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Sample records for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G6PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Janz TG, Hamilton GC. Anemia, polycythemia, and white blood cell disorders. In: Marx ...

  2. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  3. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: the added value of cytology.

    PubMed

    Roelens, Marie; Dossier, Claire; Fenneteau, Odile; Couque, Nathalie; Da Costa, Lydie

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 2 year-old boy hospitalized into the emergency room for influenza pneumonia infection. The evolution was marked by a respiratory distress syndrome, a severe hemolytic anemia, associated with thrombocytopenia and kidney failure. First, a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has been judiciously suggested due to the classical triad: kidney failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. But, strikingly, blood smears do not exhibit schizocytes, but instead ghosts and hemighosts, some characteristic features of a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Our hypothesis has been confirmed by enzymatic dosage and molecular biology. The unusual initial aplastic feature of this anemia could be the result of a transient erythroblastopenia due to the viral agent, at the origin of the G6PD crisis on a background of a major erythrocyte anti-oxydant enzyme defect. This case of G6PD defect points out the continuously importance of the cytology, which was able to redirect the diagnosis by the hemighost and ghost detection.

  4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: the added value of cytology.

    PubMed

    Roelens, Marie; Dossier, Claire; Fenneteau, Odile; Couque, Nathalie; Da Costa, Lydie

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 2 year-old boy hospitalized into the emergency room for influenza pneumonia infection. The evolution was marked by a respiratory distress syndrome, a severe hemolytic anemia, associated with thrombocytopenia and kidney failure. First, a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has been judiciously suggested due to the classical triad: kidney failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. But, strikingly, blood smears do not exhibit schizocytes, but instead ghosts and hemighosts, some characteristic features of a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Our hypothesis has been confirmed by enzymatic dosage and molecular biology. The unusual initial aplastic feature of this anemia could be the result of a transient erythroblastopenia due to the viral agent, at the origin of the G6PD crisis on a background of a major erythrocyte anti-oxydant enzyme defect. This case of G6PD defect points out the continuously importance of the cytology, which was able to redirect the diagnosis by the hemighost and ghost detection. PMID:27101632

  5. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presented with convulsion: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Merdin, Alparslan; Avci, Fatma; Guzelay, Nihal

    2014-01-29

    Red blood cells carry oxygen in the body and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase protects these cells from oxidative chemicals. If there is a lack of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, red blood cells can go acute hemolysis. Convulsion is a rare presentation for acute hemolysis due to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. Herein, we report a case report of a Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency diagnosed patient after presentation with convulsion. A 70 year-old woman patient had been hospitalized because of convulsion and fatigue. She has not had similar symptoms before. She had ingested fava beans in the last two days. Her hypophyseal and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal. Blood transfusion was performed and the patient recovered.

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presented with convulsion: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Merdin, Alparslan; Avci, Fatma; Guzelay, Nihal

    2014-01-29

    Red blood cells carry oxygen in the body and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase protects these cells from oxidative chemicals. If there is a lack of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, red blood cells can go acute hemolysis. Convulsion is a rare presentation for acute hemolysis due to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. Herein, we report a case report of a Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency diagnosed patient after presentation with convulsion. A 70 year-old woman patient had been hospitalized because of convulsion and fatigue. She has not had similar symptoms before. She had ingested fava beans in the last two days. Her hypophyseal and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal. Blood transfusion was performed and the patient recovered. PMID:24711919

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and sulfadimidin acetylation phenotypes in Egyptian oases.

    PubMed

    Hussein, L; Yamamah, G; Saleh, A

    1992-04-01

    Screening of 1315 males from two Egyptian oases for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G-6PD) found an incidence of 5.9%. The rate of acetylation of sulfadimidin was also studied, and a bimodal distribution was found with 73% rapid acetylators. There is a correlation between high frequency of G-6PD deficiency and high frequency of slow acetylation rate.

  8. G6PD Deficiency (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are high-risk areas for the infectious disease malaria . Researchers have found evidence that the parasite that ... deficiency may have developed as a protection against malaria. continue G6PD Deficiency Symptom Triggers Kids with G6PD ...

  9. Stenotrophomonas Infection in a Patient with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Harthan, Aaron A.; Heger, Margaret L

    2013-01-01

    The drug of choice for treatment of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, and second-line therapy usually consists of a fluoroquinolone. However, in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, neither sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim nor a fluoroquinolone is a preferred option as it may result in hemolysis. Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding treatment of S maltophilia infection in these patients. This case report presents a patient who was successfully treated with doxycycline and inhaled colistimethate. PMID:23798908

  10. Complete Deficiency of Leukocyte Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase with Defective Bactericidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, M. Robert; DeChatelet, Lawrence R.; McCall, Charles E.; La Via, Mariano F.; Spurr, Charles L.; Baehner, Robert L.

    1972-01-01

    A 52 yr old Caucasian female (F. E.) had hemolytic anemia, a leukemoid reaction, and fatal sepsis due to Escherichia coli. Her leukocytes ingested bacteria normally but did not kill catalase positive Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Serratia marcescens. An H2O2-producing bacterium, Streptococcus faecalis, was killed normally. Granule myeloperoxidase, acid and alkaline phosphatase, and beta glucuronidase activities were normal, and these enzymes shifted normally to the phagocyte vacuole (light and electron microscopy). Intravacuolar reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium did not occur. Moreover, only minimal quantities of H2O2 were generated, and the hexose monophosphate shunt (HMPS) was not stimulated during phagocytosis. These observations suggested the diagnosis of chronic granulomatous disease. However, in contrast to control and chronic granulomatous disease leukocytes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was completely absent in F. E. leukocytes whereas NADH oxidase and NADPH oxidase activities were both normal. Unlike chronic granulomatous disease, methylene blue did not stimulate the hexose monophosphate shunt in F. E. cells. Thus, F. E. and chronic granulomatous disease leukocytes appear to share certain metabolic and bactericidal defects, but the metabolic basis of the abnormality differs. Chronic granulomatous disease cells lack oxidase activity which produces H2O2; F. E. cells had normal levels of oxidase activity but failed to produce NADPH due to complete glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. These data indicate that a complete absence of leukocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase with defective hexose monophosphate shunt activity is associated with low H2O2 production and inadequate bactericidal activity, and further suggest an important role for NADPH in the production of H2O2 in human granulocytes. Images PMID:4401271

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency enhances human coronavirus 229E infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Ho, Hung-Yao; Shih, Shin-Ru; Chiu, Daniel Tsun-Yee

    2008-03-15

    The host cellular environment is a key determinant of pathogen infectivity. Viral gene expression and viral particle production of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient and G6PD-knockdown cells were much higher than their counterparts when human coronavirus (HCoV) 229E was applied at 0.1 multiplicity of infection. These phenomena were correlated with increased oxidant production. Accordingly, ectopic expression of G6PD in G6PD-deficient cells or addition of antioxidant (such as alpha-lipoic acid) to G6PD-knockdown cells attenuated the increased susceptibility to HCoV 229E infection. All experimental data indicated that oxidative stress in host cells is an important factor in HCoV 229E infectivity. PMID:18269318

  12. Bilateral pulmonary edema after endoscopic sympathectomy in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lan, C J; Luk, H N; Wu, C T; Chang, W K; Tsou, M Y; Lui, P W; Lee, T Y

    2001-01-01

    Transaxillary endoscopic sympathectomy of thoracic ganglia (T2-T3) has recently gained wider acceptance as the treatment of choice for palmar hyperhidrosis. It requires one-lung ventilation to facilitate the surgery. One-lung ventilation, however, is not without complications, among which acute pulmonary edema has been reported. In this case report, we present a patient with palmar hyperhidrosis complicated by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency, who received bilateral endoscopic sympathectomy under alternate one-lung anesthesia, and developed acute pulmonary edema immediately after recruitment of the successive collapsed lung. The effects of hypoxemia, G-6-PD deficiency and sympathectomy might all add to the development of acute pulmonary edema secondary to reexpansion of each individual lung after alternate one-lung ventilation. The possibilities of the inferred causes are herein discussed. PMID:11152024

  13. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency among Male Blood Donors in Sana’a City, Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nood, Hafiz A.; Bazara, Fakiha A.; Al-Absi, Rashad; Habori, Molham AL

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency among Yemeni people from different regions of the country living in the capital city, Sana’a, giving an indication of its overall prevalence in Yemen. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among Yemeni male blood donors attending the Department of Blood Bank at the National Centre of the Public Health Laboratories in the capital city, Sana’a, Yemen. Fluorescent spot method was used for screening, spectrophotometeric estimation of G-6-PD activity and separation by electrophoresis was done to determine the G-6-PD phenotype. Results Of the total 508 male blood donors recruited into the study, 36 were G-6-PD deficient, giving a likely G-6-PD deficiency prevalence of 7.1%. None of these deficient donors had history of anemia or jaundice. Thirty-five of these deficient cases (97.2%) showed severe G-6-PD deficiency class II (<10% of normal activity), and their phenotyping presumptively revealed a G-6-PD-Mediterranean variant. Conclusion The results showed a significant presence of G-6-PD deficiency with predominance of a severe G-6-PD deficiency type in these blood donors in Sana’a City, which could represent an important health problem through occurrence of hemolytic anemia under oxidative stress. A larger sample size is needed to determine the overall prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency, and should be extended to include DNA analysis to identify its variants in Yemen. PMID:22359725

  14. Perioperative management of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patient: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Elyassi, Ali R; Rowshan, Henry H

    2009-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzymatic disorder of red blood cells in humans. It is estimated that about 400 million people are affected by this deficiency. The G6PD enzyme catalyzes the first step in the pentose phosphate pathway, leading to antioxidants that protect cells against oxidative damage. A G6PD-deficient patient, therefore, lacks the ability to protect red blood cells against oxidative stresses from certain drugs, metabolic conditions, infections, and ingestion of fava beans. The following is a literature review, including disease background, pathophysiology, and clinical implications, to help guide the clinician in management of the G6PD-deficient patient. A literature search was conducted in the following databases: PubMed, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, OMIM, and Google; this was supplemented by a search for selected authors. Keywords used were glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, anesthesia, analgesia, anxiolysis, management, favism, hemolytic anemia, benzodiazepines, codeine, codeine derivatives, ketamine, barbiturates, propofol, opioids, fentanyl, and inhalation anesthetics. Based on titles and abstracts, 23 papers and 1 website were identified. The highest prevalence of G6PD is reported in Africa, southern Europe, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and the central and southern Pacific islands; however, G6PD deficiency has now migrated to become a worldwide disease. Numerous drugs, infections, and metabolic conditions have been shown to cause acute hemolysis of red blood cells in the G6PD-deficient patient, with the rare need for blood transfusion. Benzodiazepines, codeine/codeine derivatives, propofol, fentanyl, and ketamine were not found to cause hemolytic crises in the G6PD-deficient patient. The most effective management strategy is to prevent hemolysis by avoiding oxidative stressors. Thus, management for pain and anxiety should include medications that are safe and have not been

  15. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Deficiency in Transfusion Medicine: The Unknown Risks

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Richard O.; Jhang, Jeffrey S.; Pham, Huy P.; Hod, Eldad A.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is red blood cell (RBC) destruction in response to oxidative stress. Patients requiring RBC transfusions may simultaneously receive oxidative medications or have concurrent infections, both of which can induce hemolysis in G6PD-deficient RBCs. Although it is not routine practice to screen healthy blood donors for G6PD deficiency, case reports identified transfusion of G6PD-deficient RBCs as causing hemolysis and other adverse events. In addition, some patient populations may be more at risk for complications associated with transfusions of G6PD-deficient RBCs because they receive RBCs from donors who are more likely to have G6PD deficiency. This review discusses G6PD deficiency, its importance in transfusion medicine, changes in the RBC antioxidant system (of which G6PD is essential) during refrigerated storage, and mechanisms of hemolysis. In addition, as yet unanswered questions that could be addressed by translational and clinical studies are identified and discussed. PMID:23815264

  16. Molecular characterization of a German variant of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD Aachen).

    PubMed

    Efferth, T; Osieka, R; Beutler, E

    2000-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-chromosome-linked hereditary disorder. Clinically, patients with G6PD deficiency often present with drug- or food-induced hemolytic crises or neonatal jaundice. G6PD is involved in the generation of NADPH and reduced glutathione. In contrast to American, Mediterranean, and African ancestries, only few variants are known from Middle and Northern Europe. We describe the molecular characterization of a distinct variant from the northwestern area of Germany, G6PD Aachen. The sequence of the G6PD gene from three afflicted males was found to be hemizygous at cDNA residue 1089 for a C-->G mutation with a predicted amino acid change of Asn363Lys. The 1089 C-->G point mutation is unique, but produces the identical amino acid change found in a Mexican variant of G6PD deficiency, G6PD Loma Linda. This G6PD-deficient variant is caused by a 1089 C-->A mutation. The 363-amino-acid replacement is located outside a known mutation cluster region between amino acid residues 380 and 450, but may disrupt or weaken dimer interactions of G6PD enzyme subunits.

  17. [Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency--a cause of anaemia in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, Małgorzata; Zimny, Anna

    2003-11-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is one of the most important cytoprotective enzymes for oxidative stress. The WHO classification of G6PD deficiency, based on enzyme activity and clinical significance, distinguishes five variants. Chronic haemolytic process is rare and the main factors causing haemolysis are: infections, substances derived from plants, drugs with high oxidation-reduction potential, stress, ketoacidosis in diabetes and surgery operations. We report two cases of women belonging to the class 3 of the WHO classification in whom haemolysis occured during pregnancy. One of the patients developed two incidents of haemolytic anaemia. The cause of the first episode, nine months before pregnancy, was probably infection of the urinary tract caused by Escherichia coli, but the influence of the drugs also cannot be excluded. Because of the genetic background of this enzymopathy we also examined members of the patients, families but did not find any evidence of G6PD deficiency among them. The reported cases indicate that haemolytic anaemia caused by G6PD deficiency may occur during pregnancy what can lead to many not only haematological but also serious obstetrical complications such as infertility, fetus malformations and even its death. We also draw attention to several difficulties in diagnosing G6PD deficiency especially during haemolysis. PMID:16737003

  18. Cryopreservation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity inside red blood cells: developing a specimen repository in support of development and evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common human enzyme deficiency. It is characterized by abnormally low levels of G6PD activity. Individuals with G6PD deficiency are at risk of undergoing acute haemolysis when exposed to 8‒aminoquinoline-based drugs, such as primaquine. For this reason it is imperative to identify individuals with G6PD deficiency prior to administering these anti-malarial drugs. There is a need for the development and evaluation of point-of-care G6PD deficiency screening tests suitable for areas of the developing world where malarial treatments are frequently administered. The development and evaluation of new G6PD tests will be greatly assisted with the availability of specimen repositories. Methods Cryopreservation of erythrocytes was evaluated as a means to preserve G6PD activity. Blood specimens from 31 patients including ten specimens with normal G6PD activity, three with intermediate activity, and 18 with deficient activity were cryopreserved for up to six months. Results Good correlation in G6PD activity between fresh and cryopreserved specimens (R2 = 0.95). The cryopreserved specimens show an overall small drop in mean G6PD activity of 0.23 U/g Hb (P=0.23). Cytochemical staining showed that intracellular G6PD activity distribution within the red blood cell populations is preserved during cryopreservation. Furthermore, the mosaic composition of red blood cells in heterozygous women is also preserved for six months or more. The fluorescent spot and the BinaxNOW qualitative tests for G6PD deficiency also showed high concordance in G6PD status determination between cryopreserved specimens and fresh specimens. Conclusions A methodology for establishing a specimen panel for evaluation of G6PD tests is described. The approach is similar to that used in several malaria research facilities for the cryopreservation of parasites in clinical specimens and axenic cultures. Specimens stored in this manner will aid

  19. Detection of Occult Acute Kidney Injury in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Hakeem, Gehan Lotfy; Abdel Naeem, Emad Allam; Swelam, Salwa Hussein; El Morsi Aboul Fotoh, Laila; El Mazary, Abdel Azeem Mohamed; Abdel Fadil, Ashraf Mohamed; Abdel Hafez, Asmaa Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency anemia is associated with intravascular hemolysis. The freely filtered hemoglobin can damage the kidney. We aimed to assess any subclinical renal injury in G6PD children. Methods Sixty children were included. Thirty G6PD deficiency anemia children were enrolled during the acute hemolytic crisis and after the hemolytic episode had elapsed. Another thirty healthy children were included as controls. Serum cystatin C, creatinine levels, and urinary albumin/creatinine (A/C) ratio were measured, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated. Results Significantly higher urinary A/C ratio (p=0.001,0.002 respectively) and lower GFR (p=0.001 for both) were found during hemolysis and after the hemolytic episode compared to the controls. Also, significant higher serum cystatin C (p=0.001), creatinine (p=0.05) and A/C (p= 0.001) ratio and insignificant lower GFR (p=0.3) during acute hemolytic crisis compared to the same children after the hemolytic episode subsided. Conclusions G6PD deficiency anemia is associated with a variable degree of acute renal injury during acute hemolytic episodes which may persist after elapsing of the hemolytic crises. PMID:27648201

  20. Detection of Occult Acute Kidney Injury in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Hakeem, Gehan Lotfy; Abdel Naeem, Emad Allam; Swelam, Salwa Hussein; El Morsi Aboul Fotoh, Laila; El Mazary, Abdel Azeem Mohamed; Abdel Fadil, Ashraf Mohamed; Abdel Hafez, Asmaa Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency anemia is associated with intravascular hemolysis. The freely filtered hemoglobin can damage the kidney. We aimed to assess any subclinical renal injury in G6PD children. Methods Sixty children were included. Thirty G6PD deficiency anemia children were enrolled during the acute hemolytic crisis and after the hemolytic episode had elapsed. Another thirty healthy children were included as controls. Serum cystatin C, creatinine levels, and urinary albumin/creatinine (A/C) ratio were measured, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated. Results Significantly higher urinary A/C ratio (p=0.001,0.002 respectively) and lower GFR (p=0.001 for both) were found during hemolysis and after the hemolytic episode compared to the controls. Also, significant higher serum cystatin C (p=0.001), creatinine (p=0.05) and A/C (p= 0.001) ratio and insignificant lower GFR (p=0.3) during acute hemolytic crisis compared to the same children after the hemolytic episode subsided. Conclusions G6PD deficiency anemia is associated with a variable degree of acute renal injury during acute hemolytic episodes which may persist after elapsing of the hemolytic crises.

  1. A hemolysis trigger in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency. Vicia sativa (Vetch).

    PubMed

    Bicakci, Zafer

    2009-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme, playing an important role in the redox metabolism of all aerobic cells. It was reported that certain medications, fava beans, and infections can trigger acute hemolytic anemia in patients with G6PD deficiency. An 8-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with blood in the urine, headache, dizziness, fatigue, loss of appetite, and jaundice in the eyes, 24 hours after eating large amounts of fresh, vetch grains. Laboratory investigation revealed hemolytic anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and G6PD deficiency. Approximately 0.5% of fava bean seeds have 2 pyrimidine beta-glycosides called, vicine and convicine. Vetch has 0.731% vicine, 0.081% convicine, and 0.530% beta cyanoalanine glycosides. The aim of this case report is to emphasize the importance of vetch seeds as a cause for hemolytic crisis in our country, where approximately one million tons of vetch is produced per year, especially in the agricultural regions.

  2. A hemolysis trigger in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency. Vicia sativa (Vetch).

    PubMed

    Bicakci, Zafer

    2009-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme, playing an important role in the redox metabolism of all aerobic cells. It was reported that certain medications, fava beans, and infections can trigger acute hemolytic anemia in patients with G6PD deficiency. An 8-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with blood in the urine, headache, dizziness, fatigue, loss of appetite, and jaundice in the eyes, 24 hours after eating large amounts of fresh, vetch grains. Laboratory investigation revealed hemolytic anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and G6PD deficiency. Approximately 0.5% of fava bean seeds have 2 pyrimidine beta-glycosides called, vicine and convicine. Vetch has 0.731% vicine, 0.081% convicine, and 0.530% beta cyanoalanine glycosides. The aim of this case report is to emphasize the importance of vetch seeds as a cause for hemolytic crisis in our country, where approximately one million tons of vetch is produced per year, especially in the agricultural regions. PMID:19198723

  3. Point-of-Care Quantitative Measure of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Enzyme Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Michael; Glader, Bertil; Cotten, Michael; Kleinert, Jairus; Pamula, Vamsee

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Widespread newborn screening on a point-of-care basis could prevent bilirubin neurotoxicity in newborns with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We evaluated a quantitative G6PD assay on a digital microfluidic platform by comparing its performance with standard clinical methods. METHODS: G6PD activity was measured quantitatively by using digital microfluidic fluorescence and the gold standard fluorescence biochemical test on a convenience sample of 98 discarded blood samples. Twenty-four samples were designated as G6PD deficient. RESULTS: Mean ± SD G6PD activity for normal samples using the digital microfluidic method and the standard method, respectively, was 9.7 ± 2.8 and 11.1 ± 3.0 U/g hemoglobin (Hb), respectively; for G6PD-deficient samples, it was 0.8 ± 0.7 and 1.4 ± 0.9 U/g Hb. Bland-Altman analysis determined a mean difference of –0.96 ± 1.8 U/g Hb between the digital microfluidic fluorescence results and the standard biochemical test results. The lower and upper limits for the digital microfluidic platform were 4.5 to 19.5 U/g Hb for normal samples and 0.2 to 3.7 U/g Hb for G6PD-deficient samples. The lower and upper limits for the Stanford method were 5.5 to 20.7 U/g Hb for normal samples and 0.1 to 2.8 U/g Hb for G6PD-deficient samples. The measured activity discriminated between G6PD-deficient samples and normal samples with no overlap. CONCLUSIONS: Pending further validation, a digital microfluidics platform could be an accurate point-of-care screening tool for rapid newborn G6PD screening. PMID:26459646

  4. Effect of red blood cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency on patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Tanphaichitr, Voravarn S; Chonlasin, Rachaneekorn; Suwantol, Lerlugsn; Pung-Amritt, Parichat; Tachavanich, Kalaya; Yogsan, Suthee; Viprakasit, Vip

    2002-08-01

    Eighty nine males aged 1-13 years diagnosed with dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and admitted to the Department of Pediatrics Siriraj Hospital from March 1998 to April 2000 were included in this study. 17 cases (19.1%) had red blood cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency and 72 cases (80.9%) had normal G-6-PD enzyme activities. Most of the patients were classified as DHF grade II in severity. 3 of 17 G-6-PD deficient cases had serious complications and all of them had acute intravascular hemolysis requiring blood transfusions. One of these also had hematemesis, one had azothemia and the other one had renal failure and severe liver failure with hepatic encephalopathy. In the cases without obvious hemolytic or hepatic complications, G-6-PD deficient cases had mildly but significantly higher total birirubin and indirect bilirubin, as well as a lower hematocrit than those who had normal G-6-PD. Reticulocyte count was low during the acute phase, however, during recovery, the levels were significantly increased in both groups. In the non G-6-PD deficient group, G-6-PD enzyme levels were significantly decreased during the acute phase compared to the normal controls but rose significantly to normal levels during the recovery phase. There were no statistically significant differences in other laboratory data. All patients recovered fully from DHF. The prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency in male patients who had DHF in this study was 19.1 per cent which was higher than the prevalence in a previous study of 12 per cent in Bangkok. This may imply that G-6-PD deficient males suffer more from DHF compared to normal G-6-PD subjects.

  5. Genetic heterogeneity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in south-east Sicily.

    PubMed

    Cittadella, R; Civitelli, D; Manna, I; Azzia, N; Di Cataldo, A; Schilirò, G; Brancati, C

    1997-05-01

    In order to explore the nature of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in south-east Sicily, we have analysed the G6PD gene in 25 unrelated males with abnormal G6PD activity and/or electrophoretic mobility, by using the analysis of the appropriate PCR-amplified fragment of DNA and subsequent digestion by appropriate restriction-enzymes, looking for the presence of certain known G6PD mutations. We amplified the entire G6PD coding sequence into eight fragments, followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and sequencing of those individual fragments that were found to be abnormal by SSCP. Through these methods we found a total of twelve G6PD Mediterranean variants with the association of a silent mutation 1311 (also known as polymorphic site Bcl I), one G6PD Mediterranean without this association, four G6PD A-Val 68 and two G6PD Santamaria and five G6PD Chatham. In a subject with normal activity a mutation was found in exon 5, designated as G6PD Sao Borja. This is the first report on the molecular analysis of G6PD mutations in Sicily and we have obtained evidence for four distinct classes of variants.

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency A- variant in febrile patients in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tamar E; Maloy, Halley; von Fricken, Michael; St Victor, Yves; Romain, Jean R; Okech, Bernard A; Mulligan, Connie J

    2014-08-01

    Haiti is one of two remaining malaria-endemic countries in the Caribbean. To decrease malaria transmission in Haiti, primaquine was recently added to the malaria treatment public health policy. One limitation of primaquine is that, at certain doses, primaquine can cause hemolytic anemia in individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (G6PDd). In this study, we genotyped two mutations (A376G and G202A), which confer the most common G6PDd variant in West African populations, G6PDd A-. We estimated the frequency of G6PDd A- in a sample of febrile patients enrolled in an on-going malaria study who represent a potential target population for a primaquine mass drug administration. We found that 33 of 168 individuals carried the G6PDd A- allele (includes A- hemizygous males, A- homozygous or heterozygous females) and could experience toxicity if treated with primaquine. These data inform discussions on safe and effective primaquine dosing and future malaria elimination strategies for Haiti.

  7. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency enhances germ cell apoptosis and causes defective embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H-C; Chen, T-L; Wu, Y-H; Cheng, K-P; Lin, Y-H; Cheng, M-L; Ho, H-Y; Lo, S J; Chiu, D T-Y

    2013-01-01

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, known as favism, is classically manifested by hemolytic anemia in human. More recently, it has been shown that mild G6PD deficiency moderately affects cardiac function, whereas severe G6PD deficiency leads to embryonic lethality in mice. How G6PD deficiency affects organisms has not been fully elucidated due to the lack of a suitable animal model. In this study, G6PD-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans was established by RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown to delineate the role of G6PD in animal physiology. Upon G6PD RNAi knockdown, G6PD activity was significantly hampered in C. elegans in parallel with increased oxidative stress and DNA oxidative damage. Phenotypically, G6PD-knockdown enhanced germ cell apoptosis (2-fold increase), reduced egg production (65% of mock), and hatching (10% of mock). To determine whether oxidative stress is associated with G6PD knockdown-induced reproduction defects, C. elegans was challenged with a short-term hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The early phase egg production of both mock and G6PD-knockdown C. elegans were significantly affected by H2O2. However, H2O2-induced germ cell apoptosis was more dramatic in mock than that in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. To investigate the signaling pathways involved in defective oogenesis and embryogenesis caused by G6PD knockdown, mutants of p53 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were examined. Despite the upregulation of CEP-1 (p53), cep-1 mutation did not affect egg production and hatching in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. Neither pmk-1 nor mek-1 mutation significantly affected egg production, whereas sek-1 mutation further decreased egg production in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. Intriguingly, loss of function of sek-1 or mek-1 dramatically rescued defective hatching (8.3- and 9.6-fold increase, respectively) induced by G6PD knockdown. Taken together, these findings show that G6PD knockdown reduces egg production and hatching in C. elegans

  8. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Improves Insulin Resistance With Reduced Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Ham, Mira; Choe, Sung Sik; Shin, Kyung Cheul; Choi, Goun; Kim, Ji-Won; Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Ryu, Je-Won; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), a rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, plays important roles in redox regulation and de novo lipogenesis. It was recently demonstrated that aberrant upregulation of G6PD in obese adipose tissue mediates insulin resistance as a result of imbalanced energy metabolism and oxidative stress. It remains elusive, however, whether inhibition of G6PD in vivo may relieve obesity-induced insulin resistance. In this study we showed that a hematopoietic G6PD defect alleviates insulin resistance in obesity, accompanied by reduced adipose tissue inflammation. Compared with wild-type littermates, G6PD-deficient mutant (G6PD(mut)) mice were glucose tolerant upon high-fat-diet (HFD) feeding. Intriguingly, the expression of NADPH oxidase genes to produce reactive oxygen species was alleviated, whereas that of antioxidant genes was enhanced in the adipose tissue of HFD-fed G6PD(mut) mice. In diet-induced obesity (DIO), the adipose tissue of G6PD(mut) mice decreased the expression of inflammatory cytokines, accompanied by downregulated proinflammatory macrophages. Accordingly, macrophages from G6PD(mut) mice greatly suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory signaling cascades, leading to enhanced insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and hepatocytes. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of G6PD(mut) bone marrow to wild-type mice attenuated adipose tissue inflammation and improved glucose tolerance in DIO. Collectively, these data suggest that inhibition of macrophage G6PD would ameliorate insulin resistance in obesity through suppression of proinflammatory responses. PMID:27284106

  9. Dental Considerations in Children with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (Favism): A Review of the Literature and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, Daniela; Butrón-Téllez Girón, Claudia; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an uncommon inherited enzyme deficiency characterized by hemolytic anemia, caused by the inability of erythrocytes to detoxify oxidizing agents such as drugs, infectious diseases, or fava bean ingestion. In this later case, the disorder is known as favism. The aim of the present report was to present a review of the literature in this disease, to describe a case report concerning an affected 9-year-old male, and to review the main implications and precautions in pediatric dental management.

  10. Dental Considerations in Children with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (Favism): A Review of the Literature and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, Daniela; Butrón-Téllez Girón, Claudia; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an uncommon inherited enzyme deficiency characterized by hemolytic anemia, caused by the inability of erythrocytes to detoxify oxidizing agents such as drugs, infectious diseases, or fava bean ingestion. In this later case, the disorder is known as favism. The aim of the present report was to present a review of the literature in this disease, to describe a case report concerning an affected 9-year-old male, and to review the main implications and precautions in pediatric dental management. PMID:26435857

  11. Dental Considerations in Children with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (Favism): A Review of the Literature and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pérez, Daniela; Butrón-Téllez Girón, Claudia; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an uncommon inherited enzyme deficiency characterized by hemolytic anemia, caused by the inability of erythrocytes to detoxify oxidizing agents such as drugs, infectious diseases, or fava bean ingestion. In this later case, the disorder is known as favism. The aim of the present report was to present a review of the literature in this disease, to describe a case report concerning an affected 9-year-old male, and to review the main implications and precautions in pediatric dental management. PMID:26435857

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia in a Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD)-Deficient Geriatric Trauma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Födinger, Agnes M.; Kammerlander, Christian; Luger, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic enzymatic disorder causing hemolytic anemia. Exposure to drugs is considered to be the most common cause of acute hemolysis in patients with G6PD deficiency. Experience with regional anesthesia, in particular peripheral nerve blocks, is rarely described in patients with G6PD deficiency, but is of great clinical interest. For this reason, we now report on the successful management of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block in a patient with geriatric G6PD deficiency. Case report: A female, 75-year-old geriatric trauma patient with G6PD deficiency and a fracture of the left forearm, was scheduled for osteosynthesis of the left forearm. For surgery regional anesthesia with ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block with 30 mL bupivacaine 0.5% was established. Surgical operation und postoperative course were uneventful and with no signs of hemolysis. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block with bupivacaine was a safe and effective technique in this patient with G6PD deficiency. Peripheral nerve block is a major analgesic approach and of great value for anesthesiologists and surgeons, especially in our aging and multimorbid society. PMID:23569708

  13. Canine malignant hyperthermia susceptibility: erythrocytic defects--osmotic fragility, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J; Forsyth, G W; Olexson, D W; Thatte, H S; Addis, P B

    1984-01-01

    Two dogs were diagnosed as malignant hyperthermia susceptible based on increased susceptibility (P less than 0.001) of biopsied muscle to caffeine-induced contracture. Erythrocytes from malignant hyperthermia and normal dogs were then examined for an antioxidant system deficiency. Values for serum muscle enzymes, reticulocytes and corpuscular hemoglobin were mildly elevated. Osmotic fragility was increased: hemolysis occurred at a NaCl concentration 10 mM higher than for normal dogs (P less than 0.001). A 35% glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (P less than 0.001) with a 40% compensatory increase (P less than 0.01) in 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity was found. The membrane Ca2+-activated ATPase activity was abnormal: 100% increased with a 40% decreased Arrhenius activation energy (P less than 0.005) and increased thermostability. A 40% increased intracellular accumulation of total Ca2+ occurred in response to in vitro energy depletion in erythrocytes from one malignant hyperthermia dog (P less than 0.01). The multifactorial pattern of inheritance and the broad spectrum of malignant hyperthermia susceptibility are proposed to result from an antioxidant system deficit unmasking or aggravating an intrinsic muscle membrane anomaly. An individual from a family with a history of malignant hyperthermia or unexplained anesthetic death should be considered malignant hyperthermia susceptible if erythrocyte osmotic fragility is abnormal and there is a mild, unexplained elevation in serum creatine kinase. PMID:6150753

  14. Influence of the Inherited Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency on the Appearance of Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia in Southern Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Cherepnalkovski, Anet Papazovska; Marusic, Eugenija; Piperkova, Katica; Lozic, Bernarda; Skelin, Ana; Gruev, Todor; Krzelj, Vjekoslav

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is a common clinical manifestation of the inherited glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Aim of the study: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the inherited G6PD deficiency on the appearance of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in southern Croatia. Methods: The fluorescent spot test (FST) was used in a retrospective study to screen blood samples of 513 male children who had neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, of unknown cause, higher than 240 μmol/L. Fluorescence readings were performed at the beginning and at the fifth and tenth minute of incubation and were classified into three groups bright fluorescence (BF), weak fluorescence (WF) and no fluorescence (NF). Normal samples show bright fluorescence. All NF and WF samples at the fifth minute were quantitatively measured using the spectrophotometric method. Results: Bright fluorescence was present in 461 patients (89.9%) at the fifth minute. The remaining 52 (10.1%) were quantitatively estimated using the spectrophotometric method. G6PD deficiency was observed in 38 patients (7.4%). Conclusions: Prevalence rate of G6PD deficiency among male newborns with hyperbilirubinemia in southern Croatia is significantly higher (p < 0.01) compared with the previously reported prevalence rate among male in general population of southern Croatia (0.75%). We recommend FST to be performed in hyperbilirubinemic newborns in southern Croatia. PMID:26635431

  15. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the Ouest and Sud-Est departments of Haiti.

    PubMed

    von Fricken, Michael E; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Eaton, Will T; Alam, Meer T; Carter, Tamar E; Schick, Laura; Masse, Roseline; Romain, Jean R; Okech, Bernard A

    2014-07-01

    Malaria remains a significant public health issue in Haiti, with chloroquine (CQ) used almost exclusively for the treatment of uncomplicated infections. Recently, single dose primaquine (PQ) was added to the Haitian national malaria treatment policy, despite a lack of information on the prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency within the population. G6PD deficient individuals who take PQ are at risk of developing drug induced hemolysis (DIH). In this first study to examine G6PD deficiency rates in Haiti, 22.8% (range 14.9%-24.7%) of participants were found to be G6PD deficient (class I, II, or III) with 2.0% (16/800) of participants having severe deficiency (class I and II). Differences in deficiency were observed by gender, with males having a much higher prevalence of severe deficiency (4.3% vs. 0.4%) compared to females. Male participants were 1.6 times more likely to be classified as deficient and 10.6 times more likely to be classified as severely deficient compared to females, as expected. Finally, 10.6% (85/800) of the participants were considered to be at risk for DIH. Males also had much higher rates than females (19.3% vs. 4.6%) with 4.9 times greater likelihood (p value 0.000) of having an activity level that could lead to DIH. These findings provide useful information to policymakers and clinicians who are responsible for the implementation of PQ to control and manage malaria in Haiti.

  16. Genetic heterogeneity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency revealed by single-strand conformation and sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Calabro, V.; Mason, P.J.; Luzzatto, L. ); Filosa, S.; Martini, G. ); Civitelli, D.; Cittadella, R.; Brancati, C. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors have carried out a systematic study of the molecular basis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency on a sample of 53 male subjects from Calabria, in southern Italy. Their sequential approach consisted of the following steps: (1) Partial biochemical characterization was used to pinpoint candidate known variants. The identity of these was then varified by restriction-enzyme or allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis of the appropriate PCR-amplified fragment. (2) On samples for which there was no obvious candidate mutation, they proceeded to amplify the entire coding region in eight fragments, followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of each fragment. (3) The next step was M13 phage cloning and sequencing of those individual fragments that were found to be abnormal by SSCP. Through this approach they have identified the molecular lesion in 51 of the 53 samples. In these they found a total of nine different G6PD-deficient variants, five of which (G6PD Mediterranean, G6PD A[sup [minus

  17. Sickle cell disease in Bahrain: coexistence and interaction with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, A M; Ardatl, K O; Bajakian, K M

    1998-04-01

    The object was to determine the frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in Bahraini individuals with HbS as compared to those without HbS. Haemolysates of erythrocytes from 310 Bahraini individuals attending Health Centres were obtained, electrophoresed on cellulose acetate at PH 8.2-8.6, and stained for G6PD. HbS was present in 125 individuals (study group) and in 185 only HbA was present (control group). G6PD deficiency (very low to undetectable) was identified in 59 samples (47 per cent) of the study group and 35 (19 per cent) of the control group. A positive correlation between G6PD deficiency and HbS is present in Bahraini individuals tested. This is similar to the situation in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. We speculate that the observation could be explained on the basis of historic endemicity of Falciparum malaria in both regions on the East coast of the Saudi Peninsula.

  18. GD (--) Aachen, a new variant of deficient glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Clinical, genetic, biochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Esters, A; Habedank, M

    1976-05-19

    A deficient G-6PD variant was discovered in 4 males of one family from northwestern Germany. Five generations of this family could be studied. The deficient G-6PD was a new variant, called "Gd (--) Aachen". Its main characteristics are the following: severe enzyme deficiency in erythrocytes (3% of normal), contrasting with an almost normal activity in leukocytes; normal molecular specific activity (i.e., normal ratio enzyme activity/cross-reacting material); slow mobility in starch gel electrophoresis (92-94% of normal); increased Michaelis constant for glucoes-6-phosphate (60-70 muM) and NADP+ (20-25 muM); decreased inhibition constant by NADPH with respect to NADP+ (7 muM); increased inhibition by ATP; normal utilization of the substrate analogues; slightly biphasic pH curve; thermal instability, and normal activation energy of the enzymatic reaction. The relationships between the hematologic disorders (severe and frequent hemolytic crises) and the unfavorable kinetic modifications are discussed.

  19. [Frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (A-376/202) in three Malian ethnic groups].

    PubMed

    Dolo, A; Maiga, B; Guindo, A; Diakité, S A S; Diakite, M; Tapily, A; Traoré, M; Sangaré, B; Arama, C; Daou, M; Doumbo, O

    2014-08-01

    Erythrocyte G6PD deficiency is the most common worldwide enzymopathy. The aim of this study was to determine erythrocyte G6PD deficiency in 3 ethnic groups of Mali and to investigate whether erythrocyte G6PD deficiency was associated to the observed protection against malaria seen in Fulani ethnic group. The study was conducted in two different areas of Mali: in the Sahel region of Mopti where Fulani and Dogon live as sympatric ethnic groups and in the Sudanese savannah area where lives mostly the Malinke ethnic group. The study was conducted in 2007 in Koro and in 2008 in Naguilabougou. It included a total 90 Dogon, 42 Fulani and 80 Malinke ethnic groups. Malaria was diagnosed using microscopic examination after Giemsa-staining of thick and thin blood smear. G6PD deficiency (A-(376/202)) samples were identified using RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay and analysis of PCR-amplified DNA amplicon. G6PD deficiency (A-(376/202)) rate was 11.1%, 2.4%, and 13.3% in Dogon, Fulani, and Malinke ethnic group respectively. Heterozygous state for G6PD (A-(376/202)) was found in 7.8% in Dogon; 2.4% in Fulani and 9.3% in Malinke ethnic groups while hemizygous state was found at the frequency of 2.2% in Dogon and 4% in Malinke. No homozygous state was found in our study population.We conclude that G6PD deficiency is not differing significantly between the three ethnic groups, Fulani, Dogon and Malinke.

  20. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among children attending the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, IZ; Mainasara, AS; Erhabor, Osaro; Omojuyigbe, ST; Dallatu, MK; Bilbis, LS; Adias, TC

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human enzyme deficiencies in the world. It is particularly common in populations living in malaria-endemic areas, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. This present study was conducted with the aim of determining the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children visiting the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital for pediatric-related care. The study included 118 children, made up of 77 (65.3%) males and 41 (34.7%) females aged ≤5 years with mean age of 3.26 ± 1.90 years. Randox G6PD quantitative in vitro test screening was used for the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency. Of the 118 children tested, 17 (14.4%) were G6PD-deficient. Prevalence of G6PD deficiency was concentrated predominantly among male children (22.1%). Male sex was significantly correlated with G6PD deficiency among the children studied (r = 7.85, P = 0.01). The highest prevalence occurred among children in the 2- to 5-year age-group. Of the 17 G6PD-deficient children, twelve (70.2%) were moderately deficient, while five (29.4%) were severely deficient. Blood film from G6PD-deficient children indicated the following morphological changes; Heinz bodies, schistocytes, target cells, nucleated red cells, spherocytes, and polychromasia. This present study has shown a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children residing in Sokoto in the northwestern geopolitical zone of Nigeria. The study indicated a male sex bias in the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among the children studied. There is a need for the routine screening of children for G6PD deficiency in our environment, to allow for evidence-based management of these children and to ensure the avoidance of food, drugs, and infective agents that can potentially predispose these children to oxidative stress as well as diseases that deplete micronutrients that protect against oxidative stress. There is need to build capacity in our

  1. Genetic heterogeneity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency revealed by single-strand conformation and sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Calabrò, V; Mason, P J; Filosa, S; Civitelli, D; Cittadella, R; Tagarelli, A; Martini, G; Brancati, C; Luzzatto, L

    1993-01-01

    We have carried out a systematic study of the molecular basis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency on a sample of 53 male subjects from Calabria, in southern Italy. Our sequential approach consisted of the following steps: (1) Partial biochemical characterization was used to pinpoint candidate known variants. The identity of these was then verified by restriction-enzyme or allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis of the appropriate PCR-amplified fragment. (2) On samples for which there was no obvious candidate mutation, we proceeded to amplify the entire coding region in eight fragments, followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of each fragment. (3) The next step was M13 phage cloning and sequencing of those individual fragments that were found to be abnormal by SSCP. Through this approach we have identified the molecular lesion in 51 of the 53 samples. In these we found a total of nine different G6PD-deficient variants, five of which (G6PD Mediterranean, G6PD A-, G6PD Coimbra, G6PD Seattle, and G6PD Montalbano) were already known, whereas four are new (G6PD Cassano, G6PD Cosenza, G6PD Sibari, and G6PD Maewo). G6PD Mediterranean is the commonest variant, followed by G6PD Seattle. At least seven of the variants are present, at polymorphic frequencies, in the Calabria region, and some have a nonrandom distribution within the region. This study shows that the genetic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency in Calabria, when analyzed at the DNA level, is even greater than had been anticipated from biochemical characterization. The sequential approach that we have followed is fast and efficient and could be applied to other populations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8447319

  2. Acute viral hepatitis E presenting with haemolytic anaemia and acute renal failure in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Aggarwal, Amitesh; Jain, Piyush; Rajpal, Surender; Agarwal, Mukul P

    2015-10-01

    The association of acute hepatitis E viral (HEV) infection with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency leading to extensive intravascular haemolysis is a very rare clinical entity. Here we discuss such a patient, who presented with acute HEV illness, developed severe intravascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of bilirubin, complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), and was later on found to have a deficiency of G6PD. The patient recovered completely with haemodialysis and supportive management. PMID:25500531

  3. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Glucose-6-Phosphate dehydrogenase deficient variants among the Kurdish population of Northern Iraq

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-Phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a key enzyme of the pentose monophosphate pathway, and its deficiency is the most common inherited enzymopathy worldwide. G6PD deficiency is common among Iraqis, including those of the Kurdish ethnic group, however no study of significance has ever addressed the molecular basis of this disorder in this population. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of this enzymopathy and its molecular basis among Iraqi Kurds. Methods A total of 580 healthy male Kurdish Iraqis randomly selected from a main regional premarital screening center in Northern Iraq were screened for G6PD deficiency using methemoglobin reduction test. The results were confirmed by quantitative enzyme assay for the cases that showed G6PD deficiency. DNA analysis was performed on 115 G6PD deficient subjects, 50 from the premarital screening group and 65 unrelated Kurdish male patients with documented acute hemolytic episodes due to G6PD deficiency. Analysis was performed using polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism for five deficient molecular variants, namely G6PD Mediterranean (563 C→T), G6PD Chatham (1003 G→A), G6PD A- (202 G→A), G6PD Aures (143 T→C) and G6PD Cosenza (1376 G→C), as well as the silent 1311 (C→T) mutation. Results Among 580 random Iraqi male Kurds, 63 (10.9%) had documented G6PD deficiency. Molecular studies performed on a total of 115 G6PD deficient males revealed that 101 (87.8%) had the G6PD Mediterranean variant and 10 (8.7%) had the G6PD Chatham variant. No cases of G6PD A-, G6PD Aures or G6PD Cosenza were identified, leaving 4 cases (3.5%) uncharacterized. Further molecular screening revealed that the silent mutation 1311 was present in 93/95 of the Mediterranean and 1/10 of the Chatham cases. Conclusions The current study revealed a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Iraqi Kurdish population of Northern Iraq with most cases being due to the G6PD Mediterranean and

  4. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and diagnostic challenges in 1500 immigrants in Denmark examined for haemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Warny, Marie; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Petersen, Jesper; Birgens, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    Similar to the thalassaemia syndromes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is highly prevalent in areas historically exposed to malaria. In the present study, we used quantitative and molecular methods to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in a population of 1508 immigrants in Denmark. We found the allele frequency to be between 2.4 and 2.9% in the female immigrants. Furthermore, the mutation pattern in the studied population showed a high prevalence of the G6PD A-(202A) variant in African and African-American immigrants, a high prevalence of the G6PD Mediterranean variant in Mediterranean European and Western Asian immigrants, and substantial heterogeneity in the variants found in the Eastern Asian/Pacific immigrants. Inasmuch as many of the patients included in this investigation had various thalassaemic syndromes, we were able to evaluate the effects of the interaction between a low mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) value and G6PD activity, particularly in heterozygous females. The activity level was markedly influenced by the MCH value in females with normal G6PD activity, but not in heterozygous and homozygous females. Comparison of patients with normal G6PD activity and heterozygous females indicated considerable overlap in activity levels. To help separating heterozygous females from females with wild-type genes, a DNA analysis is necessary when the female activity level is between 4.0 and 4.9 U/g hgb corresponding to 50-60% of the median activity of unaffected males.

  5. Data on how several physiological parameters of stored red blood cells are similar in glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient and sufficient donors.

    PubMed

    Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Kriebardis, Anastasios G; Georgatzakou, Hara T; Foudoulaki-Paparizos, Leontini E; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wither, Matthew J; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Papassideri, Issidora S; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Antonelou, Marianna H

    2016-09-01

    This article contains data on the variation in several physiological parameters of red blood cells (RBCs) donated by eligible glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient donors during storage in standard blood bank conditions compared to control, G6PD sufficient (G6PD(+)) cells. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cell fragility and membrane exovesiculation were measured in RBCs throughout the storage period, with or without stimulation by oxidants, supplementation of N-acetylcysteine and energy depletion, following incubation of stored cells for 24 h at 37 °C. Apart from cell characteristics, the total or uric acid-dependent antioxidant capacity of the supernatant in addition to extracellular potassium concentration was determined in RBC units. Finally, procoagulant activity and protein carbonylation levels were measured in the microparticles population. Further information can be found in "Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient subjects may be better "storers" than donors of red blood cells" [1]. PMID:27437434

  6. High Frequency of Diabetes and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Patients with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in the Western Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Marli S.; Monteiro, Wuelton M.; Costa, Mônica R. F.; Sampaio, Vanderson S.; Brito, Marcelo A. M.; Lacerda, Marcus V. G.; Alecrim, Maria G. C.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human genetic abnormalities, and it has a significant prevalence in the male population (X chromosome linked). The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of impaired fasting glucose and diabetes among G6PD-deficient persons in Manaus, Brazil, an area in the Western Brazilian Amazon to which malaria is endemic. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase–deficient males had more impaired fasting glucose and diabetes. This feature could be used as a screening tool for G6PD-deficient persons who are unable to use primaquine for the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax malaria. PMID:24865682

  7. Unsuspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presenting as symptomatic methemoglobinemia with severe hemolysis after fava bean ingestion in a 6-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, Marie-Hélène; Danékova, Névéna; Mesples, Bettina; Chemouny, Myriam; Couque, Nathalie; Parez, Nathalie; Ducrocq, Rolande; Elion, Jacques

    2011-05-01

    We report the occurrence of symptomatic methemoglobinemia in a previously healthy boy, who presented with severe acute hemolysis after fava bean ingestion. The methemoglobinemia revealed a previously unrecognized glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We discuss the pathophysiology of severe methemoglobinemia when associated with acute hemolysis, favism, and the common African G6PD A-variant [G6PD, VAL68MET, ASN126ASP]. In conclusion, screening for G6PD deficiency must be considered in symptomatic methemoglobinemia, especially in young boys, when associated with intravascular hemolysis.

  8. Unsuspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presenting as symptomatic methemoglobinemia with severe hemolysis after fava bean ingestion in a 6-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, Marie-Hélène; Danékova, Névéna; Mesples, Bettina; Chemouny, Myriam; Couque, Nathalie; Parez, Nathalie; Ducrocq, Rolande; Elion, Jacques

    2011-05-01

    We report the occurrence of symptomatic methemoglobinemia in a previously healthy boy, who presented with severe acute hemolysis after fava bean ingestion. The methemoglobinemia revealed a previously unrecognized glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We discuss the pathophysiology of severe methemoglobinemia when associated with acute hemolysis, favism, and the common African G6PD A-variant [G6PD, VAL68MET, ASN126ASP]. In conclusion, screening for G6PD deficiency must be considered in symptomatic methemoglobinemia, especially in young boys, when associated with intravascular hemolysis. PMID:21479984

  9. Human mutations in glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase reflect evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Notaro, R; Afolayan, A; Luzzatto, L

    2000-03-01

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a cytosolic enzyme encoded by a housekeeping X-linked gene whose main function is to produce NADPH, a key electron donor in the defense against oxidizing agents and in reductive biosynthetic reactions. Inherited G6PD deficiency is associated with either episodic hemolytic anemia (triggered by fava beans or other agents) or life-long hemolytic anemia. We show here that an evolutionary analysis is a key to understanding the biology of a housekeeping gene. From the alignment of the amino acid (aa) sequence of 52 glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) species from 42 different organisms, we found a striking correlation between the aa replacements that cause G6PD deficiency in humans and the sequence conservation of G6PD: two-thirds of such replacements are in highly and moderately conserved (50-99%) aa; relatively few are in fully conserved aa (where they might be lethal) or in poorly conserved aa, where presumably they simply would not cause G6PD deficiency. This is consistent with the notion that all human mutants have residual enzyme activity and that null mutations are lethal at some stage of development. Comparing the distribution of mutations in a human housekeeping gene with evolutionary conservation is a useful tool for pinpointing amino acid residues important for the stability or the function of the corresponding protein. In view of the current explosive increase in full genome sequencing projects, this tool will become rapidly available for numerous other genes.

  10. Prevalence of thalassaemia, iron-deficiency anaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among Arab migrating nomad children, southern Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Pasalar, M; Mehrabani, D; Afrasiabi, A; Mehravar, Z; Reyhani, I; Hamidi, R; Karimi, M

    2014-12-17

    This study investigated the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and β-thalassaemia trait among Arab migrating nomad children in southern Islamic Republic of Iran. Blood samples were analysed from 134 schoolchildren aged < 18 years (51 males, 83 females). Low serum ferritin (< 12 ng/dL) was present in 17.9% of children (21.7% in females and 11.8% in males). Low haemoglobin (Hb) correlated significantly with a low serum ferritin. Only 1 child had G6PD deficiency. A total of 9.7% of children had HbA2 ≥ 3.5 g/dL, indicating β-thalassaemia trait (10.8% in females and 7.8% in males). Mean serum iron, serum ferritin and total iron binding capacity were similar in males and females. Serum ferritin index was as accurate as Hb index in the diagnosis of iron-deficiency anaemia. A high prevalence of β-thalassaemia trait was the major potential risk factor in this population.

  11. Red cell glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the northern region of Turkey: is G6PD deficiency exclusively a male disease?

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut

    2015-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive genetic defect that can cause hemolytic crisis. However, this disease affects both males and females. In Turkey, the frequency of this enzyme deficiency was reported to vary, from 0.25 to 18%, by the geographical area. Its prevalence in the northern Black Sea region of Turkey is unknown. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the northern region Turkey in children and adults with hyperbilirubinemia and hemolytic anemia. This report included a total of 976 G6PD enzyme results that were analyzed between May 2005 and January 2014. G6PD deficiency was detected in 5.0% of all patients. G6PD deficiency was significantly less frequent in females (1.9%, 6/323) than in males (6.6%, 43/653). G6PD deficiency was detected in 3.7% of infants with hyperbilirubinemia, 9.2% of children, and 4.5% of adults with hemolytic anemia. In both the newborn group and the group of children, G6PD deficiency was significantly more frequent in males. In the combined group of children (groups I and II), the proportion of males was 74% and 67% in all groups (P = .0008). In conclusion, in northern region of Turkey, G6PD deficiency is an important cause of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and hemolytic crisis in children and adults. This study suggests that most pediatricians thought that G6PD deficiency is exclusively a male disease. For this reason, some female patients may have been undiagnosed.

  12. DNA damage and apoptosis in mononuclear cells from glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient patients (G6PD Aachen variant) after UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Efferth, T; Fabry, U; Osieka, R

    2001-03-01

    Patients affected with X chromosome-linked, hereditary glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency suffer from life-threatening hemolytic crises after intake of certain drugs or foods. G6PD deficiency is associated with low levels of reduced glutathione. We analyzed mononuclear white blood cells (MNC) of three males suffering from the German G6PD Aachen variant, four heterozygote females of this family, one G6PD-deficient male from another family coming from Iran, and six healthy male volunteers with respect to their DNA damage in two different genes (G6PD and T-cell receptor-delta) and their propensity to enter apoptosis after UV illumination (0.08-5.28 J/cm2). As determined by PCR stop assays, there was more UV-induced DNA damage in MNC of G6PD-deficient male patients than in those of healthy subjects. MNC of G6PD-deficient patients showed a higher rate of apoptosis after UV irradiation than MNC of healthy donors. MNC of heterozygote females showed intermediate rates of DNA damage and apoptosis. It is concluded that increased DNA damage may be a result of deficient detoxification of reactive oxygen species by glutathione and may ultimately account for the higher rate of apoptosis in G6PD-deficient MNC.

  13. N-acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol augment selenium-glutathione peroxidase activity in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Alicigüzel, Y; Aslan, M

    2004-09-01

    In glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient erythrocytes, failure to maintain normal levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) due to decreased NADPH regeneration in the hexose monophosphate pathway results in acute hemolytic anemia following exposure to oxidative insults, such as ingestion of Vicia fava beans or use of certain drugs. GSH is a source of protection against oxidative attack, used by the selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px)/reductase (GR) system to detoxify hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides, provided that sufficient GSH is made available. In this study, Se-GSH-Px activity was analyzed in G6PD-deficient patients in the presence of reducing agents such as N-Acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol. Se-GSH-Px activity was decreased in G6PD-deficient red blood cells (RBCs). N-Acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol increased Se-GSH-Px activity in G6PD-deficient human erythrocytes, indicating that other reducing agents can be utilized to complement Se-GSH-Px activity in G6PD deficiency. Based on the increased susceptibility of G6PD-deficient patients to oxidative stress, the reported increase in Se-GSH-Px activity can facilitate the detoxification of reactive oxygen species. PMID:15598086

  14. Molecular Characterization of Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Families from the Republic of Macedonia and Genotype-phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Cherepnalkovski, Anet Papazovska; Zemunik, Tatijana; Glamocanin, Sofijanka; Piperkova, Katica; Gunjaca, Ivana; Kocheva, Svetlana; Jovanova, Biljana Coneska; Krzelj, Vjekoslav

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Glucose-6-phospahte dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) is one of the most common inherited disorders affecting around 400 million people worldwide. Molecular analysis of the G6PD gene identified more than 140 distinct mutations, the majority being single base missense mutations. G6PD Mediterranean is the most common variant found in populations of the Mediterranean area. Aim: The aim of our study was to perform molecular characterization of G6PD deficiency in families from the Republic of Macedonia and correlate the findings to disease phenotype. Patients and methods: Six patients and seven other family members were selected for genetic characterization, the selection procedure involved clinical evaluation and G6PD quantitative testing. All patients were first screened for the Mediterranean mutation, and subsequently for the Seattle mutation. Mutations were detected using PCR amplification and appropriate restriction endonuclease cleavage. Results: Four hemizygote and 3 heterozygous carriers for G6PD Mediterranean were detected. All G6PD deficient patients from this group showed clinical picture of hemolysis, and in 66.6% neonatal jaundice was confirmed based on history data. To our knowledge, this is the first study concerned with molecular aspects of the G6PD deficiency in R. Macedonia. Conclusion: This study represents a step towards a more comprehensive genetic evaluation in our population and better understanding of the health issues involved. PMID:26622077

  15. Increased red cell calcium, decreased calcium adenosine triphosphatase, and altered membrane proteins during fava bean hemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient (Mediterranean variant) individuals.

    PubMed

    Turrini, F; Naitana, A; Mannuzzu, L; Pescarmona, G; Arese, P

    1985-08-01

    RBCs from four glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient (Mediterranean variant) subjects were studied during fava bean hemolysis. In the density-fractionated RBC calcium level, Ca2+-ATPase activity, reduced glutathione level, and ghost protein pattern were studied. In the bottom fraction, containing most heavily damaged RBCs, calcium level ranged from 143 to 244 mumol/L RBCs (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 17 +/- 5 mumol/L RBCs). The Ca2+-ATPase activity ranged from 0.87 to 1.84 mumol ATP consumed/g Hb/min (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 2.27 +/- 0.4). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of ghosts showed: (1) the presence of high mol wt aggregates (in three cases they were reduced by dithioerythritol; in one case, only partial reduction was possible); (2) the presence of multiple, scattered new bands; and (3) the reduction of band 3. Oxidant-mediated damage to active calcium extrusion, hypothetically associated with increased calcium permeability, may explain the large increase in calcium levels. They, in turn, could activate calcium-dependent protease activity, giving rise to the profound changes in the ghost protein pattern.

  16. Dengue Virus Type 2 (DENV2)-Induced Oxidative Responses in Monocytes from Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD)-Deficient and G6PD Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Al-alimi, Abdullah Ahmed; Ali, Syed A.; Al-Hassan, Faisal Muti; Idris, Fauziah Mohd; Teow, Sin-Yeang; Mohd Yusoff, Narazah

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue virus is endemic in peninsular Malaysia. The clinical manifestations vary depending on the incubation period of the virus as well as the immunity of the patients. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is prevalent in Malaysia where the incidence is 3.2%. It has been noted that some G6PD-deficient individuals suffer from more severe clinical presentation of dengue infection. In this study, we aim to investigate the oxidative responses of DENV2-infected monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals. Methodology Monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals were infected with DENV2 and infection rate, levels of oxidative species, nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions (O2−), and oxidative stress were determined and compared with normal controls. Principal Findings Monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals exhibited significantly higher infection rates compared to normal controls. In an effort to explain the reason for this enhanced susceptibility, we investigated the production of NO and O2− in the monocytes of individuals with G6PD deficiency compared with normal controls. We found that levels of NO and O2− were significantly lower in the DENV-infected monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals compared with normal controls. Furthermore, the overall oxidative stress in DENV-infected monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals was significantly higher when compared to normal controls. Correlation studies between DENV-infected cells and oxidative state of monocytes further confirmed these findings. Conclusions/Significance Altered redox state of DENV-infected monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals appears to augment viral replication in these cells. DENV-infected G6PD-deficient individuals may contain higher viral titers, which may be significant in enhanced virus transmission. Furthermore, granulocyte dysfunction and higher viral loads in G6PD-deificient individuals may result in severe form of dengue infection. PMID:24625456

  17. Population screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiencies in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands, using a modified enzyme assay on filter paper dried bloodspots

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency poses a significant impediment to primaquine use for the elimination of liver stage infection with Plasmodium vivax and for gametocyte clearance, because of the risk of life-threatening haemolytic anaemia that can occur in G6PD deficient patients. Although a range of methods for screening G6PD deficiency have been described, almost all require skilled personnel, expensive laboratory equipment, freshly collected blood, and are time consuming; factors that render them unsuitable for mass-screening purposes. Methods A published WST8/1-methoxy PMS method was adapted to assay G6PD activity in a 96-well format using dried blood spots, and used it to undertake population screening within a malaria survey undertaken in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands. The assay results were compared to a biochemical test and a recently marketed rapid diagnostic test. Results Comparative testing with biochemical and rapid diagnostic test indicated that results obtained by filter paper assay were accurate providing that blood spots were assayed within 5 days when stored at ambient temperature and 10 days when stored at 4 degrees. Screening of 8541 people from 41 villages in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands revealed the prevalence of G6PD deficiency as defined by enzyme activity < 30% of normal control was 20.3% and a prevalence of severe deficiency that would predispose to primaquine-induced hemolysis (WHO Class I-II) of 6.9%. Conclusions The assay enabled simple and quick semi-quantitative population screening in a malaria-endemic region. The study indicated a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Isabel Province and highlights the critical need to consider G6PD deficiency in the context of P. vivax malaria elimination strategies in Solomon Islands, particularly in light of the potential role of primaquine mass drug administration. PMID:20684792

  18. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  3. Review of key knowledge gaps in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency detection with regard to the safe clinical deployment of 8-aminoquinoline treatment regimens: a workshop report.

    PubMed

    von Seidlein, Lorenz; Auburn, Sarah; Espino, Fe; Shanks, Dennis; Cheng, Qin; McCarthy, James; Baird, Kevin; Moyes, Catherine; Howes, Rosalind; Ménard, Didier; Bancone, Germana; Winasti-Satyahraha, Ari; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Green, Justin; Domingo, Gonzalo; Yeung, Shunmay; Price, Ric

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a crucial aspect in the current phases of malaria control and elimination, which will require the wider use of 8-aminoquinolines for both reducing Plasmodium falciparum transmission and achieving the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax. 8-aminoquinolines, such as primaquine, can induce severe haemolysis in G6PD-deficient individuals, potentially creating significant morbidity and undermining confidence in 8-aminoquinoline prescription. On the other hand, erring on the side of safety and excluding large numbers of people with unconfirmed G6PD deficiency from treatment with 8-aminoquinolines will diminish the impact of these drugs. Estimating the remaining G6PD enzyme activity is the most direct, accessible, and reliable assessment of the phenotype and remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of patients who could be harmed by the administration of primaquine. Genotyping seems an unambiguous technique, but its use is limited by cost and the large range of recognized G6PD genotypes. A number of enzyme activity assays diagnose G6PD deficiency, but they require a cold chain, specialized equipment, and laboratory skills. These assays are impractical for care delivery where most patients with malaria live. Improvements to the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency are required for the broader and safer use of 8-aminoquinolines to kill hypnozoites, while lower doses of primaquine may be safely used to kill gametocytes without testing. The discussions and conclusions of a workshop conducted in Incheon, Korea in May 2012 to review key knowledge gaps in G6PD deficiency are reported here.

  4. Review of key knowledge gaps in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency detection with regard to the safe clinical deployment of 8-aminoquinoline treatment regimens: a workshop report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a crucial aspect in the current phases of malaria control and elimination, which will require the wider use of 8-aminoquinolines for both reducing Plasmodium falciparum transmission and achieving the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax. 8-aminoquinolines, such as primaquine, can induce severe haemolysis in G6PD-deficient individuals, potentially creating significant morbidity and undermining confidence in 8-aminoquinoline prescription. On the other hand, erring on the side of safety and excluding large numbers of people with unconfirmed G6PD deficiency from treatment with 8-aminoquinolines will diminish the impact of these drugs. Estimating the remaining G6PD enzyme activity is the most direct, accessible, and reliable assessment of the phenotype and remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of patients who could be harmed by the administration of primaquine. Genotyping seems an unambiguous technique, but its use is limited by cost and the large range of recognized G6PD genotypes. A number of enzyme activity assays diagnose G6PD deficiency, but they require a cold chain, specialized equipment, and laboratory skills. These assays are impractical for care delivery where most patients with malaria live. Improvements to the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency are required for the broader and safer use of 8-aminoquinolines to kill hypnozoites, while lower doses of primaquine may be safely used to kill gametocytes without testing. The discussions and conclusions of a workshop conducted in Incheon, Korea in May 2012 to review key knowledge gaps in G6PD deficiency are reported here. PMID:23537118

  5. Resistance of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency to malaria: effects of fava bean hydroxypyrimidine glucosides on Plasmodium falciparum growth in culture and on the phagocytosis of infected cells.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, H; Atamna, H; Shalmiev, G; Kanaani, J; Krugliak, M

    1996-07-01

    The balanced polymorphism of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD-) is believed to have evolved through the selective pressure of malarial combined with consumption of fava beans. The implicated fava bean constituents are the hydroxypyrimidine glucosides vicine and convicine, which upon hydrolysis of their beta-O-glucosidic bond, became protein pro-oxidants. In this work we show that the glucosides inhibit the growth of Plasmodium falciparum, increase the hexose-monophosphate shunt activity and the phagocytosis of malaria-infected erythrocytes. These activities are exacerbated in the presence of beta-glucosidase, implicating their pro-oxidant aglycones in the toxic effect, and are more pronounced in infected G6PD- erythrocytes. These results suggest that G6PD- infected erythrocytes are more susceptible to phagocytic cells, and that fava bean pro-oxidants are more efficiently suppressing parasite propagation in G6PD- erythrocytes, either by directly affecting parasite growth, or by means of enhanced phagocytic elimination of infected cells. The present findings could account for the relative resistance of G6PD- bearers to falciparum malaria, and establish a link between dietary habits and malaria in the selection of the G6PD- genotype.

