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Sample records for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient

  1. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue.

  2. [Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Ogura, Hiromi

    2015-07-01

    In the past 10 years, we have diagnosed congenital hemolytic anemia in 294 patients, approximately 33% of whom were found to have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. It is becoming more common for Japanese to marry people of other ethnic origins, such that G6PD deficiency is becoming more prevalent in Japan. Japanese G6PD deficiency tends to be diagnosed in the neonatal period due to severe jaundice, while G6PD-deficient patients with foreign ancestors tend to be diagnosed at the onset of an acute hemolytic crisis before the age of six. It is difficult to predict the clinical course of each patient by G6PD activity, reduced glutathione content, or the presence/absence of severe neonatal jaundice. We propose that both neonatal G6PD screening and systematic analyses of G6PD gene mutations may be useful for personalized management of patients with G6PD-deficient hemolytic anemia.

  3. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Lai, H. C.; Lai, Michael P. Y.; Leung, Kevin S. N.

    1968-01-01

    In a Chinese population 1,000 full-term male neonates and a further 117 jaundiced neonates of both sexes were studied in an investigation of the frequency of deficiency of erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). This enzyme was found to be deficient in 3·6% of male neonates. Correlation of the results with the birthplace of the 602 mothers who were known to come from Kwangtung province showed no significant differences in the frequency of the deficiency between certain parts of the province. The deficiency of G6PD in hemizygous males is profound but it is not associated with erythrocyte acid monophosphoesterase deficiency in Chinese in Hong Kong. The G6PD deficiency accounts for 15·4% of all the 117 cases of neonatal jaundice. The relative importance of G6PD deficiency as a cause of neonatal jaundice does not differ materially in male and female mutants. Neonatal jaundice can occur in all genotypes of G6PD mutation in Chinese. PMID:5697334

  4. Priapism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: An underestimated correlation?

    PubMed

    De Rose, Aldo Franco; Mantica, Guglielmo; Tosi, Mattia; Bovio, Giulio; Terrone, Carlo

    2016-10-05

    Priapism is a rare clinical condition characterized by a persistent erection unrelated to sexual excitement. Often the etiology is idiopathic. Three cases of priapism in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency patients have been described in literature. We present the case of a 39-year-old man with glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, who reached out to our department for the arising of a non-ischemic priapism without arteriolacunar fistula. We suggest that the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency could be an underestimated risk factor for priapism.

  5. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a protein that ...

  6. Malaria, favism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Huheey, J E; Martin, D L

    1975-10-15

    Although glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient individuals may suffer (sometimes fatally) from favism, a high incidence of this trait occurs in many Mediterranean populations. This apparent paradox is explained on the basis of a synergistic interaction between favism and G-6-PD deficiency that provides increased protection against malaria compared to that of the G-6-PD deficiency alone. This relationship is analogous to that between various hemoglobins and malaria in that there is selection for a more severe trait if it provides more protection against malaria.

  7. Drug-induced haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T K; Todd, D; Tso, S C

    1976-01-01

    People with the variants of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) deficiency common in the southern Chinese (Canton, B(-)Chinese, and Hong Kong-Pokfulam) have a moderate shortening of red-cell survival but no anaemia when they are in the steady state. With a cross-transfusion technique, primaquine, nitrofurantoin, and large doses of aspirin were found to aggravate the haemolysis while sulphamethoxazole did so only in some people. Individual differences in drug metabolism may be the reason for this. Many commonly used drugs reported to accentuate haemolysis in GPD deficiency did not shorten red-cell survival. PMID:990860

  8. Conjugated bilirubin in neonates with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M; Rubaltelli, F F; Hammerman, C; Vilei, M T; Leiter, C; Abramov, A; Muraca, M

    1996-05-01

    We used a system capable of measuring conjugated bilirubin and its monoconjugated and diconjugated fractions in serum to assess bilirubin conjugation in 29 glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient, term, male newborn infants and 35 control subjects; all had serum bilirubin levels > or = 256 mumol/L (15 mg/dI). The median value for diconjugated bilirubin was lower in the G6PD-deficient neonates than in control subjects (0.06 (range 0.00 to 1.84) vs 0.21 (range 0.00 to 1.02) mumol/L, p = 0.006). Diglucuronide was undetectable in 11 (38.9%) of the G6PD-deficient infants versus 3 (8.6%) of the control subjects (p = 0.015). These findings imply a partial defect of bilirubin conjugation not previously demonstrated in G6PD-deficient newborn infants.

  9. Hemolytic anemia caused by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olivares, N; Medina, C; Sánchez-Corona, J; Rivas, F; Rivera, H; Hernández, A; Delgado, J L; Ibarra, B; Cantú, J M; Vaca, G; Martínez, C

    1979-01-01

    Results are reported concerning quantitation of glucose -6- phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme activity where in one of the members of a family a clinical diagnosis of acute hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency had been established. In the propositus, G6PD levels were found to be less than 10 per cent thus confirming diagnosis; the same enzymatic deficiency was identified in one of the siblings without a history of hematologic pathology and in a maternal cousin with a history of neonatal jaundice as well as two obliged carriers. Electrophoretical enzyme phenotype was similar to A variant in three affected males. Advantages of prevention and medical care possible with early diagnosis of G6PD deficiency are discussed.

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: not exclusively in males.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Leonie; Heylen, Evelien; van den Akker, Machiel

    2016-12-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect, often presenting with neonatal jaundice and/or acute hemolytic anemia, triggered by oxidizing agents. G6PD deficiency is an X-linked, hereditary disease, mainly affecting men, but should also be considered in females with an oxidative hemolysis.

  11. Psychotic mania in glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase-deficient subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has been associated with acute psychosis, catatonic schizophrenia, and bipolar disorders by previous inconclusive reports. A particularly disproportionate rate of enzyme deficiency was found in manic schizoaffective patients from 662 lithium patients surveyed in Sardinia. The purpose of this study was to describe clinical characteristics which may be potentially associated with G6PD deficiency. Methods Characteristics of episodes, course of illness, family pattern of illness, laboratory tests, and treatment response of 29 G6PD-deficient subjects with a Research Diagnostic Criteria diagnosis of manic schizoaffective disorder were abstracted from available records. Results The most peculiar pattern was that of acute recurrent psychotic manic episodes, mostly characterized by loosening of associations, agitation, catatonic symptoms, and/or transient confusion, concurrent hyperbilirubinemia, positive psychiatric family history, and partial response to long-term lithium treatment. Conclusions A relationship between psychiatric disorder and G6PD deficiency is to be searched in the bipolar spectrum, particularly among patients with a history of acute episodes with psychotic and/or catatonic symptoms or with transient confusion. PMID:12844366

  12. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: the added value of cytology.

    PubMed

    Roelens, Marie; Dossier, Claire; Fenneteau, Odile; Couque, Nathalie; Da Costa, Lydie

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 2 year-old boy hospitalized into the emergency room for influenza pneumonia infection. The evolution was marked by a respiratory distress syndrome, a severe hemolytic anemia, associated with thrombocytopenia and kidney failure. First, a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has been judiciously suggested due to the classical triad: kidney failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. But, strikingly, blood smears do not exhibit schizocytes, but instead ghosts and hemighosts, some characteristic features of a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Our hypothesis has been confirmed by enzymatic dosage and molecular biology. The unusual initial aplastic feature of this anemia could be the result of a transient erythroblastopenia due to the viral agent, at the origin of the G6PD crisis on a background of a major erythrocyte anti-oxydant enzyme defect. This case of G6PD defect points out the continuously importance of the cytology, which was able to redirect the diagnosis by the hemighost and ghost detection.

  13. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Nigerian children.

    PubMed

    Williams, Olatundun; Gbadero, Daniel; Edowhorhu, Grace; Brearley, Ann; Slusher, Tina; Lund, Troy C

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (561 males and 561 females) aged 1 month to 15 years. The mean age was 7.4 ± 3.2 years. Children of Yoruba ethnicity made up the largest group (77.5%) followed by those Igbo descent (10.6%) and those of Igede (10.2%) and Tiv (1.8%) ethnicity. G6PD status was determined using the fluorescent spot method. We found that the overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency was 15.3% (24.1% in males, 6.6% in females). Yoruba children had a higher prevalence (16.9%) than Igede (10.5%), Igbo (10.1%) and Tiv (5.0%) children. The odds of G6PD deficiency were 0.38 times as high in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children (p=0.0500). The odds for Igede and Tiv children were not significantly different from Yoruba children (p=0.7528 and 0.9789 respectively). Mean oxygen saturation, heart rate and hematocrit were not significantly different in G6PD deficient and G6PD sufficient children. The odds of being G6PD deficient were 2.1 times higher in children with scleral icterus than those without (p=0.0351). In conclusion, we determined the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Nigerian sub-populations. The odds of G6PD deficiency were decreased in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children. There was no association between vital parameters or hematocrit and G6PD deficiency. We found that a history of scleral icterus may increase the odds of G6PD deficiency, but we did not exclude other common causes of icterus such as sickle cell disease or malarial infection.

  14. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Revisited

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Jerome T.; Henderson, Alfred R.

    1984-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases associated with drugs have been recognized since antiquity. Many of these anemias have been associated with oxidizing agents and deficiencies in the intraerythrocytic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This paper outlines the discovery, prevalence, and variants of this enzyme. Methods of diagnosis of associated anemias are offered. PMID:6502728

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presented with convulsion: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Merdin, Alparslan; Avci, Fatma; Guzelay, Nihal

    2014-01-29

    Red blood cells carry oxygen in the body and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase protects these cells from oxidative chemicals. If there is a lack of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, red blood cells can go acute hemolysis. Convulsion is a rare presentation for acute hemolysis due to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. Herein, we report a case report of a Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency diagnosed patient after presentation with convulsion. A 70 year-old woman patient had been hospitalized because of convulsion and fatigue. She has not had similar symptoms before. She had ingested fava beans in the last two days. Her hypophyseal and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal. Blood transfusion was performed and the patient recovered.

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and sulfadimidin acetylation phenotypes in Egyptian oases.

    PubMed

    Hussein, L; Yamamah, G; Saleh, A

    1992-04-01

    Screening of 1315 males from two Egyptian oases for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G-6PD) found an incidence of 5.9%. The rate of acetylation of sulfadimidin was also studied, and a bimodal distribution was found with 73% rapid acetylators. There is a correlation between high frequency of G-6PD deficiency and high frequency of slow acetylation rate.

  17. G6PD Deficiency (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... trigger, is removed. In rare cases, G6PD deficiency leads to chronic anemia . With the right precautions, a child with G6PD deficiency can lead a healthy and active life. About G6PD Deficiency ...

  18. G6PD Deficiency (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are high-risk areas for the infectious disease malaria . Researchers have found evidence that the parasite that ... deficiency may have developed as a protection against malaria. continue G6PD Deficiency Symptom Triggers Kids with G6PD ...

  19. Ischaemic Priapism and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A Mechanism of Increased Oxidative Stress?

    PubMed

    Morrison, B F; Thompson, E B; Shah, S D; Wharfe, G H

    2014-07-03

    Ischaemic priapism is a devastating urological condition that has the potential to cause permanent erectile dysfunction. The disorder has been associated with numerous medical conditions and the use of pharmacotherapeutic agents. The aetiology is idiopathic in a number of cases. There are two prior case reports of the association of ischaemic priapism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We report on a third case of priapism associated with G6PD deficiency and review recently described molecular mechanisms of increased oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of ischaemic priapism. The case report of a 32-year old Afro-Caribbean male with his first episode of major ischaemic priapism is described. Screening for common causes of ischaemic priapism, including sickle cell disease was negative. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency was discovered on evaluation for priapism. Penile aspiration was performed and erectile function was good post treatment.Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is a cause for ischaemic priapism and should be a part of the screening process in idiopathic causes of the disorder. Increased oxidative stress occurs in G6PD deficiency and may lead to priapism.

  20. Patient with toxoplasmosis and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Altacílio A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Toxoplasmosis, a zoonotic protozoal disease caused by toxoplasma gondii, is prevalent throughout the world, affecting a large proportion of persons who usually have no symptoms. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, an X-linked inherited disorder, is present in over 400 million people world wide. It is more common in tropical and subtropical countries and is one of the important causes of hemolytic anemia. Case presentation This case report relates the occurrence of the two diseases simultaneously in a child of five years old. Conclusion Patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency are more susceptible to toxoplasmosis and this case report, reinforce the findings of this propensity and alert us for such possibility, what it is important, therefore, the treatment of toxoplasmosis can cause serious hemolysis in these patients. PMID:19918404

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: an unusual cause of acute jaundice after paracetamol overdose.

    PubMed

    Phillpotts, Simon; Tash, Elliot; Sen, Sambit

    2014-11-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the commonest human enzyme defect causing haemolytic anaemia after exposure to specific triggers. Paracetamol-induced haemolysis in G6PD deficiency is a rare complication and mostly reported in children. We report the first case (to the best of our knowledge) of acute jaundice without overt clinical features of a haemolytic crisis, in an otherwise healthy adult female following paracetamol overdose, due to previously undiagnosed G6PD deficiency. It is important that clinicians consider this condition when a patient presents following a paracetamol overdose with significant and disproportionate jaundice, without transaminitis or coagulopathy.

  2. Is glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency more prevalent in Carrion's disease endemic areas in Latin America?

    PubMed

    Mazulis, Fernando; Weilg, Claudia; Alva-Urcia, Carlos; Pons, Maria J; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana

    2015-12-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a cytoplasmic enzyme with an important function in cell oxidative damage prevention. Erythrocytes have a predisposition towards oxidized environments due to their lack of mitochondria, giving G6PD a major role in its stability. G6PD deficiency (G6PDd) is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans; it affects approximately 400 million individuals worldwide. The overall G6PDd allele frequency across malaria endemic countries is estimated to be 8%, corresponding to approximately 220 million males and 133 million females. However, there are no reports on the prevalence of G6PDd in Andean communities where bartonellosis is prevalent.

  3. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the Greek population of Cape Town.

    PubMed

    Bonafede, R P; Botha, M C; Beighton, P

    1984-04-07

    A sample of 250 unrelated members of the Greek community of Cape Town was studied in order to establish the prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency in the community. A gene frequency of 0,067 in males and a prevalence of 6,7% are estimated for this group. It is recommended that persons with G-6-PD deficiency should have access to a list of medicinal agents which have the potential for precipitating acute haemolytic crises and that they should wear Medic-Alert discs bearing information concerning the disorder.

  4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and Alzheimer's disease: Partners in crime? The hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ulusu, N Nuray

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a multifaceted brain disorder which involves various coupled irreversible, progressive biochemical reactions that significantly reduce quality of life as well as the actual life expectancy. Aging, genetic predispositions, head trauma, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, deficiencies in insulin signaling, dysfunction of mitochondria-associated membranes, cerebrovascular changes, high cholesterol level, increased oxidative stress and free radical formation, DNA damage, disturbed energy metabolism, and synaptic dysfunction, high blood pressure, obesity, dietary habits, exercise, social engagement, and mental stress are noted among the risk factors of this disease. In this hypothesis review I would like to draw the attention on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and its relationship with Alzheimer's disease. This enzymopathy is the most common human congenital defect of metabolism and defined by decrease in NADPH+H(+) and reduced form of glutathione concentration and that might in turn, amplify oxidative stress due to essentiality of the enzyme. This most common enzymopathy may manifest itself in severe forms, however most of the individuals with this deficiency are not essentially symptomatic. To understand the sporadic Alzheimer's disease, the writer of this paper thinks that, looking into a crystal ball might not yield much of a benefit but glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency could effortlessly give some clues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo lability of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in GdA- and Gdmediterranean deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, Sergio; Corash, Laurence M.; Davenport, Deatra D.; Miraglia, Janet; Amorosi, Edward L.

    1968-01-01

    A decreased level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase might result from decreased rate of synthesis, synthesis of an enzyme of lower catalytic efficiency, increased lability, or a combined mechanism. To test the hypothesis of increased lability, the rate of decline of the enzyme in vivo was measured in three groups of individuals, controls, Gd(—),A-males, and Gd(—), Mediterranean males, by the slope of decline of activity in fractions containing erythrocytes of progressively increasing mean age. These fractions were obtained by ultracentrifugation on a discontinuous density gradient of erythrocyte suspensions free of contaminating platelets and leukocytes. The rate of in vivo decline of pyruvate kinase (another age-dependent enzyme) was also measured and found very similar in the three groups. The in vivo decline of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was found to follow an exponential rate, with a half-life of 62 days for controls and 13 days for Gd(—),A- erythrocytes. The activity in normal reticulocytes was estimated at 9.7 U and in Gd(—),A- reticulocytes at 8.8 U. These estimates were confirmed by direct measurements in reticulocytes isolated from patients with extreme reticulocytosis. In Gd(—),Mediterranean erythrocytes activity could be demonstrated only in reticulocytes, which were estimated to average 1.4 U. The rate of decline is so extreme that no activity could be detected in mature erythrocytes. These data suggest that the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency of both the GdA- and the GdMediterranean variant results from different degrees of in vivo instability of the abnormal enzyme. PMID:5641629

  6. Should we screen newborns for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the United States?

    PubMed

    Watchko, J F; Kaplan, M; Stark, A R; Stevenson, D K; Bhutani, V K

    2013-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, a common X-linked enzymopathy can lead to severe hyperbilirubinemia, acute bilirubin encephalopathy and kernicterus in the United States. Neonatal testing for G6PD deficiency is not yet routine and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends testing only in jaundiced newborns who are receiving phototherapy whose family history, ethnicity, or geographic origin suggest risk for the condition, or for infants whose response to phototherapy is poor. Screening tests for G6PD deficiency are available, are suitable for use in newborns and have been used in birth hospitals. However, US birth hospitals experience is limited and no national consensus has emerged regarding the need for newborn G6PD testing, its effectiveness or the best approach. Our review of current state of G6PD deficiency screening highlights research gaps and informs specific operational challenges to implement universal newborn G6PD testing concurrent to bilirubin screening in the United States.

  7. Apert syndrome with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tosun, G; Sener, Y

    2006-05-01

    Apert syndrome is characterized by midface hypoplasia, syndactyly of the hands and feet, proptosis of eyes, steep and flat frontal bones, and premature union of cranial sutures. Maxillary hypoplasia, deep palatal vault, anterior open bite, crowding of the dental arch, severely delayed tooth eruption, and dental malocclusion are the main oral manifestations of this syndrome. In this report, a case of Apert syndrome with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G(6)PD) deficiency is presented. The patient, a 4-year-old male and the fourth child of healthy parents, was admitted to our department because of delayed tooth eruption. He had all the cardinal symptoms of the Apert syndrome. Clinical examination revealed that primary centrals, canines and first molars erupted; however, primary second molars and laterals had not erupted. The patient had no dental caries. Preventive treatments were applied, and subsequently, the patient was taken to long-term follow up.

  8. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and red cell pyruvate kinase deficiency in neonatal jaundice cases in egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel Fattah, Mohammed; Abdel Ghany, Eman; Adel, Alia; Mosallam, Dalia; Kamal, Shahira

    2010-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency can lead to acute hemolytic anemia, chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, and neonatal jaundice. Neonatal red cell pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency may cause clinical patterns, ranging from extremely severe hemolytic anemia to moderate jaundice. The authors aimed at studying the prevalence of G6PD and PK deficiency among Egyptian neonates with pathological indirect hyperbilirubinemia in Cairo. This case-series study included 69 newborns with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. All were subjected to clinical history, laboratory investigations, e.g., complete blood counts, reticulocytic counts, direct and indirect serum bilirubin levels, Coombs tests, qualitative assay of G6PD activity by methemoglobin reduction test, and measurement of erythrocytic PK levels. The study detected 10 neonates with G6PD deficiency, which means that the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Egyptian neonates with hyperbilirubinemia is 14.4% (21.2% of males). G6PD deficiency was significantly higher in males than females (P = .01). The authors detected 2 cases with PK deficiency, making the prevalence of its deficiency 2.8%. These data demonstrate that G6PD deficiency is an important cause for neonatal jaundice in Egyptians. Neonatal screening for its deficiency is recommended. PK deficiency is not a common cause of neonatal jaundice. However, this needs further investigation on a larger scale.

  9. Anemia in patients with coinherited thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pornprasert, Sakorn; Phanthong, Siratcha

    2013-01-01

    Thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency are genetic disorders that cause hemolytic anemia. In areas with high frequencies of both hematological disorders, coinheritance of G-6-PD deficiency with thalassemia can be found. Whether G-6-PD deficiency, coinherited with thalassemia, enhances severe anemia is still unclear. Hematological parameters between thalassemia carriers with G-6-PD deficiency and those without G-6-PD deficiency were compared. The G-6-PD deficiency was diagnosed in 410 blood samples from thalassemia patients using a fluorescent spot test. The levels of hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and Hb A2/Hb E [β26(B8)Glu→Lys; HBB: c.79G>A] were measured using an automated blood counter and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. The G-6-PD deficiency was found in 37 samples (9.02%). Mean levels of Hb, PCV, MCV and Hb A2/E were similar between the two groups. Thus, G-6-PD deficiency did not enhance red blood cell pathology or induce more anemic severity in thalassemia patients.

  10. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Deficiency in Transfusion Medicine: The Unknown Risks

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Richard O.; Jhang, Jeffrey S.; Pham, Huy P.; Hod, Eldad A.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is red blood cell (RBC) destruction in response to oxidative stress. Patients requiring RBC transfusions may simultaneously receive oxidative medications or have concurrent infections, both of which can induce hemolysis in G6PD-deficient RBCs. Although it is not routine practice to screen healthy blood donors for G6PD deficiency, case reports identified transfusion of G6PD-deficient RBCs as causing hemolysis and other adverse events. In addition, some patient populations may be more at risk for complications associated with transfusions of G6PD-deficient RBCs because they receive RBCs from donors who are more likely to have G6PD deficiency. This review discusses G6PD deficiency, its importance in transfusion medicine, changes in the RBC antioxidant system (of which G6PD is essential) during refrigerated storage, and mechanisms of hemolysis. In addition, as yet unanswered questions that could be addressed by translational and clinical studies are identified and discussed. PMID:23815264

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) as a risk factor of male neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rostami-Far, Z; Ghadiri, K; Rostami-Far, M; Shaveisi-Zadeh, F; Amiri, A; Rahimian Zarif, B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction.Neonatal sepsis is a disease process, which represents the systemic response of bacteria entering the bloodstream during the first 28 days of life. The prevalence of sepsis is higher in male infants than in females, but the exact cause is unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, which leads to the production of NADPH. NADPH is required for the respiratory burst reaction in white blood cells (WBCs) to destroy microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in neonates with sepsis. Materials and methods.This study was performed on 76 neonates with sepsis and 1214 normal neonates from February 2012 to November 2014 in the west of Iran. The G6PD deficiency status was determined by fluorescent spot test. WBCs number and neutrophils percentages were measured and compared in patients with and without G6PD deficiency. Results.The prevalence of the G6PD deficiency in neonates with sepsis was significantly higher compared to the control group (p=0.03). WBCs number and neutrophils percentages in G6PD deficient patients compared with patients without G6PD deficiency were decreased, but were not statistically significant (p=0.77 and p=0.86 respectively). Conclusions.G6PD deficiency is a risk factor of neonatal sepsis and also a justification for more male involvement in this disease. Therefore, newborn screening for this disorder is recommended.

  12. Prevalence and molecular characterization of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Tantiprabha, Watcharee; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Phusua, Arunee; Sanguansermsri, Torpong

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common inherited enzymopathies in endemic areas of malaria including Southeast Asia. The molecular features of G6PD deficiency are similar among Southeast Asian population, with differences in the type of the prominent variants in each region. This study determined the prevalence and molecular characteristics of G6PD deficiency in northern Thailand. Quantitative assay of G6PD activity was conducted in 566 neonatal cord blood samples and 6 common G6PD mutations were determined by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method on G6PD complete and intermediate deficiency samples. Ninety newborns had G6PD deficiency, with prevalence in male newborns of 17% and that of female newborns having an intermediate and complete deficiency of 13% and 2%, respectively. From 95 G6PD alleles tested, G6PD Mahidol, G6PD Kaiping, G6PD Canton, G6PD Viangchan, G6PD Union, and G6PD Chinese-5 was detected in 19, 17, 15, 13, 7, and 2 alleles, respectively. Our study shows that the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in northern Thai population is high and combination of the common Chinese mutations is the majority, a distribution different from central and southern Thailand where G6PD Viangchan is the prominent variant. These findings suggest a higher proportion of assimilated Chinese ethnic group in the northern Thai population.

  13. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in transfusion medicine: the unknown risks.

    PubMed

    Francis, R O; Jhang, J S; Pham, H P; Hod, E A; Zimring, J C; Spitalnik, S L

    2013-11-01

    The hallmark of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is red blood cell (RBC) destruction in response to oxidative stress. Patients requiring RBC transfusions may simultaneously receive oxidative medications or have concurrent infections, both of which can induce haemolysis in G6PD-deficient RBCs. Although it is not routine practice to screen healthy blood donors for G6PD deficiency, case reports identified transfusion of G6PD-deficient RBCs as causing haemolysis and other adverse events. In addition, some patient populations may be more at risk for complications associated with transfusions of G6PD-deficient RBCs because they receive RBCs from donors who are more likely to have G6PD deficiency. This review discusses G6PD deficiency, its importance in transfusion medicine, changes in the RBC antioxidant system (of which G6PD is essential) during refrigerated storage and mechanisms of haemolysis. In addition, as yet unanswered questions that could be addressed by translational and clinical studies are identified and discussed.

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and risk of diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yin Key; Lai, Nai Ming; Lee, Shaun Wen Huey

    2017-05-01

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may have a higher risk of developing diabetes. The aim of the review was to synthesise the evidence on the association between G6PD deficiency and diabetes. A systematic search on Medline, EMBASE, AMED and CENTRAL databases for studies published between January 1966 and September 2016 that assessed the association between G6PD deficiency and diabetes was conducted. This was supplemented by a review of the reference list of retrieved articles. We extracted data on study characteristics, outcomes and performed an assessment on the methodological quality of the studies. A random-effects model was used to compute the summary risk estimates. Fifteen relevant publications involving 949,260 participants were identified, from which seven studies contributed to the meta-analysis. G6PD deficiency was associated with a higher odd of diabetes (odds ratio 2.37, 95% confidence interval 1.50-3.73). The odds ratio of diabetes among men was higher (2.22, 1.31-3.75) compared to women (1.87, 1.12-3.12). This association was broadly consistent in the sensitivity analysis. Current evidence suggests that G6PD deficiency may be a risk factor for diabetes, with higher odds among men compared to women. Further research is needed to determine how G6PD deficiency moderates diabetes.

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in northern Mexico and description of a novel mutation.

    PubMed

    García-Magallanes, N; Luque-Ortega, F; Aguilar-Medina, E M; Ramos-Payán, R; Galaviz-Hernández, C; Romero-Quintana, J G; Del Pozo-Yauner, L; Rangel-Villalobos, H; Arámbula-Meraz, E

    2014-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) is the most common enzyme pathology in humans; it is X-linked inherited and causes neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia, chronic nonspherocytic haemolytic anaemia and drug-induced acute haemolytic anaemia. G6PD deficiency has scarcely been studied in the northern region of Mexico, which is important because of the genetic heterogeneity described in Mexican population. Therefore, samples from the northern Mexico were biochemically screened for G6PD deficiency, and PCR-RFLPs, and DNA sequencing used to identify mutations in positive samples. The frequency of G6PD deficiency in the population was 0.95% (n = 1993); the mutations in 86% of these samples were G6PD A(-202A/376G), G6PDA(-376G/968C) and G6PD Santamaria(376G/542T). Contrary to previous reports, we demonstrated that G6PD deficiency distribution is relatively homogenous throughout the country (P = 0.48336), and the unique exception with high frequency of G6PD deficiency does not involve a coastal population (Chihuahua: 2.4%). Analysis of eight polymorphic sites showed only 10 haplotypes. In one individual we identified a new G6PD mutation named Mexico DF(193A>G) (rs199474830), which probably results in a damaging functional effect, according to PolyPhen analysis. Proteomic impact of the mutation is also described.

  16. Humanized mouse model of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency for in vivo assessment of hemolytic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rochford, Rosemary; Ohrt, Colin; Baresel, Paul C; Campo, Brice; Sampath, Aruna; Magill, Alan J; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A

    2013-10-22

    Individuals with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are at risk for the development of hemolytic anemia when given 8-aminoquinolines (8-AQs), an important class of antimalarial/antiinfective therapeutics. However, there is no suitable animal model that can predict the clinical hemolytic potential of drugs. We developed and validated a human (hu)RBC-SCID mouse model by giving nonobese diabetic/SCID mice daily transfusions of huRBCs from G6PD-deficient donors. Treatment of SCID mice engrafted with G6PD-deficient huRBCs with primaquine, an 8-AQ, resulted in a dose-dependent selective loss of huRBCs. To validate the specificity of this model, we tested known nonhemolytic antimalarial drugs: mefloquine, chloroquine, doxycycline, and pyrimethamine. No significant loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs was observed. Treatment with drugs known to cause hemolytic toxicity (pamaquine, sitamaquine, tafenoquine, and dapsone) resulted in loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs comparable to primaquine. This mouse model provides an important tool to test drugs for their potential to cause hemolytic toxicity in G6PD-deficient populations.

  17. Humanized mouse model of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency for in vivo assessment of hemolytic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rochford, Rosemary; Ohrt, Colin; Baresel, Paul C.; Campo, Brice; Sampath, Aruna; Magill, Alan J.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are at risk for the development of hemolytic anemia when given 8-aminoquinolines (8-AQs), an important class of antimalarial/antiinfective therapeutics. However, there is no suitable animal model that can predict the clinical hemolytic potential of drugs. We developed and validated a human (hu)RBC-SCID mouse model by giving nonobese diabetic/SCID mice daily transfusions of huRBCs from G6PD-deficient donors. Treatment of SCID mice engrafted with G6PD-deficient huRBCs with primaquine, an 8-AQ, resulted in a dose-dependent selective loss of huRBCs. To validate the specificity of this model, we tested known nonhemolytic antimalarial drugs: mefloquine, chloroquine, doxycycline, and pyrimethamine. No significant loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs was observed. Treatment with drugs known to cause hemolytic toxicity (pamaquine, sitamaquine, tafenoquine, and dapsone) resulted in loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs comparable to primaquine. This mouse model provides an important tool to test drugs for their potential to cause hemolytic toxicity in G6PD-deficient populations. PMID:24101478

  18. Cryopreservation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity inside red blood cells: developing a specimen repository in support of development and evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency tests.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Maria; LaRue, Nicole; Bansil, Pooja; Kalnoky, Michael; McGray, Sarah; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2013-08-20

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common human enzyme deficiency. It is characterized by abnormally low levels of G6PD activity. Individuals with G6PD deficiency are at risk of undergoing acute haemolysis when exposed to 8‒aminoquinoline-based drugs, such as primaquine. For this reason it is imperative to identify individuals with G6PD deficiency prior to administering these anti-malarial drugs. There is a need for the development and evaluation of point-of-care G6PD deficiency screening tests suitable for areas of the developing world where malarial treatments are frequently administered. The development and evaluation of new G6PD tests will be greatly assisted with the availability of specimen repositories. Cryopreservation of erythrocytes was evaluated as a means to preserve G6PD activity. Blood specimens from 31 patients including ten specimens with normal G6PD activity, three with intermediate activity, and 18 with deficient activity were cryopreserved for up to six months. Good correlation in G6PD activity between fresh and cryopreserved specimens (R2 = 0.95). The cryopreserved specimens show an overall small drop in mean G6PD activity of 0.23 U/g Hb (P=0.23). Cytochemical staining showed that intracellular G6PD activity distribution within the red blood cell populations is preserved during cryopreservation. Furthermore, the mosaic composition of red blood cells in heterozygous women is also preserved for six months or more. The fluorescent spot and the BinaxNOW qualitative tests for G6PD deficiency also showed high concordance in G6PD status determination between cryopreserved specimens and fresh specimens. A methodology for establishing a specimen panel for evaluation of G6PD tests is described. The approach is similar to that used in several malaria research facilities for the cryopreservation of parasites in clinical specimens and axenic cultures. Specimens stored in this manner will aid both the development and evaluation of

  19. Molecular characterization of a German variant of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD Aachen).

    PubMed

    Efferth, T; Osieka, R; Beutler, E

    2000-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-chromosome-linked hereditary disorder. Clinically, patients with G6PD deficiency often present with drug- or food-induced hemolytic crises or neonatal jaundice. G6PD is involved in the generation of NADPH and reduced glutathione. In contrast to American, Mediterranean, and African ancestries, only few variants are known from Middle and Northern Europe. We describe the molecular characterization of a distinct variant from the northwestern area of Germany, G6PD Aachen. The sequence of the G6PD gene from three afflicted males was found to be hemizygous at cDNA residue 1089 for a C-->G mutation with a predicted amino acid change of Asn363Lys. The 1089 C-->G point mutation is unique, but produces the identical amino acid change found in a Mexican variant of G6PD deficiency, G6PD Loma Linda. This G6PD-deficient variant is caused by a 1089 C-->A mutation. The 363-amino-acid replacement is located outside a known mutation cluster region between amino acid residues 380 and 450, but may disrupt or weaken dimer interactions of G6PD enzyme subunits.

  20. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency among tribal populations of India - Country scenario.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Malay B; Colah, Roshan B; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-05-01

    It is believed that the tribal people, who constitute 8.6 per cent of the total population (2011 census of India), are the original inhabitants of India. Glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked genetic defect, affecting around 400 million people worldwide and is characterized by considerable biochemical and molecular heterogeneity. Deficiency of this enzyme is highly polymorphic in those areas where malaria is/has been endemic. G6PD deficiency was reported from India more than 50 years ago. t0 he prevalence varies from 2.3 to 27.0 per cent with an overall prevalence of 7.7 per cent in different tribal groups. Since the tribal populations live in remote areas where malaria is/has been endemic, irrational use of antimalarial drugs could result in an increased number of cases with drug induced haemolysis. Therefore, before giving antimalarial therapy, routine screening for G6PD deficiency should be undertaken in those tribal communities where its prevalence is high.

  1. Neonatal screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: biochemical versus genetic technologies.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Michael; Hammerman, Cathy

    2011-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency, a commonly occurring genetic condition, is associated in neonates with severe hemolytic episodes, extreme hyperbilirubinemia, and bilirubin encephalopathy. Neonatal screening programs for the condition should increase parental and caretaker awareness, thereby facilitating early access to treatment with resultant diminished mortality and morbidity. However, screening for G-6-PD deficiency is not widely performed. Although G-6-PD-deficient males may be accurately identified, females are more difficult to categorize because many in this group may be heterozygotes with phenotype overlap between normal homozygotes, heterozygotes, and deficient homozygotes. Screening methodologies include biochemical qualitative assays, quantitative enzymatic activity measurements and DNA-based polymerase chain reaction molecular screening. The appropriateness of any of these technologies for any particular population group or geographic area must be assessed before setting up a screening program. The pros and cons of each method, including ease of testing, cost, need for sophisticated laboratory equipment and degree of personnel training, as well as the ability to identify females, are discussed.

  2. Detection of Occult Acute Kidney Injury in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Hakeem, Gehan Lotfy; Abdel Naeem, Emad Allam; Swelam, Salwa Hussein; El Morsi Aboul Fotoh, Laila; El Mazary, Abdel Azeem Mohamed; Abdel Fadil, Ashraf Mohamed; Abdel Hafez, Asmaa Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency anemia is associated with intravascular hemolysis. The freely filtered hemoglobin can damage the kidney. We aimed to assess any subclinical renal injury in G6PD children. Methods Sixty children were included. Thirty G6PD deficiency anemia children were enrolled during the acute hemolytic crisis and after the hemolytic episode had elapsed. Another thirty healthy children were included as controls. Serum cystatin C, creatinine levels, and urinary albumin/creatinine (A/C) ratio were measured, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated. Results Significantly higher urinary A/C ratio (p=0.001,0.002 respectively) and lower GFR (p=0.001 for both) were found during hemolysis and after the hemolytic episode compared to the controls. Also, significant higher serum cystatin C (p=0.001), creatinine (p=0.05) and A/C (p= 0.001) ratio and insignificant lower GFR (p=0.3) during acute hemolytic crisis compared to the same children after the hemolytic episode subsided. Conclusions G6PD deficiency anemia is associated with a variable degree of acute renal injury during acute hemolytic episodes which may persist after elapsing of the hemolytic crises. PMID:27648201

  3. Comparison of quantitative and qualitative tests for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Keihanian, F; Basirjafari, S; Darbandi, B; Saeidinia, A; Jafroodi, M; Sharafi, R; Shakiba, M

    2017-06-01

    Considering the high prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency among newborns, different screening methods have been established in various countries. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among newborns in Rasht, Iran, and compare G6PD activity in cord blood samples, using quantitative and qualitative tests. This cross-sectional, prospective study was performed at five largest hospitals in Rasht, Guilan Province, Iran. The screening tests were performed for all the newborns, referred to these hospitals. Specimens were characterized in terms of G6PD activity under ultraviolet light, using the kinetic method and the qualitative fluorescent spot test (FST). We also determined the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of the qualitative assay. Blood samples were collected from 1474 newborns. Overall, 757 (51.4%) subjects were male. As the findings revealed, 1376 (93.4%) newborns showed normal G6PD activity, while 98 (6.6%) had G6PD deficiency. There was a significant difference in the mean G6PD level between males and females (P = 0.0001). Also, a significant relationship was detected between FST results and the mean values obtained in the quantitative test (P < 0.0001). According to the present study, FST showed acceptable sensitivity and specificity for G6PD activity, although it appeared inefficient for diagnostic purposes in some cases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: a protection against malaria and a risk for hemolytic accidents].

    PubMed

    Wajcman, Henri; Galactéros, Frédéric

    2004-08-01

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyses the first step of the pentose phosphate pathway, which in the RBC leads to the formation of NADPH, essential to prevent the cell from an oxidative stress. Worldwide, more than 400 million people (90% being males) are affected by G6PD deficiency, in regions that are, or have been, endemic for malaria and in populations originating from these regions. RBCs with low G6PD activity offer a hostile environment to parasite growth and thus an advantage to G6PD deficiency carriers. The counterpart of this protective effect is an increased susceptibility to oxidants such as some foods (fava beans), drugs (anti-malarial or sulphonamides), or various chemicals. In the case of G6PD deficiency, the hypothesis of a convergent evolution between parasite, protecting mutation, and cultural traditions (food, skin painting...) has been proposed. Near to 150 different G6PD variants have been described, which are classified into four types, according to their clinical effects. Several variants, such as the G6PD A- or the Mediterranean variant, reach the polymorphism level in endemic regions. The recent determination of the three-dimensional structure of this enzyme allows one to explain now the mechanisms of the disorders in terms of structure-function relationship.

  5. Comparison of quantitative and qualitative tests for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Nicole; Kahn, Maria; Murray, Marjorie; Leader, Brandon T; Bansil, Pooja; McGray, Sarah; Kalnoky, Michael; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Huiqiang; Jiang, Hui; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2014-10-01

    A barrier to eliminating Plasmodium vivax malaria is inadequate treatment of infected patients. 8-Aminoquinoline-based drugs clear the parasite; however, people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are at risk for hemolysis from these drugs. Understanding the performance of G6PD deficiency tests is critical for patient safety. Two quantitative assays and two qualitative tests were evaluated. The comparison of quantitative assays gave a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.7585 with significant difference in mean G6PD activity, highlighting the need to adhere to a single reference assay. Both qualitative tests had high sensitivity and negative predictive value at a cutoff G6PD value of 40% of normal activity if interpreted conservatively and performed under laboratory conditions. The performance of both tests dropped at a cutoff level of 45%. Cytochemical staining of specimens confirmed that heterozygous females with > 50% G6PD-deficient cells can seem normal by phenotypic tests. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  6. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in jaundiced Egyptian neonates.

    PubMed

    M Abo El Fotoh, Wafaa Moustafa; Rizk, Mohammed Soliman

    2016-12-01

    The enzyme, Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), deficiency leads to impaired production of reduced glutathione and predisposes the red cells to be damaged by oxidative metabolites, causing hemolysis. Deficient neonates may manifest clinically as hyperbilirubinemia or even kernicterus. This study was carried out to detect erythrocyte G6PD deficiency in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. To determine the frequency and effect of G6PD deficiency, this study was conducted on 202 neonates with indirect hyperbilirubinemia. All term and preterm babies up to 13 day of age admitted with clinically evident jaundice were taken for the study. G6PD activity is measured by the UV-Kinetic Method using cellular enzyme determination reagents by spectrophotometry according to manufacturer's instructions. A total of 202 babies were enrolled in this study. Male babies outnumbered the female (71.3% versus 28.7%). Mean age of the study newborns was 3.75 ± 2.5 days. Eighteen neonates (8.9%) had G6PD deficiency, all are males. One case had combined G6PD deficiency and RH incompatibility. Mean serum total bilirubin was 17.2 ± 4.4 in G6PD deficient cases. There was significant positive correlation between the time of appearance of jaundice in days and G6PD levels in G6PD deficient cases. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is associated with various clinical comorbidities. G6PD deficiency is found to one important cause of neonatal jaundice developing on day 2 onwards.

  7. Diversity in expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in females.

    PubMed

    Abdulrazzaq, Y M; Micallef, R; Qureshi, M; Dawodu, A; Ahmed, I; Khidr, A; Bastaki, S M; Al-Khayat, A; Bayoumi, R A

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), to describe the different mutations in the population, to determine its prevalence, and to study inheritance patterns in families of G6PD-deficient individuals. All infants born at Tawam Hospital, Al-Ain, UAE from January 1994 to September 1996 were screened at birth for their G6PD status. In addition, those attending well-baby clinics during the period were also screened for the disorder. Families of 40 known G6PD-deficient individuals, selected randomly from the records of three hospitals in the country, were assessed for G6PD deficiency. Where appropriate, this was followed by definition of G6PD mutations. Of 8198 infants, 746 (9.1%), comprising 15% of males and 5% of females tested, were found to be G6PD deficient. A total of 27 families were further assessed: of these, all but one family had the nt563 Mediterranean mutation. In one family, two individuals had the nt202 African mutation. The high manifestation of G6PD deficiency in women may be due to the preferential expression of the G6PD-deficient gene and X-inactivation of the normal gene, and/or to the presence of an 'enhancer' gene that makes the expression of the G6PD deficiency more likely. The high level of consanguinity which, theoretically, should result in a high proportion of homozygotes and consequently a higher proportion of females with the deficiency, was not found to be a significant factor.

  8. Impact of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Peter A.; Leopold, Jane A.; Gupte, Sachin A.; Recchia, Fabio A.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the rate-determining step in the pentose phosphate pathway and produces NADPH to fuel glutathione recycling. G6PD deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans and affects over 400 million people worldwide; however, its impact on cardiovascular disease is poorly understood. The glutathione pathway is paramount to antioxidant defense, and G6PD-deficient cells do not cope well with oxidative damage. Limited clinical evidence indicates that G6PD deficiency may be associated with hypertension. However, there are also data to support a protective role of G6PD deficiency in decreasing the risk of heart disease and cardiovascular-associated deaths, perhaps through a decrease in cholesterol synthesis. Studies in G6PD-deficient (G6PDX) mice are mixed and provide evidence for both protective and deleterious effects. G6PD deficiency may provide a protective effect through decreasing cholesterol synthesis, superoxide production, and reductive stress. However, recent studies indicate that G6PDX mice are moderately more susceptible to ventricular dilation in response to myocardial infarction or pressure overload-induced heart failure. Furthermore, G6PDX hearts do not recover as well as nondeficient mice when faced with ischemia-reperfusion injury, and G6PDX mice are susceptible to the development of age-associated cardiac hypertrophy. Overall, the limited available data indicate a complex interplay in which adverse effects of G6PD deficiency may outweigh potential protective effects in the face of cardiac stress. Definitive clinical studies in large populations are needed to determine the effects of G6PD deficiency on the development of cardiovascular disease and subsequent outcomes. PMID:23241320

  9. A hemolysis trigger in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency. Vicia sativa (Vetch).

    PubMed

    Bicakci, Zafer

    2009-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme, playing an important role in the redox metabolism of all aerobic cells. It was reported that certain medications, fava beans, and infections can trigger acute hemolytic anemia in patients with G6PD deficiency. An 8-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with blood in the urine, headache, dizziness, fatigue, loss of appetite, and jaundice in the eyes, 24 hours after eating large amounts of fresh, vetch grains. Laboratory investigation revealed hemolytic anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and G6PD deficiency. Approximately 0.5% of fava bean seeds have 2 pyrimidine beta-glycosides called, vicine and convicine. Vetch has 0.731% vicine, 0.081% convicine, and 0.530% beta cyanoalanine glycosides. The aim of this case report is to emphasize the importance of vetch seeds as a cause for hemolytic crisis in our country, where approximately one million tons of vetch is produced per year, especially in the agricultural regions.

  10. Aortic valve replacement for a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Tas, Serpil; Donmez, Arzu Antal; Kirali, Kaan; Alp, Mete H; Yakut, Cevat

    2005-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate deyhdrogenase (G6PD) result in severe hemolysis with different mechanisms. In patients with both pathologies, the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on red blood cells and thrombocytes demand special care before and after open heart surgery. We evaluated the preoperative management and postoperative care of a patient with severe aortic insufficiency associated with G6PD deficiency and autoimmune hemolytic anemia who underwent aortic valve replacement.

  11. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Physical and Mental Health until Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Man Ki; Leung, Gabriel M.; Schooling, C. Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background To examine the association of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency with adolescent physical and mental health, as effects of G6PD deficiency on health are rarely reported. Methods In a population-representative Chinese birth cohort: “Children of 1997” (n = 8,327), we estimated the adjusted associations of G6PD deficiency with growth using generalized estimating equations, with pubertal onset using interval censored regression, with hospitalization using Cox proportional hazards regression and with size, blood pressure, pubertal maturation and mental health using linear regression with multiple imputation and inverse probability weighting. Results Among 5,520 screened adolescents (66% follow-up), 4.8% boys and 0.5% girls had G6PD deficiency. G6PD-deficiency was not associated with birth weight-for-gestational age or length/height gain into adolescence, but was associated with lower childhood body mass index (BMI) gain (-0.38 z-score, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.57, -0.20), adjusted for sex and parental education, and later onset of pubic hair development (time ratio = 1.029, 95% CI 1.007, 1.050). G6PD deficiency was not associated with blood pressure, height, BMI or mental health in adolescence, nor with serious infectious morbidity until adolescence. Conclusions G6PD deficient adolescents had broadly similar physical and mental health indicators, but transiently lower BMI gain and later pubic hair development, whose long-term implications warrant investigation. PMID:27824927

  12. Contribution of haemolysis to jaundice in Sephardic Jewish glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient neonates.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M; Vreman, H J; Hammerman, C; Leiter, C; Abramov, A; Stevenson, D K

    1996-06-01

    We determined the contribution of haemolysis to the development of hyperbilirubinaemia in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficient neonates and G-6-PD normal controls. Blood carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb), sampled on the third day of life, was measured by gas chromatography, corrected for inhaled carbon monoxide (COHbC), and expressed as a percentage of total haemoglobin concentration (Hb). Serum bilirubin was tested as clinically necessary. 37 non-jaundiced (peak serum total bilirubin (PSTB) < or = 255 mumol/l) and 20 jaundiced (PSTB > or = 257 mumol/l) G-6-PD-deficient neonates were compared to 31 non-jaundiced and 24 jaundiced controls with comparable PSTB values, respectively. COHbC values for the entire G-6-PD deficient group were higher than in the controls (0.75 +/- 0.17% v 0.62 +/- 0.19%, P < 0.001). COHbC and PSTB values did not correlate in the G-6-PD-deficient group (r = 0.15, P > 0.05) but did in the controls (r = 0.58, P < 0.001). COHbC values were increased to a similar extent in the G-6-PD-deficient, non-jaundiced (0.72 +/- 0.16%), the G-6-PD-deficient, jaundiced (0.80 +/- 0.19%) and the control, jaundiced (0.75 +/- 0.18%) subgroups, compared to the control, non-jaundiced subgroup (0.53 +/- 0.13%) (P < 0.05). Although present in G-6-PD deficient neonates, increased haemolysis was not directly related to the PSTB.

  13. Evaluation of the blue formazan spot test for screening glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pujades, A; Lewis, M; Salvati, A M; Miwa, S; Fujii, H; Zarza, R; Alvarez, R; Rull, E; Corrons, J L

    1999-06-01

    Several screening tests for glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency have been reported thus far, and a standardized method of testing was proposed by the International Council for Standardization in Hematology (ICSH). The screening test used in any particular laboratory depends upon a number of factors such as cost, time required, temperature, humidity, and availability of reagents. In this study, a direct comparison between three different G6PD screening methods has been undertaken. In 71 cases (50 hematologically normal volunteers, 9 hemizygous G6PD-deficient males, and 12 heterozygous deficient females), the blue formazan spot test (BFST) was compared with the conventional methemoglobin reduction test (HiRT) and the ICSH-recommended fluorescent spot test (FST-ICSH). In all cases, the results obtained with the three screening tests were correlated with the enzyme activity assayed spectrophotometrically. In hemizygous G6PD-deficient males, all cases were equally detected with the three methods: BFST (4.7-6.64, controls: 11.1-13.4), BMRT (score +3 in all 9 cases), and FST (no fluorescence in 9 cases). In heterozygous G6PD-deficient females, two methods detected 7 out of 12 cases (BFST: 8.71-11.75, controls: 11.1-13.4; and BMRT: score +3 in 7 cases), whereas the FST-ICSH missed all 12 cases that presented a variable degree of fluorescence. Although the sensitivity for G6PD-deficient carrier detection is the same for the BMRT and the BFST, the latter has the advantage of being semiquantitative and not merely qualitative. Unfortunately, none of the three screening tests compared here allowed the detection of the 100% heterozygote carrier state of G6PD deficiency.

  14. Antimalarial NADPH-Consuming Redox-Cyclers As Superior Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Copycats

    PubMed Central

    Bielitza, Max; Belorgey, Didier; Ehrhardt, Katharina; Johann, Laure; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Gallo, Valentina; Schwarzer, Evelin; Mohring, Franziska; Jortzik, Esther; Williams, David L.; Becker, Katja; Arese, Paolo; Elhabiri, Mourad

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Early phagocytosis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient erythrocytes parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum were shown to protect G6PD-deficient populations from severe malaria. Here, we investigated the mechanism of a novel antimalarial series, namely 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones, to understand whether these NADPH-consuming redox-cyclers, which induce oxidative stress, mimic the natural protection of G6PD deficiency. Results: We demonstrated that the key benzoylmenadione metabolite of the lead compound acts as an efficient redox-cycler in NADPH-dependent methaemoglobin reduction, leading to the continuous formation of reactive oxygen species, ferrylhaemoglobin, and subsequent haemichrome precipitation. Structure–activity relationships evidenced that both drug metabolites and haemoglobin catabolites contribute to potentiate drug effects and inhibit parasite development. Disruption of redox homeostasis by the lead benzylmenadione was specifically induced in Plasmodium falciparum parasitized erythrocytes and not in non-infected cells, and was visualized via changes in the glutathione redox potential of living parasite cytosols. Furthermore, the redox-cycler shows additive and synergistic effects in combination with compounds affecting the NADPH flux in vivo. Innovation: The lead benzylmenadione 1c is the first example of a novel redox-active agent that mimics the behavior of a falciparum parasite developing inside a G6PD-deficient red blood cell (RBC) giving rise to malaria protection, and it exerts specific additive effects that are inhibitory to parasite development, without harm for non-infected G6PD-sufficient or -deficient RBCs. Conclusion: This strategy offers an innovative perspective for the development of future antimalarial drugs for G6PD-sufficient and -deficient populations. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1337–1351. PMID:25714942

  15. Screening and prevention of neonatal glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Li, B; Cao, W; Jiang, X; Jia, X; Chen, Q; Wu, J

    2014-06-09

    We aimed to summarize the results of screening protocol and prevention of neonatal glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency during a 22-year-long period to provide a basis of reference for the screening of this disease. About 1,705,569 newborn subjects in Guangzhou City were screened for this deficiency. Specimens were collected according to the conventional method of specimen acquisition for "newborn dried bloodspot screening", preserved, and inspected. The specimens were studied with fluorescent spot test and quantitative fluorescence assay. Diagnosis was performed using the modified NBTG6PD/6PGD ratio method. Bloodspot filter paper specimens were sent to the laboratory within 24 h via EMS Express, and the G6PD test was performed on the same day. The G6PD deficiency-positive rate was 4.2% in the samples screened using the fluorescent spot test, while it was 5% in case of the quantitative fluorescence assay. Neonatal screening for G6PD deficiency for 11,437 cases (6117 boys and 5320 girls) showed positive results in 481 cases. About 420 cases (318 boys and 102 girls) of G6PD deficiency were confirmed with the modified Duchenne NBT ratio method. The total detection rate was 3.7:5.2% for boys and 1.9% for girls. Quantitative fluorescence assay improved the sensitivity and detection rate. Accelerating the speed of sample delivery by using Internet network systems and ensuring online availability of screening results can aid the screening and diagnosis of this deficiency within 1 week of birth.

  16. Splenic artery pseudoaneurysm due to seatbelt injury in a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient adult.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yu Zhen; Lau, Yuk Fai; Lai, Kang Yiu; Lau, Chu Pak

    2013-11-01

    A 23-year-old man presented with abdominal pain after suffering blunt trauma caused by a seatbelt injury. His low platelet count of 137 × 10(9)/L was initially attributed to trauma and his underlying hypersplenism due to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Despite conservative management, his platelet count remained persistently reduced even after his haemoglobin and clotting abnormalities were stabilised. After a week, follow-up imaging revealed an incidental finding of a pseudoaneurysm (measuring 9 mm × 8 mm × 10 mm) adjacent to a splenic laceration. The pseudoaneurysm was successfully closed via transcatheter glue embolisation; 20% of the spleen was also embolised. A week later, the platelet count normalised, and the patient was subsequently discharged. This case highlights the pitfalls in the detection of a delayed occurrence of splenic artery pseudoaneurysm after blunt injury via routine delayed phase computed tomography. While splenomegaly in G6PD may be a predisposing factor for injury, a low platelet count should arouse suspicion of internal haemorrhage rather than hypersplenism.

  17. Haemoglobinopathies, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and allied problems in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjea, J. B.

    1966-01-01

    The present world-wide interest in haemoglobinopathies and allied disorders has given rise to a very considerable literature over the past two decades. This communication reviews this literature in so far as it refers to the Indian subcontinent. The most common abnormality is thalassaemia, which has been discovered in all regions under consideration: India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan and Ceylon. Haemoglobins S, D and E are also quite common: Hb S has been found mostly in the aboriginal tribes, Hb D in Gujaratis and Punjabis and Hb E in Bengalis, Assamese and Nepalese. A few instances of haemoglobins F, H, J, K, L and M have also been reported. However, there remain many population groups to be investigated. Studies of the distribution of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency are also reviewed, and the correlation between the various haemoglobin disorders and various environmental factors is discussed, but it is pointed out that the relevant data are still insufficient to allow any definite conclusions to be drawn. PMID:5338376

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency A- variant in febrile patients in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tamar E; Maloy, Halley; von Fricken, Michael; St Victor, Yves; Romain, Jean R; Okech, Bernard A; Mulligan, Connie J

    2014-08-01

    Haiti is one of two remaining malaria-endemic countries in the Caribbean. To decrease malaria transmission in Haiti, primaquine was recently added to the malaria treatment public health policy. One limitation of primaquine is that, at certain doses, primaquine can cause hemolytic anemia in individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (G6PDd). In this study, we genotyped two mutations (A376G and G202A), which confer the most common G6PDd variant in West African populations, G6PDd A-. We estimated the frequency of G6PDd A- in a sample of febrile patients enrolled in an on-going malaria study who represent a potential target population for a primaquine mass drug administration. We found that 33 of 168 individuals carried the G6PDd A- allele (includes A- hemizygous males, A- homozygous or heterozygous females) and could experience toxicity if treated with primaquine. These data inform discussions on safe and effective primaquine dosing and future malaria elimination strategies for Haiti.

  19. Association of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and malaria: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mbanefo, Evaristus Chibunna; Ahmed, Ali Mahmoud; Titouna, Afaf; Elmaraezy, Ahmed; Trang, Nguyen Thi Huyen; Phuoc Long, Nguyen; Hoang Anh, Nguyen; Diem Nghi, Tran; The Hung, Bui; Van Hieu, Mai; Ky Anh, Nguyen; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hirayama, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency overlaps with malaria endemicity although it predisposes carriers to hemolysis. This fact supports the protection hypothesis against malaria. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the presence and the extent of protective association between G6PD deficiency and malaria. Thirteen databases were searched for papers reporting any G6PD alteration in malaria patients. Twenty-eight of the included 30 studies were eligible for the meta-analysis. Results showed absence of negative association between G6PD deficiency and uncomplicated falciparum malaria (odds ratio (OR), 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59–1.02; p = 0.07). However, this negative association happened in Africa (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.40–0.86; p = 0.007) but not in Asia (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.96–1.61; p = 0.10), and in the heterozygotes (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57–0.87; p = 0.001) but not the homo/hemizygous (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.46–1.07; p = 0.10). There was no association between G6PD deficiency and total severe malaria (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.61–1.11; p = 0.20). Similarly, there was no association with other malaria species. G6PD deficiency can potentially protect against uncomplicated malaria in African countries, but not severe malaria. Interestingly, this protection was mainly in heterozygous, being x-linked thus related to gender. PMID:28382932

  20. A new paper-based analytical device for detection of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaewarsa, Phuritat; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida; Palasuwan, Attakorn; Palasuwan, Duangdao

    2017-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic haemolytic disorder. Most persons with G6PD deficiency are asymptomatic, but exposure to oxidant drugs, such as the anti-malarial drug primaquine, may induce haemolysis, which is commonly found in Asian countries. A reliable test is necessary for diagnosing the deficiency to prevent an acute haemolytic crisis. This study proposes a novel quantitative method to detect G6PD deficiency using paper-based analytical devices (G6PDD-PAD). Wax printing was utilized for fabricating circular reaction zone patterns in paper. The colorimetric assay is based on the formation of formazan via a reduction of tetra-nitro blue tetrazolium (TNBT) by the G6PD enzyme on G6PDD-PAD. Detection was achieved by capturing the colour using a desktop scanner and the colour intensity was analysed with Adobe Photoshop C56. The results showed that the G6PD activity analysed by G6PDD-PAD was highly correlated with the standard biochemical assay (SBA) (r(2)=0.87, p<0.01). Moreover, good agreement by Bland-Altman bias plot was demonstrated between G6PDD-PAD and the SBA (mean bias 1.4 IU/gHb). The detection limit was 0 IU/gHb of G6PD activity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using G6PDD-PAD. This simple, low-cost test ($0.1/test) should be useful for diagnosing G6PD deficiency in resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Association of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and malaria: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mbanefo, Evaristus Chibunna; Ahmed, Ali Mahmoud; Titouna, Afaf; Elmaraezy, Ahmed; Trang, Nguyen Thi Huyen; Phuoc Long, Nguyen; Hoang Anh, Nguyen; Diem Nghi, Tran; The Hung, Bui; Van Hieu, Mai; Ky Anh, Nguyen; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hirayama, Kenji

    2017-04-06

    Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency overlaps with malaria endemicity although it predisposes carriers to hemolysis. This fact supports the protection hypothesis against malaria. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the presence and the extent of protective association between G6PD deficiency and malaria. Thirteen databases were searched for papers reporting any G6PD alteration in malaria patients. Twenty-eight of the included 30 studies were eligible for the meta-analysis. Results showed absence of negative association between G6PD deficiency and uncomplicated falciparum malaria (odds ratio (OR), 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-1.02; p = 0.07). However, this negative association happened in Africa (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.40-0.86; p = 0.007) but not in Asia (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.96-1.61; p = 0.10), and in the heterozygotes (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57-0.87; p = 0.001) but not the homo/hemizygous (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.46-1.07; p = 0.10). There was no association between G6PD deficiency and total severe malaria (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.61-1.11; p = 0.20). Similarly, there was no association with other malaria species. G6PD deficiency can potentially protect against uncomplicated malaria in African countries, but not severe malaria. Interestingly, this protection was mainly in heterozygous, being x-linked thus related to gender.

  2. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Tunisia: molecular data and phenotype-genotype association.

    PubMed

    Laouini, N; Bibi, A; Ammar, H; Kazdaghli, K; Ouali, F; Othmani, R; Amdouni, S; Haloui, S; Sahli, C A; Jouini, L; Hadj Fredj, S; Siala, H; Ben Romdhane, N; Toumi, N E; Fattoum, S; Messsaoud, T

    2013-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect. In this study, we aimed to perform a molecular investigation of G6PD deficiency in Tunisia and to associate clinical manifestations and the degree of deficiency with the genotype. A total of 161 Tunisian subjects of both sexes were screened by spectrophotometric assay for enzyme activity. Out of these, 54 unrelated subjects were selected for screening of the most frequent mutations in Tunisia by PCR/RFLP, followed by size-based separation of double-stranded fragments under non-denaturing conditions on a denaturing high performance liquid chromatography system. Of the 56 altered chromosomes examined, 75 % had the GdA(-) mutation, 14.28 % showed the GdB(-) mutation and no mutations were identified in 10.72 % of cases. Hemizygous males with GdA(-) mutation were mostly of class III, while those with GdB(-) mutation were mainly of class II. The principal clinical manifestation encountered was favism. Acute hemolytic crises induced by drugs or infections and neonatal jaundice were also noted. Less severe clinical features such as low back pain were present in heterozygous females and in one homozygous female. Asymptomatic individuals were in majority heterozygote females and strangely one hemizygous male. The spectrum of mutations seems to be homogeneous and similar to that of Mediterranean countries; nevertheless 10.72 % of cases remain with undetermined mutation thus suggesting a potential heterogeneity of the deficiency at the molecular level. On the other hand, we note a better association of the molecular defects with the severity of the deficiency than with clinical manifestations.

  3. Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency at the China-Myanmar Border.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Yang, Fang; Liu, Rong; Luo, Lan; Yang, Yuling; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Huaie; Zhang, Wen; Fan, Zhixiang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Cui, Liwang; He, Yongshu

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked hereditary disease that predisposes red blood cells to oxidative damage. G6PD deficiency is particularly prevalent in historically malaria-endemic areas. Use of primaquine for malaria treatment may result in severe hemolysis in G6PD deficient patients. In this study, we systematically evaluated the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the Kachin (Jingpo) ethnic group along the China-Myanmar border and determined the underlying G6PD genotypes. We surveyed G6PD deficiency in 1770 adult individuals (671 males and 1099 females) of the Kachin ethnicity using a G6PD fluorescent spot test. The overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the study population was 29.6% (523/1770), among which 27.9% and 30.6% were males and females, respectively. From these G6PD deficient samples, 198 unrelated individuals (147 females and 51 males) were selected for genotyping at 11 known G6PD single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Southeast Asia (ten in exons and one in intron 11) using a multiplex SNaPshot assay. Mutations with known association to a deficient phenotype were detected in 43.9% (87/198) of cases, intronic and synonymous mutations were detected alone in 34.8% (69/198) cases and no mutation were found in 21.2% (42/198) cases. Five non-synonymous mutations, Mahidol 487G>A, Kaiping 1388G>A, Canton 1376G>T, Chinese 4 392G>T, and Viangchan 871G>A were detected. Of the 87 cases with known deficient mutations, the Mahidol variant was the most common (89.7%; 78/87), followed by the Kaiping (8.0%; 7/87) and the Viangchan (2.2%; 2/87) variants. The Canton and Chinese 4 variants were found in 1.1% of these 87 cases. Among them, two females carried the Mahidol/Viangchan and Mahidol/Kaiping double mutations, respectively. Interestingly, the silent SNPs 1311C>T and IVS11nt93T>C both occurred in the same 95 subjects with frequencies at 56.4% and 23.5% in tested females and males, respectively (P<0.05). It is noteworthy that 24

  4. Single Cell Cytochemistry Illustrated by the Demonstration of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Peters, Anna L; van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2017-01-01

    Cytochemistry is the discipline that is applied to visualize specific molecules in individual cells and has become an essential tool in life sciences. Immunocytochemistry was developed in the sixties of last century and is the most frequently used cytochemical application. However, metabolic mapping is the oldest cytochemical approach to localize activity of specific enzymes, but in the last decades of the previous century and the first decade of the present century it almost became obsolete. The popularity of this approach revived in the past few years. Metabolism gained interest as player in chronic and complex diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and vascular diseases and both enzyme cytochemistry and metabolic mapping have become important tools in life sciences.In this chapter, we present glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the most prevalent enzyme deficiency worldwide, to illustrate recent developments in enzyme cytochemistry or metabolic mapping. The first assays which were developed quantified enzyme activity but were unreliable for single cell evaluation. The field has expanded with the development of cytochemical single cell assays and DNA testing. Still, all assays-from the earliest developed tests up to the most recently developed tests-have their place in investigations on G6PD activity. Recently, nanoscopy has become available for light and fluorescence microscopy at the nanoscale. For nanoscopy, cytochemistry is an essential tool to visualize intracellular molecular processes. The ultimate goal in the coming years will be nanoscopy of living cells so that the molecular dynamics can be studied. Cytochemistry will undoubtedly play a critical role in these developments.

