice; Oieni, Jacopo; Serafini, Melania Maria; Davin, Annalisa; Galbiati, Valentina; Corsini, Emanuela; Racchi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is thought to be an anti-glucocorticoid hormone known to be fully functional in young people but deficient in aged humans. Our previous data suggest that DHEA not only counteracts the effect of cortisol on RACK1 expression, a protein required both for the correct functioning of immune cells and for PKC-dependent pathway activation, but also modulates the inhibitory effect of cortisol on LPS-induced cytokine production. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of DHEA on the splicing mechanism of the human glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Experimental Approach The THP1 monocytic cell line was used as a cellular model. Cytokine production was measured by specific elisa. Western blot and real-time RT-PCR were used, where appropriate, to determine the effect of DHEA on GRs, serine/arginine-rich proteins (SRp), and RACK1 protein and mRNA. Small-interfering RNA was used to down-regulate GRβ. Key Results DHEA induced a dose-related up-regulation of GRβ and GRβ knockdown completely prevented DHEA-induced RACK1 expression and modulation of cytokine release. Moreover, we showed that DHEA influenced the expression of some components of the SRps found within the spliceosome, the main regulators of the alternative splicing of the GR gene. Conclusions and Implications These data contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of action of DHEA and its effect on the immune system and as an anti-glucocorticoid agent. PMID:25626076

  7. Glucocorticoid-induced glucocorticoid-receptor expression and promoter usage is not linked to glucocorticoid resistance in childhood ALL.

    PubMed

    Tissing, Wim J E; Meijerink, Jules P P; Brinkhof, Bas; Broekhuis, Mathilde J C; Menezes, Renee X; den Boer, Monique L; Pieters, Rob

    2006-08-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) resistance is an adverse prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but little is known about causes of GC resistance. Up-regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been suggested as an essential step to the induction of apoptosis in leukemic cells. In this study we investigated whether baseline mRNA expression levels of the 5 different GR promoter transcripts (1A1, 1A2, 1A3, 1B, and 1C) or differences in the degree of regulation of the GR or GR promoter transcripts upon GC exposure are related to GC resistance. Therefore, mRNA levels of the 5 GR promoter transcripts and of the GR were measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR; Taqman) technology in primary ALL cells prior to and after 3, 8, and 24 hours of prednisolone exposure. GR expression is induced upon GC exposure in primary ALL patient samples, which is opposite to what is found in tissues in which GCs do not induce apoptosis. GC resistance in childhood ALL cannot be attributed to an inability of resistant cells to up-regulate the expression of the GR upon GC exposure, nor to differences in GR promoter usage (at baseline and upon GC exposure).

  8. Down-Regulation of Ca2+-Activated K+ Channel KCa1.1 in Human Breast Cancer MDA-MB-453 Cells Treated with Vitamin D Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Khatun, Anowara; Fujimoto, Mayu; Kito, Hiroaki; Niwa, Satomi; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Ohya, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D (VD) reduces the risk of breast cancer and improves disease prognoses. Potential VD analogs are being developed as therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatments. The large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel KCa1.1 regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling pathways and is associated with high grade tumors and poor prognoses. In the present study, we examined the effects of treatments with VD receptor (VDR) agonists on the expression and activity of KCa1.1 in human breast cancer MDA-MB-453 cells using real-time PCR, Western blotting, flow cytometry, and voltage-sensitive dye imaging. Treatments with VDR agonists for 72 h markedly decreased the expression levels of KCa1.1 transcripts and proteins in MDA-MB-453 cells, resulting in the significant inhibition of depolarization responses induced by paxilline, a specific KCa1.1 blocker. The specific proteasome inhibitor MG132 suppressed VDR agonist-induced decreases in KCa1.1 protein expression. These results suggest that KCa1.1 is a new downstream target of VDR signaling and the down-regulation of KCa1.1 through the transcriptional repression of KCa1.1 and enhancement of KCa1.1 protein degradation contribute, at least partly, to the antiproliferative effects of VDR agonists in breast cancer cells. PMID:27973439

  9. Down-Regulation of Vitamin D Receptor in Mammospheres: Implications for Vitamin D Resistance in Breast Cancer and Potential for Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pervin, Shehla; Hewison, Martin; Braga, Melissa; Tran, Lac; Chun, Rene; Karam, Amer; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Norris, Keith; Singh, Rajan

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D signaling in mammary cancer stem cells (MCSCs), which are implicated in the initiation and progression of breast cancer, is poorly understood. In this study, we examined vitamin D signaling in mammospheres which are enriched in MCSCs from established breast cancer cell lines. Breast cancer cells positive for aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH+) had increased ability to form mammospheres compared to ALDH− cells. These mammospheres expressed MCSC-specific markers and generated transplantable xenografts in nude mice. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) was significantly down-regulated in mammospheres, as well as in ALDH+ breast cancer cells. TN aggressive human breast tumors as well as transplantable xenografts obtained from SKBR3 expressed significantly lower levels of VDR but higher levels of CD44 expression. Snail was up-regulated in mammospheres isolated from breast cancer cells. Inhibition of VDR expression by siRNA led to a significant change in key EMT-specific transcription factors and increased the ability of these cells to form mammospheres. On the other hand, over-expression of VDR led to a down-regulation of Snail but increased expression of E-cad and significantly compromised the ability of cells to form mammospheres. Mammospheres were relatively insensitive to treatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D), the active form of vitamin D, compared to more differentiated cancer cells grown in presence of serum. Treatment of H-Ras transformed HMLEHRas cells with DETA NONOate, a nitric oxide (NO)-donor led to induction of MAP-kinase phosphatase -1 (MKP-1) and dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 in the mammospheres. Combined treatment of these cells with 1,25D and a low-concentration of DETA NONOate led to a significant decrease in the overall size of mammospheres and reduced tumor volume in nude mice. Our findings therefore, suggest that combination therapy using 1,25D with drugs specifically targeting key survival pathways in MCSCs warrant testing in prospective clinical

  10. miR-223 contributes to the AGE-promoted apoptosis via down-regulating insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yi; Ye, Jichao; Wang, Peng; Gao, Liangbin; Wang, Suwei; Shen, Huiyong

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been confirmed to induce bone quality deterioration in diabetes mellitus (DM), and to associate with abnormal expression of miRNAs in DM patients or in vitro. Recently, miRNAs have been recognized to mediate the onset or progression of DM. In the present study, we investigated the regulation on miR-223 level by AGE-BSA treatment in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells, with real-time quantitative PCR assay. And then we examined the inhibition of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) expression by miR-223, via targeting of the 3′ UTR of IGF-1R with real-time quantitative PCR, western blotting and luciferase reporter assay. Then we explored the regulation of miR-223 and IGF-1R levels, via the lentivirus-mediated miR-223 inhibition and IGF-1R overexpression in the AGE-BSA-induced apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells. It was demonstrated that AGE-BSA treatment with more than 100 μg/ml significantly up-regulated miR-223 level, whereas down-regulated IGF-1R level in MC3T3-E1 cells. And the up-regulated miR-223 down-regulated IGF-1R expression in both mRNA and protein levels, via targeting the 3′ UTR of IGF-1R. Moreover, though the AGE-BSA treatment promoted apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells, the IGF-1R overexpression or the miR-223 inhibition significantly attenuated the AGE-BSA-promoted apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells. In summary, our study recognized the promotion of miR-223 level by AGE-BSA treatment in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. The promoted miR-223 targeted IGF-1R and mediated the AGE-BSA-induced apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells. It implies that miR-223 might be an effective therapeutic target to antagonize the AGE-induced damage to osteoblasts in DM. PMID:26893485

  11. Endothelin-1 down-regulates matrix metalloproteinase 14 and 15 expression in human first trimester trophoblasts via endothelin receptor type B

    PubMed Central

    Majali-Martinez, Alejandro; Velicky, Philipp; Pollheimer, Jürgen; Knöfler, Martin; Yung, Hong wa; Burton, Graham J.; Tabrizi-Wizsy, Nassim Ghaffari; Lang, Uwe; Hiden, Ursula; Desoye, Gernot; Dieber-Rotheneder, Martina

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does endothelin-1 (ET-1) regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 14 and 15 production and invasion of human first trimester trophoblasts? SUMMARY ANSWER ET-1 in pathophysiological concentrations down-regulates MMP14 and MMP15 expression via endothelin receptor (ETR) type B and decreases trophoblast migration and invasion. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY MMP14 and MMP15 are involved in trophoblast invasion. Impairment of invasion has been linked to pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia (PE). ET-1 is up-regulated in PE. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION In vitro study using primary human trophoblasts from 50 first trimester placentas (gestational week 7–12). PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Trophoblasts were cultured in the absence or presence of 10–100 nM ET-1. MMP14 and MMP15 mRNA and protein were quantified by RT-qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Selective antagonists for ETRA (BQ-123) or ETRB (BQ-788) were used to identify ETR subtypes involved. Functional ET-1 effects were tested in first trimester chorionic villous explants and transwell invasion assays. The roles of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (25 ng/ml) and oxygen (1%) in ET-1 regulation of MMP14 and 15 expression were assessed by Western blotting. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE ET-1 down-regulated MMP14 and MMP15 mRNA (−21% and −26%, respectively, P < 0.05) and protein levels (–18% and –22%, respectively, P < 0.05). This effect was mediated via ETRB. ET-1 decreased trophoblast outgrowth in placental explants (−24%, P < 0.05) and trophoblast invasion (−26%, P ≤ 0.01). TNF-α enhanced ET-1 mediated MMP15 down-regulation (by 10%, P < 0.05), whereas hypoxia abolished the effect of ET-1 on both MMPs. LARGE SCALE DATA N/A. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION Only primary trophoblasts were used in this study. Since trophoblast yield from first trimester placental material is limited, further aspects of MMP14 and 15 regulation could not be characterized. Other anti

  12. Epigenetic regulation of glucocorticoid receptor and infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Zou, Li-Ping; Wang, Jing; Ding, Ying-Xue

    2011-02-01

    IS is one of the few seizure syndromes that can be alleviated by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or glucocorticoids (GCs) that are considered effective drugs of choice. This indicates that, indeed, IS may be fundamentally different from most other seizure disorders owing to the dysregulation of the hypothalamic-hypophysial-adrenal axis. GCs have multiple critical effects on fetal development, especially in normal brain development. Most glucocorticoid effects are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a steroid-activated nuclear receptor that translocates to the nucleus upon binding to cortisol. In the nucleus, GR targets genes related to neuronal metabolism and plasticity. The GR has also been characterized as a critical checkpoint in the delicate hormonal control of energy homeostasis. Recent studies suggest a possible correlation between prenatal stress and the onset of infantile spasms. In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that connects the adverse events in early life with the onset of IS through methylation of the GR gene, which is an epigenetic mechanism.

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling rewrites the glucocorticoid transcriptome via glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lambert, W Marcus; Xu, Chong-Feng; Neubert, Thomas A; Chao, Moses V; Garabedian, Michael J; Jeanneteau, Freddy D

    2013-09-01

    Abnormal glucocorticoid and neurotrophin signaling has been implicated in numerous psychiatric disorders. However, the impact of neurotrophic signaling on glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent gene expression is not understood. We therefore examined the impact of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling on GR transcriptional regulatory function by gene expression profiling in primary rat cortical neurons stimulated with the selective GR agonist dexamethasone (Dex) and BDNF, alone or in combination. Simultaneous treatment with BDNF and Dex elicited a unique set of GR-responsive genes associated with neuronal growth and differentiation and also enhanced the induction of a large number of Dex-sensitive genes. BDNF via its receptor TrkB enhanced the transcriptional activity of a synthetic GR reporter, suggesting a direct effect of BDNF signaling on GR function. Indeed, BDNF treatment induces the phosphorylation of GR at serine 155 (S155) and serine 287 (S287). Expression of a nonphosphorylatable mutant (GR S155A/S287A) impaired the induction of a subset of BDNF- and Dex-regulated genes. Mechanistically, BDNF-induced GR phosphorylation increased GR occupancy and cofactor recruitment at the promoter of a BDNF-enhanced gene. GR phosphorylation in vivo is sensitive to changes in the levels of BDNF and TrkB as well as stress. Therefore, BDNF signaling specifies and amplifies the GR transcriptome through a coordinated GR phosphorylation-dependent detection mechanism.

  14. Down-regulation of muscarinic receptors and the m3 subtype in white-footed mice by dietary exposure to parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jett, D.A.; Hill, E.F.; Fernando, J.C.; Eldefrawi, M.E.; Eldefrawi, A.T.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of ad libitum dietary exposure (as occurs in the field) to parathion for 14 d was investigated on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) in brains and submaxillary glands of adults of a field species, the white-footed mouse Peromyscus leucopus. Immunoprecipitation using subtype selective antibodies revealed that the relative ratios of the m1-m5 mAChR subtypes in Peromyscus brain were similar to those in rat brain. There was little variability in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in control mice brains but large variability in 39 exposed mice, resulting from differences in food ingestion and parathion metabolism. Accordingly, data on radioligand binding to mAChRs in each mouse brain were correlated with brain AChE activity in the same mouse, and AChE inhibition served as a biomarker of exposure reflecting in situ paraoxon concentrations. Exposure to parathion for 14 d reduced maximal binding (Bmax) of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB), [3H]-N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS), and [3H]-4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide ([3H]-4-DAMP) by up to approximately 58% without affecting receptor affinities for these ligands. Maximal reduction in Bmax of [3H]QNB and [3H]-4-DAMP binding occurred in mice with highest AChE inhibition, while equivalent maximal reduction in Bmax of [3H]NMS occurred in mice with only approximately 10% AChE inhibition, without further change at higher parathion doses. This is believed to be due to the hydrophilicity of [3H]NMS, which limits its accessibility to internalized desensitized receptors. In submaxillary glands (mAChRs are predominantly m3 subtype), there were significant dose-dependent reductions in [3H]QNB binding and m3 mRNA levels in exposed mice, revealed by Northern blot analyses. The reduction in m3 receptors is suggested to result mostly from reduced synthesis at the transcription level, rather than from translational or posttranslational events. The data suggest that down-regulation of mAChRs occurs

  15. Interaction between the trout mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kiilerich, Pia; Triqueneaux, Gérard; Christensen, Nynne Meyn; Trayer, Vincent; Terrien, Xavier; Lombès, Marc; Prunet, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    The salmonid corticosteroid receptors (CRs), glucocorticoid receptors 1 and 2 (GR1 and GR2) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) share a high degree of homology with regard to structure, ligand- and DNA response element-binding, and cellular co-localization. Typically, these nuclear hormone receptors homodimerize to confer transcriptional activation of target genes, but a few studies using mammalian receptors suggest some degree of heterodimerization. We observed that the trout MR confers a several fold lower transcriptional activity compared to the trout GRs. This made us question the functional relevance of the MR when this receptor is located in the same cells as the GRs and activated by cortisol. A series of co-transfection experiments using different glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) containing promoter-reporter constructs were carried out to investigate any possible interaction between the piscine CRs. Co-transfection of the GRs with the MR significantly reduced the total transcriptional activity even at low MR levels, suggesting interaction between these receptors. Co-transfection of GR1 or GR2 with the MR did not affect the subcellular localization of the GRs, and the MR-mediated inhibition seemed to be independent of specific activation or inhibition of the MR. Site-directed mutagenesis of the DNA-binding domain and dimerization interface of the MR showed that the inhibition was dependent on DNA binding but not necessarily on dimerization ability. Thus, we suggest that the interaction between MR and the GRs may regulate the cortisol response in cell types where the receptors co-localize and propose a dominant-negative role for the MR in cortisol-mediated transcriptional activity.

  16. Dietary sodium deprivation evokes activation of brain regional neurons and down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and angiotensin-convertion enzyme mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Lu, B; Yang, X J; Chen, K; Yang, D J; Yan, J Q

    2009-12-15

    Previous studies have indicated that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the induction of sodium appetite in rats and that different dietary sodium intakes influence the mRNA expression of central and peripheral RAAS components. To determine whether dietary sodium deprivation activates regional brain neurons related to sodium appetite, and changes their gene expression of RAAS components of rats, the present study examined the c-Fos expression after chronic exposure to low sodium diet, and determined the relationship between plasma and brain angiotensin I (ANG I), angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (ALD) levels and the sodium ingestive behavior variations, as well as the effects of prolonged dietary sodium deprivation on ANG II type 1 (AT1) and ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptors and angiotensin-convertion enzyme (ACE) mRNA levels in the involved brain regions using the method of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results showed that the Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) expression in forebrain areas such as subfornical organ (SFO), paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) all increased significantly and that the levels of ANG I, ANG II and ALD also increased in plasma and forebrain in rats fed with low sodium diet. In contrast, AT1, ACE mRNA in PVN, SON and OVLT decreased significantly in dietary sodium depleted rats, while AT2 mRNA expression did not change in the examined areas. These results suggest that many brain areas are activated by increased levels of plasma and/or brain ANG II and ALD, which underlies the elevated preference for hypertonic salt solution after prolonged exposure to low sodium diet, and that the regional AT1 and ACE mRNA are down-regulated after dietary sodium deprivation, which may be mediated by increased ANG II in plasma and/or brain tissue.

  17. Impaired recovery of brain muscarinic receptor sites following an adaptive down-regulation induced by repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; De Angelis, S.; Michalek, H. )

    1990-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the recovery rate of brain cholinesterase activity (ChE) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites (mAChRs) following reduction induced by repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were s.c. injected with DFP on alternate days for 2 weeks and killed 48 hr and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after the last treatment. In the hippocampus and striatum, but not in the cerebral cortex, of control rats there as a significant age-related decline of ChE activity and maximal density of 3H-QNB binding sites (Bmax). The repeated administration of DFP during the first week caused a syndrome of cholinergic stimulation both in aged and young rats. The syndrome was more pronounced, in terms of intensity and duration in aged than in young animals resulting in 40 and 12% mortality, respectively; during the second week the syndrome attenuated in the two age-groups. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE at the end of DFP treatment did not differ between young and surviving aged rats. The down-regulation of mACRs was present in the three brain regions of both young and age rats (from 20 to 40%). Factorial analysis of variance showed significant differences for age, recovery rate, and significant interaction between age and recovery rate, both for ChE and mAChRs in young rats the three brain areas.

  18. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis, down-regulates the CXCR4 chemokine receptor and impairs migration of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulos, Basile; Meuleman, Nathalie; De Bruyn, Cécile; Delforge, Alain; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a neoplastic disorder that arises largely as a result of defective apoptosis leading to chemoresistance. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor, CXCR4, have been shown to play an important role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell trafficking and survival. Design and Methods Since histone acetylation is involved in the modulation of gene expression, we evaluated the effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells and in particular on cell survival, CXCR4 expression, migration, and drug sensitization. Results Here, we showed that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (20 μM) for 48 hours induced a decrease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell viability via apoptosis (n=20, P=0.0032). Using specific caspase inhibitors, we demonstrated the participation of caspases-3, -6 and -8, suggesting an activation of the extrinsic pathway. Additionally, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid significantly decreased CXCR4 mRNA (n=10, P=0.0010) and protein expression (n=40, P<0.0001). As a result, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell migration in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1 (n=23, P<0.0001) or through bone marrow stromal cells was dramatically impaired. Consequently, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid reduced the protective effect of the microenvironment and thus sensitized chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to chemotherapy such as fludarabine. Conclusions In conclusion, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells via the extrinsic pathway and down-regulates CXCR4 expression leading to decreased cell migration. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in combination with other drugs represents a promising therapeutic approach to inhibiting migration, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell survival and potentially overcoming drug resistance. PMID:20145270

  19. Estrogen regulates Snail and Slug in the down-regulation of E-cadherin and induces metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells through estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Hyung; Cheung, Lydia W T; Wong, Alice S T; Leung, Peter C K

    2008-09-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multistep process involving dysregulated cell growth and metastasis. Considerable evidence implicates a mitogenic action of estrogen in early ovarian carcinogenesis. In contrast, its influence in the metastatic cascade of ovarian tumor cells remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that 17beta-estradiol (E2) increased the metastatic potential of human epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines. E2 treatment led to clear morphological changes characteristic of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and an enhanced cell migratory propensity. These morphological and functional alterations were associated with changes in the abundance of EMT-related genes. Upon E2 stimulation, expression and promoter activity of the epithelial marker E-cadherin were strikingly suppressed, whereas EMT-associated transcription factors, Snail and Slug, were significantly up-regulated. This up-regulation was attributed to the increase in gene transcription activated by E2. Depletion of endogenous Snail or Slug using small interfering RNA (siRNA) attenuated E2-mediated decrease in E-cadherin. In addition, E2-induced cell migration was also neutralized by the siRNAs, suggesting that both transcription factors are indispensable for the prometastatic actions of E2. More importantly, by using selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonists, forced expression, and siRNA approaches, we identified that E2 triggered the metastatic behaviors exclusively through an ERalpha-dependent pathway. We also showed that ERbeta had an opposing action on ERalpha because the presence of ERbeta completely inhibited the EMT and down-regulation of E-cadherin induced by ERalpha. Collectively, this study provides a compelling argument that estrogen can potentiate tumor progression by EMT induction and highlights the crucial role of ERalpha in ovarian tumorigenesis.

  20. Metabolic functions of glucocorticoid receptor in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Taiyi; Harris, Charles A; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2013-11-05

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) exert key metabolic influences on skeletal muscle. GCs increase protein degradation and decrease protein synthesis. The released amino acids are mobilized from skeletal muscle to liver, where they serve as substrates for hepatic gluconeogenesis. This metabolic response is critical for mammals' survival under stressful conditions, such as fasting and starvation. GCs suppress insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and utilization and glycogen synthesis, and play a permissive role for catecholamine-induced glycogenolysis, thus preserving the level of circulating glucose, the major energy source for the brain. However, chronic or excess exposure of GCs can induce muscle atrophy and insulin resistance. GCs convey their signal mainly through the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While GR can act through different mechanisms, one of its major actions is to regulate the transcription of its primary target genes through genomic glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) by directly binding to DNA or tethering onto other DNA-binding transcription factors. These GR primary targets trigger physiological and pathological responses of GCs. Much progress has been made to understand how GCs regulate protein and glucose metabolism. In this review, we will discuss how GR primary target genes confer metabolic functions of GCs, and the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of these targets. Comprehending these processes not only contributes to the fundamental understanding of mammalian physiology, but also will provide invaluable insight for improved GC therapeutics.

  1. Glucocorticoids and their receptors: insights into specific roles in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Hyoung-Kyu; Song, In-Sung; Youm, Jaeboum; Dizon, Louise Anne; Jeong, Seung-Hun; Ko, Tae-Hee; Heo, Hye-Jin; Ko, Kyoung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Han, Jin

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) affect most physiological systems and are the most frequently used drugs for multiple disorders and organ transplantation. GC functions depend on a balance between circulating GC and cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptor II (GR). Mitochondria individually enclose circular, double-stranded DNA that is expressed and replicated in response to nuclear-encoded factors imported from the cytoplasm. Fine-tuning and response to cellular demands should be coordinately regulated by the nucleus and mitochondria; thus mitochondrial-nuclear interaction is vital to optimal mitochondrial function. Elucidation of the direct and indirect effects of steroids, including GCs, on mitochondria is an important and emerging field of research. Mitochondria may also be under GC control because GRs are present in mitochondria, and glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) reside in the mitochondrial genome. Therefore, mitochondrial gene expression can be regulated by GCs via at least two different mechanisms: direct action on mitochondrial DNA and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) genes, or by an indirect effect through interaction with nuclear genes. In this review, we outline possible mechanisms of regulation of mitochondrial genes in response to GCs in view of translocation of the GR into mitochondria and the possible regulation of OXPHOS genes by GREs in the mitochondrial genome.

  2. Recent advances in the molecular mechanisms determining tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids: novel mutations, circadian rhythm and ligand-induced repression of the human glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are pleiotropic hormones, which are involved in almost every cellular, molecular and physiologic network of the organism, and regulate a broad spectrum of physiologic functions essential for life. The cellular response to glucocorticoids displays profound variability both in magnitude and in specificity of action. Tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids differs among individuals, within tissues of the same individual and within the same cell. The actions of glucocorticoids are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor, a ubiquitously expressed intracellular, ligand-dependent transcription factor. Multiple mechanisms, such as pre-receptor ligand metabolism, receptor isoform expression, and receptor-, tissue-, and cell type-specific factors, exist to generate diversity as well as specificity in the response to glucocorticoids. Alterations in the molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor action impair glucocorticoid signal transduction and alter tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms determining tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids with particular emphasis on novel mutations and new information on the circadian rhythm and ligand-induced repression of the glucocorticoid receptor. PMID:25155432

  3. Neuroprotective Effect of Scutellarin on Ischemic Cerebral Injury by Down-Regulating the Expression of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme and AT1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jichun; Zhou, Mingjie; Ren, Huanhuan; Pan, Qunwen; Zheng, Chunli; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is involved in brain ischemic injury. In the present study, we investigated whether Scutellarin (Scu) exerts neuroprotective effects by down-regulating the Expression of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme and AT1 receptor in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia. Methods Adult Sprague–Dawley rats were administrated with different dosages of Scu by oral gavage for 7 days and underwent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). Blood pressure was measured 7 days after Scu administration and 24 h after pMCAO surgery by using a noninvasive tail cuff method. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined by Laser Doppler perfusion monitor and the neuronal dysfunction was evaluated by analysis of neurological deficits before being sacrificed at 24 h after pMCAO. Histopathological change, cell apoptosis and infarct area were respectively determined by hematoxylin–eosin staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transfer-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Tissue angiotensin II (Ang II) and ACE activity were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The expression levels of ACE, Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured by Western blot and real-time PCR. ACE inhibitory activity of Scu in vitro was detected by the photometric determination. Results Scu treatment dose-dependently decreased neurological deficit score, infarct area, cell apoptosis and morphological changes induced by pMCAO, which were associated with reductions of ACE and AT1R expression and the levels of Ang II, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in ischemic brains. Scu has a potent ACE inhibiting activity. Conclusion Scu protects brain from acute ischemic injury probably through its inhibitory effect on the ACE/Ang II/AT1 axis, CBF preservation and

  4. K20E, an oxidative-coupling compound of methyl caffeate, exhibits anti-angiogenic activities through down-regulations of VEGF and VEGF receptor-2

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Chun-Hsu; Lin, Wen-Hsin; Chien, Yi-Chung; Liu, Fon-Chang; Sheu, Ming-Jyh; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Wu, Chieh-Hsi

    2015-01-15

    Anti-angiogenesis is one of the most popular clinical interventions for cancer chemotherapy. A series of synthesized derivative of methyl caffeate were used to evaluate the anti-angiogenic activity and to investigate possible pharmacological mechanisms in the present study. The most potent anti-angiogenic compound was evaluated in the experiments of murine allograft tumor model and Matrigel plug assay as well as cell models in the human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the LLC1 lung cancer cells. Our results suggested that K20E suppressed the tumor growth in the allograft tumor model and exhibited anti-angiogenic activity in Matrigel plug assay. Besides, HUVEC viability was found to be significantly reduced by arresting cell cycle at G{sub 2}/M phase and apoptosis. Cell migration, invasion, and tube formation of the HUVECs were also markedly suppressed by K20E treatment. K20E largely down-regulated the intracellular and secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the LLC1 cancer cells. Besides, VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and its downstream signaling cascades (AKT-mTOR and MEK1/2-ERK1/2) as well as gelatinases were all evidently reduced in the HUVECs treated with K20E. Inversely, K20E can up-regulate the expression levels of p53 and p21 proteins in the HUVECs. Based on these results, our study suggested that K20E possessed inhibiting angiogenesis through regulation of VEGF/VEGFR-2 and its downstream signaling cascades in the vascular endothelial cells (VECs). - Highlights: • K20E is an oxidative-coupling compound of methyl caffeate. • K20E exhibits anti-tumor and anti-angiogenesis effects. • K20E suppresses the expressions of VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) proteins. • K20E deactivates VEGFR-2-mediated downstream signaling pathways to inhibit angiogenesis. • K20E up-regulates p53-p21 pathway to induce apoptosis and cell arrest at G2/M phase.

  5. Involvement of the Androgen and Glucocorticoid Receptors in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McBeth, Lucien; Grabnar, Maria; Selman, Steven; Hinds, Terry D.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is encountered worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. The disease has a male to female prevalence of 3 : 1. This disparity has raised the possibility of the androgen receptor (AR) pathway being involved in the genesis of the disease; indeed, research has shown that AR is involved in and is likely a driver of bladder cancer. Similarly, an inflammatory response has been implicated as a major player in bladder carcinogenesis. Consistent with this concept, recent work on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling points to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. The glucocorticoid receptor- (GR-) α isoform has an important role in suppressing inflammatory processes, which may be attenuated by AR in the development of bladder cancer. In addition, a GR isoform that is inhibitory to GRα, GRβ, is proinflammatory and has been shown to induce cancer growth. In this paper, we review the evidence of inflammatory mediators and the relationship of AR and GR isoforms as they relate to the propensity for bladder cancer. PMID:26347776

  6. An epistatic ratchet constrains the direction of glucocorticoid receptor evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bridgham, Jamie T.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Thornton, Joseph W.

    2010-10-28

    The extent to which evolution is reversible has long fascinated biologists. Most previous work on the reversibility of morphological and life-history evolution has been indecisive, because of uncertainty and bias in the methods used to infer ancestral states for such characters. Further, despite theoretical work on the factors that could contribute to irreversibility, there is little empirical evidence on its causes, because sufficient understanding of the mechanistic basis for the evolution of new or ancestral phenotypes is seldom available. By studying the reversibility of evolutionary changes in protein structure and function, these limitations can be overcome. Here we show, using the evolution of hormone specificity in the vertebrate glucocorticoid receptor as a case-study, that the evolutionary path by which this protein acquired its new function soon became inaccessible to reverse exploration. Using ancestral gene reconstruction, protein engineering and X-ray crystallography, we demonstrate that five subsequent 'restrictive' mutations, which optimized the new specificity of the glucocorticoid receptor, also destabilized elements of the protein structure that were required to support the ancestral conformation. Unless these ratchet-like epistatic substitutions are restored to their ancestral states, reversing the key function-switching mutations yields a non-functional protein. Reversing the restrictive substitutions first, however, does nothing to enhance the ancestral function. Our findings indicate that even if selection for the ancestral function were imposed, direct reversal would be extremely unlikely, suggesting an important role for historical contingency in protein evolution.

  7. Overexpression of mineralocorticoid and transdominant glucocorticoid receptor blocks the impairing effects of glucocorticoids on memory.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Deveroux; Sapolsky, Robert

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) influence hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. MRs are saturated in the presence of low corticosterone (CORT) levels; consequently receptor protein levels play a rate-limiting role in regulating the positive effects of MR-mediated gene transcription. In this study, viral vector-mediated transgene expression was used to simultaneously manipulate both MR and GR signaling. This approach allowed us to investigate the effects of spatially restricted overexpression of MR and a negative transdominant GR (TD) in the dentate gyrus (DG) subfield of the hippocampus, on short term and long term spatial memory in animals overexpressing one copy of MR or TD, two copies of MR ("MR/MR"), or one copy of each ("MR/TD"). Expression of transgenes did not influence the acquisition (learning) phase of the Morris water maze task. However, we found an overall enhancing effect of MR/MR expression on short term memory performance. In addition, rats expressing TD and MR/TD blocked the high CORT-induced impairments on long term spatial memory retrieval. These findings illustrate the potential beneficial effects of increasing MR signaling or decreasing GR signaling to enhance specific aspects of cognitive function.

  8. The Human Glucocorticoid Receptor: Molecular Basis of Biologic Function

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaides, Nicolas C.; Galata, Zoi; Kino, Tomoshige; Chrousos, George P.; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2009-01-01

    The characterization of the subfamily of steroid hormone receptors has enhanced our understanding of how a set of hormonally derived lipophilic ligands controls cellular and molecular functions to influence development and help achieve homeostasis. The glucocorticopid receptor (GR), the first member of this subfamily, is a ubiquitously expressed intracellular protein, which functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. The effector domains of the GR mediate transcriptional activation by recruiting coregulatory multi-subunit complexes that remodel chromatin, target initiation sites, and stabilize the RNA polymerase II machinery for repeated rounds of transcription of target genes. This review summarizes the basic aspects of the structure and of the human (h) GR, and the molecular basis of its biologic function. PMID:19818358

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  10. HES1 Is a Master Regulator of Glucocorticoid Receptor-Dependent Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Revollo, Javier R.; Oakley, Robert H.; Lu, Nick Z.; Kadmiel, Mahita; Gandhavadi, Maheer; Cidlowski, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is a key regulator of development and organogenesis. However, little is known about the role of HES1 after birth. Glucocorticoids, primary stress hormones that are essential for life, regulate numerous homeostatic processes that permit vertebrates to cope with physiological challenges. The molecular actions of glucocorticoids are mediated by glucocorticoid receptor-dependent regulation of nearly 25% of the genome. We now establish a genome wide molecular link between HES1 and glucocorticoid receptors that controls the ability of cells and animals to respond to stress. Glucocorticoid signaling rapidly and robustly silenced HES1 expression. This glucocorticoid-dependent repression of HES1 was necessary for the glucocorticoid receptor to regulate many of its target genes. Mice with conditional knockout of HES1 in the liver exhibited an expanded glucocorticoid receptor signaling profile and aberrant metabolic phenotype. Our results indicate that HES1 acts as a master repressor, the silencing of which is required for proper glucocorticoid signaling. PMID:24300895

  11. Glucocorticoid receptor signalling activates YAP in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Giovanni; Ruggeri, Naomi; Zannini, Alessandro; Ingallina, Eleonora; Bertolio, Rebecca; Marotta, Carolina; Neri, Carmelo; Cappuzzello, Elisa; Forcato, Mattia; Rosato, Antonio; Mano, Miguel; Bicciato, Silvio; Del Sal, Giannino

    2017-01-01

    The Hippo pathway is an oncosuppressor signalling cascade that plays a major role in the control of cell growth, tissue homoeostasis and organ size. Dysregulation of the Hippo pathway leads to aberrant activation of the transcription co-activator YAP (Yes-associated protein) that contributes to tumorigenesis in several tissues. Here we identify glucocorticoids (GCs) as hormonal activators of YAP. Stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) leads to increase of YAP protein levels, nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, we find that GCs increase expression and deposition of fibronectin leading to the focal adhesion-Src pathway stimulation, cytoskeleton-dependent YAP activation and expansion of chemoresistant cancer stem cells. GR activation correlates with YAP activity in human breast cancer and predicts bad prognosis in the basal-like subtype. Our results unveil a novel mechanism of YAP activation in cancer and open the possibility to target GR to prevent cancer stem cells self-renewal and chemoresistance. PMID:28102225

  12. NFκB and glucocorticoid receptor activity in steroid resistance.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Charlotte; Dhanda, Ashwin; Conway-Campbell, Becky; Dimambro, Alexandra; Lightman, Stafford; Dayan, Colin

    2012-02-01

    Resistance to the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of steroids is an important clinical problem that complicates the treatment of approximately 30% of patients with conditions for which steroids are normally first-line therapy. Previous studies have shown that steroid-resistant (SR) patients have more severe disease and higher levels of inflammatory cytokine production than steroid-sensitive (SS) patients, but the molecular mechanisms for this remain poorly understood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers were tested for steroid resistance by their in vitro response to the anti-proliferative effects of dexamethasone. The SR cohort had high baseline levels of NFκB DNA binding activity, equivalent to that in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated SS cells. In SR cells, dexamethasone exposure, but not PHA, increased binding of the p65 NFκB subunit to the κB promoter element. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was not detected at either the κB promoter element or the glucocorticoid response element (GRE), suggesting that it does not translocate to the nucleus in these cells. Conversely, in SS cells, baseline p65 DNA binding activity was low and significantly increased by PHA, but not by dexamethasone. Unlike in SR cells, GR was detected at the κB element and at the GRE. These findings suggest that in SR patients, steroids may be harmful by increasing NFκB activity which would exacerbate disease by increasing transcription of inflammatory cytokines.

  13. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng; Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A.; Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang; Mais, Dale E.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  14. Downregulation of brain mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor by antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment fails to alter spatial navigation in rats.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, M; Landgraf, R; Lörscher, P; Conzelmann, C; Probst, J C; Holsboer, F; Reul, J M

    1998-11-13

    Adult male Brown Norway rats were long-term intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) infused with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (18-mer, double endcapped phosphorothioate protected) targeting either mineralocorticoid or glucocorticoid receptor mRNA, or received the respective mixed bases sequence or vehicle. Mineralocorticoid receptor-mixed bases and glucocorticoid receptor-mixed bases oligodeoxynucleotide infusion (1 microg/0.5 microl/h) over a time period of seven days did not alter hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor binding when compared to vehicle treatment. In contrast, i.c.v. administration of mineralocorticoid receptor, as well as glucocorticoid receptor-antisense over the same time period resulted in a significantly reduced binding of mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor in the hippocampus [mineralocorticoid receptor-antisense group approx. 72% of mineralocorticoid receptor-mixed bases and vehicle groups (100%); glucocorticoid receptor antisense group approx. 77% of glucocorticoid receptor-mixed bases and vehicle]. The specificity of these antisense effects is indicated by the finding that rats treated with mineralocorticoid receptor-antisense did not show any changes in glucocorticoid receptor and vice versa. Animals treated according to this infusion protocol and tested in the Morris water maze for their spatial navigation abilities failed to show significant differences among the groups. These data indicate that a reduction of hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor or glucocorticoid receptor binding capacity by 20-30% does not interfere with spatial navigation.

  15. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J; Komai, Michio

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein-protein interactions with GR.

  16. Conservation analysis predicts in vivo occupancy of glucocorticoid receptor-binding sequences at glucocorticoid-induced genes.

    PubMed

    So, Alex Yick-Lun; Cooper, Samantha B; Feldman, Brian J; Manuchehri, Mitra; Yamamoto, Keith R

    2008-04-15

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) interacts with specific GR-binding sequences (GBSs) at glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) to orchestrate transcriptional networks. Although the sequences of the GBSs are highly variable among different GREs, the precise sequence within an individual GRE is highly conserved. In this study, we examined whether sequence conservation of sites resembling GBSs is sufficient to predict GR occupancy of GREs at genes responsive to glucocorticoids. Indeed, we found that the level of conservation of these sites at genes up-regulated by glucocorticoids in mouse C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal stem-like cells correlated directly with the extent of occupancy by GR. In striking contrast, we failed to observe GR occupancy of GBSs at genes repressed by glucocorticoids, despite the occurrence of these sites at a frequency similar to that of the induced genes. Thus, GR occupancy of the GBS motif correlates with induction but not repression, and GBS conservation alone is sufficient to predict GR occupancy and GRE function at induced genes.

  17. Stress and corticosteroids regulate rat hippocampal mitochondrial DNA gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Richard G.; Seligsohn, Ma’ayan; Rubin, Todd G.; Griffiths, Brian B.; Ozdemir, Yildirim; Pfaff, Donald W.; Datson, Nicole A.; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are involved in stress and circadian regulation, and produce many actions via the GC receptor (GR), which is classically understood to function as a nuclear transcription factor. However, the nuclear genome is not the only genome in eukaryotic cells. The mitochondria also contain a small circular genome, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), that encodes 13 polypeptides. Recent work has established that, in the brain and other systems, the GR is translocated from the cytosol to the mitochondria and that stress and corticosteroids have a direct influence on mtDNA transcription and mitochondrial physiology. To determine if stress affects mitochondrially transcribed mRNA (mtRNA) expression, we exposed adult male rats to both acute and chronic immobilization stress and examined mtRNA expression using quantitative RT-PCR. We found that acute stress had a main effect on mtRNA expression and that expression of NADH dehydrogenase 1, 3, and 6 (ND-1, ND-3, ND-6) and ATP synthase 6 (ATP-6) genes was significantly down-regulated. Chronic stress induced a significant up-regulation of ND-6 expression. Adrenalectomy abolished acute stress-induced mtRNA regulation, demonstrating GC dependence. ChIP sequencing of GR showed that corticosterone treatment induced a dose-dependent association of the GR with the control region of the mitochondrial genome. These findings demonstrate GR and stress-dependent transcriptional regulation of the mitochondrial genome in vivo and are consistent with previous work linking stress and GCs with changes in the function of brain mitochondria. PMID:27457949

  18. Xenoestrogens down-regulate aryl-hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator 2 mRNA expression in human breast cancer cells via an estrogen receptor alpha-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xian-Yang; Zaha, Hiroko; Nagano, Reiko; Yoshinaga, Jun; Yonemoto, Junzo; Sone, Hideko

    2011-10-10

    Environmental chemicals with estrogenic activity, known as xenoestrogens, may cause impaired reproductive development and endocrine-related cancers in humans by disrupting endocrine functions. Aryl-hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator 2 (ARNT2) is believed to play important roles in a variety of physiological processes, including estrogen signaling pathways, that may be involved in the pathogenesis and therapeutic responses of endocrine-related cancers. However, much of the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we investigated whether ARNT2 expression is regulated by a range of representative xenoestrogens in human cancer cell lines. Bisphenol A (BPA), benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(2-chlorophenyl-4-chlorophenyl)ethane (o,p'-DDT) were found to be estrogenic toward BG1Luc4E2 cells by an E-CALUX bioassay. ARNT2 expression was downregulated by BPA, BBP, and o,p'-DDT in a dose-dependent manner in estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1)-positive MCF-7 and BG1Luc4E2 cells, but not in estrogen receptor-negative LNCaP cells. The reduction in ARNT2 expression in cells treated with the xenoestrogens was fully recovered by the addition of a specific ESR1 antagonist, MPP. In conclusion, we have shown for the first time that ARNT2 expression is modulated by xenoestrogens by an ESR1-dependent mechanism in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  19. Cell-based Fluorescence Complementation Reveals a Role for HIV-1 Nef Protein Dimerization in AP-2 Adaptor Recruitment and CD4 Co-receptor Down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Sherry T; Emert-Sedlak, Lori A; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2017-02-17

    The HIV-1 Nef accessory factor enhances viral infectivity, immune evasion, and AIDS progression. Nef triggers rapid down-regulation of CD4 via the endocytic adaptor protein 2 (AP-2) complex, a process linked to enhanced viral infectivity and immune escape. Here, we describe a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay to visualize the interaction of Nef with AP-2 and CD4 in living cells. Interacting protein pairs were fused to complementary non-fluorescent fragments of YFP and co-expressed in 293T cells. Nef interactions with both CD4 and AP-2 resulted in complementation of YFP and a bright fluorescent signal by confocal microcopy that localized to the cell periphery. Co-expression of the AP-2 α subunit enhanced the Nef·AP-2 σ2 subunit BiFC signal and vice versa, suggesting that the AP-2 α-σ2 hemicomplex interacts cooperatively with Nef. Mutagenesis of Nef amino acids Arg-134, Glu-174, and Asp-175, which stabilize Nef for AP-2 α-σ2 binding in a recent co-crystal structure, substantially reduced AP-2 interaction without affecting CD4 binding. A dimerization-defective mutant of Nef failed to interact with either CD4 or AP-2 in the BiFC assay, indicating that Nef quaternary structure is required for CD4 and AP-2 recruitment as well as CD4 down-regulation. A small molecule previously shown to bind the Nef dimerization interface also reduced Nef interactions with AP-2 and CD4 and restored CD4 expression to the surface of HIV-infected cells. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for previous observations that dimerization-defective Nef mutants fail to down-regulate CD4 and validate the Nef dimerization interface as a target site for antiretroviral drug development.

  20. New insights into the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of glucocorticoids: an emerging role for glucocorticoid-receptor-mediated transactivation.

    PubMed

    Vandevyver, Sofie; Dejager, Lien; Tuckermann, Jan; Libert, Claude

    2013-03-01

    Glucocorticoids are anti-inflammatory drugs that are widely used for the treatment of numerous (autoimmune) inflammatory diseases. They exert their actions by binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. Upon ligand binding, the GR translocates to the nucleus, where it acts either as a homodimeric transcription factor that binds glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) in promoter regions of glucocorticoid (GC)-inducible genes, or as a monomeric protein that cooperates with other transcription factors to affect transcription. For decades, it has generally been believed that the undesirable side effects of GC therapy are induced by dimer-mediated transactivation, whereas its beneficial anti-inflammatory effects are mainly due to the monomer-mediated transrepressive actions of GR. Therefore, current research is focused on the development of dissociated compounds that exert only the GR monomer-dependent actions. However, many recent reports undermine this dogma by clearly showing that GR dimer-dependent transactivation is essential in the anti-inflammatory activities of GR. Many of these studies used GR(dim/dim) mutant mice, which show reduced GR dimerization and hence cannot control inflammation in several disease models. Here, we review the importance of GR dimers in the anti-inflammatory actions of GCs/GR, and hence we question the central dogma. We summarize the contribution of various GR dimer-inducible anti-inflammatory genes and question the use of selective GR agonists as therapeutic agents.