  6. Resistance of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency to malaria: effects of fava bean hydroxypyrimidine glucosides on Plasmodium falciparum growth in culture and on the phagocytosis of infected cells.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, H; Atamna, H; Shalmiev, G; Kanaani, J; Krugliak, M

    1996-07-01

    The balanced polymorphism of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD-) is believed to have evolved through the selective pressure of malarial combined with consumption of fava beans. The implicated fava bean constituents are the hydroxypyrimidine glucosides vicine and convicine, which upon hydrolysis of their beta-O-glucosidic bond, became protein pro-oxidants. In this work we show that the glucosides inhibit the growth of Plasmodium falciparum, increase the hexose-monophosphate shunt activity and the phagocytosis of malaria-infected erythrocytes. These activities are exacerbated in the presence of beta-glucosidase, implicating their pro-oxidant aglycones in the toxic effect, and are more pronounced in infected G6PD- erythrocytes. These results suggest that G6PD- infected erythrocytes are more susceptible to phagocytic cells, and that fava bean pro-oxidants are more efficiently suppressing parasite propagation in G6PD- erythrocytes, either by directly affecting parasite growth, or by means of enhanced phagocytic elimination of infected cells. The present findings could account for the relative resistance of G6PD- bearers to falciparum malaria, and establish a link between dietary habits and malaria in the selection of the G6PD- genotype. PMID:8710417

  7. Molecular Epidemiological Survey of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Thalassemia in Uygur and Kazak Ethnic Groups in Xinjiang, Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Han, Luhao; Su, Hai; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Weiying; Chen, Suqin

    2016-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and thalassemia occur frequently in tropical and subtropical regions, while the prevalence of relationship between the two diseases in Xinjiang has not been reported. We aimed to determine the prevalence of these diseases and clarify the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes of the two diseases in the Uygur and Kazak ethnic groups in Xinjiang. We measured G6PD activity by G6PD:6PGD (glucose acid-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) ratio, identified the gene variants of G6PD and α- and β-globin genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-DNA sequencing and gap-PCR and compared these variants in different ethnic groups in Xinjiang with those adjacent to it. Of the 149 subjects with molecular analysis of G6PD deficiency conducted, a higher prevalence of the combined mutations c.1311C > T/IVSXI + 93T > C and IVSXI + 93T > C, both with normal enzymatic activities, were observed in the Uygur and Kazak subjects. A case of rare mutation HBB: c.135delC [codon 44 (-C) in the heterozygous state], a heterozygous case of HBB: c.68A > G [Hb G-Taipei or β22(B4)Glu→Gly] and several common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found on the β-globin gene. In conclusion, G6PD deficiency with pathogenic mutations and three common α-thalassemia (α-thal) [- -(SEA), -α(3.7) (rightward), -α(4.2) (leftward)] deletions and point mutations of the α-globin gene were not detected in the present study. The average incidence of β-thalassemia (β-thal) in Uygurs was 1.45% (2/138) in Xinjiang. The polymorphisms of G6PD and β-globin genes might be useful genetic markers to trace the origin and migration of the Uygur and Kazak in Xinjiang. PMID:26950205

  8. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations and haplotypes in Mexican Mestizos.

    PubMed

    Arámbula, E; Aguilar L, J C; Vaca, G

    2000-08-01

    In a screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency in 1985 unrelated male subjects from the general population (Groups A and B) belonging to four states of the Pacific coast, 21 G-6-PD-deficient subjects were detected. Screening for mutations at the G-6-PD gene by PCR-restriction enzyme in these 21 G-6-PD-deficient subjects as well as in 14 G-6-PD-deficient patients with hemolytic anemia belonging to several states of Mexico showed two common G-6-PD variants: G-6-PD A-(202A/376G) (19 cases) and G-6-PD A-(376G/968C) (9 cases). In 7 individuals the mutations responsible for the enzyme deficiency remain to be determined. Furthermore, four silent polymorphic sites at the G-6-PD gene (PvuII, PstI, 1311, and NlaIII) were investigated in the 28 individuals with G-6-PD A- variants and in 137 G-6-PD normal subjects. As expected, only 10 different haplotypes were observed. To date, in our project aiming to determine the molecular basis of G-6-PD deficiency in Mexico, 60 unrelated G-6-PD-deficient Mexican males-25 in previous studies and 35 in the present work-have been studied. More than 75% of these individuals are from states of the Pacific coast (Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco, Michoacán, Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Chiapas). The results show that although G-6-PD deficiency is heterogeneous at the DNA level in Mexico, only three polymorphic variants have been observed: G-6-PD A-(202A/376G) (36 cases), G-6-PD A-(376G/968C) (13 cases), and G-6-PD Seattle(844C) (2 cases). G-6-PD A- variants are relatively distributed homogeneously and both variants explain 82% of the overall prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency. The variant G-6-PD A-(202A/376G) represents 73% of the G-6-PD A- alleles. Our data also show that the variant G-6-PD A-(376G/968C)-which has been observed in Mexico in the context of two different haplotypes-is more common than previously supposed. The three polymorphic variants that we observed in Mexico are on the same haplotypes as found in subjects from

  9. Single-Dose Primaquine in a Preclinical Model of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: Implications for Use in Malaria Transmission-Blocking Programs.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Kristina S; Baresel, Paul C; Marcsisin, Sean R; Sousa, Jason; Vuong, Chau T; Reichard, Gregory A; Campo, Brice; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Rochford, Rosemary

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (G6PDd) are at risk for developing hemolytic anemia when given the antimalarial drug primaquine (PQ). The WHO Evidence Review Group released a report suggesting that mass administration of a single dose of PQ at 0.25 mg of base/kg of body weight (mpk) (mouse equivalent of 3.125 mpk) could potentially reduce malaria transmission based on its gametocytocidal activity and could be safely administered to G6PD-deficient individuals, but there are limited safety data available confirming the optimum single dose of PQ. A single-dose administration of PQ was therefore assessed in our huRBC-SCID mouse model used to predict hemolytic toxicity with respect to G6PD deficiency. In this model, nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID mice are engrafted with human red blood cells (huRBC) from donors with the African or Mediterranean variant of G6PDd (A-G6PDd or Med-G6PDd, respectively) and demonstrate dose-dependent sensitivity to PQ. In mice engrafted with A-G6PD-deficient huRBC, single-dose PQ at 3.125, 6.25, or 12.5 mpk had no significant loss of huRBC compared to the vehicle control group. In contrast, in mice engrafted with Med-G6PDd huRBC, a single dose of PQ at 3.125, 6.25, or 12.5 mpk resulted in a significant, dose-dependent loss of huRBC compared to the value for the vehicle control group. Our data suggest that administration of a single low dose of 0.25 mpk of PQ could induce hemolytic anemia in Med-G6PDd individuals but that use of single-dose PQ at 0.25 mpk as a gametocytocidal drug to block transmission would be safe in areas where A-G6PDd predominates. PMID:27458212

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and the risk of malaria and other diseases in children in Kenya: a case-control and a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Uyoga, Sophie; Ndila, Carolyne M; Macharia, Alex W; Nyutu, Gideon; Shah, Shivang; Peshu, Norbert; Clarke, Geraldine M; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Rockett, Kirk A; Williams, Thomas N

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The global prevalence of X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is thought to be a result of selection by malaria, but epidemiological studies have yielded confusing results. We investigated the relationships between G6PD deficiency and both malaria and non-malarial illnesses among children in Kenya. Methods We did this study in Kilifi County, Kenya, where the G6PD c.202T allele is the only significant cause of G6PD deficiency. We tested the associations between G6PD deficiency and severe and complicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria through a case-control study of 2220 case and 3940 control children. Cases were children aged younger than 14 years, who visited the high dependency ward of Kilifi County Hospital with severe malaria between March 1, 1998, and Feb 28, 2010. Controls were children aged between 3–12 months who were born within the same study area between August 2006, and September 2010. We assessed the association between G6PD deficiency and both uncomplicated malaria and other common diseases of childhood in a cohort study of 752 children aged younger than 10 years. Participants of this study were recruited from a representative sample of households within the Ngerenya and Chonyi areas of Kilifi County between Aug 1, 1998, and July 31, 2001. The primary outcome measure for the case-control study was the odds ratio for hospital admission with severe malaria (computed by logistic regression) while for the cohort study it was the incidence rate ratio for uncomplicated malaria and non-malaria illnesses (computed by Poisson regression), by G6PD deficiency category. Findings 2863 (73%) children in the control group versus 1643 (74%) in the case group had the G6PD normal genotype, 639 (16%) versus 306 (14%) were girls heterozygous for G6PD c.202T, and 438 (11%) versus 271 (12%) children were either homozygous girls or hemizygous boys. Compared with boys and girls without G6PD deficiency, we found significant

  11. Frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in malaria patients from six African countries enrolled in two randomized anti-malarial clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is common in populations living in malaria endemic areas. G6PD genotype and phenotype were determined for malaria patients enrolled in the chlorproguanil-dapsone-artesunate (CDA) phase III clinical trial programme. Methods Study participants, aged > 1 year, with microscopically confirmed uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and haemoglobin ≥ 70 g/L or haematocrit ≥ 25%, were recruited into two clinical trials conducted in six African countries (Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania, Mali). G6PD genotype of the three most common African forms, G6PD*B, G6PD*A (A376G), and G6PD*A- (G202A, A542T, G680T and T968C), were determined and used for frequency estimation. G6PD phenotype was assessed qualitatively using the NADPH fluorescence test. Exploratory analyses investigated the effect of G6PD status on baseline haemoglobin concentration, temperature, asexual parasitaemia and anti-malarial efficacy after treatment with CDA 2/2.5/4 mg/kg or chlorproguanil-dapsone 2/2.5 mg/kg (both given once daily for three days) or six-dose artemether-lumefantrine. Results Of 2264 malaria patients enrolled, 2045 had G6PD genotype available and comprised the primary analysis population (1018 males, 1027 females). G6PD deficiency prevalence was 9.0% (184/2045; 7.2% [N = 147] male hemizygous plus 1.8% [N = 37] female homozygous), 13.3% (273/2045) of patients were heterozygous females, 77.7% (1588/2045) were G6PD normal. All deficient G6PD*A- genotypes were A376G/G202A. G6PD phenotype was available for 64.5% (1319/2045) of patients: 10.2% (134/1319) were G6PD deficient, 9.6% (127/1319) intermediate, and 80.2% (1058/1319) normal. Phenotype test specificity in detecting hemizygous males was 70.7% (70/99) and 48.0% (12/25) for homozygous females. Logistic regression found no significant effect of G6PD genotype on adjusted mean baseline haemoglobin (p = 0.154), adjusted mean baseline temperature (p = 0.9617), or

  12. Molecular analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variants in the Solomon Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Hirono, A.; Ishii, A.; Hirono, K.; Miwa, S.; Kere, N.; Fujii, H.

    1995-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most prevalent genetic disorders, and >100 million people are considered to have mutant genes. G6PD deficiency is frequent in the area where plasmodium falciparum infection is endemic, probably because the G6PD-deficient subjects are resistant to the parasite. Falciparum and vivax malarias have been highly endemic in the Solomon Islands, and a high frequency of G6PD deficiency has also been expected. A recent investigation showed that the frequency of G6PD deficiency in the Solomon Islands was 8.4%-14.4%. Although >80 G6PD variants from various populations have been molecularly analyzed, little is known about those in Melanesians. G6PD Maewo, which was originally found in Vanuatu, has so far been the only Melanesian variant whose structural abnormality was determined. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Multiple transcripts encode glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) is an enzyme that plays a critical role in the production of NADPH. Here we describe the identification of four transcripts (G6PDH-A, -B, -C, and -D) that putatively encode the enzyme in the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The geno...

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-derived NADPH fuels superoxide production in the failing heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the failing heart, NADPH oxidase and uncoupled NO synthase utilize cytosolic NADPH to form superoxide. NADPH is supplied principally by the pentose phosphate pathway, whose rate-limiting enzyme is glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Therefore, we hypothesized that cardiac G6PD activation dr...

  15. Appearance of Novel Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Isoforms in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Growth on Nitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Huppe, H. C.; Turpin, D. H.

    1996-01-01

    Extractable glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity is higher from N-limited Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells than from N-sufficient cells. Native gels reveal that the isoform complexity varies depending on the form of N supplied. The isoforms associated with NO3- growth appear within 2 h of switching cells from NH4+ to NO3-. PMID:12226271

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase alloenzymes and their relationship to pigmentation in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Gargallo, D; Lorén, J G; Guinea, J; Viñas, M

    1987-08-01

    A comparative study of environmental and clinical isolates of Serratia marcescens was undertaken with regard to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) electrophoretic mobility and the production of prodigiosin. Two electromorphs of G6PD with electrophoretic mobilities of 0.22 and 0.30 were detected. G6PD electrophoretic type showed a good correlation with the ability to produce prodigiosin.

  17. Inhibitory effect of a fava bean component on the in vitro development of Plasmodium falciparum in normal and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Golenser, J; Miller, J; Spira, D T; Navok, T; Chevion, M

    1983-03-01

    We examined the hypothesis that G-6-PD deficiency associated with fava bean ingestion confers resistance to malaria by studying the in vitro interactions between malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), human erythrocytes with varying degrees of G-6-PD deficiency, and isouramil (IU), a fava bean extract that is known to cause oxidant stress and hemolysis of G-6-PD-deficient erythrocytes. Untreated G-6-PD-deficient and normal erythrocytes supported the in vitro growth of P. falciparum equally well. However, after pretreatment with IU, G-6-PD-deficient erythrocytes did not support parasite growth in vitro, whereas growth remained high in normal erythrocytes. Parasite growth was proportional to the G-6-PD activity of the IU-treated erythrocytes. In contrast, when parasitized erythrocytes were exposed to IU, parasites even in normal erythrocytes were destroyed. Ring forms were much less sensitive than late trophozoites and schizonts. The results suggest that there are two modes by which IU affects the development of P. falciparum and demonstrate in vitro that G-6-PD deficiency confers resistance against malaria under conditions of fava-bean-associated oxidant stress.

  18. Novel steroid inhibitors of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Niall M; Dawson, Martin; Fairweather, Emma E; Hamilton, Nicola S; Hitchin, James R; James, Dominic I; Jones, Stuart D; Jordan, Allan M; Lyons, Amanda J; Small, Helen F; Thomson, Graeme J; Waddell, Ian D; Ogilvie, Donald J

    2012-05-10

    Novel derivatives of the steroid DHEA 1, a known uncompetitive inhibitor of G6PD, were designed, synthesized, and tested for their ability to inhibit this dehydrogenase enzyme. Several compounds with approximately 10-fold improved potency in an enzyme assay were identified, and this improved activity translated to efficacy in a cellular assay. The SAR for steroid inhibition of G6PD has been substantially developed; the 3β-alcohol can be replaced with 3β-H-bond donors such as sulfamide, sulfonamide, urea, and carbamate. Improved potency was achieved by replacing the androstane nucleus with a pregnane nucleus, provided a ketone at C-20 is present. For pregnan-20-ones incorporation of a 21-hydroxyl group is often beneficial. The novel compounds generally have good physicochemical properties and satisfactory in vitro DMPK parameters. These derivatives may be useful for examining the role of G6PD inhibition in cells and will assist the future design of more potent steroid inhibitors with potential therapeutic utility. PMID:22506561

  19. Irradiation shortens the survival time of red cells deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenasee

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, M.P.; Wald, N.; Diloy-Puray, M.

    1980-03-01

    X radiation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient red cells causes distinct shortening of their survival time. This is accompanied by significant lowering of reduced glutathione content and is not observed in similarly prepared and treated normal cells. The damage is most likely related to irradiation-induced formation of activated oxygen products and to their subsequent effects on the cells. Neither methemoglobin increases nor Heinz body formation were observed, suggesting that hemolysis occurred prior to these changes. The study provides a model for examining the effects of irradiation and activated oxygen on red cells and suggests that patients with G6PD deficiency who receive irradiation could develop severe hemolysis in certain clinical settings.

  20. Molecular Heterogeneity of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Burkina Faso: G-6-PD Betica Selma and Santamaria in People with Symptomatic Malaria in Ouagadougou

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Abdoul Karim; Yameogo, Pouiré; Diarra, Birama; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Yonli, Albert; Compaore, Tegwindé Rebeca; Soubeiga, Serge Théophile; Djigma, Florencia Wenkuuni; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The G-6-PD deficiency has an important polymorphism with genotypic variants such as 202A/376G, 376G/542T and 376G/968T known in West African populations. It would confer protection against severe forms of malaria although there are differences between the various associations in different studies. In this study we genotyped six (06) variants of the G-6-PD gene in people with symptomatic malaria in urban areas in Burkina Faso. One hundred and eighty-two (182) patients who tested positive using rapid detection test and microscopy were included in this study. A regular PCR with the GENESPARK G6PD African kit was run followed by electrophoresis, allowing initially to genotype six SNPs (G202A, A376G, A542T, G680T, C563T and T968C). Women carrying the mutations 202A and/or 376G were further typed by real-time PCR using TaqMan probes rs1050828 and rs1050829. In the study population the G-6-PD deficiency prevalence was 9.9%. In addition of G-6-PD A- (202A/376G) variant, 376G/542T and 376G/968T variants were also detected. Hemoglobin electrophoresis revealed that 22.5% (41/182) of the individuals had HbAC compared with2.2% with HbAS and one individual had double heterozygous HbSC. There was no correlation between the G-6-PD deficiency or haemoglobinopathies and symptomatic malaria infections in this study. Our study confirms that the G-6-PD deficiency does not confer protection against Plasmodium falciparum infections. As opposed to previous genotyping studies carried out in Burkina Faso, this study shows for the first time the presence of the variant A- (376G/968C) and warrants further investigation at the national level and in specific ethnic groups. PMID:27413522

  1. Molecular Heterogeneity of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Burkina Faso: G-6-PD Betica Selma and Santamaria in People with Symptomatic Malaria in Ouagadougou.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Abdoul Karim; Yameogo, Pouiré; Diarra, Birama; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Yonli, Albert; Compaore, Tegwindé Rebeca; Soubeiga, Serge Théophile; Djigma, Florencia Wenkuuni; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The G-6-PD deficiency has an important polymorphism with genotypic variants such as 202A/376G, 376G/542T and 376G/968T known in West African populations. It would confer protection against severe forms of malaria although there are differences between the various associations in different studies. In this study we genotyped six (06) variants of the G-6-PD gene in people with symptomatic malaria in urban areas in Burkina Faso. One hundred and eighty-two (182) patients who tested positive using rapid detection test and microscopy were included in this study. A regular PCR with the GENESPARK G6PD African kit was run followed by electrophoresis, allowing initially to genotype six SNPs (G202A, A376G, A542T, G680T, C563T and T968C). Women carrying the mutations 202A and/or 376G were further typed by real-time PCR using TaqMan probes rs1050828 and rs1050829. In the study population the G-6-PD deficiency prevalence was 9.9%. In addition of G-6-PD A- (202A/376G) variant, 376G/542T and 376G/968T variants were also detected. Hemoglobin electrophoresis revealed that 22.5% (41/182) of the individuals had HbAC compared with2.2% with HbAS and one individual had double heterozygous HbSC. There was no correlation between the G-6-PD deficiency or haemoglobinopathies and symptomatic malaria infections in this study. Our study confirms that the G-6-PD deficiency does not confer protection against Plasmodium falciparum infections. As opposed to previous genotyping studies carried out in Burkina Faso, this study shows for the first time the presence of the variant A- (376G/968C) and warrants further investigation at the national level and in specific ethnic groups. PMID:27413522

  2. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    MedlinePlus

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  3. [Polymorphism of Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase in the Chronically Irradiated Scots Pine Populations].

    PubMed

    Kazakova, E A; Volkova, P Yu; Geras'kin, S A; Pomelova, D O

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphism of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme was studied in the Scots pine populations growing in the sites of Bryansk region which were radioactively contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident. It was revealed that the frequency of mutations in isozyme loci increased along with the level of a dose rate (7-130 mGy/year) in the sites under the study. Significant changes in the activity of this enzyme did not depend on the level of radiation exposure.

  4. Aldosterone impairs vascular reactivity by decreasing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Dam, Aamir; Maron, Bradley A.; Scribner, Anne W.; Liao, Ronglih; Handy, Diane E.; Stanton, Robert C.; Pitt, Bertram; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired vascular reactivity; however, the mechanism by which aldosterone promotes endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd), the principal source of Nadph, modulates vascular function by limiting oxidant stress to preserve bioavailable nitric oxide (NO•). In these studies, we show that aldosterone (10−9-10−7 mol/l) decreases endothelial G6pd expression and activity in vitro resulting in increased oxidant stress and decreased cGMP levels similar to what is observed in G6pd-deficient cells. Aldosterone decreases G6pd expression by protein kinase A activation to increase expression of Crem, which interferes with Creb binding to the G6pd promoter. In vivo, infusion of aldosterone decreases vascular G6pd expression and impairs vascular reactivity. These effects are abrogated by spironolactone or vascular gene transfer of G6pd. These studies demonstrate that aldosterone induces a G6pd-deficient phenotype to impair endothelial function; aldosterone antagonism or gene transfer of G6pd improves vascular reactivity by restoring G6pd activity. PMID:17273168

  5. Androgen-estrogen synergy in rat levator ani muscle Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of castration and hormone administration on the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the rat levator ani muscle were studied. Castration caused a decrease in enzyme activity and in wet weight of the levator ani muscle. Chronic administration of testosterone propionate increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the levator ani muscle of castrated rats; the magnitude of the recovery of enzyme activity was related to the length of time of exposure to testosterone propionate after castration as well as to the length of time the animals were castrated. The longer the period of castration before exposure to testosterone propionate, the greater the effect. This result may be related to previously reported castration-mediated increases in androgen receptor binding in muscle. Dihydrotestosterone was less effective than testosterone propionate in enhancing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the levator ani muscle from castrated rats; estradiol-17-beta alone was ineffective. Combined treatment with estradiol-17-beta and dihydrotestosterone, however, was as effective as testosterone alone. Thus, androgens and estrogens may exert synergistic effects on levator ani muscle.

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase status and risk of hemolysis in Plasmodium falciparum-infected African children receiving single-dose primaquine.

    PubMed

    Eziefula, Alice C; Pett, Helmi; Grignard, Lynn; Opus, Salome; Kiggundu, Moses; Kamya, Moses R; Yeung, Shunmay; Staedke, Sarah G; Bousema, Teun; Drakeley, Chris

    2014-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme function and genotype were determined in Ugandan children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria enrolled in a primaquine trial after exclusion of severe G6PD deficiency by fluorescent spot test. G6PD A- heterozygotes and hemizygotes/homozygotes experienced dose-dependent lower hemoglobin concentrations after treatment. No severe anemia was observed. PMID:24913169

  7. Changing kinetic properties of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from pea chloroplasts during photosynthetic induction

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, X.; Anderson, L.E.

    1987-04-01

    The first enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, glucose-6-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49), is inactivated when pea chloroplasts are irradiated. They have examined the kinetics of light inactivation of glucose-6-P dehydrogenase in intact chloroplasts during photosynthetic induction and the kinetic parameters of the active (dark) and less active (light) form of the dehydrogenase. Light inactivation of the dehydrogenase is rapid and occurs before photosynthetic O/sub 2/ evolution is measureable in intact chloroplasts. Likewise dark activation is quite rapid. The major change in the kinetic parameters of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is in maximal velocity. This light inactivation probably prevents operation of a futile cycle involving glucose-6-P, NADPH and oxidative and reductive pentose phosphate pathway enzymes.

  8. Gd(-) Muret and gd(-) Colomiers, two new variants of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase associated with favism.

    PubMed

    Vergnes, H; Ribet, A; Bommelaer, G; Amadieu, J; Brun, H

    1981-01-01

    Two males subjects are described with hitherto undescribed glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) variants. The first is of French ancestry, the second of Sicilian extraction. Each subject suffered from acute hemolytic anemia following ingestion of broad beans (Vicia fava). In both cases the hemolytic crisis occurred in a late period of life (29 and 58 years). No previous hemolytic crisis was recorded. The electrophoretic and kinetic properties of the mutant enzymes examined after purification from the red cells allowed each to be distinguished from other G6PD variants reported until now. The first variant was named Gd(-) Muret, the other Gd(-) Colomiers. PMID:7250973

  9. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase polymorphisms and susceptibility to mild malaria in Dogon and Fulani, Mali

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is associated with protection from severe malaria, and potentially uncomplicated malaria phenotypes. It has been documented that G6PD deficiency in sub-Saharan Africa is due to the 202A/376G G6PD A-allele, and association studies have used genotyping as a convenient technique for epidemiological studies. However, recent studies have shown discrepancies in G6PD202/376 associations with severe malaria. There is evidence to suggest that other G6PD deficiency alleles may be common in some regions of West Africa, and that allelic heterogeneity could explain these discrepancies. Methods A cross-sectional epidemiological study of malaria susceptibility was conducted during 2006 and 2007 in the Sahel meso-endemic malaria zone of Mali. The study included Dogon (n = 375) and Fulani (n = 337) sympatric ethnic groups, where the latter group is characterized by lower susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Fifty-three G6PD polymorphisms, including 202/376, were genotyped across the 712 samples. Evidence of association of these G6PD polymorphisms and mild malaria was assessed in both ethnic groups using genotypic and haplotypic statistical tests. Results It was confirmed that the Fulani are less susceptible to malaria, and the 202A mutation is rare in this group (< 1% versus Dogon 7.9%). The Betica-Selma 968C/376G (~11% enzymatic activity) was more common in Fulani (6.1% vs Dogon 0.0%). There are differences in haplotype frequencies between Dogon and Fulani, and association analysis did not reveal strong evidence of protective G6PD genetic effects against uncomplicated malaria in both ethnic groups and gender. However, there was some evidence of increased risk of mild malaria in Dogon with the 202A mutation, attaining borderline statistical significance in females. The rs915942 polymorphism was found to be associated with asymptomatic malaria in Dogon females, and the rs61042368 polymorphism was

  10. Evaluation of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase stability in stored blood samples

    PubMed Central

    Jalil, Norunaluwar; Azma, Raja Zahratul; Mohamed, Emida; Ithnin, Azlin; Alauddin, Hafiza; Baya, Siti Noor; Othman, Ainoon

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the commonest cause of neonatal jaundice in Malaysia. Recently, OSMMR2000-D G6PD Assay Kit has been introduced to quantitate the level of G6PD activity in newborns delivered in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC). As duration of sample storage prior to analysis is one of the matters of concern, this study was conducted to identify the stability of G6PD enzyme during storage. A total of 188 cord blood samples from normal term newborns delivered at UKMMC were selected for this study. The cord bloods samples were collected in ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) tubes and refrigerated at 2-8 °C. In addition, 32 out of 188 cord blood samples were spotted on chromatography paper, air-dried and stored at room temperature. G6PD enzyme activities were measured daily for 7 days using the OSMMR2000-D G6PD Assay Kit on both the EDTA blood and dried blood samples. The mean value for G6PD activity was compared between days of analysis using Student Paired T-Test. In this study, 172 out of 188 cord blood samples showed normal enzyme levels while 16 had levels corresponding to severe enzyme deficiency. The daily mean G6PD activity for EDTA blood samples of newborns with normal G6PD activity showed a significant drop on the fourth day of storage (p < 0.005) while for samples with severely deficient G6PD activity, significant drop was seen on third day of storage (p = 0.002). Analysis of dried cord blood showed a significant reduction in enzyme activity as early as the second day of storage (p = 0.001). It was also noted that mean G6PD activity for spotted blood samples were lower compared to those in EDTA tubes for all days (p = 0.001). Thus, EDTA blood samples stored at 2-8 °C appeared to have better stability in terms of their G6PD enzyme level as compared to dried blood samples on filter paper, giving a storage time of up to 3 days. PMID:27103895

  11. Effect of divalent metals on fungal and bacterial glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W.; Niehaus, W.G.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have studied the effect of Zn/sup 2 +/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase purified from the fungi Aspergillus parasiticus, Alternaria alternata, Aphanomyces astaci, Saccharomyces cerevesiae, and Torula utilis, and from the bacteria Escherichia coli, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Bacillus stearothermophilus. Zn/sup 2 +/ reversibly inhibited the enzymes from A. parasiticus, S. cerevesiae, and T. utilis. Inhibition was competitive versus glucose-6-phosphate, with Ki = 25 ..mu..M, 75 ..mu..M, 25 ..mu..M, respectively. Zn/sup 2 +/ at 100 or 500 ..mu..M did not affect Vmax or Vmax/Km for the enzymes from A. alternata, A. astaci, L. mesenteroides, or B. stearothermophilus. Zn/sup 2 +/ caused loss of activity of the E. coli enzyme, which was not reversed by EDTA. Mg/sup 2 +/ stimulated both Vmax and Vmax/Km for all enzymes except that from A. astaci, on which it had no effect. Maximum stimulation occurred between 1 and 15 mM Mg/sup 2 +/ and ranged from 2 to 6-fold. For the enzymes from A. parasiticus, S. cerevesiae, and T. utilis, inclusion of 5 mM Mg/sup 2 +/ reversed the inhibition caused by 100 ..mu..M Zn/sup 2 +/.

  12. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase of Trypanosomatids: Characterization, Target Validation, and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shreedhara; Igoillo-Esteve, Mariana; Michels, Paul A. M.; Cordeiro, Artur T.

    2011-01-01

    In trypanosomatids, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), the first enzyme of the pentosephosphate pathway, is essential for the defense of the parasite against oxidative stress. Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania mexicana G6PDHs have been characterized. The parasites' G6PDHs contain a unique 37 amino acid long N-terminal extension that in T. cruzi seems to regulate the enzyme activity in a redox-state-dependent manner. T. brucei and T. cruzi G6PDHs, but not their Leishmania spp. counterpart, are inhibited, in an uncompetitive way, by steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone and derivatives. The Trypanosoma enzymes are more susceptible to inhibition by these compounds than the human G6PDH. The steroids also effectively kill cultured trypanosomes but not Leishmania and are presently considered as promising leads for the development of new parasite-selective chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22091394

  13. Fed-Batch Production of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Using Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Neves, Luiz Carlos Martins; Pessoa, Adalberto; Vitolo, Michele

    The strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-181, having the plasmid YEpPGK-G6P (built by coupling the vector YEPLAC 181 with the promoter phosphoglycerate kinase 1), was cultured by fed-batch process in order to evaluate its capability in the formation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC.1.1.1.49). Two liters of culture medium (10.0 g/L glucose, 3.7 g/L yeast nitrogen broth (YNB), 0.02 g/L l-tryptophan, 0.02 g/L l-histidine, 0.02 g/L uracil, and 0.02 g/L adenine) were inoculated with 1.5 g dry cell/L and left fermenting in the batch mode at pH 5.7, aeration of 2.2 vvm, 30°C, and agitation of 400 rpm. After glucose concentration in the medium was lower than 1.0 g/L, the cell culture was fed with a solution of glucose (10.0 g/L) or micronutrients (l-tryptophan, l-histidine, uracil, and adenine each one at a concentration of 0.02 g/L) following the constant, linear, or exponential mode. The volume of the culture medium in the fed-batch process was varied from 2 L up to 3 L during 5 h. The highest glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity (350 U/L; 1 U=1 μmol of NADP/min) occurred when the glucose solution was fed into the fermenter through the decreasing linear mode.

  14. Oxidant injury of caucasian glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase—deficient red blood cells by phagocytosing leukocytes during infection

    PubMed Central

    Baehner, Robert L.; Nathan, David G.; Castle, William B.

    1971-01-01

    Patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency of red blood cells (RBC) may develop sudden hemolytic anemia during infection. Since phagocytizing polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are known to generate hydrogen peroxide, we explored the influence of this oxidant product of PMN on juxtaposed G6PD-deficient and normal RBC. The oxidant stress induced by phagocytosis depleted G6PD-deficient RBC of reduced glutathione (GSH) and this was associated with rapid removal of these cells from the circulation by the liver and spleen. No such effect was observed on normal RBC. Phagocytizing chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) PMN which lack hydrogen peroxide generation, failed to diminish GSH level in G6PD-deficient RBC. Thus, PMN can pose as a source of oxidant damage to G6PD-deficient RBC due to hydrogen peroxide generated during phagocytosis. PMID:5129301

  15. Four transcripts encode glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in the Southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) is an enzyme that plays a critical role in the production of NADPH. Here we describe the characterization of four transcripts (G6PDH-A, -B, -C, and -D) that putatively encode the enzyme in the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The ...

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Plasmodium berghei: kinetic and electrophoretic characterization.

    PubMed

    Buckwitz, D; Jacobasch, G; Kuckelkorn, U; Plonka, A; Gerth, C

    1990-04-01

    Evidence is given for the existence of a parasite-specific glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) in Plasmodium berghei by characterization of its kinetic and electrophoretic properties. From infected rat erythrocytes the parasites were isolated, washed, and lysed. G6PD was purified by affinity chromatography with 2'5'-ADP-Sepharose 4B, although the separation of the malaria-specific enzyme from that of the host cell was not complete. Malarial G6PD significantly differed from the red cell enzyme with respect to its electrophoretic properties. In cellulose acetate electrophoresis, a band with catodic mobility was observed in addition to the anodically mobile host cell enzyme at pH 7.0. The subunits of the parasite-specific G6PD have a molecular weight of 55 kDa in contrast to 59 kDa of red cell G6PD subunits. The enzyme from P. berghei shows no cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibodies against G6PD from rat erythrocytes. Thus, a close evolutionary relationship between both proteins and the presence of proteolytic modifications could be excluded. The Km value for G6P of malarial G6PD is increased by one order of magnitude compared with the host cell enzyme.

  17. Expression and characterization of a cytosolic glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase isoform from barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots.

    PubMed

    Castiglia, Daniela; Cardi, Manuela; Landi, Simone; Cafasso, Donata; Esposito, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    In plant cells, glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH-EC 1.1.1.49) regulates the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP), a metabolic route involved in the production of NADPH for various biosynthetic processes and stress response. In this study, we report the overexpression of a cytosolic G6PDH isoform from barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots in bacteria, and the biochemical characterization of the purified recombinant enzyme (HvCy-G6PDH). A full-length cDNA coding for a cytosolic isoform of G6PDH was isolated, and the sequence was cloned into pET3d vector; the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified by anion exchange and affinity chromatography. The kinetic properties were calculated: the recombinant HvCy-G6PDH showed KMs and KINADPH comparable to those observed for the enzyme purified from barley roots; moreover, the analysis of NADPH inhibition suggested a competitive mechanism. Therefore, this enzyme could be utilised for the structural and regulatory characterization of this isoform in higher plants.

  18. Enhanced expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in human cells sustaining oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Ursini, M V; Parrella, A; Rosa, G; Salzano, S; Martini, G

    1997-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity in mammalian cells is necessary in order to ensure cell survival when damage is produced by reactive oxygen intermediates. In this paper we demonstrate that oxidative stress, caused by agents acting at different steps in the biochemical pathway controlling the intracellular redox status, determines the increase in G6PD-specific activity in human cell lines of different tissue origins. The intracellular level of G6PD-specific mRNA also increases, with kinetics compatible with the induction of new enzyme synthesis. We carried out experiments in which cells were exposed to oxidative stress in the presence of inhibitors of protein or RNA synthesis. These demonstrated that increased G6PD expression is mainly due to an increased rate of transcription, with a minor but significant contribution of regulatory mechanisms acting at post-transcriptional levels. These results provide new information on the defence systems that eukaryotic cells possess in order to prevent damage caused by potentially harmful oxygen derivatives. PMID:9169615

  19. Abscisic acid effects on activity and expression of barley (Hordeum vulgare) plastidial glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Cardi, Manuela; Chibani, Kamel; Cafasso, Donata; Rouhier, Nicolas; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Esposito, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Total glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity, protein abundance, and transcript levels of G6PDH isoforms were measured in response to exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) supply to barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Nure) hydroponic culture. Total G6PDH activity increased by 50% in roots treated for 12 h with exogenous 0.1 mM ABA. In roots, a considerable increase (35%) in plastidial P2-G6PDH transcript levels was observed during the first 3 h of ABA treatment. Similar protein variations were observed in immunoblotting analyses. In leaves, a 2-fold increase in total G6PDH activity was observed after ABA treatment, probably related to an increase in the mRNA level (increased by 50%) and amount of protein (increased by 85%) of P2-G6PDH. Together these results suggest that the plastidial P2-isoform plays an important role in ABA-treated barley plants. PMID:21464159

  20. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress. PMID:27187489

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is the target for the trypanocidal action of human steroids.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shreedhara; Cordeiro, Artur T; Michels, Paul A M

    2011-04-01

    Steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and epiandrosterone (EA) exert multiple effects in mammals including the inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). Initially, the inhibition was considered specific for the mammalian enzyme. The beneficial effect of these steroids on infections by protists and nematodes was attributed to stimulation of the immune system. However, we showed previously that DHEA and EA also inhibit Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi G6PDH, with low micromolar K(i)' values, but not the enzyme from Leishmania species, and kill in vitro cultured trypanosomes. We report here that, contrary to wild-type trypanosomes, mutant bloodstream-form T. brucei cells expressing L. mexicana G6PDH are not susceptible to the steroids, proving that G6PDH is the in situ target. Moreover, bromo-derivatives of the steroids show 50-100 fold lower K(i)' values for the enzyme and display an increased potency to kill the parasites. Therefore, the compounds offer promise for use in development of parasite-selective drugs.

  2. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress. PMID:27187489

  3. Testis-specific expression of a functional retroposon encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriksen, P.J.M. |; Hoogerbrugge, J.W.; Baarends, W.M.

    1997-05-01

    The X-chromosomal gene glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd) is known to be expressed in most cell types of mammalian species. In the mouse, we have detected a novel gene, designated G6pd-2, encoding a G6PD isoenzyme. G6pd-2 does not contain introns and appears to represent a retroposed gene. This gene is uniquely transcribed in postmeiotic spermatogenic cells in which the X-encoded G6pd gene is not transcribed. Expression of the G6pd-2 sequence in a bacterial system showed that the encoded product is an active enzyme. Zymogramic analysis demonstrated that recombinant G6PD-2, but not recombinant G6PD-1 (the X-chromosome-encoded G6PD), formed tetramers under reducing conditions. Under the same conditions, G6PD tetramers were also found in extracts of spermatids and spermatozoa, indicating the presence of G6pd-2-encoded isoenzyme in these cell types. G6pd-2 is one of the very few known expressed retroposons encoding a functional protein, and the presence of this gene is probably related to X chromosome inactivation during spermatogenesis. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Three Recombinant Human Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Mutants: Zacatecas, Vanua-Lava and Viangchan.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; González-Valdez, Abigail; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Cuevas-Cruz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-05-21

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in humans causes severe disease, varying from mostly asymptomatic individuals to patients showing neonatal jaundice, acute hemolysis episodes or chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In order to understand the effect of the mutations in G6PD gene function and its relation with G6PD deficiency severity, we report the construction, cloning and expression as well as the detailed kinetic and stability characterization of three purified clinical variants of G6PD that present in the Mexican population: G6PD Zacatecas (Class I), Vanua-Lava (Class II) and Viangchan (Class II). For all the G6PD mutants, we obtained low purification yield and altered kinetic parameters compared with Wild Type (WT). Our results show that the mutations, regardless of the distance from the active site where they are located, affect the catalytic properties and structural parameters and that these changes could be associated with the clinical presentation of the deficiency. Specifically, the structural characterization of the G6PD Zacatecas mutant suggests that the R257L mutation have a strong effect on the global stability of G6PD favoring an unstable active site. Using computational analysis, we offer a molecular explanation of the effects of these mutations on the active site.

  5. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Three Recombinant Human Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Mutants: Zacatecas, Vanua-Lava and Viangchan.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; González-Valdez, Abigail; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Cuevas-Cruz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in humans causes severe disease, varying from mostly asymptomatic individuals to patients showing neonatal jaundice, acute hemolysis episodes or chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In order to understand the effect of the mutations in G6PD gene function and its relation with G6PD deficiency severity, we report the construction, cloning and expression as well as the detailed kinetic and stability characterization of three purified clinical variants of G6PD that present in the Mexican population: G6PD Zacatecas (Class I), Vanua-Lava (Class II) and Viangchan (Class II). For all the G6PD mutants, we obtained low purification yield and altered kinetic parameters compared with Wild Type (WT). Our results show that the mutations, regardless of the distance from the active site where they are located, affect the catalytic properties and structural parameters and that these changes could be associated with the clinical presentation of the deficiency. Specifically, the structural characterization of the G6PD Zacatecas mutant suggests that the R257L mutation have a strong effect on the global stability of G6PD favoring an unstable active site. Using computational analysis, we offer a molecular explanation of the effects of these mutations on the active site. PMID:27213370

  6. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Three Recombinant Human Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Mutants: Zacatecas, Vanua-Lava and Viangchan

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; González-Valdez, Abigail; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Cuevas-Cruz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in humans causes severe disease, varying from mostly asymptomatic individuals to patients showing neonatal jaundice, acute hemolysis episodes or chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In order to understand the effect of the mutations in G6PD gene function and its relation with G6PD deficiency severity, we report the construction, cloning and expression as well as the detailed kinetic and stability characterization of three purified clinical variants of G6PD that present in the Mexican population: G6PD Zacatecas (Class I), Vanua-Lava (Class II) and Viangchan (Class II). For all the G6PD mutants, we obtained low purification yield and altered kinetic parameters compared with Wild Type (WT). Our results show that the mutations, regardless of the distance from the active site where they are located, affect the catalytic properties and structural parameters and that these changes could be associated with the clinical presentation of the deficiency. Specifically, the structural characterization of the G6PD Zacatecas mutant suggests that the R257L mutation have a strong effect on the global stability of G6PD favoring an unstable active site. Using computational analysis, we offer a molecular explanation of the effects of these mutations on the active site. PMID:27213370

  7. Metabolic impact of an NADH-producing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Olavarria, K; De Ingeniis, J; Zielinski, D C; Fuentealba, M; Muñoz, R; McCloskey, D; Feist, A M; Cabrera, R

    2014-12-01

    In Escherichia coli, the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway (oxPPP) is one of the major sources of NADPH when glucose is the sole carbon nutrient. However, unbalanced NADPH production causes growth impairment as observed in a strain lacking phosphoglucoisomerase (Δpgi). In this work, we studied the metabolic response of this bacterium to the replacement of its glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) by an NADH-producing variant. The homologous enzyme from Leuconostoc mesenteroides was studied by molecular dynamics and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain the NAD-preferring LmG6PDH(R46E,Q47E). Through homologous recombination, the zwf loci (encoding G6PDH) in the chromosomes of WT and Δpgi E. coli strains were replaced by DNA encoding LmG6PDH(R46E,Q47E). Contrary to some predictions performed with flux balance analysis, the replacements caused a substantial effect on the growth rates, increasing 59 % in the Δpgi strain, while falling 44 % in the WT. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of the zwf locus showed that the expression level of the mutant enzyme was similar to the native enzyme and the expression of genes encoding key enzymes of the central pathways also showed moderate changes among the studied strains. The phenotypic and qPCR data were integrated into in silico modelling, showing an operative G6PDH flux contributing to the NADH pool. Our results indicated that, in vivo, the generation of NADH by G6PDH is beneficial or disadvantageous for growth depending on the operation of the upper Embden-Meyerhof pathway. Interestingly, a genomic database search suggested that in bacteria lacking phosphofructokinase, the G6PDHs tend to have similar preferences for NAD and NADP. The importance of the generation of NADPH in a pathway such as the oxPPP is discussed.

  8. Binding Mode and Selectivity of Steroids towards Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase from the Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Cecilia; Moraca, Francesca; Medeiros, Andrea; Botta, Maurizio; Hamilton, Niall; Comini, Marcelo A

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) plays a housekeeping role in cell metabolism by generating reducing power (NADPH) and fueling the production of nucleotide precursors (ribose-5-phosphate). Based on its indispensability for pathogenic parasites from the genus Trypanosoma, G6PDH is considered a drug target candidate. Several steroid-like scaffolds were previously reported to target the activity of G6PDH. Epiandrosterone (EA) is an uncompetitive inhibitor of trypanosomal G6PDH for which its binding site to the enzyme remains unknown. Molecular simulation studies with the structure of Trypanosoma cruzi G6PDH revealed that EA binds in a pocket close to the G6P binding-site and protrudes into the active site blocking the interaction between substrates and hence catalysis. Site directed mutagenesis revealed the important steroid-stabilizing effect of residues (L80, K83 and K84) located on helix α-1 of T. cruzi G6PDH. The higher affinity and potency of 16α-Br EA by T. cruzi G6PDH is explained by the formation of a halogen bond with the hydrogen from the terminal amide of the NADP+-nicotinamide. At variance with the human enzyme, the inclusion of a 21-hydroxypregnane-20-one moiety to a 3β-substituted steroid is detrimental for T. cruzi G6PDH inhibition. The species-specificity of certain steroid derivatives towards the parasite G6PDH and the corresponding biochemically validated binding models disclosed in this work may prove valuable for the development of selective inhibitors against the pathogen's enzyme. PMID:26999093

  9. Importance of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) for vanillin tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trinh Thi My; Kitajima, Sakihito; Izawa, Shingo

    2014-09-01

    Vanillin is derived from lignocellulosic biomass and, as one of the major biomass conversion inhibitors, inhibits yeast growth and fermentation. Vanillin was recently shown to induce the mitochondrial fragmentation and formation of mRNP granules such as processing bodies and stress granules in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furfural, another major biomass conversion inhibitor, also induces oxidative stress and is reduced in an NAD(P)H-dependent manner to its less toxic alcohol derivative. Therefore, the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), through which most NADPH is generated, plays a role in tolerance to furfural. Although vanillin also induces oxidative stress and is reduced to vanillyl alcohol in a NADPH-dependent manner, the relationship between vanillin and PPP has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we examined the importance of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), which catalyzes the rate-limiting NADPH-producing step in PPP, for yeast tolerance to vanillin. The growth of the null mutant of G6PDH gene (zwf1Δ) was delayed in the presence of vanillin, and vanillin was efficiently reduced in the culture of wild-type cells but not in the culture of zwf1Δ cells. Furthermore, zwf1Δ cells easily induced the activation of Yap1, an oxidative stress responsive transcription factor, mitochondrial fragmentation, and P-body formation with the vanillin treatment, which indicated that zwf1Δ cells were more susceptible to vanillin than wild type cells. These findings suggest the importance of G6PDH and PPP in the response of yeast to vanillin.

  10. Subcellular Characterization of Porcine Oocytes with Different Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bo; Ren, Liang; Liu, Di; Ma, Jian-Zhang; An, Tie-Zhu; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Dong-Jie; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Guo, Yun-Yun; Zhu, Meng; Bai, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro maturation (IVM) efficiency of porcine embryos is still low because of poor oocyte quality. Although brilliant cresyl blue positive (BCB+) oocytes with low glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity have shown superior quality than BCB negative (−) oocytes with high G6PDH activity, the use of a BCB staining test before IVM is still controversial. This study aimed to shed more light on the subcellular characteristics of porcine oocytes after selection using BCB staining. We assessed germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, cortical granule (CG) migration, mitochondrial distribution, the levels of acetylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (AcH3K9) and nuclear apoptosis features to investigate the correlation between G6PDH activity and these developmentally related features. A pattern of chromatin surrounding the nucleoli was seen in 53.0% of BCB+ oocytes and 77.6% of BCB+ oocytes showed peripherally distributed CGs. After IVM, 48.7% of BCB+ oocytes had a diffused mitochondrial distribution pattern. However, there were no significant differences in the levels of AcH3K9 in the nuclei of blastocysts derived from BCB+ and BCB− oocytes; at the same time, we observed a similar incidence of apoptosis in the BCB+ and control groups. Although this study indicated that G6PDH activity in porcine oocytes was correlated with several subcellular characteristics such as germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, CG migration and mitochondrial distribution, other features such as AcH3K9 level and nuclear apoptotic features were not associated with G6PDH activity and did not validate the BCB staining test. In using this test for selecting porcine oocytes, subcellular characteristics such as the AcH3K9 level and apoptotic nuclear features should also be considered. Adding histone deacetylase inhibitors or apoptosis inhibitors into the culture medium used might improve the efficiency of IVM of BCB+ oocytes. PMID:26580437

  11. Lowering effect of firefly squid powder on triacylglycerol content and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Morita, Ritsuko; Shirai, Yoko; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Terashima, Teruya; Ushikubo, Shun; Matsuo, Tatsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Effects of dietary firefly squid on serum and liver lipid levels were investigated. Male Wistar rats were fed a diet containing 5% freeze-dried firefly squid or Japanese flying squid for 2 weeks. There was no significant difference in the liver triacylglycerol level between the control and Japanese flying squid groups, but the rats fed the firefly squid diet had a significantly lower liver triacylglycerol content than those fed the control diet. No significant difference was observed in serum triacylglycerol levels between the control and firefly squid groups. The rats fed the firefly squid had a significantly lower activity of liver glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase compared to the rats fed the control diet. There was no significant difference in liver fatty acid synthetase activity among the three groups. Hepatic gene expression and lipogenic enzyme activity were investigated; a DNA microarray showed that the significantly enriched gene ontology category of down-regulated genes in the firefly squid group was "lipid metabolic process". The firefly squid group had lower mRNA level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase compared to the controls. These results suggest that an intake of firefly squid decreases hepatic triacylglycerol in rats, and the reduction of mRNA level and enzyme activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase might be related to the mechanisms.

  12. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Clinical mutants of human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase: impairment of NADP(+) binding affects both folding and stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Tao; Engel, Paul C

    2009-08-01

    Human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) has both the "catalytic" NADP(+) site and a "structural" NADP(+) site where a number of severe G6PD deficiency mutations are located. Two pairs of G6PD clinical mutants, G6PD(Wisconsin) (R393G) and G6PD(Nashville) (R393H), and G6PD(Fukaya) (G488S) and G6PD(Campinas) (G488V), in which the mutations are in the vicinity of the "structural" NADP(+) site, showed elevated K(d) values of the "structural" NADP(+), ranging from 53 nM to 500 nM compared with 37 nM for the wild-type enzyme. These recombinant enzymes were denatured by Gdn-HCl and refolded by rapid dilution in the presence of l-Arg, NADP(+) and DTT at 25 degrees C. The refolding yields of the mutants exhibited strong NADP(+)-dependence and ranged from 1.5% to 59.4% with 1000 microM NADP(+), in all cases lower than the figure of 72% for the wild-type enzyme. These mutant enzymes also displayed decreased thermostability and high susceptibility to chymotrypsin digestion, in good agreement with their corresponding melting temperatures in CD experiments. Taken together, the results support the view that impaired binding of "structural" NADP(+) can hinder folding as well as cause instability of these clinical mutant enzymes in the fully folded state.

  14. Cloning, expression, purification and characterization of his-tagged human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase: a simplified method for protein yield.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Terrón-Hernández, Jessica; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; García-Torres, Itzhel; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Oria-Hernández, Jesús

    2013-10-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first step of the pentose phosphate pathway. In erythrocytes, the functionality of the pathway is crucial to protect these cells against oxidative damage. G6PD deficiency is the most frequent enzymopathy in humans with a global prevalence of 4.9 %. The clinical picture is characterized by chronic or acute hemolysis in response to oxidative stress, which is related to the low cellular activity of G6PD in red blood cells. The disease is heterogeneous at genetic level with around 160 mutations described, mostly point mutations causing single amino acid substitutions. The biochemical studies aimed to describe the detrimental effects of mutations on the functional and structural properties of human G6PD are indispensable to understand the molecular physiopathology of this disease. Therefore, reliable systems for efficient expression and purification of the protein are highly desirable. In this work, human G6PD was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography in a single chromatographic step. The structural and functional characterization indicates that His-tagged G6PD resembles previous preparations of recombinant G6PD. In contrast with previous protein yield systems, our method is based on commonly available resources and fully accessible laboratory equipment; therefore, it can be readily implemented.

  15. Inhibition of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Could Enhance 1,4-Benzoquinone-Induced Oxidative Damage in K562 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Meng; Yang, Wenwen; Sun, Fengmei; Xu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is a chemical contaminant widespread in industrial and living environments. The oxidative metabolites of benzene induce toxicity involving oxidative damage. Protecting cells and cell membranes from oxidative damage, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) maintains the reduced state of glutathione (GSH). This study aims to investigate whether the downregulation of G6PD in K562 cell line can influence the oxidative toxicity induced by 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ). G6PD was inhibited in K562 cell line transfected with the specific siRNA of G6PD gene. An empty vector was transfected in the control group. Results revealed that G6PD was significantly upregulated in the control cells and in the cells with inhibited G6PD after they were exposed to BQ. The NADPH/NADP and GSH/GSSG ratio were significantly lower in the cells with inhibited G6PD than in the control cells at the same BQ concentration. The relative reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and DNA oxidative damage were significantly increased in the cell line with inhibited G6PD. The apoptotic rate and G2 phase arrest were also significantly higher in the cells with inhibited G6PD and exposed to BQ than in the control cells. Our results suggested that G6PD inhibition could reduce GSH activity and alleviate oxidative damage. G6PD deficiency is also a possible susceptible risk factor of benzene exposure.

  16. Inhibition of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Could Enhance 1,4-Benzoquinone-Induced Oxidative Damage in K562 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Meng; Yang, Wenwen; Sun, Fengmei; Xu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is a chemical contaminant widespread in industrial and living environments. The oxidative metabolites of benzene induce toxicity involving oxidative damage. Protecting cells and cell membranes from oxidative damage, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) maintains the reduced state of glutathione (GSH). This study aims to investigate whether the downregulation of G6PD in K562 cell line can influence the oxidative toxicity induced by 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ). G6PD was inhibited in K562 cell line transfected with the specific siRNA of G6PD gene. An empty vector was transfected in the control group. Results revealed that G6PD was significantly upregulated in the control cells and in the cells with inhibited G6PD after they were exposed to BQ. The NADPH/NADP and GSH/GSSG ratio were significantly lower in the cells with inhibited G6PD than in the control cells at the same BQ concentration. The relative reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and DNA oxidative damage were significantly increased in the cell line with inhibited G6PD. The apoptotic rate and G2 phase arrest were also significantly higher in the cells with inhibited G6PD and exposed to BQ than in the control cells. Our results suggested that G6PD inhibition could reduce GSH activity and alleviate oxidative damage. G6PD deficiency is also a possible susceptible risk factor of benzene exposure. PMID:27656260

  17. Origin and spread of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variant (G6PD-Mediterranean) in the Middle East.

    PubMed Central

    Kurdi-Haidar, B; Mason, P J; Berrebi, A; Ankra-Badu, G; al-Ali, A; Oppenheim, A; Luzzatto, L

    1990-01-01

    A common glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) variant characterized by severe enzyme deficiency and B-like electrophoretic mobility is called "G6PD-Mediterranean" because it is found in different populations around the Mediterranean Sea. Sequence analysis of Italian subjects has revealed that the molecular basis of G6PD-Mediterranean is a single C-T transition at nucleotide position 563, causing a serine phenylalanine replacement at amino acid position 188. Most G6PD-Mediterranean subjects also have a silent C-T transition (without amino acid replacement) at nucleotide position 1311. Twenty-one unrelated individuals from Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran, Jordan, Lebanon, and Israel with both severe G6PD deficiency and B-like electrophoretic mobility were tested for both mutations by using amplification followed by digestion with appropriate restriction enzymes. All but one had the 563 mutation, and, of these, all but one had the 1311 mutation. Another 24 unrelated Middle Eastern individuals with normal G6PD activity or not known to be G6PD deficient were similarly tested. Four had the silent mutation at position 1311 in the absence of the deficiency mutation at position 563. We conclude that (1) the large majority of Middle Eastern subjects with the G6PD-Mediterranean phenotype have the same mutation found in Italy, (2) the silent mutation is an independent polymorphism in the Middle East, with a frequency of about .13, and (3) the mutation leading to the G6PD-Mediterranean deficiency has probably arisen on a chromosome that already carried the silent mutation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1978555

  18. Purification and characterization of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Lake Van fish (Chalcalburnus tarichii pallas, 1811) liver.

    PubMed

    Turkoglu, V; Altun, M; Ciftçi, M

    2006-09-01

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glucose 6-phosphate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49; G6PD) was purified from Lake Van fish (Chalcalburnus tarichii pallas, 1811) liver, using a simple and rapid method, and some characteristics of the enzyme were investigated. The purification procedure was composed of two steps: homogenate preparation and 2', 5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity gel chromatography, which took 7-8 hours. Thanks to the two consecutive procedures, the enzyme, having specific activity of 38 EU/mg protein, was purified with a yield of 44.39% and 1310 fold. In order to control the enzyme purification SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was done. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band for enzyme. Optimal pH, stable pH, optimal temperature, Km and, Vmax values for NADP+ and glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) were also determined for the enzyme. In addition, molecular weight and subunit molecular weights were found by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and gel filtration chromatography respectively.

  19. A Population Survey of the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) 563C>T (Mediterranean) Mutation in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Jamornthanyawat, Natsuda; Awab, Ghulam R.; Tanomsing, Naowarat; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Yamin, Fazel; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Woodrow, Charles J.; Imwong, Mallika

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common inherited enzyme defect and an important problem in areas with Plasmodium vivax infection because of the risk of haemolysis following administration of primaquine to treat the liver forms of the parasite. We undertook a genotypic survey of 713 male individuals across nine provinces of Afghanistan in which malaria is found, four in the north and five in the east. RFLP typing at nucleotide position 563 detected 40 individuals with the Mediterranean mutation 563C>T, an overall prevalence of 5.6%. This varied according to self-reported ethnicity, with prevalence in the Pashtun/Pashai group of 33/369 (8.9%) compared to 7/344 individuals in the rest of the population (2.0%; p<0.001, Chi-squared test). Multivariate analysis of ethnicity and geographical location indicated an adjusted odds ratio of 3.50 (95% CI 1.36–9.02) for the Pashtun/Pashai group, while location showed only a trend towards higher prevalence in eastern provinces (adjusted odds ratio = 1.73, 0.73–4.13). Testing of known polymorphic markers (1311C>T in exon 11, and C93T in intron XI) in a subset of 82 individuals wild-type at C563 revealed a mixture of 3 haplotypes in the background population and was consistent with data from the 1000 Genomes Project and published studies. By comparison individuals with G6PD deficiency showed a highly skewed haplotype distribution, with 95% showing the CT haplotype, a finding consistent with relatively recent appearance and positive selection of the Mediterranean variant in Afghanistan. Overall, the data confirm that the Mediterranean variant of G6PD is common in many ethnic groups in Afghanistan, indicating that screening for G6PD deficiency is required in all individuals before radical treatment of P. vivax with primaquine. PMID:24586352

  20. Purification and investigation of some kinetic properties of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves.

    PubMed

    Coban, T Abdül Kadir; Ciftçi, Mehmet; Küfrevioğlu, O Irfan

    2002-05-01

    In this study, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glucose-6-phosphate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49; G6PD) was purified from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves, and analysis of the kinetic behavior and some properties of the enzyme were investigated. The purification consisted of three steps: preparation of homogenate, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and DEAE-Sephadex A50 ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme was obtained with a yield of 8.79% and had a specific activity of 2.146 U (mg protein)(-1). The overall purification was about 58-fold. Temperature of +4 degrees C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was spectrophotometrically measured according to the Beutler method, at 340 nm. In order to control the purification of enzyme, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out in 4% and 10% acrylamide for stacking and running gel, respectively. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band for enzyme. The molecular weight was found to be 77.6 kDa by Sephadex G-150 gel filtration chromatography. A protein band corresponding to a molecular weight of 79.3 kDa was obtained on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. For the enzymes, the stable pH, optimum pH, and optimum temperature were found to be 6.0, 8.0, and 60 degrees C, respectively. Moreover, KM and Vmax values for NADP+ and G6-P at optimum pH and 25 degrees C were determined by means of Lineweaver-Burk graphs. Additionally, effects of streptomycin sulfate and tetracycline antibiotics were investigated for the enzyme activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in vitro.

  1. What is the role of the second "structural" NADP+-binding site in human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase?

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Tao; Chan, Ting Fai; Lam, Veronica M S; Engel, Paul C

    2008-08-01

    Human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, purified after overexpression in E. coli, was shown to contain one molecule/subunit of acid-extractable "structural" NADP+ and no NADPH. This tightly bound NADP+ was reduced by G6P, presumably following migration to the catalytic site. Gel-filtration yielded apoenzyme, devoid of bound NADP+ but, surprisingly, still fully active. Mr of the main component of "stripped" enzyme by gel filtration was approximately 100,000, suggesting a dimeric apoenzyme (subunit Mr = 59,000). Holoenzyme also contained tetramer molecules and, at high protein concentration, a dynamic equilibrium gave an apparent intermediate Mr of 150 kDa. Fluorescence titration of the stripped enzyme gave the K d for structural NADP+ as 37 nM, 200-fold lower than for "catalytic" NADP+. Structural NADP+ quenches 91% of protein fluorescence. At 37 degrees C, stripped enzyme, much less stable than holoenzyme, inactivated irreversibly within 2 d. Inactivation at 4 degrees C was partially reversed at room temperature, especially with added NADP+. Apoenzyme was immediately active, without any visible lag, in rapid-reaction studies. Human G6PD thus forms active dimer without structural NADP+. Apparently, the true role of the second, tightly bound NADP+ is to secure long-term stability. This fits the clinical pattern, G6PD deficiency affecting the long-lived non-nucleate erythrocyte. The Kd values for two class I mutants, G488S and G488V, were 273 nM and 480 nM, respectively (seven- and 13-fold elevated), matching the structural prediction of weakened structural NADP+ binding, which would explain decreased stability and consequent disease. Preparation of native apoenzyme and measurement of Kd constant for structural NADP+ will now allow quantitative assessment of this defect in clinical G6PD mutations.

  2. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and NADPH Redox Regulates Cardiac Myocyte L-Type Calcium Channel Activity and Myocardial Contractile Function

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Dhwajbahadur K.; Hecker, Peter; Watanabe, Makino; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Levy, Richard J.; Okada, Takao; Edwards, John G.; Gupte, Sachin A.

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a 17-ketosteroid, epiandrosterone, attenuates L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa-L) in cardiac myocytes and inhibits myocardial contractility. Because 17-ketosteroids are known to inhibit glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, and to reduce intracellular NADPH levels, we hypothesized that inhibition of G6PD could be a novel signaling mechanism which inhibit ICa-L and, therefore, cardiac contractile function. We tested this idea by examining myocardial function in isolated hearts and Ca2+ channel activity in isolated cardiac myocytes. Myocardial function was tested in Langendorff perfused hearts and ICa-L were recorded in the whole-cell patch configuration by applying double pulses from a holding potential of −80 mV and then normalized to the peak amplitudes of control currents. 6-Aminonicotinamide, a competitive inhibitor of G6PD, increased pCO2 and decreased pH. Additionally, 6-aminonicotinamide inhibited G6PD activity, reduced NADPH levels, attenuated peak ICa-L amplitudes, and decreased left ventricular developed pressure and ±dp/dt. Finally, dialyzing NADPH into cells from the patch pipette solution attenuated the suppression of ICa-L by 6-aminonicotinamide. Likewise, in G6PD-deficient mice, G6PD insufficiency in the heart decreased GSH-to-GSSG ratio, superoxide, cholesterol and acetyl CoA. In these mice, M-mode echocardiographic findings showed increased diastolic volume and end-diastolic diameter without changes in the fraction shortening. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibiting G6PD activity and reducing NADPH levels alters metabolism and leads to inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channel activity. Notably, this pathway may be involved in modulating myocardial contractility under physiological and pathophysiological conditions during which the pentose phosphate pathway-derived NADPH redox is modulated (e.g., ischemia-reperfusion and heart failure). PMID:23071515

  3. Effects of some drugs on hepatic glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in Lake Van fish (Chalcalburnus tarischii Pallas, 1811).

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Mehmet; Turkoglu, Vedat; Coban, T Abdulkadir

    2007-05-01

    Inhibitory effects of some drugs on hepatic glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Lake Van fish (chalcalburnus tarischii pallas, 1811) were investigated. For this purpose, initially liver glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was purified 899-fold in a yield of 46.24% by using 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity gel. In order to control the purification of enzyme was done SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band for enzyme. A constant temperature (+4 degrees C) was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was determined with the Beutler method by using a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. Vankomycine, sulfanylamide, sulfanylacetamide, nidazole, ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin and KMnO(4) were used as drugs. These drugs exhibited inhibitory effects on the enzyme. IC(50) values of vankomycine, sulfanylamide, sulfanylacetamide, nidazole, ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin and KMnO(4) were 1.88, 0.037, 0.032, 1.178, 2.26, 643.5 and 0.0002 mM, and the K(i) constants 1.18+/-0.148, 0.119+/-0.021, 0.075+/-0.015, 1.15+/-0.21, 7.69+/-0.67, 1007+/-69, and 0.001+/-0.00022 mM, respectively. While vankomycine and nidazole showed competitive inhibition, others displayed noncompetitive inhibition. K(i) constants and IC(50) values for drugs were determined by Lineweaver-Burk graphs and plotting activity percentage versus [I], respectively.

  4. Identification of the binding domain for NADP sup + of human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by sequence analysis of mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Hirono, A.; Kuhl, W.; Gelbart, T.; Forman, L.; Beutler, E. ); Fairbanks, V.F. )

    1989-12-01

    Human erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate is normally quite stable in the presence of 10 {mu}M NADP{sup +}. Certain glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variants lose virtually all their activity at this concentration of NADP{sup +} but are reactivated by 200 {mu}M NADP{sup +}. Such variants presumably have a defect in their NADP{sup +}-binding site. The authors analyzed the sequence of cDNA or genomic DNA from seven unrelated patients with hemolytic anemia due to the inheritance of variants that are reactivated by NADP{sup +}. Six patients had substitutions of one of three adjacent amino acids, and the seventh patient had another amino acid substitution 23 residues downstream. These amino acids are highly conserved, all being present in rat and all but one being found also in Drosophila. The anomalous electrophoretic behavior of some of the variants can be explained by their loss of ability to bind NADP{sup +}. The conclude that the region in which these mutations occur defines the binding domain for NADP{sup +} and that binding NADP{sup +} that has been designated as structural and as catalytic probably occurs at the same site.