  5. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency enhances germ cell apoptosis and causes defective embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yang, H-C; Chen, T-L; Wu, Y-H; Cheng, K-P; Lin, Y-H; Cheng, M-L; Ho, H-Y; Lo, S J; Chiu, D T-Y

    2013-05-02

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, known as favism, is classically manifested by hemolytic anemia in human. More recently, it has been shown that mild G6PD deficiency moderately affects cardiac function, whereas severe G6PD deficiency leads to embryonic lethality in mice. How G6PD deficiency affects organisms has not been fully elucidated due to the lack of a suitable animal model. In this study, G6PD-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans was established by RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown to delineate the role of G6PD in animal physiology. Upon G6PD RNAi knockdown, G6PD activity was significantly hampered in C. elegans in parallel with increased oxidative stress and DNA oxidative damage. Phenotypically, G6PD-knockdown enhanced germ cell apoptosis (2-fold increase), reduced egg production (65% of mock), and hatching (10% of mock). To determine whether oxidative stress is associated with G6PD knockdown-induced reproduction defects, C. elegans was challenged with a short-term hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The early phase egg production of both mock and G6PD-knockdown C. elegans were significantly affected by H2O2. However, H2O2-induced germ cell apoptosis was more dramatic in mock than that in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. To investigate the signaling pathways involved in defective oogenesis and embryogenesis caused by G6PD knockdown, mutants of p53 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were examined. Despite the upregulation of CEP-1 (p53), cep-1 mutation did not affect egg production and hatching in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. Neither pmk-1 nor mek-1 mutation significantly affected egg production, whereas sek-1 mutation further decreased egg production in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. Intriguingly, loss of function of sek-1 or mek-1 dramatically rescued defective hatching (8.3- and 9.6-fold increase, respectively) induced by G6PD knockdown. Taken together, these findings show that G6PD knockdown reduces egg production and hatching in C. elegans

  6. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Improves Insulin Resistance With Reduced Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Ham, Mira; Choe, Sung Sik; Shin, Kyung Cheul; Choi, Goun; Kim, Ji-Won; Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Ryu, Je-Won; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), a rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, plays important roles in redox regulation and de novo lipogenesis. It was recently demonstrated that aberrant upregulation of G6PD in obese adipose tissue mediates insulin resistance as a result of imbalanced energy metabolism and oxidative stress. It remains elusive, however, whether inhibition of G6PD in vivo may relieve obesity-induced insulin resistance. In this study we showed that a hematopoietic G6PD defect alleviates insulin resistance in obesity, accompanied by reduced adipose tissue inflammation. Compared with wild-type littermates, G6PD-deficient mutant (G6PD(mut)) mice were glucose tolerant upon high-fat-diet (HFD) feeding. Intriguingly, the expression of NADPH oxidase genes to produce reactive oxygen species was alleviated, whereas that of antioxidant genes was enhanced in the adipose tissue of HFD-fed G6PD(mut) mice. In diet-induced obesity (DIO), the adipose tissue of G6PD(mut) mice decreased the expression of inflammatory cytokines, accompanied by downregulated proinflammatory macrophages. Accordingly, macrophages from G6PD(mut) mice greatly suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory signaling cascades, leading to enhanced insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and hepatocytes. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of G6PD(mut) bone marrow to wild-type mice attenuated adipose tissue inflammation and improved glucose tolerance in DIO. Collectively, these data suggest that inhibition of macrophage G6PD would ameliorate insulin resistance in obesity through suppression of proinflammatory responses. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  7. Genetic Profiles of Korean Patients With Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaewoong; Choi, Hayoung; Kim, Jiyeon; Kwon, Ahlm; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo; Lee, Jae Wook; Chung, Nack-Gyun

    2017-01-01

    Background We describe the genetic profiles of Korean patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiencies and the effects of G6PD mutations on protein stability and enzyme activity on the basis of in silico analysis. Methods In parallel with a genetic analysis, the pathogenicity of G6PD mutations detected in Korean patients was predicted in silico. The simulated effects of G6PD mutations were compared to the WHO classes based on G6PD enzyme activity. Four previously reported mutations and three newly diagnosed patients with missense mutations were estimated. Results One novel mutation (p.Cys385Gly, labeled G6PD Kangnam) and two known mutations [p.Ile220Met (G6PD São Paulo) and p.Glu416Lys (G6PD Tokyo)] were identified in this study. G6PD mutations identified in Koreans were also found in Brazil (G6PD São Paulo), Poland (G6PD Seoul), United States of America (G6PD Riley), Mexico (G6PD Guadalajara), and Japan (G6PD Tokyo). Several mutations occurred at the same nucleotide, but resulted in different amino acid residue changes in different ethnic populations (p.Ile380 variant, G6PD Calvo Mackenna; p.Cys385 variants, Tomah, Madrid, Lynwood; p.Arg387 variant, Beverly Hills; p.Pro396 variant, Bari; and p.Pro396Ala in India). On the basis of the in silico analysis, Class I or II mutations were predicted to be highly deleterious, and the effects of one Class IV mutation were equivocal. Conclusions The genetic profiles of Korean individuals with G6PD mutations indicated that the same mutations may have arisen by independent mutational events, and were not derived from shared ancestral mutations. The in silico analysis provided insight into the role of G6PD mutations in enzyme function and stability. PMID:28028996

  8. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among malaria suspects attending Gambella hospital, southwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tsegaye, Arega; Golassa, Lemu; Mamo, Hassen; Erko, Berhanu

    2014-11-18

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd) is widespread across malaria endemic regions. G6PD-deficient individuals are at risk of haemolysis when exposed, among other agents, to primaquine and tafenoquine, which are capable of blocking malaria transmission by killing Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and preventing Plasmodium vivax relapses by targeting hypnozoites. It is evident that no measures are currently in place to ensure safe delivery of these drugs within the context of G6PDd risk. Thus, determining G6PDd prevalence in malarious areas would contribute towards avoiding possible complications in malaria elimination using the drugs. This study, therefore, was aimed at determining G6PDd prevalence in Gambella hospital, southwest Ethiopia, using CareStart™ G6PDd fluorescence spot test. Venous blood samples were collected from febrile patients (n = 449) attending Gambella hospital in November-December 2013. Malaria was diagnosed using blood films and G6PDd was screened using CareStart™ G6PDd screening test (Access Bio, New Jersey, USA). Haematological parameters were also measured. The association of G6PD phenotype with sex, ethnic group and malaria smear positivity was tested. Malaria prevalence was 59.2% (96.6% of the cases being P. falciparum mono infections). Totally 33 participants (7.3%) were G6PD-deficient with no significant difference between the sexes. The chance of being G6PD-deficient was significantly higher for the native ethnic groups (Anuak and Nuer) compared to the 'highlanders'/settlers (odds ratio (OD) = 3.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.481-31.418 for Anuak vs 'highlanders'; OD = 4.9, 95% CI 0.635-38.00 for Nuer vs 'highlanders'). G6PDd prevalence among the Nuer (14.3%) was significantly higher than that for the Anuak (12.0%). G6PDd prevalence in the area is substantial with 30 (90.9%) of the 33 deficient individuals having malaria suggesting the non-protective role of the disorder at least from clinical malaria

  9. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Haemoglobinophaties in Resident of Arso PIR, Irian Jaya

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    and drug treatment . Another factor is play a part in innate resistance. 0-6-PD the ’internal environment’ of the host and deficiency can also complicate...response to and treatment of glucose-6-phosphate. The amount of of malaria, epidemiologic and immuno- NADPH produced is detected spectropho- logic...Ohio inherited along with a B- thalassemia gene 9-66. producing Hb-E thalassemia . Although 2. Kellermeyer, R.W., A.R. Tarlov, G.J. this condition can

  10. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in a Negro family.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S; Tranchida, L; Konno, E T; Berman, L; Albert, S; Sing, C F; Brewer, G J

    1968-06-01

    Detailed clinical and genetic studies have been performed in a Negro family, which segregated for sex-linked sideroblastic anemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-DP) deficiency. This is the first such pedigree reported. Males affected with sideroblastic anemia had growth retardation, hypochromic microcytic anemia, elevated serum iron, decreased unsaturated iron-binding capacity, increased (59)Fe clearance, low (59)Fe incorporation into erythrocytes, normal erythrocyte survival ((51)Cr), normal hemoglobin electrophoretic pattern, erythroblastic hyperplasia of marrow with increased iron, and marked increase in marrow sideroblasts, particularly ringed sideroblasts. Perinuclear deposition of ferric aggregates was demonstrated to be intramitochondrial by electron microscopy. Female carriers of the sideroblastic gene were normal but exhibited a dimorphic population of erythrocytes including normocytic and microcytic cells. The bone marrow studies in the female (mother) showed ringed marrow sideroblasts. Studies of G-6-PD involved the methemoglobin elution test for G-6-PD activity of individual erythrocytes, quantitative G-6-PD assay, and electrophoresis. In the pedigree, linkage information was obtained from a doubly heterozygous woman, four of her sons, and five of her daughters. Three sons were doubly affected, and one was normal. One daughter appeared to be a recombinant. The genes appeared to be linked in the coupling phase in the mother. The maximum likelihood estimate of the recombination value was 0.14. By means of Price-Jones curves, the microcytic red cells in peripheral blood were quantitated in female carriers. The sideroblast count in the bone marrow in the mother corresponded closely to the percentage of microcytic cells in peripheral blood. This is the second example in which the cellular expression of a sex-linked trait has been documented in the human red cells, the first one being G-6-PD deficiency. The coexistence of the two genes in doubly

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency prevalence and genetic variants in malaria endemic areas of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Sócrates Herrera; Ocampo, Iván Darío; Arce-Plata, María Isabel; Recht, Judith; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2016-05-26

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme involved in prevention of cellular oxidative damage, particularly protecting erythrocytes from haemolysis. An estimated 400 million people present variable degrees of inherited G6PD deficiency (G6PDd) which puts them at risk for developing haemolysis triggered by several risk factors including multiple drugs and certain foods. Primaquine (PQ) is a widely used anti-malarial drug that can trigger haemolysis in individuals with G6PDd. Intensification of malaria control programmes worldwide and particularly malaria elimination planning in some regions recommend a more extensive use of PQ and related drugs in populations with different G6PDd prevalence. This a preliminary study to assess the prevalence of G6PDd in representative malaria endemic areas of Colombia by measuring G6PD phonotype and genotypes. Volunteers (n = 426) from four malaria endemic areas in Colombia (Buenaventura, Tumaco, Tierralta and Quibdo) were enrolled. Blood samples were drawn to evaluate G6PD enzymatic activity by using a quantitative G6PD test and a subset of samples was analysed by PCR-RFLP to determine the frequency of the three most common G6PD genotypic variants: A-, A+ and Mediterranean. A total of 28 individuals (6.56 %) displayed either severe or intermediate G6PDd. The highest prevalence (3.51 %) was in Buenaventura, whereas G6PDd prevalence was lower (<1 %) in Tierralta and Quibdo. G6PD A alleles were the most frequent (15.23 %) particularly in Buenaventura and Tumaco. Overall, a high frequency of G6PD A- genotype, followed by A+ genotype was found in the analysed population. G6PDd based on enzymatic activity as well as G6PD A allelic variants were found in malaria-endemic populations on the Pacific coast of Colombia, where most of malaria cases are caused by Plasmodium vivax infections. These infections are treated for 14 days with PQ, however there are no official reports of PQ-induced haemolytic crises. Further

  12. The Preterm Infant: A High-Risk Situation for Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia Due to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Michael; Hammerman, Cathy; Bhutani, Vinod K

    2016-06-01

    Prematurity and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are risk factors for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The 2 conditions may interact additively or synergistically, contributing to extreme hyperbilirubinemia, with the potential for bilirubin neurotoxicity. This hyperbilirubinemia is the result of sudden, unpredictable, and acute episodes of hemolysis in combination with immaturity of bilirubin elimination, primarily of conjugation. Avoidance of contact with known triggers of hemolysis in G6PD-deficient individuals will prevent some, but not all, episodes of hemolysis. All preterm infants with G6PD deficiency should be vigilantly observed for the development of jaundice both in hospital and after discharge home.

  13. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in people living in malaria endemic districts of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Prakash; Singh, Nihal; Ortega, Leonard; Rijal, Komal Raj; Adhikari, Bipin; Thakur, Garib Das; Marasini, Baburam

    2017-05-23

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a rate limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway and is closely associated with the haemolytic disorders among patients receiving anti-malarial drugs, such as primaquine. G6PD deficiency (G6PDd) is an impending factor for radical treatment of malaria which affects the clearance of gametocytes from the blood and subsequent delay in the achievement of malaria elimination. The main objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in six malaria endemic districts in Southern Nepal. A cross-sectional population based prevalence survey was conducted in six malaria endemic districts of Nepal, during April-Dec 2013. A total of 1341 blood samples were tested for G6PDd using two different rapid diagnostic test kits (Binax-Now(®) and Care Start™). Equal proportions of participants from each district (n ≥ 200) were enrolled considering ethnic and demographic representation of the population groups. Out of total 1341 blood specimens collected from six districts, the overall prevalence of G6PDd was 97/1341; 7.23% on Binax Now and 81/1341; 6.0% on Care Start test. Higher prevalence was observed in male than females [Binax Now: male 10.2%; 53/521 versus female 5.4%; 44/820 (p = 0.003) and Care Start: male 8.4%; 44/521 versus female 4.5%; 37/820 (p = 0.003)]. G6PDd was higher in ethnic groups Rajbanshi (11.7%; 19/162) and Tharu (5.6%; 56/1005) (p = 0.006), major inhabitant of the endemic districts. Higher prevalence of G6PDd was found in Jhapa (22/224; 9.8%) and Morang districts (18/225; 8%) (p = 0.031). In a multivariate analysis, male were found at more risk for G6PDd than females, on Binax test (aOR = 1.97; CI 1.28-3.03; p = 0.002) and Care Start test (aOR = 1.86; CI 1.16-2.97; p = 0.009). The higher prevalence of G6PDd in certain ethnic group, gender and geographical region clearly demonstrates clustering of the cases and ascertained the risk groups within the population. This is

  14. Dental Considerations in Children with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (Favism): A Review of the Literature and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, Daniela; Butrón-Téllez Girón, Claudia; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an uncommon inherited enzyme deficiency characterized by hemolytic anemia, caused by the inability of erythrocytes to detoxify oxidizing agents such as drugs, infectious diseases, or fava bean ingestion. In this later case, the disorder is known as favism. The aim of the present report was to present a review of the literature in this disease, to describe a case report concerning an affected 9-year-old male, and to review the main implications and precautions in pediatric dental management.

  15. Dental Considerations in Children with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (Favism): A Review of the Literature and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pérez, Daniela; Butrón-Téllez Girón, Claudia; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an uncommon inherited enzyme deficiency characterized by hemolytic anemia, caused by the inability of erythrocytes to detoxify oxidizing agents such as drugs, infectious diseases, or fava bean ingestion. In this later case, the disorder is known as favism. The aim of the present report was to present a review of the literature in this disease, to describe a case report concerning an affected 9-year-old male, and to review the main implications and precautions in pediatric dental management. PMID:26435857

  16. Incidence and mutation analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in eastern Indonesian populations.

    PubMed

    Tantular, Indah S; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Kasahara, Yuichi; Pusarawati, Suhintam; Kanbe, Toshio; Tuda, Josef S B; Kido, Yasutoshi; Dachlan, Yoes P; Kawamoto, Fumihiko

    2010-12-01

    We conducted a field survey of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenese (G6PD) deficiency in the eastern Indonesian islands, and analyzed G6PD variants molecularly. The incidence of G6PD deficiency in 5 ethnic groups (Manggarai, Bajawa, Nage-Keo, Larantuka, and Palue) on the Flores and Palue Islands was lower than that of another native group, Sikka, or a nonnative group, Riung. Molecular analysis of G6PD variants indicated that 19 cases in Sikka had a frequency distribution of G6PD variants similar to those in our previous studies, while 8 cases in Riung had a different frequency distribution of G6PD variants. On the other hand, from field surveys in another 8 ethnic groups (Timorese, Sumbanese, Savunese, Kendari, Buton, Muna, Minahasa, and Sangirese) on the islands of West Timor, Sumba, Sulawesi, Muna and Bangka, a total of 49 deficient cases were detected. Thirty-nine of these 49 cases had G6PD Vanua Lava (383T>C) of Melanesian origin. In our previous studies, many cases of G6PD Vanua Lava were found on other eastern Indonesian islands. Taken together, these findings may indicate that G6PD Vanua Lava is the most common variant in eastern Indonesian populations, except for Sikka.

  17. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and risk of colorectal cancer in Northern Sardinia: A retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Dore, Maria P; Davoli, Agnese; Longo, Nunzio; Marras, Giuseppina; Pes, Giovanni M

    2016-11-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has been associated with a lower cancer risk, possibly via a reduction of mutagenic oxygen-free radicals and by reducing nicotinamide-adeninedinucleotide-phosphate for replicating cells. In Sardinia, the enzyme defect is frequent as a consequence of selection by malaria in the past. This study investigated the relationship between G6PD deficiency and colorectal cancer (CRC).A retrospective case-control study of 3901 patients from Sardinia, who underwent a colonoscopy between 2006 and 2016, was performed. G6PD phenotype was assessed for each subject. The proportion of pre and malignant colorectal lesions was compared in cases (G6PD-deficient) and controls (G6PD-normal). Data concerning age, sex, family history of CRC, smoking habits, body height, and weight, and also associated diseases were collected.The CRC risk reduction was 43.2% among G6PD-deficient compared with G6PD-normal subjects (odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.37-0.87, P = 0.010). Age, sex, family history of CRC, and also comorbidities such as type 1 diabetes and ischemic heart disease, were significantly associated with CRC risk. The protective effect of G6PD deficiency remained significant after adjusting for all covariates by logistic regression analysis, and was consistently lower across all age groups.Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency is associated with a reduced risk of CRC.

  18. An audit of the precipitating factors for haemolytic crisis among glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Al-Ajlony, Mohammad J; Al-Khateeb, Taqwa; Alzoubi, Karem H; Mhaidat, Nizar; Ayoub, Abeer

    2009-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common genetic enzyme deficiencies leading to haemolytic anaemia. This study aimed to investigate the precipitating factors for haemolytic crisis in G6PD-deficient paediatric patients in Jordan. A retrospective study of data from the records of 258 paediatric patients admitted to a major paediatric hospital in North Jordan from January 2001 until April 2007. Patients included were G6PD-deficient children who were admitted to the hospital secondary to an episode of haemolytic anaemia. Of 258 paediatric patients, 244 (94.2%) had developed a haemolytic episode secondary to ingestion of fava beans. The remaining 14 children (5.8%) developed a haemolytic episode triggered by other factors, such as drugs and upper respiratory infections. Fava bean ingestion is the major precipitating factor for haemolytic anaemia episodes among G6PD-deficient children in Jordan.

  19. Periodontal considerations in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency with associated pancytopenia: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Harinder; Arora, Ruchika; Kamboj, Monika

    2014-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme defect in humans. G6PD deficiency is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical parts of the world and a conservative estimate is that at least 500 million people have a G6PD deficient gene. In several of these areas, the frequency of a G6PD deficiency gene may be as high as 20% or more. The vast majority of people with G6PD deficiency remain clinically asymptomatic throughout their lifetime. However, all of them have an increased risk of developing neonatal jaundice and a risk of developing acute hemolytic anemia when challenged by a number of oxidative agents. The most important treatment measure is prevention: Avoidance of the drugs and foods that cause hemolysis.

  20. High frequency of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the Western brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Santana, Marli S; Monteiro, Wuelton M; Costa, Mônica R F; Sampaio, Vanderson S; Brito, Marcelo A M; Lacerda, Marcus V G; Alecrim, Maria G C

    2014-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human genetic abnormalities, and it has a significant prevalence in the male population (X chromosome linked). The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of impaired fasting glucose and diabetes among G6PD-deficient persons in Manaus, Brazil, an area in the Western Brazilian Amazon to which malaria is endemic. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient males had more impaired fasting glucose and diabetes. This feature could be used as a screening tool for G6PD-deficient persons who are unable to use primaquine for the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax malaria.

  1. Co-occurrence of biphenotypic acute leukaemia, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and haemoglobin E trait in a single child.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Debkrishna; Thapa, Rajoo; Biswas, Biswajit

    2016-02-01

    Acute leukaemias occur as the result of clonal expansion subsequent to transformation and arrest at a normal differentiation stage of haematopoietic precursors, which commit to a single lineage, such as myeloid or B-lymphoid or T-lymphoid cells. Biphenotypic acute leukaemia (BAL) constitutes a biologically different group of leukaemia arising from a precursor stem cell and co-expressing more than one lineage specific marker. The present report describes a child with unusual co-occurrence of biphenotypic (B-precursor cell and Myeloid) acute leukaemia, haemoglobin E trait and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-PD) deficiency. To the best of our knowledge, this constellation of haematological conditions in a single child has never been described before.

  2. False-Positive Newborn Screen Using the Beutler Spot Assay for Galactosemia in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stuhrman, Grace; Perez Juanazo, Stefanie J; Crivelly, Kea; Smith, Jennifer; Andersson, Hans; Morava, Eva

    2017-01-12

    Classical galactosemia is detected through newborn screening by measuring galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) in the USA primarily via the Beutler spot assay. We report on an 18-month-old patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency that was originally diagnosed with classical galactosemia. The patient presented with elevated liver function enzymes and bilirubinemia and was immediately treated with soy-based formula. Confirmatory tests revealed deficiency of the GALT enzyme, however, full-sequencing of GALT was normal, suggestive of a different ideology. The Beutler spot assay uses three other enzymatic steps in addition to GALT. A deficiency in either of these enzymes can result in suspected decreased GALT activity when using the Beutler assay. Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation screening for phosphoglucomutase-1 deficiency was negative. Quantitative analysis of G6PD enzyme in red blood cells showed a severe deficiency and a deletion in G6PD. Soy-formula, the standard treatment for galactosemia, has been reported to trigger hemolysis in G6PD deficient patients. G6PD and phosphoglucomutase-1 deficiencies should be considered when confirmatory tests are negative for pathogenic variants in GALT and galactose-1-phosphate level is normal.

  3. Incidence and molecular characterization of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency among neonates for newborn screening in Chaozhou, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Wang, Q; Zheng, L; Zhan, X-F; Lin, M; Lin, F; Tong, X; Luo, Z-Y; Huang, Y; Yang, L-Y

    2015-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is highly prevalent in southern China. The aim of this study is to assess the extent of this disease in Chinese neonates and determine its molecular characteristics using a novel molecular screening method. A total of 2500 neonates were routinely screened for G6PD deficiency using a modified fluorescent spot test (FST). PCR-high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was then used for the molecular assay. The overall incidence of G6PD deficiency was 2.68% in our study cohort. Frequency in male population was 3.22% (44 neonates of 1365 male neonates), and in female population was 2.03% (23 neonates of 1135 female neonates). Of the 67 newborns suspected to be G6PD deficient based on FST (44 males, 23 females), 58 of 67 (87%) were detected with gene alterations. Seven kinds of mutations [c.95A>G, c.392G>T, c.493A>G, c.871G>A, c.1360C>T, c.1376G>T, and c.1388G>A] were identified by HRM analysis. Routine newborn screening in Chaozhou, China with a relatively high prevalence of G6PD deficiency is justified and meets the World Health Organization recommendation. The usage of molecular diagnosis can favor the detection of heterozygotes which can be a supplement to regular newborn screening and useful for premarital and prenatal diagnosis for G6PD deficiency. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Decreased Glutathione S-transferase Level and Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia Associated with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A Perspective Review.

    PubMed

    Al-Abdi, Sameer Yaseen

    2017-02-01

    Classically, genetically decreased bilirubin conjugation and/or hemolysis account for the mechanisms contributing to neonatal hyperbilirubinemia associated with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. However, these mechanisms are not involved in most cases of this hyperbilirubinemia. Additional plausible mechanisms for G6PD deficiency-associated hyperbilirubinemia need to be considered. Glutathione S-transferases (GST) activity depends on a steady quantity of reduced form of glutathione (GSH). If GSH is oxidized, it is reduced back by glutathione reductase, which requires the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). The main source of NADPH is the pentose phosphate pathway, in which G6PD is the first enzyme. Rat kidney GSH, rat liver GST, and human red blood cell GST levels have been found to positively correlate with G6PD levels in their respective tissues. As G6PD is expressed in hepatocytes, it is expected that GST levels would be significantly decreased in hepatocytes of G6PD-deficient neonates. As hepatic GST binds bilirubin and prevents their reflux into circulation, hypothesis that decreased GST levels in hepatocytes is an additional mechanism contributing to G6PD deficiency-associated hyperbilirubinemia seems plausible. Evidence for and against this hypothesis are discussed in this article hoping to stimulate further research on the role of GST in G6PD deficiency-associated hyperbilirubinemia.

  5. Canine malignant hyperthermia susceptibility: erythrocytic defects--osmotic fragility, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J; Forsyth, G W; Olexson, D W; Thatte, H S; Addis, P B

    1984-01-01

    Two dogs were diagnosed as malignant hyperthermia susceptible based on increased susceptibility (P less than 0.001) of biopsied muscle to caffeine-induced contracture. Erythrocytes from malignant hyperthermia and normal dogs were then examined for an antioxidant system deficiency. Values for serum muscle enzymes, reticulocytes and corpuscular hemoglobin were mildly elevated. Osmotic fragility was increased: hemolysis occurred at a NaCl concentration 10 mM higher than for normal dogs (P less than 0.001). A 35% glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (P less than 0.001) with a 40% compensatory increase (P less than 0.01) in 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity was found. The membrane Ca2+-activated ATPase activity was abnormal: 100% increased with a 40% decreased Arrhenius activation energy (P less than 0.005) and increased thermostability. A 40% increased intracellular accumulation of total Ca2+ occurred in response to in vitro energy depletion in erythrocytes from one malignant hyperthermia dog (P less than 0.01). The multifactorial pattern of inheritance and the broad spectrum of malignant hyperthermia susceptibility are proposed to result from an antioxidant system deficit unmasking or aggravating an intrinsic muscle membrane anomaly. An individual from a family with a history of malignant hyperthermia or unexplained anesthetic death should be considered malignant hyperthermia susceptible if erythrocyte osmotic fragility is abnormal and there is a mild, unexplained elevation in serum creatine kinase. PMID:6150753

  6. Hematological parameters and red blood cell morphological abnormality of Glucose-6-Phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency co-inherited with thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Pengon, Jutharat; Svasti, Saovaros; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Vattanaviboon, Phantip

    2017-06-15

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency and thalassemia are genetically independent hemolytic disorders. Co-inheritance of both disorders may affect red blood cell pathology to a greater extent than normally seen in either disorder alone. This study determines the prevalence and evaluates hematological changes of G-6-PD deficiency and thalassemia co-inheritance. G-6-PD deficiency was screened from 200 male thalassemia blood samples using a fluorescent spot test. Hematological parameters and red blood cell morphology were evaluated among G-6-PD deficiency/thalassemia co-inheritance, G-6-PD deficiency alone, thalassemia alone, and normal individuals. G-6-PD deficiency was detected together with hemoglobin (Hb) E heterozygote, Hb E homozygote, β-thalassemia trait, and β-thalassemia/Hb E, α-thalassemia-2 trait, and Hb H disease. Hb level, hematocrit, mean cell volume, and mean cell Hb of G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with asymptomatic thalassemia carriers show significantly lower mean values compared to carriers with only the same thalassemia genotypes. Higher mean red blood cell distribution width was observed in G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with Hb E heterozygote, as with numbers of hemighost cells in G-6-PD deficiency/thalassemia co-inheritance compared to those with either disorder. Apart from Hb level, hematological parameters of co-inheritance disorders were not different from individuals with a single thalassemia disease. G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with thalassemia in males was present in 10% of the participants, resulting in worsening of red blood cell pathology compared with inheritance of thalassemia alone. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the Ouest and Sud-Est departments of Haiti.

    PubMed

    von Fricken, Michael E; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Eaton, Will T; Alam, Meer T; Carter, Tamar E; Schick, Laura; Masse, Roseline; Romain, Jean R; Okech, Bernard A

    2014-07-01

    Malaria remains a significant public health issue in Haiti, with chloroquine (CQ) used almost exclusively for the treatment of uncomplicated infections. Recently, single dose primaquine (PQ) was added to the Haitian national malaria treatment policy, despite a lack of information on the prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency within the population. G6PD deficient individuals who take PQ are at risk of developing drug induced hemolysis (DIH). In this first study to examine G6PD deficiency rates in Haiti, 22.8% (range 14.9%-24.7%) of participants were found to be G6PD deficient (class I, II, or III) with 2.0% (16/800) of participants having severe deficiency (class I and II). Differences in deficiency were observed by gender, with males having a much higher prevalence of severe deficiency (4.3% vs. 0.4%) compared to females. Male participants were 1.6 times more likely to be classified as deficient and 10.6 times more likely to be classified as severely deficient compared to females, as expected. Finally, 10.6% (85/800) of the participants were considered to be at risk for DIH. Males also had much higher rates than females (19.3% vs. 4.6%) with 4.9 times greater likelihood (p value 0.000) of having an activity level that could lead to DIH. These findings provide useful information to policymakers and clinicians who are responsible for the implementation of PQ to control and manage malaria in Haiti. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in southeast Iran: implications for malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Mehdi; Salimi Khorashad, Alireza; Sakeni, Mohammad; Raeisi, Ahmad; Metanat, Zahra

    2015-03-15

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) is an X-linked genetic disorder with a relatively high frequency in malaria-endemic regions. It is an obstacle to malaria elimination, as primaquine administered in the treatment of malaria can cause hemolysis in G6PD-deficient individuals. This study presents information on the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Sistan and Balouchetsan province, which hosts more than 90% of Plasmodium vivax malaria cases in Iran. This type of information is needed for a successful malaria elimination program. A total of 526 students were randomly recruited through schools located in southeast Iran. Information was collected by interviewing the students using a structured questionnaire. Blood samples taken on filter papers were examined for G6PD deficiency using the fluorescent spot test. Overall, 72.8% (383/526) of the subjects showed normal G6PD enzyme function. Mild and severe G6PD deficiency was observed in 14.8% (78) and 12.2% (64) of subjects, respectively. A total 193/261 males (73.9%) and 190/265 (72%) females had normal enzyme activity. Mild G6PD deficiency was observed in 10.8% (28) and 18.9% (50) of male and female subjects, respectively. However, in comparison with females, a greater proportion of males showed severe enzyme deficiency (15.3% versus 9.1%). All these differences were statistically significant (p < 0.006). G6PD deficiency is highly prevalent in southeast Iran. G6PD-deficient individuals are susceptible to potentially severe and life-threatening hemolytic reactions after primaquine treatment. In order to achieve malaria elimination goals in the province, G6PD testing needs to be made routinely available within the health system.

  9. Hemoglobin E and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in the Chittagong Hill Districts of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Kerry L.; Ahmed, Sabeena; Rahman, Hafizur; Prue, Chai S.; Khyang, Jacob; Ram, Malathi; Zahirul Haq, M.; Chowdhury, Ashish; Akter, Jasmin; Glass, Gregory E.; Shields, Timothy; Nyunt, Myaing M.; Khan, Wasif A.; Sack, David A.; Sullivan, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin E is largely confined to south and southeast Asia. The association between hemoglobin E (HbE) and malaria is less clear than that of hemoglobin S and C. As part of a malaria study in the Chittagong Hill Districts of Bangladesh, an initial random sample of 202 individuals showed that 39% and 49% of Marma and Khyang ethnic groups, respectively, were positive for either heterozygous or homozygous hemoglobin E. In this group, 6.4% were also found to be severely deficient and 35% mildly deficient for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). In a separate Plasmodium falciparum malaria case–uninfected control study, the odds of having homozygous hemoglobin E (HbEE) compared with normal hemoglobin (HbAA) were higher among malaria cases detected by passive surveillance than age and location matched uninfected controls (odds ratio [OR] = 5.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07–46.93). The odds of heterozygous hemoglobin E (HbAE) compared with HbAA were similar between malaria cases and uninfected controls (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.42–1.19). No association by hemoglobin type was found in the initial parasite density or the proportion parasite negative after 2 days of artemether/lumefantrine treatment. HbEE, but not HbAE status was associated with increased passive case detection of malaria. PMID:26101273

  10. Hemoglobin E and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in the Chittagong Hill Districts of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kerry L; Ahmed, Sabeena; Rahman, Hafizur; Prue, Chai S; Khyang, Jacob; Ram, Malathi; Haq, M Zahirul; Chowdhury, Ashish; Akter, Jasmin; Glass, Gregory E; Shields, Timothy; Nyunt, Myaing M; Khan, Wasif A; Sack, David A; Sullivan, David J

    2015-08-01

    Hemoglobin E is largely confined to south and southeast Asia. The association between hemoglobin E (HbE) and malaria is less clear than that of hemoglobin S and C. As part of a malaria study in the Chittagong Hill Districts of Bangladesh, an initial random sample of 202 individuals showed that 39% and 49% of Marma and Khyang ethnic groups, respectively, were positive for either heterozygous or homozygous hemoglobin E. In this group, 6.4% were also found to be severely deficient and 35% mildly deficient for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). In a separate Plasmodium falciparum malaria case-uninfected control study, the odds of having homozygous hemoglobin E (HbEE) compared with normal hemoglobin (HbAA) were higher among malaria cases detected by passive surveillance than age and location matched uninfected controls (odds ratio [OR] = 5.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07-46.93). The odds of heterozygous hemoglobin E (HbAE) compared with HbAA were similar between malaria cases and uninfected controls (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.42-1.19). No association by hemoglobin type was found in the initial parasite density or the proportion parasite negative after 2 days of artemether/lumefantrine treatment. HbEE, but not HbAE status was associated with increased passive case detection of malaria.

  11. A comprehensive analysis of membrane and morphology of erythrocytes from patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zishui; Jiang, Chengrui; Tang, Jia; He, Ming; Lin, Xiaoying; Chen, Xiaodan; Han, Luhao; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Feng, Yi; Guo, Yibin; Li, Hongyi; Jiang, Weiying

    2016-06-01

    Acute hemolytic anemia could be triggered by oxidative stress in the patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. However, the underlying hemolytic mechanism is unknown. To make clear the hemolytic mechanisms, a systematic study on membrane ultrastructure had been undertaken. A comprehensive method was used including atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, flow cytometer and fluorescence microscopy to analyze the membrane ultrastructure, externalized phosphatidylserine (PS), intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, morphology and the distributions of band 3 protein in G6PD deficient red blood cells (RBCs) after tert-butyl-hydroperoxide (t-BHP) oxidation. The results showed that erythrocyte shrinkage, annexin-V binding to externalized PS on the membrane of early-stage apoptotic cells, the increased membrane roughness and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, as well as the change of distributions of band 3 protein in RBCs. Compared with the control RBCs, as the concentration of t-BHP up to 0.1mM, the membrane roughness of G6PD deficient RBCs showed significant difference (p<0.05) and as the concentration of t-BHP up to 0.3mM, externalized PS showed significant difference (p<0.05). Furthermore, the population types of RBCs showed dramatic difference between control groups and G6PD deficient groups. Oxidative stress induced more serious erythrocyte apoptosis and resulted in increased roughness of erythrocyte membrane and abnormal distributed band 3 protein in G6PD deficient RBCs. Echinocytes are the predominant abnormal erythrocyte shape occurring in the peripheral blood from patients with G6PD deficiency, which may shorten the RBCs lifespan. The results in the present study will give an increased understanding for the hemolytic mechanism of G6PD deficiency.

  12. Effects of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency on the metabolic and cardiac responses to obesogenic or high-fructose diets.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Peter A; Mapanga, Rudo F; Kimar, Charlene P; Ribeiro, Rogerio F; Brown, Bethany H; O'Connell, Kelly A; Cox, James W; Shekar, Kadambari C; Asemu, Girma; Essop, M Faadiel; Stanley, William C

    2012-10-15

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common human enzymopathy that affects cellular redox status and may lower flux into nonoxidative pathways of glucose metabolism. Oxidative stress may worsen systemic glucose tolerance and cardiometabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that G6PD deficiency exacerbates diet-induced systemic metabolic dysfunction by increasing oxidative stress but in myocardium prevents diet-induced oxidative stress and pathology. WT and G6PD-deficient (G6PDX) mice received a standard high-starch diet, a high-fat/high-sucrose diet to induce obesity (DIO), or a high-fructose diet. After 31 wk, DIO increased adipose and body mass compared with the high-starch diet but to a greater extent in G6PDX than WT mice (24 and 20% lower, respectively). Serum free fatty acids were increased by 77% and triglycerides by 90% in G6PDX mice, but not in WT mice, by DIO and high-fructose intake. G6PD deficiency did not affect glucose tolerance or the increased insulin levels seen in WT mice. There was no diet-induced hypertension or cardiac dysfunction in either mouse strain. However, G6PD deficiency increased aconitase activity by 42% and blunted markers of nonoxidative glucose pathway activation in myocardium, including the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway activation and advanced glycation end product formation. These results reveal a complex interplay between diet-induced metabolic effects and G6PD deficiency, where G6PD deficiency decreases weight gain and hyperinsulinemia with DIO, but elevates serum free fatty acids, without affecting glucose tolerance. On the other hand, it modestly suppressed indexes of glucose flux into nonoxidative pathways in myocardium, suggesting potential protective effects.

  13. Impact of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency on sickle cell anaemia expression in infancy and early childhood: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Benkerrou, Malika; Alberti, Corinne; Couque, Nathalie; Haouari, Zinedine; Ba, Aissatou; Missud, Florence; Boizeau, Priscilla; Holvoet, Laurent; Ithier, Ghislaine; Elion, Jacques; Baruchel, André; Ducrocq, Rolande

    2013-12-01

    In patients with sickle cell anaemia (SCA), concomitant glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is usually described as having no effect and only occasionally as increasing severity. We analysed sequential clinical and biological data for the first 42 months of life in SCA patients diagnosed by neonatal screening, including 27 G6PD-deficient patients, who were matched on sex, age and parents' geographic origin to 81 randomly selected patients with normal G6PD activity. In the G6PD-deficient group, steady-state haemoglobin was lower (-6·2 g/l, 95% confidence interval (CI), [-10·1; -2·3]) and reticulocyte count higher (247 × 10(9) /l, 95%CI, [97; 397]). The acute anaemic event rate was 3 times higher in the G6PD-deficient group (P < 10(-3) ). A higher proportion of G6PD-deficient patients required blood transfusion (20/27 [74%] vs. 37/81 [46%], P < 10(-3) ), for acute anaemic events, and also vaso-occlusive and infectious events. No significant between-group differences were found regarding the rates of vaso-occlusive, infectious, or cerebrovascular events. G6PD deficiency in babies with SCA worsens anaemia and increases blood transfusion requirements in the first years of life. These effects decrease after 2 years of age, presumably as the decline in fetal haemoglobin levels leads to increased sickle cell haemolysis and younger red blood cells with higher G6PD activity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (A-376/202) in three Malian ethnic groups].

    PubMed

    Dolo, A; Maiga, B; Guindo, A; Diakité, S A S; Diakite, M; Tapily, A; Traoré, M; Sangaré, B; Arama, C; Daou, M; Doumbo, O

    2014-08-01

    Erythrocyte G6PD deficiency is the most common worldwide enzymopathy. The aim of this study was to determine erythrocyte G6PD deficiency in 3 ethnic groups of Mali and to investigate whether erythrocyte G6PD deficiency was associated to the observed protection against malaria seen in Fulani ethnic group. The study was conducted in two different areas of Mali: in the Sahel region of Mopti where Fulani and Dogon live as sympatric ethnic groups and in the Sudanese savannah area where lives mostly the Malinke ethnic group. The study was conducted in 2007 in Koro and in 2008 in Naguilabougou. It included a total 90 Dogon, 42 Fulani and 80 Malinke ethnic groups. Malaria was diagnosed using microscopic examination after Giemsa-staining of thick and thin blood smear. G6PD deficiency (A-(376/202)) samples were identified using RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay and analysis of PCR-amplified DNA amplicon. G6PD deficiency (A-(376/202)) rate was 11.1%, 2.4%, and 13.3% in Dogon, Fulani, and Malinke ethnic group respectively. Heterozygous state for G6PD (A-(376/202)) was found in 7.8% in Dogon; 2.4% in Fulani and 9.3% in Malinke ethnic groups while hemizygous state was found at the frequency of 2.2% in Dogon and 4% in Malinke. No homozygous state was found in our study population.We conclude that G6PD deficiency is not differing significantly between the three ethnic groups, Fulani, Dogon and Malinke.

  15. Relationship between exposure to icterogenic agents, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and neonatal jaundice in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Owa, J A

    1989-11-01

    In a study of the relationship between exposure to icterogenic agents, G-6-PD deficiency and severe neonatal jaundice (NNJ) (serum bilirubin greater than or equal to 205 mumol/l) in 234 Nigerian term male neonates, 106 infants with severe NNJ and 128 controls, it was found that 62.3% of the jaundiced infants and 13.3% of the infants without NNJ were G6PD deficient (p less than 0.01). The proportion of infants exposed to icterogenic agents in the two groups was very similar (p greater than or equal to 0.5). There was a strong association between exposure to icterogenic agents and NNJ in 83 G6PD deficient infants (p less than 0.01), but there was no association between exposure to icterogenic agents and NNJ in the whole group of 234 infants or in 151 infants with normal G6PD status. It is concluded that there is an association between genetically determined G-6-PD deficiency and exogenous agents in causing severe NNJ in Nigerian infants.

  16. The risk of jaundice in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient babies exposed to menthol.

    PubMed

    Olowe, S A; Ransome-Kuti, O

    1980-05-01

    A major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in Lagos, Nigeria, is severe neonatal jaundice seen in G-6-PD deficient babies. The observation that the jaundice is more severe in outpatient than in inpatient babies suggests that its cause is exogenous. "Mentholated" powder which is commonly used in many clinics and at home to dress umbilical cords was suspected to be the offending agent. A controlled study of the effects of one of these powders was carried out on 60 consecutive G-6-PD deficient babies. In 30 of them the umbilical cords were dressed daily with the powder while the remaining half who were untreated served as controls. The treated babies developed statistically more significant jaundice than the controls. Inability of neonates to conjugate menthol in this power is probably responsible for the jaundice developed by these G-6-PD deficient babies. It is concluded that the use of menthol and/or camphor-containing commerical products on neonates be discontinued, especially in communities where the incidence of G-6-PD deficiency is high as the use of such products may be contributiing to the severity of neonatal jaundice.

  17. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in Greek newborns: the Mediterranean C563T mutation screening.

    PubMed

    Molou, Elina; Schulpis, Kleopatra H; Thodi, Georgia; Georgiou, Vassiliki; Dotsikas, Yannis; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos; Biti, Sofia; Loukas, Yannis L

    2014-04-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene is located at the X-chromosome at Xq28 and the disease is recessively inherited predominantly in males. More than 400 variants have been proposed based on clinical and enzymatic studies. The aim of the current study was to identify C563T mutation in G6PD-deficient newborns and to correlate the enzyme residual activity with the presence of the mutation. Some 1189 full-term neonates aged 3-5 days old were tested for G6PD activity in dried blood spots from Guthrie cards using a commercial kit. DNA extraction from Guthrie cards and mutation identification among the deficient samples were performed with current techniques. A total of 92 (7.7%) newborns were G6PD-deficient. In 46 (50%), the mutation C563T was identified. The residual activity in C563T hemizygote males (n = 28) was statistically significantly lower (1.23 ± 0.93 U/g Hb) than that in non-C563T G6PD-deficient males (n = 25) (4.01 ± 1.20 U/g Hb, p < 0.0001) and in controls (13.6 ± 2.9 U/g Hb, p < 0.0001). In C563T heterozygote females, the estimated enzyme activity was lower than that determined in non-C563T females. Male C563T hemizygotes suffer from G6PD deficiency and severe neonatal jaundice. G6PD activity showed statistically significant correlation with total bilirubin blood levels.

  18. Chloroamphenicol-Induced Hemolysis in Caucasian Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    typhoid fever with chloramphenicol. Two of these patients were studied when free of infection to determine the hemolytic potential of chloramphenicol in the noninfected G6PD-deficient white person. It was found to be mildly hemolytic under these conditions, suggesting that a drug- disease synergism was primarily responsible for the clinical hemolytic reactions. The febrile state itself, or changes in plasma amino acids accompanying infection, may be responsible for disease-related

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among children attending the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Iz; Mainasara, As; Erhabor, Osaro; Omojuyigbe, St; Dallatu, Mk; Bilbis, Ls; Adias, Tc

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human enzyme deficiencies in the world. It is particularly common in populations living in malaria-endemic areas, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. This present study was conducted with the aim of determining the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children visiting the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital for pediatric-related care. The study included 118 children, made up of 77 (65.3%) males and 41 (34.7%) females aged ≤5 years with mean age of 3.26 ± 1.90 years. Randox G6PD quantitative in vitro test screening was used for the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency. Of the 118 children tested, 17 (14.4%) were G6PD-deficient. Prevalence of G6PD deficiency was concentrated predominantly among male children (22.1%). Male sex was significantly correlated with G6PD deficiency among the children studied (r = 7.85, P = 0.01). The highest prevalence occurred among children in the 2- to 5-year age-group. Of the 17 G6PD-deficient children, twelve (70.2%) were moderately deficient, while five (29.4%) were severely deficient. Blood film from G6PD-deficient children indicated the following morphological changes; Heinz bodies, schistocytes, target cells, nucleated red cells, spherocytes, and polychromasia. This present study has shown a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children residing in Sokoto in the northwestern geopolitical zone of Nigeria. The study indicated a male sex bias in the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among the children studied. There is a need for the routine screening of children for G6PD deficiency in our environment, to allow for evidence-based management of these children and to ensure the avoidance of food, drugs, and infective agents that can potentially predispose these children to oxidative stress as well as diseases that deplete micronutrients that protect against oxidative stress. There is need to build capacity in our

  20. Should blood donors be routinely screened for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency? A systematic review of clinical studies focusing on patients transfused with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient red cells.

    PubMed

    Renzaho, Andre M N; Husser, Eliette; Polonsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The risk factors associated with the use of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient blood in transfusion have not yet been well established. Therefore, the aim of this review was to evaluate whether whole blood from healthy G6PD-deficient donors is safe to use for transfusion. The study undertook a systematic review of English articles indexed in COCHRANE, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINHAL, with no date restriction up to March 2013, as well as those included in articles' reference lists and those included in Google Scholar. Inclusion criteria required that studies be randomized controlled trials, case controls, case reports, or prospective clinical series. Data were extracted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews using a previously piloted form, which included fields for study design, population under study, sample size, study results, limitations, conclusions, and recommendations. The initial search identified 663 potentially relevant articles, of which only 13 studies met the inclusion criteria. The reported effects of G6PD-deficient transfused blood on neonates and children appear to be more deleterious than effects reported on adult patients. In most cases, the rise of total serum bilirubin was abnormal in infants transfused with G6PD-deficient blood from 6 hours up to 60 hours after transfusion. All studies on neonates and children, except one, recommended a routine screening for G6PD deficiency for this at-risk subpopulation because their immature hepatic function potentially makes them less able to handle any excess bilirubin load. It is difficult to make firm clinical conclusions and recommendations given the equivocal results, the lack of standardized evaluation methods to categorize red blood cell units as G6PD deficient (some of which are questionable), and the limited methodological quality and low quality of evidence. Notwithstanding these limitations, based on our review of the available literature, there is little to

  1. Effects of variant UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and thalassemia on cholelithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yang-Yang; Huang, Ching-Shui; Yang, Sien-Sing; Lin, Min-Shung; Huang, May-Jen; Huang, Ching-Shan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To test the hypothesis that the variant UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, and thalassemia influence bilirubin metabolism and play a role in the development of cholelithiasis. METHODS: A total of 372 Taiwan Chinese with cholelithiasis who had undergone cholecystectomy and 293 healthy individuals were divided into case and control groups, respectively. PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism were used to analyze the promoter area and nucleotides 211, 686, 1 091, and 1 456 of the UGT1A1 gene for all subjects and the gene variants for thalassemia and G6PD deficiency. RESULTS: Variation frequencies for the cholelithiasis patients were 16.1%, 25.8%, 5.4%, and 4.3% for A(TA)6 TAA/A(TA)7TAA (6/7), heterozygosity within the coding region, compound heterozygosity, and homozygosity of the UGT1A1 gene, respectively. Comparing the case and control groups, a statistically significant difference in frequency was demonstrated for the homozygous variation of the UGT1A1 gene (P = 0.012, χ2 test), but not for the other variations. Further, no difference was demonstrated in a between-group comparison of the incidence of G6PD deficiency and thalassemia (2.7% vs 2.4% and 5.1% vs 5.1%, respectively). The bilirubin levels for the cholelithiasis patients with the homozygous variant-UGT1A1 gene were significantly different from the control analog (18.0 ± 6.5 and 12.7 ± 2.9 μmol/L, respectively; P<0.001, Student’s t test). CONCLUSION: Our results show that the homozygous variation in the UGT1A1 gene is a risk factor for the development of cholelithiasis in Taiwan Chinese. PMID:16237771

  2. Diverse point mutations in the human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene cause enzyme deficiency and mild or severe hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Vulliamy, T J; D'Urso, M; Battistuzzi, G; Estrada, M; Foulkes, N S; Martini, G; Calabro, V; Poggi, V; Giordano, R; Town, M

    1988-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD; EC 1.1.1.49) deficiency is a common genetic abnormality affecting an estimated 400 million people worldwide. Clinical and biochemical analyses have identified many variants exhibiting a range of phenotypes, which have been well characterized from the hematological point of view. However, until now, their precise molecular basis has remained unknown. We have cloned and sequenced seven mutant G6PD alleles. In the nondeficient polymorphic African variant G6PD A we have found a single point mutation. The other six mutants investigated were all associated with enzyme deficiency. In one of the commonest, G6PD Mediterranean, which is associated with favism among other clinical manifestations, a single amino acid replacement was found (serine----phenylalanine): it must be responsible for the decreased stability and the reduced catalytic efficiency of this enzyme. Single point mutations were also found in G6PD Metaponto (Southern Italy) and in G6PD Ilesha (Nigeria), which are asymptomatic, and in G6PD Chatham, which was observed in an Indian boy with neonatal jaundice. In G6PD "Matera," which is now known to be the same as G6PD A-, two separate point mutations were found, one of which is the same as in G6PD A. In G6PD Santiago, a de novo mutation (glycine----arginine) is associated with severe chronic hemolytic anemia. The mutations observed show a striking predominance of C----T transitions, with CG doublets involved in four of seven cases. Thus, diverse point mutations may account largely for the phenotypic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency. Images PMID:3393536

  3. Screening for Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Using Three Detection Methods: A Cross-Sectional Survey in Southwestern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Roh, Michelle E; Oyet, Caesar; Orikiriza, Patrick; Wade, Martina; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Boum, Yap; Kiwanuka, Gertrude N; Parikh, Sunil

    2016-11-02

    Despite the potential benefit of primaquine in reducing Plasmodium falciparum transmission and radical cure of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium ovale infections, concerns over risk of hemolytic toxicity in individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd) have hampered its deployment. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2014 to assess the G6PDd prevalence among 631 children between 6 and 59 months of age in southwestern Uganda, an area where primaquine may be a promising control measure. G6PDd prevalence was determined using three detection methods: a quantitative G6PD enzyme activity assay (Trinity Biotech(®) G-6-PDH kit), a qualitative point-of-care test (CareStart(™) G6PD rapid diagnostic test [RDT]), and molecular detection of the G6PD A- G202A allele. Qualitative tests were compared with the gold standard quantitative assay. G6PDd prevalence was higher by RDT (8.6%) than by quantitative assay (6.8%), using a < 60% activity threshold. The RDT performed optimally at a < 60% threshold and demonstrated high sensitivity (≥ 90%) and negative predictive values (100%) across three activity thresholds (below 60%, 30%, and 40%). G202A allele frequency was 6.4%, 7.9%, and 6.8% among females, males, and overall, respectively. Notably, over half of the G202A homo-/hemizygous children expressed ≥ 60% enzyme activity. Overall, the CareStart(™) G6PD RDT appears to be a viable screening test to accurately identify individuals with enzyme activities below 60%. The low prevalence of G6PDd across all three diagnostic modalities and absence of severe deficiency in our study suggests that there is little barrier to the use of single-dose primaquine in this region.

  4. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and diagnostic challenges in 1500 immigrants in Denmark examined for haemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Warny, Marie; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Petersen, Jesper; Birgens, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    Similar to the thalassaemia syndromes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is highly prevalent in areas historically exposed to malaria. In the present study, we used quantitative and molecular methods to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in a population of 1508 immigrants in Denmark. We found the allele frequency to be between 2.4 and 2.9% in the female immigrants. Furthermore, the mutation pattern in the studied population showed a high prevalence of the G6PD A-(202A) variant in African and African-American immigrants, a high prevalence of the G6PD Mediterranean variant in Mediterranean European and Western Asian immigrants, and substantial heterogeneity in the variants found in the Eastern Asian/Pacific immigrants. Inasmuch as many of the patients included in this investigation had various thalassaemic syndromes, we were able to evaluate the effects of the interaction between a low mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) value and G6PD activity, particularly in heterozygous females. The activity level was markedly influenced by the MCH value in females with normal G6PD activity, but not in heterozygous and homozygous females. Comparison of patients with normal G6PD activity and heterozygous females indicated considerable overlap in activity levels. To help separating heterozygous females from females with wild-type genes, a DNA analysis is necessary when the female activity level is between 4.0 and 4.9 U/g hgb corresponding to 50-60% of the median activity of unaffected males.

  5. Acute viral hepatitis E presenting with haemolytic anaemia and acute renal failure in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Aggarwal, Amitesh; Jain, Piyush; Rajpal, Surender; Agarwal, Mukul P

    2015-10-01

    The association of acute hepatitis E viral (HEV) infection with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency leading to extensive intravascular haemolysis is a very rare clinical entity. Here we discuss such a patient, who presented with acute HEV illness, developed severe intravascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of bilirubin, complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), and was later on found to have a deficiency of G6PD. The patient recovered completely with haemodialysis and supportive management.

  6. Data on how several physiological parameters of stored red blood cells are similar in glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient and sufficient donors.

    PubMed

    Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Kriebardis, Anastasios G; Georgatzakou, Hara T; Foudoulaki-Paparizos, Leontini E; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wither, Matthew J; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Papassideri, Issidora S; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Antonelou, Marianna H

    2016-09-01

    This article contains data on the variation in several physiological parameters of red blood cells (RBCs) donated by eligible glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient donors during storage in standard blood bank conditions compared to control, G6PD sufficient (G6PD(+)) cells. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cell fragility and membrane exovesiculation were measured in RBCs throughout the storage period, with or without stimulation by oxidants, supplementation of N-acetylcysteine and energy depletion, following incubation of stored cells for 24 h at 37 °C. Apart from cell characteristics, the total or uric acid-dependent antioxidant capacity of the supernatant in addition to extracellular potassium concentration was determined in RBC units. Finally, procoagulant activity and protein carbonylation levels were measured in the microparticles population. Further information can be found in "Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient subjects may be better "storers" than donors of red blood cells" [1].

  7. Sub-Saharan red cell antigen phenotypes and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency variants in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Petit, Florence; Bailly, Pascal; Chiaroni, Jacques; Mazières, Stéphane

    2016-06-07

    The treatment of Plasmodium vivax infections requires the use of primaquine, which can lead to severe haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient individuals. However, most of the Latin American countries, which are still endemic for vivax malaria, lack information on the distribution of G6PD deficiency (G6PDd). No survey has been performed so far in French Guiana. Herein, 80 individuals of the French Guianan Noir Marron population were scrutinized for red cell surface antigens of six blood group systems (ABO, Rh, Kell, Kidd, Duffy and MNS) and G6PD genetic polymorphisms. First, the sub-Saharan origin of the red cell phenotypes was assessed in relation with the literature. Then, given that the main sub-Saharan G6PDd variants are expected to be encountered, only the G6PD sequences of exons 4, 5, 6 and 9 were screened. This work aims at appraising the G6PD gene variation in this population, and thus, contributing to the G6PD piecemeal information in Latin America. Ninety-seven percent (97 %) of the red cells are Fy(a- b-), either D+ C- E- c+ e+ or D+ C+ E- c+ e+ and 44 % exhibited the Fya-/Jkb-/S- combined phenotype. Noteworthy is the detection of the G6PD(Val68Met) variant characterized by c.202G > A transition, G6PD(Asn126Asp) variant characterized by c.376A>G transition and G6PD(Asp181Val) variant characterized by c.542A>T transversion of the G6PD gene in 22.5 % of the sample, characteristic of the A(-(202)), A and Santamaria G6PDd variants, respectively. French Guianan Noir Marron population represents a pool of Rh-D antigen positive, Duffy-negative and G6PD-deficient erythrocytes, the latter accounting for one in every eight persons. The present study provides the first community-based estimation of the frequency of G6PDd polymorphisms in French Guiana. These results contribute to the G6PD genetic background information puzzle in Latin America.

  8. Prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among hill-tribe school children in Omkoi District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yanola, Jintana; Kongpan, Chatpat; Pornprasert, Sakorn

    2014-07-01

    The prevalaence of anemia, iron deficiency, thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency were examined among 265 hill-tribe school children, 8-14 years of age, from Omkoi District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. Anemia was observed in 20 school children, of whom 3 had iron deficiency anemia. The prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency and β-thalassemia trait [codon 17 (A>T), IVSI-nt1 (G>T) and codons 71/72 (+A) mutations] was 4% and 8%, respectively. There was one Hb E trait, and no α-thalassemia-1 SEA or Thai type deletion. Furthermore, anemia was found to be associated with β-thalassemia trait in 11 children. These data can be useful for providing appropriate prevention and control of anemia in this region of Thailand.

  9. Unsuspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presenting as symptomatic methemoglobinemia with severe hemolysis after fava bean ingestion in a 6-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, Marie-Hélène; Danékova, Névéna; Mesples, Bettina; Chemouny, Myriam; Couque, Nathalie; Parez, Nathalie; Ducrocq, Rolande; Elion, Jacques

    2011-05-01

    We report the occurrence of symptomatic methemoglobinemia in a previously healthy boy, who presented with severe acute hemolysis after fava bean ingestion. The methemoglobinemia revealed a previously unrecognized glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We discuss the pathophysiology of severe methemoglobinemia when associated with acute hemolysis, favism, and the common African G6PD A-variant [G6PD, VAL68MET, ASN126ASP]. In conclusion, screening for G6PD deficiency must be considered in symptomatic methemoglobinemia, especially in young boys, when associated with intravascular hemolysis.

  10. A Novel de novo Mutation in the G6PD Gene in a Korean Boy with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Ji-Yoon; Lee, Ki-O; Kim, Sun-Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive hemolytic anemia caused by a mutation in the G6PD gene on Xq28. Herein, we describe a Korean boy with G6PD deficiency resulting from a novel mutation in G6PD. A 20-month-old boy with hemolytic anemia was referred for molecular diagnosis. He had no relevant family history. The G6PD activity was severely decreased at 0.2 U/g Hb (severe deficiency). Direct sequencing analyses on the G6PD gene revealed that he was hemizygous for a novel missense variant, c.1187C>G (p.Pro396Arg), in exon 10 of G6PD. Family study involving his parents revealed the de novo occurrence of the mutation. This is the first report of genetically confirmed G6PD deficiency in Korea.

  11. Prevalence of thalassaemia, iron-deficiency anaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among Arab migrating nomad children, southern Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Pasalar, M; Mehrabani, D; Afrasiabi, A; Mehravar, Z; Reyhani, I; Hamidi, R; Karimi, M

    2014-12-17

    This study investigated the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and β-thalassaemia trait among Arab migrating nomad children in southern Islamic Republic of Iran. Blood samples were analysed from 134 schoolchildren aged < 18 years (51 males, 83 females). Low serum ferritin (< 12 ng/dL) was present in 17.9% of children (21.7% in females and 11.8% in males). Low haemoglobin (Hb) correlated significantly with a low serum ferritin. Only 1 child had G6PD deficiency. A total of 9.7% of children had HbA2 ≥ 3.5 g/dL, indicating β-thalassaemia trait (10.8% in females and 7.8% in males). Mean serum iron, serum ferritin and total iron binding capacity were similar in males and females. Serum ferritin index was as accurate as Hb index in the diagnosis of iron-deficiency anaemia. A high prevalence of β-thalassaemia trait was the major potential risk factor in this population.

  12. Red cell glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the northern region of Turkey: is G6PD deficiency exclusively a male disease?

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut

    2015-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive genetic defect that can cause hemolytic crisis. However, this disease affects both males and females. In Turkey, the frequency of this enzyme deficiency was reported to vary, from 0.25 to 18%, by the geographical area. Its prevalence in the northern Black Sea region of Turkey is unknown. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the northern region Turkey in children and adults with hyperbilirubinemia and hemolytic anemia. This report included a total of 976 G6PD enzyme results that were analyzed between May 2005 and January 2014. G6PD deficiency was detected in 5.0% of all patients. G6PD deficiency was significantly less frequent in females (1.9%, 6/323) than in males (6.6%, 43/653). G6PD deficiency was detected in 3.7% of infants with hyperbilirubinemia, 9.2% of children, and 4.5% of adults with hemolytic anemia. In both the newborn group and the group of children, G6PD deficiency was significantly more frequent in males. In the combined group of children (groups I and II), the proportion of males was 74% and 67% in all groups (P = .0008). In conclusion, in northern region of Turkey, G6PD deficiency is an important cause of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and hemolytic crisis in children and adults. This study suggests that most pediatricians thought that G6PD deficiency is exclusively a male disease. For this reason, some female patients may have been undiagnosed.

  13. [Frequency of color blindness and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency in non-industrialized populations in the state of Nuevo León, México].

    PubMed

    Ceda-Flores, R M; Arriaga-Ríos, G; Muñoz-Campos, J; Bautista-Peña, V A; Angeles Rojas-Alvarado, M; González-Quiróga, G; Leal-Garza, C H; Garza-Chapa, R

    1990-01-01

    In order to know if there would be genetic structural differences among non industrial and industrial populations, two genetic markers were studied: color-blindness (CPC) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD), in students, males and females that were resident in five non industrial populations in the State of Nuevo Leon. The results were compared with the information for industrial zone from the Monterrey Metropolitan area (AMM). It was found that the frequencies of CPC and G6PD in non industrial populations (2.57 and 0.00 per cent), were lower than the ones in the industrial AMM (4.0 and 0.66 per cent), probably as a result that in the first populations, with minor urbanization, the main factors that influence are: natural selection, interacial mixed or genetic drift and the second population is the immigration, since 1940 to present time, of Mexican populations with greater influence from the Indians and Africans.

  14. Red Algal Bromophenols as Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Daisuke; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Kim, Sang Moo; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2013-01-01

    Five bromophenols isolated from three Rhodomelaceae algae (Laurencia nipponica, Polysiphonia morrowii, Odonthalia corymbifera) showed inhibitory effects against glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Among them, the symmetric bromophenol dimer (5) showed the highest inhibitory activity against G6PD. PMID:24152564

  15. DNA damage and apoptosis in mononuclear cells from glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient patients (G6PD Aachen variant) after UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Efferth, T; Fabry, U; Osieka, R

    2001-03-01

    Patients affected with X chromosome-linked, hereditary glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency suffer from life-threatening hemolytic crises after intake of certain drugs or foods. G6PD deficiency is associated with low levels of reduced glutathione. We analyzed mononuclear white blood cells (MNC) of three males suffering from the German G6PD Aachen variant, four heterozygote females of this family, one G6PD-deficient male from another family coming from Iran, and six healthy male volunteers with respect to their DNA damage in two different genes (G6PD and T-cell receptor-delta) and their propensity to enter apoptosis after UV illumination (0.08-5.28 J/cm2). As determined by PCR stop assays, there was more UV-induced DNA damage in MNC of G6PD-deficient male patients than in those of healthy subjects. MNC of G6PD-deficient patients showed a higher rate of apoptosis after UV irradiation than MNC of healthy donors. MNC of heterozygote females showed intermediate rates of DNA damage and apoptosis. It is concluded that increased DNA damage may be a result of deficient detoxification of reactive oxygen species by glutathione and may ultimately account for the higher rate of apoptosis in G6PD-deficient MNC.

  16. Molecular Characterization of Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Families from the Republic of Macedonia and Genotype-phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Cherepnalkovski, Anet Papazovska; Zemunik, Tatijana; Glamocanin, Sofijanka; Piperkova, Katica; Gunjaca, Ivana; Kocheva, Svetlana; Jovanova, Biljana Coneska; Krzelj, Vjekoslav

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Glucose-6-phospahte dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) is one of the most common inherited disorders affecting around 400 million people worldwide. Molecular analysis of the G6PD gene identified more than 140 distinct mutations, the majority being single base missense mutations. G6PD Mediterranean is the most common variant found in populations of the Mediterranean area. Aim: The aim of our study was to perform molecular characterization of G6PD deficiency in families from the Republic of Macedonia and correlate the findings to disease phenotype. Patients and methods: Six patients and seven other family members were selected for genetic characterization, the selection procedure involved clinical evaluation and G6PD quantitative testing. All patients were first screened for the Mediterranean mutation, and subsequently for the Seattle mutation. Mutations were detected using PCR amplification and appropriate restriction endonuclease cleavage. Results: Four hemizygote and 3 heterozygous carriers for G6PD Mediterranean were detected. All G6PD deficient patients from this group showed clinical picture of hemolysis, and in 66.6% neonatal jaundice was confirmed based on history data. To our knowledge, this is the first study concerned with molecular aspects of the G6PD deficiency in R. Macedonia. Conclusion: This study represents a step towards a more comprehensive genetic evaluation in our population and better understanding of the health issues involved. PMID:26622077

  17. The use of primaquine in malaria infected patients with red cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Myat-Phone-Kyaw; Myint-Oo; Aung-Naing; Aye-Lwin-Htwe

    1994-12-01

    32 subjects with Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes, and 31 cases with Plasmodium vivax infection from two military hospitals (Lashio, Mandalay) were treated with quinine 600 mg three times a day for 7 days followed by primaquine 45 mg single dose for gametocytes and 45 mg weekly x 8 weeks for vivax malaria. Although screening of red cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) was done prior to primaquine treatment, G6PD deficient subjects were not excluded from the trial. 20 patients hemizygous for mild G6PD deficiency (GdB- variant), 2 patients hemizygous for severe deficiency (Gd-Myanmar variant) completed the trial. No case of acute hemolysis was observed in all 22 patients with two genotypes of red cell G6PD deficiency status. Therefore, a single dose of primaquine 45 mg and/or weekly for 8 weeks is adequate for the treatment of patients with P. falciparum gametocytes and/or P. vivax malaria ignoring these red cell G6PD enzyme deficient variants in Myanmar.

  18. Rapid epidemiologic assessment of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in malaria-endemic areas in Southeast Asia using a novel diagnostic kit.