  1. Estrogen Receptor β Signaling through Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog/Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Akt/Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Down-Regulates Blood-Brain Barrier Breast Cancer Resistance Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, A. M. S.; Madole, E. K.; Miller, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is an ATP-driven efflux pump at the blood-brain barrier that limits central nervous system pharmacotherapy. Our previous studies showed rapid loss of BCRP transport activity in rat brain capillaries exposed to low concentrations of 17-β-estradiol (E2); this occurred without acute change in BCRP protein expression. Here, we describe a pathway through which sustained, extended exposure to E2 signals down-regulation of BCRP at the blood-brain barrier. Six-hour exposure of isolated rat and mouse brain capillaries to E2 reduced BCRP transport activity and BCRP monomer and dimer expression. Experiments with brain capillaries from estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ knockout mice and with ER agonists and antagonists showed that E2 signaled through ERβ to down-regulate BCRP expression. In rat brain capillaries, E2 increased unphosphorylated, active phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN); decreased phosphorylated, active Akt; and increased phosphorylated, active glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3. Consistent with this, inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or Akt decreased BCRP activity and protein expression, and inhibition of PTEN or GSK3 reversed the E2 effect on BCRP. Lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, abolished E2-mediated BCRP down-regulation, suggesting internalization followed by transporter degradation. Dosing mice with E2 reduced BCRP activity in brain capillaries within 1 h; this reduction persisted for 24 h. BCRP protein expression in brain capillaries was unchanged 1 h after E2 dosing but was substantially reduced 6 and 24 h after dosing. Thus, E2 signals through ERβ, PTEN/PI3K/Akt/GSK3 to stimulate proteasomal degradation of BCRP. These in vitro and in vivo findings imply that E2-mediated down-regulation of blood-brain barrier BCRP has the potential to increase brain uptake of chemotherapeutics that are BCRP substrates. PMID:20460386

  2. Glucocorticoids regulate arrestin gene expression and redirect the signaling profile of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Robert H; Revollo, Javier; Cidlowski, John A

    2012-10-23

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) compose the largest family of cell surface receptors and are the most common target of therapeutic drugs. The nonvisual arrestins, β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2, are multifunctional scaffolding proteins that play critical roles in GPCR signaling. On binding of activated GPCRs at the plasma membrane, β-arrestins terminate G protein-dependent responses (desensitization) and stimulate β-arrestin-dependent signaling pathways. Alterations in the cellular complement of β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2 occur in many human diseases, and their genetic ablation in mice has severe consequences. Surprisingly, however, the factors that control β-arrestin gene expression are poorly understood. We demonstrate that glucocorticoids differentially regulate β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2 gene expression in multiple cell types. Glucocorticoids act via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to induce the synthesis of β-arrestin-1 and repress the expression of β-arrestin-2. Glucocorticoid-dependent regulation involves the recruitment of ligand-activated glucocorticoid receptors to conserved and functional glucocorticoid response elements in intron-1 of the β-arrestin-1 gene and intron-11 of the β-arrestin-2 gene. In human lung adenocarcinoma cells, the increased expression of β-arrestin-1 after glucocorticoid treatment impairs G protein-dependent activation of inositol phosphate signaling while enhancing β-arrestin-1-dependent stimulation of the MAPK pathway by protease activated receptor 1. These studies demonstrate that glucocorticoids redirect the signaling profile of GPCRs via alterations in β-arrestin gene expression, revealing a paradigm for cross-talk between nuclear and cell surface receptors and a mechanism by which glucocorticoids alter the clinical efficacy of GPCR-based drugs.

  3. Historical contingency and its biophysical basis in glucocorticoid receptor evolution.

    PubMed

    Harms, Michael J; Thornton, Joseph W

    2014-08-14

    Understanding how chance historical events shape evolutionary processes is a central goal of evolutionary biology. Direct insights into the extent and causes of evolutionary contingency have been limited to experimental systems, because it is difficult to know what happened in the deep past and to characterize other paths that evolution could have followed. Here we combine ancestral protein reconstruction, directed evolution and biophysical analysis to explore alternative 'might-have-been' trajectories during the ancient evolution of a novel protein function. We previously found that the evolution of cortisol specificity in the ancestral glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was contingent on permissive substitutions, which had no apparent effect on receptor function but were necessary for GR to tolerate the large-effect mutations that caused the shift in specificity. Here we show that alternative mutations that could have permitted the historical function-switching substitutions are extremely rare in the ensemble of genotypes accessible to the ancestral GR. In a library of thousands of variants of the ancestral protein, we recovered historical permissive substitutions but no alternative permissive genotypes. Using biophysical analysis, we found that permissive mutations must satisfy at least three physical requirements--they must stabilize specific local elements of the protein structure, maintain the correct energetic balance between functional conformations, and be compatible with the ancestral and derived structures--thus revealing why permissive mutations are rare. These findings demonstrate that GR evolution depended strongly on improbable, non-deterministic events, and this contingency arose from intrinsic biophysical properties of the protein.

  4. Functional interaction between the glucocorticoid receptor and GANP/MCM3AP

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, Waffa; Laine, Sanna; Zilliacus, Johanna . E-mail: johanna.zilliacus@mednut.ki.se

    2006-10-06

    Glucocorticoids are widely used to treat inflammatory diseases but have a number of side effects that partly are connected to inhibition of cell proliferation. Glucocorticoids mediated their action by binding to the glucocorticoid receptor. In the present study, we have identified by two-hybrid screens the germinal center-associated protein (GANP) and MCM3-associated protein (MCM3AP), a splicing variant of GANP, as glucocorticoid receptor interacting proteins. GANP and MCM3AP can bind to the MCM3 protein involved in initiation of DNA replication. Glutathione-S-transferase-pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that the C-terminal domain of GANP, encompassing MCM3AP, interacts with the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Characterization of the intracellular localization of GANP revealed that GANP is shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we show that glucocorticoids are unable to inhibit DNA replication in HeLa cells overexpressing MCM3AP suggesting a role for both glucocorticoid receptor and GANP/MCM3AP in regulating cell proliferation.

  5. Cell-specific expression of the glucocorticoid receptor within granular convoluted tubules of the rat submaxillary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Antakly, T.; Zhang, C.X.; Sarrieau, A.; Raquidan, D. )

    1991-01-01

    The submaxillary gland, a heterogeneous tissue composed essentially of two functionally distinct cell types (tubular epithelial and acinar), offers an interesting system in which to study the mechanisms of steroid-dependent growth and differentiation. One cell type, the granular convoluted tubular (GCT) cell, secretes a large number of physiologically important polypeptides, including epidermal and nerve growth factors. Two steroids, androgens and glucocorticoids, greatly influence the growth, differentiation, and secretory activity of GCT cells. Because glucocorticoids can partially mimic or potentiate androgen effects, it has been thought that glucocorticoids act via androgen receptors. Since the presence of glucocorticoid receptors is a prerequisite for glucocorticoid action, we have investigated the presence and cellular distribution of glucocorticoid receptors within the rat submaxillary gland. Binding experiments using (3H)dexamethasone revealed the presence of high affinity binding sites in rat submaxillary tissue homogenates. Most of these sites were specifically competed by dexamethasone, corticosterone, and a pure glucocorticoid agonist RU 28362. Neither testosterone nor dihydrotestosterone competed for glucocorticoid binding. The cellular distribution of glucocorticoid receptors within the submaxillary gland was investigated by immunocytochemistry, using two highly specific glucocorticoid receptor antibodies. The receptor was localized in the GCT cells, but not in the acinar cells of rat and mouse submaxillary tissue sections. In GCT cells, the glucocorticoid receptor colocalized with several secretory polypeptides, including epidermal growth factor, nerve growth factor, alpha 2u-globulin, and atrial natriuretic factor.

  6. Induction of GST-P-positive proliferative lesions facilitating lipid peroxidation with possible involvement of transferrin receptor up-regulation and ceruloplasmin down-regulation from the early stage of liver tumor promotion in rats.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Sayaka; Ichimura, Ryohei; Kemmochi, Sayaka; Taniai, Eriko; Shimamoto, Keisuke; Ohishi, Takumi; Takahashi, Miwa; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2010-04-01

    To elucidate the role of metal-related molecules in hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined immunolocalization of transferrin receptor (Tfrc), ceruloplasmin (Cp) and metallothionein (MT)-1/2 in relation to liver cell foci positive for glutathione-S-transferase placental form (GST-P) in the early stage of tumor promotion by fenbendazole (FB), phenobarbital, piperonyl butoxide or thioacetamide in a rat two-stage hepatocarcinogenesis model. To estimate the involvement of oxidative stress responses to the promotion, immunolocalization of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, malondialdehyde and acrolein was similarly examined. Our findings showed that MT-1/2 immunoreactivity was not associated with the cellular distribution of GST-P and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, suggesting no role of MT-1/2 in hepatocarcinogenesis. We also found enhanced expression of Tfrc after treatment with strong tumor-promoting chemicals. With regard to Cp, the population showing down-regulation was increased in the GST-P-positive foci in relation to tumor promotion. Up-regulation of Tfrc and down-regulation of Cp was maintained in GST-P-positive neoplastic lesions induced after long-term promotion with FB, suggesting the expression changes occurring downstream of the signaling pathway involved in the formation of GST-P-positive lesions. Furthermore, enhanced accumulation of lipid peroxidation end products was observed in the GST-P-positive foci by promotion. Post-initiation treatment with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonists did not enhance any such distribution changes in GST-P-negative foci. The results thus suggest that facilitation of lipid peroxidation is involved in the induction of GST-P-positive lesions by tumor promotion from an early stage, and up-regulation of Tfrc and down-regulation of Cp may be a signature of enhanced oxidative cellular stress in these lesions.

  7. Deletion of Neurotrophin Signaling through the Glucocorticoid Receptor Pathway Causes Tau Neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Peguet, Camille; Catteau, Matthias; Parmentier, Marie-Laure; Wu, Synphen; Chao, Moses V; Ginsberg, Stephen D.; Jeanneteau, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid resistance is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Molecular and cellular mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance in the brain have remained unknown and are potential therapeutic targets. Phosphorylation of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling integrates both pathways for remodeling synaptic structure and plasticity. The goal of this study is to test the role of the BDNF-dependent pathway on glucocorticoid signaling in a mouse model of glucocorticoid resistance. We report that deletion of GR phosphorylation at BDNF-responding sites and downstream signaling via the MAPK-phosphatase DUSP1 triggers tau phosphorylation and dendritic spine atrophy in mouse cortex. In human cortex, DUSP1 protein expression correlates with tau phosphorylation, synaptic defects and cognitive decline in subjects diagnosed with AD. These findings provide evidence for a causal role of BDNF-dependent GR signaling in tau neuropathology and indicate that DUSP1 is a potential target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27849045

  8. RSUME Enhances Glucocorticoid Receptor SUMOylation and Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Druker, Jimena; Liberman, Ana C.; Antunica-Noguerol, María; Gerez, Juan; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Rein, Theo; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.; Holsboer, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity is modulated by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and SUMOylation. The GR has three SUMOylation sites: lysine 297 (K297) and K313 in the N-terminal domain (NTD) and K721 within the ligand-binding domain. SUMOylation of the NTD sites mediates the negative effect of the synergy control motifs of GR on promoters with closely spaced GR binding sites. There is scarce evidence on the role of SUMO conjugation to K721 and its impact on GR transcriptional activity. We have previously shown that RSUME (RWD-containing SUMOylation enhancer) increases protein SUMOylation. We now demonstrate that RSUME interacts with the GR and increases its SUMOylation. RSUME regulates GR transcriptional activity and the expression of its endogenous target genes, FKBP51 and S100P. RSUME uncovers a positive role for the third SUMOylation site, K721, on GR-mediated transcription, demonstrating that GR SUMOylation acts positively in the presence of a SUMOylation enhancer. Both mutation of K721 and small interfering RNA-mediated RSUME knockdown diminish GRIP1 coactivator activity. RSUME, whose expression is induced under stress conditions, is a key factor in heat shock-induced GR SUMOylation. These results show that inhibitory and stimulatory SUMO sites are present in the GR and at higher SUMOylation levels the stimulatory one becomes dominant. PMID:23508108

  9. The adenovirus E3 10.4K and 14.5K proteins, which function to prevent cytolysis by tumor necrosis factor and to down-regulate the epidermal growth factor receptor, are localized in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A R; Tollefson, A E; Krajcsi, P; Yei, S P; Wold, W S

    1995-01-01

    The adenovirus type 2 and 5 E3 10,400- and 14,500-molecular-weight (10.4K and 14.5K) proteins are both required to protect some cell lines from lysis by tumor necrosis factor and to down-regulate the epidermal growth factor receptor. We have shown previously that both 10.4K and 14.5K are integral membrane proteins and that 14.5K is phosphorylated and O glycosylated. The 10.4K protein coimmunoprecipitates with 14.5K, indicating that the two proteins function as a complex. Here we show, using immunofluorescence and two different cell surface-labeling techniques, that both proteins are localized in the plasma membrane. In addition, we show that trafficking of each protein to the plasma membrane depends on concomitant expression of the other protein. Finally, neither protein could be immunoprecipitated from conditioned media, indicating that neither is secreted. Taken together, these results suggest that the plasma membrane is the site at which 10.4K and 14.5K function to inhibit cytolysis by tumor necrosis factor and to down-regulate the epidermal growth factor receptor. PMID:7983708

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor alters isovolumetric contraction and restrains cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Rachel V; Batchen, Emma J; Thomson, Adrian J W; Darroch, Rowan; Pan, Xinlu; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Wyrzykowska, Wiktoria; Scullion, Kathleen; Al-Dujaili, Emad A S; Diaz, Mary E; Moran, Carmel M; Kenyon, Christopher J; Gray, Gillian A

    2017-01-01

    Corticosteroids directly affect the heart and vasculature and are implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Attention is focussed upon the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in mediating pro-fibrotic and other adverse effects of corticosteroids upon the heart. In contrast, the role of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the heart and vasculature is less well understood. We addressed this in mice with cardiomyocyte and vascular smooth muscle deletion of GR (SMGRKO mice). Survival of SMGRKO mice to weaning was reduced compared with that of littermate controls. Doppler measurements of blood flow across the mitral valve showed an elongated isovolumetric contraction time in surviving adult SMGRKO mice, indicating impairment of the initial left ventricular contractile phase. Although heart weight was elevated in both genders, only male SMGRKO mice showed evidence of pathological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, associated with increased myosin heavy chain-β expression. Left ventricular fibrosis, evident in both genders, was associated with elevated levels of mRNA encoding MR as well as proteins involved in cardiac remodelling and fibrosis. However, MR antagonism with spironolactone from birth only modestly attenuated the increase in pro-fibrotic gene expression in SMGRKO mice, suggesting that elevated MR signalling is not the primary driver of cardiac fibrosis in SMGRKO mice, and cardiac fibrosis can be dissociated from MR activation. Thus, GR contributes to systolic function and restrains normal cardiac growth, the latter through gender-specific mechanisms. Our findings suggest the GR:MR balance is critical in corticosteroid signalling in specific cardiac cell types. PMID:28057868

  11. Historical contingency and its biophysical basis in glucocorticoid receptor evolution

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Michael J.; Thornton, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how chance historical events shape evolutionary processes is a central goal of evolutionary biology1–7. Direct insights into the extent and causes of evolutionary contingency have been limited to experimental systems,7–9 because it is difficult to know what happened in the deep past and to characterize other paths that evolution could have followed. Here we combine ancestral protein reconstruction, directed evolution, and biophysical analysis to explore alternate “might-have-been” trajectories during the ancient evolution of a novel protein function. We previously found that the evolution of cortisol specificity in the ancestral glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was contingent on permissive substitutions, which had no apparent effect on receptor function but were necessary for GR to tolerate the large-effect mutations that caused the shift in specificity.6 Here we show that alternative mutations that could have permitted the historical function-switching substitutions are extremely rare in the ensemble of genotypes accessible to the ancestral GR. In a library of thousands of variants of the ancestral protein, we recovered historical permissive substitutions, but no alternate permissive genotypes. Using biophysical analysis, we found that permissive mutations must satisfy at least three physical requirements—they must stabilize specific local elements of the protein structure, maintain the correct energetic balance between functional conformations, and be compatible with the ancestral and derived structures—thus revealing why permissive mutations are rare. These findings demonstrate that GR evolution depended strongly on improbable, nondeterministic events, and this contingency arose from intrinsic biophysical properties of the protein. PMID:24930765

  12. Purified glucocorticoid receptors bind selectively in vitro to a cloned DNA fragment whose transcription is regulated by glucocorticoids in vivo.

    PubMed

    Payvar, F; Wrange, O; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Okret, S; Gustafsson, J A; Yamamoto, K R

    1981-11-01

    Activated glucocorticoid receptor protein, purified to 40-60% homogeneity from rat liver extracts, binds selectively in vitro to a cloned fragment of murine mammary tumor virus (MTV) DNA. The DNA fragment tested contains about half of the sequences present in intact MTV DNA, and its rate of transcription, like that of the intact viral element, is strongly stimulated by glucocorticoids when it is introduced into the genome of a receptor-containing cell. In contrast, the receptor fails to bind selectively to DNA restriction fragments from E. coli plasmids pBR322 and RSF2124 or from bacteriophages lambda and T4. Preliminary experiments to localize regions within MTV DNA responsible for selective binding have revealed thus far one subfragment that fails to bind the receptor and one selectively bound subfragment that maps far downstream from the 5' terminus of the normal RNA transcript. These studies are consistent with the notion that steroid receptors may modulate rates of transcription by recognizing specific DNA sequences within or near the regulated genes.

  13. Competitive inhibition of (TH)dexamethasone binding to mammary glucocorticoid receptor by leupeptin

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, L.C.C.; Su, C.; Markland, F.S. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    The inhibitory effect of leupeptin on (TH)dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor from lactating goat mammary cytosol has been studied. Leupeptin (10 mM) caused a significant (about 35%) inhibition of (TH)dexamethasone binding to glucocorticoid receptor. Binding inhibition is further increased following filtration of unlabeled cytosolic receptor through a Bio-Gel A 0.5-m column. Binding inhibition was partially reversed by monothioglycerol at 10 mM concentration. A double reciprocal plot revealed that leupeptin appears to be a competitive inhibitor of (TH)dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor. Low salt sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed that the leupeptin-treated sample formed a slightly larger (approximately 9 S) receptor complex (leupeptin-free complex sediments at 8 S).

  14. Evidence that the modulator of the glucocorticoid-receptor complex is the endogenous molybdate factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bodine, P V; Litwack, G

    1988-01-01

    We have recently purified the modulator of the glucocorticoid-receptor complex from rat liver. Purified modulator inhibits glucocorticoid-receptor complex activation and stabilizes the steroid-binding ability of the unoccupied glucocorticoid receptor. Since these activities are shared by exogenous sodium molybdate, modulator appears to be the endogenous factor that sodium molybdate mimics. In this report, we present additional evidence for the mechanism of action of purified modulator. (i) Molybdate and modulator inhibit receptor activation as measured by DNA-cellulose binding, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and Sepharose 4B gel filtration. (ii) The ability of molybdate and modulator to inhibit receptor activation and stabilize the unoccupied receptor appears to be additive. (iii) Scatchard analysis of heat-destabilized unoccupied receptors indicates that the number of steroid-binding sites is reduced during destabilization, whereas the steroid dissociation constant remains unchanged. Molybdate and modulator stabilize the receptor by maintaining the number of steroid-binding sites. (iv) Molybdate and modulator do not inhibit alkaline phosphatase-induced destabilization of the unoccupied receptor. However, alkaline phosphatase-induced destabilization is reversed by the addition of dithiothreitol in the presence, but not in the absence, of molybdate or modulator. These results suggest that the mechanism of action for modulator is identical to that of sodium molybdate, and we propose that modulator is the endogenous molybdate factor for the glucocorticoid receptor. PMID:3422744

  15. Extraction of DNA-cellulose-bound glucocorticoid-receptor complexes with sodium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Murakami, N; Moudgil, V K

    1981-09-04

    Glucocorticoid-receptor complex from rat liver cytosol, activated by warming at 23 degrees C or fractionation with (NH4)2SO4, was adsorbed over DNA-cellulose. This DNA-cellulose-bound [3H]triamcinolone acetonide-receptor complex was extracted in a dose-dependent manner by incubation with different concentrations of sodium tungstate. A 50% recovery of receptor was achieved with 5 mM sodium tungstate. Almost the entire glucocorticoid-receptor complex bound to DNA-cellulose could be extracted with 20 mM sodium tungstate. The [3H]triamcinolone acetonide released from DNA-cellulose following tungstate and molybdate treatment was found to be associated with a macromolecule, as seen by analysis on a Sephadex G-75 column. The glucocorticoid-receptor complex extracted by both the compounds sedimented as a 4 S entity of 5-20% sucrose gradients under low- and high-salt conditions. Addition of tungstate or molybdate to the preparations containing activated receptor had no effect on the sedimentation rate of receptor. However, addition of tungstate to non-activated receptor preparation caused aggregates of larger size. The tungstate-extracted glucocorticoid-receptor complex failed to rebind to DNA-cellulose even after extensive dialysis, whereas receptor in molybdate-extract retained its DNA-cellulose binding capacity.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ down-regulation mediates the inhibitory effect of d-δ-tocotrienol on the differentiation of murine 3T3-F442A preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Sheida; Yeganehjoo, Hoda; Shen, Chwan-Li; Mo, Huanbiao

    2016-12-01

    Tocotrienols accelerate the degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of mevalonate; the latter is essential for preadipocyte differentiation. Tocotrienols also down-regulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a key regulator of adipocyte differentiation. We hypothesized that mevalonate deprivation and PPARγ down-regulation mediate d-δ-tocotrienol-induced inhibition of adipocyte differentiation. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of d-δ-tocotrienol on 3T3-F442A preadipocyte differentiation and the involvement of PPARγ and mevalonate. Murine 3T3-F442A preadipocytes were incubated with d-δ-tocotrienol (2.5-10 μmol/L) for 8 days. AdipoRed assay and Oil Red O staining showed that d-δ-tocotrienol dose-dependently reduced the intracellular triglyceride content. Concomitantly, d-δ-tocotrienol dose-dependently inhibited glucose uptake by 3T3-F442A cells and the expression of GLUT4, HMG CoA reductase, and p-Akt proteins. The effects of d-δ-tocotrienol on intracellular triglyceride content and glucose uptake were attenuated by rosiglitazone, an agonist of PPARγ, but not supplemental mevalonate (100 μmol/L). In contrast, mevalonate, but not rosiglitazone, reversed the effects of lovastatin, a competitive inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase shown to inhibit adipocyte differentiation via mevalonate deprivation. Trypan blue staining revealed no changes in cell viability after a 48-hour incubation of 3T3-F442A cells with d-δ-tocotrienol (0-80 μmol/L), suggesting that the adipogenesis-suppressive activity of d-δ-tocotrienol was independent of cytotoxicity. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the antiadipogenic effect of d-δ-tocotrienol via PPARγ down-regulation.

  17. Structure and specific DNA binding of the rat liver glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, J A; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Okret, S; Wikström, A C; Wrange, O; Payvar, F; Yamamoto, K

    1984-01-01

    During recent years major advances have been made in our understanding of glucocorticoid mechanism of action. This progress has been made possible by access to purified glucocorticoid receptor in significant amounts as well as by application of hybrid DNA technology within the field of glucocorticoid control of gene expression. Especially the mammary tumour virus genome has turned out to be a convenient experimental system suitable for such investigations. This paper summarizes some of the work carried out in our own laboratory, partially in collaboration with Dr Keith Yamamoto and his associates at the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, U.S.A.

  18. Selective modulation through the glucocorticoid receptor ameliorates muscle pathology in mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Tony; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Quinn, James L; Tatem, Kathleen S; Heier, Christopher R; Van Der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Harris, Mark; Nolan, Christopher J; Haegeman, Guy; Grounds, Miranda D; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    The over-expression of NF-κB signalling in both muscle and immune cells contribute to the pathology in dystrophic muscle. The anti-inflammatory properties of glucocorticoids, mediated predominantly through monomeric glucocorticoid receptor inhibition of transcription factors such as NF-κB (transrepression), are postulated to be an important mechanism for their beneficial effects in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Chronic glucocorticoid therapy is associated with adverse effects on metabolism, growth, bone mineral density and the maintenance of muscle mass. These detrimental effects result from direct glucocorticoid receptor homodimer interactions with glucocorticoid response elements of the relevant genes. Compound A, a non-steroidal selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator, is capable of transrepression without transactivation. We confirm the in vitro NF-κB inhibitory activity of compound A in H-2Kb-tsA58 mdx myoblasts and myotubes, and demonstrate improvements in disease phenotype of dystrophin deficient mdx mice. Compound A treatment in mdx mice from 18 days of post-natal age to 8 weeks of age increased the absolute and normalized forelimb and hindlimb grip strength, attenuated cathepsin-B enzyme activity (a surrogate marker for inflammation) in forelimb and hindlimb muscles, decreased serum creatine kinase levels and reduced IL-6, CCL2, IFNγ, TNF and IL-12p70 cytokine levels in gastrocnemius (GA) muscles. Compared with compound A, treatment with prednisolone, a classical glucocorticoid, in both wild-type and mdx mice was associated with reduced body weight, reduced GA, tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscle mass and shorter tibial lengths. Prednisolone increased osteopontin (Spp1) gene expression and osteopontin protein levels in the GA muscles of mdx mice and had less favourable effects on the expression of Foxo1, Foxo3, Fbxo32, Trim63, Mstn and Igf1 in GA muscles, as well as hepatic Igf1 in wild-type mice. In conclusion, selective

  19. Selective modulation through the glucocorticoid receptor ameliorates muscle pathology in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tony; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Quinn, James L; Tatem, Kathleen S; Heier, Christopher R; Van Der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Harris, Mark; Nolan, Christopher J; Haegeman, Guy; Grounds, Miranda D; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-10-01

    The over-expression of NF-κB signalling in both muscle and immune cells contribute to the pathology in dystrophic muscle. The anti-inflammatory properties of glucocorticoids, mediated predominantly through monomeric glucocorticoid receptor inhibition of transcription factors such as NF-κB (transrepression), are postulated to be an important mechanism for their beneficial effects in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Chronic glucocorticoid therapy is associated with adverse effects on metabolism, growth, bone mineral density and the maintenance of muscle mass. These detrimental effects result from direct glucocorticoid receptor homodimer interactions with glucocorticoid response elements of the relevant genes. Compound A, a non-steroidal selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator, is capable of transrepression without transactivation. We confirm the in vitro NF-κB inhibitory activity of compound A in H-2K(b) -tsA58 mdx myoblasts and myotubes, and demonstrate improvements in disease phenotype of dystrophin deficient mdx mice. Compound A treatment in mdx mice from 18 days of post-natal age to 8 weeks of age increased the absolute and normalized forelimb and hindlimb grip strength, attenuated cathepsin-B enzyme activity (a surrogate marker for inflammation) in forelimb and hindlimb muscles, decreased serum creatine kinase levels and reduced IL-6, CCL2, IFNγ, TNF and IL-12p70 cytokine levels in gastrocnemius (GA) muscles. Compared with compound A, treatment with prednisolone, a classical glucocorticoid, in both wild-type and mdx mice was associated with reduced body weight, reduced GA, tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscle mass and shorter tibial lengths. Prednisolone increased osteopontin (Spp1) gene expression and osteopontin protein levels in the GA muscles of mdx mice and had less favourable effects on the expression of Foxo1, Foxo3, Fbxo32, Trim63, Mstn and Igf1 in GA muscles, as well as hepatic Igf1 in wild-type mice. In conclusion, selective

  20. Antenatal hypoxia induces epigenetic repression of glucocorticoid receptor and promotes ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fuxia; Lin, Thant; Song, Minwoo; Ma, Qingyi; Martinez, Shannalee R; Lv, Juanxiu; MataGreenwood, Eugenia; Xiao, Daliao; Xu, Zhice; Zhang, Lubo

    2016-02-01

    Large studies in humans and animals have demonstrated a clear association of an adverse intrauterine environment with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. Yet mechanisms remain largely elusive. The present study tested the hypothesis that gestational hypoxia leads to promoter hypermethylation and epigenetic repression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene in the developing heart, resulting in increased heart susceptibility to ischemia and reperfusion injury in offspring. Hypoxic treatment of pregnant rats from day 15 to 21 of gestation resulted in a significant decrease of GR exon 14, 15, 16, and 17 transcripts, leading to down-regulation of GR mRNA and protein in the fetal heart. Functional cAMP-response elements (CREs) at -4408 and -3896 and Sp1 binding sites at -3425 and -3034 were identified at GR untranslated exon 1 promoters. Hypoxia significantly increased CpG methylation at the CREs and Sp1 binding sites and decreased transcription factor binding to GR exon 1 promoter, accounting for the repression of the GR gene in the developing heart. Of importance, treatment of newborn pups with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine reversed hypoxia-induced promoter methylation, restored GR expression and prevented hypoxia-mediated increase in ischemia and reperfusion injury of the heart in offspring. The findings demonstrate a novel mechanism of epigenetic repression of the GR gene in fetal stress-mediated programming of ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the heart.

  1. Antenatal Hypoxia Induces Epigenetic Repression of Glucocorticoid Receptor and Promotes Ischemic-Sensitive Phenotype in the Developing Heart

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fuxia; Lin, Thant; Song, Minwoo; Ma, Qingyi; Martinez, Shannalee R.; Lv, Juanxiu; MataGreenwood, Eugenia; Xiao, Daliao; Xu, Zhice; Zhang, Lubo

    2016-01-01

    Large studies in humans and animals have demonstrated a clear association of an adverse intrauterine environment with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. Yet mechanisms remain largely elusive. The present study tested the hypothesis that gestational hypoxia leads to promoter hypermethylation and epigenetic repression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene in the developing heart, resulting in increased heart susceptibility to ischemia and reperfusion injury in offspring. Hypoxic treatment of pregnant rats from day 15 to 21 of gestation resulted in a significant decrease of GR exon 14, 15, 16, and 17 transcripts, leading to down-regulation of GR mRNA and protein in the fetal heart. Functional cAMP-response elements (CREs) at −4408 and −3896 and Sp1 binding sites at −3425 and −3034 were identified at GR untranslated exon 1 promoters. Hypoxia significantly increased CpG methylation at the CREs and Sp1 binding sites and decreased transcription factor binding to GR exon 1 promoter, accounting for the repression of the GR gene in the developing heart. Of importance, treatment of newborn pups with 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine reversed hypoxia-induced promoter methylation, restored GR expression and prevented hypoxia-mediated increase in ischemia and reperfusion injury of the heart in offspring. The findings demonstrate a novel mechanism of epigenetic repression of the GR gene in fetal stress-mediated programming of ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the heart. PMID:26779948

  2. Expression of Caveolin-1 reduces cellular responses to TGF-{beta}1 through down-regulating the expression of TGF-{beta} type II receptor gene in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, Youn Sook; Han, In-Oc; Park, Seok Hee . E-mail: parks@skku.edu

    2007-07-27

    Transcriptional repression of Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} type II receptor (T{beta}RII) gene has been proposed to be one of the major mechanisms leading to TGF-{beta} resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) gene in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells down-regulates the expression of T{beta}RII gene in the transcriptional level, eventually resulting in the decreased responses to TGF-{beta}. The reduced expression of T{beta}RII gene by Cav-1 appeared to be due to the changes of the sequence-specific DNA binding proteins to either Positive Regulatory Element 1 (PRE1) or PRE2 of the T{beta}RII promoter. In addition, Cav-1 expression inhibited TGF-{beta}-mediated cellular proliferation and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor (PAI)-1 gene expression as well as TGF-{beta}-induced luciferase activity. Furthermore, the inhibition of endogeneous Cav-1 by small interfering RNA increased the expression of T{beta}RII gene. These findings strongly suggest that expression of Cav-1 leads to the decreased cellular responsiveness to TGF-{beta} through down-regulating T{beta}RII gene expression.

  3. Down-regulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator 1α induces oxidative stress and toxicity of 1-(4-Chlorophenyl)-benzo-2,5-quinone in HaCaT human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wusheng; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator that is known to regulate oxidative stress response by enhancing the expression of antioxidant genes. We have shown previously that 1-(4-Chlorophenyl)-benzo-2,5-quinone (4-ClBQ), a quinone-metabolite of 4-monochlorobiphenyl (PCB3) induces oxidative stress and toxicity in human skin keratinocytes, and breast and prostate epithelial cells. In this study, we investigate whether PGC-1α regulates oxidative stress and toxicity in 4-ClBQ treated HaCaT human keratinocytes. Results showed significant down-regulation in the expression of PGC-1α and catalase in 4-ClBQ treated HaCaT cells. Down-regulation of PGC-1α expression was associated with 4-ClBQ induced increase in the steady-state levels of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and toxicity. Overexpression of pgc-1α enhanced the expression of catalase and suppressed 4-ClBQ induced increase in cellular ROS levels and toxicity. These results suggest that pgc-1α mediates 4-ClBQ induced oxidative stress and toxicity in HaCaT cells presumably by regulating catalase expression. PMID:26004620

  4. MicroRNA-433 Dampens Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling, Impacting Circadian Rhythm and Osteoblastic Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Spenser S; Dole, Neha S; Franceschetti, Tiziana; Hrdlicka, Henry C; Delany, Anne M

    2016-10-07

    Serum glucocorticoids play a critical role in synchronizing circadian rhythm in peripheral tissues, and multiple mechanisms regulate tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. In the skeleton, circadian rhythm helps coordinate bone formation and resorption. Circadian rhythm is regulated through transcriptional and post-transcriptional feedback loops that include microRNAs. How microRNAs regulate circadian rhythm in bone is unexplored. We show that in mouse calvaria, miR-433 displays robust circadian rhythm, peaking just after dark. In C3H/10T1/2 cells synchronized with a pulse of dexamethasone, inhibition of miR-433 using a tough decoy altered the period and amplitude of Per2 gene expression, suggesting that miR-433 regulates rhythm. Although miR-433 does not directly target the Per2 3'-UTR, it does target two rhythmically expressed genes in calvaria, Igf1 and Hif1α. miR-433 can target the glucocorticoid receptor; however, glucocorticoid receptor protein abundance was unaffected in miR-433 decoy cells. Rather, miR-433 inhibition dramatically enhanced glucocorticoid signaling due to increased nuclear receptor translocation, activating glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional targets. Last, in calvaria of transgenic mice expressing a miR-433 decoy in osteoblastic cells (Col3.6 promoter), the amplitude of Per2 and Bmal1 mRNA rhythm was increased, confirming that miR-433 regulates circadian rhythm. miR-433 was previously shown to target Runx2, and mRNA for Runx2 and its downstream target, osteocalcin, were also increased in miR-433 decoy mouse calvaria. We hypothesize that miR-433 helps maintain circadian rhythm in osteoblasts by regulating sensitivity to glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

  5. microRNA-34a-Mediated Down-Regulation of the Microglial-Enriched Triggering Receptor and Phagocytosis-Sensor TREM2 in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Prerna; Rogaev, Evgeny I.; Lukiw, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation of Aβ42-peptides and the formation of drusen in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are due in part to the inability of homeostatic phagocytic mechanisms to clear self-aggregating Aβ42-peptides from the extracellular space. The triggering receptor expressed in myeloid/microglial cells-2 (TREM2), a trans-membrane-spanning, sensor-receptor of the immune-globulin/lectin-like gene superfamily is a critical component of Aβ42-peptide clearance. Here we report a significant deficit in TREM2 in AMD retina and in cytokine- or oxidatively-stressed microglial (MG) cells. RT-PCR, miRNA-array, LED-Northern and Western blot studies indicated up-regulation of a microglial-enriched NF-кB-sensitive miRNA-34a coupled to a down-regulation of TREM2 in the same samples. Bioinformatics/transfection-luciferase reporter assays indicated that miRNA-34a targets the 299 nucleotide TREM2-mRNA-3’UTR, resulting in TREM2 down-regulation. C8B4-microglial cells challenged with Aβ42 were able to phagocytose these peptides, while miRNA-34a down-regulated both TREM2 and the ability of microglial-cells to phagocytose. Treatment of TNFα-stressed MG cells with phenyl-butyl nitrone (PBN), caffeic-acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), the NF-B-inhibitor/resveratrol analog CAY10512 or curcumin abrogated these responses. Incubation of anti-miRNA-34a (AM-34a) normalized miRNA-34a abundance and restored TREM2 back to homeostatic levels. These data support five novel observations: (i) that a ROS- and NF-B-sensitive, miRNA-34a-mediated modulation of TREM2 may in part regulate the phagocytic response; (ii) that gene products encoded on two different chromosomes (miRNA-34a at chr1q36.22 and TREM2 at chr6p21.1) orchestrate a phagocytic-Aβ42-peptide clearance-system; (iii) that this NF-kB-mediated-miRNA-34a-TREM2 mechanism is inducible from outside of the cell; (iv) that when operating normally, this pathway can clear Aβ42 peptide monomers from the extracellular medium; and (v) that anti

  6. Overexpression of Glucocorticoid Receptor β Enhances Myogenesis and Reduces Catabolic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Terry D.; Peck, Bailey; Shek, Evan; Stroup, Steven; Hinson, Jennifer; Arthur, Susan; Marino, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα), GR β (GRβ) has a truncated ligand-binding domain that prevents glucocorticoid binding, implicating GRα as the mediator of glucocorticoid-induced skeletal muscle loss. Because GRβ causes glucocorticoid resistance, targeting GRβ may be beneficial in impairing muscle loss as a result of GRα activity. The purpose of this study was to determine how the overexpression of GRβ affects myotube formation and dexamethasone (Dex) responsiveness. We measured GR isoform expression in C2C12 muscle cells in response to Dex and insulin, and through four days of myotube formation. Next, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of GRβ in C2C12 was performed, and these cells were characterized for cell fusion and myotube formation, as well as sensitivity to Dex via the expression of ubiquitin ligases. GRβ overexpression increased mRNA levels of muscle regulatory factors and enhanced proliferation in myoblasts. GRβ overexpressing myotubes had an increased fusion index. Myotubes overexpressing GRβ had lower forkhead box O3 (Foxo3a) mRNA levels and a blunted muscle atrophy F-box/Atrogen-1 (MAFbx) and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) response to Dex. We showed that GRβ may serve as a pharmacological target for skeletal muscle growth and protection from glucocorticoid-induced catabolic signaling. Increasing GRβ levels in skeletal muscle may cause a state of glucocorticoid resistance, stabilizing muscle mass during exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids. PMID:26875982

  7. Selective prostacyclin receptor agonism augments glucocorticoid-induced gene expression in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sylvia M; Shen, Pamela; Rider, Christopher F; Traves, Suzanne L; Proud, David; Newton, Robert; Giembycz, Mark A

    2009-11-15

    Prostacyclin receptor (IP-receptor) agonists display anti-inflammatory and antiviral activity in cell-based assays and in preclinical models of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this study, we have extended these observations by demonstrating that IP-receptor activation also can enhance the ability of glucocorticoids to induce genes with anti-inflammatory activity. BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells stably transfected with a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) luciferase reporter were activated in a concentration-dependent manner by the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. An IP-receptor agonist, taprostene, increased cAMP in these cells and augmented luciferase expression at all concentrations of dexamethasone examined. Analysis of the concentration-response relationship that described this effect showed that taprostene increased the magnitude of transcription without affecting the potency of dexamethasone and was, thus, steroid-sparing in this simple system. RO3244794, an IP-receptor antagonist, and oligonucleotides that selectively silenced the IP-receptor gene, PTGIR, abolished these effects of taprostene. Infection of BEAS-2B GRE reporter cells with an adenovirus vector encoding a highly selective inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) also prevented taprostene from enhancing GRE-dependent transcription. In BEAS-2B cells and primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells, taprostene and dexamethasone interacted either additively or cooperatively in the expression of three glucocorticoid-inducible genes (GILZ, MKP-1, and p57(kip2)) that have anti-inflammatory potential. Collectively, these data show that IP-receptor agonists can augment the ability of glucocorticoids to induce anti-inflammatory genes in human airway epithelial cells by activating a cAMP/PKA-dependent mechanism. This observation may have clinical relevance in the treatment of airway inflammatory diseases that are either refractory or respond suboptimally to

  8. New Insights in Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling—More Than Just a Ligand-Binding Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Scheschowitsch, Karin; Leite, Jacqueline Alves; Assreuy, Jamil

    2017-01-01

    The clinical use of classical glucocorticoids (GC) is narrowed by the many side effects it causes and the resistance to GC observed in some diseases. Since the great majority of GC effects depend on the activation of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR), many research groups had focused to better understand the signaling pathways involving those receptors. Transgenic animal models and genetic modifications of the receptor brought a huge insight into GR mechanisms of action. This in turn opened a new window for the search of selective GR modulators that ideally may have agonistic and antagonistic combined effects and activate one specific signaling pathway, inducing mostly transrepression or transactivation mechanisms. Another important research field concerns to posttranslational modifications that affect the GR and consequently also affect its signaling and function. In this mini review, we discuss many of those aspects of GR signaling, as well as findings like the ligand-independent activation of GR, which add another layer of complexity in GR signaling pathways. Although several recent data have been added to the GR field, much work has yet to be done, especially to find out the biological relevance of those alternative GR signaling pathways. Improving the knowledge about alternative GR signaling pathways and understanding how these pathways intercommunicate and in which situations they are relevant might help to develop new strategies to take benefit of it and to improve GC or other compounds efficacy causing minimal side effects. PMID:28220107

  9. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor functional down regulation in the cerebellum of hypoxic neonatal rats: neuroprotective role of glucose and oxygen, epinephrine resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Binoy; Nandhu, M S; Paulose, C S

    2010-02-01

    Brain damage due to an episode of hypoxia remains a major problem in infants causing deficit in motor and sensory function. Molecular processes regulating the dopamine receptors play a very important role in motor and cognitive functions. Disturbances in the development of the dopaminergic system lead to dyskinesia, dystonia, tics and abnormal eye movements. The present study is to understand the hypoxic damage to the dopamine content and dopamine D(1), dopamine D(2) receptors in cerebellum and the neuroprotective effect of glucose supplementation prior to the current sequence of resuscitation-oxygen and epinephrine supplementation in neonatal rats. Dopamine content in the cerebellum showed a significant decrease in hypoxic neonatal rats when compared to control. Dopamine D(1) and dopamine D(2) receptors showed a decrease in B(max) during hypoxia. The cerebellar dopamine, dopamine D(1) and dopamine D(2) receptors showed significant decrease on supplementation of 100% oxygen alone to hypoxic rats when compared to control rats. Dopamine D(1) and dopamine D(2) receptors mRNA showed significant decrease during epinephrine supplementation prior to resuscitation. These dopaminergic receptor alterations were reversed to near control by glucose supplementation. Thus our results suggest that glucose acts as a neuroprotective agent in dopaminergic receptors function. This has immense clinical significance to correct the resuscitation sequence in neonatal care.

  10. Maternal caffeine intake during gestation and lactation down-regulates adenosine A1 receptor in rat brain from mothers and neonates.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, A M; León, D; Castillo, C A; Ruiz, M A; Albasanz, J L; Martín, M

    2010-05-01

    Even though caffeine can be excreted in breast milk, few studies have analyzed the effect of maternal caffeine consumption during lactation on neonatal brain. In the present work pregnant rats were treated daily with 1 g/L of caffeine in their drinking water during pregnancy and/or lactation and the effect on adenosine A(1) receptor in brains from both lactating mothers and 15 days-old neonates was assayed using radioligand binding and real time PCR assays. Mothers receiving caffeine during gestational period developed motor activation in gestational days 8-10 which was associated with a significant decrease of total adenosine A(1) receptor number (84%). A similar decrease was detected in mothers treated with caffeine during lactation (76%) and throughout gestation and lactation (73%); this was accompanied by a significant decrease in mRNA level coding adenosine A(1) receptor (28%). In male neonates, adenosine A(1) receptor was also decreased after chronic caffeine exposure during gestation (80%), lactation (76%) and gestation plus lactation (80%). In female neonates, adenosine A(1) receptor tended to decrease in response to caffeine exposure although no significant variations were found. No variation in the level of mRNA coding adenosine A(1) receptor was detected in neonates in any case. Concerning adenosine A(2A) receptor, radioligand binding assays revealed that this receptor remains unaltered in maternal and neonatal brain in response to caffeine exposure. However, caffeine consumption during gestation and lactation evoked a significant decrease in mRNA level coding A(2A) receptor (32%) in mothers' brain.

  11. nti glucocorticoid receptor transcripts lack sequences encoding the amino-terminal transcriptional modulatory domain.

    PubMed Central

    Dieken, E S; Meese, E U; Miesfeld, R L

    1990-01-01

    Glucocorticoid induction of cell death (apoptosis) in mouse lymphoma S49 cells has long been studied as a molecular genetic model of steroid hormone action. To better understand the transcriptional control of glucocorticoid-induced S49 cell death, we isolated and characterized glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cDNA from two steroid-resistant nti S49 mutant cell lines (S49.55R and S49.143R) and the wild-type parental line (S49.A2). Our data reveal that nti GR transcripts encode intact steroid- and DNA-binding domains but lack 404 amino-terminal residues as a result of aberrant RNA splicing between exons 1 and 3. Results from transient cotransfection experiments into CV1 cells using nti receptor expression plasmids and a glucocorticoid-responsive reporter gene demonstrated that the truncated nti receptor exhibits a reduced transcriptional regulatory activity. Gene fusions containing portions of both the wild-type and the nti GR-coding sequences were constructed and used to functionally map the nti receptor mutation. We found that the loss of the modulatory domain alone is sufficient to cause the observed defect in nti transcriptional transactivation. These results support the proposal that glucocorticoid-induced S49 cell death requires GR sequences which have previously been shown to be required for transcriptional regulation, suggesting that steroid-regulated apoptosis is controlled at the level of gene expression. Images PMID:2388618

  12. Multiple specific binding sites for purified glucocorticoid receptors on mammary tumor virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Payvar, F; Firestone, G L; Ross, S R; Chandler, V L; Wrange, O; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Gustafsson, J A; Yamamoto, K R

    1982-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones selectively stimulate the rate of transcription of integrated mammary tumor virus (MTV) sequences in infected rat hepatoma cells. Using two independent assays, we find that purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor protein binds specifically to at least four widely separated regions on pure MTV proviral DNA. One of these specific binding domains, which itself contains at least two distinct receptor binding sites, resides within a fragment of viral DNA that maps 110-449 bp upstream of the promoter for MTV RNA synthesis. Three other binding domains lie downstream of the promoter and within the MTV primary transcription unit. Restriction fragments bearing separate binding domains have been introduced into cultured cells; transformants have been recovered in which the introduced fragments are expressed under glucocorticoid control. Thus, it appears that this assay will be useful for assessing the biological significance of the receptor binding sites detected in vitro.