  5. The preparation of nylon-tube-supported hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the use of the co-immobilized enzymes in the automated determination of glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D L; Campbell, J; Hornby, W E

    1975-01-01

    Triethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate was used to O-alkylate nylon-tube thus producing the imidate salt of the nylon which was further made to react with 1,6-diaminohexane. 2. Hexokinase (EC 2.7.1.1) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) were immobilized on the amino-substituted nylon tube through glutaraldeyde and bisimidates. 3. The effect of varying the conditions of O-alkylation and the amount of enzyme immobilized on the activity of nylon tube-hexokinase derivatives was determined. 4. The effect of varying the amount of enzyme immobilized on the activity of nylon-tube-glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase derivatives was determined. 5. The thermal stability of nylon-tube-hexokinase and nylon-tube-glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase derivatives was studied. 6. Different ratios of hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were co-immobilized on nylon tube, and the rate of conversion of glucose into 6-phosphogluconolactone was compared with the individual activities of the immobilized enzymes. 7. Hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase co-immobilized on nylon tube were used in the automated analysis of glucose. PMID:1167161

  6. Marked differences in drug-induced methemoglobinemia in sheep are not due to RBC glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, reduced glutathione, or methemoglobin reductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Guertler, A.T.; Lagutchik, M.S.; Woodard, C.L.; Leonard, D.A.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine is a commonly used topical anesthetic that is structurally similar to current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis. Benzocaine induces profound methemoglobinemia in some sheep but not others. After topical benzocaine administration certain sheep respond to form MHb (elevated MHb 16-50% after a 56-280 mg dose, a 2-10 second spray with benzocine), while other phenotypically similar sheep fail to significantly form MHb (less than a 2% increase from baseline). Deficiencies in Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD), reduced glutathione (GSH), and MHb reductase increase the susceptibility to methemoglobinemia in man and animals. Sheep are used as a model for G-6-PD deficiency in man, and differences in this enzyme level could cause the variable response seen in these sheep. Similarly, differences in GSH and MHb reductase could be responsible for the observed differences in MHb formation.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... as some antibiotics and medications used to treat malaria). Hemolytic anemia can also occur after eating fava ... a G6PD mutation may be partially protected against malaria, an infectious disease carried by a certain type ...

  8. Effect of feeding and of DDT on the activity of hepatic glucose 6- phosphate dehydrogenase in two salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buhler, Donald R.; Benville, P.

    1969-01-01

    The specific activity of liver glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in yearling rainbow trout remained unchanged when the fish were starved for periods as long as 8 weeks and when starved animals were fed diets of various compositions. Injection of insulin concurrently with refeeding also failed to alter the specific activity of the enzyme in trout. The absence of a dietary or insulin influence on the teleost enzyme system is to be contrasted with studies in mammals in which the activity of hepatic glucose 6-P dehydrogenase was markedly stimulated after refeeding starved animals or injection of insulin.Ingestion of the pesticide DDT by juvenile coho salmon or adult rainbow trout also had no effect on the specific activity of liver glucose 6-P dehydrogenase and DDT failed to inhibit the rainbow trout enzyme in vitro. These results also differ considerably from those found in higher animals.These results suggest that the glucose 6-P dehydrogenase enzyme in teleosts may be under a different type of regulatory control from that found in mammals.

  9. [Stability of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase complexed with its substrate and/or cofactor in aqueous and micellar environment].

    PubMed

    Puchkaev, A V; Vlasov, A P; Metelitsa, D I

    2002-01-01

    Inactivation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) complexed with its substrate, glucose 6-phosphate (GP), and/or cofactor, NADP+, has been studied within the range 20-40 degrees C in three media: (a) 0.04 M NaOH-glycine buffer (pH 9.1); (b) Aerosol OT (AOT) reversed micelles in octane; and (c) Triton X-100 micelles in octane supplemented with 10% hexanol. The enzyme inactivation was characterized quantitatively by first order rate constants, kin (s-1). In the case of G6PDH-NADP+ complexes, the values of kin were independent of the initial concentrations of G6PDH, either in aqueous medium or AOT micelles. The values of kin for the complex G6PDH-GP were inversely related to the initial concentration of the enzyme, in both aqueous and micellar media. When inactivation of both complexes were studied in AOT micelles, minimum values of kin corresponded to the degree of hydration W0 = 16.7; at W0 > 16.7 and W0 < 16.7, kin increased. Within the range 20-40 degrees C, the values of kin measured for both complexes in aqueous medium were significantly lower than those measured in AOT micelles. Temperature dependences of kin were characterized by inflections in Arrhenius plots, which corresponded, depending on the medium, to certain temperatures from 33.6 degrees C to 40 degrees C. In all media studied, NADP+ complexes of the enzyme exhibited higher stability than their GP counterparts. The parameters of G6PDH and G6PDH-NADP+ melting, measured by differential scanning microcalorimetry (maximum temperature and half-width of the transition, enthalpy of denaturation, and van't Hoff enthalpy), provided unequivocal evidence of the higher stability of the complex as compared to that of the enzyme. In addition, this approach demonstrated that G6PDH undergoes destabilization in AOT micelles.

  10. A New Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Variant, G6PD Orissa (44 Ala→Gly), is the Major Polymorphic Variant in Tribal Populations in India

    PubMed Central

    Kaeda, J. S.; Chhotray, G. P.; Ranjit, M. R.; Bautista, J. M.; Reddy, P. H.; Stevens, D.; Naidu, J. M.; Britt, R. P.; Vulliamy, T. J.; Luzzatto, L.; Mason, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is usually found at high frequencies in areas of the world where malaria has been endemic. The frequency and genetic basis of G6PD deficiency have been studied in Africa, around the Mediterranean, and in the Far East, but little such information is available about the situation in India. To determine the extent of heterogeneity of G6PD, we have studied several different Indian populations by screening for G6PD deficiency, followed by molecular analysis of deficient alleles. The frequency of G6PD deficiency varies between 3% and 15% in different tribal and urban groups. Remarkably, a previously unreported deficient variant, G6PD Orissa (44 Ala→Gly), is responsible for most of the G6PD deficiency in tribal Indian populations but is not found in urban populations, where most of the G6PD deficiency is due to the G6PD Mediterranean (188 Ser→Phe) variant. The K of G6PD Orissa is fivefold higher than that of the normal enzyme. This may be due to the fact that the alanine residue that is replaced by glycine is part of a putative coenzyme-binding site. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:8533762

  11. A new glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variant, G6PD Orissa (44 Ala{yields}Gly), is the major polymorphic variant in tribal populations in India

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeda, J.S.; Bautista, J.M.; Stevens, D.

    1995-12-01

    Deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is usually found at high frequencies in areas of the world where malaria has been epidemic. The frequency and genetic basis of G6PD deficiency have been studied in Africa, around the Mediterranean, and in the Far East, but little such information is available about the situation in India. To determine the extent of heterogeneity of G6PD, we have studied several different Indian populations by screening for G6PD deficiency, followed by molecular analysis of deficient alleles. The frequency of G6PD deficiency varies between 3% and 15% in different tribal and urban groups. Remarkably, a previously unreported deficient variant, G6PD Orissa (44 Ala{yields}Gly), is responsible for most of the G6PD deficiency in tribal Indian populations but is not found in urban populations, where most of the G6PD deficiency is due to the G6PD Mediterranean (188 Ser{yields}Phe) variant. The K{sup NADP}{sub m} of G6PD Orissa is fivefold higher than that of the normal enzyme. This may be due to the fact that the alanine residue that is replaced by glycine is part of a putative coenzyme-binding site. 37 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Pharmacological targeting of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in human erythrocytes by Bay 11-7082, parthenolide and dimethyl fumarate.

    PubMed

    Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Giustarini, Daniela; Koralkova, Pavla; Köberle, Martin; Alzoubi, Kousi; Bissinger, Rosi; Hosseinzadeh, Zohreh; Dreischer, Peter; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Lang, Florian; Toulany, Mahmoud; Wieder, Thomas; Mojzikova, Renata; Rossi, Ranieri; Mrowietz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    In mature erythrocytes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) yield NADPH, a crucial cofactor of the enzyme glutathione reductase (GR) converting glutathione disulfide (GSSG) into its reduced state (GSH). GSH is essential for detoxification processes in and survival of erythrocytes. We explored whether the anti-inflammatory compounds Bay 11-7082, parthenolide and dimethyl fumarate (DMF) were able to completely deplete a common target (GSH), and to impair the function of upstream enzymes of GSH recycling and replenishment. Treatment of erythrocytes with Bay 11-7082, parthenolide or DMF led to concentration-dependent eryptosis resulting from complete depletion of GSH. GSH depletion was due to strong inhibition of G6PDH activity. Bay 11-7082 and DMF, but not parthenolide, were able to inhibit the GR activity. This approach "Inhibitors, Detection of their common target that is completely depleted or inactivated when pharmacologically relevant concentrations of each single inhibitor are applied, Subsequent functional analysis of upstream enzymes for this target" (IDS), can be applied to a broad range of inhibitors and cell types according to the selected target. The specific G6PDH inhibitory effect of these compounds may be exploited for the treatment of human diseases with high NADPH and GSH consumption rates, including malaria, trypanosomiasis, cancer or obesity. PMID:27353740

  13. Pharmacological targeting of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in human erythrocytes by Bay 11–7082, parthenolide and dimethyl fumarate

    PubMed Central

    Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Giustarini, Daniela; Koralkova, Pavla; Köberle, Martin; Alzoubi, Kousi; Bissinger, Rosi; Hosseinzadeh, Zohreh; Dreischer, Peter; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Lang, Florian; Toulany, Mahmoud; Wieder, Thomas; Mojzikova, Renata; Rossi, Ranieri; Mrowietz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    In mature erythrocytes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) yield NADPH, a crucial cofactor of the enzyme glutathione reductase (GR) converting glutathione disulfide (GSSG) into its reduced state (GSH). GSH is essential for detoxification processes in and survival of erythrocytes. We explored whether the anti-inflammatory compounds Bay 11–7082, parthenolide and dimethyl fumarate (DMF) were able to completely deplete a common target (GSH), and to impair the function of upstream enzymes of GSH recycling and replenishment. Treatment of erythrocytes with Bay 11–7082, parthenolide or DMF led to concentration-dependent eryptosis resulting from complete depletion of GSH. GSH depletion was due to strong inhibition of G6PDH activity. Bay 11–7082 and DMF, but not parthenolide, were able to inhibit the GR activity. This approach “Inhibitors, Detection of their common target that is completely depleted or inactivated when pharmacologically relevant concentrations of each single inhibitor are applied, Subsequent functional analysis of upstream enzymes for this target” (IDS), can be applied to a broad range of inhibitors and cell types according to the selected target. The specific G6PDH inhibitory effect of these compounds may be exploited for the treatment of human diseases with high NADPH and GSH consumption rates, including malaria, trypanosomiasis, cancer or obesity. PMID:27353740

  14. Clonal evolution following chemotherapy-induced stem cell depletion in cats heterozygous for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Abkowitz, J.L.; Ott, R.M.; Holly, R.D.; Adamson, J.W.

    1988-06-01

    The number of hematopoietic stem cells necessary to support normal hematopoiesis is not known but may be small. If so, the depletion or damage of such cells could result in apparent clonal dominance. To test this hypothesis, dimethylbusulfan (2 to 4 mg/kg intravenously (IV) x 3) was given to cats heterozygous for the X-linked enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD). These cats were the daughters of domestic X Geoffroy parents. After the initial drug-induced cytopenias (2 to 4 weeks), peripheral blood counts and the numbers of marrow progenitors detected in culture remained normal, although the percentages of erythroid burst-forming cells (BFU-E) and granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) in DNA synthesis increased, as determined by the tritiated thymidine suicide technique. In three of six cats treated, a dominance of Geoffroy-type G-6-PD emerged among the progenitor cells, granulocytes, and RBCs. These skewed ratios of domestic to Geoffroy-type G-6-PD have persisted greater than 3 years. No changes in cell cycle kinetics or G-6-PD phenotypes were noted in similar studies in six control cats. These data suggest that clonal evolution may reflect the depletion or damage of normal stem cells and not only the preferential growth and dominance of neoplastic cells.

  15. [Cloning and expression analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (G6PDH1) gene from Chimonanthus praecox].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Xiao; Gao, Bo-wen; Zhang, Zhong-xiu; Shi, She-po; Tu, Peng-fei

    2015-11-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is main regulatory enzyme for pentose phosphate pathway. To amplify the core sequence of G6PDH gene from Chimonanthus praecox, the primers were synthesized, based on the conserved nucleotide sequence of other reported plant G6PDH genes. The specific primers were designed according to the major fragment. The full length cDNA of the G6PDH1 gene was isolated by the 3' and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends approach. Transcript levels of G6PDH1 isoform was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR in different tissues and in responds to cold treatment. The G6PDH1 subcellular localization, transmembrane domain, three-dimensional structure, and phylogenetic analysis were predicted by different software to analysis the bioinformatics of G6PDH1 protein. The G6PDH1 cDNA sequence was 2 011 bp in length and consisted of 1 551 bp Open Reading Frame (ORF) , encoding a protein of 516 amino acids. Expression analysis results in different tissues showed that G6PDH1 was primarily observed in flowers and roots, as opposed to the leaves and stems. Cold treatment experiments indicated that cold treatment caused a rapid increase in G6PDH1 expression in flowers within 12 h. The full-length cDNA of G6PDH1 and its expression analysis will play an important role for further study on cold stress responses in Ch. praecox. PMID:27071249

  16. Determination of the inhibitory effect of green tea extract on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase based on multilayer capillary enzyme microreactor.

    PubMed

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Liu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Xin; Wang, Yujia; Yang, Jiqing; Yang, Li

    2016-08-01

    Natural herbal medicines are an important source of enzyme inhibitors for the discovery of new drugs. A number of natural extracts such as green tea have been used in prevention and treatment of diseases due to their low-cost, low toxicity and good performance. The present study reports an online assay of the activity and inhibition of the green tea extract of the Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using multilayer capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme microreactors (CE-IMERs). The multilayer CE-IMERs were produced with layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly, which can easily enhance the enzyme loading capacity of the microreactor. The activity of the G6PDH enzyme was determined and the enzyme inhibition by the inhibitors from green tea extract was investigated using online assay of the multilayer CE-IMERs. The Michaelis constant (Km ) of the enzyme, the IC50 and Ki values of the inhibitors were achieved and found to agree with those obtained using offline assays. The results show a competitive inhibition of green tea extract on the G6PDH enzyme. The present study provides an efficient and easy-to-operate approach for determining G6PDH enzyme reaction and the inhibition of green tea extract, which may be beneficial in research and the development of natural herbal medicines. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Application of capillary enzyme micro-reactor in enzyme activity and inhibitors studies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we present an on-line measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme micro-reactor (CE-based IMER). The IMER was prepared using a two-step protocol based on electrostatic assembly. The micro-reactor exhibited good stability and reproducibility for on-line assay of G6PDH enzyme. Both the activity as well as the inhibition of the G6PDH enzyme by six inhibitors, including three metals (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+)), vancomycin, urea and KMnO4, were investigated using on-line assay of the CE-based IMERs. The enzyme activity and inhibition kinetic constants were measured using the IMERs which were found to be consistent with those using traditional off-line enzyme assays. The kinetic mechanism of each inhibitor was also determined. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using CE-based IMERs for rapid and efficient on-line assay of G6PDH, an important enzyme in the pentosephosphate pathway of human metabolism.

  18. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Misako; Mori, Nobuko; Iramina, Chizuru

    2016-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI) diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine) to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malic enzyme (ME), in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule. PMID:27597985

  19. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Misako; Mori, Nobuko; Iramina, Chizuru

    2016-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI) diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine) to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malic enzyme (ME), in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule.

  20. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Misako; Mori, Nobuko; Iramina, Chizuru; Yasutake, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI) diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine) to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malic enzyme (ME), in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule. PMID:27597985

  1. Overexpression, purification and enzymatic characterization of a recombinant plastidial glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Nure) roots.

    PubMed

    Cardi, Manuela; Chibani, Kamel; Castiglia, Daniela; Cafasso, Donata; Pizzo, Elio; Rouhier, Nicolas; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Esposito, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    In plant cells, the plastidial glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (P2-G6PDH, EC 1.1.1.49) represents one of the most important sources of NADPH. However, previous studies revealed that both native and recombinant purified P2-G6PDHs show a great instability and a rapid loss of catalytic activity. Therefore it has been difficult to describe accurately the catalytic and physico-chemical properties of these isoforms. The plastidial G6PDH encoding sequence from barley roots (Hordeum vulgare cv. Nure), devoid of a long plastidial transit peptide, was expressed as recombinant protein in Escherichia coli, either untagged or with an N-terminal his-tag. After purification from both the soluble fraction and inclusion bodies, we have explored its kinetic parameters, as well as its sensitivity to reduction. The obtained results are consistent with values determined for other P2-G6PDHs previously purified from barley roots and from other land plants. Overall, these data shed light on the catalytic mechanism of plant P2-G6PDH, summarized in a proposed model in which the sequential mechanism is very similar to the mammalian cytosolic G6PDH. This study provides a rational basis to consider the recombinant barley root P2-G6PDH as a good model for further kinetic and structural studies.

  2. On-plate enzyme and inhibition assay of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Mohamed, Amara Camara; Wang, Shengtian; Yang, Li

    2015-08-01

    We performed on-plate enzyme and inhibition assays of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography. The assays were accomplished based on different retardation factors of the substrates, enzyme, and products. All the necessary steps were integrated on-plate in one developing process, including substrate/enzyme mixing, reaction starting, and quenching as well as product separation. In order to quantitatively measure the enzyme reaction, the developed plate was then densitometrically evaluated to determine the peak area of the product. Rapid and high-throughput assays were achieved by loading different substrate spots and/or enzyme (and inhibition) spots in different tracks on the plate. The on-plate enzyme assay could be finished in a developing time of only 4 min, with good track-to-track and plate-to-plate repeatability. Moreover, we determined the Km values of the enzyme reaction and Ki values of the inhibition (Pb(2+) Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) as inhibitors), as well as the corresponding kinetics using the on-plate assay. Taken together, our method expanded the application of thin-layer chromatography in enzyme assays, and it could be potentially used in research fields for rapid and quantitative measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition.

  3. Autosomal Factors with Correlated Effects on the Activities of the Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Laurie-Ahlberg, C. C.; Williamson, J. H.; Cochrane, B. J.; Wilton, A. N.; Chasalow, F. I.

    1981-01-01

    Isogenic lines, in which chromosomes sampled from natural populations of D. melanogaster are substituted into a common genetic background, were used to detect and partially characterize autosomal factors that affect the activities of the two pentose phosphate pathway enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD). The chromosome 3 effects on G6PD and 6PGD are clearly correlated; the chromosome 2 effects, which are not so great, also appear to be correlated, but the evidence in this case is not so strong. Examination of activity variation of ten other enzymes revealed that G6PD and 6PGD are not the only pair of enzymes showing a high positive correlation, but it is among the highest in both sets of lines. In addition, there was some evidence that the factor(s) affecting G6PD and 6PGD may also affect two other metabolically related enzymes, transaldolase and phosphoglucose isomerase.—Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate specific CRM levels for three of the enzymes studied: G6PD, 6PGD and ME. This experiment shows that a large part of the activity variation is accounted for by variation in CRM level (especially for chromosome 3 lines), but there remains a significant fraction of the genetic component of activity variation that is not explained by CRM level.—These results suggest that the autosomal factors are modifiers involved in regulation of the expression of the X-linked structural genes for G6PD and 6PGD, but a role in determining part of the enzymes' primary structure cannot be excluded with the present evidence. PMID:6804300

  4. Mutations of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Durham, Santa-Maria and A+ Variants Are Associated with Loss Functional and Structural Stability of the Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; González-Valdez, Abigail; García-Torres, Itzhel; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzymopathy in the world. More than 160 mutations causing the disease have been identified, but only 10% of these variants have been studied at biochemical and biophysical levels. In this study we report on the functional and structural characterization of three naturally occurring variants corresponding to different classes of disease severity: Class I G6PD Durham, Class II G6PD Santa Maria, and Class III G6PD A+. The results showed that the G6PD Durham (severe deficiency), and the G6PD Santa Maria and A+ (less severe deficiency) (Class I, II and III, respectively) affect the catalytic efficiency of these enzymes, are more sensitive to temperature denaturing, and affect the stability of the overall protein when compared to the wild type WT-G6PD. In the variants, the exposure of more and buried hydrophobic pockets was induced and monitored with 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence, directly affecting the compaction of structure at different levels and probably reducing the stability of the protein. The degree of functional and structural perturbation by each variant correlates with the clinical severity reported in different patients. PMID:26633385

  5. Mutations of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Durham, Santa-Maria and A+ Variants Are Associated with Loss Functional and Structural Stability of the Protein.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; González-Valdez, Abigail; García-Torres, Itzhel; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2015-12-02

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzymopathy in the world. More than 160 mutations causing the disease have been identified, but only 10% of these variants have been studied at biochemical and biophysical levels. In this study we report on the functional and structural characterization of three naturally occurring variants corresponding to different classes of disease severity: Class I G6PD Durham, Class II G6PD Santa Maria, and Class III G6PD A+. The results showed that the G6PD Durham (severe deficiency), and the G6PD Santa Maria and A+ (less severe deficiency) (Class I, II and III, respectively) affect the catalytic efficiency of these enzymes, are more sensitive to temperature denaturing, and affect the stability of the overall protein when compared to the wild type WT-G6PD. In the variants, the exposure of more and buried hydrophobic pockets was induced and monitored with 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence, directly affecting the compaction of structure at different levels and probably reducing the stability of the protein. The degree of functional and structural perturbation by each variant correlates with the clinical severity reported in different patients.

  6. Identification and Characterization of the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Gene Family in the Para Rubber Tree, Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiangyu; He, Bin; Fang, Yongjun; Tang, Chaorong

    2016-01-01

    As a key enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) provides nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and intermediary metabolites for rubber biosynthesis, and plays an important role in plant development and stress responses. In this study, four Hevea brasiliensis (Para rubber tree) G6PDH genes (HbG6PDH1 to 4) were identified and cloned using a genome-wide scanning approach. All four HbG6PDH genes encode functional G6PDH enzymes as shown by heterologous expression in E. coli. Phylogeny analysis and subcellular localization prediction show that HbG6PDH3 is a cytosolic isoform, while the other three genes (HbG6PDH1, 2 and 4) are plastidic isoforms. The subcellular locations of HbG6PDH3 and 4, two latex-abundant isoforms were further verified by transient expression in rice protoplasts. Enzyme activity assay and expression analysis showed HbG6PDH3 and 4 were implicated in PPP during latex regeneration, and to influence rubber production positively in rubber tree. The cytosolic HbG6PDH3 is a predominant isoform in latex, implying a principal role for this isoform in controlling carbon flow and NADPH production in the PPP during latex regeneration. The expression pattern of plastidic HbG6PDH4 correlates well with the degree of tapping panel dryness, a physiological disorder that stops the flow of latex from affected rubber trees. In addition, the four HbG6PDHs responded to temperature and drought stresses in root, bark, and leaves, implicating their roles in maintaining redox balance and defending against oxidative stress. PMID:26941770

  7. Aspirin inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F.; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin-mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT-29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin-acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  8. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii involves a novel type of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase--The archaeal Zwischenferment.

    PubMed

    Pickl, Andreas; Schönheit, Peter

    2015-04-28

    The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP), catalyzing the oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate to ribulose-5-phosphate is ubiquitous in eukarya and bacteria but has not yet been reported in archaea. In haloarchaea a putative 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) is annotated, whereas a gene coding for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Glc6PDH) could not be identified. Here we report the purification and characterization of a novel type of Glc6PDH in Haloferax volcanii that is not related to bacterial and eukaryal Glc6PDHs and the encoding gene is designated as azf (archaeal zwischenferment). Further, recombinant H. volcanii 6PGDH was characterized. Deletion mutant analyses indicate that both, Glc6PDH and 6PGDH, are functionally involved in pentose phosphate formation in vivo. This is the first report on the operation of the OPPP in the domain of archaea.

  9. Rapid and Reliable Detection of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Gene Mutations in Han Chinese Using High-Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing-bin; Xu, Hong-ping; Xiong, Can; Ren, Zhao-rui; Tian, Guo-li; Zeng, Fanyi; Huang, Shu-zhen

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, an X-linked inherited disease, is one of the most common enzymopathies and affects over 400 million people worldwide. In China at least 21 distinct point mutations have been identified so far. In this study high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to screen for G6PD mutations in 260 unrelated Han Chinese individuals, and the rapidity and reliability of this method was investigated. The mutants were readily differentiated by using HRM analysis, which produced distinct melting curves for each tested mutation. Interestingly, G1388A and G1376T, the two most common variants accounting for 50% to 60% of G6PD deficiency mutations in the Chinese population, could be differentiated in a single reaction. Further, two G6PD mutations not previously reported in the Chinese population were identified in this study. One of these mutations, designated “G6PD Jiangxi G1340T,” involved a G1340T substitution in exon 11, predicting a Gly447Val change in the protein. The other mutation involved a C406T substitution in exon 5. The frequencies of the common polymorphism site C1311T/IVS (intervening sequence) XI t93c between patients with G6PD and healthy volunteers were not significantly different. Thus, HRM analysis will be a useful alternative for screening G6PD mutations. PMID:20203002

  10. Rapid and reliable detection of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene mutations in Han Chinese using high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-bin; Xu, Hong-ping; Xiong, Can; Ren, Zhao-rui; Tian, Guo-li; Zeng, Fanyi; Huang, Shu-zhen

    2010-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, an X-linked inherited disease, is one of the most common enzymopathies and affects over 400 million people worldwide. In China at least 21 distinct point mutations have been identified so far. In this study high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to screen for G6PD mutations in 260 unrelated Han Chinese individuals, and the rapidity and reliability of this method was investigated. The mutants were readily differentiated by using HRM analysis, which produced distinct melting curves for each tested mutation. Interestingly, G1388A and G1376T, the two most common variants accounting for 50% to 60% of G6PD deficiency mutations in the Chinese population, could be differentiated in a single reaction. Further, two G6PD mutations not previously reported in the Chinese population were identified in this study. One of these mutations, designated "G6PD Jiangxi G1340T," involved a G1340T substitution in exon 11, predicting a Gly447Val change in the protein. The other mutation involved a C406T substitution in exon 5. The frequencies of the common polymorphism site C1311T/IVS (intervening sequence) XI t93c between patients with G6PD and healthy volunteers were not significantly different. Thus, HRM analysis will be a useful alternative for screening G6PD mutations. PMID:20203002

  11. Polymorphic sites in the African population detected by sequence analysis of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene outline the evolution of the variants A and A-.

    PubMed Central

    Vulliamy, T J; Othman, A; Town, M; Nathwani, A; Falusi, A G; Mason, P J; Luzzatto, L

    1991-01-01

    The human X chromosome-linked gene encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD; EC 1.1.1.49) is known to be highly polymorphic from the biochemical characterization of enzyme variants. The variant A (with enzyme activity in the normal range) and the variant A- (associated with enzyme deficiency) each have a frequency of about 0.2 in several African populations. Two restriction fragment length polymorphisms have also been found in people of African descent, but not in other populations, whereas a silent mutation has been shown to be polymorphic in Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, African, and Indian populations. We report now on two additional polymorphisms that we have detected by sequence analysis, one in intron 7 and one in intron 8. The analysis of 54 African male subjects for the seven polymorphic sites, clustered within 3 kilobases of the G6PD gene, has revealed only 7 of the 128 possible haplotypes, indicating marked linkage disequilibrium. These data have enabled us to suggest an evolutionary pathway for the different mutations, with only a single ambiguity. The mutation underlying the A variant is the most ancient and the mutation underlying the A- variant is the most recent. Since it seems reasonable that the A- allele is subject to positive selection by malaria, whereas the other alleles are neutral, G6PD may lend itself to the analysis of the role of random genetic drift and selection in determining allele frequencies within a single genetic locus in human populations. Images PMID:1924316

  12. Determinants of Cofactor Specificity for the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli: Simulation, Kinetics and Evolutionary Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Matias; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Maturana, Pablo; Krapp, Adriana; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenases (G6PDHs) from different sources show varying specificities towards NAD+ and NADP+ as cofactors. However, it is not known to what extent structural determinants of cofactor preference are conserved in the G6PDH family. In this work, molecular simulations, kinetic characterization of site-directed mutants and phylogenetic analyses were used to study the structural basis for the strong preference towards NADP+ shown by the G6PDH from Escherichia coli. Molecular Dynamics trajectories of homology models showed a highly favorable binding energy for residues K18 and R50 when interacting with the 2'-phosphate of NADP+, but the same residues formed no observable interactions in the case of NAD+. Alanine mutants of both residues were kinetically characterized and analyzed with respect to the binding energy of the transition state, according to the kcat/KM value determined for each cofactor. Whereas both residues contribute to the binding energy of NADP+, only R50 makes a contribution (about -1 kcal/mol) to NAD+ binding. In the absence of both positive charges the enzyme was unable to discriminate NADP+ from NAD+. Although kinetic data is sparse, the observed distribution of cofactor preferences within the phylogenetic tree is sufficient to rule out the possibility that the known NADP+-specific G6PDHs form a monophyletic group. While the β1-α1 loop shows no strict conservation of K18, (rather, S and T seem to be more frequent), in the case of the β2-α2 loop, different degrees of conservation are observed for R50. Noteworthy is the fact that a K18T mutant is indistinguishable from K18A in terms of cofactor preference. We conclude that the structural determinants for the strict discrimination against NAD+ in the case of the NADP+-specific enzymes have evolved independently through different means during the evolution of the G6PDH family. We further suggest that other regions in the cofactor binding pocket, besides the β1-α1 and β2-α2

  13. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase regulation in the hepatopancreas of the anoxia-tolerant marine mollusc, Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Lama, Judeh L; Bell, Ryan A V; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) gates flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and is key to cellular antioxidant defense due to its role in producing NADPH. Good antioxidant defenses are crucial for anoxia-tolerant organisms that experience wide variations in oxygen availability. The marine mollusc, Littorina littorea, is an intertidal snail that experiences daily bouts of anoxia/hypoxia with the tide cycle and shows multiple metabolic and enzymatic adaptations that support anaerobiosis. This study investigated the kinetic, physical and regulatory properties of G6PDH from hepatopancreas of L. littorea to determine if the enzyme is differentially regulated in response to anoxia, thereby providing altered pentose phosphate pathway functionality under oxygen stress conditions. Several kinetic properties of G6PDH differed significantly between aerobic and 24 h anoxic conditions; compared with the aerobic state, anoxic G6PDH (assayed at pH 8) showed a 38% decrease in K m G6P and enhanced inhibition by urea, whereas in pH 6 assays K m NADP and maximal activity changed significantly between the two states. The mechanism underlying anoxia-responsive changes in enzyme properties proved to be a change in the phosphorylation state of G6PDH. This was documented with immunoblotting using an anti-phosphoserine antibody, in vitro incubations that stimulated endogenous protein kinases versus protein phosphatases and significantly changed K m G6P, and phosphorylation of the enzyme with (32)P-ATP. All these data indicated that the aerobic and anoxic forms of G6PDH were the high and low phosphate forms, respectively, and that phosphorylation state was modulated in response to selected endogenous protein kinases (PKA or PKG) and protein phosphatases (PP1 or PP2C). Anoxia-induced changes in the phosphorylation state of G6PDH may facilitate sustained or increased production of NADPH to enhance antioxidant defense during long term anaerobiosis and/or during the transition

  14. Determinants of Cofactor Specificity for the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli: Simulation, Kinetics and Evolutionary Studies.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Matias; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Maturana, Pablo; Krapp, Adriana; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenases (G6PDHs) from different sources show varying specificities towards NAD+ and NADP+ as cofactors. However, it is not known to what extent structural determinants of cofactor preference are conserved in the G6PDH family. In this work, molecular simulations, kinetic characterization of site-directed mutants and phylogenetic analyses were used to study the structural basis for the strong preference towards NADP+ shown by the G6PDH from Escherichia coli. Molecular Dynamics trajectories of homology models showed a highly favorable binding energy for residues K18 and R50 when interacting with the 2'-phosphate of NADP+, but the same residues formed no observable interactions in the case of NAD+. Alanine mutants of both residues were kinetically characterized and analyzed with respect to the binding energy of the transition state, according to the kcat/KM value determined for each cofactor. Whereas both residues contribute to the binding energy of NADP+, only R50 makes a contribution (about -1 kcal/mol) to NAD+ binding. In the absence of both positive charges the enzyme was unable to discriminate NADP+ from NAD+. Although kinetic data is sparse, the observed distribution of cofactor preferences within the phylogenetic tree is sufficient to rule out the possibility that the known NADP+-specific G6PDHs form a monophyletic group. While the β1-α1 loop shows no strict conservation of K18, (rather, S and T seem to be more frequent), in the case of the β2-α2 loop, different degrees of conservation are observed for R50. Noteworthy is the fact that a K18T mutant is indistinguishable from K18A in terms of cofactor preference. We conclude that the structural determinants for the strict discrimination against NAD+ in the case of the NADP+-specific enzymes have evolved independently through different means during the evolution of the G6PDH family. We further suggest that other regions in the cofactor binding pocket, besides the β1-α1 and β2-α2

  15. Mutational Analyses of Glucose Dehydrogenase and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Reveal Their Effects on Growth and Alginate Production.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Susan; Mærk, Mali; Valla, Svein; Ertesvåg, Helga

    2015-05-15

    The biosynthesis of alginate has been studied extensively due to the importance of this polymer in medicine and industry. Alginate is synthesized from fructose-6-phosphate and thus competes with the central carbon metabolism for this metabolite. The alginate-producing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens relies on the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways for glucose metabolism, and these pathways are also important for the metabolism of fructose and glycerol. In the present study, the impact of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes on growth and alginate synthesis was investigated in P. fluorescens. Mutants defective in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (Zwf-1 and Zwf-2) or glucose dehydrogenase (Gcd) were evaluated using media containing glucose, fructose, or glycerol. Zwf-1 was shown to be the most important glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase for catabolism. Both Zwf enzymes preferred NADP as a coenzyme, although NAD was also accepted. Only Zwf-2 was active in the presence of 3 mM ATP, and then only with NADP as a coenzyme, indicating an anabolic role for this isoenzyme. Disruption of zwf-1 resulted in increased alginate production when glycerol was used as the carbon source, possibly due to decreased flux through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway rendering more fructose-6-phosphate available for alginate biosynthesis. In alginate-producing cells grown on glucose, disruption of gcd increased both cell numbers and alginate production levels, while this mutation had no positive effect on growth in a non-alginate-producing strain. A possible explanation is that alginate synthesis might function as a sink for surplus hexose phosphates that could otherwise be detrimental to the cell.

  16. Development and altered gravity dependent changes in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the brain of the cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus.

    PubMed

    Slenzka, K; Appel, R; Rahmann, H

    1995-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was studied in the brain of the cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus during early ontogenetic development. In general a slight but continuous decrease in enzyme activity was found (9.5 +/- 0.5 nmol substrate cleaved per mg protein and per min at developmental stage 13 [= 1 day post hatch at 28 degrees C] to a value of 7.9 +/- 0.6 in adult brain). In order to investigate the possible influence of altered gravity during early ontogenetic brain development, fish larvae were exposed to an increased acceleration of three times earth gravity (3 g) or to functional weightlessness in a fast-rotating clinostat for 7 days. A significant increase of brain G6PDH activity of approx. 15% was found after exposure to hyper gravity, whereas a significant decrease of the enzyme activity, approximately 10%, was detected following functional weightlessness in respect to the corresponding 1 g controls. Analyses concerning the regain of normal control enzyme activity of the larvae revealed dramatic fluctuations within the first 5 h after exposure to an increased acceleration of 3 g. Thereafter, between day 1 and day 3 after exposure, brain glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase decreased slowly. At day 3 after exposure no further differences of the hyper-g larvae compared to the controls were found. Only slight changes in total brain glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity occur during ontogenetic development of cichlid fish. This suggests that a more or less constant enzyme activity is important during brain development, but is reacting very sensitively to changes in the environmental factor gravity.

  17. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi in complex with substrate

    PubMed Central

    Ortíz, Cecilia; Larrieux, Nicole; Medeiros, Andrea; Botti, Horacio; Comini, Marcelo; Buschiazzo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    An N-terminally truncated version of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma cruzi lacking the first 37 residues was crystallized both in its apo form and in a binary complex with glucose 6-­phosphate. The crystals both belonged to space group P21 and diffracted to 2.85 and 3.35 Å resolution, respectively. Self-rotation function maps were consistent with point group 222. The structure was solved by molecular replacement, confirming a tetrameric quaternary structure. PMID:22102256

  18. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Enhances Antiviral Response through Downregulation of NADPH Sensor HSCARG and Upregulation of NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Chiu, Daniel Tsun-Yee; Lin, Hsin-Ru; Tang, Hsiang-Yu; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Ho, Hung-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient cells are highly susceptible to viral infection. This study examined the mechanism underlying this phenomenon by measuring the expression of antiviral genes—tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and GTPase myxovirus resistance 1 (MX1)—in G6PD-knockdown cells upon human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection. Molecular analysis revealed that the promoter activities of TNF-α and MX1 were downregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells, and that the IκB degradation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB were decreased. The HSCARG protein, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) sensor and negative regulator of NF-κB, was upregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells with decreased NADPH/NADP+ ratio. Treatment of G6PD-knockdown cells with siRNA against HSCARG enhanced the DNA binding activity of NF-κB and the expression of TNF-α and MX1, but suppressed the expression of viral genes; however, the overexpression of HSCARG inhibited the antiviral response. Exogenous G6PD or IDH1 expression inhibited the expression of HSCARG, resulting in increased expression of TNF-α and MX1 and reduced viral gene expression upon virus infection. Our findings suggest that the increased susceptibility of the G6PD-knockdown cells to viral infection was due to impaired NF-κB signaling and antiviral response mediated by HSCARG. PMID:26694452

  19. Elevated glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase expression in the cervical cancer cases is associated with the cancerigenic event of high-risk human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Li, Ya-Shan; Chen, Bo; Chang, Ye-Fei; Liu, Guang-Cai; Hong, Ying; Chen, Hong-Lan; Xiyang, Yan-Bin

    2015-10-01

    The most important etiologic agent in the pathogenesis of cervical cancers (CCs) is human papillomavirus (HPV), while the mechanisms underlying are still not well known. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is reported to elevate in various tumor cells. However, no available references elucidated the correlation between the levels of G6PD and HPV-infected CC until now. In the present study, we explored the possible role of G6PD in the pathology of CC induced by HPV infection. Totally 48 patients with HPV + CC and another 63 healthy women enrolled in the clinical were employed in the present study. Overall, prevalence of cervical infection with high-risk-HPV (HR-HPV) type examined was HPV-16, followed by HPV-18. The expressions of G6PD in CC samples were also detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC), qRT-PCR, and Western blot. Regression analysis showed elevated G6PD level was positively correlated with the CC development in 30-40 aged patients with HR-HPV-16/18 infection. The HPV16 + Siha, HPV18 + Hela, and HPV-C33A cell lines were employed and transfected with G6PD deficient vectors developed in vitro. MTT and flow cytometry were also employed to determine the survival and apoptosis of CC cells after G6PD expressional inhibition. Our data revealed that G6PD down-regulation induced poor proliferation and more apoptosis of HPV18 + Hela cells, when compared with that of HPV16 + Siha and HPV-C33A cells. These findings suggest that G6PD expressions in the HR-HPV + human CC tissues and cell lines play an important role in tumor growth and proliferation.

  20. Elevated glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase expression in the cervical cancer cases is associated with the cancerigenic event of high-risk human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Li, Ya-Shan; Chen, Bo; Chang, Ye-Fei; Liu, Guang-Cai; Hong, Ying; Chen, Hong-Lan

    2015-01-01

    The most important etiologic agent in the pathogenesis of cervical cancers (CCs) is human papillomavirus (HPV), while the mechanisms underlying are still not well known. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is reported to elevate in various tumor cells. However, no available references elucidated the correlation between the levels of G6PD and HPV-infected CC until now. In the present study, we explored the possible role of G6PD in the pathology of CC induced by HPV infection. Totally 48 patients with HPV + CC and another 63 healthy women enrolled in the clinical were employed in the present study. Overall, prevalence of cervical infection with high-risk-HPV (HR-HPV) type examined was HPV-16, followed by HPV-18. The expressions of G6PD in CC samples were also detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC), qRT-PCR, and Western blot. Regression analysis showed elevated G6PD level was positively correlated with the CC development in 30–40 aged patients with HR-HPV-16/18 infection. The HPV16 + Siha, HPV18 + Hela, and HPV-C33A cell lines were employed and transfected with G6PD deficient vectors developed in vitro. MTT and flow cytometry were also employed to determine the survival and apoptosis of CC cells after G6PD expressional inhibition. Our data revealed that G6PD down-regulation induced poor proliferation and more apoptosis of HPV18 + Hela cells, when compared with that of HPV16 + Siha and HPV-C33A cells. These findings suggest that G6PD expressions in the HR-HPV + human CC tissues and cell lines play an important role in tumor growth and proliferation. PMID:25616277

  1. pH-induced bistable dynamic behaviour in the reaction catalysed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and conformational hysteresis of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Aon, M A; Cortassa, S; Hervagault, J F; Thomas, D

    1989-01-01

    1. Bistable (multiple stationary states) dynamic behaviour in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase that was subjected to successive pH change was demonstrated in an open continuously stirred tank reactor. Although the enzyme under study did not exhibit an autocatalytic effect and was homogeneously distributed, bistability was shown to occur. 2. The successive pH changes of the enzyme solution corresponded to a pH transition (8.3 in equilibrium 2), i.e. an acidification (forward direction) and an alkalinization (reverse direction). By use of intrinsic protein fluorescence methods, a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase conformational hysteresis was shown to exist concomitant with the pH transition before and after enzyme injection into the reactor. 3. The results obtained suggest that the enzyme behaves, conformationally, as a memory device that stores information about its pH history (i.e. the enzyme records information in its structure about the environment to which it was previously exposed) and transduces it in a non-linear dynamic fashion, producing the bistable behaviour observed in the open reactor. PMID:2590166

  2. Increased activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in purified cell suspensions and single cells from the uterine cervix in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, S. K.; Benedetto, C.; Flatman, A.; Hammond, R. H.; Micheletti, L.; Riley, C.; Riley, P. A.; Spargo, D. J.; Zonca, M.; Slater, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have been measured in squamous epithelial cells of the uterine cervix from normal patients and cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). A biochemical cycling method, which uses only simple equipment and is suited to routine use and to automation, was applied to cells separated by gradient centrifugation. In addition, cells were examined cytochemically, and the intensity of staining in the cytoplasm of single whole cells was measured using computerised microcytospectrophotometry. Twenty per cent of cells in samples from normal patients (n=61) showed staining intensities above an extinction of 0.15 at 540 nm, compared to 71% of cases of CIN 1 (n=14), 91% of cases of CIN 2 (n=11) and 67% of cases of CIN 3 (n=15). The cytochemical data do not allow definitive distinctions to be made between different grades of CIN whereas the biochemical assay applied to cell lysates shows convincing differences between normal samples and cases of CIN. There are no false negatives for CIN 3 (n=14) and CIN 2 (n=10) and 11% false negatives for CIN 1 (n=9) and 14% of false positives for normal cases (n=21). The results of this preliminary study with reference to automation are discussed [corrected]. Images Figure 1 PMID:1637668

  3. Molecular characterization of the first two enzymes of the pentose-phosphate pathway of Trypanosoma brucei. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconolactonase.

    PubMed

    Duffieux, F; Van Roy, J; Michels, P A; Opperdoes, F R

    2000-09-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasitic protists that have part of their glycolytic pathway sequestered inside peroxisome-like organelles: the glycosomes. So far, at least one enzyme of the pentose-phosphate pathway has been found to be associated partially with glycosomes. Here, we describe how two genes from Trypanosoma brucei, coding for the first two enzymes of the pentose-phosphate pathway, i.e. glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconolactonase, were identified by in silico screening of trypanosome genome project data bases. These genes were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of the lactonase sequence revealed that it contained a C-terminal peroxisome targeting signal in agreement with its subcellular localization in the bloodstream form trypanosome (15% glycosomal and 85% cytosolic). However, the dehydrogenase sequence did not reveal any targeting signal, despite its localization inside glycosomes. The corresponding enzymes have been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified, and their biochemical characteristics have been determined.

  4. Enhanced production of epsilon-caprolactone by overexpression of NADPH-regenerating glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in recombinant Escherichia coli harboring cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Jin-Byung; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2007-08-01

    Whole-cell conversion of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone was attempted by recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIMB 9871. High concentrations of cyclohexanone and epsilon-caprolactone reduced CHMO-mediated bioconversion of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in the resting recombinant E. coli cells. Metabolically active cells were employed by adopting a fed-batch culture to improve the production of epsilon-caprolactone from cyclohexanone. A glucose-limited fed-batch Baeyer-Villiger oxidation where a cyclohexanone level was maintained less than 6 g/l resulted in a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 11.0 g/l. The maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration was improved further to 15.3 g/l by coexpression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, an NADPH-generating enzyme encoded by the zwf gene which corresponded to a 39% enhancement in epsilon-caprolactone concentration compared with the control experiment performed under the same conditions.

  5. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase plays a central role in the response of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants to short and long-term drought.

    PubMed

    Landi, Simone; Nurcato, Roberta; De Lillo, Alessia; Lentini, Marco; Grillo, Stefania; Esposito, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the expression, occurrence and activity of glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH - EC 1.1.1.49), the key-enzyme of the Oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway (OPPP), in tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Red Setter) exposed to short- and long-term drought stress. For the first time, drought effects have been evaluated in plants under different growth conditions: in hydroponic laboratory system, and in greenhouse pots under controlled conditions; and in open field, in order to evaluate drought response in a representative agricultural environment. Interestingly, changes observed appear strictly associated to the induction of well known stress response mechanisms, such as the increase of proline synthesis, accumulation of chaperone Hsp70, and ascorbate peroxidase. Results show significant increase in total activity of G6PDH, and specifically in expression and occurrence of cytosolic isoform (cy-G6PDH) in plants grown in any cultivation system upon drought. Intriguingly, the results clearly suggest that abscissic acid (ABA) pathway and signaling cascade (protein phosphatase 2C PP2C) could be strictly related to increased G6PDH expression, occurrence and activities. We hypothesized for G6PDH a specific role as one of the main reductants' suppliers to counteract the effects of drought stress, in the light of converging evidences given by young and adult tomato plants under stress of different duration and intensity. PMID:27085599

  6. Metabolomic profile of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway identifies the central role of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in clear cell-renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Galleggiante, Vanessa; Rutigliano, Monica; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Cagiano, Simona; Bufo, Pantaleo; Lastilla, Gaetano; Maiorano, Eugenio; Ribatti, Domenico; Giglio, Andrea; Serino, Grazia; Vavallo, Antonio; Bettocchi, Carlo; Selvaggi, Francesco Paolo; Battaglia, Michele; Ditonno, Pasquale

    2015-05-30

    The analysis of cancer metabolome has shown that proliferating tumor cells require a large quantities of different nutrients in order to support their high rate of proliferation. In this study we analyzed the metabolic profile of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) in human clear cell-renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and evaluate the role of these pathways in sustaining cell proliferation, maintenance of NADPH levels, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Metabolomic analysis showed a clear signature of increased glucose uptake and utilization in ccRCC tumor samples. Elevated levels of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in association with higher levels of PPP-derived metabolites, suggested a prominent role of this pathway in RCC-associated metabolic alterations. G6PDH inhibition, caused a significant decrease in cancer cell survival, a decrease in NADPH levels, and an increased production of ROS, suggesting that the PPP plays an important role in the regulation of ccRCC redox homeostasis. Patients with high levels of glycolytic enzymes had reduced progression-free and cancer-specific survivals as compared to subjects with low levels. Our data suggest that oncogenic signaling pathways may promote ccRCC through rerouting the sugar metabolism. Blocking the flux through this pathway may serve as a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25945836

  7. Overcompensation in response to herbivory in Arabidopsis thaliana: the role of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Siddappaji, Madhura H; Scholes, Daniel R; Bohn, Martin; Paige, Ken N

    2013-10-01

    That some plants benefit from being eaten is counterintuitive, yet there is now considerable evidence demonstrating enhanced fitness following herbivory (i.e., plants can overcompensate). Although there is evidence that genetic variation for compensation exists, little is known about the genetic mechanisms leading to enhanced growth and reproduction following herbivory. We took advantage of the compensatory variation in recombinant inbred lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, combined with microarray and QTL analyses to assess the molecular basis of overcompensation. We found three QTL explaining 11.4, 10.1, and 26.7% of the variation in fitness compensation, respectively, and 109 differentially expressed genes between clipped and unclipped plants of the overcompensating ecotype Columbia. From the QTL/microarray screen we uncovered one gene that plays a significant role in overcompensation: glucose-6-phosphate-1-dehydrogenase (G6PDH1). Knockout studies of Transfer-DNA (T-DNA) insertion lines and complementation studies of G6PDH1 verify its role in compensation. G6PDH1 is a key enzyme in the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway that plays a central role in plant metabolism. We propose that plants capable of overcompensating reprogram their transcriptional activity by up-regulating defensive genes and genes involved in energy metabolism and by increasing DNA content (via endoreduplication) with the increase in DNA content feeding back on pathways involved in defense and metabolism through increased gene expression.

  8. Metabolomic profile of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway identifies the central role of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in clear cell-renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Galleggiante, Vanessa; Rutigliano, Monica; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Cagiano, Simona; Bufo, Pantaleo; Lastilla, Gaetano; Maiorano, Eugenio; Ribatti, Domenico; Giglio, Andrea; Serino, Grazia; Vavallo, Antonio; Bettocchi, Carlo; Selvaggi, Francesco Paolo; Battaglia, Michele; Ditonno, Pasquale

    2015-05-30

    The analysis of cancer metabolome has shown that proliferating tumor cells require a large quantities of different nutrients in order to support their high rate of proliferation. In this study we analyzed the metabolic profile of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) in human clear cell-renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and evaluate the role of these pathways in sustaining cell proliferation, maintenance of NADPH levels, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Metabolomic analysis showed a clear signature of increased glucose uptake and utilization in ccRCC tumor samples. Elevated levels of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in association with higher levels of PPP-derived metabolites, suggested a prominent role of this pathway in RCC-associated metabolic alterations. G6PDH inhibition, caused a significant decrease in cancer cell survival, a decrease in NADPH levels, and an increased production of ROS, suggesting that the PPP plays an important role in the regulation of ccRCC redox homeostasis. Patients with high levels of glycolytic enzymes had reduced progression-free and cancer-specific survivals as compared to subjects with low levels. Our data suggest that oncogenic signaling pathways may promote ccRCC through rerouting the sugar metabolism. Blocking the flux through this pathway may serve as a novel therapeutic target.

  9. Avoiding Buffer Interference in ITC Experiments: A Case Study from the Analysis of Entropy-Driven Reactions of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, M Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a label-free technique that allows the direct determination of the heat absorbed or released in a reaction. Frequently used to determining binding parameters in biomolecular interactions, it is very useful to address enzyme-catalyzed reactions as both kinetic and thermodynamic parameters can be obtained. Since calorimetry measures the total heat effects of a reaction, it is important to consider the contribution of the heat of protonation/deprotonation that is possibly taking place. Here, we show a case study of the reaction catalyzed by the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This enzyme is able to use either NAD(+) or NADP(+) as a cofactor. The reactions were done in five buffers of different enthalpy of protonation. Depending on the buffer used, the observed calorimetric enthalpy (ΔH(cal)) of the reaction varied from -22.93 kJ/mol (Tris) to 19.37 kJ/mol (phosphate) for the NADP(+)-linked reaction, and -11.67 kJ/mol (Tris) to 7.32 kcal/mol or 30.63 kJ/mol (phosphate) for the NAD(+) reaction. We will use this system as an example of how to extract proton-independent reaction enthalpies from kinetic data to ensure that the reported accurately represent the intrinsic heat of reaction.

  10. Deletion of the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Gene KlZWF1 Affects both Fermentative and Respiratory Metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis▿

    PubMed Central

    Saliola, Michele; Scappucci, Gina; De Maria, Ilaria; Lodi, Tiziana; Mancini, Patrizia; Falcone, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    In Kluyveromyces lactis, the pentose phosphate pathway is an alternative route for the dissimilation of glucose. The first enzyme of the pathway is the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), encoded by KlZWF1. We isolated this gene and examined its role. Like ZWF1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KlZWF1 was constitutively expressed, and its deletion led to increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide on glucose, but unlike the case for S. cerevisiae, the Klzwf1Δ strain had a reduced biomass yield on fermentative carbon sources as well as on lactate and glycerol. In addition, the reduced yield on glucose was associated with low ethanol production and decreased oxygen consumption, indicating that this gene is required for both fermentation and respiration. On ethanol, however, the mutant showed an increased biomass yield. Moreover, on this substrate, wild-type cells showed an additional band of activity that might correspond to a dimeric form of G6PDH. The partial dimerization of the G6PDH tetramer on ethanol suggested the production of an NADPH excess that was negative for biomass yield. PMID:17085636

  11. Definitive localization of intracellular proteins: Novel approach using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase as a model.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Netanya Y; Yan, Ziying; Cong, Le; Zhang, Yulong; Engelhardt, John F; Stanton, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Studies to determine subcellular localization and translocation of proteins are important because subcellular localization of proteins affects every aspect of cellular function. Such studies frequently utilize mutagenesis to alter amino acid sequences hypothesized to constitute subcellular localization signals. These studies often utilize fluorescent protein tags to facilitate live cell imaging. These methods are excellent for studies of monomeric proteins, but for multimeric proteins, they are unable to rule out artifacts from native protein subunits already present in the cells. That is, native monomers might direct the localization of fluorescent proteins with their localization signals obliterated. We have developed a method for ruling out such artifacts, and we use glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) as a model to demonstrate the method's utility. Because G6PD is capable of homodimerization, we employed a novel approach to remove interference from native G6PD. We produced a G6PD knockout somatic (hepatic) cell line using CRISPR-Cas9 mediated genome engineering. Transfection of G6PD knockout cells with G6PD fluorescent mutant proteins demonstrated that the major subcellular localization sequences of G6PD are within the N-terminal portion of the protein. This approach sets a new gold standard for similar studies of subcellular localization signals in all homodimerization-capable proteins.

  12. NADP+ and NAD+ binding to the dual coenzyme specific enzyme Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase: different interdomain hinge angles are seen in different binary and ternary complexes.

    PubMed

    Naylor, C E; Gover, S; Basak, A K; Cosgrove, M S; Levy, H R; Adams, M J

    2001-05-01

    The reduced coenzymes NADH and NADPH only differ by one phosphate, but in the cell NADH provides reducing power for catabolism while NADPH is utilized in biosynthetic pathways. Enzymes almost invariably discriminate between the coenzymes, but glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides is rare in being functionally dual specific. In order to elucidate the coenzyme selectivity, the structures of NADP(+)- and NAD(+)-complexed L. mesenteroides G6PD have been determined including data to 2.2 and 2.5 A resolution, respectively, and compared with unliganded G6PD crystallized in the same space groups. Coenzyme binding is also compared with that in a ternary complex of a mutant in which Asp177 in the active site has been mutated to asparagine. There are no gross structural differences between the complexes. In both binary complexes, the enzyme interdomain hinge angle has opened. NADP(+) binds to the furthest open form; of the residues within the coenzyme domain, only Arg46 moves, interacting with the 2'-phosphate and adenine. NAD(+) is less well defined in the binding site; smaller hinge opening is seen but larger local changes: Arg46 is displaced, Thr14 bonds the 3'-hydroxyl and Gln47 bonds the 2'-hydroxyl. In the ternary complex, the hinge angle has closed; only the adenine nucleotide is ordered in the binding site. Arg46 again provides most binding interactions.

  13. Involvement of ABA- and H2O2-dependent cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in maintaining redox homeostasis in soybean roots under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huahua; Yang, Lidan; Li, Yan; Hou, Junjie; Huang, Junjun; Liang, Weihong

    2016-10-01

    The roles of abscisic acid (ABA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in inducing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH, EC 1.1.1.49) activity and the possible roles of G6PDH in regulating ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle were investigated in soybean (Glycine max L.) roots under drought stress. Drought caused a marked increase of the total and cytosolic G6PDH activities and triggered a rapid ABA and H2O2 accumulation in soybean roots. Exogenous ABA or H2O2 treatment elevated the total and cytosolic G6PDH activities, whereas suppressing ABA or H2O2 production inhibited the drought-induced increase in total and cytosolic G6PDH activities, suggesting that ABA and H2O2 are required for drought-induced increase of total G6PDH activity, namely cytosolic G6PDH activity. Furthermore, ABA induced H2O2 production by stimulating NADPH oxidase activity under drought stress. Moreover, drought significantly increased the contents of AsA and GSH and the activities of key enzymes in AsA-GSH cycle, while application of G6PDH inhibitor to seedlings significantly reduced the above effect induced by drought. Taken together, these results indicate that H2O2 acting as a downstream signaling molecule of ABA mediates drought-induced increase in cytosolic G6PDH activity, and that enhanced cytosolic G6PDH activity maintains cellular redox homeostasis by regulating AsA-GSH cycle in soybean roots. PMID:27285781

  14. Involvement of ABA- and H2O2-dependent cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in maintaining redox homeostasis in soybean roots under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huahua; Yang, Lidan; Li, Yan; Hou, Junjie; Huang, Junjun; Liang, Weihong

    2016-10-01

    The roles of abscisic acid (ABA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in inducing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH, EC 1.1.1.49) activity and the possible roles of G6PDH in regulating ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle were investigated in soybean (Glycine max L.) roots under drought stress. Drought caused a marked increase of the total and cytosolic G6PDH activities and triggered a rapid ABA and H2O2 accumulation in soybean roots. Exogenous ABA or H2O2 treatment elevated the total and cytosolic G6PDH activities, whereas suppressing ABA or H2O2 production inhibited the drought-induced increase in total and cytosolic G6PDH activities, suggesting that ABA and H2O2 are required for drought-induced increase of total G6PDH activity, namely cytosolic G6PDH activity. Furthermore, ABA induced H2O2 production by stimulating NADPH oxidase activity under drought stress. Moreover, drought significantly increased the contents of AsA and GSH and the activities of key enzymes in AsA-GSH cycle, while application of G6PDH inhibitor to seedlings significantly reduced the above effect induced by drought. Taken together, these results indicate that H2O2 acting as a downstream signaling molecule of ABA mediates drought-induced increase in cytosolic G6PDH activity, and that enhanced cytosolic G6PDH activity maintains cellular redox homeostasis by regulating AsA-GSH cycle in soybean roots.

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and alternative oxidase are involved in the cross tolerance of highland barley to salt stress and UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengzhou; Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Kunlun; Li, Ping; Chang, Ning; Wang, Jianfeng; Wang, Feng; Li, Jiaolong; Bi, Yurong

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a new mechanism involving glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and alternative pathways (AP) in salt pretreatment-induced tolerance of highland barley to UV-B radiation was investigated. When highland barley was exposed to UV-B radiation, the G6PDH activity decreased but the AP capacity increased. In contrast, under UV-B+NaCl treatment, the G6PDH activity was restored to the control level and the maximal AP capacity and antioxidant enzyme activities were reached. Glucosamine (Glucm, an inhibitor of G6PDH) obviously inhibited the G6PDH activity in highland barley under UV-B + NaCl treatment and a similar pattern was observed in reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (Asc) contents. Similarly, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, an inhibitor of AOX) significantly reduced the AP capacity in highland barley under UV-B + NaCl treatment. The UV-B-induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation was also followed. Further studies indicated that non-functioning of G6PDH or AP under UV-B+NaCl + Glucm or UV-B + NaCl + SHAM treatment also caused damages in photosynthesis and stomatal movement. Western blot analysis confirmed that the alternative oxidase (AOX) and G6PDH were dependent each other in cross tolerance to UV-B and salt. The inhibition of AP or G6PDH activity resulted in a significant accumulation or reduction of NADPH content, respectively, under UV-B+NaCl treatment in highland barley leaves. Taken together, our results indicate that AP and G6PDH mutually regulate and maintain photosynthesis and stomata movement in the cross adaptation of highland barley seedlings to UV-B and salt by modulating redox homeostasis and NADPH content.

  16. Starvation actively inhibits splicing of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA via a bifunctional ESE/ESS element bound by hnRNP K.

    PubMed

    Cyphert, T J; Suchanek, A L; Griffith, B N; Salati, L M

    2013-09-01

    Regulated expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is due to changes in the rate of pre-mRNA splicing and not changes in its transcription. Starvation alters pre-mRNA splicing by decreasing the rate of intron removal, leading to intron retention and a decrease in the accumulation of mature mRNA. A regulatory element within exon 12 of G6PD pre-mRNA controls splicing efficiency. Starvation caused an increase in the expression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K protein and this increase coincided with the increase in the binding of hnRNP K to the regulatory element and a decrease in the expression of G6PD mRNA. HnRNP K bound to two C-rich motifs forming an ESS within exon 12. Overexpression of hnRNP K decreased the splicing and expression of G6PD mRNA, while siRNA-mediated depletion of hnRNP K caused an increase in the splicing and expression of G6PD mRNA. Binding of hnRNP K to the regulatory element was enhanced in vivo by starvation coinciding with a decrease in G6PD mRNA. HnRNP K binding to the C-rich motifs blocked binding of serine-arginine rich, splicing factor 3 (SRSF3), a splicing enhancer. Thus hnRNP K is a nutrient regulated splicing factor responsible for the inhibition of the splicing of G6PD during starvation.

  17. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation.

  18. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation. PMID:26676512

  19. Hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia caused by red cell glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency in two Portuguese patients: Clinical features and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Manco, Licínio; Bento, Celeste; Victor, Bruno L; Pereira, Janet; Relvas, Luís; Brito, Rui M; Seabra, Carlos; Maia, Tabita M; Ribeiro, M Letícia

    2016-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency cause hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (HNSHA) of variable severity in individuals homozygous or compound heterozygous for mutations in GPI gene. This work presents clinical features and genotypic results of two patients of Portuguese origin with GPI deficiency. The patients suffer from a mild hemolytic anemia (Hb levels ranging from 10 to 12.7g/mL) associated with macrocytosis, reticulocytosis, hyperbilirubinemia, hyperferritinemia and slight splenomegaly. Genomic DNA sequencing revealed in one patient homozygosity for a new missense mutation in exon 3, c.260G>C (p.Gly87Ala), and in the second patient compound heterozygosity for the same missense mutation (p.Gly87Ala), along with a frameshift mutation resulting from a single nucleotide deletion in exon 14, c.1238delA (p.Gln413Arg fs*24). Mutation p.Gln413Arg fs*24 is the first frameshift null mutation to be described in GPI deficiency. Molecular modeling suggests that the structural change induced by the p.Gly87Ala pathogenic variant has direct impact in the structural arrangement of the region close to the active site of the enzyme. PMID:27519939

  20. Comparative analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase levels in pre-term and term babies delivered at University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Obasa, Temitope Olorunsola; Adesiyun, Omotayo Olukemi; Mokuolu, Olugbenga Ayodeji; Ojuawo, Ayodele Isaac

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) is an enzyme in the hexose monophosphate shunt required for the production of reducing equivalents needed to mop up free radicals. thereby keeping hemoglobin in its free state. Deficiency of the enzyme can cause severe neonatal jaundice. The aim of this study was to compare G6PD levels in pre-term and term babies, and evaluate the extent to which G6PD deficiency determines the severity of jaundice in various gestational age groups. Samples of cord blood collected from consecutively delivered babies in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria, were assayed for G6PD levels, and the babies were observed for jaundice during the first week of life. Those who developed jaundice had serial serum bilirubin measured. Nine hundred and thirty-three babies had G6PD assayed, with 348 being G6PD deficient, giving a hospital based prevalence of 37.3%. Of the 644 who were followed up, 143 (22.2%) were pre-term and 501(77.8%) were term babies. Babies with gestational age (GA) 27–29 weeks had the highest G6PD levels. However, there was no significant variation among the different gestational age groups (F=0.64, P=0.64). Jaundice occurred more in pre-term compared to term babies with a relative risk of 2.41 (χ2=60.95, P=0.00001). Occurrence of jaundice in pre-term babies was irrespective of G6PD status (χ2=0.2, P=0.66, RR=1.09, CI=0.83

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and leptin are related to marbling differences among Limousin and Angus or Japanese Black x Angus steers.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, M; Faulconnier, Y; Leroux, C; Jurie, C; Cassar-Malek, I; Bauchart, D; Boulesteix, P; Pethick, D; Hocquette, J F; Chilliard, Y

    2007-11-01

    This work investigated the metabolic basis for the variability of carcass and i.m. adiposity in cattle. Our hypothesis was that the comparison of extreme breeds for adiposity might allow for the identification of some metabolic pathways determinant for carcass and i.m. adiposity. Thus, 23- to 28-mo-old steers of 3 breeds, 2 with high [Angus or Japanese Black x Angus (J. Black cross)] and 1 with low (Limousin) i.m. and carcass adiposity, were used to measure activities or mRNA levels, or both, of enzymes involved in de novo lipogenesis [acetyl-coA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase (FAS), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), malic enzyme], circulating triacylglycerol (TAG) uptake (lipoprotein lipase), and fatty acid esterification (glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), as well as the mRNA level of leptin, an adiposity-related factor. In a first study, enzyme activities were assayed in the s.c. adipose tissue (AT), the oxidative rectus abdominis, and the glycolytic semitendinosus muscles from steers finished for 6 mo. Compared with Angus or J. Black cross, Limousin steers had a 27% less (P = 0.003) rib fat thickness, and 23 and 29% less (P < or = 0.02) FAS and G6PDH activities in s.c. AT. In rectus abdominis and semitendinosus, the 75% less (P < 0.001) TAG content was concomitant with 50% less (P < 0.001) G6PDH activity. In a second study, enzyme activities plus mRNA levels were assayed in an oxido-glycolytic muscle, the longissimus thoracis (LT), in the i.m. AT dissected from LT, and in s.c. AT from the same Limousin steers and from Angus steers finished for 10 mo. Compared with Angus, the 50% less (P < 0.001) rib fat thickness in Limousin contrasted with the 1.1- to 5.8-fold greater (P < or = 0.02) mRNA levels or activities, or both, of acetyl-coA carboxylase, G6PDH, lipoprotein lipase, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in s.c. AT. Conversely, the 90% less (P < 0.001) TAG content in Limousin LT was concomitant to the 79 and 83% less (P < or = 0.002) G6PDH

  2. Purification and Characterization of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase, and Glutathione Reductase from Rat Heart and Inhibition Effects of Furosemide, Digoxin, and Dopamine on the Enzymes Activities.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate characterization and purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase from rat heart and the inhibitory effect of three drugs. The purification of the enzymes was performed using 2',5'-ADP sepharose 4B affinity material. The subunit and the natural molecular weights were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Biochemical characteristics such as the optimum temperature, pH, stable pH, and salt concentration were examined for each enzyme. Types of product inhibition and Ki values with Km and Vmax values of the substrates and coenzymes were determined. According to the obtained Ki and IC50 values, furosemide, digoxin, and dopamine showed inhibitory effect on the enzyme activities at low millimolar concentrations in vitro conditions. Dopamine inhibited the activity of these enzymes as competitive, whereas furosemide and digoxin inhibited the activity of the enzyme as noncompetitive.