    PubMed

    Jalloh, A; Tantular, I S; Pusarawati, S; Kawilarang, A P; Kerong, H; Lin, K; Ferreira, M U; Matsuoka, H; Arai, M; Kita, K; Kawamoto, F

    2004-05-01

    We recently reported a new rapid screening method for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. This method incorporates a new formazan substrate (WST-8) and is capable of detecting heterozygous females both qualitatively and quantitatively. Here, we report its evaluation during field surveys at three malaria centres and in malaria-endemic villages of Myanmar and Indonesia, either alone or in combination with a rapid on-site diagnosis of malaria. A total of 57 severe (45 males and 12 females) and 34 mild (five males and 29 females) cases of G6PD deficiency were detected among 855 subjects in Myanmar whilst 30 severe (25 males and five females) and 23 mild (six males and 17 females) cases were found among 1286 subjects in Indonesia. In all cases, severe deficiency was confirmed with another formazan method but due to limitations in its detection threshold, mild cases were misdiagnosed as G6PD-normal by this latter method. Our results indicate that the novel method can qualitatively detect both severely deficient subjects as well as heterozygous females in the field. The antimalarial drug, primaquine, was safely prescribed to Plasmodium vivax-infected patients in Myanmar. Our new, rapid screening method may be essential for the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency particularly in rural areas without electricity, and can be recommended for use in malaria control programmes.

  19. Somatic-cell selection is a major determinant of the blood-cell phenotype in heterozygotes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations causing severe enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Filosa, S.; Giacometti, N.; Wangwei, C.; De Mattia, D.; Pagnini, D.; Alfinito, F.; Schettini, F.; Luzzatto, L.; Martini, G.

    1996-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation in mammals is regarded as an essentially random process, but the resulting somatic-cell mosaicism creates the opportunity for cell selection. In most people with red-blood-cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the enzyme-deficient phenotype is only moderately expressed in nucleated cells. However, in a small subset of hemizygous males who suffer from chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the underlying mutations (designated class I) cause more-severe G6PD deficiency, and this might provide an opportunity for selection in heterozygous females during development. In order to test this possibility we have analyzed four heterozygotes for class I G6PD mutations: two with G6PD Portici (1178G-->A) and two with G6PD Bari (1187C-->T). We found that in fractionated blood cell types (including erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages) there was a significant excess of G6PD-normal cells. The significant concordance that we have observed in the degree of imbalance in the different blood-cell lineages indicates that a selective mechanism is likely to operate at the level of pluripotent blood stem cells. Thus, it appears that severe G6PD deficiency affects adversely the proliferation or the survival of nucleated blood cells and that this phenotypic characteristic is critical during hematopoiesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8808605

  20. Somatic-cell selection is a major determinant of the blood-cell phenotype in heterozygotes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations causing severe enzyme deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Filosa, S.; Giacometti, N.; Wangwei, C.; Martini, G.

    1996-10-01

    X-chromosome inactivation in mammals is regarded as an essentially random process, but the resulting somatic-cell mosaicism creates the opportunity for cell selection. In most people with red-blood-cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the enzyme-deficient phenotype is only moderately expressed in nucleated cells. However, in a small subset of hemizygous males who suffer from chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the underlying mutations (designated class I) cause more-severe G6PD deficiency, and this might provide an opportunity for selection in heterozygous females during development. In order to test this possibility we have analyzed four heterozygotes for class I G6PD mutations: two with G6PD Portici (1178G{r_arrow}A) and two with G6PD Bari (1187C{r_arrow}T). We found that in fractionated blood cell types (including erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages) there was a significant excess of G6PD-normal cells. The significant concordance that we have observed in the degree of imbalance in the different blood-cell lineages indicates that a selective mechanism is likely to operate at the level of pluripotent blood stem cells. Thus, it appears that severe G6PD deficiency affects adversely the proliferation or the survival of nucleated blood cells and that this phenotypic characteristic is critical during hematopoiesis. 65 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Increased red cell calcium, decreased calcium adenosine triphosphatase, and altered membrane proteins during fava bean hemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient (Mediterranean variant) individuals.

    PubMed

    Turrini, F; Naitana, A; Mannuzzu, L; Pescarmona, G; Arese, P

    1985-08-01

    RBCs from four glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient (Mediterranean variant) subjects were studied during fava bean hemolysis. In the density-fractionated RBC calcium level, Ca2+-ATPase activity, reduced glutathione level, and ghost protein pattern were studied. In the bottom fraction, containing most heavily damaged RBCs, calcium level ranged from 143 to 244 mumol/L RBCs (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 17 +/- 5 mumol/L RBCs). The Ca2+-ATPase activity ranged from 0.87 to 1.84 mumol ATP consumed/g Hb/min (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 2.27 +/- 0.4). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of ghosts showed: (1) the presence of high mol wt aggregates (in three cases they were reduced by dithioerythritol; in one case, only partial reduction was possible); (2) the presence of multiple, scattered new bands; and (3) the reduction of band 3. Oxidant-mediated damage to active calcium extrusion, hypothetically associated with increased calcium permeability, may explain the large increase in calcium levels. They, in turn, could activate calcium-dependent protease activity, giving rise to the profound changes in the ghost protein pattern.

  2. Red blood cell indices and prevalence of hemoglobinopathies and glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiencies in male Tanzanian residents of Dar es Salaam.

    PubMed

    Mwakasungula, Solomon; Schindler, Tobias; Jongo, Said; Moreno, Elena; Kamaka, Kasimu; Mohammed, Mgeni; Joseph, Selina; Rashid, Ramla; Athuman, Thabit; Tumbo, Anneth Mwasi; Hamad, Ali; Lweno, Omar; Tanner, Marcel; Shekalaghe, Seif; Daubenberger, Claudia A

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, disorders of hemoglobin structure and production, are one of the most common monogenic disorders in humans. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) is an inherited enzymopathy resulting in increased oxygen stress susceptibility of red blood cells. The distributions of these genetic traits in populations living in tropical and subtropical regions where malaria has been or is still present are thought to result from survival advantage against severe life threatening malaria disease. 384 male Tanzanian volunteers residing in Dar es Salaam were typed for G6PD, sickle cell disease and α-thalassemia. The most prominent red blood cell polymorphism was heterozygous α(+)-thalassemia (37.8%), followed by the G6PD(A) deficiency (16.4%), heterozygous sickle cell trait (15.9%), G6PD(A-) deficiency (13.5%) and homozygous α(+)-thalassemia (5.2%). 35%, 45%, 17% and 3% of these volunteers were carriers of wild type gene loci, one, two or three of these hemoglobinopathies, respectively. We find that using a cut off value of 28.6 pg. for mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), heterozygous α(+)-thalassemia can be predicted with a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 72% in this male population. All subjects carrying homozygous α(+)-thalassemia were identified based on their MCH value < 28.6 pg.

  3. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  4. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  8. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency does not increase the susceptibility of sperm to oxidative stress induced by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Roshankhah, Shiva; Rostami-Far, Zahra; Shaveisi-Zadeh, Farhad; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Bakhtiari, Mitra; Shaveisi-Zadeh, Jila

    2016-12-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect. G6PD plays a key role in the pentose phosphate pathway, which is a major source of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). NADPH provides the reducing equivalents for oxidation-reduction reductions involved in protecting against the toxicity of reactive oxygen species such as H2O2. We hypothesized that G6PD deficiency may reduce the amount of NADPH in sperms, thereby inhibiting the detoxification of H2O2, which could potentially affect their motility and viability, resulting in an increased susceptibility to infertility. Semen samples were obtained from four males with G6PD deficiency and eight healthy males as a control. In both groups, motile sperms were isolated from the seminal fluid and incubated with 0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 120 µM concentrations of H2O2. After 1 hour incubation at 37℃, sperms were evaluated for motility and viability. Incubation of sperms with 10 and 20 µM H2O2 led to very little decrease in motility and viability, but motility decreased notably in both groups in 40, 60, and 80 µM H2O2, and viability decreased in both groups in 40, 60, 80, and 120 µM H2O2. However, no statistically significant differences were found between the G6PD-deficient group and controls. G6PD deficiency does not increase the susceptibility of sperm to oxidative stress induced by H2O2, and the reducing equivalents necessary for protection against H2O2 are most likely produced by other pathways. Therefore, G6PD deficiency cannot be considered as major risk factor for male infertility.

  9. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency does not increase the susceptibility of sperm to oxidative stress induced by H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Roshankhah, Shiva; Rostami-Far, Zahra; Shaveisi-Zadeh, Farhad; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Shaveisi-Zadeh, Jila

    2016-01-01

    Objective Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect. G6PD plays a key role in the pentose phosphate pathway, which is a major source of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). NADPH provides the reducing equivalents for oxidation-reduction reductions involved in protecting against the toxicity of reactive oxygen species such as H2O2. We hypothesized that G6PD deficiency may reduce the amount of NADPH in sperms, thereby inhibiting the detoxification of H2O2, which could potentially affect their motility and viability, resulting in an increased susceptibility to infertility. Methods Semen samples were obtained from four males with G6PD deficiency and eight healthy males as a control. In both groups, motile sperms were isolated from the seminal fluid and incubated with 0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 120 µM concentrations of H2O2. After 1 hour incubation at 37℃, sperms were evaluated for motility and viability. Results Incubation of sperms with 10 and 20 µM H2O2 led to very little decrease in motility and viability, but motility decreased notably in both groups in 40, 60, and 80 µM H2O2, and viability decreased in both groups in 40, 60, 80, and 120 µM H2O2. However, no statistically significant differences were found between the G6PD-deficient group and controls. Conclusion G6PD deficiency does not increase the susceptibility of sperm to oxidative stress induced by H2O2, and the reducing equivalents necessary for protection against H2O2 are most likely produced by other pathways. Therefore, G6PD deficiency cannot be considered as major risk factor for male infertility. PMID:28090457

  10. First evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in vivax malaria endemic regions in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Ji, So-Young; Shin, Hyun-Il; Moon, Jun-Hye; Cho, Shin-Hyung; Lee, Won-Ja; Kim, Jung-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect and affects more than 400 million people worldwide. This deficiency is believed to protect against malaria because its global distribution is similar. However, this genetic disorder may be associated with potential hemolytic anemia after treatment with anti-malarials, primaquine or other 8-aminoquinolines. Although primaquine is used for malaria prevention, no study has previously investigated the prevalence of G6PD variants and G6PD deficiency in the Republic of Korea (ROK). Two commercialized test kits (Trinity G-6-PDH and CareStart G6PD test) were used for G6PD deficiency screening. The seven common G6PD variants were investigated by DiaPlexC kit in blood samples obtained living in vivax malaria endemic regions in the ROK. Of 1,044 blood samples tested using the CareStart G6PD test, none were positive for G6PD deficiency. However, a slightly elevated level of G6PD activity was observed in 14 of 1,031 samples tested with the Trinity G-6-PDH test. Forty-nine of the 298 samples with non-specific amplification by DiaPlexC kit were confirmed by sequencing to be negative for the G6PD variants. No G6PD deficiency was observed using phenotypic- or genetic-based tests in individuals residing in vivax malaria endemic regions in the ROK. Because massive chemoprophylaxis using primaquine has been performed in the ROK military to kill hypnozoites responsible for relapse and latent stage vivax malaria, further regular monitoring is essential for the safe administration of primaquine.

  11. Resistance of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency to malaria: effects of fava bean hydroxypyrimidine glucosides on Plasmodium falciparum growth in culture and on the phagocytosis of infected cells.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, H; Atamna, H; Shalmiev, G; Kanaani, J; Krugliak, M

    1996-07-01

    The balanced polymorphism of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD-) is believed to have evolved through the selective pressure of malarial combined with consumption of fava beans. The implicated fava bean constituents are the hydroxypyrimidine glucosides vicine and convicine, which upon hydrolysis of their beta-O-glucosidic bond, became protein pro-oxidants. In this work we show that the glucosides inhibit the growth of Plasmodium falciparum, increase the hexose-monophosphate shunt activity and the phagocytosis of malaria-infected erythrocytes. These activities are exacerbated in the presence of beta-glucosidase, implicating their pro-oxidant aglycones in the toxic effect, and are more pronounced in infected G6PD- erythrocytes. These results suggest that G6PD- infected erythrocytes are more susceptible to phagocytic cells, and that fava bean pro-oxidants are more efficiently suppressing parasite propagation in G6PD- erythrocytes, either by directly affecting parasite growth, or by means of enhanced phagocytic elimination of infected cells. The present findings could account for the relative resistance of G6PD- bearers to falciparum malaria, and establish a link between dietary habits and malaria in the selection of the G6PD- genotype.

  12. The role of reduced glutathione during the course of acute haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients: clinical and pharmacodynamic aspects.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, G G

    1990-01-01

    Tissue hypoperfusion leads to cellular oxidative and peroxidative damage due to biochemical disorders in the oxygen and substrate metabolism. The metabolic turnover of glutathione (GSH) represents one the main cytoprotective systems against the peroxide attack and the depletion or defect in resynthesis of this compound is accompanied by pathological consequences. In the present study the clinical effects of glutathione depletion were investigated in conditions of acute tissue hypoxia due to marked haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients (favism syndrome). In these subjects a significant marker of the tissue oxidative damage was represented by the uric acid blood levels, presumably linked to xanthine-hypoxanthine altered metabolism. To antagonize the effects of oxyradical pathology, reduced glutathione was administered to a group of patients and the results confirmed the cytoprotective role played by the GSH supplementation. The GSH action was evident on the tissue metabolism and this supports the opinion that reduced glutathione could represent a new and interesting therapeutic approach in marked and acute hypoxic conditions.

  13. Molecular Epidemiological Survey of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Thalassemia in Uygur and Kazak Ethnic Groups in Xinjiang, Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Han, Luhao; Su, Hai; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Weiying; Chen, Suqin

    2016-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and thalassemia occur frequently in tropical and subtropical regions, while the prevalence of relationship between the two diseases in Xinjiang has not been reported. We aimed to determine the prevalence of these diseases and clarify the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes of the two diseases in the Uygur and Kazak ethnic groups in Xinjiang. We measured G6PD activity by G6PD:6PGD (glucose acid-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) ratio, identified the gene variants of G6PD and α- and β-globin genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-DNA sequencing and gap-PCR and compared these variants in different ethnic groups in Xinjiang with those adjacent to it. Of the 149 subjects with molecular analysis of G6PD deficiency conducted, a higher prevalence of the combined mutations c.1311C > T/IVSXI + 93T > C and IVSXI + 93T > C, both with normal enzymatic activities, were observed in the Uygur and Kazak subjects. A case of rare mutation HBB: c.135delC [codon 44 (-C) in the heterozygous state], a heterozygous case of HBB: c.68A > G [Hb G-Taipei or β22(B4)Glu→Gly] and several common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found on the β-globin gene. In conclusion, G6PD deficiency with pathogenic mutations and three common α-thalassemia (α-thal) [- -(SEA), -α(3.7) (rightward), -α(4.2) (leftward)] deletions and point mutations of the α-globin gene were not detected in the present study. The average incidence of β-thalassemia (β-thal) in Uygurs was 1.45% (2/138) in Xinjiang. The polymorphisms of G6PD and β-globin genes might be useful genetic markers to trace the origin and migration of the Uygur and Kazak in Xinjiang.

  14. Acute viral hepatitis, intravascular haemolysis, severe hyperbilirubinaemia and renal failure in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, R. K.; Moudgil, A.; Kishore, K.; Srivastava, R. N.; Tandon, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    Five patients with acute viral hepatitis developed severe intrasvascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of serum bilirubin (427 to 1368 mumol/l). All 5 had high fever, marked anaemia, reticulocytosis and neutrophilic leucocytosis. Three of them developed acute renal failure, which was of non-oliguric type in 2. The clinical course was protracted, but complete recovery occurred in 4 patients between 4 to 10 weeks. One patient with hepatic coma and oliguric renal failure died. Deficiency of the enzyme G-6-PD was confirmed in 4 cases. Massive haemolysis in the patients was probably induced by the administration of chloroquine and other drugs. Intravascular haemolysis should be suspected in patients with acute viral hepatitis, if they show unexplained anaemia and very high serum bilirubin levels, and measures to prevent renal failure should be instituted in such cases. PMID:4070114

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the Albanian ethnic minority of Cosenza province, Italy.

    PubMed

    Tagarelli, A; Cittadella, R; Bria, M; Brancati, C

    1992-01-01

    The Albanian ethnic minority of the Cosenza province (Calabria, Southern Italy) is constituted by a population of 42,305 inhabitants living in 19 communes. The first presence of this population, in Southern Italy, dates back to the fifteenth century as a result of different immigrations. We have studied the G6PD in the population of this province by determining both the frequency of the G6PD-deficiency and the type of Gd(-) alleles in samples from 19 communes. The overall frequency estimate turned out to be 0.0294 and those of the 8 highland communes and of the 11 communes located in the valleys were 0.0242 and 0.033 respectively. Both the frequencies and the ratio between the frequencies of the different Gd(-) alleles are significantly different with respect to a previous study carried out on the non-Albanian population of the same areas. The high endogamy rate found among the grandparents' and among the parents of the probands living in the Albanian community, shows that this community is to a large extent reproductively isolated from the neighbouring populations, thus accounting for these differences.

  16. A trade off between catalytic activity and protein stability determines the clinical manifestations of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Boonyuen, Usa; Chamchoy, Kamonwan; Swangsri, Thitiluck; Junkree, Thanyaphorn; Day, Nicholas P J; White, Nicholas J; Imwong, Mallika

    2017-11-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common polymorphism and enzymopathy in humans, affecting approximately 400 million people worldwide. It is responsible for various clinical manifestations, including favism, hemolytic anemia, chronic non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia, spontaneous abortion, and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the severity of G6PD deficiency is of great importance but that of many G6PD variants are still unknown. In this study, we report the construction, expression, purification, and biochemical characterization in terms of kinetic properties and stability of five clinical G6PD variants-G6PD Bangkok, G6PD Bangkok noi, G6PD Songklanagarind, G6PD Canton+Bangkok noi, and G6PD Union+Viangchan. G6PD Bangkok and G6PD Canton+Bangkok noi showed a complete loss of catalytic activity and moderate reduction in thermal stability when compared with the native G6PD. G6PD Bangkok noi and G6PD Union+Viangchan showed a significant reduction in catalytic efficiency, whereas G6PD Songklanagarind showed a catalytic activity comparable to the wild-type enzyme. The Union+Viangchan mutation showed a remarkable effect on the global stability of the enzyme. In addition, our results indicate that the location of mutations in G6PD variants affects their catalytic activity, stability, and structure. Hence, our results provide a molecular explanation for clinical manifestations observed in individuals with G6PD deficiency. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... be available to those who have a family history of the condition. Alternative Names ... PG. Hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, chlorproguanil-dapsone with artesunate and post-treatment haemolysis in African children treated for uncomplicated malaria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria is a leading cause of mortality, particularly in sub-Saharan African children. Prompt and efficacious treatment is important as patients may progress within a few hours to severe and possibly fatal disease. Chlorproguanil-dapsone-artesunate (CDA) was a promising artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), but its development was prematurely stopped because of safety concerns secondary to its associated risk of haemolytic anaemia in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient individuals. The objective of the study was to assess whether CDA treatment and G6PD deficiency are risk factors for a post-treatment haemoglobin drop in African children <5 years of age with uncomplicated malaria. Methods This case–control study was performed in the context of a larger multicentre randomized clinical trial comparing safety and efficacy of four different ACT in children with uncomplicated malaria. Children, who after treatment experienced a haemoglobin drop ≥2 g/dl (cases) within the first four days (days 0, 1, 2, and 3), were compared with those without an Hb drop (controls). Cases and controls were matched for study site, sex, age and baseline haemoglobin measurements. Data were analysed using a conditional logistic regression model. Results G6PD deficiency prevalence, homo- or hemizygous, was 8.5% (10/117) in cases and 6.8% (16/234) in controls (p = 0.56). The risk of a Hb drop ≥2 g/dl was not associated with either G6PD deficiency (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.81; p = 0.76) or CDA treatment (AOR: 1.28; p = 0.37) alone. However, patients having both risk factors tended to have higher odds (AOR: 11.13; p = 0.25) of experiencing a Hb drop ≥2 g/dl within the first four days after treatment, however this finding was not statistically significant, mainly because G6PD deficient patients treated with CDA were very few. In non-G6PD deficient individuals, the proportion of cases was similar between treatment groups while in G

  19. High prevalence of hemoglobin disorders and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the Republic of Guinea (West Africa).

    PubMed

    Millimono, Tamba S; Loua, Kovana M; Rath, Silvia L; Relvas, Luis; Bento, Celeste; Diakite, Mandiou; Jarvis, Martin; Daries, Nathalie; Ribeiro, Leticia M; Manco, Licínio; Kaeda, Jaspal S

    2012-01-01

    Reliable and accurate epidemiological data is a prerequisite for a cost effective screening program for inherited disorders, which however, is lacking in a number of developing countries. Here we report the first detailed population study in the Republic of Guinea, a sub-Saharan West African country, designed to assess the frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and hemoglobinopathies, including screening for thalassemia. Peripheral blood samples from 187 Guinean adults were screened for hemoglobin (Hb) variants by standard hematological methods. One hundred and ten samples from males were screened for G6PD deficiency by the fluorescent spot test. Molecular analysis was performed for the most common α-thalassemia (α-thal) deletions, β-globin gene mutations, G6PD variants B (376A), A (376G), A- (376G/202A) and Betica (376G/968C), using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing. Of the 187 subjects screened, 36 were heterozygous for Hb S [β6(A3)Glu→Val, GAG>GTG] (allele frequency 9.62%). Sixty-four subjects were heterozygous and seven were homozygous for the -α(3.7) kb deletion (allele frequency 20.85%). β-Thalassemia alleles were detected in five subjects, four with the -29 (A>G) mutation (allele frequency 1.07%) and one with codon 15 (TGG>TAG) (allele frequency 0.96%). The G6PD A- and G6PD Betica deficient variants were highly prevalent with a frequency of 5.7 and 3.3%, respectively. While we did not test for ferritin levels or α(0)-thal, four females (5.2%) had red cell indices strongly suggestive of iron deficient anemia: Hb <9.7 g/dL; MCH <19.3 pg; MCV <68.2; MCHC <31.6 g/dl; RDW >19.8%. Our results are consistent with high frequency of alleles such as Hb S, α-thal and G6PD deficient alleles associated with malaria resistance. Finding a 9.6% Hb S allele frequency supports the notion for a proficient neonatal screening to identify the sickle cell patients, who might benefit

  20. Single-Dose Primaquine in a Preclinical Model of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: Implications for Use in Malaria Transmission-Blocking Programs.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Kristina S; Baresel, Paul C; Marcsisin, Sean R; Sousa, Jason; Vuong, Chau T; Reichard, Gregory A; Campo, Brice; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Rochford, Rosemary

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (G6PDd) are at risk for developing hemolytic anemia when given the antimalarial drug primaquine (PQ). The WHO Evidence Review Group released a report suggesting that mass administration of a single dose of PQ at 0.25 mg of base/kg of body weight (mpk) (mouse equivalent of 3.125 mpk) could potentially reduce malaria transmission based on its gametocytocidal activity and could be safely administered to G6PD-deficient individuals, but there are limited safety data available confirming the optimum single dose of PQ. A single-dose administration of PQ was therefore assessed in our huRBC-SCID mouse model used to predict hemolytic toxicity with respect to G6PD deficiency. In this model, nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID mice are engrafted with human red blood cells (huRBC) from donors with the African or Mediterranean variant of G6PDd (A-G6PDd or Med-G6PDd, respectively) and demonstrate dose-dependent sensitivity to PQ. In mice engrafted with A-G6PD-deficient huRBC, single-dose PQ at 3.125, 6.25, or 12.5 mpk had no significant loss of huRBC compared to the vehicle control group. In contrast, in mice engrafted with Med-G6PDd huRBC, a single dose of PQ at 3.125, 6.25, or 12.5 mpk resulted in a significant, dose-dependent loss of huRBC compared to the value for the vehicle control group. Our data suggest that administration of a single low dose of 0.25 mpk of PQ could induce hemolytic anemia in Med-G6PDd individuals but that use of single-dose PQ at 0.25 mpk as a gametocytocidal drug to block transmission would be safe in areas where A-G6PDd predominates. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Single-Dose Primaquine in a Preclinical Model of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: Implications for Use in Malaria Transmission-Blocking Programs

    PubMed Central

    Wickham, Kristina S.; Baresel, Paul C.; Sousa, Jason; Vuong, Chau T.; Reichard, Gregory A.; Campo, Brice; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (G6PDd) are at risk for developing hemolytic anemia when given the antimalarial drug primaquine (PQ). The WHO Evidence Review Group released a report suggesting that mass administration of a single dose of PQ at 0.25 mg of base/kg of body weight (mpk) (mouse equivalent of 3.125 mpk) could potentially reduce malaria transmission based on its gametocytocidal activity and could be safely administered to G6PD-deficient individuals, but there are limited safety data available confirming the optimum single dose of PQ. A single-dose administration of PQ was therefore assessed in our huRBC-SCID mouse model used to predict hemolytic toxicity with respect to G6PD deficiency. In this model, nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID mice are engrafted with human red blood cells (huRBC) from donors with the African or Mediterranean variant of G6PDd (A-G6PDd or Med-G6PDd, respectively) and demonstrate dose-dependent sensitivity to PQ. In mice engrafted with A-G6PD-deficient huRBC, single-dose PQ at 3.125, 6.25, or 12.5 mpk had no significant loss of huRBC compared to the vehicle control group. In contrast, in mice engrafted with Med-G6PDd huRBC, a single dose of PQ at 3.125, 6.25, or 12.5 mpk resulted in a significant, dose-dependent loss of huRBC compared to the value for the vehicle control group. Our data suggest that administration of a single low dose of 0.25 mpk of PQ could induce hemolytic anemia in Med-G6PDd individuals but that use of single-dose PQ at 0.25 mpk as a gametocytocidal drug to block transmission would be safe in areas where A-G6PDd predominates. PMID:27458212

  2. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and the risk of malaria and other diseases in children in Kenya: a case-control and a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Uyoga, Sophie; Ndila, Carolyne M; Macharia, Alex W; Nyutu, Gideon; Shah, Shivang; Peshu, Norbert; Clarke, Geraldine M; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Rockett, Kirk A; Williams, Thomas N

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The global prevalence of X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is thought to be a result of selection by malaria, but epidemiological studies have yielded confusing results. We investigated the relationships between G6PD deficiency and both malaria and non-malarial illnesses among children in Kenya. Methods We did this study in Kilifi County, Kenya, where the G6PD c.202T allele is the only significant cause of G6PD deficiency. We tested the associations between G6PD deficiency and severe and complicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria through a case-control study of 2220 case and 3940 control children. Cases were children aged younger than 14 years, who visited the high dependency ward of Kilifi County Hospital with severe malaria between March 1, 1998, and Feb 28, 2010. Controls were children aged between 3–12 months who were born within the same study area between August 2006, and September 2010. We assessed the association between G6PD deficiency and both uncomplicated malaria and other common diseases of childhood in a cohort study of 752 children aged younger than 10 years. Participants of this study were recruited from a representative sample of households within the Ngerenya and Chonyi areas of Kilifi County between Aug 1, 1998, and July 31, 2001. The primary outcome measure for the case-control study was the odds ratio for hospital admission with severe malaria (computed by logistic regression) while for the cohort study it was the incidence rate ratio for uncomplicated malaria and non-malaria illnesses (computed by Poisson regression), by G6PD deficiency category. Findings 2863 (73%) children in the control group versus 1643 (74%) in the case group had the G6PD normal genotype, 639 (16%) versus 306 (14%) were girls heterozygous for G6PD c.202T, and 438 (11%) versus 271 (12%) children were either homozygous girls or hemizygous boys. Compared with boys and girls without G6PD deficiency, we found significant

  3. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and the risk of malaria and other diseases in children in Kenya: a case-control and a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Uyoga, Sophie; Ndila, Carolyne M; Macharia, Alex W; Nyutu, Gideon; Shah, Shivang; Peshu, Norbert; Clarke, Geraldine M; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Rockett, Kirk A; Williams, Thomas N

    2015-10-01

    The global prevalence of X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is thought to be a result of selection by malaria, but epidemiological studies have yielded confusing results. We investigated the relationships between G6PD deficiency and both malaria and non-malarial illnesses among children in Kenya. We did this study in Kilifi County, Kenya, where the G6PD c.202T allele is the only significant cause of G6PD deficiency. We tested the associations between G6PD deficiency and severe and complicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria through a case-control study of 2220 case and 3940 control children. Cases were children aged younger than 14 years, who visited the high dependency ward of Kilifi County Hospital with severe malaria between March 1, 1998, and Feb 28, 2010. Controls were children aged between 3-12 months who were born within the same study area between August 2006, and September 2010. We assessed the association between G6PD deficiency and both uncomplicated malaria and other common diseases of childhood in a cohort study of 752 children aged younger than 10 years. Participants of this study were recruited from a representative sample of households within the Ngerenya and Chonyi areas of Kilifi County between Aug 1, 1998, and July 31, 2001. The primary outcome measure for the case-control study was the odds ratio for hospital admission with severe malaria (computed by logistic regression) while for the cohort study it was the incidence rate ratio for uncomplicated malaria and non-malaria illnesses (computed by Poisson regression), by G6PD deficiency category. 2863 (73%) children in the control group versus 1643 (74%) in the case group had the G6PD normal genotype, 639 (16%) versus 306 (14%) were girls heterozygous for G6PD c.202T, and 438 (11%) versus 271 (12%) children were either homozygous girls or hemizygous boys. Compared with boys and girls without G6PD deficiency, we found significant protection from severe malaria (odds ratio [OR

  4. Inactivation of Bakers' yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sungwoo; Joshi, J.G. )

    1989-04-18

    Preincubation of yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) with Al(III) produced an inactive enzyme containing 1 mol of Al(III)/mol of enzyme subunit. None of the enzyme-bound Al(III) was dissociated by dialysis against 10 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.0, containing 0.2 mM EDTA at 4{degree}C for 24 h. Citrate, NADP{sup +}, EDTA, or NaF protected the enzyme against the Al(III) inactivation. The Al(III)-inactivated enzyme, however, was completely reactivated only by citrate and NaF. The dissociation constant for the enzyme-aluminum complex was calculated to be 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M with NaF, a known reversible chelator for aluminum. Modification of histidine and lysine residues of the enzyme with diethyl pyrocarbonate and acetylsalicylic acid, respectively, inactivated the enzyme. However, the modified enzyme still bound 1 mol of Al(III)/mol of enzyme subunit. Circular dichroism studies showed that the binding of Al(III) to the enzyme induced a decrease in {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet and an increase in random coil. Therefore, it is suggested that inactivation of G6PD by Al(III) is due to the conformational change induced by Al(III) binding.

  5. [Hemoglobin Woodville associated with double point mutation in the gene of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Mansini, Adrián P; Fernández, Diego A; Aguirre, Fernando M; Pepe, Carolina; Milanesio, Berenice; Chaves, Alejandro; Eandi Eberle, Silvia; Feliú Torres, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    The co-inheritance of erythrocyte defects, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, and membranopathies is not an unusual event. For the diagnosis, a laboratory strategy, including screening and confirmatory tests, additional to molecular characterization, was designed. As the result of this approach, a 24-year-old man carrying a hemoglobinopathy (Hemoglobin Woodville) and an enzymopathy (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency) was identified. In the heterozygous state hemoglobin Woodville, is asymptomatic, and homozygous or double heterozygous individuals have not been reported thus far. On the other hand, previously described double point mutation in the gene for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase c. [202G>A; 376A>G], p. [Val 68Met; Asn126Asp], causes hemolysis of varying severity after food or drug intake or infections. This case highlights the importance of the methodology carried out for the diagnosis, treatment, and proper genetic counseling.

  6. Practical approach for characterization of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in countries with population ethnically heterogeneous: description of seven new G6PD mutants.

    PubMed

    Moradkhani, Kamran; Mekki, Chadia; Bahuau, Michel; Te, Valerie Li Thiao; Holder, Muriel; Pissard, Serge; Préhu, Claude; Rose, Christian; Wajcman, Henri; Galactéros, Frédéric

    2012-02-01

    We present a rapid strategy based on Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to characterize the more frequent glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) variants observed in a population with high gene flow. During a study involving more than 600 patients, we observed mainly G6PD A(-) (c.202G>A, c.376A>G; p.Val68Met, p.Asn126Asp), G6PD Mediterranean (Med) (c.563C>T, p.Ser188Phe), and G6PD Betica (c.376A>G, 542A>T; p.126Asn>Asp, 181Asp>Val) with addition of a few rare ones. A number of 10 abnormalities amounted to 92% of all the molecular defects. In addition, seven new mutations were found: three presented with acute hemolytic anemia following oxidative stress [G6PD Nice (c.1380G>C, p.Glu460Asp), G6PD Roubaix (c.811G>C, p.Val271Leu), and G6PD Toledo (c.496C>T, p.Arg166Cys)], three with different degrees of chronic hemolytic anemia [G6PD Lille (c.821A>T, p.Glu274Val), G6PD Villeurbanne (c.1000_1002delACC, p.Thr334del), and G6PD Amiens (c.1367A>T, p.Asp456Val)] and one found fortuitously G6PD Montpellier (c.1132G>A, p.Gly378Ser).

  7. G6PD (Dublin): chronic non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia resulting from glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in an Irish kindred.

    PubMed Central

    McCann, S R; Smithwick, A M; Temperley, I J; Tipton, K

    1980-01-01

    A new variant of G6PD associated with chronic non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia (CNSHA) in an Irish male is described. This variant is unique in that it has a normal electrophoretic mobility, Michaelis constant for G6P and NADP, and a normal pH optimum, together with a marked increase in utilisation of the substrate 2 deoxy glucose-6-phosphate. It is also relatively heat stable when compared with the normal (B) variant. These characteristics distinguish this variant from previously reported variants associated with CNSHA and we have called it G6PD Dublin. PMID:7401130

  8. Molecular analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variants in the Solomon Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Hirono, A.; Ishii, A.; Hirono, K.; Miwa, S.; Kere, N.; Fujii, H.

    1995-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most prevalent genetic disorders, and >100 million people are considered to have mutant genes. G6PD deficiency is frequent in the area where plasmodium falciparum infection is endemic, probably because the G6PD-deficient subjects are resistant to the parasite. Falciparum and vivax malarias have been highly endemic in the Solomon Islands, and a high frequency of G6PD deficiency has also been expected. A recent investigation showed that the frequency of G6PD deficiency in the Solomon Islands was 8.4%-14.4%. Although >80 G6PD variants from various populations have been molecularly analyzed, little is known about those in Melanesians. G6PD Maewo, which was originally found in Vanuatu, has so far been the only Melanesian variant whose structural abnormality was determined. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Excessive fluoride consumption increases haematological alteration in subjects with iron deficiency, thalassaemia, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pornprasert, Sakorn; Wanachantararak, Phenphichar; Kantawong, Fahsai; Chamnanprai, Supoj; Kongpan, Chatpat; Pienthai, Nattasit; Yanola, Jintana; Duangmano, Suwit; Prasannarong, Mujalin

    2016-06-18

    Excessive fluoride consumption leads to accelerated red blood cell death and anaemia. Whether that increases the haematological alteration in subjects with haematological disorders (iron deficiency, thalassaemia, and G-6-PD deficiency) is still unclear. The fluoride in serum and urine and haematological parameters of students at Mae Tuen School (fluoride endemic area) were analysed and compared to those of students at Baan Yang Poa and Baan Mai Schools (control areas). Iron deficiency, thalassaemia, and G-6-PD deficiency were also diagnosed in these students. The students at Mae Tuen School had significantly (P < 0.001) higher levels of mean fluoride in the serum and urine than those in control areas. In both control and fluoride endemic areas, students with haematological disorders had significantly lower levels of Hb, Hct, MCV, MCH, and MCHC than those without haematological disorders. Moreover, the lowest levels of Hb, MCH, and MCHC were observed in the students with haematological disorders who live in the fluoride endemic area. Thus, the excessive fluoride consumption increased haematological alteration in subjects with iron deficiency, thalassaemia, and G-6-PD deficiency and that may increase the risk of anaemia in these subjects.

  10. [Attempt at characterization of 2 erythrocyte variants of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in a patient with a partial enzymatic deficit].

    PubMed

    Bansard-Desmidt, N

    1975-09-01

    The electrophoresis shows, in red blood cells of a North African man affected by a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, the presence of two enzymes differing by their electrophoretic mobilities: one of them presents in the same mobility as variant Gd (+) B, the other being faster. After partial purification of the enzymes by ionic exchange chromatography on cellex D BIO-RAD, the preparation obtained shows some kinetic abnormalities: an increased value of 2-deoxy-glucose-6-phosphate utilisation and a non linear plot of 1/v versus 1/s, inadequate for Km determination. Assuming that our preparation contains two enzymes differing by their affinities for glucose-6-phosphate, were carried out a study of their Michaelis constants for glucose-6-phosphate by a method based on the densitometric determination of colored spots corresponding to these two variants after electrophoretic separation on cellogel strips. One of these variants is similar to Gd (+) B, the other being characterised by increased values of: electrophoretic mobility (+ 110%), Km for glucose-6-hosphate (194 +/- 38 muM, normal range being 55 to 70 muM), utilisation coefficient of 2-deoxy-glucose-6-phosphate.

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-derived NADPH fuels superoxide production in the failing heart

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the failing heart, NADPH oxidase and uncoupled NO synthase utilize cytosolic NADPH to form superoxide. NADPH is supplied principally by the pentose phosphate pathway, whose rate-limiting enzyme is glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Therefore, we hypothesized that cardiac G6PD activation dr...

  12. Inhibitory effect of a fava bean component on the in vitro development of Plasmodium falciparum in normal and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Golenser, J; Miller, J; Spira, D T; Navok, T; Chevion, M

    1983-03-01

    We examined the hypothesis that G-6-PD deficiency associated with fava bean ingestion confers resistance to malaria by studying the in vitro interactions between malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), human erythrocytes with varying degrees of G-6-PD deficiency, and isouramil (IU), a fava bean extract that is known to cause oxidant stress and hemolysis of G-6-PD-deficient erythrocytes. Untreated G-6-PD-deficient and normal erythrocytes supported the in vitro growth of P. falciparum equally well. However, after pretreatment with IU, G-6-PD-deficient erythrocytes did not support parasite growth in vitro, whereas growth remained high in normal erythrocytes. Parasite growth was proportional to the G-6-PD activity of the IU-treated erythrocytes. In contrast, when parasitized erythrocytes were exposed to IU, parasites even in normal erythrocytes were destroyed. Ring forms were much less sensitive than late trophozoites and schizonts. The results suggest that there are two modes by which IU affects the development of P. falciparum and demonstrate in vitro that G-6-PD deficiency confers resistance against malaria under conditions of fava-bean-associated oxidant stress.

  13. Molecular Heterogeneity of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Burkina Faso: G-6-PD Betica Selma and Santamaria in People with Symptomatic Malaria in Ouagadougou

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Abdoul Karim; Yameogo, Pouiré; Diarra, Birama; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Yonli, Albert; Compaore, Tegwindé Rebeca; Soubeiga, Serge Théophile; Djigma, Florencia Wenkuuni; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The G-6-PD deficiency has an important polymorphism with genotypic variants such as 202A/376G, 376G/542T and 376G/968T known in West African populations. It would confer protection against severe forms of malaria although there are differences between the various associations in different studies. In this study we genotyped six (06) variants of the G-6-PD gene in people with symptomatic malaria in urban areas in Burkina Faso. One hundred and eighty-two (182) patients who tested positive using rapid detection test and microscopy were included in this study. A regular PCR with the GENESPARK G6PD African kit was run followed by electrophoresis, allowing initially to genotype six SNPs (G202A, A376G, A542T, G680T, C563T and T968C). Women carrying the mutations 202A and/or 376G were further typed by real-time PCR using TaqMan probes rs1050828 and rs1050829. In the study population the G-6-PD deficiency prevalence was 9.9%. In addition of G-6-PD A- (202A/376G) variant, 376G/542T and 376G/968T variants were also detected. Hemoglobin electrophoresis revealed that 22.5% (41/182) of the individuals had HbAC compared with2.2% with HbAS and one individual had double heterozygous HbSC. There was no correlation between the G-6-PD deficiency or haemoglobinopathies and symptomatic malaria infections in this study. Our study confirms that the G-6-PD deficiency does not confer protection against Plasmodium falciparum infections. As opposed to previous genotyping studies carried out in Burkina Faso, this study shows for the first time the presence of the variant A- (376G/968C) and warrants further investigation at the national level and in specific ethnic groups. PMID:27413522

  14. Life and Death of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficient Erythrocytes - Role of Redox Stress and Band 3 Modifications.

    PubMed

    Arese, Paolo; Gallo, Valentina; Pantaleo, Antonella; Turrini, Franco

    2012-10-01

    G6PD catalyzes the first, pace-making reaction of pentosephosphate cycle (PPC) which produces NADPH. NADPH maintains glutathione and thiol groups of proteins and enzymes in the reduced state which is essential for protection against oxidative stress. Individuals affected by G6PD deficiency are unable to regenerate reduced glutathione (GSH) and are undefended against oxidative stress. G6PD deficiency accelerates normal senescence and enhances the precocious removal of chronologically young, yet biologically old cells. The term hemolytic anemia is misleading because RBCs do not lyse but are removed by phagocytosis. Acute hemolysis by fava bean ingestion in G6PD deficient individuals (favism) is described being the best-studied natural model of oxidant damage. It bears strong analogies to hemolysis by oxidant drugs or chemicals. Membrane alterations observed in vivo during favism are superimposable to changes in senescent RBCs. In summary, RBC membranes isolated from favic patients contained elevated amounts of complexes between IgG and the complement fragment C3b/C3c and were prone to vesiculation. Anti-band 3 IgG reacted to aggregated band 3-complement complexes. In favism extensive clustering of band 3 and membrane deposition of hemichromes were also observed. Severely damaged RBCs isolated from early crises had extensive membrane cross-bonding and very low GSH levels and were phagocytosed 10-fold more intensely compared to normal RBCs.

  15. Life and Death of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficient Erythrocytes – Role of Redox Stress and Band 3 Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Arese, Paolo; Gallo, Valentina; Pantaleo, Antonella; Turrini, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Summary G6PD catalyzes the first, pace-making reaction of pentosephosphate cycle (PPC) which produces NADPH. NADPH maintains glutathione and thiol groups of proteins and enzymes in the reduced state which is essential for protection against oxidative stress. Individuals affected by G6PD deficiency are unable to regenerate reduced glutathione (GSH) and are undefended against oxidative stress. G6PD deficiency accelerates normal senescence and enhances the precocious removal of chronologically young, yet biologically old cells. The term hemolytic anemia is misleading because RBCs do not lyse but are removed by phagocytosis. Acute hemolysis by fava bean ingestion in G6PD deficient individuals (favism) is described being the best-studied natural model of oxidant damage. It bears strong analogies to hemolysis by oxidant drugs or chemicals. Membrane alterations observed in vivo during favism are superimposable to changes in senescent RBCs. In summary, RBC membranes isolated from favic patients contained elevated amounts of complexes between IgG and the complement fragment C3b/C3c and were prone to vesiculation. Anti-band 3 IgG reacted to aggregated band 3-complement complexes. In favism extensive clustering of band 3 and membrane deposition of hemichromes were also observed. Severely damaged RBCs isolated from early crises had extensive membrane cross-bonding and very low GSH levels and were phagocytosed 10-fold more intensely compared to normal RBCs. PMID:23801924

  16. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Haemoglobin Drop after Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine Use for Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria during Pregnancy in Ghana - A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Owusu, Ruth; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Mahama, Emmanuel; Awini, Elizabeth; Anyorigiya, Thomas; Dosoo, David; Amu, Alberta; Jakpa, Gabriel; Ofei, Emmanuel; Segbaya, Sylvester; Oduro, Abraham Rexford; Gyapong, Margaret; Hodgson, Abraham; Bart-Plange, Constance; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) is still the only recommended antimalarial for use in intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) in some malaria endemic countries including Ghana. SP has the potential to cause acute haemolysis in G6PD deficient people resulting in significant haemoglobin (Hb) drop but there is limited data on post SP-IPTp Hb drop. This study determined the difference, if any in proportions of women with significant acute haemoglobin drop between G6PD normal, partial deficient and full deficient women after SP-IPTp. Prospectively, 1518 pregnant women who received SP for IPTp as part of their normal antenatal care were enrolled. Their G6PD status were determined at enrollment followed by assessments on days 3, 7,14 and 28 to document any adverse effects and changes in post-IPTp haemoglobin (Hb) levels. The three groups were comparable at baseline except for their mean Hb (10.3 g/dL for G6PD normal, 10.8 g/dL for G6PD partial deficient and 10.8 g/dL for G6PD full defect women).The prevalence of G6PD full defect was 2.3% and 17.0% for G6PD partial defect. There was no difference in the proportions with fractional Hb drop ≥ 20% as compared to their baseline value post SP-IPTp among the 3 groups on days 3, 7, 14. The G6PD full defect group had the highest median fractional drop at day 7. There was a weak negative correlation between G6PD activity and fractional Hb drop. There was no statistical difference between the three groups in the proportions of those who started the study with Hb ≥ 8g/dl whose Hb level subsequently fell below 8g/dl post-SP IPTp. No study participant required transfusion or hospitalization for severe anaemia. There was no significant difference between G6PD normal and deficient women in proportions with significant acute haemoglobin drop post SP-IPTp and lower G6PD enzyme activity was not strongly associated with significant acute drug-induced haemoglobin drop post SP-IPTp but a larger study is

  17. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Haemoglobin Drop after Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine Use for Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria during Pregnancy in Ghana – A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Ruth; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Mahama, Emmanuel; Awini, Elizabeth; Anyorigiya, Thomas; Dosoo, David; Amu, Alberta; Jakpa, Gabriel; Ofei, Emmanuel; Segbaya, Sylvester; Oduro, Abraham Rexford; Gyapong, Margaret; Hodgson, Abraham; Bart-Plange, Constance; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Background Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) is still the only recommended antimalarial for use in intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) in some malaria endemic countries including Ghana. SP has the potential to cause acute haemolysis in G6PD deficient people resulting in significant haemoglobin (Hb) drop but there is limited data on post SP-IPTp Hb drop. This study determined the difference, if any in proportions of women with significant acute haemoglobin drop between G6PD normal, partial deficient and full deficient women after SP-IPTp. Methods and Findings Prospectively, 1518 pregnant women who received SP for IPTp as part of their normal antenatal care were enrolled. Their G6PD status were determined at enrollment followed by assessments on days 3, 7,14 and 28 to document any adverse effects and changes in post-IPTp haemoglobin (Hb) levels. The three groups were comparable at baseline except for their mean Hb (10.3 g/dL for G6PD normal, 10.8 g/dL for G6PD partial deficient and 10.8 g/dL for G6PD full defect women).The prevalence of G6PD full defect was 2.3% and 17.0% for G6PD partial defect. There was no difference in the proportions with fractional Hb drop ≥ 20% as compared to their baseline value post SP-IPTp among the 3 groups on days 3, 7, 14. The G6PD full defect group had the highest median fractional drop at day 7. There was a weak negative correlation between G6PD activity and fractional Hb drop. There was no statistical difference between the three groups in the proportions of those who started the study with Hb ≥ 8g/dl whose Hb level subsequently fell below 8g/dl post-SP IPTp. No study participant required transfusion or hospitalization for severe anaemia. Conclusions There was no significant difference between G6PD normal and deficient women in proportions with significant acute haemoglobin drop post SP-IPTp and lower G6PD enzyme activity was not strongly associated with significant acute drug-induced haemoglobin

  18. Chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia due to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: report of two families with novel mutations causing G6PD Bangkok and G6PD Bangkok Noi.

    PubMed

    Tanphaichitr, Voravarn S; Hirono, Akira; Pung-amritt, Parichat; Treesucon, Ajjima; Wanachiwanawin, Wanchai

    2011-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common hereditary enzymopathies worldwide. Mostly G6PD deficient cases are asymptomatic though they may have the risk of neonatal jaundice (NNJ) and acute intravascular hemolysis during oxidative stress. Chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) due to G6PD deficiency is rare. In Thailand, one case was reported 40 years ago and by biochemical study this G6PD was reported to be a new variant G6PD Bangkok. We, herein, report two families with CNSHA due to G6PD deficiency. In the first family, we have been following up the clinical course of the patient with G6PD Bangkok. In addition to chronic hemolysis, he had three acute hemolytic episodes requiring blood transfusions during childhood period. Multiple gallstones were detected at the age of 27. His two daughters who inherited G6PD Bangkok from him and G6PD Vanua Lava from his wife are asymptomatic. Both of them had NNJ and persistent evidences of compensated hemolysis. Molecular analysis revealed a novel missense mutation 825 G→C predicting 275 Lys→Asn causing G6PD Bangkok. In the second family, two male siblings are affected. They had NNJ and several hemolytic episodes which required blood transfusions. On follow-up they have been diagnosed with chronic hemolysis as evidenced by reticulocytosis and indirect hyperbilirubinemia. Molecular analysis revealed combined missense mutations in exons 12 and 13. The first mutation was 1376 G→T predicting 459 Arg→Leu (known as G6PD Canton) and the second one was 1502 T→G predicting 501 Phe→Cys. We designated the resulting novel G6PD variant, G6PD Bangkok Noi.

  19. Noninferiority of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency diagnosis by a point-of-care rapid test vs the laboratory fluorescent spot test demonstrated by copper inhibition in normal human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Baird, J Kevin; Dewi, Mewahyu; Subekti, Decy; Elyazar, Iqbal; Satyagraha, Ari W

    2015-06-01

    Tens of millions of patients diagnosed with vivax malaria cannot safely receive primaquine therapy against repeated attacks caused by activation of dormant liver stages called hypnozoites. Most of these patients lack access to screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, a highly prevalent disorder causing serious acute hemolytic anemia with primaquine therapy. We optimized CuCl inhibition of G6PD in normal red blood cells (RBCs) to assess G6PD diagnostic technologies suited to point of care in the impoverished rural tropics. The most widely applied technology for G6PD screening-the fluorescent spot test (FST)-is impractical in that setting. We evaluated a new point-of-care G6PD screening kit (CareStart G6PD, CSG) against FST using graded CuCl treatments to simulate variable hemizygous states, and varying proportions of CuCl-treated RBC suspensions to simulate variable heterozygous states of G6PD deficiency. In experiments double-blinded to CuCl treatment, technicians reading FST and CSG test (n = 269) classified results as positive or negative for deficiency. At G6PD activity ≤40% of normal (n = 112), CSG test was not inferior to FST in detecting G6PD deficiency (P = 0.003), with 96% vs 90% (P = 0.19) sensitivity and 75% and 87% (P = 0.01) specificity, respectively. The CSG test costs less, requires no specialized equipment, laboratory skills, or cold chain for successful application, and performs as well as the FST standard of care for G6PD screening. Such a device may vastly expand access to primaquine therapy and aid in mitigating the very substantial burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by the hypnozoite reservoir of vivax malaria.

  20. Acquired hemoglobin variants and exposure to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient red blood cell units during exchange transfusion for sickle cell disease in a patient requiring antigen-matched blood.

    PubMed

    Raciti, Patricia M; Francis, Richard O; Spitalnik, Patrice F; Schwartz, Joseph; Jhang, Jeffrey S

    2013-08-01

    Red blood cell exchange (RBCEx) is frequently used in the management of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and acute chest syndrome or stroke, or to maintain target hemoglobin S (HbS) levels. In these settings, RBCEx is a category I or II recommendation according to guidelines on the use of therapeutic apheresis published by the American Society for Apheresis. Matching donor red blood cells (RBCs) to recipient phenotypes (e.g., C, E, K-antigen negative) can decrease the risk of alloimmunization in patients with multi-transfused SCD. However, this may select for donors with a higher prevalence of RBC disorders for which screening is not performed. This report describes a patient with SCD treated with RBCEx using five units negative for C, E, K, Fya, Fyb (prospectively matched), four of which were from donors with hemoglobin variants and/or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Pre-RBCEx HbS quantification by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) demonstrated 49.3% HbS and 2.8% hemoglobin C, presumably from transfusion of a hemoglobin C-containing RBC unit during a previous RBCEx. Post-RBCEx HPLC showed the appearance of hemoglobin G-Philadelphia. Two units were G6PD-deficient. The patient did well, but the consequences of transfusing RBC units that are G6PD-deficient and contain hemoglobin variants are unknown. Additional studies are needed to investigate effects on storage, in-vivo RBC recovery and survival, and physiological effects following transfusion of these units. Post-RBCEx HPLC can monitor RBCEx efficiency and detect the presence of abnormal transfused units.

  1. Molecular Analysis of the Gene Encoding F420-Dependent Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, Endang; Daniels, Lacy

    1998-01-01

    The gene fgd, which codes for F420-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (FGD), was cloned from Mycobacterium smegmatis, and its sequence was determined and analyzed. A homolog of FGD which has a very high similarity to the M. smegmatis FGD-derived amino acid sequence was identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. FGD showed significant homology with F420-dependent N5,N10-methylene-tetrahydromethanopterin reductase (MER) from methanogenic archaea and with several hypothetical proteins from M. tuberculosis and Archaeoglobus fulgidus, but FGD showed no significant homology with NADP-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases. Multiple alignment of FGD and MER proteins revealed four conserved consensus sequences. Multiple alignment of FGD with the hypothetical proteins also revealed portions of the same conserved sequences. Moderately high levels of FGD were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) carrying fgd in pBluescript. PMID:9555906

  2. Apparent role of dynein in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase trafficking in neutrophils from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ji-Biao; Espinoza, Jimmy; Romero, Roberto; Petty, Howard R

    2006-03-01

    To better understand the mechanisms of metabolic microcompartmentalization associated with neutrophil hexose monophosphate shunt activity during pregnancy, we have studied the intracellular trafficking of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDase). Microtubule motor proteins colocalize with G6PDase. Dynein inhibitors block G6PDase accumulation at the microtubule-organizing center in pregnancy cells. On this basis, we conclude that microtubule motor proteins participate in hexose monophosphate shunt enzyme transport within leukocytes.

  3. Aldosterone impairs vascular reactivity by decreasing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Dam, Aamir; Maron, Bradley A.; Scribner, Anne W.; Liao, Ronglih; Handy, Diane E.; Stanton, Robert C.; Pitt, Bertram; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired vascular reactivity; however, the mechanism by which aldosterone promotes endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd), the principal source of Nadph, modulates vascular function by limiting oxidant stress to preserve bioavailable nitric oxide (NO•). In these studies, we show that aldosterone (10−9-10−7 mol/l) decreases endothelial G6pd expression and activity in vitro resulting in increased oxidant stress and decreased cGMP levels similar to what is observed in G6pd-deficient cells. Aldosterone decreases G6pd expression by protein kinase A activation to increase expression of Crem, which interferes with Creb binding to the G6pd promoter. In vivo, infusion of aldosterone decreases vascular G6pd expression and impairs vascular reactivity. These effects are abrogated by spironolactone or vascular gene transfer of G6pd. These studies demonstrate that aldosterone induces a G6pd-deficient phenotype to impair endothelial function; aldosterone antagonism or gene transfer of G6pd improves vascular reactivity by restoring G6pd activity. PMID:17273168

  4. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Update and Analysis of New Mutations around the World

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; González-Valdez, Abigail; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a key regulatory enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway which produces nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) to maintain an adequate reducing environment in the cells and is especially important in red blood cells (RBC). Given its central role in the regulation of redox state, it is understandable that mutations in the gene encoding G6PD can cause deficiency of the protein activity leading to clinical manifestations such as neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia. Recently, an extensive review has been published about variants in the g6pd gene; recognizing 186 mutations. In this work, we review the state of the art in G6PD deficiency, describing 217 mutations in the g6pd gene; we also compile information about 31 new mutations, 16 that were not recognized and 15 more that have recently been reported. In order to get a better picture of the effects of new described mutations in g6pd gene, we locate the point mutations in the solved three-dimensional structure of the human G6PD protein. We found that class I mutations have the most deleterious effects on the structure and stability of the protein. PMID:27941691

  5. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Update and Analysis of New Mutations around the World.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; González-Valdez, Abigail; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-12-09

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a key regulatory enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway which produces nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) to maintain an adequate reducing environment in the cells and is especially important in red blood cells (RBC). Given its central role in the regulation of redox state, it is understandable that mutations in the gene encoding G6PD can cause deficiency of the protein activity leading to clinical manifestations such as neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia. Recently, an extensive review has been published about variants in the g6pd gene; recognizing 186 mutations. In this work, we review the state of the art in G6PD deficiency, describing 217 mutations in the g6pd gene; we also compile information about 31 new mutations, 16 that were not recognized and 15 more that have recently been reported. In order to get a better picture of the effects of new described mutations in g6pd gene, we locate the point mutations in the solved three-dimensional structure of the human G6PD protein. We found that class I mutations have the most deleterious effects on the structure and stability of the protein.

  6. Androgen-estrogen synergy in rat levator ani muscle Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of castration and hormone administration on the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the rat levator ani muscle were studied. Castration caused a decrease in enzyme activity and in wet weight of the levator ani muscle. Chronic administration of testosterone propionate increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the levator ani muscle of castrated rats; the magnitude of the recovery of enzyme activity was related to the length of time of exposure to testosterone propionate after castration as well as to the length of time the animals were castrated. The longer the period of castration before exposure to testosterone propionate, the greater the effect. This result may be related to previously reported castration-mediated increases in androgen receptor binding in muscle. Dihydrotestosterone was less effective than testosterone propionate in enhancing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the levator ani muscle from castrated rats; estradiol-17-beta alone was ineffective. Combined treatment with estradiol-17-beta and dihydrotestosterone, however, was as effective as testosterone alone. Thus, androgens and estrogens may exert synergistic effects on levator ani muscle.

  7. Effects of some drugs on human erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Akkemik, Ebru; Budak, Harun; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    Inhibitory effects of some drugs on glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase from the erythrocytes of human have been investigated. For this purpose, at the beginning, erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was purified 2256 times in a yield of 44.22% by using ammonium sulphate precipitation and 2', 5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity gel. Temperature of +4°C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was determined with the Beutler method by using a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. This method was utilized for all kinetic studies. Ketotifen, dacarbazine, thiocolchicoside, meloxicam, methotrexate, furosemide, olanzapine, methylprednizolone acetate, paricalcitol, ritodrine hydrochloride, and gadobenate-dimeglumine were used as drugs. All the drugs indicated the inhibitory effects on the enzyme. Ki constants for glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were found by means of Lineweaver-Burk graphs. While methylprednizolone acetate showed competitive inhibition, the others displayed non-competitive inhibition. In addition, IC(50) values of the drugs were determined by plotting Activity% vs [I].

  8. Androgen-estrogen synergy in rat levator ani muscle Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of castration and hormone administration on the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the rat levator ani muscle were studied. Castration caused a decrease in enzyme activity and in wet weight of the levator ani muscle. Chronic administration of testosterone propionate increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the levator ani muscle of castrated rats; the magnitude of the recovery of enzyme activity was related to the length of time of exposure to testosterone propionate after castration as well as to the length of time the animals were castrated. The longer the period of castration before exposure to testosterone propionate, the greater the effect. This result may be related to previously reported castration-mediated increases in androgen receptor binding in muscle. Dihydrotestosterone was less effective than testosterone propionate in enhancing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the levator ani muscle from castrated rats; estradiol-17-beta alone was ineffective. Combined treatment with estradiol-17-beta and dihydrotestosterone, however, was as effective as testosterone alone. Thus, androgens and estrogens may exert synergistic effects on levator ani muscle.

  9. Hemolytic Potential of Tafenoquine in Female Volunteers Heterozygous for Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency (G6PD Mahidol Variant) versus G6PD-Normal Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rueangweerayut, Ronnatrai; Bancone, Germana; Harrell, Emma J; Beelen, Andrew P; Kongpatanakul, Supornchai; Möhrle, Jörg J; Rousell, Vicki; Mohamed, Khadeeja; Qureshi, Ammar; Narayan, Sushma; Yubon, Nushara; Miller, Ann; Nosten, François H; Luzzatto, Lucio; Duparc, Stephan; Kleim, Jörg-Peter; Green, Justin A

    2017-07-24

    Tafenoquine is an 8-aminoquinoline under investigation for the prevention of relapse in Plasmodium vivax malaria. This open-label, dose-escalation study assessed quantitatively the hemolytic risk with tafenoquine in female healthy volunteers heterozygous for the Mahidol(487A) glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient variant versus G6PD-normal females, and with reference to primaquine. Six G6PD-heterozygous subjects (G6PD enzyme activity 40-60% of normal) and six G6PD-normal subjects per treatment group received single-dose tafenoquine (100, 200, or 300 mg) or primaquine (15 mg × 14 days). All participants had pretreatment hemoglobin levels ≥ 12.0 g/dL. Tafenoquine dose escalation stopped when hemoglobin decreased by ≥ 2.5 g/dL (or hematocrit decline ≥ 7.5%) versus pretreatment values in ≥ 3/6 subjects. A dose-response was evident in G6PD-heterozygous subjects (N = 15) receiving tafenoquine for the maximum decrease in hemoglobin versus pretreatment values. Hemoglobin declines were similar for tafenoquine 300 mg (-2.65 to -2.95 g/dL [N = 3]) and primaquine (-1.25 to -3.0 g/dL [N = 5]). Two further cohorts of G6PD-heterozygous subjects with G6PD enzyme levels 61-80% (N = 2) and > 80% (N = 5) of the site median normal received tafenoquine 200 mg; hemolysis was less pronounced at higher G6PD enzyme activities. Tafenoquine hemolytic potential was dose dependent, and hemolysis was greater in G6PD-heterozygous females with lower G6PD enzyme activity levels. Single-dose tafenoquine 300 mg did not appear to increase the severity of hemolysis versus primaquine 15 mg × 14 days.

  10. Hemizygous Expression of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Erythrocytes of Heterozygotes for the Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Nyhan, William L.; Bakay, Bohdan; Connor, James D.; Marks, James F.; Keele, Doman K.

    1970-01-01

    In women heterozygous for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl trasferase deficiency, the activity of this enzyme in the erythrocyte is usually normal. In a key kindred two such obligate heterozygotes were also heterozygous for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase types A and B. The AB genotype was confirmed in one by assay of skin fibroblasts. Erythrocytes were exclusively of type B. These observations suggest the clonal origin of the hematopoietic system in these women from a primordial cell line with a single active X chromosome. Images PMID:5263751

  11. Risks of Hemolysis in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficient Infants Exposed to Chlorproguanil-Dapsone, Mefloquine and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine as Part of Intermittent Presumptive Treatment of Malaria in Infants.

    PubMed

    Poirot, Eugenie; Vittinghoff, Eric; Ishengoma, Deus; Alifrangis, Michael; Carneiro, Ilona; Hashim, Ramadhan; Baraka, Vito; Mosha, Jacklin; Gesase, Samwel; Chandramohan, Daniel; Gosling, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Chlorproguanil-dapsone (CD) has been linked to hemolysis in symptomatic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient (G6PDd) children. Few studies have explored the effects of G6PD status on hemolysis in children treated with Intermittent Preventive Treatment in infants (IPTi) antimalarial regimens. We sought to examine the joint effects of G6PD status and IPTi antimalarial treatment on incidence of hemolysis in asymptomatic children treated with CD, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), and mefloquine (MQ). A secondary analysis of data from a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of IPTi was conducted. Hemoglobin (Hb) measurements were made at IPTi doses, regular follow-up and emergency visits. G6PD genotype was determined at 9 months looking for SNPs for the A- genotype at coding position 202. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to examine hemolysis among children with valid G6PD genotyping results. Hemolysis was defined as the absolute change in Hb or as any post-dose Hb <8 g/dL. These outcomes were assessed using either a single follow-up Hb on day 7 after an IPTi dose or Hb obtained 1 to 14 or 28 days after each IPTi dose. Relative to placebo, CD reduced Hb by approximately 0.5 g/dL at day 7 and within 14 days of an IPTi dose, and by 0.2 g/dL within 28 days. Adjusted declines in the CD group were larger than in the MQ and SP groups. At day 7, homo-/hemizygous genotype was associated with higher odds of Hb <8 g/dL (adjusted odds ratio = 6.7, 95% CI 1.7 to 27.0) and greater absolute reductions in Hb (-0.6 g/dL, 95% CI -1.1 to 0.003). There was no evidence to suggest increased reductions in Hb among homo-/hemizygous children treated with CD compared to placebo, SP or MQ. While treatment with CD demonstrated greater reductions in Hb at 7 and 14 days after an IPTi dose compared to both SP and MQ, there was no evidence that G6PD deficiency exacerbated the adverse effects of CD, despite evidence for higher hemolysis risk among G6PDd infants.

  12. Changing kinetic properties of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from pea chloroplasts during photosynthetic induction

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, X.; Anderson, L.E.