  13. Complex genomic interactions in the dynamic regulation of transcription by the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Tina B; Morris, Stephanie A; Hager, Gordon L

    2013-11-05

    The glucocorticoid receptor regulates transcriptional output through complex interactions with the genome. These events require continuous remodeling of chromatin, interactions of the glucocorticoid receptor with chaperones and other accessory factors, and recycling of the receptor by the proteasome. Therefore, the cohort of factors expressed in a particular cell type can determine the physiological outcome upon treatment with glucocorticoid hormones. In addition, circadian and ultradian cycling of hormones can also affect GR response. Here we will discuss revision of the classical static model of GR binding to response elements to incorporate recent findings from single cell and genome-wide analyses of GR regulation. We will highlight how these studies have changed our views on the dynamics of GR recruitment and its modulation of gene expression.

  14. How glucocorticoid receptors modulate the activity of other transcription factors: a scope beyond tethering.

    PubMed

    Ratman, Dariusz; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Dejager, Lien; Libert, Claude; Tavernier, Jan; Beck, Ilse M; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2013-11-05

    The activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a nuclear receptor transcription factor belonging to subclass 3C of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily, is typically triggered by glucocorticoid hormones. Apart from driving gene transcription via binding onto glucocorticoid response elements in regulatory regions of particular target genes, GR can also inhibit gene expression via transrepression, a mechanism largely based on protein:protein interactions. Hereby GR can influence the activity of other transcription factors, without contacting DNA itself. GR is known to inhibit the activity of a growing list of immune-regulating transcription factors. Hence, GCs still rule the clinic for treatments of inflammatory disorders, notwithstanding concomitant deleterious side effects. Although patience is a virtue when it comes to deciphering the many mechanisms GR uses to influence various signaling pathways, the current review is testimony of the fact that groundbreaking mechanistic work has been accumulating over the past years and steadily continues to grow.

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists down-regulate alpha2-macroglobulin expression by a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) regulates transcription of genes involved both in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as inflammation. Fibrates are PPARα ligands used to normalize lipid and glucose parameters and exert anti-inflammatory effects. Fibrates...

  16. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E.; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad. PMID:26528184

  17. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad.

  18. Yokukansan normalizes glucocorticoid receptor protein expression in oligodendrocytes of the corpus callosum by regulating microRNA-124a expression after stress exposure.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shoko; Tanaka, Takashi; Tohyama, Masaya; Miyata, Shingo

    2015-05-01

    Stressful events are known to down-regulate expression levels of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the brain. Recently, we reported that stressed mice with elevated plasma levels of corticosterone exhibit morphological changes in the oligodendrocytes of nerve fiber bundles, such as those in the corpus callosum. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of GR expression regulation in oligodendrocytes after stress exposure. A previous report has suggested that GR protein levels might be regulated by microRNA (miR)-18 and/or -124a in the brain. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the GR regulation mechanism in oligodendrocytes and evaluate the effects of yokukansan (YKS), a Kampo medicine, on GR protein regulation. Acute exposure to stress increased plasma corticosterone levels, decreased GR protein expression, and increased miR-124a expression in the corpus callosum of adult male mice, though the GR mRNA and miR-18 expression levels were not significant changes. YKS normalized the stress-induced changes in the plasma corticosterone, GR protein, and miR124a expression levels. An oligodendrocyte primary culture study also showed that YKS down-regulated miR-124a, but not miR-18, expression levels in dexamethasone-treated cells. These results suggest that the down-regulation of miR124a expression might be involved in the normalization of stress-induced decreases in GR protein in oligodendrocytes by YKS. This effect may imply the molecular mechanisms underlying the ameliorative effects of YKS on psychological symptoms and stress-related behaviors.

  19. Interleukin-18 Down-Regulates Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 Expression through Farnesoid X Receptor Associated with Nuclear Factor Kappa B and Yin Yang 1 in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-cong; Lian, Wei; Zhang, Liang-jun; Feng, Xin-chan; Gao, Yu; Li, Shao-xue; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Ying; Yang, Long; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Chen, Lei; Wang, Rong-quan; Chai, Jin; Chen, Wen-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) plays an important role in bile acid metabolism by transporting toxic organic anion conjugates, including conjugated bilirubin, glutathione, sulfate, and multifarious drugs. MRP2 expression is reduced in cholestatic patients and rodents. However, the molecular mechanism of MRP2 down-regulation remains elusive. In this report, we treated human hepatoma HepG2 cells with interleukin-18 (IL-18) and measured the expression of MRP2, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), and the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) by quantitative real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting. We found that expression of MRP2 was repressed by IL-18 at both the mRNA and protein levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, the activated NF-κB pathway increased YY1 and reduced FXR. These changes were all attenuated in HepG2 cells with knockdown of the NF-κB subunit, p65. The reduced expression of FXR and MRP2 in HepG2 cells that had been caused by IL-18 treatment was also attenuated by YY1 knockdown. We further observed significantly elevated IL-18, NF-κB, and YY1 expression and decreased FXR and MRP2 expression in bile duct-ligated Sprague Dawley rat livers. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays also showed that FXR bound to the promoter region in MRP2 was less abundant in liver extracts from bile duct-ligated rats than sham-operated rats. Our findings indicate that IL-18 down-regulates MRP2 expression through the nuclear receptor FXR in HepG2 cells, and may be mediated by NF-κB and YY1.

  20. Chronic morphine induces up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic Fas receptor and down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 oncoprotein in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Boronat, M Assumpció; García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the influence of activation and blockade of the endogenous opioid system in the brain on two key proteins involved in the regulation of programmed cell death: the pro-apoptotic Fas receptor and the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 oncoprotein. The acute treatment of rats with the μ-opioid receptor agonist morphine (3 – 30 mg kg−1, i.p., 2 h) did not modify the immunodensity of Fas or Bcl-2 proteins in the cerebral cortex. Similarly, the acute treatment with low and high doses of the antagonist naloxone (1 and 100 mg kg−1, i.p., 2 h) did not alter Fas or Bcl-2 protein expression in brain cortex. These results discounted a tonic regulation through opioid receptors on Fas and Bcl-2 proteins in rat brain. Chronic morphine (10 – 100 mg kg−1, 5 days, and 10 mg kg−1, 13 days) induced marked increases (47 – 123%) in the immunodensity of Fas receptor in the cerebral cortex. In contrast, chronic morphine (5 and 13 days) decreased the immunodensity of Bcl-2 protein (15 – 30%) in brain cortex. Chronic naloxone (10 mg kg−1, 13 days) did not alter the immunodensities of Fas and Bcl-2 proteins in the cerebral cortex. The concurrent chronic treatment (13 days) of naloxone (10 mg kg−1) and morphine (10 mg kg−1) completely prevented the morphine-induced increase in Fas receptor and decrease in Bcl-2 protein immunoreactivities in the cerebral cortex. The results indicate that morphine, through the sustained activation of opioid receptors, can promote abnormal programmed cell death by enhancing the expression of pro-apoptotic Fas receptor protein and damping the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 oncoprotein. PMID:11704646

  1. Purified glucocorticoid receptors bind selectively in vitro to a cloned DNA fragment that mediates a delayed secondary response to glucocorticoids in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hess, P; Meenakshi, T; Chan, G C; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Gustafsson, J A; Payvar, F

    1990-04-01

    We have identified and characterized a 206-base-pair region downstream from rat alpha 2u-globulin promoter that specifically mediates a delayed secondary response to glucocorticoids. Unlike positive primary glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), this regulatory element, termed delayed sGRE, dictates an inductive process preceded by a time lag of several hours and blocked by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Reminiscent of GREs and negative GREs (nGREs), a delayed sGRE confers hormonal regulation upon a linked heterologous promoter from a downstream position with respect to transcription start site and, remarkably, also interacts selectively with purified glucocorticoid receptor. These results imply that receptor binding to a delayed sGRE in vivo may mediate certain secondary responses to glucocorticoid hormones.

  2. Purified glucocorticoid receptors bind selectively in vitro to a cloned DNA fragment that mediates a delayed secondary response to glucocorticoids in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Hess, P; Meenakshi, T; Chan, G C; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Gustafsson, J A; Payvar, F

    1990-01-01

    We have identified and characterized a 206-base-pair region downstream from rat alpha 2u-globulin promoter that specifically mediates a delayed secondary response to glucocorticoids. Unlike positive primary glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), this regulatory element, termed delayed sGRE, dictates an inductive process preceded by a time lag of several hours and blocked by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Reminiscent of GREs and negative GREs (nGREs), a delayed sGRE confers hormonal regulation upon a linked heterologous promoter from a downstream position with respect to transcription start site and, remarkably, also interacts selectively with purified glucocorticoid receptor. These results imply that receptor binding to a delayed sGRE in vivo may mediate certain secondary responses to glucocorticoid hormones. Images PMID:1690888

  3. Glucocorticoid receptor activation impairs hippocampal plasticity by suppressing BDNF expression in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Wosiski-Kuhn, Marlena; Erion, Joanna R.; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P.; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Stranahan, Alexis M.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and obesity are associated with perturbation of adrenal steroid hormones and impairment of hippocampal plasticity, but the question of whether these conditions recruit glucocorticoid-mediated molecular cascades that are comparable to other stressors has yet to be fully addressed. We have used a genetic mouse model of obesity and diabetes with chronically elevated glucocorticoids to determine the mechanism for glucocorticoid-induced deficits in hippocampal synaptic function. Pharmacological inhibition of adrenal steroidogenesis attenuates structural and functional impairments by regulating plasticity among dendritic spines in the hippocampus of leptin receptor deficient (db/db) mice. Synaptic deficits evoked by exposure to elevated corticosterone levels in db/db mice are attributable to glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transrepression of AP-1 actions at BDNF promoters I and IV. db/db mice exhibit corticosterone-mediated reductions in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and a change in the ratio of TrkB to P75NTR that silences the functional response to BDNF stimulation. Lentiviral suppression of glucocorticoid receptor expression rescues behavioral and synaptic function in db/db mice, and also reinstates BDNF expression, underscoring the relevance of molecular mechanisms previously demonstrated after psychological stress to the functional alterations observed in obesity and diabetes. PMID:24636513

  4. General effect of endotoxin on glucocorticoid receptors in mammalian tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Stith, R.D.; McCallum, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Considering the ubiquitous nature of glucocorticoid actions and the fact that endotoxin inhibits glucocorticoid action in the liver, we proposed to examine whether endotoxin affected extrahepatic actions of glucocorticoids. Fasted C57BL/6J mice were injected intraperitoneally with endotoxin (LD50) at 0800 and were killed 6 h later. Control mice were injected with an equal volume of saline. /sup 3/H-dexamethasone binding, measured by a new cytosol exchange assay utilizing molybdate plus dithiothreitol, in liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, spleen, lung, and heart tissue was significantly lower in treated than in control mice. The equilibrium dissociation constants were not significantly different, but the number of available binding sites in each tissue was reduced by endotoxin treatment. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity was significantly reduced in liver but not in kidney. Endotoxin treatment lowered glycogen content in liver but not in skeletal muscle. The reduction observed in the a form of liver glycogen synthase due to endotoxin was not seen in skeletal muscle glycogen synthase a. These data support the proposal that endotoxin or a mediator of its action inhibits systemic glucocorticoid action. The results also emphasize the central role of the liver in the metabolic disturbances of the endotoxin-treated mouse.

  5. Ligand-independent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor by ursodeoxycholic acid: Repression of IFN-{gamma}-induced MHC class II gene expression via a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Makino, Yuichi; Miura, Takanori

    1996-02-15

    The therapeutic effectiveness of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) for various autoimmune liver diseases strongly indicates that UDCA possesses immunomodulatory activities. Experimental evidence also supports this notion, since, for example, UDCA has been shown to suppress secretion of IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-{gamma} from activated T lymphocytes, and Ig production from B lymphocytes. To investigate the mechanical background of UDCA-mediated immunomodulation, we asked whether UDCA interacts with the intracellular signal transduction pathway, especially whether it is involved in immunosuppressive glucocorticoid hormone action. For this purpose, we used a cloned Chinese hamster ovary cell line, CHOpMTGR, in which glucocorticoid receptor cDNA was stably integrated. In immunocytochemical analysis, we found that treatment with UDCA promoted the nuclear translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor in a ligand-independent fashion, which was further confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, the translocated glucocorticoid receptor demonstrated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Transient transfection experiments revealed that treatment of the cells with UDCA marginally enhanced glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression. We also showed that UDCA suppressed IFN-{gamma}-mediated induction of MHC class II gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated pathway. Together, UDCA-dependent promotion of translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor may be associated with, at least in part, its immunomodulatory action through glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene regulation. 68 refs., 8 figs.

  6. A Natural Mutation in Helix 5 of the Ligand Binding Domain of Glucocorticoid Receptor Enhances Receptor-Ligand Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Reyer, Henry; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Kanitz, Ellen; Pöhland, Ralf; Wimmers, Klaus; Murani, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a central player in the neuroendocrine stress response; it mediates feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and physiological actions of glucocorticoids in the periphery. Despite intensive investigations of GR in the context of receptor-ligand interaction, only recently the first naturally occurring gain-of-function substitution, Ala610Val, of the ligand binding domain was identified in mammals. We showed that this mutation underlies a major quantitative trait locus for HPA axis activity in pigs, reducing cortisol production by about 40–50 percent. To unravel the molecular mechanisms behind this gain of function, receptor-ligand interactions were evaluated in silico, in vitro and in vivo. In accordance with previously observed phenotypic effects, the mutant Val610 GR showed significantly increased activation in response to glucocorticoid and non-glucocorticoid steroids, and, as revealed by GR-binding studies in vitro and in pituitary glands, enhanced ligand binding. Concordantly, the protein structure prediction depicted reduced binding distances between the receptor and ligand, and altered interactions in the ligand binding pocket. Consequently, the Ala610Val substitution opens up new structural information for the design of potent GR ligands and to examine effects of the enhanced GR responsiveness to glucocorticoids on the entire organism. PMID:27736993

  7. Galphas-coupled receptor signaling actively down-regulates α4β1-integrin affinity: A possible mechanism for cell de-adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chigaev, Alexandre; Waller, Anna; Amit, Or; Sklar, Larry A

    2008-01-01

    Background Activation of integrins in response to inside-out signaling serves as a basis for leukocyte arrest on endothelium, and migration of immune cells. Integrin-dependent adhesion is controlled by the conformational state of the molecule (i.e. change in the affinity for the ligand and molecular unbending (extension)), which is regulated by seven-transmembrane Guanine nucleotide binding Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). α4β1-integrin (CD49d/CD29, Very Late Antigen-4, VLA-4) is expressed on leukocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, hematopoietic cancer cells, and others. Affinity and extension of VLA-4 are both rapidly up-regulated by inside-out signaling through several Gαi-coupled GPCRs. The goal of the current report was to study the effect of Gαs-coupled GPCRs upon integrin activation. Results Using real-time fluorescent ligand binding to assess affinity and a FRET based assay to probe α4β1-integrin unbending, we show that two Gαs-coupled GPCRs (H2-histamine receptor and β2-adrenergic receptor) as well as several cAMP agonists can rapidly down modulate the affinity of VLA-4 activated through two Gαi-coupled receptors (CXCR4 and FPR) in U937 cells and primary human peripheral blood monocytes. This down-modulation can be blocked by receptor-specific antagonists. The Gαs-induced responses were not associated with changes in the expression level of the Gαi-coupled receptors. In contrast, the molecular unbending of VLA-4 was not significantly affected by Gαs-coupled GPCR signaling. In a VLA-4/VCAM-1-specific myeloid cell adhesion system, inhibition of the VLA-4 affinity change by Gαs-coupled GPCR had a statistically significant effect upon cell aggregation. Conclusion We conclude that Gαs-coupled GPCRs can rapidly down modulate the affinity state of VLA-4 binding pocket through a cAMP dependent pathway. This plays an essential role in the regulation of cell adhesion. We discuss several possible implications of this described phenomenon. PMID:18534032

  8. The Effect of Mineralocorticoid and Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonism on Autobiographical Memory Recall and Amygdala Response to Implicit Emotional Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Preskorn, Sheldon H.; Victor, Teresa; Misaki, Masaya; Bodurka, Jerzy; Drevets, Wayne C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acutely elevated cortisol levels in healthy humans impair autobiographical memory recall and alter hemodynamic responses of the amygdala to emotionally valenced stimuli. It is hypothesized that the effects of the cortisol on cognition are influenced by the ratio of mineralocorticoid receptor to glucocorticoid receptor occupation. The current study examined the effects of acutely blocking mineralocorticoid receptors and glucocorticoid receptors separately on 2 processes known to be affected by altering levels of cortisol: the specificity of autobiographical memory recall, and the amygdala hemodynamic response to sad and happy faces. Methods: We employed a within-subjects design in which 10 healthy male participants received placebo, the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone (600mg) alone, and the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone (600mg) alone in a randomized, counter-balanced order separated by 1-week drug-free periods. Results: On autobiographical memory testing, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism impaired, while glucocorticoid receptor antagonism improved, recall relative to placebo, as evinced by changes in the percent of specific memories recalled. During fMRI, the amygdala hemodynamic response to masked sad faces was greater under both mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor antagonism relative to placebo, while the response to masked happy faces was attenuated only during mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism relative to placebo. Conclusions: These data suggest both mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor antagonism (and potentially any deviation from the normal physiological mineralocorticoid receptor/glucocorticoid receptor ratio achieved under the circadian pattern) enhances amygdala-based processing of sad stimuli and may shift the emotional processing bias away from the normative processing bias and towards the negative valence. In contrast, autobiographical memory was enhanced by

  9. The 10,400- and 14,500-dalton proteins encoded by region E3 of adenovirus form a complex and function together to down-regulate the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Stewart, A R; Yei, S P; Saha, S K; Wold, W S

    1991-01-01

    In adenovirus-infected cells, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) is internalized from the cell surface via endosomes and is degraded, and the E3 10,400-dalton protein (10.4K protein) is required for this effect (C. R. Carlin, A. E. Tollefson, H. A. Brady, B. L. Hoffman, and W. S. M. Wold, Cell 57:135-144, 1989). We now report that both the E3 10.4K and E3 14.5K proteins are required for this down-regulation of EGF-R in adenovirus-infected cells. Down-regulation of cell surface EGF-R was demonstrated by results from several methods, namely the absence of EGF-R autophosphorylation in an immune complex kinase assay, the inability to iodinate EGF-R on the cell surface, the formation of endosomes containing EGF-R as detected by immunofluorescence, and the degradation of the metabolically [35S]Met-labeled fully processed 170K species of EGF-R. No effect on the initial synthesis of EGF-R was observed. This down-regulation was ascribed to the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins through the analysis of cells infected with rec700 (wild-type), dl748 (10.4K-, 14.5K+), or dl764 (10.4K+, 14.5K-) or coinfected with dl748 plus dl764. Further evidence that the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins function in concert was obtained by demonstrating that the 10.4K protein was coimmunoprecipitated with the 14.5K protein by using three different antisera to the 14.5K protein, strongly implying that the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins exist as a complex. Together, these results indicate that the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins function as a complex to stimulate endosome-mediated internalization and degradation of EGF-R in adenovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:1851870

  10. Effects of essential amino acid deficiency: down-regulation of KCC2 and the GABAA receptor; disinhibition in the anterior piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Sharp, James W; Ross-Inta, Catherine M; Baccelli, Irène; Payne, John A; Rudell, John B; Gietzen, Dorothy W

    2013-11-01

    The anterior piriform cortex (APC) is activated by, and is the brain area most sensitive to, essential (indispensable) amino acid (IAA) deficiency. The APC is required for the rapid (20 min) behavioral rejection of IAA deficient diets and increased foraging, both crucial adaptive functions supporting IAA homeostasis in omnivores. The biochemical mechanisms signaling IAA deficiency in the APC block initiation of translation in protein synthesis via uncharged tRNA and the general amino acid control kinase, general control nonderepressing kinase 2. Yet, how inhibition of protein synthesis activates the APC is unknown. The neuronal K(+) Cl(-) cotransporter, neural potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2), and GABAA receptors are essential inhibitory elements in the APC with short plasmalemmal half-lives that maintain control in this highly excitable circuitry. After a single IAA deficient meal both proteins were reduced (vs. basal diet controls) in western blots of APC (but not neocortex or cerebellum) and in immunohistochemistry of APC. Furthermore, electrophysiological analyses support loss of inhibitory elements such as the GABAA receptor in this model. As the crucial inhibitory function of the GABAA receptor depends on KCC2 and the Cl(-) transmembrane gradient it establishes, these results suggest that loss of such inhibitory elements contributes to disinhibition of the APC in IAA deficiency. The circuitry of the anterior piriform cortex (APC) is finely balanced between excitatory (glutamate, +) and inhibitory (GABA, -) transmission. GABAA receptors use Cl(-), requiring the neural potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2). Both are rapidly turning-over proteins, dependent on protein synthesis for repletion. In IAA (indispensable amino acid) deficiency, within 20 min, blockade of protein synthesis prevents restoration of these inhibitors; they are diminished; disinhibition ensues. GCN2 = general control non-derepressing kinase 2, eIF2α = α-subunit of the eukaryotic

  11. Activation of autophagic flux by epigallocatechin gallate mitigates TRAIL-induced tumor cell apoptosis via down-regulation of death receptors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a major polyphenol in green tea. Recent studies have reported that EGCG can inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis and activate autophagic flux in cancer cells. However, the mechanism behind these processes is unclear. The present study found that EGCG prevents tumor cell death by antagonizing the TRAIL pathway and activating autophagy flux. Our results indicate that EGCG dose-dependently inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis and decreases the binding of death receptor 4 and 5 (DR4 and 5) to TRAIL. In addition, EGCG activates autophagy flux, which is involved in the inhibition of TRAIL cell death. We confirmed that the protective effect of EGCG can be reversed using genetic and pharmacological tools through re-sensitization to TRAIL. The inhibition of autophagy flux affects not only the re-sensitization of tumor cells to TRAIL, but also the restoration of death receptor proteins. This study demonstrates that EGCG inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through the manipulation of autophagic flux and subsequent decrease in number of death receptors. On the basis of these results, we suggest further consideration of the use of autophagy activators such as EGCG in combination anti-tumor therapy with TRAIL. PMID:27582540

  12. Neuromodulatory propensity of Bacopa monniera against scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells via down-regulation of AChE and up-regulation of BDNF and muscarnic-1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T

    2013-10-01

    Scopolamine is a competitive antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and thus classified as an anti-muscarinic and anti-cholinergic drug. PC12 cell lines possess muscarinic receptors and mimic the neuronal cells. These cells were treated with different concentrations of scopolamine for 24 h and were protected from the cellular damage by pretreatment with Bacopa monniera extract (BME). In current study, we have explored the molecular mechanism of neuromodulatory and antioxidant propensity of (BME) to attenuate scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity using PC12 cells. Our results elucidate that pretreatment of PC12 cells with BME ameliorates the mitochondrial and plasma membrane damage induced by 3 μg/ml scopolamine to 54.83 and 30.30 % as evidenced by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays respectively. BME (100 μg/ml) ameliorated scopolamine effect by down-regulating acetylcholine esterase and up-regulating brain-derived neurotropic factor and muscarinic muscarinic-1 receptor expression. BME pretreated cells also showed significant protection against scopolamine-induced toxicity by restoring the levels of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation. This result indicates that the scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity and neuromodulatory changes were restored with the pretreatment of BME.

  13. Dietary bitter melon seed increases peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ gene expression in adipose tissue, down-regulates the nuclear factor-κB expression, and alleviates the symptoms associated with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gadang, Vidya; Gilbert, William; Hettiararchchy, Navam; Horax, Ronny; Katwa, Laxmansa; Devareddy, Latha

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which bitter melon seed (BMS) alleviates the symptoms associated with metabolic syndrome and elucidate the mechanism by which BMS exerts beneficial effects. Three-month-old female Zucker rats were assigned to following groups: lean control (L-Ctrl), obese control (O-Ctrl), and obese + BMS (O-BMS). The control groups were fed AIN-93M purified rodent diet, and the O-BMS group was fed AIN-93M diet modified to contain 3.0% (wt/wt) ground BMS for 100 days. After 100 days of treatment, BMS supplementation in the obese rats lowered the total serum cholesterol by 38% and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels by about 52% and increased the ratio of serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol to total cholesterol compared to the O-Ctrl group. The percentage of total liver lipids was about 32% lower and serum triglyceride levels were 71% higher in the O-BMS group compared to the O-Ctrl group. Serum glucose levels were significantly lowered partly because of the increase in the serum insulin levels in the BMS-based diet groups. BMS supplementation increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) in the white adipose tissue of the obese rats significantly (P < .05) and down-regulated the expression of PPAR-γ, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and interferon-γ mRNA in heart tissue of the obese rats. The findings of this study suggest that BMS improves the serum and liver lipid profiles and serum glucose levels by modulating PPAR-γ gene expression. To our knowledge, this study for the first time shows that BMS exerts cardioprotective effects by down-regulating the NF-κB inflammatory pathway.

  14. Effects of glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU486, on the proliferative and differentiation capabilities of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Na; Yu, Yang; Schmidt, Thomas; Stanford, Clark; Hong, Liu

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) potentially regulate the proliferation, differentiation, and premature senescence of bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). In the present study we investigated the effects mediated by endogenous GCs and the effects of an antagonist of the glucocorticoid receptor, RU486, on the proliferative and differentiation capabilities of MSCs using an ovariectomized (OVX) animal model. Following ovariectomy and a decrease in systemic estradiol levels, the serum concentration of corticosterone is significantly increased in OVX rats. Compared to sham-operated controls, the total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in serum of OVX rats and the proliferation of their MSCs are significantly reduced. Furthermore, the osteogenic differentiation capabilities of OVX rat MSCs are significantly decreased, while adipogenic capabilities tend to increase. Subcutaneous administration of RU486 effectively increases the population and proliferative capacity of the MSCs in OVX rats. RU486 treatment also improves osteogenic capabilities and down-regulates adipogenic capabilities of MSCs. These results strongly indicate that the elevated levels of endogenous GCs induced by estrogen depletion might accelerate the premature senescence of MSCs and reduce their proliferative and osteogenic differentiation capabilities, while the blockage of the effects of endogenous GCs may restore their capabilities. These responses could potentially be developed to protect the capabilities of MSCs from oxidative stress-induced premature senescence and extend their lifespan in patients with advancing age and estrogen depletion.

  15. Down-regulation of G protein-coupled receptor 137 by RNA interference inhibits cell growth of two hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xin; Liu, Yong; Huang, Hai; Zhuang, Linyuan; Luo, Tianping; Huang, Huping; Ge, Xinguo

    2015-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important signal transduction mediators and pharmacological therapeutic targets. G protein-coupled receptor 137 (GPR137) was initially reported as a novel orphan GPCR around 10 years ago. Some orphan GPCRs have been implicated in cancer cell proliferation and migration. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of GPR137 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). GPR137 is widely expressed in several human HCC cell lines, as determined by real-time PCR. We then applied lentivirus mediated RNA interference (RNAi) to knock down GPR137 expression in two HCC cell lines HepG2 and Bel7404. Depletion of GPR137 remarkably inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation capacity. Knockdown of GPR137 in HepG2 cells led to cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and G2/M phase, and induced cell apoptosis, as determined by flow cytometry analysis, which contributed to cell growth inhibition. Our findings suggested that GPR137 could facilitate HCC cell proliferation and thus promote hepatocarcinogenesis.

  16. Human receptor kinetics and lung tissue retention of the enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid fluticasone furoate

    PubMed Central

    Valotis, Anagnostis; Högger, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Fluticasone furoate (FF) – USAN approved name, a new topically active glucocorticoid has been recently identified. The aim of this study was to characterise the binding affinity of this compound to the human lung glucocorticoid receptor in relation to other glucocorticoids. Additionally, we sought to determine the binding behaviour of fluticasone furoate to human lung tissue. The glucocorticoid receptor binding kinetics of fluticasone furoate revealed a remarkably fast association and a slow dissociation resulting in a relative receptor affinity (RRA) of 2989 ± 135 with reference to dexamethasone (RRA: 100 ± 5). Thus, the RRA of FF exceeds the RRAs of all currently clinically used corticosteroids such as mometasone furoate (MF; RRA 2244), fluticasone propionate (FP; RRA 1775), ciclesonide's active metabolite (RRA 1212 – rat receptor data) or budesonide (RRA 855). FP and FF displayed pronounced retention in human lung tissue in vitro. Lowest tissue binding was found for MF. There was no indication of instability or chemical modification of FF in human lung tissue. These advantageous binding attributes may contribute to a highly efficacious profile for FF as a topical treatment for inflammatory disorders of the respiratory tract. PMID:17650349

  17. More than meets the dimer: What is the quaternary structure of the glucocorticoid receptor?

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Gordon L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is widely accepted that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a ligand-regulated transcription factor that triggers anti-inflammatory responses, binds specific response elements as a homodimer. Here, we will discuss the original primary data that established this model and contrast it with a recent report characterizing the GR–DNA complex as a tetramer. PMID:27764575

  18. Methylation of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Promoter in Preschoolers: Links with Internalizing Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parade, Stephanie H.; Ridout, Kathryn K.; Seifer, Ronald; Armstrong, David A.; Marsit, Carmen J.; McWilliams, Melissa A.; Tyrka, Audrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that early adversity is linked to methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene, "NR3C1," which is a key regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Yet no prior work has considered the contribution of methylation of "NR3C1" to emerging behavior problems and psychopathology in…

  19. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR REGULATION IN THE RAT EMBRYO: A POTENTIAL SITE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat embryo: a potential site for developmental toxicity?

    Ghosh B, Wood CR, Held GA, Abbott BD, Lau C.

    National Research Council, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, USA.

  20. BDE-47 causes developmental retardation with down-regulated expression profiles of ecdysteroid signaling pathway-involved nuclear receptor (NR) genes in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dae-Sik; Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji; Kim, Duck-Hyun; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Hwang, Un-Ki; Zhou, Bingsheng; Choe, Joonho; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2016-08-01

    2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is a persistent organic pollutant (POP) in marine environments. Despite its adverse effects (e.g. developmental retardation) in ecdysozoa, the effects of BDE-47 on transcription of ecdysteroid signaling pathway-involved-nuclear receptor (NR) genes and metamorphosis-related genes have not been examined in copepods. To examine the deleterious effect of BDE-47 on copepod molting and metamorphosis, BDE-47 was exposed to the harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus japonicus, followed by monitoring developmental retardation and transcriptional alteration of NR genes. The developmental rate was significantly inhibited (P<0.05) in response to BDE-47 and the agricultural insecticide gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane. Conversely, the ecdysteroid agonist ponasterone A (PoA) led to decreased molting and metamorphosis time (P<0.05) from the nauplius stage to the adult stage. In particular, expression profiles of all NR genes were the highest at naupliar stages 5-6 except for SVP, FTZ-F1, and HR96 genes. Nuclear receptor USP, HR96, and FTZ-F1 genes also showed significant sex differences (P<0.05) in gene expression levels over different developmental stages, indicating that these genes may be involved in vitellogenesis. NR gene expression patterns showed significant decreases (P<0.05) in response to BDE-47 exposure, implying that molting and metamorphosis retardation is likely associated with NR gene expression. In summary, BDE-47 leads to molting and metamorphosis retardation and suppresses transcription of NR genes. This information will be helpful in understanding the molting and metamorphosis delay mechanism in response to BDE-47 exposure.

  1. MicroRNA 339 down-regulates μ-opioid receptor at the post-transcriptional level in response to opioid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qifang; Hwang, Cheol Kyu; Zheng, Hui; Wagley, Yadav; Lin, Hong-Yiou; Kim, Do Kyung; Law, Ping-Yee; Loh, Horace H.; Wei, Li-Na

    2013-01-01

    μ-Opioid receptor (MOR) level is directly related to the function of opioid drugs, such as morphine and fentanyl. Although agonist treatment generally does not affect transcription of mor, previous studies suggest that morphine can affect the translation efficiency of MOR transcript via microRNAs (miRNAs). On the basis of miRNA microarray analyses of the hippocampal total RNA isolated from mice chronically treated with μ-opioid agonists, we found a miRNA (miR-339-3p) that was consistently and specifically increased by morphine (2-fold) and by fentanyl (3.8-fold). miR-339-3p bound to the MOR 3′-UTR and specifically suppressed reporter activity. Suppression was blunted by adding miR-339-3p inhibitor or mutating the miR-339-3p target site. In cells endogenously expressing MOR, miR-339-3p inhibited the production of MOR protein by destabilizing MOR mRNA. Up-regulation of miR-339-3p by fentanyl (EC50=0.75 nM) resulted from an increase in primary miRNA transcript. Mapping of the miR-339-3p primary RNA and its promoter revealed that the primary miR-339-3p was embedded in a noncoding 3′-UTR region of an unknown host gene and was coregulated by the host promoter. The identified promoter was activated by opioid agonist treatment (10 nM fentanyl or 10 μM morphine), a specific effect blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone (10 μM). Taken together, these results suggest that miR-339-3p may serve as a negative feedback modulator of MOR signals by regulating intracellular MOR biosynthesis.—Wu, Q., Hwang, C. K., Zheng, H., Wagley, Y., Lin, H.-Y., Kim, D. K., Law, P.-Y., Loh, H. H., Wei, L.-N. MicroRNA 339 downregulates mu opioid receptor at the post-transcriptional level in response to opioid treatment. PMID:23085997

  2. Angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4, fasting-induced adipose factor) is a direct glucocorticoid receptor target and participates in glucocorticoid-regulated triglyceride metabolism.

    PubMed

    Koliwad, Suneil K; Kuo, Taiyi; Shipp, Lauren E; Gray, Nora E; Backhed, Fredrik; So, Alex Yick-Lun; Farese, Robert V; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2009-09-18

    Glucocorticoids are important regulators of lipid homeostasis, and chronically elevated glucocorticoid levels induce hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, and visceral obesity. The occupied glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a transcription factor. However, those genes regulating lipid metabolism under GR control are not fully known. Angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4, fasting-induced adipose factor), a protein inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase, is synthesized and secreted during fasting, when circulating glucocorticoid levels are physiologically increased. We therefore tested whether the ANGPTL4 gene (Angptl4) is transcriptionally controlled by GR. We show that treatment with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone increased Angptl4 mRNA levels in primary hepatocytes and adipocytes (2-3-fold) and in the livers and white adipose tissue of mice (approximately 4-fold). We tested the mechanism of this increase in H4IIE hepatoma cells and found that dexamethasone treatment increased the transcriptional rate of Angptl4. Using bioinformatics and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified a GR binding site within the rat Angptl4 sequence. A reporter plasmid containing this site was markedly activated by dexamethasone, indicative of a functional glucocorticoid response element. Dexamethasone treatment also increased histone H4 acetylation and DNase I accessibility in genomic regions near this site, further supporting that it is a glucocorticoid response element. Glucocorticoids promote the flux of triglycerides from white adipose tissue to liver. We found that mice lacking ANGPTL4 (Angptl4(-/-)) had reductions in dexamethasone-induced hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis, suggesting that ANGPTL4 is required for this flux. Overall, we establish that ANGPTL4 is a direct GR target that participates in glucocorticoid-regulated triglyceride metabolism.

  3. Distal-less homeobox 5 inhibits adipogenic differentiation through the down-regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Lim; Woo, Kyung Mi; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo; Baek, Jeong-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Distal-less homeobox 5 (Dlx5) is a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation that contains a homeobox domain. Because there are possible reciprocal relationships between osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), we examined the regulatory role of Dlx5 in adipogenic differentiation in this study. Adipogenic stimuli suppressed the expression levels of Dlx5 mRNA in mouse bone marrow stromal cells. Over-expression of Dlx5 inhibited adipogenic differentiation in human bone marrow MSCs and 3T3-L1 preadipocytic cells whereas knockdown of Dlx5 enhanced adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. Over-expression of Dlx5 suppressed the expression of adipogenic marker genes, including CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Dlx5-mediated suppression of adipogenic differentiation was overcome by over-expression of PPARγ but not by that of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) or C/EBPα. Dlx5 decreased the transcriptional activity of CREB and C/EBPα in a dose-dependent manner. Dlx5 directly bound to CREB and C/EBPα and prevented them from binding to and subsequently transactivating the PPARγ promoter. These results suggest that Dlx5 plays an important regulatory role in fate determination of bone marrow MSCs toward the osteoblast lineage through the inhibition of adipocyte differentiation as well as the direct stimulation of osteoblast differentiation.

  4. [Efficacy and Safety of the Selective Estrogen Receptor Down-Regulator "Fulvestrant" in Japanese Patients with Advanced, Recurrent, ER-Positive Postmenopausal Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Egawa, Chiyomi; Okishiro, Masatsugu; Takatsuka, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    Fulvestrant is a novel endocrine therapy for breast cancer that exerts both anti-estrogenic and down-regulatory effects by binding to and degrading estrogen receptors (ERs). In the present study, the safety and effectiveness of 500 mg fulvestrant in 69 patients with advanced, recurrent, ER-positive postmenopausal breast cancer were investigated retrospectively. Outcomes were favorable for fulvestrant. The objective response rate was 24.6%, the clinical benefit rate was 49.2%, the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 203 days, and the median overall survival was 794 days. PFS tended to be longer in patients without a history of previous treatment or visceral metastasis. The main adverse events included injection site reactions and hot flushes; however, the majority of these events were mild to moderate. The present findings suggest that, among Japanese patients with advanced, recurrent, ER-positive postmenopausal breast cancer, 500 mg fulvestrant is effective and safe in those without metastasis and a minimal history of receipt of previous treatment regimens.

  5. Covalent affinity labeling, radioautography, and immunocytochemistry localize the glucocorticoid receptor in rat testicular Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1989-12-01

    The presence and distribution of glucocorticoid receptors in the rat testis were examined by using 2 approaches: in vivo quantitative radioautography and immunocytochemistry. Radioautographic localization was made possible through the availability of a glucocorticoid receptor affinity label, dexamethasone 21-mesylate, which binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor, thereby preventing dissociation of the steroid-receptor complex. Adrenalectomized adult rats were injected with a tritiated (3H) form of this steroid into the testis and the tissue was processed for light-microscope radioautography. Silver grains were observed primarily over the Leydig cells of the interstitial space and to a lesser extent, over the cellular layers which make up the seminiferous epithelium, with no one cell type showing preferential labeling. To determine the specificity of the labeling, a 25- or 50-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone was injected simultaneously with the same dose of (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate. In these control experiments, a marked reduction in label intensity was noted over the Leydig as well as tubular cells. Endocytic macrophages of the interstitium were non-specifically labeled, indicating uptake of the ligand possibly by fluid-phase endocytosis. A quantitative analysis of the label confirmed the presence of statistically significant numbers of specific binding sites for glucocorticoids in both Leydig cells and the cellular layers of the seminiferous epithelium; 86% of the label was found over Leydig cells, and only 14% over the cells of the seminiferous epithelium. These binding data were confirmed by light-microscope immunocytochemistry using a monoclonal antibody to the glucocorticoid receptor.

  6. Receptor mutation is not a common mechanism of naturally occurring glucocorticoid resistance in leukaemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Beesley, Alex H; Weller, Renae E; Senanayake, Saranga; Welch, Mathew; Kees, Ursula R

    2009-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are among the most important drugs for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Cell lines cultured in high GC concentrations typically contain mutated glucocorticoid receptor (GR), something that is rarely found in primary ALL specimens. We studied naturally occurring mechanisms of GC resistance and examined sensitivity to GC in 15 T-ALL cell lines grown without prior exposure to drugs. Resistance could not be attributed to mutations in GR or variations in levels of its expression. We conclude that this panel of cell lines provides a suitable in vitro model since it reflects GC resistance in primary ALL.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of glucocorticoid receptor-binding sites in myotubes identifies gene networks modulating insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Taiyi; Lew, Michelle J; Mayba, Oleg; Harris, Charles A; Speed, Terence P; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2012-07-10

    Glucocorticoids elicit a variety of biological responses in skeletal muscle, including inhibiting protein synthesis and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and promoting proteolysis. Thus, excess or chronic glucocorticoid exposure leads to muscle atrophy and insulin resistance. Glucocorticoids propagate their signal mainly through glucocorticoid receptors (GR), which, upon binding to ligands, translocate to the nucleus and bind to genomic glucocorticoid response elements to regulate the transcription of nearby genes. Using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and microarray analysis, we identified 173 genes in mouse C2C12 myotubes. The mouse genome contains GR-binding regions in or near these genes, and gene expression is regulated by glucocorticoids. Eight of these genes encode proteins known to regulate distinct signaling events in insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 pathways. We found that overexpression of p85α, one of these eight genes, caused a decrease in C2C12 myotube diameters, mimicking the effect of glucocorticoids. Moreover, reducing p85α expression by RNA interference in C2C12 myotubes significantly compromised the ability of glucocorticoids to inhibit Akt and p70 S6 kinase activity and reduced glucocorticoid induction of insulin receptor substrate 1 phosphorylation at serine 307. This phosphorylation is associated with insulin resistance. Furthermore, decreasing p85α expression abolished glucocorticoid inhibition of protein synthesis and compromised glucocorticoid-induced reduction of cell diameters in C2C12 myotubes. Finally, a glucocorticoid response element was identified in the p85α GR-binding regions. In summary, our studies identified GR-regulated transcriptional networks in myotubes and showed that p85α plays a critical role in glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance and muscle atrophy in C2C12 myotubes.

  8. Down-regulation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in peripheral cells from idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus patients.

    PubMed

    Casati, Martina; Arosio, Beatrice; Gussago, Cristina; Ferri, Evelyn; Magni, Lorenzo; Assolari, Lara; Scortichini, Valeria; Nani, Carolina; Rossi, Paolo Dionigi; Mari, Daniela

    2016-02-15

    Idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a neurological disease that usually develops in the elderly. Natural history of iNPH is still unknown. It has been hypothesized that cerebrovascular diseases could have a role in etiology of chronic hydrocephalus and studies show an increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in iNPH patients. Moreover, evidences show a possible alteration of immune system in iNPH patients. Adenosine (Ado) is a metabolite produced in response to metabolic stress and injury. Adenosine and its receptors play an important role in vascular protection and in the modulation of inflammatory reactions and neuroinflammation. Our aim is to evaluate gene and protein expression of A1R and A2AR in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from iNPH patients compared to control subjects. We investigate if Ado system, that plays an important role in central nervous system, in vascular system, and also in inflammation, is involved in pathophysiology of iNPH disease. Our analysis showed that A1R mRNA levels and A1R density in PBMCs from iNPH patients were significantly lower than CT subjects (0.84 ± 0.12 and 2.42 ± 0.42, p<0.001 and 0.31 ± 0.02 and 0.42 ± 0.04, p=0.043; respectively). About A2AR, the gene expression in PBMCs was significantly lower in iNPH than CT (0.65 ± 0.09 and 1.5 ± 0.14, p<0.001) as well as there was a trend in protein expression: iNPH and CT (0.51 ± 0.05 and 0.62 ± 0.03; p=0.172). This preliminary study underlines the involvement of Ado system in iNPH disease whose pathophysiology is still unclear.

  9. Transformation of glucocorticoid receptors bound to the antagonist RU 486: Effects of alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Gruol, D.J.; Wolfe, K.A. )

    1990-08-28

    RU 486 is a synthetic steroid that binds avidly to glucocorticoid receptors without promoting their transformation into activated transcription factors. A significant part of this behavior has been shown to be due to a failure of the RU 486 bound receptor to be efficiently released from a larger (sedimenting at 8-9 S) multimeric complex containing the 90-kDa heat shock protein. The studies have found that in vitro at 15{degree}C the RU 486-receptor was slowly released from the 8-9S complex and converted into a DNA binding protein by a process that could be blocked by sodium fluoride. Moreover, this transition was significantly accelerated by treatment with alkaline phosphatase. High-resolution anion-exchange chromatography showed that the profile of receptor subspecies released from the 8-9S complex was different for the RU 486 bound receptor when compared to the receptor occupied by the agonist triamcinolone acetonide. Production of the earliest eluting receptor form (peak A) was inhibited with RU 486. Treatment of the Ru 486-receptor with alkaline phosphatase increased the formation of the peak A subspecies as well as the capacity of receptor to bind DNA-cellulose. Taken together, the results indicate that phosphorylation of the receptor or a tightly bound factor contributes to defining the capacity with which individual steroids can promote dissociation of the 8-9S complex and conversion of the glucocorticoid receptor into a DNA-binding protein.