  3. Transition of metabolisms in living popular bark from growing to wintering stages and vice versa: changes in glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activities and in the levels of sugar phosphates.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, S

    1974-10-01

    Activities of glucose 6-phosphate, 6-phosphogluconate, and isocitrate dehydrogenases, together with intermediate levels of the glycolytic pathway and the pentose phosphate cycle, were measured throughout a year in the living bark of poplar (Populus gelrica). Shoots, immediately after budding (early May), contained very high levels of the three enzyme activities, which fell gradually by early or mid-July to a level, roughly equivalent to budding (May) or growing (July) 2-year-old twigs. In September, the former two dehydrogenase activities of the new shoots and 2-year-old twigs began to rise, while the latter activity started to decrease. The rise of the two dehydrogenase activities continued until late November (or early December). The high level of the two dehydrogenase activities lasted until early in April of the following year and then the decrease in the activities began prior to the onset of budding, reaching a low, basal level in early May. The profile of changes in the two dehydrogenase activities appeared to coincide with the increase and decrease of soluble proteins.Normal concentrations of total hexose phosphates in the glycolytic pathway plus 6-phosphogluconate were found to be 288 to 895 mumoles/kilogram dry weight. During the metabolism transition (September and April), a transient and striking increase of 6-phosphogluconate was observed. In September, 6-phosphogluconate reached a level on the order of 10(-4)m and was 4 times that of fructose 6-phosphate. The increase in 6-phosphogluconate coincided with the increase in the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Coincidentally, with the change of 6-phosphogluconate level, a large deviation of the in vivo ratio of fructose 6-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate from the known equilibrium constant was observed, showing the relation of pentose phosphate cycle enzyme activity to the control of glycolysis. The ratio of glucose 6-phosphate to glucose 1-phosphate deviated from that predicted. These ratios

  4. Transition of metabolisms in living popular bark from growing to wintering stages and vice versa: changes in glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activities and in the levels of sugar phosphates.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, S

    1974-10-01

    Activities of glucose 6-phosphate, 6-phosphogluconate, and isocitrate dehydrogenases, together with intermediate levels of the glycolytic pathway and the pentose phosphate cycle, were measured throughout a year in the living bark of poplar (Populus gelrica). Shoots, immediately after budding (early May), contained very high levels of the three enzyme activities, which fell gradually by early or mid-July to a level, roughly equivalent to budding (May) or growing (July) 2-year-old twigs. In September, the former two dehydrogenase activities of the new shoots and 2-year-old twigs began to rise, while the latter activity started to decrease. The rise of the two dehydrogenase activities continued until late November (or early December). The high level of the two dehydrogenase activities lasted until early in April of the following year and then the decrease in the activities began prior to the onset of budding, reaching a low, basal level in early May. The profile of changes in the two dehydrogenase activities appeared to coincide with the increase and decrease of soluble proteins.Normal concentrations of total hexose phosphates in the glycolytic pathway plus 6-phosphogluconate were found to be 288 to 895 mumoles/kilogram dry weight. During the metabolism transition (September and April), a transient and striking increase of 6-phosphogluconate was observed. In September, 6-phosphogluconate reached a level on the order of 10(-4)m and was 4 times that of fructose 6-phosphate. The increase in 6-phosphogluconate coincided with the increase in the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Coincidentally, with the change of 6-phosphogluconate level, a large deviation of the in vivo ratio of fructose 6-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate from the known equilibrium constant was observed, showing the relation of pentose phosphate cycle enzyme activity to the control of glycolysis. The ratio of glucose 6-phosphate to glucose 1-phosphate deviated from that predicted. These ratios

  5. An examination of the role of asp-177 in the His-Asp catalytic dyad of Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase: X-ray structure and pH dependence of kinetic parameters of the D177N mutant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, M S; Gover, S; Naylor, C E; Vandeputte-Rutten, L; Adams, M J; Levy, H R

    2000-12-12

    The role of Asp-177 in the His-Asp catalytic dyad of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides has been investigated by a structural and functional characterization of the D177N mutant enzyme. Its three-dimensional structure has been determined by X-ray cryocrystallography in the presence of NAD(+) and in the presence of glucose 6-phosphate plus NADPH. The structure of a glucose 6-phosphate complex of a mutant (Q365C) with normal enzyme activity has also been determined and substrate binding compared. To understand the effect of Asp-177 on the ionization properties of the catalytic base His-240, the pH dependence of kinetic parameters has been determined for the D177N mutant and compared to that of the wild-type enzyme. The structures give details of glucose 6-phosphate binding and show that replacement of the Asp-177 of the catalytic dyad with asparagine does not affect the overall structure of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Additionally, the evidence suggests that the productive tautomer of His-240 in the D177N mutant enzyme is stabilized by a hydrogen bond with Asn-177; hence, the mutation does not affect tautomer stabilization. We conclude, therefore, that the absence of a negatively charged aspartate at 177 accounts for the decrease in catalytic activity at pH 7.8. Structural analysis suggests that the pH dependence of the kinetic parameters of D177N glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase results from an ionized water molecule replacing the missing negative charge of the mutated Asp-177 at high pH. Glucose 6-phosphate binding orders and orients His-178 in the D177N-glucose 6-phosphate-NADPH ternary complex and appears to be necessary to form this water-binding site.

  6. Lower reference limits of quantitative cord glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase estimated from healthy term neonates according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute guidelines: a cross sectional retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported the lower reference limit (LRL) of quantitative cord glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), but they have not used approved international statistical methodology. Using common standards is expecting to yield more true findings. Therefore, we aimed to estimate LRL of quantitative G6PD detection in healthy term neonates by using statistical analyses endorsed by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) for reference interval estimation. Methods This cross sectional retrospective study was performed at King Abdulaziz Hospital, Saudi Arabia, between March 2010 and June 2012. The study monitored consecutive neonates born to mothers from one Arab Muslim tribe that was assumed to have a low prevalence of G6PD-deficiency. Neonates that satisfied the following criteria were included: full-term birth (37 weeks); no admission to the special care nursery; no phototherapy treatment; negative direct antiglobulin test; and fathers of female neonates were from the same mothers’ tribe. The G6PD activity (Units/gram Hemoglobin) was measured spectrophotometrically by an automated kit. This study used statistical analyses endorsed by IFCC and CLSI for reference interval estimation. The 2.5th percentiles and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated as LRLs, both in presence and absence of outliers. Results 207 males and 188 females term neonates who had cord blood quantitative G6PD testing met the inclusion criteria. Method of Horn detected 20 G6PD values as outliers (8 males and 12 females). Distributions of quantitative cord G6PD values exhibited a normal distribution in absence of the outliers only. The Harris-Boyd method and proportion criteria revealed that combined gender LRLs were reliable. The combined bootstrap LRL in presence of the outliers was 10.0 (95% CI: 7.5-10.7) and the combined parametric LRL in absence of the outliers was 11

  7. Crystal Structures of An F420-Dependent Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Fgd1 Involved in the Activation of the Anti-Tb Drug Candidate Pa-824 Reveal the Basis of Coenzyme And Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Bashiri, G.; Squire, C.J.; Moreland, N.J.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-05-11

    The modified flavin coenzyme F{sub 420} is found in a restricted number of microorganisms. It is widely distributed in mycobacteria, however, where it is important in energy metabolism, and in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is implicated in redox processes related to non-replicating persistence. In Mtb, the F{sub 420}-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase FGD1 provides reduced F{sub 420} for the in vivo activation of the nitroimidazopyran prodrug PA-824, currently being developed for anti-tuberculosis therapy against both replicating and persistent bacteria. The structure of M. tuberculosis FGD1 has been determined by x-ray crystallography both in its apo state and in complex with F{sub 420} and citrate at resolutions of 1.90 and 1.95{angstrom}, respectively. The structure reveals a highly specific F{sub 420} binding mode, which is shared with several other F{sub 420}-dependent enzymes. Citrate occupies the substrate binding pocket adjacent to F{sub 420} and is shown to be a competitive inhibitor (IC{sub 50} 43 {micro}m). Modeling of the binding of the glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) substrate identifies a positively charged phosphate binding pocket and shows that G6P, like citrate, packs against the isoalloxazine moiety of F{sub 420} and helps promote a butterfly bend conformation that facilitates F{sub 420} reduction and catalysis.

  8. Alterations in energy/redox metabolism induced by mitochondrial and environmental toxins: a specific role for glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase and the pentose phosphate pathway in paraquat toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shulei; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Nandakumar, Renu; Huang, Yuting; Madayiputhiya, Nandakumar; Stanton, Robert C; Dodds, Eric D; Powers, Robert; Franco, Rodrigo

    2014-09-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multifactorial disorder with a complex etiology including genetic risk factors, environmental exposures, and aging. While energy failure and oxidative stress have largely been associated with the loss of dopaminergic cells in PD and the toxicity induced by mitochondrial/environmental toxins, very little is known regarding the alterations in energy metabolism associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and their causative role in cell death progression. In this study, we investigated the alterations in the energy/redox-metabolome in dopaminergic cells exposed to environmental/mitochondrial toxins (paraquat, rotenone, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium [MPP+], and 6-hydroxydopamine [6-OHDA]) in order to identify common and/or different mechanisms of toxicity. A combined metabolomics approach using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and direct-infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-MS) was used to identify unique metabolic profile changes in response to these neurotoxins. Paraquat exposure induced the most profound alterations in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) metabolome. 13C-glucose flux analysis corroborated that PPP metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, glucono-1,5-lactone, and erythrose-4-phosphate were increased by paraquat treatment, which was paralleled by inhibition of glycolysis and the TCA cycle. Proteomic analysis also found an increase in the expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), which supplies reducing equivalents by regenerating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) levels. Overexpression of G6PD selectively increased paraquat toxicity, while its inhibition with 6-aminonicotinamide inhibited paraquat-induced oxidative stress and cell death. These results suggest that paraquat "hijacks" the PPP to increase NADPH reducing equivalents and stimulate paraquat redox cycling, oxidative stress, and cell death. Our study clearly demonstrates that alterations in

  9. Population study of 1311 C/T polymorphism of Glucose 6 Phosphate Dehydrogenase gene in Pakistan – an analysis of 715 X-chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Moiz, Bushra; Nasir, Amna; Moatter, Tariq; Naqvi, Zulfiqar Ali; Khurshid, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Background Nucleotide 1311 polymorphism at exon 11 of G6PD gene is widely prevalent in various populations of the world. The aim of the study was to evaluate 1311 polymorphism in subjects carrying G6PD Mediterranean gene and in general population living in Pakistan. Results Patients already known to be G6PD deficient were tested for 563C-T (G6PD Mediterranean) and 1311 C-T mutation through RFLP based PCR and gene sequencing. A control group not known to be G6PD deficient was tested for 1311C/T only. C-T transition at nt 1311 was detected in 60/234 X-chromosomes with 563 C-T mutation (gene frequency of 0.26) while in 130 of normal 402 X-chromosomes (gene frequency of 0.32). Conclusion We conclude that 1311 T is a frequent polymorphism both in general populations and in subjects with G6PD Mediterranean gene in Pakistan. The prevalence is higher compared to most of the populations of the world. The present study will help in understanding genetic basis of G6PD deficiency in Pakistani population and in developing ancestral links of its various ethnic groups. PMID:19640310

  10. Effects of test spills of chemically dispersed and nondispersed oil on the activity of aspartate aminotransferase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in two intertidal bivalves, Mya arenaria and Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilfillan, E.S.; Foster, J.; Gerber, R.; Hanson, S.A.; Page, D.S.; Vallas, D.

    1982-10-01

    In 1981, two test oil spills were made in Maine. One spill was 975 L (250 gal) of Murban crude oil; the other was 975 L of Murban crude oil premixed with 97 L (25 gal) of Corexit 9527. The uptake of the oil and its effects on enzymatic activity in two species of common intertidal bivalve mollusks, Mya arenaria and Mytilus edulis, were studied. Data were obtained on uptake and depuration of the oil for each species; data were also obtained on the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase for each species. Data were collected both before and after each of the spills. Much less oil was taken up by the populations of animals exposed to chemically dispersed oil than by those exposed to nondispersed oil. Rates of depuration were the same for each species; they were also the same regardless of oil exposure. Significant long-term effects on enzyme activity were detected only in those animals exposed to nondispersed oil.

  11. Stress-Induced GSK3 Regulates the Redox Stress Response by Phosphorylating Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dal Santo, Silvia; Stampfl, Hansjörg; Krasensky, Julia; Kempa, Stefan; Gibon, Yves; Petutschnig, Elena; Rozhon, Wilfried; Heuck, Alexander; Clausen, Tim; Jonak, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Diverse stresses such as high salt conditions cause an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), necessitating a redox stress response. However, little is known about the signaling pathways that regulate the antioxidant system to counteract oxidative stress. Here, we show that a Glycogen Synthase Kinase3 from Arabidopsis thaliana (ASKα) regulates stress tolerance by activating Glc-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), which is essential for maintaining the cellular redox balance. Loss of stress-activated ASKα leads to reduced G6PD activity, elevated levels of ROS, and enhanced sensitivity to salt stress. Conversely, plants overexpressing ASKα have increased G6PD activity and low levels of ROS in response to stress and are more tolerant to salt stress. ASKα stimulates the activity of a specific cytosolic G6PD isoform by phosphorylating the evolutionarily conserved Thr-467, which is implicated in cosubstrate binding. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of G6PD adaptive regulation that is critical for the cellular stress response. PMID:22885737

  12. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase variants: Gd (+) Alexandra associated with neonatal jaundice and Gd (-) Camperdown in a young man with lamellar cataracts.

    PubMed

    Harley, J D; Agar, N S; Yoshida, A

    1978-02-01

    Two male subjects are described, with unusual clinical presentations and with hitherto undescribed G6PD variants. The first, of Italian extraction, suffered from severe neonatal jaundice following maternal ingestion of fresh broad beans (Vicia fava) both prenatally and postnatally: the expression of the enzymatic defect was much more severe in the neonatal period than on retesting in adolescence, when biochemical characterization showed unique features which justify designation as a new variant Gd(+) Alexandra. The second patient, a boy of Maltese extraction who was found to have bilateral lamellar cataracts at the age of 4 years, was identified as G6PD deficient only as a result of a survey of children of Mediterranean origin with unexplained cataract formation; he has approximately 15% of normal enzyme activity, with another unique combination of biochemical characteristics which has led to its designation as Gd(-) Camperdown. Although this association may be coincidental, it prompts further attention to the possibility that under certain circumstances G6PD deficiency may favor cataract formation. The two cases illustrate the value of characterization of the mutant enzyme whenever unexpected clinical or laboratory results are obtained. PMID:23402

  13. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from brewers' yeast. The effects of pH and temperature on the steady-state kinetic parameters of the two-chain protein species.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Roy, R N

    1976-05-01

    A systematic study has been made of the pH- and temperature-dependency of the steady-state kinetic parameters of the stabilized two-subunit enzyme species of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, in the absence of superimposed association-dissociation reactions. The Vmax(app) data obtained in several buffers between pH 5 and 10 and at 18-32 degrees C lead to the postulate that at least two sets of protonic equilibria may govern the catalysis (one near pH 5.7 AT 25 DEGREES C and another near pH 9.2); furthermore, two pathways for product formation (i.e., two Vmax's) appear to be required to explain the biphasic nature of the log Vmax(app) vs. pH curves, with Vmax(basic) greater than Vmax(acidic + neutral). Of the several buffers explored, either a uniform degree of interaction or a minimal degree of buffer species interaction could be assessed from the enthalpy changes associated with the derived values for ionization constants attributed to the protonic equilibria in the enzyme-substrates ternary complexes for the case of Tris-acetate-EDTA buffers, at constant ionic strength. With the selection of this buffer at 0.1 (T/2) and at 25 and 32 degrees C, a self-consistent kinetic mechanism has emerged which allows for the random binding of the two fully ionized substrates to the enzyme via two major pathways, and product formation by both E-A--B- and HE-A--B-. As before (Kuby et al. Arch. Biochem, Biophys. 165, 153-178, 1974), a quasi-equilibrium is presumed, with rate-limiting steps (k + 5 and k + 5') at the interconversion of the ternary complexes. Values for the two sets of protonic equilibria defined by this mechanism (viz., pKk, pKH2 for the first ionizations, and pKk', pKH' for the second) could then be estimated. From their numerical values (e.g., at 25 degrees C: pKK = 5.7 PKH2 = 5.2; and pKK' = 9.1, PKH' = 8.2) and from the values for delta H degrees ioniz (e.g., delta H degrees pKK APPROXIMATELY 5.1 KCAL/MOL; DELTA H degrees pKK' APPROXIMATELY 11 KCAL/MOL), A

  14. [The regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glycogen synthase activities by insulin superfamily peptides in myometrium of pregnant women and its impairments under different types of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, L A; Chistiakova, O V

    2009-01-01

    The regulatory effects of insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and relaxin on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and glycogen synthase (GS) activities have been studied in myometrium of pregnant women of control group and with diabetes mellitus of different etiology. In patients with type 1 diabetes G6PDH activity did not differ from the control group, but the enzyme activity was sharply decreased in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. In the control group maximal stimulation of G6PDH activity was observed at 10(-9) M of peptides and their stimulating effect decreased in the following order: insulin > relaxin > IGF-1. In pregnant women with types 1 diabetes insulin effect on the enzyme activity was lower than in the control, and the effects of IGF-1 and relaxin were absent. In the group of pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes the effects of insulin and IGF-1 were decreased, but the effect of relaxin was somewhat higher thus giving the following order in their efficiency relaxin > IGF-1 = insulin. At 10(-9) M peptides exhibited similar stimulating effects on the active form of GS-I, but had no influence on the total enzyme activity in the control group of pregnant women. In patients with type 1 diabetes GS activity remained unchanged (versus control), and peptides did not stimulate the enzyme activity. In patients with type 2 diabetes a significant decrease in GS activity was accompanied by the decrease in the effect of peptides, giving the following order of their efficiency: insulin = IGF-1 > relaxin. In myometrium of pregnant women with gestational (treated and untreated) diabetes GS activity decreased, the effect of insulin was weaker, whereas the effects of relaxin and IGF-1 increased thus giving the following order of their efficiency: relaxin > IGF-1 > insulin. Insulin therapy of type 1 diabetes incompletely restored sensitivity of the enzymes to the peptide actions. At the same time, in women

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-dependent hydrogen peroxide production is involved in the regulation of plasma membrane H+-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiporter protein in salt-stressed callus from Carex moorcroftii.

    PubMed

    Li, Jisheng; Chen, Guichen; Wang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yanli; Jia, Honglei; Bi, Yurong

    2011-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) is important for the activation of plant resistance to environmental stresses, and ion homeostasis is the physiological foundation for living cells. In this study, we investigated G6PDH roles in modulating ion homeostasis under salt stress in Carex moorcroftii callus. G6PDH activity increased to its maximum in 100 mM NaCl treatment and decreased with further increased NaCl concentrations. K+/Na+ ratio in 100 mM NaCl treatment did not exhibit significant difference compared with the control; however, in 300 mM NaCl treatment, it decreased. Low-concentration NaCl (100 mM) stimulated plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and NADPH oxidase activities as well as Na+/H+ antiporter protein expression, whereas high-concentration NaCl (300 mM) decreased their activity and expression. When G6PDH activity and expression were reduced by glycerol treatments, PM H+-ATPase and NADPH oxidase activities, Na+/H+ antiporter protein level and K+/Na+ ratio dramatically decreased. Simultaneously, NaCl-induced hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) accumulation was abolished. Exogenous application of H₂O₂ increased G6PDH, PM H+-ATPase and NADPH oxidase activities, Na+/H+ antiporter protein expression and K+/Na+ ratio in the control and glycerol treatments. Diphenylene iodonium (DPI), the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, which counteracted NaCl-induced H₂O₂ accumulation, decreased G6PDH, PM H+-ATPase and NADPH oxidase activities, Na+/H+ antiporter protein level and K+/Na+ ratio. Western blot result showed that G6PDH expression was stimulated by NaCl and H₂O₂, and blocked by DPI. Taken together, G6PDH is involved in H₂O₂ accumulation under salt stress. H₂O₂, as a signal, upregulated PM H+-ATPase activity and Na+/H+ antiporter protein level, which subsequently resulted in the enhanced K+/Na+ ratio. G6PDH played a central role in the process.

  16. Discovery of a Plasmodium falciparum glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase 6- phosphogluconolactonase inhibitor (R,Z)-N-((1-ethylpyrrolidin-2-yl)methyl)-2-(2-fluorobenzylidene)-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide (ML276) that reduces parasite growth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Janina; Maloney, Patrick; Peddibhotla, Satyamaheshwar; Hedrick, Michael P.; Hershberger, Paul; Gosalia, Palak; Milewski, Monika; Li, Yujie Linda; Sugarman, Eliot; Hood, Becky; Suyama, Eigo; Nguyen, Kevin; Vasile, Stefan; Sergienko, Eduard; Mangravita-Novo, Arianna; Vicchiarelli, Michael; McAnally, Danielle; Smith, Layton H.; Roth, Gregory P.; Diwan, Jena; Chung, Thomas D.Y.; Jortzik, Esther; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja; Pinkerton, Anthony B.; Bode, Lars

    2012-01-01

    A high throughput screen of the NIH’s MLSMR collection of ~340,000 compounds was undertaken to identify compounds that inhibit Plasmodium falciparum glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (PfG6PD). PfG6PD is essential for proliferating and propagating P. falciparum and differs structurally and mechanistically from the human ortholog. The reaction catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is the first, rate-limiting step in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), a key metabolic pathway sustaining anabolic needs in reductive equivalents and synthetic materials in fastgrowing cells. In P. falciparum the bifunctional enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-6- phosphogluconolactonase (PfGluPho) catalyzes the first two steps of the PPP. Because P. falciparum and infected host red blood cells rely on accelerated glucose flux, they depend on the G6PD activity of PfGluPho. The lead compound identified from this effort, (R,Z)-N-((1-ethylpyrrolidin-2-yl)methyl)-2- (2-fluorobenzylidene)-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide, 11, (ML276), is a submicromolar inhibitor of PfG6PD (IC50 = 889 nM). It is completely selective for the enzyme’s human isoform, displays micromolar potency (IC50 = 2.6 μM) against P. falciparum in culture, and has good drug-like properties, including high solubility and moderate microsomal stability. Studies testing the potential advantage of inhibiting PfG6PD in vivo are in progress. PMID:22813531

  17. Producing Glucose 6-Phosphate from Cellulosic Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Bacik, John-Paul; Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Jarboe, Laura R.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Mark, Brian L.; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The most abundant carbohydrate product of cellulosic biomass pyrolysis is the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranose), which can be converted to glucose 6-phosphate by levoglucosan kinase (LGK). In addition to the canonical kinase phosphotransfer reaction, the conversion requires cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring to allow ATP-dependent phosphorylation of the sugar O6 atom. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that LGK binds two magnesium ions in the active site that are additionally coordinated with the nucleotide and water molecules to result in ideal octahedral coordination. To further verify the metal binding sites, we co-crystallized LGK in the presence of manganese instead of magnesium and solved the structure de novo using the anomalous signal from four manganese atoms in the dimeric structure. The first metal is required for catalysis, whereas our work suggests that the second is either required or significantly promotes the catalytic rate. Although the enzyme binds its sugar substrate in a similar orientation to the structurally related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK), it forms markedly fewer bonding interactions with the substrate. In this orientation, the sugar is in an optimal position to couple phosphorylation with ring cleavage. We also observed a second alternate binding orientation for levoglucosan, and in these structures, ADP was found to bind with lower affinity. These combined observations provide an explanation for the high Km of LGK for levoglucosan. Greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to the catalytic efficiency of LGK can be used to improve applications of this enzyme for levoglucosan-derived biofuel production. PMID:26354439

  18. Structural basis for glucose-6-phosphate activation of glycogen synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Roach, Peter J.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2010-11-22

    Regulation of the storage of glycogen, one of the major energy reserves, is of utmost metabolic importance. In eukaryotes, this regulation is accomplished through glucose-6-phosphate levels and protein phosphorylation. Glycogen synthase homologs in bacteria and archaea lack regulation, while the eukaryotic enzymes are inhibited by protein kinase mediated phosphorylation and activated by protein phosphatases and glucose-6-phosphate binding. We determined the crystal structures corresponding to the basal activity state and glucose-6-phosphate activated state of yeast glycogen synthase-2. The enzyme is assembled into an unusual tetramer by an insertion unique to the eukaryotic enzymes, and this subunit interface is rearranged by the binding of glucose-6-phosphate, which frees the active site cleft and facilitates catalysis. Using both mutagenesis and intein-mediated phospho-peptide ligation experiments, we demonstrate that the enzyme's response to glucose-6-phosphate is controlled by Arg583 and Arg587, while four additional arginine residues present within the same regulatory helix regulate the response to phosphorylation.

  19. An enzymatic fluorimetric assay for glucose-6-phosphate: application in an in vitro Warburg-like effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Aiping; Romero, Roberto; Petty, Howard R.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in the regulatory role of cell metabolism in tumor biology and immunology. To assess changes in metabolite levels in cell populations and tissues, especially from small clinical samples, highly sensitive assays are required. Based upon glucose 6-phosphate’s reaction and the diaphorase-resazurin amplifying system, we have developed a fluorescence methodology to measure glucose 6-phosphate concentrations in cell extracts. In this approach, glucose 6-phosphate is oxidized by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the presence of NADP+, and the stoichiometrically generated NADPH is then amplified by the diaphorase-cycling system to produce a highly fluorescent molecule - resorufin. The limit of detection (LOD) of the assay is 10 pmol. The assay has a Z′ factor of 0.81. Its usefulness is demonstrated by experiments in which the pyruvate kinase inhibitor, phenylalanine, is added to cells. After 2 hours incubation at 37°C, glucose-6-phosphate levels rose by 20%, thus illustrating an in vitro Warburg-like effect on cell metabolism. PMID:19454216

  20. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Sickle Cell Trait among Prospective Blood Donors: A Cross-Sectional Study in Berekum, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Simpong, David Larbi; Takyi, Godfred; Ephraim, Richard K. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Blood transfusion is a therapeutic procedure usually undertaken in patients with severe anaemia. In Ghana, severe anaemia is mostly due to malaria caused by severe Plasmodium falciparum infection, road traffic accidents, and haemoglobinopathy-induced acute haemolysis. Method. This cross-sectional study evaluated coinheritance of sickle cell haemoglobin variant and G6PD enzymopathy among individuals that donated blood at the Holy Trinity Hospital, Berekum, in the Brong-Ahafo Region, Ghana. Demographic data and other pertinent information were captured using questionnaire. Sickle cell haemoglobin variants were determined using cellulose acetate electrophoresis (pH 8.6). Qualitative G6PD status and quantitative G6PD enzyme activity were determined using methaemoglobin reduction and Trinity Biotech G6PD test kit, respectively. Results. Prevalence of sickle cell trait (SCT) and G6PD enzymopathy coinheritance was 7%. In addition, 19.5% of the donors had 10%–60% of normal G6PD enzyme activity suggesting that these donor units are prone to stressor-induced acute haemolysis when given to recipients. Mild G6PD activity (p = 0.03, OR: 2.410 (CI: 1.049–5.534)), commercial (p = 0.020, OR: 5.609 (CI: 1.309–24.035)), and voluntary (p = 0.034, OR: 2.404 (CI: 1.071–5.397)) donors were significantly associated with SCT. Conclusion. Screening for red cell pathologies must be incorporated into existing protocols for populations with high incidence of haemoglobinopathies to protect high-risk recipients. PMID:27703480

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate mediates activation of the carbohydrate responsive binding protein (ChREBP)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming V.; Chen, Weiqin; Harmancey, Romain N.; Nuotio-Antar, Alli M.; Imamura, Minako; Saha, Pradip; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-05-07

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a Mondo family transcription factor that activates a number of glycolytic and lipogenic genes in response to glucose stimulation. We have previously reported that high glucose can activate the transcriptional activity of ChREBP independent of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated increase in nuclear entry and DNA binding. Here, we found that formation of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) is essential for glucose activation of ChREBP. The glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP is attenuated by D-mannoheptulose, a potent hexokinase inhibitor, as well as over-expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase); kinetics of activation of GAL4-ChREBP can be modified by exogenously expressed GCK. Further metabolism of G-6-P through the two major glucose metabolic pathways, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway, is not required for activation of ChREBP; over-expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) diminishes, whereas RNAi knockdown of the enzyme enhances, the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP, respectively. Moreover, the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), which is phosphorylated by hexokinase, but not further metabolized, effectively upregulates the transcription activity of ChREBP. In addition, over-expression of phosphofructokinase (PFK) 1 and 2, synergistically diminishes the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP. These multiple lines of evidence support the conclusion that G-6-P mediates the activation of ChREBP.

  2. AB104. Glucose-6 phospate dehydrogenase deficiency among mongolian neonates

    PubMed Central

    Batjargal, Khishigjargal; Nansal, Gerelmaa; Zagd, Gerelmaa; Ganbaatar, Erdenetuya

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans, affecting 400 million people worldwide and a high prevalence in persons of African, Middle Asian countries. The most common clinical manifestations are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which is caused by the impairment of erythrocyte’s ability to remove harmful oxidative stress triggered by exogenous agents such as drugs, infection, or fava bean ingestion. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by G6PD is strongly associated with mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment. The study aims to determine a level of G6PD in healthy neonates. Methods We obtained blood spot samples from 268 infants around 24-72 hours in their age who has unsuspected intranatal and neonatal disorders. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase “Perkin Elmer, Finland” level is determined by Victor 2D Fluorometer assay, developing of neonatal jaundice is examined by recall. Results The76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PD, other 23.5% (n=63) was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. In the both sex, 51.5% of male 0.88±0.46 Ug/Hb (n=33) and 47.6% of female (n=30) 0.97±0.55 Ug/Hb was assessed with G6PD deficiency. Developing Jaundice period in number of 63 neonates with G6PD deficiency, 86% of neonates (n=54) was in 1-4 days, 4% of neonates (n=3) was in 5-7 days and there is no sign of jaundice in 9% (n=6). Therefore neonates with G6PD deficiency, 53.9% (n=34) continued jaundice more than two weeks. Conclusions G6PD deficiency was determined in male neonates (51.5%) more than female (47.6%). The 76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PDH other 23.5% (n=63) of all participants was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. It shows that G6PD might be one potential risk of neonatal jaundice and hyperbilirubinemia in neonates in Mongolia.

  3. A gene on chromosome 11q23 coding for a putative glucose- 6-phosphate translocase is mutated in glycogen-storage disease types Ib and Ic.

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-da-Cunha, M; Gerin, I; Chen, Y T; de Barsy, T; de Lonlay, P; Dionisi-Vici, C; Fenske, C D; Lee, P J; Leonard, J V; Maire, I; McConkie-Rosell, A; Schweitzer, S; Vikkula, M; Van Schaftingen, E

    1998-01-01

    Glycogen-storage diseases type I (GSD type I) are due to a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase, an enzymatic system present in the endoplasmic reticulum that plays a crucial role in blood glucose homeostasis. Unlike GSD type Ia, types Ib and Ic are not due to mutations in the phosphohydrolase gene and are clinically characterized by the presence of associated neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction. Biochemical evidence indicates the presence of a defect in glucose-6-phosphate (GSD type Ib) or inorganic phosphate (Pi) (GSD type Ic) transport in the microsomes. We have recently cloned a cDNA encoding a putative glucose-6-phosphate translocase. We have now localized the corresponding gene on chromosome 11q23, the region where GSD types Ib and Ic have been mapped. Using SSCP analysis and sequencing, we have screened this gene, for mutations in genomic DNA, from patients from 22 different families who have GSD types Ib and Ic. Of 20 mutations found, 11 result in truncated proteins that are probably nonfunctional. Most other mutations result in substitutions of conserved or semiconserved residues. The two most common mutations (Gly339Cys and 1211-1212 delCT) together constitute approximately 40% of the disease alleles. The fact that the same mutations are found in GSD types Ib and Ic could indicate either that Pi and glucose-6-phosphate are transported in microsomes by the same transporter or that the biochemical assays used to differentiate Pi and glucose-6-phosphate transport defects are not reliable. PMID:9758626

  4. The glucose/glucose-6-phosphate cycle in the periportal and perivenous zone of rat liver.

    PubMed

    Jungermann, K; Heilbronn, R; Katz, N; Sasse, D

    1982-04-01

    Periportal and perivenous hepatocytes contain different activities (V) of antagonistic key enzymes such as glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase. In order to get an insight into the metabolism of the periportal and perivenous area the flux rates (v) of the glucose/glucose-6-phosphate cycle were calculated on the basis of the Michaelis-Menten equation using the measured zonal concentrations of glucose and glucose 6-phosphate, the zonal activities of glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase previously reported and the half-saturating substrate concentrations (Km) of the two enzymes found in the literature. The concentrations of glucose were obtained as a first approximation by measuring the concentrations in portal (= periportal) and hepatovenous (= perivenous) blood; those of glucose 6-phosphate were calculated from the levels determined in microdissected periportal and perivenous liver tissue. The calculations showed (a) that the overall cycling rates agreed remarkably well with those reported for intact animals and (b) that during a normal feeding rhythm the periportal zone should catalyze net glucose output and the perivenous zone should mediate net glucose uptake, as proposed by the model of 'metabolic zonation'.

  5. Identification of protein components of the microsomal glucose 6-phosphate transporter by photoaffinity labelling.

    PubMed

    Kramer, W; Burger, H J; Arion, W J; Corsiero, D; Girbig, F; Weyland, C; Hemmerle, H; Petry, S; Habermann, P; Herling, A

    1999-05-01

    The glucose-6-phosphatase system catalyses the terminal step of hepatic glucose production from both gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis and is thus a key regulatory factor of blood glucose homoeostasis. To identify the glucose 6-phosphate transporter T1, we have performed photoaffinity labelling of human and rat liver microsomes by using the specific photoreactive glucose-6-phosphate translocase inhibitors S 0957 and S 1743. Membrane proteins of molecular mass 70, 55, 33 and 31 kDa were labelled in human microsomes by [3H]S 0957, whereas in rat liver microsomes bands at 95, 70, 57, 54, 50, 41, 33 and 31 kDa were detectable. The photoprobe [3H]S 1743 led to the predominant labelling of a 57 kDa and a 50 kDa protein in the rat. Stripping of microsomes with 0.3% CHAPS retains the specific binding of T1 inhibitors; photoaffinity labelling of such CHAPS-treated microsomes resulted in the labelling of membrane proteins of molecular mass 55, 33 and 31 kDa in human liver and 50, 33 and 31 kDa in rat liver. Photoaffinity labelling of human liver tissue samples from a healthy individual and from liver samples of patients with a diagnosed glycogen-storage disease type 1b (GSD type 1b; von Gierke's disease) revealed the absence of the 55 kDa protein from one of the patients with GSD type 1. These findings support the identity of the glucose 6-phosphate transporter T1, with endoplasmic reticulum protein of molecular mass 50 kDa in rat liver and 55 kDa in human liver. PMID:10215602

  6. Gas Phase Spectra and Structural Determination of Glucose 6 Phosphate Using Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kregel, Steven J.; Voss, Jonathan; Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate (G6P) is one member of a class of simple phosphorylated sugars that are relevant in biological processes. We have acquired a gas phase infrared spectrum of G6P- using cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) in a home-built spectrometer. The experimental spectrum was compared with calculated vibrational spectra from a systematic conformer search. For both of the α and β anomers, results show that only the lowest energy conformers are present in the gas phase. If spectral signatures for similar sugars could be cataloged, it would allow for conformer-specific determination of mixture composition, for example, for glycolyzation processes.

  7. Beta glucosidase from Bacillus polymyxa is activated by glucose-6-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Paulo H E; Álvares, Alice C M; Gomes, Anderson A; Miletti, Luiz C; Skoronski, Everton; da Silva, Gustavo F; de Freitas, Sonia M; Magalhães, Maria L B

    2015-08-15

    Optimization of cellulose enzymatic hydrolysis is crucial for cost effective bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Enzymes involved in cellulose hydrolysis are often inhibited by their end-products, cellobiose and glucose. Efforts have been made to produce more efficient enzyme variants that are highly tolerant to product accumulation; however, further improvements are still necessary. Based on an alternative approach we initially investigated whether recently formed glucose could be phosphorylated into glucose-6-phosphate to circumvent glucose accumulation and avoid inhibition of beta-glucosidase from Bacillus polymyxa (BGLA). The kinetic properties and structural analysis of BGLA in the presence of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) were investigated. Kinetic studies demonstrated that enzyme was not inhibited by G6P. In contrast, the presence of G6P activated the enzyme, prevented beta glucosidase feedback inhibition by glucose accumulation and improved protein stability. G6P binding was investigated by fluorescence quenching experiments and the respective association constant indicated high affinity binding of G6P to BGLA. Data reported here are of great impact for future design strategies for second-generation bioethanol production.

  8. Glucose-6-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase Is Also Increased in Erythrocytes from Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, Francisco J.; Rosety-Plaza, Manuel; Rosety-Rodriguez, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    For some time it has been claimed that trisomic cells are more sensitive to oxidative stress since there is an imbalance in hydrogen peroxide metabolism due to an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalytic activity. We designed the present study to assess activity levels of antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione…

  9. A role for AMPK in the inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by polyunsaturated fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2009-10-09

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as {beta}-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser{sup 307} phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  10. Production of glucose-6-phosphate by glucokinase coupled with an ATP regeneration system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bingkun; Ding, Qingbao; Ou, Ling; Zou, Zhi

    2014-03-01

    A process of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) production coupled with an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regeneration system was constructed that utilized acetyl phosphate (ACP) via acetate kinase (ACKase). The genes glk and ack from Escherichia coli K12 were amplified and cloned into pET-28a(+), then transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) and the recombinant strains were named pGLK and pACK respectively. Glucokinase (glkase) in pGLK and ACKase in pACK were both overexpressed in soluble form. G-6-P was efficiently produced from glucose and ACP using a very small amount of ATP. The conversion yield was greater than 97 % when the reaction solution containing 10 mM glucose, 20 mM ACP-Na₂, 0.5 mM ATP, 5 mM Mg²⁺, 50 mM potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0), 4.856 U glkase and 3.632 U ACKase were put into 37 °C water bath for 1 h. PMID:24165747

  11. Producing glucose 6-phosphate from cellulosic biomass: Structural insights into levoglucosan bioconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Bacik, John -Paul; Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Jarboe, Laura R.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Mark, Brian L.; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2015-09-09

    The most abundant carbohydrate product of cellulosic biomass pyrolysis is the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranose), which can be converted to glucose 6-phosphate by levoglucosan kinase (LGK). In addition to the canonical kinase phosphotransfer reaction, the conversion requires cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring to allow ATP-dependent phosphorylation of the sugar O6 atom. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that LGK binds two magnesium ions in the active site that are additionally coordinated with the nucleotide and water molecules to result in ideal octahedral coordination. To further verify the metal binding sites, we co-crystallized LGK in the presence of manganese instead of magnesium and solved the structure de novo using the anomalous signal from four manganese atoms in the dimeric structure. The first metal is required for catalysis, whereas our work suggests that the second is either required or significantly promotes the catalytic rate. Although the enzyme binds its sugar substrate in a similar orientation to the structurally related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK), it forms markedly fewer bonding interactions with the substrate. In this orientation, the sugar is in an optimal position to couple phosphorylation with ring cleavage. We also observed a second alternate binding orientation for levoglucosan, and in these structures, ADP was found to bind with lower affinity. These combined observations provide an explanation for the high Km of LGK for levoglucosan. Furthermore, greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to the catalytic efficiency of LGK can be used to improve applications of this enzyme for levoglucosan-derived biofuel production.

  12. Producing glucose 6-phosphate from cellulosic biomass: Structural insights into levoglucosan bioconversion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bacik, John -Paul; Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Jarboe, Laura R.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Mark, Brian L.; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2015-09-09

    The most abundant carbohydrate product of cellulosic biomass pyrolysis is the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranose), which can be converted to glucose 6-phosphate by levoglucosan kinase (LGK). In addition to the canonical kinase phosphotransfer reaction, the conversion requires cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring to allow ATP-dependent phosphorylation of the sugar O6 atom. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that LGK binds two magnesium ions in the active site that are additionally coordinated with the nucleotide and water molecules to result in ideal octahedral coordination. To further verify the metal binding sites, we co-crystallized LGK in the presence of manganese instead of magnesium andmore » solved the structure de novo using the anomalous signal from four manganese atoms in the dimeric structure. The first metal is required for catalysis, whereas our work suggests that the second is either required or significantly promotes the catalytic rate. Although the enzyme binds its sugar substrate in a similar orientation to the structurally related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK), it forms markedly fewer bonding interactions with the substrate. In this orientation, the sugar is in an optimal position to couple phosphorylation with ring cleavage. We also observed a second alternate binding orientation for levoglucosan, and in these structures, ADP was found to bind with lower affinity. These combined observations provide an explanation for the high Km of LGK for levoglucosan. Furthermore, greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to the catalytic efficiency of LGK can be used to improve applications of this enzyme for levoglucosan-derived biofuel production.« less

  13. Producing glucose 6-phosphate from cellulosic biomass: structural insights into levoglucosan bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Bacik, John-Paul; Klesmith, Justin R; Whitehead, Timothy A; Jarboe, Laura R; Unkefer, Clifford J; Mark, Brian L; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2015-10-30

    The most abundant carbohydrate product of cellulosic biomass pyrolysis is the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranose), which can be converted to glucose 6-phosphate by levoglucosan kinase (LGK). In addition to the canonical kinase phosphotransfer reaction, the conversion requires cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring to allow ATP-dependent phosphorylation of the sugar O6 atom. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that LGK binds two magnesium ions in the active site that are additionally coordinated with the nucleotide and water molecules to result in ideal octahedral coordination. To further verify the metal binding sites, we co-crystallized LGK in the presence of manganese instead of magnesium and solved the structure de novo using the anomalous signal from four manganese atoms in the dimeric structure. The first metal is required for catalysis, whereas our work suggests that the second is either required or significantly promotes the catalytic rate. Although the enzyme binds its sugar substrate in a similar orientation to the structurally related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK), it forms markedly fewer bonding interactions with the substrate. In this orientation, the sugar is in an optimal position to couple phosphorylation with ring cleavage. We also observed a second alternate binding orientation for levoglucosan, and in these structures, ADP was found to bind with lower affinity. These combined observations provide an explanation for the high Km of LGK for levoglucosan. Greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to the catalytic efficiency of LGK can be used to improve applications of this enzyme for levoglucosan-derived biofuel production. PMID:26354439

  14. Producing glucose 6-phosphate from cellulosic biomass: structural insights into levoglucosan bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Bacik, John-Paul; Klesmith, Justin R; Whitehead, Timothy A; Jarboe, Laura R; Unkefer, Clifford J; Mark, Brian L; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2015-10-30

    The most abundant carbohydrate product of cellulosic biomass pyrolysis is the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranose), which can be converted to glucose 6-phosphate by levoglucosan kinase (LGK). In addition to the canonical kinase phosphotransfer reaction, the conversion requires cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring to allow ATP-dependent phosphorylation of the sugar O6 atom. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that LGK binds two magnesium ions in the active site that are additionally coordinated with the nucleotide and water molecules to result in ideal octahedral coordination. To further verify the metal binding sites, we co-crystallized LGK in the presence of manganese instead of magnesium and solved the structure de novo using the anomalous signal from four manganese atoms in the dimeric structure. The first metal is required for catalysis, whereas our work suggests that the second is either required or significantly promotes the catalytic rate. Although the enzyme binds its sugar substrate in a similar orientation to the structurally related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK), it forms markedly fewer bonding interactions with the substrate. In this orientation, the sugar is in an optimal position to couple phosphorylation with ring cleavage. We also observed a second alternate binding orientation for levoglucosan, and in these structures, ADP was found to bind with lower affinity. These combined observations provide an explanation for the high Km of LGK for levoglucosan. Greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to the catalytic efficiency of LGK can be used to improve applications of this enzyme for levoglucosan-derived biofuel production.

  15. Regulation of a plant SNF1-related protein kinase by glucose-6-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Toroser, D.; Plaut, Z.; Huber, S.C.

    2000-05-01

    One of the major protein kinases (PK{sub III}) that phosphorylates serine-158 of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), which is responsible for light/dark modulation of activity, is known to be a member of the SNF1-related family of protein kinases. In the present study, the authors have developed a fluorescence-based continuous assay for measurement of PK{sub III} activity. Using the continuous assay, along with the fixed-time-point {sup 32}P-incorporation assay, they demonstrate that PK{sub III} activity is inhibited by glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P). Relative inhibition by Glc-6-P was increased by decreasing pH from 8.5 to 5.5 and by reducing the concentration of Mg{sup 2+} in the assay from 10 to 2 nM. Under likely physiological conditions (PH 7.0 and 2 mM Mg{sup 2+}), 10 nM Glc-6-P inhibited kinase activity approximately 70%. Inhibition by Glc-6-P could not be ascribed to contaminants in the commercial preparations. Other metabolites inhibited PK{sub III} in the following order: Glc-6-P > mannose-6-P, fructose-1,6P{sub 2} > ribose-5-P, 3-PGA, fructose-6-P. Inorganic phosphate, Glc, and AMP were not inhibitory, and free Glc did not reverse the inhibition by Glc-6-P. Because SNF1-related protein kinases are thought to function broadly in the regulation of enzyme activity and gene expression, Glc-6-P inhibition of PK{sub III} activity potentially provides a mechanism for metabolic regulation of the reactions catalyzed by these important protein kinases.

  16. Mutations in the genes encoding 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase interact to cause cortisone reductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Draper, Nicole; Walker, Elizabeth A; Bujalska, Iwona J; Tomlinson, Jeremy W; Chalder, Susan M; Arlt, Wiebke; Lavery, Gareth G; Bedendo, Oliver; Ray, David W; Laing, Ian; Malunowicz, Ewa; White, Perrin C; Hewison, Martin; Mason, Philip J; Connell, John M; Shackleton, Cedric H L; Stewart, Paul M

    2003-08-01

    In cortisone reductase deficiency (CRD), activation of cortisone to cortisol does not occur, resulting in adrenocorticotropin-mediated androgen excess and a phenotype resembling polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS; refs. 1,2). This suggests a defect in the gene HSD11B1 encoding 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1), a primary regulator of tissue-specific glucocorticoid bioavailability. We identified intronic mutations in HSD11B1 that resulted in reduced gene transcription in three individuals with CRD. In vivo, 11beta-HSD1 catalyzes the reduction of cortisone to cortisol whereas purified enzyme acts as a dehydrogenase converting cortisol to cortisone. Oxo-reductase activity can be regained using a NADPH-regeneration system and the cytosolic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. But the catalytic domain of 11beta-HSD1 faces into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER; ref. 6). We hypothesized that endolumenal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH) regenerates NADPH in the ER, thereby influencing directionality of 11beta-HSD1 activity. Mutations in exon 5 of H6PD in individuals with CRD attenuated or abolished H6PDH activity. These individuals have mutations in both HSD11B1 and H6PD in a triallelic digenic model of inheritance, resulting in low 11beta-HSD1 expression and ER NADPH generation with loss of 11beta-HSD1 oxo-reductase activity. CRD defines a new ER-specific redox potential and establishes H6PDH as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of PCOS. PMID:12858176

  17. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Gu, Meng-Li; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. However, there are still 10%-15% of GISTs lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations, called wild-type GISTs (WT GISTs). Among these so-called WT GISTs, a small subset is associated with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency, known as SDH-deficient GISTs. In addition, GISTs that occur in Carney triad and Carney-Stratakis syndrome represent specific examples of SDH-deficient GISTs. SDH-deficient GISTs locate exclusively in the stomach, showing predilection for children and young adults with female preponderance. The tumor generally pursues an indolent course and exhibits primary resistance to imatinib therapy in most cases. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B expression and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) are common features of SDH-deficient GISTs. In WT GISTs without succinate dehydrogenase activity, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α may lead to increased growth signaling through IGF1R and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). As a result, IGF1R and VEGFR are promising to be the novel therapeutic targets of GISTs. This review will update the current knowledge on characteristics of SDH-deficient GISTs and further discuss the possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis and clinical management of SDH-deficient GISTs. PMID:25741136

  18. Hemolytic crisis in a G6PD-deficient infant after ingestion of pumpkin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 8 month-old infant presented with acute onset of severe jaundice, anemia requiring transfusion and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. The infant did not take drugs, he did not consume fava beans, but fava beans DNA was found on pumpkin he consumed the day before jaundice onset. This is the first case of hemolysis triggered by ingestion of food cross-contaminated with fava beans. PMID:25048415

  19. Hemolytic crisis in a G6PD-deficient infant after ingestion of pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Redaelli, Francesca; Gualdi, Valentina; Rizzi, Valeria; Mameli, Chiara; Dilillo, Dario; Fabiano, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    A 8 month-old infant presented with acute onset of severe jaundice, anemia requiring transfusion and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. The infant did not take drugs, he did not consume fava beans, but fava beans DNA was found on pumpkin he consumed the day before jaundice onset. This is the first case of hemolysis triggered by ingestion of food cross-contaminated with fava beans. PMID:25048415

  20. Amelioration by glucose-6-phosphate and NADP of potato glycoalkaloid inhibition in cell, enzyme and liposome assays.

    PubMed

    Roddick, J G; Leonard, A L

    1999-05-01

    Lysis of human erythrocytes by 20 microM chaconine was reduced by 0.5 mM glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and NADP. Both compounds caused approximately 50% inhibition of haemolysis at 1 mM. Glucose, glucose-1-phosphate, rhamnose, galactose and galactose-6-phosphate were ineffective; NAD was effective, although not to the extent of NADP. Of the tested sugars, only G6P reduced solanine-induced haemolysis. G6P also reduced the synergistic haemolytic action of solanine and chaconine in combination. G6P and NADP at or above 5 mM antagonised chaconine-induced betanin loss from excised red beet root discs; NADP was more effective than G6P. Disruption of PC/cholesterol liposomes by chaconine and inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by chaconine or solanine, were unaffected by up to 10 mM NADP or 50 mM G6P.

  1. Prenatal presentation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Niranjana; Tully, Hannah M; Chapman, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    We present the case of a female infant referred for prenatal MR evaluation of ventriculomegaly, which had been attributed by the referring obstetrician to aqueductal stenosis. Fetal MR confirmed ventriculomegaly but also demonstrated cerebral volume loss and white matter abnormalities. After birth, the infant developed persistent lactic acidosis. A diagnosis of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency was made on the basis of metabolic and molecular genetic studies. Ventriculomegaly is a common referral reason for fetal MR, yet there are few published reports of the radiographic findings that accompany inborn errors of metabolism, one potentially under-recognized cause of enlarged ventricles. This case contributes to this small body of literature on the imaging features of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency by describing pre- and postnatal MR findings and key clinical details. Our report emphasizes the necessity of considering pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency and other metabolic disorders as potential etiologies for fetal ventriculomegaly since prompt diagnosis may allow for early initiation of treatment and improve outcome. PMID:27026023

  2. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations database: review of the "old" and update of the new mutations.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Angelo; Moradkhani, Kamran; Hwang, Ming Jing; Zuppi, Cecilia; Giardina, Bruno; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2012-03-15

    In the present paper we have updated the G6PD mutations database, including all the last discovered G6PD genetic variants. We underline that the last database has been published by Vulliamy et al. [1] who analytically reported 140 G6PD mutations: along with Vulliamy's database, there are two main sites, such as http://202.120.189.88/mutdb/ and www.LOVD.nl/MR, where almost all G6PD mutations can be found. Compared to the previous mutation reports, in our paper we have included for each mutation some additional information, such as: the secondary structure and the enzyme 3D position involving by mutation, the creation or abolition of a restriction site (with the enzyme involved) and the conservation score associated with each amino acid position. The mutations reported in the present tab have been divided according to the gene's region involved (coding and non-coding) and mutations affecting the coding region in: single, multiple (at least with two bases involved) and deletion. We underline that for the listed mutations, reported in italic, literature doesn't provide all the biochemical or bio-molecular information or the research data. Finally, for the "old" mutations, we tried to verify features previously reported and, when subsequently modified, we updated the specific information using the latest literature data. PMID:22293322

  3. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... control the activity of the complex: pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase turns on (activates) the complex, while pyruvate dehydrogenase ... binding protein (the PDHX gene), and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase (the PDP1 gene) have been identified in people ...

  4. Are free glucose and glucose-6-phosphate in milk indicators of specific physiological states in the cow?

    PubMed

    Larsen, T; Moyes, K M

    2015-01-01

    A total of 3200 milk samples from Holstein and Jersey cows were analysed for free glucose and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) by an enzymatic-fluorometric method that requires no pre-treatment. The cows were primiparous as well as multiparous, and samples were taken throughout the entire lactation period. In addition, lactose, protein, fat, citrate and β-hydroxybutyrate were determined and comparisons between these variables were made. Data were analysed using GLM model for the effect of parity, breed, time from last milking and stage of lactation on variations in parameters in milk. Pearson's correlations were generated between milk variables. P<0.05 was considered significant. Concentration of free glucose and G6P were on average 331 and 81 μM, respectively. Time from last milking (stay in the gland cistern) did not increase the concentration of these monosaccharides, indicating that they are not hydrolysis product from lactose post secretion, but rather reflecting the energy status of the mammary epithelial cells pre-secretion. Wide variation in range of these metabolites, that is, from 90 to 630 μM and 5 to 324 μM, for glucose and G6P, respectively, was observed. During the first 21 weeks in milk, free glucose increased whereas G6P decreased. Concentration of free glucose in milk is greater for primiparous than multiparous cows and greater for Holstein than Jersey cows. Concentration of G6P was not affected by parity or breed. The use of free glucose and G6P as indicators of physiological conditions and risk of disease is warranted for use as potential biomarkers for in-line surveillance systems on-farm.

  5. Time course of radiolabeled 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate turnover in cerebral cortex of goats

    SciTech Connect

    Pelligrino, D.A.; Miletich, D.J.; Albrecht, R.F.

    1987-02-01

    The vivo dephosphorylation rate of 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate (DGP) in the cerebral cortex of goats injected intravenously with radiolabeled 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DG) was investigated. Serial rapidly frozen samples of parietal cortical gray tissue were obtained at regular intervals over time periods from 45 min to 3 h in awake goats or in paralyzed and artificially ventilated goats maintained under 70% N/sub 2/O or pentobarbital sodium anesthesia. The samples were analyzed for glucose content and separate DG and DGP activities. The rate parameters for phosphorylation (k/sup *//sub 4/) and dephosphorylation (k/sup *//sub 4/) were estimated in each animal. The glucose phosphorylation rate (PR) was calculated over the intervals 3-5 (or 6), 3-10, 3-20, 3-30, and 3-45 min, assuming k/sup *//sub 4/ = O. As the evaluation period was extended beyond 10 min, the calculated PR became increasingly less when compared with that calculated over the 3- to 5- (or 6) min interval (PR/sub i/). Furthermore, as metabolic activity decreased, the magnitude of the error increased such that at 45 min pentobarbital-anesthetize goats underestimated the PR/sub i/ by 46.5% compared with only 23.1 in N/sub 2/O-anesthetized goats. This was also reflected in the >twofold higher k/sup *//sub 4//k/sup *//sub 3/ ratio in the pentobarbital vs. N/sub 2/O-anesthetized group. It is concluded that when using the DG method in the goat, DGP dephosphorylation cannot be ignored when employing >10-min evaluation periods.

  6. Trehalose Phosphate Synthesis in Streptomyces hygroscopicus: Purification of Guanosine Diphosphate d-Glucose: d-Glucose-6-Phosphate 1-Glucosyl-Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Elbein, Alan D.

    1968-01-01

    Guanosine diphosphate d-glucose:d-glucose-6-phosphate 1-glucosyl-transferase was purified approximately 100-fold from extracts of Streptomyces hygroscopicus. The purified enzyme catalyzed the transfer of glucose from guanosine diphosphate-d-glucose to glucose-6-phosphate to form trehalose phosphate and guanosine diphosphate. The enzyme was specific for these two substrates and was stimulated by the addition of magnesium ions. The product was characterized as α-α-trehalose-6-phosphate by its physical and chemical properties. The enzyme was present in a large number of Streptomyces species, suggesting that this group of organisms synthesized trehalose phosphate in a unique manner. This enzyme was not detected in fungi, since these organisms utilized uridine diphosphate-d-glucose as the glucosyl donor. PMID:5726304

  7. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... not by hormone test. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2003 Mar;58(3):323-31. Citation on PubMed Pang S, ... dehydrogenase deficiency. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2001 Mar;30(1):81-99, vi-vii. Review. Citation ...

  9. NMR studies on mechanism of isomerisation of fructose 6-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate catalysed by phosphoglucose isomerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Shahzada Nadeem; Mok, Kenneth Hun; Rashid, Naeem; Xie, Yongjing; Ruether, Manuel; O'Brien, John; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    The fate of hydrogen atoms at C-2 of glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) and C-1 of fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) was studied in the reaction catalysed by phosphoglucose isomerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis (TkPGI) through 1D and 2D NMR methods. When the reaction was performed in (2)H2O the hydrogen atoms in the aforementioned positions were exchanged with deuterons indicating that the isomerization occurred by a cis-enediol intermediate involving C-1 pro-R hydrogen of F6P. These features are similar to those described for phosphoglucose isomerases from rabbit muscle and Pyrococcus furiosus.

  10. Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Mat-Jan, F.; Alam, K.Y.; Clark, D.P. )

    1989-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative NAD-linked lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) have been isolated. These mutants showed no growth defects under anaerobic conditions unless present together with a defect in pyruvate formate lyase (pfl). Double mutants (pfl ldh) were unable to grow anaerobically on glucose or other sugars even when supplemented with acetate, whereas pfl mutants can do so. The ldh mutation was found to map at 30.5 min on the E. coli chromosome. The ldh mutant FMJ39 showed no detectable lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced no lactic acid from glucose under anaerobic conditions as estimated by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. We also found that in wild-type strains the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase was conjointly induced by anaerobic conditions and an acidic pH. Despite previous findings that phosphate concentrations affect the proportion of lactic acid produced during fermentation, we were unable to find any intrinsic effect of phosphate on lactate dehydrogenase activity, apart from the buffering effect of this ion.

  11. Studies on metatherian sex chromosomes. I. Inheritance and inactivation of sex-linked allelic genes determining glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variation in kangaroos.

    PubMed

    Johnston, P G; Sharman, G B

    1975-12-01

    Wallaroos (Macropus robustus robustus), which have the G6PD-F electrophoretic phenotype, crossed with euros (M.r.erubescens), of G6PD-S phenotype, produced F1 animals which had only the maternal G6PD type regardless of the direction of the cross. When F1 hybrids were backcrossed to wallaroos or euros, backcross progeny of either perental phenotype resulted. Sex-linked inheritance of allelic G6PD genes is shown to occur in wallaroos, euros and red kangaroos (M. rufus). Dose compensation for X chromosomes at the G6PD locus in kangaroow is achieved by inactivation of the allele of male parental origin.

  12. Serine Arginine Splicing Factor 3 Is Involved in Enhanced Splicing of Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase RNA in Response to Nutrients and Hormones in Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Callee M.; Suchanek, Amanda L.; Cyphert, Travis J.; Kohan, Alison B.; Szeszel-Fedorowicz, Wioletta; Salati, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Expression of G6PD is controlled by changes in the degree of splicing of the G6PD mRNA in response to nutrients in the diet. This regulation involves an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) in exon 12 of the mRNA. Using the G6PD model, we demonstrate that nutrients and hormones control the activity of serine-arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of splicing co-activators, and thereby regulate the splicing of G6PD mRNA. In primary rat hepatocyte cultures, insulin increased the amount of phosphorylated SR proteins, and this effect was counteracted by arachidonic acid. The results of RNA affinity analysis with nuclear extracts from intact liver demonstrated that the SR splicing factor proteins SRSF3 and SRSF4 bound to the G6PD ESE. Consequently, siRNA-mediated depletion of SRSF3, but not SRSF4, in liver cells inhibited accumulation of both mRNA expressed from a minigene containing exon 12 and the endogenous G6PD mRNA. Consistent with the functional role of SRSF3 in regulating splicing, SRSF3 was observed to bind to the ESE in both intact cells and in animals using RNA immunoprecipitation analysis. Furthermore, refeeding significantly increased the binding of SRSF3 coincident with increased splicing and expression of G6PD. Together, these data establish that nutritional regulation of SRSF3 activity is involved in the differential splicing of the G6PD transcript in response to nutrients. Nutritional regulation of other SR proteins presents a regulatory mechanism that could cause widespread changes in mRNA splicing. Nutrients are therefore novel regulators of mRNA splicing. PMID:23233666

  13. The effects of salt stress cause a diversion of basal metabolism in barley roots: possible different roles for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Cardi, Manuela; Castiglia, Daniela; Ferrara, Myriam; Guerriero, Gea; Chiurazzi, Maurizio; Esposito, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    In this study the effects of salt stress and nitrogen assimilation have been investigated in roots of hydroponically-grown barley plants exposed to 150 mM NaCl, in presence or absence of ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. Salt stress determines a diversion of root metabolism towards the synthesis of osmolytes, such as glycine betaine and proline, and increased levels of reduced glutathione. The metabolic changes triggered by salt stress result in a decrease in both activities and protein abundance of key enzymes, namely GOGAT and PEP carboxylase, and in a slight increase in HSP70. These variations would enhance the requirement for reductants supplied by the OPPP, consistently with the observed increase in total G6PDH activity. The involvement and occurrence of the different G6PDH isoforms have been investigated, and the kinetic properties of partially purified cytosolic and plastidial G6PDHs determined. Bioinformatic analyses examining co-expression profiles of G6PDHs in Arabidopsis and barley corroborate the data presented. Moreover, the gene coding for the root P2-G6PDH isoform was fully sequenced; the biochemical properties of the corresponding protein were examined experimentally. The results are discussed in the light of the possible distinct roles and regulation of the different G6PDH isoforms during salt stress in barley roots.