    1987-04-01

    The first enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, glucose-6-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49), is inactivated when pea chloroplasts are irradiated. They have examined the kinetics of light inactivation of glucose-6-P dehydrogenase in intact chloroplasts during photosynthetic induction and the kinetic parameters of the active (dark) and less active (light) form of the dehydrogenase. Light inactivation of the dehydrogenase is rapid and occurs before photosynthetic O/sub 2/ evolution is measureable in intact chloroplasts. Likewise dark activation is quite rapid. The major change in the kinetic parameters of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is in maximal velocity. This light inactivation probably prevents operation of a futile cycle involving glucose-6-P, NADPH and oxidative and reductive pentose phosphate pathway enzymes.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations in Bangladeshi Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Suprovath Kumar; Hossain, Mohammad Amir; Qadri, Syeda Kashfi; Muraduzzaman, A. K. M.; Bhuyan, Golam Sarower; Shahidullah, Mohammod; Mannan, Mohammad Abdul; Tahura, Sarabon; Hussain, Manzoor; Akhter, Shahida; Nahar, Nazmun; Shirin, Tahmina; Qadri, Firdausi; Mannoor, Kaiissar

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common X-linked human enzyme defect of red blood cells (RBCs). Individuals with this gene defect appear normal until exposed to oxidative stress which induces hemolysis. Consumption of certain foods such as fava beans, legumes; infection with bacteria or virus; and use of certain drugs such as primaquine, sulfa drugs etc. may result in lysis of RBCs in G6PD deficient individuals. The genetic defect that causes G6PD deficiency has been identified mostly as single base missense mutations. One hundred and sixty G6PD gene mutations, which lead to amino acid substitutions, have been described worldwide. The purpose of this study was to detect G6PD gene mutations in hospital-based settings in the local population of Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Qualitative fluorescent spot test and quantitative enzyme activity measurement using RANDOX G6PDH kit were performed for analysis of blood specimens and detection of G6PD-deficient participants. For G6PD-deficient samples, PCR was done with six sets of primers specific for G6PD gene. Automated Sanger sequencing of the PCR products was performed to identify the mutations in the gene. Based on fluorescence spot test and quantitative enzyme assay followed by G6PD gene sequencing, 12 specimens (11 males and one female) among 121 clinically suspected patient-specimens were found to be deficient, suggesting a frequency of 9.9% G6PD deficiency. Sequencing of the G6PD-deficient samples revealed c.C131G substitution (exon-3: Ala44Gly) in six samples, c.G487A substitution (exon-6:Gly163Ser) in five samples and c.G949A substitution (exon-9: Glu317Lys) of coding sequence in one sample. These mutations either affect NADP binding or disrupt protein structure. From the study it appears that Ala44Gly and Gly163Ser are the most common G6PD mutations in Dhaka, Bangladesh. This is the first study of G6PD mutations in Bangladesh. PMID:27880809

  14. Data mining and pathway analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase with natural language processing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Zhang, Chunhua; Wang, Yanling; Li, Yuqian; Han, Qiaoqiao; Yang, Huixin; Zhu, Yuechun

    2017-08-01

    Human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a crucial enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, and serves an important role in biosynthesis and the redox balance. G6PD deficiency is a major cause of neonatal jaundice and acute hemolyticanemia, and recently, G6PD has been associated with diseases including inflammation and cancer. The aim of the present study was to conduct a search of the National Center for Biotechnology Information PubMed library for articles discussing G6PD. Genes that were identified to be associated with G6PD were recorded, and the frequency at which each gene appeared was calculated. Gene ontology (GO), pathway and network analyses were then performed. A total of 98 G6PD‑associated genes and 33 microRNAs (miRNAs) that potentially regulate G6PD were identified. The 98 G6PD‑associated genes were then sub‑classified into three functional groups by GO analysis, followed by analysis of function, pathway, network, and disease association. Out of the 47 signaling pathways identified, seven were significantly correlated with G6PD‑associated genes. At least two out of four independent programs identified the 33 miRNAs that were predicted to target G6PD. miR‑1207‑5P, miR‑1 and miR‑125a‑5p were predicted by all four software programs to target G6PD. The results of the present study revealed that dysregulation of G6PD was associated with cancer, autoimmune diseases, and oxidative stress‑induced disorders. These results revealed the potential roles of G6PD‑regulated signaling and metabolic pathways in the etiology of these diseases.

  15. Differential behaviour of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in two morphological forms of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Lupiañez, J A; Adroher, F J; Vargas, A M; Osuna, A

    1987-01-01

    1. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity (EC 1.1.1.49) of two morphological forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, epimastigotes and metacyclics, are reported. 2. The kinetic behaviour and some of the kinetic parameters of the enzyme in both forms were studied. The enzymes showed a simple Michaelis-Menten kinetic. 3. The activity in epimastigote forms was alway higher than the metacyclic ones. At subsaturating concentrations of substrate was almost 10-fold higher, whereas at saturating concentrations was about 2-fold higher. 4. In epimastigote forms the specific activity and Km values, at pH 7.5 and 37 degrees C, was found to be 142 mUnits x mg-1 of protein and 0.23 mM, respectively. 5. In the same conditions, the specific activity and Km values in metacyclic forms was 75 mUnits x mg-1 of protein and 1.06 mM, respectively. 6. A possible role in the carbohydrate metabolism of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in both forms of Trypanosoma cruzi is discussed.

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase polymorphisms and susceptibility to mild malaria in Dogon and Fulani, Mali.

    PubMed

    Maiga, Bakary; Dolo, Amagana; Campino, Susana; Sepulveda, Nuno; Corran, Patrick; Rockett, Kirk A; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Clark, Taane G

    2014-07-11

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is associated with protection from severe malaria, and potentially uncomplicated malaria phenotypes. It has been documented that G6PD deficiency in sub-Saharan Africa is due to the 202A/376G G6PD A-allele, and association studies have used genotyping as a convenient technique for epidemiological studies. However, recent studies have shown discrepancies in G6PD202/376 associations with severe malaria. There is evidence to suggest that other G6PD deficiency alleles may be common in some regions of West Africa, and that allelic heterogeneity could explain these discrepancies. A cross-sectional epidemiological study of malaria susceptibility was conducted during 2006 and 2007 in the Sahel meso-endemic malaria zone of Mali. The study included Dogon (n = 375) and Fulani (n = 337) sympatric ethnic groups, where the latter group is characterized by lower susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Fifty-three G6PD polymorphisms, including 202/376, were genotyped across the 712 samples. Evidence of association of these G6PD polymorphisms and mild malaria was assessed in both ethnic groups using genotypic and haplotypic statistical tests. It was confirmed that the Fulani are less susceptible to malaria, and the 202A mutation is rare in this group (<1% versus Dogon 7.9%). The Betica-Selma 968C/376G (~11% enzymatic activity) was more common in Fulani (6.1% vs Dogon 0.0%). There are differences in haplotype frequencies between Dogon and Fulani, and association analysis did not reveal strong evidence of protective G6PD genetic effects against uncomplicated malaria in both ethnic groups and gender. However, there was some evidence of increased risk of mild malaria in Dogon with the 202A mutation, attaining borderline statistical significance in females. The rs915942 polymorphism was found to be associated with asymptomatic malaria in Dogon females, and the rs61042368 polymorphism was associated with clinical malaria in

  17. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase polymorphisms and susceptibility to mild malaria in Dogon and Fulani, Mali

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is associated with protection from severe malaria, and potentially uncomplicated malaria phenotypes. It has been documented that G6PD deficiency in sub-Saharan Africa is due to the 202A/376G G6PD A-allele, and association studies have used genotyping as a convenient technique for epidemiological studies. However, recent studies have shown discrepancies in G6PD202/376 associations with severe malaria. There is evidence to suggest that other G6PD deficiency alleles may be common in some regions of West Africa, and that allelic heterogeneity could explain these discrepancies. Methods A cross-sectional epidemiological study of malaria susceptibility was conducted during 2006 and 2007 in the Sahel meso-endemic malaria zone of Mali. The study included Dogon (n = 375) and Fulani (n = 337) sympatric ethnic groups, where the latter group is characterized by lower susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Fifty-three G6PD polymorphisms, including 202/376, were genotyped across the 712 samples. Evidence of association of these G6PD polymorphisms and mild malaria was assessed in both ethnic groups using genotypic and haplotypic statistical tests. Results It was confirmed that the Fulani are less susceptible to malaria, and the 202A mutation is rare in this group (< 1% versus Dogon 7.9%). The Betica-Selma 968C/376G (~11% enzymatic activity) was more common in Fulani (6.1% vs Dogon 0.0%). There are differences in haplotype frequencies between Dogon and Fulani, and association analysis did not reveal strong evidence of protective G6PD genetic effects against uncomplicated malaria in both ethnic groups and gender. However, there was some evidence of increased risk of mild malaria in Dogon with the 202A mutation, attaining borderline statistical significance in females. The rs915942 polymorphism was found to be associated with asymptomatic malaria in Dogon females, and the rs61042368 polymorphism was

  18. Purification of a novel coenzyme F420-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, E; Daniels, L

    1996-01-01

    A variety of Mycobacterium species contained the 5-deazaflavin coenzyme known as F420. Mycobacterium smegmatis was found to have a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase that was dependent on F420 as an electron acceptor and which did not utilize NAD or NADP. The enzyme was purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, phenyl-Sepharose column chromatography, F420-ether-linked aminohexyl-Sepharose 4B affinity chromatography, and quaternary aminoethyl-Sephadex column chromatography, and the sequence of the first 26 N-terminal amino acids has been determined. The response of enzyme activity to a range of pHs revealed a two-peak pattern, with maxima at pH 5.5 and 8.0. The apparent Km values for F420 and glucose-6-phosphate were, respectively, 0.004 and 1.6 mM. The apparent native and subunit molecular masses were 78,000 and approximately 40,000 Da, respectively. PMID:8631674

  19. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Protects Escherichia coli from Tellurite-Mediated Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Juan M.; Arenas, Felipe A.; Vásquez, Claudio C.

    2011-01-01

    The tellurium oxyanion tellurite induces oxidative stress in most microorganisms. In Escherichia coli, tellurite exposure results in high levels of oxidized proteins and membrane lipid peroxides, inactivation of oxidation-sensitive enzymes and reduced glutathione content. In this work, we show that tellurite-exposed E. coli exhibits transcriptional activation of the zwf gene, encoding glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), which in turn results in augmented synthesis of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). Increased zwf transcription under tellurite stress results mainly from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and not from a depletion of cellular glutathione. In addition, the observed increase of G6PDH activity was paralleled by accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), suggesting a metabolic flux shift toward the pentose phosphate shunt. Upon zwf overexpression, bacterial cells also show increased levels of antioxidant molecules (NADPH, GSH), better-protected oxidation-sensitive enzymes and decreased amounts of oxidized proteins and membrane lipids. These results suggest that by increasing NADPH content, G6PDH plays an important role in E. coli survival under tellurite stress. PMID:21984934

  20. Control of glycolytic flux in Zymomonas mobilis by glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Snoep, J.L. |; Arfman, N.; Yomano, L.P.; Ingram, L.O.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Conway, T.

    1996-07-20

    Alycolytic genes in Zymomonas mobilis are highly expressed and constitute half of the cytoplasmic protein. The first four genes (glf, zwf, edd, glk) in this pathway form an operon encoding a glucose permease, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-P dehydrogenase), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, and glucokinase, respectively. Each gene was overexpressed from a tac promoter to investigate the control of glycolysis during the early stages of batch fermentation when flux (qCO{sub 2}) is highest. Almost half of flux control appears to reside with G6-P dehydrogenase (C{sub G6-P dehydrogenase}{sup J} = 0.4). Although Z. mobilis exhibits one of the highest rates of glycolysis known, recombinants with elevated G6-P dehydrogenase had a 10% to 13% higher glycolytic flux than the native organism. A small increase in flux was also observed for recombinants expressing glf. Results obtained did not allow a critical evaluation of glucokinase and this enzyme may also represent an important control point. 6-Phosphogluconate dehydratase appears to be saturating at native levels. With constructs containing the full operon, growth rate and flux were both reduced, complicating interpretations. However, results obtained were also consistent with G6-P dehydrogenase as a primary site of control. Flux was 17% higher in operon constructs which exhibited a 17% increase in G6-P dehydrogenase specific activity, relative to the average of other operon constructs which contain a frameshift mutation in zwf.

  1. An optimised system for refolding of human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Tao; Engel, Paul C

    2009-01-01

    Background Human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), active in both dimer and tetramer forms, is the key entry enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), providing NADPH for biosynthesis and various other purposes, including protection against oxidative stress in erythrocytes. Accordingly haemolytic disease is a major consequence of G6PD deficiency mutations in man, and many severe disease phenotypes are attributed to G6PD folding problems. Therefore, a robust refolding method with high recovery yield and reproducibility is of particular importance to study those clinical mutant enzymes as well as to shed light generally on the refolding process of large multi-domain proteins. Results The effects of different chemical and physical variables on the refolding of human recombinant G6PD have been extensively investigated. L-Arg, NADP+ and DTT are all major positive influences on refolding, and temperature, protein concentration, salt types and other additives also have significant impacts. With the method described here, ~70% enzyme activity could be regained, with good reproducibility, after denaturation with Gdn-HCl, by rapid dilution of the protein, and the refolded enzyme displays kinetic and CD properties indistinguishable from those of the native protein. Refolding under these conditions is relatively slow, taking about 7 days to complete at room temperature even in the presence of cyclophilin A, a peptidylprolyl isomerase reported to increase refolding rates. The refolded protein intermediates shift from dominant monomer to dimer during this process, the gradual emergence of dimer correlating well with the regain of enzyme activity. Conclusion L-Arg is the key player in the refolding of human G6PD, preventing the aggregation of folding intermediate, and NADP+ is essential for the folding intermediate to adopt native structure. The refolding protocol can be applied to produce high recovery yield of folded protein with unaltered properties, paving the

  2. Glutathion peroxidase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in bovine blood and liver.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mahmoud Rushdi; Niishimori, Kazuhiro; Goryo, Masanobu; Okada, Keiji; Yasuda, Jun

    2004-10-01

    A total of 46 cattle, including 25 as control, 16 with glycogen degeneration and 5 with severe fatty degeneration were studied. Whole blood and liver tissue specimens were used to measure glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) activities. The present study determined the value of these parameters in diagnosing glycogen and fatty degeneration in cattle from the point of the status of antioxidation and lipid peroxidation. The results showed a significant decrease in hepatic GSH-Px activity and a significant increase in hepatic G6PD activity in cases of fatty degeneration. On the other hand, there were no significant changes in erythrocytic and hepatic GSH-Px and G6PD activities in cases of glycogen degeneration. The results indicated lipoperoxidation process in the liver tissues increased in cases of fatty degeneration. Therefore, supplying animals suffering from fatty liver with sufficient quantities of nutrient antioxidants may be valuable when treatment is considered.

  3. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase of Trypanosomatids: Characterization, Target Validation, and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shreedhara; Igoillo-Esteve, Mariana; Michels, Paul A. M.; Cordeiro, Artur T.

    2011-01-01

    In trypanosomatids, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), the first enzyme of the pentosephosphate pathway, is essential for the defense of the parasite against oxidative stress. Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania mexicana G6PDHs have been characterized. The parasites' G6PDHs contain a unique 37 amino acid long N-terminal extension that in T. cruzi seems to regulate the enzyme activity in a redox-state-dependent manner. T. brucei and T. cruzi G6PDHs, but not their Leishmania spp. counterpart, are inhibited, in an uncompetitive way, by steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone and derivatives. The Trypanosoma enzymes are more susceptible to inhibition by these compounds than the human G6PDH. The steroids also effectively kill cultured trypanosomes but not Leishmania and are presently considered as promising leads for the development of new parasite-selective chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22091394

  4. Fed-Batch Production of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Using Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Neves, Luiz Carlos Martins; Pessoa, Adalberto; Vitolo, Michele

    The strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-181, having the plasmid YEpPGK-G6P (built by coupling the vector YEPLAC 181 with the promoter phosphoglycerate kinase 1), was cultured by fed-batch process in order to evaluate its capability in the formation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC.1.1.1.49). Two liters of culture medium (10.0 g/L glucose, 3.7 g/L yeast nitrogen broth (YNB), 0.02 g/L l-tryptophan, 0.02 g/L l-histidine, 0.02 g/L uracil, and 0.02 g/L adenine) were inoculated with 1.5 g dry cell/L and left fermenting in the batch mode at pH 5.7, aeration of 2.2 vvm, 30°C, and agitation of 400 rpm. After glucose concentration in the medium was lower than 1.0 g/L, the cell culture was fed with a solution of glucose (10.0 g/L) or micronutrients (l-tryptophan, l-histidine, uracil, and adenine each one at a concentration of 0.02 g/L) following the constant, linear, or exponential mode. The volume of the culture medium in the fed-batch process was varied from 2 L up to 3 L during 5 h. The highest glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity (350 U/L; 1 U=1 μmol of NADP/min) occurred when the glucose solution was fed into the fermenter through the decreasing linear mode.

  5. Effect of chronologic age on induction of cystathionine synthase, uroporphyrinogen I synthase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gartler, S M; Hornung, S K; Motulsky, A G

    1981-01-01

    The activities of cystathionine synthase [L-serine hydro-lyase (adding homocysteine), EC 4.2.1.22], uroporphyrinogen I synthase [porphobilinogen ammonia-lyase (polymerizing), EC 4.3.1.8], and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glucose-6-phosphate:NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49) have been measured in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes of young and old human subjects. A significant decrease in activity with age was observed for cystathionine synthase and uroporphyrinogen I synthase but not for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. These changes could not be related to declining phytohemagglutinin response with aging. Age-related decreases in activity of some enzymes may be relevant for an understanding of the biology of aging. False assignment of heterozygosity, and even homozygosity, for certain genetic disorders, such as homocystinuria, may result when low enzyme levels are detected in the lymphocytes of older people. PMID:6940198

  6. Multiple Independent Fusions of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase with Enzymes in the Pentose Phosphate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Nicholas A.; Dixon, Thomas A.; Cavalcanti, Andre R. O.

    2011-01-01

    Fusions of the first two enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconolactonase (6PGL), have been previously described in two distant clades, chordates and species of the malarial parasite Plasmodium. We have analyzed genome and expressed sequence data from a variety of organisms to identify the origins of these gene fusion events. Based on the orientation of the domains and range of species in which homologs can be found, the fusions appear to have occurred independently, near the base of the metazoan and apicomplexan lineages. Only one of the two metazoan paralogs of G6PD is fused, showing that the fusion occurred after a duplication event, which we have traced back to an ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans. The Plasmodium genes are known to contain a functionally important insertion that is not seen in the other apicomplexan fusions, highlighting this as a unique characteristic of this group. Surprisingly, our search revealed two additional fusion events, one that combined 6PGL and G6PD in an ancestor of the protozoan parasites Trichomonas and Giardia, and another fusing G6PD with phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) in a species of diatoms. This study extends the range of species known to contain fusions in the pentose phosphate pathway to many new medically and economically important organisms. PMID:21829610

  7. Overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enhances riboflavin production in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yun Xia; Chen, Tao; Chen, Xun; Zhao, Xue Ming

    2010-02-01

    Carbon flow in Bacillus subtilis through the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway was modulated by overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) under the control of the inducible Pxyl promoter in B. subtilis PY. Alteration of carbon flow into the PP pathway will affect the availability of ribulose-5-phosphate (Ru5P) and the riboflavin yield. Overexpression of G6PDH resulted in the glucose consumption rate increasing slightly, while the specific growth rate was unchanged. An improvement by 25% + or - 2 of the riboflavin production was obtained. Compared to by-products formation in flask culture, low acid production (acetate and pyruvate) and more acetoin were observed. Metabolic analysis, together with carbon flux redistribution, indicated that the PP pathway fluxes are increased in response to overexpression of G6PDH. Moreover, increased flux of the PP pathway is associated with an increased intracellular pool of Ru5P, which is a precursor for riboflavin biosynthesis. The high concentrations of Ru5P could explain the increased riboflavin production.

  8. The role of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in adipose tissue inflammation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon Jeong; Choe, Sung Sik; Sohn, Jee Hyung; Kim, Jae Bum

    2017-04-03

    Obesity is closely associated with metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes. One hallmark characteristics of obesity is chronic inflammation that is coordinately controlled by complex signaling networks in adipose tissues. Compelling evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and its related signaling pathways play crucial roles in the progression of chronic inflammation in obesity. The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is an anabolic pathway that utilizes the glucoses to generate molecular building blocks and reducing equivalents in the form of NADPH. In particular, NADPH acts as one of the key modulators in the control of ROS through providing an electron for both ROS generation and scavenging. Recently, we have reported that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), a rate-limiting enzyme of the PPP, is implicated in adipose tissue inflammation and systemic insulin resistance in obesity. Mechanistically, G6PD potentiates generation of ROS that augments pro-inflammatory responses in adipose tissue macrophages, leading to systemic insulin resistance. Here, we provide an overview of cell type- specific roles of G6PD in the regulation of ROS balance as well as additional details on the significance of G6PD that contributes to pro-oxidant NADPH generation in obesity-related chronic inflammation and insulin resistance.

  9. Testis-specific expression of a functional retroposon encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriksen, P.J.M. |; Hoogerbrugge, J.W.; Baarends, W.M.

    1997-05-01

    The X-chromosomal gene glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd) is known to be expressed in most cell types of mammalian species. In the mouse, we have detected a novel gene, designated G6pd-2, encoding a G6PD isoenzyme. G6pd-2 does not contain introns and appears to represent a retroposed gene. This gene is uniquely transcribed in postmeiotic spermatogenic cells in which the X-encoded G6pd gene is not transcribed. Expression of the G6pd-2 sequence in a bacterial system showed that the encoded product is an active enzyme. Zymogramic analysis demonstrated that recombinant G6PD-2, but not recombinant G6PD-1 (the X-chromosome-encoded G6PD), formed tetramers under reducing conditions. Under the same conditions, G6PD tetramers were also found in extracts of spermatids and spermatozoa, indicating the presence of G6pd-2-encoded isoenzyme in these cell types. G6pd-2 is one of the very few known expressed retroposons encoding a functional protein, and the presence of this gene is probably related to X chromosome inactivation during spermatogenesis. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress. PMID:27187489

  11. Enhanced expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in human cells sustaining oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Ursini, M V; Parrella, A; Rosa, G; Salzano, S; Martini, G

    1997-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity in mammalian cells is necessary in order to ensure cell survival when damage is produced by reactive oxygen intermediates. In this paper we demonstrate that oxidative stress, caused by agents acting at different steps in the biochemical pathway controlling the intracellular redox status, determines the increase in G6PD-specific activity in human cell lines of different tissue origins. The intracellular level of G6PD-specific mRNA also increases, with kinetics compatible with the induction of new enzyme synthesis. We carried out experiments in which cells were exposed to oxidative stress in the presence of inhibitors of protein or RNA synthesis. These demonstrated that increased G6PD expression is mainly due to an increased rate of transcription, with a minor but significant contribution of regulatory mechanisms acting at post-transcriptional levels. These results provide new information on the defence systems that eukaryotic cells possess in order to prevent damage caused by potentially harmful oxygen derivatives. PMID:9169615

  12. New PCR Assay Using Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase for Identification of Leishmania Species

    PubMed Central

    Castilho, Tiago M.; Shaw, Jeffrey Jon; Floeter-Winter, Lucile M.

    2003-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is one of the multilocus enzymes used to identify Leishmania by zymodeme analysis. The polymorphic pattern revealed by partial characterization of the gene encoding G6PD generated molecular markers useful in the identification of different Leishmania species by PCR. Initially degenerate oligonucleotides were designed on the basis of data on the conserved active center described for other organisms. Primers for reverse transcription-PCR experiments, designed from the nucleotide sequence of the PCR product, enabled us to characterize the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions and the G6PD open reading frame of reference strains of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis, Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana, and Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis. Sets of paired primers were designed and used in PCR assays to discriminate between the parasites responsible for tegumentar leishmaniasis of the subgenera Leishmania (Leishmania) and Leishmania (Viannia) and to distinguish L. (Viannia) braziliensis from others organisms of the subgenus Leishmania (Viannia). No amplification products were detected for the DNA of Crithidia fasciculata, Trypanosoma cruzi, or Leishmania (Sauroleishmania) tarentolae or DNA from a healthy human control. The tests proved to be specific and were sensitive enough to detect parasites in human biopsy specimens. The successful discrimination of L. (Viannia) braziliensis from other parasites of the subgenus Leishmania (Viannia) opens the way to epidemiological studies in areas where more than one species of the subgenus Leishmania (Viannia) exist, such as Amazonia, as well as follow-up studies after chemotherapy and assessment of clinical prognoses. PMID:12574243

  13. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-05-11

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress.

  14. Expression and characterization of a cytosolic glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase isoform from barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots.

    PubMed

    Castiglia, Daniela; Cardi, Manuela; Landi, Simone; Cafasso, Donata; Esposito, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    In plant cells, glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH-EC 1.1.1.49) regulates the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP), a metabolic route involved in the production of NADPH for various biosynthetic processes and stress response. In this study, we report the overexpression of a cytosolic G6PDH isoform from barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots in bacteria, and the biochemical characterization of the purified recombinant enzyme (HvCy-G6PDH). A full-length cDNA coding for a cytosolic isoform of G6PDH was isolated, and the sequence was cloned into pET3d vector; the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified by anion exchange and affinity chromatography. The kinetic properties were calculated: the recombinant HvCy-G6PDH showed KMs and KINADPH comparable to those observed for the enzyme purified from barley roots; moreover, the analysis of NADPH inhibition suggested a competitive mechanism. Therefore, this enzyme could be utilised for the structural and regulatory characterization of this isoform in higher plants.

  15. Design of an interface peptide as new inhibitor of human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Obiol-Pardo, Cristian; Alcarraz-Vizán, Gema; Díaz-Moralli, Santiago; Cascante, Marta; Rubio-Martinez, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) is an essential enzyme involved in the first reaction of the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Recently, G6PDH was suggested as a novel target protein for cancer therapy as one of the final products of the PPP, ribose-5-phosphate, is necessary for nucleic acid synthesis and tumor progression. After analyzing the protein-protein interface of the crystal structure of human G6PDH by means of molecular dynamics simulations, we designed six interface peptides based on the natural sequence of the protein. The three most promising peptides, as predicted by binding free energy calculations, were synthesized and one of them was confirmed as a novel inhibitor of human G6PDH in experimental assays. Together, the active peptide found and its suggested binding mode proposes a new strategy for inhibiting this enzyme and should aid the further design of novel, potent and non-peptidic G6PDH inhibitors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Importance of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) for vanillin tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trinh Thi My; Kitajima, Sakihito; Izawa, Shingo

    2014-09-01

    Vanillin is derived from lignocellulosic biomass and, as one of the major biomass conversion inhibitors, inhibits yeast growth and fermentation. Vanillin was recently shown to induce the mitochondrial fragmentation and formation of mRNP granules such as processing bodies and stress granules in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furfural, another major biomass conversion inhibitor, also induces oxidative stress and is reduced in an NAD(P)H-dependent manner to its less toxic alcohol derivative. Therefore, the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), through which most NADPH is generated, plays a role in tolerance to furfural. Although vanillin also induces oxidative stress and is reduced to vanillyl alcohol in a NADPH-dependent manner, the relationship between vanillin and PPP has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we examined the importance of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), which catalyzes the rate-limiting NADPH-producing step in PPP, for yeast tolerance to vanillin. The growth of the null mutant of G6PDH gene (zwf1Δ) was delayed in the presence of vanillin, and vanillin was efficiently reduced in the culture of wild-type cells but not in the culture of zwf1Δ cells. Furthermore, zwf1Δ cells easily induced the activation of Yap1, an oxidative stress responsive transcription factor, mitochondrial fragmentation, and P-body formation with the vanillin treatment, which indicated that zwf1Δ cells were more susceptible to vanillin than wild type cells. These findings suggest the importance of G6PDH and PPP in the response of yeast to vanillin.

  17. Molecular study of ovine glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene expression in respect to different energy intake.

    PubMed

    Laliotis, George P; Vitsa, Alkistis; Bizelis, Iosif; Charismiadou, Maria A; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2010-06-01

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) plays an important role in a ruminant's metabolism catalyzing the first committed reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway as it provides necessary compounds of NADPH for the synthesis of fatty acids. The cloning of ovine (Ovis aries) G6PD gene revealed the presence of two cDNA transcripts (oG6PD(A) and oG6PD(B)), with oG6PD(B) being a product of alternative splicing and with no similarity to any other previously reported G6PD transcript. Here, we attempt to study the effect of energy balance in ovine G6PD transcript expression, trying simultaneously to find out any potential physiological role of the oG6PD(B) transcript. Changes of energy balance that lead to synergistic changes in the expression of both transcripts, but in opposite directions and not in a proportional way. Negative energy balance favours the presence of the oG6PD(B) transcript leading to a significant increase of its expression, compared to oG6PD(A) expression (P<0.05). In contrast, positive energy balance leads to a significant increase of oG6PD(A) compared to oG6PD(B) expression (P<0.05). In either condition oG6PD(B) expression is unchanged. Regression analysis showed that there is an energy balance threshold where the expression of both transcripts shows no change. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. DHEA prevents ribavirin-induced anemia via inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Handala, Lynda; Domange, Barbara; Ouled-Haddou, Hakim; Garçon, Loïc; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Helle, Francois; Bodeau, Sandra; Duverlie, Gilles; Brochot, Etienne

    2017-09-08

    Ribavirin has been widely used for antiviral therapy. Unfortunately, ribavirin-induced anemia is often a cause of limiting or interrupting treatment. Our team has observed that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has a protective effect against in vitro and in vivo ribavirin-induced hemolysis. The aim of this study was to better understand this effect as well as the underlying mechanism(s). DHEA was able to reduce in vitro intraerythrocytic ATP depletion induced by ribavirin. Only 1% of ATP remained after incubation with ribavirin (2 mM) at 37 °C for 24 h vs. 37% if DHEA (200 μM) was added (p < 0.01). DHEA also helped erythrocytes conserve their size, with a shrinkage of only 10% vs 40% at 24 h with ribavirin alone (p < 0.01), and reduced phosphatidylserine exposure at the outer membrane, i.e. 27% vs 40% at 48 h, (p < 0.05). DHEA also inhibits ribavirin-induced hemolysis, i.e. 34% vs 46.5% at 72 h (p < 0.01). DHEA is an inhibitor of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), a key enzyme in the hexose monophosphate shunt connected to the glycolytic pathway which is the only energy supplier of the red blood cell in the form of ATP. We have confirmed this inhibitory effect in the presence of ribavirin. All these observations suggest that ribavirin-induced hemolysis was initiated by ATP depletion, and that the inhibitory effect of DHEA on G6PD was able to rescue enough ATP to limit this hemolysis. This mechanism could be important for improving the therapeutic management of patients treated with ribavirin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme stability in filter paper dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Flores, Sharon R; Hall, Elizabeth M; De Jesús, Víctor R

    2017-10-01

    Prior to initial distribution of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) proficiency testing (PT) materials, we evaluated G6PD enzyme stability in dried blood spots (DBS) under various temperature and humidity environments to develop storage and usage guidelines for our new materials. We prepared fresh G6PD-normal DBS materials and conducted stability evaluations of daily use and short and long-term storage under various temperature and humidity environments. G6PD DBS PT materials retained 92% of initial activity after 30days of use at 4°C. Materials stored at -20°C and 4°C with desiccant for 30days retained 95% and 90% of initial activity, respectively. When stored for one year at -20°C or six months at 4°C specimens retained >90% of initial activity. Specimens stored at 37°C with desiccant lost 10% activity in three days. At the end of 30days, specimens stored under 'Extreme'-humidity >50% without desiccant- conditions at 37°C assayed below the NSQAP cut off for G6PD. Humidity exacerbated loss of enzyme activity with increasing temperature and time duration. Data suggest that G6PD PT materials can be stored at 4°C and used for up to one month and can be stored at -20°C for one year and yield >90% enzyme activity. Exposure to warm temperatures, especially with elevated humidity, should be avoided. Desiccant should always be used to mitigate humidity effects. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Three Recombinant Human Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Mutants: Zacatecas, Vanua-Lava and Viangchan

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; González-Valdez, Abigail; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Cuevas-Cruz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in humans causes severe disease, varying from mostly asymptomatic individuals to patients showing neonatal jaundice, acute hemolysis episodes or chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In order to understand the effect of the mutations in G6PD gene function and its relation with G6PD deficiency severity, we report the construction, cloning and expression as well as the detailed kinetic and stability characterization of three purified clinical variants of G6PD that present in the Mexican population: G6PD Zacatecas (Class I), Vanua-Lava (Class II) and Viangchan (Class II). For all the G6PD mutants, we obtained low purification yield and altered kinetic parameters compared with Wild Type (WT). Our results show that the mutations, regardless of the distance from the active site where they are located, affect the catalytic properties and structural parameters and that these changes could be associated with the clinical presentation of the deficiency. Specifically, the structural characterization of the G6PD Zacatecas mutant suggests that the R257L mutation have a strong effect on the global stability of G6PD favoring an unstable active site. Using computational analysis, we offer a molecular explanation of the effects of these mutations on the active site. PMID:27213370

  1. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Three Recombinant Human Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Mutants: Zacatecas, Vanua-Lava and Viangchan.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; González-Valdez, Abigail; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Cuevas-Cruz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-05-21

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in humans causes severe disease, varying from mostly asymptomatic individuals to patients showing neonatal jaundice, acute hemolysis episodes or chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In order to understand the effect of the mutations in G6PD gene function and its relation with G6PD deficiency severity, we report the construction, cloning and expression as well as the detailed kinetic and stability characterization of three purified clinical variants of G6PD that present in the Mexican population: G6PD Zacatecas (Class I), Vanua-Lava (Class II) and Viangchan (Class II). For all the G6PD mutants, we obtained low purification yield and altered kinetic parameters compared with Wild Type (WT). Our results show that the mutations, regardless of the distance from the active site where they are located, affect the catalytic properties and structural parameters and that these changes could be associated with the clinical presentation of the deficiency. Specifically, the structural characterization of the G6PD Zacatecas mutant suggests that the R257L mutation have a strong effect on the global stability of G6PD favoring an unstable active site. Using computational analysis, we offer a molecular explanation of the effects of these mutations on the active site.

  2. Red Cell Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency—A Newly Recognized Cause of Neonatal Jaundice and Kernicterus in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Naiman, J. Lawrence; Kosoy, Martin H.

    1964-01-01

    Seven male newborns of Chinese, Greek and Italian origin presented with severe hemolytic jaundice due to red cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency. In five, the hemolysis was precipitated by inhalation of mothball vapours in the home. Kernicterus was evident upon admission in six infants and was fatal in four of these. G-6-PD deficiency should be suspected as a cause of jaundice in all full-term male infants of these ethnic groups. The diagnosis can be confirmed in any hospital by the methemoglobin reduction test. In areas similar to Toronto, Canada, where these high-risk ethnic groups prevail, the following measures are recommended: (1) detection of G-6-PD deficient newborns by screening cord bloods of all infants of these ethnic groups; (2) protection of affected infants from potentially hemolytic agents such as naphthalene, certain vitamin K preparations, and sulfonamides; and (3) observation of serum bilirubin levels to assess the need for exchange transfusion for hyperbilirubinemia. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:14226101

  3. Lowering effect of firefly squid powder on triacylglycerol content and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Morita, Ritsuko; Shirai, Yoko; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Terashima, Teruya; Ushikubo, Shun; Matsuo, Tatsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Effects of dietary firefly squid on serum and liver lipid levels were investigated. Male Wistar rats were fed a diet containing 5% freeze-dried firefly squid or Japanese flying squid for 2 weeks. There was no significant difference in the liver triacylglycerol level between the control and Japanese flying squid groups, but the rats fed the firefly squid diet had a significantly lower liver triacylglycerol content than those fed the control diet. No significant difference was observed in serum triacylglycerol levels between the control and firefly squid groups. The rats fed the firefly squid had a significantly lower activity of liver glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase compared to the rats fed the control diet. There was no significant difference in liver fatty acid synthetase activity among the three groups. Hepatic gene expression and lipogenic enzyme activity were investigated; a DNA microarray showed that the significantly enriched gene ontology category of down-regulated genes in the firefly squid group was "lipid metabolic process". The firefly squid group had lower mRNA level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase compared to the controls. These results suggest that an intake of firefly squid decreases hepatic triacylglycerol in rats, and the reduction of mRNA level and enzyme activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase might be related to the mechanisms.

  4. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  5. A case of ataxia telangiectasia with unbalanced glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase mosaicism in the granulocytic/monocytic lineages.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, A M; Melani, C; Canepa, L; Meloni, T; Forteleoni, G; Gaetani, G F

    1987-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a genetically determined disease with multi-system abnormalities and a high incidence of neoplasia. In order to define the nature of the association between ataxia telangiectasia and malignancy, we investigated a patient with the disease and heterozygote for the Mediterranean variant of the X-linked marker glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Enzymatic mosaicism in hemopoietic and nonhemopoietic cells was evaluated with the 2-deoxy glucose 6-phosphate technique. While erythrocytes, platelets, and lymphocytes expressed the same double-enzyme phenotype as tissues of nonhemopoietic origin, granulocytes and monocytes expressed almost exclusively the Mediterranean-type enzyme. We suggest that, as the result of genetic instability at the hemopoietic stem-cell level, the granulocytic/monocytic progeny enjoyed a proliferative advantage and became the predominant clone. PMID:3812485

  6. Inhibition of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Could Enhance 1,4-Benzoquinone-Induced Oxidative Damage in K562 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Meng; Yang, Wenwen; Sun, Fengmei; Xu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is a chemical contaminant widespread in industrial and living environments. The oxidative metabolites of benzene induce toxicity involving oxidative damage. Protecting cells and cell membranes from oxidative damage, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) maintains the reduced state of glutathione (GSH). This study aims to investigate whether the downregulation of G6PD in K562 cell line can influence the oxidative toxicity induced by 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ). G6PD was inhibited in K562 cell line transfected with the specific siRNA of G6PD gene. An empty vector was transfected in the control group. Results revealed that G6PD was significantly upregulated in the control cells and in the cells with inhibited G6PD after they were exposed to BQ. The NADPH/NADP and GSH/GSSG ratio were significantly lower in the cells with inhibited G6PD than in the control cells at the same BQ concentration. The relative reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and DNA oxidative damage were significantly increased in the cell line with inhibited G6PD. The apoptotic rate and G2 phase arrest were also significantly higher in the cells with inhibited G6PD and exposed to BQ than in the control cells. Our results suggested that G6PD inhibition could reduce GSH activity and alleviate oxidative damage. G6PD deficiency is also a possible susceptible risk factor of benzene exposure. PMID:27656260

  7. Cloning, expression, purification and characterization of his-tagged human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase: a simplified method for protein yield.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Terrón-Hernández, Jessica; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; García-Torres, Itzhel; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Oria-Hernández, Jesús

    2013-10-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first step of the pentose phosphate pathway. In erythrocytes, the functionality of the pathway is crucial to protect these cells against oxidative damage. G6PD deficiency is the most frequent enzymopathy in humans with a global prevalence of 4.9 %. The clinical picture is characterized by chronic or acute hemolysis in response to oxidative stress, which is related to the low cellular activity of G6PD in red blood cells. The disease is heterogeneous at genetic level with around 160 mutations described, mostly point mutations causing single amino acid substitutions. The biochemical studies aimed to describe the detrimental effects of mutations on the functional and structural properties of human G6PD are indispensable to understand the molecular physiopathology of this disease. Therefore, reliable systems for efficient expression and purification of the protein are highly desirable. In this work, human G6PD was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography in a single chromatographic step. The structural and functional characterization indicates that His-tagged G6PD resembles previous preparations of recombinant G6PD. In contrast with previous protein yield systems, our method is based on commonly available resources and fully accessible laboratory equipment; therefore, it can be readily implemented.

  8. Lysine-21 of Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase participates in substrate binding through charge-charge interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W. T.; Levy, H. R.

    1992-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) was isolated in high yield and purified to homogeneity from a newly constructed strain of Escherichia coli which lacks its own glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene. Lys-21 is one of two lysyl residues in the enzyme previously modified by the affinity labels pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and pyridoxal 5'-diphosphate-5'-adenosine, which are competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with respect to glucose 6-phosphate (LaDine, J.R., Carlow, D., Lee, W.T., Cross, R.L., Flynn, T.G., & Levy, H.R., 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266, 5558-5562). K21R and K21Q mutants of the enzyme were purified to homogeneity and characterized kinetically to determine the function of Lys-21. Both mutant enzymes showed increased Km-values for glucose 6-phosphate compared to wild-type enzyme: 1.4-fold (NAD-linked reaction) and 2.1-fold (NADP-linked reaction) for the K21R enzyme, and 36-fold (NAD-linked reaction) and 53-fold (NADP-linked reaction) for the K21Q enzyme. The Km for NADP+ was unchanged in both mutant enzymes. The Km for NAD+ was increased 1.5- and 3.2-fold, compared to the wild-type enzyme, in the K21R and K21Q enzymes, respectively. For the K21R enzyme the kcat for the NAD- and NADP-linked reactions was unchanged. The kcat for the K21Q enzyme was increased in the NAD-linked reaction by 26% and decreased by 30% in the NADP-linked reaction from the values for the wild-type enzyme. The data are consistent with Lys-21 participating in the binding of the phosphate group of the substrate to the enzyme via charge-charge interaction. PMID:1304341

  9. A population survey of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) 563C>T (Mediterranean) mutation in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Jamornthanyawat, Natsuda; Awab, Ghulam R; Tanomsing, Naowarat; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Yamin, Fazel; Dondorp, Arjen M; Day, Nicholas P J; White, Nicholas J; Woodrow, Charles J; Imwong, Mallika

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common inherited enzyme defect and an important problem in areas with Plasmodium vivax infection because of the risk of haemolysis following administration of primaquine to treat the liver forms of the parasite. We undertook a genotypic survey of 713 male individuals across nine provinces of Afghanistan in which malaria is found, four in the north and five in the east. RFLP typing at nucleotide position 563 detected 40 individuals with the Mediterranean mutation 563C>T, an overall prevalence of 5.6%. This varied according to self-reported ethnicity, with prevalence in the Pashtun/Pashai group of 33/369 (8.9%) compared to 7/344 individuals in the rest of the population (2.0%; p<0.001, Chi-squared test). Multivariate analysis of ethnicity and geographical location indicated an adjusted odds ratio of 3.50 (95% CI 1.36-9.02) for the Pashtun/Pashai group, while location showed only a trend towards higher prevalence in eastern provinces (adjusted odds ratio = 1.73, 0.73-4.13). Testing of known polymorphic markers (1311C>T in exon 11, and C93T in intron XI) in a subset of 82 individuals wild-type at C563 revealed a mixture of 3 haplotypes in the background population and was consistent with data from the 1000 Genomes Project and published studies. By comparison individuals with G6PD deficiency showed a highly skewed haplotype distribution, with 95% showing the CT haplotype, a finding consistent with relatively recent appearance and positive selection of the Mediterranean variant in Afghanistan. Overall, the data confirm that the Mediterranean variant of G6PD is common in many ethnic groups in Afghanistan, indicating that screening for G6PD deficiency is required in all individuals before radical treatment of P. vivax with primaquine.

  10. A Population Survey of the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) 563C>T (Mediterranean) Mutation in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Jamornthanyawat, Natsuda; Awab, Ghulam R.; Tanomsing, Naowarat; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Yamin, Fazel; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Woodrow, Charles J.; Imwong, Mallika

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common inherited enzyme defect and an important problem in areas with Plasmodium vivax infection because of the risk of haemolysis following administration of primaquine to treat the liver forms of the parasite. We undertook a genotypic survey of 713 male individuals across nine provinces of Afghanistan in which malaria is found, four in the north and five in the east. RFLP typing at nucleotide position 563 detected 40 individuals with the Mediterranean mutation 563C>T, an overall prevalence of 5.6%. This varied according to self-reported ethnicity, with prevalence in the Pashtun/Pashai group of 33/369 (8.9%) compared to 7/344 individuals in the rest of the population (2.0%; p<0.001, Chi-squared test). Multivariate analysis of ethnicity and geographical location indicated an adjusted odds ratio of 3.50 (95% CI 1.36–9.02) for the Pashtun/Pashai group, while location showed only a trend towards higher prevalence in eastern provinces (adjusted odds ratio = 1.73, 0.73–4.13). Testing of known polymorphic markers (1311C>T in exon 11, and C93T in intron XI) in a subset of 82 individuals wild-type at C563 revealed a mixture of 3 haplotypes in the background population and was consistent with data from the 1000 Genomes Project and published studies. By comparison individuals with G6PD deficiency showed a highly skewed haplotype distribution, with 95% showing the CT haplotype, a finding consistent with relatively recent appearance and positive selection of the Mediterranean variant in Afghanistan. Overall, the data confirm that the Mediterranean variant of G6PD is common in many ethnic groups in Afghanistan, indicating that screening for G6PD deficiency is required in all individuals before radical treatment of P. vivax with primaquine. PMID:24586352

  11. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase is required for sucrose and trehalose to be efficient osmoprotectants in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Barra, Lise; Pica, Nathalie; Gouffi, Kamila; Walker, Graham C; Blanco, Carlos; Trautwetter, Annie

    2003-12-12

    Inactivation of the zwf gene in Sinorhizobium meliloti induces an osmosensitive phenotype and the loss of osmoprotection by trehalose and sucrose, but not by ectoine and glycine betaine. This phenotype is not linked to a defect in the biosynthesis of endogenous solutes. zwf expression is induced by high osmolarity, sucrose and trehalose, but is repressed by betaine. A zwf mutant is more sensitive than its parental strain to superoxide ions, suggesting that glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase involvement in the osmotic response most likely results from the production of reactive oxygen species during osmotic stress.

  12. Purification and investigation of some kinetic properties of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves.

    PubMed

    Coban, T Abdül Kadir; Ciftçi, Mehmet; Küfrevioğlu, O Irfan

    2002-05-01

    In this study, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glucose-6-phosphate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49; G6PD) was purified from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves, and analysis of the kinetic behavior and some properties of the enzyme were investigated. The purification consisted of three steps: preparation of homogenate, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and DEAE-Sephadex A50 ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme was obtained with a yield of 8.79% and had a specific activity of 2.146 U (mg protein)(-1). The overall purification was about 58-fold. Temperature of +4 degrees C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was spectrophotometrically measured according to the Beutler method, at 340 nm. In order to control the purification of enzyme, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out in 4% and 10% acrylamide for stacking and running gel, respectively. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band for enzyme. The molecular weight was found to be 77.6 kDa by Sephadex G-150 gel filtration chromatography. A protein band corresponding to a molecular weight of 79.3 kDa was obtained on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. For the enzymes, the stable pH, optimum pH, and optimum temperature were found to be 6.0, 8.0, and 60 degrees C, respectively. Moreover, KM and Vmax values for NADP+ and G6-P at optimum pH and 25 degrees C were determined by means of Lineweaver-Burk graphs. Additionally, effects of streptomycin sulfate and tetracycline antibiotics were investigated for the enzyme activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in vitro.

  13. The preparation of nylon-tube-supported hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the use of the co-immobilized enzymes in the automated determination of glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D L; Campbell, J; Hornby, W E

    1975-01-01

    Triethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate was used to O-alkylate nylon-tube thus producing the imidate salt of the nylon which was further made to react with 1,6-diaminohexane. 2. Hexokinase (EC 2.7.1.1) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) were immobilized on the amino-substituted nylon tube through glutaraldeyde and bisimidates. 3. The effect of varying the conditions of O-alkylation and the amount of enzyme immobilized on the activity of nylon tube-hexokinase derivatives was determined. 4. The effect of varying the amount of enzyme immobilized on the activity of nylon-tube-glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase derivatives was determined. 5. The thermal stability of nylon-tube-hexokinase and nylon-tube-glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase derivatives was studied. 6. Different ratios of hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were co-immobilized on nylon tube, and the rate of conversion of glucose into 6-phosphogluconolactone was compared with the individual activities of the immobilized enzymes. 7. Hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase co-immobilized on nylon tube were used in the automated analysis of glucose. PMID:1167161

  14. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses inhibit pentose phosphate oxidative pathway and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Bergandi, Loredana; Aina, Valentina; Garetto, Stefano; Malavasi, Gianluca; Aldieri, Elisabetta; Laurenti, Enzo; Matera, Lina; Morterra, Claudio; Ghigo, Dario

    2010-02-12

    Bioactive glasses such as Hench's 45S5 (Bioglass) have applications to tissue engineering as well as bone repair, and the insertion of fluoride in their composition has been proposed to enhance their bioactivity. In view of a potential clinical application, we investigated whether fluoride-containing glasses exert toxic effects on human MG-63 osteoblasts, and whether and how fluoride, which is released in the cell culture medium, might play a role in such cytotoxicity. A 24h incubation with 50 microg/ml (12.5 microg/cm(2)) of fluoride-containing bioactive glasses termed HCaCaF(2) (F content: 5, 10 and 15 mol.%) caused the release of lactate dehydrogenase in the extracellular medium (index of cytotoxicity), the accumulation of intracellular malonyldialdehyde (index of lipoperoxidation), and the increase of glutathione consumption. Furthermore, fluoride-containing glasses inhibited the pentose phosphate oxidative pathway and the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. These effects are ascribable to the fluoride content/release of glass powders, since they were mimicked by NaF solutions and were prevented by dimethyl sulfoxide and tempol (two radical scavengers), by superoxide dismutase (a superoxide scavenger), and by glutathione (the most important intracellular antioxidant molecule), but not by apocynin (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase). The presence of fluoride-containing glasses and NaF caused also the generation of reactive oxygen species, which was prevented by superoxide dismutase and catalase. The data suggest that fluoride released from glasses is the cause of MG-63 cell oxidative damage and is independent of NADPH oxidase activation. Our data provide a new mechanism to explain F(-) ions toxicity: fluoride could trigger, at least in part, an oxidative stress via inhibition of the pentose phosphate oxidative pathway and, in particular, through the oxidative inhibition of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

  15. Inhibition of catalase by aminotriazole in vivo results in reduction of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Bayliak, M; Gospodaryov, D; Semchyshyn, H; Lushchak, V

    2008-04-01

    The inhibitor of catalase 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AMT) was used to study the physiological role of catalase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under starvation. It was shown that AMT at the concentration of 10 mM did not affect the growth of the yeast. In vivo and in vitro the degree of catalase inhibition by AMT was concentration- and time-dependent. Peroxisomal catalase in bakers' yeast was more sensitive to AMT than the cytosolic one. In vivo inhibition of catalase by AMT in S. cerevisiae caused a simultaneous decrease in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and an increase in glutathione reductase activity. At the same time, the level of protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative modification, was not affected. Possible mechanisms compensating the negative effects caused by AMT inhibition of catalase are discussed.

  16. Marked differences in drug-induced methemoglobinemia in sheep are not due to RBC glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, reduced glutathione, or methemoglobin reductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Guertler, A.T.; Lagutchik, M.S.; Woodard, C.L.; Leonard, D.A.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine is a commonly used topical anesthetic that is structurally similar to current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis. Benzocaine induces profound methemoglobinemia in some sheep but not others. After topical benzocaine administration certain sheep respond to form MHb (elevated MHb 16-50% after a 56-280 mg dose, a 2-10 second spray with benzocine), while other phenotypically similar sheep fail to significantly form MHb (less than a 2% increase from baseline). Deficiencies in Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD), reduced glutathione (GSH), and MHb reductase increase the susceptibility to methemoglobinemia in man and animals. Sheep are used as a model for G-6-PD deficiency in man, and differences in this enzyme level could cause the variable response seen in these sheep. Similarly, differences in GSH and MHb reductase could be responsible for the observed differences in MHb formation.

  17. Effect of feeding and of DDT on the activity of hepatic glucose 6- phosphate dehydrogenase in two salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buhler, Donald R.; Benville, P.

    1969-01-01

    The specific activity of liver glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in yearling rainbow trout remained unchanged when the fish were starved for periods as long as 8 weeks and when starved animals were fed diets of various compositions. Injection of insulin concurrently with refeeding also failed to alter the specific activity of the enzyme in trout. The absence of a dietary or insulin influence on the teleost enzyme system is to be contrasted with studies in mammals in which the activity of hepatic glucose 6-P dehydrogenase was markedly stimulated after refeeding starved animals or injection of insulin.Ingestion of the pesticide DDT by juvenile coho salmon or adult rainbow trout also had no effect on the specific activity of liver glucose 6-P dehydrogenase and DDT failed to inhibit the rainbow trout enzyme in vitro. These results also differ considerably from those found in higher animals.These results suggest that the glucose 6-P dehydrogenase enzyme in teleosts may be under a different type of regulatory control from that found in mammals.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... as some antibiotics and medications used to treat malaria). Hemolytic anemia can also occur after eating fava ... a G6PD mutation may be partially protected against malaria, an infectious disease carried by a certain type ...

  19. The glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma cruzi: its role in the defense of the parasite against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Igoillo-Esteve, Mariana; Cazzulo, Juan José

    2006-10-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) is encoded by several genes located in three of the parasite chromosomes. All the sequences present two possible start codons, 111bp apart, also present in its Trypanosoma brucei counterpart. As the 37 residues comprised between the two candidate initiator methionines of T. brucei and T. cruzi G6PDHs constitute an unusual N-terminal extension only present in trypanosomatids, two forms of the T. cruzi G6PDH were expressed in Escherichia coli: a long one (Tc-G6PDH-L) translated from the first ATG codon, and a short one (Tc-G6PDH-S) translated from the second. Both were purified and their kinetic constants determined. The apparent K(m) for glucose-6-phosphate was 189.9, 98.4, and 288microM, for Tc-G6PDH-L, Tc-G6PDH-S and native Tc-G6PDH, respectively. The apparent K(m) for NADP was similar for both recombinant proteins. The Tc-G6PDH-L as well as the native enzyme, was inactivated by DTT while the Tc-G6PDH-S was unaffected by the reducing agent. This behavior could be related to the presence of two Cys groups in the N-terminal extension of the Tc-G6PDH-L similarly to the redox regulated G6PDHs from chloroplasts and cyanobacteria. This property, together with a remarkable induction (up to 46-fold) of the T. cruzi G6PDH in metacyclic trypomastigotes under oxidative stress conditions, suggests that the enzyme may play a prominent role in the defense mechanisms of the parasite against oxidative stress becoming an important target for chemotherapy. Western blots using antibodies against the N-terminal extension in Tc-G6PDH-L show that this form is expressed in the parasite.

  20. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase Guadalajara--a case of chronic non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia responding to splenectomy and the role of splenectomy in this disorder.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, J W; Jones, F G C; McMullin, Mary Frances

    2004-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme of the pentose phosphate shunt pathway a major function of which is to prevent cellular oxidative damage. Deficiency in red blood cells is associated with a number of varied clinical manifestations. Chronic non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia is uncommon but is usually characterized by chronic haemolysis, often with severe anaemia. In the past splenectomy in this condition has been thought to be of questionable benefit. We report a case of G6PD Guadalajara where splenectomy produced transfusion independence and have reviewed the literature. Those cases with exon 10 mutations often have a severe clinical phenotype, which responds to splenectomy. This procedure should be considered in this condition.

  1. Regulation of Enzyme Activities in Drosophila: Genetic Variation Affecting Induction of Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases in Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Bruce J.; Lucchesi, John C.; Laurie-Ahlberg, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The genetic basis of modulation by dietary sucrose of the enzyme activities glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) activities in third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated, using isogenic lines derived from wild populations. Considerable genetically determined variation in response was detected among lines that differed only in their third chromosome constitution. Comparison of crossreacting material between a responding and a nonresponding line showed that the G6PD activity variation is due to changes in G6PD protein level. These differences in responses are localized in the fat body, with 300 m m sucrose in the diet resulting in a sixfold stimulation of G6PD activity and a fourfold one of 6PGD in the line showing the strongest response. In this tissue, the responses of the two enzymes are closely correlated with one another. Using recombinant lines, we obtained data that suggested the existence of more than one gene on chromosome III involved in the regulation of G6PD in the fat body, and at least one of these genes affects the level of 6PGD as well. PMID:6416921

  2. A new glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variant, G6PD Orissa (44 Ala{yields}Gly), is the major polymorphic variant in tribal populations in India

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeda, J.S.; Bautista, J.M.; Stevens, D.

    1995-12-01

    Deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is usually found at high frequencies in areas of the world where malaria has been epidemic. The frequency and genetic basis of G6PD deficiency have been studied in Africa, around the Mediterranean, and in the Far East, but little such information is available about the situation in India. To determine the extent of heterogeneity of G6PD, we have studied several different Indian populations by screening for G6PD deficiency, followed by molecular analysis of deficient alleles. The frequency of G6PD deficiency varies between 3% and 15% in different tribal and urban groups. Remarkably, a previously unreported deficient variant, G6PD Orissa (44 Ala{yields}Gly), is responsible for most of the G6PD deficiency in tribal Indian populations but is not found in urban populations, where most of the G6PD deficiency is due to the G6PD Mediterranean (188 Ser{yields}Phe) variant. The K{sup NADP}{sub m} of G6PD Orissa is fivefold higher than that of the normal enzyme. This may be due to the fact that the alanine residue that is replaced by glycine is part of a putative coenzyme-binding site. 37 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. [Molecular identification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) detected in neonatal screening].

    PubMed

    Zamorano-Jiménez, Clara Aurora; Baptista-González, Héctor Alfredo; Bouchán-Valencia, Patricia; Granados-Cepeda, Martha Lucía; Trueba-Gómez, Rocío; Coeto-Barona, Georgina; Rosenfeld-Mann, Fany; Rosa-Mireles, Luisa Blanca; Meléndez-Ramírez, Rocío

    2015-01-01

    To present the strategy of identifying the molecular variants of G6PD detected in neonatal screening (NS). We present a series of incident cases of newborns positive for G6PD deficiency detected in NS. From nuclear DNA with the methodology of real-time PCR we sought molecular G6PD variants: G202A, A376G, T968C and C563T. Of a total of 21,619 neonates, 41 cases were reactive in NS for G6PD (189.6/100,000 RN screened rate), 34 cases confirmed the molecular variant of G6PD (157.3/100,000 RN screened rate). The most frequent allele combination G202A/A376G (G6PD ratio and median activity, 0.460 and 1.72 ± 0.35 U/g Hb, respectively), followed by G202A (0.170 and 1.74 ± 0.27 U/g Hb) and A376G/T968C (ratio 0.150 and 1.10 ± 0.44 U/g Hb). The T968C allelic variant showed lower enzyme activity than the rest (1.1 ± 0.4; p = 0.02). Two women were detected with G6PD deficiency with G202A/A376G and G202A variant. African alleles were prevalently detected in neonatal screening. This strategy allows the identification of molecular variants involved in 80% of cases.

  4. An unexpected emergency request for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase testing in a 9-year-old African American boy.

    PubMed

    Platteborze, Peter; Matos, Renee; Gidvany-Diaz, Vinod; Wilhelms, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    9-year-old African American male. Recently diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after investigation into a large anterior mediastinal mass causing airway compression. The day before the unexpected urgent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) request, the patient was diagnosed with an aggressive form of leukemia and a significant tumor mass causing airway compression. A computed tomography (CT) scan indicated potential renal involvement. Based on this information and the size of the mass, the patient was referred for immediate chemotherapy. However, there was a concern that he could develop tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) during treatment. To avoid this condition, the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) sought to pretreat the child with rasburicase, which led to the emergency G6PD request. Unknown. Largely unknown, but no apparent chronic diseases. Three weeks of progressively worsening lymphadenopathy, coughing, night sweats, mild hepatosplenomegaly, and breathing difficulty when supine. The patient arrived at the medical center for airway management and had a temperature of 36.1°C; blood pressure, 120/87 mmHg; pulse, 115 bpm; respiratory rate, 22 breaths per minute, with labored breathing but normal O(2) saturation while upright and awake, in room air. Table 1. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

  5. Determination of the inhibitory effect of green tea extract on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase based on multilayer capillary enzyme microreactor.

    PubMed

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Liu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Xin; Wang, Yujia; Yang, Jiqing; Yang, Li

    2016-08-01

    Natural herbal medicines are an important source of enzyme inhibitors for the discovery of new drugs. A number of natural extracts such as green tea have been used in prevention and treatment of diseases due to their low-cost, low toxicity and good performance. The present study reports an online assay of the activity and inhibition of the green tea extract of the Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using multilayer capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme microreactors (CE-IMERs). The multilayer CE-IMERs were produced with layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly, which can easily enhance the enzyme loading capacity of the microreactor. The activity of the G6PDH enzyme was determined and the enzyme inhibition by the inhibitors from green tea extract was investigated using online assay of the multilayer CE-IMERs. The Michaelis constant (Km ) of the enzyme, the IC50 and Ki values of the inhibitors were achieved and found to agree with those obtained using offline assays. The results show a competitive inhibition of green tea extract on the G6PDH enzyme. The present study provides an efficient and easy-to-operate approach for determining G6PDH enzyme reaction and the inhibition of green tea extract, which may be beneficial in research and the development of natural herbal medicines. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Application of capillary enzyme micro-reactor in enzyme activity and inhibitors studies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we present an on-line measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme micro-reactor (CE-based IMER). The IMER was prepared using a two-step protocol based on electrostatic assembly. The micro-reactor exhibited good stability and reproducibility for on-line assay of G6PDH enzyme. Both the activity as well as the inhibition of the G6PDH enzyme by six inhibitors, including three metals (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+)), vancomycin, urea and KMnO4, were investigated using on-line assay of the CE-based IMERs. The enzyme activity and inhibition kinetic constants were measured using the IMERs which were found to be consistent with those using traditional off-line enzyme assays. The kinetic mechanism of each inhibitor was also determined. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using CE-based IMERs for rapid and efficient on-line assay of G6PDH, an important enzyme in the pentosephosphate pathway of human metabolism.

  7. Cloning, characterization and computational analysis of the 5' regulatory region of ovine glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Laliotis, George P; Bizelis, Iosif; Argyrokastritis, Alexandros; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2007-08-01

    To better understand the structure and the function of ovine glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) promoter region, a genome-walking procedure was followed to isolate and sequence a 1628 bp fragment, containing the 5' regulatory region of the G6PD gene. In silico analysis of the sequence showed many conserved blocks and features with other known mammalian G6PD promoter regions. The analysis also revealed the presence of one TATA box, three GC boxes, two E-boxes and several binding sites for Stimulating Protein 1 (Sp1) and Activator Protein 2 (AP2). Moreover, elements involved in the regulation of lipogenesis like USF (Upstream stimulating factor), HSF (Heat Shock Factor), F2F (Prolactin receptor), RAR (Retinoid Acid Receptor), STRE (STress Response Element), RORa (Retinoid related Orphan Receptor alpha), GATA (GATA binding factor), RFX (Regulatory Factor X), SREBP (Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein), MEP (Metal Element Protein), CREB (insulin receptor), PRE (Progesterone receptor), and HNF4 (Hepatic Nuclear Factor 4) were detected. The most important regulatory motifs were found to be conserved as compared to those in human and mouse counterparts. However, some differences were noted, likely indicating differences in the transcription regulation of G6PD gene between ruminant and non-ruminant species.

  8. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of cDNA for human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variant A(-)

    SciTech Connect

    Hirono, A.; Beutler, E. )

    1988-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase A(-) is a common variant in Blacks that causes sensitivity to drug- and infection-induced hemolytic anemia. A cDNA library was constructed from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cells from a male who was G6PD A(-). One of four cDNA clones isolated contained a sequence not found in the other clones nor in the published cDNA sequence. Consisting of 138 bases and coding 46 amino acids, this segment of cDNA apparently is derived from the alternative splicing involving the 3{prime} end of intron 7. Comparison of the remaining sequences of these clones with the published sequence revealed three nucleotide substitutions: C{sup 33} {yields} G, G{sup 202} {yields} A, and A{sup 376} {yields} G. Each change produces a new restriction site. Genomic DNA from five G6PD A(-) individuals was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. The findings of the same mutation in G6PD A(-) as is found in G6PD A(+) strongly suggests that the G6PD A(-) mutation arose in an individual with G6PD A(+), adding another mutation that causes the in vivo instability of this enzyme protein.

  9. On-plate enzyme and inhibition assay of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Mohamed, Amara Camara; Wang, Shengtian; Yang, Li

    2015-08-01

    We performed on-plate enzyme and inhibition assays of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography. The assays were accomplished based on different retardation factors of the substrates, enzyme, and products. All the necessary steps were integrated on-plate in one developing process, including substrate/enzyme mixing, reaction starting, and quenching as well as product separation. In order to quantitatively measure the enzyme reaction, the developed plate was then densitometrically evaluated to determine the peak area of the product. Rapid and high-throughput assays were achieved by loading different substrate spots and/or enzyme (and inhibition) spots in different tracks on the plate. The on-plate enzyme assay could be finished in a developing time of only 4 min, with good track-to-track and plate-to-plate repeatability. Moreover, we determined the Km values of the enzyme reaction and Ki values of the inhibition (Pb(2+) Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) as inhibitors), as well as the corresponding kinetics using the on-plate assay. Taken together, our method expanded the application of thin-layer chromatography in enzyme assays, and it could be potentially used in research fields for rapid and quantitative measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Clonal evolution following chemotherapy-induced stem cell depletion in cats heterozygous for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Abkowitz, J.L.; Ott, R.M.; Holly, R.D.; Adamson, J.W.

    1988-06-01

    The number of hematopoietic stem cells necessary to support normal hematopoiesis is not known but may be small. If so, the depletion or damage of such cells could result in apparent clonal dominance. To test this hypothesis, dimethylbusulfan (2 to 4 mg/kg intravenously (IV) x 3) was given to cats heterozygous for the X-linked enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD). These cats were the daughters of domestic X Geoffroy parents. After the initial drug-induced cytopenias (2 to 4 weeks), peripheral blood counts and the numbers of marrow progenitors detected in culture remained normal, although the percentages of erythroid burst-forming cells (BFU-E) and granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) in DNA synthesis increased, as determined by the tritiated thymidine suicide technique. In three of six cats treated, a dominance of Geoffroy-type G-6-PD emerged among the progenitor cells, granulocytes, and RBCs. These skewed ratios of domestic to Geoffroy-type G-6-PD have persisted greater than 3 years. No changes in cell cycle kinetics or G-6-PD phenotypes were noted in similar studies in six control cats. These data suggest that clonal evolution may reflect the depletion or damage of normal stem cells and not only the preferential growth and dominance of neoplastic cells.

  11. Role of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase inhibition in the antiproliferative effects of dehydroepiandrosterone on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Di Monaco, M.; Pizzini, A.; Gatto, V.; Leonardi, L.; Gallo, M.; Brignardello, E.; Boccuzzi, G.

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) exerts a protective effect against breast cancer. It has been proposed that the non-competitive inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) contributes to DHEA antitumor action. We evaluated the effects of DHEA on G6PD activity and on the in vitro proliferation of two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 (steroid receptor positive) and MDA-MB-231 (steroid receptor negative), in a serum-free assay. DHEA inhibition of G6PD was only found to occur at concentrations above 10 microM; at these high concentrations, the growth curve was parallel to the enzyme inhibition curve in both cell lines. In contrast, at concentrations in the in vivo breast tissue concentration range, neither cell growth nor enzyme activity was inhibited. The results failed to confirm DHEA's putative anti-tumor action on breast cancer through G6PD inhibition, as the enzyme blockade only becomes apparent at pharmacological concentrations of the steroid. PMID:9052415

  12. Overexpression, purification and enzymatic characterization of a recombinant plastidial glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Nure) roots.