  10. Folding and stability of the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Jackson, Sophie E.

    2002-01-01

    A complex pathway involving many molecular chaperones has been proposed for the folding, assembly, and maintenance of a high-affinity ligand-binding form of steroid receptors in vivo, including the glucocorticoid receptor. To better understand this intricate folding and assembly process, we studied the folding of the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor in vitro. We found that this domain can be refolded into a compact, highly structured state in vitro in the absence of chaperones. However, the presence of zwitterionic detergent is required to maintain the domain in a soluble form. In this state, the protein is dimeric and has considerable helical structure as shown by far-UV circular dichroism. Further investigation of the properties of this in vitro refolded state show that it is stable and resistant to denaturation by heat or low concentrations of chemical denaturants. A detailed analysis of the unfolding equilibria using three different structural probes demonstrated that this state unfolds via a highly populated dimeric intermediate state. Together, these data clearly show that the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor does not require chaperones for folding per se. However, this in vitro refolded state binds the ligand dexamethasone only weakly (Kd = 45 μM) compared to the in vivo assembled receptor (Kd = 3.4 nM). We suggest that the role of Hsp90 and associated chaperones is to bind to, and stabilize, a specific conformational state of the receptor which binds ligand with high affinity. PMID:12142447

  11. Effects of Maternal Dexamethasone Treatment Early in Pregnancy on Glucocorticoid Receptors in the Ovine Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Shang, H.; Meng, W.; Sloboda, D. M.; Li, S.; Ehrlich, L.; Plagemann, A.; Dudenhausen, J. W.; Henrich, W.; Newnham, J. P.; Challis, J. R. G.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of endogenous cortisol on binucleate cells (BNCs), which promote fetal growth, may be mediated by glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), and exposure to dexamethasone (DEX) in early pregnancy stages of placental development might modify this response. In this article, we have investigated the expression of GR as a determinant of these responses. Pregnant ewes carrying singleton fetuses (n = 119) were randomized to control (2 mL saline/ewe) or DEX-treated groups (intramuscular injections of 0.14 mg/kg ewe weight per 12 hours) at 40 to 41 days of gestation (dG). Placental tissue was collected at 50, 100, 125, and 140 dG. Total glucocorticoid receptor protein (GRt) was increased significantly by DEX at 50 and 125 dG in females only, but decreased in males at 125 dG as compared to controls. Glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) protein was not changed after DEX treatment. Three BNC phenotypes were detected regarding GRα expression (++, +−, −−), DEX increased the proportion of (++) and decreased (−−) BNC at 140 dG. Effects were sex- and cell type dependent, modifying the responsiveness of the placenta to endogenous cortisol. We speculate that 3 maturational stages of BNCs exist and that the overall activity of BNCs is determined by the distribution of these 3 cell types, which may become altered through early pregnancy exposure to elevated glucocorticoids. PMID:25332218

  12. Down-regulation of intestinal scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) expression in rodents under conditions of deficient bile delivery to the intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Voshol, P J; Schwarz, M; Rigotti, A; Krieger, M; Groen, A K; Kuipers, F

    2001-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) is expressed in the intestines of rodents and has been suggested to be involved in the absorption of dietary cholesterol. The aim of this study was to determine whether intestinal SR-BI expression is affected in animal models with altered bile delivery to the intestine and impaired cholesterol absorption. SR-BI protein and mRNA levels were determined in proximal and distal small intestine from control, bile-duct-ligated and bile-diverted rats and from control and bile-duct-ligated mice. Two genetically altered mouse models were studied: multidrug resistance-2 P-glycoprotein-deficient [Mdr2((-/-))] mice that produce phospholipid/cholesterol-free bile, and cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase-deficient [Cyp7a((-/-))] mice, which exhibit qualitative and quantitative changes in the bile-salt pool. Cholesterol-absorption efficiency was quantified using a dual-isotope ratio method. SR-BI was present at the apical membrane of enterocytes in control rats and mice and was more abundant in proximal than in distal segments of the intestine. In bile-duct-ligated animals, levels of SR-BI protein were virtually absent and mRNA levels were decreased by approximately 50%. Bile-diverted rats, Mdr2((-/-)) mice and Cyp7a((-/-)) mice showed decreased levels of intestinal SR-BI protein while mRNA levels were unaffected. Cholesterol absorption was reduced by >90% in bile-duct-ligated and bile-diverted animals and in Cyp7a((-/-)) mice, whereas Mdr2((-/-)) mice showed an approximately 50% reduction. This study shows that SR-BI is expressed at the apical membrane of enterocytes of rats and mice, mainly in the upper intestine where cholesterol absorption is greatest, and indicates that bile components play a role in post-transcriptional regulation of SR-BI expression. Factors associated with cholestasis appear to be involved in transcriptional control of intestinal SR-BI expression. The role of SR-BI in the cholesterol-absorption process remains to be

  13. Glucocorticoid receptor monoclonal antibodies define the biological action of RU 38486 in intact B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lindemeyer, R G; Robertson, N M; Litwack, G

    1990-12-15

    The mechanism of action of the synthetic glucocorticoid antagonist, RU 38486, has yet to be completely elucidated. Although RU 38486 is a potent antiglucocorticoid in vivo, several studies have indicated that it has some agonist activities in vitro, such as high-affinity steroid binding to the receptor, activation, and DNA binding. Nevertheless, these in vitro postbinding events do not lead to any known gene expression. To understand the action of the glucocorticoid antagonist RU 38486, we studied glucocorticoid receptor localization on a mouse melanoma cell line (B16C3) by indirect immunofluorescent staining techniques, using monoclonal antibodies to the glucocorticoid receptor. Our data in intact cells suggest that, unlike glucocorticoid agonists such as triamcinolone acetonide, and similar to the glucocorticoid antagonist cortexolone, RU 38486-bound receptors do not translocate to the nucleus and hence do not allow for transcription of glucocorticoid-regulated genes to occur. Passage through the nuclear membrane may be a rate-limiting step in the action of glucocorticoid antagonists, and translocation may in itself be an important regulatory mechanism of steroid hormone action.

  14. Ferulic acid attenuated acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity though down-regulating the cytochrome P 2E1 and inhibiting toll-like receptor 4 signaling-mediated inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Junhui; Ge, Kuang; Mu, Junhuan; Rong, Jiang; Zhang, Li; Wang, Bin; Wan, Jingyuan; Xia, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic acid which is abundant in vegetables and fruits, has been reported to exert anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, the pharmacological effects and the underlying mechanisms of FA in mice with acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity were investigated. Our results revealed that FA pretreatment inhibited the augments of serum aminotransferases in a dose-dependent manner and attenuated the hepatic histopathological abnormalities and hepatocellular apoptosis in acetaminophen (APAP) exposed mice. Moreover, FA inhibited the expression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) as well as the contents of glutathione (GSH). Furthermore, FA markedly attenuated acetaminophen-induced serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β production, suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 expression and dampened p38 mitogen-activated (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activation. These data suggested that FA could effectively protect against APAP-induced liver injury by down-regulated expression of CYP 2E1 and the suppression of TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses. PMID:27830004

  15. Down-Regulation of Ca(2+)-Activated K⁺ Channel KCa1.1 in Human Breast Cancer MDA-MB-453 Cells Treated with Vitamin D Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Anowara; Fujimoto, Mayu; Kito, Hiroaki; Niwa, Satomi; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Ohya, Susumu

    2016-12-11

    Vitamin D (VD) reduces the risk of breast cancer and improves disease prognoses. Potential VD analogs are being developed as therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatments. The large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K⁺ channel KCa1.1 regulates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling pathways and is associated with high grade tumors and poor prognoses. In the present study, we examined the effects of treatments with VD receptor (VDR) agonists on the expression and activity of KCa1.1 in human breast cancer MDA-MB-453 cells using real-time PCR, Western blotting, flow cytometry, and voltage-sensitive dye imaging. Treatments with VDR agonists for 72 h markedly decreased the expression levels of KCa1.1 transcripts and proteins in MDA-MB-453 cells, resulting in the significant inhibition of depolarization responses induced by paxilline, a specific KCa1.1 blocker. The specific proteasome inhibitor MG132 suppressed VDR agonist-induced decreases in KCa1.1 protein expression. These results suggest that KCa1.1 is a new downstream target of VDR signaling and the down-regulation of KCa1.1 through the transcriptional repression of KCa1.1 and enhancement of KCa1.1 protein degradation contribute, at least partly, to the antiproliferative effects of VDR agonists in breast cancer cells.

  16. Mitogenicity and down-regulation of high-affinity interleukin 2 receptor by YTA-1 and YTA-2, monoclonal antibodies that recognize 75-kDa molecules on human large granular lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Y; Inamoto, T; Sugie, K; Masutani, H; Shindo, T; Tagaya, Y; Yamauchi, A; Ozawa, K; Yodoi, J

    1989-01-01

    A large number of interleukin 2 receptors lacking the Tac epitope (IL-2R/p75) were found to be constitutively expressed on the human large granular lymphocyte/natural killer cell line YT, which bears inducible IL-2R/p55 associated with Tac antigen. Two anti-YT IgG1 monoclonal antibodies, YTA-1 and YTA-2, recognizing different epitopes of the same 75- to 80-kDa molecule, were established. The 75-kDa antigen recognized by these monoclonal antibodies was strongly expressed on the large granular lymphocytes of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells and on various lymphoid cell lines bearing IL-2R/p75. The YTA-1 and YTA-2 antibodies were mitogenic and were different from other mitogenic monoclonal antibodies such as anti-T3 (CD3), anti-T11 (CD2), and KOLT-2 (CD28). Further, they down-regulated the high-affinity IL-2R of peripheral blood mononuclear cells within 24 hr in culture. The relationship between the YTA-1/2 antigen and the IL-2R system is discussed. Images PMID:2465549

  17. The down-regulation of IL-6-stimulated fibrinogen steady state mRNA and protein levels by human recombinant IL-1 is not PGE2-dependent: effects of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA).

    PubMed

    Conti, P; Bartle, L; Barbacane, R C; Reale, M; Sipe, J D

    1995-01-26

    Infections, trauma and inflammatory processes induce a host response with increases in a large group of structurally and functionally diverse plasma proteins. Parental administration of foreign proteins also induce an increase in plasma fibrinogen. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a monocyte-derived mediator and has regulatory effects on acute phase protein genes which result in the induction of fibrinogen synthesis in primary hepatocytes, while the addition of interleukin-1 (IL-1) exerts a negative modulating influence on the IL-6-stimulated fibrinogen. In order to understand the mechanisms by which IL-1 inhibits IL-6-stimulated fibrinogen transcription and translation, and since IL-1 is believed to act through PGE2 stimulation, we have studied the influence of PGE2 in IL-6 or IL-1, alone and in combination, on Fg mRNA expression (by Northern blot analysis) and the influence of PGE2, indomethacin, and arachidonic acid on Fg secretion. Moreover, since human recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (hrIL-1ra) is a strong inhibitor of IL-1 induced IL-1 transcription and translation and has an inhibitory effect on PGE2, we have studied the effects of IL-1ra on the down-regulation of IL-6 stimulated fibrinogen by IL-1, using an Fg ELISA method.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Oxandrolone blocks glucocorticoid signaling in an androgen receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Bauman, William A; Huang, Ruojun; Caplan, Avrom J; Cardozo, Christopher

    2004-05-01

    The anabolic steroid oxandrolone is increasingly used to preserve or restore muscle mass in those with HIV infection or serious burns. These effects are mediated, in part, by the androgen receptor (AR). Anti-glucocorticoid effects have also been reported for some anabolic steroids, and the goal of our studies was to determine whether oxandrolone had a similar mechanism of action. Studies with in vitro translated glucocorticoid receptor (GR), however, showed no inhibition of cortisol binding by oxandrolone. Conversely, experiments in cell culture systems demonstrated significant antagonism of cortisol-induced transcriptional activation by oxandrolone in cells expressing both the AR and GR. Inhibition was not overcome by increased cortisol concentration, and no inhibition by oxandrolone was observed in cells expressing GR alone, confirming that non-competitive mechanisms were involved. AR-dependent repression of transcriptional activation by oxandrolone was also observed with the synthetic glucocorticoids dexamethasone and methylprednisolone. Furthermore, the AR antagonists 2-hydroxyflutamide and DDE also repressed GR transactivation in an AR-dependent manner. A mutant AR lacking a functional nuclear localization signal (AR(4RKM)) was active in oxandrolone-mediated repression of GR even though oxandrolone-bound AR(4RKM) failed to enter the nucleus and did not affect nuclear import of GR. These data indicate a novel action of oxandrolone to suppress glucocorticoid action via crosstalk between AR and GR.

  19. A glucocorticoid receptor in fetal mouse: its relationship to cleft palate formation.

    PubMed

    Hackney, J F

    1980-02-01

    Fetal mouse tissue was investigated for a glucocorticoid binding receptor which might be responsible for cleft palate formation. Fetal mouse heads contain a soluble component which binds the glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide in vitro with high affinity. This binding component is present in small finite amounts. Other glucocorticoids compete with triamcinolone acetonide for the binding site in a manner consistent with their potency ranking as cleft palate teratogens. Several mineralocorticoids and progestins also compete when administered in vitro but not when administered in vivo. Triamcinolone acetonide binding was determined in three mouse strains, A/J, C3H, and C57BL, which are listed in decreasing order of cleft palate susceptibility to cortisone. No positive correlation was found between cortisone cleft palate susceptibility and either triamcinolone acetonide binding affinity or binding amount in fetuses from these strains. Cleft palate dose response curves for triamcinolone acetonide were determined in these strains, but they were not parallel to each other as they were for cortisone. This suggests that triamcinolone acetonide may cause cleft palate by different mechanisms in these strains. Thus, fetal mouse tissue contains an apparent glucocorticoid receptors, but its relationship to cleft palate formation in mice is not clear.

  20. Single point estimation of glucocorticoid receptors in lymphocytes of normal subjects and of children under long term glucocorticoid treatment.

    PubMed

    Lapcík, P; Hampl, R; Bicíková, M

    1992-03-01

    A single point assay of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in human lymphocytes based on the measurement of specific dexamethasone binding has been developed and compared with a common multi-point Scatchard analysis. The assay conditions-concentration of the ligand 20 nmol/l, incubation time 2 h and the cell count 2-6 mil. cells/tube in the assay volume 0.25 ml were found to be optimal. An attempt was also undertaken to use a cell harvester for the separation of cells from unbound ligand. Though specifically bound dexamethasone measured by whole-cell assay and that using cell harvester correlated well, almost by one order lower values obtained with the latter method render it non-applicable for receptor quantitation. The results from 9 healthy volunteers (average GR concentration 7131 +/- 1256 sites/cell) correlated excellently with those obtained by the Scatchard analysis. The single point assay has been also applied for determination of GH in 10 children treated with large doses of prednisone. The average values from healthy volunteers did not differ significantly from those found in these children, though much broader range was found in patients.

  1. Modulation of central glucocorticoid receptors in short- and long-term experimental hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulou, Elena; Mytilinaios, Dimitrios; Calogero, Aldo E; Kamilaris, Themis C; Troupis, Theodore; Chrousos, George P; Johnson, Elizabeth O

    2015-08-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with a significant increase in circulating glucocorticoid levels and hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The aim of this study was to examine whether the HPA axis hyperactivity observed in hyperthyroidism may be explained by a disturbed feedback inhibition of endogenous glucocorticoids through two specific intracellular receptors in the brain: the high affinity mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the lower affinity glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Cytosolic receptor binding and gene expression was assessed in rats with short (7 days) and long standing (60 days) eu- and hyperthyroidism. Glucocorticoid receptor number and binding affinity (Kd) in the hippocampus were measured using [(3)H2]-dexamethasone radioreceptor assay. In situ hybridization was employed to examine the effects of hyperthyroidism on the GR and MR mRNA levels in the hippocampus and the pituitary. Both short- and long-term hyperthyroid rats showed pronounced reduction in the concentration of cytosolic GR in the hippocampus, without changes in binding affinity or changes in GR expression. In contrast, GR mRNA in the pituitary increased after 7 days and decreased after 60 days of thyroxin treatment. MR mRNA was moderately affected. Hyperthyroidism is associated with significant decreases in hippocampal GR levels supporting the hypothesis that hyperactivity of the HPA axis observed in experimentally induced hyperthyroidism may be attributed, at least in part, to decreased negative feedback at the level of the hippocampus. These findings further support the notion that a central locus is principally responsible for the hyperactivity of the HPA axis observed in hyperthyroidism.

  2. Role of the hinge region of glucocorticoid receptor for HEXIM1-mediated transcriptional repression

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Noritada; Shimizu, Noriaki; Sano, Motoaki; Ohnuma, Kei; Iwata, Satoshi; Hosono, Osamu; Fukuda, Keiichi; Morimoto, Chikao

    2008-06-20

    We previously reported that HEXIM1 (hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein 1), which suppresses transcription elongation via sequestration of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) using 7SK RNA as a scaffold, directly associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to suppress glucocorticoid-inducible gene activation. Here, we revealed that the hinge region of GR is essential for its interaction with HEXIM1, and that oxosteroid receptors including GR show sequence homology in their hinge region and interact with HEXIM1, whereas the other members of nuclear receptors do not. We also showed that HEXIM1 suppresses GR-mediated transcription in two ways: sequestration of P-TEFb by HEXIM1 and direct interaction between GR and HEXIM1. In contrast, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}-dependent gene expression is negatively modulated by HEXIM1 solely via sequestration of P-TEFb. We, therefore, conclude that HEXIM1 may act as a gene-selective transcriptional regulator via direct interaction with certain transcriptional regulators including GR and contribute to fine-tuning of, for example, glucocorticoid-mediated biological responses.

  3. Effect of long term dexamethasone treatment on the glucocorticoid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, C.M.; DeLorenzo, T.M.; Cidlowski, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    The ability of dexamethasone(dex) to induce alkaline phosphatase activity was found to decrease with chronic hormone exposure. In order to better understand this adaptive resistance, the structure of the receptor from control cells and cells under long term dex (10/sup -6/M) treatment was analyzed. Native isoelectric focusing showed that receptor from dex treated cells focused at more basic pI than receptor from control cells. Denaturing two-dimensional gel analysis resulted in the characteristic 4-5 spots of (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone mesylate (DM) binding of receptor from control cells, but no (/sup 3/H)DM binding could be seen for receptor from dex treated cells. In order to study DNA-binding characteristics, gels were renatured, transferred to nitrocellulose and probed with (/sup 32/P)MMTV-GRE. Receptor from control cells showed 5 spots of DNA-binding at 101 kDa molecular weight and a pI range of 7.42 to 7.32. However, receptor from dex treated cells showed less intense DNA-binding which occurred only at the more basic range of pIs (7.42 to 7.39). Furthermore, no nuclear receptor sites could be measured in the dex treated cells, whereas 20,000 sites were measured in control cells. Even after being taken off hormone treatment for 12 days, cells could regenerate only 50% of their receptors. In conclusion, this system is conducive to studying the mechanism of receptor regulation.

  4. Identification of hormone-interacting amino acid residues within the steroid-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor in relation to other steroid hormone receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstedt-Duke, J.; Stroemstedt, P.E.; Persson, B.; Cederlund, E.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Joernvall, H.

    1988-05-15

    Purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor was covalently charged with (/sup 3/H)glucocorticoid by photoaffinity labeling (UV irradiation of (/sup 3/H)triamcinolone acetonide-glucocorticoid receptor) or affinity labeling (incubation with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone mesylate). After labeling, separate samples of the denatured receptor were cleaved with trypsin (directly or after prior succinylation), chymotrypsin, and cyanogen bromide. Labeled residues in the peptides obtained were identified by radiosequence analysis. The peaks of radioactivity corresponded to Met-622 and Cys-754 after photoaffinity labeling with (/sup 3/H)triamcinolone acetonide and Cys-656 after affinity labeling with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone mesylate. The labeled residues are all positioned within hydrophobic segments of the steroid-binding domain. The patterns of hydropathy and secondary structure for the glucocorticoid receptor are highly similar to those for the progestin receptor and similar but less so to those for the estrogen receptor and to those for c-erb A.

  5. Heat shock protein 70 down-regulates the production of toll-like receptor-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines by a heat shock factor-1/constitutive heat shock element-binding factor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an intracellular chaperone protein with regulatory and cytoprotective functions. Hsp70 can also be found in the extracellular milieu, as a result of active secretion or passive release from damaged cells. The role of extracellular Hsp70 is not fully understood. Some studies report that it activates monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells through innate immune receptors (such as Toll-like receptors, TLRs), while others report that Hsp70 is a negative regulator of the inflammatory response. In order to address this apparent inconsistency, in this study we evaluated the response of human monocytes to a highly purified recombinant Hsp70. Methods Human peripheral blood monocytes were stimulated with Hsp70, alone or in combination with TLR agonists. Cytokines were quantified in culture supernatants, their mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR, and the binding of transcription factors was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Kruskal-Wallis test or one-way or two-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results The addition of Hsp70 to TLR-activated monocytes down-regulated TNF-α as well as IL-6 levels. This effect was independent of a physical interaction between Hsp70 and TLR agonists; instead it resulted of changes at the TNF-α gene expression level. The decrease in TNF-α expression correlated with the binding of HSF-1 (heat shock transcription factor 1, a transcription factor activated in response to Hsp70) and CHBF (constitutive HSE-binding factor) to the TNF-α gene promoter. Conclusion Extracellular Hsp70 negatively regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines of monocytes exposed to TLR agonists and contributes to dampen the inflammatory response. PMID:25053922

  6. Targeted Ablation Reveals a Novel Role of FKBP52 in Gene-Specific Regulation of Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Irene M.; Periyasamy, Sumudra; Hinds, Terry; Yong, Weidong; Shou, Weinian; Sanchez, Edwin R.

    2009-01-01

    FKBP52 is a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein with peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity and is found in steroid receptor complexes, including glucocorticoid receptor (GR). It is generally accepted that FKBP52 has a stimulatory effect on GR transcriptional activity. However, the mechanism by which FKBP52 controls GR is not yet clear, with reports showing effects on GR hormone-binding affinity and/or hormone-induced nuclear translocation. To address this issue, we have generated mice with targeted ablation of the FKBP52 gene. To date, no overt defects of GR-regulated physiology have been found in these animals, demonstrating that FKBP52 is not an essential regulator of global GR activity. To better assess the impact of FKBP52 on GR, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were generated from wild-type (WT) and FKBP52-deficient (KO) animals. Analysis of GR activity at reporter genes showed an approximate 70% reduction of activity in 52KO MEF cells, with no effect of FKBP52 loss on thyroid receptor. Interestingly, GR activity at endogenous genes was not globally affected in 52KO cells, with reduced activity at GILZ and FKBP51, but not at SGK and p21. Thus, FKBP52 appears to be a gene-specific modulator of GR. To investigate the mechanism of this action, analyses of GR heterocomplex composition, hormone-binding affinity, and ability to undergo hormone-induced nuclear translocation and DNA-binding were performed. Interestingly, no effect of FKBP52 loss was found for any of these GR properties, suggesting that the main function of FKBP52 is a heretofore-unknown ability to control GR activity at target genes. Lastly, loss of FKBP52 did not affect the ability of GR to undergo hormone-induced autologous down-regulation, showing that FKBP52 does not contribute to all branches of GR signaling. The implications of these results to the potential actions of FKBP52 on GR activity in vivo are discussed. PMID:19073255

  7. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state.

  8. Highly inducible expression from vectors containing multiple GRE's in CHO cells overexpressing the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Israel, D I; Kaufman, R J

    1989-01-01

    A conditional glucocorticoid-responsive expression vector system is described for highly inducible expression of heterologous genes in mammalian cells. This host-vector system requires high level expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein in the host cell and multiple copies of the receptor binding site within the expression vector. Transfection and selection of Chinese hamster ovary cells with expression vectors encoding the rat GR yielded cell lines which express functional receptor at high levels. Insertion of multiple copies of the MMTV enhancer (glucocorticoid responsive element, GRE) into an Adenovirus major late promoter (AdMLP) based expression vector yielded greater than 1000-fold inducible expression by dexamethasone (dex) in transient DNA transfection assays. The induced expression level was 7-fold greater than that obtained with an AdMLP based vector containing an SV40 enhancer, but lacking GRE's. Vectors containing the SV40 enhancer in combination with multiple GRE's exhibited elevated basal expression in the absence of dex, but retained inducibility in both transient assays and after integration and amplification in the CHO genome. This expression system should be of general utility for studying gene regulation and for expressing heterologous genes in a regulatable fashion. Images PMID:2546123

  9. Cortisol Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Through a Membrane Glucocorticoid Receptor in Rainbow Trout Myotubes.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Marlen B; Aedo, Jorge E; Zuloaga, Rodrigo; Valenzuela, Cristian; Molina, Alfredo; Valdés, Juan A

    2017-04-01

    Cortisol is an essential regulator of neuroendocrine stress responses in teleosts. Cortisol predominantly affects target tissues through the genomic pathway, which involves interacting with cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptors, and thereby, modulating stress-response gene expressions. Cortisol also produces rapid effects via non-genomic pathways, which do not involve gene transcription. Although cortisol-mediated genomic pathways are well documented in teleosts, non-genomic pathways are not fully understood. Moreover, no studies have focused on the contribution of non-genomic cortisol pathways in compensatory stress responses in fish. In this study, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skeletal myotubes were stimulated with physiological concentrations of cortisol and cortisol-BSA, a membrane-impermeable agent, resulting in an early induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This production was not suppressed by transcription or translation inhibitors, suggesting non-genomic pathway involvement. Moreover, myotube preincubation with RU486 and NAC completely suppressed cortisol- and cortisol-BSA-induced ROS production. Subcellular fractionation analysis revealed the presence of cell membrane glucocorticoid receptors. Finally, cortisol-BSA induced a significant increase in ERK1/2 and CREB phosphorylation, as well as in CREB-dependent transcriptional activation of the pgc1a gene expression. The obtained results strongly suggest that cortisol acts through a non-genomic glucocorticoid receptor-mediated pathway to induce ROS production and contribute to ERK/CREB/PGC1-α signaling pathway activation as stress compensation mechanisms. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 718-725, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Assessment of glucocorticoid lung targeting by ex-vivo receptor binding studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, G; Gonzalez-Rothi, R J; Lukyanov, A; Derendorf, H; Schreier, H; Dalla Costa, T

    1995-01-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide (TA, 22 micrograms) was given to rats by intravenous (i.v.) injection or intratracheal (IT) instillation. Free glucocorticoid receptors were monitored over time in liver and lung using an ex-vivo receptor binding technique. After i.v. administration of a TA solution, the reduction of free receptors over time was very similar in lung and liver (AUCLung = 280 +/- 47% h; AUCLiver = 320 +/- 76% h). Intratracheal instillation of the same solution produced time profiles which mirrored those of i.v. injection (AUCLung = 260 +/- 41% h; AUCLiver = 330 +/- 50% h). The lack of lung targeting was also reflected in the failure to show any significant difference in the pulmonary targeting factor T (AUCLung/AUCLiver) between i.v. (T = 0.84 +/- 0.18) and IT (T = 0.78 +/- 0.03) administration. In contrast, a certain degree of lung specificity was observed after IT instillation of a glucocorticoid suspension (22 micrograms; AUCLung = 160 +/- 135% h; AUCLiver = 65 +/- 91% h, T = 2.3 +/- 0.5) as indicated by significant differences in T between i.v. injection and IT instillation (p = 0.038). The method presented provides a means of simultaneously assessing pulmonary and systemic effects after different forms and routes of administration and might be of value in further studying multiple aspects of inhalation glucocorticoid therapy.

  11. Developmental Expression and Glucocorticoid Control of the Leptin Receptor in Fetal Ovine Lung.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Miles J; Boije, Maria; Vaughan, Owen R; Bernstein, Brett S; Davies, Katie L; Plein, Alice; Kempster, Sarah L; Smith, Gordon C S; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Blache, Dominique; Wooding, F B Peter; Giussani, Dino A; Fowden, Abigail L; Forhead, Alison J

    2015-01-01

    The effects of endogenous and synthetic glucocorticoids on fetal lung maturation are well-established, although the role of leptin in lung development before birth is unclear. This study examined mRNA and protein levels of the signalling long-form leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) in fetal ovine lungs towards term, and after experimental manipulation of glucocorticoid levels in utero by fetal cortisol infusion or maternal dexamethasone treatment. In fetal ovine lungs, Ob-Rb protein was localised to bronchiolar epithelium, bronchial cartilage, vascular endothelium, alveolar macrophages and type II pneumocytes. Pulmonary Ob-Rb mRNA abundance increased between 100 (0.69 fractional gestational age) and 144 days (0.99) of gestation, and by 2-4-fold in response to fetal cortisol infusion and maternal dexamethasone treatment. In contrast, pulmonary Ob-Rb protein levels decreased near term and were halved by glucocorticoid treatment, without any significant change in phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3) at Ser727, total STAT3 or the pulmonary pSTAT3:STAT3 ratio. Leptin mRNA was undetectable in fetal ovine lungs at the gestational ages studied. These findings demonstrate differential control of pulmonary Ob-Rb transcript abundance and protein translation, and/or post-translational processing, by glucocorticoids in utero. Localisation of Ob-Rb in the fetal ovine lungs, including alveolar type II pneumocytes, suggests a role for leptin signalling in the control of lung growth and maturation before birth.

  12. Research resource: modulators of glucocorticoid receptor activity identified by a new high-throughput screening assay.

    PubMed

    Blackford, John A; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Dougherty, Edward J; Pradhan, Madhumita; Shen, Min; Li, Zhuyin; Auld, Douglas S; Chow, Carson C; Austin, Christopher P; Simons, S Stoney

    2014-07-01

    Glucocorticoid steroids affect almost every type of tissue and thus are widely used to treat a variety of human pathological conditions. However, the severity of numerous side effects limits the frequency and duration of glucocorticoid treatments. Of the numerous approaches to control off-target responses to glucocorticoids, small molecules and pharmaceuticals offer several advantages. Here we describe a new, extended high-throughput screen in intact cells to identify small molecule modulators of dexamethasone-induced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) transcriptional activity. The novelty of this assay is that it monitors changes in both GR maximal activity (A(max)) and EC(50) (the position of the dexamethasone dose-response curve). Upon screening 1280 chemicals, 10 with the greatest changes in the absolute value of A(max) or EC(50) were selected for further examination. Qualitatively identical behaviors for 60% to 90% of the chemicals were observed in a completely different system, suggesting that other systems will be similarly affected by these chemicals. Additional analysis of the 10 chemicals in a recently described competition assay determined their kinetically defined mechanism and site of action. Some chemicals had similar mechanisms of action despite divergent effects on the level of the GR-induced product. These combined assays offer a straightforward method of identifying numerous new pharmaceuticals that can alter GR transactivation in ways that could be clinically useful.

  13. Reciprocal regulation of a glucocorticoid receptor-steroidogenic factor-1 transcription complex on the Dax-1 promoter by glucocorticoids and adrenocorticotropic hormone in the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Gummow, Brian M; Scheys, Joshua O; Cancelli, Victoria R; Hammer, Gary D

    2006-11-01

    Numerous genes required for adrenocortical steroidogenesis are activated by the nuclear hormone receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) (NR5A1). Dax-1 (NR0B1), another nuclear hormone receptor, represses SF-1-dependent activation. Glucocorticoid products of the adrenal cortex provide negative feedback to the production of hypothalamic CRH and pituitary ACTH. We hypothesized that glucocorticoids stimulate an intraadrenal negative feedback loop via activation of Dax-1 expression. Reporter constructs show glucocorticoid-dependent synergy between SF-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the activation of Dax-1, which is antagonized by ACTH signaling. We map the functional glucocorticoid response element between -718 and -704 bp, required for activation by GR and synergy with SF-1. Of three SF-1 response elements, only the -128-bp SF-1 response element is required for synergy with GR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrate that dexamethasone treatment increases GR and SF-1 binding to the endogenous murine Dax-1 promoter 10- and 3.5-fold over baseline. Serial ChIP assays reveal that that GR and SF-1 are part of the same complex on the Dax-1 promoter, whereas coimmunoprecipitation assay confirms the presence of a protein complex that contains both GR and SF-1. ACTH stimulation disrupts the formation of this complex by abrogating SF-1 binding to the Dax-1 promoter, while promoting SF-1 binding to the melanocortin-2 receptor (Mc2r) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) promoters. Finally, dexamethasone treatment increases endogenous Dax-1 expression and concordantly decreases StAR expression. ACTH signaling antagonizes the increase in Dax-1 yet strongly activates StAR transcription. These data indicate that GR provides feedback regulation of adrenocortical steroid production through synergistic activation of Dax-1 with SF-1, which is antagonized by ACTH activation of the adrenal cortex.

  14. Chromatin immunoprecipitation scanning identifies glucocorticoid receptor binding regions in the proximal promoter of a ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid target gene in brain.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Siem; Sarabdjitsingh, R Angela; Van Batenburg, Marcel F; Lachize, Servane B; Li, Hualing; Dijkmans, Thomas F; Vreugdenhil, Erno; de Kloet, E Ron; Meijer, Onno C

    2008-09-01

    While the actions of glucocorticoids on brain functions have been comprehensively studied, the underlying genomic mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we show that glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) mRNA is strongly and ubiquitously induced in rat brain. To decipher the molecular mechanisms underlying these genomic effects, it is of interest to identify the regulatory sites in the promoter region. Alignment of the rat GILZ promoter with the well-characterized human promoter resulted in poor sequence homology. Consequently, we analyzed the rat 5' flanking sequence by Matrix REDUCE and identified two high-affinity glucocorticoid response elements (GRE) located 2 kb upstream of the transcription start site. These findings were corroborated using the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expressing Ns-1 PC12 rat cell-line. In these cells, dexamethasone treatment leads to a progressive increase of GILZ mRNA expression levels via a GR-dependent mechanism. Subsequently, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we show that the two high-affinity GREs are located within the GR-binding regions. Lastly, we demonstrate using multiple tissue in situ hybridization a marked increase in mRNA expression levels in spleen, thymus, heart, lung, liver, muscle, testis, kidney, colon, ileum, as well as in brain and conclude that the GILZ gene can be used to study glucocorticoid effects in many additional rodent tissues.

  15. Separate regions of glucocorticoid receptor, coactivator TIF2, and comodulator STAMP modify different parameters of glucocorticoid-mediated gene induction.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Smita; Simons, S Stoney

    2012-05-15

    Increased specificity in steroid-regulated gene expression is a long-sought goal of endocrinologists. Considerable progress has resulted from the discovery of coactivators, corepressors, and comodulators that adjust the total activity (A(max)) of gene induction. Two less frequently quantitated, but equally potent, means of improving specificity are the concentration of agonist steroid required for half-maximal activity (EC(50)) and the residual or partial agonist activity displayed by most antisteroids (PAA). It is usually assumed that the modulatory activity of transcriptional cofactors coordinately regulates A(max), EC(50), and PAA. Here we examine the hypothesis that these three parameters can be independently modified by separate protein domains. The test system involves three differently sized fragments of each of three factors (glucocorticoid receptor [GR], coactivator TIF2, and comodulator STAMP), which are shown to form a ternary complex and similarly affect the induction properties of transfected and endogenous genes. Twenty-five different fragment combinations of the ternary complex are examined for their ability to modulate the A(max), EC(50), and PAA of a transiently transfected synthetic reporter gene. Different combinations selectively alter one, two, or all three parameters. These results clearly demonstrate that A(max), EC(50), and PAA can be independently regulated under some conditions by different pathways or molecular interactions. This new mechanistic insight suggests that selected activities of individual transcription factors are attractive targets for small molecules, which would have obvious clinical applications for increasing the specificity of steroids during endocrine therapies.

  16. Presence of a non-neuronal cholinergic system and occurrence of up- and down-regulation in expression of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: new aspects of importance regarding Achilles tendon tendinosis (tendinopathy).

    PubMed

    Bjur, Dennis; Danielson, Patrik; Alfredson, Håkan; Forsgren, Sture

    2008-02-01

    Limited information is available concerning the existence of a cholinergic system in the human Achilles tendon. We have studied pain-free normal Achilles tendons and chronically painful Achilles tendinosis tendons with regard to immunohistochemical expression patterns of the M(2) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M(2)R), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). M(2)R immunoreactivity was detected in the walls of blood vessels. As evidenced via parallel staining for CD31 and alpha-smooth muscle actin, most M(2)R immunoreactivity was present in the endothelium. M(2)R immunoreactivity also occured in tenocytes, which regularly immunoreact for vimentin. The degree of M(2)R immunoreactivity was highly variable, tendinosis tendons that exhibit hypercellularity and hypervascularity showing the highest levels of immunostaining. Immunoreaction for ChAT and VAChT was detected in tenocytes in tendinosis specimens, particularly in aberrant cells. In situ hybridization revealed that mRNA for ChAT is present in tenocytes in tendinosis specimens. Our results suggest that autocrine/paracrine effects occur concerning the tenocytes in tendinosis. Up-regulation/down-regulation in the levels of M(2)R immunoreactivity possibly take place in tenocytes and blood vessel cells during the various stages of tendinosis. The presumed local production of acetylcholine (ACh), as evidenced by immunoreactivity for ChAT and VAChT and the detection of ChAT mRNA, appears to evolve in response to tendinosis. These observations are of importance because of the well-known vasoactive, trophic, and pain-modulating effects that ACh is known to have and do unexpectedly establish the presence of a non-neuronal cholinergic system in the Achilles tendon.

  17. The adenosine A3 receptor agonist Cl-IB-MECA induces cell death through Ca²⁺/ROS-dependent down regulation of ERK and Akt in A172 human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Thae Hyun; Kim, Yong Keun; Woo, Jae Suk

    2012-12-01

    Adenosine A(3) receptor (A3AR) is coupled to G proteins that are involved in a variety of intracellular signaling pathways and physiological functions. 2-Chloro-N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl) adenosine-5'-N-methylcarboxamide (Cl-IB-MECA), an agonist of A3AR, has been reported to induce cell death in various cancer cells. However, the effect of CI-IB-MECA on glioma cell growth is not clear. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of CI-IB-MECA on glioma cell viability and to determine its molecular mechanism. CI-IB-MECA inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of CI-IB-MECA resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) followed by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. EGTA and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) blocked the cell death induced by CI-IB-MECA, suggesting that Ca(2+) and ROS are involved in the Cl-IB-MECA-induced cell death. Western blot analysis showed that CI-IB-MECA induced the down-regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and Akt, which was prevented by EGTA, NAC, and the A3AR antagonist MRS1191. Transfection of constitutively active forms of MEK, the upstream kinase of ERK, and Akt prevented the cell death. CI-IB-MECA induced caspase-3 activation and the CI-IB-MECA-induced cell death was blocked by the caspase inhibitors DEVD-CHO and z-VAD-FMK. In addition, expression of XIAP and Survivin were decreased in cells treated with Cl-IB-MECA. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that CI-IB-MECA induce a caspase-dependent cell death through suppression of ERK and Akt mediated by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS generation in human glioma cells. These suggest that A3AR agonists may be a potential therapeutic agent for induction of apoptosis in human glioma cells.

  18. An affective disorder in zebrafish with mutation of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Ziv, L; Muto, A; Schoonheim, P J; Meijsing, S H; Strasser, D; Ingraham, H A; Schaaf, M J M; Yamamoto, K R; Baier, H

    2013-06-01

    Upon binding of cortisol, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) regulates the transcription of specific target genes, including those that encode the stress hormones corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone. Dysregulation of the stress axis is a hallmark of major depression in human patients. However, it is still unclear how glucocorticoid signaling is linked to affective disorders. We identified an adult-viable zebrafish mutant in which the negative feedback on the stress response is disrupted, due to abolition of all transcriptional activity of GR. As a consequence, cortisol is elevated, but unable to signal through GR. When placed into an unfamiliar aquarium ('novel tank'), mutant fish become immobile ('freeze'), show reduced exploratory behavior and do not habituate to this stressor upon repeated exposure. Addition of the antidepressant fluoxetine to the holding water and social interactions restore normal behavior, followed by a delayed correction of cortisol levels. Fluoxetine does not affect the overall transcription of CRH, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), the serotonin transporter (Serta) or GR itself. Fluoxetine, however, suppresses the stress-induced upregulation of MR and Serta in both wild-type fish and mutants. Our studies show a conserved, protective function of glucocorticoid signaling in the regulation of emotional behavior and reveal novel molecular aspects of how chronic stress impacts vertebrate brain physiology and behavior. Importantly, the zebrafish model opens up the possibility of high-throughput drug screens in search of new classes of antidepressants.

  19. Caveolin-1 regulates genomic action of the glucocorticoid receptor in neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Peffer, Melanie E; Chandran, Uma R; Luthra, Soumya; Volonte, Daniela; Galbiati, Ferruccio; Garabedian, Michael J; Monaghan, A Paula; DeFranco, Donald B

    2014-07-01

    While glucocorticoids (GCs) are used clinically to treat many conditions, their neonatal and prenatal usage is increasingly controversial due to reports of delayed adverse outcomes, especially their effects on brain development. Such alterations may reflect the impact of GCs on neural progenitor/stem cell (NPSC) function. We previously demonstrated that the lipid raft protein caveolin-1 (Cav-1) was required for rapid GC signaling in embryonic mouse NPSCs operating through plasma membrane-bound glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). We show here that genomic GR signaling in NPSCs requires Cav-1. Loss of Cav-1 impacts the transcriptional response of many GR target genes (e.g., the serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 gene) that are likely to mediate the antiproliferative effects of GCs. Microarray analysis of wild-type C57 or Cav-1-deficient NPSCs identified approximately 100 genes that are differentially regulated by GC treatment. These changes in hormone responsiveness in Cav-1 knockout NPSCs are associated with the loss of GC-regulated phosphorylation of GR at serine 211 but not at serine 226. Chromatin recruitment of total GR to regulatory regions of target genes such as Fkbp-5, RhoJ, and Sgk-1, as well as p211-GR recruitment to Sgk-1, are compromised in Cav-1 knockout NPSCs. Cav-1 is therefore a multifunctional regulator of GR in NPSCs influencing both rapid and genomic action of the receptor to impact cell proliferation.

  20. The antidepressant fluoxetine normalizes the nuclear glucocorticoid receptor evoked by psychosocial stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitić, M.; Simić, I.; Djordjević, J.; Radojčić, M. B.; Adžić, M.

    2011-12-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and stress disorders. Glucocorticoids, key regulators of the stress response, exert diverse effects on cellular processes in the hippocampus. Beside non-genomic pathways, glucocorticoid effects are mediated through activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a ligand activated transcriptional factor that belongs to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. We analysed the GR protein levels both in the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of the hippocampus of Wistar rats exposed to chronic psychosocial isolation stress upon chronic fluoxetine (FLU) treatment. Under chronic stress, corticosterone levels (CORT) were decreased compared to the control, and treatment with FLU did not change its level in the stressed rats. At the molecular level, FLU normalized the level of nuclear GR protein in the hippocampus of the stressed rats. Discrepancy between normalization of nuclear GR in the hippocampus and lack of normalization of HPA axis activity judged by CORT, suggests that other brain structures such as the amygdale and prefrontal cortex that also regulate HPA axis activity, seem not to be normalized by the FLU treatment used in our study.