  14. [Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Agaimy, A

    2016-03-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) represents a type II mitochondrial complex related to the respiratory chain and Krebs cycle. The complex is composed of four major subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD. The oncogenic role of this enzyme complex has only recently been recognized and the complex is currently considered an important oncogenic signaling pathway with tumor suppressor properties. In addition to the familial paraganglioma syndromes (types 1-5) as prototypical SDH-related diseases, many other tumors have been defined as SDH-deficient, in particular a subset of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), rare hypophyseal adenomas, a subset of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (recently added) and a variety of other tumor entities, the latter mainly described as rare case reports. As a central core subunit responsible for the integrity of the SDH complex, the expression of SDHB is lost in all SDH-deficient neoplasms irrespective of the specific SDH subunit affected by a genetic mutation in addition to concurrent loss of the subunit specifically affected by genetic alteration. Accordingly, all SDH-deficient neoplasms are by definition SDHB-deficient. The SDH-deficient renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has only recently been well-characterized and it is included as a specific subtype of RCC in the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification published in 2016. In this review, the major clinicopathological, immunohistochemical and genetic features of this rare disease entity are presented and discussed in the context of the broad differential diagnosis. PMID:26979428

  15. Quantification of glucose cycling and the extent of equilibration of glucose 6-phosphate with fructose 6-phosphate in islets from ob/ob mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chandramouli, V; Khan, A; Ostenson, C G; Berggren, P O; Löw, H; Landau, B R; Efendić, S E

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic islets from fed and fasted obese hyperglycaemic (ob/ob) mice were incubated with [1-14C]glucose at 5.5 mM and 16.7 mM, [1-14C]mannose at 16.7 mM, and 3H2O. Yields of 14CO2 and 14C-labelled lactate, and amounts of 14C from [1-14C]mannose incorporated into glucose and of 3H bound to C-2 of glucose, were measured. Glucose utilization was determined from yields of 3H2O from [5-3H]glucose. From the results using 14C, 32-43% of the hexoses phosphorylated to hexose 6-phosphate were estimated to have been dephosphorylated, i.e. cycled. Estimates of hexose cycling from 3H incorporation into glucose were similar. Differences in the ratios of 14C yields in CO2 and lactate indicated incomplete isotopic equilibration between glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate, making the estimates of cycling semi-quantitative. In the fasted state, a larger percentage of the hexose utilized went to lactate than in the fed state. Thus conversion of mannose into glucose in islets indicates the occurrence of glucose cycling in islets. Yields of 14C from [1-14C]mannose, compared with from [1-14C]glucose, provide an approach for quantifying the extent of this cycling. These data provide further evidence for extensive glucose cycling occurring in ob/ob islets in both the fed and the fasted state. PMID:1898326

  16. Phenotypic and Neuropathological Characterization of Fetal Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pirot, Nathalie; Crahes, Marie; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Soares, Anais; Bucourt, Martine; Boutron, Audrey; Carbillon, Lionel; Mignot, Cyril; Trestard, Laetitia; Bekri, Soumeya; Laquerrière, Annie

    2016-03-01

    To distinguish pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDH) from other antenatal neurometabolic disorders thereby improving prenatal diagnosis, we describe imaging findings, clinical phenotype, and brain lesions in fetuses from 3 families with molecular characterization of this condition. Neuropathological analysis was performed in 4 autopsy cases from 3 unrelated families with subsequent biochemical and molecular confirmation of PDH complex deficiency. In 2 families there were mutations in the PDHA1 gene; in the third family there was a mutation in the PDHB gene. All fetuses displayed characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism of varying severity, absence of visceral lesions, and associated encephaloclastic and developmental supra- and infratentorial lesions. Neurodevelopmental abnormalities included microcephaly, migration abnormalities (pachygyria, polymicrogyria, periventricular nodular heterotopias), and cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia with hypoplastic dentate nuclei and pyramidal tracts. Associated clastic lesions included asymmetric leukomalacia, reactive gliosis, large pseudocysts of germinolysis, and basal ganglia calcifications. The diagnosis of PDH deficiency should be suspected antenatally with the presence of clastic and neurodevelopmental lesions and a relatively characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism. Postmortem examination is essential for excluding other closely related entities, thereby allowing for biochemical and molecular confirmation. PMID:26865159

  17. Sequence Analysis and Molecular Characterization of Clonorchis sinensis Hexokinase, an Unusual Trimeric 50-kDa Glucose-6-Phosphate-Sensitive Allosteric Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tingjin; Ning, Dan; Sun, Hengchang; Li, Ran; Shang, Mei; Li, Xuerong; Wang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Wenjun; Liang, Chi; Li, Wenfang; Mao, Qiang; Li, Ye; Deng, Chuanhuan; Wang, Lexun; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Xu, Jin; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-01-01

    Clonorchiasis, which is induced by the infection of Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis), is highly associated with cholangiocarcinoma. Because the available examination, treatment and interrupting transmission provide limited opportunities to prevent infection, it is urgent to develop integrated strategies to prevent and control clonorchiasis. Glycolytic enzymes are crucial molecules for trematode survival and have been targeted for drug development. Hexokinase of C. sinensis (CsHK), the first key regulatory enzyme of the glycolytic pathway, was characterized in this study. The calculated molecular mass (Mr) of CsHK was 50.0 kDa. The obtained recombinant CsHK (rCsHK) was a homotrimer with an Mr of approximately 164 kDa, as determined using native PAGE and gel filtration. The highest activity was obtained with 50 mM glycine-NaOH at pH 10 and 100 mM Tris-HCl at pH 8.5 and 10. The kinetics of rCsHK has a moderate thermal stability. Compared to that of the corresponding negative control, the enzymatic activity was significantly inhibited by praziquantel (PZQ) and anti-rCsHK serum. rCsHK was homotropically and allosterically activated by its substrates, including glucose, mannose, fructose, and ATP. ADP exhibited mixed allosteric effect on rCsHK with respect to ATP, while inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) displayed net allosteric activation with various allosteric systems. Fructose behaved as a dose-dependent V activator with the substrate glucose. Glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) displayed net allosteric inhibition on rCsHK with respect to ATP or glucose with various allosteric systems in a dose-independent manner. There were differences in both mRNA and protein levels of CsHK among the life stages of adult worm, metacercaria, excysted metacercaria and egg of C. sinensis, suggesting different energy requirements during different development stages. Our study furthers the understanding of the biological functions of CsHK and supports the need to screen for small molecule inhibitors

  18. Acute haemolytic anaemia and myolysis due to G6PD deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mangat, Chetna; Inoue, Susumu; Saah, Elna; Sharman, Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old African-American male patient with sickle cell trait developed cough, red coloured urine, pallor and fatigue. The patient was hospitalised. Diagnostic workup showed that he was glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient in erythrocytes. He also had chest X-ray findings of pneumonia. His urine examination showed the presence of haemoglobin and myoglobin. On repeated questioning it was found that he had a moth ball in his mouth a few days prior to this medical episode. This case illustrates a rarely described complication of myolysis in G6PD deficient persons on exposure to a strong oxidant. A review of the literature showed that most people with G6PD deficiency tolerate exercise well without untoward effect in muscles. However, assay of myoglobin in urine has not been routinely performed in these patients during acute haemolytic episode, and thus it is uncertain how frequent myoglobulinaemia occurs in a similar stress situation. PMID:25234071

  19. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids.

  20. An animal model of human aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Mann, J.; Yoshida, A.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic deficiency of ALDH2, a major mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, is intimately related to alcohol sensitivity and the degree of predisposition to alcoholic diseases in humans. The ultimate biological role of ALDH2 can be exposed by knocking out the ALDH2 gene in an animal model. As the first step for this line of studies, we cloned and characterized the ALDH2 gene from mouse C57/6J strain which is associated with a high alcohol preference. The gene spans 26 kbp and is composed of 13 exons. Embryonic stem cells were transfected with a replacement vector which contains a partially deleted exon3, a positive selection cassette (pPgk Neo), exon 4 with an artificial stop codon, exons 5, 6, 7, and a negative selection cassette (pMCI-Tk). Genomic DNAs prepared from drug resistant clones were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and by Southern blot analysis to distinguish random integration from homologous recombination. Out of 132 clones examined, 8 had undergone homologous recombination at one of the ALDH2 alleles. The cloned transformed embryonic stem cells with a disrupted ALDH2 allele were injected into blastocysts. Transplantation of the blastocysts into surrogate mother mice yielded chimeric mice. The role of ALDH2 in alcohol preference, alcohol sensitivity and other biological and behavioral characteristics can be elucidated by examining the heterozygous and homozygous mutant strains produced by breeding of chimeric mice.

  1. Acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and marked selenium deficiency causing severe rhabdomyolysis in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Diego E.; Valberg, Stephanie J.; Magdesian, K. Gary; Hanna, Paul E.; Lofstedt, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of severe rhabdomyolysis in a pregnant mare associated with histopathologic and biochemical features of both selenium deficiency and acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) due to seasonal pasture myopathy (SPM). This case highlights the importance of assessing plasma selenium levels in horses with clinical signs of pasture myopathy as this deficiency may be a contributing or exacerbating factor. PMID:26538673

  2. Newborn screening tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders Galactosemia Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) Human immunodeficiency disease (HIV) Organic acid metabolism disorders Phenylketonuria (PKU) Sickle cell disease and other ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency is a condition that prevents the body from converting certain fats into energy, especially during periods without food (fasting). Signs and symptoms of SCAD deficiency may ...

  4. Acetate Utilization in Lactococcus lactis Deficient in Lactate Dehydrogenase: a Rescue Pathway for Maintaining Redox Balance

    PubMed Central

    Hols, Pascal; Ramos, Ana; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Delcour, Jean; de Vos, Willem M.; Santos, Helena; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    1999-01-01

    Acetate was shown to improve glucose fermentation in Lactococcus lactis deficient in lactate dehydrogenase. 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance studies using [2-13C]glucose and [2-13C]acetate as substrates demonstrated that acetate was exclusively converted to ethanol. This novel pathway provides an alternative route for NAD+ regeneration in the absence of lactate dehydrogenase. PMID:10464231

  5. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... step that metabolizes groups of fats called medium-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the HADH gene lead ... a shortage of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids cannot be metabolized ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from food are broken down into parts called amino acids . Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for ... an enzyme that helps break down a particular amino acid called valine. Most people with IBD deficiency are ...

  7. Methylmalonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency: demonstration of defective valine and beta-alanine metabolism and reduced malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity in cultured fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.G.; Pollitt, R.J.; Webley, J.

    1987-08-01

    Intact cultured fibroblasts from a child with a new metabolic disorder, thought to be due to a deficiency of methylmalonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produced labeled CO/sub 2/ normally from (1-/sup 14/C)valine but not from (2-/sup 14/C)valine. CO/sub 2/ production from labeled beta-alanine was also much reduced, confirming the suspicion that malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase is also deficient in this condition. An assay for malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in cell homogenates showed low activity but it was impossible to assess the degree of reduction.

  8. [Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient tumors--a novel mechanism of tumor formation].

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a heterotetrameric enzyme complex participating in the Krebs cycle and electron transfer of oxidative phosphorylation. These tumors, discovered during the past 15 years, often occur in young patients and include 15% of paragangliomas, 7% of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and <1% of renal cell carcinomas and pituitary adenomas. SDH-deficient tumors have lost SDH complex activity via bi-allelic genomic losses or epigenetic silencing. This deficiency is oncogenic, activating pseudohypoxia signaling. SDH deficiency has to be suspected in the above-cited tumor types presenting at a young age. Immunohistochemical testing of tumor tissue for SDHB loss is diagnostic. PMID:26749909

  9. Strategies for Correcting Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Tenopoulou, Margarita; Chen, Jie; Bastin, Jean; Bennett, Michael J.; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Very long acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is a genetic pediatric disorder presenting with a spectrum of phenotypes that remains for the most part untreatable. Here, we present a novel strategy for the correction of VLCAD deficiency by increasing mutant VLCAD enzymatic activity. Treatment of VLCAD-deficient fibroblasts, which express distinct mutant VLCAD protein and exhibit deficient fatty acid β-oxidation, with S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine induced site-specific S-nitrosylation of VLCAD mutants at cysteine residue 237. Cysteine 237 S-nitrosylation was associated with an 8–17-fold increase in VLCAD-specific activity and concomitant correction of acylcarnitine profile and β-oxidation capacity, two hallmarks of the disorder. Overall, this study provides biochemical evidence for a potential therapeutic modality to correct β-oxidation deficiencies. PMID:25737446

  10. Reconciling diabetes management and the ketogenic diet in a child with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Henwood, Maria J; Thornton, Paul S; Preis, Christina M; Chee, Clare; Grimberg, Adda

    2006-05-01

    A 4-year-old girl with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, static encephalopathy, and seizure disorder treated with the ketogenic diet presented in severe diabetic ketoacidosis. Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency is a rare genetic defect of mitochondrial energy metabolism that leads to inefficient glucose use and lactic acidosis. The ketogenic diet provides the brain with an alternate fuel source, but its implementation opposes traditional diabetes management. Faced with this therapeutic dilemma, we aimed to maintain ketosis without compromising safety to optimize neurologic function and quality of life. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of a child simultaneously treated with the ketogenic diet and exogenous insulin. A 28-month follow-up revealed excellent glycemic control, improved activity level, significant developmental achievements, and, perhaps most striking, catch-up linear growth from < 5th percentile to the 50th percentile. Her progress to date indicates that diabetes does not preclude use of the ketogenic diet.

  11. 3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency: description of two new cases in Tunisia and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Ichraf; Wiame, Elsa; Kraoua, Lilia; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Benrhouma, Hanen; Rouissi, Aida; Turki, Ilhem; Chaabouni, Habiba; Briand, Gilbert; Kaabachi, Naziha; Van Schaftingen, Emile; Gouider-Khouja, Neziha

    2013-10-01

    3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of serine biosynthesis. It is typically characterized by congenital microcephaly, intractable seizures of infantile onset, and severe psychomotor retardation. Diagnosis is suspected on decreased l-serine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and confirmed by genetic study. Early diagnosis in index cases allows supplementation in serine and prevention of fixed lesions. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling allows prevention of secondary cases. We report on the two first unrelated Tunisian families with 3-PGDH deficiency confirmed by biochemical and genetic study. We discuss clinical, biochemical, imaging, electroencephalographic, and therapeutic aspects and review the literature. PMID:23564319

  12. 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency: a case report of a treatable cause of seizures.

    PubMed

    Coşkun, Turgay; Aydin, Halil Ibrahim; Kiliç, Mustafa; Dursun, Ali; Haliloğlu, Göknur; Topaloğlu, Haluk; Karli-Oğuz, Kader; de Koning, Tom J

    2009-01-01

    Serine deficiency disorders are a new group of neurometabolic diseases resulting from a deficiency in one of the three enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of L-serine. Deficiency of the enzyme 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH), which catalyzes the first step in the biosynthetic pathway, leads to congenital microcephaly, severe psychomotor retardation, and intractable seizures. We report a 4 1/2-year-old boy who presented with congenital microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, hypertonia, strabismus, and drug-resistant seizures due to 3-PGDH deficiency. His seizures responded to L-serine and glycine supplementation only. This potentially treatable disease should be borne in mind in patients with congenital microcephaly, psychomotor retardation and seizures. A timely diagnosis based on the detection of low cerebrospinal fluid levels of L-serine and glycine is expected to further increase the success of L-serine and glycine supplementation in these patients. PMID:20196394

  13. Mechanism of hyperinsulinism in short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency involves activation of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Chen, Pan; Palladino, Andrew; Narayan, Srinivas; Russell, Laurie K; Sayed, Samir; Xiong, Guoxiang; Chen, Jie; Stokes, David; Butt, Yasmeen M; Jones, Patricia M; Collins, Heather W; Cohen, Noam A; Cohen, Akiva S; Nissim, Itzhak; Smith, Thomas J; Strauss, Arnold W; Matschinsky, Franz M; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A

    2010-10-01

    The mechanism of insulin dysregulation in children with hyperinsulinism associated with inactivating mutations of short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCHAD) was examined in mice with a knock-out of the hadh gene (hadh(-/-)). The hadh(-/-) mice had reduced levels of plasma glucose and elevated plasma insulin levels, similar to children with SCHAD deficiency. hadh(-/-) mice were hypersensitive to oral amino acid with decrease of glucose level and elevation of insulin. Hypersensitivity to oral amino acid in hadh(-/-) mice can be explained by abnormal insulin responses to a physiological mixture of amino acids and increased sensitivity to leucine stimulation in isolated perifused islets. Measurement of cytosolic calcium showed normal basal levels and abnormal responses to amino acids in hadh(-/-) islets. Leucine, glutamine, and alanine are responsible for amino acid hypersensitivity in islets. hadh(-/-) islets have lower intracellular glutamate and aspartate levels, and this decrease can be prevented by high glucose. hadh(-/-) islets also have increased [U-(14)C]glutamine oxidation. In contrast, hadh(-/-) mice have similar glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity compared with controls. Perifused hadh(-/-) islets showed no differences from controls in response to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, even with addition of either a medium-chain fatty acid (octanoate) or a long-chain fatty acid (palmitate). Pull-down experiments with SCHAD, anti-SCHAD, or anti-GDH antibodies showed protein-protein interactions between SCHAD and GDH. GDH enzyme kinetics of hadh(-/-) islets showed an increase in GDH affinity for its substrate, α-ketoglutarate. These studies indicate that SCHAD deficiency causes hyperinsulinism by activation of GDH via loss of inhibitory regulation of GDH by SCHAD.

  14. Very long-chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency which was accepted as infanticide.

    PubMed

    Eminoglu, Tuba F; Tumer, Leyla; Okur, Ilyas; Ezgu, Fatih S; Biberoglu, Gursel; Hasanoglu, Alev

    2011-07-15

    Very-long-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) (OMIM #201475) is an autosomal recessive disorder of fatty acid oxidation. Major phenotypic expressions are hypoketotic hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, cardiomyopathy, myopathy, rhabdomyolysis, elevated creatinine kinase, and lipid infiltration of liver and muscle. At the same time, it is a rare cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) or unexplained death in the neonatal period [1-4]. We report a patient with VLCADD whose parents were investigated for infanticide because her three previous siblings had suddenly died after normal deliveries.

  15. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase caused by novel and known mutations in the E1alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jessie M; Levandovskiy, Valeriy; Mackay, Neviana; Tein, Ingrid; Robinson, Brian H

    2004-11-15

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)-complex deficiency (OMIM 312170) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder, with phenotypes ranging from fatal lactic acidosis (LA) in the newborn to chronic neurological dysfunction. To date, over 80 different mutations have been identified in the PDHA1 gene in patients with PDH complex deficiency, which are thus thought to contribute to the PDH deficient phenotype. We have identified 14 additional patients with total PDH complex deficiency, all of whom were found to contain mutations within the PDHA1 gene (E(1)alpha subunit). The mutations include both missense mutations and duplications. Eight of these patients had novel mutations, and the remaining had mutations that have been identified previously in PDH complex deficient patients, with residual fibroblast activity ranging from 2.4 to 69% of control values. The nature of these mutations illustrates the variability in phenotype for a given gene defect, with intermittent ataxia being the mildest presentation, Leigh syndrome being the most common and severe neonatal LA the most severe.

  16. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency and its relationship with epilepsy frequency--An overview.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, Suman; Aguan, Kripamoy

    2015-10-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) is a member of a family of multienzyme complexes that provides the link between glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle by catalyzing the physiologically irreversible decarboxylation of various 2-oxoacid substrates to their corresponding acyl-CoA derivatives, NADH and CO2. PDHc deficiency is a metabolic disorder commonly associated with lactic acidosis, progressive neurological and neuromuscular degeneration that vary with age and gender. In this review, we aim to discuss the relationship between occurrence of epilepsy and PDHc deficiency associated with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (E1α subunit (PDHA1) and E1β subunit (PDHB)) and PDH phosphatase (PDP) deficiency. PDHc plays a crucial role in the aerobic carbohydrate metabolism and regulates the use of carbohydrate as the source of oxidative energy. In severe PDHc deficiency, the energy deficit impairs brain development in utero resulting in physiological and structural changes in the brain that contributes to the subsequent onset of epileptogenesis. Epileptogenesis in PDHc deficiency is linked to energy failure and abnormal neurotransmitter metabolism that progressively alters neuronal excitability. This metabolic blockage might be restricted via inclusion of ketogenic diet that is broken up by β-oxidation and directly converting it to acetyl-CoA, and thereby improving the patient's health condition. Genetic counseling is essential as PDHA1 deficiency is X-linked. The demonstration of the X-chromosome localization of PDHA1 resolved a number of questions concerning the variable phenotype displayed by patients with E1 deficiency. Most patients show a broad range of neurological abnormalities, with the severity showing some dependence on the nature of the mutation in the Elα gene, while PDHB and PDH phosphatase (PDP) deficiencies are of autosomal recessive inheritance. However, in females, the disorder is further complicated by the pattern of X

  17. Eye Findings on Vigabatrin and Taurine Treatment in Two Patients with Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gabriella-Ana; Hukin, Juliette; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia G; Aroichane, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    We describe for the first time two patients with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, who were found to have abnormal electroretinogram (ERG) examinations at baseline, or 6 months after vigabatrin treatment was started. This was somewhat reversible with L-taurine treatment, or minimally progressive. The mechanism of injury to the retina may be induced by elevations of γ-aminobutyric acid causing peripheral photoreceptor and ganglion cell damage, and this can be exacerbated by the use of vigabatrin. The use of taurine supplementation in tandem with vigabatrin may allow reversal of retinopathy and mitigate or slow down further deterioration. Further prospective clinical trials are required to evaluate this further. We recommend starting L-taurine therapy together with vigabatrin if a trial of vigabatrin is commenced in a patient with SSADH deficiency. Close monitoring of visual fields or ERG is also recommended at baseline and during vigabatrin therapy. PMID:27104484

  18. Novel mutations in dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency in two cousins with borderline-normal PDH complex activity.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jessie M; Levandovskiy, Valeriy; Mackay, Neviana; Raiman, Julian; Renaud, Deborah L; Clarke, Joe T R; Feigenbaum, Annette; Elpeleg, Orly; Robinson, Brian H

    2006-07-15

    We have diagnosed dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) deficiency in two male second cousins, who presented with markedly different clinical phenotypes. Patient 1 had a recurrent encephalopathy, and patient 2 had microcephaly and lactic acidosis. Their presentation is unusual, in that the DLD subunit deficiency had little effect on pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity, but caused a severe reduction in the activities of other enzymes that utilize this subunit. We have identified two mutations in the DLD gene in each patient. The second cousins have one novel mutation in common resulting in a substitution of isoleucine for threonine (I47T), which has not been previously reported in the literature. Patient 1 has a second mutation that has been reported to be common in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, G229C. Patient 2 has a second mutation, E375K, which has also been previously reported in the literature. Enzyme kinetic measurements on patient fibroblasts show that under certain conditions, one heteroallelic mutation may have a higher K(m). This may account for the differing clinical phenotypes. These findings have important repercussions for other patients with similar clinical phenotypes, as DLD activity is not normally measured in cases with normal PDHc activity.

  19. G6PD Deficiency in an HIV Clinic Setting in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Xu, Julia Z; Francis, Richard O; Lerebours Nadal, Leonel E; Shirazi, Maryam; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Hod, Eldad A; Jhang, Jeffrey S; Stotler, Brie A; Spitalnik, Steven L; Nicholas, Stephen W

    2015-10-01

    Because human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receive prophylaxis with oxidative drugs, those with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may experience hemolysis. However, G6PD deficiency has not been studied in the Dominican Republic, where many individuals have African ancestry. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Dominican HIV-infected patients and to attempt to develop a cost-effective algorithm for identifying such individuals. To this end, histories, chart reviews, and G6PD testing were performed for 238 consecutive HIV-infected adult clinic patients. The overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency (8.8%) was similar in males (9.3%) and females (8.5%), and higher in Haitians (18%) than Dominicans (6.4%; P = 0.01). By logistic regression, three clinical variables predicted G6PD status: maternal country of birth (P = 0.01) and a history of hemolysis (P = 0.01) or severe anemia (P = 0.03). Using these criteria, an algorithm was developed, in which a patient subset was identified that would benefit most from G6PD screening, yielding a sensitivity of 94.7% and a specificity of 97.2%, increasing the pretest probability (8.8-15.1%), and halving the number of patients needing testing. This algorithm may provide a cost-effective strategy for improving care in resource-limited settings.

  20. G6PD Deficiency in an HIV Clinic Setting in the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Julia Z.; Francis, Richard O.; Lerebours Nadal, Leonel E.; Shirazi, Maryam; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Hod, Eldad A.; Jhang, Jeffrey S.; Stotler, Brie A.; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Nicholas, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Because human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receive prophylaxis with oxidative drugs, those with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may experience hemolysis. However, G6PD deficiency has not been studied in the Dominican Republic, where many individuals have African ancestry. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Dominican HIV-infected patients and to attempt to develop a cost-effective algorithm for identifying such individuals. To this end, histories, chart reviews, and G6PD testing were performed for 238 consecutive HIV-infected adult clinic patients. The overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency (8.8%) was similar in males (9.3%) and females (8.5%), and higher in Haitians (18%) than Dominicans (6.4%; P = 0.01). By logistic regression, three clinical variables predicted G6PD status: maternal country of birth (P = 0.01) and a history of hemolysis (P = 0.01) or severe anemia (P = 0.03). Using these criteria, an algorithm was developed, in which a patient subset was identified that would benefit most from G6PD screening, yielding a sensitivity of 94.7% and a specificity of 97.2%, increasing the pretest probability (8.8–15.1%), and halving the number of patients needing testing. This algorithm may provide a cost-effective strategy for improving care in resource-limited settings. PMID:26240158

  1. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Doczi, Judit; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Kawamata, Hibiki; Manfredi, Giovanni; Zhang, Steven F.; Gibson, Gary E.; Beal, M. Flint; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    A decline in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) activity has been associated with neurodegeneration. Provision of succinyl-CoA by KGDHC is essential for generation of matrix ATP (or GTP) by substrate-level phosphorylation catalyzed by succinyl-CoA ligase. Here, we demonstrate ATP consumption in respiration-impaired isolated and in situ neuronal somal mitochondria from transgenic mice with a deficiency of either dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (DLST) or dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD) that exhibit a 20–48% decrease in KGDHC activity. Import of ATP into the mitochondrial matrix of transgenic mice was attributed to a shift in the reversal potential of the adenine nucleotide translocase toward more negative values due to diminished matrix substrate-level phosphorylation, which causes the translocase to reverse prematurely. Immunoreactivity of all three subunits of succinyl-CoA ligase and maximal enzymatic activity were unaffected in transgenic mice as compared to wild-type littermates. Therefore, decreased matrix substrate-level phosphorylation was due to diminished provision of succinyl-CoA. These results were corroborated further by the finding that mitochondria from wild-type mice respiring on substrates supporting substrate-level phosphorylation exhibited ∼30% higher ADP-ATP exchange rates compared to those obtained from DLST+/− or DLD+/− littermates. We propose that KGDHC-associated pathologies are a consequence of the inability of respiration-impaired mitochondria to rely on “in-house” mitochondrial ATP reserves.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Doczi, J., Starkov, A. A., Kawamata, H., Manfredi, G., Zhang, S. F., Gibson, G. E., Beal, M. F., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation. PMID:23475850

  2. The role of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in the supply of reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate for steroidogenesis in the superovulated rat ovary

    PubMed Central

    Flint, A. P. F.; Denton, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    1. Superovulated rat ovary was found to contain high activities of NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase. The activity of each enzyme was approximately four times that of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and equalled or exceeded the activities reported to be present in other mammalian tissues. Fractionation of a whole tissue homogenate of superovulated rat ovary indicated that both enzymes were exclusively cytoplasmic. The tissue was also found to contain pyruvate carboxylase (exclusively mitochondrial), NAD–malate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase (both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic) and ATP–citrate lyase (exclusively cytoplasmic). 2. The kinetic properties of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase were determined and compared with the whole-tissue concentrations of their substrates and NADPH; NADPH is a competitive inhibitor of all three enzymes. The concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate, malate and isocitrate in incubated tissue slices were raised at least tenfold by the addition of glucose to the incubation medium, from the values below to values above the respective Km values of the dehydrogenases. Glucose doubled the tissue concentration of NADPH. 3. Steroidogenesis from acetate is stimulated by glucose in slices of superovulated rat ovary incubated in vitro. It was found that this stimulatory effect of glucose can be mimicked by malate, isocitrate, lactate and pyruvate. 4. It is concluded that NADP–malate dehydrogenase or NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase or both may play an important role in the formation of NADPH in the superovulated rat ovary. It is suggested that the stimulatory effect of glucose on steroidogenesis from acetate results from an increased rate of NADPH formation through one or both dehydrogenases, brought about by the increases in the concentrations of malate, isocitrate or both. Possible pathways involving the two enzymes are discussed

  3. Molecular epidemiological investigation of G6PD deficiency by a gene chip among Chinese Hakka of southern Jiangxi province

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rong; Lin, Min; Ye, Jun; Zheng, Bao-Ping; Jiang, Li-Xia; Zhu, Juan-Juan; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Lai, Mi; Zhong, Tian-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In southern China, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a significant health problem, and the incidence ranged from 0.5 to 4.08% in different Chinese population. The aims of this study are to investigate the molecular epidemiological characteristic of the G6PD gene among Chinese Hakka in southern Jiangxi province. 2331 unrelated subjects were screened for G6PD deficiency by a fluorescent test. DNA from deficient individuals was analyzed by a gene chip analysis for thirteen common Chinese G6PD mutations. In total, 3.60% (82/2331; 95% CI 2.77-4.27) of the sample were found to be G6PD-deficient. Eight mutations were found from 80 samples. However, mutation(s) for the two remaining samples were unknown. The most common mutations were G6PD Canton (1376 G>T) and G6PD Kaiping (1388 G>A), and the following mutations were 1311 polymorphism (1311 C>T), G6PD Gaohe (95 A>G), G6PD Chinese-5 (1024 C>T), G6PD Maewo (1360 C>T), Shunde (592 C>T), G6PD Viangchan (871 G>A) and Chinese-3 (493 A>G). This is the first report of G6PD deficiency among Chinese Hakka population in Jiangxi province. PMID:26823837

  4. Dehydrogenases, Acid and Alkaline Phosphatases, and Esterases for Chemotaxonomy of Selected Meloidogyne, Ditylenchus, Heterodera and Aphelenchus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, D. W.; Huisingh, D.; Sasser, J. N.

    1971-01-01

    Various taxonomically useful profiles of four dehydrogenases (lactate, malate, glucose-6-phosphate, and a-glycerophosphate) and three hydrolases (acid and alkaline phosphatase and esterase) were detected in whole nematode homogenates of Meloidogyne javanica, M. hapla, M. incognita, M. arenaria, Ditylenchus dipsaci, D. triformis, Heterodera glycines, and Aphelenchus avenae. The enzyme profiles were stable in populations cultured on several different hosts. A tentative enzymically-determined phylogeny of Meloidogyne is given. PMID:19322334

  5. 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II deficiency on newborn screening test.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Vitor Guilherme Brito de; Oliveira, Renata Santarem de; Gameleira, Kallianna Paula Duarte; Cruz, Cátia Barbosa; Lofrano-Porto, Adriana

    2014-08-01

    3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase II (3β-HSD) deficiency represents a rare CAH variant. Newborns affected with its classic form have salt wasting in early infancy and genital ambiguity in both sexes. High levels of 17-hydroxypregnenolone (Δ517OHP) are characteristic, but extra-adrenal conversion to 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) may lead to positive results on newborn screening tests. Filter paper 17OHP on newborn screening test was performed by immunofluorometric assay, and serum determinations of 17OHP and Δ517OHP, by radioimmunoassay. A 46,XY infant with genital ambiguity and adrenal crisis at three months of age presented a positive result on newborn screening for CAH. Serum determinations of 17OHP and Δ517OHP were elevated, and a high Δ517OHP/cortisol relation was compatible with the diagnosis of 3β-HSD deficiency. Molecular analysis of the HSD3B2 gene from the affected case revealed the presence of the homozygous p.P222Q mutation, whereas his parents were heterozygous for it. We present the first report of 3β-HSD type II deficiency genotype-proven detected at the Newborn Screening Program in Brazil. The case described herein corroborates the strong genotype-phenotype correlation associated with the HSD3B2 p.P222Q mutation, which leads to a classic salt-wasting 3β-HSD deficiency. Further evaluation of 17OHP assays used in newborn screening tests would aid in determining their reproducibility, as well as the potential significance of moderately elevated 17OHP levels as an early indicator to the diagnosis of other forms of classic CAH, beyond 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

  6. Metabolic characterization of Lactococcus lactis deficient in lactate dehydrogenase using in vivo 13C-NMR.

    PubMed

    Neves, A R; Ramos, A; Shearman, C; Gasson, M J; Almeida, J S; Santos, H

    2000-06-01

    The metabolism of glucose by nongrowing cells of Lactococcus lactis strain FI7851, constructed from the wild-type L. lactis strain MG1363 by disruption of the lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene [Gasson, M.J., Benson, K., Swindel, S. & Griffin, H. (1996) Lait 76, 33-40] was studied in a noninvasive manner by 13C-NMR. The kinetics of the build-up and consumption of the pools of intracellular intermediates mannitol 1-phosphate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, 3-phosphoglycerate, and phosphoenolpyruvate as well as the utilization of [1-13C]glucose and formation of products (lactate, acetate, mannitol, ethanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol) were monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 30 s. The metabolism of glucose by the parental wild-type strain was also examined for comparison. A clear shift from typical homolactic fermentation (parental strain) to a mixed acid fermentation (lactate dehdydrogenase deficient; LDHd strain) was observed. Furthermore, high levels of mannitol were transiently produced and metabolized once glucose was depleted. Mannitol 1-phosphate accumulated intracellularly up to 76 mM concentration. Mannitol was formed from fructose 6-phosphate by the combined action of mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphatase. The results show that the formation of mannitol 1-phosphate by the LDHd strain during glucose catabolism is a consequence of impairment in NADH oxidation caused by a highly reduced LDH activity, the transient production of mannitol 1-phosphate serving as a regeneration pathway for NAD+ regeneration. Oxygen availability caused a drastic change in the pattern of intermediates and end-products, reinforcing the key-role of the fulfilment of the redox balance. The flux control coefficients for the step catalysed by mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase were calculated and the implications in the design of metabolic engineering strategies are discussed.

  7. Expanding the molecular diversity and phenotypic spectrum of glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Shteyer, Eyal; Niceta, Marcello; Rizzo, Cristiano; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Chillemi, Giovanni; Bruselles, Alessandro; Semeraro, Michela; Barel, Ortal; Eyal, Eran; Kol, Nitzan; Haberman, Yael; Lahad, Avishai; Diomedi-Camassei, Francesca; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Rechavi, Gideon; Tartaglia, Marco; Anikster, Yair

    2016-09-01

    Transient infantile hypertriglyceridemia (HTGT1; OMIM #614480) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which manifests in early infancy with transient hypertriglyceridemia, hepatomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, persistent fatty liver and hepatic fibrosis. This rare clinical entity is caused by inactivating mutations in the GPD1 gene, which encodes the cytosolic isoform of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Here we report on four patients from three unrelated families of diverse ethnic origins, who presented with hepatomegaly, liver steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, with or without fasting ketotic hypoglycemia. Whole exome sequencing revealed the affected individuals to harbor deleterious biallelic mutations in the GPD1 gene, including the previously undescribed c.806G > A (p.Arg269Gln) and c.640T > C (p.Cys214Arg) mutations. The clinical features in three of our patients showed several differences compared to the original reports. One subject presented with recurrent episodes of fasting hypoglycemia along with hepatomegaly, hypetriglyceridemia, and elevated liver enzymes; the second showed a severe liver disease, with intrahepatic cholestasis associated with kidney involvement; finally, the third presented persistent hypertriglyceridemia at the age of 30 years. These findings expand the current knowledge of this rare disorder, both with regard to the phenotype and molecular basis. The enlarged phenotypic spectrum of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 deficiency can mimic other inborn errors of metabolism with liver involvement and should alert clinicians to recognize this entity by considering GPD1 mutations in appropriate clinical settings. PMID:27368975

  8. G6PD deficiency and fava bean consumption do not produce hemolysis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kitayaporn, D; Charoenlarp, P; Pattaraarechachai, J; Pholpoti, T

    1991-06-01

    Favism, a hemolytic condition associated with fava bean consumption among the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient persons, is well described in the Middle East and Mediterranean areas. However, it is not well documented among the Thais or other Southeast Asians. It is possible that it does exist but that hemolysis which develops is of very minor degree and thus escapes clinical detection. This cross-sectional study hypothesizes that if the fava bean and G6PD deficiency interact in the Thai population, they should cause a significant difference in hematocrit level. The study was carried out in a community hospital in a malaria endemic area. We found that there was a trivial difference of the hematocrit (approximately 1%) which was too small to warrant any clinical significance after controlling for the extraneous effects of age, sex, use of malaria chemoprophylaxis, falciparum infection, use of analgesics/antipyretics and admission status of the patients (p = 0.668). This may be due to the presence of different G6PD mutants to those found elsewhere or due to different consumption patterns of fava beans among the Thais compared to people in other areas with high prevalence of G6PD deficiency.

  9. G6PD deficiency and fava bean consumption do not produce hemolysis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kitayaporn, D; Charoenlarp, P; Pattaraarechachai, J; Pholpoti, T

    1991-06-01

    Favism, a hemolytic condition associated with fava bean consumption among the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient persons, is well described in the Middle East and Mediterranean areas. However, it is not well documented among the Thais or other Southeast Asians. It is possible that it does exist but that hemolysis which develops is of very minor degree and thus escapes clinical detection. This cross-sectional study hypothesizes that if the fava bean and G6PD deficiency interact in the Thai population, they should cause a significant difference in hematocrit level. The study was carried out in a community hospital in a malaria endemic area. We found that there was a trivial difference of the hematocrit (approximately 1%) which was too small to warrant any clinical significance after controlling for the extraneous effects of age, sex, use of malaria chemoprophylaxis, falciparum infection, use of analgesics/antipyretics and admission status of the patients (p = 0.668). This may be due to the presence of different G6PD mutants to those found elsewhere or due to different consumption patterns of fava beans among the Thais compared to people in other areas with high prevalence of G6PD deficiency. PMID:1948276

  10. G6PD deficiency: a classic example of pharmacogenetics with on-going clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Seneca, Elisa

    2014-02-01

    That primaquine and other drugs can trigger acute haemolytic anaemia in subjects who have an inherited mutation of the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene has been known for over half a century: however, these events still occur, because when giving the drug either the G6PD status of a person is not known, or the risk of this potentially life-threatening complication is under-estimated. Here we review briefly the genetic basis of G6PD deficiency, and then the pathophysiology and the clinical features of drug-induced haemolysis; we also update the list of potentially haemolytic drugs (which includes rasburicase). It is now clear that it is not good practice to give one of these drugs before testing a person for his/her G6PD status, especially in populations in whom G6PD deficiency is common. We discuss therefore how G6PD testing can be done reconciling safety with cost; this is once again becoming of public health importance, as more countries are moving along the pathway of malaria elimination, that might require mass administration of primaquine. Finally, we sketch the triangular relationship between malaria, antimalarials such as primaquine, and G6PD deficiency: which is to some extent protective against malaria, but also a genetically determined hazard when taking primaquine.

  11. G6PD deficiency: a classic example of pharmacogenetics with on-going clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Seneca, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    That primaquine and other drugs can trigger acute haemolytic anaemia in subjects who have an inherited mutation of the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene has been known for over half a century: however, these events still occur, because when giving the drug either the G6PD status of a person is not known, or the risk of this potentially life-threatening complication is under-estimated. Here we review briefly the genetic basis of G6PD deficiency, and then the pathophysiology and the clinical features of drug-induced haemolysis; we also update the list of potentially haemolytic drugs (which includes rasburicase). It is now clear that it is not good practice to give one of these drugs before testing a person for his/her G6PD status, especially in populations in whom G6PD deficiency is common. We discuss therefore how G6PD testing can be done reconciling safety with cost; this is once again becoming of public health importance, as more countries are moving along the pathway of malaria elimination, that might require mass administration of primaquine. Finally, we sketch the triangular relationship between malaria, antimalarials such as primaquine, and G6PD deficiency: which is to some extent protective against malaria, but also a genetically determined hazard when taking primaquine. PMID:24372186

  12. Fermentation and alternative respiration compensate for NADH dehydrogenase deficiency in a prokaryotic model of DJ-1-associated Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Nadia; Gautier, Valérie; Dairou, Julien; Mihoub, Mouhad; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Bouloc, Philippe; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Richarme, Gilbert

    2015-11-01

    YajL is the closest prokaryotic homologue of Parkinson's disease-associated DJ-1, a protein of undefined function involved in the oxidative stress response. We reported recently that YajL and DJ-1 protect cells against oxidative stress-induced protein aggregation by acting as covalent chaperones for the thiol proteome, including the NuoG subunit of NADH dehydrogenase 1, and that NADH dehydrogenase 1 activity is negligible in the yajL mutant. We report here that this mutant compensates for low NADH dehydrogenase activity by utilizing NADH-independent alternative dehydrogenases, including pyruvate oxidase PoxB and d-amino acid dehydrogenase DadA, and mixed acid aerobic fermentations characterized by acetate, lactate, succinate and ethanol excretion. The yajL mutant has a low adenylate energy charge favouring glycolytic flux, and a high NADH/NAD ratio favouring fermentations over pyruvate dehydrogenase and the Krebs cycle. DNA array analysis showed upregulation of genes involved in glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways and alternative respiratory pathways. Moreover, the yajL mutant preferentially catabolized pyruvate-forming amino acids over Krebs cycle-related amino acids, and thus the yajL mutant utilizes pyruvate-centred respiro-fermentative metabolism to compensate for the NADH dehydrogenase 1 defect and constitutes an interesting model for studying eukaryotic respiratory complex I deficiencies, especially those associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  13. Efficacy of vigabatrin intervention in a mild phenotypic expression of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Casarano, M; Alessandrì, M G; Salomons, G S; Moretti, E; Jakobs, C; Gibson, K M; Cioni, G; Battini, R

    2012-01-01

    We report a patient with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency who presented a mild phenotype including developmental language delay, in association with the typical elevations of 4-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in biological fluids and MRI alterations. Two pathogenic mutations were identified one transversion (c.278 G>T) in exon 1 and another (c.1557 T>G) in exon 10. Both parents are carriers of one of the mutations, confirming compound-heterozygosity in their affected child. To reduce the GHB levels in body fluids, a treatment with vigabatrin at low dose (25 mg/kg per day) was started, monitoring its efficacy by clinical and neurochemical follow-up. After 9 months of therapy with vigabatrin, a significant reduction of GHB concentrations in urine and CSF was observed; after 36 months, a significant improvement of communicative skills, not previously reported, was referred. These results support the hypothesis that the clinical improvement is correlated to the reduction in the GHB levels and the importance of considering the SSADH deficiency in the differential diagnosis of patients with mental retardation and language delay. PMID:23430864

  14. Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice with Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (LCAD) or Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Keith B.; Liu, Jian; Tian, Liqun; Barnes, Stephen; Yang, Qinglin; Wood, Philip A.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common finding in human patients with inborn errors of long-chain fatty acid oxidation. Mice with either very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCAD−/−) or long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCAD−/−) develop cardiac hypertrophy. Cardiac hypertrophy, initially measured using heart/body weight ratios, was manifested most severely in LCAD−/− male mice. VLCAD−/− mice, as a group, showed a mild increase in normalized cardiac mass (8.8% hypertrophy compared to all wild-type [WT] mice). In contrast, LCAD−/− mice as a group showed more severe cardiac hypertrophy (32.2% increase compared to all WT mice). Based on a clear male predilection, we investigated the role of dietary plant estrogenic compounds commonly found in mouse diets due to soy or alfalfa components providing natural phytoestrogens or isoflavones in cardioprotection of LCAD−/− mice. Male LCAD−/− mice fed an isoflavone-free test diet had more severe cardiac hypertrophy (58.1% hypertrophy compared to WT mice fed the same diet. There were no significant differences in the female groups fed any of the diets. Echocardiography measurement performed on male LCAD deficient mice fed a standard diet at ~3 months of age confirmed the substantial cardiac hypertrophy in these mice compared with WT controls. Left ventricular wall thickness of interventricular septum and posterior wall was remarkably increased in LCAD−/− mice compared with that of WT controls. Accordingly, the calculated LV mass after normalization to body weight was increased about 40% in the LCAD−/− mice compared with WT mice. In summary, we found that metabolic cardiomyopathy, expressed as hypertrophy, developed in mice due to either VLCAD deficiency or LCAD deficiency; however, LCAD deficiency was the most profound and appeared to be attenuated either by endogenous estrogen in females or phytoestrogens in the diet as isoflavones in males. PMID:19736549

  15. G6PD Deficiency Does Not Enhance Susceptibility for Acquiring Helicobacter pylori Infection in Sardinian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Maria Pina; Marras, Giuseppina; Rocchi, Chiara; Soro, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may be more susceptible to infections due to impaired leukocyte bactericidal activity. The disorder is common in the Mediterranean area. The aim of this study was to investigate whether G6PD deficiency may be a risk factor for acquiring H. pylori infection. Methods We performed a retrospective study. Data from clinical records of 6565 patients (2278 men and 4287 women, median age 51, range 7‒94) who underwent upper endoscopy between 2002 and 2014 were collected. H. pylori status, assessed by histology plus rapid urease test or 13C-urea breath test, and G6PD status were also reported. A multiple logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between G6PD deficiency and H. pylori infection. Results Enzyme deficiency was detected in 12% (789/6565) of the entire cohort, and more specifically in 8.3% of men and in 14.0% of women. Overall, the proportion of patients positive for H. pylori was 50.6% and 51.5% among G6PD deficient and non-deficient patients (χ² = 0.271; p = 0.315). Moreover, among G6PD-deficient and normal patients the frequency of previous H. pylori infection was similar. After adjustment for age and gender the risk for acquiring H. pylori infection was similar in G6PD-deficient and normal patients. Only age was a strong statistically significant risk predictor. Conclusions These results demonstrate for the first time that G6PD deficiency does not enhance patients’ susceptibility to acquire H. pylori infection in Sardinia. PMID:27467818

  16. Is GERD a Factor in Osteonecrosis of the Jaw? Evidence of Pathology Linked to G6PD Deficiency and Sulfomucins

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Nancy L.; Li, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), a rare side effect of bisphosphonate therapy, is a debilitating disorder with a poorly understood etiology. FDA's Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) provides the opportunity to investigate this disease. Our goals were to analyze FAERS data to discover possible relationships between ONJ and specific conditions and drugs and then to consult the scientific literature to deduce biological explanations. Our methodology revealed a very strong association between gastroesophageal reflux and bisphosphonate-induced ONJ, suggesting acidosis as a key factor. Overgrowth of acidophilic species, particularly Streptococcus mutans, in the oral microbiome in the context of insufficient acid buffering due to impaired salivary glands maintains the low pH that sustains damage to the mucosa. Significant associations between ONJ and adrenal insufficiency, vitamin C deficiency, and Sjögren's syndrome were found. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency can explain much of the pathology. An inability to maintain vitamin C and other antioxidants in the reduced form leads to vascular oxidative damage and impaired adrenal function. Thus, pathogen-induced acidosis, hypoxia, and insufficient antioxidant defenses together induce ONJ. G6PD deficiency and adrenal insufficiency are underlying factors. Impaired supply of adrenal-derived sulfated sterols such as DHEA sulfate may drive the disease process. PMID:27773962

  17. Safety of 8-aminoquinolines given to people with G6PD deficiency: protocol for systematic review of prospective studies

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, Olalekan A; Saunders, Rachel; Sinclair, David; Graves, Patricia; Gelband, Hellen; Clarke, Aileen; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A single dose or short course of primaquine given to people infected with malaria may reduce transmission of Plasmodium falciparum through its effects on gametocytes. Primaquine is also known to cause haemolysis in people with variants of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the risk of adverse effects in people with G6PD deficiency given primaquine or other 8-aminoquinoline (8AQ) as a single dose or short course (less than 7 days). Methods and analysis We will search the following databases: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS. Prospective cohort studies, randomised and quasi-randomised trials that evaluated 8AQs for whatever reason in adults or children with a known G6PD deficiency will be included. Two authors will independently assess each study for eligibility, risk of bias and extract data. Ethics and dissemination This systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. Brief reports of the review findings will be disseminated directly to the appropriate audiences and the WHO Technical Expert Group in Malaria Chemotherapy. As no primary data collection will be undertaken, no additional formal ethical assessment and informed consent are required. Protocol registration in PROSPERO The protocol is registered with PROSPERO, registration number CRD42013006518. PMID:24833685

  18. Is the flavin-deficient red blood cell common in Maremma, Italy, an important defense against malaria in this area?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, B. B.; Scattoni, M.; Perry, G. M.; Galvan, P.; Giuberti, M.; Buonocore, G.; Vullo, C.

    1994-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of a familial flavin-deficient red blood cell in Ferrara province in the Po delta in northern Italy, believed to have been selected for by malaria which was endemic from the 12th century. In the present study, activities of FAD-dependent red-cell glutathione reductase (EGR) in the Grosseto area of Maremma on the west coast of Italy where malaria was endemic from 300 B.C. are compared both with activities in the Ferrara area and with activities where there was no history of endemic malaria--in the Florence area and in London in people of Anglo-Saxon origin. EGR activities were similar in Grosseto and Ferrara and were significantly lower than in Florence and London. As previously found in Ferrara, low EGR activity in Grosseto was shown to be unrelated to low dietary riboflavin intake. These findings in Grosseto, suggesting selection by malaria, are particularly interesting because, unlike the situation in Ferrara and most other malarial areas, the prevalence of thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is very low, and they do not appear to have been selected for in Maremma. It is possible that a flavin-deficient red cell, known to inhibit growth of the malaria parasite, was an important protecting factor in the population of this area over the centuries. PMID:7977361

  19. Methaemoglobinaemia in a G6PD-deficient child treated with rasburicase

    PubMed Central

    Bontant, Thomas; Le Garrec, Sophie; Avran, David; Dauger, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy from the Congo, was admitted for hyperleucocytic acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, with a high risk of tumour lysis syndrome (TLS). He had splenomegaly and mediastinal lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray. We started steroids and hyperhydration with rasburicase to prevent TLS. Respiratory failure with mediastinal enlargement developed rapidly. A few hours after intensive care unit (ICU) admission, he was started on mechanical ventilation. Chemotherapy was started immediately given the strong suspicion of mediastinal compression. Low oxygen saturation with high partial arterial oxygen pressure persisted. Blood tests confirmed 20% methaemoglobinaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Allopurinol was substituted for rasburicase. The methaemoglobinaemia disappeared rapidly and he was discharged from the ICU after 72 h. In case of rasburicase use, a close clinical monitoring is mandatory, especially in populations where G6PD deficiency is highly prevalent. Methaemoglobinaemia must be suspected in case of low oxygen saturation when all other potential causes have been ruled out. PMID:25115783

  20. G6PD deficiency in Latin America: systematic review on prevalence and variants

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Wuelton M; Val, Fernando FA; Siqueira, André M; Franca, Gabriel P; Sampaio, Vanderson S; Melo, Gisely C; Almeida, Anne CG; Brito, Marcelo AM; Peixoto, Henry M; Fuller, Douglas; Bassat, Quique; Romero, Gustavo AS; Maria Regina F, Oliveira; Marcus Vinícius G, Lacerda

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax radical cure requires the use of primaquine (PQ), a drug that induces haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient (G6PDd) individuals, which further hampers malaria control efforts. The aim of this work was to study the G6PDd prevalence and variants in Latin America (LA) and the Caribbean region. A systematic search of the published literature was undertaken in August 2013. Bibliographies of manuscripts were also searched and additional references were identified. Low prevalence rates of G6PDd were documented in Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay, but studies from Curaçao, Ecuador, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, Suriname and Trinidad, as well as some surveys carried out in areas of Brazil, Colombia and Cuba, have shown a high prevalence (> 10%) of G6PDd. The G6PD A-202A mutation was the variant most broadly distributed across LA and was identified in 81.1% of the deficient individuals surveyed. G6PDd is a frequent phenomenon in LA, although certain Amerindian populations may not be affected, suggesting that PQ could be safely used in these specific populations. Population-wide use of PQ as part of malaria elimination strategies in LA cannot be supported unless a rapid, accurate and field-deployable G6PDd diagnostic test is made available. PMID:25141282

  1. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Wu Hai; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup -}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH{sup -} and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2 months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was {approx} 1.5-fold greater in ADH{sup -} vs. ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH{sup -} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis.

  2. Nitrofurantoin

    MedlinePlus

    ... your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.tell your doctor if you have anemia, kidney disease, lung disease, nerve damage, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency (an inherited blood ...

  3. Bilirubin - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... bilirubin is not processed normally by the liver ( Gilbert disease ) The following problems with gallbladder or bile ... Choledocholithiasis Cirrhosis Crigler-Najjar syndrome Dubin-Johnson syndrome Gilbert disease Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemoglobin Hemolytic ...

  4. Newborn screening for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: regional experience and high incidence of carnitine deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common inherited defect in the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation pathway, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in undiagnosed patients. Newborn screening (NBS) has considerably improved MCADD outcome, but the risk of complication remains in some patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between genotype, biochemical parameters and clinical data at diagnosis and during follow-up, in order to optimize monitoring of these patients. Methods We carried out a multicenter study in southwest Europe, of MCADD patients detected by NBS. Evaluated NBS data included free carnitine (C0) and the acylcarnitines C8, C10, C10:1 together with C8/C2 and C8/C10 ratios, clinical presentation parameters and genotype, in 45 patients. Follow-up data included C0 levels, duration of carnitine supplementation and occurrence of metabolic crises. Results C8/C2 ratio and C8 were the most accurate biomarkers of MCADD in NBS. We found a high number of patients homozygous for the prevalent c.985A > G mutation (75%). Moreover, in these patients C8, C8/C10 and C8/C2 were higher than in patients with other genotypes, while median value of C0 was significantly lower (23 μmol/L vs 36 μmol/L). The average follow-up period was 43 months. To keep carnitine levels within the normal range, carnitine supplementation was required in 82% of patients, and for a longer period in patients homozygotes for the c.985A>G mutation than in patients with other genotypes (average 31 vs 18 months). Even with treatment, median C0 levels remained lower in homozygous patients than in those with other genotypes (14 μmol/L vs 22 μmol/L). Two patients died and another three suffered a metabolic crisis, all of whom were homozygous for the c.985 A>G mutation. Conclusions Our data show a direct association between homozygosity for c.985A>G and lower carnitine values at diagnosis, and a higher dose of carnitine

  5. Favism, the commonest form of severe hemolytic anemia in Palestinian children, varies in severity with three different variants of G6PD deficiency within the same community.

    PubMed

    Reading, N Scott; Sirdah, Mahmoud M; Shubair, Mohammad E; Nelson, Benjamin E; Al-Kahlout, Mustafa S; Al-Tayeb, Jamal M; Aboud, Lina N; Shaban, Maysaa Abu; Luzzatto, Lucio; Prchal, Josef T

    2016-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common genetic abnormality known to predispose to acute hemolytic anemia (AHA), which can be triggered by certain drugs or infection. However, the commonest trigger is fava beans (Vicia faba) ingestion, causing AHA (favism), which may be life-threatening especially in children. G6PD deficiency is genetically highly heterogeneous, as nearly 200 different mutations have been observed. We have investigated the hematological features of acute favism in the Palestinian Gaza community that is characterized by the polymorphic coexistence of three different G6PD deficiency genes (G6PD A-, G6PD Cairo, G6PD Med). We have found by comparison to the general population (485 adults and 466 newborns) that children with favism, in terms of relative frequency, G6PD A- was under-represented, whereas G6PD Med was over-represented. We also found that the severity of anemia was significantly greater with G6PD Med and G6PD Cairo than with G6PD A-; and with G6PD Cairo, compared to the other two variants, there was greater hyperbilirubinemia, as well as persistence of mild anemia and reticulocytosis for as long as 4months after recovery from favism. This is the first report determining a differential impact of different G6PD mutations on the clinical features of favism in the same population and the same environment. PMID:27519946

  6. Equine acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) in 14 horses associated with ingestion of Maple leaves (Acer pseudoplatanus) covered with European tar spot (Rhytisma acerinum).

    PubMed

    van der Kolk, J H; Wijnberg, I D; Westermann, C M; Dorland, L; de Sain-van der Velden, M G M; Kranenburg, L C; Duran, M; Dijkstra, J A; van der Lugt, J J; Wanders, R J A; Gruys, E

    2010-01-01

    This case-series describes fourteen horses suspected of equine acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) also known as atypical myopathy of which seven cases were confirmed biochemically with all horses having had access to leaves of the Maple tree (Acer pseudoplatanus) covered with European tar spot (Rhytisma acerinum). Assessment of organic acids, glycine conjugates, and acylcarnitines in urine was regarded as gold standard in the biochemical diagnosis of equine acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

  7. Origins and implications of neglect of G6PD deficiency and primaquine toxicity in Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Most of the tens of millions of clinical attacks caused by Plasmodium vivax each year likely originate from dormant liver forms called hypnozoites. We do not systematically attack that reservoir because the only drug available, primaquine, is poorly suited to doing so. Primaquine was licenced for anti-relapse therapy in 1952 and became available despite threatening patients having an inborn deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) with acute haemolytic anaemia. The standard method for screening G6PD deficiency, the fluorescent spot test, has proved impractical where most malaria patients live. The blind administration of daily primaquine is dangerous, but so too are the relapses invited by withholding treatment. Absent G6PD screening, providers must choose between risking harm by the parasite or its treatment. How did this dilemma escape redress in science, clinical medicine and public health? This review offers critical historic reflection on the neglect of this serious problem in the chemotherapy of P. vivax. PMID:25943156

  8. Origins and implications of neglect of G6PD deficiency and primaquine toxicity in Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Baird, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Most of the tens of millions of clinical attacks caused by Plasmodium vivax each year likely originate from dormant liver forms called hypnozoites. We do not systematically attack that reservoir because the only drug available, primaquine, is poorly suited to doing so. Primaquine was licenced for anti-relapse therapy in 1952 and became available despite threatening patients having an inborn deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) with acute haemolytic anaemia. The standard method for screening G6PD deficiency, the fluorescent spot test, has proved impractical where most malaria patients live. The blind administration of daily primaquine is dangerous, but so too are the relapses invited by withholding treatment. Absent G6PD screening, providers must choose between risking harm by the parasite or its treatment. How did this dilemma escape redress in science, clinical medicine and public health? This review offers critical historic reflection on the neglect of this serious problem in the chemotherapy of P. vivax. PMID:25943156

  9. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 Deficiency Aggravates Cardiac Dysfunction Elicited by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induction

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jianquan; Sun, Aijun; Xie, Yeqing; Isse, Toyoshi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) has been characterized as an important mediator of endogenous cytoprotection in the heart. This study was designed to examine the role of ALDH2 knockout (KO) in the regulation of cardiac function after endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Wild-type (WT) and ALDH2 KO mice were subjected to a tunicamycin challenge, and the echocardiographic property was examined. Protein levels of six items—78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 subunit α (p-eIF2α), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), phosphorylation of Akt, p47phox nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and 4-hydroxynonenal—were determined by using Western blot analysis. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were estimated using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and caspase-3 activity, respectively. ALDH2 deficiency exacerbated cardiac contractile dysfunction and promoted ER stress after ER stress induction, manifested by the changes of ejection fraction and fractional shortening. In vitro study revealed that tunicamycin significantly upregulated the levels of GRP78, p-eIF2α, CHOP, p47phox NADPH oxidase and 4-hydroxynonenal, which was exacerbated by ALDH2 knockdown and abolished by ALDH2 overexpression, respectively. Overexpression of ALDH2 abrogated tunicamycin-induced dephosphorylation Akt. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase using LY294002 did not affect ALDH2-conferred protection against ER stress, although LY294002 reversed the antiapoptotic action of ALDH2 associated with p47phox NADPH oxidase. These results suggest a pivotal role of ALDH2 in the regulation of ER stress and ER stress–induced apoptosis. The protective role of ALDH2 against ER stress–induced cell death was probably mediated by Akt via a p47phox NADPH oxidase-dependent manner. These findings indicate the critical role of ALDH2 in the pathogenesis of ER stress

  10. Molecular basis of dimethylglycine dehydrogenase deficiency associated with pathogenic variant H109R

    PubMed Central

    McAndrew, R. P.; Vockley, J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (DMGDH) is a mitochondrial matrix flavoprotein that catalyses the demethylation of dimethylglycine to form sarcosine, accompanied by the reduction of the covalently bound FAD cofactor. Electron-transfer flavoprotein reoxidizes the reduced flavin and transfers reducing equivalents to the main mitochondrial respiratory chain through the enzyme ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase. DMGDH plays a prominent role in choline and 1-carbon metabolism. We have expressed the mature form of human DMGDH and the H109R variant identified in a DMGDH-deficient patient as N-terminally His6-tagged proteins in E. coli. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity by nickel affinity and anion exchange chromatography. The presence of FAD in the wild-type enzyme was confirmed by spectrophotometric analysis. The H109R variant, however, had only 47% of the wild-type level of bound flavin as expressed in E. coli, indicating its reduced affinity for FAD As previously described for rat enzyme studies, the wild-type human enzyme exhibited two Km values for N,N-dimethylglycine (Km1 = 0.039 ± 0.010 mmol/L and Km2 = 15.4 ± 1.2 mmol/L). The addition of 4 μmol/L tetrahydrofolate resulted in a slight decrease in specific activity and a substantial decrease in Km2 (1.10 ± 0.55 mmol/L). The flavinated H109R variant protein exhibited a 27-fold decrease in specific activity and a 65-fold increase in Km, explaining its pathogenicity. Additionally, the current expression system represents a significant improvement over a previously described rat DMGDH expression system and will enhance our ability to further study this important metabolic enzyme. PMID:18937046

  11. Nutritional marginal zinc deficiency disrupts placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 modulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y L; Supasai, S; Kucera, H; Gaikwad, N W; Adamo, A M; Mathieu, P; Oteiza, P I

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated if marginal zinc nutrition during gestation could affect fetal exposure to glucocorticoids as a consequence of a deregulation of placental 11βHSD2 expression. Placenta 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11βHSD2) plays a central role as a barrier protecting the fetus from the deleterious effects of excess maternal glucocorticoids. Rats were fed control (25 μg zinc per g diet) or marginal (10 μg zinc per g diet, MZD) zinc diets from day 0 through day 19 (GD19) of gestation. At GD19, corticosterone concentration in plasma, placenta, and amniotic fluid was similar in both groups. However, protein and mRNA levels of placenta 11βHSD2 were significantly higher (25% and 58%, respectively) in MZD dams than in controls. The main signaling cascades modulating 11βHSD2 expression were assessed. In MZD placentas the activation of ERK1/2 and of the downstream transcription factor Egr-1 was low, while p38 phosphorylation and SP-1-DNA binding were low compared to the controls. These results point to a central role of ERK1/Egr-1 in the regulation of 11βHSD2 expression under the conditions of limited zinc availability. In summary, results show that an increase in placenta 11βHSD2 expression occurs as a consequence of gestational marginal zinc nutrition. This seems to be due to a low tissue zinc-associated deregulation of ERK1/2 rather than to exposure to high maternal glucocorticoid exposure. The deleterious effects on brain development caused by diet-induced marginal zinc deficiency in rats do not seem to be due to fetal exposure to excess glucocorticoids.

  12. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency ameliorates alcoholic fatty liver but worsens liver inflammation and fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyo-Jung; Won, Young-Suk; Park, Ogyi; Chang, Binxia; Duryee, Michael J.; Thiele, Geoffrey E.; Matsumoto, Akiko; Singh, Surendra; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Gao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is the major enzyme that metabolizes acetaldehyde produced from alcohol metabolism. Approximately 40~50% of East Asians carry an inactive ALDH2 gene and exhibit acetaldehyde accumulation after alcohol consumption. However, the role of ALDH2 deficiency in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury remains obscure. In the present study, wild-type and ALDH2−/− mice were subjected to ethanol feeding and/or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treatment, and liver injury was assessed. Compared with wild-type mice, ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice had higher levels of malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) adduct and greater hepatic inflammation, with higher hepatic IL-6 expression but surprisingly lower levels of steatosis and serum ALT. Higher IL-6 levels were also detected in ethanol-treated precision-cut-liver-slices from ALDH2−/− mice and in Kupffer cells isolated from ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice than those levels in wild-type mice. In vitro incubation with MAA enhanced the LPS-mediated stimulation of IL-6 production in Kupffer cells. In agreement with these findings, hepatic activation of the major IL-6 downstream signaling molecule signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was higher in ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice than in wild-type mice. An additional deletion of hepatic STAT3 increased steatosis and hepatocellular damage in ALDH2−/− mice. Finally, ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice were more prone to CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis than ethanol-fed wild-type mice. Conclusions: ALDH2−/− mice are resistant to ethanol-induced steatosis but prone to inflammation and fibrosis via MAA-mediated paracrine activation of IL-6 in Kupffer cells. These findings suggest that alcohol, via acetaldehyde and its associated adducts, stimulates hepatic inflammation and fibrosis independent from causing hepatocyte death, and that ALDH2-deficient individuals may be resistant to steatosis and blood ALT elevation, but are

  13. Citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double knock-out mice recapitulate features of human citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saheki, Takeyori; Iijima, Mikio; Li, Meng Xian; Kobayashi, Keiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Ushikai, Miharu; Okumura, Fumihiko; Meng, Xiao Jian; Inoue, Ituro; Tajima, Atsushi; Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Eto, Kazuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sinasac, David S; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Tsuji, Mihoko; Okano, Akira; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi

    2007-08-24

    Citrin is the liver-type mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier that participates in urea, protein, and nucleotide biosynthetic pathways by supplying aspartate from mitochondria to the cytosol. Citrin also plays a role in transporting cytosolic NADH reducing equivalents into mitochondria as a component of the malate-aspartate shuttle. In humans, loss-of-function mutations in the SLC25A13 gene encoding citrin cause both adult-onset type II citrullinemia and neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis, collectively referred to as human citrin deficiency. Citrin knock-out mice fail to display features of human citrin deficiency. Based on the hypothesis that an enhanced glycerol phosphate shuttle activity may be compensating for the loss of citrin function in the mouse, we have generated mice with a combined disruption of the genes for citrin and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The resulting double knock-out mice demonstrated citrullinemia, hyperammonemia that was further elevated by oral sucrose administration, hypoglycemia, and a fatty liver, all features of human citrin deficiency. An increased hepatic lactate/pyruvate ratio in the double knock-out mice compared with controls was also further elevated by the oral sucrose administration, suggesting that an altered cytosolic NADH/NAD(+) ratio is closely associated with the hyperammonemia observed. Microarray analyses identified over 100 genes that were differentially expressed in the double knock-out mice compared with wild-type controls, revealing genes potentially involved in compensatory or downstream effects of the combined mutations. Together, our data indicate that the more severe phenotype present in the citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double knock-out mice represents a more accurate model of human citrin deficiency than citrin knock-out mice.

  14. Pyruvate kinase deficiency in mice protects against malaria.

    PubMed

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Fortin, Anny; Tam, Mi-Fong; Nantel, André; Stevenson, Mary M; Gros, Philippe

    2003-12-01

    The global health impact of malaria is enormous, with an estimated 300-500 million clinical cases and 1 million annual deaths. In humans, initial susceptibility to infection with Plasmodium species, disease severity and ultimate outcome of malaria (self-healing or lethal) are under complex genetic control. Alleles associated with sickle cell anemia, beta-thalassemia and deficiency in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have a protective effect against malaria and may have been retained by positive selection in areas of endemic malaria. Likewise, genetic variations in erythrocyte antigens and levels of host cytokines affect type and severity of disease. A mouse model of infection with Plasmodium chabaudi was used to study the genetic component of malaria susceptibility. Segregation analyses in informative F2 crosses derived from resistant C57BL/6J and susceptible A/J, C3H and SJL strains using extent of blood stage replication of the parasite and survival as traits mapped three P. chabaudi resistance (Char) loci on chromosomes 9 (Char1), 8 (Char2) and 17 (Char3, MHC-linked). Recombinant congenic strains AcB55 and AcB61 are unusually resistant to malaria despite carrying susceptibility alleles at Char1 and Char2. Malaria resistance in AcB55 and AcB61 is associated with splenomegaly and constitutive reticulocytosis, is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and is controlled by a locus on chromosome 3 (Char4). Sequencing of candidate genes from the Char4 region identified a loss-of-function mutation (269T-->A, resulting in the amino acid substitution I90N) in the pyruvate kinase gene (Pklr) that underlies the malaria resistance in AcB55 and AcB61. These results suggest that pyruvate kinase deficiency may similarly protect humans against malaria. PMID:14595440

  15. Characterization of Arabidopsis lines deficient in GAPC-1, a cytosolic NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Rius, Sebastián P; Casati, Paula; Iglesias, Alberto A; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2008-11-01

    Phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (GAPC-1) is a highly conserved cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-P to 1,3-bis-phosphoglycerate; besides its participation in glycolysis, it is thought to be involved in additional cellular functions. To reach an integrative view on the many roles played by this enzyme, we characterized a homozygous gapc-1 null mutant and an as-GAPC1 line of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Both mutant plant lines show a delay in growth, morphological alterations in siliques, and low seed number. Embryo development was altered, showing abortions and empty embryonic sacs in basal and apical siliques, respectively. The gapc-1 line shows a decrease in ATP levels and reduced respiratory rate. Furthermore, both lines exhibit a decrease in the expression and activity of aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase and reduced levels of pyruvate and several Krebs cycle intermediates, as well as increased reactive oxygen species levels. Transcriptome analysis of the gapc-1 mutants unveils a differential accumulation of transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in carbon partitioning. According to these studies, some enzymes involved in carbon flux decreased (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, NAD-malic enzyme, glucose-6-P dehydrogenase) or increased (NAD-malate dehydrogenase) their activities compared to the wild-type line. Taken together, our data indicate that a deficiency in the cytosolic GAPC activity results in modifications of carbon flux and mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to an alteration of plant and embryo development with decreased number of seeds, indicating that GAPC-1 is essential for normal fertility in Arabidopsis plants. PMID:18820081

  16. Nuclear enrichment of folate cofactors and methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1) protect de novo thymidylate biosynthesis during folate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Field, Martha S; Kamynina, Elena; Agunloye, Olufunmilayo C; Liebenthal, Rebecca P; Lamarre, Simon G; Brosnan, Margaret E; Brosnan, John T; Stover, Patrick J

    2014-10-24

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is a metabolic network of interconnected pathways that is required for the de novo synthesis of three of the four DNA bases and the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine. Previous studies have indicated that the thymidylate synthesis and homocysteine remethylation pathways compete for a limiting pool of methylenetetrahydrofolate cofactors and that thymidylate biosynthesis is preserved in folate deficiency at the expense of homocysteine remethylation, but the mechanisms are unknown. Recently, it was shown that thymidylate synthesis occurs in the nucleus, whereas homocysteine remethylation occurs in the cytosol. In this study we demonstrate that methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1), an enzyme that generates methylenetetrahydrofolate from formate, ATP, and NADPH, functions in the nucleus to support de novo thymidylate biosynthesis. MTHFD1 translocates to the nucleus in S-phase MCF-7 and HeLa cells. During folate deficiency mouse liver MTHFD1 levels are enriched in the nucleus >2-fold at the expense of levels in the cytosol. Furthermore, nuclear folate levels are resistant to folate depletion when total cellular folate levels are reduced by >50% in mouse liver. The enrichment of folate cofactors and MTHFD1 protein in the nucleus during folate deficiency in mouse liver and human cell lines accounts for previous metabolic studies that indicated 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate is preferentially directed toward de novo thymidylate biosynthesis at the expense of homocysteine remethylation during folate deficiency.