    PubMed

    Cardi, Manuela; Chibani, Kamel; Castiglia, Daniela; Cafasso, Donata; Pizzo, Elio; Rouhier, Nicolas; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Esposito, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    In plant cells, the plastidial glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (P2-G6PDH, EC 1.1.1.49) represents one of the most important sources of NADPH. However, previous studies revealed that both native and recombinant purified P2-G6PDHs show a great instability and a rapid loss of catalytic activity. Therefore it has been difficult to describe accurately the catalytic and physico-chemical properties of these isoforms. The plastidial G6PDH encoding sequence from barley roots (Hordeum vulgare cv. Nure), devoid of a long plastidial transit peptide, was expressed as recombinant protein in Escherichia coli, either untagged or with an N-terminal his-tag. After purification from both the soluble fraction and inclusion bodies, we have explored its kinetic parameters, as well as its sensitivity to reduction. The obtained results are consistent with values determined for other P2-G6PDHs previously purified from barley roots and from other land plants. Overall, these data shed light on the catalytic mechanism of plant P2-G6PDH, summarized in a proposed model in which the sequential mechanism is very similar to the mammalian cytosolic G6PDH. This study provides a rational basis to consider the recombinant barley root P2-G6PDH as a good model for further kinetic and structural studies.

  13. Glucose regulates enzymatic sources of mitochondrial NADPH in skeletal muscle cells; a novel role for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2010-07-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) is a functionally important metabolite required to support numerous cellular processes. However, despite the identification of numerous NADPH-producing enzymes, the mechanisms underlying how the organellar pools of NADPH are maintained remain elusive. Here, we have identified glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) as an important source of NADPH in mitochondria. Activity analysis, submitochondrial fractionation, fluorescence microscopy, and protease sensitivity assays revealed that G6PDH is localized to the mitochondrial matrix. 6-ANAM, a specific G6PDH inhibitor, depleted mitochondrial NADPH pools and increased oxidative stress revealing the importance of G6PDH in NADPH maintenance. We also show that glucose availability and differences in metabolic state modulate the enzymatic sources of NADPH in mitochondria. Indeed, cells cultured in high glucose (HG) not only adopted a glycolytic phenotype but also relied heavily on matrix-associated G6PDH as a source of NADPH. In contrast, cells exposed to low-glucose (LG) concentrations, which displayed increased oxygen consumption, mitochondrial metabolic efficiency, and decreased glycolysis, relied predominantly on isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) as the principal NADPH-producing enzyme in the mitochondria. Culturing glycolytic cells in LG for 48 h decreased G6PDH and increased ICDH protein levels in the mitochondria, further pointing to the regulatory role of glucose. 2-Deoxyglucose treatment also prevented the increase of mitochondrial G6PDH in response to HG. The role of glucose in regulating enzymatic sources of mitochondrial NADPH pool maintenance was confirmed using human myotubes from obese adults with a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (post-T2DM). Myotubes from post-T2DM participants failed to increase mitochondrial G6PDH in response to HG in contrast to mitochondria in myotubes from control participants (non-T2DM). Hence, we not only identified a matrix

  14. Autosomal factors with correlated effects on the activities of the glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Laurie-Ahlberg, C C; Williamson, J H; Cochrane, B J; Wilton, A N; Chasalow, F I

    1981-09-01

    Isogenic lines, in which chromosomes sampled from natural populations of C. melanogaster are substituted into a common genetic background, were used to detect and partially characterize autosomal factors that affect the activities of the two pentose phosphate pathway enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD). The chromosome 3 effects on G6PD and 6PGD are clearly correlated; the chromosome 2 effects, which are not so great, also appear to be correlated, but the evidence in this case is not so strong. Examination of activity variation of ten other enzymes revealed that G6PD and 6PGD are not the only pair of enzymes showing a high positive correlation, but it is among the highest in both sets of lines. In addition, there was some evidence that the factor(s) affecting G6PD and 6PGD may also affect two other metabolically related enzymes, transaldolase and phosphoglucose isomerase.--Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate specific CRM levels for three of the enzymes studied: G6PD, 6PGD and ME. This experiment shows that a large part of the activity variation is accounted for by variation in CRM level (especially for chromosome 3 lines), but there remains a significant fraction of the genetic component of activity variation that is not explained by CRM level.--These results suggest that the autosomal factors are modifiers involved in regulation of the expression of the X-linked structural genes for G6PD and 6PGD, but a role in determining part of the enzymes' primary structure cannot be excluded with the present evidence.

  15. Autosomal Factors with Correlated Effects on the Activities of the Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Laurie-Ahlberg, C. C.; Williamson, J. H.; Cochrane, B. J.; Wilton, A. N.; Chasalow, F. I.

    1981-01-01

    Isogenic lines, in which chromosomes sampled from natural populations of D. melanogaster are substituted into a common genetic background, were used to detect and partially characterize autosomal factors that affect the activities of the two pentose phosphate pathway enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD). The chromosome 3 effects on G6PD and 6PGD are clearly correlated; the chromosome 2 effects, which are not so great, also appear to be correlated, but the evidence in this case is not so strong. Examination of activity variation of ten other enzymes revealed that G6PD and 6PGD are not the only pair of enzymes showing a high positive correlation, but it is among the highest in both sets of lines. In addition, there was some evidence that the factor(s) affecting G6PD and 6PGD may also affect two other metabolically related enzymes, transaldolase and phosphoglucose isomerase.—Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate specific CRM levels for three of the enzymes studied: G6PD, 6PGD and ME. This experiment shows that a large part of the activity variation is accounted for by variation in CRM level (especially for chromosome 3 lines), but there remains a significant fraction of the genetic component of activity variation that is not explained by CRM level.—These results suggest that the autosomal factors are modifiers involved in regulation of the expression of the X-linked structural genes for G6PD and 6PGD, but a role in determining part of the enzymes' primary structure cannot be excluded with the present evidence. PMID:6804300

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides is a reliable internal standard for radiation-inactivation studies of membranes in the frozen state

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, J.O.; Churchill, P.

    1985-06-01

    The target size of four soluble enzymes (beta-galactosidase, pyruvate kinase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) in the presence or absence of subcellular membrane fractions has been determined by the radiation-inactivation method using samples in the frozen state. For each of the four enzymes, full activity was recovered after freezing and thawing in the absence of radiation. The authors found minimal (less than 20%) binding of the enzymes to either submitochondrial vesicles or sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Under the conditions tested, beta-galactosidase, pyruvate kinase, and alcohol dehydrogenase exhibited target sizes which varied according to the experimental conditions, i.e., the buffer selected and also the presence or absence of membrane preparations. For these tetrameric enzymes, the target sizes were generally comparable to either a monomer or a dimer. By contrast, the target size of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides was found to be essentially invariant when frozen in a variety of buffers and in the presence or absence of either cryoprotectant (sucrose or glycerol) or different membrane preparations. The target size from 19 separate determinations gave an average value of 104 +/- 16 kDa, which is comparable to the molecular weight of the enzyme (104 kDa). The authors conclude that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from L. mesenteroides is a reliable internal standard for radiation-inactivation studies of membrane preparations in the frozen state.

  17. Knockdown of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) following cerebral ischemic reperfusion: the pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Yanxin; Wang, Xingyu; Xu, Ying

    2012-07-01

    NADPH derived from glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, has been implicated not only to promote reduced glutathione (GSH) but also enhance oxidative stress in specific cellular conditions. In this study, the effects of G6PD antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) was examined on the CA1 pyramidal neurons following transient cerebral ischemia. Specifically knockdown of G6PD protein expression in hippocampus CA1 subregion at early reperfusion period (1-24 h) with a strategy to pre-treated G6PD AS-ODNs significantly reduced G6PD activity and NADPH level, an effect correlated with attenuation of NADPH oxidase activation and superoxide anion production. Concomitantly, pre-treatment of G6PD AS-ODNs markedly reduced oxidative DNA damage and the delayed neuronal cell death in rat hippocampal CA1 region induced by global cerebral ischemia. By contrast, knockdown of G6PD protein at late reperfusion period (48-96 h) increased oxidative DNA damage and exacerbated the ischemia-induced neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 region, an effect associated with reduced NADPH level and GSH/GSSG ratio. These findings indicate that G6PD not only plays a role in oxidative neuronal damage but also a neuroprotective role during different ischemic reperfusion period. Therefore, G6PD mediated oxidative response and redox regulation in the hippocampal CA1 act as the two sides of the same coin and may represent two potential applications of G6PD during different stage of cerebral ischemic reperfusion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Free fatty acid inhibition of the insulin induction of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in rat hepatocyte monolayers.

    PubMed

    Salati, L M; Adkins-Finke, B; Clarke, S D

    1988-01-01

    Rat hepatocytes in monolayer culture were utilized to determine if the decrease in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity resulting from the ingestion of fat can be mimicked by the addition of fatty acids to a chemically, hormonally defined medium. G6PD activity in cultured hepatocytes was induced several-fold by insulin. Dexamethasone or T3 did not amplify the insulin induction of G6PD. Glucose alone increased G6PD activity in cultured hepatocytes from fasted donors by nearly 500%. Insulin in combination with glucose induced G6PD an additional two-fold. The increase in G6PD activity caused by glucose was greater in hepatocytes isolated from 72 hr-fasted rats as compared to fed donor rats. Such a response was reminiscent of the "overshoot" phenomenon in which G6PD activity is induced well above the normal level by fasting-refeeding rats a high glucose diet. Addition of linoleate to the medium resulted in a significant suppression of insulin's ability to induce G6PD, but linoleate had no effect on the induction of G6PD activity by glucose alone. A shift to the right in the insulin-response curve for the induction of G6PD also was detected for the induction of malic enzyme and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Arachidonate (0.25 mM) was a significantly more effective inhibitor of the insulin action than linoleate was. Apparently rat hepatocytes in monolayer culture can be utilized as a model to investigate the molecular mechanism by which fatty acids inhibit the production of lipogenic enzymes. In part, this mechanism of fatty acid inhibition involves desensitization of hepatocytes to the lipogenic action of insulin.

  19. The effects of chemical and radioactive properties of Tl-201 on human erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ali; Senturk, Murat; Ciftci, Mehmet; Varoglu, Erhan; Kufrevioglu, Omer Irfan

    2010-04-01

    The inhibitory effects of thallium-201 ((201)Tl) solution on human erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity were investigated. For this purpose, erythrocyte G6PD was initially purified 835-fold at a yield of 41.7% using 2',5'-Adenosine diphosphate sepharose 4B affinity gel chromatography. The purification was monitored by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which showed a single band for the final enzyme preparation. The in vitro and in vivo effects of the (201)Tl solution including Tl(+), Fe(+3) and Cu(+2) metals and the in vitro effects of the radiation effect of the (201)Tl solution and non-radioactive Tl(+), Fe(+3) and Cu(+2) metals on human erythrocyte G6PD enzyme were studied. Enzyme activity was determined with the Beutler method at 340 nm using a spectrophotometer. All purification procedures were carried out at +4 degrees C. (201)Tl solution and radiation exposure had inhibitory effects on the enzyme activity. IC(50) value of (201)Tl solution was 36.86 microl ([Tl(+)]: 0.0036 microM, [Cu(+2)]: 0.0116 microM, [Fe(+3)]: 0.0132 microM), of human erythrocytes G6PD. Seven human patients were also used for in vivo studies of (201)Tl solution. Furthermore, non-radioactive Tl(+), Fe(+3) and Cu(+2) were found not to have influenced the enzyme in vitro. Human erythrocyte G6PD activity was inhibited by exposure for up to 10 minutes to 0.057 mCi/kg (201)Tl solution. It was detected in in vitro and in vivo studies that the human erythrocyte G6PD enzyme is inhibited due to the radiation effect of (201)Tl solution. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity strongly influences xylose fermentation and inhibitor sensitivity in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Jeppsson, Marie; Johansson, Björn; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F

    2003-11-01

    Disruption of the ZWF1 gene encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) has been shown to reduce the xylitol yield and the xylose consumption in the xylose-utilizing recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TMB3255. In the present investigation we have studied the influence of different production levels of G6PDH on xylose fermentation. We used a synthetic promoter library and the copper-regulated CUP1 promoter to generate G6PDH-activities between 0% and 179% of the wild-type level. G6PDH-activities of 1% and 6% of the wild-type level resulted in 2.8- and 5.1-fold increase in specific xylose consumption, respectively, compared with the ZWF1-disrupted strain. Both strains exhibited decreased xylitol yields (0.13 and 0.19 g/g xylose) and enhanced ethanol yields (0.36 and 0.34 g/g xylose) compared with the control strain TMB3001 (0.29 g xylitol/g xylose, 0.31 g ethanol/g xylose). Cytoplasmic transhydrogenase (TH) from Azotobacter vinelandii has previously been shown to transfer NADPH and NAD(+) into NADP(+) and NADH, and TH-overproduction resulted in lower xylitol yield and enhanced glycerol yield during xylose utilization. Strains with low G6PDH-activity grew slower in a lignocellulose hydrolysate than the strain with wild-type G6PDH-activity, which suggested that the availability of intracellular NADPH correlated with tolerance towards lignocellulose-derived inhibitors. Low G6PDH-activity strains were also more sensitive to H(2)O(2) than the control strain TMB3001.

  1. Mutations of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Durham, Santa-Maria and A+ Variants Are Associated with Loss Functional and Structural Stability of the Protein.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; González-Valdez, Abigail; García-Torres, Itzhel; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2015-12-02

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzymopathy in the world. More than 160 mutations causing the disease have been identified, but only 10% of these variants have been studied at biochemical and biophysical levels. In this study we report on the functional and structural characterization of three naturally occurring variants corresponding to different classes of disease severity: Class I G6PD Durham, Class II G6PD Santa Maria, and Class III G6PD A+. The results showed that the G6PD Durham (severe deficiency), and the G6PD Santa Maria and A+ (less severe deficiency) (Class I, II and III, respectively) affect the catalytic efficiency of these enzymes, are more sensitive to temperature denaturing, and affect the stability of the overall protein when compared to the wild type WT-G6PD. In the variants, the exposure of more and buried hydrophobic pockets was induced and monitored with 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence, directly affecting the compaction of structure at different levels and probably reducing the stability of the protein. The degree of functional and structural perturbation by each variant correlates with the clinical severity reported in different patients.

  2. Mutations of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Durham, Santa-Maria and A+ Variants Are Associated with Loss Functional and Structural Stability of the Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; González-Valdez, Abigail; García-Torres, Itzhel; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzymopathy in the world. More than 160 mutations causing the disease have been identified, but only 10% of these variants have been studied at biochemical and biophysical levels. In this study we report on the functional and structural characterization of three naturally occurring variants corresponding to different classes of disease severity: Class I G6PD Durham, Class II G6PD Santa Maria, and Class III G6PD A+. The results showed that the G6PD Durham (severe deficiency), and the G6PD Santa Maria and A+ (less severe deficiency) (Class I, II and III, respectively) affect the catalytic efficiency of these enzymes, are more sensitive to temperature denaturing, and affect the stability of the overall protein when compared to the wild type WT-G6PD. In the variants, the exposure of more and buried hydrophobic pockets was induced and monitored with 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence, directly affecting the compaction of structure at different levels and probably reducing the stability of the protein. The degree of functional and structural perturbation by each variant correlates with the clinical severity reported in different patients. PMID:26633385

  3. Effect of peptides of the insulin superfamily on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in skeletal muscles of river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) during prespawning starvation.

    PubMed

    Chistyakova, O V; Kuznetsova, L A

    2009-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in skeletal muscles of the lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) decreased during prespawning starvation (September-May). The observed changes were particularly pronounced in January. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, and relaxin produce an in vitro stimulatory effect on the enzyme. Insulin was most potent in this respect. Inactivation of the enzyme was accompanied by a decrease in its sensitivity to the stimulatory effect of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1.

  4. Determinants of Cofactor Specificity for the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli: Simulation, Kinetics and Evolutionary Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Matias; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Maturana, Pablo; Krapp, Adriana; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenases (G6PDHs) from different sources show varying specificities towards NAD+ and NADP+ as cofactors. However, it is not known to what extent structural determinants of cofactor preference are conserved in the G6PDH family. In this work, molecular simulations, kinetic characterization of site-directed mutants and phylogenetic analyses were used to study the structural basis for the strong preference towards NADP+ shown by the G6PDH from Escherichia coli. Molecular Dynamics trajectories of homology models showed a highly favorable binding energy for residues K18 and R50 when interacting with the 2'-phosphate of NADP+, but the same residues formed no observable interactions in the case of NAD+. Alanine mutants of both residues were kinetically characterized and analyzed with respect to the binding energy of the transition state, according to the kcat/KM value determined for each cofactor. Whereas both residues contribute to the binding energy of NADP+, only R50 makes a contribution (about -1 kcal/mol) to NAD+ binding. In the absence of both positive charges the enzyme was unable to discriminate NADP+ from NAD+. Although kinetic data is sparse, the observed distribution of cofactor preferences within the phylogenetic tree is sufficient to rule out the possibility that the known NADP+-specific G6PDHs form a monophyletic group. While the β1-α1 loop shows no strict conservation of K18, (rather, S and T seem to be more frequent), in the case of the β2-α2 loop, different degrees of conservation are observed for R50. Noteworthy is the fact that a K18T mutant is indistinguishable from K18A in terms of cofactor preference. We conclude that the structural determinants for the strict discrimination against NAD+ in the case of the NADP+-specific enzymes have evolved independently through different means during the evolution of the G6PDH family. We further suggest that other regions in the cofactor binding pocket, besides the β1-α1 and β2-α2

  5. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase regulation in the hepatopancreas of the anoxia-tolerant marine mollusc, Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Lama, Judeh L; Bell, Ryan A V; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) gates flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and is key to cellular antioxidant defense due to its role in producing NADPH. Good antioxidant defenses are crucial for anoxia-tolerant organisms that experience wide variations in oxygen availability. The marine mollusc, Littorina littorea, is an intertidal snail that experiences daily bouts of anoxia/hypoxia with the tide cycle and shows multiple metabolic and enzymatic adaptations that support anaerobiosis. This study investigated the kinetic, physical and regulatory properties of G6PDH from hepatopancreas of L. littorea to determine if the enzyme is differentially regulated in response to anoxia, thereby providing altered pentose phosphate pathway functionality under oxygen stress conditions. Several kinetic properties of G6PDH differed significantly between aerobic and 24 h anoxic conditions; compared with the aerobic state, anoxic G6PDH (assayed at pH 8) showed a 38% decrease in K m G6P and enhanced inhibition by urea, whereas in pH 6 assays K m NADP and maximal activity changed significantly between the two states. The mechanism underlying anoxia-responsive changes in enzyme properties proved to be a change in the phosphorylation state of G6PDH. This was documented with immunoblotting using an anti-phosphoserine antibody, in vitro incubations that stimulated endogenous protein kinases versus protein phosphatases and significantly changed K m G6P, and phosphorylation of the enzyme with (32)P-ATP. All these data indicated that the aerobic and anoxic forms of G6PDH were the high and low phosphate forms, respectively, and that phosphorylation state was modulated in response to selected endogenous protein kinases (PKA or PKG) and protein phosphatases (PP1 or PP2C). Anoxia-induced changes in the phosphorylation state of G6PDH may facilitate sustained or increased production of NADPH to enhance antioxidant defense during long term anaerobiosis and/or during the transition

  6. Determinants of Cofactor Specificity for the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli: Simulation, Kinetics and Evolutionary Studies.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Matias; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Maturana, Pablo; Krapp, Adriana; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenases (G6PDHs) from different sources show varying specificities towards NAD+ and NADP+ as cofactors. However, it is not known to what extent structural determinants of cofactor preference are conserved in the G6PDH family. In this work, molecular simulations, kinetic characterization of site-directed mutants and phylogenetic analyses were used to study the structural basis for the strong preference towards NADP+ shown by the G6PDH from Escherichia coli. Molecular Dynamics trajectories of homology models showed a highly favorable binding energy for residues K18 and R50 when interacting with the 2'-phosphate of NADP+, but the same residues formed no observable interactions in the case of NAD+. Alanine mutants of both residues were kinetically characterized and analyzed with respect to the binding energy of the transition state, according to the kcat/KM value determined for each cofactor. Whereas both residues contribute to the binding energy of NADP+, only R50 makes a contribution (about -1 kcal/mol) to NAD+ binding. In the absence of both positive charges the enzyme was unable to discriminate NADP+ from NAD+. Although kinetic data is sparse, the observed distribution of cofactor preferences within the phylogenetic tree is sufficient to rule out the possibility that the known NADP+-specific G6PDHs form a monophyletic group. While the β1-α1 loop shows no strict conservation of K18, (rather, S and T seem to be more frequent), in the case of the β2-α2 loop, different degrees of conservation are observed for R50. Noteworthy is the fact that a K18T mutant is indistinguishable from K18A in terms of cofactor preference. We conclude that the structural determinants for the strict discrimination against NAD+ in the case of the NADP+-specific enzymes have evolved independently through different means during the evolution of the G6PDH family. We further suggest that other regions in the cofactor binding pocket, besides the β1-α1 and β2-α2

  7. Mutational Analyses of Glucose Dehydrogenase and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Reveal Their Effects on Growth and Alginate Production.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Susan; Mærk, Mali; Valla, Svein; Ertesvåg, Helga

    2015-05-15

    The biosynthesis of alginate has been studied extensively due to the importance of this polymer in medicine and industry. Alginate is synthesized from fructose-6-phosphate and thus competes with the central carbon metabolism for this metabolite. The alginate-producing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens relies on the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways for glucose metabolism, and these pathways are also important for the metabolism of fructose and glycerol. In the present study, the impact of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes on growth and alginate synthesis was investigated in P. fluorescens. Mutants defective in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (Zwf-1 and Zwf-2) or glucose dehydrogenase (Gcd) were evaluated using media containing glucose, fructose, or glycerol. Zwf-1 was shown to be the most important glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase for catabolism. Both Zwf enzymes preferred NADP as a coenzyme, although NAD was also accepted. Only Zwf-2 was active in the presence of 3 mM ATP, and then only with NADP as a coenzyme, indicating an anabolic role for this isoenzyme. Disruption of zwf-1 resulted in increased alginate production when glycerol was used as the carbon source, possibly due to decreased flux through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway rendering more fructose-6-phosphate available for alginate biosynthesis. In alginate-producing cells grown on glucose, disruption of gcd increased both cell numbers and alginate production levels, while this mutation had no positive effect on growth in a non-alginate-producing strain. A possible explanation is that alginate synthesis might function as a sink for surplus hexose phosphates that could otherwise be detrimental to the cell.

  8. Serum Soluble Transferrin Receptor Concentrations Are Elevated in Congolese Children with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Variants, but Not Sickle Cell Variants or α-Thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Barker, Mikaela K; Henderson, Amanda M; Naguib, Karimah; Vercauteren, Suzanne M; Devlin, Angela M; Albert, Arianne Y; Bahizire, Esto; Tugirimana, Pierrot L; Akilimali, Pierre Z; Boy, Erick; Green, Tim J; Karakochuk, Crystal D

    2017-09-01

    Background: Anemia is common in Congolese children, and inherited blood disorders may be a contributing cause. The presence of sickle cell variants, X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and α-thalassemia, has been previously reported. G6PD A- deficiency is characterized by the co-inheritance of G6PD 376 and 202 variants and is common in sub-Saharan Africa.Objective: We aimed to measure the associations between inherited blood disorders and hemoglobin, ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations in Congolese children.Methods: Venous blood was collected from 744 children aged 6-59 mo from 2 provinces. We measured biomarkers of nutritional and inflammation status and malaria. Pyrosequencing was used to detect sickle cell variants. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect G6PD variants and α-thalassemia deletions.Results: Overall, 11% of children had a sickle cell variant, 19% of boys were G6PD A- hemizygotes, 12% and 10% of girls were G6PD A- hetero- or homozygotes, respectively, and 12% of children had α-thalassemia. Multivariable linear regression models (adjusted for age, province, altitude, malaria, and biomarkers of nutritional and inflammation status) showed that G6PD A- hemizygous boys and G6PD 376 homozygous girls had higher sTfR concentrations [geometric mean ratios (95% CIs): 1.20 (1.03, 1.39) and 1.25 (1.02, 1.53), respectively] than children with no G6PD variants. Hemoglobin and ferritin concentrations were not independently associated with any of the inherited blood disorder genotypes.Conclusions: We found that 2 G6PD variant genotypes were associated with elevated sTfR concentrations, which limits the accuracy of sTfR as a biomarker of iron status in this population. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Nine different glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) variants in a Malaysian population with Malay, Chinese, Indian and Orang Asli (aboriginal Malaysian) backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jichun; Luo, Enjie; Hirai, Makoto; Arai, Meiji; Abdul-Manan, Eas; Mohamed-Isa, Zaleha; Hidayah, Ni; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki

    2008-10-01

    The Malaysian people consist of several ethnic groups including the Malay, the Chinese, the Indian and the Orang Asli (aboriginal Malaysians). We collected blood samples from outpatients of 2 hospitals in the State of Selangor and identified 27 glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient subjects among these ethnic groups. In the Malay, G6PD Viangchan (871GA, 1311CT, IVS11 nt93TC) and G6PD Mahidol (487GA) types, which are common in Cambodia and Myanmar, respectively, were detected. The Malay also had both subtypes of G6PD Mediterranean:the Mediterranean subtype (563CT, 1311CT, IVS11 nt93TC) and the Indo-Pakistan subtype (563CT, 1311C, IVS11 nt93T). In Malaysians of Chinese background, G6PD Kaiping (1388GA), G6PD Canton (1376GT) and G6PD Gaohe (95AG), which are common in China, were detected. Indian Malaysians possessed G6PD Mediterranean (Indo-Pakistan subtype) and G6PD Namoru (208TC), a few cases of which had been reported in Vanuatu and many in India. Our findings indicate that G6PD Namoru occurs in India and flows to Malaysia up to Vanuatu. We also discovered 5 G6PD-deficient cases with 2 nucleotide substitutions of 1311CT and IVS11 nt93TC, but without amino-acid substitution in the G6PD molecule. These results indicate that the Malaysian people have incorporated many ancestors in terms of G6PD variants.

  10. Neuroprotective effect of liquiritin as an antioxidant via an increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase expression on B65 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yoshihiko; Kobe, Aya; Kuriya, Megumi; Hiroki, Yoko; Yahagi, Tadahiro; Sakakibara, Iwao; Matsuzaki, Keiichi; Amano, Taku

    2017-09-29

    Glycyrrhiza (the roots and rhizomes of licorice) has been used worldwide as both an herbal nutraceutical and herbal medicine. In addition, it is well known that Glycyrrhiza contains various compounds with biological effects, such as anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory, anti-tumor and neuroprotective effects. Among the various compounds in Glycyrrhiza, the active compounds that show biological activity are thought to include glycyrrhizin, glycyrrhetinic acid, glabridin, licochalcones and liquiritin. In the present study, we investigated the biological effects of three of these compounds (glycyrrhizin, liquiritin and isoliquiritin) on B65 neuroblastoma cells derived from serotonergic neurons. Among these three compounds, only liquiritin enhanced the proliferation of B65 neuroblastoma cells. In contrast, both glycyrrhizin and isoliquiritin, particularly at high concentrations had cytotoxic effects. Cells were treated with various cytotoxic agents and liquiritin could ameliorate the cytotoxicity induced by menadione sodium bisulfate in a dose-dependent manner. We also examined the effect of liquiritin on cell survival by evaluating the expression levels of phospho-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase, cyclin-related proteins and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, which produces nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Under treatment with liquiritin, the protein expression level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the protein expression level of cyclin-related proteins did not change at all under treatment with liquiritin. These results suggest that liquiritin, which is contained in Glycyrrhiza, may enhance cell survival by increasing the protein expression level of glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi in complex with substrate

    PubMed Central

    Ortíz, Cecilia; Larrieux, Nicole; Medeiros, Andrea; Botti, Horacio; Comini, Marcelo; Buschiazzo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    An N-terminally truncated version of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma cruzi lacking the first 37 residues was crystallized both in its apo form and in a binary complex with glucose 6-­phosphate. The crystals both belonged to space group P21 and diffracted to 2.85 and 3.35 Å resolution, respectively. Self-rotation function maps were consistent with point group 222. The structure was solved by molecular replacement, confirming a tetrameric quaternary structure. PMID:22102256

  12. Elevated glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase expression in the cervical cancer cases is associated with the cancerigenic event of high-risk human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Li, Ya-Shan; Chen, Bo; Chang, Ye-Fei; Liu, Guang-Cai; Hong, Ying; Chen, Hong-Lan

    2015-01-01

    The most important etiologic agent in the pathogenesis of cervical cancers (CCs) is human papillomavirus (HPV), while the mechanisms underlying are still not well known. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is reported to elevate in various tumor cells. However, no available references elucidated the correlation between the levels of G6PD and HPV-infected CC until now. In the present study, we explored the possible role of G6PD in the pathology of CC induced by HPV infection. Totally 48 patients with HPV + CC and another 63 healthy women enrolled in the clinical were employed in the present study. Overall, prevalence of cervical infection with high-risk-HPV (HR-HPV) type examined was HPV-16, followed by HPV-18. The expressions of G6PD in CC samples were also detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC), qRT-PCR, and Western blot. Regression analysis showed elevated G6PD level was positively correlated with the CC development in 30–40 aged patients with HR-HPV-16/18 infection. The HPV16 + Siha, HPV18 + Hela, and HPV-C33A cell lines were employed and transfected with G6PD deficient vectors developed in vitro. MTT and flow cytometry were also employed to determine the survival and apoptosis of CC cells after G6PD expressional inhibition. Our data revealed that G6PD down-regulation induced poor proliferation and more apoptosis of HPV18 + Hela cells, when compared with that of HPV16 + Siha and HPV-C33A cells. These findings suggest that G6PD expressions in the HR-HPV + human CC tissues and cell lines play an important role in tumor growth and proliferation. PMID:25616277

  13. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Enhances Antiviral Response through Downregulation of NADPH Sensor HSCARG and Upregulation of NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Chiu, Daniel Tsun-Yee; Lin, Hsin-Ru; Tang, Hsiang-Yu; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Ho, Hung-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient cells are highly susceptible to viral infection. This study examined the mechanism underlying this phenomenon by measuring the expression of antiviral genes—tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and GTPase myxovirus resistance 1 (MX1)—in G6PD-knockdown cells upon human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection. Molecular analysis revealed that the promoter activities of TNF-α and MX1 were downregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells, and that the IκB degradation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB were decreased. The HSCARG protein, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) sensor and negative regulator of NF-κB, was upregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells with decreased NADPH/NADP+ ratio. Treatment of G6PD-knockdown cells with siRNA against HSCARG enhanced the DNA binding activity of NF-κB and the expression of TNF-α and MX1, but suppressed the expression of viral genes; however, the overexpression of HSCARG inhibited the antiviral response. Exogenous G6PD or IDH1 expression inhibited the expression of HSCARG, resulting in increased expression of TNF-α and MX1 and reduced viral gene expression upon virus infection. Our findings suggest that the increased susceptibility of the G6PD-knockdown cells to viral infection was due to impaired NF-κB signaling and antiviral response mediated by HSCARG. PMID:26694452

  14. pH-induced bistable dynamic behaviour in the reaction catalysed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and conformational hysteresis of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Aon, M A; Cortassa, S; Hervagault, J F; Thomas, D

    1989-01-01

    1. Bistable (multiple stationary states) dynamic behaviour in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase that was subjected to successive pH change was demonstrated in an open continuously stirred tank reactor. Although the enzyme under study did not exhibit an autocatalytic effect and was homogeneously distributed, bistability was shown to occur. 2. The successive pH changes of the enzyme solution corresponded to a pH transition (8.3 in equilibrium 2), i.e. an acidification (forward direction) and an alkalinization (reverse direction). By use of intrinsic protein fluorescence methods, a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase conformational hysteresis was shown to exist concomitant with the pH transition before and after enzyme injection into the reactor. 3. The results obtained suggest that the enzyme behaves, conformationally, as a memory device that stores information about its pH history (i.e. the enzyme records information in its structure about the environment to which it was previously exposed) and transduces it in a non-linear dynamic fashion, producing the bistable behaviour observed in the open reactor. PMID:2590166

  15. Cloning and characterization of an alternative transcript of ovine glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene: comparative approach between ruminant and non-ruminant species.

    PubMed

    Laliotis, George P; Argyrokastritis, Alexandros; Bizelis, Iosif; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2007-02-15

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) plays an important role in ruminant's lipogenesis, as it provides necessary compounds of NADPH for the synthesis of fatty acids catalyzing the first committed reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway. In this work the full length ovine glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase cDNA was isolated using a polymerase chain reaction based strategy. Two isoforms (OG6PDA and OG6PDB) were detected encoding a protein of 515 and 524 amino acids, respectively. Both deduced amino acid sequences reveal a well conserved protein containing all the important residues for its catalytic role. The extra nine amino acids encoded by OG6PDB cause a frameshift in the polypeptide chain resulting in changes around the area of the potential substrate binding site. A three-dimensional model of ovine G6PD protein shows that this frameshift cause structural changes in the catalytic binding "pocket" of the molecule. Southern blot and RT analysis revealed that ovine G6PD appears as a single copy gene while it is expressed, with slight variability, in all tissues analyzed. Moreover, expression analysis of the ovine G6PD isoforms showed that OG6PDB is expressed only in tissues where lipogenesis is high in ruminants. Thus, we hypothesize that in ruminants G6PD may be regulated by the ratio of the two transcripts, according to the existence stimulus.

  16. Increased activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in purified cell suspensions and single cells from the uterine cervix in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, S. K.; Benedetto, C.; Flatman, A.; Hammond, R. H.; Micheletti, L.; Riley, C.; Riley, P. A.; Spargo, D. J.; Zonca, M.; Slater, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have been measured in squamous epithelial cells of the uterine cervix from normal patients and cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). A biochemical cycling method, which uses only simple equipment and is suited to routine use and to automation, was applied to cells separated by gradient centrifugation. In addition, cells were examined cytochemically, and the intensity of staining in the cytoplasm of single whole cells was measured using computerised microcytospectrophotometry. Twenty per cent of cells in samples from normal patients (n=61) showed staining intensities above an extinction of 0.15 at 540 nm, compared to 71% of cases of CIN 1 (n=14), 91% of cases of CIN 2 (n=11) and 67% of cases of CIN 3 (n=15). The cytochemical data do not allow definitive distinctions to be made between different grades of CIN whereas the biochemical assay applied to cell lysates shows convincing differences between normal samples and cases of CIN. There are no false negatives for CIN 3 (n=14) and CIN 2 (n=10) and 11% false negatives for CIN 1 (n=9) and 14% of false positives for normal cases (n=21). The results of this preliminary study with reference to automation are discussed [corrected]. Images Figure 1 PMID:1637668

  17. Purification and characterization of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver and investigation of the effects of some metal ions on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Comakli, Veysel; Akkemik, Ebru; Ciftci, Mehmet; Kufrevioglu, Omer Irfan

    2015-05-01

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (d-glucose 6-phosphate: NADP(+) oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49; G6PD) is a key enzyme that is localized in all mammal tissues, especially in cytoplasmic sections and that catalyzes the first step of pentose phosphate metabolic pathway. In this study, G6PD enzyme was purified 1444-fold with a yield of 77% from rainbow trout liver using 2',5'-ADP-sepharose-4B affinity chromatography. Moreover, a purity check of the enzyme was performed with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Some characteristic features like optimal pH, stable pH, optimal temperature and optimal ionic strength were determined for the purified enzyme. In addition to this, in vitro effects of ions like silver nitrate (Ag(+)), thallium sulphate (TI(+)), cobalt (II) nitrate (Co(2+)) and arsenic (V) oxide (As(5+)) on enzyme activity were researched. Half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of Ag(+), Co(2+) and As(5+) metal ions, which showed an inhibitory effect, were found to be 0.0044, 0.084 and 4.058 mM, respectively; and their inhibition constants (K i) were found to be 0.0052 ± 0.00042, 0.087 ± 0.015700 and 4.833 ± 1.753207 mM, respectively. Tl(+) not exhibited inhibitory effect on the enzyme activity. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. [Effect of aminotriazole on the activity of catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in tissues of two frog species--Rana ridibunda and Rana esculenta].

    PubMed

    Lushchak, O V; Bahniukova, T V; Lushchak, V I

    2003-01-01

    Changes of the activity of catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) during 48 hrs after intraperitoneal injection of 1.0, 0.5 and 0.1 mg aminotriazole per gram of body weight of two frog species as well as catalase inhibition by aminotriazole in vitro were investigated. Both aminotriazole concentration and species affiliation affected the catalase inhibition. The sensitivity of catalase from different tissues was decreased in the order: liver--kidney--lung--muscle--brain. The constant of half inhibition of lung catalase was significantly lower than that of liver and kidney catalase. The activity of G6PDH of AMT-treated frogs R. esculenta was higher comparing to control group. Possible ways of compensation of antioxidant defense under catalase inhibition are discussed.

  19. What is the true enzyme kinetics in the biological system? An investigation of macromolecular crowding effect upon enzyme kinetics of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Norris, Matthew G S; Malys, Naglis

    2011-02-18

    Enzyme kinetic parameters for rate equations are vital in metabolic network simulation, a major part of systems biology research efforts. Measurements of Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters Km and Kcat have been performed for enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6P DH) under crowded conditions using molecular crowding agents bovine serum albumin (BSA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) of 8000 Da molecular weight. An increase in Kcat was observed at very low concentrations of crowding agent, and also at high crowder concentrations when the experiment was performed at 45 °C with PEG. The observed pattern in Kcat for G6P DH at high crowder concentrations has been explained via modelling using excluded volume theory. An increase in rate was observed at 45 °C for G6P DH versus 30 °C; this has been modelled via the Arrhenius equation.

  20. Discovery and characterization of an F420-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Rh-FGD1) from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quoc-Thai; Trinco, Gianluca; Binda, Claudia; Mattevi, Andrea; Fraaije, Marco W

    2017-04-01

    Cofactor F420, a 5-deazaflavin involved in obligatory hydride transfer, is widely distributed among archaeal methanogens and actinomycetes. Owing to the low redox potential of the cofactor, F420-dependent enzymes play a pivotal role in central catabolic pathways and xenobiotic degradation processes in these organisms. A physiologically essential deazaflavoenzyme is the F420-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (FGD), which catalyzes the reaction F420 + glucose-6-phosphate → F420H2 + 6-phospho-gluconolactone. Thereby, FGDs generate the reduced F420 cofactor required for numerous F420H2-dependent reductases, involved e.g., in the bioreductive activation of the antitubercular prodrugs pretomanid and delamanid. We report here the identification, production, and characterization of three FGDs from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 (Rh-FGDs), being the first experimental evidence of F420-dependent enzymes in this bacterium. The crystal structure of Rh-FGD1 has also been determined at 1.5 Å resolution, showing a high similarity with FGD from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) (Mtb-FGD1). The cofactor-binding pocket and active-site catalytic residues are largely conserved in Rh-FGD1 compared with Mtb-FGD1, except for an extremely flexible insertion region capping the active site at the C-terminal end of the TIM-barrel, which also markedly differs from other structurally related proteins. The role of the three positively charged residues (Lys197, Lys258, and Arg282) constituting the binding site of the substrate phosphate moiety was experimentally corroborated by means of mutagenesis study. The biochemical and structural data presented here provide the first step towards tailoring Rh-FGD1 into a more economical biocatalyst, e.g., an F420-dependent glucose dehydrogenase that requires a cheaper cosubstrate and can better match the demands for the growing applications of F420H2-dependent reductases in industry and bioremediation.

  1. Pleurotus ostreatus, an edible mushroom, enhances glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, ascorbate peroxidase and reduces xanthine dehydrogenase in major organs of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Geraldine, Pitchairaj; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran

    2014-05-01

    Aging is now considered to be associated with an elevation in oxidative damage to macromolecules and enhanced levels of inflammation. Therefore, inhibition of age-related oxidative stress by natural supplement is an important study. To investigate whether the treatment with Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr) Kumm, (Pleurotaceae) can ameliorate oxidative damage in aged rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups of six each: group 1, normal young rats; group 2, normal aged untreated rats; group 3, normal aged rats treated with P. ostreatus (200 mg/kg body wt administered intraperitoneally for 21 days). On the 22nd day, rats were sacrificed by decapitation; the liver, kidneys, heart and brain were removed from each rat for the biochemical and isozyme analyses of the antioxidant enzymes glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), ascorbate peroxidase (Apx) and xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). An elevated activity of XDH was observed in the liver (G2:13.72 ± 4.1 versus G1: 7.57 ± 1.15; p < 0.05), kidneys (G2:101.48 ± 12.3 versus G1: 31.15 ± 1.71; p < 0.01), heart (G2: 63.21 ± 3.96 versus G1: 37.3 ± 2.70; p < 0.01) and brain (G2: 39.02 ± 3.96 versus G1: 19.84 ± 1.22; p < 0.001). The activities of G6PDH and Apx were lowered in major organs of aged untreated rats. However, treatment of P. ostreatus to aged rats resulted in decreased XDH and increased G6PDH and Apx activities in liver, kidneys, heart and brain. Interestingly, analyses of isozyme pattern of these enzymes are support the results obtained from the spectrophotometric determinations. These results suggest that an extract of P. ostreatus can protect the age-related oxidative damage in major organs of Wistar rats by enhancing the antioxidant enzymes G6PDH and Apx and by reducing XDH.

  2. Pyruvate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the second most common cause, after glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency . PKD is found in people ... Read More Anemia Autosomal recessive Enzyme Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemolytic anemia Review Date 10/27/ ...

  3. Involvement of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in reduced glutathione maintenance and hydrogen peroxide signal under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomin; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Chenghong; Li, Jisheng; Wan, Qi; Bi, Yurong

    2008-06-01

    Cellular redox homeostasis is essential for plant growth, development as well as for the resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, which is governed by the complex network of prooxidant and antioxidant systems. Recently, new evidence has been published that NADPH, produced by glucose-6-phosephate dehydrogenase enzyme (G6PDH), not only acted as the reducing potential for the output of reduced glutathione (GSH), but was involved in the activity of plasma membrane (PM) NADPH oxidase under salt stress, which resulted in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) accumulation. H(2)O(2) acts as a signal in regulating G6PDH activity and expression, and the activities of the enzymes in the glutathione cycle as well, through which the ability of GSH regeneration was increased under salt stress. Thus, G6PDH plays a critical role in maintaining cellular GSH levels under long-term salt stress. In this addendum, a hypothetical model for the roles of G6PDH in modulating the intracellular redox homeostasis under salt stress is presented.

  4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase plays a central role in the response of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants to short and long-term drought.

    PubMed

    Landi, Simone; Nurcato, Roberta; De Lillo, Alessia; Lentini, Marco; Grillo, Stefania; Esposito, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the expression, occurrence and activity of glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH - EC 1.1.1.49), the key-enzyme of the Oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway (OPPP), in tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Red Setter) exposed to short- and long-term drought stress. For the first time, drought effects have been evaluated in plants under different growth conditions: in hydroponic laboratory system, and in greenhouse pots under controlled conditions; and in open field, in order to evaluate drought response in a representative agricultural environment. Interestingly, changes observed appear strictly associated to the induction of well known stress response mechanisms, such as the increase of proline synthesis, accumulation of chaperone Hsp70, and ascorbate peroxidase. Results show significant increase in total activity of G6PDH, and specifically in expression and occurrence of cytosolic isoform (cy-G6PDH) in plants grown in any cultivation system upon drought. Intriguingly, the results clearly suggest that abscissic acid (ABA) pathway and signaling cascade (protein phosphatase 2C PP2C) could be strictly related to increased G6PDH expression, occurrence and activities. We hypothesized for G6PDH a specific role as one of the main reductants' suppliers to counteract the effects of drought stress, in the light of converging evidences given by young and adult tomato plants under stress of different duration and intensity.

  5. Avoiding Buffer Interference in ITC Experiments: A Case Study from the Analysis of Entropy-Driven Reactions of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, M Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a label-free technique that allows the direct determination of the heat absorbed or released in a reaction. Frequently used to determining binding parameters in biomolecular interactions, it is very useful to address enzyme-catalyzed reactions as both kinetic and thermodynamic parameters can be obtained. Since calorimetry measures the total heat effects of a reaction, it is important to consider the contribution of the heat of protonation/deprotonation that is possibly taking place. Here, we show a case study of the reaction catalyzed by the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This enzyme is able to use either NAD(+) or NADP(+) as a cofactor. The reactions were done in five buffers of different enthalpy of protonation. Depending on the buffer used, the observed calorimetric enthalpy (ΔH(cal)) of the reaction varied from -22.93 kJ/mol (Tris) to 19.37 kJ/mol (phosphate) for the NADP(+)-linked reaction, and -11.67 kJ/mol (Tris) to 7.32 kcal/mol or 30.63 kJ/mol (phosphate) for the NAD(+) reaction. We will use this system as an example of how to extract proton-independent reaction enthalpies from kinetic data to ensure that the reported accurately represent the intrinsic heat of reaction.

  6. Metabolomic profile of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway identifies the central role of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in clear cell-renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Galleggiante, Vanessa; Rutigliano, Monica; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Cagiano, Simona; Bufo, Pantaleo; Lastilla, Gaetano; Maiorano, Eugenio; Ribatti, Domenico; Giglio, Andrea; Serino, Grazia; Vavallo, Antonio; Bettocchi, Carlo; Selvaggi, Francesco Paolo; Battaglia, Michele; Ditonno, Pasquale

    2015-05-30

    The analysis of cancer metabolome has shown that proliferating tumor cells require a large quantities of different nutrients in order to support their high rate of proliferation. In this study we analyzed the metabolic profile of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) in human clear cell-renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and evaluate the role of these pathways in sustaining cell proliferation, maintenance of NADPH levels, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Metabolomic analysis showed a clear signature of increased glucose uptake and utilization in ccRCC tumor samples. Elevated levels of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in association with higher levels of PPP-derived metabolites, suggested a prominent role of this pathway in RCC-associated metabolic alterations. G6PDH inhibition, caused a significant decrease in cancer cell survival, a decrease in NADPH levels, and an increased production of ROS, suggesting that the PPP plays an important role in the regulation of ccRCC redox homeostasis. Patients with high levels of glycolytic enzymes had reduced progression-free and cancer-specific survivals as compared to subjects with low levels. Our data suggest that oncogenic signaling pathways may promote ccRCC through rerouting the sugar metabolism. Blocking the flux through this pathway may serve as a novel therapeutic target.

  7. Exposure to chrysotile asbestos causes carbonylation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase through a reaction with lipid peroxidation products in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yuki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2010-05-19

    Exposure to asbestos is known to lead to a reduction in glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity and to cause oxidative damage to cells. In the present study, we exposed the human lung carcinoma cell line A549 to chrysotile. We observed an increase in the production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS, the breakdown products of lipid peroxide) along with a significant decrease in G6PDH activity. Alternatively, when chrysotile was added directly to the cell extract obtained by removing the cell membrane, no loss of G6PDH activity was observed. To elucidate the mechanism of G6PDH inactivation due to exposure to chrysotile, we focused on the TBARS responsible for protein modification via carbonylation. When malondialdehyde or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal was added to a membrane-free A549 cell extract, G6PDH activity was reduced markedly. However, when t-butylhydroperoxide was added to the extract, there was no significant decrease in G6PDH activity. Western blot analysis and immunoprecipitation of the carbonylated proteins in the A549 cell lysate that was prepared after exposure to chrysotile demonstrated that G6PDH had been carbonylated. Our findings indicate that the decrease in G6PDH activity that occurs after exposure of the cultured cells to chrysotile results from the carbonylation of G6PDH by TBARS.

  8. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone on obesity and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the lethal yellow mouse (strain 129/Sv-Ay/Aw).

    PubMed

    Granholm, N H; Staber, L D; Wilkin, P J

    1987-04-01

    We investigated the anti-obesity effects of the adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), on genetically predisposed obese lethal yellow mice (Ay/Aw). Secondly, we tested the hypothesis that DHEA promotes its anti-obesity effects by decreasing the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). We subjected four genotype-sex combinations of yellow and agouti (control) mice to four dietary treatments and determined weight changes, food consumption, and G6PDH activity. Although G6PDH activities of yellow mice were considerably decreased in the 0.4% DHEA treatment group, they were elevated in the 0.0 and 0.1% DHEA treatment groups. In contrast, G6PDH activities of DHEA-treated control agouti mice remained relatively constant. These studies confirm that DHEA prevents the Ay gene from promoting excess fat deposition via some mechanism(s) other than reduced dietary intake. However, the overall absence of agreement between weight change (gain or loss) and G6PDH activity suggests that the anti-obesity activity of DHEA is not mediated via G6PDH. Since yellow obese (Ay/Aw) mice were found to be more susceptible to DHEA's effects than their agouti (Aw/Aw) littermates, Ay appears to induce an altered metabolism in Ay/Aw mice which is more susceptible to the effects of DHEA than the normal metabolism of Aw/Aw mice.

  9. Magnetic resonance angiography-defined intracranial vasculopathy is associated with silent cerebral infarcts and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutation in children with sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Thangarajh, Mathula; Yang, Genyan; Fuchs, Dana; Ponisio, Maria R; McKinstry, Robert C; Jaju, Alok; Noetzel, Michael J; Casella, James F; Barron-Casella, Emily; Hooper, W Craig; Boulet, Sheree L; Bean, Christopher J; Pyle, Meredith E; Payne, Amanda B; Driggers, Jennifer; Trau, Heidi A; Vendt, Bruce A; Rodeghier, Mark; DeBaun, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    Silent cerebral infarct (SCI) is the most commonly recognized cause of neurological injury in sickle cell anaemia (SCA). We tested the hypothesis that magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)-defined vasculopathy is associated with SCI. Furthermore, we examined genetic variations in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and HBA (α-globin) genes to determine their association with intracranial vasculopathy in children with SCA. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and MRA of the cerebral vasculature were available in 516 paediatric patients with SCA, enrolled in the Silent Infarct Transfusion (SIT) Trial. All patients were screened for G6PD mutations and HBA deletions. SCI were present in 41·5% (214 of 516) of SIT Trial children. The frequency of intracranial vasculopathy with and without SCI was 15·9% and 6·3%, respectively (P < 0·001). Using a multivariable logistic regression model, only the presence of a SCI was associated with increased odds of vasculopathy (P = 0·0007, odds ratio (OR) 2·84; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1·55-5·21). Among male children with SCA, G6PD status was associated with vasculopathy (P = 0·04, OR 2·78; 95% CI = 1·04-7·42), while no significant association was noted for HBA deletions. Intracranial vasculopathy was observed in a minority of children with SCA, and when present, was associated with G6PD status in males and SCI.

  10. Overcompensation in Response to Herbivory in Arabidopsis thaliana: The Role of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and the Oxidative Pentose-Phosphate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Siddappaji, Madhura H.; Scholes, Daniel R.; Bohn, Martin; Paige, Ken N.

    2013-01-01

    That some plants benefit from being eaten is counterintuitive, yet there is now considerable evidence demonstrating enhanced fitness following herbivory (i.e., plants can overcompensate). Although there is evidence that genetic variation for compensation exists, little is known about the genetic mechanisms leading to enhanced growth and reproduction following herbivory. We took advantage of the compensatory variation in recombinant inbred lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, combined with microarray and QTL analyses to assess the molecular basis of overcompensation. We found three QTL explaining 11.4, 10.1, and 26.7% of the variation in fitness compensation, respectively, and 109 differentially expressed genes between clipped and unclipped plants of the overcompensating ecotype Columbia. From the QTL/microarray screen we uncovered one gene that plays a significant role in overcompensation: glucose-6-phosphate-1-dehydrogenase (G6PDH1). Knockout studies of Transfer-DNA (T-DNA) insertion lines and complementation studies of G6PDH1 verify its role in compensation. G6PDH1 is a key enzyme in the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway that plays a central role in plant metabolism. We propose that plants capable of overcompensating reprogram their transcriptional activity by up-regulating defensive genes and genes involved in energy metabolism and by increasing DNA content (via endoreduplication) with the increase in DNA content feeding back on pathways involved in defense and metabolism through increased gene expression. PMID:23934891

  11. Enhanced production of epsilon-caprolactone by overexpression of NADPH-regenerating glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in recombinant Escherichia coli harboring cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Jin-Byung; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2007-08-01

    Whole-cell conversion of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone was attempted by recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIMB 9871. High concentrations of cyclohexanone and epsilon-caprolactone reduced CHMO-mediated bioconversion of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in the resting recombinant E. coli cells. Metabolically active cells were employed by adopting a fed-batch culture to improve the production of epsilon-caprolactone from cyclohexanone. A glucose-limited fed-batch Baeyer-Villiger oxidation where a cyclohexanone level was maintained less than 6 g/l resulted in a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 11.0 g/l. The maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration was improved further to 15.3 g/l by coexpression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, an NADPH-generating enzyme encoded by the zwf gene which corresponded to a 39% enhancement in epsilon-caprolactone concentration compared with the control experiment performed under the same conditions.

  12. Metabolomic profile of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway identifies the central role of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in clear cell-renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sanguedolce, Francesca; Cagiano, Simona; Bufo, Pantaleo; Lastilla, Gaetano; Maiorano, Eugenio; Ribatti, Domenico; Giglio, Andrea; Serino, Grazia; Vavallo, Antonio; Bettocchi, Carlo; Selvaggi, Francesco Paolo; Battaglia, Michele; Ditonno, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of cancer metabolome has shown that proliferating tumor cells require a large quantities of different nutrients in order to support their high rate of proliferation. In this study we analyzed the metabolic profile of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) in human clear cell-renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and evaluate the role of these pathways in sustaining cell proliferation, maintenance of NADPH levels, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Metabolomic analysis showed a clear signature of increased glucose uptake and utilization in ccRCC tumor samples. Elevated levels of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in association with higher levels of PPP-derived metabolites, suggested a prominent role of this pathway in RCC-associated metabolic alterations. G6PDH inhibition, caused a significant decrease in cancer cell survival, a decrease in NADPH levels, and an increased production of ROS, suggesting that the PPP plays an important role in the regulation of ccRCC redox homeostasis. Patients with high levels of glycolytic enzymes had reduced progression-free and cancer-specific survivals as compared to subjects with low levels. Our data suggest that oncogenic signaling pathways may promote ccRCC through rerouting the sugar metabolism. Blocking the flux through this pathway may serve as a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25945836

  13. [Adaptogenic effect of the vitamin D3 containing supplement "videchol" on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in erythrone of irradiated rats].

    PubMed

    Becerril Aragon, G A; Starykovych, L S; Kolodkin, A; Horot', I V; Velykyĭ, M M

    2007-01-01

    Two fast migrating, major, multiple molecular forms (MMF) of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [EC:1.1.1.49]: G-6-PDH-1 and G-6-PDH-2, and two minor forms: G-6-PDH-3 and G-6-PDH-4 were revealed in the electrophoregrams of both erythrocytes haemolisates as well in the homogenates of bone marrow cellular lines of rats at control conditions. Daily 1 cGy irradiation of rats up to a cumulative dose of 20 cGy led to a drop of G-6-PDH total activity and it caused a redistribution of the MMF of the enzyme in bone marrow cellular populations. However, G-6-PDH activity in erythrocytes exceeded the control means in all the experimental terms. The calculation of the local redistribution coefficient (l(G-6-FDH-i)) showed that these changes are mainly determined by the increase of the activity of the isoform G-6-PDH-3. Vitamin D3 administration to rats generated a correction of G-6-PDH activity in all studied cellular populations. Meanwhile, the MMF profiles were characterized by multidirectional rearrangements in the bone marrow erythroid and granulocyte-monocyte cells and in erythrocytes. The specificity of changes in the distribution of the MMF of G-6-PDH in the three studied cellular populations depends on the particularities of their energetic metabolism at irradiation conditions and on the modifying action of the natural adaptogen 1,25-dihydroxicholecalciferol.

  14. Involvement of ABA- and H2O2-dependent cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in maintaining redox homeostasis in soybean roots under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huahua; Yang, Lidan; Li, Yan; Hou, Junjie; Huang, Junjun; Liang, Weihong

    2016-10-01

    The roles of abscisic acid (ABA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in inducing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH, EC 1.1.1.49) activity and the possible roles of G6PDH in regulating ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle were investigated in soybean (Glycine max L.) roots under drought stress. Drought caused a marked increase of the total and cytosolic G6PDH activities and triggered a rapid ABA and H2O2 accumulation in soybean roots. Exogenous ABA or H2O2 treatment elevated the total and cytosolic G6PDH activities, whereas suppressing ABA or H2O2 production inhibited the drought-induced increase in total and cytosolic G6PDH activities, suggesting that ABA and H2O2 are required for drought-induced increase of total G6PDH activity, namely cytosolic G6PDH activity. Furthermore, ABA induced H2O2 production by stimulating NADPH oxidase activity under drought stress. Moreover, drought significantly increased the contents of AsA and GSH and the activities of key enzymes in AsA-GSH cycle, while application of G6PDH inhibitor to seedlings significantly reduced the above effect induced by drought. Taken together, these results indicate that H2O2 acting as a downstream signaling molecule of ABA mediates drought-induced increase in cytosolic G6PDH activity, and that enhanced cytosolic G6PDH activity maintains cellular redox homeostasis by regulating AsA-GSH cycle in soybean roots. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemical modification of lysozyme, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and bovine eye lens proteins induced by peroxyl radicals: role of oxidizable amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Andrea; López-Alarcón, Camilo; Kogan, Marcelo; Lissi, Eduardo; Davies, Michael J; Silva, Eduardo

    2013-01-18

    Chemical and structural alterations to lysozyme (LYSO), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and bovine eye lens proteins (BLP) promoted by peroxyl radicals generated by the thermal decomposition of 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) under aerobic conditions were investigated. SDS-PAGE analysis of the AAPH-treated proteins revealed the occurrence of protein aggregation, cross-linking, and fragmentation; BLP, which are naturally organized in globular assemblies, were the most affected proteins. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of BLP shows the formation of complex protein aggregates after treatment with AAPH. These structural modifications were accompanied by the formation of protein carbonyl groups and protein hydroperoxides. The yield of carbonyls was lower than that for protein hydroperoxide generation and was unrelated to protein fragmentation. The oxidized proteins were also characterized by significant oxidation of Met, Trp, and Tyr (but not other) residues, and low levels of dityrosine. As the dityrosine yield is too low to account for the observed cross-linking, we propose that aggregation is associated with tryptophan oxidation and Trp-derived cross-links. It is also proposed that Trp oxidation products play a fundamental role in nonrandom fragmentation and carbonyl group formation particularly for LYSO and G6PD. These data point to a complex mechanism of peroxyl-radical mediated modification of proteins with monomeric (LYSO), dimeric (G6PD), and multimeric (BLP) structural organization, which not only results in oxidation of protein side chains but also gives rise to radical-mediated protein cross-links and fragmentation, with Trp species being critical intermediates.

  16. Haptoglobin, alpha-thalassaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase polymorphisms and risk of abnormal transcranial Doppler among patients with sickle cell anaemia in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sharon E; Makani, Julie; Soka, Deogratias; L'Esperence, Veline S; Kija, Edward; Dominguez-Salas, Paula; Newton, Charles R J; Birch, Anthony A; Prentice, Andrew M; Kirkham, Fenella J

    2014-06-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography measures cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) of basal intracranial vessels and is used clinically to detect stroke risk in children with sickle cell anaemia (SCA). Co-inheritance in SCA of alpha-thalassaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) polymorphisms is reported to associate with high CBFv and/or risk of stroke. The effect of a common functional polymorphism of haptoglobin (HP) is unknown. We investigated the effect of co-inheritance of these polymorphisms on CBFv in 601 stroke-free Tanzanian SCA patients aged <24 years. Homozygosity for alpha-thalassaemia 3·7 deletion was significantly associated with reduced mean CBFv compared to wild-type (β-coefficient -16·1 cm/s, P = 0·002) adjusted for age and survey year. Inheritance of 1 or 2 alpha-thalassaemia deletions was associated with decreased risk of abnormally high CBFv, compared to published data from Kenyan healthy control children (Relative risk ratio [RRR] = 0·53 [95% confidence interval (CI):0·35-0·8] & RRR = 0·43 [95% CI:0·23-0·78]), and reduced risk of abnormally low CBFv for 1 deletion only (RRR = 0·38 [95% CI:0·17-0·83]). No effects were observed for G6PD or HP polymorphisms. This is the first report of the effects of co-inheritance of common polymorphisms, including the HP polymorphism, on CBFv in SCA patients resident in Africa and confirms the importance of alpha-thalassaemia in reducing risk of abnormal CBFv.

  17. Starvation actively inhibits splicing of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA via a bifunctional ESE/ESS element bound by hnRNP K.

    PubMed

    Cyphert, T J; Suchanek, A L; Griffith, B N; Salati, L M

    2013-09-01

    Regulated expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is due to changes in the rate of pre-mRNA splicing and not changes in its transcription. Starvation alters pre-mRNA splicing by decreasing the rate of intron removal, leading to intron retention and a decrease in the accumulation of mature mRNA. A regulatory element within exon 12 of G6PD pre-mRNA controls splicing efficiency. Starvation caused an increase in the expression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K protein and this increase coincided with the increase in the binding of hnRNP K to the regulatory element and a decrease in the expression of G6PD mRNA. HnRNP K bound to two C-rich motifs forming an ESS within exon 12. Overexpression of hnRNP K decreased the splicing and expression of G6PD mRNA, while siRNA-mediated depletion of hnRNP K caused an increase in the splicing and expression of G6PD mRNA. Binding of hnRNP K to the regulatory element was enhanced in vivo by starvation coinciding with a decrease in G6PD mRNA. HnRNP K binding to the C-rich motifs blocked binding of serine-arginine rich, splicing factor 3 (SRSF3), a splicing enhancer. Thus hnRNP K is a nutrient regulated splicing factor responsible for the inhibition of the splicing of G6PD during starvation.

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and alternative oxidase are involved in the cross tolerance of highland barley to salt stress and UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengzhou; Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Kunlun; Li, Ping; Chang, Ning; Wang, Jianfeng; Wang, Feng; Li, Jiaolong; Bi, Yurong

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a new mechanism involving glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and alternative pathways (AP) in salt pretreatment-induced tolerance of highland barley to UV-B radiation was investigated. When highland barley was exposed to UV-B radiation, the G6PDH activity decreased but the AP capacity increased. In contrast, under UV-B+NaCl treatment, the G6PDH activity was restored to the control level and the maximal AP capacity and antioxidant enzyme activities were reached. Glucosamine (Glucm, an inhibitor of G6PDH) obviously inhibited the G6PDH activity in highland barley under UV-B + NaCl treatment and a similar pattern was observed in reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (Asc) contents. Similarly, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, an inhibitor of AOX) significantly reduced the AP capacity in highland barley under UV-B + NaCl treatment. The UV-B-induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation was also followed. Further studies indicated that non-functioning of G6PDH or AP under UV-B+NaCl + Glucm or UV-B + NaCl + SHAM treatment also caused damages in photosynthesis and stomatal movement. Western blot analysis confirmed that the alternative oxidase (AOX) and G6PDH were dependent each other in cross tolerance to UV-B and salt. The inhibition of AP or G6PDH activity resulted in a significant accumulation or reduction of NADPH content, respectively, under UV-B+NaCl treatment in highland barley leaves. Taken together, our results indicate that AP and G6PDH mutually regulate and maintain photosynthesis and stomata movement in the cross adaptation of highland barley seedlings to UV-B and salt by modulating redox homeostasis and NADPH content.

  19. Starvation actively inhibits splicing of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA via a bifunctional ESE/ESS element bound by hnRNP K

    PubMed Central

    Cyphert, T.J.; Suchanek, A.L.; Griffith, B.N.; Salati, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Regulated expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is due to changes in the rate of pre-mRNA splicing and not changes in its transcription. Starvation alters pre-mRNA splicing by decreasing the rate of intron removal, leading to intron retention and a decrease in the accumulation of mature mRNA. A regulatory element within exon 12 of G6PD pre-mRNA controls splicing efficiency. Starvation caused an increase in the expression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K protein and this increase coincided with the increase in the binding of hnRNP K to the regulatory element and a decrease in the expression of G6PD mRNA. HnRNP K bound to two C-rich motifs forming an ESS within exon 12. Overexpression of hnRNP K decreased the splicing and expression of G6PD mRNA, while siRNA-mediated depletion of hnRNP K caused an increase in the splicing and expression of G6PD mRNA. Binding of hnRNP K to the regulatory element was enhanced in vivo by starvation coinciding with a decrease in G6PD mRNA. HnRNP K binding to the C-rich motifs blocked binding of serine-arginine rich, splicing factor 3 (SRSF3), a splicing enhancer. Thus hnRNP K is a nutrient regulated splicing factor responsible for the inhibition of the splicing of G6PD during starvation. PMID:23631859

  20. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation.

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and leptin are related to marbling differences among Limousin and Angus or Japanese Black x Angus steers.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, M; Faulconnier, Y; Leroux, C; Jurie, C; Cassar-Malek, I; Bauchart, D; Boulesteix, P; Pethick, D; Hocquette, J F; Chilliard, Y

    2007-11-01

    This work investigated the metabolic basis for the variability of carcass and i.m. adiposity in cattle. Our hypothesis was that the comparison of extreme breeds for adiposity might allow for the identification of some metabolic pathways determinant for carcass and i.m. adiposity. Thus, 23- to 28-mo-old steers of 3 breeds, 2 with high [Angus or Japanese Black x Angus (J. Black cross)] and 1 with low (Limousin) i.m. and carcass adiposity, were used to measure activities or mRNA levels, or both, of enzymes involved in de novo lipogenesis [acetyl-coA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase (FAS), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), malic enzyme], circulating triacylglycerol (TAG) uptake (lipoprotein lipase), and fatty acid esterification (glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), as well as the mRNA level of leptin, an adiposity-related factor. In a first study, enzyme activities were assayed in the s.c. adipose tissue (AT), the oxidative rectus abdominis, and the glycolytic semitendinosus muscles from steers finished for 6 mo. Compared with Angus or J. Black cross, Limousin steers had a 27% less (P = 0.003) rib fat thickness, and 23 and 29% less (P < or = 0.02) FAS and G6PDH activities in s.c. AT. In rectus abdominis and semitendinosus, the 75% less (P < 0.001) TAG content was concomitant with 50% less (P < 0.001) G6PDH activity. In a second study, enzyme activities plus mRNA levels were assayed in an oxido-glycolytic muscle, the longissimus thoracis (LT), in the i.m. AT dissected from LT, and in s.c. AT from the same Limousin steers and from Angus steers finished for 10 mo. Compared with Angus, the 50% less (P < 0.001) rib fat thickness in Limousin contrasted with the 1.1- to 5.8-fold greater (P < or = 0.02) mRNA levels or activities, or both, of acetyl-coA carboxylase, G6PDH, lipoprotein lipase, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in s.c. AT. Conversely, the 90% less (P < 0.001) TAG content in Limousin LT was concomitant to the 79 and 83% less (P < or = 0.002) G6PDH

  2. A survey for isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase, phosphoglucomutase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in C3-, C 4-and crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants, and green algae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1979-01-01

    Two isoenzymes each of glucosephosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9), phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.43) were separated by (NH4)2SO4 gradient solubilization and DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange chromatography from green leaves of the C3-plants spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), of the Crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen, and from the green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardii. After isolation of cell organelles from spinach leaves by isopyenic centrifugation in sucrose gradients one of two isoenzymes of each of the four enzymes was found to be associated with whole chloroplasts while the other was restricted to the soluble cell fraction, implying the same intracellular distribution of these isoenzymes also in the other species.Among C4-plants, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were found in only one form in corn (Zea mays L.), sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) and Coix lacrymajobi L., but as two isoenzymes in Atriplex spongiosa L. and Portulaca oleracea L. In corn, the two dehydrogenases were mainly associated with isolated mesophyll protoplasts while in Atriplex spongiosa they were of similar specific activity in both mesophyll protoplasts and bundle-sheath strands. In all five C4-plants three isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase and phosphoglucomutase were found. In corn two were localized in the bundle-sheath strands and the third one in the mesophyll protoplasts. The amount of activity of the enzymes was similar in each of the two cell fractions. Apparently, C4 plants have isoenzymes not only in two cell compartments, but also in physiologically closely linked cell types such as mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells.