  1. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    SciTech Connect

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  2. Post-Stress Combined Administration of Beta-Receptor and Glucocorticoid Antagonists as a Novel Preventive Treatment in an Animal Model of PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    promising, but mixed results were obtained with the acute drug interventions. Propranolol had no effect, and mifepristone had only a modest effect on...stress, PTSD, open field test, social interaction test, fear conditioning, extinction, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoids, propranolol ...study, social interaction was unaffected (B). Combined treatment with the β-receptor antagonist, propranolol (10 mg/kg) and glucocorticoid-receptor

  3. Glucocorticoid receptor gene haplotype structure and steroid therapy outcome in IBD patients

    PubMed Central

    Mwinyi, Jessica; Wenger, Christa; Eloranta, Jyrki J; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the glucocorticoid receptor (GR/NR3C1) gene haplotypes influence the steroid therapy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We sequenced all coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the NR3C1 gene in 181 IBD patients, determined the single nucleotide polymorphisms, and predicted the NR3C1 haplotypes. Furthermore, we investigated whether certain NR3C1 haplotypes are significantly associated with steroid therapy outcomes. RESULTS: We detected 13 NR3C1 variants, which led to the formation of 17 different haplotypes with a certainty of > 95% in 173 individuals. The three most commonly occurring haplotypes were included in the association analysis of the influence of haplotype on steroid therapy outcome or IBD activity. None of the NR3C1 haplotypes showed statistically significant association with glucocorticoid therapy success. CONCLUSION: NR3C1 haplotypes are not related to steroid therapy outcome. PMID:20712049

  4. Role of TATA-element in transcription from glucocorticoid receptor-responsive model promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, S; Schatt, M D; Rusconi, S

    1990-01-01

    Transcription activation properties of the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) on minimal, TATA-box containing or depleted promoters have been tested. We show that a cluster of Glucocorticoid Responsive Elements (GRE), upon activation by the GR, is sufficient to mediate abundant RNA-polymerase II transcription. We find that in absence of a bona fide TATA-element transcription initiates at a distance of 45-55bp from the activated GRE cluster with a marked preference for sequences homologous to the initiator element (Inr). Analyzing defined, bi-directional transcription units we demonstrate that the apparent reduction of specific transcription in strong, TATA-depleted promoters, is mainly due to loss of short-range promoter polarization. The implications for long-range promoter/enhancer communication mechanisms are also discussed. Images PMID:2402438

  5. Ischemia-like Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation Mediates Down-regulation of Cell Surface γ-Aminobutyric AcidB Receptors via the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress-induced Transcription Factor CCAAT/Enhancer-binding Protein (C/EBP)-homologous Protein (CHOP)*

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Patrick J.; Zemoura, Khaled; Acuña, Mario A.; Yévenes, Gonzalo E.; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Benke, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia frequently leads to long-term disability and death. Excitotoxicity is believed to be the main cause for ischemia-induced neuronal death. Although a role of glutamate receptors in this process has been firmly established, the contribution of metabotropic GABAB receptors, which control excitatory neurotransmission, is less clear. A prominent characteristic of ischemic insults is endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress associated with the up-regulation of the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP). After inducing ER stress in cultured cortical neurons by sustained Ca2+ release from intracellular stores or by a brief episode of oxygen and glucose deprivation (in vitro model of cerebral ischemia), we observed an increased expression of CHOP accompanied by a strong reduction of cell surface GABAB receptors. Our results indicate that down-regulation of cell surface GABAB receptors is caused by the interaction of the receptors with CHOP in the ER. Binding of CHOP prevented heterodimerization of the receptor subunits GABAB1 and GABAB2 and subsequent forward trafficking of the receptors to the cell surface. The reduced level of cell surface receptors diminished GABAB receptor signaling and, thus, neuronal inhibition. These findings indicate that ischemia-mediated up-regulation of CHOP down-regulates cell surface GABAB receptors by preventing their trafficking from the ER to the plasma membrane. This mechanism leads to diminished neuronal inhibition and may contribute to excitotoxicity in cerebral ischemia. PMID:24668805

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor blockade inhibits brain cell addition and aggressive signaling in electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Kent D; Jashari, Denisa; Pappas, Kristina M

    2011-08-01

    When animals are under stress, glucocorticoids commonly inhibit adult neurogenesis by acting through glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). However, in some cases, conditions that elevate glucocorticoids promote adult neurogenesis, and the role of glucocorticoid receptors in these circumstances is not well understood. We examined the involvement of GRs in social enhancement of brain cell addition and aggressive signaling in electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus. In this species, long-term social interaction simultaneously elevates plasma cortisol, enhances brain cell addition and increases production of aggressive electrocommunication signals ("chirps"). We implanted isolated and paired fish with capsules containing nothing (controls) or the GR antagonist, RU486, recorded chirp production and locomotion for 7d, and measured the density of newborn cells in the periventricular zone. Compared to isolated controls, paired controls showed elevated chirping in two phases: much higher chirp rates in the first 5h and moderately higher nocturnal rates thereafter. Treating paired fish with RU486 reduced chirp rates in both phases to those of isolated fish, demonstrating that GR activation is crucial for socially induced chirping. Neither RU486 nor social interaction affected locomotion. RU486 treatment to paired fish had a partial effect on cell addition: paired RU486 fish had less cell addition than paired control fish but more than isolated fish. This suggests that cortisol activation of GRs contributes to social enhancement of cell addition but works in parallel with another GR-independent mechanism. RU486 also reduced cell addition in isolated fish, indicating that GRs participate in the regulation of cell addition even when cortisol levels are low.

  7. Development of glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat forebrain: Implications for adverse effects of glucocorticoids in preterm infants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoids are the consensus treatment to avoid respiratory distress in preterm infants but there is accumulating evidence that these agents evoke long-term neurobehavioral deficits. Earlier, we showed that the developing rat forebrain is far more sensitive to glucocorticoi...

  8. The heat shock protein 70 cochaperone hip enhances functional maturation of glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory M; Prapapanich, Viravan; Carrigan, Patricia E; Roberts, Patricia J; Riggs, Daniel L; Smith, David F

    2004-07-01

    Multiple molecular chaperones interact with steroid receptors to promote functional maturation and stability of receptor complexes. The heat shock protein (Hsp)70 cochaperone Hip has been identified in conjunction with Hsp70, Hsp90, and the Hsp70/Hsp90 cochaperone Hop/Sti1p in receptor complexes during an intermediate stage of receptor assembly, but a functional requirement for Hip in the receptor assembly process has not been established. Because the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains orthologs for most of the receptor-associated chaperones yet lacks an orthologous Hip gene, we exploited the well-established yeast model for steroid receptor function to ask whether Hip can alter steroid receptor function in vivo. Introducing human Hip into yeast enhances hormone-dependent activation of a reporter gene by glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Because Hip does not similarly enhance signaling by mineralocorticoid, progesterone, or estrogen receptors, a general effect on transcription can be excluded. Instead, Hip promotes functional maturation of GR without increasing steady-state levels of GR protein. Unexpectedly, Hip binding to Hsp70 is not critical for boosting GR responsiveness to hormone. In conclusion, Hip functions by a previously unrecognized mechanism to promote the efficiency of GR maturation in cells.

  9. A role for glucocorticoid-signaling in depression-like behavior of gastrin-releasing peptide receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Monje, Francisco J; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cabatic, Maureen; Lubec, Gert; Herkner, Kurt R; Pollak, Daniela D

    2011-08-01

    Abstract Background. The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is highly expressed in the limbic system, where it importantly regulates emotional functions and in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it is central for the photic resetting of the circadian clock. Mice lacking GRPR presented with deficient light-induced phase shift in activity as well altered emotional learning and amygdala function. The effect of GRPR deletion on depression-like behavior and its molecular signature in the amygdala, however, has not yet been evaluated. Methods. GRPR knock-out mice (GRPR-KO) were tested in the forced-swim test and the sucrose preference test for depression-like behavior. Gene expression in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala was evaluated by micorarray analysis subsequent to laser-capture microdissection-assisted extraction of mRNA. The expression of selected genes was confirmed by RT-PCR. Results. GRPR-KO mice were found to present with increased depression-like behavior. Microarray analysis revealed down-regulation of several glucocorticoid-responsive genes in the basolateral amygdala. Acute administration of dexamethasone reversed the behavioral phenotype and alterations in gene expression. Discussion. We propose that deletion of GRPR leads to the induction of depression-like behavior which is paralleled by dysregulation of amygdala gene expression, potentially resulting from deficient light-induced corticosterone release in GRPR-KO.

  10. Characterization of the angiotensin (AT1b) receptor promoter and its regulation by glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Bogdarina, Irina G; King, Peter J; Clark, Adrian J L

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin II acts through two pharmacologically distinct receptors known as AT1 and AT2. Duplication of the AT1 receptor in rodents into At1a and b subtypes allows tissue-specific expression of the AT1b in adrenal and pituitary tissue. Adrenal expression of this receptor is increased in the offspring of rat mothers exposed to a low-protein diet and this is associated with the undermethylation of its promoter. This phenomenon is blocked by the inhibition of maternal glucocorticoid synthesis by metyrapone. We have mapped the transcriptional start site of the promoter and demonstrated that a 1·2 kbp fragment upsteam of this site is effective in driving luciferase expression in mouse Y1 cells. A combination of bioinformatic analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift analysis (EMSA), and mutagenesis studies demonstrates: i) the presence of a putative TATA box and CAAT box; ii) the presence of three Sp1 response elements, capable of binding SP1; mutation of any pair of these sites effectively disables this promoter; iii) the presence of four potential glucocorticoid response elements which each bind glucocorticoid receptor in EMSA, although only two confer dexamethasone inhibition on the promoter; iv) the presence of two AP1 sites. Mutagenesis of the distal AP1 site greatly diminishes promoter function but this is also associated with the loss of dexamethasone inhibition. These studies will facilitate an understanding of the mechanisms by which fetal programming leads to long term alterations in gene expression and the development of adult disease. PMID:19411305

  11. Clinical and biological significance of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Rezvan; Negm, Ola H; Lai, Chun-Fui; Jerjees, Dena A; Al-Kaabi, Methaq; Hamed, Mohamed R; Tighe, Patrick J; Buluwela, Lakjaya; Mukherjee, Abhik; Green, Andrew R; Ali, Simak; Rakha, Emad A; Ellis, Ian O

    2015-04-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors, which exerts anti-proliferative and anti-apoptotic activities. The GR is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancer (BC) although levels generally decrease during cancer progression. This study aimed to determine the clinical and biological significance of GR expression using a large series of early-stage BC with long-term follow-up and BC cell lines. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of GR in 999 cases of primary invasive BC prepared as tissue microarrays. Reverse phase protein microarray was used to assess the expression of GR in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Nuclear expression of GR was observed in 61.6 % of breast tumours and was associated with features of good prognosis including smaller tumour size and lower grade with less pleomorphism and low mitotic count. GR expression was positively correlated with expression of oestrogen (ER) and progesterone receptors. In ER-positive tumours, GR was associated with other features of favourable outcome including FOXA1, GATA3 and BEX1 expression, while low GR expression was associated with high Ki67, p53 and CD71 expression. GR expression is associated with features of good outcome but does not provide prognostic information independent of size, stage and grade. Understanding the receptor and its effects on BC behaviour is essential for avoiding any unwanted effects from the use of glucocorticoids in routine oncology practice.

  12. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs

    2016-11-01

    REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level.

  13. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S.; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level. PMID:27686098

  14. Screening of bisphenol A, triclosan and paraben analogues as modulators of the glucocorticoid and androgen receptor activities.

    PubMed

    Kolšek, Katra; Gobec, Martina; Mlinarič Raščan, Irena; Sollner Dolenc, Marija

    2015-02-01

    A homeostasis of the glucocorticoid and androgen endocrine system is essential to human health. Their disturbance can lead to various diseases, for example cardiovascular, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, infertility, cancer. Fifteen widely used industrial chemicals that disrupt endocrine activity were selected for evaluation of potential (anti)glucocorticoid and (anti)androgenic activities. The human breast carcinoma MDA-kb2 cell line was utilized for reporter gene assays, since it expresses both the androgen and the glucocorticoid-responsive reporter. Two new antiandrogens, 4,4'-sulfonylbis(2-methylphenol) (dBPS) and 4,4'-thiodiphenol (THIO), and two new antiglucocorticoids, bisphenol Z and its analog bis[4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)phenyl] sulfone (BHEPS) were identified. Moreover, four new glucocorticoid agonists (methyl paraben, ethyl paraben, propyl paraben and bisphenol F) were found. To elucidate the structure-activity relationship of bisphenols, we performed molecular docking experiments with androgen and glucocorticoid receptor. These docking experiments had shown that bulky structures such as BHEPS and bisphenol Z act as antiglucocorticoid, because they are positioned toward helix H12 in the antagonist conformation and could therefore be responsible for H12 conformational change and the switch between agonistic and antagonistic conformation of receptor. On the other hand smaller structures cannot interact with H12. The results of in vitro screening of fifteen industrial chemicals as modulators of the glucocorticoid and androgen receptor activities demand additional in vivo testing of these chemicals for formulating any relevant hazard identification to human health.

  15. Delayed secondary glucocorticoid response elements. Unusual nucleotide motifs specify glucocorticoid receptor binding to transcribed regions of alpha 2u-globulin DNA.

    PubMed

    Chan, G C; Hess, P; Meenakshi, T; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Gustafsson, J A; Payvar, F

    1991-11-25

    Glucocorticoids stimulate the transcription of rat alpha 2u-globulin (RUG) genes. Because this induction occurs after a time lag of several hours and is blocked by inhibitors of protein synthesis, it exemplifies a delayed secondary response to steroid hormones. In this report, we show that a region of RUG-transcribed DNA (approximately +1800 to +2174) contains multiple footprint sites for glucocorticoid receptor that are, apparently, organized into at least three independent binding clusters. The DNA sequences bound by the receptor and the location of binding sites were determined. A family of sequences related to half-sites of the consensus primary glucocorticoid response element (GRE) is discernible at each cluster of sites. Compared to the consensus GRE, which contains two pseudo-palindromic hexanucleotides arranged in a tail-to-tail fashion and separated by three bases, the arrangements of hexanucleotides within this segment of RUG DNA are unusual and heterogeneous. Methylation interference of a binding cluster containing three receptor footprints demonstrates that certain guanines of the GRE-like hexanucleotides are essential for efficient receptor binding. A synthetic 29-base pair (bp) RUG element, containing one receptor footprint from this cluster, selectively binds the receptor. Within this 29-bp element, six nucleotides separate two directly repeated copies of GRE-like hexanucleotides. RUG DNA fragments containing all or part of the three binding clusters, including the 29-bp element, confer a delayed secondary hormone responsiveness upon a linked heterologous promoter and reporter gene in stably transfected cell lines. We speculate that the unusual DNA sequence motifs of the receptor-binding sites are crucial for the generation of certain delayed secondary responses.

  16. Subunit dissociation and activation of wild-type and mutant glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Gehring, U; Mugele, K; Arndt, H; Busch, W

    1987-09-01

    Apparent molecular weights of wild-type and nti ('increased nuclear transfer') mutant glucocorticoid receptors were obtained from Stokes radii and sedimentation coefficients. At low salt concentrations molecular forms of Mr 328,000 and 298,000 of the wild-type and mutant, respectively, were predominant. Increasing ionic strength resulted in receptor dissociation. Dissociated forms of Mr 130,000 and 63,000 of the wild-type and mutant, respectively, were obtained at 300 mM KCl and above. Some metal oxi-anions prevented dissociation. Receptor activation to allow DNA binding produced the dissociated forms which could be separated from non-activated receptors by filtration through DNA-cellulose or by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Non-activated wild-type and nti receptors eluted from DEAE-cellulose under identical conditions while activated wild-type and nti receptors eluted differently. Partially proteolyzed wild-type receptors behaved identically to nti receptors. We conclude that the large forms of wild-type and nti receptors are heteromeric and contain only one hormone-building polypeptide per complex.

  17. Down-regulation of insulin receptor substrates (IRS)-1 and IRS-2 and Src homologous and collagen-like protein Shc gene expression by insulin in skeletal muscle is not associated with insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xudong; Vaag, Allan; Hansson, Mona; Groop, Leif

    2002-01-01

    To examine whether altered gene expression of insulin receptor substrates (IRS)-1 and IRS-2 and Src homologous and collagen-like protein Shc is an inherited trait and is associated with muscle insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes, we measured mRNA levels of these genes by a relative quantitative RT-PCR method in muscle biopsies taken before and after an insulin clamp from 12 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for type 2 diabetes and 12 control subjects. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was decreased both in the diabetic and nondiabetic twin, compared with healthy control subjects (5.2 +/- 0.7 and 8.5 +/- 0.8 vs. 11.4 +/- 0.9 mg/kg x min(-1); P < 0.01 and P < 0.02, respectively). Basal mRNA levels of IRS-1, IRS-2, and Shc were similar in the diabetic and nondiabetic twins as well as in the control subjects. Insulin decreased mRNA expression of IRS-1 by 72% (from 0.75 +/- 0.06 to 0.21 +/- 0.04 relative units; P < 0.001), IRS-2 by 71% (from 0.55 +/- 0.10 to 0.16 +/- 0.08 relative units; P < 0.03), and Shc by 25% (from 0.95 +/- 0.04 to 0.71 +/- 0.04 relative units; P < 0.01) vs. baseline as demonstrated in the control subjects. The postclamp Shc mRNA level was slightly higher in the diabetic twins (P = 0.05) but similar in the nondiabetic twins, as compared with the control subjects, whereas postclamp IRS-1 and IRS-2 mRNA levels were similar between the study groups. There was an inverse correlation between postclamp Shc mRNA concentration and glucose uptake (r = -0.53, P = 0.01; n = 22) in the controls and nondiabetic twins. However, the decrease in Shc gene expression by insulin was not significantly different between the study groups. In conclusion, because insulin down-regulates IRS-1, IRS-2, and Shc gene expression in skeletal muscle in diabetic and nondiabetic monozygotic twins and control subjects to the same extent, it is unlikely that expression of these genes is an inherited trait or contributes to skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

  18. Evaluation of glucocorticoid receptor function in COPD lung macrophages using beclomethasone-17-monopropionate.

    PubMed

    Plumb, Jonathan; Robinson, Laura; Lea, Simon; Banyard, Antonia; Blaikley, John; Ray, David; Bizzi, Andrea; Volpi, Giorgina; Facchinetti, Fabrizio; Singh, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) function in COPD lung macrophages have used dexamethasone to evaluate inhibition of cytokine production. We have now used the clinically relevant corticosteroid beclomethasone-17-monopropionate (17-BMP) to assess GR function in COPD lung macrophages, and investigated the transactivation of glucocorticoid sensitive genes and GR phosphorylation in addition to cytokine production. Lung macrophages were purified from surgically acquired lung tissue, from patients with COPD, smokers, and non-smokers. The transactivation of glucocorticoid sensitive genes (FKBP51 and GILZ) by 17-BMP were analysed by polymerase chain reaction. 17-BMP suppression of LPS-induced TNFα, IL-6 and CXCL8 was measured by ELISA and GR phosphorylation was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. 17-BMP reduced cytokine release in a concentration dependent manner, with >70% inhibition of all cytokines, and no difference between COPD patients and controls. Similarly, the transactivation of FKBP51 and GILZ, and GR phosphorylation was similar between COPD patients and controls. In this context, GR function in COPD lung macrophages is unaltered. 17-BMP effectively suppresses cytokine production in COPD lung macrophages.

  19. Ligand-dependent genomic function of glucocorticoid receptor in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Lan, Xun; Wu, Dayong; Sunkel, Benjamin; Ye, Zhenqing; Huang, Jiaoti; Liu, Zhihua; Clinton, Steven K; Jin, Victor X; Wang, Qianben

    2015-09-16

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been widely used as coadjuvants in the treatment of solid tumours, but GC treatment may be associated with poor pharmacotherapeutic response or prognosis. The genomic action of GC in these tumours is largely unknown. Here we find that dexamethasone (Dex, a synthetic GC)-regulated genes in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells are associated with drug resistance. Importantly, these GC-regulated genes are aberrantly expressed in TNBC patients and are associated with unfavourable clinical outcomes. Interestingly, in TNBC cells, Compound A (CpdA, a selective GR modulator) only regulates a small number of genes not involved in carcinogenesis and therapy resistance. Mechanistic studies using a ChIP-exo approach reveal that Dex- but not CpdA-liganded glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds to a single glucocorticoid response element (GRE), which drives the expression of pro-tumorigenic genes. Our data suggest that development of safe coadjuvant therapy should consider the distinct genomic function between Dex- and CpdA-liganded GR.

  20. Human Glucocorticoid Receptor β Regulates Gluconeogenesis and Inflammation in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Cruz-Topete, Diana; Oakley, Robert H; Xiao, Xiao; Cidlowski, John A

    2015-12-28

    While in vitro studies have demonstrated that a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) splice isoform, β-isoform of human GR (hGRβ), acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of the classic hGRα and confers glucocorticoid resistance, the in vivo function of hGRβ is poorly understood. To this end, we created an adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express hGRβ in the mouse liver under the control of the hepatocyte-specific promoter. Genome-wide expression analysis of mouse livers showed that hGRβ significantly increased the expression of numerous genes, many of which are involved in endocrine system disorders and the inflammatory response. Physiologically, hGRβ antagonized GRα's function and attenuated hepatic gluconeogenesis through downregulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in wild-type (WT) mouse liver. Interestingly, however, hGRβ did not repress PEPCK in GR liver knockout (GRLKO) mice. In contrast, hGRβ regulates the expression of STAT1 in the livers of both WT and GRLKO mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that hGRβ binds to the intergenic glucocorticoid response element (GRE) of the STAT1 gene. Furthermore, treatment with RU486 inhibited the upregulation of STAT1 mediated by hGRβ. Finally, our array data demonstrate that hGRβ regulates unique components of liver gene expression in vivo by both GRα-dependent and GRα-independent mechanisms.

  1. Endocrine-Disrupting Effects of Pesticides through Interference with Human Glucocorticoid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianyun; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Rui; Gan, Jay; Liu, Jing; Liu, Weiping

    2016-01-05

    Many pesticides have been identified as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) due to their ability to bind sex-steroid hormone receptors. However, little attention has been paid to the ability of pesticides to interfere with other steroid hormone receptors such as glucocorticoid receptor (GR) that plays a critical role in metabolic, endocrine, immune, and nervous systems. In this study, the glucocorticoidic and antiglucocorticoidic effects of 34 pesticides on human GR were investigated using luciferase reporter gene assay. Surprisingly, none of the test chemicals showed GR agonistic activity, but 12 chemicals exhibited apparent antagonistic effects. Bifenthrin, λ-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, resmethrin, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDT, methoxychlor, ethiofencarb, and tolylfluanid showed remarkable GR antagonistic properties with RIC20 values lower than 10(-6) M. The disruption of glucocorticoid-responsive genes in H4IIE and J774A.1 cells was further evaluated on these 12 GR antagonists. In H4IIEcells, four organochlorine insecticides, bifenthrin, and 3-PBA decreased cortisol-induced PEPCK gene expression, while o,p'-DDT and methoxychlor inhibited cortisol-stimulated Arg and TAT gene expression. Cypermethrin and tolyfluanid attenuated cortisol-induced TAT expression. In J774A.1 cells, λ-cyhalothrin, resmethrin, 3-PBA, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE, methoxychlor- and tolylfluanid-reduced cortisol-stimulated GILZ expression. Furthermore, molecular docking simulation indicated that different interactions may stabilize the binding between molecules and GR. Our findings suggest that comprehensive screening and evaluation of GR antagonists and agonists should be considered to better understand the health and ecological risks of man-made chemicals such as pesticides.

  2. Developmental Expression and Glucocorticoid Control of the Leptin Receptor in Fetal Ovine Lung

    PubMed Central

    De Blasio, Miles J.; Boije, Maria; Vaughan, Owen R.; Bernstein, Brett S.; Davies, Katie L.; Plein, Alice; Kempster, Sarah L.; Smith, Gordon C. S.; Charnock-Jones, D. Stephen; Blache, Dominique; Wooding, F. B. Peter; Giussani, Dino A.; Fowden, Abigail L.; Forhead, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of endogenous and synthetic glucocorticoids on fetal lung maturation are well-established, although the role of leptin in lung development before birth is unclear. This study examined mRNA and protein levels of the signalling long-form leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) in fetal ovine lungs towards term, and after experimental manipulation of glucocorticoid levels in utero by fetal cortisol infusion or maternal dexamethasone treatment. In fetal ovine lungs, Ob-Rb protein was localised to bronchiolar epithelium, bronchial cartilage, vascular endothelium, alveolar macrophages and type II pneumocytes. Pulmonary Ob-Rb mRNA abundance increased between 100 (0.69 fractional gestational age) and 144 days (0.99) of gestation, and by 2–4-fold in response to fetal cortisol infusion and maternal dexamethasone treatment. In contrast, pulmonary Ob-Rb protein levels decreased near term and were halved by glucocorticoid treatment, without any significant change in phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3) at Ser727, total STAT3 or the pulmonary pSTAT3:STAT3 ratio. Leptin mRNA was undetectable in fetal ovine lungs at the gestational ages studied. These findings demonstrate differential control of pulmonary Ob-Rb transcript abundance and protein translation, and/or post-translational processing, by glucocorticoids in utero. Localisation of Ob-Rb in the fetal ovine lungs, including alveolar type II pneumocytes, suggests a role for leptin signalling in the control of lung growth and maturation before birth. PMID:26287800

  3. Cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor interaction with nuclear factor-kappa B proteins in rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Widén, Christina; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Wikström, Ann-Charlotte

    2003-07-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) acts as an anti-inflammatory factor. To a large extent, this activity is exerted by the interference of pro-inflammatory nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) activity. In their respective inactive forms, both GR and NF-kappa B reside in the cytoplasm and translocate to the nucleus on relevant stimulation. Previously, p65, a component of the NF-kappa B complex, and GR have been shown to interact physically in vitro, and the interaction is assumed to take place in the nucleus of cells [McKay and Cidlowski (1999) Endocrine Rev. 20, 435-459]. We have studied the interaction between GR and NF-kappa B using in vivo -like conditions. Using immunoaffinity chromatography or immunoprecipitation, combined with Western blotting, we observed that, with endogenous protein levels in cytosolic extracts of rat liver and of H4-II-E-C3 hepatoma cells and in contrast with the current belief, p65, p50 and inhibitory kappa B alpha complex interact with GR, even in the absence of glucocorticoid or an inflammatory signal. The interaction between non-liganded/non-activated GR and p65/p50 has also been verified by both p65 and p50 co-immunoprecipitations. Intracellular localization studies, using Western blotting, revealed that glucocorticoids can decrease tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-induced nuclear entry of p65, whereas glucocorticoid-induced GR translocation was much less affected by TNFalpha. We were also able to demonstrate a nuclear interaction of GR and p65 and p50 using in vivo -like protein concentrations. Furthermore, nuclear GR interaction with heat-shock protein 90 was enhanced distinctly by TNFalpha treatment. In conclusion, our studies suggest a strong interconnectivity between the NF-kappa B and GR-signalling pathways where also, somewhat unexpectedly, a physical interaction in the cytosol constitutes an integral part of GR-NF-kappa B cross-talk.

  4. Neuroendocrine Function After Hypothalamic Depletion of Glucocorticoid Receptors in Male and Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Matia B; Loftspring, Matthew; de Kloet, Annette D; Ghosal, Sriparna; Jankord, Ryan; Flak, Jonathan N; Wulsin, Aynara C; Krause, Eric G; Zhang, Rong; Rice, Taylor; McKlveen, Jessica; Myers, Brent; Tasker, Jeffrey G; Herman, James P

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoids act rapidly at the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) to inhibit stress-excitatory neurons and limit excessive glucocorticoid secretion. The signaling mechanism underlying rapid feedback inhibition remains to be determined. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the canonical glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) is required for appropriate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation. Local PVN GR knockdown (KD) was achieved by breeding homozygous floxed GR mice with Sim1-cre recombinase transgenic mice. This genetic approach created mice with a KD of GR primarily confined to hypothalamic cell groups, including the PVN, sparing GR expression in other HPA axis limbic regulatory regions, and the pituitary. There were no differences in circadian nadir and peak corticosterone concentrations between male PVN GR KD mice and male littermate controls. However, reduction of PVN GR increased ACTH and corticosterone responses to acute, but not chronic stress, indicating that PVN GR is critical for limiting neuroendocrine responses to acute stress in males. Loss of PVN GR induced an opposite neuroendocrine phenotype in females, characterized by increased circadian nadir corticosterone levels and suppressed ACTH responses to acute restraint stress, without a concomitant change in corticosterone responses under acute or chronic stress conditions. PVN GR deletion had no effect on depression-like behavior in either sex in the forced swim test. Overall, these findings reveal pronounced sex differences in the PVN GR dependence of acute stress feedback regulation of HPA axis function. In addition, these data further indicate that glucocorticoid control of HPA axis responses after chronic stress operates via a PVN-independent mechanism.

  5. The role of glucocorticoids in pregnancy, parturition, lactation, and nurturing in melanocortin receptor 2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Chida, Dai; Miyoshi, Keiko; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Yoda, Tetsuya; Kikusui, Takefumi; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2011-04-01

    Maternal glucocorticoids are critical for fetal development, but overexpression can be deleterious. Previously we established a mouse line deficient in melanocortin receptor 2 (MC2R). MC2R(-/-) mice have undetectable levels of corticosterone despite high levels of ACTH and defects resembling those in patients with familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Here we analyzed the role of glucocorticoids in pregnancy, parturition, lactation, and nurturing in MC2R(-/-) mice. MC2R(-/-) mice were fertile and produced normal litters when crossed with MC2R(+/+) mice. However, MC2R(-/-) females crossed with MC2R(-/-) males had no live births, and approximately 20% of the embryos at d 18.5 of pregnancy were of normal body size but were dead when born. MC2R(-/-) pregnant females crossed with MC2R(+/+) males had detectable serum corticosterone levels, suggesting the transplacental passage of corticosterone from fetus to mother. MC2R(+/-) pups delivered from MC2R(-/-) females crossed with MC2R(+/+) males mice thrived poorly with MC2R(-/-) mothers but grew to adulthood when transferred to foster mothers after birth, suggesting that MC2R(-/-) females are poor mothers or cannot nurse. MC2R(-/-) females had normal alveoli, but penetration of mammary epithelium into fat pads and expression of milk proteins were reduced. Myoepithelial cells, which force milk out of the alveoli, were fully developed and differentiated. Pup retrieval behavior was normal in MC2R(-/-) mice. Exogenous corticosterone rescued expression of milk proteins in MC2R(-/-) mothers, and the pups of treated mothers grew to adulthood. Our results reveal the importance of glucocorticoids for fetal survival late in pregnancy, mammary gland development, and milk protein gene expression.

  6. Neuroendocrine Function After Hypothalamic Depletion of Glucocorticoid Receptors in Male and Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Loftspring, Matthew; de Kloet, Annette D.; Ghosal, Sriparna; Jankord, Ryan; Flak, Jonathan N.; Wulsin, Aynara C.; Krause, Eric G.; Zhang, Rong; Rice, Taylor; McKlveen, Jessica; Myers, Brent; Tasker, Jeffrey G.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids act rapidly at the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) to inhibit stress-excitatory neurons and limit excessive glucocorticoid secretion. The signaling mechanism underlying rapid feedback inhibition remains to be determined. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the canonical glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) is required for appropriate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation. Local PVN GR knockdown (KD) was achieved by breeding homozygous floxed GR mice with Sim1-cre recombinase transgenic mice. This genetic approach created mice with a KD of GR primarily confined to hypothalamic cell groups, including the PVN, sparing GR expression in other HPA axis limbic regulatory regions, and the pituitary. There were no differences in circadian nadir and peak corticosterone concentrations between male PVN GR KD mice and male littermate controls. However, reduction of PVN GR increased ACTH and corticosterone responses to acute, but not chronic stress, indicating that PVN GR is critical for limiting neuroendocrine responses to acute stress in males. Loss of PVN GR induced an opposite neuroendocrine phenotype in females, characterized by increased circadian nadir corticosterone levels and suppressed ACTH responses to acute restraint stress, without a concomitant change in corticosterone responses under acute or chronic stress conditions. PVN GR deletion had no effect on depression-like behavior in either sex in the forced swim test. Overall, these findings reveal pronounced sex differences in the PVN GR dependence of acute stress feedback regulation of HPA axis function. In addition, these data further indicate that glucocorticoid control of HPA axis responses after chronic stress operates via a PVN-independent mechanism. PMID:26046806

  7. Distinct, genome-wide, gene-specific selectivity patterns of four glucocorticoid receptor coregulators.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dai-Ying; Ou, Chen-Yin; Chodankar, Rajas; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Stallcup, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are a class of steroid hormones that bind to and activate the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which then positively or negatively regulates transcription of many genes that govern multiple important physiological pathways such as inflammation and metabolism of glucose, fat and bone. The remodeling of chromatin and regulated assembly or disassembly of active transcription complexes by GR and other DNA-binding transcription factors is mediated and modulated by several hundred transcriptional coregulator proteins. Previous studies focusing on single coregulators demonstrated that each coregulator is required for regulation of only a subset of all the genes regulated by a steroid hormone. We hypothesized that the gene-specific patterns of coregulators may correspond to specific physiological pathways such that different coregulators modulate the pathway-specificity of hormone action, thereby providing a mechanism for fine tuning of the hormone response. We tested this by direct comparison of multiple coregulators, using siRNA to deplete the products of four steroid hormone receptor coregulator genes (CCAR1, CCAR2, CALCOCO1 and ZNF282). Global analysis of glucocorticoid-regulated gene expression after siRNA mediated depletion of coregulators confirmed that each coregulator acted in a selective and gene-specific manner and demonstrated both positive and negative effects on glucocorticoid-regulated expression of different genes. We identified several classes of hormone-regulated genes based on the effects of coregulator depletion. Each coregulator supported hormonal regulation of some genes and opposed hormonal regulation of other genes (coregulator-modulated genes), blocked hormonal regulation of a second class of genes (coregulator-blocked genes), and had no effect on hormonal regulation of a third gene class (coregulator-independent genes). In spite of previously demonstrated physical and functional interactions among these four coregulators, the majority

  8. Down-regulation of cell surface insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation by inhibitor of 90-kDa heat-shock protein family: endoplasmic reticulum retention of monomeric insulin receptor precursor with calnexin in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tomokazu; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Shiraishi, Seiji; Yokoo, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Minami, Shin-Ichi; Onitsuka, Toshio; Wada, Akihiko

    2002-10-01

    Treatment (>/=6 h) of cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells with geldanamycin (GA) or herbimycin A (HA), an inhibitor of the 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) family, decreased cell surface (125)I-insulin binding. The effect of GA was concentration (EC(50) = 84 nM)- and time (t(1/2) = 8.5 h)-dependent; GA (1 microM for 24 h) lowered the B(max) value of (125)I-insulin binding by 80%, without changing the K(d) value. Western blot analysis showed that GA (>/=3 h) lowered insulin receptor (IR) level by 83% (t(1/2) = 7.4 h; EC(50) = 74 nM), while raising IR precursor level by 100% (t(1/2) = 7.9 h; EC(50) = 300 nM). Pulse-label followed by reducing and nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that monomeric IR precursor (~190 kDa) developed into the homodimeric IR precursor (approximately 380 kDa) and the mature alpha(2)beta(2) IR (~410 kDa) in nontreated cells, but not in GA-treated cells; in GA-treated cells, the homodimerization-incompetent form of monomeric IR precursor was degraded via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation. Immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot analysis showed that IR precursor was associated with calnexin (CNX) to a greater extent in GA-treated cells, compared with nontreated cells. GA had no effect on IR mRNA levels and internalization rate of cell surface IRs. In GA-treated cells, insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) was attenuated by 77%, with no change in IRS-1 level. Thus, inhibition of the Hsp90 family by GA or HA interrupts homodimerization of monomeric IR precursor in the ER and increases retention of monomeric IR precursor with CNX; this event retards cell surface expression of IR and attenuates insulin-induced activation of IRS-1.

  9. Ligand-induced repression of the glucocorticoid receptor gene is mediated by an NCoR1 repression complex formed by long-range chromatin interactions with intragenic glucocorticoid response elements.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Sivapriya; Cidlowski, John A

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are among the most potent and effective agents for treating inflammatory diseases and hematological cancers. However, subpopulations of patients are often resistant to steroid therapy, and determining the molecular mechanisms that contribute to glucocorticoid resistance is thus critical to addressing this clinical problem affecting patients with chronic inflammatory disorders. Since the cellular level of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a critical determinant of glucocorticoid sensitivity and resistance, we investigated the molecular mechanisms mediating repression of glucocorticoid receptor gene expression. We show here that glucocorticoid-induced repression of GR gene expression is mediated by inhibition of transcription initiation. This process is orchestrated by the recruitment of agonist-bound GR to exon 6, followed by the assembly of a GR-NCoR1-histone deacetylase 3-containing repression complex at the transcriptional start site of the GR gene. A functional negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE) in exon 6 of the GR gene and a long-range interaction occurring between this intragenic response element and the transcription start site appear to be instrumental in this repression. This autoregulatory mechanism of repression implies that the GR concentration can coordinate repression with excess ligand, regardless of the combinatorial associations of tissue-specific transcription factors. Consequently, the chronic nature of inflammatory conditions involving long-term glucocorticoid administration may lead to constitutive repression of GR gene transcription and thus to glucocorticoid resistance.

  10. Expression of glucocorticoid receptor and coactivators in ependymal cells of male rats.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kinuyo; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2014-08-29

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor which is widely distributed in the brain. Many types of neurons and glial cells are known to express GR, but the expression of GR in ependymal cells has yet to be identified. The present study therefore was undertaken to determine whether ependymal cells express GR and coactivators of GR, such as steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) and p300. GR immunoreactivity was found in cells immunopositive to vimentin, a marker of ependymal cells, around the third ventricle (3V), the lateral ventricle (LV), the cerebral aqueduct and the fourth ventricle (4V), whereas the expression of GR in vimentin-immunoreactive (ir) cells was significantly reduced by adrenalectomy (ADX) in male rats. Vimentin-ir cells also expressed both SRC-1 and p300 at around 3V, LV, the cerebral aqueduct and 4V. ADX had no effect on the expression of SRC-1 or p300 in vimentin-ir cells. These results suggest that glucocorticoid may exert effects on ependymal cells through binding to GR followed by association with SRC-1 and p300 to maintain brain environment under stressful conditions.

  11. Do smoking intensity-related differences in vigilance indicate altered glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity?

    PubMed

    Reuter, Martin; Hennig, Juergen; Netter, Petra

    2004-03-01

    The relationship of critical flicker fusion frequency (CFF) and a pharmacologically induced cortisol suppression by means of dexamethasone (DEX) and metyrapone (MET) was investigated during nicotine deprivation in a between-subjects design in 60 male smokers divided into light, medium and heavy smokers. DEX reduced vigilance in medium smokers and improved it in heavy smokers compared to placebo, whereas MET was more detrimental in heavy smokers. The hypothesis was put forward that the intensity of nicotine consumption is related to differences in glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor sensitivity.

  12. Requisite Role of Basolateral Amygdala Glucocorticoid Receptor Stimulation in Drug Context-Induced Cocaine-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stringfield, Sierra J.; Higginbotham, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to cocaine-associated stimuli triggers a robust rise in circulating glucocorticoid levels. Glucocorticoid receptors are richly expressed in the basolateral amygdala, a brain region that controls the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior upon exposure to a previously cocaine-paired environmental context. In the present study, we investigated whether glucocorticoid receptor stimulation in the basolateral amygdala is integral to drug context-induced motivation to seek cocaine in a rat model of drug relapse. Methods: Rats were trained to lever press for cocaine reinforcement in a distinct environmental context and were then given daily extinction training sessions in a different context. At test, the rats received bilateral glucocorticoid receptor antagonist (mifepristone; 3 or 10ng/hemisphere) or vehicle microinfusions into either the basolateral amygdala or the overlying posterior caudate-putamen (anatomical control region). Immediately thereafter, drug-seeking behavior (i.e., nonreinforced lever presses) was assessed in the previously cocaine-paired context and locomotor activity was assessed in a novel context. Results: Intra-basolateral amygdala, but not intra-posterior caudate-putamen, mifepristone dose-dependently attenuated drug context-induced cocaine-seeking behavior relative to vehicle, such that responding was similar to that observed in the extinction context. In contrast, mifepristone treatment did not alter locomotor activity. Conclusions: These findings suggest that basolateral amygdala glucocorticoid receptor stimulation is necessary for drug context-induced motivation to seek cocaine. PMID:27521756

  13. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mediates glucocorticoid effects on hormone secretion induced by volume and osmotic changes.

    PubMed

    Ruginsk, S G; Uchoa, E T; Elias, L L K; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    2012-02-01

    The present study provides the first in vivo evidence that the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mediates the effects of dexamethasone on hormone release induced by changes in circulating volume and osmolality. Male adult rats were administered with the CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (10 mg/Kg, p.o.), followed or not in 1 hour by dexamethasone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.). Extracellular volume expansion (EVE, 2 mL/100 g of body weight, i.v.) was performed 2 hours after dexamethasone or vehicle treatment using either isotonic (I-EVE, 0.15 mol/L) or hypertonic (H-EVE, 0.30 mol/L) NaCl solution. Five minutes after EVE, animals were decapitated and trunk blood was collected for all plasma measurements. Rimonabant potentiated oxytocin (OT) secretion induced by H-EVE and completely reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone in response to the same stimulus. These data suggest that glucocorticoid modulation of OT release is mediated by the CB(1) receptor. Although dexamethasone did not affect vasopressin (AVP) secretion induced by H-EVE, the administration of rimonabant potentiated AVP release in response to the same stimulus, supporting the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor regulates AVP secretion independently of glucocorticoid-mediated signalling. Dexamethasone alone did not affect atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release stimulated by I-EVE or H-EVE. However, pretreatment with rimonabant potentiated ANP secretion induced by H-EVE, suggesting a possible role for the CB(1) receptor in the control of peripheral factors that modulate cardiovascular function. Rimonabant also reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on H-EVE-induced corticosterone secretion, reinforcing the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor may be involved in the negative feedback exerted by glucocorticoids on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that the CB(1) receptor modulates neurohypophyseal hormone secretion and

  14. Dexamethasone enhances serum deprivation-induced necrotic death of rat C6 glioma cells through activation of glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Morita, K; Ishimura, K; Tsuruo, Y; Wong, D L

    1999-01-23

    Glucocorticoids have been shown to be neurotoxic and appear to play a role in neuronal cell loss during aging and following neuropathological insults. However, very little is known about the effects of these steroid hormones on glial cells. The effect of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) on glial cell viability was therefore examined by measuring neutral red uptake into rat C6 glioma cells. Serum deprivation markedly reduced cell viability, and this effect was significantly enhanced by DEX. Electrophoretic analysis showed that the cell damage induced by either serum deprivation alone or in combination with DEX was not accompanied by the degradation of DNA into nucleosomic fragments. Electron microscopic studies confirmed that serum deprivation and glucocorticoid treatment caused necrotic cell death. Furthermore, the effect of DEX on cell viability could be mimicked by the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU28362, and completely prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU38486. These results indicate that dexamethasone can enhance the necrotic death of glioma cells induced by serum deprivation, suggesting that glucocorticoids may be involved in the chronic alteration of brain function arising from neuropathological damage to glial cells.

  15. Isoform switching of steroid receptor co-activator-1 attenuates glucocorticoid-induced anxiogenic amygdala CRH expression.

    PubMed

    Zalachoras, I; Verhoeve, S L; Toonen, L J; van Weert, L T C M; van Vlodrop, A M; Mol, I M; Meelis, W; de Kloet, E R; Meijer, O C

    2016-12-01

    Maladaptive glucocorticoid effects contribute to stress-related psychopathology. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) that mediates many of these effects uses multiple signaling pathways. We have tested the hypothesis that manipulation of downstream factors ('coregulators') can abrogate potentially maladaptive GR-mediated effects on fear-motivated behavior that are linked to corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). For this purpose the expression ratio of two splice variants of steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) was altered via antisense-mediated 'exon-skipping' in the central amygdala of the mouse brain. We observed that a change in splicing towards the repressive isoform SRC-1a strongly reduced glucocorticoid-induced responsiveness of Crh mRNA expression and increased methylation of the Crh promoter. The transcriptional GR target gene Fkbp5 remained responsive to glucocorticoids, indicating gene specificity of the effect. The shift of the SRC-1 splice variants altered glucocorticoid-dependent exploratory behavior and attenuated consolidation of contextual fear memory. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that manipulation of GR signaling pathways related to the Crh gene can selectively diminish potentially maladaptive effects of glucocorticoids.

  16. Glucocorticoid Receptor, C/EBP, HNF3, and Protein Kinase A Coordinately Activate the Glucocorticoid Response Unit of the Carbamoylphosphate Synthetase I Gene

    PubMed Central

    Christoffels, Vincent M.; Grange, Thierry; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Cole, Timothy J.; Darlington, Gretchen J.; Croniger, Colleen M.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    1998-01-01

    A single far-upstream enhancer is sufficient to confer hepatocyte-specific, glucocorticoid- and cyclic AMP-inducible periportal expression to the carbamoylphosphate synthetase I (CPS) gene. To identify the mechanism of hormone-dependent activation, the composition and function of the enhancer have been analyzed. DNase I protection and gel mobility shift assays revealed the presence of a cyclic AMP response element, a glucocorticoid response element (GRE), and several sites for the liver-enriched transcription factor families HNF3 and C/EBP. The in vivo relevance of the transcription factors interacting with the enhancer in the regulation of CPS expression in the liver was assessed by the analysis of knockout mice. A strong reduction of CPS mRNA levels was observed in glucocorticoid receptor- and C/EBPα-deficient mice, whereas the CPS mRNA was normally expressed in C/EBPβ knockout mice and in HNF3α and -γ double-knockout mice. (The role of HNFβ could not be assessed, because the corresponding knockout mice die at embryonic day 10). In hepatoma cells, most of the activity of the enhancer is contained within a 103-bp fragment, which depends for its activity on the simultaneous occupation of the GRE, HNF3, and C/EBP sites, thus meeting the requirement of a glucocorticoid response unit. In fibroblast-like CHO cells, on the other hand, the GRE in the CPS enhancer does not cooperate with the C/EBP and HNF3 elements in transactivation of the CPS promoter. In both hepatoma and CHO cells, stimulation of expression by cyclic AMP depends mainly on the integrity of the glucocorticoid pathway, demonstrating cross talk between this pathway and the cyclic AMP (protein kinase A) pathway. PMID:9774647

  17. Noncoding RNA gas5 is a growth arrest- and starvation-associated repressor of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Kino, Tomoshige; Hurt, Darrell E; Ichijo, Takamasa; Nader, Nancy; Chrousos, George P

    2010-02-02

    The availability of nutrients influences cellular growth and survival by affecting gene transcription. Glucocorticoids also influence gene transcription and have diverse activities on cell growth, energy expenditure, and survival. We found that the growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5) noncoding RNA, which is abundant in cells whose growth has been arrested because of lack of nutrients or growth factors, sensitized cells to apoptosis by suppressing glucocorticoid-mediated induction of several responsive genes, including the one encoding cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2. Gas5 bound to the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by acting as a decoy glucocorticoid response element (GRE), thus competing with DNA GREs for binding to the GR. We conclude that Gas5 is a "riborepressor" of the GR, influencing cell survival and metabolic activities during starvation by modulating the transcriptional activity of the GR.