  17. Nuclear Enrichment of Folate Cofactors and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1) Protect de Novo Thymidylate Biosynthesis during Folate Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Field, Martha S.; Kamynina, Elena; Agunloye, Olufunmilayo C.; Liebenthal, Rebecca P.; Lamarre, Simon G.; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Brosnan, John T.; Stover, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is a metabolic network of interconnected pathways that is required for the de novo synthesis of three of the four DNA bases and the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine. Previous studies have indicated that the thymidylate synthesis and homocysteine remethylation pathways compete for a limiting pool of methylenetetrahydrofolate cofactors and that thymidylate biosynthesis is preserved in folate deficiency at the expense of homocysteine remethylation, but the mechanisms are unknown. Recently, it was shown that thymidylate synthesis occurs in the nucleus, whereas homocysteine remethylation occurs in the cytosol. In this study we demonstrate that methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1), an enzyme that generates methylenetetrahydrofolate from formate, ATP, and NADPH, functions in the nucleus to support de novo thymidylate biosynthesis. MTHFD1 translocates to the nucleus in S-phase MCF-7 and HeLa cells. During folate deficiency mouse liver MTHFD1 levels are enriched in the nucleus >2-fold at the expense of levels in the cytosol. Furthermore, nuclear folate levels are resistant to folate depletion when total cellular folate levels are reduced by >50% in mouse liver. The enrichment of folate cofactors and MTHFD1 protein in the nucleus during folate deficiency in mouse liver and human cell lines accounts for previous metabolic studies that indicated 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate is preferentially directed toward de novo thymidylate biosynthesis at the expense of homocysteine remethylation during folate deficiency. PMID:25213861

  18. Development and pathomechanisms of cardiomyopathy in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient (VLCAD(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Flögel, Ulrich; Hermann, Sven; Sturm, Marga; Schäfers, Michael; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a typical manifestation of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD), the most common long-chain β-oxidation defects in humans; however in some patients cardiac function is fully compensated. Cardiomyopathy may also be reversed by supplementation of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT). We here characterize cardiac function of VLCAD-deficient (VLCAD(-/-)) mice over one year. Furthermore, we investigate the long-term effect of a continuous MCT diet on the cardiac phenotype. We assessed cardiac morphology and function in VLCAD(-/-) mice by in vivo MRI. Cardiac energetics were measured by (31)P-MRS and myocardial glucose uptake was quantified by positron-emission-tomography (PET). Metabolic adaptations were identified by the expression of genes regulating glucose and lipid metabolism using real-time-PCR. VLCAD(-/-) mice showed a progressive decrease in heart function over 12 months accompanied by a reduced phosphocreatine-to-ATP-ratio indicative of chronic energy deficiency. Long-term MCT supplementation aggravated the cardiac phenotype into dilated cardiomyopathy with features similar to diabetic heart disease. Cardiac energy production and function in mice with a β-oxidation defect cannot be maintained with age. Compensatory mechanisms are insufficient to preserve the cardiac energy state over time. However, energy deficiency by impaired β-oxidation and long-term MCT induce cardiomyopathy by different mechanisms. Cardiac MRI and MRS may be excellent tools to assess minor changes in cardiac function and energetics in patients with β-oxidation defects for preventive therapy.

  19. Prevention of Kernicterus in South Asia: role of neonatal G6PD deficiency and its identification.

    PubMed

    Arain, Yassar H; Bhutani, Vinod K

    2014-06-01

    Extreme hyperbilirubinemia (EHB) caused by neonatal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is strongly associated with mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment, yet there are limited national strategies to reduce this burden in South Asia. Current known and predicted prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, and Pakistan ranges from 3.8 to 15 %, with regional "hot spots" exceeding 22 %. Annually, 3.14 million infants are born at risk for this condition. In 2010, South Asian countries reported 37 million (27 %) of world-wide livebirths ≥ 32 wk gestational-age and G6PD deficiency accounted for > 33 % of the global EHB burden, in contrast to 2.2 % for those born in high-income nations. Traditional national approach includes universal newborn screening in malaria-endemic countries or those with prevalence >3.5 %. However, screening implementation should be best optimized using timely quantitative enzyme assay and identification of at-risk female newborns. Furthermore, economic and social constraints, in context of sub-regional variances, call for flexible problem-solving methods in anticipation of changing community demographics. Thus, incremental and need-based newborn screening programs could be the most optimal approach. A human-centered design (HCD) approach, as an alternate pathway, could build the evidence to translate the complex biology of G6PD deficiency and the biodesign of affordable technologies, allowing facilitation of access to knowledge and services, in order to deliver on a long-term public health mandate. Key steps would encompass the initiation of local inquiry of both quantitative and qualitative data to identify at-risk communities and to prospectively design for local innovative solutions.

  20. Complex changes in the liver mitochondrial proteome of short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uechi, Guy; Schreiber, Emanuel; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Day, Billy; Michael Barmada, M; Vockley, Jerry

    2014-05-01

    Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism that leads to the impaired mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation of short chain fatty acids. It is heterogeneous in clinical presentation including asymptomatic in most patients identified by newborn screening. Multiple mutations have been identified in patients; however, neither clear genotype-phenotype relationships nor a good correlation between genotype and current biochemical markers for diagnosis has been identified. The definition and pathophysiology of this deficiency remain unclear. To better understand this disorder at a global level, quantitative alterations in the mitochondrial proteome in SCAD deficient mice were examined using a combined proteomics approach: two-dimensional gel difference electrophoresis (2DIGE) followed by protein identification with MALDI-TOF/TOF and iTRAQ labeling followed by nano-LC/MALDI-TOF/TOF. We found broad mitochondrial dysfunction in SCAD deficiency. Changes in the levels of multiple energy metabolism related proteins were identified indicating that a more complex mechanism for development of symptoms may exist. Affected pathways converge on disorders with neurologic symptoms, suggesting that even asymptomatic individuals with SCAD deficiency may be at risk to develop more severe disease. Our results also identified a pattern associated with hepatotoxicity implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, fatty acid metabolism, decrease of depolarization of mitochondria and mitochondrial membranes, and swelling of mitochondria, demonstrating that SCAD deficiency relates more directly to mitochondrial dysfunction and alteration of fatty acid metabolism. We propose several candidate molecules that may serve as markers for recognition of clinical risk associated with this disorder.

  1. NADP-dehydrogenases from pepper fruits: effect of maturation.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Rosa M; Bonilla-Valverde, Daniel; del Río, Luis A; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2009-02-01

    NADPH is an important molecule in the redox balance of the cell. Pepper fruits are the second worldwide consumable vegetables and exhibit different phenotypes after maturation. In this paper, two pepper cultivars were studied: Vergasa whose fruits shift from green to red after maturation, and Biela that shifts to yellow. Using fresh fruits from the same plants of the two cultivars at distinct maturation stages, the activity and gene expression of the main NADPH-generating dehydrogenases was studied. The activity analysis of the main NADP-dehydrogenases, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH) and NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), showed that, except for the G6PDH, all the activities were enhanced (54-100%) in the mature pepper fruits from both cultivars (red or yellow) with respect to green pepper fruits. The content of NADPH and NADP in the mature fruits of both cultivars showed a noteworthy increase with respect to green fruits. For the transcript analysis, a partial cDNA of each NADP-dehydrogenase was obtained, and the NADP-ME was the only NADP-dehydrogenase that showed a significant induction. The increase in the content of NADPH in mature fruits because of the enhanced activity of NADP-dehydrogenases suggests that these NADPH-generating enzymes could be involved in the maturation of pepper fruits.

  2. G6PD deficiency at Sumba in Eastern Indonesia is prevalent, diverse and severe: implications for primaquine therapy against relapsing Vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Satyagraha, Ari Winasti; Sadhewa, Arkasha; Baramuli, Vanessa; Elvira, Rosalie; Ridenour, Chase; Elyazar, Iqbal; Noviyanti, Rintis; Coutrier, Farah Novita; Harahap, Alida Roswita; Baird, J Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Safe treatment of Plasmodium vivax requires diagnosis of both the infection and status of erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity because hypnozoitocidal therapy against relapse requires primaquine, which causes a mild to severe acute hemolytic anemia in G6PD deficient patients. Many national malaria control programs recommend primaquine therapy without G6PD screening but with monitoring due to a broad lack of G6PD deficiency screening capacity. The degree of risk in doing so hinges upon the level of residual G6PD activity among the variants present in any given area. We conducted studies on Sumba Island in eastern Indonesia in order to assess the potential threat posed by primaquine therapy without G6PD screening. We sampled 2,033 residents of three separate districts in western Sumba for quantitative G6PD activity and 104 (5.1%) were phenotypically deficient (<4.6U/gHb; median normal 10U/gHb). The villages were in two distinct ecosystems, coastal and inland. A positive correlation occurred between the prevalence of malaria and G6PD deficiency: 5.9% coastal versus inland 0.2% for malaria (P<0.001), and 6.7% and 3.1% for G6PD deficiency (P<0.001) at coastal and inland sites, respectively. The dominant genotypes of G6PD deficiency were Vanua Lava, Viangchan, and Chatham, accounting for 98.5% of the 70 samples genotyped. Subjects expressing the dominant genotypes all had less than 10% of normal enzyme activities and were thus considered severe variants. Blind administration of anti-relapse primaquine therapy at Sumba would likely impose risk of serious harm.

  3. Increased and early lipolysis in children with long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency during fast.

    PubMed

    Haglind, C Bieneck; Nordenström, A; Ask, S; von Döbeln, U; Gustafsson, J; Stenlid, M Halldin

    2015-03-01

    Children with long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCHAD) have a defect in the degradation of long-chain fatty acids and are at risk of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and insufficient energy production as well as accumulation of toxic fatty acid intermediates. Knowledge on substrate metabolism in children with LCHAD deficiency during fasting is limited. Treatment guidelines differ between centers, both as far as length of fasting periods and need for night feeds are concerned. To increase the understanding of fasting intolerance and improve treatment recommendations, children with LCHAD deficiency were investigated with stable isotope technique, microdialysis, and indirect calometry, in order to assess lipolysis and glucose production during 6 h of fasting. We found an early and increased lipolysis and accumulation of long chain acylcarnitines after 4 h of fasting, albeit no patients developed hypoglycemia. The rate of glycerol production, reflecting lipolysis, averaged 7.7 ± 1.6 µmol/kg/min, which is higher compared to that of peers. The rate of glucose production was normal for age; 19.6 ± 3.4 µmol/kg/min (3.5 ± 0.6 mg/kg/min). Resting energy expenditure was also normal, even though the respiratory quotient was increased indicating mainly glucose oxidation. The results show that lipolysis and accumulation of long chain acylcarnitines occurs before hypoglycemia in fasting children with LCHAD, which may indicate more limited fasting tolerance than previously suggested.

  4. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 and 4 gene deficiency attenuates nociceptive behaviors in a mouse model of acute inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Rahman, Md Habibur; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-09-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinases (PDKs) 1-4, expressed in peripheral and central tissues, regulate the activity of the PDH complex (PDC). The PDC is an important mitochondrial gatekeeping enzyme that controls cellular metabolism. The role of PDKs in diverse neurological disorders, including neurometabolic aberrations and neurodegeneration, has been described. Implications for a role of PDKs in inflammation and neurometabolic coupling led us to investigate the effect of genetic ablation of PDK2/4 on nociception in a mouse model of acute inflammatory pain. Deficiency in Pdk2 and/or Pdk4 in mice led to attenuation of formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors (flinching, licking, biting, or lifting of the injected paw). Likewise, the pharmacological inhibition of PDKs substantially diminished the nociceptive responses in the second phase of the formalin test. Furthermore, formalin-provoked paw edema formation and mechanical and thermal hypersensitivities were significantly reduced in Pdk2/4-deficient mice. Formalin-driven neutrophil recruitment at the site of inflammation, spinal glial activation, and neuronal sensitization were substantially lessened in the second or late phase of the formalin test in Pdk2/4-deficient animals. Overall, our results suggest that PDK2/4 can be a potential target for the development of pharmacotherapy for the treatment of acute inflammatory pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26931482

  5. Environmental Stresses of Field Growth Allow Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase-Deficient Nicotiana attenuata Plants to Compensate for their Structural Deficiencies1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harleen; Shaker, Kamel; Heinzel, Nicolas; Ralph, John; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2012-01-01

    The organized lignocellulosic assemblies of cell walls provide the structural integrity required for the large statures of terrestrial plants. Silencing two CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (CAD) genes in Nicotiana attenuata produced plants (ir-CAD) with thin, red-pigmented stems, low CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity, low lignin contents, and rubbery, structurally unstable stems when grown in the glasshouse (GH). However, when planted into their native desert habitat, ir-CAD plants produced robust stems that survived wind storms as well as the wild-type plants. Despite efficient silencing of NaCAD transcripts and enzymatic activity, field-grown ir-CAD plants had delayed and restricted spread of red stem pigmentation, a color change reflecting blocked lignification by CAD silencing, and attained wild-type-comparable total lignin contents. The rubbery GH phenotype was largely restored when field-grown ir-CAD plants were protected from wind, herbivore attack, and ultraviolet B exposure and grown in restricted rooting volumes; conversely, it was lost when ir-CAD plants were experimentally exposed to wind, ultraviolet B, and grown in large pots in growth chambers. Transcript and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight analysis revealed that these environmental stresses enhanced the accumulation of various phenylpropanoids in stems of field-grown plants; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the lignin of field-grown ir-CAD plants had GH-grown comparable levels of sinapaldehyde and syringaldehyde cross-linked into their lignins. Additionally, field-grown ir-CAD plants had short, thick stems with normal xylem element traits, which collectively enabled field-grown ir-CAD plants to compensate for the structural deficiencies associated with CAD silencing. Environmental stresses play an essential role in regulating lignin biosynthesis in lignin-deficient plants. PMID:22645069

  6. Genetics Home Reference: 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 10 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... involved in breaking down the protein building block ( amino acid ) isoleucine and a group of fats called branched- ... system. Mutations that cause HSD10 deficiency change single amino acids in HSD10, which reduces or eliminates the activity ...

  7. Specific combination of compound heterozygous mutations in 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4) defines a new subtype of D-bifunctional protein deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background D-bifunctional protein (DBP) deficiency is typically apparent within the first month of life with most infants demonstrating hypotonia, psychomotor delay and seizures. Few children survive beyond two years of age. Among patients with prolonged survival all demonstrate severe gross motor delay, absent language development, and severe hearing and visual impairment. DBP contains three catalytically active domains; an N-terminal dehydrogenase, a central hydratase and a C-terminal sterol carrier protein-2-like domain. Three subtypes of the disease are identified based upon the domain affected; DBP type I results from a combined deficiency of dehydrogenase and hydratase activity; DBP type II from isolated hydratase deficiency and DBP type III from isolated dehydrogenase deficiency. Here we report two brothers (16½ and 14 years old) with DBP deficiency characterized by normal early childhood followed by sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cerebellar and sensory ataxia and subclinical retinitis pigmentosa. Methods and results Biochemical analysis revealed normal levels of plasma VLCFA, phytanic acid and pristanic acid, and normal bile acids in urine; based on these results no diagnosis was made. Exome analysis was performed using the Agilent SureSelect 50Mb All Exon Kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 next-generation-sequencing (NGS) platform. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified by exome sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing within the dehydrogenase domain (c.101C>T; p.Ala34Val) and hydratase domain (c.1547T>C; p.Ile516Thr) of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 gene (HSD17B4). These mutations have been previously reported in patients with severe-forms of DBP deficiency, however each mutation was reported in combination with another mutation affecting the same domain. Subsequent studies in fibroblasts revealed normal VLCFA levels, normal C26:0 but reduced pristanic acid beta-oxidation activity. Both DBP hydratase and dehydrogenase

  8. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency (SSADHD): Pathophysiological complexity and multifactorial trait associations in a rare monogenic disorder of GABA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Malaspina, P; Roullet, J-B; Pearl, P L; Ainslie, G R; Vogel, K R; Gibson, K M

    2016-10-01

    Discovered some 35 years ago, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency (SSADHD) represents a rare, autosomal recessively-inherited defect in the second step of the GABA degradative pathway. Some 200 patients have been reported, with broad phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity. SSADHD represents an unusual neurometabolic disorder in which two neuromodulatory agents, GABA (and the GABA analogue, 4-hydroxybutyrate), accumulate to supraphysiological levels. The unexpected occurrence of epilepsy in several patients is counterintuitive in view of the hyperGABAergic state, in which sedation might be expected. However, the epileptic status of some patients is most likely represented by broader imbalances of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission. Cumulative research encompassing decades of basic and clinical study of SSADHD reveal a monogenic disease with broad pathophysiological and clinical phenotypes. Numerous metabolic perturbations unmasked in SSADHD include alterations in oxidative stress parameters, dysregulation of autophagy and mitophagy, dysregulation of both inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters and gene expression, and unique subsets of SNP alterations of the SSADH gene (so-called ALDH5A1, or aldehyde dehydrogenase 5A1 gene) on the 6p22 chromosomal arm. While seemingly difficult to collate and interpret, these anomalies have continued to open novel pathways for pharmacotherapeutic considerations. Here, we present an update on selected aspects of SSADHD, the ALDH5A1 gene, and future avenues for research on this rare disorder of GABA metabolism. PMID:27311541

  9. Large Cohort Screening of G6PD Deficiency and the Mutational Spectrum in the Dongguan District in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Keze; Li, Wenrui; Ma, Qiang; He, Xiaoguang; He, Yuejing; He, Ting; Lu, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common enzymatic disorder of the erythrocytes that affects 400 million people worldwide. We developed a PCR-reverse dot blot (RDB) assay to screen twenty genotypes of seventeen Chinese G6PD mutations and investigate the spectrum of G6PD deficiency mutations in Dongguan District, Guangdong Province, in southern China. Method The PCR-RDB assay consists of multiplex PCR amplification of seven fragments in the G6PD target sequence of wild-type and mutant genomic DNA samples followed by hybridization to a test strip containing allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. A total of 16,464 individuals were analyzed by a combination of phenotypic screening and genotypic detection using the PCR-RDB assay and DNA sequence analysis. Results The PCR-RDB assay had a detection rate of 98.1%, which was validated by direct sequencing in a blind study with 100% concordance. The G6PD deficiency incidence rate in Dongguan District is 4.08%. Thirty-two genotypes from 469 individuals were found. The two most common variants were c.1376G>T and c.1388G>A, followed by c.95A>G, c.871G>A, c.392G>T, and c.1024 C>T. In addition, two rare mutations (c.703C>A and c.406C>T) were detected by DNA sequencing analysis. In our study, 65 cases harbored the C1311T/IVS polymorphism and 67 cases were homozygote. Conclusion The PCR-RDB assay we established is a reliable and effective method for screening G6PD mutations in the Chinese population. Data on the spectrum of mutations in the Dongguan District is beneficial to the clinical diagnosis and prevention of G6PD deficiency. PMID:25775246

  10. Development and pathomechanisms of cardiomyopathy in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient (VLCAD(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Flögel, Ulrich; Hermann, Sven; Sturm, Marga; Schäfers, Michael; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a typical manifestation of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD), the most common long-chain β-oxidation defects in humans; however in some patients cardiac function is fully compensated. Cardiomyopathy may also be reversed by supplementation of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT). We here characterize cardiac function of VLCAD-deficient (VLCAD(-/-)) mice over one year. Furthermore, we investigate the long-term effect of a continuous MCT diet on the cardiac phenotype. We assessed cardiac morphology and function in VLCAD(-/-) mice by in vivo MRI. Cardiac energetics were measured by (31)P-MRS and myocardial glucose uptake was quantified by positron-emission-tomography (PET). Metabolic adaptations were identified by the expression of genes regulating glucose and lipid metabolism using real-time-PCR. VLCAD(-/-) mice showed a progressive decrease in heart function over 12 months accompanied by a reduced phosphocreatine-to-ATP-ratio indicative of chronic energy deficiency. Long-term MCT supplementation aggravated the cardiac phenotype into dilated cardiomyopathy with features similar to diabetic heart disease. Cardiac energy production and function in mice with a β-oxidation defect cannot be maintained with age. Compensatory mechanisms are insufficient to preserve the cardiac energy state over time. However, energy deficiency by impaired β-oxidation and long-term MCT induce cardiomyopathy by different mechanisms. Cardiac MRI and MRS may be excellent tools to assess minor changes in cardiac function and energetics in patients with β-oxidation defects for preventive therapy. PMID:24530811

  11. Molecular genetics and pathophysiology of 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Andersson, S; Geissler, W M; Wu, L; Davis, D L; Grumbach, M M; New, M I; Schwarz, H P; Blethen, S L; Mendonca, B B; Bloise, W; Witchel, S F; Cutler, G B; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J D; Russel, D W

    1996-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in the 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 gene impair the formation of testosterone in the fetal testis and give rise to genetic males with female external genitalia. Such individuals are usually raised as females, but virilize at the time of expected puberty as the result of increases in serum testosterone. Here we describe mutations in 12 additional subjects/families with this disorder. The 14 mutations characterized to date include 10 missense mutations, 3 splice junction abnormalities, and 1 small deletion that results in a frame shift. Three of these mutations have occurred in more than 1 family. Complementary DNAs incorporating 9 of the 10 missense mutations have been constructed and expressed in reporter cells; 8 of the 9 missense mutations cause almost complete loss of enzymatic activity. In 2 subjects with loss of function, missense mutations testosterone levels in testicular venous blood were very low. Considered together, these findings strongly suggest that the common mechanism for testosterone formation in postpubertal subjects with this disorder is the conversion of circulating androstenedione to testosterone by one or more of the unaffected 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isoenzymes.

  12. Comparative 13C metabolic flux analysis of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient, L-valine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Blombach, Bastian; Lang, Siegmund; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    L-Valine can be formed successfully using C. glutamicum strains missing an active pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC). Wild-type C. glutamicum and four PDHC-deficient strains were compared by (13)C metabolic flux analysis, especially focusing on the split ratio between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Compared to the wild type, showing a carbon flux of 69% ± 14% through the PPP, a strong increase in the PPP flux was observed in PDHC-deficient strains with a maximum of 113% ± 22%. The shift in the split ratio can be explained by an increased demand of NADPH for l-valine formation. In accordance, the introduction of the Escherichia coli transhydrogenase PntAB, catalyzing the reversible conversion of NADH to NADPH, into an L-valine-producing C. glutamicum strain caused the PPP flux to decrease to 57% ± 6%, which is below the wild-type split ratio. Hence, transhydrogenase activity offers an alternative perspective for sufficient NADPH supply, which is relevant for most amino acid production systems. Moreover, as demonstrated for L-valine, this bypass leads to a significant increase of product yield due to a concurrent reduction in carbon dioxide formation via the PPP.

  13. Deficient expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 is consistent with increased sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome patients to radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Aaron T.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Gache, Yannick; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-11-27

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of relevant pathways/networks. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol-reactive probes with a flexible click chemistry functional group to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. We observe qualitative differences in protein thiol profiles by SDS-PAGE analysis when detection by iodoacetamide vs maleimide probe chemistries are compared, and pretreatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide eliminates detection of the majority of SDS-PAGE bands. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent donors, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and this deficiency was confirmed by Western blot. Redox probes revealed additional protein thiol differences between GDFs and NHDFs, including radiation responsive annexin family members. Our results indicate a multifactorial basis for the unusual sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome to radiation carcinogenesis, and the pathways identified have plausible implications for radiation health effects.

  14. Deficient expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 is consistent with increased sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome patients to radiation carcinogenesis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wright, Aaron T.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Gache, Yannick; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-11-27

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of relevant pathways/networks. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol-reactive probes with a flexible click chemistry functional group to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. We observe qualitative differences in protein thiol profilesmore » by SDS-PAGE analysis when detection by iodoacetamide vs maleimide probe chemistries are compared, and pretreatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide eliminates detection of the majority of SDS-PAGE bands. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent donors, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and this deficiency was confirmed by Western blot. Redox probes revealed additional protein thiol differences between GDFs and NHDFs, including radiation responsive annexin family members. Our results indicate a multifactorial basis for the unusual sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome to radiation carcinogenesis, and the pathways identified have plausible implications for radiation health effects.« less

  15. Nonsalt-losing congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency with normal glomerulosa function.

    PubMed

    Pang, S; Levine, L S; Stoner, E; Opitz, J M; Pollack, M S; Dupont, B; New, M I

    1983-04-01

    In studies of a 6-yr-old boy and his non-HLA identical 8-yr-old sister, we demonstrated 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD) deficiency in the biosynthetic pathways of glucocorticoids and androgens, but not mineralocorticoids. The sister did not manifest abnormal genital development at birth, but developed premature adrenarche at the age of 4 yr, with clitoromegaly and advanced bone age. The brother had perineal hypospadias at birth and developed premature adrenarche at the age of 6 yr. In both siblings, baseline and ACTH-stimulated delta 5 steroids were markedly elevated. The baseline and ACTH-stimulated ratios of delta 5 to delta 4 steroids remained extremely high, and all steroids promptly suppressed with dexamethasone (DEX). Normal baseline PRA and serum and urinary aldosterone (Aldo) levels increased after stimulation with a low Na+ diet. Renal Na+ conservation was normal after dietary Na+ deprivation with and without DEX administration. The PRA to pH 1 Aldo ratio remained normal with normal and low Na+ diets, regardless of DEX administration, indicating normal glomerulosa function with renin stimulation. In both siblings, ACTH increased PRA and Aldo levels, maintaining the PRA to pH 1 Aldo ratio unchanged from the baseline value. In contrast, in control children, PRA was suppressed, while Aldo increased, resulting in a fall of the PRA to pH 1 Aldo ratio. The increase in PRA with exogenous ACTH in these siblings suggests there may be an ACTH-stimulable mineralocorticoid antagonist. During prolonged DEX administration, hCG administration caused a slight increase in 17-hydroxypregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone in both the siblings, while testosterone (T) rose poorly in the brother, and estradiol did not rise at all in the sister. These results suggest the possibility of a deficiency of 3 beta-HSD in the gonads as well as the adrenals. After [3H]dehydroepiandrosterone iv infusion, there was normal conversion to [3H]-conjugated testosterone

  16. Metabolic evolution and (13) C flux analysis of a succinate dehydrogenase deficient strain of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Yuzbashev, Tigran V; Bondarenko, Pavel Yu; Sobolevskaya, Tatiana I; Yuzbasheva, Evgeniya Yu; Laptev, Ivan A; Kachala, Vadim V; Fedorov, Alexander S; Vybornaya, Tatiana V; Larina, Anna S; Sineoky, Sergey P

    2016-11-01

    Bio-based succinic acid production can redirect industrial chemistry processes from using limited hydrocarbons to renewable carbohydrates. A fermentation process that does not require pH-titrating agents will be advantageous to the industry. Previously, a Yarrowia lipolytica strain that was defective for succinate dehydrogenase was constructed and was found to accumulate up to 17.5 g L(-1) of succinic acid when grown on glycerol without buffering. Here, a derivative mutant was isolated that produced 40.5 g L(-1) of succinic acid in 36 h with a yield of 0.32 g g(-1) glycerol. A combination approach of induced mutagenesis and metabolic evolution allowed isolation of another derivative that could utilize glucose efficiently and accumulated 50.2 g L(-1) succinic acid in 54 h with a yield of 0.43 g g(-1) . The parent strain of these isolated mutants was used for [1,6-(13) C2 ]glucose assimilation analysis. At least 35% glucose was estimated to be utilized through the pentose phosphate pathway, while ≥84% succinic acid was formed through the oxidative branch of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2425-2432. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27182846

  17. Establishment of permanent chimerism in a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mouse mutant with hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, T.; Doermer, P.

    1987-12-01

    Pluripotent hemopoietic stem cell function was investigated in the homozygous muscle type lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-A) mutant mouse using bone marrow transplantation experiments. Hemopoietic tissues of LDH-A mutants showed a marked decreased in enzyme activity that was associated with severe hemolytic anemia. This condition proved to be transplantable into wild type mice (+/+) through total body irradiation (TBI) at a lethal dose of 8.0 Gy followed by engraftment of mutant bone marrow cells. Since the mutants are extremely radiosensitive (lethal dose50/30 4.4 Gy vs 7.3 Gy in +/+ mice), 8.0-Gy TBI followed by injection of even high numbers of normal bone marrow cells did not prevent death within 5-6 days. After a nonlethal dose of 4.0 Gy and grafting of normal bone marrow cells, a transient chimerism showing peripheral blood characteristics of the wild type was produced that returned to the mutant condition within 12 weeks. The transfusion of wild type red blood cells prior to and following 8.0-Gy TBI and reconstitution with wild type bone marrow cells prevented the early death of the mutants and permanent chimerism was achieved. The chimeras showed all hematological parameters of wild type mice, and radiosensitivity returned to normal. It is concluded that the mutant pluripotent stem cells are functionally comparable to normal stem cells, emphasizing the significance of this mouse model for studies of stem cell regulation.

  18. Redox stress is not essential for the pseudo-hypoxic phenotype of succinate dehydrogenase deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Selak, Mary A; Durán, Raul V; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2006-01-01

    HIFalpha prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) are a family of enzymes that regulate protein levels of the alpha subunit of the hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF) under different oxygen levels. PHDs catalyse the conversion of a prolyl residue, molecular oxygen and alpha-ketoglutarate to hydroxy-prolyl, carbon dioxide and succinate in a reaction dependent on ferrous iron and ascorbate as cofactors. Recently it was shown that pseudo-hypoxia, HIF induction under normoxic conditions, is an important feature of tumours generated as a consequence of inactivation of the mitochondrial tumour suppressor 'succinate dehydrogenase' (SDH). Two models have been proposed to describe the link between SDH inhibition and HIF activation. Both models suggest that a mitochondrial-generated signal leads to the inhibition of PHDs in the cytosol, however, the models differ in the nature of the proposed messenger. The first model postulates that mitochondrial-generated hydrogen peroxide mediates signal transduction while the second model implicates succinate as the molecular messenger which leaves the mitochondrion and inhibits PHDs in the cytosol. Here we show that pseudo-hypoxia can be observed in SDH-suppressed cells in the absence of oxidative stress and in the presence of effective antioxidant treatment.

  19. Disruption of brain redox homeostasis in glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient mice treated with high dietary lysine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Seminotti, Bianca; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; da Rosa, Mateus Struecker; Fernandes, Carolina Gonçalves; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Olivera-Bravo, Silvia; Barbeito, Luis; Ribeiro, César Augusto J; de Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Woontner, Michael; Goodman, Stephen I; Koeller, David M; Wajner, Moacir

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) activity or glutaric aciduria type I (GA I) is an inherited neurometabolic disorder biochemically characterized by predominant accumulation of glutaric acid and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid in the brain and other tissues. Affected patients usually present acute striatum necrosis during encephalopathic crises triggered by metabolic stress situations, as well as chronic leukodystrophy and delayed myelination. Considering that the mechanisms underlying the brain injury in this disease are not yet fully established, in the present study we investigated important parameters of oxidative stress in the brain (cerebral cortex, striatum and hippocampus), liver and heart of 30-day-old GCDH deficient knockout (Gcdh(-/-)) and wild type (WT) mice submitted to a normal lysine (Lys) (0.9% Lys), or high Lys diets (2.8% or 4.7% Lys) for 60 h. It was observed that the dietary supplementation of 2.8% and 4.7% Lys elicited noticeable oxidative stress, as verified by an increase of malondialdehyde concentrations (lipid oxidative damage) and 2-7-dihydrodichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation (free radical production), as well as a decrease of reduced glutathione levels and alteration of various antioxidant enzyme activities (antioxidant defenses) in the cerebral cortex and the striatum, but not in the hippocampus, the liver and the heart of Gcdh(-/-) mice, as compared to WT mice receiving the same diets. Furthermore, alterations of oxidative stress parameters in the cerebral cortex and striatum were more accentuated in symptomatic, as compared to asymptomatic Gcdh(-/-) mice exposed to 4.7% Lys overload. Histopathological studies performed in the cerebral cortex and striatum of these animals exposed to high dietary Lys revealed increased expression of oxidative stress markers despite the absence of significant structural damage. The results indicate that a disruption of redox homeostasis in the cerebral cortex and striatum of young Gcdh(-/-) mice

  20. Altered Energetics of Exercise Explain Risk of Rhabdomyolysis in Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Diekman, E F; Visser, G; Schmitz, J P J; Nievelstein, R A J; de Sain-van der Velden, M; Wardrop, M; Van der Pol, W L; Houten, S M; van Riel, N A W; Takken, T; Jeneson, J A L

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is common in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) and other metabolic myopathies, but its pathogenic basis is poorly understood. Here, we show that prolonged bicycling exercise against a standardized moderate workload in VLCADD patients is associated with threefold bigger changes in phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations in quadriceps muscle and twofold lower changes in plasma acetyl-carnitine levels than in healthy subjects. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that muscle ATP homeostasis during exercise is compromised in VLCADD. However, the measured rates of PCr and Pi recovery post-exercise showed that the mitochondrial capacity for ATP synthesis in VLCADD muscle was normal. Mathematical modeling of oxidative ATP metabolism in muscle composed of three different fiber types indicated that the observed altered energy balance during submaximal exercise in VLCADD patients may be explained by a slow-to-fast shift in quadriceps fiber-type composition corresponding to 30% of the slow-twitch fiber-type pool in healthy quadriceps muscle. This study demonstrates for the first time that quadriceps energy balance during exercise in VLCADD patients is altered but not because of failing mitochondrial function. Our findings provide new clues to understanding the risk of rhabdomyolysis following exercise in human VLCADD. PMID:26881790

  1. Altered Energetics of Exercise Explain Risk of Rhabdomyolysis in Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Diekman, E. F.; Visser, G.; Schmitz, J. P. J.; Nievelstein, R. A. J.; de Sain-van der Velden, M.; Wardrop, M.; Van der Pol, W. L.; Houten, S. M.; van Riel, N. A. W.; Takken, T.; Jeneson, J. A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is common in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) and other metabolic myopathies, but its pathogenic basis is poorly understood. Here, we show that prolonged bicycling exercise against a standardized moderate workload in VLCADD patients is associated with threefold bigger changes in phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations in quadriceps muscle and twofold lower changes in plasma acetyl-carnitine levels than in healthy subjects. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that muscle ATP homeostasis during exercise is compromised in VLCADD. However, the measured rates of PCr and Pi recovery post-exercise showed that the mitochondrial capacity for ATP synthesis in VLCADD muscle was normal. Mathematical modeling of oxidative ATP metabolism in muscle composed of three different fiber types indicated that the observed altered energy balance during submaximal exercise in VLCADD patients may be explained by a slow-to-fast shift in quadriceps fiber-type composition corresponding to 30% of the slow-twitch fiber-type pool in healthy quadriceps muscle. This study demonstrates for the first time that quadriceps energy balance during exercise in VLCADD patients is altered but not because of failing mitochondrial function. Our findings provide new clues to understanding the risk of rhabdomyolysis following exercise in human VLCADD. PMID:26881790

  2. Adult-onset multiple acyl CoA dehydrogenation deficiency associated with an abnormal isoenzyme pattern of serum lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Fuminobu; Baba, Kousuke; Toyooka, Keiko; Liang, Wen-Chen; Nishino, Ichizo; Yamadera, Misaki; Sumi, Hisae; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Nishikawa, Yoshiro

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of a 37 year-old male with multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD). The patient had suffered from exercise intolerance in his hip and thigh muscles for one year. Then, restriction of carbohydrates for a diet made his symptoms rapidly deteriorate. Blood test revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel missense mutations in the electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase gene (ETFDH), and an abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern: LDH-1 (60.0%) and LDH-2 (26.0%) predominated with abnormally elevated LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (2.3), compared with muscle-derived LDH-5 (4.0%). Oral riboflavin treatment significantly improved his exercise intolerance and the LDH profile: LDH-1 (34.4%), LDH-2 (34.9%), LDH-5 (6.9%) and LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (1.0). The abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern may be one feature of adult-onset MADD selectively affecting type I muscle fibers with relatively high LDH-1 content. PMID:21907580

  3. Activity of select dehydrogenases with Sepharose-immobilized N6-carboxymethyl-NAD

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N6-carboxymethyl-NAD (N6-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N6-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N6-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N6-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N6-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N6-amine group on NAD. PMID:25611453

  4. Activity of select dehydrogenases with sepharose-immobilized N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD (N(6)-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N(6)-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N(6)-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N(6)-amine group on NAD.

  5. Riboflavin responsive mitochondrial myopathy is a new phenotype of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency. The chaperon-like effect of vitamin B2.

    PubMed

    Carrozzo, Rosalba; Torraco, Alessandra; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Diego; Di Nottia, Michela; Rizza, Teresa; Vozza, Angelo; Verrigni, Daniela; Diodato, Daria; Parisi, Giovanni; Maiorana, Arianna; Rizzo, Cristiano; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Zucano, Stefania; Piemonte, Fiorella; Bertini, Enrico; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2014-09-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD, E3) is a flavoprotein common to pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate and branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenases. We found two novel DLD mutations (p.I40Lfs*4; p.G461E) in a 19 year-old patient with lactic acidosis and a complex amino- and organic aciduria consistent with DLD deficiency, manifesting progressive exertional fatigue. Muscle biopsy showed mitochondrial proliferation and lack of DLD cross-reacting material. Riboflavin supplementation determined the complete resolution of exercise intolerance with the partial restoration of the DLD protein and disappearance of mitochondrial proliferation in the muscle. Morphological and functional studies support the riboflavin chaperon-like role in stabilizing DLD protein with rescue of its expression in the muscle. PMID:25251739

  6. Hereditary non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia due to red blood cell glutathione synthetase deficiency in four unrelated patients from Spain: clinical and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Corrons, J L; Alvarez, R; Pujades, A; Zarza, R; Oliva, E; Lasheras, G; Callis, M; Ribes, A; Gelbart, T; Beutler, E

    2001-02-01

    In four unrelated patients with chronic haemolysis and markedly reduced red blood cell (RBC) glutathione (49.5%, 12.6%, 11.5% and 15% of the normal concentration respectively), a severe glutathione synthetase (GSH-S, EC 6.3.2.3) deficiency was found. One case exhibited a neonatal haemolytic anaemia associated with oxoprolinuria, but without neurological manifestations. The family study revealed GSH-S activity in both parents to be around half the normal level, a finding consistent with the presumed autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of this enzymopathy. Two cases exhibited a well-compensated haemolytic syndrome without anaemia or splenomegaly at steady state. One of these cases was diagnosed after an episode of acute haemolytic anaemia after fava bean ingestion. The remaining patient suffered from moderate to severe chronic non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia and splenomegaly, and required occasional blood transfusion for a haemolytic crisis associated with drug ingestion. In this patient, the anaemia was corrected by splenectomy. In addition to GSH-S, a panel of 16 other RBC enzyme activities was also studied in all the patients. Hexokinase, aldolase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase activities all increased; these increases were to be expected, given the rise in the number of circulating reticulocytes. In two patients, the incubation of RBCs with hydrogen peroxide revealed an enhanced production of malonyldialdehyde. DNA analysis showed a homozygous state for 656 A-->G mutation in patients 2 and 3. The GSH-S gene of patient 1, studied elsewhere, revealed an 808 T-->C. The GSH-S gene of patient 4 was not available for study. The present study demonstrates that GSH-S deficiency is also present in Spain and further supports the molecular and clinical heterogeneity of this enzymopathy PMID:11167850

  7. Acetic acid treatment in S. cerevisiae creates significant energy deficiency and nutrient starvation that is dependent on the activity of the mitochondrial transcriptional complex Hap2-3-4-5.

    PubMed

    Kitanovic, Ana; Bonowski, Felix; Heigwer, Florian; Ruoff, Peter; Kitanovic, Igor; Ungewiss, Christin; Wölfl, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic pathways play an indispensable role in supplying cellular systems with energy and molecular building blocks for growth, maintenance and repair and are tightly linked with lifespan and systems stability of cells. For optimal growth and survival cells rapidly adopt to environmental changes. Accumulation of acetic acid in stationary phase budding yeast cultures is considered to be a primary mechanism of chronological aging and induction of apoptosis in yeast, which has prompted us to investigate the dependence of acetic acid toxicity on extracellular conditions in a systematic manner. Using an automated computer controlled assay system, we investigated and model the dynamic interconnection of biomass yield- and growth rate-dependence on extracellular glucose concentration, pH conditions and acetic acid concentration. Our results show that toxic concentrations of acetic acid inhibit glucose consumption and reduce ethanol production. In absence of carbohydrates uptake, cells initiate synthesis of storage carbohydrates, trehalose and glycogen, and upregulate gluconeogenesis. Accumulation of trehalose and glycogen, and induction of gluconeogenesis depends on mitochondrial activity, investigated by depletion of the Hap2-3-4-5 complex. Analyzing the activity of glycolytic enzymes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), pyruvate kinase (PYK), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) we found that while high acetic acid concentration increased their activity, lower acetic acids concentrations significantly inhibited these enzymes. With this study we determined growth and functional adjustment of metabolism to acetic acid accumulation in a complex range of extracellular conditions. Our results show that substantial acidification of the intracellular environment, resulting from accumulation of dissociated acetic acid in the cytosol, is required for acetic acid toxicity, which creates a state of energy deficiency and nutrient starvation.

  8. Acetic acid treatment in S. cerevisiae creates significant energy deficiency and nutrient starvation that is dependent on the activity of the mitochondrial transcriptional complex Hap2-3-4-5

    PubMed Central

    Kitanovic, Ana; Bonowski, Felix; Heigwer, Florian; Ruoff, Peter; Kitanovic, Igor; Ungewiss, Christin; Wölfl, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic pathways play an indispensable role in supplying cellular systems with energy and molecular building blocks for growth, maintenance and repair and are tightly linked with lifespan and systems stability of cells. For optimal growth and survival cells rapidly adopt to environmental changes. Accumulation of acetic acid in stationary phase budding yeast cultures is considered to be a primary mechanism of chronological aging and induction of apoptosis in yeast, which has prompted us to investigate the dependence of acetic acid toxicity on extracellular conditions in a systematic manner. Using an automated computer controlled assay system, we investigated and model the dynamic interconnection of biomass yield- and growth rate-dependence on extracellular glucose concentration, pH conditions and acetic acid concentration. Our results show that toxic concentrations of acetic acid inhibit glucose consumption and reduce ethanol production. In absence of carbohydrates uptake, cells initiate synthesis of storage carbohydrates, trehalose and glycogen, and upregulate gluconeogenesis. Accumulation of trehalose and glycogen, and induction of gluconeogenesis depends on mitochondrial activity, investigated by depletion of the Hap2-3-4-5 complex. Analyzing the activity of glycolytic enzymes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), pyruvate kinase (PYK), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) we found that while high acetic acid concentration increased their activity, lower acetic acids concentrations significantly inhibited these enzymes. With this study we determined growth and functional adjustment of metabolism to acetic acid accumulation in a complex range of extracellular conditions. Our results show that substantial acidification of the intracellular environment, resulting from accumulation of dissociated acetic acid in the cytosol, is required for acetic acid toxicity, which creates a state of energy deficiency and nutrient starvation. PMID:23050242

  9. Genetic Analysis of Carbohydrate Transport-deficient Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Levinthal, Mark; Simoni, Robert D.

    1969-01-01

    Mutants (car) isolated from Salmonella typhimurium were unable to utilize or ferment the following carbohydrates (all d-configuration): glucose, fructose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, sorbitol, mannitol, maltose, melibiose, and glycerol. The mutants did utilize galactose, glucose 6-phosphate, gluconic acid, glucuronic acid, pyruvate, and l-lactate. Biochemical analysis showed that there were two classes of mutants, each lacking one component of a phosphotransferase system. CarA mutants were deficient in enzyme I; carB lacked the phosphate carrier protein, HPr. Mapping experiments showed that the carA gene was located near pro; the carB gene mapped near purC. PMID:4884816

  10. Single Low Dose Primaquine (0.25mg/kg) Does Not Cause Clinically Significant Haemolysis in G6PD Deficient Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bancone, Germana; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Somsakchaicharoen, Raweewan; Poodpanya, Lalita; Moo, Paw Khu; Gornsawun, Gornpan; Kajeechiwa, Ladda; Thwin, May Myo; Rakthinthong, Santisuk; Nosten, Suphak; Thinraow, Suradet; Nyo, Slight Naw; Ling, Clare L.; Wiladphaingern, Jacher; Kiricharoen, Naw Lily; Moore, Kerryn A.; White, Nicholas J.; Nosten, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Background Primaquine is the only drug consistently effective against mature gametocytes of Plasmodium falciparum. The transmission blocking dose of primaquine previously recommended was 0.75mg/kg (adult dose 45mg) but its deployment was limited because of concerns over haemolytic effects in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. G6PD deficiency is an inherited X-linked enzymatic defect that affects an estimated 400 million people around the world with high frequencies (15–20%) in populations living in malarious areas. To reduce transmission in low transmission settings and facilitate elimination of P. falciparum, the World Health Organization now recommends adding a single dose of 0.25mg/kg (adult dose 15mg) to Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies (ACTs) without G6PD testing. Direct evidence of the safety of this low dose is lacking. Adverse events and haemoglobin variations after this treatment were assessed in both G6PD normal and deficient subjects in the context of targeted malaria elimination in a malaria endemic area on the North-Western Myanmar-Thailand border where prevalence of G6PD deficiency (Mahidol variant) approximates 15%. Methods and Findings The tolerability and safety of primaquine (single dose 0.25 mg base/kg) combined with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ) given three times at monthly intervals was assessed in 819 subjects. Haemoglobin concentrations were estimated over the six months preceding the ACT + primaquine rounds of mass drug administration. G6PD deficiency was assessed with a phenotypic test and genotyping was performed in male subjects with deficient phenotypes and in all females. Fractional haemoglobin changes in relation to G6PD phenotype and genotype and primaquine round were assessed using linear mixed-effects models. No adverse events related to primaquine were reported during the trial. Mean fractional haemoglobin changes after each primaquine treatment in G6PD deficient subjects (-5

  11. G6PD Deficiency and Hemoglobinopathies: Molecular Epidemiological Characteristics and Healthy Effects on Malaria Endemic Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min; Yang, Li Ye; Xie, Dong De; Chen, Jiang Tao; Nguba, Santiago-m Monte; Ehapo, Carlos Sala; Zhan, Xiao Fen; Eyi, Juan Urbano Monsuy; Matesa, Rocio Apicante; Obono, Maximo Miko Ondo; Yang, Hui; Yang, Hui Tian; Cheng, Ji Dong

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and hemoglobinopathies were the inherited conditions found mostly in African. However, few epidemiological data of these disorders was reported in Equatorial Guinea (EQG). This study aimed to assess the prevalence and healthy effects of G6PD deficiency and hemoglobinopathies among the people on malaria endemic Bioko Island, EQG. Materials and Methods Blood samples from 4,144 unrelated subjects were analyzed for G6PD deficieny by fluorescence spot test (FST), high-resolution melting assay and PCR-DNA sequencing. In addition, 1,186 samples were randomly selected from the 4,144 subjects for detection of hemoglobin S (HbS), HbC, and α-thalassemia deletion by complete blood count, PCR-DNA sequencing and reverse dot blot (RDB). Results The prevalence of malaria and anemia was 12.6% (522/4,144) and 32.8% (389/1,186), respectively. Overall, 8.7% subjects (359/4,144) were G6PD-deficient by FST, including 9.0% (249/2,758) males and 7.9% (110/1,386) females. Among the 359 G6PD-deficient individuals molecularly studied, the G6PD A- (G202A/A376G) were detected in 356 cases (99.2%), G6PD Betica (T968C/A376G) in 3 cases. Among the 1,186 subjects, 201 cases were HbS heterozygotes, 35 cases were HbC heterozygotes, and 2 cases were HbCS double heterozygotes; 452 cases showed heterozygous α-thalassemia 3.7 kb deletion (-α3.7 kb deletion) and 85 homozygous - α3.7 kb deletion. The overall allele frequencies were HbS 17.1% (203/1186); HbC, 3.1% (37/1186); and –α3.7 kb deletion 52.4% (622/1186), respectively. Conclusions High G6PD deficiency in this population indicate that diagnosis and management of G6PD deficiency is necessary on Bioko Island. Obligatory newborn screening, prenatal screening and counseling for these genetic disorders, especially HbS, are needed on the island. PMID:25915902

  12. Developmental Defects of Caenorhabditis elegans Lacking Branched-chain α-Ketoacid Dehydrogenase Are Mainly Caused by Monomethyl Branched-chain Fatty Acid Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fan; Cui, Mingxue; Than, Minh T; Han, Min

    2016-02-01

    Branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) catalyzes the critical step in the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic pathway and has been the focus of extensive studies. Mutations in the complex disrupt many fundamental metabolic pathways and cause multiple human diseases including maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), autism, and other related neurological disorders. BCKDH may also be required for the synthesis of monomethyl branched-chain fatty acids (mmBCFAs) from BCAAs. The pathology of MSUD has been attributed mainly to BCAA accumulation, but the role of mmBCFA has not been evaluated. Here we show that disrupting BCKDH in Caenorhabditis elegans causes mmBCFA deficiency, in addition to BCAA accumulation. Worms with deficiency in BCKDH function manifest larval arrest and embryonic lethal phenotypes, and mmBCFA supplementation suppressed both without correcting BCAA levels. The majority of developmental defects caused by BCKDH deficiency may thus be attributed to lacking mmBCFAs in worms. Tissue-specific analysis shows that restoration of BCKDH function in multiple tissues can rescue the defects, but is especially effective in neurons. Taken together, we conclude that mmBCFA deficiency is largely responsible for the developmental defects in the worm and conceivably might also be a critical contributor to the pathology of human MSUD.

  13. Developmental Defects of Caenorhabditis elegans Lacking Branched-chain α-Ketoacid Dehydrogenase Are Mainly Caused by Monomethyl Branched-chain Fatty Acid Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fan; Cui, Mingxue; Than, Minh T; Han, Min

    2016-02-01

    Branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) catalyzes the critical step in the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic pathway and has been the focus of extensive studies. Mutations in the complex disrupt many fundamental metabolic pathways and cause multiple human diseases including maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), autism, and other related neurological disorders. BCKDH may also be required for the synthesis of monomethyl branched-chain fatty acids (mmBCFAs) from BCAAs. The pathology of MSUD has been attributed mainly to BCAA accumulation, but the role of mmBCFA has not been evaluated. Here we show that disrupting BCKDH in Caenorhabditis elegans causes mmBCFA deficiency, in addition to BCAA accumulation. Worms with deficiency in BCKDH function manifest larval arrest and embryonic lethal phenotypes, and mmBCFA supplementation suppressed both without correcting BCAA levels. The majority of developmental defects caused by BCKDH deficiency may thus be attributed to lacking mmBCFAs in worms. Tissue-specific analysis shows that restoration of BCKDH function in multiple tissues can rescue the defects, but is especially effective in neurons. Taken together, we conclude that mmBCFA deficiency is largely responsible for the developmental defects in the worm and conceivably might also be a critical contributor to the pathology of human MSUD. PMID:26683372

  14. Autophagy in yeast demonstrated with proteinase-deficient mutants and conditions for its induction.

    PubMed

    Takeshige, K; Baba, M; Tsuboi, S; Noda, T; Ohsumi, Y

    1992-10-01

    For determination of the physiological role and mechanism of vacuolar proteolysis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mutant cells lacking proteinase A, B, and carboxypeptidase Y were transferred from a nutrient medium to a synthetic medium devoid of various nutrients and morphological changes of their vacuoles were investigated. After incubation for 1 h in nutrient-deficient media, a few spherical bodies appeared in the vacuoles and moved actively by Brownian movement. These bodies gradually increased in number and after 3 h they filled the vacuoles almost completely. During their accumulation, the volume of the vacuolar compartment also increased. Electron microscopic examination showed that these bodies were surrounded by a unit membrane which appeared thinner than any other intracellular membrane. The contents of the bodies were morphologically indistinguishable from the cytosol; these bodies contained cytoplasmic ribosomes, RER, mitochondria, lipid granules and glycogen granules, and the density of the cytoplasmic ribosomes in the bodies was almost the same as that of ribosomes in the cytosol. The diameter of the bodies ranged from 400 to 900 nm. Vacuoles that had accumulated these bodies were prepared by a modification of the method of Ohsumi and Anraku (Ohsumi, Y., and Y. Anraku. 1981. J. Biol. Chem. 256:2079-2082). The isolated vacuoles contained ribosomes and showed latent activity of the cytosolic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. These results suggest that these bodies sequestered the cytosol in the vacuoles. We named these spherical bodies "autophagic bodies." Accumulation of autophagic bodies in the vacuoles was induced not only by nitrogen starvation, but also by depletion of nutrients such as carbon and single amino acids that caused cessation of the cell cycle. Genetic analysis revealed that the accumulation of autophagic bodies in the vacuoles was the result of lack of the PRB1 product proteinase B, and disruption of the PRB1 gene

  15. Three RFLPs defining a haplotype associated with the common mutation in a human medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency occur in Alu repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhifang Zhang; Yeqing Zhou; Kelly, D.P.; Strauss, A.W. St. Louis Children's Hospital, MO ); Kolvraa, S.; Gregersen, N. )

    1993-06-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a common inborn error of fatty-acid oxidation and may cause sudden infant death. Previous studies revealed that (i) homozygosity for an A-to-G mutation at nucleotide 985 of the mRNA coding region (A985G) is an extremely common cause of MCAD deficiency and (ii) MCAD deficiency is strongly associated with a particular haplotype for RFLPs for BanII, PstI, and TaqI. TaqI allele 2 is always associated with the A985G mutation in human MCAD deficiency. In this study, the authors have delineated the molecular basis of the RFLPs for PstI, BamHI, and TaqI in the human MCAD gene. Their results prove that the three RFLPs are caused by point mutations in the 8 kb of DNA encompassing exons 8--10 of the human MCAD gene. The TaqI polymorphism is caused by a C-to-A substitution 392 bp upstream of the exon 8, and the PstI and BamHI polymorphisms are due to T-to-C and G-to-A substitutions, respectively, which are 727 and 931 bp downstream of exon 10, respectively. All three RFLPs lie within Alu repetitive sequences. Comparison of intronic sequences immediately following exon 10 from two normal individuals with different haplotypes showed that this region contains densely packed Alu repeats and is highly polymorphic. The results are consistent both with a founder effect as the cause of the high prevalence of a single (A985G) mutation in MCAD deficiency and with its association with a particular haplotype for these intragenic RFLPs. 27 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Inactivation of the 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase gene in mice: changes in gene expression and associated regulatory networks resulting from serine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shigeki; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Kawakami, Yuriko; Yang, Jyung Hoon; Sayano, Tomoko; Azuma, Norihiro; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Kuhara, Satoru; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2008-08-01

    D-3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh) is a necessary enzyme for de novo L-serine biosynthesis. Mutations in the human PHGDH cause serine deficiency disorders characterized by severe neurological symptoms including congenital microcephaly and psychomotor retardation. We showed previously that targeted disruption of Phgdh in mice causes overall growth retardation with severe brain microcephaly and leads to embryonic lethality. Here, amino acid analysis of Phgdh knockout (KO) mouse embryos demonstrates that free serine and glycine concentrations are decreased markedly in head samples, reflecting the metabolic changes of serine deficiency found in human patients. To understand the pathogenesis of serine deficiency disorders at the molecular level, we have exploited this animal model to identify altered gene expression patterns using a microarray technology. Comparative microarray analysis of the Phgdh KO and wild-type head at gestational day 13.5 revealed an upregulation of genes involved in transfer RNA aminoacylation, amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, transcriptional regulation, and translation, and a downregulation of genes involved in transcription in neuronal progenitors and muscle and cartilage development. A computational network analysis software was used to construct transcriptional regulatory networks operative in the Phgdh KO embryos in vivo. These observations suggest that Phgdh inactivation alters transcriptional programs in several regulatory networks. PMID:18228065

  17. [NADH:ubiquinone reductase and succinate dehydrogenase activity in the liver of rats with acetaminophen-induced toxic hepatitis on the background of alimentary protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kopylchuk, G P; Voloshchuk, O M

    2015-01-01

    The ratio between the redox forms of the nicotinamide coenzymes and key enzymatic activity of the I and II respiratory chain complexes in the liver cells mitochondria of rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis under the conditions of alimentary deprivation of protein was studied. It was estimated, that under the conditions of acute acetaminophen-induced hepatitis of rats kept on a low-protein diet during 4 weeks a significant decrease of the NADH:ubiquinone reductase and succinate dehydrogenase activity with simultaneous increase of the ratio between redox forms of the nicotinamide coenzymes (NAD+/NADH) is observed compared to the same indices in the liver cells of animals with experimental hepatitis kept on the ration balanced by all nutrients. Results of research may become basic ones for the biochemical rationale for the approaches directed to the correction and elimination of the consequences of energy exchange in the toxic hepatitis, induced on the background of protein deficiency. PMID:26036138

  18. Glutaric acid and its metabolites cause apoptosis in immature oligodendrocytes: a novel mechanism of white matter degeneration in glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gerstner, Bettina; Gratopp, Alexander; Marcinkowski, Monika; Sifringer, Marco; Obladen, Michael; Bührer, Christoph

    2005-06-01

    Glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency is an inherited metabolic disease characterized by elevated concentrations of glutaric acid (GA) and its metabolites glutaconic acid (GC) and 3-hydroxy-glutaric acid (3-OH-GA). Its hallmarks are striatal and cortical degeneration, which have been linked to excitotoxic neuronal cell death. However, magnetic resonance imaging studies have also revealed widespread white matter disease. Correspondingly, we decided to investigate the effects of GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA on the rat immature oligodendroglia cell line, OLN-93. For comparison, we also exposed the neuroblastoma line SH-SY5Y and the microglia line BV-2 to GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA. Cell viability was measured by metabolism of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium. Flow cytometry was used to assess apoptosis via annexin-V, anti-active caspase-3 antibody, and propidium iodide staining. GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA reduced OLN-93 oligodendroglia cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Toxicity of GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA was abrogated by preincubation with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Apoptosis but not necrosis was detected at various stages (early: annexin-V; effector: caspase-3) after 24-48 h of incubation with GA, GC, or 3-OH-GA in OLN-93 but not in neuroblastoma or microglia cells. OLN-93 lacked expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, making classical glutamatergic excitotoxicity an unlikely explanation for the selective toxicity of GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA for OLN-93 cells. GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA directly initiate the apoptotic cascade in oligodendroglia cells. This mechanism may contribute to the white matter damage observed in glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

  19. Sorbitol production from lactose by engineered Lactobacillus casei deficient in sorbitol transport system and mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Reinout; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Nadal, Inmaculada; Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2010-02-01

    Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol largely used in the food industry as a low-calorie sweetener. We have previously described a sorbitol-producing Lactobacillus casei (strain BL232) in which the gutF gene, encoding a sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, was expressed from the lactose operon. Here, a complete deletion of the ldh1 gene, encoding the main L-lactate dehydrogenase, was performed in strain BL232. In a resting cell system with glucose, the new strain, named BL251, accumulated sorbitol in the medium that was rapidly metabolized after glucose exhaustion. Reutilization of produced sorbitol was prevented by deleting the gutB gene of the phosphoenolpyruvate: sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTS(Gut)) in BL251. These results showed that the PTS(Gut) did not mediate sorbitol excretion from the cells, but it was responsible for uptake and reutilization of the synthesized sorbitol. A further improvement in sorbitol production was achieved by inactivation of the mtlD gene, encoding a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase. The new strain BL300 (lac::gutF Deltaldh1 DeltagutB mtlD) showed an increase in sorbitol production whereas no mannitol synthesis was detected, avoiding thus a polyol mixture. This strain was able to convert lactose, the main sugar from milk, into sorbitol, either using a resting cell system or in growing cells under pH control. A conversion rate of 9.4% of lactose into sorbitol was obtained using an optimized fed-batch system and whey permeate, a waste product of the dairy industry, as substrate.

  20. Sorbitol production from lactose by engineered Lactobacillus casei deficient in sorbitol transport system and mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Reinout; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Nadal, Inmaculada; Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2010-02-01

    Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol largely used in the food industry as a low-calorie sweetener. We have previously described a sorbitol-producing Lactobacillus casei (strain BL232) in which the gutF gene, encoding a sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, was expressed from the lactose operon. Here, a complete deletion of the ldh1 gene, encoding the main L-lactate dehydrogenase, was performed in strain BL232. In a resting cell system with glucose, the new strain, named BL251, accumulated sorbitol in the medium that was rapidly metabolized after glucose exhaustion. Reutilization of produced sorbitol was prevented by deleting the gutB gene of the phosphoenolpyruvate: sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTS(Gut)) in BL251. These results showed that the PTS(Gut) did not mediate sorbitol excretion from the cells, but it was responsible for uptake and reutilization of the synthesized sorbitol. A further improvement in sorbitol production was achieved by inactivation of the mtlD gene, encoding a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase. The new strain BL300 (lac::gutF Deltaldh1 DeltagutB mtlD) showed an increase in sorbitol production whereas no mannitol synthesis was detected, avoiding thus a polyol mixture. This strain was able to convert lactose, the main sugar from milk, into sorbitol, either using a resting cell system or in growing cells under pH control. A conversion rate of 9.4% of lactose into sorbitol was obtained using an optimized fed-batch system and whey permeate, a waste product of the dairy industry, as substrate. PMID:19784641

  1. Toxicological effects of thiomersal and ethylmercury: Inhibition of the thioredoxin system and NADP(+)-dependent dehydrogenases of the pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Juan; Branco, Vasco; Lu, Jun; Holmgren, Arne; Carvalho, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a strong toxicant affecting mainly the central nervous, renal, cardiovascular and immune systems. Thiomersal (TM) is still in use in medical practice as a topical antiseptic and as a preservative in multiple dose vaccines, routinely given to young children in some developing countries, while other forms of mercury such as methylmercury represent an environmental and food hazard. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of thiomersal (TM) and its breakdown product ethylmercury (EtHg) on the thioredoxin system and NADP(+)-dependent dehydrogenases of the pentose phosphate pathway. Results show that TM and EtHg inhibited the thioredoxin system enzymes in purified suspensions, being EtHg comparable to methylmercury (MeHg). Also, treatment of neuroblastoma and liver cells with TM or EtHg decreased cell viability (GI50: 1.5 to 20μM) and caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in the overall activities of thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in cell lysates. Compared to control, the activities of Trx and TrxR in neuroblastoma cells after EtHg incubation were reduced up to 60% and 80% respectively, whereas in hepatoma cells the reduction was almost 100%. In addition, the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were also significantly inhibited by all mercurials, with inhibition intensity of Hg(2+)>MeHg≈EtHg>TM (p<0.05). Cell incubation with sodium selenite alleviated the inhibitory effects on TrxR and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus, the molecular mechanism of toxicity of TM and especially of its metabolite EtHg encompasses the blockage of the electrons from NADPH via the thioredoxin system.

  2. Homo-D-lactic acid fermentation from arabinose by redirection of the phosphoketolase pathway to the pentose phosphate pathway in L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-08-01

    Optically pure d-lactic acid fermentation from arabinose was achieved by using the Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 strain whose l-lactate dehydrogenase gene was deficient and whose phosphoketolase gene was substituted with a heterologous transketolase gene. After 27 h of fermentation, 38.6 g/liter of d-lactic acid was produced from 50 g/liter of arabinose.