  3. Purification and Characterization of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase, and Glutathione Reductase from Rat Heart and Inhibition Effects of Furosemide, Digoxin, and Dopamine on the Enzymes Activities.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate characterization and purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase from rat heart and the inhibitory effect of three drugs. The purification of the enzymes was performed using 2',5'-ADP sepharose 4B affinity material. The subunit and the natural molecular weights were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Biochemical characteristics such as the optimum temperature, pH, stable pH, and salt concentration were examined for each enzyme. Types of product inhibition and Ki values with Km and Vmax values of the substrates and coenzymes were determined. According to the obtained Ki and IC50 values, furosemide, digoxin, and dopamine showed inhibitory effect on the enzyme activities at low millimolar concentrations in vitro conditions. Dopamine inhibited the activity of these enzymes as competitive, whereas furosemide and digoxin inhibited the activity of the enzyme as noncompetitive. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase variants: a unique variant (G6PD Kobe) showed an extremely increased affinity for galactose 6-phosphate and a new variant (G6PD Sapporo) resembling G6PD Pea Ridge.

    PubMed

    Fujii, H; Miwa, S; Tani, K; Takegawa, S; Fujinami, N; Takahashi, K; Nakayama, S; Konno, M; Sato, T

    1981-01-01

    Two new glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) variants associated with chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia were discovered, G6PD Kobe was found in a 16-year-old male associated with hemolytic crisis after upper respiratory infection. The enzyme activity of the variant was about 22% of that of the normal enzyme. The main enzymatic characteristics were slower than normal anodal electrophoretic mobility, high Km G6P, increased thermal-instability, an acidic pH optimum, and an extremely increased affinity for the substrate analogue, galactose 6-phosphate (Gal-6P). G6PD Sapporo was found in a 3-year-old male associated with drug-induced hemolysis. The enzyme activity was extremely low, being 3.6% of normal. In addition, this variant showed high Ki NADPH and thermal-instability. G6PD Kobe utilized the artificial substrate Gal-6P effectively as compared with the common natural substrate, glucose 6-phosphate. In G6PD Sapporo, NADPH could not exert the effect of product inhibition. The structural changes of these variants are expected to occur at the portions inducing conformational changes of the substrate binding site of the enzyme.

  5. Crystal Structures of An F420-Dependent Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Fgd1 Involved in the Activation of the Anti-Tb Drug Candidate Pa-824 Reveal the Basis of Coenzyme And Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Bashiri, G.; Squire, C.J.; Moreland, N.J.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-05-11

    The modified flavin coenzyme F{sub 420} is found in a restricted number of microorganisms. It is widely distributed in mycobacteria, however, where it is important in energy metabolism, and in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is implicated in redox processes related to non-replicating persistence. In Mtb, the F{sub 420}-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase FGD1 provides reduced F{sub 420} for the in vivo activation of the nitroimidazopyran prodrug PA-824, currently being developed for anti-tuberculosis therapy against both replicating and persistent bacteria. The structure of M. tuberculosis FGD1 has been determined by x-ray crystallography both in its apo state and in complex with F{sub 420} and citrate at resolutions of 1.90 and 1.95{angstrom}, respectively. The structure reveals a highly specific F{sub 420} binding mode, which is shared with several other F{sub 420}-dependent enzymes. Citrate occupies the substrate binding pocket adjacent to F{sub 420} and is shown to be a competitive inhibitor (IC{sub 50} 43 {micro}m). Modeling of the binding of the glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) substrate identifies a positively charged phosphate binding pocket and shows that G6P, like citrate, packs against the isoalloxazine moiety of F{sub 420} and helps promote a butterfly bend conformation that facilitates F{sub 420} reduction and catalysis.

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase deficiency results in mTOR activation, failed translocation of lipin 1α to the nucleus and hypersensitivity to glucose: Implications for the inherited glycolytic disease.

    PubMed

    Haller, Jorge F; Krawczyk, Sarah A; Gostilovitch, Lubov; Corkey, Barbara E; Zoeller, Raphael A

    2011-11-01

    Inherited glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is the second most frequent glycolytic erythroenzymopathy in humans. Patients present with non-spherocytic anemia of variable severity and with neuromuscular dysfunction. We previously described Chinese hamster (CHO) cell lines with mutations in GPI and loss of GPI activity. This resulted in a temperature sensitivity and severe reduction in the synthesis of glycerolipids due to a reduction in phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP). In the current article we attempt to describe the nature of this pleiotropic effect. We cloned and sequenced the CHO lipin 1 cDNA, a gene that codes for PAP activity. Overexpression of lipin 1 in the GPI-deficient cell line, GroD1 resulted in increased PAP activity, however it failed to restore glycerolipid biosynthesis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a failure of GPI-deficient cells to localize lipin 1α to the nucleus. We also found that glucose-6-phosphate levels in GroD1 cells were 10-fold over normal. Lowering glucose levels in the growth medium partially restored glycerolipid biosynthesis and nuclear localization of lipin 1α. Western blot analysis of the elements within the mTOR pathway, which influences lipin 1 activity, was consistent with an abnormal activation of this system. Combined, these data suggest that GPI deficiency results in an accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate, and possibly other glucose-derived metabolites, leading to activation of mTOR and sequestration of lipin 1 to the cytosol, preventing its proper functioning. These results shed light on the mechanism underlying the pathologies associated with inherited GPI deficiency and the variability in the severity of the symptoms observed in these patients.

  7. The effect of restricted hydration on the rate of reaction of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglucose isomerase, hexokinase and fumarase. Relevance for metabolism in xeric (near-dry) conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Evelyn; Stevens, Lewis

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the measurement of enzyme activity under xeric conditions. The reaction mixtures had water contents ranging between 0.1 and 0.6g/g of reaction mixture. For glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, hexokinase and fumarase, enzyme activity became detectable (about 0.05% of the fully hydrated rate) when the water content was about 0.2g/g of reaction mixture, and for phosphoglucose isomerase, around 0.15g/g of reaction mixture. With the water content raised to 0.3g/g of reaction mixture the reaction rates were only increased to 0.1–3% of the fully hydrated rate. When the combined rates for phosphoglucose isomerase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were measured, reasonable agreement was found between the experimental data and those calculated from the individual experimentally determined rates on the assumption that diffusion was not further limiting. A method was devised for measuring the diffusion coefficients of low-molecular-weight substances in solutions having low water contents. The diffusion coefficients of riboflavin in sorbitol solution decreased by about 100-fold when the water content of the latter was reduced from 3 to 0.25g/g of sorbitol. It is concluded that to detect enzyme activity a certain minimal amount of water is required and that above this minimum the rate is still restricted by diffusion limitation. The relevance of the results to the physical state of water in reaction mixtures and to metabolism in seeds and spores in xeric conditions is discussed. PMID:475753

  8. Improved localization of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in cells with 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl-tetrazolium chloride as fluorescent redox dye reveals its cell cycle-dependent regulation.

    PubMed

    Frederiks, Wilma M; van Marle, Jan; van Oven, Carel; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Cascante, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Since the introduction of cyano-ditolyl-tetrazolium chloride (CTC), a tetrazolium salt that gives rise to a fluorescent formazan after reduction, it has been applied to quantify activity of dehydrogenases in individual cells using flow cytometry. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that the fluorescent formazan was exclusively localized at the surface of individual cells and not at intracellular sites of enzyme activity. In the present study, the technique has been optimized to localize activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) intracellularly in individual cells. Activity was demonstrated in cultured fibrosarcoma cells in different stages of the cell cycle. Cells were incubated for the detection of G6PD activity using a medium containing 6% (w/v) polyvinyl alcohol, 5 mM CTC, magnesium chloride, sodium azide, the electron carrier methoxyphenazine methosulphate, NADP, and glucose-6-phosphate. Before incubation, cells were permeabilized with 0.025% glutaraldehyde. Fluorescent formazan was localized exclusively in the cytoplasm of fibrosarcoma cells. The amount of fluorescent formazan in cells increased linearly with incubation time when measured with flow cytometry and CLSM. When combining the Hoechst staining for DNA with the CTC method for the demonstration of G6PD activity, flow cytometry showed that G6PD activity of cells in S phase and G2/M phase is 27 +/- 4% and 43 +/- 4% higher, respectively, than that of cells in G1 phase. CLSM revealed that cells in all phases of mitosis as well as during apoptosis contained considerably lower G6PD activity than cells in interphase. It is concluded that posttranslational regulation of G6PD is responsible for this cell cycle-dependent activity.

  9. Purification of rat kidney glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase enzymes using 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity in a single chromatography step.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    The enzymes of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), and glutathione reductase (GR) were purified from rat kidney in one chromatographic step consisting of the use of the 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B by using different elution buffers. This purification procedure was accomplished with the preparation of the homogenate and affinity chromatography on 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B. The purity and subunit molecular weights of the enzymes were checked on SDS-PAGE and purified enzymes showed a single band on the gel. The native molecular weights of the enzymes were found with Sephadex G-150 gel filtration chromatography. Using this procedure, G6PG, having the specific activity of 32 EU/mg protein, was purified 531-fold with a yield of 88%; 6PGD, having the specific activity of 25 EU/mg protein, was purified 494-fold with a yield of 73%; and GR, having the specific activity of 33 EU/mg protein, was purified 477-fold with a yield of 76%. Their native molecular masses were estimated to be 144 kDa for G6PD, 110 kDa for 6PGD, and 121 kDa for GR and the subunit molecular weights were found to be 68, 56, and 61 kDa, respectively. A new modified method to purify G6PD, 6PGD, and GR, namely one chromatographic step using the 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B, is described for the first time in this study. This procedure has several advantages for purification of enzymes, such as, rapid purification, produces high yield, and uses less chemical materials.

  10. Alterations in Energy/Redox Metabolism Induced by Mitochondrial and Environmental Toxins: A Specific Role for Glucose-6-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase and the Pentose Phosphate Pathway in Paraquat Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a multifactorial disorder with a complex etiology including genetic risk factors, environmental exposures, and aging. While energy failure and oxidative stress have largely been associated with the loss of dopaminergic cells in PD and the toxicity induced by mitochondrial/environmental toxins, very little is known regarding the alterations in energy metabolism associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and their causative role in cell death progression. In this study, we investigated the alterations in the energy/redox-metabolome in dopaminergic cells exposed to environmental/mitochondrial toxins (paraquat, rotenone, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium [MPP+], and 6-hydroxydopamine [6-OHDA]) in order to identify common and/or different mechanisms of toxicity. A combined metabolomics approach using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and direct-infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-MS) was used to identify unique metabolic profile changes in response to these neurotoxins. Paraquat exposure induced the most profound alterations in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) metabolome. 13C-glucose flux analysis corroborated that PPP metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, glucono-1,5-lactone, and erythrose-4-phosphate were increased by paraquat treatment, which was paralleled by inhibition of glycolysis and the TCA cycle. Proteomic analysis also found an increase in the expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), which supplies reducing equivalents by regenerating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) levels. Overexpression of G6PD selectively increased paraquat toxicity, while its inhibition with 6-aminonicotinamide inhibited paraquat-induced oxidative stress and cell death. These results suggest that paraquat “hijacks” the PPP to increase NADPH reducing equivalents and stimulate paraquat redox cycling, oxidative stress, and cell death. Our study clearly demonstrates that alterations

  11. Alterations in energy/redox metabolism induced by mitochondrial and environmental toxins: a specific role for glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase and the pentose phosphate pathway in paraquat toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shulei; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Nandakumar, Renu; Huang, Yuting; Madayiputhiya, Nandakumar; Stanton, Robert C; Dodds, Eric D; Powers, Robert; Franco, Rodrigo

    2014-09-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multifactorial disorder with a complex etiology including genetic risk factors, environmental exposures, and aging. While energy failure and oxidative stress have largely been associated with the loss of dopaminergic cells in PD and the toxicity induced by mitochondrial/environmental toxins, very little is known regarding the alterations in energy metabolism associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and their causative role in cell death progression. In this study, we investigated the alterations in the energy/redox-metabolome in dopaminergic cells exposed to environmental/mitochondrial toxins (paraquat, rotenone, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium [MPP+], and 6-hydroxydopamine [6-OHDA]) in order to identify common and/or different mechanisms of toxicity. A combined metabolomics approach using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and direct-infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-MS) was used to identify unique metabolic profile changes in response to these neurotoxins. Paraquat exposure induced the most profound alterations in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) metabolome. 13C-glucose flux analysis corroborated that PPP metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, glucono-1,5-lactone, and erythrose-4-phosphate were increased by paraquat treatment, which was paralleled by inhibition of glycolysis and the TCA cycle. Proteomic analysis also found an increase in the expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), which supplies reducing equivalents by regenerating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) levels. Overexpression of G6PD selectively increased paraquat toxicity, while its inhibition with 6-aminonicotinamide inhibited paraquat-induced oxidative stress and cell death. These results suggest that paraquat "hijacks" the PPP to increase NADPH reducing equivalents and stimulate paraquat redox cycling, oxidative stress, and cell death. Our study clearly demonstrates that alterations in

  12. A quantitative cytochemical study of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the membrana granulosa of the ovulable type of follicle of the rat.

    PubMed

    Zoller, L C; Weisz, J

    1979-08-01

    During the last four days of follicular development prior to ovulation, the activities of delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta OHD) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) were quantified in cryostat sections of the rat ovary. The product of the enzyme reactions were measured using a scanning and integrating microdensitometer. The enzyme activity was measured in the peripheral region, the antral region and the cumulus of the membrana granulosa (MG) of these follicles on the morning of each of the four days of the estrous cycle. G-6-PD activity was measured in the presence and absence of an intermediate hydrogen acceptor, phenazine methosulphate, to provide a measure of the quantity of Type I and Type II Hydrogen (H) generated: Type I H is considered to be related to hydroxylating reactions such as those of steroids and Type II H to other general biosynthetic activities of cells. In all three regions of the MG of follicles of the ovulable type, 3 beta OHD activity was lowest in estrus and diestrus-1, increased on diestrus-2 and peaked in proestrus. In estrus and diestrus-1, the level of 3 beta OHD activity in the three regions was comparable. However, by diestrus-2, and even more conspicuously in proestrus, enzyme activity was significantly greater in the peripheral region than in the antral region or in the cumulus. During the same period, the level of enzyme activity remained comparable in the last two regions. Throughout the estrous cycle, both Type I and Type II H generation from G-6-PD was greatest in the peripheral region, less in the antral region and least in the cumulus. In the eripheral region, Type I H generation increased progressively after diestrus-1, to reach a maximum in prestrus. In the antral region, Type I H generation increased between diestrus-1 and diestrus-2 and then remained unchanged through proestrus. In the cumulus, Type I H generation remained at levels seen in estrus throughout the remainder of the cycle. Generation

  13. In vivo effects of curcumin on the paraoxonase, carbonic anhydrase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase enzyme activities in dextran sulphate sodium-induced ulcerative colitis mice.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Hatice; Sunay, Fatma Bahar; Sinan, Selma; Köçkar, Feray

    2016-12-01

    Increases in the risk of infections and malignancy due to immune suppressive therapies of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) have led the researchers to focus on more nontoxic and acceptable natural products like curcumin. Here we investigate whether prophylactic and therapeutic application of the curcumin alters the enzyme activities of paraoxonase (PON), carbonic anhydrase (CA), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and cytosolic β-glucosidase in dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis mice. Prophylactic application of curcumin resulted in higher MPO activity, less body weight loss and longer colon lengths compared to therapeutic group indicating preventive role of curcumin in IBDs. DSS-induced decrease in liver and serum PON activities were completely recovered by prophylactic administration of curcumin. DSS-induced reduction in liver cytosolic β-glucosidase activity was not affected by curcumin neither in the prophylactic group nor in the therapeutic group. Erythrocyte CA activity was significantly increased in curcumin groups, however no remarkable change in G6PD activity was observed.

  14. Effects of test spills of chemically dispersed and nondispersed oil on the activity of aspartate aminotransferase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in two intertidal bivalves, Mya arenaria and Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilfillan, E.S.; Foster, J.; Gerber, R.; Hanson, S.A.; Page, D.S.; Vallas, D.

    1982-10-01

    In 1981, two test oil spills were made in Maine. One spill was 975 L (250 gal) of Murban crude oil; the other was 975 L of Murban crude oil premixed with 97 L (25 gal) of Corexit 9527. The uptake of the oil and its effects on enzymatic activity in two species of common intertidal bivalve mollusks, Mya arenaria and Mytilus edulis, were studied. Data were obtained on uptake and depuration of the oil for each species; data were also obtained on the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase for each species. Data were collected both before and after each of the spills. Much less oil was taken up by the populations of animals exposed to chemically dispersed oil than by those exposed to nondispersed oil. Rates of depuration were the same for each species; they were also the same regardless of oil exposure. Significant long-term effects on enzyme activity were detected only in those animals exposed to nondispersed oil.

  15. Regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme in liver and adipose tissue: effect of dietary trilinolein level in starved-refed and ad libitum-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nace, C S; Szepesi, B; Michaelis, O E

    1979-06-01

    The responses of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) (EC 1.1.1.49) and malic enzyme (ME) (EC 1.1.1.40) were studied in liver and adipose tissue of rats fed for 2 days a high glucose diet containing levels of synthetic trilinolein ranging from 0 to 25% (w/w) of the diet (trilinolein was substituted for glucose). One group of rats was starved for 2 days before the trilinolein-containing diets were fed (starved-refed); a second group of rats was fed a fat-free diet for 7 days before the trilinolein-containing diets were fed (ad libitum). Liver G6PD activity decreased exponentially and liver ME activity decreased linearly with increasing dietary trilinolein in starved-refed rats, but did not decrease significantly in ad libitum fed rats. Total liver lipid decreased exponentially with increasing trilinolein in starved-refed rats, but increased exponentially in ad libitum fed rats. Adipose tissue G6PD and ME activities decreased slightly with increasing trilinolein in starved-refed rats, but did not decrease in ad libitum fed rats. When the data were adjusted by analysis of covariance for differences in glucose intake, the liver responses in starved-refed rats were still significant but the adipose tissue responses were not, indicating that the responses of adipose tissue (but not of liver) may have resulted from decreased glucose intake rather than from increased trilinolein intake. The results suggest that dietary trilinolein inhibits the characteristic increase in liver G6PD, ME and total lipids upon starvation-refeeding. However, after the levels of these parameters have been increased by feeding a fat-free diet they cannot be decreased by dietary trilinolein in 2 days.

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-dependent hydrogen peroxide production is involved in the regulation of plasma membrane H+-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiporter protein in salt-stressed callus from Carex moorcroftii.

    PubMed

    Li, Jisheng; Chen, Guichen; Wang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yanli; Jia, Honglei; Bi, Yurong

    2011-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) is important for the activation of plant resistance to environmental stresses, and ion homeostasis is the physiological foundation for living cells. In this study, we investigated G6PDH roles in modulating ion homeostasis under salt stress in Carex moorcroftii callus. G6PDH activity increased to its maximum in 100 mM NaCl treatment and decreased with further increased NaCl concentrations. K+/Na+ ratio in 100 mM NaCl treatment did not exhibit significant difference compared with the control; however, in 300 mM NaCl treatment, it decreased. Low-concentration NaCl (100 mM) stimulated plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and NADPH oxidase activities as well as Na+/H+ antiporter protein expression, whereas high-concentration NaCl (300 mM) decreased their activity and expression. When G6PDH activity and expression were reduced by glycerol treatments, PM H+-ATPase and NADPH oxidase activities, Na+/H+ antiporter protein level and K+/Na+ ratio dramatically decreased. Simultaneously, NaCl-induced hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) accumulation was abolished. Exogenous application of H₂O₂ increased G6PDH, PM H+-ATPase and NADPH oxidase activities, Na+/H+ antiporter protein expression and K+/Na+ ratio in the control and glycerol treatments. Diphenylene iodonium (DPI), the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, which counteracted NaCl-induced H₂O₂ accumulation, decreased G6PDH, PM H+-ATPase and NADPH oxidase activities, Na+/H+ antiporter protein level and K+/Na+ ratio. Western blot result showed that G6PDH expression was stimulated by NaCl and H₂O₂, and blocked by DPI. Taken together, G6PDH is involved in H₂O₂ accumulation under salt stress. H₂O₂, as a signal, upregulated PM H+-ATPase activity and Na+/H+ antiporter protein level, which subsequently resulted in the enhanced K+/Na+ ratio. G6PDH played a central role in the process.

  17. Effects of antioxidant supplementation on mRNA expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, β-actin and 18S rRNA in the anterior capsule of the lens in cataract patients.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Rijo; Hayashi, Shimmin; Arai, Kiyomi; Chikuda, Makoto; Obara, Yositaka

    2012-03-01

    This was a preliminary study of the effects of antioxidant supplementation on the peroxidation status of the lens by investigating mRNA expression of anti-oxidative enzymes in the lens. The mRNA expression levels of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), β-actin (β-ACT) and 18S rRNA (18S) were measured in this study because they are common reference genes for measuring mRNA levels by means of a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in various tissues. Thirteen patients with binocular cataracts of the same grade were included in the study after giving informed consent. A piece of the anterior capsule, along with a sample of lenticular epithelial cells (LECs), was collected as a pre-intake sample during cataract surgery. Ocuvite + Lutein(®), an antioxidant supplement, was administered orally beginning the day after surgery. Six weeks later, a piece of the anterior capsule along with a sample of LECs, was collected as a post-intake sample during cataract surgery of the opposite eye. RNA was purified from the homogenized samples, and cDNA was reverse transcribed to measure mRNA levels. The expression levels of G6PDH, 18S and β-ACT were measured using RT-PCR. The expression levels of G6PDH and 18S were significantly higher in the post-intake samples than they were in the pre-intake samples. Significant positive correlations between the expression levels of G6PDH and 18S were observed in both the pre- and post-intake samples. Following gender-specific analyses, the expression levels of G6PDH and 18S in the post-intake samples were found to be significantly higher among the female patients. A significant positive correlation between the expression levels of G6PDH and 18S was observed in the post-intake samples from the male patients. There were no significant changes in the gene expression levels of β-ACT after supplementation among male or female patients. β-ACT has been verified for use as a reference gene for measuring the

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from brewers' yeast. The effects of pH and temperature on the steady-state kinetic parameters of the two-chain protein species.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Roy, R N

    1976-05-04

    A systematic study has been made of the pH- and temperature-dependency of the steady-state kinetic parameters of the stabilized two-subunit enzyme species of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, in the absence of superimposed association-dissociation reactions. The Vmax(app) data obtained in several buffers between pH 5 and 10 and at 18-32 degrees C lead to the postulate that at least two sets of protonic equilibria may govern the catalysis (one near pH 5.7 AT 25 DEGREES C and another near pH 9.2); furthermore, two pathways for product formation (i.e., two Vmax's) appear to be required to explain the biphasic nature of the log Vmax(app) vs. pH curves, with Vmax(basic) greater than Vmax(acidic + neutral). Of the several buffers explored, either a uniform degree of interaction or a minimal degree of buffer species interaction could be assessed from the enthalpy changes associated with the derived values for ionization constants attributed to the protonic equilibria in the enzyme-substrates ternary complexes for the case of Tris-acetate-EDTA buffers, at constant ionic strength. With the selection of this buffer at 0.1 (T/2) and at 25 and 32 degrees C, a self-consistent kinetic mechanism has emerged which allows for the random binding of the two fully ionized substrates to the enzyme via two major pathways, and product formation by both E-A--B- and HE-A--B-. As before (Kuby et al. Arch. Biochem, Biophys. 165, 153-178, 1974), a quasi-equilibrium is presumed, with rate-limiting steps (k + 5 and k + 5') at the interconversion of the ternary complexes. Values for the two sets of protonic equilibria defined by this mechanism (viz., pKk, pKH2 for the first ionizations, and pKk', pKH' for the second) could then be estimated. From their numerical values (e.g., at 25 degrees C: pKK = 5.7 PKH2 = 5.2; and pKK' = 9.1, PKH' = 8.2) and from the values for delta H degrees ioniz (e.g., delta H degrees pKK APPROXIMATELY 5.1 KCAL/MOL; DELTA H degrees pKK' APPROXIMATELY 11 KCAL/MOL), A

  19. [The regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glycogen synthase activities by insulin superfamily peptides in myometrium of pregnant women and its impairments under different types of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, L A; Chistiakova, O V

    2009-01-01

    The regulatory effects of insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and relaxin on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and glycogen synthase (GS) activities have been studied in myometrium of pregnant women of control group and with diabetes mellitus of different etiology. In patients with type 1 diabetes G6PDH activity did not differ from the control group, but the enzyme activity was sharply decreased in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. In the control group maximal stimulation of G6PDH activity was observed at 10(-9) M of peptides and their stimulating effect decreased in the following order: insulin > relaxin > IGF-1. In pregnant women with types 1 diabetes insulin effect on the enzyme activity was lower than in the control, and the effects of IGF-1 and relaxin were absent. In the group of pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes the effects of insulin and IGF-1 were decreased, but the effect of relaxin was somewhat higher thus giving the following order in their efficiency relaxin > IGF-1 = insulin. At 10(-9) M peptides exhibited similar stimulating effects on the active form of GS-I, but had no influence on the total enzyme activity in the control group of pregnant women. In patients with type 1 diabetes GS activity remained unchanged (versus control), and peptides did not stimulate the enzyme activity. In patients with type 2 diabetes a significant decrease in GS activity was accompanied by the decrease in the effect of peptides, giving the following order of their efficiency: insulin = IGF-1 > relaxin. In myometrium of pregnant women with gestational (treated and untreated) diabetes GS activity decreased, the effect of insulin was weaker, whereas the effects of relaxin and IGF-1 increased thus giving the following order of their efficiency: relaxin > IGF-1 > insulin. Insulin therapy of type 1 diabetes incompletely restored sensitivity of the enzymes to the peptide actions. At the same time, in women

  20. Dissimilar Deficiency of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) among the AFARS and the Somalis of Djibouti

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    ET LES SOMALIS DE DJIBOUI I and/or par W. SIDRAK (1), E. FOX (2), D. POLYCARPE ( 3 ), J.G. OLSON ( 4 ) S.0. SHAKIB (5), J.P. PARRA (6), G. RODIER (7...Baltimore. ( 3 ) Docteur en midecine. Service midical inter-entreprses (SMI-1), Djibouti. ( 4 ) Docteur en philosophic (PhD), Head, Division of...hommes d’origine* phosphate deshvdrogdnase en Italie ( 4 ). Somali. La part relative de l’accis palustre et du dificit en La description relativement

  1. Discovery of a Plasmodium falciparum glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase 6- phosphogluconolactonase inhibitor (R,Z)-N-((1-ethylpyrrolidin-2-yl)methyl)-2-(2-fluorobenzylidene)-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide (ML276) that reduces parasite growth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Janina; Maloney, Patrick; Peddibhotla, Satyamaheshwar; Hedrick, Michael P.; Hershberger, Paul; Gosalia, Palak; Milewski, Monika; Li, Yujie Linda; Sugarman, Eliot; Hood, Becky; Suyama, Eigo; Nguyen, Kevin; Vasile, Stefan; Sergienko, Eduard; Mangravita-Novo, Arianna; Vicchiarelli, Michael; McAnally, Danielle; Smith, Layton H.; Roth, Gregory P.; Diwan, Jena; Chung, Thomas D.Y.; Jortzik, Esther; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja; Pinkerton, Anthony B.; Bode, Lars

    2012-01-01

    A high throughput screen of the NIH’s MLSMR collection of ~340,000 compounds was undertaken to identify compounds that inhibit Plasmodium falciparum glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (PfG6PD). PfG6PD is essential for proliferating and propagating P. falciparum and differs structurally and mechanistically from the human ortholog. The reaction catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is the first, rate-limiting step in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), a key metabolic pathway sustaining anabolic needs in reductive equivalents and synthetic materials in fastgrowing cells. In P. falciparum the bifunctional enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-6- phosphogluconolactonase (PfGluPho) catalyzes the first two steps of the PPP. Because P. falciparum and infected host red blood cells rely on accelerated glucose flux, they depend on the G6PD activity of PfGluPho. The lead compound identified from this effort, (R,Z)-N-((1-ethylpyrrolidin-2-yl)methyl)-2- (2-fluorobenzylidene)-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide, 11, (ML276), is a submicromolar inhibitor of PfG6PD (IC50 = 889 nM). It is completely selective for the enzyme’s human isoform, displays micromolar potency (IC50 = 2.6 μM) against P. falciparum in culture, and has good drug-like properties, including high solubility and moderate microsomal stability. Studies testing the potential advantage of inhibiting PfG6PD in vivo are in progress. PMID:22813531

  2. Producing Glucose 6-Phosphate from Cellulosic Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Bacik, John-Paul; Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Jarboe, Laura R.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Mark, Brian L.; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The most abundant carbohydrate product of cellulosic biomass pyrolysis is the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranose), which can be converted to glucose 6-phosphate by levoglucosan kinase (LGK). In addition to the canonical kinase phosphotransfer reaction, the conversion requires cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring to allow ATP-dependent phosphorylation of the sugar O6 atom. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that LGK binds two magnesium ions in the active site that are additionally coordinated with the nucleotide and water molecules to result in ideal octahedral coordination. To further verify the metal binding sites, we co-crystallized LGK in the presence of manganese instead of magnesium and solved the structure de novo using the anomalous signal from four manganese atoms in the dimeric structure. The first metal is required for catalysis, whereas our work suggests that the second is either required or significantly promotes the catalytic rate. Although the enzyme binds its sugar substrate in a similar orientation to the structurally related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK), it forms markedly fewer bonding interactions with the substrate. In this orientation, the sugar is in an optimal position to couple phosphorylation with ring cleavage. We also observed a second alternate binding orientation for levoglucosan, and in these structures, ADP was found to bind with lower affinity. These combined observations provide an explanation for the high Km of LGK for levoglucosan. Greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to the catalytic efficiency of LGK can be used to improve applications of this enzyme for levoglucosan-derived biofuel production. PMID:26354439

  3. Structural basis for glucose-6-phosphate activation of glycogen synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Roach, Peter J.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2010-11-22

    Regulation of the storage of glycogen, one of the major energy reserves, is of utmost metabolic importance. In eukaryotes, this regulation is accomplished through glucose-6-phosphate levels and protein phosphorylation. Glycogen synthase homologs in bacteria and archaea lack regulation, while the eukaryotic enzymes are inhibited by protein kinase mediated phosphorylation and activated by protein phosphatases and glucose-6-phosphate binding. We determined the crystal structures corresponding to the basal activity state and glucose-6-phosphate activated state of yeast glycogen synthase-2. The enzyme is assembled into an unusual tetramer by an insertion unique to the eukaryotic enzymes, and this subunit interface is rearranged by the binding of glucose-6-phosphate, which frees the active site cleft and facilitates catalysis. Using both mutagenesis and intein-mediated phospho-peptide ligation experiments, we demonstrate that the enzyme's response to glucose-6-phosphate is controlled by Arg583 and Arg587, while four additional arginine residues present within the same regulatory helix regulate the response to phosphorylation.

  4. The glucose-6-phosphate transport is not mediated by a glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate exchange in liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Marcolongo, Paola; Fulceri, Rosella; Giunti, Roberta; Margittai, Eva; Banhegyi, Gabor; Benedetti, Angelo

    2012-09-21

    A phosphate-linked antiporter activity of the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) has been recently described in liposomes including the reconstituded transporter protein. We directly investigated the mechanism of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) transport in rat liver microsomal vesicles. Pre-loading with inorganic phosphate (Pi) did not stimulate G6P or Pi microsomal inward transport. Pi efflux from pre-loaded microsomes could not be enhanced by G6P or Pi addition. Rapid G6P or Pi influx was registered by light-scattering in microsomes not containing G6P or Pi. The G6PT inhibitor, S3483, blocked G6P transport irrespectively of experimental conditions. We conclude that hepatic G6PT functions as an uniporter.

  5. Hypoglycaemic activity of Coccinia indica and Momordica charantia in diabetic rats: depression of the hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and elevation of both liver and red-cell shunt enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Shibib, B A; Khan, L A; Rahman, R

    1993-01-01

    Coccinia indica leaves were extracted with 60% ethanol, solvents were evaporated and the residue was suspended in water. This suspension was administered orally at a dose of 200 mg/kg body wt. after 18 h of fasting to normal fed and streptozotocin-induced male diabetic rats (180-250 g). After 90 min the rats were killed, and blood-glucose, hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and red-cell G6PDH were assayed. Blood sugar was depressed by 23% (P < 0.01) and 27% (P < 0.001) in the normal fed and streptozotocin-diabetic rats respectively compared with controls which were given distilled water. Hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activities were depressed by 32% (P < 0.001) 30% (P < 0.05) respectively in the streptozotocin-diabetic rats, compared with 19% (P < 0.02) and 20% (P < 0.01) depression in the normal fed controls, whereas both the red-cell and hepatic G6PDH activities were found to be elevated by feeding the extract in the streptozotocin-diabetic and in the normal fed controls. Similar results were obtained with the 95%-ethanolic extract of Momordica charantia. Taken together, these results indicate that Coccinia indica and Momordica charantia extracts lowered blood glucose by depressing its synthesis, on the one hand through depression of the key gluconeogenic enzymes glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and on the other by enhancing glucose oxidation by the shunt pathway through activation of its principal enzyme G6PDH. PMID:8389127

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate mediates activation of the carbohydrate responsive binding protein (ChREBP)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming V.; Chen, Weiqin; Harmancey, Romain N.; Nuotio-Antar, Alli M.; Imamura, Minako; Saha, Pradip; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-05-07

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a Mondo family transcription factor that activates a number of glycolytic and lipogenic genes in response to glucose stimulation. We have previously reported that high glucose can activate the transcriptional activity of ChREBP independent of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated increase in nuclear entry and DNA binding. Here, we found that formation of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) is essential for glucose activation of ChREBP. The glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP is attenuated by D-mannoheptulose, a potent hexokinase inhibitor, as well as over-expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase); kinetics of activation of GAL4-ChREBP can be modified by exogenously expressed GCK. Further metabolism of G-6-P through the two major glucose metabolic pathways, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway, is not required for activation of ChREBP; over-expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) diminishes, whereas RNAi knockdown of the enzyme enhances, the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP, respectively. Moreover, the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), which is phosphorylated by hexokinase, but not further metabolized, effectively upregulates the transcription activity of ChREBP. In addition, over-expression of phosphofructokinase (PFK) 1 and 2, synergistically diminishes the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP. These multiple lines of evidence support the conclusion that G-6-P mediates the activation of ChREBP.

  7. Extremely high intracellular concentration of glucose-6-phosphate and NAD(H) in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Takumi; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2017-03-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is highly resistant to ionizing radiation and UV radiation, and oxidative stress caused by such radiations. NADP(H) seems to be important for this resistance (Slade and Radman, Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 75:133-191; Slade, Radman, Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 75:133-191, 2011), but the mechanism underlying the generation of NADP(H) or NAD(H) in D. radiodurans has not fully been addressed. Intracellular concentrations of NAD(+), NADH, NADP(+), and NADPH in D. radiodurans are also not determined yet. We found that cell extracts of D. radiodurans catalyzed reduction of NAD(P)(+) in vitro, indicating that D. radiodurans cells contain both enzymes and a high concentration of substrates for this activity. The enzyme and the substrate were attributed to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate of which intracellular concentration was extremely high. Unexpectedly, the intracellular concentration of NAD(H) was also much greater than that of NADP(H), suggesting some significant roles of NADH. These unusual features of this bacterium would shed light on a new aspect of physiology of this bacterium.

  8. Diagnostic value of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lie Ying; Zong, Ming; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Lin; Sun, Li Shan; Ye, Qin; Ding, Yuan Yuan; Ma, Jian Wei

    2010-12-14

    Although glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI), anti-G6PI antibodies and G6PI-containing immune complexes (G6PI-CIC) have proved high expression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), comprehensive evaluation of the G6PI-derived markers, G6PI antigen, anti-G6PI Abs, G6PI-CIC and G6PI mRNA, in the diagnosis of RA remains necessary. We measured G6PI antigen, anti-G6PI Abs, C1q/G6PI-CIC as well as anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP Abs) in serum and concomitantly synovial fluid (SF) by ELISA in RA, other rheumatic diseases and healthy controls. The G6PI mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was assessed with real-time PCR. As compared with non-RA patients, RA patients had increased levels of G6PI antigen, anti-G6PI Abs, C1q/G6PI-CIC and G6PI mRNA expression in sera or PBMCs, and increased levels of G6PI and C1q/G6PI-CIC in SF. The serum G6PI levels in RA patients positively correlated with anti-G6PI Abs, C1q/G6PI-CIC, G6PI mRNA, anti-CCP Abs, RF, CRP and ESR, respectively. The area under curve analyses demonstrated that serum G6PI had the best discriminating power for RA and active RA followed by C1q/G6PI-CIC, anti-G6PI Abs and G6PI mRNA. The simultaneous use of serum G6PI and anti-CCP Abs assays in the form of either of them tested positive gave improved sensitivities of 88.1% for RA and 95.8% for active RA. Despite the elevated expression of all G6PI-derived markers in RA, the serum G6PI has the best discriminating power among the four G6PI-derived markers. The serum G6PI determination either alone or in combination with anti-CCP Abs improves the diagnosis of RA. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. AB104. Glucose-6 phospate dehydrogenase deficiency among mongolian neonates

    PubMed Central

    Batjargal, Khishigjargal; Nansal, Gerelmaa; Zagd, Gerelmaa; Ganbaatar, Erdenetuya

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans, affecting 400 million people worldwide and a high prevalence in persons of African, Middle Asian countries. The most common clinical manifestations are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which is caused by the impairment of erythrocyte’s ability to remove harmful oxidative stress triggered by exogenous agents such as drugs, infection, or fava bean ingestion. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by G6PD is strongly associated with mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment. The study aims to determine a level of G6PD in healthy neonates. Methods We obtained blood spot samples from 268 infants around 24-72 hours in their age who has unsuspected intranatal and neonatal disorders. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase “Perkin Elmer, Finland” level is determined by Victor 2D Fluorometer assay, developing of neonatal jaundice is examined by recall. Results The76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PD, other 23.5% (n=63) was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. In the both sex, 51.5% of male 0.88±0.46 Ug/Hb (n=33) and 47.6% of female (n=30) 0.97±0.55 Ug/Hb was assessed with G6PD deficiency. Developing Jaundice period in number of 63 neonates with G6PD deficiency, 86% of neonates (n=54) was in 1-4 days, 4% of neonates (n=3) was in 5-7 days and there is no sign of jaundice in 9% (n=6). Therefore neonates with G6PD deficiency, 53.9% (n=34) continued jaundice more than two weeks. Conclusions G6PD deficiency was determined in male neonates (51.5%) more than female (47.6%). The 76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PDH other 23.5% (n=63) of all participants was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. It shows that G6PD might be one potential risk of neonatal jaundice and hyperbilirubinemia in neonates in Mongolia.

  10. Protective effects of glucose-6-phosphate and NADP against alpha-chaconine-induced developmental toxicity in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Rayburn, J R; Bantle, J A; Qualls, C W; Friedman, M

    1995-12-01

    In previous studies a metabolic activation system (MAS) composed of Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver microsomes led to an apparent reduction of potato glycoalkaloid developmental toxicity in the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX). The reasons for this reduction were investigated in this study. The effect of the exogenous MAS on glycoalkaloid developmental toxicity was examined in two experiments in which a concentration series of alpha-chaconine was tested with a MAS with and without a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) generator system consisting of NADPH, oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADP), glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The NADPH generator system and each of its individual components were tested at a single high concentration of alpha-chaconine to evaluate their potential effects on toxicity. The findings indicated that the protective effect of the MAS was not the result of detoxification by microsomal enzyme systems, but was caused by two components of the NADPH generator system, namely NADP and G6P. G6P was more protective of alpha-chaconine-induced toxicity than NADP at the concentrations tested. Thus, FETAX with a MAS must be performed with appropriate controls that take into account the possible interactions with individual components of the system.

  11. Amperometric biosensor based on Prussian Blue nanoparticle-modified screen-printed electrode for estimation of glucose-6-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Suchanda; Sarkar, Priyabrata; Turner, Anthony P F

    2013-08-15

    Glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) plays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism of all living organisms. Compared with the conventional analytical methods available for estimation of G6P, the biosensors having relative simplicity, specificity, low cost, and fast response time are a promising alternative. We have reported a G6P biosensor based on screen-printed electrode using Prussian Blue (PB) nanoparticles and enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase. The PB nanoparticles acted as a mediator and thereby enhanced the rate of electron transfer in a bienzymatic reaction. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy study confirmed the formation of PB, whereas atomic force microscopy revealed that PB nanoparticles were approximately 25 to 30 nm in diameter. Various optimization studies, such as pH, enzyme, and cofactor loading, were conducted to obtain maximum amperometric responses for G6P measurement. The developed G6P biosensor showed a broad linear response in the range of 0.01 to 1.25 mM, with a detection limit of 2.3 μM and sensitivity of 63.3 μA/mM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 within 15s at an applied working potential of -100 mV. The proposed G6P biosensor also exhibited good stability and excellent anti-interference ability, and it worked well for serum samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Astrocytic glucose-6-phosphatase and the permeability of brain microsomes to glucose 6-phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, R J; Bartlett, K; Burchell, A; Scott, H M; Eyre, J A

    1993-01-01

    Cells from primary rat astrocyte cultures express a 36.5 kDa protein that cross-reacts with polyclonal antibodies to the catalytic subunit of rat hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase on Western blotting. Glucose-6-phosphate-hydrolysing activity of the order of 10 nmol/min per mg of total cellular protein can be demonstrated in cell homogenates. This activity shows latency, and is localized to the microsomal fraction. Kinetic analysis shows a Km of 15 mM and a Vmax. of 30 nmol/min per mg of microsomal protein in disrupted microsomes. Approx. 40% of the total phosphohydrolase activity is specific glucose-6-phosphatase, as judged by sensitivity to exposure to pH 5 at 37 degrees C. Previous reports that the brain microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase system does not distinguish glucose 6-phosphate and mannose 6-phosphate are confirmed in astrocyte microsomes. However, we demonstrate significant phosphomannose isomerase activity in brain microsomes, allowing for ready interconversion between mannose 6-phosphate and glucose 6-phosphate (Vmax. 15 nmol/min per mg of microsomal protein; apparent Km < 1 mM; pH optimum 5-6 for the two-step conversion). This finding invalidates the past inference from the failure of brain microsomes to distinguish mannose 6-phosphate and glucose 6-phosphate that the cerebral glucose-6-phosphatase system lacks a 'glucose 6-phosphate translocase' [Fishman and Karnovsky (1986) J. Neurochem. 46, 371-378]. Furthermore, light-scattering experiments confirm that a proportion of whole brain microsomes is readily permeable to glucose 6-phosphate. Images Figure 1 PMID:8395816

  13. Inhibition of hexose transport by glucose in a glucose-6-phosphate isomerase mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Pascual, C; Romay, C; Herrera, L; Kotyk, A

    1989-01-01

    The rate of hexose transport was approximately 60% lower for both the high- and the low-affinity components of hexose uptake when a glucose-6-phosphate isomerase mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was preincubated with glucose, as compared with preincubation with water. Similarly the Jmax value of the high-affinity system of the mutant was 25-35% of the corresponding Jmax value for normal cells incubated with glucose. Accumulation of glucose 6-phosphate or of some other metabolite, such as fructose 6-phosphate or trehalose, may be responsible for this striking inhibition.

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate Reduces Calcium Accumulation in Rat Brain Endoplasmic Reticulum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    low millimolar range. Most Ca2+ is sequestered within organelles , including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, mitochondria , and nucleus (Carafoli...G6P and thapsigargin caused generalized reduction in Ca2+ accumulation in remarkably similar patterns with no apparent gray matter regional...with glucose-6-phosphate (10 mM) or thapsigargin (1 µM), revealed very similar pattern of generalized reduction in 45Ca2+ accumulation in gray and

  15. Type I glycogen storage diseases: disorders of the glucose-6-phosphatase/glucose-6-phosphate transporter complexes.

    PubMed

    Chou, Janice Y; Jun, Hyun Sik; Mansfield, Brian C

    2015-05-01

    Disorders of the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase)/glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) complexes consist of three subtypes: glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), deficient in the liver/kidney/intestine-restricted G6Pase-α (or G6PC); GSD-Ib, deficient in a ubiquitously expressed G6PT (or SLC37A4); and G6Pase-β deficiency or severe congenital neutropenia syndrome type 4 (SCN4), deficient in the ubiquitously expressed G6Pase-β (or G6PC3). G6Pase-α and G6Pase-β are glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) hydrolases with active sites lying inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and as such are dependent upon the G6PT to translocate G6P from the cytoplasm into the lumen. The tissue expression profiles of the G6Pase enzymes dictate the disease's phenotype. A functional G6Pase-α/G6PT complex maintains interprandial glucose homeostasis, while a functional G6Pase-β/G6PT complex maintains neutrophil/macrophage energy homeostasis and functionality. G6Pase-β deficiency is not a glycogen storage disease but biochemically it is a GSD-I related syndrome (GSD-Irs). GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib patients manifest a common metabolic phenotype of impaired blood glucose homeostasis not shared by GSD-Irs. GSD-Ib and GSD-Irs patients manifest a common myeloid phenotype of neutropenia and neutrophil/macrophage dysfunction not shared by GSD-Ia. While a disruption of the activity of the G6Pase-α/G6PT complex readily explains why GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib patients exhibit impaired glucose homeostasis, the basis for neutropenia and myeloid dysfunction in GSD-Ib and GSD-Irs are only now starting to be understood. Animal models of all three disorders are now available and are being exploited to both delineate the disease more precisely and develop new treatment approaches, including gene therapy.

  16. Mimicked translocation of glucose and glucose 6-phosphate with artificial enzyme membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Maïsterrena, B; Coulet, P R

    1989-01-01

    An approach to the mechanism which may govern the behaviour of biological compartmentalized systems is presented. Artificial enzyme membranes with immobilized glucose oxidase, invertase or hexokinase were used to separate two compartments of a specially designed diffusion cell. Asymmetry in volume, hydrodynamic conditions and enzyme location was purposely chosen in order to create situations which could not be obtained with an enzyme free in solution, and was then used to tentatively mimic situations existing in vivo. Experiments were conducted and a translocation effect of H2O2, glucose and glucose 6-phosphate was obtained. A theoretical analysis taking into account the different identified parameters of the system was elaborated. PMID:2764883

  17. Gas Phase Spectra and Structural Determination of Glucose 6 Phosphate Using Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kregel, Steven J.; Voss, Jonathan; Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate (G6P) is one member of a class of simple phosphorylated sugars that are relevant in biological processes. We have acquired a gas phase infrared spectrum of G6P- using cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) in a home-built spectrometer. The experimental spectrum was compared with calculated vibrational spectra from a systematic conformer search. For both of the α and β anomers, results show that only the lowest energy conformers are present in the gas phase. If spectral signatures for similar sugars could be cataloged, it would allow for conformer-specific determination of mixture composition, for example, for glycolyzation processes.

  18. Bio-catalytic nanocompartments for in situ production of glucose-6-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Lomora, M; Gunkel-Grabole, G; Mantri, S; Palivan, C G

    2017-08-29

    Cells are sophisticated biocatalytic systems driving a complex network of biochemical reactions. A bioinspired strategy to create advanced functional systems is to design confined spaces for complex enzymatic reactions by using a combination of synthetic polymer assemblies and natural cell components. Here, we developed bio-catalytic nanocompartments that contain phosphoglucomutase protected by a biomimetic polymer membrane, which was permeabilized for reactants through insertion of an engineered α-hemolysin pore protein. These bio-catalytic nanocompartments serve for production of glucose-6-phosphate, and thus possess great potential for applications in an incomplete glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, or in plant biological reactions.

  19. Glucose-6-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase Is Also Increased in Erythrocytes from Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, Francisco J.; Rosety-Plaza, Manuel; Rosety-Rodriguez, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    For some time it has been claimed that trisomic cells are more sensitive to oxidative stress since there is an imbalance in hydrogen peroxide metabolism due to an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalytic activity. We designed the present study to assess activity levels of antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione…

  20. Glucose-6-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase Is Also Increased in Erythrocytes from Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, Francisco J.; Rosety-Plaza, Manuel; Rosety-Rodriguez, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    For some time it has been claimed that trisomic cells are more sensitive to oxidative stress since there is an imbalance in hydrogen peroxide metabolism due to an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalytic activity. We designed the present study to assess activity levels of antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione…

  1. A role for AMPK in the inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by polyunsaturated fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2009-10-09

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as {beta}-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser{sup 307} phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  2. A ROLE FOR AMPK IN THE INHIBITION OF GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE BY POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as β-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser307 phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:19646964

  3. IMMUNOGLOBULIN AND GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE AS MARKERS OF CELLULAR ORIGIN IN BURKITT LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Philip J.; Klein, Eva; Klein, George; Clifford, Peter; Singh, Surjit

    1973-01-01

    Two independent marker systems, G-6-PD isoenzymes and cell membrane-associated IgM, were used to trace the cellular origin of Burkitt lymphoma. Application of the G-6-PD system is dependent upon the fact that, in accordance with inactivity of one X chromosome in each somatic cell, females heterozygous for the usual B gene (GdB) at the X-linked G-6-PD locus and the variant allele GdA (or GdA-) have two types of cells. GdB is active in one cell population, which consequently produces B type enzyme; in the other population GdA is active, producing the variant A enzyme. Therefore, tumors with a clonal origin in a GdB/GdA heterozygote should exhibit only one enzyme type (B or A) whereas those with multicellular origin may show both A and B enzymes. Utilization of the immunoglobulin system is based upon the supposition that in lymphoid neoplasms with clonal origin either all or none of the tumor cells should have surface-associated IgM and κ-reactivities. 33 of 34 relatively homogeneous (with respect to content of neoplastic cells) individual Burkitt tumors from 19 G-6-PD heterozygotes had single enzyme phenotypes. Similarly, of 95 tumors tested, 92 consisted essentially of IgM(+) or (-) cells. Two neoplasms could not be definitely classified and one tumor had two cell populations. These data suggest a clonal origin for most Burkitt tumors, but the one neoplasm with a double G-6-PD phenotype (A/B) and the one tumor that had two populations of cells with respect to surface IgM, could have originated from multiple cells. G-6-PD was determined in each of two tumors from seven heterozygotes and in all cases both tumors had the same single enzyme phenotype. Surface-associated IgM was tested in four tumors from one patient, three from another, and in two neoplasms from 11 patients. With one exception, all tumors from the same patient were concordant with respect to IgM. These findings suggest that the entire disease has a clonal origin, i.e., it emerges at one focus and then spreads to other parts of the body. Cells from 36 recurrent neoplasms were typed for G-6-PD (in heterozygotes) and/or IgM. In one previously reported patient, initial and recurrent tumors were discordant for G-6-PD. Two other patients had IgM phenotypes in recurrences that were discordant with those found in their initial tumors. Phenotypes from three of nine relapses which occurred after 5 mo were discordant for G-6-PD or IgM but no discordance was detected among 27 earlier recurrences. Thus, some "late" recurrences may be due to emergence of "new" maligant cell lines whereas most early relapses are due to reemergence of the original malignant clones. The probable unicellular origin of Burkitt lymphoma and the findings in tumor recurrences are discussed in terms of the disease's putative viral etiology. PMID:4577623

  4. Energy balance-dependent regulation of ovine glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase protein isoform expression

    PubMed Central

    Triantaphyllopoulos, Kostas A; Laliotis, George P; Bizelis, Iosif A

    2014-01-01

    G6PDH is the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway and one of the principal source of NADPH, a major cellular reductant. Importantly, in ruminant's metabolism the aforementioned NADPH provided, is utilized for de novo fatty acid synthesis. Previous work of cloning the ovine (Ovis aries) og6pdh gene has revealed the presence of two cDNA transcripts (og6pda and og6pdb), og6pdb being a product of alternative splicing not similar to any other previously reported.1 In the current study the effect of energy balance in the ovine G6PDH protein expression was investigated, shedding light on the biochemical features and potential physiological role of the oG6PDB isoform. Changes in energy balance leads to protein expression changes in both transcripts, to the opposite direction and not in a proportional way. Negative energy balance was not in favor of the presence of any particular isoform, while both protein expression levels were not significantly different (P > 0.05). In contrast, at the transition point from negative to positive and on the positive energy balance, there is a significant increase of oG6PDA compared with oG6PDB protein expression (P < 0.001). Both oG6PDH protein isoforms changed significantly toward the positive energy balance. oG6PDA is escalating, while oG6PDB is falling, under the same stimulus (positive energy balance alteration). This change is also positively associated with increasing levels in enzyme activity, 4 weeks post-weaning in ewes’ adipose tissue. Furthermore, regression analysis clearly demonstrated the linear correlation of both proteins in response to the WPW, while energy balance, enzyme activity, and oG6PDA relative protein expression follow the same escalating trend; in contrast, oG6PDB relative protein expression falls in time, similar to both transcripts accumulation pattern, as reported previously.2 PMID:24575366

  5. Energy balance-dependent regulation of ovine glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase protein isoform expression.

    PubMed

    Triantaphyllopoulos, Kostas A; Laliotis, George P; Bizelis, Iosif A

    2014-01-01

    G6PDH is the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway and one of the principal source of NADPH, a major cellular reductant. Importantly, in ruminant's metabolism the aforementioned NADPH provided, is utilized for de novo fatty acid synthesis. Previous work of cloning the ovine (Ovis aries) og6pdh gene has revealed the presence of two cDNA transcripts (og6pda and og6pdb), og6pdb being a product of alternative splicing not similar to any other previously reported.(1) In the current study the effect of energy balance in the ovine G6PDH protein expression was investigated, shedding light on the biochemical features and potential physiological role of the oG6PDB isoform. Changes in energy balance leads to protein expression changes in both transcripts, to the opposite direction and not in a proportional way. Negative energy balance was not in favor of the presence of any particular isoform, while both protein expression levels were not significantly different (P > 0.05). In contrast, at the transition point from negative to positive and on the positive energy balance, there is a significant increase of oG6PDA compared with oG6PDB protein expression (P < 0.001). Both oG6PDH protein isoforms changed significantly toward the positive energy balance. oG6PDA is escalating, while oG6PDB is falling, under the same stimulus (positive energy balance alteration). This change is also positively associated with increasing levels in enzyme activity, 4 weeks post-weaning in ewes' adipose tissue. Furthermore, regression analysis clearly demonstrated the linear correlation of both proteins in response to the WPW, while energy balance, enzyme activity, and oG6PDA relative protein expression follow the same escalating trend; in contrast, oG6PDB relative protein expression falls in time, similar to both transcripts accumulation pattern, as reported previously.(2.)

  6. Glucose-6-Phosphate Isomerase (G6PI) Mediates Hypoxia-Induced Angiogenesis in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying; Yu, Shan-Shan; Zong, Ming; Fan, Sha-Sha; Lu, Tian-Bao; Gong, Ru-Han; Sun, Li-Shan; Fan, Lie-Ying

    2017-01-01

    The higher level of Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI) has been found in both synovial tissue and synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, while the function of G6PI in RA remains unclear. Herein we found the enrichment of G6PI in microvascular endothelial cells of synovial tissue in RA patients, where a 3% O2 hypoxia environment has been identified. In order to determine the correlation between the high G6PI level and the low oxygen concentration in RA, a hypoxia condition (~3% O2) in vitro was applied to mimic the RA environment in vivo. Hypoxia promoted cellular proliferation of rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs), and induced cell migration and angiogenic tube formation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs), which were accompanied with the increased expression of G6PI and HIF-1α. Through application of G6PI loss-of-function assays, we confirmed the requirement of G6PI expression for those hypoxia-induced phenotype in RA. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time that G6PI plays key roles in regulating VEGF secretion from RASFs to regulate the hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in RA. Taken together, we demonstrated a novel pathway regulating hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in RA mediated by G6PI. PMID:28067317

  7. Producing glucose 6-phosphate from cellulosic biomass: Structural insights into levoglucosan bioconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Bacik, John -Paul; Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Jarboe, Laura R.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Mark, Brian L.; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2015-09-09

    The most abundant carbohydrate product of cellulosic biomass pyrolysis is the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranose), which can be converted to glucose 6-phosphate by levoglucosan kinase (LGK). In addition to the canonical kinase phosphotransfer reaction, the conversion requires cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring to allow ATP-dependent phosphorylation of the sugar O6 atom. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that LGK binds two magnesium ions in the active site that are additionally coordinated with the nucleotide and water molecules to result in ideal octahedral coordination. To further verify the metal binding sites, we co-crystallized LGK in the presence of manganese instead of magnesium and solved the structure de novo using the anomalous signal from four manganese atoms in the dimeric structure. The first metal is required for catalysis, whereas our work suggests that the second is either required or significantly promotes the catalytic rate. Although the enzyme binds its sugar substrate in a similar orientation to the structurally related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK), it forms markedly fewer bonding interactions with the substrate. In this orientation, the sugar is in an optimal position to couple phosphorylation with ring cleavage. We also observed a second alternate binding orientation for levoglucosan, and in these structures, ADP was found to bind with lower affinity. These combined observations provide an explanation for the high Km of LGK for levoglucosan. Furthermore, greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to the catalytic efficiency of LGK can be used to improve applications of this enzyme for levoglucosan-derived biofuel production.

  8. Producing glucose 6-phosphate from cellulosic biomass: structural insights into levoglucosan bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Bacik, John-Paul; Klesmith, Justin R; Whitehead, Timothy A; Jarboe, Laura R; Unkefer, Clifford J; Mark, Brian L; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2015-10-30

    The most abundant carbohydrate product of cellulosic biomass pyrolysis is the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranose), which can be converted to glucose 6-phosphate by levoglucosan kinase (LGK). In addition to the canonical kinase phosphotransfer reaction, the conversion requires cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring to allow ATP-dependent phosphorylation of the sugar O6 atom. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that LGK binds two magnesium ions in the active site that are additionally coordinated with the nucleotide and water molecules to result in ideal octahedral coordination. To further verify the metal binding sites, we co-crystallized LGK in the presence of manganese instead of magnesium and solved the structure de novo using the anomalous signal from four manganese atoms in the dimeric structure. The first metal is required for catalysis, whereas our work suggests that the second is either required or significantly promotes the catalytic rate. Although the enzyme binds its sugar substrate in a similar orientation to the structurally related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK), it forms markedly fewer bonding interactions with the substrate. In this orientation, the sugar is in an optimal position to couple phosphorylation with ring cleavage. We also observed a second alternate binding orientation for levoglucosan, and in these structures, ADP was found to bind with lower affinity. These combined observations provide an explanation for the high Km of LGK for levoglucosan. Greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to the catalytic efficiency of LGK can be used to improve applications of this enzyme for levoglucosan-derived biofuel production. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Regulation of a plant SNF1-related protein kinase by glucose-6-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Toroser, D.; Plaut, Z.; Huber, S.C.

    2000-05-01

    One of the major protein kinases (PK{sub III}) that phosphorylates serine-158 of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), which is responsible for light/dark modulation of activity, is known to be a member of the SNF1-related family of protein kinases. In the present study, the authors have developed a fluorescence-based continuous assay for measurement of PK{sub III} activity. Using the continuous assay, along with the fixed-time-point {sup 32}P-incorporation assay, they demonstrate that PK{sub III} activity is inhibited by glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P). Relative inhibition by Glc-6-P was increased by decreasing pH from 8.5 to 5.5 and by reducing the concentration of Mg{sup 2+} in the assay from 10 to 2 nM. Under likely physiological conditions (PH 7.0 and 2 mM Mg{sup 2+}), 10 nM Glc-6-P inhibited kinase activity approximately 70%. Inhibition by Glc-6-P could not be ascribed to contaminants in the commercial preparations. Other metabolites inhibited PK{sub III} in the following order: Glc-6-P > mannose-6-P, fructose-1,6P{sub 2} > ribose-5-P, 3-PGA, fructose-6-P. Inorganic phosphate, Glc, and AMP were not inhibitory, and free Glc did not reverse the inhibition by Glc-6-P. Because SNF1-related protein kinases are thought to function broadly in the regulation of enzyme activity and gene expression, Glc-6-P inhibition of PK{sub III} activity potentially provides a mechanism for metabolic regulation of the reactions catalyzed by these important protein kinases.

  10. Producing glucose 6-phosphate from cellulosic biomass: Structural insights into levoglucosan bioconversion

    DOE PAGES

    Bacik, John -Paul; Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; ...

    2015-09-09

    The most abundant carbohydrate product of cellulosic biomass pyrolysis is the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranose), which can be converted to glucose 6-phosphate by levoglucosan kinase (LGK). In addition to the canonical kinase phosphotransfer reaction, the conversion requires cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring to allow ATP-dependent phosphorylation of the sugar O6 atom. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that LGK binds two magnesium ions in the active site that are additionally coordinated with the nucleotide and water molecules to result in ideal octahedral coordination. To further verify the metal binding sites, we co-crystallized LGK in the presence of manganese instead of magnesium andmore » solved the structure de novo using the anomalous signal from four manganese atoms in the dimeric structure. The first metal is required for catalysis, whereas our work suggests that the second is either required or significantly promotes the catalytic rate. Although the enzyme binds its sugar substrate in a similar orientation to the structurally related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK), it forms markedly fewer bonding interactions with the substrate. In this orientation, the sugar is in an optimal position to couple phosphorylation with ring cleavage. We also observed a second alternate binding orientation for levoglucosan, and in these structures, ADP was found to bind with lower affinity. These combined observations provide an explanation for the high Km of LGK for levoglucosan. Furthermore, greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to the catalytic efficiency of LGK can be used to improve applications of this enzyme for levoglucosan-derived biofuel production.« less

  11. [Significance of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase assay in early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Liu, J; Zhu, L; Zhang, X W; Li, Z G

    2016-12-18

    To explore the titer of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) for early diagnosis of the outpatient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in real life, and to analyze its relationship with disease activity. In the study, 1 051 patients with arthritis were collected in the group who had joints tender and swelling, and 90 cases of healthy people as a control group. ELISA method was used to detect the serum level of GPI, and according to clinical features and laboratory test, all the patients including 525 RA patients, the other patients including osteoarthritis (OA), 134 cases of seronegative spine joint disease (SpA), 104 cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 31 cases of primary Sjogren syndrome (pSS), 24 cases of gout arthritis (GA), 22 cases of other connective tissue diseases (including polymyalgia rheumatica, dermatomyositis, systemic sclerosis, adult Still disease) and 46 cases of other diseases (including 165 cases of osteoporosis, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, traumatic osteomyelitis, bone and joint disease, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, tumor). The diagnostic values of GPI were assessed, and the differences between the GPI positive and negative groups of the RA patients in clinical characteristics, disease activity, severity and inflammatory index analyzed. The positive rate of serum GPI in the patients with RA was 55.4%, contrasting to other autoimmune diseases (14.3%) and healthy controls (7.78%)(P<0.001). Compared with the OA and SpA patients, the RA group was increased more significantly, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.001). The diagnostic value of GPI alone for RA was 0.39 mg/L, the sensitivity was 54.2%, and specificity was 87.3%. The positive rate of GPI in RF negative patients was 36.1%; the positive rate of GPI in anti-CCP antibody negative patients was 34.2%; the positive rate of GPI in RF and anti-CCP antibody negative patients was 24.1%. The level of GPI had positive correlation (P<0.05) with ESR, RF, anti

  12. Genetic Epidemiology of Glucose-6-Dehydrogenase Deficiency in the Arab World.

    PubMed

    Doss, C George Priya; Alasmar, Dima R; Bux, Reem I; Sneha, P; Bakhsh, Fadheela Dad; Al-Azwani, Iman; Bekay, Rajaa El; Zayed, Hatem

    2016-11-17

    A systematic search was implemented using four literature databases (PubMed, Embase, Science Direct and Web of Science) to capture all the causative mutations of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (G6PDD) in the 22 Arab countries. Our search yielded 43 studies that captured 33 mutations (23 missense, one silent, two deletions, and seven intronic mutations), in 3,430 Arab patients with G6PDD. The 23 missense mutations were then subjected to phenotypic classification using in silico prediction tools, which were compared to the WHO pathogenicity scale as a reference. These in silico tools were tested for their predicting efficiency using rigorous statistical analyses. Of the 23 missense mutations, p.S188F, p.I48T, p.N126D, and p.V68M, were identified as the most common mutations among Arab populations, but were not unique to the Arab world, interestingly, our search strategy found four other mutations (p.N135T, p.S179N, p.R246L, and p.Q307P) that are unique to Arabs. These mutations were exposed to structural analysis and molecular dynamics simulation analysis (MDSA), which predicting these mutant forms as potentially affect the enzyme function. The combination of the MDSA, structural analysis, and in silico predictions and statistical tools we used will provide a platform for future prediction accuracy for the pathogenicity of genetic mutations.