  18. Mechanisms for the Evolution of a Derived Function in the Ancestral Glucocorticoid Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Sean Michael; Ortlund, Eric A; Thornton, Joseph W.

    2012-03-16

    Understanding the genetic, structural, and biophysical mechanisms that caused protein functions to evolve is a central goal of molecular evolutionary studies. Ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) offers an experimental approach to these questions. Here we use ASR to shed light on the earliest functions and evolution of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a steroid-activated transcription factor that plays a key role in the regulation of vertebrate physiology. Prior work showed that GR and its paralog, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), duplicated from a common ancestor roughly 450 million years ago; the ancestral functions were largely conserved in the MR lineage, but the functions of GRs - reduced sensitivity to all hormones and increased selectivity for glucocorticoids - are derived. Although the mechanisms for the evolution of glucocorticoid specificity have been identified, how reduced sensitivity evolved has not yet been studied. Here we report on the reconstruction of the deepest ancestor in the GR lineage (AncGR1) and demonstrate that GR's reduced sensitivity evolved before the acquisition of restricted hormone specificity, shortly after the GR-MR split. Using site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, and computational analyses of protein stability to recapitulate and determine the effects of historical mutations, we show that AncGR1's reduced ligand sensitivity evolved primarily due to three key substitutions. Two large-effect mutations weakened hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions within the ancestral protein, reducing its stability. The degenerative effect of these two mutations is extremely strong, but a third permissive substitution, which has no apparent effect on function in the ancestral background and is likely to have occurred first, buffered the effects of the destabilizing mutations. Taken together, our results highlight the potentially creative role of substitutions that partially degrade protein structure and function and

  19. Glucocorticoid receptor signaling is essential for mesoderm formation and muscle development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nesan, Dinushan; Kamkar, Maryam; Burrows, Jeffrey; Scott, Ian C; Marsden, Mungo; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2012-03-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling is thought to play a key role in embryogenesis, but its specific developmental effects remain unclear. Cortisol is the primary ligand for GR activation in teleosts, and in zebrafish (Danio rerio), the prehatch embryo content of this steroid is of maternal origin. Using early zebrafish developmental stages, we tested the hypothesis that GR signaling is critical for embryo growth and hatching. In zebrafish, maternal GR mRNA is degraded quickly, followed by zygotic synthesis of the receptor. GR protein is widely expressed throughout early development, and we were able to knockdown this protein using morpholino oligonucleotides. This led to a more than 70% reduction in mRNA abundance of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (mmp13), a glucocorticoid-responsive gene. The GR morphants displayed delayed somitogenesis, defects in somite and tail morphogenesis, reduced embryo size, and rarely survived after hatch. This correlated with altered expression of myogenic markers, including myogenin, myostatin, and muscle-specific myosin heavy chain and troponin genes. A key finding was a 70-90% reduction in the mRNA abundance of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP), including bmp2a, bmp2b, and bmp4 in GR morphants. Bioinformatics analysis confirmed multiple putative glucocorticoid response elements upstream of these BMP genes. GR morphants displayed reduced expression of BMP-modulated genes, including eve1 and pax3. Zebrafish GR mRNA injection rescued the GR morphant phenotype and reversed the disrupted expression of BMP and myogenic genes. Our results for the first time indicate that GR signaling is essential for zebrafish muscle development, and we hypothesize a role for BMP morphogens in this process.

  20. Aminosulfhydryl and Aminodisulfide Compounds Enhance Binding of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Complex to Deoxyribonucleic Acid-Coated Cellulose and to Chromatin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    glucocorticoid receptor [21]. Diaminosulfhydryl chloroacetic acid was obtained from the Fisher compounds are more active at enhancing GRC Scientific...phase consisting of 0. I M BASE containing 25mM KCI and 3 mM chloroacetic acid and 5mM d/-10-camphorsul- MgCI2, pH 7.6 at 0 0C) was added to each tube...Enhance Binding of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Complex to Deoxy- ribonucleic Acid -Coated Cellulose and to Chromatin 4. AUThOR(S)’ J.M. Karle, R. Olmeda and

  1. Glucocorticoid receptors in primary cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells: characterization and modulation by prolactin and cortisol

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.; Shyamala, G.

    1985-06-01

    Mammary epithelial cells isolated from midpregant mice and cultured on collagen gels contain soluble glucocorticoid receptors. The kinetics of binding of dexamethasone reveal a saturable binding site (dissociation constant (K /sub d/), approximately 1 nM), and the binding site obeys a steroid specificity characteristic of a glucocorticoid receptor. As with the receptor isolated from intact glands, the receptor from the cultured cells also requires the addition of dithiothreitol for maximal binding of dexamethasone. The receptors are maintained at in vivo levels (approximately 1.3 pmol/mg DNA) for at least a period of 10 days in culture. However, the presence of both cortisol and PRL is required for the maintenance of the receptors, and the effect of both these hormones is dose dependent.

  2. Crucial role of the 5-HT2C receptor, but not of the 5-HT2A receptor, in the down regulation of stimulated dopamine release produced by pressure exposure in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Kriem, B; Rostain, J C; Abraini, J H

    1998-06-15

    Helium pressure of more than 2 MPa is a well known factor underlying pressure-dependent central neuroexcitatory disorders, referred to as the high-pressure neurological syndrome. This includes an increase in both serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) release. The relationship between the increase in 5-HT transmission produced by helium pressure and its effect on DA release has been clarified in a recent study, which have first demonstrated that the helium pressure-induced increase in DA release was dependent on some 5-HT receptor activation. In the present study, we examined in freely moving rats the role of 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors in the increase in DA release induced by 8 MPa helium pressure. We used the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin and the 5-HT2C receptor agonist m-CPP which have been demonstrated to reduce DA function. Because neither ketanserin is an ideal 5-HT2A receptor antagonist nor m-CPP an ideal 5-HT2C receptor agonist, additional experiments were made at normal pressure to check up on the selectivity of ketanserin and m-CPP for 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors, respectively. Administration of m-CPP reduced both DA basal level and the helium pressure-induced increase in DA release, whereas administration of ketanserin only showed a little effect on the increase in DA release produced by high helium pressure. These results suggest that the 5-HT2C receptor, but not the 5-HT2A receptor, would play a crucial role in the helium pressure-induced increase in DA release. This further suggests that helium pressure may simultaneously induce an increase in 5-HT transmission at the level of 5-HT2A receptors and a decrease in 5-HT transmission at the level of 5-HT2C receptors.

  3. Activated glucocorticoid receptor interacts with the INHAT component Set/TAF-Ibeta and releases it from a glucocorticoid-responsive gene promoter, relieving repression: implications for the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistance in acute undifferentiated leukemia with Set-Can translocation.

    PubMed

    Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P; Kino, Tomoshige

    2008-02-13

    Set/template-activating factor (TAF)-Ibeta, part of the Set-Can oncogene product found in acute undifferentiated leukemia, is a component of the inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) complex. Set/TAF-Ibeta interacted with the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in yeast two-hybrid screening, and repressed GR-induced transcriptional activity of a chromatin-integrated glucocorticoid-responsive and a natural promoter. Set/TAF-Ibeta was co-precipitated with glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) of these promoters in the absence of dexamethasone, while addition of the hormone caused dissociation of Set/TAF-Ibeta from and attraction of the p160-type coactivator GRIP1 to the promoter GREs. Set-Can fusion protein, on the other hand, did not interact with GR, was constitutively co-precipitated with GREs and suppressed GRIP1-induced enhancement of GR transcriptional activity and histone acetylation. Thus, Set/TAF-Ibeta acts as a ligand-activated GR-responsive transcriptional repressor, while Set-Can does not retain physiologic responsiveness to ligand-bound GR, possibly contributing to the poor responsiveness of Set-Can-harboring leukemic cells to glucocorticoids.

  4. Effects of histamine H1 receptor signaling on glucocorticoid receptor activity. Role of canonical and non-canonical pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zappia, Carlos Daniel; Granja-Galeano, Gina; Fernández, Natalia; Shayo, Carina; Davio, Carlos; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.; Monczor, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Histamine H1 receptor (H1R) antagonists and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonists are used to treat inflammatory conditions such as allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and asthma. Consistent with the high morbidity levels of such inflammatory conditions, these receptors are the targets of a vast number of approved drugs, and in many situations their ligands are co-administered. However, this drug association has no clear rationale and has arisen from clinical practice. We hypothesized that H1R signaling could affect GR-mediated activity, impacting on its transcriptional outcome. Indeed, our results show a dual regulation of GR activity by the H1R: a potentiation mediated by G-protein βγ subunits and a parallel inhibitory effect mediated by Gαq-PLC pathway. Activation of the H1R by its full agonists resulted in a composite potentiating effect. Intriguingly, inactivation of the Gαq-PLC pathway by H1R inverse agonists resulted also in a potentiation of GR activity. Moreover, histamine and clinically relevant antihistamines synergized with the GR agonist dexamethasone to induce gene transactivation and transrepression in a gene-specific manner. Our work provides a delineation of molecular mechanisms underlying the widespread clinical association of antihistamines and GR agonists, which may contribute to future dosage optimization and reduction of well-described side effects associated with glucocorticoid administration. PMID:26635083

  5. The glucocorticoid receptor type II complex is a target of the HIV-1 vpr gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Refaeli, Y; Levy, D N; Weiner, D B

    1995-01-01

    The vpr gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes a 15-kDa virion-associated protein that functions as a regulator of cellular processes linked to the HIV life cycle. We report the interaction of a 41-kDa cytosolic viral protein R interacting protein 1 (Rip-1) with Vpr in vitro. Rip-1 displays a wide tissue distribution, including relevant targets of HIV infection. Vpr protein induced nuclear translocation of Rip-1, as did glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-II-stimulating steroids. Importantly, Vpr and Rip-1 coimmunoprecipitated with the human GR as part of an activated receptor complex. Vpr complementation of a vpr mutant virus was also mimicked by GR-II-stimulating steroids. Vpr and GR-II actions were inhibited by mifepristone, a GR-II pathway inhibitor. Together these data directly link the activity of the vpr gene product to the glucocorticoid steroid pathway and provide a biochemical mechanism for the cellular and viral activity of Vpr, as well as suggest that a unique class of antivirals, which includes mifepristone (RU486), may influence HIV-1 replication. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7724608

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor represses proinflammatory genes at distinct steps of the transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Rebecca; Muse, Ginger W; Chinenov, Yurii; Adelman, Karen; Rogatsky, Inez

    2013-09-03

    Widespread anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoid hormones are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily. In conjunction with its corepressor GR-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1), GR tethers to the DNA-bound activator protein-1 and NF-κB and represses transcription of their target proinflammatory cytokine genes. However, these target genes fall into distinct classes depending on the step of the transcription cycle that is rate-limiting for their activation: Some are controlled through RNA polymerase II (PolII) recruitment and initiation, whereas others undergo signal-induced release of paused elongation complexes into productive RNA synthesis. Whether these genes are differentially regulated by GR is unknown. Here we report that, at the initiation-controlled inflammatory genes in primary macrophages, GR inhibited LPS-induced PolII occupancy. In contrast, at the elongation-controlled genes, GR did not affect PolII recruitment or transcription initiation but promoted, in a GRIP1-dependent manner, the accumulation of the pause-inducing negative elongation factor. Consistently, GR-dependent repression of elongation-controlled genes was abolished specifically in negative elongation factor-deficient macrophages. Thus, GR:GRIP1 use distinct mechanisms to repress inflammatory genes at different stages of the transcription cycle.

  7. Feed-forward inhibition of androgen receptor activity by glucocorticoid action in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Sean M; He, Bin; Newberg, Justin Y; Ochsner, Scott A; Loose, David S; Lanz, Rainer B; McKenna, Neil J; Buehrer, Benjamin M; McGuire, Sean E; Marcelli, Marco; Mancini, Michael A

    2012-09-21

    We compared transcriptomes of terminally differentiated mouse 3T3-L1 and human adipocytes to identify cell-specific differences. Gene expression and high content analysis (HCA) data identified the androgen receptor (AR) as both expressed and functional, exclusively during early human adipocyte differentiation. The AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) inhibited human adipocyte maturation by downregulation of adipocyte marker genes, but not in 3T3-L1. It is interesting that AR induction corresponded with dexamethasone activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR); however, when exposed to the differentiation cocktail required for adipocyte maturation, AR adopted an antagonist conformation and was transcriptionally repressed. To further explore effectors within the cocktail, we applied an image-based support vector machine (SVM) classification scheme to show that adipocyte differentiation components inhibit AR action. The results demonstrate human adipocyte differentiation, via GR activation, upregulates AR but also inhibits AR transcriptional activity.

  8. Thymic involution in the suspended rat - Adrenal hypertrophy and glucocorticoid receptor content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy is studied. The thymus, adrenal glands, and tissue water content are evaluated in male Sprague rats suspended in antiorthostatic (AO) or orthostatic (O) positions. A 50 percent decrease in the wet weight of the thymus and hypertrophy of the adrenal glands are observed during the seven days of AO suspension. After seven days of recovery the thymus weight is increased to control level; however, the hypertrophy of the adrenal glands remains unchanged. Thymic and renal responses in O postioned rats are similar to AO reactions. Thymic glucocorticoid (GC) receptor concentrations in the rats are analyzed; a 20 percent decrease in GC receptor site concentration, which is related to thymic involution, is detected in both AO and O rats. It is concluded that there is a temporal correlation between thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy, which is not affected by AO positioning, and thymic involution is not associated with an increased sensitivity to GC.

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor isoforms direct distinct mitochondrial programs to regulate ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, David J.; Poolman, Toryn M.; Williamson, Andrew J. K.; Wang, Zichen; Clark, Neil R.; Ma’ayan, Avi; Whetton, Anthony D.; Brass, Andrew; Matthews, Laura C.; Ray, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a nuclear receptor and major drug target, has a highly conserved minor splice variant, GRγ, which differs by a single arginine within the DNA binding domain. GRγ, which comprises 10% of all GR transcripts, is constitutively expressed and tightly conserved through mammalian evolution, suggesting an important non-redundant role. However, to date no specific role for GRγ has been reported. We discovered significant differences in subcellular localisation, and nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling in response to ligand. In addition the GRγ transcriptome and protein interactome was distinct, and with a gene ontology signal for mitochondrial regulation which was confirmed using Seahorse technology. We propose that evolutionary conservation of the single additional arginine in GRγ is driven by a distinct, non-redundant functional profile, including regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:27226058

  10. Glucocorticoids and the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Julie E

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids affect the developing and mature cardiovascular system in profound and, at times, contradictory ways. The glucocorticoid receptor is ubiquitous in most cell types and conserved across species, highlighting its importance in development and homeostasis. Despite the fact that the glucocorticoid receptor is widely expressed, tissue-specific effects of glucocorticoids may have pronounced effects on whole organism phenotypes. Here we will review the interactions between glucocorticoids and the cardiovascular system.

  11. Blockade of glucocorticoid receptors with ORG 34116 does not normalize stress-induced symptoms in male tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Van Kampen, Marja; De Kloet, E Ronald; Flügge, Gabriele; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2002-12-20

    Glucocorticoid receptors play an important role in the regulation of the activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, and are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. The present study investigated the effect of the specific glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 (a substituted 11,21 bisarylsteroid compound) in the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) chronic psychosocial stress model, an established animal model for depressive disorders. Animals were stressed for 10 days before treatment with ORG 34116 started (25 mg/kg p.o. for 28 days). Stress induced a decrease in body weight, which just failed significance, whereas ORG 34116 did not affect body weight in stress and control animals. ORG 34116 enhanced the stress-induced increase in the concentration of urinary-free cortisol, although no differences between the different experimental groups existed during the last week of treatment. In stressed animals, ORG 34116 did not affect marking behavior, but decreased locomotor activity. Post mortem analysis of 5-HT(1A) receptors revealed a decreased affinity of 3[H]-8-OH-DPAT (3[H]-8-hydroxy-2-[di-n-propylamino]tetralin) binding sites in the hippocampus of animals treated with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. In conclusion, under our experimental conditions, the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 did not normalize the depressive-like symptoms in the psychosocial stress model of male tree shrews. This finding, however, does not exclude that specific central, neuroendocrine and behavioral features are affected by the compound.

  12. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state. - Highlights: • DEX facilitates the transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • GR is involved in DEX-dependent transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • A 17 bp repeat is responsible for the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX. • An NF-I-like protein is involved in the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX.

  13. Expression of glucocorticoid receptors α and ß in steroid sensitive and steroid insensitive interstitial lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pujols, L; Xaubet, A; Ramirez, J; Mullol, J; Roca-Ferrer, J; Torrego, A; Cidlowski, J; Picado, C

    2004-01-01

    Background: Sensitivity to glucocorticoids may be related to the concentration of glucocorticoid receptors α (GRα) and ß (GRß). A study was undertaken to assess GRα and GRß expression in steroid insensitive interstitial lung disease (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)) and steroid sensitive interstitial lung diseases (sarcoidosis and cryptogenic organising pneumonia (COP)). Methods: Lung tissue was obtained from control subjects and from patients with IPF, sarcoidosis, and COP. Pulmonary function tests were carried out at the time of lung biopsy and every 3 months. GRα and GRß expression was evaluated by both competitive RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Data are presented as median and 25–75th percentile. Results: GRα mRNA expression (105 cDNA copies/µg total RNA) was higher in patients with steroid sensitive interstitial lung diseases (10.0; 7.8–14.9; n = 11) than in patients with IPF (4.4; 3.2–6.6; n = 19; p<0.001). GRß expression was at least 1000 times lower than that of GRα and did not differ between the three groups. A negative correlation was found between GRα mRNA levels and the fibrotic pathology score of the tissue (r = –0.484, p<0.01) and a positive correlation was found between GRα mRNA levels and improvement in forced vital capacity (r = 0.633; p<0.01) after treatment of patients with glucocorticoids. Immunoreactivity for GR protein was also higher in patients with sarcoidosis and COP than in those with IPF. Conclusion: The variable response of some interstitial lung diseases to steroid treatment may be the result of differences in the expression of GRα. PMID:15282390

  14. Ligand structural motifs can decouple glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activation from target promoter occupancy.

    PubMed

    Blind, Raymond D; Pineda-Torra, Inés; Xu, Yong; Xu, H Eric; Garabedian, Michael J

    2012-04-20

    Glucocorticoid (GC) induction of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a classic model used to investigate steroid-regulated gene expression. Classic studies analyzing GC-induction of the TAT gene demonstrated that despite having very high affinity for GR, some steroids cannot induce maximal TAT enzyme activity, but the molecular basis for this phenomenon is unknown. Here, we used RT-PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation to determine TAT mRNA accumulation and GR recruitment to the TAT promoter (TAT-GRE) in rat hepatoma cells induced by seven GR ligands: dexamethasone (DEX), cortisol (CRT), corticosterone (CCS), 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), aldosterone (ALD), progesterone (PRG) and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17P). As expected, DEX, CRT, CCS and ALD all induced both TAT mRNA and GR recruitment to the TAT-GRE, while PRG and 17P did not. However, while DOC could not induce significant TAT mRNA, it did induce robust GR occupancy of the TAT-GRE. DOC also induced recruitment of the histone acetyltransferase p300 to the TAT-GRE as efficiently as DEX. These DOC-induced effects recapitulated at another GR target gene (sulfonyltransferase 1A1), and DOC also failed to promote the multiple changes in gene expression required for glucocorticoid-dependent 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Structural simulations and protease sensitivity assays suggest that DOC and DEX induce different conformations in GR. Thus, although steroids that bind GR with high affinity can induce GR and p300 occupancy of target promoters, they may not induce a conformation of GR capable of activating transcription.

  15. DNA binding triggers tetramerization of the glucocorticoid receptor in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Presman, Diego M.; Ganguly, Sourav; Schiltz, R. Louis; Johnson, Thomas A.; Karpova, Tatiana S.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors dynamically bind to chromatin and are essential for the regulation of genes. Although a large percentage of these proteins appear to self-associate to form dimers or higher order oligomers, the stoichiometry of DNA-bound transcription factors has been poorly characterized in vivo. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ligand-regulated transcription factor widely believed to act as a dimer or a monomer. Using a unique set of imaging techniques coupled with a cell line containing an array of DNA binding elements, we show that GR is predominantly a tetramer when bound to its target DNA. We find that DNA binding triggers an interdomain allosteric regulation within the GR, leading to tetramerization. We therefore propose that dynamic changes in GR stoichiometry represent a previously unidentified level of regulation in steroid receptor activation. Quaternary structure analysis of other members of the steroid receptor family (estrogen, androgen, and progesterone receptors) reveals variation in oligomerization states among this family of transcription factors. Because GR’s oligomerization state has been implicated in therapy outcome, our findings open new doors to the rational design of novel GR ligands and redefine the quaternary structure of steroid receptors. PMID:27382178

  16. The BclI polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene is associated with emotional memory performance in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Sandra; Heck, Angela; Rasch, Björn; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2013-07-01

    Glucocorticoids, stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex, are important players in the regulation of emotional memory. Specifically, in animals and in humans, glucocorticoids enhance memory consolidation of emotionally arousing experiences, but impair memory retrieval. These glucocorticoid actions are partly mediated by glucocorticoid receptors in the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex, key brain regions for emotional memory. In a recent study in patients who underwent cardiac surgery, the BclI polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) was associated with traumatic memories and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms after intensive care therapy. Based on this finding, we investigated if the BclI polymorphism is also associated with emotional memory in healthy young subjects (N=841). We used a picture-learning task consisting of learning and recalling neutral and emotional photographs on two consecutive days. The BclI variant was associated with short-delay recall of emotional pictures on both days, with GG carriers showing increased emotional memory performance as compared to GC and CC carriers. We did not detect a genotype-dependent difference in recall performance for neutral pictures. These findings suggest that the Bcll polymorphism contributes to inter-individual differences in emotional memory also in healthy humans.

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor activation lowers the threshold for NMDA-receptor-dependent homosynaptic long-term depression in the hippocampus through activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Coussens, C M; Kerr, D S; Abraham, W C

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 on homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) were examined in hippocampal slices obtained from adrenal-intact adult male rats. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials were evoked by stimulation of the Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway and recorded in stratum radiatum of area CA1. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) was delivered at LTD threshold (2 bouts of 600 pulses, 1 Hz, at baseline stimulation intensity). LFS of the Schaffer collaterals did not produce significant homosynaptic LTD in control slices. However, identical conditioning in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 (10 microM) produced a robust LTD, which was blocked by the selective glucocorticoid antagonist RU-38486. The LTD induced by glucocorticoid receptor activation was dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity, because the specific NMDA receptor antagonist D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5) blocked the facilitation. However, the facilitation of LTD was not due to a potentiation of the isolated NMDA receptor potential by RU-28362. The facilitation of LTD by RU-28362 was also blocked by coincubation of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) antagonist nimodipine. Selective activation of the L-type VDCCs by the agonist Bay K 8644 also facilitated LTD induction. Both nimodipine and D-AP5 were effective in blocking the facilitation of LTD by Bay K 8644. These results indicate that L-type VDCCs can contribute to NMDA-receptor-dependent LTD induction.

  18. Amphiregulin induces human ovarian cancer cell invasion by down-regulating E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    So, Wai-Kin; Fan, Qianlan; Lau, Man-Tat; Qiu, Xin; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Leung, Peter C K

    2014-11-03

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation is associated with ovarian cancer progression. In this study, we report that the EGFR ligand amphiregulin (AREG) stimulates cell invasion and down-regulates E-cadherin expression in two human ovarian cancer cell lines, SKOV3 and OVCAR5. In addition, AREG increases the expression of transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin including SNAIL, SLUG and ZEB1. siRNA targeting SNAIL or SLUG abolishes AREG-induced cell invasion. Moreover, ERK1/2 and AKT pathways are involved in AREG-induced E-cadherin down-regulation and cell invasion. Finally, we show that three EGFR ligands, AREG, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), exhibit comparable effects in down-regulating E-cadherin and promoting cell invasion. This study demonstrates that AREG induces ovarian cancer cell invasion by down-regulating E-cadherin expression.

  19. Subchronic glucocorticoid receptor inhibition rescues early episodic memory and synaptic plasticity deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lanté, Fabien; Chafai, Magda; Raymond, Elisabeth Fabienne; Pereira, Ana Rita Salgueiro; Mouska, Xavier; Kootar, Scherazad; Barik, Jacques; Bethus, Ingrid; Marie, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The early phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by hippocampus-dependent memory deficits and impaired synaptic plasticity. Increasing evidence suggests that stress and dysregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, marked by the elevated circulating glucocorticoids, are risk factors for AD onset. How these changes contribute to early hippocampal dysfunction remains unclear. Using an elaborated version of the object recognition task, we carefully monitored alterations in key components of episodic memory, the first type of memory altered in AD patients, in early symptomatic Tg2576 AD mice. We also combined biochemical and ex vivo electrophysiological analyses to reveal novel cellular and molecular dysregulations underpinning the onset of the pathology. We show that HPA axis, circadian rhythm, and feedback mechanisms, as well as episodic memory, are compromised in this early symptomatic phase, reminiscent of human AD pathology. The cognitive decline could be rescued by subchronic in vivo treatment with RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. These observed phenotypes were paralleled by a specific enhancement of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR)-dependent LTD in CA1 pyramidal neurons, whereas LTP and metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent LTD remain unchanged. NMDAR transmission was also enhanced. Finally, we show that, as for the behavioral deficit, RU486 treatment rescues this abnormal synaptic phenotype. These preclinical results define glucocorticoid signaling as a contributing factor to both episodic memory loss and early synaptic failure in this AD mouse model, and suggest that glucocorticoid receptor targeting strategies could be beneficial to delay AD onset.

  20. In vitro activation of rat cardiac glucocorticoid antagonist- versus agonist-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, T J; Diehl, E E

    1988-06-30

    The synthetic antiglucocorticoid RU 38486 interacts with cardiac cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptors and competes for in vitro binding with the potent agonist triamcinolone acetonide. In addition to binding to receptors with high affinity, RU 38486 also facilitates the in vitro conformational change in the receptor which is a consequence of the physiologically relevant activation step during which the receptor is converted from a non DNA- to a DNA-binding form. This ability of RU 38486 to promote receptor activation is reflected by both the appropriate shift in the elution profile of [3H]RU 38486-receptor complexes from DEAE-cellulose as well as by an increased binding of these complexes to DNA-cellulose. Although less effective than triamcinolone acetonide, RU 38486 promotes in vitro receptor activation under a variety of experimental conditions, including incubation of labeled cardiac cytosols at 25 degrees C for 30 min or at 15 degrees C for 30 min in the presence of 5 mM pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Once thermally activated, the cardiac [3H]triamcinolone acetonide and [3H]RU 38486-receptor complexes bind to nonspecific DNA-cellulose with the same relative affinities, as evidenced by the fact that 50% of both activated complexes are eluted at approx. 215-250 mM NaCl. Thus, this pure antiglucocorticoid does promote, at least to some extent, many of the crucial in vitro events including high-affinity binding, activation, and DNA binding which have been shown to be required to elicit a physiological response in vivo.

  1. Effect of glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphisms in Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Marieke J H J; van den Akker, Erica L T; Koper, Jan Willem; Manenschijn, Laura; Geleijns, Karin; Ruts, Liselotte; van Rijs, Wouter; Tio-Gillen, Anne P; van Doorn, Pieter A; Lamberts, Steven W J; Jacobs, Bart C

    2009-06-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a postinfectious immune-mediated polyneuroradiculopathy in which host factors influence disease susceptibility and clinical course. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene influence the sensitivity to glucocorticoids and are related to both microbial colonization and susceptibility to develop auto-immune disease. This genetic variation may therefore also influence the chance to develop GBS. In this study, we genotyped 318 GBS patients and 210 control subjects for five known SNPs in the GR gene. We could distinguish six different GR haplotypes of which two carried the BclI polymorphism: haplotype 1, which consists of the minor allele of BclI in combination with the common variant of TthIIII and haplotype 2, which carries the minor allele of BclI as well as the minor allele of TthIIII. The GR haplotypes were not related to susceptibility to develop GBS. Carriers of haplotype 2 had more frequently preceding diarrhea, serum antibodies to GM1 and GD1a, and more severe muscle weakness at entry. Haplotype 1 carriers had a significantly better prognosis. In conclusion, GR haplotypes are not a susceptibility factor for GBS. However, haplotypes carrying the minor allele of the BclI polymorphism were related to the phenotype and outcome of GBS.

  2. Arsenic alters the function of the glucocorticoid receptor as a transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Kaltreider, R C; Davis, A M; Lariviere, J P; Hamilton, J W

    2001-01-01

    Chronic human exposure to nonovertly toxic doses of arsenic is associated with an increased risk of cancer. Although its carcinogenic mechanism is still unknown, arsenic does not directly cause DNA damage or mutations and is therefore thought to act principally as a co-mutagen, co-carcinogen, and/or tumor promoter. Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated that effects of low-dose arsenic (III) (arsenite) on expression of the hormone-regulated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene were strongly associated with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated regulatory pathway. We therefore examined specifically the effects of arsenite on the biochemical function of GR in hormone-responsive H4IIE rat hepatoma cells. Completely noncytotoxic arsenite treatments (0.3-3.3 microM) significantly decreased dexamethasone-induced expression of transiently transfected luciferase constructs containing either an intact hormone-responsive promoter from the mammalian PEPCK gene or two tandem glucocorticoid response elements (GRE). Western blotting and confocal microscopy of a green fluorescent protein-tagged-GR fusion protein demonstrated that arsenite pretreatment did not block the normal dexamethasone-induced nuclear translocation of GR. These data indicate that nontoxic doses of arsenite can interact directly with GR complexes and selectively inhibit GR-mediated transcription, which is associated with altered nuclear function rather than a decrease in hormone-induced GR activation or nuclear translocation. PMID:11333185

  3. Effects of a glucocorticoid receptor agonist, dexamethasone, on fathead minnow reproduction, growth, and development.

    PubMed

    LaLone, Carlie A; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Olmstead, Allen W; Medlock, Elizabeth K; Kahl, Michael D; Jensen, Kathleen M; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Blanksma, Chad A; Cavallin, Jenna E; Thomas, Linnea M; Seidl, Sara M; Skolness, Sarah Y; Wehmas, Leah C; Johnson, Rodney D; Ankley, Gerald T

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids are pharmaceutical compounds prescribed in human and veterinary medicine as anti-inflammatory agents and have the potential to contaminate natural watersheds via inputs from wastewater treatment facilities and confined animal-feeding operations. Despite this, few studies have examined the effects of this class of chemicals on aquatic vertebrates. To generate data to assess potential risk to the aquatic environment, we used fathead minnow 21-d reproduction and 29-d embryo-larvae assays to determine reproductive toxicity and early-life-stage effects of dexamethasone. Exposure to 500 µg dexamethasone/L in the 21-d test caused reductions in fathead minnow fecundity and female plasma estradiol concentrations and increased the occurrence of abnormally hatched fry. Female fish exposed to 500 µg dexamethasone/L also displayed a significant increase in plasma vitellogenin protein levels, possibly because of decreased spawning. A decrease in vitellogenin messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression in liver tissue from females exposed to the high dexamethasone concentration lends support to this hypothesis. Histological results indicate that a 29-d embryo-larval exposure to 500 µg dexamethasone/L caused a significant increase in deformed gill opercula. Fry exposed to 500 µg dexamethasone/L for 29 d also exhibited a significant reduction in weight and length compared with control fry. Taken together, these results indicate that nonlethal concentrations of a model glucocorticoid receptor agonist can impair fish reproduction, growth, and development.

  4. Maturation and maintenance of cholinergic medial septum neurons require glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, Christian; Rutz, Susanne; Rothmaier, Katharina; Turiault, Marc; Zhi, Qixia; Naumann, Thomas; Frotscher, Michael; Tronche, Francois; Jackisch, Rolf; Kretz, Oliver

    2006-05-01

    Glucocorticoids have been shown to influence trophic processes in the nervous system. In particular, they seem to be important for the development of cholinergic neurons in various brain regions. Here, we applied a genetic approach to investigate the role of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) on the maturation and maintenance of cholinergic medial septal neurons between P15 and one year of age by using a mouse model carrying a CNS-specific conditional inactivation of the GR gene (GRNesCre). The number of choline acetyltransferase and p75NTR immuno-positive neurons in the medial septum (MS) was analyzed by stereology in controls versus mutants. In addition, cholinergic fiber density, acetylcholine release and cholinergic key enzyme activity of these neurons were determined in the hippocampus. We found that in GRNesCre animals the number of medial septal cholinergic neurons was significantly reduced during development. In addition, cholinergic cell number further decreased with aging in these mutants. The functional GR gene is therefore required for the proper maturation and maintenance of medial septal cholinergic neurons. However, the loss of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum is not accompanied by a loss of functional cholinergic parameters of these neurons in their target region, the hippocampus. This pinpoints to plasticity of the septo-hippocampal system, that seems to compensate for the septal cell loss by sprouting of the remaining neurons.

  5. Glucocorticoid--receptor interactions. Studies of the negative co-operativity induced by steroid interactions with a secondary, hydrophobic, binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T R; Bell, P A

    1980-01-01

    The effects of steroids on the binding of [1,2-3H]dexamethasone and [1,2-3H]progesterone to the glucocorticoid receptor of rat thymus cytosol were studied. Although both glucocorticoid agonists and antagonists competed with [1,2-3H]dexamethasone for binding to the receptor under equilibrium conditions, only glucocorticoid antagonists of partial agonists, at micromolar concentrations, were capable of accelerating the rate of dissociation of previously bound [1,2-3H]dexamethasone from the receptor. Antagonists or partial agonists also enhanced the rate of dissociation of [1,2-3H]progesterone from the glucocorticoid receptor, with identical specificity and concentration--response characteristics. These effects are attributed to the presence on the receptor of a secondary, low-affinity, binding site for glucocorticoid antagonists, the occupancy of which produces negatively co-operative interactions with the primary glucocorticoid-binding site. In contrast with the interactions with the primary site, the interactions of steroids with the negatively co-operative site appear to be primarily hydrophobic in nature, and the site resembles the steroid-binding site of progestin-binding proteins in its specificity, though not its affinity. The results also suggest that the initial interactions of both glucocorticoid agonists and antagonists with the receptor under equilibrium conditions are with one primary site on a receptor existing in one conformation only. PMID:7406882

  6. Control of energy balance by hypothalamic gene circuitry involving two nuclear receptors, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 and glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Gyun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kim, Juhee; Lee, Seunghee; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Jae W

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate diverse physiological processes, including the central nervous system control of energy balance. However, the molecular mechanisms for the central actions of NRs in energy balance remain relatively poorly defined. Here we report a hypothalamic gene network involving two NRs, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR1) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which directs the regulated expression of orexigenic neuropeptides agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in response to peripheral signals. Our results suggest that the anorexigenic signal leptin induces NOR1 expression likely via the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), while the orexigenic signal glucocorticoid mobilizes GR to inhibit NOR1 expression by antagonizing the action of CREB. Also, NOR1 suppresses glucocorticoid-dependent expression of AgRP and NPY. Consistently, relative to wild-type mice, NOR1-null mice showed significantly higher levels of AgRP and NPY and were less responsive to leptin in decreasing the expression of AgRP and NPY. These results identify mutual antagonism between NOR1 and GR to be a key rheostat for peripheral metabolic signals to centrally control energy balance.

  7. Nuclear export of the glucocorticoid receptor is accelerated by cell fusion-dependent release of calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Walther, Rhian F; Lamprecht, Claudia; Ridsdale, Andrew; Groulx, Isabelle; Lee, Stephen; Lefebvre, Yvonne A; Haché, Robert J G

    2003-09-26

    Nucleocytoplasmic exchange of nuclear hormone receptors is hypothesized to allow for rapid and direct interactions with cytoplasmic signaling factors. In addition to recycling between a naïve, chaperone-associated cytoplasmic complex and a liganded chaperone-free nuclear form, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been observed to shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm. Nuclear export of GR and other nuclear receptors has been proposed to depend on direct interactions with calreticulin, which is predominantly localized to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that rapid calreticulin-mediated nuclear export of GR is a specific response to transient disruption of the endoplasmic reticulum that occurs during polyethylene glycol-mediated cell fusion. Using live and digitonin-permeabilized cells we demonstrate that, in the absence of cell fusion, GR nuclear export occurs slowly over a period of many hours independent of direct interaction with calreticulin. Our findings temper expectations that nuclear receptors respond rapidly and directly to cytoplasmic signals in the absence of additional regulatory control. These results highlight the importance of verifying findings of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking using techniques in addition to heterokaryon cell fusion.

  8. Thymic involution in the suspended rat model for weightlessness - Decreased glucocorticoid receptor concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1984-01-01

    Hindlimb muscle atrophy, thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy in rats during spaceflight can be simulated using suspension models. Skeletal muscle and thymus are sensitive to gluco-corticoids (GC), and previous studies have demonstrated that muscle atrophy in suspended rats is associated with increased GC receptor concentration. The objectives were to confirm thymic involution during suspension, and determine if involution correlated with increased GC receptor concentration. Seven days of antiorthostatic (AO) suspension of rats produced a significant (P less than 0.001) reduction in thymic wet weight not associated with an alteration of percent water content. GC receptor concentration (pmol/mg protein) decreased 20 percent (P less than 0.025) in thymus glands from 7 day AO suspended rats. Suspension, therefore, is associated with involution of the thymus, but this is not dependent upon AO positioning. Thymus GC receptor concentrations were depressed in 7-day suspended rats, in contrast with previous observations on skeletal muscle, suggesting that different mechanisms may underlie these responses.

  9. Disruption of the glucocorticoid receptor assembly with heat shock protein 90 by a peptidic antiglucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Dao-Phan, H P; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-06-01

    Association of glucocorticoid (GR) and progesterone (PR) receptors with a set of molecular chaperones, including the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90), is a dynamic process required for proper folding and maintaining these nuclear receptors under a transcriptionally inactive, ligand-responsive state. Mutational studies of the chicken hsp90 complementary DNA suggested that three regions of this protein (A, B, and Z) interact with the hormone-binding domain of GR, whereas region A is dispensable for hsp90 binding to PR. We found that this 69-amino acid region can be narrowed down to a 35-mer alpha-helical, acidic peptide, which is by itself able to inhibit hsp90 association to GR translated in vitro. The hsp90-free GR did not bind ligand, but was devoid of any specific DNA-binding activity, and higher peptide concentrations specifically inhibited the binding of activated GR to DNA. When overexpressed in cultured cells, this peptide acted as an antiglucocorticoid and inhibited the antiactivating protein-1 activity and the ligand-dependent nuclear transfer of GR. None of these effects, either in vivo and in vitro, was observed for PR. The region from residue 232 to residue 265 of hsp90 is, therefore, a domain critical for its association to GR, an association that is a prerequisite for receptor transcriptional activity. More importantly, these results demonstrate that targeting specific protein/protein interaction interfaces is a powerful means to specifically modulate nuclear receptor signaling pathways in a ligand-independent manner.

  10. Distribution and Abundance of Glucocorticoid and Mineralocorticoid Receptors throughout the Brain of the Great Tit (Parus major)

    PubMed Central

    Senft, Rebecca A.; Meddle, Simone L.; Baugh, Alexander T.

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid stress response, regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, enables individuals to cope with stressors through transcriptional effects in cells expressing the appropriate receptors. The two receptors that bind glucocorticoids—the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)—are present in a variety of vertebrate tissues, but their expression in the brain is especially important. Neural receptor patterns have the potential to integrate multiple behavioral and physiological traits simultaneously, including self-regulation of glucocorticoid secretion through negative feedback processes. In the present work, we quantified the expression of GR and MR mRNA throughout the brain of a female great tit (Parus major), creating a distribution map encompassing 48 regions. This map, the first of its kind for P. major, demonstrated a widespread but not ubiquitous distribution of both receptor types. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the hippocampus (HP)—the two brain regions that we sampled from a total of 25 birds, we found high GR mRNA expression in the former and, unexpectedly, low MR mRNA in the latter. We examined the covariation of MR and GR levels in these two regions and found a strong, positive relationship between MR in the PVN and MR in the HP and a similar trend for GR across these two regions. This correlation supports the idea that hormone pleiotropy may constrain an individual’s behavioral and physiological phenotype. In the female song system, we found moderate GR in hyperstriatum ventrale, pars caudalis (HVC), and moderate MR in robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA). Understanding intra- and interspecific patterns of glucocorticoid receptor expression can inform us about the behavioral processes (e.g. song learning) that may be sensitive to stress and stimulate future hypotheses concerning the relationships between receptor expression, circulating hormone concentrations

  11. Glucocorticoid receptor in T cells mediates protection from autoimmunity in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Engler, Jan Broder; Kursawe, Nina; Solano, María Emilia; Patas, Kostas; Wehrmann, Sabine; Heckmann, Nina; Lühder, Fred; Reichardt, Holger M.; Arck, Petra Clara; Gold, Stefan M.

    2017-01-01

    Pregnancy is one of the strongest inducers of immunological tolerance. Disease activity of many autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) is temporarily suppressed by pregnancy, but little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here, we investigated the endocrine regulation of conventional and regulatory T cells (Tregs) during reproduction. In vitro, we found the pregnancy hormone progesterone to robustly increase Treg frequencies via promiscuous binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in T cells. In vivo, T-cell–specific GR deletion in pregnant animals undergoing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS, resulted in a reduced Treg increase and a selective loss of pregnancy-induced protection, whereas reproductive success was unaffected. Our data imply that steroid hormones can shift the immunological balance in favor of Tregs via differential engagement of the GR in T cells. This newly defined mechanism confers protection from autoimmunity during pregnancy and represents a potential target for future therapy. PMID:28049829

  12. The first intron of the human growth hormone gene contains a binding site for glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Moore, D D; Marks, A R; Buckley, D I; Kapler, G; Payvar, F; Goodman, H M

    1985-02-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) protein stimulates transcription from a variety of cellular genes. We show here that GCR partially purified from rat liver binds specifically to a site within the first intron of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene, approximately 100 base pairs downstream from the start of hGH transcription. GCR binding is selectively inhibited by methylation of two short, symmetrically arranged clusters of guanine residues within this site. A cloned synthetic 24-base-pair deoxyoligonucleotide containing the predicted GCR binding sequence interacts specifically with GCR. The hGH binding site shares sequence homology with a GCR binding site upstream from the human metallothionein II gene and a subset of GCR binding sites from mouse mammary tumor virus. All of these binding sites for this eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory protein show remarkable similarity in overall geometry to the binding sites for several prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  13. The glucocorticoid receptor hormone binding domain mediates transcriptional activation in vitro in the absence of ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, J; Stunnenberg, H G

    1993-01-01

    We show that recombinant rat glucocorticoid receptor (vvGR) expressed using vaccinia virus is indistinguishable from authentic GR with respect to DNA and hormone binding. In the absence of hormone, vvGR is mainly found in the cytoplasm in a complex with heat shock protein 90. Upon incubation with ligand, vvGR is released from this complex and translocated to the nucleus. Thus, the ligand binding domain displays the known biochemical properties. However, in vitro, transcription from a synthetic promoter and from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is enhanced by recombinant GR in a ligand independent manner. Both transactivation domains contribute to the transcriptional activity, additively on a synthetic promoter and cooperatively on the MMTV promoter. We thus provide the first evidence that in vitro the hormone binding domain has a transcriptional activity even in the absence of ligand. Images PMID:8392705

  14. A naturally occurring insertion of a single amino acid rewires transcriptional regulation by glucocorticoid receptor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Watson, Lisa C; Cooper, Samantha B; Pufall, Miles A; Liu, Jennifer S; Borzym, Katja; Vingron, Martin; Yamamoto, Keith R; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2013-10-29

    In addition to guiding proteins to defined genomic loci, DNA can act as an allosteric ligand that influences protein structure and activity. Here we compared genome-wide binding, transcriptional regulation, and, using NMR, the conformation of two glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoforms that differ by a single amino acid insertion in the lever arm, a domain that adopts DNA sequence-specific conformations. We show that these isoforms differentially regulate gene expression levels through two mechanisms: differential DNA binding and altered communication between GR domains. Our studies suggest a versatile role for DNA in both modulating GR activity and also in directing the use of GR isoforms. We propose that the lever arm is a "fulcrum" for bidirectional allosteric signaling, conferring conformational changes in the DNA reading head that influence DNA sequence selectivity, as well as conferring changes in the dimerization domain that connect functionally with remote regulatory surfaces, thereby influencing which genes are regulated and the magnitude of their regulation.