  3. Defects in the HSD11 gene encoding 11[beta]-hydroxysteriod dehydrogenase are not found in patients with apparent mineralocorticoid excess or 11-oxoreductase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkila, H.; White, P.C. ); Tannin, G.M. ); New, M.I.; Taylor, N.F. ); Kalaitzoglou, G.; Monder, C. )

    1993-09-01

    The syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is a form of low renin hypertension that is thought to be caused by congenital deficiency of 11[beta]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11HSD) activity. This enzyme converts cortisol to cortisone and apparently prevents cortisol from acting as a ligand for the mineralocorticoid (type I) receptor. It also catalyzes the reverse oxoreductase (cortisone to cortisol) reaction. Four patients with AME and the parents of the first patient described (now deceased) were analyzed for mutations in the cloned HSD11 gene encoding an 11HSD enzyme. A patient with suspected cortisone reductase deficiency was also studied. No gross deletions or rearrangements in the HSD11 gene were apparent on hybridizations of blot of genomic DNA. Direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified fragments corresponding to the coding sequences, intronexon junctions, and proximal untranslated regions of this gene revealed no mutations. AME may involve mutations in a gene for another enzyme with 11HSD activity or perhaps another cortisol metabolizing enzyme. 48 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Additive effects of clofibric acid and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 4 (PDK4) deficiency on hepatic steatosis in mice fed a high-saturated fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Byounghoon; Wu, Pengfei; Harris, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Although improving glucose metabolism by inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) might prove beneficial in the treatment of type 2 diabetes or diet-induced obesity, it might induce detrimental effects by inhibiting fatty acid oxidation. PPARα agonists are often used to treat dyslipidemia in patients, especially in type 2 diabetes. Combinational treatment with a PDK4 inhibitor and PPARα agonists may prove beneficial. However, PPARα agonists may be less effective in the presence of a PDK4 inhibitor because PPARα agonists induce PDK4 expression. In the present study, the effects of clofibric acid, a PPARα agonist, on blood and liver lipids were determined in wild type and PDK4 knockout mice fed a high fat diet. As expected, treatment of wild type mice with clofibric acid resulted in less body weight gain, smaller epididymal fat pads, greater insulin sensitivity, and lower levels of serum and liver triacylglycerol. Surprisingly, rather than decreasing the effectiveness of clofibric acid, PDK4 deficiency enhanced the beneficial effects of clofibric acid on hepatic steatosis, lowered blood glucose levels, and did not prevent the positive effects of clofibric acid on serum triacylglycerols and free fatty acids. The metabolic effects of clofibric acid are therefore independent of the induction of PDK4 expression. The additive beneficial effects on hepatic steatosis may be due to induction of increased capacity for fatty acid oxidation and partial uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by clofibric acid and a reduction in the capacity for fatty acid synthesis by PDK4 deficiency. PMID:22429297

  5. Field Trial Evaluation of the Performances of Point-of-Care Tests for Screening G6PD Deficiency in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Roca-Feltrer, Arantxa; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Chy, Sophy; Canier, Lydie; Kerleguer, Alexandra; Tor, Pety; Chuor, Char Meng; Kheng, Sim; Siv, Sovannaroth; Kachur, Patrick S.; Taylor, Walter R. J.; Hwang, Jimee; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background User-friendly, accurate, point-of-care rapid tests to detect glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd) are urgently needed at peripheral level to safely recommend primaquine for malaria elimination. Methods The CareStart G6PD RDT (AccessBio, New Jersey, USA), a novel rapid diagnostic test and the most commonly used test, the fluorescent spot test (FST) were assessed against the quantitatively measured G6PD enzyme activity for detecting G6PDd. Subjects were healthy males and non-pregnant females aged 18 years or older residing in six villages in Pailin Province, western Cambodia. Findings Of the 938 subjects recruited, 74 (7.9%) were severe and moderately severe G6PD deficient (enzyme activity <30%), mostly in male population; population median G6PD activity was 12.0 UI/g Hb. The performances of the CareStart G6PD RDT and the FST, according to different cut-off values used to define G6PDd were very similar. For the detection of severe and moderately severe G6PDd (enzyme activity <30%, <3.6 UI/g Hb) in males and females, sensitivity and negative (normal status) predictive value were 100% for both point-of-care tools. When the G6PDd cut-off value increased (from <40% to <60%), the sensitivity for both PoCs decreased: 93.3% to 71.7% (CareStart G6PD RDT, p = 10−6) and 95.5% to 73.2% (FST, p = 10−6) while the specificity for both PoCs remained similar: 97.4% to 98.3% (CareStart G6PD RDT, p = 0.23) and 98.7% to 99.6% (FST, p = 0.06). The cut-off values for classifying individuals as normal were 4.0 UI/g Hb and 4.3 UI/g Hb for the CareStart G6PD RDT and the FST, respectively. Conclusions The CareStart G6PD RDT reliably detected moderate and severe G6PD deficient individuals (enzyme activity <30%), suggesting that this novel point-of-care is a promising tool for tailoring appropriate primaquine treatment for malaria elimination by excluding individuals with severe G6PDd for primaquine treatment. PMID:25541721

  6. The Deletion of the Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene KlSDH1 in Kluyveromyces lactis Does Not Lead to Respiratory Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Saliola, Michele; Bartoccioni, Paola Chiara; De Maria, Ilaria; Lodi, Tiziana; Falcone, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    We have isolated a Kluyveromyces lactis mutant unable to grow on all respiratory carbon sources with the exception of lactate. Functional complementation of this mutant led to the isolation of KlSDH1, the gene encoding the flavoprotein subunit of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex, which is essential for the aerobic utilization of carbon sources. Despite the high sequence conservation of the SDH genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and K. lactis, they do not have the same relevance in the metabolism of the two yeasts. In fact, unlike SDH1, KlSDH1 was highly expressed under both fermentative and nonfermentative conditions. In addition to this, but in contrast with S. cerevisiae, K. lactis strains lacking KlSDH1 were still able to grow in the presence of lactate. In these mutants, oxygen consumption was one-eighth that of the wild type in the presence of lactate and was normal with glucose and ethanol, indicating that the respiratory chain was fully functional. Northern analysis suggested that alternative pathway(s), which involves pyruvate decarboxylase and the glyoxylate cycle, could overcome the absence of SDH and allow (i) lactate utilization and (ii) the accumulation of succinate instead of ethanol during growth on glucose. PMID:15189981

  7. Methemoglobinemia hemotoxicity of some antimalarial 8-aminoquinoline analogues and their hydroxylated derivatives: density functional theory computation of ionization potentials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The administration of primaquine (PQ), an essential drug for treatment and radical cure of malaria, can lead to methemoglobin formation and life-threatening hemolysis for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients. The ionization potential (IP, a quantitative measure of the ability to lose...

  8. Sulfadiazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), diabetes medications, diuretics ('water pills'), and vitamins.tell your doctor if you have or have ever had liver or kidney disease, asthma, severe allergies, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6PD) deficiency (an inherited blood disease). ...

  9. Haemolytic anaemia after ingestion of Neem (Azadirachta indica) tea

    PubMed Central

    Page, Cristy; Hawes, Emily M

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a clinically relevant and possible cause of haemolytic anaemia from ingestion of a Mexican tea from the Neem tree, also known as Azadirachta indica, in a 35-year-old Hispanic man who was found to have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. PMID:24136910

  10. Riboflavin-Responsive and -Non-responsive Mutations in FAD Synthase Cause Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase and Combined Respiratory-Chain Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Koňaříková, Eliška; Giancaspero, Teresa A; Mosegaard, Signe; Boczonadi, Veronika; Mataković, Lavinija; Veauville-Merllié, Alice; Terrile, Caterina; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Haack, Tobias B; Auranen, Mari; Leone, Piero; Galluccio, Michele; Imbard, Apolline; Gutierrez-Rios, Purificacion; Palmfeldt, Johan; Graf, Elisabeth; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Oppenheim, Marcus; Schiff, Manuel; Pichard, Samia; Rigal, Odile; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Möslinger, Dorothea; Feichtinger, René G; Talim, Beril; Topaloglu, Haluk; Coskun, Turgay; Gucer, Safak; Botta, Annalisa; Pegoraro, Elena; Malena, Adriana; Vergani, Lodovica; Mazzà, Daniela; Zollino, Marcella; Ghezzi, Daniele; Acquaviva, Cecile; Tyni, Tiina; Boneh, Avihu; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Gregersen, Niels; Mayr, Johannes A; Horvath, Rita; Barile, Maria; Prokisch, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies (MADDs) are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders with combined respiratory-chain deficiency and a neuromuscular phenotype. Despite recent advances in understanding the genetic basis of MADD, a number of cases remain unexplained. Here, we report clinically relevant variants in FLAD1, which encodes FAD synthase (FADS), as the cause of MADD and respiratory-chain dysfunction in nine individuals recruited from metabolic centers in six countries. In most individuals, we identified biallelic frameshift variants in the molybdopterin binding (MPTb) domain, located upstream of the FADS domain. Inasmuch as FADS is essential for cellular supply of FAD cofactors, the finding of biallelic frameshift variants was unexpected. Using RNA sequencing analysis combined with protein mass spectrometry, we discovered FLAD1 isoforms, which only encode the FADS domain. The existence of these isoforms might explain why affected individuals with biallelic FLAD1 frameshift variants still harbor substantial FADS activity. Another group of individuals with a milder phenotype responsive to riboflavin were shown to have single amino acid changes in the FADS domain. When produced in E. coli, these mutant FADS proteins resulted in impaired but detectable FADS activity; for one of the variant proteins, the addition of FAD significantly improved protein stability, arguing for a chaperone-like action similar to what has been reported in other riboflavin-responsive inborn errors of metabolism. In conclusion, our studies identify FLAD1 variants as a cause of potentially treatable inborn errors of metabolism manifesting with MADD and shed light on the mechanisms by which FADS ensures cellular FAD homeostasis. PMID:27259049

  11. Multi-organ abnormalities and mTORC1 activation in zebrafish model of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Hyung; Scott, Sarah A; Bennett, Michael J; Carson, Robert P; Fessel, Joshua; Brown, H Alex; Ess, Kevin C

    2013-06-01

    Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (MADD) is a severe mitochondrial disorder featuring multi-organ dysfunction. Mutations in either the ETFA, ETFB, and ETFDH genes can cause MADD but very little is known about disease specific mechanisms due to a paucity of animal models. We report a novel zebrafish mutant dark xavier (dxa(vu463) ) that has an inactivating mutation in the etfa gene. dxa(vu463) recapitulates numerous pathological and biochemical features seen in patients with MADD including brain, liver, and kidney disease. Similar to children with MADD, homozygote mutant dxa(vu463) zebrafish have a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from moderate to severe. Interestingly, excessive maternal feeding significantly exacerbated the phenotype. Homozygous mutant dxa(vu463) zebrafish have swollen and hyperplastic neural progenitor cells, hepatocytes and kidney tubule cells as well as elevations in triacylglycerol, cerebroside sulfate and cholesterol levels. Their mitochondria were also greatly enlarged, lacked normal cristae, and were dysfunctional. We also found increased signaling of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) with enlarged cell size and proliferation. Treatment with rapamycin partially reversed these abnormalities. Our results indicate that etfa gene function is remarkably conserved in zebrafish as compared to humans with highly similar pathological, biochemical abnormalities to those reported in children with MADD. Altered mTORC1 signaling and maternal nutritional status may play critical roles in MADD disease progression and suggest novel treatment approaches that may ameliorate disease severity.

  12. Multi-organ Abnormalities and mTORC1 Activation in Zebrafish Model of Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Hyung; Scott, Sarah A.; Bennett, Michael J.; Carson, Robert P.; Fessel, Joshua; Brown, H. Alex; Ess, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (MADD) is a severe mitochondrial disorder featuring multi-organ dysfunction. Mutations in either the ETFA, ETFB, and ETFDH genes can cause MADD but very little is known about disease specific mechanisms due to a paucity of animal models. We report a novel zebrafish mutant dark xavier (dxavu463) that has an inactivating mutation in the etfa gene. dxavu463 recapitulates numerous pathological and biochemical features seen in patients with MADD including brain, liver, and kidney disease. Similar to children with MADD, homozygote mutant dxavu463 zebrafish have a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from moderate to severe. Interestingly, excessive maternal feeding significantly exacerbated the phenotype. Homozygous mutant dxavu463 zebrafish have swollen and hyperplastic neural progenitor cells, hepatocytes and kidney tubule cells as well as elevations in triacylglycerol, cerebroside sulfate and cholesterol levels. Their mitochondria were also greatly enlarged, lacked normal cristae, and were dysfunctional. We also found increased signaling of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) with enlarged cell size and proliferation. Treatment with rapamycin partially reversed these abnormalities. Our results indicate that etfa gene function is remarkably conserved in zebrafish as compared to humans with highly similar pathological, biochemical abnormalities to those reported in children with MADD. Altered mTORC1 signaling and maternal nutritional status may play critical roles in MADD disease progression and suggest novel treatment approaches that may ameliorate disease severity. PMID:23785301

  13. Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenation Deficiency (Glutaric Aciduria Type II) with a Novel Mutation of Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-Dehydrogenase in a Cat.

    PubMed

    Wakitani, Shoichi; Torisu, Shidow; Yoshino, Taiki; Hattanda, Kazuhisa; Yamato, Osamu; Tasaki, Ryuji; Fujita, Haruo; Nishino, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD; also known as glutaric aciduria type II) is a human autosomal recessive disease classified as one of the mitochondrial fatty-acid oxidation disorders. MADD is caused by a defect in the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or ETF dehydrogenase (ETFDH) molecule, but as yet, inherited MADD has not been reported in animals. Here we present the first report of MADD in a cat. The affected animal presented with symptoms characteristic of MADD including hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, vomiting, diagnostic organic aciduria, and accumulation of medium- and long-chain fatty acids in plasma. Treatment with riboflavin and L-carnitine ameliorated the symptoms. To detect the gene mutation responsible for MADD in this case, we determined the complete cDNA sequences of feline ETFα, ETFβ, and ETFDH. Finally, we identified the feline patient-specific mutation, c.692T>G (p.F231C) in ETFDH. The affected animal only carries mutant alleles of ETFDH. p.F231 in feline ETFDH is completely conserved in eukaryotes, and is located on the apical surface of ETFDH, receiving electrons from ETF. This study thus identified the mutation strongly suspected to have been the cause of MADD in this cat. PMID:24142280

  14. The mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 1 gene GhmMDH1 is involved in plant and root growth under phosphorus deficiency conditions in cotton.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-An; Li, Qing; Ge, Xiao-Yang; Yang, Chun-Lin; Luo, Xiao-Li; Zhang, An-Hong; Xiao, Juan-Li; Tian, Ying-Chuan; Xia, Gui-Xian; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Li, Fu-Guang; Wu, Jia-He

    2015-07-16

    Cotton, an important commercial crop, is cultivated for its natural fibers, and requires an adequate supply of soil nutrients, including phosphorus, for its growth. Soil phosporus exists primarily in insoluble forms. We isolated a mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (MDH) gene, designated as GhmMDH1, from Gossypium hirsutum L. to assess its effect in enhancing P availability and absorption. An enzyme kinetic assay showed that the recombinant GhmMDH1 possesses the capacity to catalyze the interconversion of oxaloacetate and malate. The malate contents in the roots, leaves and root exudates was significantly higher in GhmMDH1-overexpressing plants and lower in knockdown plants compared with the wild-type control. Knockdown of GhmMDH1 gene resulted in increased respiration rate and reduced biomass whilst overexpression of GhmMDH1 gave rise to decreased respiration rate and higher biomass in the transgenic plants. When cultured in medium containing only insoluble phosphorus, Al-phosphorus, Fe-phosphorus, or Ca-phosphorus, GhmMDH1-overexpressing plants produced significantly longer roots and had a higher biomass and P content than WT plants, however, knockdown plants showed the opposite results for these traits. Collectively, our results show that GhmMDH1 is involved in plant and root growth under phosphorus deficiency conditions in cotton, owing to its functions in leaf respiration and P acquisition.

  15. The mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 1 gene GhmMDH1 is involved in plant and root growth under phosphorus deficiency conditions in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-An; Li, Qing; Ge, Xiao-Yang; Yang, Chun-Lin; Luo, Xiao-Li; Zhang, An-Hong; Xiao, Juan-Li; Tian, Ying-Chuan; Xia, Gui-Xian; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Li, Fu-Guang; Wu, Jia-He

    2015-01-01

    Cotton, an important commercial crop, is cultivated for its natural fibers, and requires an adequate supply of soil nutrients, including phosphorus, for its growth. Soil phosporus exists primarily in insoluble forms. We isolated a mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (MDH) gene, designated as GhmMDH1, from Gossypium hirsutum L. to assess its effect in enhancing P availability and absorption. An enzyme kinetic assay showed that the recombinant GhmMDH1 possesses the capacity to catalyze the interconversion of oxaloacetate and malate. The malate contents in the roots, leaves and root exudates was significantly higher in GhmMDH1-overexpressing plants and lower in knockdown plants compared with the wild-type control. Knockdown of GhmMDH1 gene resulted in increased respiration rate and reduced biomass whilst overexpression of GhmMDH1 gave rise to decreased respiration rate and higher biomass in the transgenic plants. When cultured in medium containing only insoluble phosphorus, Al-phosphorus, Fe-phosphorus, or Ca-phosphorus, GhmMDH1-overexpressing plants produced significantly longer roots and had a higher biomass and P content than WT plants, however, knockdown plants showed the opposite results for these traits. Collectively, our results show that GhmMDH1 is involved in plant and root growth under phosphorus deficiency conditions in cotton, owing to its functions in leaf respiration and P acquisition. PMID:26179843

  16. [Activity of liver mitochondrial NAD+-dependent dehydrogenases of the krebs cycle in rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis developed under conditions of alimentary protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Voloshchuk, O N; Kopylchuk, G P

    2016-01-01

    Activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and the NAD(+)/NADН ratio were studied in the liver mitochondrial fraction of rats with toxic hepatitis induced by acetaminophen under conditions of alimentary protein deprivation. Acetaminophen-induced hepatitis was characterized by a decrease of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase activities, while the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio remained at the control level. Modeling of acetaminophen-induced hepatitis in rats with alimentary protein caused a more pronounced decrease in the activity of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases studied and a 2.2-fold increase of the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio. This suggests that alimentary protein deprivation potentiated drug-induced liver damage.

  17. [Activity of liver mitochondrial NAD+-dependent dehydrogenases of the krebs cycle in rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis developed under conditions of alimentary protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Voloshchuk, O N; Kopylchuk, G P

    2016-01-01

    Activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and the NAD(+)/NADН ratio were studied in the liver mitochondrial fraction of rats with toxic hepatitis induced by acetaminophen under conditions of alimentary protein deprivation. Acetaminophen-induced hepatitis was characterized by a decrease of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase activities, while the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio remained at the control level. Modeling of acetaminophen-induced hepatitis in rats with alimentary protein caused a more pronounced decrease in the activity of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases studied and a 2.2-fold increase of the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio. This suggests that alimentary protein deprivation potentiated drug-induced liver damage. PMID:27143375

  18. Cellular and subcellular localization of hexokinase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and alanine aminotransferase in the honeybee drone retina.

    PubMed

    Veuthey, A L; Tsacopoulos, M; Millan de Ruiz, L; Perrottet, P

    1994-05-01

    Subcellular localization of hexokinase in the honeybee drone retina was examined following fractionation of cell homogenate using differential centrifugation. Nearly all hexokinase activity was found in the cytosolic fraction, following a similar distribution as the cytosolic enzymatic marker, phosphoglycerate kinase. The distribution of enzymatic markers of mitochondria (succinate dehydrogenase, rotenone-insensitive cytochrome c reductase, and adenylate kinase) indicated that the outer mitochondrial membrane was partly damaged, but their distributions were different from that of hexokinase. The activity of hexokinase in purified suspensions of cells was fivefold higher in glial cells than in photoreceptors. This result is consistent with the hypothesis based on quantitative 2-deoxy[3H]glucose autoradiography that only glial cells phosphorylate significant amounts of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate. The activities of alanine aminotransferase and to a lesser extent of glutamate dehydrogenase were higher in the cytosolic than in the mitochondrial fraction. This important cytosolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was consistent with the higher activity found in mitochondria-poor glial cells. In conclusion, this distribution of enzymes is consistent with the model of metabolic interactions between glial and photoreceptor cells in the intact bee retina. PMID:8158142

  19. Cellular and subcellular localization of hexokinase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and alanine aminotransferase in the honeybee drone retina.

    PubMed

    Veuthey, A L; Tsacopoulos, M; Millan de Ruiz, L; Perrottet, P

    1994-05-01

    Subcellular localization of hexokinase in the honeybee drone retina was examined following fractionation of cell homogenate using differential centrifugation. Nearly all hexokinase activity was found in the cytosolic fraction, following a similar distribution as the cytosolic enzymatic marker, phosphoglycerate kinase. The distribution of enzymatic markers of mitochondria (succinate dehydrogenase, rotenone-insensitive cytochrome c reductase, and adenylate kinase) indicated that the outer mitochondrial membrane was partly damaged, but their distributions were different from that of hexokinase. The activity of hexokinase in purified suspensions of cells was fivefold higher in glial cells than in photoreceptors. This result is consistent with the hypothesis based on quantitative 2-deoxy[3H]glucose autoradiography that only glial cells phosphorylate significant amounts of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate. The activities of alanine aminotransferase and to a lesser extent of glutamate dehydrogenase were higher in the cytosolic than in the mitochondrial fraction. This important cytosolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was consistent with the higher activity found in mitochondria-poor glial cells. In conclusion, this distribution of enzymes is consistent with the model of metabolic interactions between glial and photoreceptor cells in the intact bee retina.

  20. Anesthetic agents in patients with very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, Charlotte; Stewart, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    Very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrongenase deficiency (VLCADD) is a rare disorder of fatty acid metabolism that renders sufferers susceptible to hypoglycemia, liver failure, cardiomyopathy, and rhabdomyolysis. The literature about the management of these patients is hugely conflicting, suggesting that both propofol and volatile anesthesia should be avoided. We have reviewed the literature and have concluded that the source papers do not support the statements that volatile anesthetic agents are unsafe. The reports on rhabdomyolysis secondary to anesthesia appear to be due to inadequate supply of carbohydrate not volatile agents. Catabolism must be avoided with minimal fasting, glucose infusions based on age and weight, and attenuation of emotional and physical stress. General anesthesia appears to be protective of stress-induced catabolism and may offer benefits in children and anxious patients over regional anesthesia. Propofol has not been demonstrated to be harmful in VLCADD but is presented in an emulsion containing very long-chain fatty acids which can cause organ lipidosis and itself can inhibit mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism. It is therefore not recommended. Suxamethonium-induced myalgia may mimic symptoms of rhabdomyolysis and cause raised CK therefore should be avoided. Opioids, NSAIDS, regional anesthesia, and local anesthetic techniques have all been used without complication. PMID:25069536

  1. Sensory integration intervention: historical concepts, treatment strategies and clinical experiences in three patients with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kratz, S V

    2009-06-01

    This paper is a review of clinical experiences providing developmental therapy services for three boys diagnosed with paediatric neurotransmitter disease. The clinical presentation of paediatric neurotransmitter diseases might parallel other diagnostic characteristics seen in a typical paediatric therapy clinic (i.e. hypotonia, motor and cognitive delays, coordination, expressive speech, and ocular motor difficulties.) From the clinical perspective of the author, sensory integrative function is but one aspect of a thorough evaluation and treatment plan for all patients. The manifestations of sensory integration dysfunction (SID), also known as sensory processing dysfunction (SPD), can occur alone or be concurrent with a variety of known medical, behavioural and neurological diagnoses. These manifestations of SPD can include, but are not limited to: hypotonia, hyperactivity, irritability, distractibility, attention difficulties, learning difficulties, clumsiness and incoordination, instability, poor motor skills, social-emotional difficulties, and behavioural problems. This paper summarizes the theory and practice applications of sensory integration. The author discusses clinical experiences providing occupational therapy services utilizing sensory integration methods and strategies with clients who were eventually diagnosed with SSADH deficiency.

  2. Improved production of homo-D-lactic acid via xylose fermentation by introduction of xylose assimilation genes and redirection of the phosphoketolase pathway to the pentose phosphate pathway in L-Lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Yoshida, Shogo; Yamada, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-12-01

    The production of optically pure d-lactic acid via xylose fermentation was achieved by using a Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 strain whose l-lactate dehydrogenase gene was deficient and whose phosphoketolase genes were replaced with a heterologous transketolase gene. After 60 h of fermentation, 41.2 g/liter of d-lactic acid was produced from 50 g/liter of xylose.

  3. Assessment of Point-of-Care Diagnostics for G6PD Deficiency in Malaria Endemic Rural Eastern Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Satyagraha, Ari W.; Sadhewa, Arkasha; Elvira, Rosalie; Elyazar, Iqbal; Feriandika, Denny; Antonjaya, Ungke; Oyong, Damian; Subekti, Decy; Rozi, Ismail E.; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Harahap, Alida R.; Baird, J. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients infected by Plasmodium vivax or Plasmodium ovale suffer repeated clinical attacks without primaquine therapy against latent stages in liver. Primaquine causes seriously threatening acute hemolytic anemia in patients having inherited glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Access to safe primaquine therapy hinges upon the ability to confirm G6PD normal status. CareStart G6PD, a qualitative G6PD rapid diagnostic test (G6PD RDT) intended for use at point-of-care in impoverished rural settings where most malaria patients live, was evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings This device and the standard qualitative fluorescent spot test (FST) were each compared against the quantitative spectrophotometric assay for G6PD activity as the diagnostic gold standard. The assessment occurred at meso-endemic Panenggo Ede in western Sumba Island in eastern Indonesia, where 610 residents provided venous blood. The G6PD RDT and FST qualitative assessments were performed in the field, whereas the quantitative assay was performed in a research laboratory at Jakarta. The median G6PD activity ≥5 U/gHb was 9.7 U/gHb and was considered 100% of normal activity. The prevalence of G6PD deficiency by quantitative assessment (<5 U/gHb) was 7.2%. Applying 30% of normal G6PD activity as the cut-off for qualitative testing, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for G6PD RDT versus FST among males were as follows: 100%, 98.7%, 89%, and 100% versus 91.7%, 92%, 55%, and 99%; P = 0.49, 0.001, 0.004, and 0.24, respectively. These values among females were: 83%, 92.7%, 17%, and 99.7% versus 100%, 92%, 18%, and 100%; P = 1.0, 0.89, 1.0 and 1.0, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The overall performance of G6PD RDT, especially 100% negative predictive value, demonstrates suitable safety for G6PD screening prior to administering hemolytic drugs like primaquine and many others. Relatively poor diagnostic performance

  4. High Incidence of Malaria Along the Sino-Burmese Border Is Associated With Polymorphisms of CR1, IL-1A, IL-4R, IL-4, NOS, and TNF, But Not With G6PD Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ren, Na; Kuang, Ying-Min; Tang, Qiong-Lin; Cheng, Long; Zhang, Chun-Hua; Yang, Zao-Qing; He, Yong-Shu; Zhu, Yue-Chun

    2015-10-01

    Malaria is highly endemic in Yunnan Province, China, with the incidence of malaria being highest along the Sino-Burmese border. The aim of our study was to determine whether genetic polymorphisms are associated with the prevalence of malaria among Chinese residents of the Sino-Burmese border region. Fourteen otherwise healthy people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, 50 malaria patients, and 67 healthy control subjects were included in our cross-sectional study. We analyzed the frequency of the G3093T and T520C single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CR1. Logistic regression was used to calculate the prevalence odds ratio (POR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of malaria for the T520C SNP of CR1 and SNPs of G6PD, IL-4, IL-4R, IL-1A, NOS, CD40LG, TNF, and LUC7L. The frequency of the 3093T/3093T genotype of CR1 in the malaria group (0.16) was significantly higher than that in the control group (0.045, P < 0.05), and significantly lower than that in the G6PD deficiency group (0.43, P < 0.01). The frequency of the 520T/520T genotype of CR1 was significantly higher in the malaria patients (0.78) than that in the control group (0.67, P < 0.05) and G6PD-deficiency group (0.36, P < 0.05). The T allele of the T520C variant of CR1 was significantly associated with the prevalence of malaria (POR: 1.460; 95% CI: 0.703-3.034). Polymorphisms of G6PD did not significantly influence the prevalence malaria (P > 0.05). A GTGTGTC haplotype consisting of IL-1A (rs17561), IL-4 (rs2243250), TNF (rs1800750), IL-4R (rs1805015), NOS (rs8078340), CD40LG (rs1126535), and LUC7L (rs1211375) was significantly associated with the prevalence of malaria (POR: 1.822, 95% CI: 0.998-3.324). The 3093G/3093G and 520T/520T genotypes are the predominant genetic variants of CR1 among Chinese residents near the Sino-Burmese border, and the T allele of T520C is associated with the prevalence of malaria in this region. Although G6PD deficiency does not protect against malaria, it may

  5. Prevalence and mutation analysis of short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SBCADD) detected on newborn screening in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Van Calcar, Sandra C; Baker, Mei W; Williams, Phillip; Jones, Susan A; Xiong, Blia; Thao, Mai Choua; Lee, Sheng; Yang, Mai Khou; Rice, Greg M; Rhead, William; Vockley, Jerry; Hoffman, Gary; Durkin, Maureen S

    2013-01-01

    Short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SBCADD), also called 2-methylbutyryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (2-MBCDD), is a disorder of l-isoleucine metabolism of uncertain clinical significance. SBCADD is inadvertently detected on expanded newborn screening by elevated 2-methylbutyrylcarnitine (C5), which has the same mass to charge (m/s) on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) as isovalerylcarnitine (C5), an analyte that is elevated in isovaleric acidemia (IVA), a disorder in leucine metabolism. SBCADD cases identified in the Hmong-American population have been found in association with the c.1165 A>G mutation in the ACADSB gene. The purposes of this study were to: (a) estimate the prevalence of SBCADD and carrier frequency of the c.1165 A>G mutation in the Hmong ethnic group; (b) determine whether the c.1165 A>G mutation is common to all Hmong newborns screening positive for SBCADD; and (c) evaluate C5 acylcarnitine cut-off values to detect and distinguish between SBCADD and IVA diagnoses. During the first 10years of expanded newborn screening using MS/MS in Wisconsin (2001-2011), 97 infants had elevated C5 values (≥0.44μmol/L), of whom five were Caucasian infants confirmed to have IVA. Of the remaining 92 confirmed SBCADD cases, 90 were of Hmong descent. Mutation analysis was completed on an anonymous, random sample of newborn screening cards (n=1139) from Hmong infants. Fifteen infants, including nine who had screened positive for SBCADD based on a C5 acylcarnitine concentration ≥0.44μmol/L, were homozygous for the c.1165 A>G mutation. This corresponds to a prevalence in this ethnic group of being homozygous for the mutation of 1.3% (95% confidence interval 0.8-2.2%) and of being heterozygous for the mutation of 21.8% (95% confidence interval 19.4-24.3%), which is consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Detection of homozygous individuals who were not identified on newborn screening suggests that the C5 screening cut-off would need to

  6. Prevalence and mutation analysis of short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SBCADD) detected on newborn screening in Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Van Calcar, Sandra C.; Baker, Mei W.; Williams, Phillip; Jones, Susan A.; Xiong, Blia; Thao, Mai Choua; Lee, Sheng; Yang, Mai Khou; Rice, Greg M.; Rhead, William; Vockley, Jerry; Hoffman, Gary; Durkin, Maureen S.

    2015-01-01

    Short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SBCADD), also called 2-methylbutyryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (2-MBCDD), is a disorder of L-isoleucine metabolism of uncertain clinical significance. SBCADD is inadvertently detected on expanded newborn screening by elevated 2-methylbutyrylcarnitine (C5), which has the same mass to charge (m/s) on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) as isovalerylcarnitine (C5), an analyte that is elevated in isovaleric acidemia (IVA), a disorder in leucine metabolism. SBCADD cases identified in the Hmong-American population have been found in association with the c.1165 A>G mutation in the ACADSB gene. The purposes of this study were to: (a) estimate the prevalence of SBCADD and carrier frequency of the c.1165 A>G mutation in the Hmong ethnic group; (b) determine whether the c.1 165 A>G mutation is common to all Hmong newborns screening positive for SBCADD; and (c) evaluate C5 acylcarnitine cut-off values to detect and distinguish between SBCADD and IVA diagnoses. During the first 10 years of expanded newborn screening using MS/MS in Wisconsin (2001–2011), 97 infants had elevated C5 values (≥0.44 μmol/L), of whom five were Caucasian infants confirmed to have IVA Of the remaining 92 confirmed SBCADD cases, 90 were of Hmong descent. Mutation analysis was completed on an anonymous, random sample of newborn screening cards (n = 1139) from Hmong infants. Fifteen infants, including nine who had screened positive for SBCADD based on a C5 acylcarnitine concentrations ≥0.44 μmol/L, were homozygous for the c.1165 A>G mutation. This corresponds to a prevalence in this ethnic group of being homozygous for the mutation of 1.3% (95% confidence interval 0.8–2.2%) and of being heterozygous for the mutation of 21.8% (95% confidence interval 19.4–24.3%), which is consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Detection of homozygous individuals who were not identified on newborn screening suggests that the C5 screening cut

  7. Application of a genetically encoded biosensor for live cell imaging of L-valine production in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient Corynebacterium glutamicum strains.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Nurije; Grünberger, Alexander; Mahr, Regina; Helfrich, Stefan; Nöh, Katharina; Blombach, Bastian; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Frunzke, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biotechnologically relevant metabolites do not impart a conspicuous phenotype to the producing cell. Consequently, the analysis of microbial metabolite production is still dominated by bulk techniques, which may obscure significant variation at the single-cell level. In this study, we have applied the recently developed Lrp-biosensor for monitoring of amino acid production in single cells of gradually engineered L-valine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum strains based on the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient (PDHC) strain C. glutamicum ΔaceE. Online monitoring of the sensor output (eYFP fluorescence) during batch cultivation proved the sensor's suitability for visualizing different production levels. In the following, we conducted live cell imaging studies on C. glutamicum sensor strains using microfluidic chip devices. As expected, the sensor output was higher in microcolonies of high-yield producers in comparison to the basic strain C. glutamicum ΔaceE. Microfluidic cultivation in minimal medium revealed a typical Gaussian distribution of single cell fluorescence during the production phase. Remarkably, low amounts of complex nutrients completely changed the observed phenotypic pattern of all strains, resulting in a phenotypic split of the population. Whereas some cells stopped growing and initiated L-valine production, others continued to grow or showed a delayed transition to production. Depending on the cultivation conditions, a considerable fraction of non-fluorescent cells was observed, suggesting a loss of metabolic activity. These studies demonstrate that genetically encoded biosensors are a valuable tool for monitoring single cell productivity and to study the phenotypic pattern of microbial production strains.

  8. Sexual dimorphism of lipid metabolism in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient (VLCAD-/-) mice in response to medium-chain triglycerides (MCT).

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Flögel, Ulrich; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2015-07-01

    Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) are widely applied in the treatment of long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders. Previously it was shown that long-term MCT supplementation strongly affects lipid metabolism in mice. We here investigate sex-specific effects in mice with very-long-chain-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency in response to a long-term MCT modified diet. We quantified blood lipids, acylcarnitines, glucose, insulin and free fatty acids, as well as tissue triglycerides in the liver and skeletal muscle under a control and an MCT diet over 1 year. In addition, visceral and hepatic fat content and muscular intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) were assessed by in vivo(1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques. The long-term application of an MCT diet induced a marked alteration of glucose homeostasis. However, only VLCAD-/- female mice developed a severe metabolic syndrome characterized by marked insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, severe hepatic and visceral steatosis, whereas VLCAD-/- males seemed to be protected and only presented with milder insulin resistance. Moreover, the highly saturated MCT diet is associated with a decreased hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) activity in females aggravating the harmful effects of a saturated MCT diet. Long-term MCT supplementation deeply affects lipid metabolism in a sexual dimorphic manner resulting in a severe metabolic syndrome only in female mice. These findings are striking since the first signs of insulin resistance already occur in female VLCAD-/- mice during their reproductive period. How these metabolic adaptations are finally regulated needs to be determined. More important, the relevance of these findings for humans under these dietary modifications needs to be investigated. PMID:25887160

  9. An animal model of PDH deficiency using AAV8-siRNA vector-mediated knockdown of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α

    PubMed Central

    Ojano-Dirain, Carolyn; Glushakova, Lyudmyla G.; Zhong, Li; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Srivastava, Arun; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) vector-mediated knockdown of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex using small interfering RNAs directed against the E1α subunit gene (PDHA1). AAV serotype 8 was used to stereotaxically deliver scAAV8-si3-PDHA1-Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (knockdown) or scAAV8-EGFP (control) vectors into the right striatum and substantia nigra of rats. Rotational asymmetry was employed to quantify abnormal rotation following neurodegeneration in the nigrostriatal system. By 20 weeks after surgery, the siRNA-injected rats exhibited higher contralateral rotation during the first 10 min following amphetamine administration and lower 90-min total rotations (p≤0.05). Expression of PDC E1α, E1β and E2 subunits in striatum was decreased (p≤0.05) in the siRNA-injected striatum after 14 weeks. By week 25, both PDC activity and expression of E1α were lower (p≤0.05) in siRNA-injected striata compared to controls. E1α expression was associated with PDC activity (R2=0.48; p=0.006) and modestly associated with counterclockwise rotation (R2=0.51;p=0.07). The use of tyrosine-mutant scAAV8 vectors resulted in ~17-fold increase in transduction efficiency of rat striatal neurons in vivo. We conclude that scAAV8-siRNA vector-mediated knockdown of PDC E1α in brain regions typically affected in humans with PDC deficiency results in a reproducible biochemical and clinical phenotype in rats that may be further enhanced with the use of tyrosine-mutant vectors. PMID:20685142

  10. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    PubMed Central

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Ju, Hyunsu; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Calhoun, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to <0.2% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 were observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease. PMID:24625836

  11. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding.

    PubMed

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Hyunsu, Ju; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S; Calhoun, William J

    2014-06-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to <1.0% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 was observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease.

  12. Sexual dimorphism of lipid metabolism in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient (VLCAD-/-) mice in response to medium-chain triglycerides (MCT).

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Flögel, Ulrich; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2015-07-01

    Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) are widely applied in the treatment of long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders. Previously it was shown that long-term MCT supplementation strongly affects lipid metabolism in mice. We here investigate sex-specific effects in mice with very-long-chain-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency in response to a long-term MCT modified diet. We quantified blood lipids, acylcarnitines, glucose, insulin and free fatty acids, as well as tissue triglycerides in the liver and skeletal muscle under a control and an MCT diet over 1 year. In addition, visceral and hepatic fat content and muscular intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) were assessed by in vivo(1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques. The long-term application of an MCT diet induced a marked alteration of glucose homeostasis. However, only VLCAD-/- female mice developed a severe metabolic syndrome characterized by marked insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, severe hepatic and visceral steatosis, whereas VLCAD-/- males seemed to be protected and only presented with milder insulin resistance. Moreover, the highly saturated MCT diet is associated with a decreased hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) activity in females aggravating the harmful effects of a saturated MCT diet. Long-term MCT supplementation deeply affects lipid metabolism in a sexual dimorphic manner resulting in a severe metabolic syndrome only in female mice. These findings are striking since the first signs of insulin resistance already occur in female VLCAD-/- mice during their reproductive period. How these metabolic adaptations are finally regulated needs to be determined. More important, the relevance of these findings for humans under these dietary modifications needs to be investigated.

  13. A Historical Cohort Study on the Efficacy of Glucocorticoids and Riboflavin Among Patients with Late-onset Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-Yi; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Ni; Lin, Min-Ting; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background: Late-onset multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is the most common type of lipid storage myopathies in China. Most patients with late-onset MADD are well responsive to riboflavin. Up to now, these patients are often treated with glucocorticoids as the first-line drug because they are misdiagnosed as polymyositis without muscle biopsy or gene analysis. Although glucocorticoids seem to improve the fatty acid metabolism of late-onset MADD, the objective evaluation of their rationalization on this disorder and comparison with riboflavin treatment are unknown. Methods: We performed a historical cohort study on the efficacy of the two drugs among 45 patients with late-onset MADD, who were divided into glucocorticoids group and riboflavin group. Detailed clinical information of baseline and 1-month follow-up were collected. Results: After 1-month treatment, a dramatic improvement of muscle strength was found in riboflavin group (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in muscle enzymes between the two groups. Significantly, the number of patients with full recovery in glucocorticoids group was less than the number in riboflavin group (P < 0.05). On the other hand, almost half of the patients in riboflavin group still presented high-level muscle enzymes and weak muscle strength after 1-month riboflavin treatment, meaning that 1-month treatment duration maybe insufficient and patients should keep on riboflavin supplement for a longer time. Conclusions: Our results provide credible evidences that the overall efficacy of riboflavin is superior to glucocorticoids, and a longer duration of riboflavin treatment is necessary for patients with late-onset MADD. PMID:26830983

  14. Acute haemolytic episodes & fava bean consumption in G6PD deficient Iraqis.

    PubMed

    Yahya, H I; al-Allawi, N A

    1993-12-01

    The relation between fava bean ingestion and the occurrence of a haemolytic episode was studied in 102 glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenate (G6PD) deficient Iraqi patients. None of the patients (mean age 12.8 yr) had a documented similar illness earlier, although all of them gave history of reported regular fava bean ingestion in the past. Further, none of the three patients who were rechallenged (2-3 months later) by the beans developed any clinical or laboratory evidence of haemolysis. The incidence of the haemolytic episodes was found to peak in April, while the fava bean season extends from February to June. This study thus does not support a causal relation between the bean ingestion and the haemolytic episodes in G6PD deficient Iraqis. Possibly, some other factor such as a viral infection may be involved.

  15. Acute haemolytic episodes & fava bean consumption in G6PD deficient Iraqis.

    PubMed

    Yahya, H I; al-Allawi, N A

    1993-12-01

    The relation between fava bean ingestion and the occurrence of a haemolytic episode was studied in 102 glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenate (G6PD) deficient Iraqi patients. None of the patients (mean age 12.8 yr) had a documented similar illness earlier, although all of them gave history of reported regular fava bean ingestion in the past. Further, none of the three patients who were rechallenged (2-3 months later) by the beans developed any clinical or laboratory evidence of haemolysis. The incidence of the haemolytic episodes was found to peak in April, while the fava bean season extends from February to June. This study thus does not support a causal relation between the bean ingestion and the haemolytic episodes in G6PD deficient Iraqis. Possibly, some other factor such as a viral infection may be involved. PMID:8132232

  16. NADP-Dependent Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis Roots Contributes in the Mechanism of Defence against the Nitro-Oxidative Stress Induced by Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B.; Valderrama, Raquel; Palma, José M.; Corpas, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    NADPH regeneration appears to be essential in the mechanism of plant defence against oxidative stress. Plants contain several NADPH-generating dehydrogenases including isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), and malic enzyme (ME). In Arabidopsis seedlings grown under salinity conditions (100 mM NaCl) the analysis of physiological parameters, antioxidant enzymes (catalase and superoxide dismutase) and content of superoxide radical (O2  ∙−), nitric oxide (NO), and peroxynitrite (ONOO−) indicates a process of nitro-oxidative stress induced by NaCl. Among the analysed NADPH-generating dehydrogenases under salinity conditions, the NADP-ICDH showed the maximum activity mainly attributable to the root NADP-ICDH. Thus, these data provide new insights on the relevance of the NADP-ICDH which could be considered as a second barrier in the mechanism of response against the nitro-oxidative stress generated by salinity. PMID:22649311

  17. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function in pubertal male and female siblings with glucocorticoid-treated nonsalt-wasting 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y T; Kulin, H E; Garibaldi, L; Suriano, M J; Bracki, K; Pang, S

    1993-11-01

    We report pubertal maturation and dynamic studies of gonadotropin and gonadal hormone secretion in long term glucocorticoid-treated siblings with nonsalt-wasting classic adrenal and gonadal 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta HSD) deficiency. The 18-yr-old female siblings spontaneously developed thelarche and menarche at 10 and 12 yr, respectively, and manifested irregular menses, hirsutism, and polycystic ovaries at 17 yr. The 16-yr-old male sibling spontaneously developed secondary sex characteristics at age 11 yr and exhibited Tanner IV-V pubic hair, a 6.5 x 3.0-cm surgically repaired penis, and enlarged nonnodular testes. Overnight (2200-0700 h) plasma gonadotropin (every 20 min) and gonadal steroid levels (every 2 h) under ACTH adrenal suppression revealed the following. In the male sibling, there were overall normal Tanner V male LH (3-21 mIU/mL) and FSH (1.2-13 mIU/mL) levels, normal peak frequency and amplitude of LH (70 +/- 62 min and 15 +/- 3 mIU/mL, respectively) and FSH (65 +/- 28 min and 13 +/- 3 mIU/mL), and low normal Tanner V testosterone (T) levels (11.4-17.9 nmol/L). In the female sibling, there were normal follicular phase range LH (10-28 mIU/mL) and FSH (5.1-17.2 mIU/mL) levels, normal peak frequency and amplitude of LH (96 +/- 17 min and 22 +/- 4.5 mIU/mL, respectively) and FSH (62 +/- 27 min, 13 +/- 4 mIU/mL), and early follicular phase estradiol (E2) levels (100-170 pmol/L). The LH-releasing hormone-stimulated LH response was in the normal adult range in the male and normal for the early follicular phase in the female. In contrast, ACTH and adrenal delta 5-steroid responses to CRH administration were elevated in each sibling. Gonadal suppression via Norlutin administration (30 mg/day for 3 days) after prolonged adrenal suppression by dexamethasone resulted in suppression of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and E2 in the female and DHEA and T in the male. Gonadal stimulation via hCG administration (5000 IU/day for 3 days, im) during

  18. Isolation of a Histoplasma capsulatum cDNA that complements a mitochondrial NAD(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase subunit I-deficient mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C H; McEwen, J E

    1999-06-30

    A cDNA library was prepared from Histoplasma capsulatum strain G-217B yeast cells and an apparently full-length cDNA for a subunit of the citric acid cycle enzyme NAD(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase was identified by sequence analysis. Its predicted amino acid sequence is more similar to the IDH1 regulatory subunit of S. cerevisiae NAD(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase than to the IDH2 catalytic subunit. After expression in S. cerevisiae from an S. cerevisiae promoter, it was shown to functionally complement an S. cerevisiae idh1 mutant, but not an idh2 mutant, for growth on acetate as a carbon source and for production of NAD(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase enzyme activity. These results confirm that the H. capsulatum cDNA encodes a homologue of subunit I of the S. cerevisiae mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase isozyme that functions in the citric acid cycle.

  19. Safety, efficacy and physiological actions of a lysine-free, arginine-rich formula to treat glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: focus on cerebral amino acid influx.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Kevin A; Brumbaugh, Joan; Duffy, Alana; Wardley, Bridget; Robinson, Donna; Hendrickson, Christine; Tortorelli, Silvia; Moser, Ann B; Puffenberger, Erik G; Rider, Nicholas L; Morton, D Holmes

    2011-01-01

    Striatal degeneration from glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (glutaric aciduria type 1, GA1) is associated with cerebral formation and entrapment of glutaryl-CoA and its derivatives that depend on cerebral lysine influx. In 2006 we designed a lysine-free study formula enriched with arginine to selectively block lysine transport across cerebral endothelia and thereby limit glutaryl-CoA production by brain. Between 2006 and present, we treated twelve consecutive children with study formula (LYSx group) while holding all other treatment practices constant. Clinical and biochemical outcomes were compared to 25 GA1 patients (PROx group) treated between 1995 and 2005 with natural protein restriction (dietary lysine/arginine ratio of 1.7±0.3 mg:mg). We used published kinetic parameters of the y+and LAT1 blood-brain barrier transporters to model the influx of amino acids into the brain. Arginine fortification to achieve a mean dietary lysine/arginine ratio of 0.7±0.2 mg:mg was neuroprotective. All 12 LYSx patients are physically and neurologically healthy after 28 aggregate patient-years of follow up (current ages 28±21 months) and there were no adverse events related to formula use. This represents a 36% reduction of neurological risk (95% confidence interval 14-52%, p=0.018) that we can directly attribute to altered amino acid intake. During the first year of life, 20% lower lysine intake and two-fold higher arginine intake by LYSx patients were associated with 50% lower plasma lysine, 3-fold lower plasma lysine/arginine concentration ratio, 42% lower mean calculated cerebral lysine influx, 54% higher calculated cerebral arginine influx, 15-26% higher calculated cerebral influx of several anaplerotic precursors (isoleucine, threonine, methionine, and leucine), 50% less 3-hydroxyglutarate excretion, and a 3-fold lower hospitalization rate (0.8 versus 2.3 hospitalizations per patient per year). The relationship between arginine fortification and plasma lysine

  20. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    SciTech Connect

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Hyunsu, Ju; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Calhoun, William J.

    2014-06-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to < 1.0% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 was observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease. - Highlights: • Chronic

  1. The glucose 6-phosphate shunt around the Calvin-Benson cycle.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Weise, Sean E

    2016-07-01

    It is just over 60 years since a cycle for the regeneration of the CO2-acceptor used in photosynthesis was proposed. In this opinion paper, we revisit the origins of the Calvin-Benson cycle that occurred at the time that the hexose monophosphate shunt, now called the pentose phosphate pathway, was being worked out. Eventually the pentose phosphate pathway was separated into two branches, an oxidative branch and a non-oxidative branch. It is generally thought that the Calvin-Benson cycle is the reverse of the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway but we describe crucial differences and also propose that some carbon routinely passes through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. This creates a futile cycle but may help to stabilize photosynthesis. If it occurs it could explain a number of enigmas including the lack of complete labelling of the Calvin-Benson cycle intermediates when carbon isotopes are fed to photosynthesizing leaves.

  2. Metabolic Adaptations of White Lupin Roots and Shoots under Phosphorus Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Müller, Julia; Gödde, Victoria; Niehaus, Karsten; Zörb, Christian

    2015-01-01

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) is highly adapted to phosphorus-diminished soils. P-deficient white lupin plants modify their root architecture and physiology to acquire sparingly available soil phosphorus. We employed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling of P-deficient white lupins, to investigate biochemical pathways involved in the P-acquiring strategy. After 14 days of P-deficiency, plants showed reduced levels of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in shoots. Phosphorylated metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, myo-inositol-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate were reduced in both shoots and roots. After 22 days of P-deficiency, no effect on shoot or root sugar metabolite levels was found, but the levels of phosphorylated metabolites were further reduced. Organic acids, amino acids and several shikimate pathway products showed enhanced levels in 22-day-old P-deficient roots and shoots. These results indicate that P-deficient white lupins adapt their carbohydrate partitioning between shoot and root in order to supply their growing root system as an early response to P-deficiency. Organic acids are released into the rhizosphere to mobilize phosphorus from soil particles. A longer period of P-deficiency leads to scavenging of Pi from P-containing metabolites and reduced protein anabolism, but enhanced formation of secondary metabolites. The latter can serve as stress protection molecules or actively acquire phosphorus from the soil. PMID:26635840

  3. Metabolic Adaptations of White Lupin Roots and Shoots under Phosphorus Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Julia; Gödde, Victoria; Niehaus, Karsten; Zörb, Christian

    2015-01-01

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) is highly adapted to phosphorus-diminished soils. P-deficient white lupin plants modify their root architecture and physiology to acquire sparingly available soil phosphorus. We employed gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling of P-deficient white lupins, to investigate biochemical pathways involved in the P-acquiring strategy. After 14 days of P-deficiency, plants showed reduced levels of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in shoots. Phosphorylated metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, myo-inositol-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate were reduced in both shoots and roots. After 22 days of P-deficiency, no effect on shoot or root sugar metabolite levels was found, but the levels of phosphorylated metabolites were further reduced. Organic acids, amino acids and several shikimate pathway products showed enhanced levels in 22-day-old P-deficient roots and shoots. These results indicate that P-deficient white lupins adapt their carbohydrate partitioning between shoot and root in order to supply their growing root system as an early response to P-deficiency. Organic acids are released into the rhizosphere to mobilize phosphorus from soil particles. A longer period of P-deficiency leads to scavenging of Pi from P-containing metabolites and reduced protein anabolism, but enhanced formation of secondary metabolites. The latter can serve as stress protection molecules or actively acquire phosphorus from the soil. PMID:26635840

  4. Toxicological effects of thiomersal and ethylmercury: Inhibition of the thioredoxin system and NADP{sup +}-dependent dehydrogenases of the pentose phosphate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Juan; Branco, Vasco; Lu, Jun; Holmgren, Arne; Carvalho, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a strong toxicant affecting mainly the central nervous, renal, cardiovascular and immune systems. Thiomersal (TM) is still in use in medical practice as a topical antiseptic and as a preservative in multiple dose vaccines, routinely given to young children in some developing countries, while other forms of mercury such as methylmercury represent an environmental and food hazard. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of thiomersal (TM) and its breakdown product ethylmercury (EtHg) on the thioredoxin system and NADP{sup +}-dependent dehydrogenases of the pentose phosphate pathway. Results show that TM and EtHg inhibited the thioredoxin system enzymes in purified suspensions, being EtHg comparable to methylmercury (MeHg). Also, treatment of neuroblastoma and liver cells with TM or EtHg decreased cell viability (GI{sub 50}: 1.5 to 20 μM) and caused a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the overall activities of thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in cell lysates. Compared to control, the activities of Trx and TrxR in neuroblastoma cells after EtHg incubation were reduced up to 60% and 80% respectively, whereas in hepatoma cells the reduction was almost 100%. In addition, the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were also significantly inhibited by all mercurials, with inhibition intensity of Hg{sup 2+} > MeHg ≈ EtHg > TM (p < 0.05). Cell incubation with sodium selenite alleviated the inhibitory effects on TrxR and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus, the molecular mechanism of toxicity of TM and especially of its metabolite EtHg encompasses the blockage of the electrons from NADPH via the thioredoxin system. - Highlights: • TM and EtHg inhibit Trx and TrxR both in purified suspensions and cell lysates. • TM and EtHg also inhibit the activities of G6PDH and 6PGDH in cell lysates, • Co-exposure to selenite alleviates

  5. A new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3{beta}-HSD gene causes salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Sakkal-Alkaddour, S.; Chang, Ying T.; Yang, Xiaojiang; Songya Pang

    1996-01-01

    We report a new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{Beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3{beta}-HSD) gene in a Pakistanian female child with the salt-wasting form of 3{Beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The etiology for her congenital adrenal hyperplasia was not defined. Although the family history suggested possible 3{beta}-HSd deficiency disorder, suppressed adrenal function caused by excess glucocorticoid therapy in this child at 7 yr of age did not allow hormonal diagnosis. To confirm 3{beta}-HSD deficiency, we sequenced the type II 3{beta}-HSD gene in the patient, her family, and the parents of her deceased paternal cousins. The type II 3{beta}-HSD gene region of a putative promotor, exons I, II, III, and IV, and exon-intron boundaries were amplified by PCR and sequenced in all subjects. The DNA sequence of the child revealed a single nucleotide deletion at codon 318 [ACA(Thr){r_arrow}AA] in exon IV in one allele, and two nucleotide deletions at codon 273 [AAA(Lys){r_arrow}A] in exon IV in the other allele. The remaining gene sequences were normal. The codon 318 mutation was found in one allele from the father, brother, and parents of the deceased paternal cousins. The codon 273 mutation was found in one allele of the mother and a sister. These findings confirmed inherited 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the child caused by the compound heterozygous type II 3{beta}-HSD gene mutation. Both codons at codons 279 and 367, respectively, are predicted to result in an altered and truncated type II 3{beta}-HSD protein, thereby causing salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the patient. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. [Isolation and characteristics of somatic cell hybrids of the Chinese hamster and American mink].

    PubMed

    Rubtsov, N B; Radzhabli, S I; Gradov, A A; Serov, O L

    1981-01-01

    The paper deals with obtaining somatic cell hybrids of Chinese hamster and mink by means of inactivated Sendy virus. 39 hybrid clones segregating mink chromosomes were formed by fusing Chinese hamster cells deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyliransferase with normal cells of mink. Enzyme analyses of these hybrid clones revealed that in mink genes coding lactate dehydrogenase-A, lactate dehydrogenase-B, malate dehydrogenase-NAD (soluble), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are not syntenic. A possibility of successful utilization of these somatic cell hybrids for mapping mink genes is shown. PMID:6942558

  7. Comparison of Three Screening Test Kits for G6PD Enzyme Deficiency: Implications for Its Use in the Radical Cure of Vivax Malaria in Remote and Resource-Poor Areas in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Fe Esperanza; Sornillo, Johanna Beulah; Tan, Alvin; von Seidlein, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Objective We evaluated a battery of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase diagnostic point-of-care tests (PoC) to assess the most suitable product in terms of performance and operational characteristics for remote areas. Methods Samples were collected in Puerto Princesa City, Palawan, Philippines and tested for G6PD deficiency with a fluorescent spot test (FST; Procedure 203, Trinity Biotech, Ireland), the semiquantitative WST8/1-methoxy PMS (WST; Dojindo, Japan) and the Carestart G6PD Rapid Diagnostic Test (CSG; AccessBio, USA). Results were compared to spectrophotometry (Procedure 345, Trinity Biotech, Ireland). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each test with cut-off activities of 10%, 20%, 30% and 60% of the adjusted male median. Results The adjusted male median was 270.5 IU/1012 RBC. FST and WST were tested on 621 capillary blood samples, the CSG was tested on venous and capillary blood on 302 samples. At 30% G6PD activity, sensitivity for the FST was between 87.7% (95%CI: 76.8% to 93.9%) and 96.5% (95%CI: 87.9% to 99.5%) depending on definition of intermediate results; the WST was 84.2% (95%CI: 72.1% to 92.5%); and the CSG was between 68.8% (95%CI: 41.3% to 89.0%) and 93.8% (95%CI: 69.8% to 99.8%) when the test was performed on capillary or venous blood respectively. Sensitivity of FST and CSG (tested with venous blood) were comparable (p>0.05). The analysis of venous blood samples by the CSG yielded significantly higher results than FST and CSG performed on capillary blood (p<0.05). Sensitivity of the CSG varied depending on source of blood used (p<0.05). Conclusion The operational characteristics of the CSG were superior to all other test formats. Performance and operational characteristics of the CSG performed on venous blood suggest the test to be a good alternative to the FST. PMID:26849445

  8. Pharmacological Blockade of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in Diet-Induced Obesity Regulates Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase in Muscle.

    PubMed

    Arrabal, Sergio; Lucena, Miguel Angel; Canduela, Miren Josune; Ramos-Uriarte, Almudena; Rivera, Patricia; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Decara, Juan; Vargas, Antonio; Baixeras, Elena; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Márquez, Javier; Fernández-Llébrez, Pedro; De Roos, Baukje; Grandes, Pedro; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors peripherally modulate energy metabolism. Here, we investigated the role of CB1 receptors in the expression of glucose/pyruvate/tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism in rat abdominal muscle. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD), a flavoprotein component (E3) of α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes with diaphorase activity in mitochondria, was specifically analyzed. After assessing the effectiveness of the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (3 mg kg(-1), 14 days) on food intake and body weight, we could identified seven key enzymes from either glycolytic pathway or TCA cycle--regulated by both diet and CB1 receptor activity--through comprehensive proteomic approaches involving two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/LC-ESI trap mass spectrometry. These enzymes were glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), enolase (Eno3), lactate dehydrogenase (LDHa), glyoxalase-1 (Glo1) and the mitochondrial DLD, whose expressions were modified by AM251 in hypercaloric diet-induced obesity. Specifically, AM251 blocked high-carbohydrate diet (HCD)-induced expression of GPI, TPI, Eno3 and LDHa, suggesting a down-regulation of glucose/pyruvate/lactate pathways under glucose availability. AM251 reversed the HCD-inhibited expression of Glo1 and DLD in the muscle, and the DLD and CB1 receptor expression in the mitochondrial fraction. Interestingly, we identified the presence of CB1 receptors at the membrane of striate muscle mitochondria. DLD over-expression was confirmed in muscle of CB1-/- mice. AM251 increased the pyruvate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activity in C2C12 myotubes, and the diaphorase/oxidative activity in the mitochondria fraction. These results indicated an up-regulation of methylglyoxal and TCA cycle activity. Findings suggest that CB1 receptors in muscle modulate glucose/pyruvate/lactate pathways and mitochondrial oxidative activity by targeting DLD.

  9. Pharmacological Blockade of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in Diet-Induced Obesity Regulates Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Arrabal, Sergio; Lucena, Miguel Angel; Canduela, Miren Josune; Ramos-Uriarte, Almudena; Rivera, Patricia; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Decara, Juan; Vargas, Antonio; Baixeras, Elena; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Márquez, Javier; Fernández-Llébrez, Pedro; De Roos, Baukje; Grandes, Pedro; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors peripherally modulate energy metabolism. Here, we investigated the role of CB1 receptors in the expression of glucose/pyruvate/tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism in rat abdominal muscle. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD), a flavoprotein component (E3) of α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes with diaphorase activity in mitochondria, was specifically analyzed. After assessing the effectiveness of the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (3 mg kg-1, 14 days) on food intake and body weight, we could identified seven key enzymes from either glycolytic pathway or TCA cycle—regulated by both diet and CB1 receptor activity—through comprehensive proteomic approaches involving two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/LC-ESI trap mass spectrometry. These enzymes were glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), enolase (Eno3), lactate dehydrogenase (LDHa), glyoxalase-1 (Glo1) and the mitochondrial DLD, whose expressions were modified by AM251 in hypercaloric diet-induced obesity. Specifically, AM251 blocked high-carbohydrate diet (HCD)-induced expression of GPI, TPI, Eno3 and LDHa, suggesting a down-regulation of glucose/pyruvate/lactate pathways under glucose availability. AM251 reversed the HCD-inhibited expression of Glo1 and DLD in the muscle, and the DLD and CB1 receptor expression in the mitochondrial fraction. Interestingly, we identified the presence of CB1 receptors at the membrane of striate muscle mitochondria. DLD over-expression was confirmed in muscle of CB1-/- mice. AM251 increased the pyruvate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activity in C2C12 myotubes, and the diaphorase/oxidative activity in the mitochondria fraction. These results indicated an up-regulation of methylglyoxal and TCA cycle activity. Findings suggest that CB1 receptors in muscle modulate glucose/pyruvate/lactate pathways and mitochondrial oxidative activity by targeting DLD. PMID:26671069

  10. Differential response of NADP-dehydrogenases and carbon metabolism in leaves and roots of two durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) cultivars (Karim and Azizi) with different sensitivities to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Bouthour, Donia; Kalai, Tawba; Chaffei, Haouari C; Gouia, Houda; Corpas, Francisco J

    2015-05-01

    Wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) is a common Mediterranean species of considerable agronomic importance. Salinity is one of the major threats to sustainable agricultural production mainly because it limits plant productivity. After exposing the Karim and Azizi durum wheat cultivars, which are of agronomic significance in Tunisia, to 100mM NaCl salinity, growth parameters (dry weight and length), proline content and chlorophylls were evaluated in their leaves and roots. In addition, we analyzed glutathione content and key enzymatic activities, including phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), involved in the carbon metabolism and NADPH-generating system. The sensitivity index indicates that cv Karim was more tolerant to salinity than cv Azizi. This higher tolerance was corroborated at the biochemical level, as cv Karim showed a greater capacity to accumulate proline, especially in leaves, while the enzyme activities studied were differentially regulated in both organs, with NADP-ICDH being the only activity to be unaffected in all organs. In summary, the data indicate that higher levels of proline accumulation and the differential responses of some key enzymes involved in the carbon metabolism and NADPH regeneration contribute to the salinity tolerance mechanism and lead to increased biomass accumulation in cv Karim.

  11. Impact of chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption on blood lipid and heart energy profile in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Cao, Quan; Wang, Cong; Ma, Xin; Shen, Cheng; Liu, Xiang-wei; Bu, Li-ping; Zou, Yun-zeng; Hu, Kai; Sun, Ai-jun; Ge, Jun-bo

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the roles of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), the key enzyme of ethanol metabolism, in chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption-induced heart protective effects in mice. Methods: Twenty-one male wild-type (WT) or ALDH2-knockout (KO) mice were used in this study. In each genotype, 14 animals received alcohol (2.5%, 5% and 10% in week 1–3, respectively, and 18% in week 4–7), and 7 received water for 7 weeks. After the treatments, survival rate and general characteristics of the animals were evaluated. Serum ethanol and acetaldehyde levels and blood lipids were measured. Metabolomics was used to characterize the heart and serum metabolism profiles. Results: Chronic alcohol intake decreased the survival rate of KO mice by 50%, and significantly decreased their body weight, but did not affect those of WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum ethanol levels in both WT and KO mice, but KO mice had significantly higher serum acetaldehyde levels than WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum HDL cholesterol levels in WT mice, and did not change the serum HDL cholesterol levels in KO mice. After chronic alcohol intake, WT and KO mice showed differential heart and serum metabolism profiles, including the 3 main energy substrate types (lipids, glucose and amino acids) and three carboxylic acid cycles. Conclusion: Low to moderate alcohol consumption increases HDL cholesterol levels and improves heart energy metabolism profile in WT mice but not in ALDH2-KO mice. Thus, preserved ALDH2 function is essential for the protective effect of low to moderate alcohol on the cardiovascular system. PMID:24998256

  12. De novo fatty acid biosynthesis and elongation in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mice supplemented with odd or even medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Behringer, Sidney; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2015-11-01

    An even medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)-based diet is the mainstay of treatment in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency (VLCADD). Previous studies with magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown an impact of MCT on the average fatty acid chain length in abdominal fat. We therefore assume that medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are elongated and accumulate in tissue as long-chain fatty acids. In this study, we explored the hepatic effects of long-term supplementation with MCT or triheptanoin, an odd-chain C7-based triglyceride, in wild-type and VLCAD-deficient (VLCAD(-/-) ) mice after 1 year of supplementation as compared with a control diet. The de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids, and peroxisomal β-oxidation, were quantified by RT-PCR. This was followed by a comprehensive analysis of hepatic and cardiac fatty acid profiles by GC-MS. Long-term application of even and odd MCFAs strongly induced de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids in both wild-type and VLCAD(-/-) mice, leading to an alteration of the hepatic fatty acid profiles. We detected de novo-synthesized and elongated fatty acids, such as heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n9), eicosanoic acid (C20:1n9), erucic acid (C22:1n9), and mead acid (C20:3n9), that were otherwise completely absent in mice under control conditions. In parallel, the content of monounsaturated fatty acids was massively increased. Furthermore, we observed strong upregulation of peroxisomal β-oxidation in VLCAD(-/-) mice, especially when they were fed an MCT diet. Our data raise the question of whether long-term MCFA supplementation represents the most efficient treatment in the long term. Studies on the hepatic toxicity of triheptanoin are still ongoing.