  13. Genetic Epidemiology of Glucose-6-Dehydrogenase Deficiency in the Arab World

    PubMed Central

    Doss, C. George Priya; Alasmar, Dima R.; Bux, Reem I.; Sneha, P.; Bakhsh, Fadheela Dad; Al-Azwani, Iman; Bekay, Rajaa El; Zayed, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    A systematic search was implemented using four literature databases (PubMed, Embase, Science Direct and Web of Science) to capture all the causative mutations of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (G6PDD) in the 22 Arab countries. Our search yielded 43 studies that captured 33 mutations (23 missense, one silent, two deletions, and seven intronic mutations), in 3,430 Arab patients with G6PDD. The 23 missense mutations were then subjected to phenotypic classification using in silico prediction tools, which were compared to the WHO pathogenicity scale as a reference. These in silico tools were tested for their predicting efficiency using rigorous statistical analyses. Of the 23 missense mutations, p.S188F, p.I48T, p.N126D, and p.V68M, were identified as the most common mutations among Arab populations, but were not unique to the Arab world, interestingly, our search strategy found four other mutations (p.N135T, p.S179N, p.R246L, and p.Q307P) that are unique to Arabs. These mutations were exposed to structural analysis and molecular dynamics simulation analysis (MDSA), which predicting these mutant forms as potentially affect the enzyme function. The combination of the MDSA, structural analysis, and in silico predictions and statistical tools we used will provide a platform for future prediction accuracy for the pathogenicity of genetic mutations. PMID:27853304

  14. [Significance of antibodies to the citrullinated glucose-6-phosphate isomerase peptides in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Wu, D; Sun, L; Li, C H; Yang, L; Zhao, J X; Liu, X Y

    2016-12-18

    To detect the anti-citrullinated glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) 70-88 peptide antibody (anti-C-GPI(70-88) antibody), anti-citrullinated GPI 435-453 peptide antibody (anti-C-GPI(435-453) antibody), anti-GPI 70-88 peptide antibody (anti-GPI(70-88) antibody) and anti-GPI 435-453 peptide antibody(anti-GPI(435-453) antibody) in the serum of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and examine the diagnostic values of the anti-C-GPI peptide antibodies in RA. The anti-C-GPI(70-88) antibody, anti-C-GPI(435-453) antibody, anti-GPI(70-88) antibody and anti-GPI(435-453) antibody were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 191 RA patients, 129 other rheumatic diseases and 74 healthy controls. The clinical and laboratory data of the patients with RA were collected, and the values of anti-C-GPI peptide antibodies in the diagnosis of RA and the relationships of anti-C-GPI peptide antibodies with the clinical and laboratory parameters analyzed. (1) The mean titers of the anti-C-GPI(70-88) antibody and the anti-C-GPI(435-453) antibody in the RA patients (respectively, 68.71 ± 4.20 and 51.78 ± 3.13) were significantly higher than those with other rheumatic diseases and healthy individuals (P <0.05). However, the mean titers of the anti-GPI(70-88) antibody and anti-GPI(435-453) antibody in the RA patients were similar to those with other rheumatic diseases and healthy individuals. (2) The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the anti-C-GPI(70-88) antibody for RA were 41.88% and 84.50% respectively; and the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the anti-C-GPI(435-453) antibody for RA were 46.05% and 86.05% respectively. The sensitivity of combined detection of the two anti-C-GPI peptide antibodies was 50.79%, and the specificity was 81.40%. (3) The positive rates of the anti-C-GPI(70-88) antibody and the anti-C-GPI(435-453) antibody were 35% and 45% respectively in those patients with negative anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody, anti

  15. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skin on the palms and soles (hand-foot syndrome); shortness of breath; and hair loss may also ... dehydrogenase deficiency , with its early-onset neurological symptoms, is a rare disorder. Its prevalence is ...

  16. Comparison of glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, ribose, and mannose as flavour precursors in pork; the effect of monosaccharide addition on flavour generation.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Lene; Schäfer, Annette; Bjergegaard, Charlotte; Aaslyng, Margit D; Bredie, Wender L P

    2009-03-01

    The effect of glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, mannose and ribose on the generation of aroma volatiles in pork was investigated. The monosaccharides were added individually to minced pork prior to heat treatment (160°C for 10min) in the following concentrations: glucose (27.5μmol/g), ribose (1.2μmol/g), mannose (8.3μmol/g) and glucose 6-phosphate (0.5μmol/g). The natural concentrations of the monosaccharides in the pork used were found to be 4.0μmol/g for glucose, 0.1μmol/g for ribose, 0.3μmol/g for mannose and 2.6μmol/g for glucose 6-phosphate. The major aroma compounds identified in the headspace of the heated samples were pyrazines, aldehydes (Strecker and lipid-derived), ketones, and sulphides. Glucose generated the highest amounts of volatiles followed by glucose 6-phosphate. However, when related to the added concentration of glucose 6-phosphate, this phosphorylated monosaccharide showed the highest aroma generating potential. The addition of ribose did not increase the concentration of volatiles compared with pork without the added monosaccharide. The fates of ribose 5-phosphate and ribose in pork were studied over time. The concentrations of ribose and ribose 5-phosphate clearly decreased during 2h equilibration, which may be due to enzymatic activities. These precursors may, therefore, be less important pork flavour precursors than glucose and glucose 6-phosphate.

  17. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations database: review of the "old" and update of the new mutations.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Angelo; Moradkhani, Kamran; Hwang, Ming Jing; Zuppi, Cecilia; Giardina, Bruno; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2012-03-15

    In the present paper we have updated the G6PD mutations database, including all the last discovered G6PD genetic variants. We underline that the last database has been published by Vulliamy et al. [1] who analytically reported 140 G6PD mutations: along with Vulliamy's database, there are two main sites, such as http://202.120.189.88/mutdb/ and www.LOVD.nl/MR, where almost all G6PD mutations can be found. Compared to the previous mutation reports, in our paper we have included for each mutation some additional information, such as: the secondary structure and the enzyme 3D position involving by mutation, the creation or abolition of a restriction site (with the enzyme involved) and the conservation score associated with each amino acid position. The mutations reported in the present tab have been divided according to the gene's region involved (coding and non-coding) and mutations affecting the coding region in: single, multiple (at least with two bases involved) and deletion. We underline that for the listed mutations, reported in italic, literature doesn't provide all the biochemical or bio-molecular information or the research data. Finally, for the "old" mutations, we tried to verify features previously reported and, when subsequently modified, we updated the specific information using the latest literature data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. AB222. Enolase1 (ENO1) and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) are good markers to predict human sperm freezability

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuping; Wang, Shangqian; Wang, Wei; Xu, Yang; Sun, Hongyong; Wang, Zengjun; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sperm cryopreservation is a method to preserve sperm samples for a long period. However, the fertility of sperm decreases markedly after freezing and thawing in a certain amount of samples. The aim of the present study was to find useful and reliable predictive biomarkers of the capacity to withstand the freeze-thawing process in human ejaculates. Methods We chose the two proteins as probable markers of sperm freezing capacity. Ejaculate samples were separated into good freezability ejaculates (GFE) and poor freezability ejaculates (PFE) according to progressive motility of the sperm after thawing. Before starting cryopreservation protocols, the two proteins from each group were compared using western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. Results Results showed that normalized content of enolase1 (ENO1) (P<0.05) and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) (P<0.01) were both significantly higher in GFE than in PFE. The association of ENO1 and GPI with post thaw sperm viability and motility was confirmed using Pearson’s linear correlation. Conclusions In conclusion, ENO1 and GPI can be used as markers of human sperm freezability before starting the cryopreservation procedure.

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase is an endogenous inhibitor to myofibril-bound serine proteinase of crucian carp (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Sun, Le-Chang; Zhou, Li-Gen; Du, Cui-Hong; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Hara, Kenji; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2009-06-24

    Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) was purified to homogeneity from the skeletal muscle of crucian carp ( Carassius auratus ) by ammonium sulfate fractionation, column chromatographies of Q-Sepharose, SP-Sepharose, and Superdex 200 with a yield of 8.0%, and purification folds of 468. The molecular mass of GPI was 120 kDa as estimated by gel filtration, while on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), two subunits (55 and 65 kDa) were identified, suggesting that it is a heterodimer. Interestingly, GPI revealed specific inhibitory activity toward a myofibril-bound serine proteinase (MBSP) from crucian carp, while no inhibitory activity was identified toward other serine proteinases, such as white croaker MBSP and crucian carp trypsin. Kinetic analysis showed that GPI is a competitive inhibitor toward MBSP, and the K(i) was 0.32 microM. Our present results indicated that the multifunctional protein GPI is an endogenous inhibitor to MBSP and may play a significant role in the regulation of muscular protein metabolism in vivo.

  20. Evidence that adrenal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase can effect microsomal P450 cytochrome steroidogenic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Foster, Christy A; Mick, Gail J; Wang, Xudong; McCormick, Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    The role of adrenal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in providing reducing equivalents to P450 cytochrome steroidogenic enzymes in the endoplasmic reticulum is uncertain. Hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase resides in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and co-localizes with the bidirectional enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1. Hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase likely provides 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 with NADPH electrons via channeling. Intracellularly, two compartmentalized reactions generate NADPH upon oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate: cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and microsomal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because some endoplasmic reticulum enzymes require an electron donor (NADPH), it is conceivable that hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase serves in this capacity for these pathways. Besides 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, we examined whether hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase generates reduced pyridine nucleotide for pivotal adrenal microsomal P450 enzymes. 21-hydroxylase activity was increased with glucose-6-phosphate and, also, glucose and glucosamine-6-phosphate. The latter two substrates are only metabolized by hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, indicating that requisite NADPH for 21-hydroxylase activity was not via glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Moreover, dihydroepiandrostenedione, a non-competitive inhibitor of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, but not hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, did not curtail activation by glucose-6-phosphate. Finally, the most compelling observation was that the microsomal glucose-6-phosphate transport inhibitor, chlorogenic acid, blunted the activation by glucose-6-phosphate of both 21-hydroxylase and 17-hydroxylase indicating that luminal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase can supply NADPH for these enzymes. Analogous kinetic observations were found with microsomal 17-hydroxylase. These findings indicate that hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase can be a source, but not exclusively so, of NADPH

  1. Regulatory mechanism of the three-component system HptRSA in glucose-6-phosphate uptake in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifan; Sun, Haipeng; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Mingxing; Xue, Ting; Sun, Baolin

    2016-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) is a common alternative carbon source for various bacteria, and its uptake usually relies on the hexose phosphate antiporter UhpT. In the human pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, the ability to utilize different nutrients, particularly alternative carbon source uptake in glucose-limiting conditions, is essential for its fitness in the host environment during the infectious process. It has been reported that G6P uptake in S. aureus is regulated by the three-component system HptRSA. When G6P is provided as the only carbon source, HptRSA could sense extracellular G6P and activate uhpT expression to facilitate G6P utilization. However, the regulatory mechanism of HptRSA is still unclear. In this study, we further investigated the HptRSA system in S. aureus. First, we confirmed that HptRSA is necessary for the normal growth of this pathogen in chemically defined medium with G6P supplementation, and we discovered that HptRSA could exclusively sense extracellular G6P compared to the other organophosphates we tested. Next, using isothermal titration calorimetry, we found that HptA could bind to G6P, suggesting that it may be the G6P sensor. After that experiment, using an electrophoresis mobility shift assay, we verified that the response regulator HptR could directly bind to the uhpT promoter and identified a putative binding site from -67 to -96-bp. Subsequently, we created different point mutations in the putative binding site and revealed that the entire 30-bp sequence is essential for HptR regulation. In summary, we unveiled the regulatory mechanism of the HptRSA system in S. aureus, HptA most likely functions as the G6P sensor, and HptR could implement its regulatory function by directly binding to a conserved, approximately 30-bp sequence in the uhpT promoter.

  2. Glucose-induced glycogenesis in the liver involves the glucose-6-phosphate-dependent dephosphorylation of glycogen synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Cadefau, J; Bollen, M; Stalmans, W

    1997-01-01

    Non-metabolized glucose derivatives may cause inactivation of phosphorylase but, unlike glucose, they are unable to elicit activation of glycogen synthase in isolated hepatocytes. We report here that, after the previous inactivation of phosphorylase by one of these glucose derivatives (2-deoxy-2-fluoro-alpha-glucosyl fluoride), glycogen synthase was progressively activated by addition of increasing concentrations of glucose. Under these conditions, the degree of activation of glycogen synthase was linearly correlated with the intracellular glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) concentration. Addition of glucosamine, an inhibitor of glucokinase, decreased both parameters in parallel. Further experiments using an inhibitor of either protein kinases (5-iodotubercidin) or protein phosphatases (microcystin) in isolated hepatocytes indicated that Glc-6-P does not affect glycogen-synthase kinase activity but enhances the glycogen-synthase phosphatase reaction. Experiments in vitro showed that the synthase phosphatase activity of glycogen-bound type-1 protein phosphatase was increased by physiological concentrations of Glc-6-P (0.1-0.5 mM), but not by 2.5 mM fructose-6-P, fructose-1-P or glucose-1-P. At physiological ionic strength, the glycogen-associated synthase phosphatase activity was nearly entirely Glc-6-P-dependent, but Glc-6-P did not relieve the strong inhibitory effect of phosphorylase a. The large stimulatory effects of 2.5 mM Glc-6-P, with glycogen synthase b and phosphorylase a as substrates, appeared to be mostly substrate-directed, while the modest effects observed with casein and histone IIA pointed to an additional stimulation of glycogen-bound protein phosphatase-1 by Glc-6-P. We conclude that glucose elicits hepatic synthase phosphatase activity both by removal of the inhibitor, phosphorylase a, and by generation of the stimulator, Glc-6-P. PMID:9148744

  3. Glucose-induced glycogenesis in the liver involves the glucose-6-phosphate-dependent dephosphorylation of glycogen synthase.

    PubMed

    Cadefau, J; Bollen, M; Stalmans, W

    1997-03-15

    Non-metabolized glucose derivatives may cause inactivation of phosphorylase but, unlike glucose, they are unable to elicit activation of glycogen synthase in isolated hepatocytes. We report here that, after the previous inactivation of phosphorylase by one of these glucose derivatives (2-deoxy-2-fluoro-alpha-glucosyl fluoride), glycogen synthase was progressively activated by addition of increasing concentrations of glucose. Under these conditions, the degree of activation of glycogen synthase was linearly correlated with the intracellular glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) concentration. Addition of glucosamine, an inhibitor of glucokinase, decreased both parameters in parallel. Further experiments using an inhibitor of either protein kinases (5-iodotubercidin) or protein phosphatases (microcystin) in isolated hepatocytes indicated that Glc-6-P does not affect glycogen-synthase kinase activity but enhances the glycogen-synthase phosphatase reaction. Experiments in vitro showed that the synthase phosphatase activity of glycogen-bound type-1 protein phosphatase was increased by physiological concentrations of Glc-6-P (0.1-0.5 mM), but not by 2.5 mM fructose-6-P, fructose-1-P or glucose-1-P. At physiological ionic strength, the glycogen-associated synthase phosphatase activity was nearly entirely Glc-6-P-dependent, but Glc-6-P did not relieve the strong inhibitory effect of phosphorylase a. The large stimulatory effects of 2.5 mM Glc-6-P, with glycogen synthase b and phosphorylase a as substrates, appeared to be mostly substrate-directed, while the modest effects observed with casein and histone IIA pointed to an additional stimulation of glycogen-bound protein phosphatase-1 by Glc-6-P. We conclude that glucose elicits hepatic synthase phosphatase activity both by removal of the inhibitor, phosphorylase a, and by generation of the stimulator, Glc-6-P.

  4. Endothelial inflammation induced by excess glucose is associated with cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate but not increased mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Ian R; Gilbert, Merle; Maloney, Ezekiel; Hockenbery, David M.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Kim, Francis

    2009-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose levels suppresses responses to insulin, including induction of endothelial nitric oxide synthetase activity, through pro-inflammatory signaling via the IKKβ-NF-κB pathway. In the current study, we aimed to identify metabolic responses to glucose excess that mediate endothelial cell inflammation and insulin resistance. Since endothelial cells decrease their rate of oxygen consumption (OCR) in response to glucose, we hypothesized that increased mitochondrial function would not mediate these cell’s response to excess substrate. Methods The effects of glycolytic and mitochondrial fuels on metabolic intermediates and end products of glycolytic and oxidative metabolism, including glucose-6 phosphate (G6P), lactate, CO2, NAD(P)H, and OCR, were measured in cultured human microvascular endothelial cells and correlated with IKKβ activation. Results In response to increases in glucose concentration from low to physiological levels (0 to 5 mM), production of G6P, lactate, NAD(P)H and CO2 each increased as expected, while OCR was sharply reduced. IKKβ activation was detected at glucose concentrations above 5 mM, which was associated with parallel increases of G6P levels, whereas downstream metabolic pathways were insensitive to excess substrate. Conclusions/interpretation Activation of IKKβ by excess glucose correlates with increased levels of the glycolytic intermediate G6P, but not with lactate generation or OCR, which are inhibited well below saturation levels at physiologic glucose concentrations. These findings suggest that oxidative stress due to increased mitochondrial respiration is unlikely to mediate endothelial inflammation induced by excess glucose and suggests instead the involvement of G6P accumulation in the adverse effects of hyperglycemia on endothelial cells. PMID:19219423

  5. One-step purification and immobilization of thermophilic polyphosphate glucokinase from Thermobifida fusca YX: glucose-6-phosphate generation without ATP.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hehuan; Myung, Suwan; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2012-02-01

    The discovery of stable and active polyphosphate glucokinase (PPGK, EC 2.7.1.63) would be vital to cascade enzyme biocatalysis that does not require a costly ATP input. An open reading frame Tfu_1811 from Thermobifida fusca YX encoding a putative PPGK was cloned and the recombinant protein fused with a family 3 cellulose-binding module (CBM-PPGK) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Mg²⁺ was an indispensible activator. This enzyme exhibited the highest activity in the presence of 4 mM Mg²⁺ at 55°C and pH 9.0. Under its suboptimal conditions (pH 7.5), the k (cat) and K(m) values of CBM-PPGK on glucose were 96.9 and 39.7 s⁻¹ as well as 0.77 and 0.45 mM at 37°C and 50°C respectively. The thermoinactivation of CBM-PPGK was independent of its mass concentration. Through one-step enzyme purification and immobilization on a high-capacity regenerated amorphous cellulose, immobilized CBM-PPGK had an approximately eightfold half lifetime enhancement (i.e., t(1/2) = 120 min) as compared to free enzyme at 50°C. To our limited knowledge, this enzyme was the first thermostable PPGK reported. Free PPGK and immobilized CBM-PPGK had total turnover number values of 126,000 and 961,000 mol product per mol enzyme, respectively, suggesting their great potential in glucose-6-phosphate generation based on low-cost polyphosphate.

  6. Time course of radiolabeled 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate turnover in cerebral cortex of goats

    SciTech Connect

    Pelligrino, D.A.; Miletich, D.J.; Albrecht, R.F.

    1987-02-01

    The vivo dephosphorylation rate of 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate (DGP) in the cerebral cortex of goats injected intravenously with radiolabeled 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DG) was investigated. Serial rapidly frozen samples of parietal cortical gray tissue were obtained at regular intervals over time periods from 45 min to 3 h in awake goats or in paralyzed and artificially ventilated goats maintained under 70% N/sub 2/O or pentobarbital sodium anesthesia. The samples were analyzed for glucose content and separate DG and DGP activities. The rate parameters for phosphorylation (k/sup *//sub 4/) and dephosphorylation (k/sup *//sub 4/) were estimated in each animal. The glucose phosphorylation rate (PR) was calculated over the intervals 3-5 (or 6), 3-10, 3-20, 3-30, and 3-45 min, assuming k/sup *//sub 4/ = O. As the evaluation period was extended beyond 10 min, the calculated PR became increasingly less when compared with that calculated over the 3- to 5- (or 6) min interval (PR/sub i/). Furthermore, as metabolic activity decreased, the magnitude of the error increased such that at 45 min pentobarbital-anesthetize goats underestimated the PR/sub i/ by 46.5% compared with only 23.1 in N/sub 2/O-anesthetized goats. This was also reflected in the >twofold higher k/sup *//sub 4//k/sup *//sub 3/ ratio in the pentobarbital vs. N/sub 2/O-anesthetized group. It is concluded that when using the DG method in the goat, DGP dephosphorylation cannot be ignored when employing >10-min evaluation periods.

  7. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guidelines for Rasburicase Therapy in the context of G6PD Deficiency Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Relling, Mary V.; McDonagh, Ellen M.; Chang, Tamara; Caudle, Kelly E.; McLeod, Howard L.; Haidar, Cyrine E.; Klein, Teri; Luzzatto, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is associated with development of acute hemolytic anemia (AHA) induced by a number of drugs. We provide guidance as to which G6PD genotypes are associated with G6PD deficiency in males and females. Rasburicase is contraindicated in G6PD deficient patients due to the risk of AHA and possibly methemoglobinemia. Unless preemptive genotyping has established a positive diagnosis of G6PD deficiency, quantitative enzyme assay remains the mainstay of screening prior to rasburicase use. PMID:24787449

  8. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  9. G6pd Deficiency Does Not Affect the Cytosolic Glutathione or Thioredoxin Antioxidant Defense in Mouse Cochlea.

    PubMed

    White, Karessa; Kim, Mi-Jung; Ding, Dalian; Han, Chul; Park, Hyo-Jin; Meneses, Zaimary; Tanokura, Masaru; Linser, Paul; Salvi, Richard; Someya, Shinichi

    2017-06-07

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway; it catalyzes the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to 6-phosphogluconate and NADP(+) to NADPH and is thought to be the principal source of NADPH for the cytosolic glutathione and thioredoxin antioxidant defense systems. We investigated the roles of G6PD in the cytosolic antioxidant defense in the cochlea of G6pd hypomorphic mice that were backcrossed onto normal-hearing CBA/CaJ mice. Young G6pd-deficient mice displayed a significant decrease in cytosolic G6PD protein levels and activities in the inner ears. However, G6pd deficiency did not affect the cytosolic NADPH redox state, or glutathione or thioredoxin antioxidant defense in the inner ears. No histological abnormalities or oxidative damage was observed in the cochlea of G6pd hemizygous males or homozygous females. Furthermore, G6pd deficiency did not affect auditory brainstem response hearing thresholds, wave I amplitudes or wave I latencies in young males or females. In contrast, G6pd deficiency resulted in increased activities and protein levels of cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase 1, an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate and NADP(+) to NADPH, in the inner ear. In a mouse inner ear cell line, knockdown of Idh1, but not G6pd, decreased cell growth rates, cytosolic NADPH levels, and thioredoxin reductase activities. Therefore, under normal physiological conditions, G6pd deficiency does not affect the cytosolic glutathione or thioredoxin antioxidant defense in mouse cochlea. Under G6pd deficiency conditions, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 likely functions as the principal source of NADPH for cytosolic antioxidant defense in the cochlea.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway; it catalyzes the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to 6-phosphogluconate and NADP(+) to NADPH and

  10. Glycogen storage disease type 1b: an early onset severe phenotype associated with a novel mutation (IVS4) in the glucose 6-phosphate translocase (SLC37A4) gene in a Turkish patient.

    PubMed

    Oguz, M M; Aykan, E; Yilmaz, G; Aytekin, C; Karaer, K; Açoğlu, E A

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) is a group of autosomal recessive disorders that include types Ia and Ib. GSD-Ib is caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) caused by a mutation in the SLC37A4 gene coding for G6PT. Glycogen storage disease is characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver and chronic neutropenia. Herein we describe a 4-month-old Turkish patient with early onset and severe typical clinical features of GSD-1b in which a novel mutation in the SLC37A4 gene was detected. After the bone marrow examination parenteral antibiotic therapy and subcutaneous granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were started. Due to the severe neutropenia the patient had developed nosocomial sepsis and the dose of G-CSF was increased. After 2 months later from the initial treatment of the G-CSF he developed splenomegaly and urinary complications. Despite maximal therapy he had an extremely poor quality of life and life-threatening complications due to impaired bone marrow function. As the patient required continual hospitalization he was schedule for bone marrow transplantation.

  11. The Two Km's for ATP of Corn-Root H+-ATPase and the Use of Glucose-6-Phosphate and Hexokinase as an ATP-Regenerating System.

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, R. S.; Caldeira, M. T.; Arruda, P.; De Meis, L.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles derived from corn (Zea mays L.) roots retain a membrane-bound H+-ATPase that is able to form a H+ gradient across the vesicle membranes. The activity of this ATPase is enhanced 2- to 3-fold when Triton X-100 or lysophosphatidylcholine is added to the medium at a protein:detergent ratio of 2:1 (w/w). In the absence of detergent, the ATPase exhibits only one Km for ATP (0.1-0.2 mM), which is the same as for the pumping of H+. After the addition of either Triton X-100 or lysophosphatidylcholine, two Km's for ATP are detected, one in the range of 1 to 3 [mu]M and a second in the range of 0.1 to 0.2 mM. The Vmax of the second Km for ATP increases as the temperature of the assay medium is raised from 15[deg]C to 38[deg]C. The Arrhenius plot reveals a single break at 30[deg]C, both in the absence and in the presence of detergents. In the presence of Triton X-100 the H+-ATPase catalyzes the cleavage of glucose-6-phosphate when both hexokinase and ADP are included in the assay medium. There is no measurable cleavage when the apparent affinity for ATP of the H+-ATPase is not enhanced by Triton X-100 or when 1 mM glucose is included in the assay medium. These data indicate that when the high-affinity Km for ATP is unmasked with the use of detergent, the ATPase can use glucose-6-phosphate and hexokinase as an ATP-regenerating system. PMID:12232248

  12. Antisense inhibition of the plastidial glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator in Vicia seeds shifts cellular differentiation and promotes protein storage.

    PubMed

    Rolletschek, Hardy; Nguyen, Thuy H; Häusler, Rainer E; Rutten, Twan; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Radchuk, Ruslana; Tewes, Annegret; Claus, Bernhard; Klukas, Christian; Linemann, Ute; Weber, Hans; Wobus, Ulrich; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2007-08-01

    The glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator (GPT) acts as an importer of carbon into the plastid. Despite the potential importance of GPT for storage in crop seeds, its regulatory role in biosynthetic pathways that are active during seed development is poorly understood. We have isolated GPT1 from Vicia narbonensis and studied its role in seed development using a transgenic approach based on the seed-specific legumin promoter LeB4. GPT1 is highly expressed in vegetative sink tissues, flowers and young seeds. In the embryo, localized upregulation of GPT1 at the onset of storage coincides with the onset of starch accumulation. Embryos of transgenic plants expressing antisense GPT1 showed a significant reduction (up to 55%) in the specific transport rate of glucose-6-phosphate as determined using proteoliposomes prepared from embryos. Furthermore, amyloplasts developed later and were smaller in size, while the expression of genes encoding plastid-specific translocators and proteins involved in starch biosynthesis was decreased. Metabolite analysis and stable isotope labelling demonstrated that starch biosynthesis was also reduced, although storage protein biosynthesis increased. This metabolic shift was characterized by upregulation of genes related to nitrogen uptake and protein storage, morphological variation of the protein-storing vacuoles, and a crude protein content of mature seeds of transgenics that was up to 30% higher than in wild-type. These findings provide evidence that (1) the prevailing level of GPT1 abundance/activity is rate-limiting for the synthesis of starch in developing seeds, (2) GPT1 exerts a controlling function on assimilate partitioning into storage protein, and (3) GPT1 is essential for the differentiation of embryonic plastids and seed maturation.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... down proteins from food into smaller parts called amino acids. Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for ... methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency cannot process a particular amino acid called isoleucine. Most cases of 2-methylbutyryl-CoA ...

  14. Quantitative Analysis of X Chromosome Effects on the Activities of the Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Naohiko; Laurie-Ahlberg, Cathy C.; Wilton, Alan N.; Emigh, Ted H.

    1986-01-01

    By combining 20 X chromosomes with five autosomal backgrounds, the relative importance of these factors with respect to the activity variations of G6PD and 6PGD in Drosophila melanogaster were investigated. Analysis of variance revealed that there exist significant X chromosome, autosomal background and genetic interaction effects. The effect of the X chromosome was due mainly to the two allozymic forms of each enzyme, but some within-allozyme effects were also detected. From the estimated variance components, it was concluded that the variation attributed to the autosomal background is much larger than the variation attributed to the X chromosome, even when the effect of the allozymes is included. The segregation of the allozymes seems to account for about 10% of the total activity variation of each enzyme. The variation due to the interaction between the X chromosome and the autosomal background is much smaller than variations attributed either to the X chromosome or to the autosomal background. The interaction effect is indicated by the change of the ranking of the X chromosomes for different autosomal backgrounds. Highly significant and positive correlation between G6PD and 6PGD activities was detected. Again, the contribution of the autosomal background to the correlation was much larger than that attributed to the X chromosome. PMID:3087815

  15. Functional analysis of PsG6PDH, a cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from Populus suaveolens, and its contribution to cold tolerance improvement in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuanzhen; Lin, Shanzhi; Guo, Hai; Zhang, Zhiyi; Chen, Xiaoyang

    2013-09-01

    A 1,697-bp cDNA sequence, designated as PsG6PDH, was amplified from Populus suaveolens. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicated that PsG6PDH encodes a cytosolic G6PDH isoform, with Southern blot analysis demonstrating that the gene is single or low copy in Populus. Transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing PsG6PDH exhibited enhanced cold tolerance. In both transgenic and wild-type (WT) tobacco plants, cold stress increased leaf malondialdehyde (MDA) content, electrolyte leakage (EL), and peroxide (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities; relative to WT, however, transgenic lines had lower MDA content and EL and higher SOD and POD activities. In addition, PsG6PDH activated the expression of stress-related genes, including NtERD10b, NtERD10c, and NtSOD, in tobacco plants. Our results provide evidence regarding PsG6PDH regulatory function in plants during low temperature stress.

  16. Serine Arginine Splicing Factor 3 Is Involved in Enhanced Splicing of Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase RNA in Response to Nutrients and Hormones in Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Callee M.; Suchanek, Amanda L.; Cyphert, Travis J.; Kohan, Alison B.; Szeszel-Fedorowicz, Wioletta; Salati, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Expression of G6PD is controlled by changes in the degree of splicing of the G6PD mRNA in response to nutrients in the diet. This regulation involves an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) in exon 12 of the mRNA. Using the G6PD model, we demonstrate that nutrients and hormones control the activity of serine-arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of splicing co-activators, and thereby regulate the splicing of G6PD mRNA. In primary rat hepatocyte cultures, insulin increased the amount of phosphorylated SR proteins, and this effect was counteracted by arachidonic acid. The results of RNA affinity analysis with nuclear extracts from intact liver demonstrated that the SR splicing factor proteins SRSF3 and SRSF4 bound to the G6PD ESE. Consequently, siRNA-mediated depletion of SRSF3, but not SRSF4, in liver cells inhibited accumulation of both mRNA expressed from a minigene containing exon 12 and the endogenous G6PD mRNA. Consistent with the functional role of SRSF3 in regulating splicing, SRSF3 was observed to bind to the ESE in both intact cells and in animals using RNA immunoprecipitation analysis. Furthermore, refeeding significantly increased the binding of SRSF3 coincident with increased splicing and expression of G6PD. Together, these data establish that nutritional regulation of SRSF3 activity is involved in the differential splicing of the G6PD transcript in response to nutrients. Nutritional regulation of other SR proteins presents a regulatory mechanism that could cause widespread changes in mRNA splicing. Nutrients are therefore novel regulators of mRNA splicing. PMID:23233666

  17. The effects of salt stress cause a diversion of basal metabolism in barley roots: possible different roles for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Cardi, Manuela; Castiglia, Daniela; Ferrara, Myriam; Guerriero, Gea; Chiurazzi, Maurizio; Esposito, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    In this study the effects of salt stress and nitrogen assimilation have been investigated in roots of hydroponically-grown barley plants exposed to 150 mM NaCl, in presence or absence of ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. Salt stress determines a diversion of root metabolism towards the synthesis of osmolytes, such as glycine betaine and proline, and increased levels of reduced glutathione. The metabolic changes triggered by salt stress result in a decrease in both activities and protein abundance of key enzymes, namely GOGAT and PEP carboxylase, and in a slight increase in HSP70. These variations would enhance the requirement for reductants supplied by the OPPP, consistently with the observed increase in total G6PDH activity. The involvement and occurrence of the different G6PDH isoforms have been investigated, and the kinetic properties of partially purified cytosolic and plastidial G6PDHs determined. Bioinformatic analyses examining co-expression profiles of G6PDHs in Arabidopsis and barley corroborate the data presented. Moreover, the gene coding for the root P2-G6PDH isoform was fully sequenced; the biochemical properties of the corresponding protein were examined experimentally. The results are discussed in the light of the possible distinct roles and regulation of the different G6PDH isoforms during salt stress in barley roots. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential sensitivity of male and female mouse embryos to oxidative induced heat-stress is mediated by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Crespo, M; Ramírez, M A; Fernández-González, R; Rizos, D; Lonergan, P; Pintado, B; Gutiérrez-Adán, A

    2005-12-01

    During the preimplantation period, in vitro cultured males have a higher metabolic rate, different gene expression, and grow faster than females. It has been suggested that under some stress conditions male embryos are more vulnerable than females; however, the biological fragility of male embryos is little understood. Since many forms of stress result in the overproduction of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), we addressed the hypothesis that the connection between female advantage during early developmental stages and heat stress involves ROS and differential gene expression of G6PD, an X-linked gene related to oxidative stress. We have found that after compaction, female heat-stressed embryos have less relative amounts of H2O2 than males, and female embryos survive better than males under in vivo or in vitro heat stress situations. In addition, in vitro produced female embryos grow slower than male embryos, have differential mRNA transcription of G6PD and also of some genes situated on autosomal-chromosomes (Sox, Bax, and Oct-4). Moreover, by inhibiting G6PD, all differences generated by oxidative stress between male and female embryos disappear. For the first time, we provide an experimental demonstration of a mechanism that explains why following exposure to heat stress-induced ROS, female preimplantation embryos are more resistant than males.

  19. Serine arginine splicing factor 3 is involved in enhanced splicing of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase RNA in response to nutrients and hormones in liver.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Callee M; Suchanek, Amanda L; Cyphert, Travis J; Kohan, Alison B; Szeszel-Fedorowicz, Wioletta; Salati, Lisa M

    2013-01-25

    Expression of G6PD is controlled by changes in the degree of splicing of the G6PD mRNA in response to nutrients in the diet. This regulation involves an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) in exon 12 of the mRNA. Using the G6PD model, we demonstrate that nutrients and hormones control the activity of serine-arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of splicing co-activators, and thereby regulate the splicing of G6PD mRNA. In primary rat hepatocyte cultures, insulin increased the amount of phosphorylated SR proteins, and this effect was counteracted by arachidonic acid. The results of RNA affinity analysis with nuclear extracts from intact liver demonstrated that the SR splicing factor proteins SRSF3 and SRSF4 bound to the G6PD ESE. Consequently, siRNA-mediated depletion of SRSF3, but not SRSF4, in liver cells inhibited accumulation of both mRNA expressed from a minigene containing exon 12 and the endogenous G6PD mRNA. Consistent with the functional role of SRSF3 in regulating splicing, SRSF3 was observed to bind to the ESE in both intact cells and in animals using RNA immunoprecipitation analysis. Furthermore, refeeding significantly increased the binding of SRSF3 coincident with increased splicing and expression of G6PD. Together, these data establish that nutritional regulation of SRSF3 activity is involved in the differential splicing of the G6PD transcript in response to nutrients. Nutritional regulation of other SR proteins presents a regulatory mechanism that could cause widespread changes in mRNA splicing. Nutrients are therefore novel regulators of mRNA splicing.

  20. Disturbed hepatic carbohydrate management during high metabolic demand in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD)-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Herrema, Hilde; Derks, Terry G J; van Dijk, Theo H; Bloks, Vincent W; Gerding, Albert; Havinga, Rick; Tietge, Uwe J F; Müller, Michael; Smit, G Peter A; Kuipers, Folkert; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan

    2008-06-01

    Medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase (MCAD) catalyzes crucial steps in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, a process that is of key relevance for maintenance of energy homeostasis, especially during high metabolic demand. To gain insight into the metabolic consequences of MCAD deficiency under these conditions, we compared hepatic carbohydrate metabolism in vivo in wild-type and MCAD(-/-) mice during fasting and during a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute phase response (APR). MCAD(-/-) mice did not become more hypoglycemic on fasting or during the APR than wild-type mice did. Nevertheless, microarray analyses revealed increased hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (Pgc-1alpha) and decreased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (Ppar alpha) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (Pdk4) expression in MCAD(-/-) mice in both conditions, suggesting altered control of hepatic glucose metabolism. Quantitative flux measurements revealed that the de novo synthesis of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) was not affected on fasting in MCAD(-/-) mice. During the APR, however, this flux was significantly decreased (-20%) in MCAD(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. Remarkably, newly formed G6P was preferentially directed toward glycogen in MCAD(-/-) mice under both conditions. Together with diminished de novo synthesis of G6P, this led to a decreased hepatic glucose output during the APR in MCAD(-/-) mice; de novo synthesis of G6P and hepatic glucose output were maintained in wild-type mice under both conditions. APR-associated hypoglycemia, which was observed in wild-type mice as well as MCAD(-/-) mice, was mainly due to enhanced peripheral glucose uptake. Our data demonstrate that MCAD deficiency in mice leads to specific changes in hepatic carbohydrate management on exposure to metabolic stress. This deficiency, however, does not lead to reduced de novo synthesis of G6P during fasting alone, which may be due to the

  1. Expanding the clinical spectrum of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaie, L.; Klomp, L. W. J.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. E.; Spaapen, L. J. M.; Haagen, A. A. M.; Dorland, L.

    2010-01-01

    3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency is considered to be a rare cause of congenital microcephaly, infantile onset of intractable seizures and severe psychomotor retardation. Here, we report for the first time a very mild form of genetically confirmed 3-PGDH deficiency in two siblings with juvenile onset of absence seizures and mild developmental delay. Amino acid analysis showed serine values in CSF and plasma identical to what is observed in the severe infantile form. Both patients responded favourably to relatively low dosages of serine supplementation with cessation of seizures, normalisation of their EEG abnormalities and improvement of well-being and behaviour. These cases illustrate that 3-PGDH deficiency can present with mild symptoms and should be considered as a treatable disorder in the differential diagnosis of mild developmental delay and seizures. Synopsis: we present a novel mild phenotype in patients with 3-PGDH deficiency. PMID:21113737

  2. The chemopreventive properties of chlorogenic acid reveal a potential new role for the microsomal glucose-6-phosphate translocase in brain tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Belkaid, Anissa; Currie, Jean-Christophe; Desgagnés, Julie; Annabi, Borhane

    2006-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid (CHL), the most potent functional inhibitor of the microsomal glucose-6-phosphate translocase (G6PT), is thought to possess cancer chemopreventive properties. It is not known, however, whether any G6PT functions are involved in tumorigenesis. We investigated the effects of CHL and the potential role of G6PT in regulating the invasive phenotype of brain tumor-derived glioma cells. Results RT-PCR was used to show that, among the adult and pediatric brain tumor-derived cells tested, U-87 glioma cells expressed the highest levels of G6PT mRNA. U-87 cells lacked the microsomal catalytic subunit glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase)-α but expressed G6Pase-β which, when coupled to G6PT, allows G6P hydrolysis into glucose to occur in non-glyconeogenic tissues such as brain. CHL inhibited U-87 cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 secretion, two prerequisites for tumor cell invasion. Moreover, CHL also inhibited cell migration induced by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a potent mitogen for glioblastoma multiform cells, as well as the rapid, S1P-induced extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylation potentially mediated through intracellular calcium mobilization, suggesting that G6PT may also perform crucial functions in regulating intracellular signalling. Overexpression of the recombinant G6PT protein induced U-87 glioma cell migration that was, in turn, antagonized by CHL. MMP-2 secretion was also inhibited by the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-depleting agents 2-deoxyglucose and 5-thioglucose, a mechanism that may inhibit ATP-mediated calcium sequestration by G6PT. Conclusion We illustrate a new G6PT function in glioma cells that could regulate the intracellular signalling and invasive phenotype of brain tumor cells, and that can be targeted by the anticancer properties of CHL. PMID:16566826

  3. Anti-citrullinated glucose-6-phosphate isomerase peptide antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are associated with HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles and disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Umeda, N; Matsumoto, I; Ito, I; Kawasaki, A; Tanaka, Y; Inoue, A; Tsuboi, H; Suzuki, T; Hayashi, T; Ito, S; Tsuchiya, N; Sumida, T

    2013-01-01

    To identify and characterize anti-citrullinated glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) peptide antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nine GPI arginine-bearing peptides in human GPI protein were selected and cyclic citrullinated GPI peptides (CCG-1–9) were constructed. Samples were obtained from RA (n = 208), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (n = 101), Sjögren's syndrome (SS; n = 101) and healthy controls (n = 174). Antibodies against CCG-1–9 were measured, and anti-citrullinated α-enolase-1 (CEP-1), -cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCP) and -GPI proteins antibodies were also examined. Patients with RA were genotyped for HLA-DRB1. The numbers of shared epitope (SE) alleles were counted and compared with those of the autoantibodies. Rabbit GPI was citrullinated with rabbit peptidylarginine deiminase and immunoblot analysis of RA sera performed. The levels of autoantibodies were compared before and after treatment with TNF antagonists in 58 RA patients. Anti-CCG-2, -4 and -7 antibodies were detected in 25·5, 33·2 and 37·0% patients with RA, respectively, and these antibodies were very specific for RA (specificity, 98·1–99·7%). Altogether, 44·2, 86·1 and 13·9% of RA sera were positive for anti-CEP-1, -CCP and -GPI protein antibodies, respectively. Anti-CCG-2, -4 and -7 antibodies were correlated with anti-CCP and anti-CEP-1 antibodies and with the presence of HLA-DRB1 SE alleles. Citrullinated GPI protein was detected using RA sera. Treatment with tumour necrosis factor antagonists reduced significantly the levels of anti-CCG-2 and -7 but not of anti-CEP-1 antibodies. This is the first report documenting the presence of anti-CCG antibodies in RA. Anti-CCG-2 and -7 antibodies could be considered as markers for the diagnosis of RA and its disease activity. PMID:23480184

  4. Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) but not Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSDIb) is associated to an increased risk of metabolic syndrome: possible role of microsomal glucose 6-phosphate accumulation.

    PubMed

    Melis, Daniela; Rossi, Alessandro; Pivonello, Rosario; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Balivo, Francesca; Spadarella, Simona; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Casa, Roberto Della; Formisano, Pietro; Andria, Generoso; Colao, Annamaria; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2015-07-29

    In GSDIa, glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); in GSDIb, G6P levels are reduced in ER. G6P availability directly modulates the activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1), an ER-bound enzyme playing a key role in the development of the metabolic syndrome (MS). To evaluate the prevalence of MS and Insulin Resistance (IR) in GSDIa and GSDIb patients. This was a prospective study. All the enrolled patients were followed at the Department of Pediatrics "Federico II" University of Naples for 10 years. Clinical and biochemical parameters of MS and the presence of IR were recorded. The results were correlated with the biochemical parameters of GSDI-related metabolic control. 10 GSDIa patient (median age 12.10 ± 1.50), 7 GSDIb patients (median age 14.90 ± 2.20 were enrolled in the study. They were compared to 20 and 14 age and sex matched controls, respectively. 10 GSDIa patients (median age 24.60 ± 1.50) and 6 GSDIb patients (median age 25.10 ± 2.00) completed the 10-year-follow-up. At the end of the study the patients' data were compared to 10 and 6 age and sex matched controls, respectively. At study entry, 20 % GSDIa patients had MS and 80 % showed 2 criteria for MS. GSDIa patients showed higher HOMA-IR than controls and GSDIb patients (p < 0.001, p < 0.05), respectively. Baseline ISI was lower in GSDIa than controls (p < 0.001). QUICKI was significantly lower in GSDIa than in controls (p < 0.001). At the end of the study 70 % of GSDIa patients had MS and 30 % showed 2 criteria for MS. HOMA-IR was higher in GSDIa than controls (p < 0.01). Baseline ISI was higher in GSDIb than controls (p < 0.005) and GSD1a (p < 0.05). QUICKI was lower in GSD1a patients than in controls (p < 0.03). VAI was higher in GSDIa patients than controls (p < 0.001) and GSDIb patients (p = 0.002). Our data showed high prevalence of IR and MS in GSDIa patients. We speculate a

  5. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  6. Natural history of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency through adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Evan Cole; De Meulemeester, Christine; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Gibson, K. Michael; Torres, Carlos; Guberman, Alan; Salomons, Gajja S.; Jakobs, Cornelis; Ali-Ridha, Andre; Parviz, Mahsa; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The natural history of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency in adulthood is unknown; we elucidate the clinical manifestations of the disease later in life. Methods: A 63-year-old man with long-standing intellectual disability was diagnosed with SSADH deficiency following hospitalization for progressive decline, escalating seizures, and prolonged periods of altered consciousness. We present a detailed review of his clinical course and reviewed our SSADH deficiency database adult cohort to derive natural history information. Results: Of 95 patients in the database for whom age at diagnosis is recorded, there are 40 individuals currently aged 18 years or older. Only 3 patients were diagnosed after age 18 years. Of 25 adults for whom data are available after age 18, 60% have a history of epilepsy. Predominant seizure types are generalized tonic-clonic, absence, and myoclonic. EEGs showed background slowing or generalized epileptiform discharges in two-thirds of adults for whom EEG data were collected. History of psychiatric symptoms was prominent, with frequent anxiety, sleep disturbances, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Conclusions: We identified patients older than 18 years with SSADH deficiency in our database following identification and review of a patient diagnosed in the seventh decade of life. The illness had a progressive course with escalating seizures in the index case, with fatality at age 63. Diagnosis in adulthood is rare. Epilepsy is more common in the adult than the pediatric SSADH deficiency cohort; neuropsychiatric morbidity remains prominent. PMID:26268900

  7. Ketonic diet in the management of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Falk, R E; Cederbaum, S D; Blass, J P; Gibson, G E; Kark, R A; Carrel, R E

    1976-11-01

    Two brothers, aged 11 years 6 months and 2 years 3 months, with psychomotor and growth retardation, episodes of weakness, ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, and elevated levels of blood pyruvate were shown to have a deficiency in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH). When they ate a diet high enough in fats to cause ketonemia but not acidosis, there was a fall in blood pyruvate levels, a decrease in the frequency and severity of the episodes of neurological deterioration, an increased rate of growth and development in the younger brother, and increased strength and endurance in the older one. The possibility of dietary treatment makes the early diagnosis of PDH deficiency more important. Determination of blood pyruvate and lactate levels following a standard glucose meal (glucose-pyruvate test) appears to be the most reliable screening test for this condition.

  8. Thalassemia and G-6-PD Deficiency in Chinese-Canadians

    PubMed Central

    Gray, G. R.; Marion, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    Admission screening was performed on 684 Chinese-Canadian patients for thalassemia, abnormal hemoglobins and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency. Thirty-six healthy Chinese adults were also studied. The incidence of beta-thalassemia minor (hemoglobin A2 greater than 3.5%) was 3.8%. Presumptive alpha-thalassemia minor (demonstration of occasional red cells containing hemoglobin H inclusion bodies) was found in 6.7%. Two patients had findings consistent with alpha-beta-thalassemia. The incidence of G-6-PD deficiency (abnormal methemoglobin reduction test) in adult males was 4.7%. In a parallel study the incidence of hemoglobin Bart's in 310 Chinese newborns was 6.8%. Two mutant hemoglobins were found — hemoglobin E and hemoglobin J (Bangkok). PMID:5563348

  9. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activity in Normal and Deficient Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Kwan-Fu Rex; Hu, Chii-Whei C.; Utter, Merton F.

    1981-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity in human skin fibroblasts appears to be regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism, as is the case with other animal cells. The enzyme can be activated by pretreating the cells with dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, before they are disrupted for measurement of PDC activity. With such treatment, the activity reaches 5-6 nmol/min per mg of protein at 37°C with fibroblasts from infants. Such values represent an activation of about 5-20-fold over those observed with untreated cells. That this assay, based on [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation, represents a valid measurement of the overall PDC reaction is shown by the dependence of 14CO2 production on the presence of thiamin-PP, coenzyme A (CoA), Mg++, and NAD+. Also, it has been shown that acetyl-CoA and 14CO2 are formed in a 1:1 ratio. A similar degree of activation of PDC can also be achieved by adding purified pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase and high concentrations of Mg++ and Ca++, or in some cases by adding the metal ions alone to the cell homogenate after disruption. These results strongly suggest that activation is due to dephosphorylation. Addition of NaF, which inhibits dephosphorylation, leads to almost complete loss of PDC activity. Assays of completely activated PDC were performed on two cell lines originating from patients reported to be deficient in this enzyme (Blass, J. P., J. Avigan, and B. W. Ublendorf. 1970. J. Clin. Invest. 49: 423-432; Blass, J. P., J. D. Schuman, D. S. Young, and E. Ham. 1972. J. Clin. Invest. 51: 1545-1551). Even after activation with DCA, fibroblasts from the patients showed values of only 0.1 and 0.3 nmol/min per mg of protein. A familial study of one of these patients showed that both parents exhibited activity in fully activated cells about half that of normal values, whereas cells from a sibling appeared normal. These results demonstrate the inheritance nature of PDC deficiency

  10. Hereditary characteristics of enzyme deficiency and dermatoglyphics in congenital color blindness.

    PubMed

    Wu, L Z; Zeng, L H; Ma, Q Y; Xie, Y J; Chen, Y Z; Wu, D Z

    1988-01-01

    The hereditary characteristics of enzyme deficiency and dermatoglyphics in congenital color blindness (CCB) were studied. We propose that there is a linkage between the two loci on the X-chromosome determining CCB and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), based on our study of a high incidence of G6PD deficiency in 156 male cases with CCB. The CCB gene is closely linked with that of G6PD deficiency from our pedigree investigations. The rise in the frequency of eight or more whorls, the low value of atd angle and the presenting rate of real palmar patterns of the thenar, hypothenar and I, areas presented the hereditary traits of congenital color blindness.

  11. Incidence and Geographic Distribution of Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (SSADH) Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Attri, Savita Verma; Singhi, Pratibha; Wiwattanadittakul, Natrujee; Goswami, Jyotindra N; Sankhyan, Naveen; Salomons, Gajja S; Roullett, Jean-Baptiste; Hodgeman, Ryan; Parviz, Mahsa; Gibson, K Michael; Pearl, Phillip L

    2016-11-05

    The incidence of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of GABA degradation, is unknown. Upon a recent diagnosis of a new family of affected fraternal twins from the Punjabi ethnic group of India, case ascertainment from the literature and our database was done to determine the number of confirmed cases along with their geographic distribution. The probands presented with global developmental delay, infantile onset epilepsy, and a persistent neurodevelopmental disorder upon diagnosis at 10 years of age with intellectual disability, expressive aphasia, and behavioral problems most prominent for hyperactivity. Gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria and homozygous ALDH5A1 c.608C>T; p.Pro203Leu mutations were confirmed. Identification of all available individual cases with clinical details available including geographic or ethnic origin revealed 182 patients from 40 countries, with the largest number of patients reported from the USA (24%), Turkey (10%), China (7%), Saudi Arabia (6%), and Germany (5%). This study provides an accounting of all published cases of confirmed SSADH deficiency and provides data useful in planning further studies of this rare inborn error of metabolism.

  12. Biorhythms of activities of liver and blood dehydrogenases and changes in body weight of the rats feeding normal diet or excess of sugar substitutes.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Yu A; Volozhin, A I; Zubtsov, V A; Kichenko, S M

    2007-12-01

    Biorhythms with higher levels of activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in blood plasma, specific activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase in the liver, and body weight of rats were more pronounced in the spring-summer period than in the autumn-winter period. These specific features were revealed in animals feeding a normal diet or food with 54 and 27% sugar substitute sorbitol. However, specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the liver was higher in the autumn-winter period. Activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase in blood plasma increased by tens of times due to induction of sorbitol synthesis (substrate) in the liver. Sugar substitute xylitol is structurally similar to sorbitol, but is not the substrate for sorbitol dehydrogenase. However, the effect of xylitol on activities of lactate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the spring-summer period was similar to that of sorbitol.

  13. Screening for G6PD Deficiency Among Neonates with Neonatal Jaundice Admitted to Tertiary Care Center: A Need in Disguise.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kishwer; Sohaila, Arjumand; Tikmani, Shiyam Sunder; Khan, Iqtidar Ahmed; Zafar, Anila

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the association of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency among neonates admitted with jaundice at the neonatal intensive care unit, well baby nursery and neonatal step down nursery of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from January to June 2010. A total of 205 neonates following the selection criteria were included. All selected neonates have their venous blood drawn, saved in EDTA bottle and sent to laboratory of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH). The laboratory results of whether G-6-PD deficiency was present or not was recorded in the proforma. G-6-PD was deficient in 19 neonates (9.3%). All neonates were male.

  14. Energy substrate metabolism in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stenlid, Maria Halldin; Ahlsson, Fredrik; Forslund, Anders; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Gustafsson, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is an inherited disorder of carbohydrate metabolism, resulting in lactic acidosis and neurological dysfunction. In order to provide energy for the brain, a ketogenic diet has been tried. Both the disorder and the ketogenic therapy may influence energy production. The aim of the study was to assess hepatic glucose production, lipolysis and resting energy expenditure (REE) in an infant, given a ketogenic diet due to neonatal onset of the disease. Lipolysis and glucose production were determined for two consecutive time periods by constant-rate infusions of [1,1,2,3,3-²H₅]-glycerol and [6,6-²H²]-glucose. The boy had been fasting for 2.5 h at the start of the sampling periods. REE was estimated by indirect calorimetry. Rates of glucose production and lipolysis were increased compared with those of term neonates. REE corresponded to 60% of normal values. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was increased, indicating a predominance of glucose oxidation. Blood lactate was within the normal range. Several mechanisms may underlie the increased rates of glucose production and lipolysis. A ketogenic diet will result in a low insulin secretion and reduced peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity, leading to increased production of glucose and decreased peripheral glucose uptake. Surprisingly, RQ was high, indicating active glucose oxidation, which may reflect a residual enzyme activity, sufficient during rest. Considering this, a strict ketogenic diet might not be the optimal choice for patients with PDH deficiency. We propose an individualised diet for this group of patients aiming at the highest glucose intake that each patient will tolerate without elevated lactate levels.

  15. Riboflavin-responsive glutaryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Ronald A; Bain, Murray D; Zschocke, Johannes

    2006-05-01

    We report here riboflavin responsiveness in a patient with glutaryl CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) deficiency, compound heterozygous for the S139L and P248L mutations and with 20% residual GCDH enzyme activity in vitro. Our results suggest the mitochondrial GCDH homotetramer remains intact with one of these mutations associated with the binding site of the single FAD cofactor and that pharmacological doses of the cofactor precursor may be sufficient to induce an increase in activity in the mutant GCDH enzyme, although not sufficient to normalise urinary organic acid excretion. Serine139 is one of nine conserved amino acid residues that line the binding site of the protein and is in close proximity to both substrate and FAD cofactor. It is possible that steric alterations caused by substitution of serine with leucine at this position may be overcome with high cofactor concentrations. P248L is also associated with some residual GCDH activity in other patients and the unique combination of S139L with P248L may also explain the results in our patient. Responsiveness to riboflavin in our patient has been compared with two other patients with glutaric aciduria type 1 and minimal residual GCDH activity, one with homozygosity for the R257Q mutation and one with heterozygosity for the G354S mutation and a novel G156V mutation. A low lysine diet reduced glutaric acid excretion in our riboflavin-responsive GCDH-deficient patient almost to control values. She is now 21 years of age and clinically and neurologically normal.

  16. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids.

  17. An animal model of human aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Mann, J.; Yoshida, A.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic deficiency of ALDH2, a major mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, is intimately related to alcohol sensitivity and the degree of predisposition to alcoholic diseases in humans. The ultimate biological role of ALDH2 can be exposed by knocking out the ALDH2 gene in an animal model. As the first step for this line of studies, we cloned and characterized the ALDH2 gene from mouse C57/6J strain which is associated with a high alcohol preference. The gene spans 26 kbp and is composed of 13 exons. Embryonic stem cells were transfected with a replacement vector which contains a partially deleted exon3, a positive selection cassette (pPgk Neo), exon 4 with an artificial stop codon, exons 5, 6, 7, and a negative selection cassette (pMCI-Tk). Genomic DNAs prepared from drug resistant clones were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and by Southern blot analysis to distinguish random integration from homologous recombination. Out of 132 clones examined, 8 had undergone homologous recombination at one of the ALDH2 alleles. The cloned transformed embryonic stem cells with a disrupted ALDH2 allele were injected into blastocysts. Transplantation of the blastocysts into surrogate mother mice yielded chimeric mice. The role of ALDH2 in alcohol preference, alcohol sensitivity and other biological and behavioral characteristics can be elucidated by examining the heterozygous and homozygous mutant strains produced by breeding of chimeric mice.

  18. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency: lessons from mice and men.

    PubMed

    Pearl, P L; Gibson, K M; Cortez, M A; Wu, Y; Carter Snead, O; Knerr, I; Forester, K; Pettiford, J M; Jakobs, C; Theodore, W H

    2009-06-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, a disorder of GABA degradation with subsequent elevations in brain GABA and GHB, is a neurometabolic disorder with intellectual disability, epilepsy, hypotonia, ataxia, sleep disorders, and psychiatric disturbances. Neuroimaging reveals increased T2-weighted MRI signal usually affecting the globus pallidus, cerebellar dentate nucleus, and subthalamic nucleus, and often cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. EEG abnormalities are usually generalized spike-wave, consistent with a predilection for generalized epilepsy. The murine phenotype is characterized by failure-to-thrive, progressive ataxia, and a transition from generalized absence to tonic-clonic to ultimately fatal convulsive status epilepticus. Binding and electrophysiological studies demonstrate use-dependent downregulation of GABA(A) and (B) receptors in the mutant mouse. Translational human studies similarly reveal downregulation of GABAergic activity in patients, utilizing flumazenil-PET and transcranial magnetic stimulation for GABA(A) and (B) activity, respectively. Sleep studies reveal decreased stage REM with prolonged REM latencies and diminished percentage of stage REM. An ad libitum ketogenic diet was reported as effective in the mouse model, with unclear applicability to the human condition. Acute application of SGS-742, a GABA(B) antagonist, leads to improvement in epileptiform activity on electrocorticography. Promising mouse data using compounds available for clinical use, including taurine and SGS-742, form the framework for human trials.

  19. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient GISTs are characterized by IGF1R overexpression.

    PubMed

    Chou, Angela; Chen, Jason; Clarkson, Adele; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Hugh, Thomas J; Gill, Anthony J

    2012-09-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) demonstrate unique pathological and clinical features, including the absence of activating mutations of KIT and PDGFRA, and primary resistance to imatinib. They arise exclusively in the stomach and account for 5-7.5% of all adult stomach GISTs and the great majority of these tumors in childhood. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) overexpression has been associated with wild-type and pediatric GISTs. We propose that IGF1R overexpression is a feature of succinate dehydrogenase-deficient GISTs as a group. We assessed succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit B (SDHB) and IGF1R expression by immunohistochemistry in eight known succinate dehydrogenase-deficient GISTs, three GISTs arising in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1 syndrome and 40 unselected GISTs. Selected KIT and PDGFRA exons were amplified and sequenced from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples. All eight succinate dehydrogenase-deficient tumors were wild-type for KIT and PDGFRA, succinate dehydrogenase B negative and demonstrated IGF1R overexpression. The three neurofibromatosis-related tumors were succinate dehydrogenase B positive and IGF1R negative. Of the 40 unselected upper GISTs, five were wild-type for KIT and PDGFRA in the selected exons. Two of the wild-type GISTs were succinate dehydrogenase B negative and showed IGF1R overexpression and three were succinate dehydrogenase B positive and IGF1R negative. We conclude that IGF1R overexpression is a feature of succinate dehydrogenase deficient GIST as a group, rather than pediatric or wild-type GIST per se. Therefore, IGF1R inhibition represents a potential rational therapeutic approach in this recently recognized subgroup of GIST.

  20. Acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and marked selenium deficiency causing severe rhabdomyolysis in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Diego E.; Valberg, Stephanie J.; Magdesian, K. Gary; Hanna, Paul E.; Lofstedt, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of severe rhabdomyolysis in a pregnant mare associated with histopathologic and biochemical features of both selenium deficiency and acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) due to seasonal pasture myopathy (SPM). This case highlights the importance of assessing plasma selenium levels in horses with clinical signs of pasture myopathy as this deficiency may be a contributing or exacerbating factor. PMID:26538673

  1. Acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and marked selenium deficiency causing severe rhabdomyolysis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Diego E; Valberg, Stephanie J; Magdesian, K Gary; Hanna, Paul E; Lofstedt, Jeanne

    2015-11-01

    This report describes a case of severe rhabdomyolysis in a pregnant mare associated with histopathologic and biochemical features of both selenium deficiency and acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) due to seasonal pasture myopathy (SPM). This case highlights the importance of assessing plasma selenium levels in horses with clinical signs of pasture myopathy as this deficiency may be a contributing or exacerbating factor.

  2. Heterogeneous expression of protein and mRNA in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, I D; Kerr, D S; Ho, L; Lusk, M M; Pepin, R A; Javed, A A; Mole, J E; Jesse, B W; Thekkumkara, T J; Pons, G

    1988-01-01

    Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase [pyruvate:lipoamide 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating and acceptor-acetylating), EC 1.2.4.1], the first component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is associated with lactic acidosis and central nervous system dysfunction. Using both specific antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and cDNAs coding for its two alpha and beta subunits, we characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency in 11 patients. Three different patterns were found on immunologic and RNA blot analyses. (i) Seven patients had immunologically detectable crossreactive material for the alpha and beta proteins of pyruvate dehydrogenase. (ii) Two patients had no detectable crossreactive protein for either the alpha or beta subunit but had normal amounts of mRNA for both alpha and beta subunits. (iii) The remaining two patients also had no detectable crossreactive protein but had diminished amounts of mRNA for the alpha subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase only. These results indicate that loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity may be associated with either absent or catalytically inactive proteins, and in those cases in which this enzyme is absent, mRNA for one of the subunits may also be missing. When mRNA for one of the subunits is lacking, both protein subunits are absent, suggesting that a mutation affecting the expression of one of the subunit proteins causes the remaining uncomplexed subunit to be unstable. The results show that several different mutations account for the molecular heterogeneity of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Images PMID:3140238

  3. Genetics Home Reference: short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency is a condition that prevents the body from converting certain fats into energy, especially during periods without food (fasting). Signs and symptoms of SCAD deficiency may ...

  4. [The isotope effect in the glycine dehydrogenase reaction is the cause of the intramolecular isotope inhomogeneity of glucose carbon of starch synthesized during photorespiration].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    2005-01-01

    The isotope distribution of glucose-6-phosphate in the main pathways of its biosynthesis (in the processes of CO2 assimilation and photorespiration in the Calvin cycle and during resynthesis from the degradation products of lipids and proteins) was analyzed. For reconstructing the isotope distribution of glucoso-6-phosphate synthesized in the Calvin cycle during photorespiration, the functioning of the cycle with regard to its coupling with the glycolate chain, which together constitute the photorespiration chain, was considered. In the glycine dehydrogenase reaction of the glycolate cycle, there arises an isotope effect, which determines the distribution of isotopes in the glucose-6-phosphate and other photorespiration products. The isotope effect of the glycine dehydrogenase reaction increases at the expense of the exhaustion of glucose resources feeding the photorespiration chain. As a result, atoms C-3 and C-4 of glucose become enriched with the heavy isotope, and subsequent mixing of atoms and the specificity of interactions in the photorespiration chain lead to an isotope weighting of the other atoms and an uneven distribution of carbon isotopes in glucose-6-phosphate and other photorespiration products. A comparison of the glucose-6-phosphate isotope patterns in different pathways of the synthesis with the experimental data on the distribution of carbon isotopes in starch glucose of storing plant organs led to the conclusion that the starch resources are predominantly formed at the expense of glucose-6-phosphate of photorespiration. This is consistent with the earlier observed enhancement of photorespiration at the stage of plant maturation.

  5. Formate Dehydrogenase, an Enzyme of Anaerobic Metabolism, Is Induced by Iron Deficiency in Barley Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Itai, Reiko; Suzuki, Koichiro; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko-Kishi; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Mori, Satoshi

    1998-01-01

    To identify the proteins induced by Fe deficiency, we have compared the proteins of Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) roots by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Peptide sequence analysis of induced proteins revealed that formate dehydrogenase (FDH), adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, and the Ids3 gene product (for Fe deficiency-specific) increased in Fe-deficient roots. FDH enzyme activity was detected in Fe-deficient roots but not in Fe-sufficient roots. A cDNA encoding FDH (Fdh) was cloned and sequenced. Fdh expression was induced by Fe deficiency. Fdh was also expressed under anaerobic stress and its expression was more rapid than that induced by Fe deficiency. Thus, the expression of Fdh observed in Fe-deficient barley roots appeared to be a secondary effect caused by oxygen deficiency in Fe-deficient plants. PMID:9489019

  6. Severe Malaria Complicated by G6PD Deficiency in a Pediatric Tanzanian Immigrant

    PubMed Central

    Damhoff, Heather N.; Stadler, Laura P.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1,500 cases of malaria are diagnosed in the United States each year. Most cases are travelers and immigrants returning from parts of the world where malaria transmission occurs. Malaria is the most frequent cause of systemic febrile illness without localizing symptoms in travelers returning from the developing world, so vigilance by providers is needed when evaluating patients returning from areas in which malaria is endemic. Despite the availability of effective treatment, malaria still accounts for more than 1 million deaths per year worldwide, with rates being disproportionately high in young children under the age of 5. We present the case of a 4-year-old refugee who emigrated from Tanzania with severe malaria due to dual infections of Plasmodium falciparum and P. ovale, whose treatment course was complicated by quinidine gluconate cardiotoxicity and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. PMID:25762879

  7. Effects of zinc deficiency on ethanol metabolism and alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities.

    PubMed

    Das, I; Burch, R E; Hahn, H K

    1984-10-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase, low Km and high Km mitochondrial and microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase, and in vivo ethanol elimination rates were determined in five groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats given liquid diets, as follows: control (C), control plus 5% ethanol (CE), pair-fed control and zinc-deficient (PC-ZnD), zinc-deficient (ZnD), and zinc-deficient plus 5% ethanol (ZnDE). Rats fed CE had decreased liver and serum zinc content. The animals given ZnD diets had an even more dramatic decrease in their tissue zinc concentrations and displayed marked growth retardation. The in vivo blood ethanol elimination rate was increased in animals fed ethanol, and this increase was accompanied by increased alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities. There was a significant decrease in the ethanol elimination rate in rats given ZnD and ZnDE diets. Alcohol dehydrogenase activities in rats with deficient zinc levels also were decreased, and there were no changes in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. Our results suggest that the metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde is impaired in zinc deficiency, but acetaldehyde to acetate conversion appears normal.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... step that metabolizes groups of fats called medium-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the HADH gene lead ... a shortage of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids cannot be metabolized ...