  15. p11 is up-regulated in the forebrain of stressed rats by glucocorticoid acting via two specific glucocorticoid response elements in the p11 promoter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Li, H; Su, T P; Barker, J L; Maric, D; Fullerton, C S; Webster, M J; Hough, C J; Li, X X; Ursano, R

    2008-06-02

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders. Despite the extensive study of the neurobiological correlates of this disorder, the underlying mechanisms of PTSD are still poorly understood. Recently, a study demonstrated that dexamethasone (Dex), a synthetic glucocorticoid, can up-regulate p11, known as S100A10-protein which is down-regulated in patients with depression, (Yao et al., 1999; Huang et al., 2003) a common comorbid disorder in PTSD. These observations led to our hypothesis that traumatic stress may alter expression of p11 mediated through a glucocorticoid receptor. Here, we demonstrate that inescapable tail shock increased both prefrontal cortical p11 mRNA levels and plasma corticosterone levels in rats. We also found that Dex up-regulated p11 expression in SH-SY5Y cells through glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) within the p11 promoter. This response was attenuated by either RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist or mutating two of three glucocorticoid response elements (GRE2 and GRE3) in the p11 promoter. Finally, we showed that p11 mRNA levels were increased in postmortem prefrontal cortical tissue (area 46) of patients with PTSD. The data obtained from our work in a rat model of inescapable tail shock, a p11-transfected cell line and postmortem brain tissue from PTSD patients outline a possible mechanism by which p11 is regulated by glucocorticoids elevated by traumatic stress.

  16. Post-training glucocorticoid receptor activation during Pavlovian conditioning reduces Pavlovian-instrumental transfer in rats.

    PubMed

    Pielock, Steffi M; Sommer, Susanne; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that glucocorticoid receptor activation can enhance memory consolidation in Pavlovian learning tasks. For instance, post-training injections of the synthetic glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone increased conditioned responding to reward-predictive Pavlovian stimuli. Here we explored whether post-training dexamethasone injections can enhance appetitive Pavlovian learning and amplify the ability of Pavlovian stimuli to invigorate instrumental behaviour, a phenomenon termed Pavlovian-instrumental transfer (PIT). Animals were given 8 training days with two sessions per day, an instrumental training session in the morning and a Pavlovian training session in the afternoon. Dexamethasone or vehicle injections were administered daily immediately after Pavlovian training sessions. In a subsequent transfer test, we measured the general PIT effect, i.e. the enhancement of lever pressing for expected reward during presentation of an appetitive Pavlovian stimulus predictive for the same reward. Repeated high-dose (1.2 mg/kg, i.p.) dexamethasone injections elicited pronounced body weight loss, markedly reduced instrumental performance and left Pavlovian learning unaltered, whereas repeated low-dose (3 μg/kg, i.p.) dexamethasone injections inhibited body weight gain, slightly reduced instrumental performance and left Pavlovian learning unaltered during training. Importantly, in rats subjected to high- and low-dose dexamethasone injections, the overall response rates and the PIT effect were reduced in the transfer test. Thus, dexamethasone given after Pavlovian training was not able to amplify the invigorating effects of Pavlovian stimuli on instrumental action. Considerable evidence suggests that body weight changes after repeated low- and high-dose dexamethasone treatment as observed here are associated with muscle atrophy that could impair response capabilities. However, our data suggest that impaired response capabilities are not a

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor gene inactivation in dopamine-innervated areas selectively decreases behavioral responses to amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Parnaudeau, Sébastien; Dongelmans, Marie-louise; Turiault, Marc; Ambroggi, Frédéric; Delbes, Anne-Sophie; Cansell, Céline; Luquet, Serge; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo; Tronche, François; Barik, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    The meso-cortico-limbic system, via dopamine release, encodes the rewarding and reinforcing properties of natural rewards. It is also activated in response to abused substances and is believed to support drug-related behaviors. Dysfunctions of this system lead to several psychiatric conditions including feeding disorders and drug addiction. These disorders are also largely influenced by environmental factors and in particular stress exposure. Stressors activate the corticotrope axis ultimately leading to glucocorticoid hormone (GCs) release. GCs bind the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) a transcription factor ubiquitously expressed including within the meso-cortico-limbic tract. While GR within dopamine-innervated areas drives cocaine's behavioral responses, its implication in responses to other psychostimulants such as amphetamine has never been clearly established. Moreover, while extensive work has been made to uncover the role of this receptor in addicted behaviors, its contribution to the rewarding and reinforcing properties of food has yet to be investigated. Using mouse models carrying GR gene inactivation in either dopamine neurons or in dopamine-innervated areas, we found that GR in dopamine responsive neurons is essential to properly build amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization. c-Fos quantification in the nucleus accumbens further confirmed defective neuronal activation following amphetamine injection. These diminished neuronal and behavioral responses to amphetamine may involve alterations in glutamate transmission as suggested by the decreased MK801-elicited hyperlocomotion and by the hyporeactivity to glutamate of a subpopulation of medium spiny neurons. In contrast, GR inactivation did not affect rewarding and reinforcing properties of food suggesting that responding for natural reward under basal conditions is preserved in these mice. PMID:24574986

  18. Dissection of Glucocorticoid Receptor-mediated Inhibition of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal Axis by Gene Targeting in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laryea, Gloria; Muglia, Lisa; Arnett, Melinda; Muglia, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Negative feedback regulation of glucocorticoid (GC) synthesis and secretion occurs through the function of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) at sites in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, as well as in brain regions such as the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and sympathetic nervous system. This function of GRs in negative feedback coordinates basal glucocorticoid secretion and stress-induced increases in secretion that integrate GC production with the magnitude and duration of the stressor. This review describes the effects of GR loss along major sites of negative feedback including the entire brain, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), and the pituitary. In genetic mouse models, we evaluate circadian regulation of the HPA axis, stress-stimulated neuroendocrine response and behavioral activity, as well as the integrated response of organism metabolism. Our analysis provides information on contributions of region-specific GR-mediated negative feedback to provide insight in understanding HPA axis dysregulation and the pathogenesis of psychiatric and metabolic disorders. PMID:25256348

  19. Glucocorticoid Receptor Knockdown Decreases the Antioxidant Protection of B16 Melanoma Cells: An Endocrine System-Related Mechanism that Compromises Metastatic Cell Resistance to Vascular Endothelium-Induced Tumor Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L.; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J. Antoni; Pellicer, José A.; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F.; Estrela, José M.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2−-generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium. PMID:24802641

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor knockdown decreases the antioxidant protection of B16 melanoma cells: an endocrine system-related mechanism that compromises metastatic cell resistance to vascular endothelium-induced tumor cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J Antoni; Pellicer, José A; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F; Estrela, José M

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2--generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium.

  1. Prenatal Dexamethasone Exposure Increases the Susceptibility to Autoimmunity in Offspring Rats by Epigenetic Programing of Glucocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanhong; Ouyang, Juan; Xie, Renfeng; Wang, Xueping

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Prenatal glucocorticoids (GC) can induce long term effects on offspring health. However, reports and related studies regarding the prolonged effects of prenatal GC on the development of autoimmunity are limited. Here, we aimed to explore the immunological effects of dexamethasone (DEX) exposure on young adults and whether glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is involved in this process. Methods. Wistar rats were given DEX during pregnancy. Susceptibility to autoimmunity in offspring was assessed using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) animal models. To reveal the possible mechanism, glucocorticoid response, GR expression, and methylation status were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results. Our results showed that the DEX-treated rats had greater susceptibility to EAE (100% versus 62.5%, P < 0.05) and AIA (63.6% versus 0%, P < 0.05) than saline control group. Glucocorticoid response and GR expression were decreased in DEX rats. Significant difference was also found in the methylation levels of GR exon 1-10 to exon 1-11 region. Conclusions. Prenatal DEX administration increases the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, which is potentially mediated by programming GR methylation status and glucocorticoid sensitivity. PMID:28078304

  2. Glucocorticoid Receptor ChIP-seq Identifies PLCD1 as a KLF15 Target that Represses Airway Smooth Muscle Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Kadiyala, Vineela; Danhorn, Thomas; Panettieri, Reynold A; Phang, Tzu L; Gerber, Anthony N

    2017-04-04

    Glucocorticoids exert important therapeutic effects on airway smooth muscle (ASM), yet few direct targets of glucocorticoid signaling in ASM have been definitively identified. Here, we show that the transcription factor, KLF15, is directly induced by glucocorticoids in primary human ASM and that KLF15 represses ASM hypertrophy. We integrated transcriptome data from KLF15 overexpression with genome-wide analysis of RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) occupancy (i.e. ChIP-seq) to identify PLCD1 as both a KLF15-regulated gene and a novel repressor of ASM hypertrophy. Our ChIP-seq data also allowed us to establish numerous direct transcriptional targets of GR in ASM. Genes with inducible GR occupancy and putative anti-inflammatory properties included IRS2, APPL2, RAMP1 and MFGE8. Surprisingly, we also observed GR occupancy in the absence of supplemental ligand, including robust GR binding peaks within the IL11 and LIF loci. Detection of antibody-GR complexes at these areas was abrogated by dexamethasone treatment in association with reduced RNAPII occupancy, suggesting that non-canonical pathways contribute to cytokine repression by glucocorticoids in ASM. Through defining GR interactions with chromatin on a genome-wide basis in ASM, our data also provide an important resource for future studies of GR in this therapeutically relevant cell type.

  3. Gestational dietary betaine supplementation suppresses hepatic expression of lipogenic genes in neonatal piglets through epigenetic and glucocorticoid receptor-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cai, Demin; Wang, Junjian; Jia, Yimin; Liu, Haoyu; Yuan, Mengjie; Dong, Haibo; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Methyl donors play critical roles in nutritional programming through epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Here we fed gestational sows with control or betaine-supplemented diets (3g/kg) throughout the pregnancy to explore the effects of maternal methyl-donor nutrient on neonatal expression of hepatic lipogenic genes. Betaine-exposed piglets demonstrated significantly lower liver triglyceride content associated with down-regulated hepatic expression of lipogenic genes acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c. Moreover, s-adenosyl methionine to s-adenosyl homocysteine ratio was elevated in the liver of betaine-exposed piglets, which was accompanied by DNA hypermethylation on FAS and SCD gene promoters and more enriched repression histone mark H3K27me3 on SCD gene promoter. Furthermore, glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding to SCD gene promoter was diminished along with reduced serum cortisol and liver GR protein content in betaine-exposed piglets. GR-mediated SCD gene regulation was confirmed in HepG2 cells in vitro. Dexamethasone (Dex) drastically increased the luciferase activity of porcine SCD promoter, while the deletion of GR response element on SCD promoter significantly attenuated Dex-mediated SCD transactivation. In addition, miR-let-7e, miR-1285 and miR-124a, which respectively target porcine SCD, ACC and GR, were significantly up-regulated in the liver of betaine-exposed piglets, being in accordance with decreased protein content of these three genes. Taken together, our results suggest that maternal dietary betaine supplementation during gestation attenuates hepatic lipogenesis in neonatal piglets via epigenetic and GR-mediated mechanisms.

  4. Familial glucocorticoid receptor haploinsufficiency by non-sense mediated mRNA decay, adrenal hyperplasia and apparent mineralocorticoid excess.

    PubMed

    Bouligand, Jérôme; Delemer, Brigitte; Hecart, Annie-Claude; Meduri, Geri; Viengchareun, Say; Amazit, Larbi; Trabado, Séverine; Fève, Bruno; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Young, Jacques; Lombès, Marc

    2010-10-22

    Primary glucocorticoid resistance (OMIM 138040) is a rare hereditary disease that causes a generalized partial insensitivity to glucocorticoid action, due to genetic alterations of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Investigation of adrenal incidentalomas led to the discovery of a family (eight affected individuals spanning three generations), prone to cortisol resistance, bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, arterial hypertension and hypokalemia. This phenotype exacerbated over time, cosegregates with the first heterozygous nonsense mutation p.R469[R,X] reported to date for the GR, replacing an arginine (CGA) by a stop (TGA) at amino-acid 469 in the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain of the receptor. In vitro, this mutation leads to a truncated 50-kDa GR lacking hormone and DNA binding capacity, devoid of hormone-dependent nuclear translocation and transactivation properties. In the proband's fibroblasts, we provided evidence for the lack of expression of the defective allele in vivo. The absence of detectable mutated GR mRNA was accompanied by a 50% reduction in wild type GR transcript and protein. This reduced GR expression leads to a significantly below-normal induction of glucocorticoid-induced target genes, FKBP5 in fibroblasts. We demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid signaling dysfunction involved GR haploinsufficiency due to the selective degradation of the mutated GR transcript through a nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay that was experimentally validated on emetine-treated propositus' fibroblasts. GR haploinsufficiency leads to hypertension due to illicit occupation of renal mineralocorticoid receptor by elevated cortisol rather than to increased mineralocorticoid production reported in primary glucocorticoid resistance. Indeed, apparent mineralocorticoid excess was demonstrated by a decrease in urinary tetrahydrocortisone-tetrahydrocortisol ratio in affected patients, revealing reduced glucocorticoid degradation by renal activity of

  5. Glucocorticoid Receptor-DNA Dissociation Kinetics Measured in Vitro Reveal Exchange on the Second Time Scale.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Rolando W; Maluf, Nasib K; Yang, Qin; Lambert, James R; Bain, David L

    2015-09-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a member of the steroid receptor family of ligand-activated transcription factors. Recent live cell imaging studies have revealed that interactions of GR with chromatin are highly dynamic, with average receptor residence times of only seconds. These findings were surprising because early kinetic studies found that GR-DNA interactions in vitro were much slower, having calculated residence times of minutes to hours. However, these latter analyses were conducted at a time when it was possible to work with only either partially purified holoreceptor or its purified but isolated DNA binding domain. Noting these limitations, we reexamined GR-DNA dissociation kinetics using a highly purified holoreceptor shown to be amenable to rigorous study. We first observe that GR-DNA interactions in vitro are not slow as previously thought but converge with in vivo behavior, having residence times of only seconds to tens of seconds. This rapid exchange is seen at six individual response elements and the multisite MMTV promoter used in live cell imaging. Second, GR dissociation rates are identical for all response elements. Thus, previously observed differences in receptor affinity toward these sequences are not due to differences in off rate but in on rate. Finally, dissociation kinetics are biphasic in character. A minimal kinetic model consistent with the data is that in which DNA-bound GR interconverts between states on a second time scale, with dissociation occurring via a multistep process. We speculate that receptor interconversion in this time frame can be recognized by the coregulatory proteins that interact with GR, leading to unique transcriptional responses.

  6. Identification of constitutive androstane receptor and glucocorticoid receptor binding sites in the CYP2C19 promoter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuping; Ferguson, Stephen S; Negishi, Masahiko; Goldstein, Joyce A

    2003-08-01

    CYP2C19 is an important human drug-metabolizing enzyme that metabolizes a number of clinically used drugs including the antiulcer drug omeprazole, the anxiolytic drug diazepam, the beta-blocker propranolol, the antimalarial drug proguanil, certain antidepressants and barbiturates, and the prototype substrate S-mephenytoin. Previous studies show that compounds such as rifampicin and dexamethasone induce CYP2C19 both in vivo in humans and in vitro in human hepatocytes. This study examines the transcriptional regulation of CYP2C19. Analysis of the CYP2C19 promoter revealed a single constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) binding site (CAR-RE; -1891/-1876 bp) and a glucocorticoid-responsive element (GRE; -1750/-1736 bp). Gel-shift assays showed that CAR-RE binds CAR and pregnane X receptor (PXR). Cotransfection with hCAR, mCAR, or hPXR in HepG2 cells up-regulated transcription of CYP2C19 promoter constructs, whereas mutation of the -1891-bp CAR-RE abolished up-regulation. Expression with hCAR also up-regulated endogenous CYP2C19 mRNA content in HepG2 cells. Androstenol repressed the mCAR-mediated constitutive activation of the CYP2C19 promoter in HepG2 cells, whereas the potent mCAR ligand 1,4-bis[2-3,5-dichloropyridyloxyl)] benzene derepressed this response. Rifampicin produced a modest increase in promoter activity in cells cotransfected with hPXR. Dexamethasone activated the -2.7-kb CYP2C19 promoter constructs in HepG2 cells only in the presence of cotransfected glucocorticoid receptor (GR), whereas the GR antagonist mifepristone inhibits this response. Mutation of the GRE abolishes dexamethasone activation. This is the first study to identify nuclear receptor binding sites (CAR/PXR and GR) in the CYP2C19 promoter and to suggest that these receptors may up-regulate CYP2C19 constitutively and possibly its response to drugs.

  7. Hepatic growth hormone and glucocorticoid receptor signaling in body growth, steatosis and metabolic liver cancer development.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kristina M; Themanns, Madeleine; Friedbichler, Katrin; Kornfeld, Jan-Wilhelm; Esterbauer, Harald; Tuckermann, Jan P; Moriggl, Richard

    2012-09-25

    Growth hormone (GH) and glucocorticoids (GCs) are involved in the control of processes that are essential for the maintenance of vital body functions including energy supply and growth control. GH and GCs have been well characterized to regulate systemic energy homeostasis, particular during certain conditions of physical stress. However, dysfunctional signaling in both pathways is linked to various metabolic disorders associated with aberrant carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In liver, GH-dependent activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 controls a variety of physiologic functions within hepatocytes. Similarly, GCs, through activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), influence many important liver functions such as gluconeogenesis. Studies in hepatic Stat5 or GR knockout mice have revealed that they similarly control liver function on their target gene level and indeed, the GR functions often as a cofactor of STAT5 for GH-induced genes. Gene sets, which require physical STAT5-GR interaction, include those controlling body growth and maturation. More recently, it has become evident that impairment of GH-STAT5 signaling in different experimental models correlates with metabolic liver disease, ranging from hepatic steatosis to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). While GH-activated STAT5 has a protective role in chronic liver disease, experimental disruption of GC-GR signaling rather seems to ameliorate metabolic disorders under metabolic challenge. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge about hepatic GH-STAT5 and GC-GR signaling in body growth, metabolism, and protection from fatty liver disease and HCC development.

  8. Enhancement of stress resilience through Hdac6-mediated regulation of glucocorticoid receptor chaperone dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, Jeanine; Teegarden, Sarah L; Chen, Yong; Boulden, Janette; Challis, Collin; Ben-Dor, Gabriel A; Kim, Sangwon F; Berton, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetylation of Hsp90 regulates downstream hormone signaling via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), but the role of this molecular mechanism in stress homeostasis remains poorly understood. We tested whether acetylation of Hsp90 in the brain predicts and modulates the behavioral sequelae of a mouse model of social stress. Methods Mice subjected to chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) were stratified into resilient and vulnerable subpopulations. HPA axis function was probed using a DEX/CRF test. Hsp90 acetylation, Hsp90-GR interactions and GR translocation were measured in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). To manipulate Hsp90 acetylation, we pharmacologically inhibited Hdac6, a known deacetylase of Hsp90 or overexpressed a point-mutant that mimics the hyperacetylated state of Hsp90 at lysine K294 Results Lower acetylated Hsp90, higher GR-Hsp90 association and enhanced GR translocation were observed in DRN of vulnerable mice after CSDS. Administration of ACY-738, an Hdac6-selective inhibitor, led to Hsp90 hyperacetylation in brain and in neuronal culture. In cell-based assays, ACY-738 increased the relative association of Hsp90 with FKBP51 versus FKBP52 and inhibited hormone-induced GR translocation. This effect was replicated by overexpressing the acetylation-mimic point-mutant of Hsp90. In vivo, ACY-738 promoted resilience to CSDS and serotonin-selective viral overexpression of the acetylation-mimic mutant of Hsp90 in raphe neurons reproduced the behaviroral effect of ACY-738. Conclusions Hyperacetylation of Hsp90 is a predictor and causal molecular determinant of stress resilience in mice. Brain-penetrant Hdac6 inhibitors increase Hsp90 acetylation and modulate GR chaperone dynamics offering a promising strategy to curtail deleterious socioaffective effects of stress and glucocorticoids. PMID:25442004

  9. Hepatic Glucocorticoid Receptor Plays a Greater Role Than Adipose GR in Metabolic Syndrome Despite Renal Compensation.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sandip K; Hutson, Irina; Harris, Charles A

    2016-12-01

    Exogenous glucocorticoid administration results in hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hepatic dyslipidemia, and hypertension, a constellation of findings known as Cushing's syndrome. These effects are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Because GR activation in liver and adipose has been implicated in metabolic syndrome (MS), we wanted to determine the role of GR in these tissues in the development of MS. Because GR knockout (KO) mice (whole-body KO) exhibit perinatal lethality due to respiratory failure, we generated tissue-specific (liver or adipose) GRKO mice using cre-lox technology. Real-time PCR analysis of liver mRNA from dexamethasone-treated wildtype (WT) and liver GRKO mice indicated that hepatic GR regulates the expression of key genes involved in gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism. Interestingly, we have observed that liver-specific deletion of GR resulted in a significant increase in mRNA expression of key genes involved in gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in kidney tissue, indicating a compensatory mechanism to maintain glucose homeostasis. We have also observed that GR plays an important role in regulating the mRNA expression of key genes involved in lipid metabolism. Liver GRKO mice demonstrated decreased fat mass and liver glycogen content compared with WT mice administered dexamethasone for 2 weeks. Adipose-specific deletion of GR did not alter glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity of adipose GRKO mice compared with WT mice administrated dexamethasone. This indicates that liver GR might be more important in development of MS in dexamethasone-treated mice, whereas adipose GR plays a little role in these paradigms.

  10. The prognostic value of glucocorticoid receptors for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    EL-Maghraby, Shereen M.; Kandil, Noha S.; El-Bendary, Waleed R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic protocols used in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are widely variable, and glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential components in ALL treatment. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the distribution of prominent glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene polymorphic variants among adult ALL patients. We also investigated the association between GR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) isoform expressions and the response to chemotherapy. Methods Fifty-two newly diagnosed Philadelphia-negative adult ALL patients and 30 healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. Genotyping was carried out using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. GR mRNA isoform expressions were assayed by quantitative real-time PCR. Results ALL patients in this study had a median age of 34 years (range, 18-75). GRα expression was associated with complete remission (P=0.03), while GRγ mRNA expression was significantly higher in GC resistant patients (P=0.032) and in non-responders (P=0.019). However, there were no significant associations with GC resistance. The BclI polymorphic variant of the GR gene was the most frequent in adult ALL patients and was not associated with the GC response. Both higher GRα expression and lower GRγ expression were associated with achievement of complete remission, while higher GRγ expression was associated with GC-resistance. Conclusion Our data suggest that the level of GR isoform expression may be useful in predicting GC response, achievement of complete remission, and better event-free survival in ALL patients. However, further evaluation with a larger cohort of patients is warranted. PMID:26770951

  11. Steroid hormone receptor gene expression in human breast cancer cells: inverse relationship between oestrogen and glucocorticoid receptor messenger RNA levels.

    PubMed

    Hall, R E; Lee, C S; Alexander, I E; Shine, J; Clarke, C L; Sutherland, R L

    1990-12-15

    The relative expression in human breast cancer cells of messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNA) encoding different steroid hormone receptors is unknown. Accordingly, mRNA levels in total RNA extracted from 13 human breast cancer cell lines were measured by Northern analysis employing complementary DNA probes for the human oestrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), androgen (AR), vitamin D3 (VDR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR). The 7 ER+ lines expressed a single 6.4 kilobases (kb) ER mRNA. Interestingly, low concentrations of ER mRNA were detected in the ER- cell lines, MDA-MB-330 and BT 20. PR mRNA, predominantly a 13.5 kb species, was expressed in the 6 lines known to be ER+, PR+ by radioligand binding; however, one ER+ cell line, MDA-MB-134, failed to express PR mRNA. A 10.5 kb AR mRNA was expressed at significantly higher levels in ER+ than ER- cell lines. All cell lines expressed a single 4.6 kb mRNA for VDR and a single 7.4 kb mRNA for GR. ER and PR mRNA levels were positively correlated (p = 0.011) and each was positively correlated with androgen receptor (AR) mRNA levels (p less than or equal to 0.009). ER, PR and AR mRNAs were negatively associated with GR levels (p less than or equal to 0.012), while ER and AR mRNA levels were negatively correlated with mRNA for the epidermal growth factor receptor. In contrast, levels of VDR mRNA were unrelated to the concentration of any other steroid receptor mRNA. Our data demonstrate the coordinate expression of ER, PR and AR genes, and an inverse relationship between sex steroid hormone receptor and GR gene expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

  12. Region-specific Alterations in Glucocorticoid Receptor Expression in the Postmortem Brain of Teenage Suicide Victims

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N.; Rizavi, Hooriyah S.; Ren, Xinguo; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Palkovits, Miklós

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Abnormal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and suicide. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reported dysregulation of the HPA axis in suicide may be related to a disturbed feedback inhibition caused by decreased corticoid receptors in the brain. We therefore determined the protein and gene expression of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the postmortem brain of teenage suicide victims and matched normal controls. Methods Protein and mRNA expression of GR (GR-α and GR-β) and MR and the mRNA expression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a target gene for GR were determined by immunolabeling using Western blot technique and the real-time RT-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) technique in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, subiculum, and amygdala obtained from 24 teenage suicide victims and 24 teenage control subjects. Results We observed that protein and gene expression of GR-α was significantly decreased in the PFC and amygdala, but not in the hippocampus or subiculum, of teenage suicide victims compared with normal control subjects. Also, the mRNA levels of GR inducible target gene GILZ was significantly decreased in PFC and amygdaloid nuclei but not in hippocampus compared with controls. In contrast, no significant differences were observed in protein or gene expression of MR in any of the areas studied between teenage suicide victims and normal control subjects. There was no difference in the expression of GR-β in the PFC between suicide victims and normal controls. Conclusions These results suggested that the observed dysregulation of the HPA axis in suicide may be related to a decreased expression of GR-α and GR inducible genes in the PFC and amygdala of teenage suicide victims. The reason why GR receptors are not dysregulated in the hippocampus or subiculum, presumably two sites of stress action

  13. Phenylalanine-780 near the C-terminus of the mouse glucocorticoid receptor is important for ligand binding affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Kohli, K; Zhang, S; Danielsen, M; Stallcup, M R

    1994-04-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to make two single amino acid substitutions for highly conserved amino acid residues near the C-terminus of the 783-amino acid mouse glucocorticoid receptor. Substitution of leucine for histidine-781 caused little or no change in the concentration of dexamethasone required for half-maximal activation of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene expressed from a mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. However, when phenylalanine-780 was changed to alanine, the half-maximal concentrations of various agonists were increased as follows, compared with the wild-type glucocorticoid receptor: triamcinolone acetonide by 7-fold, dexamethasone by 25-fold, and hydrocortisone and deoxycorticosterone by more than 150-fold. Binding of labeled steroids by the mutant receptor in vitro and in vivo was also decreased. In contrast, this mutation caused a small decrease in the concentration of RU486 required for antagonist or partial agonist activity. Thus, the phenyl group of phenylalanine-780 of the mouse glucocorticoid receptor is an important determinant of ligand binding affinity and specificity.

  14. Glucocorticoid-induced changes in glucocorticoid receptor mRNA and protein expression in the human placenta as a potential factor for altering fetal growth and development.

    PubMed

    Bivol, Svetlana; Owen, Suzzanne J; Rose'Meyer, Roselyn B

    2016-02-05

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) control essential metabolic processes in virtually every cell in the body and play a vital role in the development of fetal tissues and organ systems. The biological actions of GCs are mediated via glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), the cytoplasmic transcription factors that regulate the transcription of genes involved in placental and fetal growth and development. Several experimental studies have demonstrated that fetal exposure to high maternal GC levels early in gestation is associated with adverse fetal outcomes, including low birthweight, intrauterine growth restriction and anatomical and structural abnormalities that may increase the risk of cardiovascular, metabolic and neuroendocrine disorders in adulthood. The response of the fetus to GCs is dependent on gender, with female fetuses becoming hypersensitive to changes in GC levels whereas male fetuses develop GC resistance in the environment of high maternal GCs. In this paper we review GR function and the physiological and pathological effects of GCs on fetal development. We propose that GC-induced changes in the placental structure and function, including alterations in the expression of GR mRNA and protein levels, may play role in inhibiting in utero fetal growth.

  15. Divergent effects of amygdala glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors in the regulation of visceral and somatic pain.

    PubMed

    Myers, Brent; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2010-02-01

    Elevated amygdala activity and increased responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis have been observed in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Recently, we demonstrated that corticosterone (Cort) placed on the amygdala induced anxiety-like behavior coupled with decreased thresholds for visceral and somatic pain in rats. Moreover, these studies suggested that the effects of Cort were dependent on both the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR); however, the specific contributions of these receptors to the interaction between corticosteroids and the amygdala are still unclear. In the present study, we sought to define the distinct roles of amygdaloid GR and MR in anxiety-like behavior, visceral sensitivity, and somatic sensitivity through selective pharmacological activation. Male Fischer 344 rats received bilateral implants on the dorsal margin of the central amygdala containing the GR agonist dexamethasone (Dex), the MR agonist aldosterone (Aldo), or cholesterol as a control. Our results showed that GR or MR activation significantly reduced open arm exploration on the elevated plus maze, a measure of anxiety-like behavior. Aldo increased the number of abdominal muscle contractions in response to all levels of colorectal distension (CRD). In contrast, Dex only increased visceral sensitivity at noxious levels of CRD. Furthermore, GR but not MR activation reduced somatic pain thresholds measured by the mechanical force required to elicit hindlimb withdrawal. In summary, GR and MR mediated-mechanisms induce anxiety and visceral hypersensitivity, whereas somatic sensitivity involves only GR, suggesting that corticosteroids may enhance visceral and somatic sensation via divergent processes originating in the amygdala and involving specific steroid receptor mechanisms.

  16. Gene and protein alterations of FKBP5 and glucocorticoid receptor in the amygdala of suicide victims.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ortiz, José M; García-Gutiérrez, María S; Navarrete, Francisco; Giner, Salvador; Manzanares, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    Recent reports suggest that FKBP5 gene and its corresponding FKBP5 protein play a relevant role in the regulation of anxiety and depression in animal models and human stress-related disorders. In the present study, FKBP5 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene and protein expression were analyzed in the amygdala (AMY) of suicide victims (n=13 males, without clinical psychiatric history and non-treated with anxiolytic or antidepressant drugs) and its corresponding controls (n=13 males) by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The results revealed that FKBP5 and GR gene expression were significantly reduced in the AMY (-38% and -48%, respectively) of suicide victims compared with controls. Interestingly, FKBP5 and GR protein expression were also significantly decreased (-41% and -42%, respectively) in the AMY of suicide victims compared with controls. These results suggest that the FKBP5 plays a relevant role in human emotional responses and suggest this receptor as a new promising target in the treatment of suicide behavior.

  17. Trehalose induces functionally active conformation in the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain of glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shagufta H; Jasuja, Ravi; Kumar, Raj

    2016-08-05

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a classic member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and plays pivotal roles in human physiology at the level of gene regulation. Various constellations of cellular cofactors are required to associate with GR to activate/repress genes. The effects of specific ligands on the AF2 structure and consequent preferential binding of co-activators or co-repressors have helped our understanding of the mechanisms involved. But the data so far fall short of fully explaining GR actions. We believe that this is because work so far has largely avoided detailed examination of the contributions of AF1 to overall GR actions. It has been shown that the GR containing only the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the DNA-binding domain (GR500) is constitutively quite active in stimulating transcription from simple promoters. However, we are only beginning to understand structure and functions of GR500 in spite of the fact that AF1 located within the NTD serves as major transactivation domain for GR. Lack of this information has hampered our complete understanding of how GR regulates its target gene(s). The major obstacle in determining GR500 structure has been due to its intrinsically disordered NTD conformation, frequently found in transcription factors. In this study, we tested whether a naturally occurring osmolyte, trehalose, can promote functionally ordered conformation in GR500. Our data show that in the presence of trehalose, GR500 is capable of formation of a native-like functionally folded conformation.

  18. Insights into negative regulation by the glucocorticoid receptor from genome-wide profiling of inflammatory cistromes.

    PubMed

    Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Barish, Grant D; Yu, Ruth T; Downes, Michael; Karunasiri, Malith; Liddle, Christopher; Schwalie, Petra; Hübner, Norbert; Evans, Ronald M

    2013-01-10

    How the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activates some genes while potently repressing others remains an open question. There are three current models for suppression: transrepression via GR tethering to AP-1/NF-κB sites, direct GR association with inhibitory elements (nGREs), and GR recruitment of the corepressor GRIP1. To gain insights into GR suppression, we used genomic analyses and genome-wide profiling of GR, p65, and c-Jun in LPS-stimulated macrophages. We show that GR mediates both activation and repression at tethered sites, GREs, and GRIP1-bound elements, indicating that motif classification is insufficient to predict regulatory polarity of GR binding. Interestingly, sites of GR repression utilize GRIP1's corepressor function and display reduced histone acetylation. Together, these findings suggest that while GR occupancy confers hormone responsiveness, the receptor itself may not participate in the regulatory effects. Furthermore, transcriptional outcome is not established by sequence but is influenced by epigenetic regulators, context, and other unrecognized regulatory determinants.

  19. Corticosterone Inhibits the Proliferation of C6 Glioma Cells via the Translocation of Unphosphorylated Glucocorticoid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yoshihiko; Amano, Taku; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Astroglial cells have been considered to have passive brain function by helping to maintain neurons. However, recent studies have revealed that the dysfunction of such passive functions may be associated with various neuropathological diseases, such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and major depression. Corticosterone (CORT), which is often referred to as the stress hormone, is a well-known regulator of peripheral immune responses and also shows anti-inflammatory properties in the brain. However, it is still obscure how CORT affects astroglial cell function. In this study, we investigated the effects of CORT on the proliferation and survival of astroglial cells using C6 glioma cells. Under treatment with CORT for 24h, the proliferation of C6 glioma cells decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, this inhibition was diminised by treatment with mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, but not by spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, and was independent of GR phosphorylation and other GR-related intracellular signaling cascades. Furthermore, it was observed that the translocation of GR from the cytosol to the nucleus was promoted by the treatment with CORT. These results indicate that CORT decreases the proliferation of C6 glioma cells by modifying the transcription of a particular gene related to cell proliferation independent of GR phosphorylation.

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) {beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Tomoshige; Manoli, Irini; Kelkar, Sujata; Wang, Yonghong; Su, Yan A.; Chrousos, George P.

    2009-04-17

    The human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene produces C-terminal GR{beta} and GR{alpha} isoforms through alternative use of specific exons 9{beta} and {alpha}, respectively. We explored the transcriptional activity of GR{beta} on endogenous genes by developing HeLa cells stably expressing EGFP-GR{beta} or EGFP. Microarray analyses revealed that GR{beta} had intrinsic gene-specific transcriptional activity, regulating mRNA expression of a large number of genes negatively or positively. Majority of GR{beta}-responsive genes was distinct from those modulated by GR{alpha}, while GR{beta} and GR{alpha} mutually modulated each other's transcriptional activity in a subpopulation of genes. We did not observe in HCT116 cells nuclear translocation of GR{beta} and activation of this receptor by RU 486, a synthetic steroid previously reported to bind GR{beta} and to induce nuclear translocation. Our results indicate that GR{beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent, gene-specific transcriptional activity, in addition to its previously reported dominant negative effect on GR{alpha}-induced transactivation of GRE-driven promoters.

  1. Blockade of glucocorticoid receptors improves cutaneous wound healing in stressed mice.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Taís Fontoura; de Castro Pires, Taiza; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2016-02-01

    Stress is an important condition of modern life. The successful wound healing requires the execution of three major overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling, and stress can disturb this process. Chronic stress impairs wound healing through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the glucocorticoids (GCs) hormones have been shown to delay wound closure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a GC receptor antagonist (RU486) treatment on cutaneous healing in chronically stressed mice. Male mice were submitted to rotational stress, whereas control animals were not subjected to stress. Stressed and control animals were treated with RU486. A full-thickness excisional lesion was generated, and seven days later, lesions were recovered. The RU486 treatment improves wound healing since contraction takes place earlier in RU486-treated in comparison to non-treated mice, and the RU486 treatment also improves the angiogenesis in Stress+RU486 mice when compared to stressed animals. The Stress+RU486 group showed a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration and in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression; meanwhile, there was an increase in myofibroblasts quantity. In conclusion, blockade of GC receptors with RU486 partially ameliorates stress-impaired wound healing, suggesting that stress inhibits healing through more than one functional pathway.

  2. Corticosterone targets distinct steps of synaptic transmission via concentration specific activation of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sreejata; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2014-02-01

    Hippocampal neurons are affected by chronic stress and have a high density of cytoplasmic mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors (MR and GR). Detailed studies on the genomic effects of the stress hormone corticosterone at physiologically relevant concentrations on different steps in synaptic transmission are limited. In this study, we tried to delineate how activation of MR and GR by different concentrations of corticosterone affects synaptic transmission at various levels. The effect of 3-h corticosterone (25, 50, and 100 nM) treatment on depolarization-mediated calcium influx, vesicular release and properties of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) were studied in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of MR with 25 nM corticosterone treatment resulted in enhanced depolarization-mediated calcium influx via a transcription-dependent process and increased frequency of mEPSCs with larger amplitude. On the other hand, activation of GR upon 100 nM corticosterone treatment resulted in increase in the rate of vesicular release via the genomic actions of GR. Furthermore, GR activation led to significant increase in the frequency of mEPSCs with larger amplitude and faster decay. Our studies indicate that differential activation of the dual receptor system of MR and GR by corticosterone targets the steps in synaptic transmission differently.

  3. Endogenous hepatic glucocorticoid receptor signaling coordinates sex-biased inflammatory gene expression.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Matthew A; Cidlowski, John A

    2016-02-01

    An individual's sex affects gene expression and many inflammatory diseases present in a sex-biased manner. Glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are regulators of inflammatory genes, but their role in sex-specific responses is unclear. Our goal was to evaluate whether GR differentially regulates inflammatory gene expression in male and female mouse liver. Twenty-five percent of the 251 genes assayed by nanostring analysis were influenced by sex. Of these baseline sexually dimorphic inflammatory genes, 82% was expressed higher in female liver. Pathway analyses defined pattern-recognition receptors as the most sexually dimorphic pathway. We next exposed male and female mice to the proinflammatory stimulus LPS. Female mice had 177 genes regulated by treatment with LPS, whereas males had 149, with only 66% of LPS-regulated genes common between the sexes. To determine the contribution of GR to sexually dimorphic inflammatory genes we performed nanostring analysis on liver-specific GR knockout (LGRKO) mice in the presence or absence of LPS. Comparing LGRKO to GR(flox/flox) revealed that 36 genes required GR for sexually dimorphic expression, whereas 24 genes became sexually dimorphic in LGRKO. Fifteen percent of LPS-regulated genes in GR(flox/flox) were not regulated in male and female LGRKO mice treated with LPS. Thus, GR action is influenced by sex to regulate inflammatory gene expression.

  4. Human glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor ligand regulates its signaling activity through multiple oligomerization states

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhaocai; Song, Xiaomin; Berezov, Alan; Zhang, Geng; Li, Yanjing; Zhang, Hongtao; Murali, Ramachandran; Li, Bin; Greene, Mark I.

    2008-01-01

    Ligation between glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR) and its ligand (GITRL) provides an undefined signal that renders CD4+CD25− effector T cells resistant to the inhibitory effects of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. To understand the structural basis of GITRL function, we have expressed and purified the extracellular domain of human GITR ligand in Escherichia coli. Chromotography and cross-linking studies indicate that human GITRL (hGITRL) exists as dimers and trimers in solution and also can form a supercluster. To gain insight into the nature of GITRL oligomerization, we determined the crystallographic structures of hGITRL, which revealed a loosely associated open trimer with a deep cavity at the molecular center and a flexible C-terminal tail bent for trimerization. Moreover, a tetramer of trimers (i.e., supercluster) has also been observed in the crystal, consistent with the cross-linking analysis. Deletion of the C-terminal distal three residues disrupts the loosely assembled trimer and favors the formation of a dimer that has compromised receptor binding and signaling activity. Collectively, our studies identify multiple oligomeric species of hGITRL that possess distinct kinetics of ERK activation. The studies address the functional implications and structural models for a process by which hGITRL utilizes multiple oligomerization states to regulate GITR-mediated signaling during T cell costimulation. PMID:18378892

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor binding to a specific DNA sequence is required for hormone-dependent repression of pro-opiomelanocortin gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, J; Trifiro, M A; Plante, R K; Nemer, M; Eriksson, P; Wrange, O

    1989-01-01

    Glucocorticoids rapidly and specifically inhibit transcription of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene in the anterior pituitary, thus offering a model for studying negative control of transcription in mammals. We have defined an element within the rat POMC gene 5'-flanking region that is required for glucocorticoid inhibition of POMC gene transcription in POMC-expressing pituitary tumor cells (AtT-20). This element contains an in vitro binding site for purified glucocorticoid receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that binding of the receptor to this site located at position base pair -63 is essential for glucocorticoid repression of transcription. Although related to the well-defined glucocorticoid response element (GRE) found in glucocorticoid-inducible genes, the DNA sequence of the POMC negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE) differs significantly from the GRE consensus; this sequence divergence may result in different receptor-DNA interactions and may account at least in part for the opposite transcriptional properties of these elements. Hormone-dependent repression of POMC gene transcription may be due to binding of the receptor over a positive regulatory element of the promoter. Thus, repression may result from mutually exclusive binding of two DNA-binding proteins to overlapping DNA sequences. Images PMID:2586521

  6. Disruption by interferon-alpha of an autocrine interleukin-6 growth loop in IL-6-dependent U266 myeloma cells by homologous and heterologous down-regulation of the IL-6 receptor alpha- and beta-chains.

    PubMed Central

    Schwabe, M; Brini, A T; Bosco, M C; Rubboli, F; Egawa, M; Zhao, J; Princler, G L; Kung, H F

    1994-01-01

    IL-6 is an autocrine growth factor for U266 myeloma cells and their growth is inhibited by IFN-alpha or IL-6 mAb. We asked, therefore, whether IFN-alpha-induced growth inhibition involved IL-6. IFN-alpha and mAb against IL-6, the IL-6R alpha-(gp80) or beta-chain (gp130) potently inhibited U266 cells. Remarkably, this effect occurred despite IFN-alpha-augmented secretion of endogenous IL-6. However, examining the IL-6R revealed that IFN-alpha drastically curtailed expression of the IL-6R alpha- and beta-chain. This effect occurred on two different levels (protein and mRNA) and by two different mechanisms (directly and indirectly through IL-6). First, IFN-alpha, but not IL-6, greatly decreased gp80 and, to a lesser extent, gp130 mRNA levels which resulted in a loss of IL-6 binding sites. Second, IFN-alpha-induced IL-6 predominantly down-regulated membrane-bound gp130. IFN-alpha-mediated decrease of gp80 levels was not detected on IL-6-independent myeloma (RPMI 8226) or myeloid cells (U937). We conclude that IFN-alpha inhibited IL-6-dependent myeloma cell growth by depriving U266 cells of an essential component of their autocrine growth loop, a functional IL-6R. Images PMID:7989587

  7. Disruption of glucocorticoid receptors in the noradrenergic system leads to BDNF up-regulation and altered serotonergic transmission associated with a depressive-like phenotype in female GR(DBHCre) mice.

    PubMed

    Chmielarz, Piotr; Kreiner, Grzegorz; Kot, Marta; Zelek-Molik, Agnieszka; Kowalska, Marta; Bagińska, Monika; Daniel, Władysława Anna; Nalepa, Irena

    2015-10-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that conditional inactivation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the noradrenergic system, may evoke depressive-like behavior in female but not male mutant mice (GR(DBHCre) mice). The aim of the current study was to dissect how selective ablation of glucocorticoid signaling in the noradrenergic system influences the previously reported depressive-like phenotype and whether it might be linked to neurotrophic alterations or secondary changes in the serotonergic system. We demonstrated that selective depletion of GRs enhances brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in female but not male GR(DBHCre) mice on both the mRNA and protein levels. The possible impact of the mutation on brain noradrenergic and serotonergic systems was addressed by investigating the tissue neurotransmitter levels under basal conditions and after acute restraint stress. The findings indicated a stress-provoked differential response in tissue noradrenaline content in the GR(DBHCre) female but not male mutant mice. An analogous gender-specific effect was identified in the diminished content of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, the main metabolite of serotonin, in the prefrontal cortex, which suggests down-regulation of this monoamine system in female GR(DBHCre) mice. The lack of GR also resulted in an up-regulation of alpha2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) density in the female but not male mutants in the locus coeruleus. We have also confirmed the utility of the investigated model in pharmacological studies, which demonstrates that the depressive-like phenotype of GR(DBHCre) female mice can be reversed by antidepressant treatment with desipramine or fluoxetine, with the latter drug evoking more pronounced effects. Overall, our study validates the use of female GR(DBHCre) mice as an interesting and novel genetic tool for the investigation of the cross-connected mechanisms of depression that is not only based on behavioral phenotypes.