  13. De novo fatty acid biosynthesis and elongation in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mice supplemented with odd or even medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Behringer, Sidney; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2015-11-01

    An even medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)-based diet is the mainstay of treatment in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency (VLCADD). Previous studies with magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown an impact of MCT on the average fatty acid chain length in abdominal fat. We therefore assume that medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are elongated and accumulate in tissue as long-chain fatty acids. In this study, we explored the hepatic effects of long-term supplementation with MCT or triheptanoin, an odd-chain C7-based triglyceride, in wild-type and VLCAD-deficient (VLCAD(-/-) ) mice after 1 year of supplementation as compared with a control diet. The de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids, and peroxisomal β-oxidation, were quantified by RT-PCR. This was followed by a comprehensive analysis of hepatic and cardiac fatty acid profiles by GC-MS. Long-term application of even and odd MCFAs strongly induced de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids in both wild-type and VLCAD(-/-) mice, leading to an alteration of the hepatic fatty acid profiles. We detected de novo-synthesized and elongated fatty acids, such as heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n9), eicosanoic acid (C20:1n9), erucic acid (C22:1n9), and mead acid (C20:3n9), that were otherwise completely absent in mice under control conditions. In parallel, the content of monounsaturated fatty acids was massively increased. Furthermore, we observed strong upregulation of peroxisomal β-oxidation in VLCAD(-/-) mice, especially when they were fed an MCT diet. Our data raise the question of whether long-term MCFA supplementation represents the most efficient treatment in the long term. Studies on the hepatic toxicity of triheptanoin are still ongoing. PMID:26284828

  14. Sustained photoevolution of molecular hydrogen in a mutant of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 deficient in the type I NADPH-dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Cournac, Laurent; Guedeney, Geneviève; Peltier, Gilles; Vignais, Paulette M

    2004-03-01

    The interaction between hydrogen metabolism, respiration, and photosynthesis was studied in vivo in whole cells of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 by continuously monitoring the changes in gas concentrations (H2, CO2, and O2) with an online mass spectrometer. The in vivo activity of the bidirectional [NiFe]hydrogenase [H2:NAD(P) oxidoreductase], encoded by the hoxEFUYH genes, was also measured independently by the proton-deuterium (H-D) exchange reaction in the presence of D2. This technique allowed us to demonstrate that the hydrogenase was insensitive to light, was reversibly inactivated by O2, and could be quickly reactivated by NADH or NADPH (+H2). H2 was evolved by cells incubated anaerobically in the dark, after an adaptation period. This dark H2 evolution was enhanced by exogenously added glucose and resulted from the oxidation of NAD(P)H produced by fermentation reactions. Upon illumination, a short (less than 30-s) burst of H2 output was observed, followed by rapid H2 uptake and a concomitant decrease in CO2 concentration in the cyanobacterial cell suspension. Uptake of both H2 and CO2 was linked to photosynthetic electron transport in the thylakoids. In the ndhB mutant M55, which is defective in the type I NADPH-dehydrogenase complex (NDH-1) and produces only low amounts of O2 in the light, H2 uptake was negligible during dark-to-light transitions, allowing several minutes of continuous H2 production. A sustained rate of photoevolution of H2 corresponding to 6 micro mol of H2 mg of chlorophyll(-1) h(-1) or 2 ml of H2 liter(-1) h(-1) was observed over a longer time period in the presence of glucose and was slightly enhanced by the addition of the O2 scavenger glucose oxidase. By the use of the inhibitors DCMU [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] and DBMIB (2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone), it was shown that two pathways of electron supply for H2 production operate in M55, namely photolysis of water at the level of photosystem II and

  15. Efficient production of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch by using a genetically modified L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient and alpha-amylase-secreting Lactobacillus plantarum strain.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Zhang, Qiao; Shinkawa, Satoru; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve direct and efficient fermentation of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch, we constructed L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL1)-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum and introduced a plasmid encoding Streptococcus bovis 148 alpha-amylase (AmyA). The resulting strain produced only D-lactic acid from glucose and successfully expressed amyA. With the aid of secreting AmyA, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished. After 48 h of fermentation, 73.2 g/liter of lactic acid was produced with a high yield (0.85 g per g of consumed sugar) and an optical purity of 99.6%. Moreover, a strain replacing the ldhL1 gene with an amyA-secreting expression cassette was constructed. Using this strain, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics. This is the first report of direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw starch.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the production of the protein building block ( amino acid ) serine. Specifically, the enzyme converts a substance called ... Resources MedlinePlus (5 links) Encyclopedia: Microcephaly Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the breakdown of three protein building blocks (amino acids) commonly found in protein-rich foods: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Breakdown of these amino acids produces molecules that can be used for energy. ...

  18. [Regularities of organ-specific expression of enzyme systems in cattle].

    PubMed

    Tatarenko, O F; Glazko, V I

    1992-01-01

    The organ specificity of creatine kinase, esterase, isocitrate dehydrogenase lactate dehydrogenase, nucleoside phosphorylase, adenylate kinase, hexokinase, malate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase of black-white cattle has been studied. Esterases, creatine kinase, adenylate kinase, hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have a very wide spectrum of the organ variabilities. Liver and heart have the largest specificity of enzymes activity. Some peculiarities of isozyme spectrum are found in ovaries and spleen.

  19. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the 72-kilodalton dehydrogenase subunit of alcohol dehydrogenase from Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Sunagawa, M; Mori, A; Imai, C; Fukuda, M; Takagi, M; Yano, K

    1989-06-01

    A genomic library of Acetobacter aceti DNA was constructed by using a broad-host-range cosmid vector. Complementation of a spontaneous alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient mutant resulted in the isolation of a plasmid designated pAA701. Subcloning and deletion analysis of pAA701 limited the region that complemented the deficiency in alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the mutant. The nucleotide sequence of this region was determined and showed that this region contained the full structural gene for the 72-kilodalton dehydrogenase subunit of the alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme complex. The predicted amino acid sequence of the gene showed homology with sequences of methanol dehydrogenase structural genes of Paracoccus denitrificans and Methylobacterium organophilum.

  20. Molybdopterin cofactor from Methanobacterium formicicum formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    May, H D; Schauer, N L; Ferry, J G

    1986-01-01

    The molybdopterin cofactor from the formate dehydrogenase of Methanobacterium formicicum was studied. The cofactor was released by guanidine denaturation of homogeneous enzyme, which also released greater than 80% of the molybdenum present in the enzyme. The anoxically isolated cofactor was nonfluorescent, but after exposure to air it fluoresced with spectra similar to those of described molybdopterin cofactors. Aerobic release from acid-denatured formate dehydrogenase in the presence of I2 and potassium iodide produced a mixture of fluorescent products. Alkaline permanganate oxidation of the mixture yielded pterin-6-carboxylic acid as the only detectable fluorescent product. The results showed that the cofactor from formate dehydrogenase contained a pterin nucleus with a 6-alkyl side chain of unknown structure. Covalently bound phosphate was also present. The isolated cofactor was unable to complement the cofactor-deficient nitrate reductase of the Neurospora crassa nit-1 mutant. PMID:3700335

  1. Do all patients with acquired methemoglobinemia need treatment? A lesson learnt

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Raju; Karmacharya, Paras; Pathak, Ranjan; Poudel, Dilli Ram; Ghimire, Sushil; Alweis, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Acquired methemoglobinemia is a medical emergency, and its prompt recognition and treatment can avoid catastrophic complications including death. However, in mild asymptomatic cases without any comorbid conditions, it would be reasonable to simply observe and treat symptomatically to avoid severe treatment-related complications, especially in patients with suspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We present a case of mild methemoglobinemia in occult G6PD deficiency in which the patient developed hemolysis after treatment with intravenous methylene blue, requiring transfusion. PMID:26486118

  2. An unusual syncope cause in the ED: favism.

    PubMed

    Soyuncu, Secgin; Bektas, Firat; Isik, Soner; Yigit, Ozlem

    2011-04-01

    Favism is an acute hemolytic syndrome occurring in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient individuals after the consumption of fava beans. The highest incidence is in boys aged 2-6 years. We report a 56-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED) with recurrent syncope attacks due to favism. In our knowledge, this is the first report of favism-caused syncope in an adult patient without a G6PD deficiency diagnosis in the past and diagnosed in ED. PMID:20930025

  3. Genetic red cell disorders and severity of falciparum malaria in Myanmar.

    PubMed Central

    Oo, M.; Tin-Shwe; Marlar-Than; O'Sullivan, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    A hospital-based survey was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the incidence and severity of malaria infection and various red cell disorders in Myanmar. The mean parasitaemia levels of patients with alpha- or beta-thalassaemia trait or with severe glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency were lower than those of individuals with normal haemoglobin AA or with heterozygous haemoglobin E. The double genetic defect of thalassaemia trait and severe G6PD deficiency appeared to confer some degree of protection against malaria. PMID:8846492

  4. Transaldolase deficiency influences the pentose phosphate pathway, mitochondrial homoeostasis and apoptosis signal processing.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yueming; Banerjee, Sanjay; Grossman, Craig E; Amidon, Wendy; Nagy, Gyorgy; Barcza, Maureen; Niland, Brian; Karp, David R; Middleton, Frank A; Banki, Katalin; Perl, Andras

    2008-10-01

    TAL (transaldolase) was originally described in the yeast as an enzyme of the PPP (pentose phosphate pathway). However, certain organisms and mammalian tissues lack TAL, and the overall reason for its existence is unclear. Recently, deletion of Ser(171) (TALDeltaS171) was found in five patients causing inactivation, proteasome-mediated degradation and complete deficiency of TAL. In the present study, microarray and follow-up Western-blot, enzyme-activity and metabolic studies of TALDeltaS171 TD (TAL-deficient) lymphoblasts revealed co-ordinated changes in the expression of genes involved in the PPP, mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative stress, and Ca(2+) fluxing. Sedoheptulose 7-phosphate was accumulated, whereas G6P (glucose 6-phosphate) was depleted, indicating a failure to recycle G6P for the oxidative branch of the PPP. Nucleotide analysis showed depletion of NADPH and NAD(+) and accumulation of ADP-ribose. TD cells have diminished Deltapsi(m) (mitochondrial transmembrane potential) and increased mitochondrial mass associated with increased production of nitric oxide and ATP. TAL deficiency resulted in enhanced spontaneous and H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis. TD lymphoblasts showed increased expression of CD38, which hydrolyses NAD(+) into ADP-ribose, a trigger of Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum that, in turn, facilitated CD20-induced apoptosis. By contrast, TD cells were resistant to CD95/Fas-induced apoptosis, owing to a dependence of caspase activity on redox-sensitive cysteine residues. Normalization of TAL activity by adeno-associated-virus-mediated gene transfer reversed the elevated CD38 expression, ATP and Ca(2+) levels, suppressed H(2)O(2)- and CD20-induced apoptosis and enhanced Fas-induced cell death. The present study identified the TAL deficiency as a modulator of mitochondrial homoeostasis, Ca(2+) fluxing and apoptosis.

  5. [Effect of thrombin and prostaglandins E and F on various indices of carbohydrate metabolism in human platelets].

    PubMed

    Makarov, S A; Kudriavtseva, G V; Kolotilova, A I

    1985-01-01

    After incubation of intact thrombocytes with prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha stimulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activities as well as an increase in the rate of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate accumulation were found. Thrombin inhibited the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity by 30% in these thrombocytes. Addition of thrombin, following the incubation of thrombocytes with prostaglandins, removed the activating effect of the prostaglandins on the pentosephosphate pathway reactions, inhibited glutathione reductase and lactate dehydrogenase.

  6. Deregulation of mitochondrial functions provoked by long-chain fatty acid accumulating in long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and mitochondrial permeability transition deficiencies in rat heart--mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening as a potential contributing pathomechanism of cardiac alterations in these disorders.

    PubMed

    Cecatto, Cristiane; Hickmann, Fernanda H; Rodrigues, Marília D N; Amaral, Alexandre U; Wajner, Moacir

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial trifunctional protein and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies are fatty acid oxidation disorders biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of long-chain fatty acids and derivatives, including the monocarboxylic long-chain 3-hydroxy fatty acids (LCHFAs) 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (3HTA) and 3-hydroxypalmitic acid (3HPA). Patients commonly present severe cardiomyopathy for which the pathogenesis is still poorly established. We investigated the effects of 3HTA and 3HPA, the major metabolites accumulating in these disorders, on important parameters of mitochondrial homeostasis in Ca(2+) -loaded heart mitochondria. 3HTA and 3HPA significantly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, the matrix NAD(P)H pool and Ca(2+) retention capacity, and also induced mitochondrial swelling. These fatty acids also provoked a marked decrease of ATP production reflecting severe energy dysfunction. Furthermore, 3HTA-induced mitochondrial alterations were completely prevented by the classical mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) inhibitors cyclosporin A and ADP, as well as by ruthenium red, a Ca(2+) uptake blocker, indicating that LCHFAs induced Ca(2+)-dependent mPT pore opening. Milder effects only achieved at higher doses of LCHFAs were observed in brain mitochondria, implying a higher vulnerability of heart to these fatty acids. By contrast, 3HTA and docosanoic acids did not change mitochondrial homeostasis, indicating selective effects for monocarboxylic LCHFAs. The present data indicate that the major LCHFAs accumulating in mitochondrial trifunctional protein and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies induce mPT pore opening, compromising Ca(2+) homeostasis and oxidative phosphorylation more intensely in the heart. It is proposed that these pathomechanisms may contribute at least in part to the severe cardiac alterations characteristic of patients affected by these diseases.

  7. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  8. Aspirin inhibits glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin‑mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT‑29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT‑29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin‑acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  9. Aspirin inhibits glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin‑mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT‑29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT‑29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin‑acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH.

  10. Red blood cell-derived microparticles: An overview.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Maxwell; Porter, John B

    2016-07-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) is historically the original parent cell of microparticles (MPs). In this overview, we describe the discovery and the early history of red cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) and present an overview of the evolution of RMP. We report the formation, characteristics, effects of RMP and factors which may affect RMP evaluation. The review examines RMP derived from both normal and pathologic RBC. The pathologic RBC studies include sickle cell anemia (SCA), sickle cell trait (STr), thalassemia intermedia (TI), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD). PMID:27282583

  11. G6PD: The Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is it used? Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme testing is used to screen for and help ... and the District of Columbia. G6PD is an enzyme found in all cells, including red blood cells ( ...

  12. Diagnosis of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency by stable isotope dilution analysis of urinary acylglycines: Retrospective and prospective studies, and comparison of its accuracy to acylcarnitine identification by FAB/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldo, P.; O'Shea, J.J.; Welch, R.D.; Tanaka, K. )

    1990-01-01

    In summary, we have demonstrated that the accurate quantitation of urinary HG and PPG by stable isotope dilution analysis is currently the most reliable method for the diagnosis of MCAD deficiency. This method is particularly useful for testing random samples from asymptomatic patients without any provocative test, and it is suitable to widely survey a fairly large population, such as patients with episodic manifestations and families with a history of SIDS.

  13. Bioluminescent microassay of various metabolites using bacterial luciferase co-immobilized with multienzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Ugarova, N N; Lebedeva, O V; Frumkina, I G

    1988-09-01

    Co-immobilization methods have been developed for a bienzymatic system of luminescent Beneckea harveyi bacteria with formate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglucomutase. Bioluminescent assays have been devised for NADH, NAD, FMN, glucose 6-phosphate, and glucose 1-phosphate using the co-immobilized enzyme preparation. The lowest detection limits were in the picomole range with the bacterial extract and in the femtomole range with the partially purified enzymes, bacterial luciferase, and NADH:FMN oxidoreductase. PMID:3263818

  14. Proteomics and gene expression analyses of mitochondria from squalene-treated apoE-deficient mice identify short-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase changes associated with fatty liver amelioration.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Torres, Adela; Barceló-Batllori, Sílvia; Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Navarro, María A; Arnal, Carmen; Guillén, Natalia; Acín, Sergio; Osada, Jesús

    2012-05-17

    Squalene, a hydrocarbon involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, is an abundant component in virgin olive oil. Previous studies showed that its administration decreased atherosclerosis and steatosis in male apoE knock-out mice. To study the effect of squalene on mitochondrial proteins in fatty liver, 1 g/kg/day of this isoprenoid was administered to those mice. After 10 weeks, hepatic fat was assessed and protein extracts from mitochondria enriched fractions from control and squalene-treated animals were analyzed by 2D-DIGE. Spots exhibiting significant differences were identified by MS analysis. Squalene administration modified the expression of eighteen proteins involved in different metabolic processes, 12 associated with hepatic fat content. Methionine adenosyltransferase I alpha (Mat1a) and short-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acads) showed significant increased and decreased transcripts, respectively, consistent with their protein changes. These mRNAs were also studied in wild-type mice receiving squalene, where Mat1a was found increased and Acads decreased. However, this mRNA was significantly increased in the absence of apolipoprotein E. These results suggest that squalene action may be executed through a complex regulation of mitochondrial protein expression, including changes in Mat1a and Acads levels. Indeed, Mat1a is a target of squalene administration while Acads reflects the anti-steatotic properties of squalene.

  15. Heterozygosity for an in-frame deletion causes glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency in a patient detected by newborn screening: investigation of the effect of the mutant allele.

    PubMed

    Bross, Peter; Frederiksen, Jane B; Bie, Anne S; Hansen, Jakob; Palmfeldt, Johan; Nielsen, Marit N; Duno, Morten; Lund, Allan M; Christensen, Ernst

    2012-09-01

    A patient with suspected glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA-1) was detected by newborn screening. GA-1 is known as an autosomal recessively inherited disease due to defects in the gene coding for glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH), a mitochondrial enzyme involved in the catabolism of the amino acids hydroxylysine, lysine and tryptophan. DNA and cDNA sequencing revealed a 18 bp deletion (c.553_570del18) resulting in deletion of six amino acids (p.Gly185_Ser190del) in one allele and no sequence changes in the other allele. Confirmatory biochemical analysis of blood, urine and cultured fibroblasts from the proband were consistent with a mild biochemical GA-1 phenotype. Recombinant expression of the mutant variant in E. coli showed that the GCDH-(p.Gly185_Ser190del) protein displayed severely decreased assembly into tetramers and enzyme activity. To discover a potential dominant negative effect of the mutant protein, we engineered a prokaryotic expression system in which expression of a wild type and a mutant GCDH allele is controlled by separately inducible promoters. These cells displayed decreased levels of GCDH tetramer and enzyme activity when expressing both the wild type and the mutant GCDH variant protein compared to the situation when only the wild type allele was expressed. Further experiments suggest that the major impact of the GCDH-(p.Gly185_Ser190del) protein in heterozygous cells consists of hampering the assembly of wild type GCDH into tetramers. Our experimental data are consistent with the hypothesis that heterozygosity for this mutation confers a dominant negative effect resulting in a GCDH enzyme activity that is significantly lower than the expected 50%.

  16. Metabolism of leucine in fibroblasts from patients with deficiencies in each of the major catabolic enzymes: branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase, isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, I; Søvik, O; Sweetman, L; Nyhan, W L

    1985-12-01

    The metabolism of leucine was studied in cultured human fibroblasts derived from patients with defects in each of the major steps in the catabolism of the amino acid. Intact fibroblasts were incubated with [U-14C]leucine and the organic acid products were isolated by liquid partition chromatography. In control fibroblasts the major product of leucine was 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid. This was also the case for fibroblasts with deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase, 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase. There was little or no accumulation of the compound with fibroblasts from patients with maple syrup urine disease and isovaleric acidemia.

  17. Characterization of hybrids between bovine (MDBK) and mouse (L-cell) cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chinchar, V G; Floyd, A D; Chinchar, G D; Taylor, M W

    1979-02-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT)-deficient mutants of a bovine kidney cell line (MDBK) were selected following mutagenesis with ethylmethane sulfonate or ICR-170G. MDBK mutants were hybridized to thymidine kinase-deficient L cells and selected in HAT medium. Parental and hybrid cells were characterized for isozyme patterns of lactic dehydrogenase malate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glutamate oxalate transaminase. Chromosomes of MDBK can be distinguished from mouse L cells by configuration and by fluorescent staining with Hoechst 33-258 stain. Hybrid cells contained both MDBK and L-cell chromosomes and had elevated DNA content. MDBK cells are normally restrictive for mengovirus replication. Both permissive and restrictive hybrids were found. Our data indicate that there was preferential loss of MDBK chromosomes in the hybrid cell lines.

  18. NADP-dependent dehydrogenases in rat liver parenchyma. III. The description of a liponeogenic area on the basis of histochemically demonstrated enzyme activities and the neutral fat content during fasting and refeeding.

    PubMed

    Rieder, H

    1981-01-01

    The activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase(6PGDH), malic enzyme (ME) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDh) were investigated with optimized histochemical methods (Rieder it al 1978), and the activity of 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (3HBDH) and neutral fat content with conventional techniques in the liver of male rats under the following experimental dietary conditions: (A) Fasting for 0, 12 and 84h; (B) 84-h fasting followed by refeeding with a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet for 6 h and for 2, 3, 5, 7, 11 and 14 nights; (C) refeeding with standard diet for 5 nights; (D) low-fat high-carbohydrate diet for 7 an 14 nights. The activities of G6PDH, 6PGDH and ME decreased slightly during fasting primarily in zone 1 and increased dramatically on refeeding with a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. This activity increase was confined mainly to zone 3 during the first 3 days and was accompanied by a deposition of neutral fats that began in zone 3 and progressed to zone 1. Neutral for accumulation was maximal after 3 nights, with a uniform accumulation of large droplets in all the hepatocytes; this was followed by a release that started in zone 3 and proceeded in a periportal direction. On the other hand, G6PDH, 6PGDH and ME attained their maximum activities after 5 amd 7 nights of low-fat diet, the activities being nearly homogeneously distributed over the liver acinus in a few cases. Subsequently the activities fill mainly in zone 1, causing the activity patterns and levels to approach those of the animals in group (D). In contrast to this, the activity of ICDH increased during fasting principally in zone 1, so that the otherwise steep activity gradient in favor of zone 3 lessened. Refeeding led at first to a fall of activity below the initial value, but later the normal distribution pattern was restored. The activity of 3HBDH showed a behavior similar to that of ICDH. The findings are discussed with reference to the

  19. Lactate dehydrogenase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury Muscle weakness and loss of muscle tissue ( muscular dystrophy ) New abnormal tissue formation (usually cancer) Pancreatitis Stroke ... test LDH isoenzyme blood test Liver disease Mononucleosis Muscular dystrophy Pernicious anemia Stroke Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia Update ...

  20. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) is a severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism first described in 1978. It is characterized by a neonatal presentation of intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, microcephaly with brain atrophy and coarse facial features. MoCD results in deficiency of the molybdenum cofactor dependent enzymes sulfite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. The resultant accumulation of sulfite, taurine, S-sulfocysteine and thiosulfate contributes to the severe neurological impairment. Recently, initial evidence has demonstrated early treatment with cyclic PMP can turn MoCD type A from a previously neonatal lethal condition with only palliative options, to near normal neurological outcomes in affected patients. We review MoCD and focus on describing the currently published evidence of this exciting new therapeutic option for MoCD type A caused by pathogenic variants in MOCD1.

  1. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  2. [Effect of aggregating agents on the pentosephosphate pathway of carbohydrate metabolism in human blood platelet extracts].

    PubMed

    Makarov, S A; Kudriavtseva, G V; Kolotilova, A I

    1983-01-01

    Thrombin inhibits the rate of glucose-6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate oxidation. ADP decreases the incorporation of ribose-5-phosphate into metabolism. The effect of adrenaline on the pentose phosphate pathway reactions was not demonstrated. Cell destruction by means of freezing, thawing and treatment with Triton X-100 decreases the rate of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase reaction to a greater degree as compared with osmotic shock.

  3. Rapid kinetics of liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase. Evidence for tight-coupling between glucose-6-phosphate transport and phosphohydrolase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Berteloot, A.; Vidal, H.; van de Werve, G. )

    1991-03-25

    Rapid kinetics of both glucose-6-P uptake and hydrolysis in fasted rat liver microsomes were investigated with a recently developed fast-sampling, rapid-filtration apparatus. Experiments were confronted with both the substrate transport and conformational models currently proposed for the glucose-6-phosphatase system. Accumulation in microsomes of 14C products from (U-14C)glucose-6-P followed biexponential kinetics. From the inside to outside product concentrations, it could be inferred that mostly glucose should accumulate inside the vesicles. While biexponential kinetics are compatible with the mathematical predictions of a simplified substrate transport model, the latter fails in explaining the burst in total glucose production over a similar time scale to that used for the uptake measurements. Since the initial rate of the burst phase in untreated microsomes exactly matched the steady-state rate of glucose production in detergent-treated vesicles, it can be definitely concluded that the substrate transport model does not describe adequately our results. While the conformational model accounts for both the burst of glucose production and the kinetics of glucose accumulation into the vesicles, it cannot explain the burst in 32Pi production from (32P)glucose-6-P measured under the same conditions. Since the amplitude of the observed bursts is not compatible with a presteady state in enzyme activity, we propose that a hysteretic transition best explains our results in both untreated and permeabilized microsomes, thus providing a new rationale to understand the molecular mechanism of the glucose-6-phosphatase system.

  4. Molecular characterization of CcpA and involvement of this protein in transcriptional regulation of lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate formate-lyase in the ruminal bacterium Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Narito; Yoshii, Takahiro; Hino, Tsuneo

    2004-09-01

    A ccpA gene that encodes global catabolite control protein A (CcpA) in Streptococcus bovis was identified and characterized, and the involvement of CcpA in transcriptional control of a gene (ldh) encoding lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a gene (pfl) encoding pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) was examined. The ccpA gene was shown to be transcribed as a monocistronic operon. A catabolite-responsive element (cre) was found in the promoter region of ccpA, suggesting that ccpA transcription in S. bovis is autogenously regulated. CcpA required HPr that was phosphorylated at the serine residue at position 46 (HPr-[Ser-P]) for binding to the cre site, but glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, and NADP had no effect on binding. Diauxic growth was observed when S. bovis was grown in a medium containing glucose and lactose, but it disappeared when ccpA was disrupted, which indicates that CcpA is involved in catabolite repression in S. bovis. The level of ccpA mRNA was higher when cells were grown on glucose than when they were grown on lactose, which was in line with the level of ldh mRNA. When cells were grown on glucose, the ldh mRNA level was lower but the pfl mRNA level was higher in a ccpA-disrupted mutant than in the parent strain, which suggests that ldh transcription is enhanced and pfl transcription is suppressed by CcpA. The ccpA-disrupted mutant produced less lactate and more formate than the parent, probably because the mutant had reduced LDH activity and elevated PFL activity. In the upper region of both ldh and pfl, a cre-like sequence was found, suggesting that the complex consisting of CcpA and HPr-[Ser-P] binds to the possible cre sites. Thus, CcpA appears to be involved in the global regulation of sugar utilization in S. bovis. PMID:15345406

  5. Genetics Home Reference: 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... down proteins from food into smaller parts called amino acids . Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for ... of an enzyme that helps process a particular amino acid called isoleucine. Health problems related to 2-methylbutyryl- ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: 17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... boys, some affected males may also experience breast enlargement (gynecomastia). Men with this disorder are generally unable ... of estrogen may be produced, leading to breast enlargement in some affected individuals. Learn more about the ...

  7. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  8. Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Rdhe2 Is a Novel Retinol Dehydrogenase Essential for Frog Embryonic Development*

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Olga V.; Lee, Seung-Ah; Adams, Mark K.; Chang, Chenbei; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2012-01-01

    The enzymes responsible for the rate-limiting step in retinoic acid biosynthesis, the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde, during embryogenesis and in adulthood have not been fully defined. Here, we report that a novel member of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, frog sdr16c5, acts as a highly active retinol dehydrogenase (rdhe2) that promotes retinoic acid biosynthesis when expressed in mammalian cells. In vivo assays of rdhe2 function show that overexpression of rdhe2 in frog embryos leads to posteriorization and induction of defects resembling those caused by retinoic acid toxicity. Conversely, antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of endogenous rdhe2 results in phenotypes consistent with retinoic acid deficiency, such as defects in anterior neural tube closure, microcephaly with small eye formation, disruption of somitogenesis, and curved body axis with bent tail. Higher doses of morpholino induce embryonic lethality. Analyses of retinoic acid levels using either endogenous retinoic acid-sensitive gene hoxd4 or retinoic acid reporter cell line both show that the levels of retinoic acid are significantly decreased in rdhe2 morphants. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that Xenopus rdhe2 functions as a retinol dehydrogenase essential for frog embryonic development in vivo. Importantly, the retinol oxidizing activity of frog rdhe2 is conserved in its mouse homologs, suggesting that rdhe2-related enzymes may represent the previously unrecognized physiologically relevant retinol dehydrogenases that contribute to retinoic acid biosynthesis in higher vertebrates. PMID:22291023

  9. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  10. Urinary AASA excretion is elevated in patients with molybdenum cofactor deficiency and isolated sulphite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mills, Philippa B; Footitt, Emma J; Ceyhan, Serkan; Waters, Paula J; Jakobs, Cornelis; Clayton, Peter T; Struys, Eduard A

    2012-11-01

    Analysis of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde is an important tool in the diagnosis of antiquitin deficiency (pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy). However continuing use of this test has revealed that elevated urinary excretion of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde is not only found in patients with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy but is also seen in patients with molybdenum cofactor deficiency and isolated sulphite oxidase deficiency. This should be taken into account when interpreting the laboratory data. Sulphite was shown to inhibit α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in vitro.

  11. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  12. Large scale screening for haemoglobin disorders in southern Vietnam: implications for avoidance and management.

    PubMed

    O'Riordan, Sean; Hien, Tran Tinh; Miles, Katie; Allen, Angela; Quyen, Nguyen Ngoc; Hung, Nguyen Quoc; Anh, Do Quang; Tuyen, Luc Nguyen; Khoa, Dao Bach; Thai, Cao Quang; Triet, Dao Minh; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Dunstan, Sarah; Peto, Tim; Clegg, John; Farrar, Jeremy; Weatherall, David

    2010-08-01

    In order to obtain an approximate assessment of the public health burden that will be posed by the inherited disorders of haemoglobin in southern Vietnam, several thousand individuals were screened for these conditions. A smaller sample was screened for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. The important haemoglobin disorders identified were beta thalassaemia, haemoglobin E and a variety of different forms of alpha thalassaemia. There were sufficient G6PD-deficient individuals to materially affect malaria control programme design. The most remarkable finding was wide variation in the gene frequencies of these conditions among the ethnic groups sampled. The approximate number of babies expected to be born with clinically significant haemoglobin disorders in Vietnam was estimated from the gene-frequency data. This study emphasizes the importance of wide-scale population screening, including ethnic subgroups, to establish the requirements for inherited haemoglobin disorder programmes in resource-limited settings.

  13. Blue cures blue but be cautious

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pranav; Bindra, V. K.; Kapoor, Seema; Jain, Vivek; Saxena, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    Methemoglobinemia is a disorder characterized by the presence of >1% methemoglobin (metHb) in the blood. Spontaneous formation of methemoglobin is normally counteracted by protective enzyme systems, for example, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) methemoglobin reductase. Methemoglobinemia is treated with supplemental oxygen and methylene blue (1–2 mg/kg) administered slow intravenously, which acts by providing an artificial electron acceptor for NADPH methemoglobin reductase. But known or suspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a relative contraindication to the use of methylene blue because G6PD is the key enzyme in the formation of NADPH through pentose phosphate pathway and G6PD-deficient individuals generate insufficient NADPH to efficiently reduce methylene blue to leukomethylene blue, which is necessary for the activation of the NADPH-dependent methemoglobin reductase system. So, we should be careful using methylene blue in methemoglobinemia patient before G6PD levels. PMID:22219589

  14. Agriculture-related anaemias.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A F

    1994-12-01

    Man evolved as a hunter-gatherer, and the invention and spread of agriculture was followed by changes in diet, the environment and population densities which have resulted in globally high prevalences of anaemias due to nutritional deficiencies of iron, folate and (locally) vitamin B12, to infestations by hookworm and schistosomes, to malaria, and to the natural selection for the genes for sickle-cell diseases, beta-thalassaemias, alpha-thalassaemias, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, ovalocytosis and possibly (locally) elliptocytosis. The present explosion of population is driving an expansion of agriculture, especially the cultivation of rice, and this has led often to disastrous increases of transmission of malaria, schistosomiasis and other diseases, to widespread chemical pollution, and to degradation of the environment. Anaemia, as the commonest manifestation of human disease, is a frequent consequence. The urgent need for increased food production is matched by the urgent need for assessment and control of the health impact of agricultural development.

  15. [Favism (study of 8 families)].

    PubMed

    Cintado Bueno, C; Sosa Alamo, R; Plaza Delgado, E; Toro Ortega, J; Santos Soto, J; Fernández Palacios, F

    1978-05-01

    This paper presents ten cases of total glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency in individuals with hemolytic crisis after exposure to products of the fava been ("Vicia faba"). Three other cases of total G-6-PD deficiency and eleven partial deficit cases of the enzyme, without associated hemolysis were detected in a total of forty individuals belonging to eight families of the province of Seville examinated for G-6-PD levels. Important differences were noted in the G-6-PD enzyme dosage taken during the crisis and six and twelve months after. This fact was interpreted as a secondary effect to the elimination of the enzymopenic cells because of hemolysis. Data suggests the existence of a relatively stable form of G-6-PD that could explain the dissociation between the incidence of deficit in G-6-PD level in the general population and the reduced casuist of favism reported in our literature. PMID:697214

  16. Mechanisms and pathophysiological significance of eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elisabeth; Lang, Florian

    2015-03-01

    Eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling, is stimulated by Ca(2+) entry through Ca(2+)-permeable, PGE2-activated cation channels, by ceramide, caspases, calpain, complement, hyperosmotic shock, energy depletion, oxidative stress, and deranged activity of several kinases (e.g. AMPK, GK, PAK2, CK1α, JAK3, PKC, p38-MAPK). Eryptosis is triggered by intoxication, malignancy, hepatic failure, diabetes, chronic renal insufficiency, hemolytic uremic syndrome, dehydration, phosphate depletion, fever, sepsis, mycoplasma infection, malaria, iron deficiency, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and Wilson's disease. Eryptosis may precede and protect against hemolysis but by the same token result in anemia and deranged microcirculation. PMID:25636585

  17. Convergent evolution of Trichomonas vaginalis lactate dehydrogenase from malate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Fiser, András; ter Kuile, Benno; Šali, Andrej; Müller, Miklós

    1999-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is present in the amitochondriate parasitic protist Trichomonas vaginalis and some but not all other trichomonad species. The derived amino acid sequence of T. vaginalis LDH (TvLDH) was found to be more closely related to the cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (MDH) of the same species than to any other LDH. A key difference between the two T. vaginalis sequences was that Arg91 of MDH, known to be important in coordinating the C-4 carboxyl of oxalacetate/malate, was replaced by Leu91 in LDH. The change Leu91Arg by site-directed mutagenesis converted TvLDH into an MDH. The reverse single amino acid change Arg91Leu in TvMDH, however, gave a product with no measurable LDH activity. Phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that TvLDH arose from an MDH relatively recently. PMID:10339579

  18. Sorbitol dehydrogenase is a zinc enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, J; Chesters, J; Mills, C; Sadler, P J; Jörnvall, H

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is given that tetrameric sorbitol dehydrogenase from sheep liver contains one zinc atom per subunit, most probably located at the active site, and no other specifically bound zinc or iron atom. In alcohol dehydrogenases that are structurally related to sorbitol dehydrogenase, more than one zinc atom per subunit can complicate investigations of zinc atom function. Therefore, sorbitol dehydrogenase will be particularly valuable for defining the precise roles of zinc in alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases, and for establishing correlations of structure and function with other important zinc-containing proteins. PMID:6370679

  19. An update on serine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    van der Crabben, S N; Verhoeven-Duif, N M; Brilstra, E H; Van Maldergem, L; Coskun, T; Rubio-Gozalbo, E; Berger, R; de Koning, T J

    2013-07-01

    Serine deficiency disorders are caused by a defect in one of the three synthesising enzymes of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway. Serine deficiency disorders give rise to a neurological phenotype with psychomotor retardation, microcephaly and seizures in newborns and children or progressive polyneuropathy in adult patients. There are three defects that cause serine deficiency of which 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency, the defect affecting the first step in the pathway, has been reported most frequently. The other two disorders in L-serine biosynthesis phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) deficiency and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) deficiency have been reported only in a limited number of patients. The biochemical hallmarks of all three disorders are low concentrations of serine in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma. Prompt recognition of affected patients is important, since serine deficiency disorders are treatable causes of neurometabolic disorders. The use of age-related reference values for serine in CSF and plasma can be of great help in establishing a correct diagnosis of serine deficiency, in particular in newborns and young children. PMID:23463425

  20. Suicide for survival--death of infected erythrocytes as a host mechanism to survive malaria.

    PubMed

    Föller, Michael; Bobbala, Diwakar; Koka, Saisudha; Huber, Stephan M; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian

    2009-01-01

    The pathogen of malaria, Plasmodium, enters erythrocytes and thus escapes recognition by the immune system. The pathogen induces oxidative stress to the host erythrocyte, which triggers eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes. Eryptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and cell membrane phospholipid scrambling with phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. Phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes are identified by macrophages which engulf and degrade the eryptotic cells. To the extent that infected erythrocytes undergo eryptosis prior to exit of Plasmodiaand subsequent infection of other erythrocytes, the premature eryptosis may protect against malaria. Accordingly, any therapeutical intervention accelerating suicidal death of infected erythrocytes has the potential to foster elimination of infected erythrocytes, delay the development of parasitemia and favorably influence the course of malaria. Eryptosis is stimulated by a wide variety of triggers including osmotic shock, oxidative stress, energy depletion and a wide variety of xenobiotics. Diseases associated with accelerated eryptosis include sepsis, haemolytic uremic syndrome, malaria, sickle-cell anemia, beta-thalassemia, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficiency, phosphate depletion, iron deficiency and Wilson's disease. Among the known stimulators of eryptosis, paclitaxel, chlorpromazine, cyclosporine, curcumin, PGE2 and lead have indeed been shown to favourably influence the course of malaria. Moreover, sickle-cell trait, beta-thalassemia trait, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficiency and iron deficiency confer some protection against a severe course of malaria. Importantly, counteracting Plasmodia by inducing eryptosis is not expected to generate resistance of the pathogen, as the proteins involved in suicidal death of the host cell are not encoded by the pathogen and thus cannot be modified by mutations of its genes.

  1. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  2. Peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P A; Chen, W W; Harris, C J; Hoefler, G; Hoefler, S; Blake, D C; Balfe, A; Kelley, R I; Moser, A B; Beard, M E

    1989-01-01

    Peroxisomal function was evaluated in a male infant with clinical features of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. Very long chain fatty acid levels were elevated in both plasma and fibroblasts, and beta-oxidation of very long chain fatty acids in cultured fibroblasts was significantly impaired. Although the level of the bile acid intermediate trihydroxycoprostanoic acid was slightly elevated in plasma, phytanic acid and L-pipecolic acid levels were normal, as was plasmalogen synthesis in cultured fibroblasts. The latter three parameters distinguish this case from classical neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. In addition, electron microscopy and catalase subcellular distribution studies revealed that, in contrast to neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, peroxisomes were present in the patient's tissues. Immunoblot studies of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes revealed that the bifunctional enzyme (enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) was deficient in postmortem liver samples, whereas acyl-CoA oxidase and the mature form of beta-ketothiolase were present. Density gradient centrifugation of fibroblast homogenates confirmed that intact peroxisomes were present. Immunoblots of fibroblasts peroxisomal fractions showed that they contained acyl-CoA oxidase and beta-ketothiolase, but bifunctional enzyme was not detected. Northern analysis, however, revealed that mRNA coding for the bifunctional enzyme was present in the patient's fibroblasts. These results indicate that the primary biochemical defect in this patient is a deficiency of peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme. It is of interest that the phenotype of this patient resembled neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy and would not have been distinguished from this disorder by clinical study alone. Images PMID:2921319

  3. Elevation deficiency in children with recessive RDH12-related retinopathy.

    PubMed

    AlBakri, Amani; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Khan, Arif O

    2015-12-01

    Children with retinal dystrophies often have nonspecific strabismus, but vertical incomitant deviations are uncommon. We report 4 children from 3 consanguineous families with bilateral elevation deficiency in the context of retinal dystrophy. All were found to harbor recessive mutations in retinal dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12). PMID:26691045

  4. PGK deficiency.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) deficiency is one of the relatively uncommon causes of hereditary non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia (HNSHA). The gene encoding the erythrocyte enzyme PGK1, is X-linked. Mutations of this gene may cause chronic haemolysis with or without mental retardation and they may cause myopathies, often with episodes of myoglobinuria, or a combination of these clinical manifestations. Twenty-six families have been described and in 20 of these the mutations are known. The reason for different clinical manifestations of mutations of the same gene remains unknown. PMID:17222195

  5. Molecular mediators of favism-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    García-Camín, Rosa María; Goma, Montserrat; Osuna, Rosa García; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Buendía, Irene; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesús; Manzarbeitia, Félix; Chevarria, Julio Leonel; Gluksmann, María Constanza; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Intolerance to fava beans in subjects with glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase deficiency (favism) may lead to severe hemolytic crises and decreased renal function. Renal biopsy findings exploring the molecular mechanisms of renal damage in favism have not been previously reported. We report a case of favism-associated acute kidney injury in which renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis and massive iron deposits in tubular cells. Interestingly, iron deposit areas were characterized by the presence of oxidative stress markers (NADPH-p22 phox and heme-oxigenase-1) and macrophages expressing the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163. In addition, iron deposits, NADPH-p22 phox, hemeoxigenase- 1 and CD163 positive cells were observed in some glomeruli. These results identify both glomerular and tubular involvement in favism-associated acute kidney injury and suggest novel therapeutic targets to prevent or accelerate recovery from acute kidney injury.

  6. [Favism. Acute hemolysis after intake of fava beans].

    PubMed

    Holm, B; Jensenius, M

    1998-01-30

    Acute haemolysis due to Glucose-6-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase deficiency is a common disorder in American and African Blacks, in Mediterranean people and among Orientals. The erythrocytes in affected individuals have insufficient reducing power against toxic peroxydes and free radicals generated during metabolism. Normally, affected individuals are without signs of disease, but under the influence of oxydants severe intravascular haemolysis may occur. One of the most important oxydants is the fava bean which, when ingested, may cause acute favism, a condition which has a 10% mortality if not treated properly. We describe a 35 year-old man from Iraq who developed serious haemolytic anemia with a fall in haemoglobin to 6.5 g/100 ml three days after ingestion of fava beans. He was treated with intravenous fluids and blood transfusions. He recovered and was discharged from hospital after nine days. This is the first described case of favism in Norway.

  7. Sweetened Blood Cools Hot Tempers: Physiological Self-Control and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, C. Nathan; Deckman, Timothy; Gailliot, Matthew T.; Bushman, Brad J.

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive and violent behaviors are restrained by self-control. Self-control consumes a lot of glucose in the brain, suggesting that low glucose and poor glucose metabolism are linked to aggression and violence. Four studies tested this hypothesis. Study 1 found that participants who consumed a glucose beverage behaved less aggressively than did participants who consumed a placebo beverage. Study 2 found an indirect relationship between diabetes (a disorder marked by low glucose levels and poor glucose metabolism) and aggressiveness through low self-control. Study 3 found that states with high diabetes rates also had high violent crime rates. Study 4 found that countries with high rates of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (a metabolic disorder related to low glucose levels) also had higher killings rates, both war related and non-war related. All four studies suggest that a spoonful of sugar helps aggressive and violent behaviors go down. PMID:21064166

  8. [Favism. Acute hemolysis after intake of fava beans].

    PubMed

    Holm, B; Jensenius, M

    1998-01-30

    Acute haemolysis due to Glucose-6-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase deficiency is a common disorder in American and African Blacks, in Mediterranean people and among Orientals. The erythrocytes in affected individuals have insufficient reducing power against toxic peroxydes and free radicals generated during metabolism. Normally, affected individuals are without signs of disease, but under the influence of oxydants severe intravascular haemolysis may occur. One of the most important oxydants is the fava bean which, when ingested, may cause acute favism, a condition which has a 10% mortality if not treated properly. We describe a 35 year-old man from Iraq who developed serious haemolytic anemia with a fall in haemoglobin to 6.5 g/100 ml three days after ingestion of fava beans. He was treated with intravenous fluids and blood transfusions. He recovered and was discharged from hospital after nine days. This is the first described case of favism in Norway. PMID:9499726

  9. Access to orphan drugs in the Middle East: Challenge and perspective

    PubMed Central

    Almalki, Ziyad S.; Alahmari, Abdullah K.; Guo, Jeff J.; Kelton, Christina M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary An orphan drug is a drug developed specifically to treat a rare medical condition. With a combined population of less than 400 million, about 2.8 million patients are estimated to be suffering from a rare disease in the Middle East. Some disorders such as hemoglobinopathy, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, autosomal recessive syndromes, and several metabolic disorders have a presence throughout the Middle East. In order to promote the treatment of these diseases, Middle Eastern governments need to facilitate education and training of healthcare personnel; develop and execute a method for obtaining and paying for orphan drugs; and, finally, provide tax, marketing, and other incentives to domestic and international firms to develop drugs specifically for the diseases of most importance to Middle Eastern patients. PMID:25343087

  10. Molecular mediators of favism-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    García-Camín, Rosa María; Goma, Montserrat; Osuna, Rosa García; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Buendía, Irene; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesús; Manzarbeitia, Félix; Chevarria, Julio Leonel; Gluksmann, María Constanza; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Intolerance to fava beans in subjects with glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase deficiency (favism) may lead to severe hemolytic crises and decreased renal function. Renal biopsy findings exploring the molecular mechanisms of renal damage in favism have not been previously reported. We report a case of favism-associated acute kidney injury in which renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis and massive iron deposits in tubular cells. Interestingly, iron deposit areas were characterized by the presence of oxidative stress markers (NADPH-p22 phox and heme-oxigenase-1) and macrophages expressing the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163. In addition, iron deposits, NADPH-p22 phox, hemeoxigenase- 1 and CD163 positive cells were observed in some glomeruli. These results identify both glomerular and tubular involvement in favism-associated acute kidney injury and suggest novel therapeutic targets to prevent or accelerate recovery from acute kidney injury. PMID:23006341

  11. Pharmacogenetic considerations in the treatment of gout.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rebecca L; Stamp, Lisa K

    2015-01-01

    Gout is one of the most common forms of arthritis and the prevalence is increasing. Management comprises rapid and effective control of the inflammation in acute gout and sustained urate lowering in the long term. Improving the outcomes for cheaper old drugs and for the increasing number of new, more expensive agents is an important clinical goal. The role of pharmacogenetics in predicting response and adverse events to gout therapies is of considerable interest. Currently, prospective screening is employed to detect HLA-B*5801 carriage and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, to minimize occurrence of allopurinol hypersensitivity and pegloticase-related hemolytic anemia. In the future it is likely that other genetic markers of drug response will make the transition to clinical practice to further improve the efficacy and safety of gout therapies. In this review, we will examine the potential clinical relevance of specific genetic variants in the management of gout.

  12. Access to orphan drugs in the Middle East: Challenge and perspective.

    PubMed

    Almalki, Ziyad S; Alahmari, Abdullah K; Guo, Jeff J; Kelton, Christina M L

    2012-11-01

    An orphan drug is a drug developed specifically to treat a rare medical condition. With a combined population of less than 400 million, about 2.8 million patients are estimated to be suffering from a rare disease in the Middle East. Some disorders such as hemoglobinopathy, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, autosomal recessive syndromes, and several metabolic disorders have a presence throughout the Middle East. In order to promote the treatment of these diseases, Middle Eastern governments need to facilitate education and training of healthcare personnel; develop and execute a method for obtaining and paying for orphan drugs; and, finally, provide tax, marketing, and other incentives to domestic and international firms to develop drugs specifically for the diseases of most importance to Middle Eastern patients. PMID:25343087

  13. Favism, with special reference to Iran.

    PubMed

    Donoso, G; Hedayat, H; Khayatian, H

    1969-04-01

    Fava beans (Vicia fava) are cultivated rather widely in most countries of the Eastern Mediterranean area and provide a cheap but protein-rich food that can be eaten alone, in various culinary preparations, including bread, or as a dietary supplement. However, the ingestion of fava beans may induce a haemolytic disease-favism-in some susceptible individuals and this might appear to limit the use of this pulse crop in those regions where favism occurs frequently. The uses of fava beans in Iran, the characteristics of favism and the present state of knowledge of the pathology of the disease are reviewed in this paper. Although some progress has been made in identifying the toxic substances and in explaining their mode of action, our understanding of favism is still limited. It appears that the disease is seen particularly in young children and is associated with a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) in the blood. PMID:5306718

  14. Interrelationship between aminopyrine oxidation and gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes prepared from fructose-pretreated mice.

    PubMed

    Bánhegyi, G; Mandl, J; Antoni, F; Garzó, T

    1987-03-11

    Aminopyrine oxidation was studied in isolated hepatocytes prepared from 24-h-starved mice (i) after induction of the NADPH-generating malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, but not the mixed function oxygenases by fructose, (ii) after induction of both mixed function oxygenases and NADPH-generating malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by phenobarbital and (iii) without any pretreatment. Phenobarbital pretreatment, as expected, increased the rate of aminopyrine oxidation of isolated hepatocytes. However, fructose pretreatment also enhanced the rate of N-demethylation of aminopyrine by more than 100% supporting the view that the availability of NADPH is rate limiting in drug oxidation under certain conditions. The role of malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the NADPH supply for aminopyrine oxidation was investigated by the addition of two groups of gluconeogenic precursors: lactate or alanine and glycerol or fructose with the simultaneous measurement of glucose synthesis and aminopyrine N-demethylation. There was a clear correlation between the increased rate of aminopyrine oxidation and the decreases of glucose production caused by aminopyrine. Gluconeogenesis in the presence of 1 mM aminopyrine was decreased by 70-80% when alanine or lactate were used as precursors, it was decreased by only 35-40% when glucose production was started from glycerol or fructose; in an accordance with the facts that NADPH generation and gluconeogenesis starting from alanine or lactate share two common intermediates--malate and glucose-6 phosphate--, while there is only one common intermediate--glucose-6 phosphate--if fructose or glycerol are used. Similar results were obtained with the addition of the structurally dissimilar hexobarbital. It is concluded that besides malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase also takes part in NADPH supply for drug oxidation in glycogen-depleted hepatocytes.

  15. Isocitrate dehydrogenases and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activities of baker's yeast grown in a variety of hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Machado, A; Nuñez de Castro, I; Mayor, F

    1975-02-28

    The activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD), isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP) and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase have been investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in a variety of aerobic and hypoxic conditions, the latter including oxygen deprivation, high glucose concentration, addition of inhibitors of mitochondrial protein synthesis, respiratory inhibition by azide, and impaired respiration mutants. All hypoxic conditions led to a marked decrease of oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and significant decreases of the two isocitrate dehydrogenases. According to its kinetic properties, the NAD-isocitrate dehydrogenase will not be operative in hypoxia "in vivo". From these and other related facts it is concluded that hypoxic conditions in yeast generally lead to a splitting of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and that glutamate synthesis in these conditions takes place through the coupling of the NADP-linked isocitrate and glutamate dehydrogenases.

  16. [The PQQ-dehydrogenases. A novel example of bacterial quinoproteins].

    PubMed

    Flores-Encarnación, Marcos; Sánchez-Cuevas, Mariano; Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    The word "quinoprotein" describes four groups of different enzymes which have cofactors containing o-quinones. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is not covalently attached. PQQ is the cofactor of several quinoprotein bacterial dehydrogenases including glucose dehydrogenase (G-DH), alcohol dehydrogenase (A-DH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AL-DH). These dehydrogenases are located in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria. This report summarises the structural properties of quinoprotein dehydrogenases, such as the biological functions and biotechnological aspects more important.

  17. Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on lipoamide dehydrogenase, a member of three multi-enzyme complexes

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Aditya; Bryk, Ruslana; Shi, Shuangping; Rhee, Kyu; Rath, Poonam; Schnappinger, Dirk; Ehrt, Sabine; Nathan, Carl

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) adapts to persist in a nutritionally limited macrophage compartment. Lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), the third enzyme (E3) in Mtb’s pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH), also serves as E1 of peroxynitrite reductase/peroxidase (PNR/P), which helps Mtb resist host reactive nitrogen intermediates. In contrast to Mtb lacking dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (DlaT), the E2 of PDH and PNR/P, Lpd-deficient Mtb is severely attenuated in wild type and immunodeficient mice. This suggests that Lpd has a function that DlaT does not share. When DlaT is absent, Mtb upregulates an Lpd-dependent branched chain keto-acid dehydrogenase (BCKADH) encoded by pdhA, pdhB, pdhC and lpdC. Without Lpd, Mtb cannot metabolize branched chain amino acids and potentially toxic branched chain intermediates accumulate. Mtb deficient in both DlaT and PdhC phenocopies Lpd-deficient Mtb. Thus, Mtb critically requires BCKADH along with PDH and PNR/P for pathogenesis. These findings position Lpd as a potential target for anti-infectives against Mtb. PMID:21238944

  18. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  3. Formate dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas oxalaticus.

    PubMed

    Müller, U; Willnow, P; Ruschig, U; Höpner, T

    1978-02-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.2) from Pseudomonas oxalaticus has been isolated and characterized. The enzyme (molecular weight 315000) is a complex flavoprotein containing 2 FMN, 18--25 non-heme iron atoms and 15--20 acid-labile sulphides. In the last step of the purification, a sucrose gradient centrifugation, a second catalytically active species has been found apparently originating from a dissociation of the enzyme into two equal subunits. The enzyme is specific toward its natural substrate formate. It transfers electrons to NAD+, oxygen, ferricyanide, and a lot of nonphysiological acceptors (dyes). In addition electrons are transferred from NADH to these acceptors. The (reversible) removal of FMN requires a reduction step. Reincorporation has been followed by the reappearance of the reactivity against formate and by fluorescence titration. The deflavo enzyme also binds FAD and riboflavin. The resulting enzyme species show characteristic catalytic abilities. Activity against formate is peculiar to the FMN species. PMID:631130

  4. Opine dehydrogenases in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Harcet, Matija; Perina, Drago; Pleše, Bruna

    2013-10-01

    It is well known today that opine production anaerobic pathways are analogs to the classical glycolytic pathway (lactate production pathway). These pathways, catalyzed by a group of enzymes called opine dehydrogenases (OpDHs), ensure continuous flux of glycolysis and a constant supply of ATP by maintaining the NADH/NAD(+) ratio during exercise and hypoxia, thus regulating the cytosolic redox balance in glycolysis under anoxia. OpDHs are distributed in a wide range of marine invertebrate phyla, including sponges (Porifera). Phylogenetic analyses supported with enzymatic assays strongly indicate that sponge OpDHs constitute an enzyme class unrelated to other OpDHs. Therefore, OpDHs in marine invertebrates are divided into two groups, a mollusk/annelid type and a sponge type, which belongs to the OCD/mu-crystallin family.

  5. Xanthine Dehydrogenase Is Transported to the Drosophila Eye

    PubMed Central

    Reaume, A. G.; Clark, S. H.; Chovnick, A.

    1989-01-01

    The rosy (ry) locus in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase. Mutants that have no enzyme activity are characterized by a brownish eye color phenotype reflecting a deficiency in the red eye pigment. This report demonstrates that enzyme which is synthesized in some tissue other than the eye is transported and sequestered at the eye. Previous studies find that no leader sequence is associated with this molecule but a peroxisomal targeting sequence has been noted, and the enzyme has been localized to peroxisomes. This represents a rare example of an enzyme involved in intermediary metabolism being transported from one tissue to another and may also be the first example of a peroxisomal protein being secreted from a cell. PMID:2513252

  6. Molecular characterization of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Robertson, A G; Fewson, C A

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of xylB and xylC from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, the genes encoding benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, were determined. The complete nucleotide sequence indicates that these two genes form part of an operon and this was supported by heterologous expression and physiological studies. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II is a 51654 Da protein with 484 amino acids per subunit and it is typical of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenases. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase has a subunit Mr of 38923 consisting of 370 amino acids, it stereospecifically transfers the proR hydride of NADH, and it is a member of the family of zinc-dependent long-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. The enzyme appears to be more similar to animal and higher-plant alcohol dehydrogenases than it is to most other microbial alcohol dehydrogenases. Residue His-51 of zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases is thought to be necessary as a general base for catalysis in this category of alcohol dehydrogenases. However, this residue was found to be replaced in benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus by an isoleucine, and the introduction of a histidine residue in this position did not alter the kinetic coefficients, pH optimum or substrate specificity of the enzyme. Other workers have shown that His-51 is also absent from the TOL-plasmid-encoded benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase of Pseudomonas putida and so these two closely related enzymes presumably have a catalytic mechanism that differs from that of the archetypal zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:9494109

  7. Growth on ethanol results in co-ordinated Saccharomyces cerevisiae response to inactivation of genes encoding superoxide dismutases.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Oleh V; Semchyshyn, Halyna M; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2007-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an essential enzyme protecting cells against oxidative stress. However, its specific role under different conditions is not clear. To study the possible role of SOD in the cell during respiration, Saccharomyces cerevisiae single and double mutants with inactivated SOD1 and/or SOD2 genes growing on ethanol as an energy and carbon source were used. Activities of antioxidant and associated enzymes as well as the level of protein carbonyls were measured. SOD activity was significantly higher in a Mn-SOD deficient strain than that in the wild-type parental strain, but significantly lower in a Cu, Zn-SOD mutant. A strong positive correlation between SOD and catalase activities (R(2) = 0.99) shows possible protection of catalase by SOD from inactivation in vivo and/or decrease in catalase activity because of lower H(2)O(2) formation in the mutant cells. SOD deficiency resulted in a malate dehydrogenase activity increase, whereas glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity was lower in SOD-deficient strains. Linear and non-linear positive correlations between SOD and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are discussed. No changes in the activity of glutathione reductase and protein carbonyl levels support the idea that SOD-deficient cells are not exposed to strong oxidative stress during exponential growth of yeast cultures on ethanol.

  8. Shikimate dehydrogenase from Pinu sylvestris L. needles

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, V.I.; Shein, I.V.

    1986-07-10

    Shikimate dehydrogenase was isolated by extraction from pine needles and partially purified by fractionation with ammonium sulfate. In conifers, in contrast to other plants, all three isoenzymes of shikimate dehydrogenase exhibit activity not only with NADP/sup +/, but also with NAD/sup +/. The values of K/sub m/ for shikimate, when NADP/sup +/ and NAD/sup +/ are used as cofactors, are 0.22 and 1.13 mM, respectively. The enzyme is maximally active at pH 10 with both cofactors. It is suggested that NAD-dependent shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the initial reaction of the alternative pathway of the conversion of shikimic acid to hydroxybenzoic acid. The peculiarities of the organization and regulation of the initial reactions of the shikimate pathway in conifers and in plants with shikimate dehydrogenase absolutely specific for NADP are discussed.

  9. An amino acid substitution in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} gene, affecting mitochondrial import of the precursor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Takakubo, F.; Thorburn, D.R.; Dahl, H.H.M.

    1995-10-01

    A mutation in the mitochondrial targeting sequence was characterized in a male patient with X chromosome-linked pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} deficiency. The mutation was a base substitution of G by C at nucleotide 134 in the mitochondrial targeting sequence of the PDHA1 gene, resulting in an arginine-to-proline substitution at codon 10 (R10P). Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in cultured skin fibroblasts was 28% of the control value, and immunoblot analysis revealed a decreased level of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha}immunoreactivity. Chimeric constructs in which the normal and mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} targeting sequences were attached to the mitochondrial matrix protein ornithine transcarbamylase were synthesized in a cell free translation system, and mitochondrial import of normal and mutant proteins was compared in vitro. The results show that ornithine transcarbamylase targeted by the mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} sequence was translocated into the mitochondrial matrix at a reduced rate, suggesting that defective import is responsible for the reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase level in mitochondria. The mutation was also present in an affected brother and the mildly affected mother. The clinical presentations of this X chromosome-linked disorder in affected family members are discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an amino acid substitution in a mitochondrial targeting sequence resulting in a human genetic disease. 58 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Evaluation of the endogenous glucocorticoid hypothesis of denervation atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Max, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The effects are studied of the oral administration of RU38486, a potent selective glucocorticoid antagonist, on muscle weight, non-collagen protein content, and selected enzyme activities (choline acetyltransferase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glutamine synthetase) following denervation of rat skeletal muscle. Neither decreases in muscle weight, protein content, and choline acetyltransferase activity, nor increases in the activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogernase and glutamine synthetase were affected by RU38486. These data do not support the hypothesis that denervation atrophy results from enhanced sensitivity of muscle to endogenous glucocorticoids.

  11. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the /sup 32/P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation.

  12. Controlled clinical evaluations of chlorine dioxide, chlorite and chlorate in man.

    PubMed Central

    Lubbers, J R; Chauan, S; Bianchine, J R

    1982-01-01

    To assess the relative safety of chronically administered chlorine water disinfectants in man, a controlled study was undertaken. The clinical evaluation was conducted in the three phases common to investigational drug studies. Phase I, a rising dose tolerance investigation, examined the acute effects of progressively increasing single doses of chlorine disinfectants to normal healthy adult male volunteers. Phase II considered the impact on normal subjects of daily ingestion of the disinfectants at a concentration of 5 mg/l. for twelve consecutive weeks. Persons with a low level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase may be expected to be especially susceptible to oxidative stress; therefore, in Phase III, chlorite at a concentration of 5 mg/l. was administered daily for twelve consecutive weeks to a small group of potentially at-risk glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient subjects. Physiological impact was assessed by evaluation of a battery of qualitative and quantitative tests. The three phases of this controlled double-blind clinical evaluation of chlorine dioxide and its potential metabolites in human male volunteer subjects were completed uneventfully. There were no obvious undesirable clinical sequellae noted by any of the participating subjects or by the observing medical team. In several cases, statistically significant trends in certain biochemical or physiological parameters were associated with treatment; however, none of these trends was judged to have physiological consequence. One cannot rule out the possibility that, over a longer treatment period, these trends might indeed achieve proportions of clinical importance. However, by the absence of detrimental physiological responses within the limits of the study, the relative safety of oral ingestion of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites, chlorite and chlorate, was demonstrated. PMID:6961033

  13. Enzymes of the Glycolytic and Pentose Phosphate Pathways in Proplastids from the Developing Endosperm of Ricinus communis L.

    PubMed

    Simcox, P D; Reid, E E; Canvin, D T; Dennis, D T

    1977-06-01

    The metabolism of sucrose to long chain fatty acids in the endosperm of developing castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) seeds requires a combination of cytosolic and proplastid enzymes. The total activity and the subcellular distribution of the intermediate enzymic steps responsible for the conversion of sucrose to pyruvate have been determined. Hexose phosphate synthesis from sucrose occurs in the cytosol along with the first oxidative step in the pentose phosphate pathway, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The proplastids contain the necessary complement of glycolytic enzymes to account for the in vivo rates of acetate synthesis from glucose 6-phosphate. These organelles also contain the majority of the cellular 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, transketolase, and transaldolase activities.The consequence of these enzyme distributions is that glucose 6-phosphate or 6-phosphogluconate produced in the cytosol must be transported into the proplastids where conversion to pyruvate occurs. The unique segregation of the two oxidative steps in the pentose phosphate pathway may be required to meet the metabolic needs of these fat-storing seeds. Compartmentation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the cytosol and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the proplastids is discussed in light of the NADPH requirements for fatty acid synthesis in these subcellular locations.

  14. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF.

    PubMed

    Keularts, Irene M L W; Leroy, Piet L J M; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M; Spaapen, Leo J M; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2010-12-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and enzyme measurement (in one patient) excluded 3-PGDH deficiency. Deficiencies in other serine biosynthesis enzymes were highly unlikely on clinical grounds. On basis of the fasting state, ketone bodies and lactate in plasma, urine and CSF, we speculate that reduced serine levels were due to its use as gluconeogenic substrate, conversion to pyruvate by brain serine racemase or decreased L-serine production because of a lack of glucose. These are the first strikingly similar cases of patients with a clear secondary serine deficiency associated with a toxic encephalopathy.

  15. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF.

    PubMed

    Keularts, Irene M L W; Leroy, Piet L J M; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M; Spaapen, Leo J M; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2010-12-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and enzyme measurement (in one patient) excluded 3-PGDH deficiency. Deficiencies in other serine biosynthesis enzymes were highly unlikely on clinical grounds. On basis of the fasting state, ketone bodies and lactate in plasma, urine and CSF, we speculate that reduced serine levels were due to its use as gluconeogenic substrate, conversion to pyruvate by brain serine racemase or decreased L-serine production because of a lack of glucose. These are the first strikingly similar cases of patients with a clear secondary serine deficiency associated with a toxic encephalopathy. PMID:20300853

  16. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  17. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  18. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase from the chemolithotroph Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Takashi; Ehara, Nagisa; Nishito, Akira; Nakayama, Yumi; Maekawa, Makiko; Imada, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hidehiko; Inagaki, Kenji

    2002-08-27

    An isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) with an unique coenzyme specificity from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was purified and characterized, and its gene was cloned. The native enzyme was homodimeric with a subunit of M(r) 45000 and showed a 78-fold preference for NAD(+) over NADP(+). The cloned ICDH gene (icd) was expressed in an icd-deficient strain of Escherichia coli EB106; the activity was found in the cell extract. The gene encodes a 429-amino acid polypeptide and is located between open reading frames encoding a putative aconitase gene (upstream of icd) and a putative succinyl-CoA synthase beta-subunit gene (downstream of icd). A. thiooxidans ICDH showed high sequence similarity to bacterial NADP(+)-dependent ICDH rather than eukaryotic NAD(+)-dependent ICDH, but the NAD(+)-preference of the enzyme was suggested due to residues conserved in the coenzyme binding site of the NAD(+)-dependent decarboxylating dehydrogenase.

  19. Affinity chromatography of bacterial lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, N; Delaney, M; O'Carra, P

    1978-01-01

    The affinity system used was the immobilized oxamate derivative previously used to purify mammalian lactate dehydrogenases. The bacterial dehydrogenases specific for the L-stereoisomer of lactate behaved in the same way as the mammalian enzymes, binding strongly in the presence of NADH. The D-lactate-specific enzymes, however, did not show any biospecific affinity for this gel. The L-specific enzymes could be purified to homogeneity in one affinity-chromatographic step. The D-specific enzymes could be efficiently separated from the L-specific ones and could then be further purified on an immobilized NAD derivative. The mechanism of activation of the lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus faecalis by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was investigated by using the immobilized oxamate gel. PMID:666726

  20. Affinity chromatography of bacterial lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Kelly, N; Delaney, M; O'Carra, P

    1978-06-01

    The affinity system used was the immobilized oxamate derivative previously used to purify mammalian lactate