  9. Long-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme a dehydrogenase deficiency: a molecular and biochemical review.

    PubMed

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Bennett, Michael J; Rogers, Beverly B

    2002-07-01

    Since the first report of long-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency a little more than a decade ago, its phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity in individuals homozygous for the enzyme defect has become more and more evident. Even more interesting is its association with pregnancy-specific disorders, including preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets), hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and maternal floor infarct of the placenta. In this review we discuss the biochemical and molecular basis, clinical features, diagnosis, and management of long-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency.

  10. cDNA cloning of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase from crucian carp (Carassius carassius) and expression of the active region as myofibril-bound serine proteinase inhibitor in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Han, Long; Cao, Min-Jie; Shi, Chao-lan; Wei, Xiao-Nan; Li, Huan; Du, Cui-Hong

    2014-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) (EC 5.3.1.9) can act as a myofibril-bound serine proteinase (MBSP) inhibitor (MBSPI) in fish. In order to better understand the biological information of the GPI and its functional domain for inhibiting MBSP, the cDNA of GPI was cloned from crucian carp (Carassius carassius) with RT-PCR, nested-PCR and 3'-RACE. The result of sequencing showed that the GPI cDNA had an open reading frame of 1662bp encoding 553 amino acid residues. After constructing and comparing the three-dimensional structures of GPI and MBSP, the middle fragment of crucian carp GPI (GPI-M) was predicted as a functional domain for inhibiting MBSP. Then the crucian carp GPI-M gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that the recombinant GPI-M (rGPI-M) with molecular mass of approximately 21kDa in the form of inclusion bodies. The rGPI-M was obtained at an electrophoresis level purity of approximately 95% after denaturation and dialysis renaturation.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from food are broken down into parts called amino acids . Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for ... an enzyme that helps break down a particular amino acid called valine. Most people with IBD deficiency are ...

  12. Characteristics of butanol metabolism in alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deermice.

    PubMed Central

    Alderman, J A; Kato, S; Lieber, C S

    1989-01-01

    Deermice lacking the low-Km alcohol dehydrogenase eliminated butan-1-ol, a substrate for microsomal oxidation but not for catalase, at 117 mumol/min per kg body wt. Microsomal fractions and hepatocytes metabolized butan-1-ol also (Vmax. = 6.7 nmol/min per nmol of cytochrome P-450, Km = 0.85 mM; Vmax. = 5.3 nmol/min per 10(6) cells, Km = 0.71 mM respectively). These results are consistent with alcohol oxidation by the microsomal system in these deermice. PMID:2930472

  13. [Leigh syndrome and leukodystrophy due to partial succinate dehydrogenase deficiency: regression with riboflavin].

    PubMed

    Pinard, J M; Marsac, C; Barkaoui, E; Desguerre, I; Birch-Machin, M; Reinert, P; Ponsot, G

    1999-04-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency is rare. Clinical manifestations can appear in infancy with a marked impairment of psychomotor development with pyramidal signs and extrapyramidal rigidity. A 10-month-old boy developed severe neurological features, evoking a Leigh syndrome; magnetic resonance imaging showed features of leukodystrophy. A deficiency in the complex II respiratory chain (succinate dehydrogenase [SDH]) was shown. The course was remarkable by the regression of neurological impairment under treatment by riboflavin. The delay of psychomotor development, mainly involving language, was moderate at the age of 5 years. The relatively good prognosis of this patient, despite severe initial neurological impairment, may be due to the partial enzyme deficiency and/or riboflavin administration.

  14. Activity of divicine in Plasmodium vinckei-infected mice has implications for treatment of favism and epidemiology of G-6-PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Clark, I A; Cowden, W B; Hunt, N H; Maxwell, L E; Mackie, E J

    1984-07-01

    Intravenous injection of divicine into mice infected with Plasmodium vinckei rapidly killed the parasites and caused haemolysis. Degenerating parasites were observed frequently inside intact circulating erythrocytes, implying that parasite death was not a passive consequence of haemolysis. Both parasite death and haemolysis were prevented by the iron chelator desferrioxamine. In vitro, divicine caused the accumulation of malonyldialdehyde and the depletion of reduced glutathione in normal mouse erythrocytes. Desferrioxamine inhibited the former event, but not the latter. These observations support the hypothesis advanced by Huheey & Martin (Experientia, 31, 1145, 1975) to explain the patchy geographical distribution of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in historic malarial areas and also suggest that desferrioxamine, a drug already in clinical use, is a potential treatment for favism and other examples of oxidative haemolysis.

  15. Comparison of anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides, anti-glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and anti-keratin antibodies and rheumatoid factor in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Feng, Liyun

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin antibodies (anti-MCV), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides antibodies (anti-CCP), anti-glucose-6-phosphate isomerase antibodies (anti-GPI) and anti-keratin antibodies (AKA) and rheumatoid factor (RF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The five auto-antibodies were detected in serum samples of 56 patients with RA, 21 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 11 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), six with Sjögren's syndrome (SS), four with connective tissue disease (CTD) and 20 healthy controls. Anti-MCV, anti-CCP and anti-GPI were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), AKA was determined by indirect immunofluorescence and RF was determined by rate nephelometry. In RA, anti-MCV and anti-GPI had the highest sensitivity (78.6% and 75.0%, respectively), anti-CCP and AKA had the highest specificity (97.6%). Anti-GPI had the lowest specificity (64.3%), and AKA had the lowest sensitivity (48.2%). When two antibodies were detected together, the sensitivity of anti-MCV/anti-CCP/RF were highest (92.9%) with a lower specificity (73.8%). The combination of anti-MCV/anti-CCP had a slightly decreased sensitivity (89.3%) and the same specificity (73.8%). The combination RF/anti-MCV/anti-CCP or anti-MCV/anti-CCP are usefully serologic tests for the diagnosis of RA in Chinese patients. © 2013 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Strategies for Correcting Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Tenopoulou, Margarita; Chen, Jie; Bastin, Jean; Bennett, Michael J.; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Very long acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is a genetic pediatric disorder presenting with a spectrum of phenotypes that remains for the most part untreatable. Here, we present a novel strategy for the correction of VLCAD deficiency by increasing mutant VLCAD enzymatic activity. Treatment of VLCAD-deficient fibroblasts, which express distinct mutant VLCAD protein and exhibit deficient fatty acid β-oxidation, with S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine induced site-specific S-nitrosylation of VLCAD mutants at cysteine residue 237. Cysteine 237 S-nitrosylation was associated with an 8–17-fold increase in VLCAD-specific activity and concomitant correction of acylcarnitine profile and β-oxidation capacity, two hallmarks of the disorder. Overall, this study provides biochemical evidence for a potential therapeutic modality to correct β-oxidation deficiencies. PMID:25737446

  17. Reconciling diabetes management and the ketogenic diet in a child with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Henwood, Maria J; Thornton, Paul S; Preis, Christina M; Chee, Clare; Grimberg, Adda

    2006-05-01

    A 4-year-old girl with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, static encephalopathy, and seizure disorder treated with the ketogenic diet presented in severe diabetic ketoacidosis. Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency is a rare genetic defect of mitochondrial energy metabolism that leads to inefficient glucose use and lactic acidosis. The ketogenic diet provides the brain with an alternate fuel source, but its implementation opposes traditional diabetes management. Faced with this therapeutic dilemma, we aimed to maintain ketosis without compromising safety to optimize neurologic function and quality of life. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of a child simultaneously treated with the ketogenic diet and exogenous insulin. A 28-month follow-up revealed excellent glycemic control, improved activity level, significant developmental achievements, and, perhaps most striking, catch-up linear growth from < 5th percentile to the 50th percentile. Her progress to date indicates that diabetes does not preclude use of the ketogenic diet.

  18. Xanthine Dehydrogenase (XDH) cross-reacting material in mutants of Drosophila melanogaster deficient in XDH activity.

    PubMed

    Browder, L W; Tucker, L; Wilkes, J

    1982-02-01

    Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate xanthine dehydrogenase cross-reacting material (XDH-CRM) in strains containing the cin and cin mutant genes, which are deficient in XDH enzymatic activity. CRM levels were determined as percentages of CRM in the Oregon-R wild-type strain. The mutant strains contain 72 and 76% of Oregon-R CRM, respectively. CRM levels in strains containing the XDH-deficient mutant genes lxd and mal are 93 and 105%, respectively. The high levels of CRM in these four mutant strains indicate that the primary effects of the mutant genes are on the function of XDH protein rather than its accumulation.

  19. 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency in a male pseudohermaphrodite

    PubMed Central

    Mains, Lindsay M.; Vakili, Babak; Lacassie, Yves; Andersson, Stefan; Lindqvist, Annika; Rock, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To present the clinical, biochemical, and genetic features of a male pseudohermaphrodite due to 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (17beta-HSD3) deficiency. Design Case report. Setting University teaching hospital Gynecology practice Patient(s) A 15-year-old black American male pseudohermaphrodite with 17beta-HSD3 deficiency. Intervention(s) Laboratory evaluation, genetic mutation analysis, bilateral gonadectomy, hormone replacement. Main Outcome Measure(s) Endocrinologic evaluation and genetic analysis. Result(s) A diagnosis of 17beta-HSD3 deficiency made on the basis of hormone evaluation was confirmed through genetic mutation analysis of the HSD17B3 gene. Female phenotype was attained after gonadectomy, passive vaginal dilatation, and hormone therapy. Conclusion(s) 17beta-HSD3 deficiency was diagnosed in this patient based on endocrinologic evaluation and confirmed with genetic mutation analysis. The patient was able to retain her female sexual identity after surgical and medical treatment. PMID:17509588

  20. Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Two Malaysian Siblings with Abnormal MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bee Chin; Mohd Rawi, Rowani; Meinsma, Rutger; Meijer, Judith; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; van Kuilenburg, André B.P.

    2014-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of the pyrimidine metabolism. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to an accumulation of thymine and uracil and a deficiency of metabolites distal to the catabolic enzyme. The disorder presents with a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from asymptomatic to severe neurological manifestations, including intellectual disability, seizures, microcephaly, autistic behavior, and eye abnormalities. Here, we report on an 11-year-old Malaysian girl and her 6-year-old brother with DPD deficiency who presented with intellectual disability, microcephaly, and hypotonia. Brain MRI scans showed generalized cerebral and cerebellar atrophy and callosal body dysgenesis in the boy. Urine analysis showed strongly elevated levels of uracil in the girl and boy (571 and 578 mmol/mol creatinine, respectively) and thymine (425 and 427 mmol/mol creatinine, respectively). Sequence analysis of the DPYD gene showed that both siblings were homozygous for the mutation c.1651G>A (pAla551Thr). PMID:25565930

  1. Isolated isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: an unrecognized defect in human valine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roe, C R; Cederbaum, S D; Roe, D S; Mardach, R; Galindo, A; Sweetman, L

    1998-12-01

    A 2-year-old female was well until 12 months of age when she was found to be anemic and had dilated cardiomyopathy. Total plasma carnitine was 6 microM and acylcarnitine analysis while receiving carnitine supplement revealed an increase in the four-carbon species. Urine organic acids were normal. In vitro analysis of the mitochondrial pathways for beta oxidation, and leucine, valine, and isoleucine metabolism was performed in fibroblasts using stable isotope-labeled precursors to these pathways followed by acylcarnitine analysis by tandem mass spectrometry. 16-2H3-palmitate was metabolized normally down to the level of butyryl-CoA thus excluding SCAD deficiency. 13C6-leucine and 13C6-isoleucine were also metabolized normally. 13C5-valine incubation revealed a significant increase in 13C4-isobutyrylcarnitine without any incorporation into propionylcarnitine as is observed normally. These same precursors were also evaluated in fibroblasts with proven ETF-QO deficiency in which acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies in each of these pathways was clearly identified. These results indicate that in the human, there is an isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase which exists as a separate enzyme serving only the valine pathway in addition to the 2-methyl branched-chain dehydrogenase which serves both the valine and the isoleucine pathways in both rat and human.

  2. Field trials of a rapid test for G6PD deficiency in combination with a rapid diagnosis of malaria.

    PubMed

    Tantular, I S; Iwai, K; Lin, K; Basuki, S; Horie, T; Htay, H H; Matsuoka, H; Marwoto, H; Wongsrichanalai, C; Dachlan, Y P; Kojima, S; Ishii, A; Kawamoto, F

    1999-04-01

    A rapid single-step screening method for detection of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6 PD) deficiency was evaluated on Halmahera Island, Maluku Province, Indonesia, and in Shan and Mon States, Myanmar, in combination with a rapid diagnosis of malaria by an acridine orange staining method. Severe deficiency was detected by the rapid test in 45 of 1126 volunteers in Indonesia and 54 of 1079 in Myanmar, but it was difficult to distinguish blood samples with mild deficiency from those with normal activity. 89 of 99 severely deficient cases were later confirmed by formazan ring method in the laboratory, but 5 with mild and 5 with no deficiency were misdiagnosed as severe. Of the samples diagnosed as mild and no deficiency on-site, none was found to be severely deficient by the formazan method. Malaria patients were simultaenously++ detected on-site in 273 samples on Halmahera island and 277 samples from Shan and Mon States. In Mon State, primaquine was prescribed safely to G6 PD-normal malaria patients infected with Plasmodium vivax and/or gametocytes of P. falciparum. The new rapid test for G6 PD deficiency may be useful for detecting severe cases under field conditions, and both rapid tests combined are can be useful in malaria-endemic areas, facilitating early diagnosis, prompt and radical treatment of malaria and suppression of malaria transmission.

  3. Targeting 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP sensitizes leukemia cells to antimalarial agent dihydroartemisinin.

    PubMed

    Elf, S; Lin, R; Xia, S; Pan, Y; Shan, C; Wu, S; Lonial, S; Gaddh, M; Arellano, M L; Khoury, H J; Khuri, F R; Lee, B H; Boggon, T J; Fan, J; Chen, J

    2017-01-12

    The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is crucial for cancer cell metabolism and tumor growth. We recently reported that targeting a key oxidative PPP enzyme, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), using our novel small-molecule 6PGD inhibitors Physcion and its derivative S3, shows anticancer effects. Notably, humans with genetic deficiency of either 6PGD or another oxidative PPP enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, exhibit non-immune hemolytic anemia upon exposure to aspirin and various antimalarial drugs. Inspired by these clinical observations, we examined the anticancer potential of combined treatment with 6PGD inhibitors and antimalarial drugs. We found that stable knockdown of 6PGD sensitizes leukemia cells to antimalarial agent dihydroartemisinin (DHA). Combined treatment with DHA and Physcion activates AMP-activated protein kinase, leading to synergistic inhibition of human leukemia cell viability. Moreover, our combined therapy synergistically attenuates tumor growth in xenograft nude mice injected with human K562 leukemia cells and cell viability of primary leukemia cells from human patients, but shows minimal toxicity to normal hematopoietic cells in mice as well as red blood cells and mononucleocytes from healthy human donors. Our findings reveal the potential for combined therapy using optimized doses of Physcion and DHA as a novel antileukemia treatment without inducing hemolysis.

  4. Re-examination of the roles of PEP and Mg2+ in the reaction catalysed by the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from leaves of Zea mays. Effects of the activators glucose 6-phosphate and glycine.

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Méndez, A; Rodríguez-Sotres, R; López-Valentín, D M; Muñoz-Clares, R A

    1998-01-01

    To study the effects of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and Mg2+ on the activity of the non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Zea mays leaves, steady-state measurements have been carried out with the free forms of PEP (fPEP) and Mg2+ (fMg2+), both in a near-physiological concentration range. At pH 7.3, in the absence of activators, the initial velocity data obtained with both forms of the enzyme are consistent with the exclusive binding of MgPEP to the active site and of fPEP to an activating allosteric site. At pH 8.3, and in the presence of saturating concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate (Glc6P) or Gly, the free species also combined with the active site in the free enzyme, but with dissociation constants at least 35-fold that estimated for MgPEP. The latter dissociation constant was lowered to the same extent by saturating Glc6P and Gly, to approx. one-tenth and one-sixteenth in the non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated enzymes respectively. When Glc6P is present, fPEP binds to the active site in the free enzyme better than fMg2+, whereas the metal ion binds better in the presence of Gly. Saturation of the enzyme with Glc6P abolished the activation by fPEP, consistent with a common binding site, whereas saturation with Gly increased the affinity of the allosteric site for fPEP. Under all the conditions tested, our results suggest that fPEP is not able to combine with the allosteric site in the free enzyme, i.e. it cannot combine until after MgPEP, fPEP or fMg2+ are bound at the active site. The physiological role of Mg2+ in the regulation of the enzyme is only that of a substrate, mainly as part of the MgPEP complex. The kinetic properties of maize leaf PEPC reported here are consistent with the enzyme being well below saturation under the physiological concentrations of fMg2+ and PEP, particularly during the dark period; it is therefore suggested that the basal PEPC activity in vivo is very low, but highly

  5. Decreased GABA-A binding on FMZ-PET in succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, P L.; Gibson, K M.; Quezado, Z; Dustin, I; Taylor, J; Trzcinski, S; Schreiber, J; Forester, K; Reeves-Tyer, P; Liew, C; Shamim, S; Herscovitch, P; Carson, R; Butman, J; Jakobs, C; Theodore, W

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of GABA metabolism characterized by elevated levels of GABA and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid. Clinical findings include intellectual impairment, hypotonia, hyporeflexia, hallucinations, autistic behaviors, and seizures. Autoradiographic labeling and slice electrophysiology studies in the murine model demonstrate use-dependent downregulation of GABA(A) receptors. We studied GABA(A) receptor activity in human SSADH deficiency utilizing [11C]-flumazenil (FMZ)-PET. Methods: FMZ binding was measured in 7 patients, 10 unaffected parents, and 8 healthy controls. Data analysis was performed using a reference region compartmental model, with time-activity curve from pons as the input function. Relative parametric binding potential (BPND) was derived, with MRI-based pixel by pixel partial volume correction, in regions of interest drawn on coregistered MRI. Results: In amygdala, hippocampus, cerebellar vermis, frontal, parietal, and occipital cortex, patients with SSADH deficiency had significant reductions in FMZ BPND compared to parents and controls. Mean cortical values were 6.96 ± 0.79 (controls), 6.89 ± 0.71 (parents), and 4.88 ± 0.77 (patients) (F ratio 16.1; p < 0.001). There were no differences between controls and parents in any cortical region. Conclusions: Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficient patients show widespread reduction in BZPR binding on [11C]-flumazenil-PET. Our results suggest that high endogenous brain GABA levels in SSADH deficiency downregulate GABA(A)-BZPR binding site availability. This finding suggests a potential mechanism for neurologic dysfunction in a serious neurodevelopmental disorder, and suggests that PET may be useful to translate studies in animal models to human disease. GLOSSARY FMZ = flumazenil; MRS = magnetic resonance spectroscopy; PVC = partial volume correction; ROI = region of interest; SPGR = spoiled gradient

  6. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency: diagnosis by acylcarnitine analysis in blood.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hove, J L; Zhang, W; Kahler, S G; Roe, C R; Chen, Y T; Terada, N; Chace, D H; Iafolla, A K; Ding, J H; Millington, D S

    1993-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a disorder of fatty acid catabolism, with autosomal recessive inheritance. The disease is characterized by episodic illness associated with potentially fatal hypoglycemia and has a relatively high frequency. A rapid and reliable method for the diagnosis of MCAD deficiency is highly desirable. Analysis of specific acylcarnitines was performed by isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry on plasma or whole blood samples from 62 patients with MCAD deficiency. Acylcarnitines were also analyzed in 42 unaffected relatives of patients with MCAD deficiency and in other groups of patients having elevated plasma C8 acylcarnitine, consisting of 32 receiving valproic acid, 9 receiving medium-chain triglyceride supplement, 4 having multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, and 8 others with various etiologies. Criteria for the unequivocal diagnosis of MCAD deficiency by acylcarnitine analysis are an elevated C8-acylcarnitine concentration (> 0.3 microM), a ratio of C8/C10 acylcarnitines of > 5, and lack of elevated species of chain length > C10. These criteria were not influenced by clinical state, carnitine treatment, or underlying genetic mutation, and no false-positive or false-negative results were obtained. The same criteria were also successfully applied to profiles from neonatal blood spots retrieved from the original Guthrie cards of eight patients. Diagnosis of MCAD deficiency can therefore be made reliably through the analysis of acylcarnitines in blood, including presymptomatic neonatal recognition. Tandem mass spectrometry is a convenient method for fast and accurate determination of all relevant acylcarnitine species. PMID:8488845

  7. Regulation of p-nitroanisole O-demethylation in perfused rat liver. Adenine nucleotide inhibition of NADP+-dependent dehydrogenases and NADPH-cytochrome c reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, F C; Evans, R K; Reinke, L A; Thurman, R G

    1979-01-01

    Perfusion of rat livers with 10 mM-fructose or pretreatment of the rat with 6-aminonicotinamide (70 mg/kg) 6 h before perfusion decreased intracellular ATP concentrations and increased the rate of p-nitroanisole O-demethylation. This increase was accompanied by a decrease in the free [NADP+]/[NADPH] ratio calculated from concentrations of substrates assumed to be in near-equilibrium with isocitrate dehydrogenase. After pretreatment with 6-aminonicotinamide the [NADP+]/[NADPH] ratio also declined. Reduction of NADP+ during mixed-function oxidation may be explained by inhibition of of one or more NADPH-generating enzymes. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and "malic" enzyme, partially purified from livers of phenobarbital-treated rats, were inhibited by ATP and ADP. Inhibitor constants of ATP for the four dehydrogenases varied considerably, ranging from 9 micrometer for "malic" enzyme to 1.85 mM for glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. NADPH-cytochrome c reductase was also inhibited by ATP (Ki 2.8 mM) and by ADP (Ki 0.9 mM), but not by AMP. Concentrations of ATP and ADP that inhibited glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the reductase were comparable with concentrations in the intact liver. Thus agents that lower intracellular ATP may accelerate rates of mixed-function oxidation by a concerted mechanism involving deinhibition of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and one or more NADPH-generating enzymes. PMID:44195

  8. Screening for medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency using electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P.; Doig, M.; Ghafari, S.; Meaney, C.; Taylor, C.; Leonard, J.; Morris, M.; Johnson, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To establish criteria for the diagnosis of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency in the UK population using a method in which carnitine species eluted from blood spots are butylated and analysed by electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS).
DESIGN—Four groups were studied: (1) 35 children, aged 4 days to 16.2 years, with proven MCAD deficiency (mostly homozygous for the A985G mutation, none receiving carnitine supplements); (2) 2168control children; (3) 482 neonates; and (4) 15 MCAD heterozygotes.
RESULTS—All patients with MCAD deficiency had an octanoylcarnitine concentration ([C8-Cn]) > 0.38 µM and no accumulation of carnitine species > C10 or < C6. Among the patients with MCAD deficiency, the [C8-Cn] was significantly lower in children > 10 weeks old and in children with carnitine depletion (free carnitine < 20 µM). Neonatal blood spots from patients with MCAD deficiency had a [C8-Cn] > 1.5 µM, whereas in heterozygotes and other normal neonates the [C8-Cn] was < 1.0 µM. In contrast, the blood spot [C8-Cn] in eight of 27 patients with MCAD deficiency > 10 weeks old fell within the same range as five of 15 MCAD heterozygotes (0.38-1.0 µM). However, the free carnitine concentrations were reduced (< 20 µM) in the patients with MCAD deficiency but normal in the heterozygotes.
CONCLUSIONS—Criteria for the diagnosis of MCAD deficiency using ESI-MS/MS must take account of age and carnitine depletion. If screening is undertaken at 7-10 days, the number of false positive and negative results should be negligible. Because there have been no instances of death or neurological damage following diagnosis of MCAD deficiency in our patient group, a strong case can be made for neonatal screening for MCAD deficiency in the UK.

 PMID:9797589

  9. Changes in red blood cell membrane structure in G6PD deficiency: an atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jia; Jiang, Chengrui; Xiao, Xiao; Fang, Zishui; Li, Lei; Han, Luhao; Mei, Anqi; Feng, Yi; Guo, Yibin; Li, Hongyi; Jiang, Weiying

    2015-04-15

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency affects over 400 million people worldwide. The hemolytic anemia in G6PD deficiency is usually triggered by oxidative stress, but the mechanism remains uncertain. We have used atomic force microscopy for studying changes in red blood cell membrane and providing new insights on the mechanism. G6PD activity assay and molecular genetic tests were used for molecular diagnosis. AFM was used to investigate alterations in the ultrastructure of G6PD deficient RBC membranes, the influence of different primaquine concentrations, and the protective effects of vitamin C. Nine variants were identified from 33 G6PD deficient individuals. AFM imaging and quantitative analysis showed that G6PD deficient erythrocytes became heterogeneous and roughness measurements of erythrocyte membranes are increased. G6PD enzyme activity and different mutations may relate with roughness parameters. Furthermore, primaquine induces an increased roughness and height of erythrocyte membrane. Meanwhile, primaquine induces damages to erythrocytes which could be prevented by vitamin C treatment in normal RBCs but not in G6PD deficient erythrocytes. Our research may give valuable information about the status of G6PD deficient patients and explore the mechanism of hemolytic anemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adverse effects of herbal or dietary supplements in G6PD deficiency: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Lai, Nai Ming; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Chong, David Weng Kwai

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common genetic disorder, affecting nearly 400 million individuals worldwide. Whilst it is known that a number of drugs, foods and chemicals can trigger haemolysis in G6PD deficient individuals, the association between herbal and dietary supplements and haemolysis is less clear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between herbal or dietary supplements and adverse events in G6PD deficient individuals. We searched 14 electronic databases from their inception until November 2015 for articles describing the use of herbal or dietary supplements in G6PD deficient individuals. Additional publications were identified from manually searching textbooks, conference abstracts and the grey literature. All study designs were included as long as they contained clinical information. These gathered findings were summarized narratively. Thirty-two publications met inclusion criteria. These reported on 10 herbal and dietary supplements. Overall evidence linking haemolysis to a herbal/dietary supplement was only found for henna. No evidence of harm was observed for vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, Gingko biloba and α-lipoic acid. The review showed that there was insufficient evidence to contravene the use of most herbal or dietary products at therapeutic doses in G6PD deficient subjects. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Decreased GABA-A binding on FMZ-PET in succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pearl, P L; Gibson, K M; Quezado, Z; Dustin, I; Taylor, J; Trzcinski, S; Schreiber, J; Forester, K; Reeves-Tyer, P; Liew, C; Shamim, S; Herscovitch, P; Carson, R; Butman, J; Jakobs, C; Theodore, W

    2009-08-11

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of GABA metabolism characterized by elevated levels of GABA and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid. Clinical findings include intellectual impairment, hypotonia, hyporeflexia, hallucinations, autistic behaviors, and seizures. Autoradiographic labeling and slice electrophysiology studies in the murine model demonstrate use-dependent downregulation of GABA(A) receptors. We studied GABA(A) receptor activity in human SSADH deficiency utilizing [(11)C]-flumazenil (FMZ)-PET. FMZ binding was measured in 7 patients, 10 unaffected parents, and 8 healthy controls. Data analysis was performed using a reference region compartmental model, with time-activity curve from pons as the input function. Relative parametric binding potential (BP(ND)) was derived, with MRI-based pixel by pixel partial volume correction, in regions of interest drawn on coregistered MRI. In amygdala, hippocampus, cerebellar vermis, frontal, parietal, and occipital cortex, patients with SSADH deficiency had significant reductions in FMZ BP(ND) compared to parents and controls. Mean cortical values were 6.96 +/- 0.79 (controls), 6.89 +/- 0.71 (parents), and 4.88 +/- 0.77 (patients) (F ratio 16.1; p < 0.001). There were no differences between controls and parents in any cortical region. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficient patients show widespread reduction in BZPR binding on [(11)C]-flumazenil-PET. Our results suggest that high endogenous brain GABA levels in SSADH deficiency downregulate GABA(A)-BZPR binding site availability. This finding suggests a potential mechanism for neurologic dysfunction in a serious neurodevelopmental disorder, and suggests that PET may be useful to translate studies in animal models to human disease.

  12. Cerebral Developmental Abnormalities in a Mouse with Systemic Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pliss, Lioudmila; Hausknecht, Kathryn A.; Stachowiak, Michal K.; Dlugos, Cynthia A.; Richards, Jerry B.; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) deficiency is an inborn error of pyruvate metabolism causing a variety of neurologic manifestations. Systematic analyses of development of affected brain structures and the cellular processes responsible for their impairment have not been performed due to the lack of an animal model for PDC deficiency. METHODS: In the present study we investigated a murine model of systemic PDC deficiency by interrupting the X-linked Pdha1 gene encoding the α subunit of PDH to study its role on brain development and behavioral studies. RESULTS: Male embryos died prenatally but heterozygous females were born. PDC activity was reduced in the brain and other tissues in female progeny compared to age-matched control females. Immunohistochemical analysis of several brain regions showed that approximately 40% of cells were PDH−. The oxidation of glucose to CO2 and incorporation of glucose-carbon into fatty acids were reduced in brain slices from 15 day-old PDC-deficient females. Histological analyses showed alterations in several structures in white and gray matters in 35 day-old PDC-deficient females. Reduction in total cell number and reduced dendritic arbors in Purkinje neurons were observed in PDC-deficient females. Furthermore, cell proliferation, migration and differentiation into neurons by newly generated cells were reduced in the affected females during pre- and postnatal periods. PDC-deficient mice had normal locomotor activity in a novel environment but displayed decreased startle responses to loud noises and there was evidence of abnormal pre-pulse inhibition of the startle reflex. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that a reduction in glucose metabolism resulting in deficit in energy production and fatty acid biosynthesis impairs cellular differentiation and brain development in PDC-deficient mice. PMID:23840713

  13. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency aggravates energy metabolism disturbance and diastolic dysfunction in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Fan, Fan; Cao, Quan; Shen, Cheng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Xiaona; Sun, Xiaolei; Dong, Zhen; Ma, Xin; Liu, Xiangwei; Han, Shasha; Wu, Chaoneng; Zou, Yunzeng; Hu, Kai; Ge, Junbo; Sun, Aijun

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes causes energy metabolism disturbance and may lead to cardiac dysfunction. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) protects cardiac function from myocardial damage. Therefore, understanding of its roles in diabetic heart is critical for developing new therapeutics targeting ALDH2 and mitochondrial function for diabetic hearts. This study investigated the impact of ALDH2 deficiency on diastolic function and energy metabolism in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced in ALDH2 knockout and wild-type mice by streptozotocin. Cardiac function was determined by echocardiography. Glucose uptake, energy status, and metabolic profiles were used to evaluate cardiac energy metabolism. The association between ALDH2 polymorphism and diabetes was also analyzed in patients. Echocardiography revealed preserved systolic function and impaired diastolic function in diabetic ALDH2-deficient mice. Energy reserves (phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate ratio) were reduced in the diabetic mutants and were associated with diastolic dysfunction. Western blot analysis showed that diabetes induces accumulated lipid peroxidation products and escalated AMP-activated protein kinase-LKB1 pathway. Further, ALDH2 deficiency exacerbated the diabetes-induced deficient myocardial glucose uptake and other perturbations of metabolic profiles. Finally, ALDH2 mutations were associated with worse diastolic dysfunction in diabetic patients. Together, our results demonstrate that ALDH2 deficiency and resulting energy metabolism disturbance is a part of pathology of diastolic dysfunction of diabetic hearts, and suggest that patients with ALDH2 mutations are vulnerable to diabetic damage. ALDH2 deficiency exacerbates diastolic dysfunction in early diabetic hearts. ALDH2 deficiency triggers decompensation of metabolic reserves and energy metabolism disturbances in early diabetic hearts. ALDH2 deficiency potentiates oxidative stress and AMPK phosphorylation induced by diabetes via post

  14. A severe genotype with favourable outcome in very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Touma, E; Rashed, M; Vianey-Saban, C; Sakr, A; Divry, P; Gregersen, N; Andresen, B

    2001-01-01

    A patient with very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is reported. He had a severe neonatal presentation and cardiomyopathy. He was found to be homozygous for a severe mutation with no residual enzyme activity. Tandem mass spectrometry on dried blood spots revealed increased long chain acylcarnitines. VLCAD enzyme activity was severely decreased to 2% of control levels. Dietary management consisted of skimmed milk supplemented with medium chain triglycerides and L-carnitine. Outcome was good and there was no acute recurrence.

 PMID:11124787

  15. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 deficiency alters the gut microbiome response to Western diet

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jethro S; Opiyo, Monica N; Thomson, Marian; Gharbi, Karim; Seckl, Jonathan R; Heger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) interconverts active glucocorticoids and their intrinsically inert 11-keto forms. The type 1 isozyme, 11β-HSD1, predominantly reactivates glucocorticoids in vivo and can also metabolise bile acids. 11β-HSD1-deficient mice show altered inflammatory responses and are protected against the adverse metabolic effects of a high-fat diet. However, the impact of 11β-HSD1 on the composition of the gut microbiome has not previously been investigated. We used high-throughput 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing to characterise the gut microbiome of 11β-HSD1-deficient and C57Bl/6 control mice, fed either a standard chow diet or a cholesterol- and fat-enriched ‘Western’ diet. 11β-HSD1 deficiency significantly altered the composition of the gut microbiome, and did so in a diet-specific manner. On a Western diet, 11β-HSD1 deficiency increased the relative abundance of the family Bacteroidaceae, and on a chow diet, it altered relative abundance of the family Prevotellaceae. Our results demonstrate that (i) genetic effects on host–microbiome interactions can depend upon diet and (ii) that alterations in the composition of the gut microbiome may contribute to the aspects of the metabolic and/or inflammatory phenotype observed with 11β-HSD1 deficiency. PMID:27885053

  16. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 deficiency alters the gut microbiome response to Western diet.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jethro S; Opiyo, Monica N; Thomson, Marian; Gharbi, Karim; Seckl, Jonathan R; Heger, Andreas; Chapman, Karen E

    2017-02-01

    The enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) interconverts active glucocorticoids and their intrinsically inert 11-keto forms. The type 1 isozyme, 11β-HSD1, predominantly reactivates glucocorticoids in vivo and can also metabolise bile acids. 11β-HSD1-deficient mice show altered inflammatory responses and are protected against the adverse metabolic effects of a high-fat diet. However, the impact of 11β-HSD1 on the composition of the gut microbiome has not previously been investigated. We used high-throughput 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing to characterise the gut microbiome of 11β-HSD1-deficient and C57Bl/6 control mice, fed either a standard chow diet or a cholesterol- and fat-enriched 'Western' diet. 11β-HSD1 deficiency significantly altered the composition of the gut microbiome, and did so in a diet-specific manner. On a Western diet, 11β-HSD1 deficiency increased the relative abundance of the family Bacteroidaceae, and on a chow diet, it altered relative abundance of the family Prevotellaceae Our results demonstrate that (i) genetic effects on host-microbiome interactions can depend upon diet and (ii) that alterations in the composition of the gut microbiome may contribute to the aspects of the metabolic and/or inflammatory phenotype observed with 11β-HSD1 deficiency. © 2017 The authors.

  17. Eye Findings on Vigabatrin and Taurine Treatment in Two Patients with Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gabriella-Ana; Hukin, Juliette; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia G; Aroichane, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    We describe for the first time two patients with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, who were found to have abnormal electroretinogram (ERG) examinations at baseline, or 6 months after vigabatrin treatment was started. This was somewhat reversible with L-taurine treatment, or minimally progressive. The mechanism of injury to the retina may be induced by elevations of γ-aminobutyric acid causing peripheral photoreceptor and ganglion cell damage, and this can be exacerbated by the use of vigabatrin. The use of taurine supplementation in tandem with vigabatrin may allow reversal of retinopathy and mitigate or slow down further deterioration. Further prospective clinical trials are required to evaluate this further. We recommend starting L-taurine therapy together with vigabatrin if a trial of vigabatrin is commenced in a patient with SSADH deficiency. Close monitoring of visual fields or ERG is also recommended at baseline and during vigabatrin therapy.

  18. Therapeutic intervention in mice deficient for succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Maneesh; Greven, Rachel; Jansen, Erwin E W; Jakobs, Cornelis; Hogema, Boris M; Froestl, Wolfgang; Snead, O Carter; Bartels, Hilke; Grompe, Markus; Gibson, K Michael

    2002-07-01

    Therapeutic intervention for human succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency (gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria) has been limited to vigabatrin (VGB). Pharmacologically, VGB should be highly effective due to 4-aminobutyrate-transaminase (GABA-transaminase) inhibition, lowering succinic semialdehyde and, thereby, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) levels. Unfortunately, clinical efficacy has been limited. Because GHB possesses a number of potential receptor interactions, we addressed the hypothesis that antagonism of these interactions in mice with SSADH deficiency could lead to the development of novel treatment strategies for human patients. SSADH-deficient mice have significantly elevated tissue GHB levels, are neurologically impaired, and die within 4 weeks postnatally. In the current report, we compared oral versus intraperitoneal administration of VGB, CGP 35348 [3-aminopropyl(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist], and the nonprotein amino acid taurine in rescue of SSADH-deficient mice from early death. In addition, we assessed the efficacy of the specific GHB receptor antagonist NCS-382 (6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-[H]benzocycloheptene-5-ol-6-ylideneacetic acid) using i.p. administration. All interventions led to significant lifespan extension (22-61%), with NCS-382 being most effective (50-61% survival). To explore the limited human clinical efficacy of VGB, we measured brain GHB and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in SSADH-deficient mice receiving VGB. Whereas high-dose VGB led to the expected elevation of brain GABA, we found no parallel decrease in GHB levels. Our data indicate that, at a minimum, GHB and GABA(B) receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of SSADH deficiency. We conclude that taurine and NCS-382 may have therapeutic relevance in human SSADH deficiency and that the poor clinical efficacy of VGB in this disease may relate to an inability to decrease brain GHB concentrations.

  19. The Pathogenesis of Alcohol-Induced Airflow Limitation in Acetaldehyde Dehydrogenase 2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Terufumi; Obase, Yasushi; Matsuse, Hiroto; Asai, Sadahiro; Iwanaga, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    In Japanese patients, alcohol-induced asthma is attributed to elevated plasma concentrations of acetaldehyde following alcohol consumption because of an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2) polymorphism. The resulting increase in plasma histamine concentrations seems to trigger the onset of asthma symptoms. However, the specific pathogenic mechanism underlying this response remains unclear. ALDH2-deficient mice were therefore generated to investigate the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced asthma. ALDH2-deficient mice were generated using embryonic stem cells that were derived from C57BL/6 mice. The resulting mice were backcrossed into the BALB/c mice background. Exon 1 of ALDH2 was replaced with the Neo cassette. Pure ethanol was orally administered to ALDH2-deficient and wild-type mice, and the plasma concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and histamine, in addition to enhanced pause (Penh) values, were determined and compared between the 2 groups. We established an ALDH2-deficient mouse line to compare responses between wild-type and ALDH2-deficient mice receiving orally administered ethanol. The results showed that the plasma concentrations of acetaldehyde (p < 0.0001) and histamine (p < 0.005) were significantly higher, and the Penh values (p < 0.01) were significantly greater in the ALDH2-deficient mice, although plasma ethanol levels were not different. We studied the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced asthma using ALDH2-deficient mice. The results demonstrated that alcohol intake resulted in an increase in acetaldehyde levels, and a subsequent increase in histamine levels, which induced airway constriction. Alcohol consumption is known to be an important factor that exacerbates bronchial asthma, and studies investigating this factor are useful for the treatment of patients with alcohol-induced asthma. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. The role of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in the supply of reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate for steroidogenesis in the superovulated rat ovary

    PubMed Central

    Flint, A. P. F.; Denton, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    1. Superovulated rat ovary was found to contain high activities of NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase. The activity of each enzyme was approximately four times that of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and equalled or exceeded the activities reported to be present in other mammalian tissues. Fractionation of a whole tissue homogenate of superovulated rat ovary indicated that both enzymes were exclusively cytoplasmic. The tissue was also found to contain pyruvate carboxylase (exclusively mitochondrial), NAD–malate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase (both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic) and ATP–citrate lyase (exclusively cytoplasmic). 2. The kinetic properties of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase were determined and compared with the whole-tissue concentrations of their substrates and NADPH; NADPH is a competitive inhibitor of all three enzymes. The concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate, malate and isocitrate in incubated tissue slices were raised at least tenfold by the addition of glucose to the incubation medium, from the values below to values above the respective Km values of the dehydrogenases. Glucose doubled the tissue concentration of NADPH. 3. Steroidogenesis from acetate is stimulated by glucose in slices of superovulated rat ovary incubated in vitro. It was found that this stimulatory effect of glucose can be mimicked by malate, isocitrate, lactate and pyruvate. 4. It is concluded that NADP–malate dehydrogenase or NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase or both may play an important role in the formation of NADPH in the superovulated rat ovary. It is suggested that the stimulatory effect of glucose on steroidogenesis from acetate results from an increased rate of NADPH formation through one or both dehydrogenases, brought about by the increases in the concentrations of malate, isocitrate or both. Possible pathways involving the two enzymes are discussed

  1. Carboxylate metabolism changes induced by Fe deficiency in barley, a Strategy II plant species.

    PubMed

    López-Millán, Ana-Flor; Grusak, Michael A; Abadía, Javier

    2012-07-15

    The effects of iron (Fe) deficiency on carboxylate metabolism were investigated in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) using two cultivars, Steptoe and Morex, which differ in their Fe efficiency response. In both cultivars, root extracts of plants grown in Fe-deficient conditions showed higher activities of enzymes related to organic acid metabolism, including citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, compared to activities measured in root extracts of Fe-sufficient plants. Accordingly, the concentration of total carboxylates was higher in Fe-deficient roots of both cultivars, with citrate concentration showing the greatest increase. In xylem sap, the concentration of total carboxylates was also higher with Fe deficiency in both cultivars, with citrate and malate being the major organic acids. Leaf extracts of Fe-deficient plants also showed increases in citric acid concentration and in the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and fumarase activities, and decreases in aconitase activity. Our results indicate that changes in root carboxylate metabolism previously reported in Strategy I species also occur in barley, a Strategy II plant species, supporting the existence of anaplerotic carbon fixation via increases in the root activities of these enzymes, with citrate playing a major role. However, these changes occur less intensively than in Strategy I plants. Activities of the anaerobic metabolism enzymes pyruvate decarboxylase and lactate dehydrogenase did not change in barley roots with Fe deficiency, in contrast to what occurs in Strategy I plants, suggesting that these changes may be Strategy I-specific. No significant differences were observed in overall carboxylate metabolism between cultivars, for plants challenged with high or low Fe treatments, suggesting that carboxylate metabolism changes are not behind the Fe-efficiency differences between these cultivars. Citrate synthase was the only measured enzyme with

  2. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Doczi, Judit; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Kawamata, Hibiki; Manfredi, Giovanni; Zhang, Steven F.; Gibson, Gary E.; Beal, M. Flint; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    A decline in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) activity has been associated with neurodegeneration. Provision of succinyl-CoA by KGDHC is essential for generation of matrix ATP (or GTP) by substrate-level phosphorylation catalyzed by succinyl-CoA ligase. Here, we demonstrate ATP consumption in respiration-impaired isolated and in situ neuronal somal mitochondria from transgenic mice with a deficiency of either dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (DLST) or dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD) that exhibit a 20–48% decrease in KGDHC activity. Import of ATP into the mitochondrial matrix of transgenic mice was attributed to a shift in the reversal potential of the adenine nucleotide translocase toward more negative values due to diminished matrix substrate-level phosphorylation, which causes the translocase to reverse prematurely. Immunoreactivity of all three subunits of succinyl-CoA ligase and maximal enzymatic activity were unaffected in transgenic mice as compared to wild-type littermates. Therefore, decreased matrix substrate-level phosphorylation was due to diminished provision of succinyl-CoA. These results were corroborated further by the finding that mitochondria from wild-type mice respiring on substrates supporting substrate-level phosphorylation exhibited ∼30% higher ADP-ATP exchange rates compared to those obtained from DLST+/− or DLD+/− littermates. We propose that KGDHC-associated pathologies are a consequence of the inability of respiration-impaired mitochondria to rely on “in-house” mitochondrial ATP reserves.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Doczi, J., Starkov, A. A., Kawamata, H., Manfredi, G., Zhang, S. F., Gibson, G. E., Beal, M. F., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation. PMID:23475850

  3. Environmental stresses of field growth allow cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient Nicotiana attenuata plants to compensate for their structural deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harleen; Shaker, Kamel; Heinzel, Nicolas; Ralph, John; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-08-01

    The organized lignocellulosic assemblies of cell walls provide the structural integrity required for the large statures of terrestrial plants. Silencing two CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (CAD) genes in Nicotiana attenuata produced plants (ir-CAD) with thin, red-pigmented stems, low CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity, low lignin contents, and rubbery, structurally unstable stems when grown in the glasshouse (GH). However, when planted into their native desert habitat, ir-CAD plants produced robust stems that survived wind storms as well as the wild-type plants. Despite efficient silencing of NaCAD transcripts and enzymatic activity, field-grown ir-CAD plants had delayed and restricted spread of red stem pigmentation, a color change reflecting blocked lignification by CAD silencing, and attained wild-type-comparable total lignin contents. The rubbery GH phenotype was largely restored when field-grown ir-CAD plants were protected from wind, herbivore attack, and ultraviolet B exposure and grown in restricted rooting volumes; conversely, it was lost when ir-CAD plants were experimentally exposed to wind, ultraviolet B, and grown in large pots in growth chambers. Transcript and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight analysis revealed that these environmental stresses enhanced the accumulation of various phenylpropanoids in stems of field-grown plants; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the lignin of field-grown ir-CAD plants had GH-grown comparable levels of sinapaldehyde and syringaldehyde cross-linked into their lignins. Additionally, field-grown ir-CAD plants had short, thick stems with normal xylem element traits, which collectively enabled field-grown ir-CAD plants to compensate for the structural deficiencies associated with CAD silencing. Environmental stresses play an essential role in regulating lignin biosynthesis in lignin-deficient plants.

  4. Markers of oxidative stress in umbilical cord blood from G6PD deficient African newborns

    PubMed Central

    Bengo, Derrick; Cusick, Sarah E.; Ndidde, Susan; Slusher, Tina M.

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked disorder that affects as many as 400 million people worldwide, making it the most common enzymatic defect. Subjects with G6PD deficiency are more likely to develop neonatal hyperbilirubinemia potentially leading to kernicterus and are at increased risk for acute hemolytic anemia when exposed to pro-oxidant compounds such as anti-malarial drugs. We collected umbilical cord blood from 300 males born in Uganda to assess for novel markers of systemic oxidative stress. We determined that 10.7% of the samples collected were G6PD A- deficient (G202A/A376G) and when these were compared with unaffected controls, there was significantly higher 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentration, elevated ferritin, increased leukocyte count and higher small molecule antioxidant capacity. These data suggest increased baseline oxidative stress and an elevated antioxidant response in umbilical cord blood of patients with G6PD deficiency. PMID:28235023

  5. G6PD deficiency: global distribution, genetic variants and primaquine therapy.

    PubMed

    Howes, Rosalind E; Battle, Katherine E; Satyagraha, Ari W; Baird, J Kevin; Hay, Simon I

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a potentially pathogenic inherited enzyme abnormality and, similar to other human red blood cell polymorphisms, is particularly prevalent in historically malaria endemic countries. The spatial extent of Plasmodium vivax malaria overlaps widely with that of G6PD deficiency; unfortunately the only drug licensed for the radical cure and relapse prevention of P. vivax, primaquine, can trigger severe haemolytic anaemia in G6PD deficient individuals. This chapter reviews the past and current data on this unique pharmacogenetic association, which is becoming increasingly important as several nations now consider strategies to eliminate malaria transmission rather than control its clinical burden. G6PD deficiency is a highly variable disorder, in terms of spatial heterogeneity in prevalence and molecular variants, as well as its interactions with P. vivax and primaquine. Consideration of factors including aspects of basic physiology, diagnosis, and clinical triggers of primaquine-induced haemolysis is required to assess the risks and benefits of applying primaquine in various geographic and demographic settings. Given that haemolytically toxic antirelapse drugs will likely be the only therapeutic options for the coming decade, it is clear that we need to understand in depth G6PD deficiency and primaquine-induced haemolysis to determine safe and effective therapeutic strategies to overcome this hurdle and achieve malaria elimination.

  6. G6PD Deficiency in an HIV Clinic Setting in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Xu, Julia Z; Francis, Richard O; Lerebours Nadal, Leonel E; Shirazi, Maryam; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Hod, Eldad A; Jhang, Jeffrey S; Stotler, Brie A; Spitalnik, Steven L; Nicholas, Stephen W

    2015-10-01

    Because human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receive prophylaxis with oxidative drugs, those with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may experience hemolysis. However, G6PD deficiency has not been studied in the Dominican Republic, where many individuals have African ancestry. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Dominican HIV-infected patients and to attempt to develop a cost-effective algorithm for identifying such individuals. To this end, histories, chart reviews, and G6PD testing were performed for 238 consecutive HIV-infected adult clinic patients. The overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency (8.8%) was similar in males (9.3%) and females (8.5%), and higher in Haitians (18%) than Dominicans (6.4%; P = 0.01). By logistic regression, three clinical variables predicted G6PD status: maternal country of birth (P = 0.01) and a history of hemolysis (P = 0.01) or severe anemia (P = 0.03). Using these criteria, an algorithm was developed, in which a patient subset was identified that would benefit most from G6PD screening, yielding a sensitivity of 94.7% and a specificity of 97.2%, increasing the pretest probability (8.8-15.1%), and halving the number of patients needing testing. This algorithm may provide a cost-effective strategy for improving care in resource-limited settings. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  7. G6PD Deficiency in an HIV Clinic Setting in the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Julia Z.; Francis, Richard O.; Lerebours Nadal, Leonel E.; Shirazi, Maryam; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Hod, Eldad A.; Jhang, Jeffrey S.; Stotler, Brie A.; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Nicholas, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Because human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receive prophylaxis with oxidative drugs, those with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may experience hemolysis. However, G6PD deficiency has not been studied in the Dominican Republic, where many individuals have African ancestry. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Dominican HIV-infected patients and to attempt to develop a cost-effective algorithm for identifying such individuals. To this end, histories, chart reviews, and G6PD testing were performed for 238 consecutive HIV-infected adult clinic patients. The overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency (8.8%) was similar in males (9.3%) and females (8.5%), and higher in Haitians (18%) than Dominicans (6.4%; P = 0.01). By logistic regression, three clinical variables predicted G6PD status: maternal country of birth (P = 0.01) and a history of hemolysis (P = 0.01) or severe anemia (P = 0.03). Using these criteria, an algorithm was developed, in which a patient subset was identified that would benefit most from G6PD screening, yielding a sensitivity of 94.7% and a specificity of 97.2%, increasing the pretest probability (8.8–15.1%), and halving the number of patients needing testing. This algorithm may provide a cost-effective strategy for improving care in resource-limited settings. PMID:26240158

  8. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells reduces atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kipari, Tiina; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Iqbal, Javaid; Man, Tak-Yung; Miller, Eileen; Coutinho, Agnes E; Zhang, Zhenguang; Sullivan, Katie M; Mitic, Tijana; Livingstone, Dawn E W; Schrecker, Christopher; Samuel, Kay; White, Christopher I; Bouhlel, M Amine; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R; Savill, John S; Chapman, Karen E; Seckl, Jonathan R

    2013-04-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type-1 (11β-HSD1) converts inert cortisone into active cortisol, amplifying intracellular glucocorticoid action. 11β-HSD1 deficiency improves cardiovascular risk factors in obesity but exacerbates acute inflammation. To determine the effects of 11β-HSD1 deficiency on atherosclerosis and its inflammation, atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO) mice were treated with a selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitor or crossed with 11β-HSD1-KO mice to generate double knockouts (DKOs) and challenged with an atherogenic Western diet. 11β-HSD1 inhibition or deficiency attenuated atherosclerosis (74-76%) without deleterious effects on plaque structure. This occurred without affecting plasma lipids or glucose, suggesting independence from classical metabolic risk factors. KO plaques were not more inflamed and indeed had 36% less T-cell infiltration, associated with 38% reduced circulating monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and 36% lower lesional vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Bone marrow (BM) cells are key to the atheroprotection, since transplantation of DKO BM to irradiated ApoE-KO mice reduced atherosclerosis by 51%. 11β-HSD1-null macrophages show 76% enhanced cholesterol ester export. Thus, 11β-HSD1 deficiency reduces atherosclerosis without exaggerated lesional inflammation independent of metabolic risk factors. Selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitors promise novel antiatherosclerosis effects over and above their benefits for metabolic risk factors via effects on BM cells, plausibly macrophages.

  9. The Spectrum of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency: Clinical, Biochemical and Genetic Features in 371 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kavi P.; O'Brien, Thomas W.; Subramony, Sankarasubramon H.; Shuster, Jonathan; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Context Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) deficiency is a genetic mitochondrial disorder commonly associated with lactic acidosis, progressive neurological and neuromuscular degeneration and, usually, death during childhood. There has been no recent comprehensive analysis of the natural history and clinical course of this disease. Objective We reviewed 371 cases of PDC deficiency, published between 1970-2010, that involved defects in subunits E1α and E1β and components E1, E2, E3 and the E3 Binding Protein of the complex. Data Sources and Extraction English language peer-reviewed publications were identified, primarily by using PubMed and Google Scholar search engines. Results Neurodevelopmental delay and hypotonia were the commonest clinical signs of PDC deficiency. Structural brain abnormalities frequently included ventriculomegaly, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and neuroimaging findings typical of Leigh syndrome. Neither gender nor any clinical or neuroimaging feature differentiated the various biochemical etiologies of the disease. Patients who died were younger, presented clinically earlier and had higher blood lactate levels and lower residual enzyme activities than subjects who were still alive at the time of reporting. Survival bore no relationship to the underlying biochemical or genetic abnormality or to gender. Conclusions Although the clinical spectrum of PDC deficiency is broad, the dominant clinical phenotype includes presentation during the first year of life; neurological and neuromuscular degeneration; structural lesions revealed by neuroimaging; lactic acidosis and a blood lactate:pyruvate ratio ≤20. PMID:22079328

  10. The spectrum of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency: Clinical, biochemical and genetic features in 371 patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kavi P.; O’Brien, Thomas W.; Subramony, Sankarasubramon H.; Shuster, Jonathan; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Context Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) deficiency is a genetic mitochondrial disorder commonly associated with lactic acidosis, progressive neurological and neuromuscular degeneration and, usually, death during childhood. There has been no recent comprehensive analysis of the natural history and clinical course of this disease. Objective We reviewed 371 cases of PDC deficiency, published between 1970 and 2010, that involved defects in subunits E1α and E1β and components E1, E2, E3 and the E3 binding protein of the complex. Data sources and extraction English language peer-reviewed publications were identified, primarily by using PubMed and Google Scholar search engines. Results Neurodevelopmental delay and hypotonia were the commonest clinical signs of PDC deficiency. Structural brain abnormalities frequently included ventriculomegaly, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and neuroimaging findings typical of Leigh syndrome. Neither gender nor any clinical or neuroimaging feature differentiated the various biochemical etiologies of the disease. Patients who died were younger, presented clinically earlier and had higher blood lactate levels and lower residual enzyme activities than subjects who were still alive at the time of reporting. Survival bore no relationship to the underlying biochemical or genetic abnormality or to gender. Conclusions Although the clinical spectrum of PDC deficiency is broad, the dominant clinical phenotype includes presentation during the first year of life; neurological and neuromuscular degeneration; structural lesions revealed by neuroimaging; lactic acidosis and a blood lactate:pyruvate ratio≤20. PMID:22896851

  11. Optimal dietary therapy of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gillingham, Melanie B.; Connor, William E.; Matern, Dietrich; Rinaldo, Piero; Burlingame, Terry; Meeuws, Kaatje; Harding, Cary O.

    2009-01-01

    Current dietary therapy for long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) or trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency consists of fasting avoidance, and limiting long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) intake. This study reports the relationship of dietary intake and metabolic control as measured by plasma acylcarnitine and organic acid profiles in 10 children with LCHAD or TFP deficiency followed for 1 year. Subjects consumed an average of 11% of caloric intake as dietary LCFA, 11% as MCT, 12% as protein, and 66% as carbohydrate. Plasma levels of hydroxypalmitoleic acid, hydroxyoleic, and hydroxylinoleic carnitine esters positively correlated with total LCFA intake and negatively correlated with MCT intake suggesting that as dietary intake of LCFA decreases and MCT intake increases, there is a corresponding decrease in plasma hydroxyacylcarnitines. There was no correlation between plasma acylcarnitines and level of carnitine supplementation. Dietary intake of fat-soluble vitamins E and K was deficient. Dietary intake and plasma levels of essential fatty acids, linoleic and linolenic acid, were deficient. On this dietary regimen, the majority of subjects were healthy with no episodes of metabolic decompensation. Our data suggest that an LCHAD or TFP-deficient patient should adhere to a diet providing age-appropriate protein and limited LCFA intake (10% of total energy) while providing 10–20% of energy as MCT and a daily multi-vitamin and mineral (MVM) supplement that includes all of the fat-soluble vitamins. The diet should be supplemented with vegetable oils as part of the 10% total LCFA intake to provide essential fatty acids. PMID:12809642

  12. [Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD): a curable cause of genetic muscular lipidosis].

    PubMed

    Maillart, E; Acquaviva-Bourdain, C; Rigal, O; Brivet, M; Jardel, C; Lombès, A; Eymard, B; Vianey-Saban, C; Laforêt, P

    2010-03-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a rare genetic disease involving fatty acid oxidation. It is due to the deficiency of one of the two electron transporters: electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxydoreductase (ETF-QO). Symptoms begin more often in childhood or in young adulthood with a multisystemic disease with encephalopathy or muscular weakness. We report here two adult cases with ETF-QO deficiency, confirmed by mutation analysis (ETFDH gene), revealed by a muscular weakness associated with muscle lipidosis. One of our patients presented an acute encephalopathy with vomiting ten years before the onset of muscular symptoms. The second patient exhibited a slowly progressive pelvic girdle muscle weakness. Diagnosis was established by characteristic abnormalities of acylcarnitine profile by tandem mass spectrometry. For both patients, a dramatic clinical improvement was observed under treatment with riboflavine and L-carnitine. Since it is a treatable disorder, this diagnosis must be considered by performing an acylcarnitine profile in all patients presenting with an unexplained muscular weakness. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Pharmacologic rescue of lethal seizures in mice deficient in succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hogema, B M; Gupta, M; Senephansiri, H; Burlingame, T G; Taylor, M; Jakobs, C; Schutgens, R B; Froestl, W; Snead, O C; Diaz-Arrastia, R; Bottiglieri, T; Grompe, M; Gibson, K M

    2001-10-01

    Succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH5A1, encoding SSADH deficiency is a defect of 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA) degradation that manifests in humans as 4-hydroxybutyric (gamma-hydroxybutyric, GHB) aciduria. It is characterized by a non-specific neurological disorder including psychomotor retardation, language delay, seizures, hypotonia and ataxia. The current therapy, vigabatrin (VGB), is not uniformly successful. Here we report the development of Aldh5a1-deficient mice. At postnatal day 16-22 Aldh5a1-/- mice display ataxia and develop generalized seizures leading to rapid death. We observed increased amounts of GHB and total GABA in urine, brain and liver homogenates and detected significant gliosis in the hippocampus of Aldh5a1-/- mice. We found therapeutic intervention with phenobarbital or phenytoin ineffective, whereas intervention with vigabatrin or the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 (ref. 2) prevented tonic-clonic convulsions and significantly enhanced survival of the mutant mice. Because neurologic deterioration coincided with weaning, we hypothesized the presence of a protective compound in breast milk. Indeed, treatment of mutant mice with the amino acid taurine rescued Aldh5a1-/- mice. These findings provide insight into pathomechanisms and may have therapeutic relevance for the human SSADH deficiency disease and GHB overdose and toxicity.

  14. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Doczi, Judit; Starkov, Anatoly A; Kawamata, Hibiki; Manfredi, Giovanni; Zhang, Steven F; Gibson, Gary E; Beal, M Flint; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2013-06-01

    A decline in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) activity has been associated with neurodegeneration. Provision of succinyl-CoA by KGDHC is essential for generation of matrix ATP (or GTP) by substrate-level phosphorylation catalyzed by succinyl-CoA ligase. Here, we demonstrate ATP consumption in respiration-impaired isolated and in situ neuronal somal mitochondria from transgenic mice with a deficiency of either dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (DLST) or dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD) that exhibit a 20-48% decrease in KGDHC activity. Import of ATP into the mitochondrial matrix of transgenic mice was attributed to a shift in the reversal potential of the adenine nucleotide translocase toward more negative values due to diminished matrix substrate-level phosphorylation, which causes the translocase to reverse prematurely. Immunoreactivity of all three subunits of succinyl-CoA ligase and maximal enzymatic activity were unaffected in transgenic mice as compared to wild-type littermates. Therefore, decreased matrix substrate-level phosphorylation was due to diminished provision of succinyl-CoA. These results were corroborated further by the finding that mitochondria from wild-type mice respiring on substrates supporting substrate-level phosphorylation exhibited ~30% higher ADP-ATP exchange rates compared to those obtained from DLST(+/-) or DLD(+/-) littermates. We propose that KGDHC-associated pathologies are a consequence of the inability of respiration-impaired mitochondria to rely on "in-house" mitochondrial ATP reserves.

  15. Pegloticase Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (an inherited blood disease). Your doctor may test you for G6PD deficiency before you start to receive pegloticase injection. If ...

  16. A pivotal role for beta-aminoisobutyric acid and oxidative stress in dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency?

    PubMed

    van Kuilenburg, A B P; Stroomer, A E M; Abeling, N G G M; van Gennip, A H

    2006-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) constitutes the first step of the pyrimidine degradation pathway in which the pyrimidine bases uracil and thymine are catabolised to beta-alanine and beta-aminoisobutyric acid (beta-AIB), respectively. The mean concentration of beta-AIB was approximately 5- to 8-fold lower in urine of patients with a DPD deficiency, when compared to age-matched controls. Comparable levels of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were present in urine from controls and DPD patients at the age <2 year. In contrast, slightly elevated levels of 8-OHdG were detected in urine from DPD patients with an age >2 year, suggesting the presence of increased oxidative stress.

  17. [Novel nutritional management regimen for very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Haruki, Hiroyo; Kawai, Motoharu; Ogasawara, Jun-Ichi; Koga, Michiaki; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    We report a novel regimen of nutritional management in 22-year-old woman with myopathic form of very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. This regimen is based on avoidance of fasting by frequent intake of carbohydrates and substitution of medium chain triglyceride for long- and very long-chain fatty acids. Oral intake of medium amount of long-chain fatty acid (300 kcal daily) was allowed, to facilitate compliance and to escape pigmentary retinopathy. After this nutritional management and lifestyle guidance about prevention of fatigue and starvation, the patient was free from severe rhabdomyolysis for more than three years, which had forced her to hospital management nine times in seven years.

  18. G6PD deficiency and fava bean consumption do not produce hemolysis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kitayaporn, D; Charoenlarp, P; Pattaraarechachai, J; Pholpoti, T

    1991-06-01

    Favism, a hemolytic condition associated with fava bean consumption among the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient persons, is well described in the Middle East and Mediterranean areas. However, it is not well documented among the Thais or other Southeast Asians. It is possible that it does exist but that hemolysis which develops is of very minor degree and thus escapes clinical detection. This cross-sectional study hypothesizes that if the fava bean and G6PD deficiency interact in the Thai population, they should cause a significant difference in hematocrit level. The study was carried out in a community hospital in a malaria endemic area. We found that there was a trivial difference of the hematocrit (approximately 1%) which was too small to warrant any clinical significance after controlling for the extraneous effects of age, sex, use of malaria chemoprophylaxis, falciparum infection, use of analgesics/antipyretics and admission status of the patients (p = 0.668). This may be due to the presence of different G6PD mutants to those found elsewhere or due to different consumption patterns of fava beans among the Thais compared to people in other areas with high prevalence of G6PD deficiency.

  19. G6PD deficiency: a classic example of pharmacogenetics with on-going clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Seneca, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    That primaquine and other drugs can trigger acute haemolytic anaemia in subjects who have an inherited mutation of the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene has been known for over half a century: however, these events still occur, because when giving the drug either the G6PD status of a person is not known, or the risk of this potentially life-threatening complication is under-estimated. Here we review briefly the genetic basis of G6PD deficiency, and then the pathophysiology and the clinical features of drug-induced haemolysis; we also update the list of potentially haemolytic drugs (which includes rasburicase). It is now clear that it is not good practice to give one of these drugs before testing a person for his/her G6PD status, especially in populations in whom G6PD deficiency is common. We discuss therefore how G6PD testing can be done reconciling safety with cost; this is once again becoming of public health importance, as more countries are moving along the pathway of malaria elimination, that might require mass administration of primaquine. Finally, we sketch the triangular relationship between malaria, antimalarials such as primaquine, and G6PD deficiency: which is to some extent protective against malaria, but also a genetically determined ha