  8. Subchronic Glucocorticoid Receptor Inhibition Rescues Early Episodic Memory and Synaptic Plasticity Deficits in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lanté, Fabien; Chafai, Magda; Raymond, Elisabeth Fabienne; Salgueiro Pereira, Ana Rita; Mouska, Xavier; Kootar, Scherazad; Barik, Jacques; Bethus, Ingrid; Marie, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    The early phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by hippocampus-dependent memory deficits and impaired synaptic plasticity. Increasing evidence suggests that stress and dysregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, marked by the elevated circulating glucocorticoids, are risk factors for AD onset. How these changes contribute to early hippocampal dysfunction remains unclear. Using an elaborated version of the object recognition task, we carefully monitored alterations in key components of episodic memory, the first type of memory altered in AD patients, in early symptomatic Tg2576 AD mice. We also combined biochemical and ex vivo electrophysiological analyses to reveal novel cellular and molecular dysregulations underpinning the onset of the pathology. We show that HPA axis, circadian rhythm, and feedback mechanisms, as well as episodic memory, are compromised in this early symptomatic phase, reminiscent of human AD pathology. The cognitive decline could be rescued by subchronic in vivo treatment with RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. These observed phenotypes were paralleled by a specific enhancement of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR)-dependent LTD in CA1 pyramidal neurons, whereas LTP and metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent LTD remain unchanged. NMDAR transmission was also enhanced. Finally, we show that, as for the behavioral deficit, RU486 treatment rescues this abnormal synaptic phenotype. These preclinical results define glucocorticoid signaling as a contributing factor to both episodic memory loss and early synaptic failure in this AD mouse model, and suggest that glucocorticoid receptor targeting strategies could be beneficial to delay AD onset. PMID:25622751

  9. Influences of maternal and paternal PTSD on epigenetic regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor gene in Holocaust survivor offspring

    PubMed Central

    Desarnaud, Frank; Bader, Heather N.; Makotkine, Iouri; Flory, Janine D.; Bierer, Linda M.; Meaney, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Differential effects of maternal and paternal PTSD have been observed in adult offspring of Holocaust survivors in both glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity and vulnerability to psychiatric disorder. The current study examined the relative influences of maternal and paternal PTSD on DNA methylation of the exon 1F promoter of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and its relationship to glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity, in Holocaust offspring. Method Adult offspring with at least one Holocaust survivor parent (n=80), and demographically similar participants without parental Holocaust exposure or PTSD (n=15) completed clinical interviews, self-report measures, and biological procedures. Blood samples were collected for analysis of glucocorticoid receptor gene exon 1F (GR-1F) promoter methylation and cortisol levels in response to low-dose dexamethasone, and two-way analysis of covariance was performed using maternal and paternal PTSD as main effects. Hierarchical-clustering analysis was used to permit visualization of maternal vs. paternal PTSD effects on clinical variables. Results A significant interaction demonstrated that in the absence of maternal PTSD, offspring with paternal PTSD showed higher GR-1F promoter methylation, whereas offspring with both maternal and paternal PTSD showed lower methylation. Lower GR-1F promoter methylation was significantly associated with greater post-dexamethasone cortisol suppression. The clustering analysis confirmed that maternal and paternal PTSD effects were differentially associated with clinical indicators. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate alterations of GR-1F promoter methylation in relation to parental PTSD and neuroendocrine outcomes. The moderation of paternal PTSD effects by maternal PTSD suggests different mechanisms for the intergenerational transmission of trauma-related vulnerabilities. PMID:24832930

  10. PPAR-α and glucocorticoid receptor synergize to promote erythroid progenitor self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiang-Ying; Gao, Xiaofei; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Li, Hu; Elmes, Russell R; Peters, Luanne L; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-06-25

    Many acute and chronic anaemias, including haemolysis, sepsis and genetic bone marrow failure diseases such as Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, are not treatable with erythropoietin (Epo), because the colony-forming unit erythroid progenitors (CFU-Es) that respond to Epo are either too few in number or are not sensitive enough to Epo to maintain sufficient red blood cell production. Treatment of these anaemias requires a drug that acts at an earlier stage of red cell formation and enhances the formation of Epo-sensitive CFU-E progenitors. Recently, we showed that glucocorticoids specifically stimulate self-renewal of an early erythroid progenitor, burst-forming unit erythroid (BFU-E), and increase the production of terminally differentiated erythroid cells. Here we show that activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) by the PPAR-α agonists GW7647 and fenofibrate synergizes with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to promote BFU-E self-renewal. Over time these agonists greatly increase production of mature red blood cells in cultures of both mouse fetal liver BFU-Es and mobilized human adult CD34(+) peripheral blood progenitors, with a new and effective culture system being used for the human cells that generates normal enucleated reticulocytes. Although Ppara(-/-) mice show no haematological difference from wild-type mice in both normal and phenylhydrazine (PHZ)-induced stress erythropoiesis, PPAR-α agonists facilitate recovery of wild-type but not Ppara(-/-) mice from PHZ-induced acute haemolytic anaemia. We also show that PPAR-α alleviates anaemia in a mouse model of chronic anaemia. Finally, both in control and corticosteroid-treated BFU-E cells, PPAR-α co-occupies many chromatin sites with GR; when activated by PPAR-α agonists, additional PPAR-α is recruited to GR-adjacent sites and presumably facilitates GR-dependent BFU-E self-renewal. Our discovery of the role of PPAR-α agonists in stimulating self-renewal of early erythroid

  11. PPARα and glucocorticoid receptor synergize to promote erythroid progenitor self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsiang-Ying; Gao, Xiaofei; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Li, Hu; Elmes, Russell R.; Peters, Luanne L.; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many acute and chronic anemias, including hemolysis, sepsis, and genetic bone marrow failure diseases such as Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA), are not treatable with erythropoietin (Epo), because the colony-forming unit erythroid progenitors (CFU-Es) that respond to Epo are either too few in number or are not sensitive enough to Epo to maintain sufficient red blood cell production 1,2,3–5,6,7,8,9. Treatment of these anemias requires a drug that acts at an earlier stage of red cell formation and enhances the formation of Epo-sensitive CFU-E progenitors. Recently we showed that glucocorticoids specifically stimulate self-renewal of the early erythroid progenitor, the burst-forming unit erythroid (BFU-E), and increase the production of terminally differentiated erythroid cells 10,11. Here we demonstrate that activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) by PPARα agonists, GW7647 and fenofibrate, synergizes with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to promote BFU-E self-renewal. Over time these agonists greatly increase production of mature red blood cells in cultures both of mouse fetal liver BFU-Es and of mobilized human adult CD34+ peripheral blood progenitors, the latter employing a new and effective culture system that generates normal enucleated reticulocytes. While PPARα−/− mice show no hematological difference from wild-type mice in both normal and phenylhydrazine (PHZ)-induced stress erythropoiesis, PPARα agonists facilitate recovery of wild-type mice, but not PPARα−/− mice, from PHZ-induced acute hemolytic anemia. We also showed that PPARα alleviates anemia in a mouse model of chronic anemia. Finally, both in control and corticosteroid-treated BFU-E cells PPARα co-occupies many chromatin sites with GR; when activated by PPARα agonists, additional PPARα is recruited to GR-adjacent sites and presumably facilitates GR-dependent BFU-E self-renewal. Our discovery of the role of PPARα agonists in stimulating self

  12. Eosinophil as a cellular target of the ocular anti-allergic action of mapracorat, a novel selective glucocorticoid receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Baiula, Monica; Spartà, Antonino; Bedini, Andrea; Carbonari, Gioia; Bucolo, Claudio; Ward, Keith W.; Zhang, Jin-Zhong; Govoni, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Glucocorticoids can either suppress gene transcription (transrepression) or activate it (transactivation). This latter process may contribute to certain side effects caused by these agents. Mapracorat (also known as BOL-303242-X or ZK 245186) is a novel selective glucocorticoid receptor agonist that maintains a beneficial anti-inflammatory activity but seems to be less effective in transactivation, resulting in a lower potential for side effects; it has been proposed for the topical treatment of inflammatory skin disorders. This study assessed the anti-allergic activity of mapracorat at the ocular level and whether eosinophils and mast cells are targets of its action. Methods With in vitro studies apoptosis was evaluated in human eosinophils by flow cytometry and western blot of caspase-3 fragments. Eosinophil migration toward platelet-activating factor was evaluated by transwell assays. Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5)/regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTES) were measured using a high-throughput multiplex luminex technology. Annexin I and the chemochine receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) were detected by flow cytometry. With in vivo studies, allergic conjunctivitis was induced in guinea pigs sensitized to ovalbumin by an ocular allergen challenge and evaluated by a clinical score. Conjunctival eosinophils were determined by microscopy or eosinophil peroxidase assay. Results In cultured human eosinophils, mapracorat showed the same potency as dexamethasone but displayed higher efficacy in increasing spontaneous apoptosis and in counteracting cytokine-sustained eosinophil survival. These effects were prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. Mapracorat inhibited eosinophil migration and IL-8 release from eosinophils or the release of IL-6, IL-8, CCL5/RANTES, and TNF-α from a human mast cell line with equal

  13. A translational approach to clinical practice via stress-responsive glucocorticoid receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Agustini, Bruno; Cleare, Anthony J.; Young, Allan H.

    2017-01-01

    A recent article by Kwan and colleagues could elegantly demonstrate the necessary interaction between neuronal serotonin (5-HT) systems and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis through glucocorticoid receptors (GR), producing an adequate stress response, in this case, responding to hypoxia with an increase in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). There is an intricate system connecting brain, body and mind and this exchange is only possible when all these systems—nervous, endocrine, and immune—have receptors on critical cells to receive information (via messenger molecules) from each of the other systems. There is evidence that the expression and function of GR in the hippocampus, mainly MR, is regulated by the stimulation of 5-HT receptors. Stressful stimuli increase 5-HT release and turnover in the hippocampus, and it seems reasonable to suggest that some of the changes in mineralocorticoid and GR expression may be mediated, in part at least, by the increase in 5-HT. Also serotonin and HPA axis dysfunctions have already been implicated in a variety of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. Early life stress (ELS) can have profound impact on these systems and can predispose subjects to a variety of adult metabolic and psychiatric conditions. It is important to analyze the mechanisms of this complex interaction and its subsequent programming effects on the stress systems, so that we can find new ways and targets for treatment of psychiatric disorders. Different areas of research on basic biological sciences are now being integrated and this approach will hopefully provide several new insights, new pharmacological targets and improve our global understanding of these highly debilitating chronic conditions, that we now call mental disorders. PMID:28275643

  14. Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation Inhibits Chemotherapy-induced Cell Death in High-grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stringer-Reasor, Erica M.; Baker, Gabrielle M.; Skor, Maxwell N.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Lengyel, Ernst; Fleming, Gini F.; Conzen, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation increases resistance to chemotherapy in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGS-OvCa) and that treatment with a GR antagonist will improve sensitivity to chemotherapy. Methods GR expression was assessed in OvCa cell lines by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis and in xenografts and primary human tumors using immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also examined the effect of GR activation versus inhibition on chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity in OvCa cell lines and in a xenograft model. Results With the exception of IGROV-1 cells, all OvCa cell lines tested had detectable GR expression by Western blot and qRT-PCR analysis. Twenty-five out of the 27 human primary HGS-OvCas examined expressed GR by IHC. No cell line expressed detectable progesterone receptor (PR) or androgen receptor (AR) by Western blot analysis. In vitro assays showed that in GR-positive HeyA8 and SKOV3 cells, dexamethasone (100 nM) treatment upregulated the pro-survival genes SGK1 and MKP1/DUSP1 and inhibited carboplatin/gemcitabine-induced cell death. Concurrent treatment with two GR antagonists, either mifepristone (100 nM) or CORT125134 (100 nM), partially reversed these effects. There was no anti-apoptotic effect of dexamethasone on chemotherapy-induced cell death in IGROV-1 cells, which did not have detectable GR protein. Mifepristone treatment alone was not cytotoxic in any cell line. HeyA8 OvCa xenograft studies demonstrated that adding mifepristone to carboplatin/gemcitabine increased tumor shrinkage by 48% compared to carboplatin/gemcitabine treatment alone (P=0.0004). Conclusions These results suggest that GR antagonism sensitizes GR+ OvCa to chemotherapy-induced cell death through inhibition of GR-mediated cell survival pathways. PMID:26115975

  15. Fluorescent Protein–Labeled Glucocorticoid Receptor alpha Isoform Trafficking in Cultured Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dibas, Adnan; Jiang, Ming; Fudala, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Clark, Abbot F.; Yorio, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize the roles of the cytoskeleton and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in steroid-induced glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GRα) translocation in cultured human trabecular meshwork cells. Methods. Stably transfected red fluorescent protein (RFP)-GRα NTM5 cell lines were developed. Nuclear localization of RFP-GRα in NTM5 cells treated with vehicle (ethanol), dexamethasone (DEX), or RU486 was measured in cytosolic and nuclear fractions by western blotting and laser confocal microscopy. Cytochalasin D, colchicine, and 17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG, an HSP90 inhibitor), were tested for their abilities to affect GRα trafficking. Nuclear export of RFP-GRα was studied using confocal microscopy following DEX or RU486 removal. Results. NTM5 cells transfected with RFP-GRα showed a clear cytosolic localization of receptor that underwent nuclear localization after DEX treatment. RFP-GRα translocation was temperature sensitive, occurring at 37°C but not at room temperature. Neither cytochalasin D nor colchicine blocked DEX-induced or RU486-induced RFP-GRα nuclear translocation; however, 17AAG prevented DEX-induced RFP-GRα nuclear translocation. Both nuclear import and export of DEX-induced RFP-GRα were faster than RU-486–induced nuclear shuttling. Conclusions. RFP-GRα receptor behaves similarly to the wild-type GRα with its cytosolic localization and shuttling to nucleus after DEX or RU486 treatment. HSP90 is required for nuclear translocation, but the disruption of cytoskeleton had no effect on nuclear translocation of RFP-GRα. PMID:22447868

  16. Potent and multiple regulatory actions of microglial glucocorticoid receptors during CNS inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-de Sauvage, M Á; Maatouk, L; Arnoux, I; Pasco, M; Sanz Diez, A; Delahaye, M; Herrero, M T; Newman, T A; Calvo, C F; Audinat, E; Tronche, F; Vyas, S

    2013-01-01

    In CNS, glucocorticoids (GCs) activate both GC receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), whereas GR is widely expressed, the expression of MR is restricted. However, both are present in the microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain and their activation can lead to pro- or anti-inflammatory effects. We have therefore addressed the specific functions of GR in microglia. In mice lacking GR in macrophages/microglia and in the absence of modifications in MR expression, intraparenchymal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activating Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway resulted in exacerbated cellular lesion, neuronal and axonal damage. Global inhibition of GR by RU486 pre-treatment revealed that microglial GR is the principal mediator preventing neuronal degeneration triggered by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and contributes with GRs of other cell types to the protection of non-neuronal cells. In vivo and in vitro data show GR functions in microglial differentiation, proliferation and motility. Interestingly, microglial GR also abolishes the LPS-induced delayed outward rectifier currents by downregulating Kv1.3 expression known to control microglia proliferation and oxygen radical production. Analysis of GR transcriptional function revealed its powerful negative control of pro-inflammatory effectors as well as upstream inflammatory activators. Finally, we analyzed the role of GR in chronic unpredictable mild stress and aging, both known to prime or sensitize microglia in vivo. We found that microglial GR suppresses rather than mediates the deleterious effects of stress or aging on neuronal survival. Overall, the results show that microglial GR acts on several key processes limiting pro-inflammatory actions of activated microglia. PMID:24013726

  17. Differential contribution of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors to memory formation during sleep.

    PubMed

    Groch, Sabine; Wilhelm, Ines; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Corticosteroids are known to modulate the consolidation of memories during sleep, specifically in the hippocampus-dependent declarative memory system. However, effects of the major human corticosteroid cortisol are conveyed via two different receptors, i.e., mineralocorticoid (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) whose specific contributions to memory consolidation are unclear. Whereas a shift in the balance between MR and GR activation toward predominant GR activation has been found to impair sleep-dependent consolidation of declarative memories, the effect of predominant MR activation is not well characterized. Here, we examined differential corticosteroid receptor contributions to memory consolidation during post-learning sleep in two placebo-controlled double-blind studies in humans, by comparing the effects of the selective MR agonist fludrocortisone (0.2 mg, orally, Study 1) and of hydrocortisone (22 mg, intravenously, Study 2) with strong binding affinity to both MR and GR. We hypothesized increased activation of MRs during sleep to enhance declarative memory consolidation, but the joint MR/GR activation to impair it. Participants (16 men in each study) learned a declarative (word pair associates) and a procedural task (mirror tracing) before a 7-h period of nocturnal retention sleep, with the substances administered before sleep (Study 1) and during sleep (Study 2), respectively. As hypothesized, retention of word pairs, but not of mirror tracing skill, was selectively enhanced by the MR agonist fludrocortisone. An impairing effect of hydrocortisone on word pair retention remained non-significant possibly reflecting that hydrocortisone administration failed to establish robust predominance of GR activation. Our results show that predominant MR activation benefits declarative memory consolidation presumably by enhancing the sleep-dependent reactivation of hippocampal memories and resultant synaptic plastic processes. The effect is counteracted by

  18. A translational approach to clinical practice via stress-responsive glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Juruena, Mario F; Agustini, Bruno; Cleare, Anthony J; Young, Allan H

    2017-01-01

    A recent article by Kwan and colleagues could elegantly demonstrate the necessary interaction between neuronal serotonin (5-HT) systems and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis through glucocorticoid receptors (GR), producing an adequate stress response, in this case, responding to hypoxia with an increase in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). There is an intricate system connecting brain, body and mind and this exchange is only possible when all these systems-nervous, endocrine, and immune-have receptors on critical cells to receive information (via messenger molecules) from each of the other systems. There is evidence that the expression and function of GR in the hippocampus, mainly MR, is regulated by the stimulation of 5-HT receptors. Stressful stimuli increase 5-HT release and turnover in the hippocampus, and it seems reasonable to suggest that some of the changes in mineralocorticoid and GR expression may be mediated, in part at least, by the increase in 5-HT. Also serotonin and HPA axis dysfunctions have already been implicated in a variety of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. Early life stress (ELS) can have profound impact on these systems and can predispose subjects to a variety of adult metabolic and psychiatric conditions. It is important to analyze the mechanisms of this complex interaction and its subsequent programming effects on the stress systems, so that we can find new ways and targets for treatment of psychiatric disorders. Different areas of research on basic biological sciences are now being integrated and this approach will hopefully provide several new insights, new pharmacological targets and improve our global understanding of these highly debilitating chronic conditions, that we now call mental disorders.

  19. Systems Biology and Birth Defects Prevention: Blockade of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Prevents Arsenic-Induced Birth Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ahir, Bhavesh K.; Sanders, Alison P.; Rager, Julia E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The biological mechanisms by which environmental metals are associated with birth defects are largely unknown. Systems biology–based approaches may help to identify key pathways that mediate metal-induced birth defects as well as potential targets for prevention. Objectives: First, we applied a novel computational approach to identify a prioritized biological pathway that associates metals with birth defects. Second, in a laboratory setting, we sought to determine whether inhibition of the identified pathway prevents developmental defects. Methods: Seven environmental metals were selected for inclusion in the computational analysis: arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, nickel, and selenium. We used an in silico strategy to predict genes and pathways associated with both metal exposure and developmental defects. The most significant pathway was identified and tested using an in ovo whole chick embryo culture assay. We further evaluated the role of the pathway as a mediator of metal-induced toxicity using the in vitro midbrain micromass culture assay. Results: The glucocorticoid receptor pathway was computationally predicted to be a key mediator of multiple metal-induced birth defects. In the chick embryo model, structural malformations induced by inorganic arsenic (iAs) were prevented when signaling of the glucocorticoid receptor pathway was inhibited. Further, glucocorticoid receptor inhibition demonstrated partial to complete protection from both iAs- and cadmium-induced neurodevelopmental toxicity in vitro. Conclusions: Our findings highlight a novel approach to computationally identify a targeted biological pathway for examining birth defects prevention. PMID:23458687

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor and Histone deacetylase 6 mediate the differential effect of dexamethasone during osteogenesis of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Rimando, Marilyn G.; Wu, Hao-Hsiang; Liu, Yu-An; Lee, Chien-Wei; Kuo, Shu-Wen; Lo, Yin-Ping; Tseng, Kuo-Fung; Liu, Yi-Shiuan; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Lineage commitment and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) into osteoblasts in vitro is enhanced by a potent synthetic form of glucocorticoid (GC), dexamethasone (Dex). Paradoxically, when used chronically in patients, GCs exert negative effects on bone, a phenomenon known as glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in clinical practice. The mechanism on how GC differentially affects bone precursor cells to become mature osteoblasts during osteogenesis remains elusive. In this study, the dose and temporal regulation of Dex on MSC differentiation into osteoblasts were investigated. We found that continuous Dex treatment led to a net reduction of the maturation potential of differentiating osteoblasts. This phenomenon correlated with a decrease in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression, hastened degradation, and impaired sub cellular localization. Similarly, Histone Deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) expression was found to be regulated by Dex, co-localized with GR and this GR-HDAC6 complex occupied the promoter region of the osteoblast late marker osteocalcin (OCN). Combinatorial inhibition of HDAC6 and GR enhanced OCN expression. Together, the cross-talk between the Dex effector molecule GR and the inhibitory molecule HDAC6 provided mechanistic explanation of the bimodal effect of Dex during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. These findings may provide new directions of research to combat glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. PMID:27901049

  1. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor and enhances its transcriptional activities

    SciTech Connect

    Togi, Sumihito; Nakasuji, Misa; Muromoto, Ryuta; Ikeda, Osamu; Okabe, Kanako; Kitai, Yuichi; Kon, Shigeyuki; Oritani, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-07-31

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which interacts with cellular proteins, plays a central role in modification of viral and/or cellular gene expression. Here, we show that LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and that LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between LANA and GR in transiently transfected 293T and HeLa cells. In human B-lymphoma cells, LANA overexpression enhanced GR activity and cell growth suppression following glucocorticoid stimulation. Furthermore, confocal microscopy showed that activated GR was bound to LANA and accumulated in the nucleus, leading to an increase in binding of activated GR to the glucocorticoid response element of target genes. Taken together, KSHV-derived LANA acts as a transcriptional co-activator of GR. Our results might suggest a careful use of glucocorticoids in the treatment of patients with KSHV-related malignancies such as Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman disease. - Highlights: • KSHV-LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR in 293T and HeLa cells. • KSHV-LANA physically associates with GR. • KSHV-LANA enhances GR activation and cell growth suppression in human B-lymphocytes. • KSHV-LANA influences the nuclear retention and DNA binding activity of GR.

  2. A naturally hypersensitive glucocorticoid receptor elicits a compensatory reduction of hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal axis activity early in ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Muráni, Eduard; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Jaeger, Alexandra; Görres, Andreas; Tuchscherer, Armin; Wimmers, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    We comprehensively characterized the effects of a unique natural gain-of-function mutation in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), GRAla610Val, in domestic pigs to expand current knowledge of the phenotypic consequences of GR hypersensitivity. Cortisol levels were consistently reduced in one-week-old piglets, at weaning and in peripubertal age, probably due to a reduced adrenal capacity to produce glucocorticoids (GC), which was indicated by an adrenocortical thinning in GRAla610Val carriers. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) levels were significantly reduced in one-week-old piglets only. Expression analyses in peripubertal age revealed significant downregulation of hypothalamic expression of CRH and AVP, the latter only in females, and upregulation of hepatic expression of SERPINA6, by GRAla610Val. Transcriptional repression of proinflammatory genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from GRAla610Val carriers was more sensitive to dexamethasone treatment ex vivo. However, no significant effects on growth, body composition, blood chemistry or cell counts were observed under baseline conditions. These results suggest that GRAla610Val-induced GR hypersensitivity elicits a compensatory reduction in endogenous, bioactive glucocorticoid levels via readjustment of the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis early in ontogeny to maintain an adequate response, but carriers are more sensitive to exogenous GC. Therefore, GRAla610Val pigs represent a valuable animal model to explore GR-mediated mechanisms of HPA axis regulation and responses to glucocorticoid-based drugs. PMID:27440422

  3. Elevated glucocorticoid receptor binding in cultured human lymphoblasts following hydroxyurea treatment: lack of effect on steroid responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Littlefield, B.A.; Hoagland, H.C.; Greipp, P.R.

    1986-08-01

    While studying the effects of chemotherapy on glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding levels in hematological malignancies, we observed a sizable increase in nuclear GR binding of (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone in peripheral leukocytes from a chronic basophilic leukemia patient following treatment with hydroxyurea plus prednisone, but not after prednisone alone. This apparent clinical effect of hydroxyurea led to an examination of hydroxyurea effects on GR binding and sensitivity in the glucocorticoid-sensitive human lymphoblast cell line GM4672A. GR binding levels in GM4672A cells were measured following a 3-day exposure to 50 microM hydroxyurea, a concentration chosen to have a minimal but measurable effect on cellular growth rates with little or no effect on cellular viability. Under these conditions, nuclear (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone receptor binding measured by Scatchard analysis using a whole-cell assay was elevated 2.4-fold over control values (P less than 0.05), while cytosolic residual receptor binding (measured at 37/sup 0/C) remained unchanged. Thus, the total cellular content of measurable GR was increased, and this increase was totally accounted for by GR capable of nuclear binding. Hydroxyurea treatment of GM4672A cells had no effect on the affinity of nuclear or cytosolic GR for (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone. The increase in measurable nuclear-bound receptors occurred in a time-dependent manner over a period of 3 days and was fully reversible within 3 days following removal of hydroxyurea. The increase in receptor binding could not be explained by the slight alterations in cell cycle kinetics which occur at this low level of hydroxyurea. Despite increased receptor binding, cellular glucocorticoid responsiveness was unaltered as assessed by dexamethasone inhibition of cell growth and dexamethasone inhibition of a urokinase-like plasminogen activator.

  4. Methylation of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Promoter in Preschoolers: Links with Internalizing Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Parade, Stephanie H.; Ridout, Kathryn K.; Seifer, Ronald; Armstrong, David A.; Marsit, Carmen J.; McWilliams, Melissa A.; Tyrka, Audrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that early adversity is linked to methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor gene NR3C1, which is a key regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Yet no prior work has considered the contribution of methylation of NR3C1 to emerging behavior problems and psychopathology in childhood. The current study examined links between methylation of NR3C1 and behavior problems in preschoolers. Data were drawn from a sample of preschoolers with early adversity (n=171). Children ranged in age from 3 to 5 years, were racially and ethnically diverse, and nearly all qualified for public assistance. Seventy-one children had child welfare documentation of moderate-severe maltreatment in the past six months. Structured record review and interviews in the home were used to assess early adversity. Parents reported on child internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. Methylation of NR3C1 at exons 1D, 1F, and 1H were measured via sodium bisulfite pyrosequencing from saliva DNA. Methylation of NR3C1 at exons 1D and 1F was positively associated with internalizing (r = .21, p < .01 and r = .23, p < .01 respectively), but not externalizing, behavior problems. Furthermore, NR3C1 methylation mediated effects of early adversity on internalizing behavior problems. These results suggest that methylation of NR3C1 contributes to psychopathology in young children, and NR3C1 methylation from saliva DNA is salient to behavioral outcomes. PMID:26822445

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor gene methylation and HPA-axis regulation in adolescents. The TRAILS study.

    PubMed

    van der Knaap, Lisette J; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Verhulst, Frank C; van Oort, Floor V A; Riese, Harriëtte

    2015-08-01

    Early life adversity and psychopathology are thought to be linked through HPA-axis deregulation. Changes in methylation levels of stress reactivity genes such as the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) can be induced by adversity. Higher NR3C1 methylation levels have been associated with a reduced NR3C1 expression, possibly leading to impaired negative feedback regulation of the HPA-axis. In this study we tested whether methylation levels of NR3C1 were associated with HPA-axis regulation, operationalized as cortisol responses. In 361 adolescents (mean age 16.1, SD=0.6), salivary cortisol samples were collected before, during, and after a social stress task, from which response measures (cortisol activation and recovery) were calculated. Higher NR3C1 methylation levels were associated with a flattened cortisol recovery slope, indicating a delayed recovery time. Cortisol response activation was not associated with NR3C1 methylation. These results suggest that methylation of NR3C1 may impair negative feedback of the HPA-axis in adolescents.

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor positively regulates transcription of FNDC5 in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Jeong, Yu Jeong; Song, In-Sung; Noh, Yeon Hee; Seo, Kyo Won; Kim, Min; Han, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Irisin is secreted by skeletal muscle during exercise and influences energy and metabolic homeostasis. This hormone is a cleaved and secreted fragment of fibronectin type III domain-containing 5 (FNDC5). Elucidation of the FNDC5 gene regulation mechanism is necessary to clarify the function of irisin as a potential therapeutic target in human metabolic diseases. Thus, we investigated the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate expression of the FNDC5 gene. FNDC5 mRNA was strong expressed in major energy-dependent human tissues, including heart, brain, liver, and skeletal muscle. Promoter analysis of the FNDC5 gene revealed that the core promoter region of the FNDC5 gene contained one CpG island that was located just upstream of the transcriptional start site for variants 2 and 3. Treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate and the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine increased mRNA expression of FNDC5 in Huh7 cells. Prediction of transcription factor binding sites suggested that the glucocorticoid receptor was involved in the regulation of FNDC5 expression, and indeed, cortisol treatment increased mRNA expression of FNDC5 in Huh7 cells. Collectively, these findings offer insight into the genetic and epigenetic regulation of FNDC5, providing the initial steps required for understanding the role of irisin in the metabolic homeostasis. PMID:28240298

  7. Glial glucocorticoid receptors in aged Fisher 344 (F344) and F344/Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Kasckow, J; Xiao, C; Herman, JP

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GR) regulate glial function, and changes in astrocyte gene expression are implicated in age-related pathology. We evaluated changes in astroglial GR expression in two strains of rats – Fisher 344 (F344; 4, 12 and 24 months) and F344/Brown Norway strain (F344/BN; 4, 12 and 30 months). In both strains basal levels of corticosterone were higher in the oldest groups of rats. Age-related increases in GR (+) astrocytes but not the percent of astrocytes expressing GR were observed in the hippocampus CA1 region in F344 rats. Age-related decreases in CA1 GR (+) astrocytes and the percentage of GR (+) astrocytes were observed in the F344/BN strain only. Similar strain-specific changes were observed in the dentate gyrus. In the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus: 1) F344 rats exhibited significant decreases in the overall number of glial profiles with age, 2) F344/BN rats exhibited decreases in the numbers of GR (+) astrocytes with aging and 3) the proportion of GR (+) astrocytes decreased in older F344/BN, but not F344 rats. Overall, the data demonstrate age- and strain-related alterations in GR astrocytic expression that may explain unique phenotypic differences in brain function observed in both strains. PMID:19249343

  8. Identification and characterization of DNA sequences that prevent glucocorticoid receptor binding to nearby response elements.

    PubMed

    Telorac, Jonas; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Schöne, Stefanie; Meierhofer, David; Sauer, Sascha; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2016-07-27

    Out of the myriad of potential DNA binding sites of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) found in the human genome, only a cell-type specific minority is actually bound, indicating that the presence of a recognition sequence alone is insufficient to specify where GR binds. Cooperative interactions with other transcription factors (TFs) are known to contribute to binding specificity. Here, we reasoned that sequence signals preventing GR recruitment to certain loci provide an alternative means to confer specificity. Motif analyses uncovered candidate Negative Regulatory Sequences (NRSs) that interfere with genomic GR binding. Subsequent functional analyses demonstrated that NRSs indeed prevent GR binding to nearby response elements. We show that NRS activity is conserved across species, found in most tissues and that they also interfere with the genomic binding of other TFs. Interestingly, the effects of NRSs appear not to be a simple consequence of changes in chromatin accessibility. Instead, we find that NRSs interact with proteins found at sub-nuclear structures called paraspeckles and that these proteins might mediate the repressive effects of NRSs. Together, our studies suggest that the joint influence of positive and negative sequence signals partition the genome into regions where GR can bind and those where it cannot.

  9. Widespread negative response elements mediate direct repression by agonist-liganded glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Surjit, Milan; Ganti, Krishna Priya; Mukherji, Atish; Ye, Tao; Hua, Guoqiang; Metzger, Daniel; Li, Mei; Chambon, Pierre

    2011-04-15

    The glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR), when liganded to GC, activates transcription through direct binding to simple (+)GRE DNA binding sequences (DBS). GC-induced direct repression via GR binding to complex "negative" GREs (nGREs) has been reported. However, GR-mediated transrepression was generally ascribed to indirect "tethered" interaction with other DNA-bound factors. We report that GC-induces direct transrepression via the binding of GR to simple DBS (IR nGREs) unrelated to (+)GRE. These DBS act on agonist-liganded GR, promoting the assembly of cis-acting GR-SMRT/NCoR repressing complexes. IR nGREs are present in over 1000 mouse/human ortholog genes, which are repressed by GC in vivo. Thus variations in the levels of a single ligand can coordinately turn genes on or off depending in their response element DBS, allowing an additional level of regulation in GR signaling. This mechanism suits GR signaling remarkably well, given that adrenal secretion of GC fluctuates in a circadian and stress-related fashion.

  10. Seasonal changes in cortisol sensitivity and glucocorticoid receptor affinity and number in leukocytes of coho salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maule, Alec G.; Schreck, Carl B.; Sharpe, Cameron

    1993-01-01

    To determine if there were organ-specific changes in immune responses or immune-endocrine interaction, we monitored in vitro immune response, cortisol sensitivity and number and affinity of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in leukocytes from freshwater-adapted juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) during the physiological changes that prepare them to enter the marine environment. During this period, absolute immune response declined, but splenic leukocytes generated more antibody-producing cells than did cells from anterior kidney. Splenic leukocytes were initially more sensitive to the suppressive effects of cortisol and had fewer GR than leukocytes from the anterior kidney. Leukocytes from the anterior kidney were initially insensitive to cortisol but developed sensitivity at about the same time as the dissociation constant and number of GR increased. In vitro incubation of anterior kidney leukocytes in cortisol altered GR variables when experiments were conducted during March through September but not during November through February. In some years, changes in GR or immune responses were correlated with plasma cortisol titers, but in other years there was no correlation. Thus, the exact relation between cortisol, GR and immune response in anadromous salmonids is unclear and other factors are involved.

  11. Transgenerational impact of intimate partner violence on methylation in the promoter of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Radtke, K M; Ruf, M; Gunter, H M; Dohrmann, K; Schauer, M; Meyer, A; Elbert, T

    2011-07-19

    Prenatal exposure to maternal stress can have lifelong implications for psychological function, such as behavioral problems and even the development of mental illness. Previous research suggests that this is due to transgenerational epigenetic programming of genes operating in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, such as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). However, it is not known whether intrauterine exposure to maternal stress affects the epigenetic state of these genes beyond infancy. Here, we analyze the methylation status of the GR gene in mothers and their children, at 10-19 years after birth. We combine these data with a retrospective evaluation of maternal exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV). Methylation of the mother's GR gene was not affected by IPV. For the first time, we show that methylation status of the GR gene of adolescent children is influenced by their mother's experience of IPV during pregnancy. As these sustained epigenetic modifications are established in utero, we consider this to be a plausible mechanism by which prenatal stress may program adult psychosocial function.

  12. Morphine conditioned place preference depends on glucocorticoid receptors in both hippocampus and nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhifang; Han, Huili; Wang, Meina; Xu, Lin; Hao, Wei; Cao, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Learned association between drugs of abuse and context is essential for the formation of drug conditioned place preference (CPP), which is believed to engage many brain regions including hippocampus and nucleus accumbens (NAc). The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we examined whether glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) of hippocampus and NAc influenced the formation of morphine CPP in Sprague Dawley rats. We found that systemic or intrahippocampal infused DMSO vehicle (DMSO 20% in saline) 30 min before daily morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.) conditioning did not affect the formation of morphine CPP. In contrast, systemic administration (5 mg/kg, s.c.) or intrahippocampal infusion (0, 0.1, 1.0, 10, 20 microg per side) of the GR antagonist RU38486 blocked or impaired the formation of CPP in a dose-dependent manner, respectively. Furthermore, intra-NAc infused RU38486 (10 microg per side) but not DMSO vehicle also prevented the formation of CPP. These results demonstrate that both the GRs of hippocampus and NAc are necessary for the formation of morphine CPP, suggesting a neural network function of the GRs in forming the opiate-associated memory.

  13. Localization of glucocorticoid receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in hippocampus of rat brain using in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Matocha, M.F.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1988-08-01

    An in situ hybridization procedure was applied to quantify glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNAs in the hippocampus of rat brain. Hybridization was carried out using a radiolabeled antisense probe complementary to the rat liver GR gene. The specificity of the method was validated by showing: 1) a high cellular grain density in sections hybridized with an antisense but not a sense probe; 2) agreement between the experimental and theoretical temperature at which 50% of the hybrids melted, and 3) a high signal distribution of GR mRNA in the hippocampus, a region of brain known to preferentially concentrate steroid hormones. Within the hippocampus, however, subregional differences in hybridization densities were observed. Quantitative autoradiography indicated that the average neuronal silver grain number was highest in the pyramidal cell layers of CA2 and CA4 and lowest in those of CA1 and CA3. Also, there was a significant difference in the average grain number between all of the cell fields except for that between CA2 and CA4. These results show that contiguous but neuroanatomically distinct cell fields of the hippocampus express different levels of GR transcripts, and indicate that differential regulation of GR expression occurs in subpopulations of hippocampal neurons.

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor expression in 20 solid tumor types using immunohistochemistry assay

    PubMed Central

    Block, Thaddeus S; Murphy, Tiffany I; Munster, Pamela N; Nguyen, Dat P; Lynch, Frank J

    2017-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity plays a role in many aspects of human physiology and may play a crucial role in chemotherapy resistance in a wide variety of solid tumors. A novel immunohistochemistry (IHC) based assay has been previously developed and validated in order to assess GR immunoreactivity in triple-negative breast cancer. The current study investigates the standardized use of this validated assay to assess GR expression in a broad range of solid tumor malignancies. Methods Archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor bank samples (n=236) from 20 different solid tumor types were analyzed immunohistochemically. Nuclear staining was reported based on the H-score method using differential intensity scores (0, 1+, 2+, or 3+) with the percent stained (out of at least 100 carcinoma cells) recorded at each intensity. Results GR was expressed in all tumor types that had been evaluated. Renal cell carcinoma, sarcoma, cervical cancer, and melanoma were those with the highest mean H-scores, indicating high levels of GR expression. Colon, endometrial, and gastric cancers had lower GR staining percentages and intensities, resulting in the lowest mean H-scores. Conclusion A validated IHC assay revealed GR immunoreactivity in all solid tumor types studied and allowed for standardized comparison of reactivity among the different malignancies. Impact Baseline expression levels of GR may be a useful biomarker when pharmaceutically targeting GR in research or clinical setting. PMID:28293120

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor-PPARα axis in fetal mouse liver prepares neonates for milk lipid catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Gianpaolo; Tan, Chek Kun; Khaled, Nourhène; Montagner, Alexandra; Leuenberger, Nicolas; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Paramalingam, Eeswari; Guillou, Hervé; Wahli, Walter

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, hepatic lipid catabolism is essential for the newborns to efficiently use milk fat as an energy source. However, it is unclear how this critical trait is acquired and regulated. We demonstrate that under the control of PPARα, the genes required for lipid catabolism are transcribed before birth so that the neonatal liver has a prompt capacity to extract energy from milk upon suckling. The mechanism involves a fetal glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-PPARα axis in which GR directly regulates the transcriptional activation of PPARα by binding to its promoter. Certain PPARα target genes such as Fgf21 remain repressed in the fetal liver and become PPARα responsive after birth following an epigenetic switch triggered by β-hydroxybutyrate-mediated inhibition of HDAC3. This study identifies an endocrine developmental axis in which fetal GR primes the activity of PPARα in anticipation of the sudden shifts in postnatal nutrient source and metabolic demands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11853.001 PMID:27367842

  16. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity

    PubMed Central

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes. PMID:27581526

  17. Histone Acetyltransferase Complexes Can Mediate Transcriptional Activation by the Major Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation Domain

    PubMed Central

    Wallberg, Annika E.; Neely, Kristen E.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Workman, Jerry L.; Wright, Anthony P. H.; Grant, Patrick A.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Ada adapter proteins are important for glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene activation in yeast. The N-terminal transactivation domain of GR, τ1, is dependent upon Ada2, Ada3, and Gcn5 for transactivation in vitro and in vivo. Using in vitro techniques, we demonstrate that the GR-τ1 interacts directly with the native Ada containing histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex SAGA but not the related Ada complex. Mutations in τ1 that reduce τ1 transactivation activity in vivo lead to a reduced binding of τ1 to the SAGA complex and conversely, mutations increasing the transactivation activity of τ1 lead to an increased binding of τ1 to SAGA. In addition, the Ada-independent NuA4 HAT complex also interacts with τ1. GAL4-τ1-driven transcription from chromatin templates is stimulated by SAGA and NuA4 in an acetyl coenzyme A-dependent manner. Low-activity τ1 mutants reduce SAGA- and NuA4-stimulated transcription while high-activity τ1 mutants increase transcriptional activation, specifically from chromatin templates. Our results demonstrate that the targeting of native HAT complexes by the GR-τ1 activation domain mediates transcriptional stimulation from chromatin templates. PMID:10454542

  18. Interaction of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) with estrogen receptor (ER) α and activator protein 1 (AP1) in dexamethasone-mediated interference of ERα activity.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Sudipan; Jin, Yetao; Nagaich, Akhilesh K

    2013-08-16

    The role of glucocorticoids in the inhibition of estrogen (17-β-estradiol (E2))-regulated estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell proliferation is well established. We and others have seen that synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) antagonizes E2-stimulated endogenous ERα target gene expression. However, how glucocorticoids negatively regulate the ERα signaling pathway is still poorly understood. ChIP studies using ERα- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-positive MCF-7 cells revealed that GR occupies several ERα-binding regions (EBRs) in cells treated with E2 and Dex simultaneously. Interestingly, there was little or no GR loading to these regions when cells were treated with E2 or Dex alone. The E2+Dex-dependent GR recruitment is associated with the displacement of ERα and steroid receptor coactivator-3 from the target EBRs leading to the repression of ERα-mediated transcriptional activation. The recruitment of GR to EBRs requires assistance from ERα and FOXA1 and is facilitated by AP1 binding within the EBRs. The GR binding to EBRs is mediated via direct protein-protein interaction between the GR DNA-binding domain and ERα. Limited mutational analyses indicate that arginine 488 located within the C-terminal zinc finger domain of the GR DNA-binding domain plays a critical role in stabilizing this interaction. Together, the results of this study unravel a novel mechanism involved in glucocorticoid inhibition of ERα transcriptional activity and E2-mediated cell proliferation and thus establish a foundation for future exploitation of the GR signaling pathway in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer.

  19. The glucocorticoid receptor regulates the binding of C/EPBbeta on the alpha-1-acid glycoprotein promoter in vivo.

    PubMed

    Savoldi, G; Fenaroli, A; Ferrari, F; Rigaud, G; Albertini, A; Di Lorenzo, D

    1997-12-01

    A complex interaction between the Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR), C/EBPbeta, and other transcription factors activate the Alpha-1 Acid Glycoprotein (AGP) promoter in HTC(JZ-1) rat hepatoma culture cells. This effect is mediated by the so-called Steroid Responsive Unit (SRU) of the AGP promoter that contains several binding sites for C/EBP transcription factors, some of which overlap with the Glucocorticoid Responsive Element (GRE). Our in vivo footprinting experiments revealed that the GRE- and the C/EBP-binding sites were already occupied glucocorticoid dependently in HTC(JZ-1) cells 10 min after dexamethasone administration (10(-6) M). Furthermore, local changes in the chromatine structure shown by the appearance of DNAse I hypersensitive sites (HS sites) also took place. These changes were probably dependent on a tissue-specific organization of the chromatine at the SRU because they were not detectable in a different glucocorticoid-responsive cell line (PC12) that did not express AGP. Here, we have also shown that withdrawal of dexamethasone or addition of the anti-glucocorticoid RU486 were able to revert the pattern induced by dexamethasone in vivo. The disappearance of the protected region and the hypersensitive sites, typical of the hormone activated promoter, confirmed the necessity of the GR to be bound by the agonist and the inability of the GR-antagonist complex to bind the DNA. By functional assays, we showed that the occupancy of the SRU by these transcriptional proteins in vivo correlated with the activation of the AGP gene transcription. With these results, we have shown that one of the functions of the GR to activate transcription of the AGP gene is to recruit C/EBPbeta and to maintain it bound at its target DNA sequences (SRU). This process was not accomplished by RU486.

  20. Chronic stress accelerates ligature-induced periodontitis by suppressing glucocorticoid receptor-α signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan; Zhao, Lisheng

    2016-03-25

    Periodontitis is a common chronic inflammatory disease. Recent studies have shown that chronic stress (CS) might modulate periodontal disease, but there are few models of CS-induced periodontitis, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study established a rat model of periodontitis associated with CS induced by nylon thread ligatures. The severity of periodontitis was evaluated in this model by radiographic and pathological examination. The inflammatory reaction indicated by the elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and glucocorticoid receptor-α (GR-α) expressions were detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Open-field tests and serum corticosterone were used to evaluate CS. The results showed that CS induced behavioral changes and increased corticosterone levels of the animals with periodontitis. CS stimulation markedly increased alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket depth and the number of plaques. It also enhanced the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that CS accelerated the ligature-induced pathological changes associated with periodontitis. Further analysis of the mechanisms involved showed that GR-α expression was significantly downregulated in periodontal tissues of the animals undergoing CS. Blocking GR-α signaling in lipopolysaccharide and corticosteroid-treated human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells in vitro significantly upregulated the expression of p-Akt (protein kinase B) and TLR4, promoted nuclear factor-κB activity and increased levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. This research suggests that CS might accelerate the pathological progression of periodontitis by a GR-α signaling-mediated inflammatory response and that this may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in patients with CS.